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Sample records for bacteriophage t4 lysozyme

  1. Control of Bacteriophage T4 Tail Lysozyme Activity During the Infection Process

    SciTech Connect

    Kanamaru, Shuji; Ishiwata, Yasutaka; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Rossmann, Michael G.; Arisaka, Fumio

    2010-07-19

    Bacteriophage T4 has an efficient mechanism for injecting the host Escherichia coli cell with genomic DNA. Its gene product 5 (gp5) has a needle-like structure attached to the end of a tube through which the DNA passes on its way out of the head and into the host. The gp5 needle punctures the outer cell membrane and then digests the peptidoglycan cell wall in the periplasmic space. gp5 is normally post-translationally cleaved between residues 351 and 352. The function of this process in controlling the lysozyme activity of gp5 has now been investigated. When gp5 is over-expressed in E. coli, two mutants (S351H and S351A) showed a reduction of cleavage products and five other mutants (S351L, S351K, S351Y, S351Q, and S351T) showed no cleavage. Furthermore, in a complementation assay at 20 C, the mutants that had no cleavage of gp5 produced a reduced number of plaques compared to wild-type T4. The crystal structure of the non-cleavage phenotype mutant of gp5, S351L, complexed with gene product 27, showed that the 18 residues in the vicinity of the potential cleavage site (disordered in the wild-type structure) had visible electron density. The polypeptide around the potential cleavage site is exposed, thus allowing access for an E. coli protease. The lysozyme activity is inhibited in the wild-type structure by a loop from the adjacent gp5 monomer that binds into the substrate-binding site. The same inhibition is apparent in the mutant structure, showing that the lysozyme is inhibited before gp5 is cleaved and, presumably, the lysozyme is activated only after gp5 has penetrated the outer membrane.

  2. Expression of the bacteriophage T4 lysozyme gene in tall fescue confers resistance to gray leaf spot and brown patch diseases.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shujie; Shew, H David; Tredway, Lane P; Lu, Jianli; Sivamani, Elumalai; Miller, Eric S; Qu, Rongda

    2008-02-01

    Tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) is an important turf and forage grass species worldwide. Fungal diseases present a major limitation in the maintenance of tall fescue lawns, landscapes, and forage fields. Two severe fungal diseases of tall fescue are brown patch, caused by Rhizoctonia solani, and gray leaf spot, caused by Magnaporthe grisea. These diseases are often major problems of other turfgrass species as well. In efforts to obtain tall fescue plants resistant to these diseases, we introduced the bacteriophage T4 lysozyme gene into tall fescue through Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation. In replicated experiments under controlled environments conducive to disease development, 6 of 13 transgenic events showed high resistance to inoculation of a mixture of two M. grisea isolates from tall fescue. Three of these six resistant plants also displayed significant resistance to an R. solani isolate from tall fescue. Thus, we have demonstrated that the bacteriophage T4 lysozyme gene confers resistance to both gray leaf spot and brown patch diseases in transgenic tall fescue plants. The gene may have wide applications in engineered fungal disease resistance in various crops.

  3. Bacteriophage T4 Genome†

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Eric S.; Kutter, Elizabeth; Mosig, Gisela; Arisaka, Fumio; Kunisawa, Takashi; Rüger, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    Phage T4 has provided countless contributions to the paradigms of genetics and biochemistry. Its complete genome sequence of 168,903 bp encodes about 300 gene products. T4 biology and its genomic sequence provide the best-understood model for modern functional genomics and proteomics. Variations on gene expression, including overlapping genes, internal translation initiation, spliced genes, translational bypassing, and RNA processing, alert us to the caveats of purely computational methods. The T4 transcriptional pattern reflects its dependence on the host RNA polymerase and the use of phage-encoded proteins that sequentially modify RNA polymerase; transcriptional activator proteins, a phage sigma factor, anti-sigma, and sigma decoy proteins also act to specify early, middle, and late promoter recognition. Posttranscriptional controls by T4 provide excellent systems for the study of RNA-dependent processes, particularly at the structural level. The redundancy of DNA replication and recombination systems of T4 reveals how phage and other genomes are stably replicated and repaired in different environments, providing insight into genome evolution and adaptations to new hosts and growth environments. Moreover, genomic sequence analysis has provided new insights into tail fiber variation, lysis, gene duplications, and membrane localization of proteins, while high-resolution structural determination of the “cell-puncturing device,” combined with the three-dimensional image reconstruction of the baseplate, has revealed the mechanism of penetration during infection. Despite these advances, nearly 130 potential T4 genes remain uncharacterized. Current phage-sequencing initiatives are now revealing the similarities and differences among members of the T4 family, including those that infect bacteria other than Escherichia coli. T4 functional genomics will aid in the interpretation of these newly sequenced T4-related genomes and in broadening our understanding of the

  4. An improved 96-well turbidity assay for T4 lysozyme activity.

    PubMed

    Toro, Tasha B; Nguyen, Thao P; Watt, Terry J

    2015-01-01

    T4 lysozyme (T4L) is an important model system for investigating the relationship between protein structure and function. Despite being extensively studied, a reliable, quantitative activity assay for T4L has not been developed. Here, we present an improved T4L turbidity assay as well as an affinity-based T4L expression and purification protocol. This assay is designed for 96-well format and utilizes conditions amenable for both T4L and other lysozymes. This protocol enables easy, efficient, and quantitative characterization of T4L variants and allows comparison between different lysozymes. Our method: •Is applicable for all lysozymes, with enhanced sensitivity for T4 lysozyme compared to other 96-well plate turbidity assays;•Utilizes standardized conditions for comparing T4 lysozyme variants and other lysozymes; and•Incorporates a simplified expression and purification protocol for T4 lysozyme.

  5. Solid-state synthesis and mechanical unfolding of polymers of T4 lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Yang, G; Cecconi, C; Baase, W A; Vetter, I R; Breyer, W A; Haack, J A; Matthews, B W; Dahlquist, F W; Bustamante, C

    2000-01-01

    Recent advances in single molecule manipulation methods offer a novel approach to investigating the protein folding problem. These studies usually are done on molecules that are naturally organized as linear arrays of globular domains. To extend these techniques to study proteins that normally exist as monomers, we have developed a method of synthesizing polymers of protein molecules in the solid state. By introducing cysteines at locations where bacteriophage T4 lysozyme molecules contact each other in a crystal and taking advantage of the alignment provided by the lattice, we have obtained polymers of defined polarity up to 25 molecules long that retain enzymatic activity. These polymers then were manipulated mechanically by using a modified scanning force microscope to characterize the force-induced reversible unfolding of the individual lysozyme molecules. This approach should be general and adaptable to many other proteins with known crystal structures. For T4 lysozyme, the force required to unfold the monomers was 64 +/- 16 pN at the pulling speed used. Refolding occurred within 1 sec of relaxation with an efficiency close to 100%. Analysis of the force versus extension curves suggests that the mechanical unfolding transition follows a two-state model. The unfolding forces determined in 1 M guanidine hydrochloride indicate that in these conditions the activation barrier for unfolding is reduced by 2 kcal/mol. PMID:10618384

  6. T4 bacteriophage as a phage display platform.

    PubMed

    Gamkrelidze, Mariam; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2014-07-01

    Analysis of molecular events in T4-infected Escherichia coli has revealed some of the most important principles of biology, including relationships between structures of genes and their products, virus-induced acquisition of metabolic function, and morphogenesis of complex structures through sequential gene product interaction rather than sequential gene activation. T4 bacteriophages and related strains were applied in the first formulations of many fundamental biological concepts. These include the unambiguous recognition of nucleic acids as the genetic material, the definition of the gene by fine-structure mutation, recombinational and functional analyses, the demonstration that the genetic code is triplet, the discovery of mRNA, the importance of recombination and DNA replications, light-dependent and light-independent DNA repair mechanisms, restriction and modification of DNA, self-splicing of intron/exon arrangement in prokaryotes, translation bypassing and others. Bacteriophage T4 possesses unique features that make it a good tool for a multicomponent vaccine platform. Hoc/Soc-fused antigens can be assembled on the T4 capsid in vitro and in vivo. T4-based phage display combined with affinity chromatography can be applied as a new method for bacteriophage purification. The T4 phage display system can also be used as an attractive approach for cancer therapy. The data show the efficient display of both single and multiple HIV antigens on the phage T4 capsid and offer insights for designing novel particulate HIV or other vaccines that have not been demonstrated by other vector systems.

  7. T4 bacteriophage as a phage display platform.

    PubMed

    Gamkrelidze, Mariam; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2014-07-01

    Analysis of molecular events in T4-infected Escherichia coli has revealed some of the most important principles of biology, including relationships between structures of genes and their products, virus-induced acquisition of metabolic function, and morphogenesis of complex structures through sequential gene product interaction rather than sequential gene activation. T4 bacteriophages and related strains were applied in the first formulations of many fundamental biological concepts. These include the unambiguous recognition of nucleic acids as the genetic material, the definition of the gene by fine-structure mutation, recombinational and functional analyses, the demonstration that the genetic code is triplet, the discovery of mRNA, the importance of recombination and DNA replications, light-dependent and light-independent DNA repair mechanisms, restriction and modification of DNA, self-splicing of intron/exon arrangement in prokaryotes, translation bypassing and others. Bacteriophage T4 possesses unique features that make it a good tool for a multicomponent vaccine platform. Hoc/Soc-fused antigens can be assembled on the T4 capsid in vitro and in vivo. T4-based phage display combined with affinity chromatography can be applied as a new method for bacteriophage purification. The T4 phage display system can also be used as an attractive approach for cancer therapy. The data show the efficient display of both single and multiple HIV antigens on the phage T4 capsid and offer insights for designing novel particulate HIV or other vaccines that have not been demonstrated by other vector systems. PMID:24828789

  8. REDOR NMR Characterization of DNA Packaging in Bacteriophage T4

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tsyr-Yan; Schaefer, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Bacteriophage T4 is a large-tailed E. coli virus whose capsid is 120 × 86 nm. ATP-driven DNA packaging of the T4 capsid results in the loading of a 171-kb genome in less than 5 minutes during viral infection. We have isolated 50-mg quantities of uniform 15N and [ε-15N]lysine-labeled bacteriophage T4. We have also introduced 15NH4+ into filled, unlabeled capsids from synthetic medium by exchange. We have examined lyo- and cryoprotected lyophilized T4 using 15N{31P} and 31P{15N} rotational-echo double resonance. The results of these experiments have shown that: (i) packaged DNA is in an unperturbed duplex B-form conformation; (ii) the DNA phosphate negative charge is balanced by lysyl amines (3.2%), polyamines (5.8%), and monovalent cations (40%); and (iii) 11% of lysyl amines, 40% of –NH2 groups of polyamines, and 80% of monovalent cations within the lyophilized T4 capsid, are involved in the DNA charge balance. The NMR evidence suggests that DNA enters the T4 capsid in a charge-unbalanced state. We propose that electrostatic interactions may provide free energy to supplement the nanomotor-driven T4 DNA packaging. PMID:18703073

  9. Direct Observation of T4 Lysozyme Hinge-Bending Motion by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yirdaw, Robel B.; Mchaourab, Hassane S.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriophage T4 Lysozyme (T4L) catalyzes the hydrolysis of the peptidoglycan layer of the bacterial cell wall late in the infection cycle. It has long been postulated that equilibrium dynamics enable substrate access to the active site located at the interface between the N- and C-terminal domains. Crystal structures of WT-T4L and point mutants captured a range of conformations that differ by the hinge-bending angle between the two domains. Evidence of equilibrium between open and closed conformations in solution was gleaned from distance measurements between the two domains but the nature of the equilibrium and the timescale of the underlying motion have not been investigated. Here, we used fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy to directly detect T4L equilibrium conformational fluctuations in solution. For this purpose, Tetramethylrhodamine probes were introduced at pairs of cysteines in regions of the molecule that undergo relative displacement upon transition from open to closed conformations. Correlation analysis of Tetramethylrhodamine intensity fluctuations reveals hinge-bending motion that changes the relative distance and orientation of the N- and C-terminal domains with ≅15 μs relaxation time. That this motion involves interconversion between open and closed conformations was further confirmed by the dampening of its amplitude upon covalent substrate trapping. In contrast to the prevalent two-state model of T4L equilibrium, molecular brightness and number of particles obtained from cumulant analysis suggest that T4L populates multiple intermediate states, consistent with the wide range of hinge-bending angles trapped in the crystal structure of T4L mutants. PMID:23062345

  10. Direct observation of T4 lysozyme hinge-bending motion by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yirdaw, Robel B; McHaourab, Hassane S

    2012-10-01

    Bacteriophage T4 Lysozyme (T4L) catalyzes the hydrolysis of the peptidoglycan layer of the bacterial cell wall late in the infection cycle. It has long been postulated that equilibrium dynamics enable substrate access to the active site located at the interface between the N- and C-terminal domains. Crystal structures of WT-T4L and point mutants captured a range of conformations that differ by the hinge-bending angle between the two domains. Evidence of equilibrium between open and closed conformations in solution was gleaned from distance measurements between the two domains but the nature of the equilibrium and the timescale of the underlying motion have not been investigated. Here, we used fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy to directly detect T4L equilibrium conformational fluctuations in solution. For this purpose, Tetramethylrhodamine probes were introduced at pairs of cysteines in regions of the molecule that undergo relative displacement upon transition from open to closed conformations. Correlation analysis of Tetramethylrhodamine intensity fluctuations reveals hinge-bending motion that changes the relative distance and orientation of the N- and C-terminal domains with ≅ 15 μs relaxation time. That this motion involves interconversion between open and closed conformations was further confirmed by the dampening of its amplitude upon covalent substrate trapping. In contrast to the prevalent two-state model of T4L equilibrium, molecular brightness and number of particles obtained from cumulant analysis suggest that T4L populates multiple intermediate states, consistent with the wide range of hinge-bending angles trapped in the crystal structure of T4L mutants.

  11. Physical and genetical analysis of bacteriophage T4 generalized transduction.

    PubMed

    Young, K K; Edlin, G

    1983-01-01

    This report describes a comparison of the efficiency of transduction of genes in E. coli by the generalized transducing bacteriophages T4GT7 and P1CM. Both phages are capable of transducing many genetic markers in E. coli although the frequency of transduction for particular genes varies over a wide range. The frequency of transduction for most genes depends on which transducing phage is used as well as on the donor and recipient bacterial strains. Analysis of T4GT7 phage lysates by cesium chloride density gradient centrifugation shows that transducing phage particles contain primarily bacterial DNA and carry little, if any, phage DNA. In this regard transducing phages P1CM and T4GT7 are similar; both phages package either bacterial or phage DNA but not both DNAs into the same particle.

  12. The effect of alpha particles on bacteriophage T4Br+.

    PubMed

    Leont'eva, G A; Akoev, I G; Grigor'ev, A E

    1983-01-01

    It is generally accepted that heavy charged particles play an important part in generating the secondary flux of nuclear particles formed by the interaction of space hadrons with nuclei. It is assumed that these particles are responsible for the high biological efficiency of space hadrons in causing cellular damage by their strong interactions. To examine this assumption we investigated the effects of 5.3 MeV alpha particles on bacteriophage T4. This energy provides a LET value of 88.6 KeV/micrometer lying in the range of the highest biological efficiency. PMID:11542756

  13. Structure and assembly of bacteriophage T4 head.

    PubMed

    Rao, Venigalla B; Black, Lindsay W

    2010-01-01

    The bacteriophage T4 capsid is an elongated icosahedron, 120 nm long and 86 nm wide, and is built with three essential proteins; gp23*, which forms the hexagonal capsid lattice, gp24*, which forms pentamers at eleven of the twelve vertices, and gp20, which forms the unique dodecameric portal vertex through which DNA enters during packaging and exits during infection. The past twenty years of research has greatly elevated the understanding of phage T4 head assembly and DNA packaging. The atomic structure of gp24 has been determined. A structural model built for gp23 using its similarity to gp24 showed that the phage T4 major capsid protein has the same fold as that found in phage HK97 and several other icosahedral bacteriophages. Folding of gp23 requires the assistance of two chaperones, the E. coli chaperone GroEL and the phage coded gp23-specific chaperone, gp31. The capsid also contains two non-essential outer capsid proteins, Hoc and Soc, which decorate the capsid surface. The structure of Soc shows two capsid binding sites which, through binding to adjacent gp23 subunits, reinforce the capsid structure. Hoc and Soc have been extensively used in bipartite peptide display libraries and to display pathogen antigens including those from HIV, Neisseria meningitides, Bacillus anthracis, and FMDV. The structure of Ip1*, one of the components of the core, has been determined, which provided insights on how IPs protect T4 genome against the E. coli nucleases that degrade hydroxymethylated and glycosylated T4 DNA. Extensive mutagenesis combined with the atomic structures of the DNA packaging/terminase proteins gp16 and gp17 elucidated the ATPase and nuclease functional motifs involved in DNA translocation and headful DNA cutting. Cryo-EM structure of the T4 packaging machine showed a pentameric motor assembled with gp17 subunits on the portal vertex. Single molecule optical tweezers and fluorescence studies showed that the T4 motor packages DNA at a rate of up to 2000 bp

  14. Mechanisms of Spontaneous and Induced Frameshift Mutation in Bacteriophage T4

    PubMed Central

    Streisinger, George; Owen, Joyce Emrich

    1985-01-01

    Frequencies of spontaneous and proflavine-induced frameshift mutations increase dramatically as a function of the number of reiterated base pairs at each of two sites in the lysozyme gene of bacteriophage T4. At each site, proflavine induces addition mutations more frequently than deletion mutations. We confirm that the steroidal diamine, irehdiamine A, induces frameshift addition mutations. At sites of reiterated bases, we propose that base pairing is misaligned adjacent to a gap. The misaligned configuration is stabilized by the stacking of mutagen molecules around the extrahelical base, forming a sandwich. Proflavine induces addition mutations efficiently at a site without any reiterated bases. Mutagenesis at such sites may be due to mutagen-induced stuttering of the replication complex. PMID:3988038

  15. Genetic and Immunological Studies of Bacteriophage T4 Thymidylate Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, S. W.; Stollar, B. D.; Friedkin, M.

    1973-01-01

    Thymidylate synthetase, which appears after infection of Escherichia coli with bacteriophage T4, has been partially purified. The phage enzyme is immunologically distinct from the host enzyme and has a molecular weight of 50,000 in comparison to 68,000 for the host enzyme. A system has been developed to characterize T4 td mutants previously known to have impaired expression of phage thymidylate synthetase. For this system, an E. coli host lacking thymidylate synthetase was isolated. Known genetic suppressors were transduced into this host. The resulting isogenic hosts were infected with phage T4 td mutants. The specific activities and amounts of cross-reacting material induced by several different types of phage mutants under conditions of suppression or non-suppression have been examined. The results show that the phage carries the structural gene specifying the thymidylate synthetase which appears after phage infection, and that the combination of plaque morphology, enzyme activity assays, and an assay for immunologically cross-reacting material provides a means for identifying true amber mutants of the phage gene. Images PMID:4575286

  16. A promiscuous DNA packaging machine from bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhihong; Kottadiel, Vishal I; Vafabakhsh, Reza; Dai, Li; Chemla, Yann R; Ha, Taekjip; Rao, Venigalla B

    2011-01-01

    Complex viruses are assembled from simple protein subunits by sequential and irreversible assembly. During genome packaging in bacteriophages, a powerful molecular motor assembles at the special portal vertex of an empty prohead to initiate packaging. The capsid expands after about 10%-25% of the genome is packaged. When the head is full, the motor cuts the concatemeric DNA and dissociates from the head. Conformational changes, particularly in the portal, are thought to drive these sequential transitions. We found that the phage T4 packaging machine is highly promiscuous, translocating DNA into finished phage heads as well as into proheads. Optical tweezers experiments show that single motors can force exogenous DNA into phage heads at the same rate as into proheads. Single molecule fluorescence measurements demonstrate that phage heads undergo repeated initiations, packaging multiple DNA molecules into the same head. These results suggest that the phage DNA packaging machine has unusual conformational plasticity, powering DNA into an apparently passive capsid receptacle, including the highly stable virus shell, until it is full. These features probably led to the evolution of viral genomes that fit capsid volume, a strikingly common phenomenon in double-stranded DNA viruses, and will potentially allow design of a novel class of nanocapsid delivery vehicles. PMID:21358801

  17. Adsorption of T4 bacteriophages on planar indium tin oxide surface via controlled surface tailoring.

    PubMed

    Liana, Ayu Ekajayanthi; Chia, Ed Win; Marquis, Christopher P; Gunawan, Cindy; Gooding, J Justin; Amal, Rose

    2016-04-15

    The work investigates the influence of surface physicochemical properties of planar indium tin oxide (ITO) as a model substrate on T4 bacteriophage adsorption. A comparative T4 bacteriophage adsorption study shows a significant difference in bacteriophage adsorption observed on chemically modified planar ITO when compared to similarly modified particulate ITO, which infers that trends observed in virus-particle interaction studies are not necessarily transferrable to predict virus-planar surface adsorption behaviour. We also found that ITO surfaces modified with methyl groups, (resulting in increased surface roughness and hydrophobicity) remained capable of adsorbing T4 bacteriophage. The adsorption of T4 onto bare, amine and carboxylic functionalised planar ITO suggests the presence of a unique binding behaviour involving specific functional groups on planar ITO surface beyond the non-specific electrostatic interactions that dominate phage to particle interactions. The paper demonstrates the significance of physicochemical properties of surfaces on bacteriophage-surface interactions.

  18. Crystal structure of T4-lysozyme generated from synthetic coding DNA expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rose, D R; Phipps, J; Michniewicz, J; Birnbaum, G I; Ahmed, F R; Muir, A; Anderson, W F; Narang, S

    1988-10-01

    The polypeptide produced by expressing a chemically synthesized gene coding for the amino-acid sequence of T4-lysozyme has been crystallized and subjected to X-ray diffraction. The crystal structure has been refined to a standard R-factor of 0.191 for data between 8 and 2 A resolution. The refined model is essentially the same as the well-known structure of wild-type T4-lysozyme determined previously by Matthews et al. (1987). Some small changes in the C-terminal region, which is important in maintaining the folded structure, have been noted. In addition to confirming that the synthetic gene product is very close to the wild type, this structure provides a benchmark for protein engineering experiments on the folding and the catalytic activity of this molecule by the method of gene synthesis.

  19. Engineered bacteriophage T4 nanoparticles for cellular imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinny L; Robertson, Kelly L

    2014-01-01

    Tailless T4 nanoparticles (NPs) have large surface areas consisting of more than 10(5) diverse surface reactive groups and offer great flexibility in chemical modification for tailoring the desired functionality. Dye-conjugated T4 NPs exhibiting bright fluorescence are biocompatible and can be internalized by various eukaryotic cells which land themselves as excellent cellular imaging agents. Here, we describe the preparation of engineered T4 NPs including dye-conjugation and characterization, and the procedure for cellular uptake and confocal microscopy.

  20. Association and dissociation of the cell puncturing complex of bacteriophage T4 is controlled by both pH and temperature.

    PubMed

    Kumar Sarkar, Subodh; Takeda, Yoko; Kanamaru, Shuji; Arisaka, Fumio

    2006-09-01

    The tail lysozyme, gp5, of bacteriophage T4 is a trimeric protein and all the subunits are nicked between Ser351 and Ala352 during assembly through processing. When subsequently heated, the resulting (gp5*)(3) (gp5C)(3) (the asterisk "*" denotes that the intact pre-gp5 trimer has been nicked) dissociates into three gp5* (three independent N-terminal monomeric peptides, that carry lysozyme moieties at the C-termini of gp5*), and a C-terminal trimeric beta-helical structure (gp5C)(3). The interaction between gp27 and gp5* during infection is sundered by reducing pH. This dissociation would be physiologically relevant because the lysozyme moieties should be free in the periplasm (where the pH is low) and would digest the peptidoglycan layer, thereby enabling the tail tube to contact the inner membrane, and probably help to form a pore for DNA injection.

  1. A novel screening approach for optimal and functional fusion of T4 lysozyme in GPCRs

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Elizabeth; Dumont, Mark E

    2016-01-01

    Determination of high resolution, three dimensional structures of transmembrane proteins has, in many cases, only been accomplished through the use of stabilized variant forms of the proteins being studied. For the important G protein coupled receptor superfamily this has most often been achieved by inserting a stable soluble protein, such as T4 lysozyme (T4L) in an internal loop of a receptor. However, creation of such fusion proteins generally results in loss of the ability of receptors to activate their cognate cytoplasmic G proteins. Furthermore, the criteria for designing fusions that minimally perturb receptor structure are not well established. We describe here a method for creating a library of receptor variants containing T4L inserted into an internal loop at varying positions and as replacements for varying amounts of the original receptor sequence. We also describe methods for screening for variants displaying maximal expression levels, ligand binding capacity, and signaling function. When applied to the yeast α-factor receptor, Ste2p, this approach allowed recovery of well-expressed receptor variants containing internally fused T4L that retained nearly normal signaling function. The approach we describe can be readily adapted to creation of stabilized fusions of other transmembrane proteins expressed in yeast or other expression systems. PMID:25950958

  2. Structural analysis of bacteriophage T4 DNA replication: a review in the Virology Journal series on bacteriophage T4 and its relatives

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The bacteriophage T4 encodes 10 proteins, known collectively as the replisome, that are responsible for the replication of the phage genome. The replisomal proteins can be subdivided into three activities; the replicase, responsible for duplicating DNA, the primosomal proteins, responsible for unwinding and Okazaki fragment initiation, and the Okazaki repair proteins. The replicase includes the gp43 DNA polymerase, the gp45 processivity clamp, the gp44/62 clamp loader complex, and the gp32 single-stranded DNA binding protein. The primosomal proteins include the gp41 hexameric helicase, the gp61 primase, and the gp59 helicase loading protein. The RNaseH, a 5' to 3' exonuclease and T4 DNA ligase comprise the activities necessary for Okazaki repair. The T4 provides a model system for DNA replication. As a consequence, significant effort has been put forth to solve the crystallographic structures of these replisomal proteins. In this review, we discuss the structures that are available and provide comparison to related proteins when the T4 structures are unavailable. Three of the ten full-length T4 replisomal proteins have been determined; the gp59 helicase loading protein, the RNase H, and the gp45 processivity clamp. The core of T4 gp32 and two proteins from the T4 related phage RB69, the gp43 polymerase and the gp45 clamp are also solved. The T4 gp44/62 clamp loader has not been crystallized but a comparison to the E. coli gamma complex is provided. The structures of T4 gp41 helicase, gp61 primase, and T4 DNA ligase are unknown, structures from bacteriophage T7 proteins are discussed instead. To better understand the functionality of T4 DNA replication, in depth structural analysis will require complexes between proteins and DNA substrates. A DNA primer template bound by gp43 polymerase, a fork DNA substrate bound by RNase H, gp43 polymerase bound to gp32 protein, and RNase H bound to gp32 have been crystallographically determined. The preparation and

  3. Bacteriophage T4 whiskers: a rudimentary environment-sensing device.

    PubMed Central

    Conley, M P; Wood, W B

    1975-01-01

    The 400 A filaments or "whiskers," which extend outward from the collar region of the phage, control retraction and extension of the tail fibers in response to certain environmental conditions. The tail fibers of normal phage retract in the absence of a required adsorption cofactor, at low pH, at low ionic strength, at low temperature, and at high concentrations of polyethylene glycol. The tail fibers of mutant whiskerless (wac) phage still retract under the first two conditions, but not the last three. Antibodies to whiskers neutralize T4, probably by fixing tail fibers in the retracted configuration. Phage with retracted tail fibers adsorb poorly to host bacterial cells, and their adsorption rate increases as the fibers become extended. These results suggest that one function of the whiskers is to retract the tail fibers and thereby prevent adsorption to host cells under certain conditions that might be unfavorable for production of phage progeny following infection. PMID:242007

  4. Role of cavities and hydration in the pressure unfolding of T4 lysozyme

    PubMed Central

    Nucci, Nathaniel V.; Fuglestad, Brian; Athanasoula, Evangelia A.; Wand, A. Joshua

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that high hydrostatic pressures can induce the unfolding of proteins. The physical underpinnings of this phenomenon have been investigated extensively but remain controversial. Changes in solvation energetics have been commonly proposed as a driving force for pressure-induced unfolding. Recently, the elimination of void volumes in the native folded state has been argued to be the principal determinant. Here we use the cavity-containing L99A mutant of T4 lysozyme to examine the pressure-induced destabilization of this multidomain protein by using solution NMR spectroscopy. The cavity-containing C-terminal domain completely unfolds at moderate pressures, whereas the N-terminal domain remains largely structured to pressures as high as 2.5 kbar. The sensitivity to pressure is suppressed by the binding of benzene to the hydrophobic cavity. These results contrast to the pseudo-WT protein, which has a residual cavity volume very similar to that of the L99A–benzene complex but shows extensive subglobal reorganizations with pressure. Encapsulation of the L99A mutant in the aqueous nanoscale core of a reverse micelle is used to examine the hydration of the hydrophobic cavity. The confined space effect of encapsulation suppresses the pressure-induced unfolding transition and allows observation of the filling of the cavity with water at elevated pressures. This indicates that hydration of the hydrophobic cavity is more energetically unfavorable than global unfolding. Overall, these observations point to a range of cooperativity and energetics within the T4 lysozyme molecule and illuminate the fact that small changes in physical parameters can significantly alter the pressure sensitivity of proteins. PMID:25201963

  5. Complete genome sequence of T4-Like Escherichia coli bacteriophage HX01.

    PubMed

    Tang, Fang; Li, Yanzhe; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Chengping

    2012-12-01

    Phage T4 is among the best-characterized biological systems (S. Kanamaru and F. Arisaka, Seikagaku 74:131-135, 2002; E. S. Miller et al., Microbiol. Mol. Biol. Rev. 67:86-156, 2003; W. B. Wood and H. R. Revel, Bacteriol. Rev. 40:847-868, 1976). To date, several genomes of T4-like bacteriophages are available in public databases but without any APEC bacteriophages (H. Jiang et al., Arch. Virol. 156:1489-1492, 2011; L. Kaliniene, V. Klausa, A. Zajanckauskaite, R. Nivinskas, and L. Truncaite, Arch. Virol. 156:1913-1916, 2011; J. H. Kim et al., Vet. Microbiol. 157:164-171, 2012; W. C. Liao et al., J. Virol. 85:6567-6578, 2011). We isolated a bacteriophage from a duck factory, named HX01, that infects avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC). Sequence and morphological analyses revealed that phage HX01 is a T4-like bacteriophage and belongs to the family Myoviridae. Here, we announce the complete genome sequence of phage HX01 and report the results of our analysis. PMID:23166268

  6. Structure of the bacteriophage T4 long tail fiber receptor-binding tip

    PubMed Central

    Bartual, Sergio G.; Otero, José M.; Garcia-Doval, Carmela; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; Kahn, Richard; Fox, Gavin C.; van Raaij, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Bacteriophages are the most numerous organisms in the biosphere. In spite of their biological significance and the spectrum of potential applications, little high-resolution structural detail is available on their receptor-binding fibers. Here we present the crystal structure of the receptor-binding tip of the bacteriophage T4 long tail fiber, which is highly homologous to the tip of the bacteriophage lambda side tail fibers. This structure reveals an unusual elongated six-stranded antiparallel beta-strand needle domain containing seven iron ions coordinated by histidine residues arranged colinearly along the core of the biological unit. At the end of the tip, the three chains intertwine forming a broader head domain, which contains the putative receptor interaction site. The structure reveals a previously unknown beta-structured fibrous fold, provides insights into the remarkable stability of the fiber, and suggests a framework for mutations to expand or modulate receptor-binding specificity. PMID:21041684

  7. Probing the folded state and mechanical unfolding pathways of T4 lysozyme using all-atom and coarse-grained molecular simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wenjun; Glenn, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The Bacteriophage T4 Lysozyme (T4L) is a prototype modular protein comprised of an N-terminal and a C-domain domain, which was extensively studied to understand the folding/unfolding mechanism of modular proteins. To offer detailed structural and dynamic insights to the folded-state stability and the mechanical unfolding behaviors of T4L, we have performed extensive equilibrium and steered molecular dynamics simulations of both the wild-type (WT) and a circular permutation (CP) variant of T4L using all-atom and coarse-grained force fields. Our all-atom and coarse-grained simulations of the folded state have consistently found greater stability of the C-domain than the N-domain in isolation, which is in agreement with past thermostatic studies of T4L. While the all-atom simulation cannot fully explain the mechanical unfolding behaviors of the WT and the CP variant observed in an optical tweezers study, the coarse-grained simulations based on the Go model or a modified elastic network model (mENM) are in qualitative agreement with the experimental finding of greater unfolding cooperativity in the WT than the CP variant. Interestingly, the two coarse-grained models predict different structural mechanisms for the observed change in cooperativity between the WT and the CP variant—while the Go model predicts minor modification of the unfolding pathways by circular permutation (i.e., preserving the general order that the N-domain unfolds before the C-domain), the mENM predicts a dramatic change in unfolding pathways (e.g., different order of N/C-domain unfolding in the WT and the CP variant). Based on our simulations, we have analyzed the limitations of and the key differences between these models and offered testable predictions for future experiments to resolve the structural mechanism for cooperative folding/unfolding of T4L.

  8. Probing the folded state and mechanical unfolding pathways of T4 lysozyme using all-atom and coarse-grained molecular simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Wenjun Glenn, Paul

    2015-01-21

    The Bacteriophage T4 Lysozyme (T4L) is a prototype modular protein comprised of an N-terminal and a C-domain domain, which was extensively studied to understand the folding/unfolding mechanism of modular proteins. To offer detailed structural and dynamic insights to the folded-state stability and the mechanical unfolding behaviors of T4L, we have performed extensive equilibrium and steered molecular dynamics simulations of both the wild-type (WT) and a circular permutation (CP) variant of T4L using all-atom and coarse-grained force fields. Our all-atom and coarse-grained simulations of the folded state have consistently found greater stability of the C-domain than the N-domain in isolation, which is in agreement with past thermostatic studies of T4L. While the all-atom simulation cannot fully explain the mechanical unfolding behaviors of the WT and the CP variant observed in an optical tweezers study, the coarse-grained simulations based on the Go model or a modified elastic network model (mENM) are in qualitative agreement with the experimental finding of greater unfolding cooperativity in the WT than the CP variant. Interestingly, the two coarse-grained models predict different structural mechanisms for the observed change in cooperativity between the WT and the CP variant—while the Go model predicts minor modification of the unfolding pathways by circular permutation (i.e., preserving the general order that the N-domain unfolds before the C-domain), the mENM predicts a dramatic change in unfolding pathways (e.g., different order of N/C-domain unfolding in the WT and the CP variant). Based on our simulations, we have analyzed the limitations of and the key differences between these models and offered testable predictions for future experiments to resolve the structural mechanism for cooperative folding/unfolding of T4L.

  9. The tight linkage between DNA replication and double-strand break repair in bacteriophage T4

    PubMed Central

    George, James W.; Stohr, Bradley A.; Tomso, Daniel J.; Kreuzer, Kenneth N.

    2001-01-01

    Double-strand break (DSB) repair and DNA replication are tightly linked in the life cycle of bacteriophage T4. Indeed, the major mode of phage DNA replication depends on recombination proteins and can be stimulated by DSBs. DSB-stimulated DNA replication is dramatically demonstrated when T4 infects cells carrying two plasmids that share homology. A DSB on one plasmid triggered extensive replication of the second plasmid, providing a useful model for T4 recombination-dependent replication (RDR). This system also provides a view of DSB repair in T4-infected cells and revealed that the DSB repair products had been replicated in their entirety by the T4 replication machinery. We analyzed the detailed structure of these products, which do not fit the simple predictions of any of three models for DSB repair. We also present evidence that the T4 RDR system functions to restart stalled or inactivated replication forks. First, we review experiments involving antitumor drug-stabilized topoisomerase cleavage complexes. The results suggest that forks blocked at cleavage complexes are resolved by recombinational repair, likely involving RDR. Second, we show here that the presence of a T4 replication origin on one plasmid substantially stimulated recombination events between it and a homologous second plasmid that did not contain a T4 origin. Furthermore, replication of the second plasmid was increased when the first plasmid contained the T4 origin. Our interpretation is that origin-initiated forks become inactivated at some frequency during replication of the first plasmid and are then restarted via RDR on the second plasmid. PMID:11459966

  10. Structure-relaxation mechanism for the response of T4 lysozyme cavity mutants to hydrostatic pressure

    PubMed Central

    Lerch, Michael T.; López, Carlos J.; Yang, Zhongyu; Kreitman, Margaux J.; Horwitz, Joseph; Hubbell, Wayne L.

    2015-01-01

    Application of hydrostatic pressure shifts protein conformational equilibria in a direction to reduce the volume of the system. A current view is that the volume reduction is dominated by elimination of voids or cavities in the protein interior via cavity hydration, although an alternative mechanism wherein cavities are filled with protein side chains resulting from a structure relaxation has been suggested [López CJ, Yang Z, Altenbach C, Hubbell WL (2013) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 110(46):E4306–E4315]. In the present study, mechanisms for elimination of cavities under high pressure are investigated in the L99A cavity mutant of T4 lysozyme and derivatives thereof using site-directed spin labeling, pressure-resolved double electron–electron resonance, and high-pressure circular dichroism spectroscopy. In the L99A mutant, the ground state is in equilibrium with an excited state of only ∼3% of the population in which the cavity is filled by a protein side chain [Bouvignies et al. (2011) Nature 477(7362):111–114]. The results of the present study show that in L99A the native ground state is the dominant conformation to pressures of 3 kbar, with cavity hydration apparently taking place in the range of 2–3 kbar. However, in the presence of additional mutations that lower the free energy of the excited state, pressure strongly populates the excited state, thereby eliminating the cavity with a native side chain rather than solvent. Thus, both cavity hydration and structure relaxation are mechanisms for cavity elimination under pressure, and which is dominant is determined by details of the energy landscape. PMID:25918400

  11. High diversity and potential origins of T4-type bacteriophages on the surface of Arctic glaciers.

    PubMed

    Bellas, Christopher M; Anesio, Alexandre M

    2013-09-01

    Tailed bacteriophages are the most abundant viruses in the biosphere. Here we examined the T4-type bacteriophage community inhabiting the surface of two glaciers in Svalbard. We used a molecular approach to target g23, the major capsid protein gene, to demonstrate that in the extreme cryoconite hole habitats the T4-type phages are surprisingly diverse. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that cryoconite hole sediments harbour a mixed phage community spanning multiple T4-type phage subgroups. The majority (71 %) of phage sequences clustered into three novel phylogenetically distinct groups, whilst the remainder clustered with known marine and soil derived phage sequences. The meltwater in cryoconite holes also contained a further distinct phage community which was related to previously detected marine phage variants. The ability of phages to move between marine and glacial habitats was tested in a transplantation experiment. Phages from the nearby marine fjord were found to be capable of initiating infection of supraglacial bacteria, suggesting suitable hosts could be found by non-native phages. Together this evidence suggests that the surface of glaciers contain both novel and cosmopolitan phages, some of which may have arrived in the cryosphere from other biomes.

  12. Purification of phage display-modified bacteriophage T4 by affinity chromatography

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Affinity chromatography is one of the most efficient protein purification strategies. This technique comprises a one-step procedure with a purification level in the order of several thousand-fold, adaptable for various proteins, differentiated in their size, shape, charge, and other properties. The aim of this work was to verify the possibility of applying affinity chromatography in bacteriophage purification, with the perspective of therapeutic purposes. T4 is a large, icosahedral phage that may serve as an efficient display platform for foreign peptides or proteins. Here we propose a new method of T4 phage purification by affinity chromatography after its modification with affinity tags (GST and Histag) by in vivo phage display. As any permanent introduction of extraneous DNA into a phage genome is strongly unfavourable for medical purposes, integration of foreign motifs with the phage genome was not applied. The phage was propagated in bacteria expressing fusions of the phage protein Hoc with affinity tags from bacterial plasmids, independently from the phage expression system. Results Elution profiles of phages modified with the specific affinity motifs (compared to non-specific phages) document their binding to the affinity resins and effective elution with standard competitive agents. Non-specific binding was also observed, but was 102-105 times weaker than the specific one. GST-modified bacteriophages were also effectively released from glutathione Sepharose by proteolytic cleavage. The possibility of proteolytic release was designed at the stage of expression vector construction. Decrease in LPS content in phage preparations was dependent on the washing intensity; intensive washing resulted in preparations of 11-40 EU/ml. Conclusions Affinity tags can be successfully incorporated into the T4 phage capsid by the in vivo phage display technique and they strongly elevate bacteriophage affinity to a specific resin. Affinity chromatography can be

  13. Cryo-electron microscopy study of bacteriophage T4 displaying anthrax toxin proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fokine, Andrei; Bowman, Valorie D.; Battisti, Anthony J.; Li Qin; Chipman, Paul R.; Rao, Venigalla B.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2007-10-25

    The bacteriophage T4 capsid contains two accessory surface proteins, the small outer capsid protein (Soc, 870 copies) and the highly antigenic outer capsid protein (Hoc, 155 copies). As these are dispensable for capsid formation, they can be used for displaying proteins and macromolecular complexes on the T4 capsid surface. Anthrax toxin components were attached to the T4 capsid as a fusion protein of the N-terminal domain of the anthrax lethal factor (LFn) with Soc. The LFn-Soc fusion protein was complexed in vitro with Hoc{sup -}Soc{sup -}T4 phage. Subsequently, cleaved anthrax protective antigen heptamers (PA63){sub 7} were attached to the exposed LFn domains. A cryo-electron microscopy study of the decorated T4 particles shows the complex of PA63 heptamers with LFn-Soc on the phage surface. Although the cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction is unable to differentiate on its own between different proposed models of the anthrax toxin, the density is consistent with a model that had predicted the orientation and position of three LFn molecules bound to one PA63 heptamer.

  14. Covalent Modification of Bacteriophage T4 DNA Inhibits CRISPR-Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Bryson, Alexandra L.; Hwang, Young; Sherrill-Mix, Scott; Wu, Gary D.; Lewis, James D.; Black, Lindsay; Clark, Tyson A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genomic DNAs of tailed bacteriophages are commonly modified by the attachment of chemical groups. Some forms of DNA modification are known to protect phage DNA from cleavage by restriction enzymes, but others are of unknown function. Recently, the CRISPR-Cas nuclease complexes were shown to mediate bacterial adaptive immunity by RNA-guided target recognition, raising the question of whether phage DNA modifications may also block attack by CRISPR-Cas9. We investigated phage T4 as a model system, where cytosine is replaced with glucosyl-hydroxymethylcytosine (glc-HMC). We first quantified the extent and distribution of covalent modifications in T4 DNA by single-molecule DNA sequencing and enzymatic probing. We then designed CRISPR spacer sequences targeting T4 and found that wild-type T4 containing glc-HMC was insensitive to attack by CRISPR-Cas9 but mutants with unmodified cytosine were sensitive. Phage with HMC showed only intermediate sensitivity. While this work was in progress, another group reported examples of heavily engineered CRISRP-Cas9 complexes that could, in fact, overcome the effects of T4 DNA modification, indicating that modifications can inhibit but do not always fully block attack. PMID:26081634

  15. Identification of bacteriophage T4 prereplicative proteins on two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels.

    PubMed

    Kutter, E M; d'Acci, K; Drivdahl, R H; Gleckler, J; McKinney, J C; Peterson, S; Guttman, B S

    1994-03-01

    Bacteriophage T4 makes a large number of prereplicative proteins, which are involved in directing the transition from host to phage functions, in producing the new T4 DNA, and in regulating transcriptional shifts. We have used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (nonequilibrium pH gradient electrophoresis gels in the first dimension and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gradient slab gels in the second) to identify a number of new prereplicative proteins. The products of many known genes are identified because they are missing in mutants with amber mutations of those genes, as analyzed by us and/or by previous workers. Some have also been identified by running purified proteins as markers on gels with labeled extracts from infected cells. Other proteins that are otherwise unknown are characterized as missing in infections with phage carrying certain large deletions and, in some cases, are correlated with sequence data.

  16. Identification of bacteriophage T4 prereplicative proteins on two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels.

    PubMed Central

    Kutter, E M; d'Acci, K; Drivdahl, R H; Gleckler, J; McKinney, J C; Peterson, S; Guttman, B S

    1994-01-01

    Bacteriophage T4 makes a large number of prereplicative proteins, which are involved in directing the transition from host to phage functions, in producing the new T4 DNA, and in regulating transcriptional shifts. We have used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (nonequilibrium pH gradient electrophoresis gels in the first dimension and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gradient slab gels in the second) to identify a number of new prereplicative proteins. The products of many known genes are identified because they are missing in mutants with amber mutations of those genes, as analyzed by us and/or by previous workers. Some have also been identified by running purified proteins as markers on gels with labeled extracts from infected cells. Other proteins that are otherwise unknown are characterized as missing in infections with phage carrying certain large deletions and, in some cases, are correlated with sequence data. Images PMID:8132459

  17. Regulation by interdomain communication of a headful packaging nuclease from bacteriophage T4

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh-Kumar, Manjira; Alam, Tanfis I.; Draper, Bonnie; Stack, John D.; Rao, Venigalla B.

    2011-01-01

    In genome packaging by tailed bacteriophages and herpesviruses, a concatemeric DNA is cut and inserted into an empty procapsid. A series of cuts follow the encapsidation of each unit-length ‘headful’ genome, but the mechanisms by which cutting is coupled to packaging are not understood. Here we report the first biochemical characterization of a headful nuclease from bacteriophage T4. Our results show that the T4 nuclease, which resides in the C-terminal domain of large ‘terminase’ gp17, is a weak endonuclease and regulated by a variety of factors; Mg, NaCl, ATP, small terminase gp16 and N-terminal ATPase domain. The small terminase, which stimulates gp17-ATPase, also stimulates nuclease in the presence of ATP but inhibits in the absence of ATP suggesting interdomain crosstalk. Comparison of the ‘relaxed’ and ‘tensed’ states of the motor show that a number of basic residues lining the nuclease groove are positioned to interact with DNA in the tensed state but change their positions in the relaxed state. These results suggest that conformational changes in the ATPase center remodel the nuclease center via an interdomain ‘communication track’. This might be a common regulatory mechanism for coupling DNA cutting to DNA packaging among the headful packaging nucleases from dsDNA viruses. PMID:21109524

  18. Discrimination of infectious bacteriophage T4 virus by propidium monoazide real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Fittipaldi, Mariana; Rodriguez, Nancy J Pino; Codony, Francesc; Adrados, Bárbara; Peñuela, Gustavo A; Morató, Jordi

    2010-09-01

    The advent of quantitative PCR has improved the detection of human viral pathogens in the environment. However, a serious limitation of this method may arise from the inability to discriminate between viruses that are infectious and viruses that have been inactivated and do not represent a human health hazard. To assess whether propidium monoazide (PMA) pre-treatment is a good approach to inhibiting DNA amplification from non-infectious viruses, bacteriophage T4 survival was measured using cell culture titration and real-time PCR with and without PMA pre-treatment. Heat (85 degrees C) and proteolysis methods were carried out. After these inactivation treatments, the results indicated that the PMA pre-treatment approach is not appropriate for differentiating infectious viruses. However, when a heat treatment at 110 degrees C was undertaken, PMA pre-treatment did allow differentiation of non-infectious from infectious viruses. In this case, effective binding of PMA to bacteriophage T4 DNA could be taken to indicate capsid damage. Therefore, PMA pre-treatment may be appropriate for assessing effective disinfection treatments and for a more reliable understanding of the factors that contribute to viral inactivation through capsid damage monitoring. The PMA-PCR approach could be useful as a rapid and inexpensive analytical tool for screening and evaluation of the efficacy of disinfectants.

  19. The activity of mouse Kupffer cells following intravenous injection of T4 bacteriophage

    PubMed Central

    Inchley, C. J.

    1969-01-01

    The response of macrophages from the livers and spleens of mice given a single immunizing dose of T4 bacteriophage has been studied. Following their rapid removal from the circulation, phage particles were found to be concentrated in the liver to a level twelve times that for the spleen. Investigation of the fate of ingested phage showed that it was disposed of more rapidly in the liver than in the spleen, as measured by the disappearance of viable T4 particles and by the loss of radioactive label following injection of [131I]T4. It was also found that antigen-containing Kupffer cells could elicit little or no antibody synthesis on transfer into normal syngeneic recipients, or on incubation with lymphoid cells in vitro. It is suggested that these macrophages differ from other components of the reticulo-endothelial system in their treatment of T4 antigen, and may be concerned mainly with its breakdown and disposal rather than with providing a stimulus for the initiation of antibody synthesis. PMID:5370053

  20. Structure, assembly, and DNA packaging of the bacteriophage T4 head.

    PubMed

    Black, Lindsay W; Rao, Venigalla B

    2012-01-01

    The bacteriophage T4 head is an elongated icosahedron packed with 172 kb of linear double-stranded DNA and numerous proteins. The capsid is built from three essential proteins: gp23*, which forms the hexagonal capsid lattice; gp24*, which forms pentamers at 11 of the 12 vertices; and gp20, which forms the unique dodecameric portal vertex through which DNA enters during packaging and exits during infection. Intensive work over more than half a century has led to a deep understanding of the phage T4 head. The atomic structure of gp24 has been determined. A structural model built for gp23 using its similarity to gp24 showed that the phage T4 major capsid protein has the same fold as numerous other icosahedral bacteriophages. However, phage T4 displays an unusual membrane and portal initiated assembly of a shape determining self-sufficient scaffolding core. Folding of gp23 requires the assistance of two chaperones, the Escherichia coli chaperone GroEL acting with the phage-coded gp23-specific cochaperone, gp31. The capsid also contains two nonessential outer capsid proteins, Hoc and Soc, which decorate the capsid surface. Through binding to adjacent gp23 subunits, Soc reinforces the capsid structure. Hoc and Soc have been used extensively in bipartite peptide display libraries and to display pathogen antigens, including those from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Neisseria meningitides, Bacillus anthracis, and foot and mouth disease virus. The structure of Ip1*, one of a number of multiple (>100) copy proteins packed and injected with DNA from the full head, shows it to be an inhibitor of one specific restriction endonuclease specifically targeting glycosylated hydroxymethyl cytosine DNA. Extensive mutagenesis, combined with atomic structures of the DNA packaging/terminase proteins gp16 and gp17, elucidated the ATPase and nuclease functional motifs involved in DNA translocation and headful DNA cutting. The cryoelectron microscopy structure of the T4 packaging

  1. Role of the host cell in bacteriophage T4 development. II. Characterization of host mutants that have pleiotropic effects on T4 growth.

    PubMed Central

    Stitt, B L; Revel, H R; Lielausis, I; Wood, W B

    1980-01-01

    Mutant host-defective Escherichi coli that fail to propagate bacteriophage T4 and have a pleiotropic effect on T4 development have been isolated and characterized. In phage-infected mutant cells, specific early phage proteins are absent or reduced in amount, phage DNA synthesis is depressed by about 50%, specific structural phage proteins, including some tail and collar components, are deficient or missing, and host-cell lysis is delayed and slow. Almost all phage that can overcome the host block carry mutantions that map in functionally undefined 'nonessential' regions of the T4 genome, most near gene 39. The mutant host strains are temperature sensitive for growth and show simultaneous reversion of the ts phenotype and the inability to propagate T4+. The host mutations are cotransduced with ilv (83 min) and may lie in the gene for transcription termination factor rho. Images PMID:6999171

  2. Marine T4-type bacteriophages, a ubiquitous component of the dark matter of the biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filée, Jonathan; Tétart, Françoise; Suttle, Curtis A.; Krisch, H. M.

    2005-08-01

    Tailed bacteriophages are the most abundant biological entities in marine environments. However, most of these marine phages are uncharacterized because few of their hosts have been cultivated. To learn more about such phages, we designed a set of degenerate PCR primers for phage T4 g23, which encodes the major capsid protein in all of the T4-type phages, an important family of the tailed phage. These primers were used to amplify g23-related sequences from diverse marine environments (fjords and bays of British Columbia, the eastern Gulf of Mexico, and the western Arctic Ocean) revealing a remarkable level of molecular diversity, which in some cases was correlated with morphological variation of the virions. Phylogenetic analysis showed that although some of these sequences were closely related to well studied subgroups of the T4-type phage, such as the T-evens, the majority of them belong to five previously uncharacterized subgroups. These data indicate that the host range of T4-type phages is much broader than previously imagined and that the laboratory isolate T4 belongs to a phage family that is extraordinarily widespread and diverse in the biosphere. Author contributions: J.F., F.T., and H.M.K. designed research; J.F. and F.T. performed research; C.A.S. contributed new reagents/analytic tools; J.F., C.A.S., and H.M.K. analyzed data; and J.F., C.A.S., and H.M.K. wrote the paper.This paper was submitted directly (Track II) to the PNAS office.Data deposition: The nucleotide sequences of g23 reported in this paper have been deposited in the GenBank database (accession nos. DQ105858-DQ105942).

  3. ESCHERICHIA COLI Rho Factor Is Involved in Lysis of Bacteriophage T4-Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Linder, Claës H.; Carlson, Karin

    1985-01-01

    A Rid (Rho interaction deficient) phenotype of bacteriophage T4 mutants was defined by cold-sensitive restriction (lack of plaque formation) on rho+ hosts carrying additional polar mutations in unrelated genes, coupled to suppression (plaque formation) in otherwise isogenic strains carrying either a polarity-suppressing rho or a multicopy plasmid expressing the rho+ allele. This suggests that the restriction may be due to lower levels of Rho than what is available to T4 in the suppressing strains.—Rid394x4 was isolated upon hydroxylamine mutagenesis and mapped in the t gene; other t mutants (and mot, as well as dda dexA double mutants) also showed a Rid phenotype. In liquid culture in strains that restricted plaque formation Rid394x4 showed strong lysis inhibition (a known t- phenotype) but no prolonged phage production (another well-known t- phenotype). This implies that when Rho is limiting the t mutant shuts off phage production at the normal time. Lysis inhibition was partially relieved, and phage production prolonged to varying extents depending on growth conditions in strains that allowed plaque formation. No significant effects on early gene expression were found. Apparently, both mutant (polarity-suppressing) and wild-type Rho can function in prolonging phage production and partially relieving lysis inhibition of Rid394x4 when present at a sufficiently high level, and Rho may play other role(s) in T4 development than in early gene regulation. PMID:3902562

  4. Structural remodeling of bacteriophage T4 and host membranes during infection initiation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bo; Margolin, William; Molineux, Ian J.; Liu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The first stages of productive bacteriophage infections of bacterial host cells require efficient adsorption to the cell surface followed by ejection of phage DNA into the host cytoplasm. To achieve this goal, a phage virion must undergo significant structural remodeling. For phage T4, the most obvious change is the contraction of its tail. Here, we use skinny E. coli minicells as a host, along with cryo-electron tomography and mutant phage virions, to visualize key structural intermediates during initiation of T4 infection. We show for the first time that most long tail fibers are folded back against the tail sheath until irreversible adsorption, a feature compatible with the virion randomly walking across the cell surface to find an optimal site for infection. Our data confirm that tail contraction is triggered by structural changes in the baseplate, as intermediates were found with remodeled baseplates and extended tails. After contraction, the tail tube penetrates the host cell periplasm, pausing while it degrades the peptidoglycan layer. Penetration into the host cytoplasm is accompanied by a dramatic local outward curvature of the cytoplasmic membrane as it fuses with the phage tail tip. The baseplate hub protein gp27 and/or the ejected tape measure protein gp29 likely form the transmembrane channel for viral DNA passage into the cell cytoplasm. Building on the wealth of prior biochemical and structural information, this work provides new molecular insights into the mechanistic pathway of T4 phage infection. PMID:26283379

  5. Structural remodeling of bacteriophage T4 and host membranes during infection initiation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bo; Margolin, William; Molineux, Ian J; Liu, Jun

    2015-09-01

    The first stages of productive bacteriophage infections of bacterial host cells require efficient adsorption to the cell surface followed by ejection of phage DNA into the host cytoplasm. To achieve this goal, a phage virion must undergo significant structural remodeling. For phage T4, the most obvious change is the contraction of its tail. Here, we use skinny E. coli minicells as a host, along with cryo-electron tomography and mutant phage virions, to visualize key structural intermediates during initiation of T4 infection. We show for the first time that most long tail fibers are folded back against the tail sheath until irreversible adsorption, a feature compatible with the virion randomly walking across the cell surface to find an optimal site for infection. Our data confirm that tail contraction is triggered by structural changes in the baseplate, as intermediates were found with remodeled baseplates and extended tails. After contraction, the tail tube penetrates the host cell periplasm, pausing while it degrades the peptidoglycan layer. Penetration into the host cytoplasm is accompanied by a dramatic local outward curvature of the cytoplasmic membrane as it fuses with the phage tail tip. The baseplate hub protein gp27 and/or the ejected tape measure protein gp29 likely form the transmembrane channel for viral DNA passage into the cell cytoplasm. Building on the wealth of prior biochemical and structural information, this work provides new molecular insights into the mechanistic pathway of T4 phage infection.

  6. Bacteriophage T4 Mutants Hypersensitive to an Antitumor Agent That Induces Topoisomerase-DNA Cleavage Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Woodworth, D. L.; Kreuzer, K. N.

    1996-01-01

    Many antitumor agents and antibiotics affect cells by interacting with type II topoisomerases, stabilizing a covalent enzyme-DNA complex. A pathway of recombination can apparently repair this DNA damage. In this study, transposon mutagenesis was used to identify possible components of the repair pathway in bacteriophage T4. Substantial increases in sensitivity to the antitumor agent m-AMSA [4'-(9-acridinyl-amino) methanesulfon-m-anisidide] were found with transposon insertion mutations that inactivate any of six T4-encoded proteins: UvsY (DNA synaptase accessory protein), UvsW (unknown function), Rnh (RNase H and 5' to 3' DNA exonuclease), α-gt (α-glucosyl transferase), gp47.1 (uncharacterized), and NrdB (β subunit of ribonucleotide reductase). The role of the rnh gene in drug sensitivity was further characterized. First, an in-frame rnh deletion mutation was constructed and analyzed, providing evidence that the absence of Rnh protein causes hypersensitivity to m-AMSA. Second, the m-AMSA sensitivity of the rnh-deletion mutant was shown to require a drug-sensitive T4 topoisomerase. Third, analysis of double mutants suggested that uvsW and rnh mutations impair a common step in the recombinational repair pathway for m-AMSA-induced damage. Finally, the rnh-deletion mutant was found to be hypersensitive to UV, implicating Rnh in recombinational repair of UV-induced damage. PMID:8807283

  7. Evidence for an electrostatic mechanism of force generation by the bacteriophage T4 DNA packaging motor

    PubMed Central

    Migliori, Amy D.; Keller, Nicholas; Alam, Tanfis I.; Mahalingam, Marthandan; Rao, Venigalla B.; Arya, Gaurav; Smith, Douglas E

    2014-01-01

    How viral packaging motors generate enormous forces to translocate DNA into viral capsids remains unknown. Recent structural studies of the bacteriophage T4 packaging motor have led to a proposed mechanism wherein the gp17 motor protein translocates DNA by transitioning between extended and compact states, orchestrated by electrostatic interactions between complimentarily charged residues across the interface between the N- and C-terminal subdomains. Here, we show that site-directed alterations in these residues cause force dependent impairments of motor function including lower translocation velocity, lower stall force, and higher frequency of pauses and slips. We further show that the measured impairments correlate with computed changes in free energy differences between the two states. These findings support the proposed structural mechanism and further suggest an energy landscape model of motor activity that couples the free energy profile of motor conformational states with that of the ATP hydrolysis cycle. PMID:24937091

  8. Evidence for an electrostatic mechanism of force generation by the bacteriophage T4 DNA packaging motor.

    PubMed

    Migliori, Amy D; Keller, Nicholas; Alam, Tanfis I; Mahalingam, Marthandan; Rao, Venigalla B; Arya, Gaurav; Smith, Douglas E

    2014-01-01

    How viral packaging motors generate enormous forces to translocate DNA into viral capsids remains unknown. Recent structural studies of the bacteriophage T4 packaging motor have led to a proposed mechanism wherein the gp17 motor protein translocates DNA by transitioning between extended and compact states, orchestrated by electrostatic interactions between complimentarily charged residues across the interface between the N- and C-terminal subdomains. Here we show that site-directed alterations in these residues cause force dependent impairments of motor function including lower translocation velocity, lower stall force and higher frequency of pauses and slips. We further show that the measured impairments correlate with computed changes in free-energy differences between the two states. These findings support the proposed structural mechanism and further suggest an energy landscape model of motor activity that couples the free-energy profile of motor conformational states with that of the ATP hydrolysis cycle. PMID:24937091

  9. The tail sheath structure of bacteriophage T4: a molecular machine for infecting bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Aksyuk, Anastasia A.; Leiman, Petr G.; Kurochkina, Lidia P.; Shneider, Mikhail M.; Kostyuchenko, Victor A.; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2009-07-22

    The contractile tail of bacteriophage T4 is a molecular machine that facilitates very high viral infection efficiency. Its major component is a tail sheath, which contracts during infection to less than half of its initial length. The sheath consists of 138 copies of the tail sheath protein, gene product (gp) 18, which surrounds the central non-contractile tail tube. The contraction of the sheath drives the tail tube through the outer membrane, creating a channel for the viral genome delivery. A crystal structure of about three quarters of gp18 has been determined and was fitted into cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of the tail sheath before and after contraction. It was shown that during contraction, gp18 subunits slide over each other with no apparent change in their structure.

  10. Evidence for an electrostatic mechanism of force generation by the bacteriophage T4 DNA packaging motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliori, Amy D.; Keller, Nicholas; Alam, Tanfis I.; Mahalingam, Marthandan; Rao, Venigalla B.; Arya, Gaurav; Smith, Douglas E.

    2014-06-01

    How viral packaging motors generate enormous forces to translocate DNA into viral capsids remains unknown. Recent structural studies of the bacteriophage T4 packaging motor have led to a proposed mechanism wherein the gp17 motor protein translocates DNA by transitioning between extended and compact states, orchestrated by electrostatic interactions between complimentarily charged residues across the interface between the N- and C-terminal subdomains. Here we show that site-directed alterations in these residues cause force dependent impairments of motor function including lower translocation velocity, lower stall force and higher frequency of pauses and slips. We further show that the measured impairments correlate with computed changes in free-energy differences between the two states. These findings support the proposed structural mechanism and further suggest an energy landscape model of motor activity that couples the free-energy profile of motor conformational states with that of the ATP hydrolysis cycle.

  11. Bacteriophage T4 development in Escherichia coli is growth rate dependent.

    PubMed

    Rabinovitch, Avinoam; Fishov, Itzhak; Hadas, Hilla; Einav, Monica; Zaritsky, Arieh

    2002-05-01

    Three independent parameters (eclipse and latent periods, and rate of ripening during the rise period) are essential and sufficient to describe bacteriophage development in its bacterial host. A general model to describe the classical "one-step growth" experiment [Rabinovitch et al. (1999a) J. Bacteriol.181, 1687-1683] allowed their calculations from experimental results obtained with T4 in Escherichia coli B/r under different growth conditions [Hadas et al. (1997) Microbiology143, 179-185]. It is found that all three parameters could be described by their dependence solely on the culture doubling time tau before infection. Their functional dependence on tau, derived by a best-fit analysis, was used to calculate burst size values. The latter agree well with the experimental results. The dependence of the derived parameters on growth conditions can be used to predict phage development under other experimental manipulations.

  12. Nucleotide sequence and revised map location of the arn gene from bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed

    Kim, B C; Kim, K; Park, E H; Lim, C J

    1997-10-31

    Non-glucosylated (Glu-) T-even phage DNAs are restricted by Escherichia coli RgIA and RgIB endonucleases with different specificities. RgIB endonuclease activity is strongly inhibited by anti-restriction endonuclease (Arn) encoded by the bacteriophage T4 genome. The nucleotide sequence of the arn gene encoding Arn was determined. The product of the cloned arn gene was overexpressed by the T7 RNA polymerase/promoter system, and its molecular size is consistent with that predicted from the open reading frame of the arn gene. The arn gene is located between the asiA gene and motA gene in the region of 161,300-161,578 nucleotides.

  13. Functional Analysis of the Bacteriophage T4 Rad50 Homolog (gp46) Coiled-coil Domain.

    PubMed

    Barfoot, Tasida; Herdendorf, Timothy J; Behning, Bryanna R; Stohr, Bradley A; Gao, Yang; Kreuzer, Kenneth N; Nelson, Scott W

    2015-09-25

    Rad50 and Mre11 form a complex involved in the detection and processing of DNA double strand breaks. Rad50 contains an anti-parallel coiled-coil with two absolutely conserved cysteine residues at its apex. These cysteine residues serve as a dimerization domain and bind a Zn(2+) cation in a tetrathiolate coordination complex known as the zinc-hook. Mutation of the zinc-hook in bacteriophage T4 is lethal, indicating the ability to bind Zn(2+) is critical for the functioning of the MR complex. In vitro, we found that complex formation between Rad50 and a peptide corresponding to the C-terminal domain of Mre11 enhances the ATPase activity of Rad50, supporting the hypothesis that the coiled-coil is a major conduit for communication between Mre11 and Rad50. We constructed mutations to perturb this domain in the bacteriophage T4 Rad50 homolog. Deletion of the Rad50 coiled-coil and zinc-hook eliminates Mre11 binding and ATPase activation but does not affect its basal activity. Mutation of the zinc-hook or disruption of the coiled-coil does not affect Mre11 or DNA binding, but their activation of Rad50 ATPase activity is abolished. Although these mutants excise a single nucleotide at a normal rate, they lack processivity and have reduced repetitive exonuclease rates. Restricting the mobility of the coiled-coil eliminates ATPase activation and repetitive exonuclease activity, but the ability to support single nucleotide excision is retained. These results suggest that the coiled-coiled domain adopts at least two conformations throughout the ATPase/nuclease cycle, with one conformation supporting enhanced ATPase activity and processivity and the other supporting nucleotide excision.

  14. Autoinhibition of Bacteriophage T4 Mre11 by Its C-terminal Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yang; Nelson, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    Mre11 and Rad50 form a stable complex (MR) and work cooperatively in repairing DNA double strand breaks. In the bacteriophage T4, Rad50 (gene product 46) enhances the nuclease activity of Mre11 (gene product 47), and Mre11 and DNA in combination stimulate the ATPase activity of Rad50. The structural basis for the cross-activation of the MR complex has been elusive. Various crystal structures of the MR complex display limited protein-protein interfaces that mainly exist between the C terminus of Mre11 and the coiled-coil domain of Rad50. To test the role of the C-terminal Rad50 binding domain (RBD) in Mre11 activation, we constructed a series of C-terminal deletions and mutations in bacteriophage T4 Mre11. Deletion of the RBD in Mre11 eliminates Rad50 binding but only has moderate effect on its intrinsic nuclease activity; however, the additional deletion of the highly acidic flexible linker that lies between RBD and the main body of Mre11 increases the nuclease activity of Mre11 by 20-fold. Replacement of the acidic residues in the flexible linker with alanine elevates the Mre11 activity to the level of the MR complex when combined with deletion of RBD. Nuclease activity kinetics indicate that Rad50 association and deletion of the C terminus of Mre11 both enhance DNA substrate binding. Additionally, a short peptide that contains the flexible linker and RBD of Mre11 acts as an inhibitor of Mre11 nuclease activity. These results support a model where the Mre11 RBD and linker domain act as an autoinhibitory domain when not in complex with Rad50. Complex formation with Rad50 alleviates this inhibition due to the tight association of the RBD and the Rad50 coiled-coil. PMID:25077970

  15. Interaction of bacteriophage T4 and T7 single-stranded DNA binding proteins with DNA

    PubMed Central

    Shokri, Leila; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark C.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteriophage T4 and T7 are well studied model replication systems, which have allowed researchers to determine the roles of many proteins central to DNA replication, recombination, and repair. Here we discuss the results from two recently developed single molecule methods to determine the salt-dependent DNA binding kinetics and thermodynamics of the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding proteins (SSBs) from these systems. We use these methods to characterize both the equilibrium double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and ssDNA binding of the SSBs T4 gene 32 protein (gp32) and T7 gene 2.5 protein (gp2.5). Despite the overall two order of magnitude weaker binding of gp2.5 to both forms of DNA, we find that both proteins exhibit four orders of magnitude preferential binding to ssDNA relative to dsDNA. This strong preferential ssDNA binding as well as the weak dsDNA binding are essential for the ability of both proteins to search dsDNA in one dimension to find available ssDNA binding sites at the replication fork. PMID:19571366

  16. Architecture of the Bacteriophage T4 Activator MotA/Promoter DNA Interaction during Sigma Appropriation*

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Meng-Lun; James, Tamara D.; Knipling, Leslie; Waddell, M. Brett; White, Stephen; Hinton, Deborah M.

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression can be regulated through factors that direct RNA polymerase to the correct promoter sequence at the correct time. Bacteriophage T4 controls its development in this way using phage proteins that interact with host RNA polymerase. Using a process called σ appropriation, the T4 co-activator AsiA structurally remodels the σ70 subunit of host RNA polymerase, while a T4 activator, MotA, engages the C terminus of σ70 and binds to a DNA promoter element, the MotA box. Structures for the N-terminal (NTD) and C-terminal (CTD) domains of MotA are available, but no structure exists for MotA with or without DNA. We report the first molecular map of the MotA/DNA interaction within the σ-appropriated complex, which we obtained by using the cleaving reagent, iron bromoacetamidobenzyl-EDTA (FeBABE). We conjugated surface-exposed, single cysteines in MotA with FeBABE and performed cleavage reactions in the context of stable transcription complexes. The DNA cleavage sites were analyzed using ICM Molsoft software and three-dimensional physical models of MotANTD, MotACTD, and the DNA to investigate shape complementarity between the protein and the DNA and to position MotA on the DNA. We found that the unusual “double wing” motif present within MotACTD resides in the major groove of the MotA box. In addition, we have used surface plasmon resonance to show that MotA alone is in a very dynamic equilibrium with the MotA element. Our results demonstrate the utility of fine resolution FeBABE mapping to determine the architecture of protein-DNA complexes that have been recalcitrant to traditional structure analyses. PMID:23902794

  17. Crystallization of the carboxy-terminal region of the bacteriophage T4 proximal long tail fibre protein gp34

    SciTech Connect

    Granell, Meritxell; Namura, Mikiyoshi; Alvira, Sara; Garcia-Doval, Carmela; Singh, Abhimanyu K.; Gutsche, Irina; Raaij, Mark J. van Kanamaru, Shuji

    2014-06-19

    The crystallization of three C-terminal fragments of the bacteriophage T4 protein gp34 is reported. Diffraction data have been obtained for three native crystal forms and two selenomethionine derivatives, one of which contained high-quality anomalous signal.

  18. A bacteriophage T4 in vitro system to clone long DNA molecules. Final report, June 1, 1990--January 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, V.B.

    1997-09-01

    A summary is presented of the following objectives: development of a bacteriophage T4 in vitro system, and techniques to clone long segments of foreign DNA; development of a giant prohead DNA packaging system that could potentially be used to clone even a megabase size DNA; and development of techniques to rapidly map the cloned DNA inserts.

  19. In vitro synthesis of large peptide molecules using glucosylated single-stranded bacteriophage T4D DNA template.

    PubMed Central

    Hulen, C; Legault-Demare, J

    1975-01-01

    Denatured Bacteriophage T4D DNA is able to stimulate aminoacid incorporation into TCA-precipitable material in an in vitro protein synthesis system according to base DNA sequences. Newly synthesized polypeptides remain associated with ribosomes and have a molecular weight in range of 15,000 to 45,000 Daltons. PMID:1052527

  20. Structure-Function Analysis of the DNA Translocating Portal of the Bacteriophage T4 Packaging Machine

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Sanchez, Victor; Gao, Song; Kim, Hyung Rae; Kihara, Daisuke; Sun, Lei; Rossmann, Michael G.; Rao, Venigalla B.

    2013-01-01

    Tailed bacteriophages and herpesviruses consist of a structurally well conserved dodecameric portal at a special five-fold vertex of the capsid. The portal plays critical roles in head assembly, genome packaging, neck/tail attachment, and genome ejection. Although the structures of portals from phages φ29, SPP1 and P22 have been determined, their mechanistic roles have not been well understood. Structural analysis of phage T4 portal (gp20) has been hampered because of its unusual interaction with the E. coli inner membrane. Here, we predict atomic models for the T4 portal monomer and dodecamer, and fit the dodecamer into the cryoEM density of the phage portal vertex. The core structure, like that from other phages, is cone-shaped with the wider end containing the “wing” and “crown” domains inside the phage head. A long “stem” encloses a central channel, and a narrow “stalk” protrudes outside the capsid. A biochemical approach was developed to analyze portal function by incorporating plasmid-expressed portal protein into phage heads and determining the effect of mutations on head assembly, DNA translocation, and virion production. We found that the protruding loops of the stalk domain are involved in assembling the DNA packaging motor. A loop that connects the stalk to the channel might be required for communication between the motor and portal. The “tunnel” loops that project into the channel are essential for sealing the packaged head. These studies established that the portal is required throughout the DNA packaging process, with different domains participating at different stages of genome packaging. PMID:24126213

  1. Structure-function analysis of the DNA translocating portal of the bacteriophage T4 packaging machine.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Sanchez, Victor; Gao, Song; Kim, Hyung Rae; Kihara, Daisuke; Sun, Lei; Rossmann, Michael G; Rao, Venigalla B

    2014-03-01

    Tailed bacteriophages and herpesviruses consist of a structurally well conserved dodecameric portal at a special 5-fold vertex of the capsid. The portal plays critical roles in head assembly, genome packaging, neck/tail attachment, and genome ejection. Although the structures of portals from phages φ29, SPP1, and P22 have been determined, their mechanistic roles have not been well understood. Structural analysis of phage T4 portal (gp20) has been hampered because of its unusual interaction with the Escherichia coli inner membrane. Here, we predict atomic models for the T4 portal monomer and dodecamer, and we fit the dodecamer into the cryo-electron microscopy density of the phage portal vertex. The core structure, like that from other phages, is cone shaped with the wider end containing the "wing" and "crown" domains inside the phage head. A long "stem" encloses a central channel, and a narrow "stalk" protrudes outside the capsid. A biochemical approach was developed to analyze portal function by incorporating plasmid-expressed portal protein into phage heads and determining the effect of mutations on head assembly, DNA translocation, and virion production. We found that the protruding loops of the stalk domain are involved in assembling the DNA packaging motor. A loop that connects the stalk to the channel might be required for communication between the motor and the portal. The "tunnel" loops that project into the channel are essential for sealing the packaged head. These studies established that the portal is required throughout the DNA packaging process, with different domains participating at different stages of genome packaging. PMID:24126213

  2. Exclusion of small terminase mediated DNA threading models for genome packaging in bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Zhang, Liang; Rao, Venigalla B

    2016-05-19

    Tailed bacteriophages and herpes viruses use powerful molecular machines to package their genomes. The packaging machine consists of three components: portal, motor (large terminase; TerL) and regulator (small terminase; TerS). Portal, a dodecamer, and motor, a pentamer, form two concentric rings at the special five-fold vertex of the icosahedral capsid. Powered by ATPase, the motor ratchets DNA into the capsid through the portal channel. TerS is essential for packaging, particularly for genome recognition, but its mechanism is unknown and controversial. Structures of gear-shaped TerS rings inspired models that invoke DNA threading through the central channel. Here, we report that mutations of basic residues that line phage T4 TerS (gp16) channel do not disrupt DNA binding. Even deletion of the entire channel helix retained DNA binding and produced progeny phage in vivo On the other hand, large oligomers of TerS (11-mers/12-mers), but not small oligomers (trimers to hexamers), bind DNA. These results suggest that TerS oligomerization creates a large outer surface, which, but not the interior of the channel, is critical for function, probably to wrap viral genome around the ring during packaging initiation. Hence, models involving TerS-mediated DNA threading may be excluded as an essential mechanism for viral genome packaging. PMID:26984529

  3. Role of bacteriophage T4 baseplate in regulating assembly and infection

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Moh Lan; Klose, Thomas; Arisaka, Fumio; Speir, Jeffrey A.; Veesler, David; Fokine, Andrei; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophage T4 consists of a head for protecting its genome and a sheathed tail for inserting its genome into a host. The tail terminates with a multiprotein baseplate that changes its conformation from a “high-energy” dome-shaped to a “low-energy” star-shaped structure during infection. Although these two structures represent different minima in the total energy landscape of the baseplate assembly, as the dome-shaped structure readily changes to the star-shaped structure when the virus infects a host bacterium, the dome-shaped structure must have more energy than the star-shaped structure. Here we describe the electron microscopy structure of a 3.3-MDa in vitro-assembled star-shaped baseplate with a resolution of 3.8 Å. This structure, together with other genetic and structural data, shows why the high-energy baseplate is formed in the presence of the central hub and how the baseplate changes to the low-energy structure, via two steps during infection. Thus, the presence of the central hub is required to initiate the assembly of metastable, high-energy structures. If the high-energy structure is formed and stabilized faster than the low-energy structure, there will be insufficient components to assemble the low-energy structure. PMID:26929357

  4. Role of bacteriophage T4 baseplate in regulating assembly and infection.

    PubMed

    Yap, Moh Lan; Klose, Thomas; Arisaka, Fumio; Speir, Jeffrey A; Veesler, David; Fokine, Andrei; Rossmann, Michael G

    2016-03-01

    Bacteriophage T4 consists of a head for protecting its genome and a sheathed tail for inserting its genome into a host. The tail terminates with a multiprotein baseplate that changes its conformation from a "high-energy" dome-shaped to a "low-energy" star-shaped structure during infection. Although these two structures represent different minima in the total energy landscape of the baseplate assembly, as the dome-shaped structure readily changes to the star-shaped structure when the virus infects a host bacterium, the dome-shaped structure must have more energy than the star-shaped structure. Here we describe the electron microscopy structure of a 3.3-MDa in vitro-assembled star-shaped baseplate with a resolution of 3.8 Å. This structure, together with other genetic and structural data, shows why the high-energy baseplate is formed in the presence of the central hub and how the baseplate changes to the low-energy structure, via two steps during infection. Thus, the presence of the central hub is required to initiate the assembly of metastable, high-energy structures. If the high-energy structure is formed and stabilized faster than the low-energy structure, there will be insufficient components to assemble the low-energy structure. PMID:26929357

  5. Destabilization of Bacteriophage T4 Mrnas by a Mutation of Gene 61.5

    PubMed Central

    Kai, T.; Selick, H. E.; Yonesaki, T.

    1996-01-01

    We identified a novel gene of bacteriophage T4, gene 61.5, which appears to be involved in protein synthesis late in infection. Northern blot analysis revealed that a mutant of 61.5 accumulated truncated transcripts of representative late genes. Using a double mutant of genes 61.5 and 55, which prevents transcription of late genes, we demonstrate that even transcripts of middle genes, while full-length when initially expressed, are similarly truncated at later stages of infection. These results indicate that the abnormality in transcript length occurs late in infection, regardless of whether the transcript derives from a middle or a late gene. Primer-extension analysis revealed that the 5' ends of the late gene 23 transcripts that accumulated in gene 61.5 mutant-infected cells were located at internal discrete sites as well as at the expected transcription start site. Moreover, the decay rates of full-length transcripts from genes uvsY or 45 were more than twofold faster in the absence of a functional gene 61.5. These results suggest that mutation of gene 61.5 activates endonucleolytic cleavage of middle and late transcripts, probably by RNase M. PMID:8878669

  6. Exclusion of small terminase mediated DNA threading models for genome packaging in bacteriophage T4

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Song; Zhang, Liang; Rao, Venigalla B.

    2016-01-01

    Tailed bacteriophages and herpes viruses use powerful molecular machines to package their genomes. The packaging machine consists of three components: portal, motor (large terminase; TerL) and regulator (small terminase; TerS). Portal, a dodecamer, and motor, a pentamer, form two concentric rings at the special five-fold vertex of the icosahedral capsid. Powered by ATPase, the motor ratchets DNA into the capsid through the portal channel. TerS is essential for packaging, particularly for genome recognition, but its mechanism is unknown and controversial. Structures of gear-shaped TerS rings inspired models that invoke DNA threading through the central channel. Here, we report that mutations of basic residues that line phage T4 TerS (gp16) channel do not disrupt DNA binding. Even deletion of the entire channel helix retained DNA binding and produced progeny phage in vivo. On the other hand, large oligomers of TerS (11-mers/12-mers), but not small oligomers (trimers to hexamers), bind DNA. These results suggest that TerS oligomerization creates a large outer surface, which, but not the interior of the channel, is critical for function, probably to wrap viral genome around the ring during packaging initiation. Hence, models involving TerS-mediated DNA threading may be excluded as an essential mechanism for viral genome packaging. PMID:26984529

  7. Hydrogen Bonding of 1,2-Azaborines in the Binding Cavity of T4 Lysozyme Mutants: Structures and Thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyelee; Fischer, Marcus; Shoichet, Brian K; Liu, Shih-Yuan

    2016-09-21

    Protein crystallography and calorimetry were used to characterize the binding of 1,2-azaborines to model cavities in T4 lysozyme in direct comparison to their carbonaceous counterparts. In the apolar L99A cavity, affinity for Ab dropped only slightly versus benzene. In the cavity designed to accommodate a single hydrogen bond (L99A/M102Q), Gln102═O···H-N hydrogen bonding for Ab and BEtAb was observed in the crystallographic complexes. The strength of the hydrogen bonding was estimated as 0.94 and 0.64 kcal/mol for Ab and BEtAb, respectively. This work unambiguously demonstrates that 1,2-azaborines can be readily accommodated in classic aryl recognition pockets and establishes one of 1,2-azaborine's distinguishing features from its carbonaceous isostere benzene: its ability to serve as an NH hydrogen bond donor in a biological setting. PMID:27603116

  8. Bacteriophage T4 Infection of Stationary Phase E. coli: Life after Log from a Phage Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Daniel; El-Shibiny, Ayman; Hobbs, Zack; Porter, Jillian; Kutter, Elizabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    Virtually all studies of phage infections investigate bacteria growing exponentially in rich media. In nature, however, phages largely encounter non-growing cells. Bacteria entering stationary phase often activate well-studied stress defense mechanisms that drastically alter the cell, facilitating its long-term survival. An understanding of phage-host interactions in such conditions is of major importance from both an ecological and therapeutic standpoint. Here, we show that bacteriophage T4 can efficiently bind to, infect and kill E. coli in stationary phase, both in the presence and absence of a functional stationary-phase sigma factor, and explore the response of T4-infected stationary phase cells to the addition of fresh nutrients 5 or 24 h after that infection. An unexpected new mode of response has been identified. “Hibernation” mode is a persistent but reversible dormant state in which the infected cells make at least some phage enzymes, but halt phage development until appropriate nutrients become available before producing phage particles. Our evidence indicates that the block in hibernation mode occurs after the middle-mode stage of phage development; host DNA breakdown and the incorporation of the released nucleotides into phage DNA indicate that the enzymes of the nucleotide synthesizing complex, under middle-mode control, have been made and assembled into a functional state. Once fresh glucose and amino acids become available, the standard lytic infection process rapidly resumes and concentrations of up to 1011 progeny phage (an average of about 40 phage per initially present cell) are produced. All evidence is consistent with the hibernation-mode control point lying between middle mode and late mode T4 gene expression. We have also observed a “scavenger” response, where the infecting phage takes advantage of whatever few nutrients are available to produce small quantities of progeny within 2 to 5 h after infection. The scavenger response seems

  9. Bacteriophage T4 Infection of Stationary Phase E. coli: Life after Log from a Phage Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Daniel; El-Shibiny, Ayman; Hobbs, Zack; Porter, Jillian; Kutter, Elizabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    Virtually all studies of phage infections investigate bacteria growing exponentially in rich media. In nature, however, phages largely encounter non-growing cells. Bacteria entering stationary phase often activate well-studied stress defense mechanisms that drastically alter the cell, facilitating its long-term survival. An understanding of phage-host interactions in such conditions is of major importance from both an ecological and therapeutic standpoint. Here, we show that bacteriophage T4 can efficiently bind to, infect and kill E. coli in stationary phase, both in the presence and absence of a functional stationary-phase sigma factor, and explore the response of T4-infected stationary phase cells to the addition of fresh nutrients 5 or 24 h after that infection. An unexpected new mode of response has been identified. “Hibernation” mode is a persistent but reversible dormant state in which the infected cells make at least some phage enzymes, but halt phage development until appropriate nutrients become available before producing phage particles. Our evidence indicates that the block in hibernation mode occurs after the middle-mode stage of phage development; host DNA breakdown and the incorporation of the released nucleotides into phage DNA indicate that the enzymes of the nucleotide synthesizing complex, under middle-mode control, have been made and assembled into a functional state. Once fresh glucose and amino acids become available, the standard lytic infection process rapidly resumes and concentrations of up to 1011 progeny phage (an average of about 40 phage per initially present cell) are produced. All evidence is consistent with the hibernation-mode control point lying between middle mode and late mode T4 gene expression. We have also observed a “scavenger” response, where the infecting phage takes advantage of whatever few nutrients are available to produce small quantities of progeny within 2 to 5 h after infection. The scavenger response seems

  10. Bacteriophage T4 Infection of Stationary Phase E. coli: Life after Log from a Phage Perspective.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Daniel; El-Shibiny, Ayman; Hobbs, Zack; Porter, Jillian; Kutter, Elizabeth M

    2016-01-01

    Virtually all studies of phage infections investigate bacteria growing exponentially in rich media. In nature, however, phages largely encounter non-growing cells. Bacteria entering stationary phase often activate well-studied stress defense mechanisms that drastically alter the cell, facilitating its long-term survival. An understanding of phage-host interactions in such conditions is of major importance from both an ecological and therapeutic standpoint. Here, we show that bacteriophage T4 can efficiently bind to, infect and kill E. coli in stationary phase, both in the presence and absence of a functional stationary-phase sigma factor, and explore the response of T4-infected stationary phase cells to the addition of fresh nutrients 5 or 24 h after that infection. An unexpected new mode of response has been identified. "Hibernation" mode is a persistent but reversible dormant state in which the infected cells make at least some phage enzymes, but halt phage development until appropriate nutrients become available before producing phage particles. Our evidence indicates that the block in hibernation mode occurs after the middle-mode stage of phage development; host DNA breakdown and the incorporation of the released nucleotides into phage DNA indicate that the enzymes of the nucleotide synthesizing complex, under middle-mode control, have been made and assembled into a functional state. Once fresh glucose and amino acids become available, the standard lytic infection process rapidly resumes and concentrations of up to 10(11) progeny phage (an average of about 40 phage per initially present cell) are produced. All evidence is consistent with the hibernation-mode control point lying between middle mode and late mode T4 gene expression. We have also observed a "scavenger" response, where the infecting phage takes advantage of whatever few nutrients are available to produce small quantities of progeny within 2 to 5 h after infection. The scavenger response seems able

  11. Marker-Dependent Recombination in T4 Bacteriophage. IV. Recombinational Effects of Antimutator T4 DNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Shcherbakov, V. P.; Plugina, L. A.; Kudryashova, E. A.

    1995-01-01

    Recombinational effects of the antimutator allele tsL42 of gene 43 of phage T4, encoding DNA polymerase, were studied in crosses between rIIB mutants. Recombination under tsL42-restricted conditions differed from the normal one in several respects: (1) basic recombination was enhanced, especially within very short distances; (2) mismatch repair tracts were shortened, while the contribution of mismatch repair to recombination was not changed; (3) marker interference at very short distances was augmented. We infer that the T4 DNA polymerase is directly involved in mismatch repair, performing both excision of a nonmatched single strand (by its 3' -> 5' exonuclease) and filling the resulting gap. A pathway for the mismatch repair was substantiated; it includes sequential action of endo VII (gp49) -> 3'->5' exonuclease (gp43) -> DNA polymerase (gp43) -> DNA ligase (gp30). It is argued that the marker interference at very short distances may result from the same sequence of events during the final processing of recombinational intermediates. PMID:7635281

  12. Structure of the 3.3 MDa, in Vitro Assembled, Hubless Bacteriophage T4 Baseplate

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Moh Lan; Klose, Thomas; Plevka, Pavel; Aksyuk, Anastasia; Zhang, Xinzheng; Arisaka, Fumio; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    The bacteriophage T4 baseplate is the control center of the virus, where the recognition of an E. coli host by the long tail fibers is translated into a signal to initiate infection. The short tail fibers unfold from the baseplate for firm attachment to the host, followed by shrinkage of the tail sheath that causes the tail tube to enter and cross the periplasmic space ending with injection of the genome into the host. During this process, the 6.5 MDa baseplate changes its structure from a “dome” shape to a “star” shape. An in vitro assembled hubless baseplate has been crystalized. It consists of six copies of the recombinantly expressed trimeric gene product (gp) 10, monomeric gp7, dimeric gp8, dimeric gp6 and monomeric gp53. The diffraction pattern extends, at most, to 4.0 Å resolution. The known partial structures of gp10, gp8, and gp6 and their relative position in the baseplate derived from earlier electron microscopy studies were used for molecular replacement. An electron density map has been calculated based on molecular replacement, single isomorphous replacement with anomalous dispersion data and 2-fold non-crystallographic symmetry averaging between two baseplate wedges in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. The current electron density map indicates that there are structural changes in the gp6, gp8, and gp10 oligomers compared to their structures when separately crystallized. Additional density is also visible corresponding to gp7, gp53 and the unknown parts of gp10 and gp6. PMID:24998893

  13. A physical map of bacteriophage T4 including the positions of strong promoters and terminators recognized in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gram, H; Liebig, H D; Hack, A; Niggemann, E; Rüger, W

    1984-01-01

    We present a linearized physical map of the genome of bacteriophage T4. This map contains the cleavage sites for restriction enzymes SmaI, KpnI, SalI, BglII, XhoI, XbaI, ClaI , HaeII, EcoRI, and EcoRV . It also contains about 200 TaqI sites. The promoter sites recognized in vitro and a number of rho independent terminators have also been mapped.

  14. The ATP-activated hexameric helicase of bacteriophage T4 (gp41) forms a stable primosome with a single subunit of T4-coded primase (gp61).

    PubMed

    Dong, F; von Hippel, P H

    1996-08-01

    We have examined the formation of the primosome subassembly of the bacteriophage T4-coded DNA replication (elongation) complex from its helicase, primase, and DNA components. Previously, we had shown that the T4 helicase (gp41) exists in solution in a stable monomer left and right arrow dimer equilibrium at physiological protein (and salt) concentrations and forms a hexamer upon activation by ATP (or GTP) binding (Dong, F., Gogol, E. P., and von Hippel, P. H.(1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 7462-7473). Here we report that the T4 primase (gp61) is a monomer in solution under the same conditions, and that the ATP-activated helicase binds to a single gp61 primase molecule on appropriate DNA templates to reconstitute a stable primosome. We show that: (i) the gp41 helicase alone does not form a stable complex with DNA templates, although this helicase by itself can carry out moderately processive ATP-driven translocation along single-stranded DNA (Young, M. C., Schultz, D. E., Ring, D., and von Hippel, P. H.(1994) J. Mol. Biol. 235, 1447-1458); (ii) the primase alone does form a stable complex with DNA; (iii) the helicase can bind to the primase-DNA complex in the presence of ATP or GTP to form a stable ternary complex; (iv) this complex consists of six helicase subunits and one primase subunit; and (v) the reconstituted primosome is stable for at least 10 to 20 min after NTP cleavage and dissociation of the hydrolysis products. These results strongly suggest that the functional T4 DNA replication primosome consists of an integrated 6:1 helicase-primase complex bound to DNA, and that the ATP-activated helicase hexamer remains intact throughout the processive DNA replication process. PMID:8702659

  15. Cryo-EM structure of the bacteriophage T4 portal protein assembly at near-atomic resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lei; Zhang, Xinzheng; Gao, Song; Rao, Prashant A.; Padilla-Sanchez, Victor; Chen, Zhenguo; Sun, Siyang; Xiang, Ye; Subramaniam, Sriram; Rao, Venigalla B.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2015-07-01

    The structure and assembly of bacteriophage T4 has been extensively studied. However, the detailed structure of the portal protein remained unknown. Here we report the structure of the bacteriophage T4 portal assembly, gene product 20 (gp20), determined by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to 3.6 Å resolution. In addition, analysis of a 10 Å resolution cryo-EM map of an empty prolate T4 head shows how the dodecameric portal assembly interacts with the capsid protein gp23 at the special pentameric vertex. The gp20 structure also verifies that the portal assembly is required for initiating head assembly, for attachment of the packaging motor, and for participation in DNA packaging. Comparison of the Myoviridae T4 portal structure with the known portal structures of φ29, SPP1 and P22, representing Podo- and Siphoviridae, shows that the portal structure probably dates back to a time when self-replicating microorganisms were being established on Earth.

  16. Cryo-EM structure of the bacteriophage T4 portal protein assembly at near-atomic resolution

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lei; Zhang, Xinzheng; Gao, Song; Rao, Prashant A.; Padilla-Sanchez, Victor; Chen, Zhenguo; Sun, Siyang; Xiang, Ye; Subramaniam, Sriram; Rao, Venigalla B.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    The structure and assembly of bacteriophage T4 has been extensively studied. However, the detailed structure of the portal protein remained unknown. Here we report the structure of the bacteriophage T4 portal assembly, gene product 20 (gp20), determined by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to 3.6 Å resolution. In addition, analysis of a 10 Å resolution cryo-EM map of an empty prolate T4 head shows how the dodecameric portal assembly interacts with the capsid protein gp23 at the special pentameric vertex. The gp20 structure also verifies that the portal assembly is required for initiating head assembly, for attachment of the packaging motor, and for participation in DNA packaging. Comparison of the Myoviridae T4 portal structure with the known portal structures of φ29, SPP1 and P22, representing Podo- and Siphoviridae, shows that the portal structure probably dates back to a time when self-replicating microorganisms were being established on Earth. PMID:26144253

  17. Cryo-EM structure of the bacteriophage T4 portal protein assembly at near-atomic resolution.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lei; Zhang, Xinzheng; Gao, Song; Rao, Prashant A; Padilla-Sanchez, Victor; Chen, Zhenguo; Sun, Siyang; Xiang, Ye; Subramaniam, Sriram; Rao, Venigalla B; Rossmann, Michael G

    2015-07-06

    The structure and assembly of bacteriophage T4 has been extensively studied. However, the detailed structure of the portal protein remained unknown. Here we report the structure of the bacteriophage T4 portal assembly, gene product 20 (gp20), determined by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to 3.6 Å resolution. In addition, analysis of a 10 Å resolution cryo-EM map of an empty prolate T4 head shows how the dodecameric portal assembly interacts with the capsid protein gp23 at the special pentameric vertex. The gp20 structure also verifies that the portal assembly is required for initiating head assembly, for attachment of the packaging motor, and for participation in DNA packaging. Comparison of the Myoviridae T4 portal structure with the known portal structures of φ29, SPP1 and P22, representing Podo- and Siphoviridae, shows that the portal structure probably dates back to a time when self-replicating microorganisms were being established on Earth.

  18. The Effects of T4 and A3/R Bacteriophages on Differentiation of Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Bocian, Katarzyna; Borysowski, Jan; Zarzycki, Michał; Pacek, Magdalena; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Machcińska, Maja; Korczak-Kowalska, Grażyna; Górski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) are viruses of bacteria. Here we evaluated the effects of T4 and A3/R bacteriophages, as well as phage-generated bacterial lysates, on differentiation of human myeloid dendritic cells (DCs) from monocytes. Neither of the phages significantly reduced the expression of markers associated with differentiation of DCs and their role in the activation of T cells (CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86, CD1c, CD11c, MHC II, PD-L1, PD-L2, TLR2, TLR4, and CCR7) and phagocytosis receptors (CD64 and DEC-205). By contrast, bacterial lysate of T4 phage significantly decreased the percentages of DEC-205- and CD1c-positive cells. The percentage of DEC-205-positive cells was also significantly reduced in DCs differentiated in the presence of lysate of A3/R phage. Thus while bacteriophages do not substantially affect differentiation of DCs, some products of phage-induced lysis of bacterial cells may influence the differentiation and potentially also some functions of DCs. Our results have important implications for phage therapy of bacterial infections because during infections monocytes recruited to the site of inflammation are an important source of inflammatory DCs. PMID:27582733

  19. The Effects of T4 and A3/R Bacteriophages on Differentiation of Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bocian, Katarzyna; Borysowski, Jan; Zarzycki, Michał; Pacek, Magdalena; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Machcińska, Maja; Korczak-Kowalska, Grażyna; Górski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) are viruses of bacteria. Here we evaluated the effects of T4 and A3/R bacteriophages, as well as phage-generated bacterial lysates, on differentiation of human myeloid dendritic cells (DCs) from monocytes. Neither of the phages significantly reduced the expression of markers associated with differentiation of DCs and their role in the activation of T cells (CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86, CD1c, CD11c, MHC II, PD-L1, PD-L2, TLR2, TLR4, and CCR7) and phagocytosis receptors (CD64 and DEC-205). By contrast, bacterial lysate of T4 phage significantly decreased the percentages of DEC-205- and CD1c-positive cells. The percentage of DEC-205-positive cells was also significantly reduced in DCs differentiated in the presence of lysate of A3/R phage. Thus while bacteriophages do not substantially affect differentiation of DCs, some products of phage-induced lysis of bacterial cells may influence the differentiation and potentially also some functions of DCs. Our results have important implications for phage therapy of bacterial infections because during infections monocytes recruited to the site of inflammation are an important source of inflammatory DCs. PMID:27582733

  20. The Effects of T4 and A3/R Bacteriophages on Differentiation of Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Bocian, Katarzyna; Borysowski, Jan; Zarzycki, Michał; Pacek, Magdalena; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Machcińska, Maja; Korczak-Kowalska, Grażyna; Górski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) are viruses of bacteria. Here we evaluated the effects of T4 and A3/R bacteriophages, as well as phage-generated bacterial lysates, on differentiation of human myeloid dendritic cells (DCs) from monocytes. Neither of the phages significantly reduced the expression of markers associated with differentiation of DCs and their role in the activation of T cells (CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86, CD1c, CD11c, MHC II, PD-L1, PD-L2, TLR2, TLR4, and CCR7) and phagocytosis receptors (CD64 and DEC-205). By contrast, bacterial lysate of T4 phage significantly decreased the percentages of DEC-205- and CD1c-positive cells. The percentage of DEC-205-positive cells was also significantly reduced in DCs differentiated in the presence of lysate of A3/R phage. Thus while bacteriophages do not substantially affect differentiation of DCs, some products of phage-induced lysis of bacterial cells may influence the differentiation and potentially also some functions of DCs. Our results have important implications for phage therapy of bacterial infections because during infections monocytes recruited to the site of inflammation are an important source of inflammatory DCs.

  1. Genetic effects of cosmic radiation on bacteriophage T4Br+ (on materials of biological experiment "Soyuz-Apollo").

    PubMed

    Yurov, S S; Akoev, I G; Akhmadieva, A K; Livanova, I A; Leont'eva, G A; Marennyi, A M; Popov, V I

    1979-01-01

    During the experiment "Spore-ring Forming Fungi Biorhythm" of the Apollo-Soyuz test project the Rhythm-1 apparatus contained a dried film culture of bacteriophage T4Br+, growing cultures of Actinomyces and plastic nuclear particle detectors. The following were studied: the frequency of induction of r mutations in the bacteriophage film per 2 X 10(4) surviving particles, the spectrum of mutant types obtained (rI, rII, rIII), and the possible molecular mechanisms for the occurrence of rII mutants with due regard to the registered tracks of heavy nuclear particles. The studies showed that the local radiation due to heavy nuclear particle tracks plays a major role in space radiation damage.

  2. Genetic effects of cosmic radiation on bacteriophage T4Br+ (on materials of biological experiment "Soyuz-Apollo").

    PubMed

    Yurov, S S; Akoev, I G; Akhmadieva, A K; Livanova, I A; Leont'eva, G A; Marennyi, A M; Popov, V I

    1979-01-01

    During the experiment "Spore-ring Forming Fungi Biorhythm" of the Apollo-Soyuz test project the Rhythm-1 apparatus contained a dried film culture of bacteriophage T4Br+, growing cultures of Actinomyces and plastic nuclear particle detectors. The following were studied: the frequency of induction of r mutations in the bacteriophage film per 2 X 10(4) surviving particles, the spectrum of mutant types obtained (rI, rII, rIII), and the possible molecular mechanisms for the occurrence of rII mutants with due regard to the registered tracks of heavy nuclear particles. The studies showed that the local radiation due to heavy nuclear particle tracks plays a major role in space radiation damage. PMID:12008698

  3. Use of stabilizing mutations to engineer a charged group within a ligand-binding hydrophobic cavity in T4 lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lijun; Baase, Walter A; Michael, Miya M; Matthews, Brian W

    2009-09-22

    Both large-to-small and nonpolar-to-polar mutations in the hydrophobic core of T4 lysozyme cause significant loss in stability. By including supplementary stabilizing mutations we constructed a variant that combines the cavity-creating substitution Leu99 --> Ala with the buried charge mutant Met102 --> Glu. Crystal structure determination confirmed that this variant has a large cavity with the side chain of Glu102 located within the cavity wall. The cavity includes a large disk-shaped region plus a bulge. The disk-like region is essentially nonpolar, similar to L99A, while the Glu102 substituent is located in the vicinity of the bulge. Three ordered water molecules bind within this part of the cavity and appear to stabilize the conformation of Glu102. Glu102 has an estimated pKa of about 5.5-6.5, suggesting that it is at least partially charged in the crystal structure. The polar ligands pyridine, phenol and aniline bind within the cavity, and crystal structures of the complexes show one or two water molecules to be retained. Nonpolar ligands of appropriate shape can also bind in the cavity and in some cases exclude all three water molecules. This disrupts the hydrogen-bond network and causes the Glu102 side chain to move away from the ligand by up to 0.8 A where it remains buried in a completely nonpolar environment. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that the binding of these compounds stabilizes the protein by 4-6 kcal/mol. For both polar and nonpolar ligands the binding is enthalpically driven. Large negative changes in entropy adversely balance the binding of the polar ligands, whereas entropy has little effect on the nonpolar ligand binding.

  4. Discovery and characterization of a thermostable bacteriophage RNA ligase homologous to T4 RNA ligase 1.

    PubMed

    Blondal, Thorarinn; Hjorleifsdottir, Sigridur H; Fridjonsson, Olafur F; Aevarsson, Arnthor; Skirnisdottir, Sigurlaug; Hermannsdottir, Anna Gudny; Hreggvidsson, Gudmundur O; Smith, Albert Vernon; Kristjansson, Jakob K

    2003-12-15

    Thermophilic viruses represent a novel source of genetic material and enzymes with great potential for use in biotechnology. We have isolated a number of thermophilic viruses from geothermal areas in Iceland, and by combining high throughput genome sequencing and state of the art bioinformatics we have identified a number of genes with potential use in biotechnology. We have also demonstrated the existence of thermostable counterparts of previously known bacteriophage enzymes. Here we describe a thermostable RNA ligase 1 from the thermophilic bacteriophage RM378 that infects the thermophilic eubacterium Rhodothermus marinus. The RM378 RNA ligase 1 has a temperature optimum of 60-64 degrees C and it ligates both RNA and single-stranded DNA. Its thermostability and ability to work under conditions of high temperature where nucleic acid secondary structures are removed makes it an ideal enzyme for RNA ligase-mediated rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RLM-RACE), and other RNA and DNA ligation applications.

  5. Structure of the Three N-Terminal Immunoglobulin Domains of the Highly Immunogenic Outer Capsid Protein from a T4-Like Bacteriophage

    SciTech Connect

    Fokine, Andrei; Islam, Mohammad Z.; Zhang, Zhihong; Bowman, Valorie D.; Rao, Venigalla B.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2011-09-16

    The head of bacteriophage T4 is decorated with 155 copies of the highly antigenic outer capsid protein (Hoc). One Hoc molecule binds near the center of each hexameric capsomer. Hoc is dispensable for capsid assembly and has been used to display pathogenic antigens on the surface of T4. Here we report the crystal structure of a protein containing the first three of four domains of Hoc from bacteriophage RB49, a close relative of T4. The structure shows an approximately linear arrangement of the protein domains. Each of these domains has an immunoglobulin-like fold, frequently found in cell attachment molecules. In addition, we report biochemical data suggesting that Hoc can bind to Escherichia coli, supporting the hypothesis that Hoc could attach the phage capsids to bacterial surfaces and perhaps also to other organisms. The capacity for such reversible adhesion probably provides survival advantages to the bacteriophage.

  6. A mutation in ribosomal protein L9 affects ribosomal hopping during translation of gene 60 from bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, K L; Nichols, L M; Gesteland, R F; Weiss, R B

    1994-01-01

    Ribosomes hop over a 50-nt coding gap during translation of gene 60 mRNA from bacteriophage T4. This event occurs with near-unitary efficiency when gene 60-lacZ fusions are expressed in Escherichia coli. One of the components necessary for this hop is an RNA hairpin structure containing the 5' junction of the 50-nt coding gap. A mutant E. coli was isolated and found to significantly increase hopping when carrying gene 60-lacZ constructs with altered hairpins. The mutation, hop-1, changed Ser93 to Phe in rplI, the gene coding for ribosomal large-subunit protein L9. Ribosomal hopping on a synthetic sequence in the absence of a hairpin was also increased by this mutation. These data suggest that hop-1 may substitute for the function of the hairpin during ribosomal hopping. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:7809071

  7. Crystallization of the carboxy-terminal region of the bacteriophage T4 proximal long tail fibre protein gp34.

    PubMed

    Granell, Meritxell; Namura, Mikiyoshi; Alvira, Sara; Garcia-Doval, Carmela; Singh, Abhimanyu K; Gutsche, Irina; van Raaij, Mark J; Kanamaru, Shuji

    2014-07-01

    The phage-proximal part of the long tail fibres of bacteriophage T4 consists of a trimer of the 1289 amino-acid gene product 34 (gp34). Different carboxy-terminal parts of gp34 have been produced and crystallized. Crystals of gp34(726-1289) diffracting X-rays to 2.9 Å resolution, crystals of gp34(781-1289) diffracting to 1.9 Å resolution and crystals of gp34(894-1289) diffracting to 3.0 and 2.0 Å resolution and belonging to different crystal forms were obtained. Native data were collected for gp34(726-1289) and gp34(894-1289), while single-wavelength anomalous diffraction data were collected for selenomethionine-containing gp34(781-1289) and gp34(894-1289). For the latter, high-quality anomalous signal was obtained.

  8. Structure and function of the small terminase component of the DNA packaging machine in T4-like bacteriophages

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Siyang; Gao, Song; Kondabagil, Kiran; Xiang, Ye; Rossmann, Michael G.; Rao, Venigalla B.

    2012-04-04

    Tailed DNA bacteriophages assemble empty procapsids that are subsequently filled with the viral genome by means of a DNA packaging machine situated at a special fivefold vertex. The packaging machine consists of a 'small terminase' and a 'large terminase' component. One of the functions of the small terminase is to initiate packaging of the viral genome, whereas the large terminase is responsible for the ATP-powered translocation of DNA. The small terminase subunit has three domains, an N-terminal DNA-binding domain, a central oligomerization domain, and a C-terminal domain for interacting with the large terminase. Here we report structures of the central domain in two different oligomerization states for a small terminase from the T4 family of phages. In addition, we report biochemical studies that establish the function for each of the small terminase domains. On the basis of the structural and biochemical information, we propose a model for DNA packaging initiation.

  9. The Riia Gene of Bacteriophage T4. II. Regulation of Its Messenger RNA Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Daegelen, P.; Brody, E.

    1990-01-01

    When the rII genes are first introduced into cells which had been previously infected by T4 phage deleted for these genes, the kinetics of synthesis of rIIA and rIIB RNA are rapid and identical. We show that this rapid synthesis depends on a functional motA gene for rIIB, but not for rIIA, RNA synthesis. By primer-extension mapping of T4 messenger RNA, we find three promoters close to the rIIA gene. One of them is an early promoter just before the rIIA.1 gene; it is used under all conditions tested. Another is in the coding portion of the rIIA.1 gene; it is weak, primarily because of a 19-bp spacing between the -10 and -35 elements, and its use is stimulated by T4 functions. The third is a motA-dependent (middle) promoter which has an unusual CCCGCTT box at -33. We present results which suggest that none of these promoters is likely to be the site at which the motB and motC gene products exercise their major influence on rIIA RNA synthesis. PMID:2379818

  10. Suppressors of Mutations in the rII Gene of Bacteriophage T4 Affect Promoter Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Dwight H.; Snyder, Ronald D.

    1981-01-01

    Homyk, Rodriguez and Weil (1976) have described T4 mutants, called sip, that partially suppress the inability of T4rII mutants to grow in λ lysogens. We have found that mutants sip1 and sip2 are resistant to folate analogs and overproduce FH2 reductase. The results of recombination and complementation studies indicate that sip mutations are in the mot gene. Like other mot mutations (Mattson, Richardson and Goodin 1974; Chace and Hall 1975; Sauerbier, Hercules and Hall 1976), the sip2 mutation affects the expression of many genes and appears to affect promoter utilization. The mot gene function is not required for T4 growth on most hosts, but we have found that it is required for good growth on E. coli CTr5X. Homyk, Rodriguez and Weil (1976) also described L mutations that reverse the effects of sip mutations. L2 decreases the folate analog resistance and the inability of sip2 to grow on CTr5X. L2 itself is partially resistant to a folate analog, and appears to reverse the effects of sip2 on gene expression. These results suggest that L2 affects another regulatory gene related to the mot gene. PMID:7262547

  11. Assembly of the bacteriophage T4 replication machine requires the acidic carboxy terminus of gene 32 protein.

    PubMed

    Hurley, J M; Chervitz, S A; Jarvis, T C; Singer, B S; Gold, L

    1993-01-20

    The acidic carboxy-terminal 89-amino acid fragment of bacteriophage T4 gene 32 protein was expressed in Escherichia coli to high levels from an inducible plasmid construct. Infection of induced cells by wild-type T4 phage results in impaired phage DNA synthesis. The time at which DNA synthesis begins and the diminution in DNA synthesis rates correlate with the amount of carboxy-terminal peptide that accumulates intracellularly prior to infection. Correspondingly, when induced cells are infected with viable phage containing a small deletion near the carboxy-terminus of 32 protein (delta PR201), the inhibition of phage DNA synthesis was much more severe. The mutant 32 protein competes less well against overproduced wild-type acid peptide than does wild-type 32 protein. The purified acid peptide, when used as the attached ligand for affinity chromatography, binds several T4 proteins from phage-infected cells, including 43 protein (T4 DNA polymerase), Dda protein (a DNA helicase), and UvsX protein (a Rec-like recombination protein). Furthermore, at 50- to 100-fold molar excess of acid peptide over intact 32 protein, phage DNA synthesis was specifically inhibited at the initiation step in an in vitro 5-protein DNA replication experiment. We propose that one or more phage replication proteins are titrated as non-productive protein-protein complexes at a site away from the DNA template. This implies that the carboxy-terminal domain of 32 protein is involved in an obligate step of replication machine assembly when the protein is properly attached to ssDNA in the vicinity of a primer-template junction. The assembly defect we observe is strikingly similar to the repression, or "squelching", of the activity of certain eukaryotic transcriptional activators. PMID:8429554

  12. Highly Effective Soluble and Bacteriophage T4 Nanoparticle Plague Vaccines Against Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Tao, Pan; Mahalingam, Marthandan; Rao, Venigalla B

    2016-01-01

    Plague caused by Yersinia pestis is an ancient disease, responsible for millions of deaths in human history. Unfortunately, there is no FDA-approved vaccine available. Recombinant subunit vaccines based on two major antigens, Caf 1 (F1) and LcrV (V), have been under investigation and showed promise. However, there are two main problems associated with these vaccines. First, the Yersinia capsular protein F1 has high propensity to aggregate, particularly when expressed in heterologous systems such as Escherichia coli, thus affecting vaccine quality and efficacy. Second, the subunit vaccines do not induce adequate cell-mediated immune responses that also appear to be essential for optimal protection against plague. We have developed two basic approaches, structure-based immunogen design and phage T4 nanoparticle delivery, to construct new plague vaccines that may overcome these problems. First, by engineering F1 protein, we generated a monomeric and soluble F1V mutant (F1mutV) which has similar immunogenicity as wild-type F1V. The NH2-terminal β-strand of F1 was transplanted to the COOH-terminus and the sequence flanking the β-strand was duplicated to retain a key CD4(+) T cell epitope. Second, we generated a nanoparticle plague vaccine that can induce balanced antibody- and cell-mediated immune responses. This was done by arraying the F1mutV on phage T4 via the small outer capsid (Soc) protein which binds to T4 capsid at nanomolar affinity. Preparation of these vaccines is described in detail and we hope that these would be considered as candidates for licensing a next-generation plague vaccine. PMID:27076150

  13. Highly Effective Soluble and Bacteriophage T4 Nanoparticle Plague Vaccines Against Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Tao, Pan; Mahalingam, Marthandan; Rao, Venigalla B

    2016-01-01

    Plague caused by Yersinia pestis is an ancient disease, responsible for millions of deaths in human history. Unfortunately, there is no FDA-approved vaccine available. Recombinant subunit vaccines based on two major antigens, Caf 1 (F1) and LcrV (V), have been under investigation and showed promise. However, there are two main problems associated with these vaccines. First, the Yersinia capsular protein F1 has high propensity to aggregate, particularly when expressed in heterologous systems such as Escherichia coli, thus affecting vaccine quality and efficacy. Second, the subunit vaccines do not induce adequate cell-mediated immune responses that also appear to be essential for optimal protection against plague. We have developed two basic approaches, structure-based immunogen design and phage T4 nanoparticle delivery, to construct new plague vaccines that may overcome these problems. First, by engineering F1 protein, we generated a monomeric and soluble F1V mutant (F1mutV) which has similar immunogenicity as wild-type F1V. The NH2-terminal β-strand of F1 was transplanted to the COOH-terminus and the sequence flanking the β-strand was duplicated to retain a key CD4(+) T cell epitope. Second, we generated a nanoparticle plague vaccine that can induce balanced antibody- and cell-mediated immune responses. This was done by arraying the F1mutV on phage T4 via the small outer capsid (Soc) protein which binds to T4 capsid at nanomolar affinity. Preparation of these vaccines is described in detail and we hope that these would be considered as candidates for licensing a next-generation plague vaccine.

  14. Destabilizing effect of proline substitutions in two helical regions of T4 lysozyme: leucine 66 to proline and leucine 91 to proline.

    PubMed

    Gray, T M; Arnoys, E J; Blankespoor, S; Born, T; Jagar, R; Everman, R; Plowman, D; Stair, A; Zhang, D

    1996-04-01

    A class of temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants of T4 lysozyme with reduced activity at 30 degrees C and no activity at 43 degrees C has been selected. These mutants, designated "tight" ts mutants, differ from most other T4 lysozyme mutants that are active at 43 degrees C, but only manifest their ts lesion by a reduced halo size around phage plaques after exposure of the growth plates to chloroform vapors. For example, in the series of T4 lysozyme mutants at position 157, the original randomly selected mutant, T1571, is the least stable of the series, yet, apart from the halo assay and subsequent in vitro protein stability measurements, this mutant is indistinguishable from wild type (WT) even at 43 degrees C. Two mutants were identified: L91P and L66P. Both insert proline residues into alpha-helical regions of the WT protein structure. The stabilities (delta delta G) as determined by urea denaturation are 8.2 kcal/mol for L91P and 7.1 kcal/mol for L66P. CD spectra indicate that no major conformational changes have occurred in the mutant structures. The structures of the mutants were modeled with a 40-ps molecular dynamics simulation using explicit solvent. For L91P, the reduction of stability appears to be due to an unsatisfied hydrogen bond in the alpha-helix and to a new buried cavity. For L66P, the reduction of stability appears to be due to a disruption of the interdomain alpha-helix, at least two unsatisfied hydrogen bonds, and a newly formed solvent-filled pocket that protrudes into the hydrophobic core, possibly reducing the stabilizing contribution of a partially buried intrachain salt bridge.

  15. Structure and Biophysical Properties of a Triple-Stranded Beta-Helix Comprising the Central Spike of Bacteriophage T4

    PubMed Central

    Buth, Sergey A.; Menin, Laure; Shneider, Mikhail M.; Engel, Jürgen; Boudko, Sergei P.; Leiman, Petr G.

    2015-01-01

    Gene product 5 (gp5) of bacteriophage T4 is a spike-shaped protein that functions to disrupt the membrane of the target cell during phage infection. Its C-terminal domain is a long and slender β-helix that is formed by three polypeptide chains wrapped around a common symmetry axis akin to three interdigitated corkscrews. The folding and biophysical properties of such triple-stranded β-helices, which are topologically related to amyloid fibers, represent an unsolved biophysical problem. Here, we report structural and biophysical characterization of T4 gp5 β-helix and its truncated mutants of different lengths. A soluble fragment that forms a dimer of trimers and that could comprise a minimal self-folding unit has been identified. Surprisingly, the hydrophobic core of the β-helix is small. It is located near the C-terminal end of the β-helix and contains a centrally positioned and hydrated magnesium ion. A large part of the β-helix interior comprises a large elongated cavity that binds palmitic, stearic, and oleic acids in an extended conformation suggesting that these molecules might participate in the folding of the complete β-helix. PMID:26295253

  16. Interaction of bacteriophage T4 and T7 single-stranded DNA-binding proteins with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri, Leila; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark C.

    2009-06-01

    Bacteriophages T4 and T7 are well-studied model replication systems, which have allowed researchers to determine the roles of many proteins central to DNA replication, recombination and repair. Here we summarize and discuss the results from two recently developed single-molecule methods to determine the salt-dependent DNA-binding kinetics and thermodynamics of the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding proteins (SSBs) from these systems. We use these methods to characterize both the equilibrium double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and ssDNA binding of the SSBs T4 gene 32 protein (gp32) and T7 gene 2.5 protein (gp2.5). Despite the overall two-orders-of-magnitude weaker binding of gp2.5 to both forms of DNA, we find that both proteins exhibit four-orders-of-magnitude preferential binding to ssDNA relative to dsDNA. This strong preferential ssDNA binding as well as the weak dsDNA binding is essential for the ability of both proteins to search dsDNA in one dimension to find available ssDNA-binding sites at the replication fork.

  17. Imbalanced deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate pools and spontaneous mutation rates determined during dCMP deaminase-defective bacteriophage T4 infections.

    PubMed

    Sargent, R G; Mathews, C K

    1987-04-25

    DNA precursor imbalances are known to be mutagenic in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic systems. Almost certainly, such mutagenesis involves competition between correctly and incorrectly base-paired precursors at replication sites. Since other factors may be involved, it is important to identify specific mutations induced by specific pool imbalances. Using bacteriophage T4, we have developed a system for such analysis. We prepare double mutants of T4; one mutation affects a phage-coded enzyme of deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) metabolism, while the second is an rII mutation known to revert along a specific pathway. We determine dNTP pools in infection by such a mutant and measure both the spontaneous reversion rate of the rII mutation and, in some cases, the nucleotide sequence at the mutant site. In this paper we analyze mutations induced by a deficiency of T4-encoded deoxycytidylate deaminase. This causes pools of 5-hydroxymethyl-dCTP to expand some 30-fold, while dTTP pools contract. This specifically stimulates AT-to-GC reversion. One of the four AT-to-GC reverters tested, rIIUV215, increases its reversion rate at least 1000-fold under these pool-imbalance conditions, while the other mutants tested show increases of only about 10-fold. Therefore, factors other than dNTP competition, including local DNA sequence environment, must be invoked to fully explain mechanisms of dNTP pool imbalance-induced mutagenesis. We discuss models for this, and we also report unexpected effects of the dCMP deaminase deficiency upon pools of ribonucleoside triphosphates. PMID:3553179

  18. Cryoelectron Microscopy Analysis of Small Heat Shock Protein 16.5 (Hsp16.5) Complexes with T4 Lysozyme Reveals the Structural Basis of Multimode Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jian; Koteiche, Hanane A.; McDonald, Ezelle T.; Fox, Tara L.; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Mchaourab, Hassane S.

    2013-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) are ubiquitous chaperones that bind and sequester non-native proteins preventing their aggregation. Despite extensive studies of sHSPs chaperone activity, the location of the bound substrate within the sHSP oligomer has not been determined. In this paper, we used cryoelectron microscopy (cryoEM) to visualize destabilized mutants of T4 lysozyme (T4L) bound to engineered variants of the small heat shock protein Hsp16.5. In contrast to wild type Hsp16.5, binding of T4L to these variants does not induce oligomer heterogeneity enabling cryoEM analysis of the complexes. CryoEM image reconstruction reveals the sequestration of T4L in the interior of the Hsp16.5 oligomer primarily interacting with the buried N-terminal domain but also tethered by contacts with the α-crystallin domain shell. Analysis of Hsp16.5-WT/T4L complexes uncovers oligomer expansion as a requirement for high affinity binding. In contrast, a low affinity mode of binding is found to involve T4L binding on the outer surface of the oligomer bridging the formation of large complexes of Hsp16.5. These mechanistic principles were validated by cryoEM analysis of an expanded variant of Hsp16.5 in complex with T4L and Hsp16.5-R107G, which is equivalent to a mutant of human αB-crystallin linked to cardiomyopathy. In both cases, high affinity binding is found to involve conformational changes in the N-terminal region consistent with a central role of this region in substrate recognition. PMID:23277356

  19. Autogenous Regulation of the Rega Gene of Bacteriophage T4: Derepression of Translation

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Y.; Wei, R.; Hsu, T.; Alford, C.; Dawson, M.; Karam, J.

    1988-01-01

    The regA gene of phage T4 encodes a translational repressor that inhibits utilization of its own mRNA as well as the translation of a number of other phage-induced mRNAs. In recombinant plasmids, autogenous translational repression limits production of the RegA protein when the cloned structural gene is expressed under control of a strong, plasmid-borne promoter (lambda P(L)). We have found that a genetic fusion which places the regA ribosome binding domain in proximity to active translation leads to partial derepression of wild-type RegA protein synthesis. The derepression is not due to increased synthesis of regA RNA, suggesting that it occurs at the translational level. Derepressed clones of the wild-type regA gene were used to overproduce and purify the repressor. In an in vitro assay the wild-type target was sensitive and a mutant target was resistant to inhibition by the added protein. The results suggest that the sensitivity of a regA-regulated cistron to translational repression may depend on the competition between ribosomes and RegA protein for overlapping recognition sequences in the translation initiation domain of the mRNA. PMID:3410302

  20. Restriction endonuclease inhibitor IPI* of bacteriophage T4: a novel structure for a dedicated target.

    PubMed

    Rifat, Dalin; Wright, Nathan T; Varney, Kristen M; Weber, David J; Black, Lindsay W

    2008-01-18

    Phage T4 protects its DNA from the two-gene-encoded gmrS/gmrD (glucose-modified hydroxymethylcytosine restriction endonuclease) CT of pathogenic Escherichia coli, CT596, by injecting several hundred copies of the 76-amino-acid-residue nuclease inhibitor, IPI*, into the infected host. Here, the three-dimensional solution structure of mature IPI* is reported as determined by nuclear magnetic resonance techniques using 1290 experimental nuclear Overhauser effect and dipolar coupling constraints ( approximately 17 constraints per residue). Close examination of this oblate-shaped protein structure reveals a novel fold consisting of two small beta-sheets (beta1: B1 and B2; beta2: B3-B5) flanked at the N- and C-termini by alpha-helices (H1 and H2). Such a fold is very compact in shape and allows ejection of IPI* through the narrow 30-A portal and tail tube apertures of the virion without unfolding. Structural and dynamic measurements identify an exposed hydrophobic knob that is a putative gmrS/gmrD-binding site. A single gene from the uropathogenic E. coli UT189, which codes for a gmrS/gmrD-like UT fusion enzyme (with approximately 90% identity to the heterodimeric CT enzyme), has evolved IPI* inhibitor immunity. Analysis of the gmrS/gmrD restriction endonuclease enzyme family and its IPI* family phage antagonists reveals an evolutionary pathway that has elaborated a surprisingly diverse and specifically fitted set of coevolving attack and defense structures.

  1. Bacteriophage T4 Self-Assembly: In Vitro Reconstitution of Recombinant gp2 into Infectious Phage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, G. R.; Vianelli, A.; Goldberg, E. B.

    2000-01-01

    T4 gene 2 mutants have a pleiotropic phenotype: degradation of injected phage DNA by exonuclease V (ExoV) in the recBCD+ host cell cytoplasm and a low burst size due, at least in part, to a decreased ability for head-to-tail (H-T) joining. The more N terminal the mutation, the more pronounced is the H-T joining defect. We have overexpressed and purified the recombinant gene 2 product (rgp2) to homogeneity in order to test its role in H-T joining, during in vitro reconstitution. When we mix extracts of heads from a gp2+ phage infection (H+) with tails from a gp2+ or gp2− phage infection (T+ or T−), the H-T joining is fast and all of the reconstituted phage grow equally well on cells with or without ExoV activity. When heads from gene 2 amber mutants (H−) are used, addition of rgp2 is required for H-T joining. In this case, H-T joining is slow and only about 10% of the reconstituted phage can form plaques on ExoV+ cells. When extracts of heads with different gene 2 amber mutations are mixed with extracts of tails (with a gene 2 amber mutation) in the presence of rgp2, we find that the size of the gp2 amber peptide of the head extract is inversely related to the fraction of reconstituted phage with a 2+ phenotype. We conclude that free rgp2 is biologically active and has a direct role in H-T joining but that the process is different from H-T joining promoted by natural gp2 that is incorporated into the head in vivo. Furthermore, it seems that gp2 has a domain which binds it to the head. Thus, the presence of the longer gp2am mutants (with this domain) inhibits their replacement by full-length rgp2. PMID:10633100

  2. Single substitution in bacteriophage T4 RNase H alters the ratio between its exo- and endonuclease activities.

    PubMed

    Kholod, Natalia; Sivogrivov, Dmitry; Latypov, Oleg; Mayorov, Sergey; Kuznitsyn, Rafail; Kajava, Andrey V; Shlyapnikov, Mikhail; Granovsky, Igor

    2015-11-01

    The article describes substitutions in bacteriophage T4 RNase H which provide so called das-effect. Phage T4 DNA arrest suppression (das) mutations have been described to be capable of partially suppressing the phage DNA arrest phenotype caused by a dysfunction in genes 46 and/or 47 (also known as Mre11/Rad50 complex). Genetic mapping of das13 (one of the das mutations) has shown it to be in the region of the rnh gene encoding RNase H. Here we report that Das13 mutant of RNase H has substitutions of valine 43 and leucine 242 with isoleucines. To investigate the influence of these mutations on RNase H nuclease properties we have designed a novel in vitro assay that allows us to separate and quantify exo- or endonuclease activities of flap endonuclease. The nuclease assay in vitro showed that V43I substitution increased the ratio between exonuclease/endonuclease activities of RNase H whereas L242I substitution did not affect the nuclease activity of RNase H in vitro. However, both mutations were necessary for the full das effect in vivo. Molecular modelling of the nuclease structure suggests that V43I substitution may lead to disposition of H4 helix, responsible for the interaction with the first base pairs of 5'end of branched DNA. These structural changes may affect unwinding of the first base pairs of gapped or nicked DNA generating a short flap and therefore may stabilize the DNA-enzyme complex. L242I substitution did not affect the structure of RNase H and its role in providing das-effect remains unclear.

  3. The Structure of Gene Product 6 of Bacteriophage T4, the Hinge-Pin of the Baseplate

    SciTech Connect

    Aksyuk, Anastasia A.; Leiman, Petr G.; Shneider, Mikhail M.; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2009-07-21

    The baseplate of bacteriophage T4 is a multicomponent protein complex, which controls phage attachment to the host. It assembles from six wedges and a central hub. During infection the baseplate undergoes a large conformational change from a dome-shaped to a flat, star-shaped structure. We report the crystal structure of the C-terminal half of gene product (gp) 6 and investigate its motion with respect to the other proteins during the baseplate rearrangement. Six gp6 dimers interdigitate, forming a ring that maintains the integrity of the baseplate in both conformations. One baseplate wedge contains an N-terminal dimer of gp6, whereas neighboring wedges are tied together through the C-terminal dimer of gp6. The dimeric interactions are preserved throughout the rearrangement of the baseplate. However, the hinge angle between the N- and C-terminal parts of gp6 changes by {approx}15{sup o}, accounting for a 10 {angstrom} radial increase in the diameter of the gp6 ring.

  4. Crystallization of the carboxy-terminal region of the bacteriophage T4 proximal long tail fibre protein gp34

    PubMed Central

    Granell, Meritxell; Namura, Mikiyoshi; Alvira, Sara; Garcia-Doval, Carmela; Singh, Abhimanyu K.; Gutsche, Irina; van Raaij, Mark J.; Kanamaru, Shuji

    2014-01-01

    The phage-proximal part of the long tail fibres of bacteriophage T4 consists of a trimer of the 1289 amino-acid gene product 34 (gp34). Different carboxy-terminal parts of gp34 have been produced and crystallized. Crystals of gp34(726–1289) diffracting X-rays to 2.9 Å resolution, crystals of gp34(781–1289) diffracting to 1.9 Å resolution and crystals of gp34(894–1289) diffracting to 3.0 and 2.0 Å resolution and belonging to different crystal forms were obtained. Native data were collected for gp34(726–1289) and gp34(894–1289), while single-wavelength anomalous diffraction data were collected for selenomethionine-containing gp34(781–1289) and gp34(894–1289). For the latter, high-quality anomalous signal was obtained. PMID:25005101

  5. Building a replisome solution structure by elucidation of protein-protein interactions in the bacteriophage T4 DNA polymerase holoenzyme.

    PubMed

    Alley, S C; Trakselis, M A; Mayer, M U; Ishmael, F T; Jones, A D; Benkovic, S J

    2001-10-19

    Assembly of DNA replication systems requires the coordinated actions of many proteins. The multiprotein complexes formed as intermediates on the pathway to the final DNA polymerase holoenzyme have been shown to have distinct structures relative to the ground-state structures of the individual proteins. By using a variety of solution-phase techniques, we have elucidated additional information about the solution structure of the bacteriophage T4 holoenzyme. Photocross-linking and mass spectrometry were used to demonstrate interactions between I107C of the sliding clamp and the DNA polymerase. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer, analytical ultracentrifugation, and isothermal titration calorimetry measurements were used to demonstrate that the C terminus of the DNA polymerase can interact at two distinct locations on the sliding clamp. Both of these binding modes may be used during holoenzyme assembly, but only one of these binding modes is found in the final holoenzyme. Present and previous solution interaction data were used to build a model of the holoenzyme that is consistent with these data.

  6. Overexpression, purification, and partial characterization of ADP-ribosyltransferases modA and modB of bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed

    Tiemann, B; Depping, R; Rüger, W

    1999-01-01

    There is increasing experimental evidence that ADP-ribosylation of host proteins is an important means to regulate gene expression of bacteriophage T4. Surprisingly, this phage codes for three different ADP-ribosyltransferases, gene products Alt, ModA, and ModB, modifying partially overlapping sets of host proteins. While gene product Alt already has been isolated as a recombinant protein and its action on host RNA polymerases and transcription regulation have been studied, the nucleotide sequences of the two mod genes was published only recently. Their mode of action in the course of the infection cycle and the consequences of the ADP-ribosylations catalyzed by these enzymes remain to be investigated. Here we describe the cloning of the genes, the overexpression, purification, and partial characterization of ADP-ribosyltransferases ModA and ModB. Both proteins seem to act independently, and the ADP-ribosyl moieties are transferred to different sets of host proteins. While gene product ModA, similarly to the Alt protein, acts also on the alpha-subunit of host RNA polymerase, the ModB activity serves another set of proteins, one of which was identified as the S1 protein associated with the 30S subunit of the E. coli ribosomes.

  7. Analyzing indirect secondary electron contrast of unstained bacteriophage T4 based on SEM images and Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ogura, Toshihiko

    2009-03-06

    The indirect secondary electron contrast (ISEC) condition of the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) produces high contrast detection with minimal damage of unstained biological samples mounted under a thin carbon film. The high contrast image is created by a secondary electron signal produced under the carbon film by a low acceleration voltage. Here, we show that ISEC condition is clearly able to detect unstained bacteriophage T4 under a thin carbon film (10-15 nm) by using high-resolution field emission (FE) SEM. The results show that FE-SEM provides higher resolution than thermionic emission SEM. Furthermore, we investigated the scattered electron area within the carbon film under ISEC conditions using Monte Carlo simulation. The simulations indicated that the image resolution difference is related to the scattering width in the carbon film and the electron beam spot size. Using ISEC conditions on unstained virus samples would produce low electronic damage, because the electron beam does not directly irradiate the sample. In addition to the routine analysis, this method can be utilized for structural analysis of various biological samples like viruses, bacteria, and protein complexes.

  8. Conformation of T4 lysozyme in solution. Hinge-bending motion and the substrate-induced conformational transition studied by site-directed spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Mchaourab, H S; Oh, K J; Fang, C J; Hubbell, W L

    1997-01-14

    T4 lysozyme and mutants thereof crystallize in different conformations that are related to each other by a bend about a hinge in the molecule. This observation suggests that the wild type protein may undergo a hinge-bending motion in solution to allow substrate access to an otherwise closed active site cleft [Faber, H.R., & Matthews, B.W. (1990) Nature 348, 263-266]. To test this hypothesis, either single or pairs of nitroxide side chains were introduced into the protein to monitor tertiary contact interactions and inter-residue distances, respectively, in solution. A set of constraints for these structural parameters was derived from a reference state, a covalent enzyme-substrate adduct where the enzyme is locked in the closed state. In the absence of substrate, differences in both inter-residue distances and tertiary contact interactions relative to this reference state are consistent with a hinge-bending motion that opens the active site cleft. Quantitative analysis of spin-spin interactions between nitroxide pairs reveals an 8 A relative domain movement upon substrate binding. In addition, it is demonstrated that the I3P mutation, which produces a large hinge-bending angle in the crystal, has no effect on the solution conformation. Thus, the hinge motion is not the result of the mutation but is an integral part of T4 lysozyme catalysis in solution, as suggested recently [Zhang, X.J., Wozniak, J.A., & Matthews, B.W. (1995) J. Mol. Biol. 250, 527-552]. The strategy employed here, based on site-directed spin labeling, should be generally applicable to the study of protein conformation and conformational changes in solution.

  9. Double-strand break repair and genetic recombination in topoisomerase and primase mutants of bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed

    Shcherbakov, Victor P; Kudryashova, Elena

    2014-09-01

    The effects of primase and topoisomerase II deficiency on the double-strand break (DSB) repair and genetic recombination in bacteriophage T4 were studied in vivo using focused recombination. Site-specific DSBs were induced by SegC endonuclease in the rIIB gene of one of the parents. The frequency/distance relationship was determined in crosses of the wild-type phage, topoisomerase II mutant amN116 (gene 39), and primase mutant E219 (gene 61). Ordinary two-factor (i×j) and three-factor (i k×j) crosses between point rII mutations were also performed. These data provide information about the frequency and distance distribution of the single-exchange (splice) and double-exchange (patch) events. In two-factor crosses ets1×i, the topoisomerase and primase mutants had similar recombinant frequencies in crosses at ets1-i distances longer than 1000 bp, comprising about 80% of the corresponding wild-type values. They, however, differ remarkably in crosses at shorter distances. In the primase mutant, the recombinant frequencies are similar to those in the wild-type crosses at distances less than 100 bp, being a bit diminished at longer distances. In two-factor crosses ets1×i of the topoisomerase mutant, the recombinant frequencies were reduced ten-fold at the shortest distances. In three-factor crosses a6 ets1×i, where we measure patch-related recombination, the primase mutant was quite proficient across the entire range of distances. The topoisomerase mutant crosses demonstrated virtually complete absence of rII(+) recombinants at distances up to 33 bp, with the frequencies increasing steadily at longer distances. The data were interpreted as follows. The primase mutant is fully recombination-proficient. An obvious difference from the wild-type state is some shortage of EndoVII function leading to prolonged existence of HJs and thus stretched out ds-branch migration. This is also true for the topoisomerase mutant. However, the latter is deficient in the ss

  10. ModA and ModB, two ADP-ribosyltransferases encoded by bacteriophage T4: catalytic properties and mutation analysis.

    PubMed

    Tiemann, Bernd; Depping, Reinhard; Gineikiene, Egle; Kaliniene, Laura; Nivinskas, Rimas; Rüger, Wolfgang

    2004-11-01

    Bacteriophage T4 encodes three ADP-ribosyltransferases, Alt, ModA, and ModB. These enzymes participate in the regulation of the T4 replication cycle by ADP-ribosylating a defined set of host proteins. In order to obtain a better understanding of the phage-host interactions and their consequences for regulating the T4 replication cycle, we studied cloning, overexpression, and characterization of purified ModA and ModB enzymes. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that amino acids, as deduced from secondary structure alignments, are indeed decisive for the activity of the enzymes, implying that the transfer reaction follows the Sn1-type reaction scheme proposed for this class of enzymes. In vitro transcription assays performed with Alt- and ModA-modified RNA polymerases demonstrated that the Alt-ribosylated polymerase enhances transcription from T4 early promoters on a T4 DNA template, whereas the transcriptional activity of ModA-modified polymerase, without the participation of T4-encoded auxiliary proteins for middle mode or late transcription, is reduced. The results presented here support the conclusion that ADP-ribosylation of RNA polymerase and of other host proteins allows initial phage-directed mRNA synthesis reactions to escape from host control. In contrast, subsequent modification of the other cellular target proteins limits transcription from phage early genes and participates in redirecting transcription to phage middle and late genes.

  11. An ADP-ribosyltransferase Alt of bacteriophage T4 negatively regulates the Escherichia coli MazF toxin of a toxin-antitoxin module.

    PubMed

    Alawneh, Abdulraheem M; Qi, Dan; Yonesaki, Tetsuro; Otsuka, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Prokaryotic toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are linked to many roles in cell physiology, such as plasmid maintenance, stress response, persistence and protection from phage infection, and the activities of toxins are tightly regulated. Here, we describe a novel regulatory mechanism for a toxin of Escherichia coli TA systems. The MazF toxin of MazE-MazF, which is one of the best characterized type II TA systems, was modified immediately after infection with bacteriophage T4. Mass spectrometry demonstrated that the molecular weight of this modification was 542 Da, corresponding to a mono-ADP-ribosylation. This modification disappeared in cells infected with T4 phage lacking Alt, which is one of three ADP-ribosyltransferases encoded by T4 phage and is injected together with phage DNA upon infection. In vivo and in vitro analyses confirmed that T4 Alt ADP-ribosylated MazF at an arginine residue at position 4. Finally, the ADP-ribosylation of MazF by Alt resulted in the reduction of MazF RNA cleavage activity in vitro, suggesting that it may function to inactivate MazF during T4 infection. This is the first example of the chemical modification of an E. coli toxin in TA systems to regulate activity.

  12. Ergothioneine, histidine, and two naturally occurring histidine dipeptides as radioprotectors against gamma-irradiation inactivation of bacteriophages T4 and P22

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, P.E.; Hartman, Z.; Citardi, M.J.

    1988-05-01

    Bacteriophages P22, T4+, and T4os (osmotic shock-resistant mutant with altered capsids) were diluted in 0.85% NaCl and exposed to gamma irradiation (2.79 Gy/min) at room temperature (24 degrees C). T4+ was more sensitive to inactivation than was P22, and the T4os mutant was even more sensitive than T4+. Catalase exhibited a strong protective effect and superoxide dismutase a weaker protection, indicating that H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ or some product derived therefrom was predominant in causing inactivation of plaque formation. Low but significant (0.1-0.3 mM) reduced glutathione (GSH) enhanced phage inactivation, but a higher (1 mM) GSH concentration protected. A similar effect was found for the polyamine, spermidine. In contrast, 0.1 mM L-ergothioneine (2-thiol-L-histidine betaine) exhibited strong protection and 1 mM afforded essentially complete protection. L-Ergothioneine is present in millimolar concentrations in some fungi and is conserved up to millimolar concentrations in critical tissues when consumed by man. L-Histidine and two histidine-containing dipeptides, carnosine and anserine, protected at a concentration of 1 mM, a level at which they are present in striated muscles of various animals.

  13. Genetic Recombination in Bacteriophage T4: Single-Burst Analysis of Cosegregants and Evidence in Favor of a Splice/Patch Coupling Model

    PubMed Central

    Shcherbakov, V. P.; Plugina, L. A.; Nesheva, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    To reveal the structure of penultimate DNA intermediates in T4 bacteriophage recombination, resolution of which produces free recombinant molecules, a single-burst analysis of the recombinant progeny was made in multifactor crosses, enabling one to determine quantitatively the different recombinants generated by one or two exchanges within the same chromosome segment. It was found that double and single exchanges are highly correlated in T4 recombination. These results were interpreted as evidence for simultaneous formation of a splice/patch pair as the primary recombination products. A recombination model called here the ``splice/patch coupling model'' is presented according to which resolution of a single DNA intermediate results in two linear heterozygous molecules containing a patch and a splice, respectively, in homologous positions. PMID:1516814

  14. Semiconservative DNA replication is initiated at a single site in recombination-deficient gene 32 mutants of bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed Central

    Dannenberg, R; Mosig, G

    1981-01-01

    We have investigated, by electron microscopy, replicative intermediate produced early after infection of Escherichia coli with two phage T4 gene 32 mutants (amA453 and tsG26) which replicate their parental DNA but are defective in secondary replications and in moderating the activities of recombination nucleases. Under conditions completely restrictive for progeny production, both of these mutant produced replicative intermediates, each containing a single internal loop. Both branches of these loops were double stranded; i.e., both leading and lagging strands were synthesized. The replicative intermediates of these mutants qualitatively and quantitatively resembled early replicating wild-type T4 chromosomes after solitary infection of E. coli. However, in contrast to intracellular wild-type T4 DNA isolated from multiple infection, the mutant DNAs showed neither multiple branches nor multiple tandem loops. These results demonstrate that a truncated gene 32 protein which consists of less than one-third of the wild-type T4 helix-destabilizing protein can facilitate the functions of T4 replication proteins, specifically those of T4 DNA polymerase and priming proteins. Our results also support the hypothesis that the generation of multiple tandem loops or branches in vegetative T4 DNA depends on recombination (Mosig et al., in B. Alberts, ed., Mechanistic Studies of DNA Replication and Genetic Recombination, p. 527-543, Academic Press, Inc., New York, 1980). Images PMID:7321104

  15. Complete Genome Sequences of T4-Like Bacteriophages RB3, RB5, RB6, RB7, RB9, RB10, RB27, RB33, RB55, RB59, and RB68

    PubMed Central

    Esvelt, Kevin M.; Church, George M.

    2015-01-01

    T4-like bacteriophages have been explored for phage therapy and are model organisms for phage genomics and evolution. Here, we describe the sequencing of 11 T4-like phages. We found a high nucleotide similarity among the T4, RB55, and RB59; RB32 and RB33; and RB3, RB5, RB6, RB7, RB9, and RB10 phages. PMID:25555735

  16. Bypass of a primase requirement for bacteriophage T4 DNA replication in vivo by a recombination enzyme, endonuclease VII.

    PubMed

    Mosig, G; Luder, A; Ernst, A; Canan, N

    1991-12-01

    A primase, the product of phage T4 gene 61, is required to initiate synthesis of Okazaki pieces and to allow bidirectional replication from several T4 origins. However, primase-defective T4 gene 61 mutants are viable. In these mutants, leading-strand DNA synthesis starts at the same time as in wild type infections, but, in contrast to wild type, initiation is unidirectional and the first replicative intermediates are large displacement loops. Rapid double-strand DNA replication occurs later after infection, generating multiple branched concatemers, which are cut and packaged into viable progeny particles, as in wild-type T4. Evidence is presented that this late double-strand DNA replication requires functional endonuclease VII (endo VII), the product of the T4 gene 49. We propose that endo VII can provide a backup mechanism when primase is defective, because it cuts recombinational junctions, generating 3' ends. These ends can prime DNA synthesis to copy the DNA strands that had been displaced during the initial origin-dependent replication. We explain the DNA-delay phenotype and the commonly observed temperature dependence of DNA replication in primase-deficient gene 61 mutants as a consequence of temperature-dependent translational control of gene 49 expression. In the presence or absence of functional primase endo VII is essential for correct packaging of DNA. The powerful selection that keeps the function of endo VII and expression of its gene at levels that are optimal for T4 development determines both the efficiency and the limitations of the bypass mechanism.

  17. Interaction of Escherichia coli B and B/4 and Bacteriophage T4D with Berea Sandstone Rock in Relation to Enhanced Oil Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Philip L.; Yen, Teh Fu

    1984-01-01

    Much research and development is needed to recover oil reserves presently unattainable, and microbially enhanced oil recovery is a technology that may be used for this purpose. To address the problem of bacterial contamination in an oil field injection well region, we connected each end of a Teflon-sleeved Berea sandstone rock to a flask containing nutrient medium. By inoculating one flask with Escherichia coli B, we could observe bacterial growth in the uninoculated flask resulting from the transport and establishment of cells across the rock. Differences in bacterial populations occurred depending on whether bacteriophage T4D was first adsorbed to the rock. The results of these experiments indicate that the inhibition of bacterial establishment within a rock matrix is possible via lytic interaction. Some nonlytic effects are also implied by experiments with B/4 cells, which are T4D-resistant mutants of E. coli B. A 10 to 40% retention of T4 by the rock occurred when it was loaded with 105 to 106 PFU. We also describe a lysogenic system for possible use in microbially enhanced oil recovery techniques. PMID:16346492

  18. Interaction of Escherichia coli B and B/4 and Bacteriophage T4D with Berea Sandstone Rock in Relation to Enhanced Oil Recovery.

    PubMed

    Chang, P L; Yen, T F

    1984-03-01

    Much research and development is needed to recover oil reserves presently unattainable, and microbially enhanced oil recovery is a technology that may be used for this purpose. To address the problem of bacterial contamination in an oil field injection well region, we connected each end of a Teflon-sleeved Berea sandstone rock to a flask containing nutrient medium. By inoculating one flask with Escherichia coli B, we could observe bacterial growth in the uninoculated flask resulting from the transport and establishment of cells across the rock. Differences in bacterial populations occurred depending on whether bacteriophage T4D was first adsorbed to the rock. The results of these experiments indicate that the inhibition of bacterial establishment within a rock matrix is possible via lytic interaction. Some nonlytic effects are also implied by experiments with B/4 cells, which are T4D-resistant mutants of E. coli B. A 10 to 40% retention of T4 by the rock occurred when it was loaded with 10 to 10 PFU. We also describe a lysogenic system for possible use in microbially enhanced oil recovery techniques.

  19. Studies of viral DNA packaging motors with optical tweezers: a comparison of motor function in bacteriophages φ29, λ, and T4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Douglas E.; Fuller, Derek N.; Raymer, Dorian M.; Rickgauer, Peter; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J.; Anderson, Dwight L.; Catalano, Carlos E.; Kottadiel, Vishal; Rao, Venigalla B.

    2007-09-01

    A key step in the assembly of many viruses is the packaging of double-stranded DNA into a viral procapsid (an empty protein shell) by the action of an ATP-powered portal motor complex. We have developed methods to measure the packaging of single DNA molecules into single viral proheads in real time using optical tweezers. We can measure DNA binding and initiation of translocation, the DNA translocation dynamics, and the filling of the capsid against resisting forces. In addition to studying bacteriophage φ29, we have recently extended these methods to study the E. coli bacteriophages λ and T4, two important model systems in molecular biology. The three systems have different capsid sizes/shapes, genome lengths, and biochemical and structural differences in their packaging motors. Here, we compare and contrast these three systems. We find that all three motors translocate DNA processively and generate very large forces, each exceeding 50 piconewtons, ~20x higher force than generated by the skeletal muscle myosin 2 motor. This high force generation is required to overcome the forces resisting the confinement of the stiff, highly charged DNA at high density within the viral capsids. However, there are also striking differences between the three motors: they exhibit different DNA translocation rates, degrees of static and dynamic disorder, responses to load, and pausing and slipping dynamics.

  20. Two-dimensional gel analysis of rolling circle replication in the presence and absence of bacteriophage T4 primase.

    PubMed Central

    Belanger, K G; Mirzayan, C; Kreuzer, H E; Alberts, B M; Kreuzer, K N

    1996-01-01

    The rolling circle DNA replication structures generated by the in vitro phage T4 replication system were analyzed using two-dimensional agarose gels. Replication structures were generated in the presence or absence of T4 primase (gp61), permitting the analysis of replication forks with either duplex or single-stranded tails. A characteristic arc shape was visualized when forks with single-stranded tails were cleaved by a restriction enzyme with the help of an oligonucleotide that anneals to restriction sites in the single-stranded tail. After calibrating the gel system with this well-studied rolling circle replication reaction, we then analyzed the in vivo replication directed by a T4 replication origin cloned within a plasmid. DNA samples were generated from infections with either wild-type or primase-deletion mutant phage. The only replicative arc that could be detected in the wild-type sample corresponded to duplex Y forms, consistent with very efficient lagging strand synthesis. Surprisingly, we obtained evidence for both duplex and single-stranded DNA tails in the samples from the primase-deficient infection. We conclude that a relatively inefficient mechanism primes lagging strand DNA synthesis in vivo when gp61 is absent. PMID:8668550

  1. Coordination and processing of DNA ends during double-strand break repair: the role of the bacteriophage T4 Mre11/Rad50 (MR) complex.

    PubMed

    Almond, Joshua R; Stohr, Bradley A; Panigrahi, Anil K; Albrecht, Dustin W; Nelson, Scott W; Kreuzer, Kenneth N

    2013-11-01

    The in vivo functions of the bacteriophage T4 Mre11/Rad50 (MR) complex (gp46/47) in double-strand-end processing, double-strand break repair, and recombination-dependent replication were investigated. The complex is essential for T4 growth, but we wanted to investigate the in vivo function during productive infections. We therefore generated a suppressed triple amber mutant in the Rad50 subunit to substantially reduce the level of complex and thereby reduce phage growth. Growth-limiting amounts of the complex caused a concordant decrease in phage genomic recombination-dependent replication. However, the efficiencies of double-strand break repair and of plasmid-based recombination-dependent replication remained relatively normal. Genetic analyses of linked markers indicated that double-strand ends were less protected from nuclease erosion in the depleted infection and also that end coordination during repair was compromised. We discuss models for why phage genomic recombination-dependent replication is more dependent on Mre11/Rad50 levels when compared to plasmid recombination-dependent replication. We also tested the importance of the conserved histidine residue in nuclease motif I of the T4 Mre11 protein. Substitution with multiple different amino acids (including serine) failed to support phage growth, completely blocked plasmid recombination-dependent replication, and led to the stabilization of double-strand ends. We also constructed and expressed an Mre11 mutant protein with the conserved histidine changed to serine. The mutant protein was found to be completely defective for nuclease activities, but retained the ability to bind the Rad50 subunit and double-stranded DNA. These results indicate that the nuclease activity of Mre11 is critical for phage growth and recombination-dependent replication during T4 infections.

  2. Bacteriophage T4 Dam DNA-[N6-adenine]methyltransferase. Kinetic evidence for a catalytically essential conformational change in the ternary complex.

    PubMed

    Evdokimov, Alexey A; Zinoviev, Victor V; Malygin, Ernst G; Schlagman, Samuel L; Hattman, Stanley

    2002-01-01

    We carried out a steady state kinetic analysis of the bacteriophage T4 DNA-[N6-adenine]methyltransferase (T4 Dam) mediated methyl group transfer reaction from S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet) to Ade in the palindromic recognition sequence, GATC, of a 20-mer oligonucleotide duplex. Product inhibition patterns were consistent with a steady state-ordered bi-bi mechanism in which the order of substrate binding and product (methylated DNA, DNA(Me) and S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine, AdoHcy) release was AdoMet downward arrow DNA downward arrow DNA(Me) upward arrow AdoHcy upward arrow. A strong reduction in the rate of methylation was observed at high concentrations of the substrate 20-mer DNA duplex. In contrast, increasing substrate AdoMet concentration led to stimulation in the reaction rate with no evidence of saturation. We propose the following model. Free T4 Dam (initially in conformational form E) randomly interacts with substrates AdoMet and DNA to form a ternary T4 Dam-AdoMet-DNA complex in which T4 Dam has isomerized to conformational state F, which is specifically adapted for catalysis. After the chemical step of methyl group transfer from AdoMet to DNA, product DNA(Me) dissociates relatively rapidly (k(off) = 1.7 x s(-1)) from the complex. In contrast, dissociation of product AdoHcy proceeds relatively slowly (k(off) = 0.018 x s(-1)), indicating that its release is the rate-limiting step, consistent with kcat = 0.015 x s(-1). After AdoHcy release, the enzyme remains in the F conformational form and is able to preferentially bind AdoMet (unlike form E, which randomly binds AdoMet and DNA), and the AdoMet-F binary complex then binds DNA to start another methylation cycle. We also propose an alternative pathway in which the release of AdoHcy is coordinated with the binding of AdoMet in a single concerted event, while T4 Dam remains in the isomerized form F. The resulting AdoMet-F binary complex then binds DNA, and another methylation reaction ensues. This route is

  3. Mutated and bacteriophage T4 nanoparticle arrayed F1-V immunogens from Yersinia pestis as next generation plague vaccines.

    PubMed

    Tao, Pan; Mahalingam, Marthandan; Kirtley, Michelle L; van Lier, Christina J; Sha, Jian; Yeager, Linsey A; Chopra, Ashok K; Rao, Venigalla B

    2013-01-01

    Pneumonic plague is a highly virulent infectious disease with 100% mortality rate, and its causative organism Yersinia pestis poses a serious threat for deliberate use as a bioterror agent. Currently, there is no FDA approved vaccine against plague. The polymeric bacterial capsular protein F1, a key component of the currently tested bivalent subunit vaccine consisting, in addition, of low calcium response V antigen, has high propensity to aggregate, thus affecting its purification and vaccine efficacy. We used two basic approaches, structure-based immunogen design and phage T4 nanoparticle delivery, to construct new plague vaccines that provided complete protection against pneumonic plague. The NH₂-terminal β-strand of F1 was transplanted to the COOH-terminus and the sequence flanking the β-strand was duplicated to eliminate polymerization but to retain the T cell epitopes. The mutated F1 was fused to the V antigen, a key virulence factor that forms the tip of the type three secretion system (T3SS). The F1mut-V protein showed a dramatic switch in solubility, producing a completely soluble monomer. The F1mut-V was then arrayed on phage T4 nanoparticle via the small outer capsid protein, Soc. The F1mut-V monomer was robustly immunogenic and the T4-decorated F1mut-V without any adjuvant induced balanced TH1 and TH2 responses in mice. Inclusion of an oligomerization-deficient YscF, another component of the T3SS, showed a slight enhancement in the potency of F1-V vaccine, while deletion of the putative immunomodulatory sequence of the V antigen did not improve the vaccine efficacy. Both the soluble (purified F1mut-V mixed with alhydrogel) and T4 decorated F1mut-V (no adjuvant) provided 100% protection to mice and rats against pneumonic plague evoked by high doses of Y. pestis CO92. These novel platforms might lead to efficacious and easily manufacturable next generation plague vaccines.

  4. Expression of cloned bacteriophage T4 uvsW and uvsY genes in rec+ and rec- Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    DeVries, J.K.; Wallace, S.S.

    1983-09-01

    Chimeric plasmids containing the uvsY uvsW region of the T4 genome were examined for the expression of these genes. Certain of these plasmids were shown to express the uvsY or the uvsW gene products by their ability to complement the UV sensitivity of infecting uvsW or uvsY mutant phage. Also, a chimeric plasmid containing both the uvsW and uvsY genes increases the survival of UV-irradiated, methyl methane sulfonate- or ethyl methane sulfonate-treated recA hosts.

  5. Optical tweezers studies of viral DNA packaging: Motor function and DNA confinement in Bacteriophages phi29, lambda, and T4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Douglas

    2007-03-01

    In the assembly of many viruses a powerful molecular motor translocates the genome into a pre-assembled capsid. We use optical tweezers to directly measure translocation of a single DNA molecule into the viral capsid. Improved techniques allow us to measure initiation and early stages of packaging. With phi29 the DNA terminal protein was found to cause large variations in the starting point of packaging. Removal of this protein results in terminal initiation, permitting more accurate assessment of motor function and DNA confinement forces. We investigated the role of electrostatic repulsion by varying ionic screening of the DNA. The observed trends are in accord with those theoretically expected considering counter-ion competition; however the forces are larger than expected in comparison with recent theories and DNA ejection measurements. We have recently succeeded in extending our methods to study two other phages: lambda and T4. These systems have unique structural and functional features, presenting an opportunity for comparative studies in this family of molecular motors. Initial measurements show that lambda and T4 translocate DNA several times faster than the phi29 motor, but are more sensitive to applied load.

  6. Two recombination-dependent DNA replication pathways of bacteriophage T4, and their roles in mutagenesis and horizontal gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Mosig, Gisela; Gewin, John; Luder, Andreas; Colowick, Nancy; Vo, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Two major pathways of recombination-dependent DNA replication, “join-copy” and “join-cut-copy,” can be distinguished in phage T4: join-copy requires only early and middle genes, but two late proteins, endonuclease VII and terminase, are uniquely important in the join-cut-copy pathway. In wild-type T4, timing of these pathways is integrated with the developmental program and related to transcription and packaging of DNA. In primase mutants, which are defective in origin-dependent lagging-strand DNA synthesis, the late pathway can bypass the lack of primers for lagging-strand DNA synthesis. The exquisitely regulated synthesis of endo VII, and of two proteins from its gene, explains the delay of recombination-dependent DNA replication in primase (as well as topoisomerase) mutants, and the temperature-dependence of the delay. Other proteins (e.g., the single-stranded DNA binding protein and the products of genes 46 and 47) are important in all recombination pathways, but they interact differently with other proteins in different pathways. These homologous recombination pathways contribute to evolution because they facilitate acquisition of any foreign DNA with limited sequence homology during horizontal gene transfer, without requiring transposition or site-specific recombination functions. Partial heteroduplex repair can generate what appears to be multiple mutations from a single recombinational intermediate. The resulting sequence divergence generates barriers to formation of viable recombinants. The multiple sequence changes can also lead to erroneous estimates in phylogenetic analyses. PMID:11459968

  7. RNA initiation with dinucleoside monophosphates during transcription of bacteriophage T4 DNA with RNA polymerase of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, D J; Niyogi, S K

    1973-02-01

    The effects of dinucleoside monophosphates on the transcription of phage T4 DNA by E. coli RNA polymerase have been examined at various concentrations of the sigma subunit and extremely low concentration of ribonucleoside triphosphate. The following conclusions were reached: (i) Labeled specific dinucleoside monophosphates are incorporated as chain initiators. (ii) When the ratio of sigma factor to core enzyme is small, there is a general stimulation by most 5'-guanosyl dinucleoside monophosphates. (iii) When the ratio is increased or holoenzyme is present, ApU, CpA, UpA, and GpU are the most effective stimulators. (iv) At high concentrations of sigma factor, only certain adenosine-containing dinucleoside monophosphates (ApU, CpA, UpA, and ApA) stimulate the reaction. (v) Competition hybridization studies indicate that the RNAs stimulated by dinucleoside monophosphates (ApU, CpA, UpA, and GpU) are of the T4 "early" type. (vi) Studies involving both combinations of stimulatory dinucleoside monophosphates and competitive effects of these compounds on chain initiation by ATP and GTP suggest that the stimulatory dinucleoside monophosphates act as chain initiators and may recognize part of a continuous sequence in a promoter region. Studies based on the incorporation of (3)H-labeled stimulatory dinucleoside monophosphates support the above conclusions.

  8. The MotA transcription factor from bacteriophage T4 contains a novel DNA-binding domain : the 'double wing' motif.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, N.; Sickmier, E. A.; Zhang, R.; Joachimiak, A.; White, S. W.; Biosciences Division; St. Jude Children's Research Hospital; Univ. of Tennessee Health Science Center; Corixa Inc.

    2002-01-01

    MotA is a transcription factor from bacteriophage T4 that helps adapt the host Escherichia coli transcription apparatus to T4 middle promoters. We have determined the crystal structure of the C-terminal DNA-binding domain of MotA (MotCF) to 1.6 A resolution using multiwavelength, anomalous diffraction methods. The structure reveals a novel DNA-binding alpha/beta motif that contains an exposed beta-sheet surface that mediates interactions with the DNA. Independent biochemical experiments have shown that MotCF binds to one surface of a single turn of DNA through interactions in adjacent major and minor grooves. We present a model of the interaction in which beta-ribbons at opposite corners of the six-stranded beta-sheet penetrate the DNA grooves, and call the motif a 'double wing' to emphasize similarities to the 'winged-helix' motif. The model is consistent with data on how MotA functions at middle promoters, and provides an explanation for why MotA can form non-specific multimers on DNA.

  9. Mapping the interactions of the single-stranded DNA binding protein of bacteriophage T4 (gp32) with DNA lattices at single nucleotide resolution: gp32 monomer binding.

    PubMed

    Jose, Davis; Weitzel, Steven E; Baase, Walter A; von Hippel, Peter H

    2015-10-30

    Combining biophysical measurements on T4 bacteriophage replication complexes with detailed structural information can illuminate the molecular mechanisms of these 'macromolecular machines'. Here we use the low energy circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescent properties of site-specifically introduced base analogues to map and quantify the equilibrium binding interactions of short (8 nts) ssDNA oligomers with gp32 monomers at single nucleotide resolution. We show that single gp32 molecules interact most directly and specifically near the 3'-end of these ssDNA oligomers, thus defining the polarity of gp32 binding with respect to the ssDNA lattice, and that only 2-3 nts are directly involved in this tight binding interaction. The loss of exciton coupling in the CD spectra of dimer 2-AP (2-aminopurine) probes at various positions in the ssDNA constructs, together with increases in fluorescence intensity, suggest that gp32 binding directly extends the sugar-phosphate backbone of this ssDNA oligomer, particularly at the 3'-end and facilitates base unstacking along the entire 8-mer lattice. These results provide a model (and 'DNA map') for the isolated gp32 binding to ssDNA targets, which serves as the nucleation step for the cooperative binding that occurs at transiently exposed ssDNA sequences within the functioning T4 DNA replication complex. PMID:26275775

  10. An antitumor drug-induced topoisomerase cleavage complex blocks a bacteriophage T4 replication fork in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hong, G; Kreuzer, K N

    2000-01-01

    Many antitumor and antibacterial drugs inhibit DNA topoisomerases by trapping covalent enzyme-DNA cleavage complexes. Formation of cleavage complexes is important for cytotoxicity, but evidence suggests that cleavage complexes themselves are not sufficient to cause cell death. Rather, active cellular processes such as transcription and/or replication are probably necessary to transform cleavage complexes into cytotoxic lesions. Using defined plasmid substrates and two-dimensional agarose gel analysis, we examined the collision of an active replication fork with an antitumor drug-trapped cleavage complex. Discrete DNA molecules accumulated on the simple Y arc, with branch points very close to the topoisomerase cleavage site. Accumulation of the Y-form DNA required the presence of a topoisomerase cleavage site, the antitumor drug, the type II topoisomerase, and a T4 replication origin on the plasmid. Furthermore, all three arms of the Y-form DNA were replicated, arguing strongly that these are trapped replication intermediates. The Y-form DNA appeared even in the absence of two important phage recombination proteins, implying that Y-form DNA is the result of replication rather than recombination. This is the first direct evidence that a drug-induced topoisomerase cleavage complex blocks the replication fork in vivo. Surprisingly, these blocked replication forks do not contain DNA breaks at the topoisomerase cleavage site, implying that the replication complex was inactivated (at least temporarily) and that topoisomerase resealed the drug-induced DNA breaks. The replication fork may behave similarly at other types of DNA lesions, and thus cleavage complexes could represent a useful (site-specific) model for chemical- and radiation-induced DNA damage.

  11. Designing a nine cysteine-less DNA packaging motor from bacteriophage T4 reveals new insights into ATPase structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Kondabagil, Kiran; Dai, Li; Vafabakhsh, Reza; Ha, Taekjip; Draper, Bonnie; Rao, Venigalla B.

    2015-01-01

    The packaging motor of bacteriophage T4 translocates DNA into the capsid at a rate of up to 2000 bp/s. Such a high rate would require coordination of motor movements at millisecond timescale. Designing a cysteine-less gp17 is essential to generate fluorescently labeled motors and measure distance changes between motor domains by FRET analyses. Here, by using sequence alignments, structural modeling, combinatorial mutagenesis, and recombinational rescue, we replaced all nine cysteines of gp17 and introduced single cysteines at defined positions. These mutant motors retained in vitro DNA packaging activity. Single mutant motors translocated DNA molecules in real time as imaged by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. We discovered, unexpectedly, that a hydrophobic or nonpolar amino acid next to Walker B motif is essential for motor function, probably for efficient generation of OH− nucleophile. The ATPase Walker B motif, thus, may be redefined as “β-strand (4–6 hydrophobic-rich amino acids)–DE-hydrophobic/nonpolar amino acid”. PMID:25443668

  12. Incomplete complementation of the DNA repair defect in cockayne syndrome cells by the denV gene from bacteriophage T4 suggests a deficiency in base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Francis, M A; Bagga, P S; Athwal, R S; Rainbow, A J

    1997-10-01

    Endonuclease V (denV) from bacteriophage T4 has been examined for its ability to complement the repair defect in Cockayne syndrome (CS) cells of complementation groups A and B. CS is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hypersensitivity to UV light and a defect in the preferential repair of UV-induced lesions in transcriptionally active DNA by the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. The denV gene was introduced into non-transformed normal and CS fibroblasts transiently via a recombinant adenovirus (Ad) vector and into SV40-transformed normal and CS cells via a retroviral vector. Expression of denV in CS-A cells resulted in partial correction of the UV-sensitive phenotype in assays of gene-specific repair and cell viability, while correction of CS-B cells by expression of denV in the same assays was minimal or non-existent. In contrast, denV expression led to enhanced host cell reactivation (HCR) of viral DNA synthesis in both CS complementation groups to near normal levels. DenV is a glycosylase which is specific for cyclobutane-pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) but does not recognize other UV-induced lesions. Previous work has indicated that CS cells can efficiently repair all non-CPD UV-induced transcription blocking lesions (S.F. Barrett et al.. Mutation Res. 255 (1991) 281-291 [1]) and that denV incised lesions are believed to be processed via the base excision repair (BER) pathway. The inability of denV to complement the NER defect in CS cells to normal levels implies an impaired ability to process denV incised lesions by the BER pathway, and suggests a role for the CS genes, particularly the CS-B gene, in BER. PMID:9372849

  13. Mutants of bacteriophage T4 deficient in the ability to induce nuclear disruption: shutoff of host DNA and protein synthesis gene dosage experiments, identification of a restrictive host, and possible biological significance.

    PubMed

    Snustad, D P; Bursch, C J; Parson, K A; Hefeneider, S H

    1976-04-01

    The shutoff of host DNA synthesis is delayed until about 8 to 10 min after infection when Escherichia coli B/5 cells were infected with bacteriophage T4 mutants deficient in the ability to induce nuclear disruption (ndd mutants). The host DNA synthesized after infection with ndd mutants is stable in the absence of T4 endonucleases II and IV, but is unstable in the presence of these nucleases. Host protein synthesis, as indicated by the inducibility of beta-galactosidase and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel patterns of isoptopically labeled proteins synthesize after infection, is shut off normally in ndd-infected cells, even in the absence of host DNA degradation. The Cal Tech wild-type strain of E. coli CT447 was found to restrict growth of the ndd mutants. Since T4D+ also has a very low efficiency of plating on CT447, we have isolated a nitrosoguanidine-induced derivative of CT447 which yields a high T4D+ efficiency of plating while still restricting the ndd mutants. Using this derivative, CT447 T4 plq+ (for T4 plaque+), we have shown that hos DNA degradation and shutoff of host DNA synthesis occur after infection with either ndd98 X 5 (shutoff delayed) or T4D+ (shutoff normal) with approximately the same kinetics as in E. coli strain B/5. Nuclear disruption occurs after infection of CT447 with ndd+ phage, but not after infection with ndd- phage. The rate of DNA synthesis after infection of CT447 T4 plq+ with ndd98 X 5 is about 75% of the rate observed after infection with T4D+ while the burst size of ndd98 X 5 is only 3.5% of that of T4D+. The results of gene dosage experiments using the ndd restrictive host C5447 suggest that the ndd gene product is required in stoichiometric amounts. The observation by thin-section electron microscopy of two distinct pools of DNA, one apparently phage DNA and the other host DNA, in cells infected with nuclear disruption may be a compartmentalization mechanism which separates the pathways of host DNA degradation and

  14. In vitro binding of anthrax protective antigen on bacteriophage T4 capsid surface through Hoc-capsid interactions: A strategy for efficient display of large full-length proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shivachandra, Sathish B.; Rao, Mangala; Janosi, Laszlo; Sathaliyawala, Taheri; Matyas, Gary R.; Alving, Carl R.; Leppla, Stephen H.; Rao, Venigalla B. . E-mail: rao@cua.edu

    2006-02-05

    An in vitro binding system is described to display large full-length proteins on bacteriophage T4 capsid surface at high density. The phage T4 icosahedral capsid features 155 copies of a nonessential highly antigenic outer capsid protein, Hoc, at the center of each major capsid protein hexon. Gene fusions were engineered to express the 83-kDa protective antigen (PA) from Bacillus anthracis fused to the N-terminus of Hoc and the 130-kDa PA-Hoc protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The purified PA-Hoc was assembled in vitro on hoc {sup -} phage particles. Binding was specific, stable, and of high affinity. This defined in vitro system allowed manipulation of the copy number of displayed PA and imposed no significant limitation on the size of the displayed antigen. In contrast to in vivo display systems, the in vitro approach allows all the capsid binding sites to be occupied by the 130-kDa PA-Hoc fusion protein. The PA-T4 particles were immunogenic in mice in the absence of an adjuvant, eliciting strong PA-specific antibodies and anthrax lethal toxin neutralizing antibodies. The in vitro display on phage T4 offers a novel platform for potential construction of customized vaccines against anthrax and other infectious diseases.

  15. Dual Functions of Bacteriophage T4D Gene 28 Product: Structural Component of the Viral Tail Baseplate Central Plug and Cleavage Enzyme for Folyl Polyglutamates II. Folate Metabolism and Polyglutamate Cleavage Activity of Uninfected and Infected Escherichia coli Cells and Bacteriophage Particles

    PubMed Central

    Kozloff, Lloyd M.; Lute, M.

    1981-01-01

    We investigated the role of the T4D bacteriophage gene 28 product in folate metabolism in infected Escherichia coli cells by using antifolate drugs and a newly devised assay for folyl polyglutamate cleavage activity. Preincubation of host E. coli cells with various sulfa drugs inhibited phage production by decreasing the burst size when the phage particles produced an altered gene 28 product (i.e., after infection under permissive conditions with T4D 28ts or T4D am28). In addition, we found that another folate analog, pyrimethamine, also inhibited T4D 28ts production and T4D 28am production, but this analog did not inhibit wild-type T4D production. A temperature-resistant revertant of T4D 28ts was not sensitive to either sulfa drugs or pyrimethamine. We developed an assay to measure the enzymatic cleavage of folyl polyglutamates. The high-molecular-weight folyl polyglutamate substrate was isolated from E. coli B cells infected with T4D am28 in the presence of labeled glutamic acid and was characterized as a folate compound containing 12 to 14 labeled glutamate residues. Extracts of uninfected bacteria liberated glutamate residues from this substrate with a pH optimum of 8.4 to 8.5. Extracts of bacteriophage T4D-infected E. coli B cells exhibited an additional new folyl polyglutamate cleavage activity with a pH optimum of about 6.4 to 6.5, which was clearly distinguished from the preexisting activity in the uninfected host cells. This new activity was induced in E. coli B cells by infection with wild-type T4D and T4D amber mutants 29−, 26−, 27−, 51−, and 10−, but it was not induced under nonpermissive conditions by T4D am28 or by T4D 28ts. Mutations in gene 28 affected the properties of the induced cleavage enzyme. Wild-type T4D-induced cleavage activity was not inhibited by pyrimethamine, whereas the T4D 28ts activity induced at a permissive temperature was inhibited by this folate analog. Folyl polyglutamate cleavage activity characteristic of the

  16. A dual role for substrate S-adenosyl-L-methionine in the methylation reaction with bacteriophage T4 Dam DNA-[N6-adenine]-methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Malygin, E G; Evdokimov, A A; Zinoviev, V V; Ovechkina, L G; Lindstrom, W M; Reich, N O; Schlagman, S L; Hattman, S

    2001-06-01

    The fluorescence of 2-aminopurine ((2)A)-substituted duplexes (contained in the GATC target site) was investigated by titration with T4 Dam DNA-(N6-adenine)-methyltransferase. With an unmethylated target ((2)A/A duplex) or its methylated derivative ((2)A/(m)A duplex), T4 Dam produced up to a 50-fold increase in fluorescence, consistent with (2)A being flipped out of the DNA helix. Though neither S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine nor sinefungin had any significant effect, addition of substrate S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet) sharply reduced the Dam-induced fluorescence with these complexes. In contrast, AdoMet had no effect on the fluorescence increase produced with an (2)A/(2)A double-substituted duplex. Since the (2)A/(m)A duplex cannot be methylated, the AdoMet-induced decrease in fluorescence cannot be due to methylation per se. We propose that T4 Dam alone randomly binds to the asymmetric (2)A/A and (2)A/(m)A duplexes, and that AdoMet induces an allosteric T4 Dam conformational change that promotes reorientation of the enzyme to the strand containing the native base. Thus, AdoMet increases enzyme binding-specificity, in addition to serving as the methyl donor. The results of pre-steady-state methylation kinetics are consistent with this model.

  17. Control of Escherichia coli O157 on beef at 37, 22 and 4 °C by T5-, T1-, T4-and O1-like bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Niu, Y D; Meng, R; Wang, J; Li, J; Johnson, R P; McAllister, T A; Stanford, K

    2015-10-01

    Efficacy of four bacteriophages (phages) and a cocktail for biocontrol of Escherichia coli O157 was assessed on beef samples stored at 4, 22 and 37 °C. Samples (3 × 3 × 1 cm) were contaminated with E. coli O157 (10(4) CFU/cm(2)) and treated with single phages: T5-like (T5), T1-like (T1), T4-like (T4) and O1-like (O1), or a cocktail at two titers: multiplicity of infection (MOI) = 1000 and MOI = 10. In contrast to previous studies, use of virucidal solution prevented over-estimation of phage efficacy. Irrespective of temperature and MOIs, T5 was most (P < 0.001) and O1 least (P < 0.05) effective for biocontrol of E. coli O157, with relative efficacy of other phages temperature dependent. At 4 °C, T1 (P < 0.05) and cocktail (P < 0.001) were more effective than T4. In contrast, T4 was equally (P = 0.08, at 37 °C) or less effective (P = 0.003, at 22 °C) than T5. Phages were more effective (P < 0.001) against E. coli O157 at warmer temperatures and high MOI. As the beef supply chain includes hours of storage or transport at temperatures near 4 °C, this study demonstrates phages could significantly reduce E. coli O157 during this period. PMID:26187829

  18. Mapping the interactions of the single-stranded DNA binding protein of bacteriophage T4 (gp32) with DNA lattices at single nucleotide resolution: polynucleotide binding and cooperativity.

    PubMed

    Jose, Davis; Weitzel, Steven E; Baase, Walter A; Michael, Miya M; von Hippel, Peter H

    2015-10-30

    We here use our site-specific base analog mapping approach to study the interactions and binding equilibria of cooperatively-bound clusters of the single-stranded DNA binding protein (gp32) of the T4 DNA replication complex with longer ssDNA (and dsDNA) lattices. We show that in cooperatively bound clusters the binding free energy appears to be equi-partitioned between the gp32 monomers of the cluster, so that all bind to the ssDNA lattice with comparable affinity, but also that the outer domains of the gp32 monomers at the ends of the cluster can fluctuate on and off the lattice and that the clusters of gp32 monomers can slide along the ssDNA. We also show that at very low binding densities gp32 monomers bind to the ssDNA lattice at random, but that cooperatively bound gp32 clusters bind preferentially at the 5'-end of the ssDNA lattice. We use these results and the gp32 monomer-binding results of the companion paper to propose a detailed model for how gp32 might bind to and interact with ssDNA lattices in its various binding modes, and also consider how these clusters might interact with other components of the T4 DNA replication complex.

  19. Mapping the interactions of the single-stranded DNA binding protein of bacteriophage T4 (gp32) with DNA lattices at single nucleotide resolution: polynucleotide binding and cooperativity.

    PubMed

    Jose, Davis; Weitzel, Steven E; Baase, Walter A; Michael, Miya M; von Hippel, Peter H

    2015-10-30

    We here use our site-specific base analog mapping approach to study the interactions and binding equilibria of cooperatively-bound clusters of the single-stranded DNA binding protein (gp32) of the T4 DNA replication complex with longer ssDNA (and dsDNA) lattices. We show that in cooperatively bound clusters the binding free energy appears to be equi-partitioned between the gp32 monomers of the cluster, so that all bind to the ssDNA lattice with comparable affinity, but also that the outer domains of the gp32 monomers at the ends of the cluster can fluctuate on and off the lattice and that the clusters of gp32 monomers can slide along the ssDNA. We also show that at very low binding densities gp32 monomers bind to the ssDNA lattice at random, but that cooperatively bound gp32 clusters bind preferentially at the 5'-end of the ssDNA lattice. We use these results and the gp32 monomer-binding results of the companion paper to propose a detailed model for how gp32 might bind to and interact with ssDNA lattices in its various binding modes, and also consider how these clusters might interact with other components of the T4 DNA replication complex. PMID:26275774

  20. Naturally resident and exogenously applied T4-like and T5-like bacteriophages can reduce Escherichia coli O157:H7 levels in sheep guts

    PubMed Central

    Raya, Raul R; Oot, Rebecca A; Moore-Maley, Ben; Wieland, Serena; Callaway, Todd R; Kutter, Elizabeth M

    2011-01-01

    In preparing sheep for an in vivo Escherichia coli O157:H7 eradication trial, we found that 20/39 members of a single flock were naturally colonized by O157:H7-infecting phages. Characterization showed these were all one phage type (subsequently named CEV2) infecting 15/16 O157:H7, 7/72 ECOR and common lab strains. Further characterization by PFGE (genome∼120 kb), restriction enzyme digest (DNA appears unmodified), receptor studies (FhuA but not TonB is required for infection) and sequencing (>95% nucleotide identity) showed it is a close relative of the classically studied coliphage T5. Unlike T5, CEV2 infects O157:H7 in vitro, both aerobically and anaerobically, rapidly adsorbing and killing, but resistant mutants regrew within 24 h. When used together with T4-like CEV1 (MOI ∼2 per phage), bacterial killing was longer lasting. CEV2 did not reproduce when co-infecting the same cell as CEV1, presumably succumbing to CEV1's ability to shut off transcription of cytosine-containing DNA. In vivo sheep trials to remove resident O157:H7 showed that a cocktail of CEV2 and CEV1 (∼1011 total PFU) applied once orally was more effective (>99.9% reduction) than CEV1 alone (∼99%) compared to the untreated phage-free control. Those sheep naturally carrying CEV2, receiving no additional phage treatment, had the lowest O157:H7 levels (∼99.99% reduction). These data suggest that phage cocktails are more effective than individual phage in removing O157:H7 that have taken residence if the phage work in concert with one another and that naturally resident O157:H7-infecting phages may prevent O157:H7 gut colonization and be one explanation for the transient O157:H7 colonization in ruminants. PMID:21687531

  1. DNA "melting" proteins. IV. Fluorescence measurements of binding parameters for bacteriophage T4 gene 32-protein to mono-, oligo-, and polynucleotides.

    PubMed

    Kelly, R C; Jensen, D E; von Hippel, P H

    1976-11-25

    The quenching of the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of T4-coded gene 32-protein on binding to nucleotide ligands, which was described in the preceding paper, is here exploited to measure thermodynamic parameters of the single-stranded nucleic acid-gene 32-protein interaction. It is shown that binding of small ligands follows a single site binding isotherm, with association constants increasing from approximately 20 M-1 for phosphate, to approximately 10(3) M for ribose or deoxyribose 5'-phosphate, to approximately 10(4) M-1 for mononucleotides, and to approximately 10(5) M-1 for dinucleoside monophosphates (all in 0.1 M Na+). The measured binding constants appear to be about the same for homologous ribose- and deoxyribose-containing ligands and to be independent of oligonucleotide base sequence and composition. Furthermore, beyond the dinucleotide level and up to octanucleotides, the increase in binding constant with increasing chain length is only about that expected from the statistical factor resulting from the increased number of ways a longer oligonucleotide can form a protein complex. This suggests that the basic binding unit involved in gene 32-protein associations with single-stranded nucleic acids can be approximated by a dinucleoside monophosphate. Oligonucleotides long enough to accomodate two or more protein monomers are characterized by much larger association constants, indicating that binding is cooperative in protein concentration. A cooperativity parameter (omegac) of approximately 10(3) is estimated from these data, in good agreement with that deduced from the application of ligand-perturbed helix in equilibrium coil transition calculations. Values of association constants (Kcomegac) of approximately 10(8) M-1 (in 0.1 M Na+) and site size (nc) of approximately 5 (+/-1) nucleotide residues/protein monomer are determined by the fluorescence titration technique for the cooperative binding of gene 32-protein to both poly(dA) and poly(rA); these

  2. Measurement of steady-state kinetic parameters for DNA unwinding by the bacteriophage T4 Dda helicase: use of peptide nucleic acids to trap single-stranded DNA products of helicase reactions

    PubMed Central

    Nanduri, Bindu; Eoff, Robert L.; Tackett, Alan J.; Raney, Kevin D.

    2001-01-01

    Measurement of steady-state rates of unwinding of double-stranded oligonucleotides by helicases is hampered due to rapid reannealing of the single-stranded DNA products. Including an oligonucleotide in the reaction mixture which can hybridize with one of the single strands can prevent reannealing. However, helicases bind to single-stranded DNA, therefore the additional oligonucleotide can sequester the enzyme, leading to slower observed rates for unwinding. To circumvent this problem, the oligonucleotide that serves as a trap was replaced with a strand of peptide nucleic acid (PNA). Fluorescence polarization was used to determine that a 15mer PNA strand does not bind to the bacteriophage T4 Dda helicase. Steady-state kinetic parameters of unwinding catalyzed by Dda were determined by using PNA as a trapping strand. The substrate consisted of a partial duplex with 15 nt of single-stranded DNA and 15 bp. In the presence of 250 nM substrate and 1 nM Dda, the rate of unwinding in the presence of the DNA trapping strand was 0.30 nM s–1 whereas the rate was 1.34 nM s–1 in the presence of the PNA trapping strand. PNA prevents reannealing of single-stranded DNA products, but does not sequester the helicase. This assay will prove useful in defining the complete kinetic mechanism for unwinding of oligonucleotide substrates by this helicase. PMID:11433029

  3. Models for the binary complex of bacteriophage T4 gp59 helicase loading protein: gp32 single-stranded DNA-BINDING protein and ternary complex with pseudo-Y junction DNA.

    PubMed

    Hinerman, Jennifer M; Dignam, J David; Mueser, Timothy C

    2012-05-25

    Bacteriophage T4 gp59 helicase assembly protein (gp59) is required for loading of gp41 replicative helicase onto DNA protected by gp32 single-stranded DNA-binding protein. The gp59 protein recognizes branched DNA structures found at replication and recombination sites. Binding of gp32 protein (full-length and deletion constructs) to gp59 protein measured by isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrates that the gp32 protein C-terminal A-domain is essential for protein-protein interaction in the absence of DNA. Sedimentation velocity experiments with gp59 protein and gp32ΔB protein (an N-terminal B-domain deletion) show that these proteins are monomers but form a 1:1 complex with a dissociation constant comparable with that determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. Small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) studies indicate that the gp59 protein is a prolate monomer, consistent with the crystal structure and hydrodynamic properties determined from sedimentation velocity experiments. SAXS experiments also demonstrate that gp32ΔB protein is a prolate monomer with an elongated A-domain protruding from the core. Fitting structures of gp59 protein and the gp32 core into the SAXS-derived molecular envelope supports a model for the gp59 protein-gp32ΔB protein complex. Our earlier work demonstrated that gp59 protein attracts full-length gp32 protein to pseudo-Y junctions. A model of the gp59 protein-DNA complex, modified to accommodate new SAXS data for the binary complex together with mutational analysis of gp59 protein, is presented in the accompanying article (Dolezal, D., Jones, C. E., Lai, X., Brister, J. R., Mueser, T. C., Nossal, N. G., and Hinton, D. M. (2012) J. Biol. Chem. 287, 18596-18607).

  4. Models for the Binary Complex of Bacteriophage T4 Gp59 Helicase Loading Protein. GP32 Single-Stranded DNA-Binding Protein and Ternary Complex with Pseudo-Y Junction DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Hinerman, Jennifer M.; Dignam, J. David; Mueser, Timothy C.

    2012-04-05

    The bacteriophage T4 gp59 helicase assembly protein (gp59) is required for loading of gp41 replicative helicase onto DNA protected by gp32 single-stranded DNA-binding protein. The gp59 protein recognizes branched DNA structures found at replication and recombination sites. Binding of gp32 protein (full-length and deletion constructs) to gp59 protein measured by isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrates that the gp32 protein C-terminal A-domain is essential for protein-protein interaction in the absence of DNA. Sedimentation velocity experiments with gp59 protein and gp32ΔB protein (an N-terminal B-domain deletion) show that these proteins are monomers but form a 1:1 complex with a dissociation constant comparable with that determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. Small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) studies indicate that the gp59 protein is a prolate monomer, consistent with the crystal structure and hydrodynamic properties determined from sedimentation velocity experiments. SAXS experiments also demonstrate that gp32ΔB protein is a prolate monomer with an elongated A-domain protruding from the core. Moreover, fitting structures of gp59 protein and the gp32 core into the SAXS-derived molecular envelope supports a model for the gp59 protein-gp32ΔB protein complex. Our earlier work demonstrated that gp59 protein attracts full-length gp32 protein to pseudo-Y junctions. A model of the gp59 protein-DNA complex, modified to accommodate new SAXS data for the binary complex together with mutational analysis of gp59 protein, is presented in the accompanying article (Dolezal, D., Jones, C. E., Lai, X., Brister, J. R., Mueser, T. C., Nossal, N. G., and Hinton, D. M. (2012) J. Biol. Chem. 287, 18596–18607).

  5. Inactivation of Gram-Negative Bacteria by Lysozyme, Denatured Lysozyme, and Lysozyme-Derived Peptides under High Hydrostatic Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Masschalck, Barbara; Van Houdt, Rob; Van Haver, Ellen G. R.; Michiels, Chris W.

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the inactivation of six gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Salmonella enteritidis, Shigella sonnei, and Shigella flexneri) by high hydrostatic pressure treatment in the presence of hen egg-white lysozyme, partially or completely denatured lysozyme, or a synthetic cationic peptide derived from either hen egg white or coliphage T4 lysozyme. None of these compounds had a bactericidal or bacteriostatic effect on any of the tested bacteria at atmospheric pressure. Under high pressure, all bacteria except both Salmonella species showed higher inactivation in the presence of 100 μg of lysozyme/ml than without this additive, indicating that pressure sensitized the bacteria to lysozyme. This extra inactivation by lysozyme was accompanied by the formation of spheroplasts. Complete knockout of the muramidase enzymatic activity of lysozyme by heat treatment fully eliminated its bactericidal effect under pressure, but partially denatured lysozyme was still active against some bacteria. Contrary to some recent reports, these results indicate that enzymatic activity is indispensable for the antimicrobial activity of lysozyme. However, partial heat denaturation extended the activity spectrum of lysozyme under pressure to serovar Typhimurium, suggesting enhanced uptake of partially denatured lysozyme through the serovar Typhimurium outer membrane. All test bacteria were sensitized by high pressure to a peptide corresponding to amino acid residues 96 to 116 of hen egg white, and all except E. coli and P. fluorescens were sensitized by high pressure to a peptide corresponding to amino acid residues 143 to 155 of T4 lysozyme. Since they are not enzymatically active, these peptides probably have a different mechanism of action than all lysozyme polypeptides. PMID:11133464

  6. Protein engineering with biosynthesized libraries from Bordetella bronchiseptica bacteriophage.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Tom Z; Overstreet, Cathie M; Moody, Issa S; Weiss, Gregory A

    2013-01-01

    Phage display offers a powerful approach to engineer protein affinity. A naturally occurring analog to phage display, the Bordetella bronchiseptica bacteriophage (BP) employs a highly variable protein termed the major tropism determinant (Mtd) to recognize its dynamic host. Propagation of BP provides a self-made phage library (SMPL) with vast numbers of phage particles, each displaying a single Mtd variant. We report applying the diversity of the BP-SMPL to access a tyrosine-rich library of Mtd variants. Expression of the SMPL-engineered Mtd variant as a GST-bound fusion protein demonstrated specific binding to the target T4 lysozyme with dissociation constants in the sub-micromolar range. The results guide future experiments with SMPLs applied to protein engineering.

  7. Structural analysis of bacteriophage-encoded peptidoglycan hydrolase domain KMV36C: crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hecke, Kristof; Briers, Yves; Derua, Rita; Waelkens, Etienne; Lavigne, Rob; Van Meervelt, Luc

    2008-04-01

    Crystallization and X-ray data collection of the C-terminus of gp36 from bacteriophage ϕKMV (KMV36C) are reported. The C-terminus of gp36 of bacteriophage ϕKMV (KMV36C) functions as a particle-associated muramidase, presumably as part of the injection needle of the ϕKMV genome during infection. Crystals of KMV36C were obtained by hanging-drop vapour diffusion and diffracted to a resolution of 1.6 Å. The crystals belong to the cubic space group P432, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 102.52 Å. KMV36C shows 30% sequence identity to T4 lysozyme (PDB code)

  8. Lysozyme Crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    To the crystallographer, this may not be a diamond but it is just as priceless. A Lysozyme crystal grown in orbit looks great under a microscope, but the real test is X-ray crystallography. The colors are caused by polarizing filters. Proteins can form crystals generated by rows and columns of molecules that form up like soldiers on a parade ground. Shining X-rays through a crystal will produce a pattern of dots that can be decoded to reveal the arrangement of the atoms in the molecules making up the crystal. Like the troops in formation, uniformity and order are everything in X-ray crystallography. X-rays have much shorter wavelengths than visible light, so the best looking crystals under the microscope won't necessarily pass muster under the X-rays. In order to have crystals to use for X-ray diffraction studies, crystals need to be fairly large and well ordered. Scientists also need lots of crystals since exposure to air, the process of X-raying them, and other factors destroy them. Growing protein crystals in space has yielded striking results. Lysozyme's structure is well known and it has become a standard in many crystallization studies on Earth and in space.

  9. Free T4 test

    MedlinePlus

    ... thyroid) Eating a lot of foods that contain iodine (very rare, and only if there is a problem with the thyroid) A lower than normal level of T4 may be due to: Hypothyroidism (including Hashimoto disease and other disorders involving an ...

  10. Delineation of an evolutionary salvage pathway by compensatory mutations of a defective lysozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Jucovic, M.; Poteete, A. R.

    1998-01-01

    Model-free approaches (random mutagenesis, DNA shuffling) in combination with more "rational," three-dimensional information-guided randomization have been used for directed evolution of lysozyme activity in a defective T4 lysozyme mutant. A specialized lysozyme cloning vector phage, derived from phage lambda, depends upon T4 lysozyme function for its ability to form plaques. The substitution W138P in T4 lysozyme totally abolishes its plaque-forming ability. Compensating mutations in W138P T4 lysozyme after sequential random mutagenesis of the whole gene as well as after targeted randomization of residues in the vicinity of Trp138 were selected. In a second stage, these mutations were randomly recombined by the recombinatorial PCR method of DNA shuffling. Shuffled and selected W138P T4 lysozyme variants provide the hybrid lambda phage with sufficient lysozyme activity to produce normal-size plaques, even at elevated temperature (42 degrees C). The individual mutations with the highest compensatory information for W138P repair are the substitutions A146F and A146M, selected after targeted randomization of three residues in the neighborhood of Trp138 by combinatorial mutagenesis. The best evolved W138P T4 lysozymes, however, accumulated mutations originating from both randomly mutagenized as well as target-randomized variants. PMID:9792108

  11. Expression of lysozymes from Erwinia amylovora phages and Erwinia genomes and inhibition by a bacterial protein.

    PubMed

    Müller, Ina; Gernold, Marina; Schneider, Bernd; Geider, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Genes coding for lysozyme-inhibiting proteins (Ivy) were cloned from the chromosomes of the plant pathogens Erwinia amylovora and Erwinia pyrifoliae. The product interfered not only with activity of hen egg white lysozyme, but also with an enzyme from E. amylovora phage ΦEa1h. We have expressed lysozyme genes from the genomes of three Erwinia species in Escherichia coli. The lysozymes expressed from genes of the E. amylovora phages ΦEa104 and ΦEa116, Erwinia chromosomes and Arabidopsis thaliana were not affected by Ivy. The enzyme from bacteriophage ΦEa1h was fused at the N- or C-terminus to other peptides. Compared to the intact lysozyme, a His-tag reduced its lytic activity about 10-fold and larger fusion proteins abolished activity completely. Specific protease cleavage restored lysozyme activity of a GST-fusion. The bacteriophage-encoded lysozymes were more active than the enzymes from bacterial chromosomes. Viral lyz genes were inserted into a broad-host range vector, and transfer to E. amylovora inhibited cell growth. Inserted in the yeast Pichia pastoris, the ΦEa1h-lysozyme was secreted and also inhibited by Ivy. Here we describe expression of unrelated cloned 'silent' lyz genes from Erwinia chromosomes and a novel interference of bacterial Ivy proteins with a viral lysozyme.

  12. Thermodynamic Treatment of Bacteriophage T4B Adsorption Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Gamow, Rustem I.

    1969-01-01

    The activation energy was measured for the reaction of inactive phage becoming active in the presence and in the absence of l-tryptophan and was found to be about 50% lower in the former case. PMID:4897123

  13. Antiviral effect of cationic compounds on bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Ly-Chatain, Mai H.; Moussaoui, Saliha; Vera, Annabelle; Rigobello, Véronique; Demarigny, Yann

    2013-01-01

    The antiviral activity of several cationic compounds – cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), chitosan, nisin, and lysozyme – was investigated on the bacteriophage c2 (DNA head and non-contractile tail) infecting Lactococcus strains and the bacteriophage MS2 (F-specific RNA) infecting E. coli. Firstly, these activities were evaluated in a phosphate buffer pH 7 – 10 mM. The CTAB had a virucidal effect on the Lactococcus bacteriophages, but not on the MS2. After 1 min of contact with 0.125 mM CTAB, the c2 population was reduced from 6 to 1.5 log(pfu)/mL and completely deactivated at 1 mM. On the contrary, chitosan inhibited the MS2 more than it did the bacteriophages c2. No antiviral effect was observed for the nisin or the lysozyme on bacteriophages after 1 min of treatment. A 1 and 2.5 log reduction was respectively observed for nisin and lysozyme when the treatment time increased (5 or 10 min). These results showed that the antiviral effect depended both on the virus and structure of the antimicrobial compounds. The antiviral activity of these compounds was also evaluated in different physico-chemical conditions and in complex matrices. The antiviral activity of CTAB was impaired in acid pH and with an increase of the ionic strength. These results might be explained by the electrostatic interactions between cationic compounds and negatively charged particles such as bacteriophages or other compounds in a matrix. Milk proved to be protective suggesting the components of food could interfere with antimicrobial compounds. PMID:23487495

  14. LPS-Activated Monocytes Are Unresponsive to T4 Phage and T4-Generated Escherichia coli Lysate

    PubMed Central

    Bocian, Katarzyna; Borysowski, Jan; Zarzycki, Michał; Wierzbicki, Piotr; Kłosowska, Danuta; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Korczak-Kowalska, Grażyna; Górski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of data shows that bacteriophages can interact with different kinds of immune cells. The objective of this study was to investigate whether T4 bacteriophage and T4-generated Escherichia coli lysate affect functions of monocytes, the key population of immune cells involved in antibacterial immunity. To that end, we evaluated how T4 and E. coli lysate influence the expression of main costimulatory molecules including CD40, CD80 and CD86, TLR2, TLR4 on monocytes, as well as the production of IL-6 and IL-12 in cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Separate experiments were performed on unactivated and LPS-activated PBMCs cultures. Both studied preparations significantly increased the percentage of CD14+CD16-CD40+ and CD14+CD16-CD80+ monocytes in unactivated PBMCs cultures, as well as the concentration of IL-6 and IL-12 in culture supernates. However, neither purified T4 nor E. coli lysate had any significant effect on monocytes in LPS-activated PBMCs cultures. We conclude that LPS-activated monocytes are unresponsive to phages and products of phage-induced lysis of bacteria. This study is highly relevant to phage therapy because it suggests that in patients with infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria the administration of phage preparations to patients and lysis of bacteria by phages are not likely to overly stimulate monocytes. PMID:27630621

  15. LPS-Activated Monocytes Are Unresponsive to T4 Phage and T4-Generated Escherichia coli Lysate.

    PubMed

    Bocian, Katarzyna; Borysowski, Jan; Zarzycki, Michał; Wierzbicki, Piotr; Kłosowska, Danuta; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Korczak-Kowalska, Grażyna; Górski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of data shows that bacteriophages can interact with different kinds of immune cells. The objective of this study was to investigate whether T4 bacteriophage and T4-generated Escherichia coli lysate affect functions of monocytes, the key population of immune cells involved in antibacterial immunity. To that end, we evaluated how T4 and E. coli lysate influence the expression of main costimulatory molecules including CD40, CD80 and CD86, TLR2, TLR4 on monocytes, as well as the production of IL-6 and IL-12 in cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Separate experiments were performed on unactivated and LPS-activated PBMCs cultures. Both studied preparations significantly increased the percentage of CD14(+)CD16(-)CD40(+) and CD14(+)CD16(-)CD80(+) monocytes in unactivated PBMCs cultures, as well as the concentration of IL-6 and IL-12 in culture supernates. However, neither purified T4 nor E. coli lysate had any significant effect on monocytes in LPS-activated PBMCs cultures. We conclude that LPS-activated monocytes are unresponsive to phages and products of phage-induced lysis of bacteria. This study is highly relevant to phage therapy because it suggests that in patients with infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria the administration of phage preparations to patients and lysis of bacteria by phages are not likely to overly stimulate monocytes. PMID:27630621

  16. Differential Bacteriophage Mortality on Exposure to Copper ▿

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinyu; Dennehy, John J.

    2011-01-01

    Many studies report that copper can be used to control microbial growth, including that of viruses. We determined the rates of copper-mediated inactivation for a wide range of bacteriophages. We used two methods to test the effect of copper on bacteriophage survival. One method involved placing small volumes of bacteriophage lysate on copper and stainless steel coupons. Following exposure, metal coupons were rinsed with lysogeny broth, and the resulting fluid was serially diluted and plated on agar with the corresponding bacterial host. The second method involved adding copper sulfate (CuSO4) to bacteriophage lysates to a final concentration of 5 mM. Aliquots were removed from the mixture, serially diluted, and plated with the appropriate bacterial host. Significant mortality was observed among the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) bacteriophages Φ6 and Φ8, the single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) bacteriophage PP7, the ssDNA bacteriophage ΦX174, and the dsDNA bacteriophage PM2. However, the dsDNA bacteriophages PRD1, T4, and λ were relatively unaffected by copper. Interestingly, lipid-containing bacteriophages were most susceptible to copper toxicity. In addition, in the first experimental method, the pattern of bacteriophage Φ6 survival over time showed a plateau in mortality after lysates dried out. This finding suggests that copper's effect on bacteriophage is mediated by the presence of water. PMID:21841029

  17. Campylobacter bacteriophages and bacteriophage therapy.

    PubMed

    Connerton, P L; Timms, A R; Connerton, I F

    2011-08-01

    Members of the genus Campylobacter are frequently responsible for human enteric disease with occasionally very serious outcomes. Much of this disease burden is thought to arise from consumption of contaminated poultry products. More than 80% of poultry in the UK harbour Campylobacter as a part of their intestinal flora. To address this unacceptably high prevalence, various interventions have been suggested and evaluated. Among these is the novel approach of using Campylobacter-specific bacteriophages, which are natural predators of the pathogen. To optimize their use as therapeutic agents, it is important to have a comprehensive understanding of the bacteriophages that infect Campylobacter, and how they can affect their host bacteria. This review will focus on many aspects of Campylobacter-specific bacteriophages including: their first isolation in the 1960s, their use in bacteriophage typing schemes, their isolation from the different biological sources and genomic characterization. As well as their use as therapeutic agents to reduce Campylobacter in poultry their future potential, including their use in bio-sanitization of food, will be explored. The evolutionary consequences of naturally occurring bacteriophage infection that have come to light through investigations of bacteriophages in the poultry ecosystem will also be discussed.

  18. Nanoscale bacteriophage biosensors beyond phage display.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Wook; Song, Jangwon; Hwang, Mintai P; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriophages are traditionally used for the development of phage display technology. Recently, their nanosized dimensions and ease with which genetic modifications can be made to their structure and function have put them in the spotlight towards their use in a variety of biosensors. In particular, the expression of any protein or peptide on the extraluminal surface of bacteriophages is possible by genetically engineering the genome. In addition, the relatively short replication time of bacteriophages offers researchers the ability to generate mass quantities of any given bacteriophage-based biosensor. Coupled with the emergence of various biomarkers in the clinic as a means to determine pathophysiological states, the development of current and novel technologies for their detection and quantification is imperative. In this review, we categorize bacteriophages by their morphology into M13-based filamentous bacteriophages and T4- or T7-based icosahedral bacteriophages, and examine how such advantages are utilized across a variety of biosensors. In essence, we take a comprehensive approach towards recent trends in bacteriophage-based biosensor applications and discuss their outlook with regards to the field of biotechnology.

  19. Nanoscale bacteriophage biosensors beyond phage display

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Wook; Song, Jangwon; Hwang, Mintai P; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriophages are traditionally used for the development of phage display technology. Recently, their nanosized dimensions and ease with which genetic modifications can be made to their structure and function have put them in the spotlight towards their use in a variety of biosensors. In particular, the expression of any protein or peptide on the extraluminal surface of bacteriophages is possible by genetically engineering the genome. In addition, the relatively short replication time of bacteriophages offers researchers the ability to generate mass quantities of any given bacteriophage-based biosensor. Coupled with the emergence of various biomarkers in the clinic as a means to determine pathophysiological states, the development of current and novel technologies for their detection and quantification is imperative. In this review, we categorize bacteriophages by their morphology into M13-based filamentous bacteriophages and T4- or T7-based icosahedral bacteriophages, and examine how such advantages are utilized across a variety of biosensors. In essence, we take a comprehensive approach towards recent trends in bacteriophage-based biosensor applications and discuss their outlook with regards to the field of biotechnology. PMID:24143096

  20. A novel approach for separating bacteriophages from other bacteriophages using affinity chromatography and phage display

    PubMed Central

    Ceglarek, Izabela; Piotrowicz, Agnieszka; Lecion, Dorota; Miernikiewicz, Paulina; Owczarek, Barbara; Hodyra, Katarzyna; Harhala, Marek; Górski, Andrzej; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2013-01-01

    Practical applications of bacteriophages in medicine and biotechnology induce a great need for technologies of phage purification. None of the popular methods offer solutions for separation of a phage from another similar phage. We used affinity chromatography combined with competitive phage display (i) to purify T4 bacteriophage from bacterial debris and (ii) to separate T4 from other contaminating bacteriophages. In ‘competitive phage display’ bacterial cells produced both wild types of the proteins (expression from the phage genome) and the protein fusions with affinity tags (expression from the expression vectors). Fusion proteins were competitively incorporated into the phage capsid. It allowed effective separation of T4 from a contaminating phage on standard affinity resins. PMID:24225840

  1. Molecular Biology and Biotechnology of Bacteriophage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onodera, Kazukiyo

    The development of the molecular biology of bacteriophage such as T4, lambda and filamentous phages was described and the process that the fundamental knowledge obtained in this field has subsequently led us to the technology of phage display was introduced.

  2. Lytic bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Manan

    2013-01-01

    Foodborne illnesses resulting from the consumption of produce commodities contaminated with enteric pathogens continue to be a significant public health issue. Lytic bacteriophages may provide an effective and natural intervention to reduce bacterial pathogens on fresh and fresh-cut produce commodities. The use of multi-phage cocktails specific for a single pathogen has been most frequently assessed on produce commodities to minimize the development of bacteriophage insensitive mutants (BIM) in target pathogen populations. Regulatory approval for the use of several lytic phage products specific for bacterial pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in foods and on food processing surfaces has been granted by various agencies in the US and other countries, possibly allowing for the more widespread use of bacteriophages in the decontamination of fresh and minimally processed produce. Research studies have shown lytic bacteriophages specific for E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes have been effective in reducing pathogen populations on leafy greens, sprouts and tomatoes. PMID:24228223

  3. Chlamydia bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Śliwa-Dominiak, Joanna; Suszyńska, Ewa; Pawlikowska, Małgorzata; Deptuła, Wiesław

    2013-11-01

    Phages are called "good viruses" due to their ability to infect and kill pathogenic bacteria. Chlamydia are small, Gram-negative (G-) microbes that can be dangerous to human and animals. In humans, these bacteria are etiological agents of diseases such as psittacosis or respiratory tract diseases, while in animals, the infection may result in enteritis in cattle and chronic bowel diseases, as well as miscarriages in sheep. The first-known representative of chlamydiaphages was Chp1. It was discovered in Chlamydia psittaci isolates. Since then, four more species of chlamydiaphages have been identified [Chp2, Chp3, φCPG1 φCPAR39 (φCpn1) and Chp4]. All of them were shown to infect Chlamydia species. This paper described all known chlamydiaphages. They were characterised in terms of origin, host range, and their molecular structure. The review concerns the characterisation of bacteriophages that infects pathogenic and dangerous bacteria with unusual, intracellular life cycles that are pathogenic. In the era of antibiotic resistance, it is difficult to cure chlamydophilosis. Those bacteriophages can be an alternative to antibiotics, but before this happens, we need to get to know chlamydiaphages better. PMID:23903989

  4. Chlamydia bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Śliwa-Dominiak, Joanna; Suszyńska, Ewa; Pawlikowska, Małgorzata; Deptuła, Wiesław

    2013-11-01

    Phages are called "good viruses" due to their ability to infect and kill pathogenic bacteria. Chlamydia are small, Gram-negative (G-) microbes that can be dangerous to human and animals. In humans, these bacteria are etiological agents of diseases such as psittacosis or respiratory tract diseases, while in animals, the infection may result in enteritis in cattle and chronic bowel diseases, as well as miscarriages in sheep. The first-known representative of chlamydiaphages was Chp1. It was discovered in Chlamydia psittaci isolates. Since then, four more species of chlamydiaphages have been identified [Chp2, Chp3, φCPG1 φCPAR39 (φCpn1) and Chp4]. All of them were shown to infect Chlamydia species. This paper described all known chlamydiaphages. They were characterised in terms of origin, host range, and their molecular structure. The review concerns the characterisation of bacteriophages that infects pathogenic and dangerous bacteria with unusual, intracellular life cycles that are pathogenic. In the era of antibiotic resistance, it is difficult to cure chlamydophilosis. Those bacteriophages can be an alternative to antibiotics, but before this happens, we need to get to know chlamydiaphages better.

  5. Template reporter bacteriophage platform and multiple bacterial detection assays based thereon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodridge, Lawrence (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The invention is a method for the development of assays for the simultaneous detection of multiple bacteria. A bacteria of interest is selected. A host bacteria containing plasmid DNA from a T even bacteriophage that infects the bacteria of interest is infected with T4 reporter bacteriophage. After infection, the progeny bacteriophage are plating onto the bacteria of interest. The invention also includes single-tube, fast and sensitive assays which utilize the novel method.

  6. Structure of the Small Outer Capsid Protein, Soc: A Clamp for Stabilizing Capsids of T4-like Phages

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Li; Fokine, Andrei; O'Donnell, Erin; Rao, Venigalla B.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2010-07-22

    Many viruses need to stabilize their capsid structure against DNA pressure and for survival in hostile environments. The 9-kDa outer capsid protein (Soc) of bacteriophage T4, which stabilizes the virus, attaches to the capsid during the final stage of maturation. There are 870 Soc molecules that act as a 'glue' between neighboring hexameric capsomers, forming a 'cage' that stabilizes the T4 capsid against extremes of pH and temperature. Here we report a 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of Soc from the bacteriophage RB69, a close relative of T4. The RB69 crystal structure and a homology model of T4 Soc were fitted into the cryoelectron microscopy reconstruction of the T4 capsid. This established the region of Soc that interacts with the major capsid protein and suggested a mechanism, verified by extensive mutational and biochemical studies, for stabilization of the capsid in which the Soc trimers act as clamps between neighboring capsomers. The results demonstrate the factors involved in stabilizing not only the capsids of T4-like bacteriophages but also many other virus capsids.

  7. [Cloning and expression of bacteriophage FMV lysocyme gene in cells of yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris].

    PubMed

    Kozlov, D G; Cheperigin, S E; Chestkov, A V; Krylov, V N; Tsygankov, Iu D

    2010-03-01

    Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the gene for soluble lysozyme of bacteriophage FMV from Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria were conducted in yeast cells. Comparable efficiency of two lysozyme expression variants (as intracellular or secreted proteins) was estimated in cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris. Under laboratory conditions, yeast S. cerevisiae proved to be more effective producer of phage lysozyme than P. pastoris, the yield of the enzyme in the secreted form being significantly higher than that produced in the intracellular form. PMID:20391778

  8. Structure of the Three N-Terminal Immunoglobulin Domains of the Highly Immunogenic Outer Capsid Protein from a T4-Like Bacteriophage▿

    PubMed Central

    Fokine, Andrei; Islam, Mohammad Z.; Zhang, Zhihong; Bowman, Valorie D.; Rao, Venigalla B.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    The head of bacteriophage T4 is decorated with 155 copies of the highly antigenic outer capsid protein (Hoc). One Hoc molecule binds near the center of each hexameric capsomer. Hoc is dispensable for capsid assembly and has been used to display pathogenic antigens on the surface of T4. Here we report the crystal structure of a protein containing the first three of four domains of Hoc from bacteriophage RB49, a close relative of T4. The structure shows an approximately linear arrangement of the protein domains. Each of these domains has an immunoglobulin-like fold, frequently found in cell attachment molecules. In addition, we report biochemical data suggesting that Hoc can bind to Escherichia coli, supporting the hypothesis that Hoc could attach the phage capsids to bacterial surfaces and perhaps also to other organisms. The capacity for such reversible adhesion probably provides survival advantages to the bacteriophage. PMID:21632759

  9. Protein determinants of phage T4 lysis inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Moussa, Samir H; Kuznetsov, Vladimir; Tran, Tram Anh T; Sacchettini, James C; Young, Ry

    2012-01-01

    Genetic studies have established that lysis inhibition in bacteriophage T4 infections occurs when the RI antiholin inhibits the lethal hole-forming function of the T holin. The T-holin is composed of a single N-terminal transmembrane domain and a ∼20 kDa periplasmic domain. It accumulates harmlessly throughout the bacteriophage infection cycle until suddenly causing permeabilization of the inner membrane, thereby initiating lysis. The RI antiholin has a SAR domain that directs its secretion to the periplasm, where it can either be inactivated and degraded or be activated as a specific inhibitor of T. Previously, it was shown that the interaction of the soluble domains of these two proteins within the periplasm was necessary for lysis inhibition. We have purified and characterized the periplasmic domains of both T and RI. Both proteins were purified in a modified host that allows disulfide bond formation in the cytoplasm, due to the functional requirement of conserved disulfide bonds. Analytical centrifugation and circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that RI was monomeric and exhibited ∼80% alpha-helical content. In contrast, T exhibited a propensity to oligomerize and precipitate at high concentrations. Incubation of RI with T inhibits this aggregation and results in a complex of equimolar T and RI content. Although gel filtration analysis indicated a complex mass of 45 kDa, intermediate between the predicted 30 kDa heterodimer and 60 kDa heterotetramer, sedimentation velocity analysis indicated that the predominant species is the former. These results suggest that RI binding to T is necessary and sufficient for lysis inhibition. PMID:22389108

  10. Identification and characterization of a novel phage-type like lysozyme from Manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jianfeng; Wang, Rui; Yang, Feng; Zhao, Liqiang; Qin, Yanjie; Zhang, Guofan; Yan, Xiwu

    2014-11-01

    A novel lysozyme gene (RpLysPh) with high similarity to the bacteriophage lysozymes was identified in Manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum. The full length cDNA of RpLysPh is 828bp and contains a 462bp open reading frame (ORF) that codes for a 154 amino acid protein. Multiple sequence alignment analysis revealed that the three residues essential for catalytic activity in phage-type lysozyme (Glu(20), Asp(29), and Thr(35)) are conserved in RpLysPh. The comparison of the 3D models of RpLysPh and Coxiella burnetii lysozyme also suggested that the active sites involved in the binding of substrate have similar conformations. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that RpLysPh shares a similar origin with the bacterial phage-type lysozyme group. The highest level of expression of RpLysPh was observed in hemocytes, followed by mantle. Induction of RpLysPh expression was observed in gills in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), peptidoglycan (PGN), polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (Poly(I:C)), and whole glucan particles (WGP) challenge. The recombinant protein of RpLysPh showed antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

  11. The Tape Measure Protein of the Staphylococcus aureus Bacteriophage vB_SauS-phiIPLA35 Has an Active Muramidase Domain

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Rubio, Lorena; Gutiérrez, Dolores; Martínez, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Ana; Götz, Friedrich

    2012-01-01

    Tailed double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) bacteriophages frequently harbor structural proteins displaying peptidoglycan hydrolytic activities. The tape measure protein from Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophage vB_SauS-phiIPLA35 has a lysozyme-like and a peptidase_M23 domain. This report shows that the lysozyme-like domain (TG1) has muramidase activity and exhibits in vitro lytic activity against live S. aureus cells, an activity that could eventually find use in the treatment of infections. PMID:22729533

  12. PROTEOLYTIC REMOVAL OF THE CARBOXYL TERMINUS OF THE T4 GENE 32 HELIX-DESTABILIZING PROTEIN ALTERS THE T4 IN VITRO REPLICATION COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, R.L.; Alberts, B.M.; Hosoda, J.

    1980-07-01

    The proteolytic removal of about 60 amino acids from the COOH terminus of the bacteriophage T4 helix-destabilizing protein (gene 32 protein) produces 32*I, a 27,000-dalton fragment which still binds tightly and cooperatively to single-stranded DNA. The substitution of 32*I protein for intact 32 protein in the seven-protein T4 replication complex results in dramatic changes in some of the reactions catalyzed by this in vitro DNA replication system, while leaving others largely unperturbed. (1) Like intact 32 protein, the 32*I protein promotes DNA synthesis by the DNA polymerase when the T4 polymerase accessory proteins (gene 44/62 and 45 proteins) are also present. The host helix-destabilizing protein (Escherichia coli ssb protein) cannot replace the 32*I protein for this synthesis. (2) Unlike intact 32 protein, 32*I protein strongly inhibits DNA synthesis catalyzed by the T4 DNA polymerase alone on a primed single-stranded DNA template. (3) Unlike intact 32 protein, the 32*I protein strongly inhibits RNA primer synthesis catalyzed by the T4 gene 41 and 61 proteins and also reduces the efficiency of RNA primer utilization. As a result, de novo DNA chain starts are blocked completely in the complete T4 replication system, and no lagging strand DNA synthesis occurs. (4) The 32*I protein does not bind to either the T4 DNA polymerase or to the T4 gene 61 protein in the absence of DNA; these associations (detected with intact 32 protein) would therefore appear to be essential for the normal control of 32 protein activity, and to account at least in part for observations 2 and 3, above. We propose that the COOH-terminal domain of intact 32 protein functions to guide its interactions with the T4 DNA polymerase and the T4 gene 61 RNA-priming protein. When this domain is removed, as in 32*I protein, the helix destabilization induced by the protein is controlled inadequately, so that polymerizing enzymes tend to be displaced from the growing 3{prime}-OH end of a

  13. Bacteriophages Infecting Propionibacterium acnes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Viruses specifically infecting bacteria, or bacteriophages, are the most common biological entity in the biosphere. As such, they greatly influence bacteria, both in terms of enhancing their virulence and in terms of killing them. Since the first identification of bacteriophages in the beginning of the 20th century, researchers have been fascinated by these microorganisms and their ability to eradicate bacteria. In this review, we will cover the history of the Propionibacterium acnes bacteriophage research and point out how bacteriophage research has been an important part of the research on P. acnes itself. We will further discuss recent findings from phage genome sequencing and the identification of phage sequence signatures in clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs). Finally, the potential to use P. acnes bacteriophages as a therapeutic strategy to combat P. acnes-associated diseases will be discussed. PMID:23691509

  14. Bacteriophages infecting Propionibacterium acnes.

    PubMed

    Brüggemann, Holger; Lood, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Viruses specifically infecting bacteria, or bacteriophages, are the most common biological entity in the biosphere. As such, they greatly influence bacteria, both in terms of enhancing their virulence and in terms of killing them. Since the first identification of bacteriophages in the beginning of the 20th century, researchers have been fascinated by these microorganisms and their ability to eradicate bacteria. In this review, we will cover the history of the Propionibacterium acnes bacteriophage research and point out how bacteriophage research has been an important part of the research on P. acnes itself. We will further discuss recent findings from phage genome sequencing and the identification of phage sequence signatures in clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs). Finally, the potential to use P. acnes bacteriophages as a therapeutic strategy to combat P. acnes-associated diseases will be discussed.

  15. Repairing DNA damage in xeroderma pigmentosum: T4N5 lotion and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Zahid, Sarwar; Brownell, Isaac

    2008-04-01

    Patients with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) have defective DNA repair and are at a high risk for cutaneous malignancies. Standard treatments for XP are limited in scope and effectiveness. Understanding the molecular etiology of XP has led to the development of novel therapeutic approaches, including enzyme and gene therapies. One new topical treatment utilizing bacteriophage T4 endonuclease 5 (T4N5) in a liposomal lotion is currently in clinical trials and has received a Fast Track designation from the FDA. Gene therapy for XP, while making leaps in preclinical studies, has been slower to develop due to tactical hurdles, but seems to have much potential for future treatment. If these treatments prove effective in lowering the risk of cancer in patients with XP, they may also be found useful in reducing skin cancers in other at-risk patient populations.

  16. Scientist prepare Lysozyme Protein Crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Dan Carter and Charles Sisk center a Lysozyme Protein crystal grown aboard the USML-2 shuttle mission. Protein isolated from hen egg-white and functions as a bacteriostatic enzyme by degrading bacterial cell walls. First enzyme ever characterized by protein crystallography. It is used as an excellent model system for better understanding parameters involved in microgravity crystal growth experiments. The goal is to compare kinetic data from microgravity experiments with data from laboratory experiments to study the equilibrium.

  17. Morphogenesis of the T4 tail and tail fibers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Remarkable progress has been made during the past ten years in elucidating the structure of the bacteriophage T4 tail by a combination of three-dimensional image reconstruction from electron micrographs and X-ray crystallography of the components. Partial and complete structures of nine out of twenty tail structural proteins have been determined by X-ray crystallography and have been fitted into the 3D-reconstituted structure of the "extended" tail. The 3D structure of the "contracted" tail was also determined and interpreted in terms of component proteins. Given the pseudo-atomic tail structures both before and after contraction, it is now possible to understand the gross conformational change of the baseplate in terms of the change in the relative positions of the subunit proteins. These studies have explained how the conformational change of the baseplate and contraction of the tail are related to the tail's host cell recognition and membrane penetration function. On the other hand, the baseplate assembly process has been recently reexamined in detail in a precise system involving recombinant proteins (unlike the earlier studies with phage mutants). These experiments showed that the sequential association of the subunits of the baseplate wedge is based on the induced-fit upon association of each subunit. It was also found that, upon association of gp53 (gene product 53), the penultimate subunit of the wedge, six of the wedge intermediates spontaneously associate to form a baseplate-like structure in the absence of the central hub. Structure determination of the rest of the subunits and intermediate complexes and the assembly of the hub still require further study. PMID:21129200

  18. BACTERIOPHAGE T4 MULTIPLICATION IN A GLUCOSE-LIMITED ESCHERICHIA COLI BIOFILM. (R825503)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  19. Bacteriophages and cancer.

    PubMed

    Budynek, Paulina; Dabrowska, Krystyna; Skaradziński, Grzegorz; Górski, Andrzej

    2010-05-01

    Bacteriophages can be used effectively to cure bacterial infections. They are known to be active against bacteria but inactive against eukaryotic cells. Nevertheless, novel observations suggest that phages are not neutral for higher organisms. They can affect physiological and immunological processes which may be crucial to their expected positive effects in therapies. Bacteriophages are a very differentiated group of viruses and at least some of them can influence cancer processes. Phages may also affect the immunological system. In general, they activate the immunological response, for example cytokine secretion. They can also switch the tumor microenvironment to one advantageous for anticancer treatment. On the other hand, bacteriophages are used as a platform for foreign peptides that may induce anticancer effects. As bacterial debris can interfere with bacteriophage activity, phage purification is significant for the final effect of a phage preparation. In this review, results of the influence of bacteriophages on cancer processes are presented which have implications for the perspective application of phage therapy in patients with cancer and the general understanding of the role of bacteriophages in the human organism.

  20. Bacteriophages and Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Harper, David R.; Parracho, Helena M. R. T.; Walker, James; Sharp, Richard; Hughes, Gavin; Werthén, Maria; Lehman, Susan; Morales, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are an extremely common adaptation, allowing bacteria to colonize hostile environments. They present unique problems for antibiotics and biocides, both due to the nature of the extracellular matrix and to the presence within the biofilm of metabolically inactive persister cells. Such chemicals can be highly effective against planktonic bacterial cells, while being essentially ineffective against biofilms. By contrast, bacteriophages seem to have a greater ability to target this common form of bacterial growth. The high numbers of bacteria present within biofilms actually facilitate the action of bacteriophages by allowing rapid and efficient infection of the host and consequent amplification of the bacteriophage. Bacteriophages also have a number of properties that make biofilms susceptible to their action. They are known to produce (or to be able to induce) enzymes that degrade the extracellular matrix. They are also able to infect persister cells, remaining dormant within them, but re-activating when they become metabolically active. Some cultured biofilms also seem better able to support the replication of bacteriophages than comparable planktonic systems. It is perhaps unsurprising that bacteriophages, as the natural predators of bacteria, have the ability to target this common form of bacterial life.

  1. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated phage resistance is not impeded by the DNA modifications of phage T4.

    PubMed

    Yaung, Stephanie J; Esvelt, Kevin M; Church, George M

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria rely on two known DNA-level defenses against their bacteriophage predators: restriction-modification and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated (Cas) systems. Certain phages have evolved countermeasures that are known to block endonucleases. For example, phage T4 not only adds hydroxymethyl groups to all of its cytosines, but also glucosylates them, a strategy that defeats almost all restriction enzymes. We sought to determine whether these DNA modifications can similarly impede CRISPR-based defenses. In a bioinformatics search, we found naturally occurring CRISPR spacers that potentially target phages known to modify their DNA. Experimentally, we show that the Cas9 nuclease from the Type II CRISPR system of Streptococcus pyogenes can overcome a variety of DNA modifications in Escherichia coli. The levels of Cas9-mediated phage resistance to bacteriophage T4 and the mutant phage T4 gt, which contains hydroxymethylated but not glucosylated cytosines, were comparable to phages with unmodified cytosines, T7 and the T4-like phage RB49. Our results demonstrate that Cas9 is not impeded by N6-methyladenine, 5-methylcytosine, 5-hydroxymethylated cytosine, or glucosylated 5-hydroxymethylated cytosine.

  2. Microneedle-mediated transdermal bacteriophage delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Elizabeth; Garland, Martin J.; Singh, Thakur Raghu Raj; Bambury, Eoin; O’Dea, John; Migalska, Katarzyna; Gorman, Sean P.; McCarthy, Helen O.; Gilmore, Brendan F.; Donnelly, Ryan F.

    2012-01-01

    Interest in bacteriophages as therapeutic agents has recently been reawakened. Parenteral delivery is the most routinely-employed method of administration. However, injection of phages has numerous disadvantages, such as the requirement of a health professional for administration and the possibility of cross-contamination. Transdermal delivery offers one potential means of overcoming many of these problems. The present study utilized a novel poly (carbonate) (PC) hollow microneedle (MN) device for the transdermal delivery of Escherichia coli-specific T4 bacteriophages both in vitro and in vivo. MN successfully achieved bacteriophage delivery in vitro across dermatomed and full thickness skin. A concentration of 2.67 × 106 PFU/ml (plaque forming units per ml) was detected in the receiver compartment when delivered across dermatomed skin and 4.0 × 103 PFU/ml was detected in the receiver compartment when delivered across full thickness skin. An in vivo study resulted in 4.13 × 103 PFU/ml being detected in blood 30 min following initial MN-mediated phage administration. Clearance occurred rapidly, with phages being completely cleared from the systemic circulation within 24 h, which was expected in the absence of infection. We have shown here that MN-mediated delivery allows successful systemic phage absorption. Accordingly, bacteriophage-based therapeutics may now have an alternative route for systemic delivery. Once fully-investigated, this could lead to more widespread investigation of these interesting therapeutic viruses. PMID:22750416

  3. Fluorescence Studies of Lysozyme Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Smith, Lori

    1998-01-01

    Fluorescence is one of the most powerful tools available for the study of macromolecules. For example, fluorescence can be used to study self association through methods such as anisotropy (the rotational rate of the molecule in solution), quenching (the accessibility of a bound probe to the bulk solution), and resonance energy transfer (measurement of the distance between two species). Fluorescence can also be used to study the local environment of the probe molecules, and the changes in that environment which accompany crystal nucleation and growth. However fluorescent techniques have been very much underutilized in macromolecular growth studies. One major advantage is that the fluorescent species generally must be at low concentration, typically ca 10-5 to 10-6 M. Thus one can study a very wide range of solution conditions, ranging from very high to very low protein concentration, he latter of which are not readily accessible to scattering techniques. We have prepared a number of fluorescent derivatives of chicken egg white lysozyme (CEWL). Fluorescent probes have been attached to two different sites, ASP 101 and the N-terrninal amine, with a sought for use in different lines of study. Preliminary resonance energy transfer studies have been -carried out using pyrene acetic acid (Ex 340 mn, Em 376 nm) lysozyme as a donor and cascade blue (Ex 377 run, Em 423 nm) labeled lysozyme as an acceptor. The emission of both the pyrene and cascade blue probes was followed as a function of the salt protein concentrations. The data show an increase in cascade blue and a concomitant decrease in the pyrene fluorescence as either the salt or protein concentrations are increased, suggesting that the two species are approaching each other close enough for resonance energy transfer to occur. This data can be analyzed to measure the distance between the probe molecules and, knowing their locations on the protein molecule their distances from and orientations with respect to each

  4. Hyperexpansion of RNA Bacteriophage Diversity.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Siddharth R; Janowski, Andrew B; Zhao, Guoyan; Barouch, Dan; Wang, David

    2016-03-01

    Bacteriophage modulation of microbial populations impacts critical processes in ocean, soil, and animal ecosystems. However, the role of bacteriophages with RNA genomes (RNA bacteriophages) in these processes is poorly understood, in part because of the limited number of known RNA bacteriophage species. Here, we identify partial genome sequences of 122 RNA bacteriophage phylotypes that are highly divergent from each other and from previously described RNA bacteriophages. These novel RNA bacteriophage sequences were present in samples collected from a range of ecological niches worldwide, including invertebrates and extreme microbial sediment, demonstrating that they are more widely distributed than previously recognized. Genomic analyses of these novel bacteriophages yielded multiple novel genome organizations. Furthermore, one RNA bacteriophage was detected in the transcriptome of a pure culture of Streptomyces avermitilis, suggesting for the first time that the known tropism of RNA bacteriophages may include gram-positive bacteria. Finally, reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR)-based screening for two specific RNA bacteriophages in stool samples from a longitudinal cohort of macaques suggested that they are generally acutely present rather than persistent. PMID:27010970

  5. Hyperexpansion of RNA Bacteriophage Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, Siddharth R.; Janowski, Andrew B.; Zhao, Guoyan; Barouch, Dan; Wang, David

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophage modulation of microbial populations impacts critical processes in ocean, soil, and animal ecosystems. However, the role of bacteriophages with RNA genomes (RNA bacteriophages) in these processes is poorly understood, in part because of the limited number of known RNA bacteriophage species. Here, we identify partial genome sequences of 122 RNA bacteriophage phylotypes that are highly divergent from each other and from previously described RNA bacteriophages. These novel RNA bacteriophage sequences were present in samples collected from a range of ecological niches worldwide, including invertebrates and extreme microbial sediment, demonstrating that they are more widely distributed than previously recognized. Genomic analyses of these novel bacteriophages yielded multiple novel genome organizations. Furthermore, one RNA bacteriophage was detected in the transcriptome of a pure culture of Streptomyces avermitilis, suggesting for the first time that the known tropism of RNA bacteriophages may include gram-positive bacteria. Finally, reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR)-based screening for two specific RNA bacteriophages in stool samples from a longitudinal cohort of macaques suggested that they are generally acutely present rather than persistent. PMID:27010970

  6. Hyperexpansion of RNA Bacteriophage Diversity.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Siddharth R; Janowski, Andrew B; Zhao, Guoyan; Barouch, Dan; Wang, David

    2016-03-01

    Bacteriophage modulation of microbial populations impacts critical processes in ocean, soil, and animal ecosystems. However, the role of bacteriophages with RNA genomes (RNA bacteriophages) in these processes is poorly understood, in part because of the limited number of known RNA bacteriophage species. Here, we identify partial genome sequences of 122 RNA bacteriophage phylotypes that are highly divergent from each other and from previously described RNA bacteriophages. These novel RNA bacteriophage sequences were present in samples collected from a range of ecological niches worldwide, including invertebrates and extreme microbial sediment, demonstrating that they are more widely distributed than previously recognized. Genomic analyses of these novel bacteriophages yielded multiple novel genome organizations. Furthermore, one RNA bacteriophage was detected in the transcriptome of a pure culture of Streptomyces avermitilis, suggesting for the first time that the known tropism of RNA bacteriophages may include gram-positive bacteria. Finally, reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR)-based screening for two specific RNA bacteriophages in stool samples from a longitudinal cohort of macaques suggested that they are generally acutely present rather than persistent.

  7. Lysozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Protein isolated from hen egg-white and functions as a bacteriostatic enzyme by degrading bacterial cell walls. First enzyme ever characterized by protein crystallography. It is used as an excellent model system for better understanding parameters involved in microgravity experiments with data from laboratory experiments to study the equilibrium rate of hanging drop experiments in microgravity.

  8. Crystal Structure of the Phage T4 Recombinase UvsX and Its Functional Interaction with the T4 SF2 Helicase UvsW

    SciTech Connect

    Gajewski, Stefan; Webb, Michael R.; Galkin, Vitold; Egelman, Edward H.; Kreuzer, Kenneth N.; White, Stephen W.

    2012-07-11

    Bacteriophage T4 provides an important model system for studying the mechanism of homologous recombination. We have determined the crystal structure of the T4 UvsX recombinase, and the overall architecture and fold closely resemble those of RecA, including a highly conserved ATP binding site. Based on this new structure, we reanalyzed electron microscopy reconstructions of UvsX-DNA filaments and docked the UvsX crystal structure into two different filament forms: a compressed filament generated in the presence of ADP and an elongated filament generated in the presence of ATP and aluminum fluoride. In these reconstructions, the ATP binding site sits at the protomer interface, as in the RecA filament crystal structure. However, the environment of the ATP binding site is altered in the two filament reconstructions, suggesting that nucleotide cannot be as easily accommodated at the protomer interface of the compressed filament. Finally, we show that the phage helicase UvsW completes the UvsX-promoted strand-exchange reaction, allowing the generation of a simple nicked circular product rather than complex networks of partially exchanged substrates.

  9. Problem-Solving Test: RNA and Protein Synthesis in Bacteriophage-Infected "E. coli" Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2008-01-01

    The classic experiment presented in this problem-solving test was designed to identify the template molecules of translation by analyzing the synthesis of phage proteins in "Escherichia coli" cells infected with bacteriophage T4. The work described in this test led to one of the most seminal discoveries of early molecular biology: it dealt a…

  10. [Bacteriophages as antibacterial agents].

    PubMed

    Shasha, Shaul M; Sharon, Nehama; Inbar, Michael

    2004-02-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that only infect bacteria. They have played an important role in the development of molecular biology and have been used as anti-bacterial agents. Since their independent discovery by Twort and d'Herelle, they have been extensively used to prevent and treat bacterial infections, mainly in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. In western countries this method has been sporadically employed on humans and domesticated animals. However, the discovery and widespread use of antibiotics, coupled with doubts about the efficacy of phage therapy, led to an eclipse in the use of phage in medicine. The emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria, especially strains that are multiply resistant, has resulted in a renewed interest in alternatives to conventional drugs. One of the possible replacements for antibiotics is the use of bacteriophages as antimicrobial agents. This brief review aims to describe the history of bacteriophage and early clinical studies on their use in bacterial disease prophylaxis and therapy, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of bacteriophage in this regard.

  11. BACTERIOPHAGE THERAPY AND CAMPYLOBACTER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The book chapter reports efforts to exploit Campylobacter-specific bacteriophages to reduce the numbers of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli colonizing poultry and contaminating poultry meat products. Controlling campylobacters in poultry represents one of the greatest challenges to the agriculture a...

  12. Chlamydial plasmids and bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Pawlikowska-Warych, Małgorzata; Śliwa-Dominiak, Joanna; Deptuła, Wiesław

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia are absolute pathogens of humans and animals; despite being rather well recognised, they are still open for discovery. One such discovery is the occurrence of extrachromosomal carriers of genetic information. In prokaryotes, such carriers include plasmids and bacteriophages, which are present only among some Chlamydia species. Plasmids were found exclusively in Chlamydia (C.) trachomatis, C. psittaci, C. pneumoniae, C. suis, C. felis, C. muridarum and C. caviae. In prokaryotic organisms, plasmids usually code for genes that facilitate survival of the bacteria in the environment (although they are not essential). In chlamydia, their role has not been definitely recognised, apart from the fact that they participate in the synthesis of glycogen and encode proteins responsible for their virulence. Furthermore, in C. suis it was evidenced that the plasmid is integrated in a genomic island and contains the tetracycline-resistance gene. Bacteriophages specific for chlamydia (chlamydiaphages) were detected only in six species: C. psittaci, C. abortus, C. felis, C. caviae C. pecorum and C. pneumoniae. These chlamydiaphages cause inhibition of the developmental cycle, and delay transformation of reticulate bodies (RBs) into elementary bodies (EBs), thus reducing the possibility of infecting other cells in time. Plasmids and bacteriophages can be used in the diagnostics of chlamydioses; although especially in the case of plasmids, they are already used for detection of chlamydial infections. In addition, bacteriophages could be used as therapeutic agents to replace antibiotics, potentially addressing the problem of increasing antibiotic-resistance among chlamydia.

  13. Bacteriophages of Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The specific aims of the book chapter are to: (1) Briefly review the nomenclature of bacteriophages and how these agents are classified. (2) Discuss the problems associated with addition/removal of antibiotics in commercial animal feeds. (3) Provide a brief overview of Clostridium perfringens biolog...

  14. Phylogeny of the Major Head and Tail Genes of the Wide-Ranging T4-Type Bacteriophages†

    PubMed Central

    Tétart, Françoise; Desplats, Carine; Kutateladze, Mzia; Monod, Caroline; Ackermann, Hans-Wolfgang; Krisch, H. M.

    2001-01-01

    We examined a number of bacteriophages with T4-type morphology that propagate in different genera of enterobacteria, Aeromonas, Burkholderia, and Vibrio. Most of these phages had a prolate icosahedral head, a contractile tail, and a genome size that was similar to that of T4. A few of them had more elongated heads and larger genomes. All these phages are phylogenetically related, since they each had sequences homologous to the capsid gene (gene 23), tail sheath gene (gene 18), and tail tube gene (gene 19) of T4. On the basis of the sequence comparison of their virion genes, the T4-type phages can be classified into three subgroups with increasing divergence from T4: the T-evens, pseudoT-evens, and schizoT-evens. In general, the phages that infect closely related host species have virion genes that are phylogenetically closer to each other than those of phages that infect distantly related hosts. However, some of the phages appear to be chimeras, indicating that, at least occasionally, some genetic shuffling has occurred between the different T4-type subgroups. The compilation of a number of gene 23 sequences reveals a pattern of conserved motifs separated by sequences that differ in the T4-type subgroups. Such variable patches in the gene 23 sequences may determine the size of the virion head and consequently the viral genome length. This sequence analysis provides molecular evidence that phages related to T4 are widespread in the biosphere and diverged from a common ancestor in acquiring the ability to infect different host bacteria and to occupy new ecological niches. PMID:11114936

  15. Kinetics of single DNA molecule denaturation by T4 Gene 32 protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, Kiran; Karpel, Richard L.; Williams, Mark C.

    2003-03-01

    Bacteriophage T4 gene 32 protein (32 protein) specifically binds single-stranded DNA, a property essential for its role in DNA replication, recombination, and repair. Although on a thermodynamic basis, single-stranded DNA binding proteins should lower the thermal melting temperature of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), 32 protein does not. Using single molecule force spectroscopy, we show for the first time that 32 protein is capable of slowly destabilizing natural dsDNA. Direct measurements of single DNA molecule denaturation and renaturation kinetics in the presence of 32 protein and its proteolytic fragments reveal three types of kinetic behavior, attributable to specific protein structural domains, which regulate 32 protein's helix-destabilizing capabilities. This regulation is potentially biologically significant because uncontrolled helix-destabilization would be lethal to the cell. We also obtain equilibrium measurements of the DNA helix-coil transition free energy in the presence of these proteins for the first time.

  16. T4 Phage Tail Adhesin Gp12 Counteracts LPS-Induced Inflammation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Miernikiewicz, Paulina; Kłopot, Anna; Soluch, Ryszard; Szkuta, Piotr; Kęska, Weronika; Hodyra-Stefaniak, Katarzyna; Konopka, Agnieszka; Nowak, Marcin; Lecion, Dorota; Kaźmierczak, Zuzanna; Majewska, Joanna; Harhala, Marek; Górski, Andrzej; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages that infect Gram-negative bacteria often bind to the bacterial surface by interaction of specific proteins with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Short tail fiber proteins (tail adhesin, gp12) mediate adsorption of T4-like bacteriophages to Escherichia coli, binding surface proteins or LPS. Produced as a recombinant protein, gp12 retains its ability to bind LPS. Since LPS is able to exert a major impact on the immune response in animals and in humans, we have tested LPS-binding phage protein gp12 as a potential modulator of the LPS-induced immune response. We have produced tail adhesin gp12 in a bacterial expression system and confirmed its ability to form trimers and to bind LPS in vitro by dynamic light scattering. This product had no negative effect on mammalian cell proliferation in vitro. Further, no harmful effects of this protein were observed in mice. Thus, gp12 was used in combination with LPS in a murine model, and it decreased the inflammatory response to LPS in vivo, as assessed by serum levels of cytokines IL-1 alpha and IL-6 and by histopathological analysis of spleen, liver, kidney and lungs. Thus, in future studies gp12 may be considered as a potential tool for modulating and specifically for counteracting LPS-related physiological effects in vivo. PMID:27471503

  17. T4 Phage Tail Adhesin Gp12 Counteracts LPS-Induced Inflammation In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Miernikiewicz, Paulina; Kłopot, Anna; Soluch, Ryszard; Szkuta, Piotr; Kęska, Weronika; Hodyra-Stefaniak, Katarzyna; Konopka, Agnieszka; Nowak, Marcin; Lecion, Dorota; Kaźmierczak, Zuzanna; Majewska, Joanna; Harhala, Marek; Górski, Andrzej; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages that infect Gram-negative bacteria often bind to the bacterial surface by interaction of specific proteins with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Short tail fiber proteins (tail adhesin, gp12) mediate adsorption of T4-like bacteriophages to Escherichia coli, binding surface proteins or LPS. Produced as a recombinant protein, gp12 retains its ability to bind LPS. Since LPS is able to exert a major impact on the immune response in animals and in humans, we have tested LPS-binding phage protein gp12 as a potential modulator of the LPS-induced immune response. We have produced tail adhesin gp12 in a bacterial expression system and confirmed its ability to form trimers and to bind LPS in vitro by dynamic light scattering. This product had no negative effect on mammalian cell proliferation in vitro. Further, no harmful effects of this protein were observed in mice. Thus, gp12 was used in combination with LPS in a murine model, and it decreased the inflammatory response to LPS in vivo, as assessed by serum levels of cytokines IL-1 alpha and IL-6 and by histopathological analysis of spleen, liver, kidney and lungs. Thus, in future studies gp12 may be considered as a potential tool for modulating and specifically for counteracting LPS-related physiological effects in vivo. PMID:27471503

  18. Functional assay for T4 lysozyme-engineered G Protein-Coupled Receptors with an ion channel reporter

    PubMed Central

    Niescierowicz, Katarzyna; Caro, Lydia; Cherezov, Vadim; Vivaudou, Michel; Moreau, Christophe J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Structural studies of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) extensively use the insertion of globular soluble protein domains in order to facilitate their crystallization. However, when inserted in the third intracellular loop (i3 loop), the soluble protein domain disrupts their coupling to G proteins and impedes the GPCRs functional characterization by standard G protein-based assays. Therefore, activity tests of crystallization-optimized GPCRs are essentially limited to their ligand binding properties using radioligand binding assays. Functional characterization of additional thermostabilizing mutations requires the insertion of similar mutations in the wild-type receptor to allow G protein-activation tests. We demonstrate that Ion Channel-Coupled Receptor technology is a complementary approach for a comprehensive functional characterization of crystallization-optimized GPCRs and potentially of any engineered GPCR. Ligand-induced conformational changes of the GPCRs are translated into electrical signal and detected by simple current recordings, even though binding of G proteins is sterically blocked by the added soluble protein domain. PMID:24268646

  19. T-4G Simulator and T-4 Ground Training Devices in USAF Undergraduate Pilot Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, Robert R.; Smith, James F.

    The objective of the project was to investigate the utility of using an A/F37A-T4G T-37 flight simulator within the context of Air Force undergraduate pilot training. Twenty-one subjects, selected from three undergraduate pilot training classes, were given contact flight training in a TP4G/EPT simulator before going to T-37 aircraft for further…

  20. Incorporation of Deoxyribonucleic Acid Precursors by T4 Deoxyribonucleic Acid-Protein Complexes Retained on Glass Fiber Filters

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Robert C.; Kozinski, Andrzej W.

    1970-01-01

    Bacteriophage T4 deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-protein complexes were retained preferentially on glass fiber filters. DNA polymerase activity in the complex was detected through the incorporation of 3H-labeled DNA precursors. The primer-product DNA hybridized with both phage and Escherichia coli DNA. Density labeling experiments showed that about 30% of incorporated 3H-deoxyadenosine triphosphate was found in DNA which hybridized with phage DNA; this DNA was found to be covalently attached to the primer DNA. PMID:5497903

  1. Expression of the denV gene of coliphage T4 in UV-sensitive rad mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Valerie, K.; Fronko, G.; Henderson, E.E.; de Riel, J.K.

    1986-10-01

    A plasmid containing the denV gene from bacteriophage T4, under the control of the yeast alcohol dehydrogenase I (ADC1) promoter, conferred a substantial increase in UV resistance in the UV-sensitive Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants rad1-2 and rad3-2. The UV resistance of the denV+ yeast cells was cell cycle dependent and correlated well with the level of the denV gene product as measured by immunoblotting and by a photoreversal assay for pyrimidine dimer-DNA glycosylase activity.

  2. Cytoplasmic bacteriophage display system

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Rosenberg, Alan H.

    1998-06-16

    Disclosed are display vectors comprising DNA encoding a portion of a structural protein from a cytoplasmic bacteriophage, joined covalently to a protein or peptide of interest. Exemplified are display vectors wherein the structural protein is the T7 bacteriophage capsid protein. More specifically, in the exemplified display vectors the C-terminal amino acid residue of the portion of the capsid protein is joined to the N-terminal residue of the protein or peptide of interest. The portion of the T7 capsid protein exemplified comprises an N-terminal portion corresponding to form 10B of the T7 capsid protein. The display vectors are useful for high copy number display or lower copy number display (with larger fusion). Compositions of the type described herein are useful in connection with methods for producing a virus displaying a protein or peptide of interest.

  3. Cytoplasmic bacteriophage display system

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.; Rosenberg, A.H.

    1998-06-16

    Disclosed are display vectors comprising DNA encoding a portion of a structural protein from a cytoplasmic bacteriophage, joined covalently to a protein or peptide of interest. Exemplified are display vectors wherein the structural protein is the T7 bacteriophage capsid protein. More specifically, in the exemplified display vectors the C-terminal amino acid residue of the portion of the capsid protein is joined to the N-terminal residue of the protein or peptide of interest. The portion of the T7 capsid protein exemplified comprises an N-terminal portion corresponding to form 10B of the T7 capsid protein. The display vectors are useful for high copy number display or lower copy number display (with larger fusion). Compositions of the type described herein are useful in connection with methods for producing a virus displaying a protein or peptide of interest. 1 fig.

  4. The structure of the phage T4 DNA packaging motor suggests a mechanism dependent on electrostatic forces.

    PubMed

    Sun, Siyang; Kondabagil, Kiran; Draper, Bonnie; Alam, Tanfis I; Bowman, Valorie D; Zhang, Zhihong; Hegde, Shylaja; Fokine, Andrei; Rossmann, Michael G; Rao, Venigalla B

    2008-12-26

    Viral genomes are packaged into "procapsids" by powerful molecular motors. We report the crystal structure of the DNA packaging motor protein, gene product 17 (gp17), in bacteriophage T4. The structure consists of an N-terminal ATPase domain, which provides energy for compacting DNA, and a C-terminal nuclease domain, which terminates packaging. We show that another function of the C-terminal domain is to translocate the genome into the procapsid. The two domains are in close contact in the crystal structure, representing a "tensed state." A cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of the T4 procapsid complexed with gp17 shows that the packaging motor is a pentamer and that the domains within each monomer are spatially separated, representing a "relaxed state." These structures suggest a mechanism, supported by mutational and other data, in which electrostatic forces drive the DNA packaging by alternating between tensed and relaxed states. Similar mechanisms may occur in other molecular motors. PMID:19109896

  5. The Structure of the Phage T4 DNA Packaging Motor Suggests a Mechanism Dependent on Electrostatic Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Siyang; Kondabagil, Kiran; Draper, Bonnie; Alam, Tanfis I.; Bowman, Valorie D.; Zhang, Zhihong; Hegde, Shylaja; Fokine, Andrei; Rossmann, Michael G.; Rao, Venigalla B.

    2009-06-30

    Viral genomes are packaged into procapsids by powerful molecular motors. We report the crystal structure of the DNA packaging motor protein, gene product 17 (gp17), in bacteriophage T4. The structure consists of an N-terminal ATPase domain, which provides energy for compacting DNA, and a C-terminal nuclease domain, which terminates packaging. We show that another function of the C-terminal domain is to translocate the genome into the procapsid. The two domains are in close contact in the crystal structure, representing a tensed state. A cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of the T4 procapsid complexed with gp17 shows that the packaging motor is a pentamer and that the domains within each monomer are spatially separated, representing a relaxed state. These structures suggest a mechanism, supported by mutational and other data, in which electrostatic forces drive the DNA packaging by alternating between tensed and relaxed states. Similar mechanisms may occur in other molecular motors.

  6. Acetylated Lysozyme as Impurity in Lysozyme Crystals: Constant Distribution Coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, B. R.; Chernov, A. A.

    2000-01-01

    Hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) was acetylated to modify molecular charge keeping the molecular size and weight nearly constant. Two derivatives, A and B, more and less acetylated, respectively, were obtained, separated, purified and added to the solution from which crystals of tetragonal HEWL crystals were grown. Amounts of the A or B impurities added were 0.76, 0.38 and 0.1 milligram per millimeter while HEWL concentration were 20, 30 and 40 milligram per milliliter. The crystals grown in 18 experiments for each impurity were dissolved and quantities of A or B additives in these crystals were analyzed by cation exchange high performance liquid chromatography. All the data for each set of 18 samples with the different impurity and regular HEWL concentrations is well described by one distribution coefficient K = 2.15 plus or minus 0.13 for A and K = 3.42 plus or minus 0.25 for B. The observed independence of the distribution coefficient on both the impurity concentration and supersaturation is explained by the dilution model described in this paper. It shows that impurity adsorption and incorporation rate is proportional to the impurity concentration and that the growth rate is proportional to the crystallizing protein in solution. With the kinetic coefficient for crystallization, beta = 5.10(exp -7) centimeters per second, the frequency at which an impurity molecule near the growing interface irreversibly joins a molecular site on the crystal was found to be 3 1 per second, much higher than the average frequency for crystal molecules. For best quality protein crystals it is better to have low microheterogeneous protein impurity concentration and high supers aturation.

  7. Effect of HZE particles and space hadrons on bacteriophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurov, S. S.; Akoev, I. G.; Leont'eva, G. A.

    The effect of high energy (HZE) particles and high energy hadrons on T4Br+ bacteriophage was analyzed. The experiments were done in orbital flight, on high mountains, on an accelerator, and with an alpha particle source. We studied the survival rate of the bacteriophage, the mutation frequency, the mutation spectrum and the revertability under the action of chemical mutagens with a known mechanism of action on DNA. It was found that the biological efficiency of HZE particles and high energy hadrons is greater than that of γ radiation. The spectra of mutations produced by these mutations and the mechanisms of their action are also different. These effects were local, because of the mode of interaction of the radiant energy with biological objects, and depended on the linear energy transfer (LET). The modes have now been experimentally defined.

  8. Bacteriophage application to control the contaminated water with Shigella

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Jin Woo; Giri, Sib Sankar; Kim, Hyoun Joong; Yun, Sae Kil; Chi, Cheng; Chai, Ji Young; Lee, Byeong Chun; Park, Se Chang

    2016-01-01

    Shigella is one of the most important waterborne and foodborne pathogens around the world. Emergence of antibiotic-resistant Shigella has made the development of alternatives to conventional antibiotics necessary. In this study, a virulent Myoviridae bacteriophage, pSs-1 was isolated from environmental water in South Korea and showed infectivity to S. flexneri as well as S. sonnei strains. One-step growth analysis showed that pSs-1 has a short latent period (25 min) and a large burst size (97 PFU/cell). According to the genomic analysis, pSs-1 contains 164,999 bp of genome with a G + C content of 35.54% and it is considered as a member of the T4-like bacteriophage group. These results showed that pSs-1 may have potential as a biocontrol agent instead of conventional antibiotics for shigellosis. PMID:26971572

  9. Visualizing the phage T4 activated transcription complex of DNA and E. coli RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    James, Tamara D.; Cardozo, Timothy; Abell, Lauren E.; Hsieh, Meng-Lun; Jenkins, Lisa M. Miller; Jha, Saheli S.; Hinton, Deborah M.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of RNA polymerase (RNAP) to select the right promoter sequence at the right time is fundamental to the control of gene expression in all organisms. However, there is only one crystallized structure of a complete activator/RNAP/DNA complex. In a process called σ appropriation, bacteriophage T4 activates a class of phage promoters using an activator (MotA) and a co-activator (AsiA), which function through interactions with the σ70 subunit of RNAP. We have developed a holistic, structure-based model for σ appropriation using multiple experimentally determined 3D structures (Escherichia coli RNAP, the Thermus aquaticus RNAP/DNA complex, AsiA /σ70 Region 4, the N-terminal domain of MotA [MotANTD], and the C-terminal domain of MotA [MotACTD]), molecular modeling, and extensive biochemical observations indicating the position of the proteins relative to each other and to the DNA. Our results visualize how AsiA/MotA redirects σ, and therefore RNAP activity, to T4 promoter DNA, and demonstrate at a molecular level how the tactful interaction of transcriptional factors with even small segments of RNAP can alter promoter specificity. Furthermore, our model provides a rational basis for understanding how a mutation within the β subunit of RNAP (G1249D), which is far removed from AsiA or MotA, impairs σ appropriation. PMID:27458207

  10. Visualizing the phage T4 activated transcription complex of DNA and E. coli RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    James, Tamara D; Cardozo, Timothy; Abell, Lauren E; Hsieh, Meng-Lun; Jenkins, Lisa M Miller; Jha, Saheli S; Hinton, Deborah M

    2016-09-19

    The ability of RNA polymerase (RNAP) to select the right promoter sequence at the right time is fundamental to the control of gene expression in all organisms. However, there is only one crystallized structure of a complete activator/RNAP/DNA complex. In a process called σ appropriation, bacteriophage T4 activates a class of phage promoters using an activator (MotA) and a co-activator (AsiA), which function through interactions with the σ(70) subunit of RNAP. We have developed a holistic, structure-based model for σ appropriation using multiple experimentally determined 3D structures (Escherichia coli RNAP, the Thermus aquaticus RNAP/DNA complex, AsiA /σ(70) Region 4, the N-terminal domain of MotA [MotA(NTD)], and the C-terminal domain of MotA [MotA(CTD)]), molecular modeling, and extensive biochemical observations indicating the position of the proteins relative to each other and to the DNA. Our results visualize how AsiA/MotA redirects σ, and therefore RNAP activity, to T4 promoter DNA, and demonstrate at a molecular level how the tactful interaction of transcriptional factors with even small segments of RNAP can alter promoter specificity. Furthermore, our model provides a rational basis for understanding how a mutation within the β subunit of RNAP (G1249D), which is far removed from AsiA or MotA, impairs σ appropriation. PMID:27458207

  11. Growth kinetics of tetragonal lysozyme crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, M.; Naumann, R.

    1986-01-01

    A method for immobilizing protein crystals in small volumes to determine growth rates on various faces is applied to study the growth kinetics of the (100) face of tetragonal hen-egg white lysozyme crystals at different degrees of bulk saturation. In normal gravity, transport is found to be dominated by convection for crystal sizes larger than a few microns, while in a microgravity environment, transport is diffusion-limited for sizes up to a few mm. It is found that convection can be significant even in microgravity for crystals approaching cm sizes, and that lysozyme growth is limited by surface kinetics in normal gravity.

  12. Thermophysical properties of lysozyme (protein) solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Jiaching; Yang, Wen-Jei

    1992-01-01

    Thermophysical properties of protein solutions composed of the lysozyme crystals with a 0.1 M sodium acetate and 5 percent NaCl solution as the buffer (pH = 4.0) are determined. The properties being measured include specific heat, thermal conductivity, dynamic viscosity, and surface tension. The protein concentrations are varied. Thermal diffusivity is calculated using the measured results. The purpose of the research is to measure thermophysical properties of lysozyme solutions which would serve as the data bank for controlling and modeling the crystal growth process on earth as well as in space.

  13. Cloning and expression of autogenes encoding RNA polymerases of T7-like bacteriophages

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.; Dubendorff, J.W.

    1998-11-03

    This invention relates to the cloning and expression of autogenes encoding RNA polymerases of T7 and T7-like bacteriophages, in which the RNA polymerase gene is transcribed from a promoter which is recognized by the encoded RNA polymerase. Cloning of T7 autogenes was achieved by reducing the activity of the RNA polymerase sufficiently to permit host cell growth. T7 RNA polymerase activity was controlled by combining two independent methods: lac-repression of the recombinant lac operator-T7 promoter in the autogene and inhibition of the polymerase by T7 lysozyme. Expression systems for producing the RNA polymerases of T7 and other T7-like bacteriophages, and expression systems for producing selected gene products are described, as well as other related materials and methods. 12 figs.

  14. Cloning and expression of autogenes encoding RNA polymerases of T7-like bacteriophages

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.; Dubendorff, J.W.

    1998-10-20

    This invention relates to the cloning and expression of autogenes encoding RNA polymerases of T7 and T7-like bacteriophages, in which the RNA polymerase gene is transcribed from a promoter which is recognized by the encoded RNA polymerase. Cloning of T7 autogenes was achieved by reducing the activity of the RNA polymerase sufficiently to permit host cell growth. T7 RNA polymerase activity was controlled by combining two independent methods: lac-repression of the recombinant lac operator-T7 promoter in the autogene and inhibition of the polymerase by T7 lysozyme. Expression systems for producing the RNA polymerases of T7 and other T7-like bacteriophages, and expression systems for producing selected gene products are described, as well as other related materials and methods. 12 figs.

  15. Cloning and expression of autogenes encoding RNA poly,erases of T7-like bacteriophages

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Dubendorff, John W.

    1998-01-01

    This invention relates to the cloning and expression of autogenes encoding RNA polymerases of T7 and T7-like bacteriophages, in which the RNA polymerase gene is transcribed from a promoter which is recognized by the encoded RNA polymerase. Cloning of T7 autogenes was achieved by reducing the activity of the RNA polymerase sufficiently to permit host cell growth. T7 RNA polymerase activity was controlled by combining two independent methods: lac-repression of the recombinant lac operator-T7 promoter in the autogene and inhibition of the polymerase by T7 lysozyme. Expression systems for producing the RNA polymerases of T7 and other T7-like bacteriophages, and expression systems for producing selected gene products are described, as well as other related materials and methods.

  16. Cloning and expression of autogenes encoding RNA polymerases of T7-like bacteriophages

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Dubendorff, John W.

    1998-01-01

    This invention relates to the cloning and expression of autogenes encoding RNA polymerases of T7 and T7-like bacteriophages, in which the RNA polymerase gene is transcribed from a promoter which is recognized by the encoded RNA polymerase. Cloning of T7 autogenes was achieved by reducing the activity of the RNA polymerase sufficiently to permit host cell growth. T7 RNA polymerase activity was controlled by combining two independent methods: lac-repression of the recombinant lac operator-T7 promoter in the autogene and inhibition of the polymerase by T7 lysozyme. Expression systems for producing the RNA polymerases of T7 and other T7-like bacteriophages, and expression systems for producing selected gene products are described, as well as other related materials and methods.

  17. [Possibilities of bacteriophage therapy].

    PubMed

    Skurnik, Mikael; Kiljunen, Saija

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance of bacterial pathogens has increased, and new therapies are urgently needed. Bacteriophages (phages), viruses infecting and killing bacteria, are the most abundant organisms on earth. In nature there are several specific phages for every bacterium, controlling bacterial numbers and maintaining ecological balance. Phage therapy, i.e., treating bacterial infections with phages, offers an alternative complementary to antibiotics as phages infect and kill also multi-resistant bacteria. Phages possess narrow host specificity, each phage infecting only a few bacterial species or strains. Thereby phages do not harm the normal microbiota as antibiotics do. We aim to begin clinical trials of phage therapy in Finland. PMID:27244930

  18. Recombinant goose-type lysozyme in channel catfish: Lysozyme activity and efficacy as plasmid DNA immunostimulant against Aeromonas hydrophila infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were: 1) to investigate whether recombinant channel catfish lysozyme g (CC-Lys-g) produced in E. coli expression system possesses any lysozyme activity; and 2) to evaluate whether channel catfish lysozyme g plasmid DNA could be used as an immunostimulant to protect chann...

  19. Recombinant goose-type lysozyme in channel catfish: lysozyme activity and efficacy as plasmid DNA immunostimulant against Aeromonas hydrophila infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were: 1) to investigate whether recombinant channel catfish lysozyme g (CC-Lys-g) produced in E. coli expression system possesses any lysozyme activity; and 2) to evaluate whether channel catfish lysozyme g plasmid DNA could be used as an immunostimulant to protect chann...

  20. Lysozyme Photochemistry as a Function of Temperature. The Protective Effect of Nanoparticles on Lysozyme Photostability.

    PubMed

    Oliveira Silva, Catarina; Petersen, Steffen B; Pinto Reis, Catarina; Rijo, Patrícia; Molpeceres, Jesús; Vorum, Henrik; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa

    2015-01-01

    The presence of aromatic residues and their close spatial proximity to disulphide bridges makes hen egg white lysozyme labile to UV excitation. UVB induced photo-oxidation of tryptophan and tyrosine residues leads to photochemical products, such as, kynurenine, N-formylkynurenine and dityrosine and to the disruption of disulphide bridges in proteins. We here report that lysozyme UV induced photochemistry is modulated by temperature, excitation power, illumination time, excitation wavelength and by the presence of plasmonic quencher surfaces, such as gold, and by the presence of natural fluorescence quenchers, such as hyaluronic acid and oleic acid. We show evidence that the photo-oxidation effects triggered by 295 nm at 20°C are reversible and non-reversible at 10°C, 25°C and 30°C. This paper provides evidence that the 295 nm damage threshold of lysozyme lies between 0.1 μW and 0.3 μW. Protein conformational changes induced by temperature and UV light have been detected upon monitoring changes in the fluorescence emission spectra of lysozyme tryptophan residues and SYPRO® Orange. Lysozyme has been conjugated onto gold nanoparticles, coated with hyaluronic acid and oleic acid (HAOA). Steady state and time resolved fluorescence studies of free and conjugated lysozyme onto HAOA gold nanoparticles reveals that the presence of the polymer decreased the rate of the observed photochemical reactions and induced a preference for short fluorescence decay lifetimes. Size and surface charge of the HAOA gold nanoparticles have been determined by dynamic light scattering and zeta potential measurements. TEM analysis of the particles confirms the presence of a gold core surrounded by a HAOA matrix. We conclude that HAOA gold nanoparticles may efficiently protect lysozyme from the photochemical effects of UVB light and this nanocarrier could be potentially applied to other proteins with clinical relevance. In addition, this study confirms that the temperature plays a

  1. Lysozymes and lysozyme-like proteins from the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda.

    PubMed

    Chapelle, Michael; Girard, Pierre-Alain; Cousserans, François; Volkoff, Nathalie-Anne; Duvic, Bernard

    2009-12-01

    Lysozyme is an important component of the insect non-specific immune response against bacteria that is characterized by its ability to break down bacterial cell-walls. By searching an EST database from the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (Negre et al., 2006), we identified five sequences encoding proteins of the lysozyme family. The deduced protein sequences corresponded to three classical c-type lysozymes Sf-Lys1, Sf-Lys2 and Sf-Lys3, and two lysozyme-like proteins, Sf-LLP1 and Sf-LLP2. Sf-Lys1 was purified from the hemolymph of Escherichia coli-challenged S. frugiperda larvae. The mature protein had a molecular mass of 13.975 Da with an isoelectric point of 8.77 and showed 98.3% and 96.7% identity with lysozymes from Spodoptera litura and Spodoptera exigua, respectively. As the other insect lysozymes, Sf-Lys1 was active against gram positive bacteria such as Micrococcus luteus but also induced a slight permeabilization of the inner membrane of E. coli. Genes encoding these five Sf-Lys or Sf-LLPs were differentially up-regulated in three immune-competent tissues (hemocytes, fat body and gut) after challenges with non-pathogenic bacteria, E. coli and M. luteus, or entomopathogenic bacterium, Photorhabdus luminescens. Sf-Lys1 and Sf-Lys2 were mainly induced in fat body in the presence of E. coli or P. luminescens. Sf-Lys3, which had an acidic isoelectric point, was found to be the most up-regulated of all five Sf-Lys or Sf-LLPs in hemocytes and gut after challenge with P. luminescens. More molecular data are now available to investigate differences in physiological functions of these different members of the lysozyme superfamily. PMID:19828200

  2. Bacteriophages of methanotrophic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Tyutikow, F.M.; Bespalova, I.A.; Rebentish, B.A.; Aleksandrushkina, N.N.; Krivisky, A.S.

    1980-10-01

    Bacteriophages of methanotrophic bacteria have been found in 16 out of 88 studied samples (underground waters, pond water, soil, gas and oil installation waters, fermentor cultural fluids, bacterial paste, and rumen of cattle) taken in different geographic zones of the Soviet Union. Altogether, 23 phage strains were isolated. By fine structure, the phages were divided into two types (with very short or long noncontractile tails); by host range and serological properties, they fell into three types. All phages had guanine- and cytosine-rich double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid consisting of common nitrogen bases. By all of the above-mentioned properties, all phages within each of the groups were completely identical to one another, but differed from phages of other groups.

  3. Genetically modified bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Sagona, Antonia P; Grigonyte, Aurelija M; MacDonald, Paul R; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2016-04-18

    Phages or bacteriophages, viruses that infect and replicate inside bacteria, are the most abundant microorganisms on earth. The realization that antibiotic resistance poses a substantial risk to the world's health and global economy is revitalizing phage therapy as a potential solution. The increasing ease by which phage genomes can be modified, owing to the influx of new technologies, has led to an expansion of their natural capabilities, and a reduced dependence on phage isolation from environmental sources. This review will discuss the way synthetic biology has accelerated the construction of genetically modified phages and will describe the wide range of their applications. It will further provide insight into the societal and economic benefits that derive from the use of recombinant phages in various sectors, from health to biodetection, biocontrol and the food industry.

  4. Genetically modified bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Sagona, Antonia P; Grigonyte, Aurelija M; MacDonald, Paul R; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2016-04-18

    Phages or bacteriophages, viruses that infect and replicate inside bacteria, are the most abundant microorganisms on earth. The realization that antibiotic resistance poses a substantial risk to the world's health and global economy is revitalizing phage therapy as a potential solution. The increasing ease by which phage genomes can be modified, owing to the influx of new technologies, has led to an expansion of their natural capabilities, and a reduced dependence on phage isolation from environmental sources. This review will discuss the way synthetic biology has accelerated the construction of genetically modified phages and will describe the wide range of their applications. It will further provide insight into the societal and economic benefits that derive from the use of recombinant phages in various sectors, from health to biodetection, biocontrol and the food industry. PMID:26906932

  5. [Inactivation of T4 phage in water environment using proteinase].

    PubMed

    Lü, Wen-zhou; Yang, Qing-xiang; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Min; Zhu, Chun-fang

    2004-09-01

    The inactivation effectiveness of proteinase to viruses was investigated by using T4 phage as a model virus. The results showed that the inactivation effectiveness of proteinase to T4 phage was obvious. In the optimum conditions and 67.5 u/mL concentration, the inactivation rate of proteinase K to T4 phage in sterilized water and in sewage achieved 99.4% and 49.4% respectively in an hour, and achieved >99.9% and 81.1% in three hours. The inactivation rate of the industrial proteinase 1398 to T4 phage in sterilized water achieved 74.4% in an hour. The effects of pH and temperature on the inactivation effectiveness was not evident.

  6. Bacteriophage-encoded cochaperonins can substitute for Escherichia coli’s essential GroES protein

    PubMed Central

    Keppel, France; Rychner, Monique; Georgopoulos, Costa

    2002-01-01

    The Escherichia coli chaperonin machine is composed of two members, GroEL and GroES. The GroEL chaperonin can bind 10–15% of E. coli’s unfolded proteins in one of its central cavities and help them fold in cooperation with the GroES cochaperonin. Both proteins are absolutely essential for bacterial growth. Several large, lytic bacteriophages, such as T4 and RB49, use the host-encoded GroEL in conjunction with their own bacteriophage-encoded cochaperonin for the correct assembly of their major capsid protein, suggesting a cochaperonin specificity for the in vivo folding of certain substrates. Here, we demonstrate that, when the cochaperonin of either bacteriophage T4 (Gp31) or RB49 (CocO) is expressed in E. coli, the otherwise essential groES gene can be deleted. Thus, it appears that, despite very little sequence identity with groES, the bacteriophage-encoded Gp31 and CocO proteins are capable of replacing GroES in the folding of E. coli’s essential, housekeeping proteins. PMID:12189177

  7. Genomic organization and evolution of ruminant lysozyme c genes.

    PubMed

    Irwin, David M

    2015-01-18

    Ruminant stomach lysozyme is a long established model of adaptive gene evolution. Evolution of stomach lysozyme function required changes in the site of expression of the lysozyme c gene and changes in the enzymatic properties of the enzyme. In ruminant mammals, these changes were associated with a change in the size of the lysozyme c gene family. The recent release of near complete genome sequences from several ruminant species allows a more complete examination of the evolution and diversification of the lysozyme c gene family. Here we characterize the size of the lysozyme c gene family in extant ruminants and demonstrate that their pecoran ruminant ancestor had a family of at least 10 lysozyme c genes, which included at least two pseudogenes. Evolutionary analysis of the ruminant lysozyme c gene sequences demonstrate that each of the four exons of the lysozyme c gene has a unique evolutionary history, indicating that they participated independently in concerted evolution. These analyses also show that episodic changes in the evolutionary constraints on the protein sequences occurred, with lysozyme c genes expressed in the abomasum of the stomach of extant ruminant species showing the greatest levels of selective constraints.

  8. The gp38 Adhesins of the T4 Superfamily: A Complex Modular Determinant of the Phage’s Host Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Trojet, Sabrina N.; Caumont-Sarcos, Anne; Perrody, Elsa; Comeau, André M.; Krisch, H. M.

    2011-01-01

    The tail fiber adhesins are the primary determinants of host range in the T4-type bacteriophages. Among the indispensable virion components, the sequences of the long tail fiber genes and their associated adhesins are among the most variable. The predominant form of the adhesin in the T4-type phages is not even the version of the gene encoded by T4, the archetype of the superfamily, but rather a small unrelated protein (gp38) encoded by closely related phages such as T2 and T6. This gp38 adhesin has a modular design: its N-terminal attachment domain binds at the tip of the tail fiber, whereas the C-terminal specificity domain determines its host receptor affinity. This specificity domain has a series of four hypervariable segments (HVSs) that are separated by a set of highly conserved glycine-rich motifs (GRMs) that apparently form the domain’s conserved structural core. The role of gp38’s various components was examined by a comparative analysis of a large series of gp38 adhesins from T-even superfamily phages with differing host specificities. A deletion analysis revealed that the individual HVSs and GRMs are essential to the T6 adhesin’s function and suggests that these different components all act in synergy to mediate adsorption. The evolutionary advantages of the modular design of the adhesin involving both conserved structural elements and multiple independent and easily interchanged specificity determinants are discussed. PMID:21746838

  9. Dynamics of Lysozyme in Trehalose solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghatty, Pavan; Uberbacher, Edward C.

    2008-03-01

    Anhydrobiosis in Tardigrades and Nematodes has been a topic of constant interest and intrigue in the scientific community. An increase in the concentration of Trehalose has been attributed to the ability of some organisms to survive extreme conditions of temperature, pressure and pH. Although there exist many experimental studies attributing this effect to Trehalose, the molecular details governing the interaction between Trehalose and proteins remains unclear. We have conducted a 20ns study of Lysozyme in varying concentrations of Trehalose in water. Strong and weak hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions between water, Trehalose and protein seem to dictate the interactions in the system. We have observed a hydrogen bonded network of Trehalose around the protein entrapping a layer of water between itself and protein. Lysozyme remains in a near-native conformation throughout the simulation giving hints on the ability of Trehalose in preserving the structure of protiens.

  10. Growth and dissolution kinetics of tetragonal lysozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monaco, L. A.; Rosenberger, F.

    1993-01-01

    The growth and dissolution kinetics of lysozyme in a 25 ml solution bridge inside a closed growth cell was investigated. It was found that, under all growth conditions, the growth habit forming (110) and (101) faces grew through layer spreading with different growth rate dependence on supersaturation/temperature. On the other hand, (100) faces which formed only at low temperatures underwent a thermal roughening transition around 12 C.

  11. The oligomeric T4 primase is the functional form during replication.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jingsong; Xi, Jun; Zhuang, Zhihao; Benkovic, Stephen J

    2005-07-01

    Replisome DNA primases are responsible for the synthesis of short RNA primers required for the initiation of repetitive Okazaki fragment synthesis on the lagging strand during DNA replication. In bacteriophage T4, the primase (gp61) interacts with the helicase (gp41) to form the primosome complex, an interaction that greatly stimulates the priming activity of gp61. Because gp41 is hexameric, a question arises as to whether gp61 also forms a hexameric structure during replication. Several results from this study support such a structure. Titration of the primase/single-stranded DNA binding followed by fluorescence anisotropy implicated a 6:1 stoichiometry. The observed rate constant, k(cat), for priming was found to increase with the primase concentration, implicating an oligomeric form of the primase as the major functional species. The generation of hetero-oligomeric populations of the hexameric primase by controlled mixing of wild type and an inactive mutant primase confirmed the oligomeric nature of the most active primase form. Mutant primases defective in either the N- or C-terminal domains and catalytically inactive could be mixed to create oligomeric primases with restored catalytic activity suggesting an active site shared between subunits. Collectively, these results provide strong evidence for the functional oligomerization of gp61. The potential roles of gp61 oligomerization during lagging strand synthesis are discussed.

  12. Addition of oligonucleotides to the 5'-terminus of DNA by T4 RNA ligase.

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, N P; Geballe, A P; Cozzarelli, N R

    1979-01-01

    Bacteriophage T4-induced RNA ligase catalyzes the controlled template-independent addition of RNA to the 5'-phosphoryl end of large DNA molecules. Restriction enzyme-generated fragments of Co1E1 DNA with completely basepaired or cohesive ends and linear single-stranded øX174 viral DNA were all good substrates. DNA molecules from 10 to 6000 nucleotides long were quantitatively joined in an hour to a number of different RNA homopolymers. The most efficient of these was A(pA)5; I(pI)5 and C(pC)5 were also utilized while U(pU)5 was not. The optimum ribohomopolymer length was six nucleotides. Joining of ribohomopolymers between 10 and 20 nucleotides long occurred at approximately 1/2 the maximal rate and a trimer was the shortest substrate. Thus RNA ligase provides a method for generating extensions of predetermined length and base composition at the 5'-end of large DNA molecules that complements the available procedures for extending the 3'-hydroxyl terminus of DNA. Images PMID:375192

  13. Colorimetric and fluorometric dual-readout sensor for lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hanye; Qiu, Suyan; Xu, Kefeng; Luo, Linguang; Song, Yibiao; Lin, Zhenyu; Guo, Longhua; Qiu, Bin; Chen, Guonan

    2013-11-01

    A novel, highly sensitive and selective dual-readout sensor (colorimetric and fluorometric) for the detection of lysozyme was proposed. The fluorescence of triazolylcoumarin molecules was quenched by Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) initially through the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), after the addition of lysozyme, the stronger binding of lysozyme onto the surfaces of AuNPs made triazolylcoumarin molecules remove from the AuNPs surface and led to the recovery of the fluorescence of triazolylcoumarin molecules, and accompanied by the discernable color change of the solution from red to purple. The lowest detectable concentration for lysozyme was 50 ng mL(-1) by the naked eye, and the limit of detection (LOD) was 23 ng mL(-1) by fluorescence measurements. In addition, satisfactory results for lysozyme detection in hen egg white were confirmed in the study. Moreover, the presented sensor provides a reliable option to determine lysozyme with high sensitivity and selectivity. PMID:23978821

  14. Lysozyme pattern formation in evaporating droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorr, Heather Meloy

    Liquid droplets containing suspended particles deposited on a solid, flat surface generally form ring-like structures due to the redistribution of solute during evaporation (the "coffee ring effect"). The forms of the deposited patterns depend on complex interactions between solute(s), solvent, and substrate in a rapidly changing, far from equilibrium system. Solute self-organization during evaporation of colloidal sessile droplets has attracted the attention of researchers over the past few decades due to a variety of technological applications. Recently, pattern formation during evaporation of various biofluids has been studied due to potential applications in medical screening and diagnosis. Due to the complexity of 'real' biological fluids and other multicomponent systems, a comprehensive understanding of pattern formation during droplet evaporation of these fluids is lacking. In this PhD dissertation, the morphology of the patterns remaining after evaporation of droplets of a simplified model biological fluid (aqueous lysozyme solutions + NaCl) are examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical microscopy. Lysozyme is a globular protein found in high concentration, for example, in human tears and saliva. The drop diameters, D, studied range from the micro- to the macro- scale (1 microm -- 2 mm). In this work, the effect of evaporation conditions, solution chemistry, and heat transfer within the droplet on pattern formation is examined. In micro-scale deposits of aqueous lysozyme solutions (1 microm < D < 50 microm), the protein motion and the resulting dried residue morphology are highly influenced by the decreased evaporation time of the drop. The effect of electrolytes on pattern formation is also investigated by adding varying concentrations NaCl to the lysozyme solutions. Finally, a novel pattern recognition program is described and implemented which classifies deposit images by their solution chemistries. The results presented in this Ph

  15. The Caulobacter crescentus transducing phage Cr30 is a unique member of the T4-like family of myophages.

    PubMed

    Ely, Bert; Gibbs, Whitney; Diez, Simon; Ash, Kurt

    2015-06-01

    Bacteriophage Cr30 has proven useful for the transduction of Caulobacter crescentus. Nucleotide sequencing of Cr30 DNA revealed that the Cr30 genome consists of 155,997 bp of DNA that codes for 287 proteins and five tRNAs. In contrast to the 67 % GC content of the host genome, the GC content of the Cr30 genome is only 38 %. This lower GC content causes both the codon usage pattern and the amino acid composition of the Cr30 proteins to be quite different from those of the host bacteria. As a consequence, the Cr30 mRNAs probably are translated at a rate that is slower than the normal rate for host mRNAs. A phylogenetic comparison of the genome indicates that Cr30 is a member of the T4-like family that is most closely related to a new group of T-like phages exemplified by фM12.

  16. Purification and properties of lysozyme produced by Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Hawiger, J

    1968-02-01

    A method based on cold ethyl alcohol fractionation at different pH levels and ionic strengths and on gel filtration on a Sephadex G-200 column was used to concentrate and purify lysozyme from the culture supernatant fluid of Staphylococcus aureus strain 524. The final, nondialyzable product exhibited a 163-fold rise in specific activity over that of the starting material. Staphylococcal lysozyme is a glycosidase which splits N-acetylamino sugars from the susceptible substrate. Staphylococcal lysozyme was shown to be similar to egg white lysozyme in its optimal temperature for reaction, optimal pH, activation by NaCl and Ca(++) ions, inhibition by sodium citrate and ethylenediaminetetraacetate, and inactivation by Cu(++) ions and sodium dodecyl sulfate. It differs from the egg white lysozyme in its temperature susceptibility range (staphylococcal lysozyme is inactivated at 56 C). It acts on whole cells and cell walls of Micrococcus lysodeikticus, murein from S. aureus 524, and cell walls of S. epidermidis Zak. The last substrate was not susceptible to the action of egg white lysozyme in the test system used. The mechanism of action of staphylococcal lysozyme seems to be analogous to that of egg white lysozyme; however, the biological specificity of the two enzymes may be different.

  17. Purification and Properties of Lysozyme Produced by Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Hawiger, J.

    1968-01-01

    A method based on cold ethyl alcohol fractionation at different pH levels and ionic strengths and on gel filtration on a Sephadex G-200 column was used to concentrate and purify lysozyme from the culture supernatant fluid of Staphylococcus aureus strain 524. The final, nondialyzable product exhibited a 163-fold rise in specific activity over that of the starting material. Staphylococcal lysozyme is a glycosidase which splits N-acetylamino sugars from the susceptible substrate. Staphylococcal lysozyme was shown to be similar to egg white lysozyme in its optimal temperature for reaction, optimal pH, activation by NaCl and Ca++ ions, inhibition by sodium citrate and ethylenediaminetetraacetate, and inactivation by Cu++ ions and sodium dodecyl sulfate. It differs from the egg white lysozyme in its temperature susceptibility range (staphylococcal lysozyme is inactivated at 56 C). It acts on whole cells and cell walls of Micrococcus lysodeikticus, murein from S. aureus 524, and cell walls of S. epidermidis Zak. The last substrate was not susceptible to the action of egg white lysozyme in the test system used. The mechanism of action of staphylococcal lysozyme seems to be analogous to that of egg white lysozyme; however, the biological specificity of the two enzymes may be different. PMID:4966544

  18. Effect of environmental contaminants on nasal lysozyme secretions.

    PubMed

    Noble, Rudolf E

    2002-02-01

    Human nasal secretions are comprised of lysozyme and albumin as their main protein components. Lysozyme, an anti-microbial substance, is produced by nasal serous cells while albumin is obtained, primarily, from increased nasal vasculature permeability. We measured lysozyme levels in nasal secretions following challenge by a variety of non-infectious environmental contaminants. The methodology given presents a simple and rapid method of collecting nasal secretions and determining their lysozyme content, a technique which can be used for a host of environmental irritants.

  19. Evaluation of oriented lysozyme immobilized with monoclonal antibody

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyagi, Satoka; Okada, Keigo; Shigyo, Ayako; Man, Naoki; Karen, Akiya

    2008-12-01

    The orientation of a lysozyme immobilized with a monoclonal antibody was evaluated based on determination of the uppermost surface structure using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). Specific peaks of the oriented lysozyme immobilized with monoclonal anti-lysozyme antibody were obtained in comparison with reference samples, non-oriented immobilized lysozyme and immobilized anti-lysozyme antibody. All samples were freeze-dried before TOF-SIMS measurement, and then each sample was measured using TOF-SIMS with a bismuth cluster ion source. TOF-SIMS spectra were analyzed to select peaks specific to the oriented immobilized lysozyme as well as to identify their chemical formula and ensemble of amino acids. The possible chemical formulae of the lysozyme fragments were then investigated with an element matching program and a residue matching program. The results from TOF-SIMS spectra analysis were compared to the amino acid sequence of the lysozyme and its three-dimensional structure registered in the protein data bank. Finally, the fragment-ion-generating regions of the oriented immobilized lysozyme were determined based on the suggested residues and the three-dimensional structure.

  20. Purification and properties of lysozyme produced by Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Hawiger, J

    1968-02-01

    A method based on cold ethyl alcohol fractionation at different pH levels and ionic strengths and on gel filtration on a Sephadex G-200 column was used to concentrate and purify lysozyme from the culture supernatant fluid of Staphylococcus aureus strain 524. The final, nondialyzable product exhibited a 163-fold rise in specific activity over that of the starting material. Staphylococcal lysozyme is a glycosidase which splits N-acetylamino sugars from the susceptible substrate. Staphylococcal lysozyme was shown to be similar to egg white lysozyme in its optimal temperature for reaction, optimal pH, activation by NaCl and Ca(++) ions, inhibition by sodium citrate and ethylenediaminetetraacetate, and inactivation by Cu(++) ions and sodium dodecyl sulfate. It differs from the egg white lysozyme in its temperature susceptibility range (staphylococcal lysozyme is inactivated at 56 C). It acts on whole cells and cell walls of Micrococcus lysodeikticus, murein from S. aureus 524, and cell walls of S. epidermidis Zak. The last substrate was not susceptible to the action of egg white lysozyme in the test system used. The mechanism of action of staphylococcal lysozyme seems to be analogous to that of egg white lysozyme; however, the biological specificity of the two enzymes may be different. PMID:4966544

  1. Comparative genomics of the T4-Like Escherichia coli phage JS98: implications for the evolution of T4 phages.

    PubMed

    Chibani-Chennoufi, Sandra; Canchaya, Carlos; Bruttin, Anne; Brüssow, Harald

    2004-12-01

    About 130 kb of sequence information was obtained from the coliphage JS98 isolated from the stool of a pediatric diarrhea patient in Bangladesh. The DNA shared up to 81% base pair identity with phage T4. The most conserved regions between JS98 and T4 were the structural genes, but their degree of conservation was not uniform. The head genes showed the highest sequence conservation, followed by the tail, baseplate, and tail fiber genes. Many tail fiber genes shared only protein sequence identity. Except for the insertion of endonuclease genes in T4 and gene 24 duplication in JS98, the structural gene maps of the two phages were colinear. The receptor-recognizing tail fiber proteins gp37 and gp38 were only distantly related to T4, but shared up to 83% amino acid identity to other T6-like phages, suggesting lateral gene transfer. A greater degree of variability was seen between JS98 and T4 over DNA replication and DNA transaction genes. While most of these genes came in the same order and shared up to 76% protein sequence identity, a few rearrangements, insertions, and replacements of genes were observed. Many putative gene insertions in the DNA replication module of T4 were flanked by intron-related endonuclease genes, suggesting mobile DNA elements. A hotspot of genome diversification was located downstream of the DNA polymerase gene 43 and the DNA binding gene 32. Comparative genomics of 100-kb genome sequence revealed that T4-like phages diversify more by the accumulation of point mutations and occasional gene duplication events than by modular exchanges. PMID:15576776

  2. Multiple specialised goose-type lysozymes potentially compensate for an exceptional lack of chicken-type lysozymes in Atlantic cod.

    PubMed

    Seppola, Marit; Bakkemo, Kathrine Ryvold; Mikkelsen, Helene; Myrnes, Bjørnar; Helland, Ronny; Irwin, David M; Nilsen, Inge W

    2016-01-01

    Previous analyses of the Atlantic cod genome showed unique combinations of lacking and expanded number of genes for the immune system. The present study examined lysozyme activity, lysozyme gene distribution and expression in cod. Enzymatic assays employing specific bacterial lysozyme inhibitors provided evidence for presence of g-type, but unexpectedly not for c-type lysozyme activity. Database homology searches failed to identify any c-type lysozyme gene in the cod genome or in expressed sequence tags from cod. In contrast, we identified four g-type lysozyme genes (LygF1a-d) constitutively expressed, although differentially, in all cod organs examined. The active site glutamate residue is replaced by alanine in LygF1a, thus making it enzymatic inactive, while LygF1d was found in two active site variants carrying alanine or glutamate, respectively. In vitro and in vivo infection by the intracellular bacterium Francisella noatunensis gave a significantly reduced LygF1a and b expression but increased expression of the LygF1c and d genes as did also the interferon gamma (IFNγ) cytokine. These results demonstrate a lack of c-type lysozyme that is unprecedented among vertebrates. Our results further indicate that serial gene duplications have produced multiple differentially regulated cod g-type lysozymes with specialised functions potentially compensating for the lack of c-type lysozymes. PMID:27324690

  3. Multiple specialised goose-type lysozymes potentially compensate for an exceptional lack of chicken-type lysozymes in Atlantic cod.

    PubMed

    Seppola, Marit; Bakkemo, Kathrine Ryvold; Mikkelsen, Helene; Myrnes, Bjørnar; Helland, Ronny; Irwin, David M; Nilsen, Inge W

    2016-01-01

    Previous analyses of the Atlantic cod genome showed unique combinations of lacking and expanded number of genes for the immune system. The present study examined lysozyme activity, lysozyme gene distribution and expression in cod. Enzymatic assays employing specific bacterial lysozyme inhibitors provided evidence for presence of g-type, but unexpectedly not for c-type lysozyme activity. Database homology searches failed to identify any c-type lysozyme gene in the cod genome or in expressed sequence tags from cod. In contrast, we identified four g-type lysozyme genes (LygF1a-d) constitutively expressed, although differentially, in all cod organs examined. The active site glutamate residue is replaced by alanine in LygF1a, thus making it enzymatic inactive, while LygF1d was found in two active site variants carrying alanine or glutamate, respectively. In vitro and in vivo infection by the intracellular bacterium Francisella noatunensis gave a significantly reduced LygF1a and b expression but increased expression of the LygF1c and d genes as did also the interferon gamma (IFNγ) cytokine. These results demonstrate a lack of c-type lysozyme that is unprecedented among vertebrates. Our results further indicate that serial gene duplications have produced multiple differentially regulated cod g-type lysozymes with specialised functions potentially compensating for the lack of c-type lysozymes.

  4. Amino acid sequences of lysozymes newly purified from invertebrates imply wide distribution of a novel class in the lysozyme family.

    PubMed

    Ito, Y; Yoshikawa, A; Hotani, T; Fukuda, S; Sugimura, K; Imoto, T

    1999-01-01

    Lysozymes were purified from three invertebrates: a marine bivalve, a marine conch, and an earthworm. The purified lysozymes all showed a similar molecular weight of 13 kDa on SDS/PAGE. Their N-terminal sequences up to the 33rd residue determined here were apparently homologous among them; in addition, they had a homology with a partial sequence of a starfish lysozyme which had been reported before. The complete sequence of the bivalve lysozyme was determined by peptide mapping and subsequent sequence analysis. This was composed of 123 amino acids including as many as 14 cysteine residues and did not show a clear homology with the known types of lysozymes. However, the homology search of this protein on the protein or nucleic acid database revealed two homologous proteins. One of them was a gene product, CELF22 A3.6 of C. elegans, which was a functionally unknown protein. The other was an isopeptidase of a medicinal leech, named destabilase. Thus, a new type of lysozyme found in at least four species across the three classes of the invertebrates demonstrates a novel class of protein/lysozyme family in invertebrates. The bivalve lysozyme, first characterized here, showed extremely high protein stability and hen lysozyme-like enzymatic features.

  5. Multiple specialised goose-type lysozymes potentially compensate for an exceptional lack of chicken-type lysozymes in Atlantic cod

    PubMed Central

    Seppola, Marit; Bakkemo, Kathrine Ryvold; Mikkelsen, Helene; Myrnes, Bjørnar; Helland, Ronny; Irwin, David M.; Nilsen, Inge W.

    2016-01-01

    Previous analyses of the Atlantic cod genome showed unique combinations of lacking and expanded number of genes for the immune system. The present study examined lysozyme activity, lysozyme gene distribution and expression in cod. Enzymatic assays employing specific bacterial lysozyme inhibitors provided evidence for presence of g-type, but unexpectedly not for c-type lysozyme activity. Database homology searches failed to identify any c-type lysozyme gene in the cod genome or in expressed sequence tags from cod. In contrast, we identified four g-type lysozyme genes (LygF1a-d) constitutively expressed, although differentially, in all cod organs examined. The active site glutamate residue is replaced by alanine in LygF1a, thus making it enzymatic inactive, while LygF1d was found in two active site variants carrying alanine or glutamate, respectively. In vitro and in vivo infection by the intracellular bacterium Francisella noatunensis gave a significantly reduced LygF1a and b expression but increased expression of the LygF1c and d genes as did also the interferon gamma (IFNγ) cytokine. These results demonstrate a lack of c-type lysozyme that is unprecedented among vertebrates. Our results further indicate that serial gene duplications have produced multiple differentially regulated cod g-type lysozymes with specialised functions potentially compensating for the lack of c-type lysozymes. PMID:27324690

  6. Resistance screening essay of wine lactic acid bacteria on lysozyme: efficacy of lysozyme in unclarified grape musts.

    PubMed

    Delfini, Claudio; Cersosimo, Manuela; Del Prete, Vincenzo; Strano, Morela; Gaetano, Giuseppe; Pagliara, Adolfo; Ambrò, Stefano

    2004-04-01

    In wine making, the bacteriolytic activity of lysozyme has primarily been used to control the malolactic fermentation in wines. The use of lysozyme in musts before settling and the beginning of the alcoholic fermentation to inhibit the growth of lactic acid bacteria could be very beneficial. In a resistance test carried out in MT/b broth, lysozyme had greater antimicrobial activity toward Oenococcus oeni than Lactobacillus species. Several strains of wine bacteria belonging to Oenococcus proved sensitive to the bacteriolytic activity of lysozyme at low concentrations in both synthetic medium (MT/b) (50 mg/L), white must, or red must made with or without the skins (100 mg/L). Lactobacillus and Pediococcus strains survived at lysozyme concentrations of 200-500 and 500 mg/L, respectively, in MT/b and musts. Suspended solids in unclarified musts may strongly bind to lysozyme thereby causing its removal by filtration or centrifugation. One hour after lysozyme was added to musts, it was quantified by HPLC and found after centrifugation to be 40-50% and only 10% in musts made with or without the skins, respectively. Although appreciable amounts of lysozyme were bound to wine components, this did not appear to be a serious hindrance to lysozyme activity.

  7. Amino acid sequences of lysozymes newly purified from invertebrates imply wide distribution of a novel class in the lysozyme family.

    PubMed

    Ito, Y; Yoshikawa, A; Hotani, T; Fukuda, S; Sugimura, K; Imoto, T

    1999-01-01

    Lysozymes were purified from three invertebrates: a marine bivalve, a marine conch, and an earthworm. The purified lysozymes all showed a similar molecular weight of 13 kDa on SDS/PAGE. Their N-terminal sequences up to the 33rd residue determined here were apparently homologous among them; in addition, they had a homology with a partial sequence of a starfish lysozyme which had been reported before. The complete sequence of the bivalve lysozyme was determined by peptide mapping and subsequent sequence analysis. This was composed of 123 amino acids including as many as 14 cysteine residues and did not show a clear homology with the known types of lysozymes. However, the homology search of this protein on the protein or nucleic acid database revealed two homologous proteins. One of them was a gene product, CELF22 A3.6 of C. elegans, which was a functionally unknown protein. The other was an isopeptidase of a medicinal leech, named destabilase. Thus, a new type of lysozyme found in at least four species across the three classes of the invertebrates demonstrates a novel class of protein/lysozyme family in invertebrates. The bivalve lysozyme, first characterized here, showed extremely high protein stability and hen lysozyme-like enzymatic features. PMID:9914527

  8. Lysogenic bacteriophage isolated from acidophilium

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Thomas W.; Bruhn, Debby F.; Bulmer, Deborah K.

    1992-01-01

    A bacteriophage identified as .phi.Ac1 capable of infecting acidophilic heterotropic bacteria (such as Acidiphilium sp.) and processes for genetically engineering acidophilic bacteria for biomining or sulfur removal from coal are disclosed. The bacteriophage is capable of growth in cells existing at pH at or below 3.0. Lytic forms of the phage introduced into areas experiencing acid drainage kill the bacteria causing such drainage. Lysogenic forms of the phase having genes for selective removal of metallic or nonmetallic elements can be introduced into acidophilic bacteria to effect removal of the desired element form ore or coal.

  9. [Critical appraisal: combined T3 and T4 replacement therapy is not better than replacement with T4 alone].

    PubMed

    Téllez T, Rafael

    2005-09-01

    Conflicting results have recently been published about the benefits of combined thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) in treating hypothyroid patients. However these studies may have been underpowered to detect differences in psychological well-being specifically related to thyroxine replacement. We conducted a large, double-blind, randomized controlled trial of partial substitution of 50 microg of T4 by 10 microg of T3 (T3) vs placebo (T4 alone - 50 microg of T4 replaced) in 697 hypothyroid patients. Thyroid function showed a rise in the TSH (132%), a fall in Free T4 (35%, P <0.001) and unchanged basal Free T3 levels (P=0.92). At 3 months there was a large (39%) improvement in defined by the General Health Questionnaire 12 score (GHQ 12) in the control group compared with baseline and this was sustained at 12 months. Differences vs the intervention (T3) group were more modest with improvements in GHQ caseness (OR - 0.61; 95% CI: 0.42, 0.90; P=0.01) and HADS anxiety scores at 3 months (P <0.03) but not GHQ Likert scores, HADS depression, thyroid symptoms or visual analog scales of mood and the initial differences were lost at 12 months. These results may be consistent with a subgroup of patients showing transient improvement following partial substitution with T3 but do not provide conclusive evidence of specific benefit from partial substitution of T4 by T3 in patients on thyroxine replacement. They also emphasize the large and sustained that can follow changes in thyroid hormone administration. PMID:16311707

  10. Lysozyme Photochemistry as a Function of Temperature. The Protective Effect of Nanoparticles on Lysozyme Photostability

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira Silva, Catarina; Petersen, Steffen B.; Pinto Reis, Catarina; Rijo, Patrícia; Molpeceres, Jesús; Vorum, Henrik; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa

    2015-01-01

    The presence of aromatic residues and their close spatial proximity to disulphide bridges makes hen egg white lysozyme labile to UV excitation. UVB induced photo-oxidation of tryptophan and tyrosine residues leads to photochemical products, such as, kynurenine, N–formylkynurenine and dityrosine and to the disruption of disulphide bridges in proteins. We here report that lysozyme UV induced photochemistry is modulated by temperature, excitation power, illumination time, excitation wavelength and by the presence of plasmonic quencher surfaces, such as gold, and by the presence of natural fluorescence quenchers, such as hyaluronic acid and oleic acid. We show evidence that the photo-oxidation effects triggered by 295 nm at 20°C are reversible and non-reversible at 10°C, 25°C and 30°C. This paper provides evidence that the 295 nm damage threshold of lysozyme lies between 0.1 μW and 0.3 μW. Protein conformational changes induced by temperature and UV light have been detected upon monitoring changes in the fluorescence emission spectra of lysozyme tryptophan residues and SYPRO® Orange. Lysozyme has been conjugated onto gold nanoparticles, coated with hyaluronic acid and oleic acid (HAOA). Steady state and time resolved fluorescence studies of free and conjugated lysozyme onto HAOA gold nanoparticles reveals that the presence of the polymer decreased the rate of the observed photochemical reactions and induced a preference for short fluorescence decay lifetimes. Size and surface charge of the HAOA gold nanoparticles have been determined by dynamic light scattering and zeta potential measurements. TEM analysis of the particles confirms the presence of a gold core surrounded by a HAOA matrix. We conclude that HAOA gold nanoparticles may efficiently protect lysozyme from the photochemical effects of UVB light and this nanocarrier could be potentially applied to other proteins with clinical relevance. In addition, this study confirms that the temperature plays a

  11. T-4G Methodology: Undergraduate Pilot Training T-37 Phase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, Robert R.; And Others

    The report's brief introduction describes the application of T-4G methodology to the T-37 instrument phase of undergraduate pilot training. The methodology is characterized by instruction in trainers, proficiency advancement, a highly structured syllabus, the training manager concept, early exposure to instrument training, and hands-on training.…

  12. Tetragonal Lysozyme, From Monomer to Crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The data now leads us to a comprehensive model for the process by which tetragonal lysozyme crystals are nucleated and subsequently grow. Lysozyme is typically desolubilized by addition of ionic salts. The salt anions bind to basic and other sites on the protein and promote protein-protein interactions, i.e., initiate the nucleation self assembly process. Formation of protein-protein interactions occurs at the expense of the protein-anion interactions, with the anions being released to the solution. The association follows a defined pattern, forming the "head to side" interactions of the crystal 4(3) helix. The presence of the high salt also promotes hydrophobic interactions between the protein molecules, further tightening their interaction. The solute assembly process persists after crystal nucleation, and the 4(3) helical structures form the subsequent growth units. AFM measurements show that the growth units follow the dimensions of these helices, and that those on the surface are more compact about the c-axis than in the bulk crystal, with adjacent helices riot being in contact. This further supports the role of hydrophobic interactions, as the surface is still in contact with the bulk solution. Once buried within the crystal the protein:salt ratio radically changes and the hydrophobic interactions relax to those measured crystallographically. Thus the crystal growth process recapitulates the initial stages of the nucleation process, and the two seamlessly merge. Experimental evidence, based upon face growth rate, AFM, and fluorescence energy transfer data, for a postulated model of the nucleation of tetragonal lysozyme crystals and how it transitions into crystal growth will be presented.

  13. Mechanics of bacteriophage maturation.

    PubMed

    Roos, Wouter H; Gertsman, Ilya; May, Eric R; Brooks, Charles L; Johnson, John E; Wuite, Gijs J L

    2012-02-14

    Capsid maturation with large-scale subunit reorganization occurs in virtually all viruses that use a motor to package nucleic acid into preformed particles. A variety of ensemble studies indicate that the particles gain greater stability during this process, however, it is unknown which material properties of the fragile procapsids change. Using Atomic Force Microscopy-based nano-indentation, we study the development of the mechanical properties during maturation of bacteriophage HK97, a λ-like phage of which the maturation-induced morphological changes are well described. We show that mechanical stabilization and strengthening occurs in three independent ways: (i) an increase of the Young's modulus, (ii) a strong rise of the capsid's ultimate strength, and (iii) a growth of the resistance against material fatigue. The Young's modulus of immature and mature capsids, as determined from thin shell theory, fit with the values calculated using a new multiscale simulation approach. This multiscale calculation shows that the increase in Young's modulus isn't dependent on the crosslinking between capsomers. In contrast, the ultimate strength of the capsids does increase even when a limited number of cross-links are formed while full crosslinking appears to protect the shell against material fatigue. Compared to phage λ, the covalent crosslinking at the icosahedral and quasi threefold axes of HK97 yields a mechanically more robust particle than the addition of the gpD protein during maturation of phage λ. These results corroborate the expected increase in capsid stability and strength during maturation, however in an unexpected intricate way, underlining the complex structure of these self-assembling nanocontainers.

  14. Crystal and cryoEM structural studies of a cell wall degrading enzyme in the bacteriophage [psi]29 tail

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Ye; Morais, Marc C.; Cohen, Daniel N.; Bowman, Valorie D.; Anderson, Dwight L.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2009-08-28

    The small bacteriophage {phi}29 must penetrate the {approx}250-{angstrom} thick external peptidoglycan cell wall and cell membrane of the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis, before ejecting its dsDNA genome through its tail into the bacterial cytoplasm. The tail of bacteriophage {phi}29 is noncontractile and {approx}380 {angstrom} long. A 1.8-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of gene product 13 (gp13) shows that this tail protein has spatially well separated N- and C-terminal domains, whose structures resemble lysozyme-like enzymes and metallo-endopeptidases, respectively. CryoEM reconstructions of the WT bacteriophage and mutant bacteriophages missing some or most of gp13 shows that this enzyme is located at the distal end of the {phi}29 tail knob. This finding suggests that gp13 functions as a tail-associated, peptidoglycan-degrading enzyme able to cleave both the polysaccharide backbone and peptide cross-links of the peptidoglycan cell wall. Comparisons of the gp13{sup -} mutants with the {phi}29 mature and emptied phage structures suggest the sequence of events that occur during the penetration of the tail through the peptidoglycan layer.

  15. Adaptive functional diversification of lysozyme in insectivorous bats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; He, Guimei; Xu, Huihui; Han, Xiuqun; Jones, Gareth; Rossiter, Stephen J; Zhang, Shuyi

    2014-11-01

    The role of gene duplication in generating new genes and novel functions is well recognized and is exemplified by the digestion-related protein lysozyme. In ruminants, duplicated chicken-type lysozymes facilitate the degradation of symbiotic bacteria in the foregut. Chicken-type lysozyme has also been reported to show chitinase-like activity, yet no study has examined the molecular evolution of lysozymes in species that specialize on eating insects. Insectivorous bats number over 900 species, and lysozyme expression in the mouths of some of these species is associated with the ingestion of insect cuticle, suggesting a chitinase role. Here, we show that chicken-type lysozyme has undergone multiple duplication events in a major family of insect-eating bats (Vespertilionidae) and that new duplicates have undergone molecular adaptation. Examination of duplicates from two insectivorous bats-Pipistrellus abramus and Scotophilus kuhlii-indicated that the new copy was highly expressed in the tongue, whereas the other one was less tissue-specific. Functional assays applied to pipistrelle lysozymes confirmed that, of the two copies, the tongue duplicate was more efficient at breaking down glycol chitin, a chitin derivative. These results suggest that the evolution of lysozymes in vespertilionid bats has likely been driven in part by natural selection for insectivory.

  16. Purification of Lysozyme by Intrinsically Shielded Hydrogel Beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cong; Zhang, R.; Wang, L.; Bowyer, A.; Eisenthal, R.; Shen, Yehua; Hubble, J.

    2013-07-01

    Macro-sized intrinsically shielded hydrogel beads have been prepared from BSA and CM-dextran grafted with CB using a technique based on freeze-thawing gelation method. The size of the beads lies in around 500 μm. Isothemal titration calorimetry (ITC) showed that the relative binding affinities of the lysozyme for CB, compared with BSA, at pH 3.0 was stronger than that at pH 7.4. They were employed for the affinity separation of lysozyme using chromatography column. Their adsorption capacity for lysozyme at pH 3.0 is higher than that at pH 9. In a binary mixture of lysozyme and ovalbumin, the beads showed very high selectivity toward lysozyme. Lysozyme of very high purity (> 93%) was obtained from a mixture of lysozyme and ovalbumin, and 85% from egg white solution. The results indicate that the macro-sized bead can be used for the separation, purification, and recovery of lysozyme in a chromatograph column.

  17. Regenerated cellulose fiber and film immobilized with lysozyme

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present work reports an initial engineering approach for fabricating lysozyme-bound regenerated cellulose fiber and film. Glycine-esterified cotton was dissolved in an ionic liquid solvent 1–Butyl–3–methylimidazolium Chloride (BMIMCl) in which lysozyme was activated and covalently attached to c...

  18. Immobilization of lysozyme on cotton fabrics; synthesis, characterication, and activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The antimicrobial activity of lysozyme derives from the hydrolysis of the bacterial cell wall polysaccharide at the glycosidic bond that links N-acetyl-glucosamine and N-acetyl-muramic acid. Maintaining the activity of lysozyme while bound to a cellulose substrate is a goal toward developing enzyme...

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of vB_EcoM_112, a T-Even-Type Bacteriophage Specific for Escherichia coli O157:H7

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Brid; Ross, R. Paul; O’Flynn, Gary; O’Sullivan, Orla; Casey, Aidan; Callanan, Michael; Coffey, Aidan

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophage vB_EcoM_112 (formerly e11/2) is an Escherichia coli phage with specificity for the O157:H7 serotype. The vB_EcoM_112 genome sequence shares high degrees of similarity with the phage T4 genome sequence. PMID:25395625

  20. Bacteriophage therapy in animal production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concerns over the consequences of bacterial resistance to antibiotics with the use of antibiotics in animal production have led to an increase in research on alternatives to antibiotics. Bacteriophages kill bacteria, are natural, safe, plentiful, self replicating, self limiting, can be used to spec...

  1. Bacteriophage endolysins as novel antimicrobials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endolysins are enzymes used by bacteriophages at the end of their replication cycle to degrade the peptidoglycan of the bacterial host from within, resulting in cell lysis and release of progeny virions. Due to the absence of an outer membrane in the Gram-positive bacterial cell wall, endolysins can...

  2. Bacteriophages: back to the future

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A Listeria monocytogenes-specific bacteriophage cocktail (ListShield™) was evaluated for its activity against a nalidixic acid-resistant L. monocytogenes (Lm-NalR) isolate on fresh-cut spinach stored under modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) at various temperatures. Pieces (~2x2 cm2) of fresh spinac...

  3. Determination of monomer concentrations in crystallizing lysozyme solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L. J.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed a non-optical technique for the study of aggregation in lysozyme and other protein solutions. By monitoring the rate at which lysozyme traverses a semipermeable membrane it was possible to quantitate the degree of aggregation in supersaturated solutions. Using this technique, we have measured the concentration of monomers and larger aggregates in under- and oversaturated lysozyme solutions, and in the presence of crystals, at pH 4.0 and 3 percent NaCl (0.1M NaAc). Comparison of these concentration profiles with (110) face growth rate data supports the theory that tetragonal lysozyme crystals grow by addition of preformed aggregates and not by monomer addition. The data suggest that a considerable population of aggregates larger than dimers are present at lysozyme concentrations above 22 mg/ml. Determination of dimer concentrations, and equilibrium constants for subsequent aggregation levels, are currently underway.

  4. Effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes on lysozyme gelation.

    PubMed

    Tardani, Franco; La Mesa, Camillo

    2014-09-01

    The possibility to disperse carbon nanotubes in biocompatible matrices has got substantial interest from the scientific community. Along this research line, the inclusion of single walled carbon nanotubes in lysozyme-based hydrogels was investigated. Experiments were performed at different nanotube/lysozyme weight ratios. Carbon nanotubes were dispersed in protein solutions, in conditions suitable for thermal gelation. The state of the dispersions was determined before and after thermal treatment. Rheology, dynamic light scattering and different microscopies investigated the effect that carbon nanotubes exert on gelation. The gelation kinetics and changes in gelation temperature were determined. The effect of carbon and lysozyme content on the gel properties was, therefore, determined. At fixed lysozyme content, moderate amounts of carbon nanotubes do not disturb the properties of hydrogel composites. At moderately high volume fractions in carbon nanotubes, the gels become continuous in both lysozyme and nanotubes. This is because percolating networks are presumably formed. Support to the above statements comes by rheology.

  5. Complete Genome Sequences of Five Bacteriophages That Infect Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Bollivar, David W; Bernardoni, Brooke; Bockman, Matthew R; Miller, Brenda M; Russell, Daniel A; Delesalle, Veronique A; Krukonis, Gregory P; Hatfull, Graham F; Cross, Madeline R; Szewczyk, Marlena M; Eppurath, Atul

    2016-05-26

    Five bacteriophages that infect the Rhodobacter capsulatus strain YW1 were isolated from stream water near Bloomington, Illinois, USA. Two distinct genome types are represented in the newly isolated bacteriophages. These genomes are different from other bacteriophage genomes previously described.

  6. Oral Application of T4 Phage Induces Weak Antibody Production in the Gut and in the Blood

    PubMed Central

    Majewska, Joanna; Beta, Weronika; Lecion, Dorota; Hodyra-Stefaniak, Katarzyna; Kłopot, Anna; Kaźmierczak, Zuzanna; Miernikiewicz, Paulina; Piotrowicz, Agnieszka; Ciekot, Jarosław; Owczarek, Barbara; Kopciuch, Agnieszka; Wojtyna, Karolina; Harhala, Marek; Mąkosa, Mateusz; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    A specific humoral response to bacteriophages may follow phage application for medical purposes, and it may further determine the success or failure of the approach itself. We present a long-term study of antibody induction in mice by T4 phage applied per os: 100 days of phage treatment followed by 112 days without the phage, and subsequent second application of phage up to day 240. Serum and gut antibodies (IgM, IgG, secretory IgA) were analyzed in relation to microbiological status of the animals. T4 phage applied orally induced anti-phage antibodies when the exposure was long enough (IgG day 36, IgA day 79); the effect was related to high dosage. Termination of phage treatment resulted in a decrease of IgA again to insignificant levels. Second administration of phage induces secretory IgA sooner than that induced by the first administrations. Increased IgA level antagonized gut transit of active phage. Phage resistant E. coli dominated gut flora very late, on day 92. Thus, the immunological response emerges as a major factor determining phage survival in the gut. Phage proteins Hoc and gp12 were identified as highly immunogenic. A low response to exemplary foreign antigens (from Ebola virus) presented on Hoc was observed, which suggests that phage platforms can be used in oral vaccine design. PMID:26308042

  7. Oral Application of T4 Phage Induces Weak Antibody Production in the Gut and in the Blood.

    PubMed

    Majewska, Joanna; Beta, Weronika; Lecion, Dorota; Hodyra-Stefaniak, Katarzyna; Kłopot, Anna; Kaźmierczak, Zuzanna; Miernikiewicz, Paulina; Piotrowicz, Agnieszka; Ciekot, Jarosław; Owczarek, Barbara; Kopciuch, Agnieszka; Wojtyna, Karolina; Harhala, Marek; Mąkosa, Mateusz; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2015-08-01

    A specific humoral response to bacteriophages may follow phage application for medical purposes, and it may further determine the success or failure of the approach itself. We present a long-term study of antibody induction in mice by T4 phage applied per os: 100 days of phage treatment followed by 112 days without the phage, and subsequent second application of phage up to day 240. Serum and gut antibodies (IgM, IgG, secretory IgA) were analyzed in relation to microbiological status of the animals. T4 phage applied orally induced anti-phage antibodies when the exposure was long enough (IgG day 36, IgA day 79); the effect was related to high dosage. Termination of phage treatment resulted in a decrease of IgA again to insignificant levels. Second administration of phage induces secretory IgA sooner than that induced by the first administrations. Increased IgA level antagonized gut transit of active phage. Phage resistant E. coli dominated gut flora very late, on day 92. Thus, the immunological response emerges as a major factor determining phage survival in the gut. Phage proteins Hoc and gp12 were identified as highly immunogenic. A low response to exemplary foreign antigens (from Ebola virus) presented on Hoc was observed, which suggests that phage platforms can be used in oral vaccine design. PMID:26308042

  8. Molecular interactions and residues involved in force generation in the T4 viral DNA packaging motor.

    PubMed

    Migliori, Amy D; Smith, Douglas E; Arya, Gaurav

    2014-12-12

    Many viruses utilize molecular motors to package their genomes into preformed capsids. A striking feature of these motors is their ability to generate large forces to drive DNA translocation against entropic, electrostatic, and bending forces resisting DNA confinement. A model based on recently resolved structures of the bacteriophage T4 motor protein gp17 suggests that this motor generates large forces by undergoing a conformational change from an extended to a compact state. This transition is proposed to be driven by electrostatic interactions between complementarily charged residues across the interface between the N- and C-terminal domains of gp17. Here we use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to investigate in detail the molecular interactions and residues involved in such a compaction transition of gp17. We find that although electrostatic interactions between charged residues contribute significantly to the overall free energy change of compaction, interactions mediated by the uncharged residues are equally if not more important. We identify five charged residues and six uncharged residues at the interface that play a dominant role in the compaction transition and also reveal salt bridging, van der Waals, and solvent hydrogen-bonding interactions mediated by these residues in stabilizing the compact form of gp17. The formation of a salt bridge between Glu309 and Arg494 is found to be particularly crucial, consistent with experiments showing complete abrogation in packaging upon Glu309Lys mutation. The computed contributions of several other residues are also found to correlate well with single-molecule measurements of impairments in DNA translocation activity caused by site-directed mutations. PMID:25311860

  9. Elucidating the pH-Dependent Structural Transition of T7 Bacteriophage Endolysin.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Meenakshi; Kumar, Dinesh; Poluri, Krishna Mohan

    2016-08-23

    Bacteriophages are the most abundant and diverse biological entities on earth. Bacteriophage endolysins are unique peptidoglycan hydrolases and have huge potential as effective enzybiotics in various infectious models. T7 bacteriophage endolysin (T7L), also known as N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidase or T7 lysozyme, is a 17 kDa protein that lyses a range of Gram-negative bacteria by hydrolyzing the amide bond between N-acetylmuramoyl residues and the l-alanine of the peptidoglycan layer. Although the activity profiles of several of the T7 family members have been known for many years, the molecular basis for their pH-dependent differential activity is not clear. In this study, we explored the pH-induced structural, stability, and activity characteristics of T7L by applying a variety of biophysical techniques and protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Our studies established a reversible structural transition of T7L below pH 6 and the formation of a partially denatured conformation at pH 3. This low-pH conformation is thermally stable and exposed its hydrophobic pockets. Further, NMR relaxation measurements and structural analysis unraveled that T7L is highly dynamic in its native state and a network of His residues are responsible for the observed pH-dependent conformational dynamics and transitions. As bacteriophage chimeric and engineered endolysins are being developed as novel therapeutics against multiple drug resistance pathogens, we believe that our results are of great help in designing these entities as broadband antimicrobial and/or antibacterial agents.

  10. Elucidating the pH-Dependent Structural Transition of T7 Bacteriophage Endolysin.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Meenakshi; Kumar, Dinesh; Poluri, Krishna Mohan

    2016-08-23

    Bacteriophages are the most abundant and diverse biological entities on earth. Bacteriophage endolysins are unique peptidoglycan hydrolases and have huge potential as effective enzybiotics in various infectious models. T7 bacteriophage endolysin (T7L), also known as N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidase or T7 lysozyme, is a 17 kDa protein that lyses a range of Gram-negative bacteria by hydrolyzing the amide bond between N-acetylmuramoyl residues and the l-alanine of the peptidoglycan layer. Although the activity profiles of several of the T7 family members have been known for many years, the molecular basis for their pH-dependent differential activity is not clear. In this study, we explored the pH-induced structural, stability, and activity characteristics of T7L by applying a variety of biophysical techniques and protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Our studies established a reversible structural transition of T7L below pH 6 and the formation of a partially denatured conformation at pH 3. This low-pH conformation is thermally stable and exposed its hydrophobic pockets. Further, NMR relaxation measurements and structural analysis unraveled that T7L is highly dynamic in its native state and a network of His residues are responsible for the observed pH-dependent conformational dynamics and transitions. As bacteriophage chimeric and engineered endolysins are being developed as novel therapeutics against multiple drug resistance pathogens, we believe that our results are of great help in designing these entities as broadband antimicrobial and/or antibacterial agents. PMID:27513288

  11. Removal of endotoxins from bacteriophage preparations by extraction with organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Szermer-Olearnik, Bożena; Boratyński, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin, pyrogen) constitutes a very troubling contaminant of crude phage lysates produced in Gram-negative bacteria. Toxicity of LPS depends on the strong innate immunity response including the cytokines. Therefore, its removal is important for bacteriophage applications. In this paper, we present a procedure for extractive removal of endotoxin from bacteriophage preparations with water immiscible solvents (1-octanol or 1-butanol). During extraction most of the phage lytic activity is retained in the aqueous phase, while endotoxin accumulates in the organic solvent. The levels of endotoxin (expressed as endotoxin units, EU) in the aqueous bacteriophage-containing fraction determined by limulus amebocyte lysate or EndoLISA assay were exceptionally low. While the initial endotoxin levels in the crude phage lysates ranged between 10(3) and 10(5) EU/ml the average level after organic extraction remaining in the aqueous fraction was 5.3 EU/ml. These values when related to phage titers decreased from 10(3)-10(5) EU/10(9) PFU (plaque forming units) down to an average of 2.8 EU/10(9) PFU. The purification procedure is scalable, efficient and applicable to all the bacteriophages tested: T4, HAP1 (E. coli) and F8 (P. aeruginosa).

  12. Lysozyme loading and release from Se doped hydroxyapatite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanhua; Hao, Hang; Zhang, Shengmin

    2016-04-01

    Element-substituted hydroxyapatite (HA) based nanocomposites have become a promising therapeutic material for improving bone defect repair. Selenium substituted HA nanoparticles can both induce apoptosis of bone tumor cells and enhance osteointegration. However, the effect of selenite ions on the proteins in combination with the HA nanoparticles remains to be elucidated. Here, we investigated the influence of selenium doping concentration on the loading and release of lysozyme (LSM) as a model protein drug. The selenium substituted HA-LSM composites with different doping concentrations were synthesized and characterized. The subsequent delivery of lysozyme was studied in a phosphate buffer solution (PBS). We found that selenium substituted HA-LSM composites with Se:P=10% showed the highest amount of lysozyme loading (41.7%), whereas the amount of lysozyme loaded in undoped HA nanoparticles was the lowest (34.1%). The doped selenium interacts with lysozyme molecules, which leads to the increase of β-sheet and unordered, and the decrease of self-association, α-helix and β-turns in protein structures. Moreover, selenium addition significantly slows the protein release from HA-LSM composites. The composites with Se:P=10% release lysozyme at the slightly slower rate among the samples with different Se doping concentrations. It also shows that the released lysozyme retains most of its enzymatic activity.

  13. Lysozyme loading and release from Se doped hydroxyapatite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanhua; Hao, Hang; Zhang, Shengmin

    2016-04-01

    Element-substituted hydroxyapatite (HA) based nanocomposites have become a promising therapeutic material for improving bone defect repair. Selenium substituted HA nanoparticles can both induce apoptosis of bone tumor cells and enhance osteointegration. However, the effect of selenite ions on the proteins in combination with the HA nanoparticles remains to be elucidated. Here, we investigated the influence of selenium doping concentration on the loading and release of lysozyme (LSM) as a model protein drug. The selenium substituted HA-LSM composites with different doping concentrations were synthesized and characterized. The subsequent delivery of lysozyme was studied in a phosphate buffer solution (PBS). We found that selenium substituted HA-LSM composites with Se:P=10% showed the highest amount of lysozyme loading (41.7%), whereas the amount of lysozyme loaded in undoped HA nanoparticles was the lowest (34.1%). The doped selenium interacts with lysozyme molecules, which leads to the increase of β-sheet and unordered, and the decrease of self-association, α-helix and β-turns in protein structures. Moreover, selenium addition significantly slows the protein release from HA-LSM composites. The composites with Se:P=10% release lysozyme at the slightly slower rate among the samples with different Se doping concentrations. It also shows that the released lysozyme retains most of its enzymatic activity. PMID:26838882

  14. The Effects of Acetate Buffer Concentration on Lysozyme Solubility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1996-01-01

    The micro-solubility column technique was employed to systematically investigate the effects of buffer concentration on tetragonal lysozyme solubility. While keeping the NaCl concentrations constant at 2%, 3%, 4%, 5% and 7%, and the pH at 4.0, we have studied the solubility of tetragonal lysozyme over an acetate buffer concentration range of 0.01M to 0.5M as a function of temperature. The lysozyme solubility decreased with increasing acetate concentration from 0.01M to 0.1M. This decrease may simply be due to the net increase in solvent ionic strength. Increasing the acetate concentration beyond 0.1M resulted in an increase in the lysozyme solubility, which reached a peak at - 0.3M acetate concentration. This increase was believed to be due to the increased binding of acetate to the anionic binding sites of lysozyme, preventing their occupation by chloride. In keeping with the previously observed reversal of the Hoffmeister series for effectiveness of anions in crystallizing lysozyme, acetate would be a less effective precipitant than chloride. Further increasing the acetate concentration beyond 0.3M resulted in a subsequent gradual decrease in the lysozyme solubility at all NaCl concentrations.

  15. Modulation of Lysozyme Function and Degradation after Nitration with Peroxynitrite

    PubMed Central

    Curry-McCoy, Tiana V.; Osna, Natalia A.; Donohue, Terrence M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Peroxynitrite (PN) is formed from superoxide and nitric oxide, both of which are increased during hepatic ethanol metabolism. Peroxynitrite forms adducts with proteins, causing structural and functional alterations. Here, we investigated PN-induced alterations in lysozyme structure and function, and whether they altered the protein’s susceptibility to proteasome-catalyzed degradation. Methods Hen egg lysozyme was nitrated using varying amounts of either PN or the PN donor, 3-morpholinosynonimine (SIN-1). The activity, nitration status and the susceptibility of lysozyme to proteasome-catalyzed degradation were assessed. Results Lysozyme nitration by PN or SIN-1 caused dose-dependent formation of 3-nitrotyrosine-lysozyme adducts, causing decreased catalytic activity, and enhanced susceptibility to degradation by the 20S proteasome. Kinetic analyses revealed an increased affinity by the 20S proteasome toward nitrated lysozyme compared with the native protein. Conclusion Lysozyme nitration enhances the affinity of the modified enzyme for degradation by the proteasome, thereby increasing its susceptibility to proteolysis. General Significance Increased levels of peroxynitrite have been detected in tissues of ethanol-fed animals. The damaging effects from excessive peroxynitrite in the cell increase hepatotoxicity and cellular death by protein modification due to nitration. Cellular defenses against such changes include enhanced proteolysis by the proteasome in order to maintain protein quality control. PMID:19376194

  16. Nucleation and Growth According to Lysozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    How does one take a molecule, strongly asymmetric in both shape and charge distribution, and assemble it into a crystal? We propose a model for the nucleation and crystal growth process for tetragonal lysozyme that may be very germane to other monomeric proteins. The first species formed is postulated to be a dimer. Through repeating associations involving the same intermolecular interactions this becomes the 4(sub 3) helix, that in turn serves as the basic unit for nucleation and crystal growth. High salt attenuates surface charges while promoting hydrophobic interactions. Symmetry facilitates helix self-association. Assembly stability is enhanced when a four helix structure is obtained, with each bound to two neighbors. Only two unique interactions are required. The first are those for helix formation, where the dominant interaction is the intermolecular bridging anion. The second is the anti-parallel side-by-side helix-helix interaction, guided by alternating pairs of symmetry related salt bridges along each side. At this stage all eight unique positions of the P4(sub 3)2(sub 1)2(sub 1) unit cell are filled. From the above, the process is one of a) attenuating the most strongly interacting groups, such that b) the molecules begin to self-associate in defined patterns, so that c) symmetry is obtained, which d) propagates as a growing crystal. Simple and conceptually obvious in hindsight, this tells much about what we are empirically doing when we crystallize macromolecules. By adjusting the solution parameters we are empirically balancing the intermolecular interactions, preferentially attenuating the dominant strong (for lysozyme the charged groups) while strengthening the lesser strong (hydrophobic) interactions. Lysozyme is atypical in the breadth of its crystallization conditions; many proteins only crystallize under narrowly defined conditions, pointing to the criticality of the empirical balancing process. Lack of a singularly defined association pathway

  17. Mesoscopic coarse-grained simulations of lysozyme adsorption.

    PubMed

    Yu, Gaobo; Liu, Jie; Zhou, Jian

    2014-05-01

    Coarse-grained simulations are adopted to study the adsorption behavior of lysozyme on different (hydrophobic, neutral hydrophilic, zwitterionic, negatively charged, and positively charged) surfaces at the mesoscopic microsecond time scale (1.2 μs). Simulation results indicate the following: (i) the conformation change of lysozyme on the hydrophobic surface is bigger than any other studied surfaces; (ii) the active sites of lysozyme are faced to the hydrophobic surface with a "top end-on" orientation, while they are exposed to the liquid phase on the hydrophilic surface with a "back-on" orientation; (iii) the neutral hydrophilic surface can induce the adsorption of lysozyme, while the nonspecific protein adsorption can be resisted by the zwitterionic surface; (iv) when the solution ionic strength is low, lysozyme can anchor on the negatively charged surface easily but cannot adsorb on the positively charged surface; (v) when the solution ionic strength is high, the positively charged lysozyme can also adsorb on the like-charged surface; (vi) the major positive potential center of lysozyme, especially the residue ARG128, plays a vital role in leading the adsorption of lysozyme on charged surfaces; (vii) when the ionic strength is high, a counterion layer is formed above the positively charged surface, which is the key factor why lysozyme can adsorb on a like-charged surface. The coarse-grained method based on the MARTINI force field for proteins and the BMW water model could provide an efficient way to understand protein interfacial adsorption behavior at a greater length scale and time scale. PMID:24785197

  18. Separation of lysozyme using superparamagnetic carboxymethyl chitosan nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jun; Su, Yujie; Rao, Shengqi; Yang, Yanjun

    2011-08-01

    Functionalized Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles conjugated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and carboxymethyl chitosan (CM-CTS) were developed and used as a novel magnetic absorbing carrier for the separation and purification of lysozyme from the aqueous solution and chicken egg white, respectively. The morphology of magnetic CM-CTS nanoparticles was observed by transmission electron microscope (TEM). It was found that the diameter of superparamagnetic carboxymethyl chitosan nanoparticles (Fe(3)O(4) (PEG+CM-CTS)) was about 15 nm, and could easily aggregate by a magnet when suspending in the aqueous solution. The adsorption capacity of lysozyme onto the superparamagnetic Fe(3)O(4) (PEG+CM-CTS) nanoparticles was determined by changing the medium pH, temperature, ionic strength and the concentration of lysozyme. The maximum adsorption loading reached 256.4 mg/g. Due to the small diameter, the adsorption equilibrium of lysozyme onto the nanoparticles reached very quickly within 20 min. The adsorption equilibrium of lysozyme onto the superparamagnetic nanoparticles fitted well with the Langmuir model. The nanoparticles were stable when subjected to six repeated adsorption-elution cycles. Separation and purification were monitored by determining the lysozyme activity using Micrococcus lysodeikticus as substrate. The lysozyme was purified from chicken egg white in a single step had higher purity, as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Considering that the superparamagnetic nanoparticles possess the advantages of high efficiency, cost-effectiveness and excellent binding of a larger amount of lysozyme and easier separation from the reaction system, thus this type of superparamagnetic nanoparticles would bring advantages to the conventional separation techniques of lysozyme from chicken egg white.

  19. Reentrant condensation of lysozyme: Implications for studying dynamics of lysozyme in aqueous solutions of lithium chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Mamontov, Eugene; O'Neill, Hugh Michael

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have outlined the use of eutectic solution of lithium chloride in water to study microscopic dynamics of lysozyme in an aqueous solvent that is remarkably similar to pure water in many respects, yet allows experiments over a wide temperature range without the solvent crystallization. The eutectic point in (H2O)R(LiCl) system corresponds to R 7.3, and it is of interest to investigate whether less concentrated aqueous solutions of LiCl could be employed in low-temperature studies of a solvated protein. We have investigated a range of concentrations of lysozyme and LiCl in aqueous solutions to identify systems that do not show phase separation and avoid solvent crystallization on cooling down. Compared to the lysozyme concentration in solution, the concentration of LiCl in the aqueous solvent plays the major role in determining systems suitable for low-temperature studies. We have observed interesting and rich phase behavior reminiscent of reentrant condensation of proteins.

  20. Reentrant condensation of lysozyme: Implications for studying dynamics of lysozyme in aqueous solutions of lithium chloride.

    PubMed

    Mamontov, Eugene; O'Neill, Hugh

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have outlined the use of eutectic solutions of lithium chloride in water to study microscopic dynamics of lysozyme in an aqueous solvent that is remarkably similar to pure water in many respects, yet allows experiments over a wide temperature range without solvent crystallization. The eutectic point in a (H2O)R(LiCl) system corresponds to R ≈ 7.3, and it is of interest to investigate whether less-concentrated aqueous solutions of LiCl could be used in low-temperature studies of a solvated protein. We have investigated a range of concentrations of lysozyme and LiCl in aqueous solutions to identify systems that do not show phase separation and avoid solvent crystallization on cooling down. Compared to the lysozyme concentration in solution, the concentration of LiCl in the aqueous solvent plays the major role in determining systems suitable for low-temperature studies. We have observed interesting and rich phase behavior reminiscent of reentrant condensation of proteins. PMID:26819974

  1. Bacteriophage Procurement for Therapeutic Purposes.

    PubMed

    Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Jończyk-Matysiak, Ewa; Żaczek, Maciej; Łobocka, Małgorzata; Łusiak-Szelachowska, Marzanna; Górski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages), discovered 100 years ago, are able to infect and destroy only bacterial cells. In the current crisis of antibiotic efficacy, phage therapy is considered as a supplementary or even alternative therapeutic approach. Evolution of multidrug-resistant and pandrug-resistant bacterial strains poses a real threat, so it is extremely important to have the possibility to isolate new phages for therapeutic purposes. Our phage laboratory and therapy center has extensive experience with phage isolation, characterization, and therapeutic application. In this article we present current progress in bacteriophages isolation and use for therapeutic purposes, our experience in this field and its practical implications for phage therapy. We attempt to summarize the state of the art: properties of phages, the methods for their isolation, criteria of phage selection for therapeutic purposes and limitations of their use. Perspectives for the use of genetically engineered phages to specifically target bacterial virulence-associated genes are also briefly presented. PMID:27570518

  2. Bacteriophage Procurement for Therapeutic Purposes

    PubMed Central

    Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Jończyk-Matysiak, Ewa; Żaczek, Maciej; Łobocka, Małgorzata; Łusiak-Szelachowska, Marzanna; Górski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages), discovered 100 years ago, are able to infect and destroy only bacterial cells. In the current crisis of antibiotic efficacy, phage therapy is considered as a supplementary or even alternative therapeutic approach. Evolution of multidrug-resistant and pandrug-resistant bacterial strains poses a real threat, so it is extremely important to have the possibility to isolate new phages for therapeutic purposes. Our phage laboratory and therapy center has extensive experience with phage isolation, characterization, and therapeutic application. In this article we present current progress in bacteriophages isolation and use for therapeutic purposes, our experience in this field and its practical implications for phage therapy. We attempt to summarize the state of the art: properties of phages, the methods for their isolation, criteria of phage selection for therapeutic purposes and limitations of their use. Perspectives for the use of genetically engineered phages to specifically target bacterial virulence-associated genes are also briefly presented. PMID:27570518

  3. Recombinant bacteriophage lysins as antibacterials

    PubMed Central

    Fenton, Mark; Ross, Paul; McAuliffe, Olivia; O'Mahony, Jim

    2010-01-01

    With the increasing worldwide prevalence of antibiotic resistant bacteria, bacteriophage endolysins (lysins) represent a very promising novel alternative class of antibacterial in the fight against infectious disease. Lysins are phage-encoded peptidoglycan hydrolases which, when applied exogenously (as purified recombinant proteins) to Gram-positive bacteria, bring about rapid lysis and death of the bacterial cell. A number of studies have recently demonstrated the strong potential of these enzymes in human and veterinary medicine to control and treat pathogens on mucosal surfaces and in systemic infections. They also have potential in diagnostics and detection, bio-defence, elimination of food pathogens and control of phytopathogens. This review discusses the extensive research on recombinant bacteriophage lysins in the context of antibacterials, and looks forward to future development and potential. PMID:21327123

  4. Bacteriophage biocontrol of foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Mustafa; Annapure, Uday S

    2016-03-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that only infect bacterial cells. Phages are categorized based on the type of their life cycle, the lytic cycle cause lysis of the bacterium with the release of multiple phage particles where as in lysogenic phase the phage DNA is incorporated into the bacterial genome. Lysogeny does not result in lysis of the host. Lytic phages have several potential applications in the food industry as biocontrol agents, biopreservatives and as tools for detecting pathogens. They have also been proposed as alternatives to antibiotics in animal health. Two unique features of phage relevant for food safety are that they are harmless to mammalian cells and high host specificity, keeping the natural microbiota undisturbed. However, the recent approval of bacteriophages as food additives has opened the discussion about 'edible viruses'. This article reviews in detail the application of phages for the control of foodborne pathogens in a process known as "biocontrol". PMID:27570260

  5. Immobilization of Active Bacteriophages on Polyhydroxyalkanoate Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chanchan; Sauvageau, Dominic; Elias, Anastasia

    2016-01-20

    A rapid, efficient technique for the attachment of bacteriophages (phages) onto polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) surfaces has been developed and compared to three reported methods for phage immobilization. Polymer surfaces were modified to facilitate phage attachment using (1) plasma treatment alone, (2) plasma treatment followed by activation by 1-ethyl-3-(3-(dimethylamino)propyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide (sulfo-NHS), (3) plasma-initiated acrylic acid grafting, or (4) plasma-initiated acrylic acid grafting with activation by EDC and sulfo-NHS. The impact of each method on the surface chemistry of PHA was investigated using contact angle analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Each of the four treatments was shown to result in both increased hydrophilicity and in the modification of the surface functional groups. Modified surfaces were immersed in suspensions of phage T4 for immobilization. The highest level of phage binding was observed for the surfaces modified by plasma treatment alone. The change in chemical bond states observed for surfaces that underwent plasma treatment is suspected to be the cause of the increased binding of active phages. Plasma-treated surfaces were further analyzed through phage-staining and fluorescence microscopy to assess the surface density of immobilized phages and their capacity to capture hosts. The infective capability of attached phages was confirmed by exposing the phage-immobilized surfaces to the host bacteria Escherichia coli in both plaque and infection dynamic assays. Plasma-treated surfaces with immobilized phages displayed higher infectivity than surfaces treated with other methods; in fact, the equivalent initial multiplicity of infection was 2 orders of magnitude greater than with other methods. Control samples - prepared by immersing polymer surfaces in phage suspensions (without prior plasma treatment) - did not show any bacterial growth inhibition, suggesting they did not bind

  6. Bacteriophage Transduction in Staphylococcus epidermidis

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Michael E.; Horswill, Alexander R.

    2016-01-01

    The genetic manipulation of Staphylococcus epidermidis for molecular experimentation has long been an area of difficulty. Many of the traditional laboratory techniques for strain construction are laborious and hampered by poor efficiency. The ability to move chromosomal genetic markers and plasmids using bacteriophage transduction has greatly increased the speed and ease of S. epidermidis studies. These molecular genetic advances have advanced the S. epidermidis research field beyond a select few genetically tractable strains and facilitated investigations of clinically relevant isolates. PMID:24222465

  7. Bacteriophage Transduction in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Olson, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    The genetic manipulation of Staphylococcus aureus for molecular experimentation is a valuable tool for assessing gene function and virulence. Genetic variability between strains coupled with difficult laboratory techniques for strain construction is a frequent roadblock in S. aureus research. Bacteriophage transduction greatly increases the speed and ease of S. aureus studies by allowing movement of chromosomal markers and plasmids between strains. This technique enables the S. aureus research community to focus investigations on clinically relevant isolates.

  8. Enzymic and immunochemical properties of lysozyme. X. Conformation, enzymic activity and immunochemistry of lysozyme reduced at two carboxyl groups.

    PubMed

    Atassi, M Z; Suliman, A M; Habeeb, A F

    1975-10-20

    Reduction of lysozyme by diborane, followed by air oxidation of the reduced disulfides and chromatography on CM-cellulose, yielded a homogeneous derivative. In the derivative, the carboxyl groups of aspartic acid 119 and the end-chain leucine residue were reduced to their corresponding alcohols. Correct re-forming of the disulfide bonds was demonstrated by peptide mapping of the tryptic hydrolysates of the derivative and lysozyme without breaking the disulfide bonds, followed by identification of the disulfide-containing peptides. Correct disulfide pairing in the two-disulfide peptide in the tryptic hydrolysate was established from its immunochemical behavior. Preparations of the two-disulfide fragment from lysozyme and derivative had equal inhibitory activities (26 or 32%) of the reaction of lysozyme with two homologous antisera. In ORD measurements, lysozyme and the derivative had equal rotatory powers at neutral pH. However, the bo value for the derivative decreased by about 10%. Below pH 6.4 and above pH 8.0, the derivative was less rotatory than native lysozyme. In CD measurements at neutral pH, the negative ellipticity bands at 220 and 208 nm showed little or no decrease in the derivative relative to the native protein. Although conformational differences between the derivative and its parent protein were almost undetectable by ORD and CD measurements, they were readily detected by chemical monitoring of the conformation. In the derivative, both accessibility to tryptic hydrolysis and reducibility of the disulfide bonds increased markedly. The enzymic activity of the derivative was decreased but retained the same pH optimum. With antisera to lysozyme or antisera to the derivative, lysozyme and its derivative possessed equal antigenic reactivities. The immunochemical findings further confirm the correct refolding of the disulfides. Also, they indicate that aspartic acid 119 and the C-terminal leucine residue are not part of an antigenic reactive region in

  9. On symmetries of = (4, 4) sigma models on T 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpato, Roberto

    2014-08-01

    Motivated by an analogous result for K3 models, we classify all groups of symmetries of non-linear sigma models on a torus T 4 that preserve the = (4 , 4) superconformal algebra. The resulting symmetry groups are isomorphic to certain subgroups of the Weyl group of E 8, that plays a role similar to the Conway group for the case of K3 models. Our analysis heavily relies on the triality automorphism of the T-duality group SO(4 , 4 , ℤ). As a byproduct of our results, we discover new explicit descriptions of K3 models as asymmetric orbifolds of torus CFTs.

  10. Surface plasmon resonance detection of E. coli and methicillin-resistant S. aureus using bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Tawil, Nancy; Sacher, Edward; Mandeville, Rosemonde; Meunier, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157:H7 and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are key elements in preventing resultant life-threatening illnesses, such as hemorrhagic colitis, hemolytic uremic syndrome, and septicemia. In this report, we describe the use of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) for the biodetection of pathogenic bacteria, using bacteriophages as the recognition elements. T4 bacteriophages were used to detect E. coli, while a novel, highly specific phage was used to detect MRSA. We found that the system permits label-free, real-time, specific, rapid and cost-effective detection of pathogens, for concentrations of 10(3) colony forming units/milliliter, in less than 20 min. This system promises to become a diagnostic tool for bacteria that cause major public concern for food safety, bioterrorism, and nosocomial infections.

  11. Molecular characterization of podoviral bacteriophages virulent for Clostridium perfringens and their comparison with members of the Picovirinae.

    PubMed

    Volozhantsev, Nikolay V; Oakley, Brian B; Morales, Cesar A; Verevkin, Vladimir V; Bannov, Vasily A; Krasilnikova, Valentina M; Popova, Anastasia V; Zhilenkov, Eugeni L; Garrish, Johnna K; Schegg, Kathleen M; Woolsey, Rebekah; Quilici, David R; Line, J Eric; Hiett, Kelli L; Siragusa, Gregory R; Svetoch, Edward A; Seal, Bruce S

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium responsible for human food-borne disease as well as non-food-borne human, animal and poultry diseases. Because bacteriophages or their gene products could be applied to control bacterial diseases in a species-specific manner, they are potential important alternatives to antibiotics. Consequently, poultry intestinal material, soil, sewage and poultry processing drainage water were screened for virulent bacteriophages that lysed C. perfringens. Two bacteriophages, designated ΦCPV4 and ΦZP2, were isolated in the Moscow Region of the Russian Federation while another closely related virus, named ΦCP7R, was isolated in the southeastern USA. The viruses were identified as members of the order Caudovirales in the family Podoviridae with short, non-contractile tails of the C1 morphotype. The genomes of the three bacteriophages were 17.972, 18.078 and 18.397 kbp respectively; encoding twenty-six to twenty-eight ORF's with inverted terminal repeats and an average GC content of 34.6%. Structural proteins identified by mass spectrometry in the purified ΦCP7R virion included a pre-neck/appendage with putative lyase activity, major head, tail, connector/upper collar, lower collar and a structural protein with putative lysozyme-peptidase activity. All three podoviral bacteriophage genomes encoded a predicted N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase and a putative stage V sporulation protein. Each putative amidase contained a predicted bacterial SH3 domain at the C-terminal end of the protein, presumably involved with binding the C. perfringens cell wall. The predicted DNA polymerase type B protein sequences were closely related to other members of the Podoviridae including Bacillus phage Φ29. Whole-genome comparisons supported this relationship, but also indicated that the Russian and USA viruses may be unique members of the sub-family Picovirinae. PMID:22666499

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations of lysozyme in water/sugar solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerbret, A.; Affouard, F.; Bordat, P.; Hédoux, A.; Guinet, Y.; Descamps, M.

    2008-04-01

    Structural and dynamical properties of the solvent at the protein/solvent interface have been investigated by molecular dynamics simulations of lysozyme in trehalose, maltose and sucrose solutions. Results are discussed in the framework of the bioprotection phenomena. The analysis of the relative concentration of water oxygen atoms around lysozyme suggests that lysozyme is preferentially hydrated. When comparing the three sugars, trehalose is seen more excluded than maltose and sucrose. The preferential exclusion of sugars from the protein surface induces some differences in the behavior of trehalose and maltose, particularly at 50 and 60 wt% concentrations, that are not observed experimentally in binary sugar/mixtures. The dynamical slowing down of the solvent is suggested to mainly arise from the homogeneity of the water/sugar matrices controlled by the percolation of the sugar hydrogen bonds networks. Furthermore, lysozyme strongly increases relaxation times of solvent molecules at the protein/solvent interface.

  13. Effect of Lysozyme on Resting Spores of Bacillus Megaterium

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Yahiko; Rode, L. J.

    1969-01-01

    Resting spores of Bacillus megaterium ATCC 9885 were found to be markedly affected by lysozyme. Exposure to as little as 1.5 μg of lysozyme per ml caused the spores to lose refractility, the darkened spores to shed their coat structures, and the spore central bodies to lyse. The spores of seven other strains of B. megaterium and seven other Bacillus species were not similarly affected by lysozyme. Proteolytic enzymes such as pronase, trypsin, pepsin, and subtilisin did not induce the change. The action of lysozyme differed in certain important respects from that of common “physiological” germinants. Its action was considered to be direct via its enzymatic attack on exposed sites directly accessible in the resting spores of B. megaterium ATCC 9885. Images PMID:4977688

  14. Location of Bromide Ions in Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Kap; Nadarajah, Arunan; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    Anions have been shown to play a dominant role in the crystallization of chicken egg white lysozyme from salt solutions. Previous studies employing X-ray crystallography had found one chloride ion binding site in the tetragonal crystal form of the protein and four nitrate ion binding sites in the monoclinic form. In this study the anion positions in the tetragonal form were determined from the difference Fourier map obtained from lysozyme crystal grown in bromide and chloride solutions. Five possible anion binding sites were found in this manner. Some of these sites were in pockets containing basic residues while others were near neutral, but polar, residues. The sole chloride ion binding site found in previous studies was confirmed, while four of these sites corresponded to four binding sites found for nitrate ions in monoclinic crystals. The study suggests that most of the anion binding sites in lysozyme remain unchanged, even when different anions and different crystal forms of lysozyme are employed.

  15. Purification, Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Diffraction Analysis of the Phage T4 Vertex Protein Gp24 and its Mutant Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Boeshans,K.; Liu, F.; Peng, G.; Idler, W.; Jang, S.; Marekov, L.; Black, L.; Ahvazi, B.

    2006-01-01

    The study of bacteriophage T4 assembly has revealed regulatory mechanisms pertinent not only to viruses but also to macromolecular complexes. The capsid of bacteriophage T4 is composed of the major capsid protein gp23, and a minor capsid protein gp24, which is arranged as pentamers at the vertices of the capsid. In this study the T4 capsid protein gp24 and its mutant forms were overexpressed and purified to homogeneity. The overexpression from plasmid vectors of all the constructs in Escherichia coli yields biologically active protein in vivo as determined by assembly of active virus following infection with inactivated gene 24 mutant viruses. The gp24 mutant was subjected to surface entropy reduction by mutagenesis and reductive alkylation in order to improve its crystallization properties and diffraction quality. To determine if surface mutagenesis targeting would result in diffractable crystals, two glutamate to alanine mutations (E89A,E90A) were introduced. We report here the biochemical observations and consequent mutagenesis experiment that resulted in improvements in the stability, crystallizability and crystal quality of gp24 without affecting the overall folding. Rational modification of the protein surface to achieve crystallization appears promising for improving crystallization behavior and crystal diffracting qualities. The crystal of gp24(E89A,E90A) diffracted to 2.6 {angstrom} resolution compared to wild-type gp24 at 3.80 {angstrom} resolution under the same experimental conditions. Surface mutation proved to be a better method than reductive methylation for improving diffraction quality of the gp24 crystals.

  16. Programming Bacteriophages by Swapping Their Specificity Determinants.

    PubMed

    Goren, Moran G; Yosef, Ido; Qimron, Udi

    2015-12-01

    Bacteriophages, bacteria's natural enemies, may serve as potent antibacterial agents. Their specificity for certain bacterial sub-species limits their effectiveness, but allows selective targeting of bacteria. Lu and colleagues present a platform for such targeting through alteration of bacteriophages' host specificity by swapping specificity domains in their host-recognition ligand.

  17. Use of Bacteriophages to control bacterial pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lytic bacteriophages can provide a natural method and an effective alternative to antibiotics to reduce bacterial pathogens in animals, foods, and other environments. Bacteriophages (phages) are viruses which infect bacterial cells and eventually kill them through lysis, and represent the most abun...

  18. Fabrication of polypyrrole nano-arrays in lysozyme single crystals.

    PubMed

    England, Matt W; Lambert, Elizabeth M; Li, Mei; Turyanska, Lyudmila; Patil, Avinash J; Mann, Stephen

    2012-11-01

    A template-directed method for the synthesis and organization of partially oxidized polypyrrole (PPy) nanoscale arrays within the solvent channels of glutaraldehyde-cross-linked lysozyme single crystals is presented. Macroscopic single crystals of the periodically arranged protein-polymer superstructure are electrically conductive, insoluble in water and organic solvents, and display increased levels of mechanical plasticity compared with native cross-linked lysozyme crystals.

  19. Destroying activity of magnetoferritin on lysozyme amyloid fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopcansky, Peter; Siposova, Katarina; Melnikova, Lucia; Bednarikova, Zuzana; Timko, Milan; Mitroova, Zuzana; Antosova, Andrea; Garamus, Vasil M.; Petrenko, Viktor I.; Avdeev, Mikhail V.; Gazova, Zuzana

    2015-03-01

    Presence of protein amyloid aggregates (oligomers, protofilaments, fibrils) is associated with many diseases as diabetes mellitus or Alzheimer's disease. The interaction between lysozyme amyloid fibrils and magnetoferritin loaded with different amount of iron atoms (168 or 532 atoms) has been investigated by small-angle X-rays scattering and thioflavin T fluorescence measurements. Results suggest that magnetoferritin caused an iron atom-concentration dependent reduction of lysozyme fibril size.

  20. Single molecule studies of DNA packaging by bacteriophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Derek Nathan

    The DNA packaging dynamics of bacteriophages φ29, gamma, and T4 were studied at the single molecule level using a dual trap optical tweezers. Also, a method for producing long DNA molecules by PCR for optical tweezers studies of protein DNA interactions is presented and thoroughly characterized. This DNA preparation technique provided DNA samples for the φ29 and T4 studies. In the studies of φ29, the role of charge was investigated by varying the ionic conditions of the packaging buffer. Ionic conditions in which the DNA charge was highly screened due to divalent and trivalent cations showed the lowest resistance to packaging of the DNA to high density. This confirmed the importance of counterions in shielding the DNA interstrand repulsion when packaged to high density. While the ionic nature of the packaging buffer had a strong effect on packaging velocities, there was no clear trend between the counterion-screened charge of the DNA and the maximum packaging velocity. The packaging studies of lambda and T4 served as systems for comparative studies with φ29. Each system showed similarities to the φ29 system and unique differences. Both the lambda and T4 packaging motors were capable of generating forces in excess of 50 pN and showed remarkably high processivity, similar to φ29. However, dynamic structural transitions were observed with lambda that are not observed with φ29. The packaging of the lambda genome showed capsid expansion at approximately 30 percent of the genome packaged and capsid rupture at 90 percent of the genome packaged in the absence of capsid stabilizing protein gpD. Unique to the T4 packaging motor, packaging dynamics showed a remarkable amount of variability in velocities. This variability was seen both within individual packaging phages and from one phage to the next. This is possibly due to different conformational states of the packaging machinery. Additionally, lambda and T4 had average packaging velocities under minimal load of 600

  1. Structure and stability of complex coacervate core micelles with lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Lindhoud, Saskia; Vries, Renko de; Norde, Willem; Stuart, Martien A Cohen

    2007-07-01

    Encapsulation of enzymes by polymers is a promising method to influence their activity and stability. Here, we explore the use of complex coacervate core micelles for encapsulation of enzymes. The core of the micelles consists of negatively charged blocks of the diblock copolymer PAA42PAAm417 and the positively charged homopolymer PDMAEMA150. For encapsulation, part of the positively charged homopolymer was replaced by the positively charged globular protein lysozyme. We have studied the formation, structure, and stability of the resulting micelles for three different mixing ratios of homopolymer and lysozyme: a system predominantly consisting of homopolymer, a system predominantly consisting of lysozyme, and a system where the molar ratio between the two positively charged molecules was almost one. We also studied complexes made of only lysozyme and PAA42PAAm417. Complex formation and the salt-induced disintegration of the complexes were studied using dynamic light-scattering titrations. Small-angle neutron scattering was used to investigate the structures of the cores. We found that micelles predominantly consisting of homopolymer are spherical but that complex coacervate core micelles predominantly consisting of lysozyme are nonspherical. The stability of the micelles containing a larger fraction of lysozyme is lower.

  2. Penetration and fusion of phospholipid vesicles by lysozyme

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.; Kim, H.

    1989-10-01

    The lysozyme-induced fusion of phosphatidylserine/phosphatidylethanolamine vesicles as studied at a wide range of pH is found to correlate well with the binding of this protein to the vesicles. An identical 6000 molecular weight segment of lysozyme at the N-terminal region is found to be protected from tryptic digestion when initially incubated with vesicles at several pH values. Only this segment is labeled by dansyl chloride, which is partitioned into the bilayer. These results suggest the penetration of one segment of lysozyme into the bilayer. Photoactivated labeling of the membrane-penetrating segment of lysozyme with 3-(trifluoromethyl)-3-(({sup 125}I)iodophenyl)diazirine (({sup 125}I)TID) and subsequent identification of the labeled residues by Edman degradation and gamma-ray counting indicate that four amino acids from the N-terminal are located outside the hydrophobic core of the bilayer. Although treatment of the membrane-embedded segment with aminopeptidase failed to cleave any amino acids from the N-terminal, it appears that a loop of lysozyme segment near the N-terminal penetrates into the bilayer at acidic pH. A helical wheel diagram shows that the labeling is done mainly on one surface of the alpha-helix. The penetration kinetics as studied by time-dependent ({sup 125}I)TID labeling coincide with the fusion kinetics, strongly suggesting that the penetration of the lysozyme segment into the vesicles is the cause of the fusion.

  3. Roles of the early genes of bacteriophage T7 in shutoff of host macromolecular synthesis.

    PubMed

    McAllister, W T; Barrett, C L

    1977-09-01

    Through the use of phage mutants in which various combinations of the early genes are active, and in which late gene expression is blocked, we have examined the roles of each of the five early gene products of bacteriophage T7 in regulating the synthesis of host RNA and proteins. At least two independent transcriptional controls operate during bacteriophage T7 development. The product of gene 0.7, acting alone, leads to a rapid (by 5 min) shutoff of host transcription. In the absence of gene 0.7 function, and in the absence of the phage-specified RNA polymerase, a delayed shutoff of host-dependent transcription begins at approximately 15 min after infection. This secondary control element requires either a functional gene 0.3 or gene 1.1. In the absence of any early gene products, host shutoff is not observed until much later in infection (>30 min). The delayed manner in which the products of genes 0.3 and 1.1 exert their effect suggests that their mode of action is indirect. Under conditions in which the late genes are transcribed (inefficiently) by the host RNA polymerase, gene 1.1 is observed to stimulate the synthesis of lysozyme (the product of a late phage gene). In contrast, when the late genes are transcribed by the phage-specified RNA polymerase (the product of gene 1), the kinetics of synthesis of the phage RNA polymerase itself, and of lysozyme, are not affected by the deletion of genes 0.3, 0.7, 1.1, and 1.3. We conclude that under these conditions, the products of these genes are required neither for regulation of expression of the late genes nor for the shutoff of early phage gene expression.

  4. Structure of the Bacteriophage [phi]KZ Lytic Transglycosylase gp144

    SciTech Connect

    Fokine, Andrei; Miroshnikov, Konstantin A.; Shneider, Mikhail M.; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2008-04-02

    Lytic transglycosylases are enzymes that act on the peptidoglycan of bacterial cell walls. They cleave the glycosidic linkage between N-acetylmuramoyl and N-acetylglucosaminyl residues with the concomitant formation of a 1,6-anhydromuramoyl product. The x-ray structure of the lytic transglycosylase gp144 from the Pseudomonas bacteriophage {phi}KZ has been determined to 2.5-{angstrom} resolution. This protein is probably employed by the bacteriophage in the late stage of the virus reproduction cycle to destroy the bacterial cell wall to release the phage progeny. {phi}KZ gp144 is a 260-residue {alpha}-helical protein composed of a 70-residue N-terminal cell wall-binding domain and a C-terminal catalytic domain. The fold of the N-terminal domain is similar to the peptidoglycan-binding domain from Streptomyces albus G d-Ala-d-Ala carboxypeptidase and to the N-terminal prodomain of human metalloproteinases that act on extracellular matrices. The C-terminal catalytic domain of gp144 has a structural similarity to the catalytic domain of the transglycosylase Slt70 from Escherichia coli and to lysozymes. The gp144 catalytic domain has an elongated groove that can bind at least five sugar residues at sites A-E. As in other lysozymes, the peptidoglycan cleavage (catalyzed by Glu{sup 115} in gp144) occurs between sugar-binding subsites D and E. The x-ray structure of the {phi}KZ transglycosylase complexed with the chitotetraose (N-acetylglucosamine){sub 4} has been determined to 2.6-{angstrom} resolution. The N-acetylglucosamine residues of the chitotetraose bind in sites A-D.

  5. Lysozyme dimer association: Similarities and differences compared with lysozyme monomer association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onuma, Kazuo; Inaka, Koji

    2008-03-01

    The protein with a molecular weight of 28.6 kDa in lysozyme solution, which has been recognized as a lysozyme dimer, was purified and its association was observed using time-resolved static light scattering and dynamic light scattering under the same buffer condition as that used in lysozyme monomer association. The chromatography results and SDS-PAGE analysis showed that the bonding state of each molecule in a dimer unit was not uniform, i.e., there were at least two kinds of bonds, strong and weak. Some of the weak-bonded dimmers dissociated to monomers (molecular weight: 14.3 kDa) in the SDS-PAGE process. The relative amount of weak-bonded dimers greatly affected the association kinetics. With a 99% pure dimer solution (1% monomers in SDS-PAGE), association proceeded in the same manner as that of a monomer solution: the Zimm-square plot had a concave shape with a maximum at a particular q2 for apparent protein concentrations, up to 2.4 mg/mL. The dynamic light-scattering data showed clear bimodal (dimer and aggregate), distributions. With a 95% pure dimer solution, the association behavior drastically changed when the apparent concentration exceeded 2.0 mg/mL. The Zimm-square plot had a bending point at a low q2, and two discrete lines fitted the plot. The particles in the solution were either oligomers or large aggregates, both of which had polydispersity distributions, and an amorphous phase formed from the aggregates. This was not observed for monomer association.

  6. Predicting Tensile Stretchability of Trimmed AA6111-T4 Sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xiaohua; Sun, Xin; Golovashchenko, Sergey F.

    2014-02-15

    An integrated manufacturing process simulation framework has been developed to predict the trimmed edge tensile stretchability of AA6111-T4 sheets by incorporating the burr geometry, damage, and plastic strain from trimming simulations into subsequent tensile stretchability simulations. The influence of the trimming die clearances on the predicted tensile stretching ductility (stretchability) is studied and quantitatively compared with experimental measurements. Stretchability is found to decrease with increasing cutting clearances, and simulation results have successfully captured experimentally observed edge crack initiation and failure mode variations for different trimming clearances. Subsequent computational sensitivity studies reveal that while deburring of previously trimmed edges has little influence on tensile stretchability, removal of trimmed edge initial plastic strain may significantly enhance the subsequent trimmed edge stretchability.

  7. Magnetic diagnostics on the Lockheed Martin T4 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoads, John

    2015-11-01

    The Lockheed Martin T4 Experiment is a magnetically encapsulated linear ring cusp confinement device designed to study the physics relevant to the Compact Fusion Reactor program. As part of the diagnostics suite, an invasive three-axis magnetic probe and several flux loops have been constructed and installed. The probe was designed to reduce electrostatic pick-up by differentially amplifying two counter-wound coils for each axis. The flux loops are designed to detect plasma diamagnetism after accounting for the flux due to the background magnetic field. This mandates that the temporal evolution of the background field must be properly taken into account in order to discern the plasma response. To this end, both hardware and software techniques have been employed. Diagnostic designs and preliminary measurements will be presented.

  8. Selective Antibacterial Properties of Lysozyme for Oral Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Iacono, Vincent J.; MacKay, Bruce J.; DiRienzo, Sharon; Pollock, Jerry J.

    1980-01-01

    The antibacterial properties of lysozyme were investigated with oral microorganisms representing the seven serotypes (a through g) of Streptococcus mutans, Veillonella alcalescens, and the virulent (V) and avirulent (AV) strains of Actinomyces viscosus T14. Growth of bacteria in defined medium was monitored spectrophotometrically after the addition of various amounts (25 μg to 5 mg/ml) of enzyme. No growth inhibition of V. alcalescens was observed. Inhibition of A. viscosus T14(V) and A. viscosus T14(AV) occurred with 160 μg of lysozyme per ml. Of the S. mutans cultures tested, the serotype a and b strains were inhibited with as little as 25 μg of enzyme per ml, whereas e and f strains were most resistant to the bacteriostatic activity of lysozyme. The presence of dl-threonine or sucrose in growth medium did not significantly affect the results. A lysoplate assay was developed to rapidly survey the bacterial cultures for their susceptibility to the lytic ability of the enzyme. Lysis, as a measure of a zone of clearing in agarose plates, occurred for all microorganisms in the presence of lysozyme after the subsequent addition of NaCl or detergent. The bactericidal activity of lysozyme was determined on S. mutans BHT and S. mutans LM-7 by the pour plate technique. Preincubation of S. mutans LM-7 with as much as 1 mg of enzyme for 90 min did not affect viability or growth, whereas preincubation of S. mutans BHT with 1 mg of lysozyme resulted in no recoverable colony-forming units. An antigen containing extract of S. mutans LM-7 blocked the growth inhibitory property of lysozyme. Human lysozyme was a more effective antibacterial factor than hen egg white lysozyme. Total growth inhibition of S. mutans BHT was effected with 40 μg of human enzyme, and as little as 10 μg of human enzyme inhibited growth for greater than 20 h. The data presented indicate that different mechanisms may be responsible for the bacteriostatic, lytic, and bactericidal properties of the

  9. Complex coacervate core micelles with a lysozyme-modified corona.

    PubMed

    Danial, Maarten; Klok, Harm-Anton; Norde, Willem; Stuart, Martien A Cohen

    2007-07-17

    This paper describes the preparation, characterization, and enzymatic activity of complex coacervate core micelles (C3Ms) composed of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and poly(N-methyl-2-vinyl pyridinium iodide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PQ2VP-PEO) to which the antibacterial enzyme lysozyme is end-attached. C3Ms were prepared by polyelectrolyte complex formation between PAA and mixtures containing different ratios of aldehyde and hydroxyl end-functionalized PQ2VP-PEO. This resulted in the formation of C3Ms containing 0-40% (w/w) of the aldehyde end-functionalized PQ2VP-PEO block copolymer (PQ2VP-PEO-CHO). Chemical conjugation of lysozyme was achieved via reductive amination of the aldehyde groups, which are exposed at the surface of the C3M, with the amine groups present in the side chains of the lysine residues of the protein. Dynamic and static light scattering indicated that the conjugation of lysozyme to C3Ms prepared using 10 and 20% (w/w) PQ2VP-PEO-CHO resulted in the formation of unimicellar particles. Multimicellar aggregates, in contrast, were obtained when lysozyme was conjugated to C3Ms prepared using 30 or 40% (w/w) PQ2VP-PEO-CHO. The enzymatic activity of the unimicellar lysozyme-C3M conjugates toward the hydrolysis of the bacterial substrate Micrococcus lysodeikticus was comparable to that of free lysozyme. For the multimicellar particles, in contrast, significantly reduced enzymatic rates of hydrolysis, altered circular dichroism, and red-shifted tryptophan fluorescence spectra were measured. These results are attributed to the occlusion of lysozyme in the interior of the multimicellar conjugates.

  10. Lytic sensitivity of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 to lysozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Iacono, V J; Boldt, P R; MacKay, B J; Cho, M I; Pollock, J J

    1983-01-01

    The ability of both human and hen egg white lysozymes to lyse Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 was investigated. Lysis was followed optically at 540 nm by measuring the percent reduction in turbidity of freshly harvested log-phase cells suspended in Tris-maleate buffers within a wide range of pH (5.2 to 8.5) and molarity (0.01 to 0.2 M) and containing various amounts of enzyme and EDTA. In several instances, treated microorganisms were subsequently examined in thin sections by electron microscopy. Reductions in turbidity and clearing of suspensions occurred with small amounts of lysozyme (less than 1 microgram) under relatively alkaline conditions and at low ionic strength and in the presence of small amounts of EDTA (greater than 0.01 mM). Under the most alkaline conditions, EDTA alone effected turbidity reductions similar to those observed in the presence of lysozyme, which suggested that EDTA not only increased outer membrane permeability but also caused cell lysis. Ultrastructural analysis did not always correspond to turbidimetric observations. Cell lysis was virtually complete in suspensions containing both lysozyme and EDTA. However, in contrast to turbidimetric findings, a significant percentage of cells (greater than 25%) was lysed in the presence of lysozyme alone. Furthermore, significant damage occurred in the presence of EDTA alone. Spheroplast-like cell ghosts were present which surrounded condensed cytoplasm or relatively clear spaces. These findings further support the concept of the requirement for electron microscopy to assess lytic damage in addition to turbidimetric and biochemical methods. Our results are the first to demonstrate the remarkable sensitivity of A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 to lysozyme and to show that EDTA not only affects outer membrane permeability but effects cell lysis, possibly through activation of autolytic enzymes at the cytoplasmic membrane. The exquisite sensitivity of A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 to lysis could be

  11. Characterization of bacteriophages virulent for Clostridium perfringens and identification of phage lytic enzymes as alternatives to antibiotics for potential control of the bacterium.

    PubMed

    Seal, Bruce S

    2013-02-01

    There has been a resurgent interest in the use of bacteriophages or their gene products to control bacterial pathogens as alternatives to currently used antibiotics. Clostridium perfringens is a gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a significant role in human foodborne disease as well as non-foodborne human, animal, and avian diseases. Countries that have complied with the ban on antimicrobial growth promoters in feeds have reported increased incidences of C. perfringens-associated diseases in poultry. To address these issues, new antimicrobial agents, putative lysins encoded by the genomes of bacteriophages, are being identified in our laboratory. Poultry intestinal material, soil, sewage, and poultry processing drainage water were screened for virulent bacteriophages that could lyse C. perfringens and produce clear plaques in spot assays. Bacteriophages were isolated that had long noncontractile tails, members of the family Siphoviridae, and with short noncontractile tails, members of the family Podoviridae. Several bacteriophage genes were identified that encoded N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidases, lysozyme-endopeptidases, and a zinc carboxypeptidase domain that has not been previously reported in viral genomes. Putative phage lysin genes (ply) were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant lysins were amidases capable of lysing both parental phage host strains of C. perfringens as well as other strains of the bacterium in spot and turbidity reduction assays, but did not lyse any clostridia beyond the species. Consequently, bacteriophage gene products could eventually be used to target bacterial pathogens, such as C. perfringens via a species-specific strategy, to control animal and human diseases without having deleterious effects on beneficial probiotic bacteria. PMID:23300321

  12. Folding Behaviors of Protein (Lysozyme) Confined in Polyelectrolyte Complex Micelle.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fu-Gen; Jiang, Yao-Wen; Chen, Zhan; Yu, Zhi-Wu

    2016-04-19

    The folding/unfolding behavior of proteins (enzymes) in confined space is important for their properties and functions, but such a behavior remains largely unexplored. In this article, we reported our finding that lysozyme and a double hydrophilic block copolymer, methoxypoly(ethylene glycol)5K-block-poly(l-aspartic acid sodium salt)10 (mPEG(5K)-b-PLD10), can form a polyelectrolyte complex micelle with a particle size of ∼30 nm, as verified by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The unfolding and refolding behaviors of lysozyme molecules in the presence of the copolymer were studied by microcalorimetry and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Upon complex formation with mPEG(5K)-b-PLD10, lysozyme changed from its initial native state to a new partially unfolded state. Compared with its native state, this copolymer-complexed new folding state of lysozyme has different secondary and tertiary structures, a decreased thermostability, and significantly altered unfolding/refolding behaviors. It was found that the native lysozyme exhibited reversible unfolding and refolding upon heating and subsequent cooling, while lysozyme in the new folding state (complexed with the oppositely charged PLD segments of the polymer) could unfold upon heating but could not refold upon subsequent cooling. By employing the heating-cooling-reheating procedure, the prevention of complex formation between lysozyme and polymer due to the salt screening effect was observed, and the resulting uncomplexed lysozyme regained its proper unfolding and refolding abilities upon heating and subsequent cooling. Besides, we also pointed out the important role the length of the PLD segment played during the formation of micelles and the monodispersity of the formed micelles. Furthermore, the lysozyme-mPEG(5K)-b-PLD10 mixtures prepared in this work were all transparent, without the formation of large aggregates or precipitates in solution as frequently observed in other protein

  13. Effects of Purification on the Crystallization of Lysozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewing, Felecia L.; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Van Der Woerd, Mark; Pusey, Marc L.

    1996-01-01

    We have additionally purified a commercial lysozyme preparation by cation exchange chromatography, followed by recrystallization. This material is 99.96% pure with respect to macromolecular impurities. At basic pH, the purified lysozyme gave only tetragonal crystals at 20 C. Protein used directly from the bottle, prepared by dialysis against distilled water, or which did not bind to the cation exchange column had considerably altered crystallization behavior. Lysozyme which did not bind to the cation exchange column was subsequently purified by size exclusion chromatography. This material gave predominately bundles of rod-shaped crystals with some small tetragonal crystals at lower pHs. The origin of the bundled rod habit was postulated to be a thermally dependent tetragonal- orthorhombic change in the protein structure. This was subsequently ruled out on the basis of crystallization behavior and growth rate experiments. This suggests that heterogeneous forms of lysozyme may be responsible. These results demonstrate three classes of impurities: (1) small molecules, which may be removed by dialysis; (2) macromolecules, which are removable by chromatographic techniques; and (3) heterogeneous forms of the protein, which can be removed in this case by cation exchange chromatography. Of these, heterogeneous forms of the lysozyme apparently have the greatest affect on its crystallization behavior.

  14. Effects of purification on the crystallization of lysozyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, Felecia L.; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; van der Woerd, Mark; Pusey, Marc L.

    1996-03-01

    We have additionally purified a commercial lysozyme preparation by cation exchange chromatography, followed by recrystallization. This material is 99.96% pure with respect to macromolecular impurities. At basic pH, the purified lysozyme gave only tetragonal crystals at 20°C. Protein used directly from the bottle, prepared by dialysis against distilled water, or which did not bind to the cation exchange column had considerably altered crystallization behavior. Lysozyme which did not bind to the cation exchange column was subsequently purified by size exclusion chromatography. This material gave predominately bundles of rod-shaped crystals with some small tetragonal crystals at lower pHs. The origin of the bundled rod habit was postulated to be a thermally dependent tetragonal ↔ orthorhombic change in the protein structure. This was subsequently ruled out on the basis of crystallization behavior and growth rate experiments. This suggests that heterogeneous forms of lysozyme may be responsible. These results demonstrate three classes of impurities: (1) small molecules, which may be removed by dialysis; (2) macromolecules, which are removable by chromatographic techniques; and (3) heterogeneous forms of the protein, which can be removed in this case by cation exchange chromatography. Of these, heterogeneous forms of the lysozyme apparently have the greatest affect on its crystallization behavior.

  15. Topoisomerase Involvement in Multiplicity Reactivation of Phage T4

    PubMed Central

    Miskimins, Robin; Schneider, Silke; Johns, Virginia; Bernstein, Harris

    1982-01-01

    The products of phage T4 genes 39, 52 and probably 60 have been previously characterized as forming a type II DNA topoisomerase. Other evidence suggested that this topoisomerase promotes normal initiation of DNA replication, and that when it is defective its loss is partially compensated for by the host gyrase. We present evidence here that mutants defective in genes 39, 52 and 60 have reduced ability to carry out multiplicity reactivation (MR, a form of recombinational repair) of phage DNA damaged either by mitomycin C (MMC) or psoralen plus near-UV light (PUVA). We also observed that there is not extensive superhelicity in the intracellular phage DNA either in the presence or absence of the phage topoisomerase. This tends to rule out the possibility that the topoisomerase influences MR by controlling the general superhelicity of the phage DNA. The dependence of MR on topoisomerase could occur in several possible ways. However, we favor the explanation that the lesions are bypassed by a postreplication recombinational repair process that is influenced by the topoisomerase through its role in initiating replication. PMID:6293912

  16. Partial characterization of Acanthamoeba castellanii (T4 genotype) DNase activity.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Junaid; Panjwani, Shamvil; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2015-02-01

    The deoxyribonuclease (DNase) activities of Acanthamoeba castellanii belonging to the T4 genotype were investigated. Using zymographic assays, the DNase activities had approximate molecular masses of 25 and 35 kDa. A. castellanii DNases exhibited activity at wide-ranging temperature of up to 60 °C and at pH ranging from 4 to 9. The DNases activities were unaffected by proteinase-K treatment, divalent cations such as Ca(++), Cu(++), Mg(++), and Zn(++), or divalent cation chelating agent ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The non-reliance on divalent cations and homology data suggests that A. castellanii DNases belong to the class of eukaryotic lysosomal DNase II but exhibit robust properties. The DNases activity in A. castellanii interfered with the genomic DNA extraction. Extraction methods involving EDTA, SDS, and proteinase-K resulted in low yield of genomic DNA. On the other hand, these methods resulted in high yield of genomic DNA from human cells suggesting the robust nature of A. castellanii DNases that are unaffected by reagents normally used in blocking eukaryotic DNases. In contrast, the use of chaotropic agent such as guanidine thiocyanate improved the yield of genomic DNA from A. castellanii cells significantly. Further purification and characterization of Acanthamoeba DNases is needed to study their non-classic distinct properties and to determine their role in the biology, cellular differentiation, cell cycle progression, and arrest of Acanthamoeba.

  17. The phage T4-coded DNA replication helicase (gp41) forms a hexamer upon activation by nucleoside triphosphate.

    PubMed

    Dong, F; Gogol, E P; von Hippel, P H

    1995-03-31

    Sedimentation and high performance liquid chromatography studies show that the functional DNA replication helicase of bacteriophage T4 (gp41) exists primarily as a dimer at physiological protein concentrations, assembling from gp41 monomers with an association constant of approximately 10(6) M-1. Cryoelectron microscopy, analytical ultracentrifugation, and protein-protein cross-linking studies demonstrate that the binding of ATP or GTP drives the assembly of these dimers into monodisperse hexameric complexes, which redissociate following depletion of the purine nucleotide triphosphatase (PuTP) substrates by the DNA-stimulated PuTPase activity of the helicase. The hexameric state of gp41 can be stabilized for detailed study by the addition of the nonhydrolyzable PuTP analogs ATP gamma S and GTP gamma S and is not significantly affected by the presence of ADP, GDP, or single-stranded or forked DNA template constructs, although some structural details of the hexameric complex may be altered by DNA binding. Our results also indicate that the active gp41 helicase exists as a hexagonal trimer of asymmetric dimers, and that the hexamer is probably characterized by D3 symmetry. The assembly pathway of the gp41 helicase has been analyzed, and its structure and properties compared with those of other helicases involved in a variety of cellular processes. Functional implications of such structural organization are also considered. PMID:7706292

  18. The region of phage T4 genes 34, 33 and 59: primary structures and organization on the genome.

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, S; Kruse, U; Rüger, W

    1986-01-01

    The product of gene 33 is essential for the regulation of late transcription and gene product 59 is required in recombination, DNA repair and replication. The exact functions of both proteins are not known. Restriction fragments spanning the genomic area of genes 33 and 59 have been cloned into phage M13 and a 4.9 kb nucleotide sequence has been determined. Translation of the DNA sequence predicted that gp33 contains 112 amino acids with a mol.wt. of 12.816 kd while gp59 is composed of 217 amino acids adding up to a mol.wt. of 25.967 kd. The genomic area studied here also contains 3 open reading frames of genes not identified to date and it is thought to include the NH2-terminal part of g34. One of the open reading frames seems to code for the 10 kd protein, probably involved in the regulation of transcription of bacteriophage T4. This protein is predicted to consist of 89 amino acid residues with a mol.wt. of 10.376 kd. Gene 33 and the gene for the 10 kd protein were cloned separately on high expression vectors resulting in over-production of the two proteins. Images PMID:3797242

  19. Analysis of Monomer Aggregation and Crystal Growth Rates of Lysozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadarajah, Arunan

    1996-01-01

    This project was originally conceived to analyze the extensive data of tetragonal lysozyme crystal growth rates collected at NASA/MSFC by Dr. Marc L. Pusey's research group. At that time the lack of analysis of the growth rates was hindering progress in understanding the growth mechanism of tetragonal lysozyme and other protein crystals. After the project was initiated our initial analysis revealed unexpected complexities in the growth rate behavior. This resulted in an expansion in the scope of the project to include a comprehensive investigation of the growth mechanisms of tetragonal lysozyme crystals. A discussion of this research is included as well a list of presentations and publications resulting from the research. This project contributed significantly toward the education of several students and fostered extensive collaborations between investigators.

  20. Salt induced reduction of lysozyme adsorption at charged interfaces.

    PubMed

    Göhring, Holger; Paulus, Michael; Salmen, Paul; Wirkert, Florian; Kruse, Theresa; Degen, Patrick; Stuhr, Susan; Rehage, Heinz; Tolan, Metin

    2015-06-17

    A study of lysozyme adsorption below a behenic acid membrane and at the solid-liquid interface between aqueous lysozyme solution and a silicon wafer in the presence of sodium chloride is presented. The salt concentration was varied between 1 mmol L(-1) and 1000 mmol L(-1). X-ray reflectivity data show a clear dependence of the protein adsorption on the salt concentration. Increasing salt concentrations result in a decreased protein adsorption at the interface until a complete suppression at high concentrations is reached. This effect can be attributed to a reduced attractive electrostatic interaction between the positively charged proteins and negatively charged surfaces by charge screening. The measurements at the solid-liquid interfaces show a transition from unoriented order of lysozyme in the adsorbed film to an oriented order with the short protein axis perpendicular to the solid-liquid interface with rising salt concentration.

  1. Lysozyme: primary bactericidin in human plasma serum active against Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Selsted, M E; Martinez, R J

    1978-01-01

    The in vitro bactericidal reaction of human plasma serum against Bacillus subtilis was investigated. Human lysozyme was purified to homogeneity, and antiserum was prepared against the enzyme. The anti-lysozyme immunoglobulin G was used as a specific inhibitor in bactericidal and bacteriolytic reactions. It was found that at low serum concentrations lysozyme was the primary bactericide active against B. subtilis. At appreciably higher serum concentrations, a lysozyme-independent bactericidal activity was also demonstrated. Images PMID:97236

  2. [Friedrich Mauz: T4 assessor and military psychiatrist].

    PubMed

    Silberzahn-Jandt, G; Schmuhl, H-W

    2012-03-01

    Friedrich Mauz is one of the medical perpetrators of the second tier whose biography is difficult to comprehend. Autobiographies from three different political systems exist - Weimar Republic, the Third Reich, and postwar Germany in which he constantly reinvented himself. While after 1933 he suddenly emphasized his participation in the civil war turmoil during the early period of the Weimar Republic and his patriotism, he then depicted himself after 1945 as an apolitical person characterized by Württemberg pietism who inwardly rejected the Nazi State but had found himself prepared to accept "all sorts of humiliating concessions." He claimed that he had always remained true to his scientific code of conduct and had distanced himself from psychiatric genetics. In point of fact, Mauz was among those exonerated in the denazification trial in 1946 and was able to pursue his career in the Federal Republic of Germany. However, if the sources are read against the grain, a different picture emerges. Mauz's career stalled in the 1930s, not because he had been politically offensive, but because his scientific work was flimsy and considered lacking originality, particularly since he had chosen constitution research and psychotherapy as his main fields of interest, which were overshadowed by research in genetic psychiatry in the 1930s. Mauz tendered his services to the Nazi policy of genetic health, served as a medical assessor in proceedings based on the "Law for the Prevention of Genetically Diseased Offspring," permitted himself to be recruited for the T4 program as a medical expert, even participated in the deliberations on a future "Law on Euthanasia," and as a consulting psychiatrist for the German Armed Forces contributed to military medicine. PMID:22399061

  3. [Friedrich Mauz: T4 assessor and military psychiatrist].

    PubMed

    Silberzahn-Jandt, G; Schmuhl, H-W

    2012-03-01

    Friedrich Mauz is one of the medical perpetrators of the second tier whose biography is difficult to comprehend. Autobiographies from three different political systems exist - Weimar Republic, the Third Reich, and postwar Germany in which he constantly reinvented himself. While after 1933 he suddenly emphasized his participation in the civil war turmoil during the early period of the Weimar Republic and his patriotism, he then depicted himself after 1945 as an apolitical person characterized by Württemberg pietism who inwardly rejected the Nazi State but had found himself prepared to accept "all sorts of humiliating concessions." He claimed that he had always remained true to his scientific code of conduct and had distanced himself from psychiatric genetics. In point of fact, Mauz was among those exonerated in the denazification trial in 1946 and was able to pursue his career in the Federal Republic of Germany. However, if the sources are read against the grain, a different picture emerges. Mauz's career stalled in the 1930s, not because he had been politically offensive, but because his scientific work was flimsy and considered lacking originality, particularly since he had chosen constitution research and psychotherapy as his main fields of interest, which were overshadowed by research in genetic psychiatry in the 1930s. Mauz tendered his services to the Nazi policy of genetic health, served as a medical assessor in proceedings based on the "Law for the Prevention of Genetically Diseased Offspring," permitted himself to be recruited for the T4 program as a medical expert, even participated in the deliberations on a future "Law on Euthanasia," and as a consulting psychiatrist for the German Armed Forces contributed to military medicine.

  4. [Spontaneous bacteriophage induction in Bacillus thuringiensis].

    PubMed

    Besaeva, S G; Mikhaĭlov, A A; Petrova, T M; Tur, A I; Bystrova, E V

    1987-01-01

    The production of temperate bacteriophages was studied in the process of batch cultivation of three Bacillus thuringiensis lysogenic strains. Phage titres were determined using an indicator culture (IPM-1148). The growth of bacteriophages was induced when thermoactivated spores germinated. Some cells (1.10(-3)-2.10(-3)) underwent lysis without their division. The subsequent lytic cycles occurred in the actively growing culture. Phage titres ceased to rise before the exponential growth phase was over.

  5. Arthrobacter globiformis and its bacteriophage in soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casida, L. E., Jr.; Liu, K.-C.

    1974-01-01

    An attempt was made to correlate bacteriophages for Arthrobacter globiformis with soils containing that bacterium. The phages were not detected unless the soil was nutritionally amended (with glucose or sucrose) and incubated for several days. Phage was continuously produced after amendment without the addition of host Arthrobacter. These results indicate that the bacteriophage is present in a masked state and that the bacteria are present in an insensitive form which becomes sensitive after addition of nutrient.

  6. Characterization of tail sheath protein of giant bacteriophage phiKZ Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Kurochkina, Lidia P.; Sachkova, Maria Yu.; Sykilinda, Nina N.; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V.

    2009-12-20

    The tail sheath protein of giant bacteriophage phiKZ Pseudomonas aeruginosa encoded by gene 29 was identified and its expression system was developed. Localization of the protein on the virion was confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy. Properties of gene product (gp) 29 were studied by electron microscopy, immunoblotting and limited trypsinolysis. Recombinant gp29 assembles into the regular tubular structures (polysheaths) of variable length. Trypsin digestion of gp29 within polysheaths or extended sheath of virion results in specific cleavage of the peptide bond between Arg135 and Asp136. However, this cleavage does not affect polymeric structure of polysheaths, sheaths and viral infectivity. Digestion by trypsin of the C-truncated gp29 mutant, lacking the ability to self-assemble, results in formation of a stable protease-resistant fragment. Although there is no sequence homology of phiKZ proteins to proteins of other bacteriophages, some characteristic biochemical properties of gp29 revealed similarities to the tail sheath protein of bacteriophage T4.

  7. Taking Bacteriophage Therapy Seriously: A Moral Argument

    PubMed Central

    Verbeken, Gilbert; Huys, Isabelle; Jennes, Serge; Chanishvili, Nina; Górski, Andrzej; De Vos, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The excessive and improper use of antibiotics has led to an increasing incidence of bacterial resistance. In Europe the yearly number of infections caused by multidrug resistant bacteria is more than 400.000, each year resulting in 25.000 attributable deaths. Few new antibiotics are in the pipeline of the pharmaceutical industry. Early in the 20th century, bacteriophages were described as entities that can control bacterial populations. Although bacteriophage therapy was developed and practiced in Europe and the former Soviet republics, the use of bacteriophages in clinical setting was neglected in Western Europe since the introduction of traditional antibiotics. Given the worldwide antibiotic crisis there is now a growing interest in making bacteriophage therapy available for use in modern western medicine. Despite the growing interest, access to bacteriophage therapy remains highly problematic. In this paper, we argue that the current state of affairs is morally unacceptable and that all stakeholders (pharmaceutical industry, competent authorities, lawmakers, regulators, and politicians) have the moral duty and the shared responsibility towards making bacteriophage therapy urgently available for all patients in need. PMID:24868534

  8. Characterization and purification of bacteriophages using chromatofocusing.

    PubMed

    Brorson, Kurt; Shen, Hong; Lute, Scott; Pérez, Jessica Soto; Frey, Douglas D

    2008-10-17

    The technique of chromatofocusing was applied to the characterization and purification of three bacteriophages that are routinely used for testing virus filters: phiX174, PR772, and PP7. Chemically well-defined eluent buffers were used, instead of the more commonly used chromatofocusing polyampholyte buffers. Chromatographic column packings were selected to minimize band broadening by confining bacteriophage adsorption solely to the exterior particle surface. Under the conditions used it was determined that bacteriophages could be made to focus into narrow bands in a retained pH gradient with recoveries of live phage that ranged from 15 to nearly 100% as determined by a plaque-forming assay. Retention times and apparent isoelectric point data were obtained for samples consisting either of purified bacteriophage, or samples consisting of crude preparations of bacteriophages containing host cell impurities. Isoelectric point estimates were obtained using modified, previously described models. The results obtained suggest that chromatofocusing is a simple and rapid method for obtaining approximate isoelectric points for bacteriophages and probably other types of viruses. It is also likely a useful method for purifying these materials.

  9. SecReT4: a web-based bacterial type IV secretion system resource

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Dexi; Liu, Linmeng; Tai, Cui; Deng, Zixin; Rajakumar, Kumar; Ou, Hong-Yu

    2013-01-01

    SecReT4 (http://db-mml.sjtu.edu.cn/SecReT4/) is an integrated database providing comprehensive information of type IV secretion systems (T4SSs) in bacteria. T4SSs are versatile assemblages that promote genetic exchange and/or effector translocation with consequent impacts on pathogenesis and genome plasticity. T4SSs have been implicated in conjugation, DNA uptake and release and effector translocation. The effectors injected into eukaryotic target cells can lead to alteration of host cellular processes during infection. SecReT4 offers a unique, highly organized, readily exploreable archive of known and putative T4SSs and cognate effectors in bacteria. It currently contains details of 10 752 core components mapping to 808 T4SSs and 1884 T4SS effectors found in representatives of 289 bacterial species, as well as a collection of more than 900 directly related references. A broad range of similarity search, sequence alignment, phylogenetic, primer design and other functional analysis tools are readily accessible via SecReT4. We propose that SecReT4 will facilitate efficient investigation of large numbers of these systems, recognition of diverse patterns of sequence-, gene- and/or functional conservation and an improved understanding of the biological roles and significance of these versatile molecular machines. SecReT4 will be regularly updated to ensure its ongoing maximum utility to the research community. PMID:23193298

  10. The solubility of hen egg-white lysozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Sandra B.; Twigg, Pamela J.; Baird, James K.; Meehan, Edward J.

    1988-01-01

    The equilibrium solubility of chicken egg-white lysozyme in the presence of crystalline solid state was determined as a function of NaCl concentration, pH, and temperature. The solubility curves obtained represent a region of the lysozyme phase diagram. This diagram makes it possible to determine the supersaturation of a given set of conditions or to achieve identical supersaturations by different combinations of parameters. The temperature dependence of the solubility permits the evaluation of Delta-H of crystallization. The data indicate a negative heat of crystallization for the tetragonal crystal form but a positive heat of crystallization for the high-temperature orthorhombic form.

  11. Spectrophotometric studies on the interaction between (-)-epigallocatechin gallate and lysozyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Kalyan Sundar; Sahoo, Bijaya Ketan; Dasgupta, Swagata

    2008-02-01

    Various reported antibacterial activities of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the major polyphenol of green tea prompted us to study its binding with lysozyme. This has been investigated by fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and protein-ligand docking. The binding parameters were determined using a modified Stern-Volmer equation. The thermodynamic parameters are indicative of an initial hydrophobic association. The complex is, however, held together predominantly by van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonding. CD studies do not indicate any significant changes in the secondary structure of lysozyme. Docking studies revealed that specific interactions are observed with residues Trp 62 and Trp 63.

  12. Mutational Analysis of the T4 Gp59 Helicase Loader Reveals Its Sites for Interaction with Helicase, Single-stranded Binding Protein, and DNA*

    PubMed Central

    Dolezal, Darin; Jones, Charles E.; Lai, Xiaoqin; Brister, J. Rodney; Mueser, Timothy C.; Nossal, Nancy G.; Hinton, Deborah M.

    2012-01-01

    Efficient DNA replication involves coordinated interactions among DNA polymerase, multiple factors, and the DNA. From bacteriophage T4 to eukaryotes, these factors include a helicase to unwind the DNA ahead of the replication fork, a single-stranded binding protein (SSB) to bind to the ssDNA on the lagging strand, and a helicase loader that associates with the fork, helicase, and SSB. The previously reported structure of the helicase loader in the T4 system, gene product (gp)59, has revealed an N-terminal domain, which shares structural homology with the high mobility group (HMG) proteins from eukaryotic organisms. Modeling of this structure with fork DNA has suggested that the HMG-like domain could bind to the duplex DNA ahead of the fork, whereas the C-terminal portion of gp59 would provide the docking sites for helicase (T4 gp41), SSB (T4 gp32), and the ssDNA fork arms. To test this model, we have used random and targeted mutagenesis to generate mutations throughout gp59. We have assayed the ability of the mutant proteins to bind to fork, primed fork, and ssDNAs, to interact with SSB, to stimulate helicase activity, and to function in leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis. Our results provide strong biochemical support for the role of the N-terminal gp59 HMG motif in fork binding and the interaction of the C-terminal portion of gp59 with helicase and SSB. Our results also suggest that processive replication may involve the switching of gp59 between its interactions with helicase and SSB. PMID:22427673

  13. Twenty-four hour hormone profiles of TSH, Free T3 and free T4 in hypothyroid patients on combined T3/T4 therapy.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, P; Siddique, H; Simmons, D J; Greenwood, R; Dayan, C M

    2007-04-01

    The benefits of using thyroxine (T4) plus triiodothyronine (T3) in combination in thyroid hormone replacement are unproven but many individuals continue to be treated with this regime. When T3 is used alone for hypothyroidism, it results in wide fluctuations of thyroid hormone levels. However, only limited data exists on combined T3/T4 therapy. In this study, we have compared 24-hour profiles of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), free T4 (fT4) and free T3 (fT3) and cardiovascular parameters in 10 hypothyroid patients who had been on once daily combined T3/T4 therapy for more than 3 months with 10 patients on T4 alone. Twenty patients, who were part of a larger study, investigating the long-term benefits of combined T3/T4 therapy, were recruited into this sub-study. Over 24-hours, 12 samples were taken for thyroid hormones. Their 24-hour pulse and BP is also monitored on a separate occasion. On T4 alone, a modest 16% rise in fT4 with no change in fT3 was seen in the first 4-hours post-dose. In contrast, on combined treatment, fT3 levels showed a marked rise of 42% within the first 4-hours post-dose (T3/T4:T4=6.24: 4.63 mU/L, p<0.001). Mean exposure to fT3 calculated by area under the curve (AUC) was higher (T3/T4:T4=1148:1062, p<0.0001) on T3. Circadian rhythm of TSH was maintained on both treatments. No difference in pulse or blood pressure over the 24-hours was seen between the groups. Our data suggests that despite chronic combined T3/T4 therapy, wide peak-to-trough variation in fT3 levels persists. Although no immediate cardiovascular effects were seen, the long-term consequences for patients on combined therapy are unknown. PMID:17479444

  14. Pathogen detection using engineered bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Smartt, Abby E; Xu, Tingting; Jegier, Patricia; Carswell, Jessica J; Blount, Samuel A; Sayler, Gary S; Ripp, Steven

    2012-04-01

    Bacteriophages, or phages, are bacterial viruses that can infect a broad or narrow range of host organisms. Knowing the host range of a phage allows it to be exploited in targeting various pathogens. Applying phages for the identification of microorganisms related to food and waterborne pathogens and pathogens of clinical significance to humans and animals has a long history, and there has to some extent been a recent revival in these applications as phages have become more extensively integrated into novel detection, identification, and monitoring technologies. Biotechnological and genetic engineering strategies applied to phages are responsible for some of these new methods, but even natural unmodified phages are widely applicable when paired with appropriate innovative detector platforms. This review highlights the use of phages as pathogen detector interfaces to provide the reader with an up-to-date inventory of phage-based biodetection strategies.

  15. Bacteriophage endolysins as novel antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Schmelcher, Mathias; Donovan, David M; Loessner, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    Endolysins are enzymes used by bacteriophages at the end of their replication cycle to degrade the peptidoglycan of the bacterial host from within, resulting in cell lysis and release of progeny virions. Due to the absence of an outer membrane in the Gram-positive bacterial cell wall, endolysins can access the peptidoglycan and destroy these organisms when applied externally, making them interesting antimicrobial candidates, particularly in light of increasing bacterial drug resistance. This article reviews the modular structure of these enzymes, in which cell wall binding and catalytic functions are separated, as well as their mechanism of action, lytic activity and potential as antimicrobials. It particularly focuses on molecular engineering as a means of optimizing endolysins for specific applications, highlights new developments that may render these proteins active against Gram-negative and intracellular pathogens and summarizes the most recent applications of endolysins in the fields of medicine, food safety, agriculture and biotechnology. PMID:23030422

  16. Host receptors for bacteriophage adsorption.

    PubMed

    Bertozzi Silva, Juliano; Storms, Zachary; Sauvageau, Dominic

    2016-02-01

    The adsorption of bacteriophages (phages) onto host cells is, in all but a few rare cases, a sine qua non condition for the onset of the infection process. Understanding the mechanisms involved and the factors affecting it is, thus, crucial for the investigation of host-phage interactions. This review provides a survey of the phage host receptors involved in recognition and adsorption and their interactions during attachment. Comprehension of the whole infection process, starting with the adsorption step, can enable and accelerate our understanding of phage ecology and the development of phage-based technologies. To assist in this effort, we have established an open-access resource--the Phage Receptor Database (PhReD)--to serve as a repository for information on known and newly identified phage receptors. PMID:26755501

  17. Fast Screening of Whole Blood Samples and Pharmaceutical Compounds for Enantiorecognition of Free L-T3 , L-T4 , and D-T4.

    PubMed

    Mitrofan, Grigorina; Stefan-van Staden, Raluca-Ioana; Comnea-Stancu, Ionela Raluca; van Staden, Jacobus Frederick; Bazylak, Grzegorz; Kapnissi-Christodoulou, Constantina P; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2015-12-01

    A fast screening method of whole blood was proposed for enantiorecognition of free L-T3 , L-T4 , and D-T4 . Stochastic microsensors based on four inulins (IN, IQ, TEX, and HD) immobilized on diamond paste (DP) were used for recognition of free L-T3 , L-T4 , and D-T4 . For the enantiorecognition of free L-T4 and D-T4 in whole blood and pharmaceutical samples, the best microsensor was the one based on TEX/DP (wide linear concentration ranges, and low limits of quantification). The best limit of detection for the assay of free L-T3 (400 fmol/L) was recorded using the microsensors based on HD/DP, while for the assay of free L-T4, and D-T4 the best limit of determination (1 pmol/L) was recorded using the TX/DP-based microsensor. For the enantiorecognition of free L-T3 in whole blood and pharmaceutical samples the best microsensor was the one based on HD/DP (the wider linear concentration range, and the lower limit of quantification - of pmol/L magnitude order). For the enantiorecognition of free L-T3 in whole blood and pharmaceutical samples the best microsensor was the one based on HD/DP (the wider linear concentration range, and the lower limit of quantification - of pmol/L magnitude order). Free L-T3 , L-T4 , and D-T4 were recovered with high reliabilities in whole blood samples (recoveries higher than 99.00%, with RSD values lower than 1.00%) and pharmaceutical samples (recoveries higher than 95.00% with RSD values lower than 1.00%). PMID:26447904

  18. Fast Screening of Whole Blood Samples and Pharmaceutical Compounds for Enantiorecognition of Free L-T3 , L-T4 , and D-T4.

    PubMed

    Mitrofan, Grigorina; Stefan-van Staden, Raluca-Ioana; Comnea-Stancu, Ionela Raluca; van Staden, Jacobus Frederick; Bazylak, Grzegorz; Kapnissi-Christodoulou, Constantina P; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2015-12-01

    A fast screening method of whole blood was proposed for enantiorecognition of free L-T3 , L-T4 , and D-T4 . Stochastic microsensors based on four inulins (IN, IQ, TEX, and HD) immobilized on diamond paste (DP) were used for recognition of free L-T3 , L-T4 , and D-T4 . For the enantiorecognition of free L-T4 and D-T4 in whole blood and pharmaceutical samples, the best microsensor was the one based on TEX/DP (wide linear concentration ranges, and low limits of quantification). The best limit of detection for the assay of free L-T3 (400 fmol/L) was recorded using the microsensors based on HD/DP, while for the assay of free L-T4, and D-T4 the best limit of determination (1 pmol/L) was recorded using the TX/DP-based microsensor. For the enantiorecognition of free L-T3 in whole blood and pharmaceutical samples the best microsensor was the one based on HD/DP (the wider linear concentration range, and the lower limit of quantification - of pmol/L magnitude order). For the enantiorecognition of free L-T3 in whole blood and pharmaceutical samples the best microsensor was the one based on HD/DP (the wider linear concentration range, and the lower limit of quantification - of pmol/L magnitude order). Free L-T3 , L-T4 , and D-T4 were recovered with high reliabilities in whole blood samples (recoveries higher than 99.00%, with RSD values lower than 1.00%) and pharmaceutical samples (recoveries higher than 95.00% with RSD values lower than 1.00%).

  19. Interplay between the mechanics of bacteriophage fibers and the strength of virus-host links.

    PubMed

    Ares, P; Garcia-Doval, C; Llauró, A; Gómez-Herrero, J; van Raaij, M J; de Pablo, P J

    2014-05-01

    Viral fibers play a central role in many virus infection mechanisms since they recognize the corresponding host and establish a mechanical link to its surface. Specifically, bacteriophages have to anchor to bacteria through the fibers surrounding the tail before starting the viral DNA translocation into the host. The protein gene product (gp) 37 from bacteriophage T4 long tail fibers forms a fibrous parallel homotrimer located at the distal end of the long tail fibers. Biochemical data indicate that, at least, three of these fibers are required for initial host cell interaction but do not reveal why three and no other numbers are required. By using atomic force microscopy, we obtained high-resolution images of gp37 fibers adsorbed on a mica substrate in buffer conditions and probed their local mechanical properties. Our experiments of radial indentation at the nanometer scale provided a radial stiffness of ∼ 0.08 N/m and a breaking force of ∼ 120 pN. In addition, we performed finite element analysis and determined a Young's modulus of ∼ 20 MPa. From these mechanical parameters, we hypothesize that three viral fibers provide enough mechanical strength to prevent a T4 virus from being detached from the bacteria by the viral particle Brownian motion, delivering a biophysical justification for the previous biochemical data. PMID:25353832

  20. Interplay between the mechanics of bacteriophage fibers and the strength of virus-host links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ares, P.; Garcia-Doval, C.; Llauró, A.; Gómez-Herrero, J.; van Raaij, M. J.; de Pablo, P. J.

    2014-05-01

    Viral fibers play a central role in many virus infection mechanisms since they recognize the corresponding host and establish a mechanical link to its surface. Specifically, bacteriophages have to anchor to bacteria through the fibers surrounding the tail before starting the viral DNA translocation into the host. The protein gene product (gp) 37 from bacteriophage T4 long tail fibers forms a fibrous parallel homotrimer located at the distal end of the long tail fibers. Biochemical data indicate that, at least, three of these fibers are required for initial host cell interaction but do not reveal why three and no other numbers are required. By using atomic force microscopy, we obtained high-resolution images of gp37 fibers adsorbed on a mica substrate in buffer conditions and probed their local mechanical properties. Our experiments of radial indentation at the nanometer scale provided a radial stiffness of ˜0.08 N/m and a breaking force of ˜120 pN. In addition, we performed finite element analysis and determined a Young's modulus of ˜20 MPa. From these mechanical parameters, we hypothesize that three viral fibers provide enough mechanical strength to prevent a T4 virus from being detached from the bacteria by the viral particle Brownian motion, delivering a biophysical justification for the previous biochemical data.

  1. Interplay between the mechanics of bacteriophage fibers and the strength of virus-host links.

    PubMed

    Ares, P; Garcia-Doval, C; Llauró, A; Gómez-Herrero, J; van Raaij, M J; de Pablo, P J

    2014-05-01

    Viral fibers play a central role in many virus infection mechanisms since they recognize the corresponding host and establish a mechanical link to its surface. Specifically, bacteriophages have to anchor to bacteria through the fibers surrounding the tail before starting the viral DNA translocation into the host. The protein gene product (gp) 37 from bacteriophage T4 long tail fibers forms a fibrous parallel homotrimer located at the distal end of the long tail fibers. Biochemical data indicate that, at least, three of these fibers are required for initial host cell interaction but do not reveal why three and no other numbers are required. By using atomic force microscopy, we obtained high-resolution images of gp37 fibers adsorbed on a mica substrate in buffer conditions and probed their local mechanical properties. Our experiments of radial indentation at the nanometer scale provided a radial stiffness of ∼ 0.08 N/m and a breaking force of ∼ 120 pN. In addition, we performed finite element analysis and determined a Young's modulus of ∼ 20 MPa. From these mechanical parameters, we hypothesize that three viral fibers provide enough mechanical strength to prevent a T4 virus from being detached from the bacteria by the viral particle Brownian motion, delivering a biophysical justification for the previous biochemical data.

  2. Effect of secondary structure on the interactions of peptide T4 LYS (11-36) in mixtures of aqueous sodium chloride and 2,2,2,-Trifluoroethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Camille O.; Spiegelberg, Susanne; Prausnitz, John M.; Blanch, Harvey W.

    2001-10-01

    The potential of mean force for protein-protein interactions is key to the development of a statistical-mechanical model for salt-induced protein precipitation and crystallization, and for understanding certain disease states, including cataract formation and {beta}-amyloid pathology in Alzheimer's disease. Fluorescence anisotropy provides a method for quantitative characterization of intermolecular interactions due to reversible association. Monomer-dimer equilibria for the peptide T4 LYS(11-36) were studied by fluorescence anisotropy. This peptide, derived from the {beta}-sheet region of the T4 lysozyme molecule, has the potential to form amyloid fibrils. 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) induces a change in peptide secondary structure, and was used in aqueous solutions at concentrations from 0 to 50% (v/v) at 25 and 37 C to examine the role of peptide conformation on peptide-peptide interactions. The association constant for dimerization increased with rising TFE concentration and with falling temperature. The peptide-peptide potential of mean force was computed from these association constants. Circular-dichroism measurements showed that the secondary structure of the peptide plays an important role in these strong attractive interactions due to intermolecular hydrogen-bond formation and hydrophobic interactions.

  3. Structural effects of monovalent anions on polymorphic lysozyme crystals.

    PubMed

    Vaney, M C; Broutin, I; Retailleau, P; Douangamath, A; Lafont, S; Hamiaux, C; Prangé, T; Ducruix, A; Riès-Kautt, M

    2001-07-01

    Understanding direct salt effects on protein crystal polymorphism is addressed by comparing different crystal forms (triclinic, monoclinic, tetragonal and orthorhombic) for hen, turkey, bob white quail and human lysozymes. Four new structures of hen egg-white lysozyme are reported: crystals grown in the presence of NapTS diffracted to 1.85 A, of NaI to 1.6 A, of NaNO(3) to 1.45 A and of KSCN to 1.63 A. These new structures are compared with previously published structures in order to draw a mapping of the surface of different lysozymes interacting with monovalent anions, such as nitrate, chloride, iodide, bromide and thiocyanate. An analysis of the structural sites of these anions in the various lysozyme structures is presented. This study shows common anion sites whatever the crystal form and the chemical nature of anions, while others seem specific to a given geometry and a particular charge environment induced by the crystal packing.

  4. Science Study Aids 6: Lysozyme - The Cooperative Enzyme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boeschen, John; Alderton, Gordon

    This publication is the sixth of a series of seven supplementary investigative materials for use in secondary science classes providing up-to-date research-related investigations. This unit is structured for grade levels 10 through 12. It is concerned with the crystallization of an enzyme, lysozyme, from egg white. The first part of this guide…

  5. The folding-unfolding transition of equine lysozyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haezebrouck, P.; Van Dael, H.

    1993-03-01

    A detailed study of the chemical and thermal unfolding transition of equine lysozyme in the presence and in the absence of Ca 2+ gives evidence for a two-step unfolding process. The pretransition can be related to the transfer of exposed Trp groups to the protein interior.

  6. Locations of Bromide Ions in Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Kap; Nadarajah, Arunan; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    Anions have been shown to play a dominant role in the crystallization of chicken egg-white lysozyme from salt solutions. Previous studies employing X-ray crystallography have found one chloride ion binding site in the tetragonal crystal form of the protein and four nitrate ion binding sites in the monoclinic form. In this study the anion positions in the tetragonal form were determined from the difference Fourier map obtained from lysozyme crystals grown in bromide and chloride solutions. Five possible anion-binding sites were found in this manner. Some of these sites were in pockets containing basic residues while others were near neutral, but polar, residues. The sole chloride ion binding site found in previous studies was confirmed, while four further sites were found which corresponded to the four binding sites found for nitrate ions in monoclinic crystals. The study suggests that most of the anion-binding sites in lysozyme remain unchanged even when different anions and different crystal forms of lysozyme are employed.

  7. Modular structural units, exons, and function in chicken lysozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Go, M

    1983-01-01

    By the application of the same algorithm for finding compact structural units encoded by exons as applied previously to hemoglobin, five units, M1-M5, were identified in chicken egg white lysozyme. They consist of residues 1-30, 31-55, 56-84, 85-108, and 109-129, respectively. I call these compact structural units "modules." As in hemoglobin, modules thus identified correspond well to exons--i.e., modules M1, M2 plus M3, M4, and M5 correspond to exons 1, 2, 3, and 4 of the lysozyme gene, respectively. Localization of the catalytic sites glutamic acid-35 and aspartic acid-52 on the module M2 suggests that this module might have worked as a functional unit in a primitive lysozyme. The good correspondence between exons and modules reinforces the idea of "proteins in pieces," which was derived from the fact of "genes in pieces." The evolutionary origin of the introns in globins and lysozyme is discussed. PMID:6572956

  8. Sinorhizobium meliloti Phage ΦM9 Defines a New Group of T4 Superfamily Phages with Unusual Genomic Features but a Common T=16 Capsid

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Matthew C.; Tatum, Kelsey B.; Lynn, Jason S.; Brewer, Tess E.; Lu, Stephen; Washburn, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Relatively little is known about the phages that infect agriculturally important nitrogen-fixing rhizobial bacteria. Here we report the genome and cryo-electron microscopy structure of the Sinorhizobium meliloti-infecting T4 superfamily phage ΦM9. This phage and its close relative Rhizobium phage vB_RleM_P10VF define a new group of T4 superfamily phages. These phages are distinctly different from the recently characterized cyanophage-like S. meliloti phages of the ΦM12 group. Structurally, ΦM9 has a T=16 capsid formed from repeating units of an extended gp23-like subunit that assemble through interactions between one subunit and the adjacent E-loop insertion domain. Though genetically very distant from the cyanophages, the ΦM9 capsid closely resembles that of the T4 superfamily cyanophage Syn9. ΦM9 also has the same T=16 capsid architecture as the very distant phage SPO1 and the herpesviruses. Despite their overall lack of similarity at the genomic and structural levels, ΦM9 and S. meliloti phage ΦM12 have a small number of open reading frames in common that appear to encode structural proteins involved in interaction with the host and which may have been acquired by horizontal transfer. These proteins are predicted to encode tail baseplate proteins, tail fibers, tail fiber assembly proteins, and glycanases that cleave host exopolysaccharide. IMPORTANCE Despite recent advances in the phylogenetic and structural characterization of bacteriophages, only a small number of phages of plant-symbiotic nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria have been studied at the molecular level. The effects of phage predation upon beneficial bacteria that promote plant growth remain poorly characterized. First steps in understanding these soil bacterium-phage dynamics are genetic, molecular, and structural characterizations of these groups of phages. The T4 superfamily phages are among the most complex phages; they have large genomes packaged within an icosahedral head and a long

  9. Image reconstruction from cryo-electron micrographs reveals the morphopoietic mechanism in the P2-P4 bacteriophage system.

    PubMed

    Dokland, T; Lindqvist, B H; Fuller, S D

    1992-03-01

    The satellite bacteriophage P4 does not have genes coding for any major structural proteins, but assembles a capsid from the gene products of bacteriophage P2. The capsid assembled under control of P4 is smaller (45 nm) than the normal P2 capsid (60 nm). The low resolution (4.5 nm) structures of P2 and P4 capsids were determined by cryo-electron microscopy and image processing. The capsid of P2 shows T = 7 symmetry with most of the mass clustered as 12 pentamers and 60 hexamers. The P4 capsid has T = 4 symmetry with a similar distribution of mass to P2, but the hexamer geometry has changed. The major capsid protein has a two-domain structure. The major domains form the capsomers proper, while connecting domains form trivalent contacts between the capsomers. The size determination by P4 appears to function by altering hexamer geometry rather than by affecting the interdomain angle alone.

  10. Complete Genome Sequences of Five Bacteriophages That Infect Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Bollivar, David W; Bernardoni, Brooke; Bockman, Matthew R; Miller, Brenda M; Russell, Daniel A; Delesalle, Veronique A; Krukonis, Gregory P; Hatfull, Graham F; Cross, Madeline R; Szewczyk, Marlena M; Eppurath, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Five bacteriophages that infect the Rhodobacter capsulatus strain YW1 were isolated from stream water near Bloomington, Illinois, USA. Two distinct genome types are represented in the newly isolated bacteriophages. These genomes are different from other bacteriophage genomes previously described. PMID:27231352

  11. Complete Genome Sequences of Five Bacteriophages That Infect Rhodobacter capsulatus

    PubMed Central

    Bernardoni, Brooke; Bockman, Matthew R.; Miller, Brenda M.; Russell, Daniel A.; Delesalle, Veronique A.; Krukonis, Gregory P.; Hatfull, Graham F.; Cross, Madeline R.; Szewczyk, Marlena M.; Eppurath, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Five bacteriophages that infect the Rhodobacter capsulatus strain YW1 were isolated from stream water near Bloomington, Illinois, USA. Two distinct genome types are represented in the newly isolated bacteriophages. These genomes are different from other bacteriophage genomes previously described. PMID:27231352

  12. Use of Lysozyme as a Feed Additive on In vitro Rumen Fermentation and Methane Emission

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Ashraf A.; Lee, Sung Sill; Mamuad, Lovelia L.; Kim, Seon-Ho; Choi, Yeon-Jae; Bae, Gui-Seck; Lee, Kichoon; Sung, Ha-Guyn; Lee, Sang-Suk

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of lysozyme addition on in vitro rumen fermentation and to identify the lysozyme inclusion rate for abating methane (CH4) production. An in vitro ruminal fermentation technique was done using a commercial concentrate to rice straw ratio of 8:2 as substrate. The following treatments were applied wherein lysozyme was added into 1 mg dry matter substrate at different levels of inclusion: Without lysozyme, 2,000, 4,000, and 8,000 U lysozyme. Results revealed that, lysozyme addition had a significant effect on pH after 24 h of incubation, with the highest pH (p<0.01) observed in 8,000 U lysozyme, followed by the 4,000 U, 2,000 U, and without lysozyme. The highest amounts of acetic acid, propionic acid (p<0.01) and total volatile fatty acid (TVFA) (p<0.05) were found in 8,000 U after 24 h of incubation. The CH4 concentration was the lowest in the 8,000 U and the highest in the without lysozyme addition after 24 h of incubation. There was no significant differences in general bacteria, methanogen, or protozoan DNA copy number. So far, addition of lysozyme increased the acetate, propionate, TVFA, and decreased CH4 concentration. These results suggest that lysozyme supplementation may improve in vitro rumen fermentation and reduce CH4 emission. PMID:27703130

  13. Thermodynamics of the lysozyme--salt interaction from calorimetric titrations.

    PubMed

    Boncina, Matjaz; Lah, Jurij; Rescic, Jurij; Vlachy, Vojko

    2010-04-01

    It is well-known that the addition of salts influences the properties of proteins in solution. The essential nature of this phenomenon is far from being fully understood, partly due to the absence of the relevant thermodynamic information. To help fill this gap, in this work isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) was employed to study the ion-lysozyme association in aqueous buffer solutions at pH = 4.0. ITC curves measured for NaCl, NaBr, NaI, NaNO3, NaSCN, KCl, CaCl2, and BaCl2 salts at three different temperatures were described by a model assuming two sets of independent binding sites on the lysozyme. The resulting thermodynamic parameters of binding of anions (counterions) to the first class of sites (N approximately 7) indicate that the binding constant (K approximately 102 M-1) increases in the order Cl- < Br- < I- < NO3- < SCN-. The anion-lysozyme association is entropy driven, accompanied by a small favorable enthalpy contribution and a positive change in heat capacity. It seems that the entropy and heat capacity increase is due to the water released upon binding, while the net exothermic effect originates from the anion-NH3+ pair formation. Moreover, the results reveal that the nature of the cation has little effect on the thermodynamics of the anion-lysozyme association under the given experimental conditions. Taken together, it seems that the observed thermodynamics of association is a result of a combination of both electrostatic and short-range interactions. The anion ordering reflects the strength of water mediated interactions between anions and lysozyme.

  14. Does Warming a Lysozyme Solution Cook Ones Data?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc; Burke, Michael; Judge, Russell

    2000-01-01

    Chicken egg white lysozyme has a well characterized thermally driven phase transition. Between pH 4.0 and 5.2, the transition temperature, as defined by the point where the tetragonal and orthorhombic solubility are equal, is a function of the pH, salt (precipitant) type and concentration, and most likely of the buffer concentration as well. This phase transition can be carried out with protein solution alone, prior to the initiation of the crystallization process. We have now measured the kinetics of this process and investigated its reversibility. An aliquot of a stock protein solution is held at a given temperature, and at periodic intervals used to set up batch crystallization experiments. The batch solutions were incubated at 20 C until macroscopic crystals were obtained, at which point the number of crystals in each well were counted. The transition effects increased with temperature, slowly falling off at 30 C with a half time (time to approx. 1/2 the t = 0 number of crystals) of approx. 5 hours, and an estimated half time of approx. 0.5 hours at 43 C. Further, the process was not reversible by simple cooling. After holding a lysozyme solution at 37 C (prior to addition of precipitant) for 16 hours, then cooling and holding it at 4 C, no return to the pre-warmed nucleation kinetics are observed after at least 4 weeks. Thus every thermal excursion above the phase transition point results in a further decrease in the nucleation rate of that solution, the extent being a function of the time and temperature. Orthorhombic lysozyme crystals apparently do not undergo the flow-induced growth cessation of tetragonal lysozyme crystals. We have previously shown that putting the protein in the orthorhombic form does not affect the averaged face growth kinetics, only nucleation, for tetragonal crystals. We may be able to use this differential behavior to elucidate how flow affects tile lysozyme crystal growth process.

  15. [Lysozyme activity of the salivary gland secretion of the medicinal leech H. verbana, H. medicinalis and H. orientalis].

    PubMed

    Baskova, I P; Kharitonova, O V; Zavalova, L L

    2011-01-01

    Salivary gland secretions of three species of the medicinal leech differ in the level of lysozyme peptidoglycan-lysing activity. Using the synthetic fluorogenic substrate, 4-methyl-umbelliferyl tetra N-acetyl-beta-chitotetraosid, the glycosidase activity (as one of peptidoglycan-lysing activities) of salivary gland secretion of three species of the medicinal leech was quantitatively evaluated in comparison with egg lysozyme. It is supposed, that lysozyme activity of the leech secretions is determined not only by 5 isoforms of destabilase-lysozyme, but by some other enzymes which can utilize this substrate. These may be lysozymes other than i- (invertebrate) lysozymes (such as destabilase-lysozyme, or related enzymes).

  16. Stability of actin-lysozyme complexes formed in cystic fibrosis disease.

    PubMed

    Mohammadinejad, Sarah; Ghamkhari, Behnoush; Abdolmaleki, Sarah

    2016-08-21

    Finding the conditions for destabilizing actin-lysozyme complexes is of biomedical importance in preventing infections in cystic fibrosis. In this manuscript, the effects of different charge-mutants of lysozyme and salt concentration on the stability of actin-lysozyme complexes are studied using Langevin dynamics simulation. A coarse-grained model of F-actin is used in which both its twist and bending rigidities are considered. We observe that the attraction between F-actins is stronger in the presence of wild-type lysozymes relative to the mutated lysozymes of lower charges. By calculating the potential of mean force between F-actins, we conclude that the stability of actin-lysozyme complexes is decreased by reducing the charge of lysozyme mutants. The distributions of different lysozyme charge-mutants show that wild-type (+9e) lysozymes are mostly accumulated in the center of triangles formed by three adjacent F-actins, while lysozyme mutants of charges +7e and +5e occupy the bridging regions between F-actins. Low-charge mutants of lysozyme (+3e) distribute uniformly around F-actins. A rough estimate of the electrostatic energy for these different distributions proves that the distribution in which lysozymes reside in the center of triangles leads to more stable complexes. Also our results in the presence of a salt suggest that at physiological salt concentration of airway, F-actin complexes are not formed by charge-reduced mutants of lysozyme. The findings are interesting because if we can design charge-reduced lysozyme mutants with considerable antibacterial activity, they are not sequestered inside F-actin aggregates and can play their role as antibacterial agents against airway infection. PMID:27436705

  17. Interplay of bacteria, bacteriophage, and Berea sandstone rock in relation to enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, P.L.

    1986-01-01

    Much research and development is needed to recovery oil reserves presently unattainable, and biologically enhanced oil recovery is a technology that may be used for this purpose. To address the problem of bacterial contamination in an oil field injection well region, each end of a Teflon-sleeved Berea sandstone rock was connected to a flask containing nutrient medium. By inoculation one flask with Escherichia coli B, observations of the bacterial growth in the uninoculated flask resulting from the transport and establishment of cells across the rock could be made. Differences in bacterial populations occurred depending on whether bacteriophage T4D was first adsorbed to the rock. The results of these experiments indicate that the inhibition of bacterial establishment within a rock matrix is possible via lytic interaction. Some nonlytic effects are also implied by experiments with B/4 cells, which are T4D-resistant mutants of E. coli B. A 10 to 40% retention of T4 by the rock occurred when it was loaded with 10/sup 5/ to 10/sup 6/ PFU. Also proposed is a lysogenic system for possible use in biologically enhanced oil recovery techniques. In addition to the model bacteria and phage system described above, measurements of the passage of Pseudomonas putida. 12633 and a phage-resistant mutant through Berea sandstone rock were also made. When bacteriophage gh-1 was adsorbed within the rock matrix, a reduction in the passage of the susceptible but no the resistant cells through the rock was observed. The use of P. putida and gh-1 represents a more realistic group of experiments since these pseudomonas are ubiquitous soil bacteria commonly found in oil rock regions. Preliminary work on the degradation of certain nitrogen compounds in the context of biologically enhanced oil recovery is also described in this dissertation.

  18. Bacteriophage-Based Pathogen Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripp, Steven

    Considered the most abundant organism on Earth, at a population approaching 1031, bacteriophage, or phage for short, mediate interactions with myriad bacterial hosts that has for decades been exploited in phage typing schemes for signature identification of clinical, food-borne, and water-borne pathogens. With over 5,000 phage being morphologically characterized and grouped as to susceptible host, there exists an enormous cache of bacterial-specific sensors that has more recently been incorporated into novel bio-recognition assays with heightened sensitivity, specificity, and speed. These assays take many forms, ranging from straightforward visualization of labeled phage as they attach to their specific bacterial hosts to reporter phage that genetically deposit trackable signals within their bacterial hosts to the detection of progeny phage or other uniquely identifiable elements released from infected host cells. A comprehensive review of these and other phage-based detection assays, as directed towards the detection and monitoring of bacterial pathogens, will be provided in this chapter.

  19. Bacteriophage lysis: mechanism and regulation.

    PubMed

    Young, R

    1992-09-01

    Bacteriophage lysis involves at least two fundamentally different strategies. Most phages elaborate at least two proteins, one of which is a murein hydrolase, or lysin, and the other is a membrane protein, which is given the designation holin in this review. The function of the holin is to create a lesion in the cytoplasmic membrane through which the murein hydrolase passes to gain access to the murein layer. This is necessary because phage-encoded lysins never have secretory signal sequences and are thus incapable of unassisted escape from the cytoplasm. The holins, whose prototype is the lambda S protein, share a common organization in terms of the arrangement of charged and hydrophobic residues, and they may all contain at least two transmembrane helical domains. The available evidence suggests that holins oligomerize to form nonspecific holes and that this hole-forming step is the regulated step in phage lysis. The correct scheduling of the lysis event is as much an essential feature of holin function as is the hole formation itself. In the second strategy of lysis, used by the small single-stranded DNA phage phi X174 and the single-stranded RNA phage MS2, no murein hydrolase activity is synthesized. Instead, there is a single species of small membrane protein, unlike the holins in primary structure, which somehow causes disruption of the envelope. These lysis proteins function by activation of cellular autolysins. A host locus is required for the lytic function of the phi X174 lysis gene E.

  20. Photodynamic Inactivation of Mammalian Viruses and Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Liliana; Faustino, Maria Amparo F.; Neves, Maria Graça P. M. S.; Cunha, Ângela; Almeida, Adelaide

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of photosensitizers. The inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages by photosensitization has been applied with success since the first decades of the last century. Due to the fact that mammalian viruses are known to pose a threat to public health and that bacteriophages are frequently used as models of mammalian viruses, it is important to know and understand the mechanisms and photodynamic procedures involved in their photoinactivation. The aim of this review is to (i) summarize the main approaches developed until now for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophages and mammalian viruses and, (ii) discuss and compare the present state of the art of mammalian viruses PDI with phage photoinactivation, with special focus on the most relevant mechanisms, molecular targets and factors affecting the viral inactivation process. PMID:22852040

  1. Photodynamic inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Costa, Liliana; Faustino, Maria Amparo F; Neves, Maria Graça P M S; Cunha, Angela; Almeida, Adelaide

    2012-07-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of photosensitizers. The inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages by photosensitization has been applied with success since the first decades of the last century. Due to the fact that mammalian viruses are known to pose a threat to public health and that bacteriophages are frequently used as models of mammalian viruses, it is important to know and understand the mechanisms and photodynamic procedures involved in their photoinactivation. The aim of this review is to (i) summarize the main approaches developed until now for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophages and mammalian viruses and, (ii) discuss and compare the present state of the art of mammalian viruses PDI with phage photoinactivation, with special focus on the most relevant mechanisms, molecular targets and factors affecting the viral inactivation process.

  2. L-T4 bioequivalence and hormone replacement studies via feedback control simulations.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Marisa; Samuels, Mary; DiStefano, Joseph J

    2006-12-01

    FDA Guidance for testing bioequivalence of levothyroxine (L-T(4)) preparations has been challenged by several groups, based on multiple issues. The efficacy of single versus combined hormone therapy also is receiving additional scrutiny. To examine these concerns, we developed a new nonlinear feedback system simulation model of whole-body regulation mechanisms involving dynamics of T(3), T(4), TSH, plasma protein binding, extravascular regulatory enzyme systems, and the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, all quantified from human data. To address bioequivalence, we explored how to best account for varying and unmeasured endogenous T(4) following dosing with exogenous oral L-T(4) in euthyroid volunteers in required pharmacokinetic (PK) studies, by simulating various dosing scenarios and developing a new and simple correction method. We computed and assessed dosing error effects and baseline corrections using simulator-predicted endogenous T(4) level variations, due to actual closed-loop effects, and compared these with approximate corrections computed directly from PK data. Predicted dose-responses were quite linear, and for constant baseline, 7-day half-life, and our new formula-correction methods, we established some bounds on bioequivalent dosages. Simulated replacement after thyroidectomy required 141 microg L-T(4) only to normalize T(3) tissue levels and 162 microg L-T(4) to normalize plasma T(3) levels. A combined dose of approximately 103 microg L-T(4) plus approximately 6 microg T(3) ( approximately 18:1 ratio) was needed to normalize both plasma T(3) and T(4) and average tissue T(3) levels. However, simulated average tissue T(3) levels were normalized with standard L-T(4)-only therapy, and plasma T(3) levels were still within the normal range. We suggest a simple and more accurate correction for endogenous T(4) in PK studies. Current standard L-T(4)-only treatment is supported for routine replacement needs. PMID:17199439

  3. Structure and expression of the human and mouse T4 genes.

    PubMed Central

    Maddon, P J; Molineaux, S M; Maddon, D E; Zimmerman, K A; Godfrey, M; Alt, F W; Chess, L; Axel, R

    1987-01-01

    The T4 molecule may serve as a T-cell receptor recognizing molecules on the surface of specific target cells and also serves as the receptor for the human immunodeficiency virus. To define the mechanisms of interaction of T4 with the surface of antigen-presenting cells as well as with human immunodeficiency virus, we have further analyzed the sequence, structure, and expression of the human and mouse T4 genes. T4 consists of an extracellular segment comprised of a leader sequence followed by four tandem variable-joining (VJ)-like domains, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic segment. The structural domains of the T4 protein deduced from amino acid sequence are precisely reflected in the intron-exon organization of the gene. Analysis of the expression of the T4 gene indicates that T4 RNA is expressed not only in T lymphocytes, but in B cells, macrophages, and granulocytes. T4 is also expressed in a developmentally regulated manner in specific regions of the brain. It is, therefore, possible that T4 plays a more general role in mediating cell recognition events that are not restricted to the cellular immune response. Images PMID:3501122

  4. Generation of recombinant destabilase-lysozyme from medicinal leeches in three different expression systems.

    PubMed

    Manuvera, Valentin A; Kurdyumov, Alexey S; Filonova, Kseniya A; Lazarev, Vassili N

    2015-12-01

    Destabilase-lysozyme (mlDL) is an enzyme secreted by the salivary gland cells of medicinal leeches. Destabilase-lysozyme possesses lysozyme and isopeptidase activities. We generated recombinant destabilase-lysozyme isoform 2 in three expression systems, i.e., in the bacteria Escherichia coli, in the yeast Pichia pastoris, and in the human cell line Expi293F. In E. coli, we generated both polypeptide in inclusion bodies that was later undergone to the refolding and soluble protein that had been fused with the chaperone SlyD. The chaperone was later cleaved by a specific TEV-protease. In cultures of the yeast P. pastoris and the human cell line Expi293F, the soluble form of destabilase-lysozyme was accumulated in the culture media. For the generated enzymes, we determined the lysozyme, isopeptidase and fibrinolytic activities and tested their general antimicrobial effects. The comparisons of the enzymes generated in the different expression systems revealed that all of the destabilase-lysozymes obtained in the soluble forms possessed equal levels of lysozyme, isopeptidase and fibrinolytic activities that exceeded several to ten times the levels of the same activities of the destabilase-lysozyme renaturated from the inclusion bodies. A similar pattern of the differences in the levels of the general antimicrobial effects was observed for the destabilase-lysozymes generated in the soluble form and as inclusion bodies.

  5. Bacteriophages as Potential Treatment for Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Sybesma, Wilbert; Zbinden, Reinhard; Chanishvili, Nino; Kutateladze, Mzia; Chkhotua, Archil; Ujmajuridze, Aleksandre; Mehnert, Ulrich; Kessler, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most prevalent microbial diseases and their financial burden on society is substantial. The continuing increase of antibiotic resistance worldwide is alarming so that well-tolerated, highly effective therapeutic alternatives are urgently needed. Objective: To investigate the effect of bacteriophages on Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae strains isolated from the urine of patients suffering from UTIs. Material and methods: Forty-one E. coli and 9 K. pneumoniae strains, isolated from the urine of patients suffering from UTIs, were tested in vitro for their susceptibility toward bacteriophages. The bacteriophages originated from either commercially available bacteriophage cocktails registered in Georgia or from the bacteriophage collection of the George Eliava Institute of Bacteriophage, Microbiology and Virology. In vitro screening of bacterial strains was performed by use of the spot-test method. The experiments were implemented three times by different groups of scientists. Results: The lytic activity of the commercial bacteriophage cocktails on the 41 E. coli strains varied between 66% (Pyo bacteriophage) and 93% (Enko bacteriophage). After bacteriophage adaptation of the Pyo bacteriophage cocktail, its lytic activity was increased from 66 to 93% and only one E. coli strain remained resistant. One bacteriophage of the Eliava collection could lyse all 9 K. pneumoniae strains. Conclusions: Based on the high lytic activity and the potential of resistance optimization by direct adaption of bacteriophages as reported in this study, and in view of the continuing increase of antibiotic resistance worldwide, bacteriophage therapy is a promising treatment option for UTIs highly warranting randomized controlled trials. PMID:27148173

  6. Genetic evolution of bacteriophage. I. Hybrids between unrelated bacteriophages P22 and Fels 2.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, N

    1969-01-01

    A new bacteriophage species, designated F22, was isolated from phage P22 stocks grown on Salmonella typhimurium Q1 lysogenic for Fels 2 at a frequency of less than 10(-11). P22 has a very short tail with a hexagonal base plate and six spikes. Phage Fels 2 is morphologically similar to E. coli T-even phages, having a long tail with a contractile sheath and carrying no genetic region related to P22. Phage F22 is morphologically and serologically indistinguishable from Fels 2, but carries the c(c(1), c(2), and c(3)) markers of P22. The color markers h(21), g, and m(3) of P22 do not appear in F22. Thus, F22 is evidently a recombinant between the unrelated bacteriophages P22 and Fels 2. The recombination between unrelated bacteriophages could play an important role in the evolution of bacteriophages.

  7. Thyroxine softgel capsule in patients with gastric-related T4 malabsorption.

    PubMed

    Santaguida, Maria Giulia; Virili, Camilla; Del Duca, Susanna Carlotta; Cellini, Miriam; Gatto, Ilenia; Brusca, Nunzia; De Vito, Corrado; Gargano, Lucilla; Centanni, Marco

    2015-05-01

    The key role of an intact gastric acid secretion for subsequent intestinal T4 absorption is supported by an increased requirement of thyroxine in patients with gastric disorders. A better pH-related dissolution profile has been described in vitro for softgel T4 preparation than for T4 tablets. Our study was aimed at comparing softgel and tablet T4 requirements in patients with gastric disorders. A total of 37 patients with gastric-related T4 malabsorption were enrolled, but only 31 (28F/3M; median age = 50 years; median T4 dose = 2.04 μg/kg/day) completed the study. All patients were in long-lasting treatment (>2 years) with the same dose of T4 tablets when treatment was switched to a lower dose of softgel T4 capsules (-17 %; p = 0.0002). Assessment of serum FT4 and TSH was carried out at baseline and after 3, 6, 12, and 18 months after the treatment switch. In more than 2/3 of patients (good-responders n = 21), despite the reduced dose of T4, median TSH values were similar at each time point (p = 0.3934) with no change in FT4 levels. In the remaining patients (poor-responders n = 10), TSH levels were significantly higher at each time point than at baseline (p < 0.0001). To note, in five of them intestinal comorbidity was subsequently detected. Comorbidity associated with poor-responders status was the only significant predictor in multivariate analysis (OR = 11.333). Doses of softgel T4 capsules lower than T4 tablet preparation are required to maintain the therapeutic goal in 2/3 of patients with impaired gastric acid secretion.

  8. Tetragonal Chicken Egg White Lysozyme Solubility in Sodium Chloride Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Judge, Russell A.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    The solubility of chicken egg white lysozyme, crystallized in the tetragonal form was measured in sodium chloride solutions from 1.6 to 30.7 C, using a miniature column solubility apparatus. Sodium chloride solution concentrations ranged from 1 to 7% (w/v). The solutions were buffered with 0.1 M sodium acetate buffer with the solubility being measured at pH values in 0.2 pH unit increments in the range pH 4.0 to 5.4, with data also included at pH 4.5. Lysozyme solubility was found to increase with increases in temperature and decreasing salt concentration. Solution pH has a varied and unpredictable effect on solubility.

  9. Elastic Properties of Lysozyme Confined in Nanoporous Polymer Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haoyu; Akcora, Pinar

    Retaining the conformational structure and bioactivity of immobilized proteins is important for biosensor designs and drug delivery systems. It is known that confined media provide a protective environment to the encapsulated proteins and prevent diffusion of the denaturant. In this study, different types of proteins (streptavidin, lysozyme and fibrinogen) were chemically attached into the nanopores of poly(methyl methacrylate) thin films. Heterogeneous flat surfaces with varying cylinder pore sizes (10-50 nm) were used to confine proteins of different sizes and shapes. Stiffness of protein functionalized nanopores was measured in nanoindentation experiments. Our results showed that streptavidin behaved more stiffly when pore dimension changed from micron to nanosize. Further, it was found that lysozyme confined within nanopores showed higher specific bioactivity than proteins on flat surfaces. These results on surface elasticity and protein activity may help in understanding protein interactions with surfaces of different topologies and chemistry.

  10. Locations of Halide Ions in Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Kap; Adimurthy, Ganapathi; Nadarajah, Arunan; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    Anions play an important role in the crystallization of lysozyme, and are known to bind to the crystalline protein. Previous studies employing X-ray crystallography had found one chloride ion binding site in the tetragonal crystal form of the protein and four nitrate ion binding sites in the monoclinic form. Studies using other approaches have reported more chloride ion binding sites, but their locations were not known. Knowing the precise location of these anions is also useful in determining the correct electrostatic fields surrounding the protein. In the first part of this study the anion positions in the tetragonal form were determined from the difference Fourier map obtained from the lysozyme crystals grown in bromide and chloride solutions under identical conditions. The anion locations were then obtained from standard crystallographic methods and five possible anion binding sites were found in this manner. The sole chloride ion binding site found in previous studies was confirmed. The remaining four sites were new ones for tetragonal lysozyme crystals. However, three of these new sites and the previously found one corresponded to the four unique binding sites found for nitrate ions in monoclinic crystals. This suggests that most of the anion binding sites in lysozyme remain unchanged, even when different anions and different crystal forms of lysozyme are employed. It is unlikely that there are many more anions in the tetragonal lysozyme crystal structure. Assuming osmotic equilibrium it can be shown that there are at most three more anions in the crystal channels. Some of the new anion binding sites found in this study were, as expected, in pockets containing basic residues. However, some of them were near neutral, but polar, residues. Thus, the study also showed the importance of uncharged, but polar groups, on the protein surface in determining its electrostatic field. This was important for the second part of this study where the electrostatic field

  11. Protein crystal growth - Growth kinetics for tetragonal lysozyme crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, M. L.; Snyder, R. S.; Naumann, R.

    1986-01-01

    Results are reported from theoretical and experimental studies of the growth rate of lysozyme as a function of diffusion in earth-gravity conditions. The investigations were carried out to form a comparison database for future studies of protein crystal growth in the microgravity environment of space. A diffusion-convection model is presented for predicting crystal growth rates in the presence of solutal concentration gradients. Techniques used to grow and monitor the growth of hen egg white lysozyme are detailed. The model calculations and experiment data are employed to discuss the effects of transport and interfacial kinetics in the growth of the crystals, which gradually diminished the free energy in the growth solution. Density gradient-driven convection, caused by presence of the gravity field, was a limiting factor in the growth rate.

  12. Mouse lysozyme M gene: isolation, characterization, and expression studies.

    PubMed Central

    Cross, M; Mangelsdorf, I; Wedel, A; Renkawitz, R

    1988-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized both cDNA and genomic DNA of the mouse lysozyme M gene. Derivation of the amino acid sequence from the nucleotide sequences revealed six positions in the carboxyl terminus that differ from partial sequences previously published. The differential detection of specific mRNAs from the closely related lysozyme M and P genes has revealed different but overlapping tissue specificities of expression. The M gene is expressed weakly in myeloblasts, moderately in immature macrophages, and strongly in both mature macrophages and macrophage-rich tissues, while high levels of P transcripts are present only in small intestine. Sites of protein accumulation, rather than gene expression, have been identified by comparative quantitation of mRNA and enzyme levels. Images PMID:3413093

  13. Strong and specific effects of cations on lysozyme chloride solubility.

    PubMed

    Bénas, Philippe; Legrand, Laurent; Riès-Kautt, Madeleine

    2002-10-01

    The influence of salt nature and concentration on tetragonal lysozyme chloride crystal solubility is presented for a set of mono-, di- and trivalent cations (Cs(+), Rb(+), Mn(2+), Co(2+) and Yb(3+)). The results show that cations have as strong an effect on protein solubility as anions and that they present their own particular effects as co-ions. Indeed, after decreasing at low ionic strength, lysozyme solubility increases with high concentration of polyvalent cations, probably due to co-ion binding and therefore the concomitant increase of the net charge of the protein-salt complex. These new results are discussed in order to progress in the understanding of the crystallisation process at the atomic level. PMID:12351866

  14. Bacteriophage protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Häuser, Roman; Blasche, Sonja; Dokland, Terje; Haggård-Ljungquist, Elisabeth; von Brunn, Albrecht; Salas, Margarita; Casjens, Sherwood; Molineux, Ian; Uetz, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriophages T7, λ, P22, and P2/P4 (from Escherichia coli), as well as ϕ29 (from Bacillus subtilis), are among the best-studied bacterial viruses. This chapter summarizes published protein interaction data of intraviral protein interactions, as well as known phage-host protein interactions of these phages retrieved from the literature. We also review the published results of comprehensive protein interaction analyses of Pneumococcus phages Dp-1 and Cp-1, as well as coliphages λ and T7. For example, the ≈55 proteins encoded by the T7 genome are connected by ≈43 interactions with another ≈15 between the phage and its host. The chapter compiles published interactions for the well-studied phages λ (33 intra-phage/22 phage-host), P22 (38/9), P2/P4 (14/3), and ϕ29 (20/2). We discuss whether different interaction patterns reflect different phage lifestyles or whether they may be artifacts of sampling. Phages that infect the same host can interact with different host target proteins, as exemplified by E. coli phage λ and T7. Despite decades of intensive investigation, only a fraction of these phage interactomes are known. Technical limitations and a lack of depth in many studies explain the gaps in our knowledge. Strategies to complete current interactome maps are described. Although limited space precludes detailed overviews of phage molecular biology, this compilation will allow future studies to put interaction data into the context of phage biology. PMID:22748812

  15. Bacteriophage lysis: mechanism and regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Young, R

    1992-01-01

    Bacteriophage lysis involves at least two fundamentally different strategies. Most phages elaborate at least two proteins, one of which is a murein hydrolase, or lysin, and the other is a membrane protein, which is given the designation holin in this review. The function of the holin is to create a lesion in the cytoplasmic membrane through which the murein hydrolase passes to gain access to the murein layer. This is necessary because phage-encoded lysins never have secretory signal sequences and are thus incapable of unassisted escape from the cytoplasm. The holins, whose prototype is the lambda S protein, share a common organization in terms of the arrangement of charged and hydrophobic residues, and they may all contain at least two transmembrane helical domains. The available evidence suggests that holins oligomerize to form nonspecific holes and that this hole-forming step is the regulated step in phage lysis. The correct scheduling of the lysis event is as much an essential feature of holin function as is the hole formation itself. In the second strategy of lysis, used by the small single-stranded DNA phage phi X174 and the single-stranded RNA phage MS2, no murein hydrolase activity is synthesized. Instead, there is a single species of small membrane protein, unlike the holins in primary structure, which somehow causes disruption of the envelope. These lysis proteins function by activation of cellular autolysins. A host locus is required for the lytic function of the phi X174 lysis gene E. Images PMID:1406491

  16. Bacteriophage Protein–Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Häuser, Roman; Blasche, Sonja; Dokland, Terje; Haggård-Ljungquist, Elisabeth; von Brunn, Albrecht; Salas, Margarita; Casjens, Sherwood; Molineux, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriophages T7, λ, P22, and P2/P4 (from Escherichia coli), as well as ϕ29 (from Bacillus subtilis), are among the best-studied bacterial viruses. This chapter summarizes published protein interaction data of intraviral protein interactions, as well as known phage–host protein interactions of these phages retrieved from the literature. We also review the published results of comprehensive protein interaction analyses of Pneumococcus phages Dp-1 and Cp-1, as well as coliphages λ and T7. For example, the ≈55 proteins encoded by the T7 genome are connected by ≈43 interactions with another ≈15 between the phage and its host. The chapter compiles published interactions for the well-studied phages λ (33 intra-phage/22 phage-host), P22 (38/9), P2/P4 (14/3), and ϕ29 (20/2). We discuss whether different interaction patterns reflect different phage lifestyles or whether they may be artifacts of sampling. Phages that infect the same host can interact with different host target proteins, as exemplified by E. coli phage λ and T7. Despite decades of intensive investigation, only a fraction of these phage interactomes are known. Technical limitations and a lack of depth in many studies explain the gaps in our knowledge. Strategies to complete current interactome maps are described. Although limited space precludes detailed overviews of phage molecular biology, this compilation will allow future studies to put interaction data into the context of phage biology. PMID:22748812

  17. Enhanced Antibacterial Activity of Acinetobacter baumannii Bacteriophage ØABP-01 Endolysin (LysABP-01) in Combination with Colistin

    PubMed Central

    Thummeepak, Rapee; Kitti, Thawatchai; Kunthalert, Duangkamol; Sitthisak, Sutthirat

    2016-01-01

    Endolysins are lytic enzymes produced by bacteriophages with their ability to degrade the cell wall of bacterial hosts. Endolysin (LysABP-01) from Acinetobacter baumannii bacteriophage ØABP-01 was cloned, overexpressed and characterized. Endolysin LysABP-01 has a globular structure consisting of lysozyme-like (N-acetyl-β-D-muramidase) catalytic domain. It contains 185 amino acids which correspond to a 21.1 kDa protein. The lytic activity of the recombinant endolysin protein was determined by a plate lysis assay for its ability to lyse the autoclaved cell (crude cell wall) of the different bacterial species. LysABP-01 can degrade the crude cell wall of A. baumannii strains, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa but not of Staphylococcus aureus. The antibacterial activity of LysABP-01 and its synergism with various antibiotics were tested. The results exhibited elevated antibacterial activity in a combination of the sub-MIC LysABP-01 and colistin. The checkerboard assay for measuring antibiotic synergy of LysABP-01 and colistin was performed. This combination was synergistic against various drug-resistant strains of A. baumannii (FIC index < 0.5). In summary, our study highlights the ability of LysABP-01 endolysin to hydrolyze the A. baumannii cell wall and its synergistic interaction with colistin. PMID:27656173

  18. Enhanced Antibacterial Activity of Acinetobacter baumannii Bacteriophage ØABP-01 Endolysin (LysABP-01) in Combination with Colistin

    PubMed Central

    Thummeepak, Rapee; Kitti, Thawatchai; Kunthalert, Duangkamol; Sitthisak, Sutthirat

    2016-01-01

    Endolysins are lytic enzymes produced by bacteriophages with their ability to degrade the cell wall of bacterial hosts. Endolysin (LysABP-01) from Acinetobacter baumannii bacteriophage ØABP-01 was cloned, overexpressed and characterized. Endolysin LysABP-01 has a globular structure consisting of lysozyme-like (N-acetyl-β-D-muramidase) catalytic domain. It contains 185 amino acids which correspond to a 21.1 kDa protein. The lytic activity of the recombinant endolysin protein was determined by a plate lysis assay for its ability to lyse the autoclaved cell (crude cell wall) of the different bacterial species. LysABP-01 can degrade the crude cell wall of A. baumannii strains, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa but not of Staphylococcus aureus. The antibacterial activity of LysABP-01 and its synergism with various antibiotics were tested. The results exhibited elevated antibacterial activity in a combination of the sub-MIC LysABP-01 and colistin. The checkerboard assay for measuring antibiotic synergy of LysABP-01 and colistin was performed. This combination was synergistic against various drug-resistant strains of A. baumannii (FIC index < 0.5). In summary, our study highlights the ability of LysABP-01 endolysin to hydrolyze the A. baumannii cell wall and its synergistic interaction with colistin.

  19. Enhanced Antibacterial Activity of Acinetobacter baumannii Bacteriophage ØABP-01 Endolysin (LysABP-01) in Combination with Colistin.

    PubMed

    Thummeepak, Rapee; Kitti, Thawatchai; Kunthalert, Duangkamol; Sitthisak, Sutthirat

    2016-01-01

    Endolysins are lytic enzymes produced by bacteriophages with their ability to degrade the cell wall of bacterial hosts. Endolysin (LysABP-01) from Acinetobacter baumannii bacteriophage ØABP-01 was cloned, overexpressed and characterized. Endolysin LysABP-01 has a globular structure consisting of lysozyme-like (N-acetyl-β-D-muramidase) catalytic domain. It contains 185 amino acids which correspond to a 21.1 kDa protein. The lytic activity of the recombinant endolysin protein was determined by a plate lysis assay for its ability to lyse the autoclaved cell (crude cell wall) of the different bacterial species. LysABP-01 can degrade the crude cell wall of A. baumannii strains, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa but not of Staphylococcus aureus. The antibacterial activity of LysABP-01 and its synergism with various antibiotics were tested. The results exhibited elevated antibacterial activity in a combination of the sub-MIC LysABP-01 and colistin. The checkerboard assay for measuring antibiotic synergy of LysABP-01 and colistin was performed. This combination was synergistic against various drug-resistant strains of A. baumannii (FIC index < 0.5). In summary, our study highlights the ability of LysABP-01 endolysin to hydrolyze the A. baumannii cell wall and its synergistic interaction with colistin. PMID:27656173

  20. On the adsorption of magnetite nanoparticles on lysozyme amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Majorosova, Jozefina; Petrenko, Viktor I; Siposova, Katarina; Timko, Milan; Tomasovicova, Natalia; Garamus, Vasil M; Koralewski, Marceli; Avdeev, Mikhail V; Leszczynski, Błażej; Jurga, Stefan; Gazova, Zuzana; Hayryan, Shura; Hu, Chin-Kun; Kopcansky, Peter

    2016-10-01

    An adsorption of magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) from electrostatically stabilized aqueous ferrofluids on amyloid fibrils of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) in 2mg/mL acidic dispersions have been detected for the MNP concentration range of 0.01-0.1vol.%. The association of the MNP with amyloid fibrils has been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and magneto-optical measurements. It has been observed that the extent of adsorption is determined by the MNP concentration. When increasing the MNP concentration the formed aggregates of magnetic particles repeat the general rod-like structure of the fibrils. The effect is not observed when MNP are mixed with the solution of lysozyme monomers. The adsorption has been investigated with the aim to clarify previously found disaggregation activity of MNP in amyloid fibrils dispersions and to get deeper insight into interaction processes between amyloids and MNP. The observed effect is also discussed with respect to potential applications for ordering lysozyme amyloid fibrils in a liquid crystal phase under external magnetic fields. PMID:27451367

  1. Electrostatic fields in the active sites of lysozymes.

    PubMed

    Sun, D P; Liao, D I; Remington, S J

    1989-07-01

    Considerable experimental evidence is in support of several aspects of the mechanism that has been proposed for the catalytic activity of lysozyme. However, the enzymatically catalyzed hydrolysis of polysaccharides proceeds over 5 orders of magnitude faster than that of model compounds that mimic the configuration of the substrate in the active site of the enzyme. Although several possible explanations for this rate enhancement have been discussed elsewhere, a definitive mechanism has not emerged. Here we report striking results obtained by classical electrodynamics, which suggest that bond breakage and the consequent separation of charge in lysozyme is promoted by a large electrostatic field across the active site cleft, produced in part by a very asymmetric distribution of charged residues on the enzyme surface. Lysozymes unrelated in amino acid sequence have similar distributions of charged residues and electric fields. The results reported here suggest that the electrostatic component of the rate enhancement is greater than 9 kcal.mol-1. Thus, electrostatic interactions may play a more important role in the enzymatic mechanism than has generally been appreciated.

  2. Impact of lysozyme on stability mechanism of nanozirconia aqueous suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szewczuk-Karpisz, Katarzyna; Wiśniewska, Małgorzata

    2016-08-01

    The effect of lysozyme (LSZ) presence on the zirconium(IV) oxide (ZrO2) aqueous suspension stability was examined. The applied zirconia contains mesopores (with a diameter about 30 nm) and its mean particle size is about 100 nm. To determine the stability mechanism of ZrO2 suspension in the biopolymer presence, the adsorption and electrokinetic (surface charge density and zeta potential) measurements were performed in the pH range 3-10. The lysozyme adsorption on the nanozirconia surface proceeds mainly through electrostatic forces. Under solid-polymer repulsion conditions, there is no adsorption of lysozyme (pH < 6, CNaCl 0.01 mol/dm3). The increase of solution ionic strength to 0.2 mol/dm3 causes screening of unfavourable forces and biopolymer adsorption becomes possible. The LSZ addition to the ZrO2 suspension influences its stability. At pH 3, 4.6 and 7.6, slight improvement of the system stability was obtained. In turn, at pH 9 considerable destabilization of nanozirconia particles covered by polymeric layers occurs.

  3. Relationship Between Equilibrium Forms of Lysozyme Crystals and Precipitant Anions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadarajah, Arunan

    1996-01-01

    Molecular forces, such as electrostatic, hydrophobic, van der Waals and steric forces, are known to be important in determining protein interactions. These forces are affected by the solution conditions and changing the pH, temperature or the ionic strength of the solution can sharply affect protein interactions. Several investigations of protein crystallization have shown that this process is also strongly dependent on solution conditions. As the ionic strength of the solution is increased, the initially soluble protein may either crystallize or form an amorphous precipitate at high ionic strengths. Studies done on the model protein hen egg white lysozyme have shown that different crystal forms can be easily and reproducibly obtained, depending primarily on the anion used to desolubilize the protein. In this study we employ pyranine to probe the effect of various anions on the water structure. Additionally, lysozyme crystallization was carried out at these conditions and the crystal form was determined by X-ray crystallography. The goal of the study was to understand the physico-chemical basis for the effect of changing the anion concentration on the equilibrium form of lysozyme crystals. It will also verify the hypothesis that the anions, by altering the bulk water structure in the crystallizing solutions, alter the surface energy of the between the crystal faces and the solution and, consequently, the equilibrium form of the crystals.

  4. Shear-Induced Unfolding of Lysozyme Monitored In Situ

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, Lorna; Dusting, Jonathan; Imomoh, Eboshogwe; Balabani, Stavroula; Blanch, Ewan W.

    2009-01-01

    Conformational changes due to externally applied physiochemical parameters, including pH, temperature, solvent composition, and mechanical forces, have been extensively reported for numerous proteins. However, investigations on the effect of fluid shear flow on protein conformation remain inconclusive despite its importance not only in the research of protein dynamics but also for biotechnology applications where processes such as pumping, filtration, and mixing may expose protein solutions to changes in protein structure. By combining particle image velocimetry and Raman spectroscopy, we have successfully monitored reversible, shear-induced structural changes of lysozyme in well-characterized flows. Shearing of lysozyme in water altered the protein's backbone structure, whereas similar shear rates in glycerol solution affected the solvent exposure of side-chain residues located toward the exterior of the lysozyme α-domain. The results demonstrate the importance of measuring conformational changes in situ and of quantifying fluid stresses by the three-dimensional shear tensor to establish reversible unfolding or misfolding transitions occurring due to flow exposure. PMID:19450493

  5. Comparative insight into surfactants mediated amyloidogenesis of lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Sumit K; Khan, Javed M; Siddiqi, Mohammad K; Alam, Parvez; Khan, Rizwan H

    2016-02-01

    Electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions have an important role in the protein aggregation. In this study, we have investigated the effect of charge and hydrophobicity of oppositely charged surfactants i.e., anionic (AOT and SDS) and cationic (CTAB and DTAB) on hen egg white lysozyme at pH 9.0 and 13.0, respectively. We have employed various methods such as turbidity measurements, Rayleigh light scattering, ThT, Congo red and ANS dye binding assays, far-UV CD, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron and fluorescence microscopy. At lower molar ratio, both anionic and cationic surfactants promote amyloid fibril formation in lysozyme at pH 9.0 and 13.0, respectively. The aggregation was proportionally increased with respect to protein concentration and hydrophobicity of surfactant. The morphology of aggregates at both the pH was fibrillar in structure, as visualized by dye binding and microscopic imaging techniques. Initially, the interaction between surfactants and lysozyme was electrostatic and then hydrophobic as investigated by ITC. This study demonstrates the crucial role of charge and hydrophobicity during amyloid fibril formation.

  6. 40 CFR 721.1880 - Borate(1-), tris(acetato-.kappa.O)hydro-, sodium, (T-4)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...)hydro-, sodium, (T-4)-. 721.1880 Section 721.1880 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1880 Borate(1-), tris(acetato-.kappa.O)hydro-, sodium... substance identified as borate(1-), tris(acetato-.kappa.O)hydro-, sodium, (T-4)- (PMN P-00-0922; CAS...

  7. 40 CFR 721.1880 - Borate(1-), tris(acetato-.kappa.O)hydro-, sodium, (T-4)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...)hydro-, sodium, (T-4)-. 721.1880 Section 721.1880 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1880 Borate(1-), tris(acetato-.kappa.O)hydro-, sodium... substance identified as borate(1-), tris(acetato-.kappa.O)hydro-, sodium, (T-4)- (PMN P-00-0922; CAS...

  8. RNA-Seq Transcriptome Analysis of Direction-Selective T4/T5 Neurons in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Pankova, Katarina; Borst, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal computation underlying detection of visual motion has been studied for more than a half-century. In Drosophila, direction-selective T4/T5 neurons show supralinear signal amplification in response to stimuli moving in their preferred direction, in agreement with the prediction made by the Hassenstein-Reichardt detector. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanism explaining how the Hassenstein-Reichardt model is implemented in T4/T5 cells has not been identified yet. In the present study, we utilized cell type-specific transcriptome profiling with RNA-seq to obtain a complete gene expression profile of T4/T5 neurons. We analyzed the expression of genes that affect neuronal computational properties and can underlie the molecular implementation of the core features of the Hassenstein-Reichardt model to the dendrites of T4/T5 neurons. Furthermore, we used the acquired RNA-seq data to examine the neurotransmitter system used by T4/T5 neurons. Surprisingly, we observed co-expression of the cholinergic markers and the vesicular GABA transporter in T4/T5 neurons. We verified the previously undetected expression of vesicular GABA transporter in T4/T5 cells using VGAT-LexA knock-in line. The provided gene expression dataset can serve as a useful source for studying the properties of direction-selective T4/T5 neurons on the molecular level. PMID:27684367

  9. An Undergraduate Laboratory Activity Demonstrating Bacteriophage Specificity†

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Mary E.; Gyure, Ruth A.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriophage are among the most diverse and numerous microbes inhabiting our planet. Yet many laboratory activities fail to engage students in meaningful exploration of their diversity, unique characteristics, and abundance. In this curriculum activity students use a standard plaque assay to enumerate bacteriophage particles from a natural sample and use the scientific method to address questions about host specificity and diversity. A raw primary sewage sample is enriched for bacteriophage using hosts in the family Enterobacteriaceae. Students hypothesize about host specificity and use quantitative data (serial dilution and plaque assay) to test their hypotheses. Combined class data also help them answer questions about phage diversity. The exercise was field tested with a class of 47 students using pre- and posttests. For all learning outcomes posttest scores were higher than pretest scores at or below p = 0.01. Average individualized learning gain (G) was also calculated for each learning outcome. Students’ use of scientific language in reference to bacteriophage and host interaction significantly improved (p = 0.002; G = 0.50). Improved means of expression helped students construct better hypotheses on phage host specificity (G = 0.31, p = 0.01) and to explain the plaque assay method (G = 0.33, p = 0.002). At the end of the exercise students also demonstrated improved knowledge and understanding of phage specificity as related to phage therapy in humans (p < 0.001; G = 51). PMID:23858357

  10. Bacteriophages as surface and ground water tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, P.; Dörfliger, N.; Kennedy, K.; Müller, I.; Aragno, M.

    Bacteriophages are increasingly used as tracers for quantitative analysis in both hydrology and hydrogeology. The biological particles are neither toxic nor pathogenic for other living organisms as they penetrate only a specific bacterial host. They have many advantages over classical fluorescent tracers and offer the additional possibility of multi-point injection for tracer tests. Several years of research make them suitable for quantitative transport analysis and flow boundary delineation in both surface and ground waters, including karst, fractured and porous media aquifers. This article presents the effective application of bacteriophages based on their use in differing Swiss hydrological environments and compares their behaviour to conventional coloured dye or salt-type tracers. In surface water and karst aquifers, bacteriophages travel at about the same speed as the typically referenced fluorescent tracers (uranine, sulphurhodamine G extra). In aquifers of interstitial porosity, however, they appear to migrate more rapidly than fluorescent tracers, albeit with a significant reduction in their numbers within the porous media. This faster travel time implies that a modified rationale is needed for defining some ground water protection area boundaries. Further developments of other bacteriophages and their documentation as tracer methods should result in an accurate and efficient tracer tool that will be a proven alternative to conventional fluorescent dyes.

  11. ADSORPTION OF BACTERIOPHAGES ON CLAY MINERALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Theability to predict the fate of microorganisms in soil is dependent on an understanding of the process of their sorption on soil and subsurface materials. Presently, we have focused on studying the thermodynamics of sorption of bacteriophages (T-2, MS-2, and

  12. Comparative genomics of Shiga toxin encoding bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Stx bacteriophages are responsible for driving the dissemination of Stx toxin genes (stx) across their bacterial host range. Lysogens carrying Stx phages can cause severe, life-threatening disease and Stx toxin is an integral virulence factor. The Stx-bacteriophage vB_EcoP-24B, commonly referred to as Ф24B, is capable of multiply infecting a single bacterial host cell at a high frequency, with secondary infection increasing the rate at which subsequent bacteriophage infections can occur. This is biologically unusual, therefore determining the genomic content and context of Ф24B compared to other lambdoid Stx phages is important to understanding the factors controlling this phenomenon and determining whether they occur in other Stx phages. Results The genome of the Stx2 encoding phage, Ф24B was sequenced and annotated. The genomic organisation and general features are similar to other sequenced Stx bacteriophages induced from Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), however Ф24B possesses significant regions of heterogeneity, with implications for phage biology and behaviour. The Ф24B genome was compared to other sequenced Stx phages and the archetypal lambdoid phage, lambda, using the Circos genome comparison tool and a PCR-based multi-loci comparison system. Conclusions The data support the hypothesis that Stx phages are mosaic, and recombination events between the host, phages and their remnants within the same infected bacterial cell will continue to drive the evolution of Stx phage variants and the subsequent dissemination of shigatoxigenic potential. PMID:22799768

  13. AtlasT4SS: A curated database for type IV secretion systems

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The type IV secretion system (T4SS) can be classified as a large family of macromolecule transporter systems, divided into three recognized sub-families, according to the well-known functions. The major sub-family is the conjugation system, which allows transfer of genetic material, such as a nucleoprotein, via cell contact among bacteria. Also, the conjugation system can transfer genetic material from bacteria to eukaryotic cells; such is the case with the T-DNA transfer of Agrobacterium tumefaciens to host plant cells. The system of effector protein transport constitutes the second sub-family, and the third one corresponds to the DNA uptake/release system. Genome analyses have revealed numerous T4SS in Bacteria and Archaea. The purpose of this work was to organize, classify, and integrate the T4SS data into a single database, called AtlasT4SS - the first public database devoted exclusively to this prokaryotic secretion system. Description The AtlasT4SS is a manual curated database that describes a large number of proteins related to the type IV secretion system reported so far in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, as well as in Archaea. The database was created using the RDBMS MySQL and the Catalyst Framework based in the Perl programming language and using the Model-View-Controller (MVC) design pattern for Web. The current version holds a comprehensive collection of 1,617 T4SS proteins from 58 Bacteria (49 Gram-negative and 9 Gram-Positive), one Archaea and 11 plasmids. By applying the bi-directional best hit (BBH) relationship in pairwise genome comparison, it was possible to obtain a core set of 134 clusters of orthologous genes encoding T4SS proteins. Conclusions In our database we present one way of classifying orthologous groups of T4SSs in a hierarchical classification scheme with three levels. The first level comprises four classes that are based on the organization of genetic determinants, shared homologies, and evolutionary

  14. Biochemical characterization of lysozymes present in egg white of selected species of anatid birds.

    PubMed

    D'Surney, S J; deKloet, S R

    1985-01-01

    The isolation of lysozyme from the egg white of several representative species of waterfowl is described. The purified lysozymes were analyzed in order to determine the type and molecular weight of each enzyme. All enzymes found in duck egg whites were found to be of the c-type. In contrast all true geese, the Mute Swan as well as the Northern Blackneck Screamer contain lysozyme g in their egg white. PMID:4085215

  15. Biochemical characterization of lysozymes present in egg white of selected species of anatid birds.

    PubMed

    D'Surney, S J; deKloet, S R

    1985-01-01

    The isolation of lysozyme from the egg white of several representative species of waterfowl is described. The purified lysozymes were analyzed to determine the type and molecular weight of each enzyme. All enzymes found in duck egg whites were found to be of the c-type. In contrast all true geese, and the mute swan species as well as the northern blackneck screamer contain lysozyme g in their egg white. PMID:4042624

  16. STUDIES ON THE PURIFICATION OF BACTERIOPHAGE.

    PubMed

    Kalmanson, G; Bronfenbrenner, J

    1939-11-20

    A simple method of concentrating and purifying bacteriophage has been described. The procedure consisted essentially in collecting the active agent on a reinforced collodion membrane of a porosity that would just retain all the active agent and permit extraneous material to pass through. Advantage was taken of the fact that B. coli will proliferate and regenerate bacteriophage in a completely diffusible synthetic medium with ammonia as the only source of nitrogen, which permitted the purification of the bacteriophage by copious washing. The material thus obtained was concentrated by suction and after thorough washing possessed all the activity of the original filtrate. It was labile, losing its activity in a few days on standing, and was quickly and completely inactivated upon drying. This material contained approximately 15 per cent of nitrogen and with 2 or 3 mg. samples of inactive dry residue it was possible to obtain positive protein color tests. The concentrated and purified bacteriophage has about 10(-14) mg. of nitrogen, or 6 x 10(-17) gm. of protein per unit of lytic activity. Assuming that each unit of activity represents a molecule, the calculated maximum average molecular weight would be approximately 36,000,000, and on the assumption of a spherical shape of particles and a density of 1.3, the calculated radius would be about 22 millimicra. By measurement of the diffusion rate, the average radius of particle of the fraction of the purified bacteriophage which diffuses most readily through a porous plate was found to be of the order of magnitude of 9 millimicra, or of a calculated molecular weight of 2,250,000. Furthermore, when this purified bacteriophage was fractionated by forcing it through a thin collodion membrane, which permits the passage of only the smaller particles, it was possible to demonstrate in the ultrafiltrate active particles of about 2 millimicra in radius, and of a calculated molecular weight of 25,000. It was of interest to apply

  17. Genomic characteristics and environmental distributions of the uncultivated Far-T4 phages

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Simon; Enault, François; Ravet, Viviane; Pereira, Olivier; Sullivan, Matthew B.

    2015-01-01

    Viral metagenomics (viromics) is a tremendous tool to reveal viral taxonomic and functional diversity across ecosystems ranging from the human gut to the world's oceans. As with microbes however, there appear vast swaths of “dark matter” yet to be documented for viruses, even among relatively well-studied viral types. Here, we use viromics to explore the “Far-T4 phages” sequence space, a neighbor clade from the well-studied T4-like phages that was first detected through PCR study in seawater and subsequently identified in freshwater lakes through 454-sequenced viromes. To advance the description of these viruses beyond this single marker gene, we explore Far-T4 genome fragments assembled from two deeply-sequenced freshwater viromes. Single gene phylogenetic trees confirm that the Far-T4 phages are divergent from the T4-like phages, genome fragments reveal largely collinear genome organizations, and both data led to the delineation of five Far-T4 clades. Three-dimensional models of major capsid proteins are consistent with a T4-like structure, and highlight a highly conserved core flanked by variable insertions. Finally, we contextualize these now better characterized Far-T4 phages by re-analyzing 196 previously published viromes. These suggest that Far-T4 are common in freshwater and seawater as only four of 82 aquatic viromes lacked Far-T4-like sequences. Variability in representation across the five newly identified clades suggests clade-specific niche differentiation may be occurring across the different biomes, though the underlying mechanism remains unidentified. While complete genome assembly from complex communities and the lack of host linkage information still bottleneck virus discovery through viromes, these findings exemplify the power of metagenomics approaches to assess the diversity, evolutionary history, and genomic characteristics of novel uncultivated phages. PMID:25852662

  18. Smaller tumor size is associated with poor survival in T4b colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ben; Feng, Yang; Mo, Shao-Bo; Cai, San-Jun; Huang, Li-Yong

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To hypothesize that in patients with colon cancer showing heavy intestinal wall invasion without distant metastasis (T4bN0-2M0), small tumor size would correlate with more aggressive tumor behaviors and therefore poorer cancer-specific survival (CSS). METHODS: We analyzed T4bN0-2M0 colon cancer patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database. A preliminary analysis of T4bN0-2M0 colon cancer patients at the Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center is also presented. RESULTS: A total of 1734 T4bN0-2M0 colon cancer patients from the SEER database were included. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed decreasing CSS with decreasing tumor size (P < 0.001). Subgroup analysis showed a significant association between poorer CSS with smaller tumor size in T4bN0 patients (P = 0.024), and a trend of association in T4bN1 (P = 0.182) and T4bN2 patients (P = 0.191). Multivariate analysis identified tumor size as an independent prognostic factor for CSS in T4bN0-2M0 patients (P = 0.024). Preliminary analysis of Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center samples suggested the 5-year CSS was 50.0%, 72.9% and 77.1% in patients with tumors ≤ 4.0 cm, 4.0-7.0 cm and ≥ 7.0 cm. CONCLUSION: Smaller tumor size is associated with poorer CSS in the T4bN0-2M0 subset of colon cancer, particularly in the T4bN0M0 subgroup. PMID:27547015

  19. Recombinant goose-type lysozyme in channel catfish: lysozyme activity and efficacy as plasmid DNA immunostimulant against Aeromonas hydrophila infection.

    PubMed

    Pridgeon, Julia W; Klesius, Phillip H; Dominowski, Paul J; Yancey, Robert J; Kievit, Michele S

    2013-10-01

    The objectives of this study were: 1) to investigate whether recombinant channel catfish lysozyme-g (CC-Lys-g) produced in Escherichia coli expression system possesses any lysozyme activity; and 2) to evaluate whether channel catfish lysozyme-g plasmid DNA could be used as an immunostimulant to protect channel catfish against Aeromonas hydrophila infection. Recombinant CC-Lys-g produced in E. coli expression system exhibited significant (P < 0.05) lytic activity against Gram-positive Micrococcus lysodeikticus and Gram-negative A. hydrophila. When pcDNA3.2-vectored recombinant channel catfish lysozyme-g (pcDNA-Lys-g) was transfected in channel catfish gill cells G1B, the over-expression of pcDNA-Lys-g offered significant (P < 0.05) protection to G1B cells against A. hydrophila infection. When channel catfish were intraperitoneally injected with pcDNA-Lys-g along with an adjuvant QCDCR, the transcriptional level of Lys-g was significantly (P < 0.05) increased. When pcDNA-Lys-g injected fish was challenged with a highly virulent A. hydrophila strain AL-09-71, pcDNA-Lys-g offered 100% protection to channel catfish at two days post DNA injection. Macrophages of fish injected with pcDNA-Lys-g produced significantly (P < 0.05) higher amounts of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide than that of fish injected with pcDNA vector alone at two days post DNA injection. Taken together, our results suggest that pcDNA-Lys-g could be used as a novel immunostimulant to offer immediate protection to channel catfish against A. hydrophila infection.

  20. Effects of different heat treatments on lysozyme quantity and antimicrobial activity of jenny milk.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, C; Labella, C; Elshafie, H S; Camele, I; Musto, M; Paolino, R; D'Adamo, C; Freschi, P

    2016-07-01

    Thermal treatments are used to improve milk microbial safety, shelf life, and biological activity of some of its components. However, thermal treatments can reduce the nutritional quality of milk, affecting the molecular structure of milk proteins, such as lysozyme, which is a very important milk component due to its antimicrobial effect against gram-positive bacteria. Jenny milk is characterized by high lysozyme content. For this reason, in the last few years, it has been used as an antimicrobial additive in dairy products as an alternative to hen egg white lysozyme, which can cause allergic reactions. This study aimed to investigate the effect of pasteurization and condensation on the concentration and antimicrobial activity of lysozyme in jenny milk. Furthermore, lysozyme quantity and activity were tested in raw and pasteurized milk after condensation at 40 and 20% of the initial volume. Reversed-phase HPLC was performed under fluorescence detection to monitor lysozyme in milk samples. We evaluated the antimicrobial activity of the tested milk against Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus mojavensis, Clavibacter michiganensis, Clostridium tyrobutyricum, Xanthomonas campestris, and Escherichia coli. Condensation and pasteurization did not affect the concentration or antimicrobial activity of lysozyme in jenny milk, except for B. mojaventis, which showed resistance to lysozyme in milk samples subjected to heat treatments. Moreover, lysozyme in jenny milk showed antimicrobial activity similar to synthetic antibiotics versus some gram-positive strains and also versus the gram-negative strain X. campestris. PMID:27157571

  1. Protective properties of lysozyme on β-amyloid pathology: implications for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Helmfors, Linda; Boman, Andrea; Civitelli, Livia; Nath, Sangeeta; Sandin, Linnea; Janefjord, Camilla; McCann, Heather; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Halliday, Glenda; Brorsson, Ann-Christin; Kågedal, Katarina

    2015-11-01

    The hallmarks of Alzheimer disease are amyloid-β plaques and neurofibrillary tangles accompanied by signs of neuroinflammation. Lysozyme is a major player in the innate immune system and has recently been shown to prevent the aggregation of amyloid-β1-40 in vitro. In this study we found that patients with Alzheimer disease have increased lysozyme levels in the cerebrospinal fluid and lysozyme co-localized with amyloid-β in plaques. In Drosophila neuronal co-expression of lysozyme and amyloid-β1-42 reduced the formation of soluble and insoluble amyloid-β species, prolonged survival and improved the activity of amyloid-β1-42 transgenic flies. This suggests that lysozyme levels rise in Alzheimer disease as a compensatory response to amyloid-β increases and aggregation. In support of this, in vitro aggregation assays revealed that lysozyme associates with amyloid-β1-42 and alters its aggregation pathway to counteract the formation of toxic amyloid-β species. Overall, these studies establish a protective role for lysozyme against amyloid-β associated toxicities and identify increased lysozyme in patients with Alzheimer disease. Therefore, lysozyme has potential as a new biomarker as well as a therapeutic target for Alzheimer disease.

  2. Estimation of the initial equilibrium constants in the formation of tetragonal lysozyme nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented from a study of the equilibria, kinetic rates, and the aggregation pathway which leads from a lysozyme monomer crystal to a tetragonal crystal, using dialyzed and recrystallized commercial hen eggwhite lysozyme. Relative light scattering intensity measurements were used to estimate the initial equilibrium constants for undersaturated lysozyme solutions in the tetragonal regime. The K1 value was estimated to be (1-3) x 10 exp 4 L/mol. Estimates of subsequent equilibrium constants depend on the crystal aggregation model chosen or determined. Experimental data suggest that tetragonal lysozyme crystal grows by addition of aggregates preformed in the bulk solution, rather than by monomer addition.

  3. Biogeography of bacteriophages at four hydrothermal vent sites in the Antarctic based on g23 sequence diversity.

    PubMed

    Millard, Andrew D; Pearce, David; Zwirglmaier, Katrin

    2016-04-01

    In this study, which was carried out within the ChEsSO consortium project (Chemosynthetically driven ecosystems south of the Polar Front), we sampled two hydrothermal vent sites on the East Scotia Ridge, Scotia Sea, one in the Kemp Caldera, South Sandwich Arc and one in the Bransfield Strait, north-west of the Antarctic Peninsula, which exhibit strong differences in their chemical characteristics. We compared a subset of their bacteriophage population by Sanger- and 454-sequencing of g23, which codes for the major capsid protein of T4likeviruses. We found that the sites differ vastly in their bacteriophage diversity, which reflects the differences in the chemical conditions and therefore putatively the differences in microbial hosts living at these sites. Comparing phage diversity in the vent samples to other aquatic samples, the vent samples formed a distinct separate cluster, which also included the non-vent control samples that were taken several hundred meters above the vent chimneys. This indicates that the influence of the vents on the microbial population and therefore also the bacteriophage population extends much further than anticipated.

  4. Biogeography of bacteriophages at four hydrothermal vent sites in the Antarctic based on g23 sequence diversity.

    PubMed

    Millard, Andrew D; Pearce, David; Zwirglmaier, Katrin

    2016-04-01

    In this study, which was carried out within the ChEsSO consortium project (Chemosynthetically driven ecosystems south of the Polar Front), we sampled two hydrothermal vent sites on the East Scotia Ridge, Scotia Sea, one in the Kemp Caldera, South Sandwich Arc and one in the Bransfield Strait, north-west of the Antarctic Peninsula, which exhibit strong differences in their chemical characteristics. We compared a subset of their bacteriophage population by Sanger- and 454-sequencing of g23, which codes for the major capsid protein of T4likeviruses. We found that the sites differ vastly in their bacteriophage diversity, which reflects the differences in the chemical conditions and therefore putatively the differences in microbial hosts living at these sites. Comparing phage diversity in the vent samples to other aquatic samples, the vent samples formed a distinct separate cluster, which also included the non-vent control samples that were taken several hundred meters above the vent chimneys. This indicates that the influence of the vents on the microbial population and therefore also the bacteriophage population extends much further than anticipated. PMID:26903011

  5. Lysozyme-immobilized electrospun PAMA/PVA and PSSA-MA/PVA ion-exchange nanofiber for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Tonglairoum, Prasopchai; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Opanasopit, Praneet

    2014-08-27

    Abstract This research was aimed to develop the lysozyme immobilized ion-exchange nanofiber mats for wound healing. To promote the healing process, the PSSA-MA/PVA and PAMA ion-exchange nanofiber mats were fabricated to mimic the extracellular matrix structure using electrospinning process followed by thermally crosslinked. Lysozyme was immobilized on the ion-exchane nanofibers by an adsorption method. The ion-exchange nanofibers were investigated using SEM, FTIR and XRPD. Moreover, the lysozyme-immobilized ion-exchange nanofibers were further investigated for lysozyme content and activity, lysozyme release and wound healing activity. The fiber diameters of the mats were in the nanometer range. Lysozyme was gradually absorbed into the PSSA-MA/PVA nanofiber with higher extend than that is absorbed on the PAMA/PVA nanofiber and exhibited higher activity than lysozyme-immobilized PAMA/PVA nanofiber. The total contents of lysozyme on the PSSA-MA/PVA and PAMA/PVA nanofiber were 648 and 166 µg/g, respectively. FTIR and lysozyme activity results confirmed the presence of lysozyme on the nanofiber mats. The lysozyme was released from the PSSA-MA/PVA and PAMA/PVA nanofiber in the same manner. The lysozyme-immobilized PSSA-MA/PVA nanofiber mats and lysozyme-immobilized PAMA/PVA nanofiber mats exhibited significantly faster healing rate than gauze and similar to the commercial antibacterial gauze dressing. These results suggest that these nanofiber mats could provide the promising candidate for wound healing application.

  6. Isolation and characterization of a bacteriophage with broad host range, displaying potential in preventing bovine diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Anand, Taruna; Vaid, Rajesh K; Bera, Bidhan Ch; Barua, Sanjay; Riyesh, T; Virmani, N; Yadav, Neeraj; Malik, Praveen

    2015-10-01

    Phage therapy has been previously tried for treatment of diarrhoea in calves, pigs and lambs but those trials were conducted without any detailed information of used phages. Here, we report isolation of a broad-spectrum phage which showed bactericidal activity against 47.3 % of calf diarrhoeal isolates of Escherichia coli, in vitro. The isolated phage resembled the characteristics of Myoviridae family and showed ~97 % similarity with earlier reported bacteriophages of sub family-Tevenvirinae, genus-T4-like virus, based on nucleotide sequence of major head protein-gp23 gene. The phage exhibits the potential to be used as drug substitute tool against E. coli causing diarrhoea in cattle in farm environments.

  7. Genome-linked protein associated with the 5' termini of bacteriophage phi29 DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Yehle, C O

    1978-01-01

    A DNA-protein complex was isolated from Bacillus subtilis bacteriophage phi29 by sucrose gradient sedimentation or gel filtration in the presence of agents known to break noncovalent bonds. A 28,000-dalton protein was released from this complex by subsequent hydrolysis of the DNA. The DNA-protein complex was examined for its susceptibility to enzymes which act upon the 5' and 3' termini of DNA molecules. It was susceptible to exonucleolytic degradation from the 3' termini by exonuclease III but not from the 5' termini by lambda exonuclease. Attempts to label radioactively the 5' termini by phosphorylation with T4 polynucleotide kinase were unsuccessful despite prior treatment with alkaline phosphatase or phosphatase treatment of denatured DNA. Removal of the majority of the bound protein by proteolytic digestion did not increase susceptibility. These results suggest that the linked protein is covalently attached to the 5' termini of phi29 DNA. Images PMID:100608

  8. Large Terminase Conformational Change Induced by Connector Binding in Bacteriophage T7*

    PubMed Central

    Daudén, María I.; Martín-Benito, Jaime; Sánchez-Ferrero, Juan C.; Pulido-Cid, Mar; Valpuesta, José M.; Carrascosa, José L.

    2013-01-01

    During bacteriophage morphogenesis DNA is translocated into a preformed prohead by the complex formed by the portal protein, or connector, plus the terminase, which are located at an especial prohead vertex. The terminase is a powerful motor that converts ATP hydrolysis into mechanical movement of the DNA. Here, we have determined the structure of the T7 large terminase by electron microscopy. The five terminase subunits assemble in a toroid that encloses a channel wide enough to accommodate dsDNA. The structure of the complete connector-terminase complex is also reported, revealing the coupling between the terminase and the connector forming a continuous channel. The structure of the terminase assembled into the complex showed a different conformation when compared with the isolated terminase pentamer. To understand in molecular terms the terminase morphological change, we generated the terminase atomic model based on the crystallographic structure of its phage T4 counterpart. The docking of the threaded model in both terminase conformations showed that the transition between the two states can be achieved by rigid body subunit rotation in the pentameric assembly. The existence of two terminase conformations and its possible relation to the sequential DNA translocation may shed light into the molecular bases of the packaging mechanism of bacteriophage T7. PMID:23632014

  9. Functional relationship between bacteriophages G4 and phi X174.

    PubMed Central

    Borrias, W E; Hagenaar, M; Van Den Brekel, R; Kühlemeijer, C; Weisbeek, P J

    1979-01-01

    Mutants of bacteriophage G4 were isolated and characterized, and their mutations were mapped. They constitute six different genes, namely, A, B, E, F, G, and H. The functional relationship with bacteriophage phi X174 was determined by complementation experiments using amber mutants of phi X and amber mutants of G4. Bacteriophage phi X was able to use the products of G4 genes E, F, G, and H. In bacteriophage G4, however, only the phi X gene H product was functional. Images PMID:480475

  10. The amino acid sequence of Lady Amherst's pheasant (Chrysolophus amherstiae) and golden pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) egg-white lysozymes.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Kuramoto, M; Torikata, T

    1990-09-01

    The amino acids of Lady Amherst's pheasant and golden pheasant egg-white lysozymes have been sequenced. The carboxymethylated lysozymes were digested with trypsin followed by sequencing of the tryptic peptides. Lady Amherst's pheasant lysozyme proved to consist of 129 amino acid residues, and a relative molecular mass of 14,423 Da was calculated. This lysozyme had 6 amino acids substitutions when compared with hen egg-white lysozyme: Phe3 to Tyr, His15 to Leu, Gln41 to His, Asn77 to His, Gln 121 to Asn, and a newly found substitution of Ile124 to Thr. The amino acid sequence of golden pheasant lysozyme was identical to that of Lady Amherst's phesant lysozyme. The phylogenetic tree constructured by the comparison of amino acid sequences of phasianoid birds lysozymes revealed a minimum genetic distance between these pheasants and the turkey-peafowl group.

  11. The amino acid sequence of Lady Amherst's pheasant (Chrysolophus amherstiae) and golden pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) egg-white lysozymes.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Kuramoto, M; Torikata, T

    1990-09-01

    The amino acids of Lady Amherst's pheasant and golden pheasant egg-white lysozymes have been sequenced. The carboxymethylated lysozymes were digested with trypsin followed by sequencing of the tryptic peptides. Lady Amherst's pheasant lysozyme proved to consist of 129 amino acid residues, and a relative molecular mass of 14,423 Da was calculated. This lysozyme had 6 amino acids substitutions when compared with hen egg-white lysozyme: Phe3 to Tyr, His15 to Leu, Gln41 to His, Asn77 to His, Gln 121 to Asn, and a newly found substitution of Ile124 to Thr. The amino acid sequence of golden pheasant lysozyme was identical to that of Lady Amherst's phesant lysozyme. The phylogenetic tree constructured by the comparison of amino acid sequences of phasianoid birds lysozymes revealed a minimum genetic distance between these pheasants and the turkey-peafowl group. PMID:1368578

  12. Steel tanks T5 and T4 with overhead pipeline between. Redwood ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Steel tanks T5 and T4 with overhead pipeline between. Redwood tanks seen in background - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  13. Control of solvent evaporation in hen egg white lysozyme crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, L. J.; Suddath, F. L.

    1992-02-01

    An investigation of the role of solvent evaporation in tetragonal lysozyme crystallization was preformed with a device that employs N 2(g) to control the evaporation of solvent from a micro-volume crystallization hanging drop. The number of crystals was found to vary with the rate at which the final supersaturation level was achieved. It was found that the more rapid the approach to supersaturation the larger the number of crystals. Accordingly, the crystals reached a smaller terminal size. Elongation of the (110) face parallel to the four-fold axis was observed with the slower evaporation rates.

  14. Polar solvation dynamics of lysozyme from molecular dynamics studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sudipta Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy

    2012-05-01

    The solvation dynamics of a protein are believed to be sensitive to its secondary structures. We have explored such sensitivity in this article by performing room temperature molecular dynamics simulation of an aqueous solution of lysozyme. Nonuniform long-time relaxation patterns of the solvation time correlation function for different segments of the protein have been observed. It is found that relatively slower long-time solvation components of the α-helices and β-sheets of the protein are correlated with lower exposure of their polar probe residues to bulk solvent and hence stronger interactions with the dynamically restricted surface water molecules. These findings can be verified by appropriate experimental studies.

  15. Control of solvent evaporation in hen egg white lysozyme crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L. J.; Suddath, F. L.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation of the role of solvent evaporation in tetragonal lysozyme crystallization was preformed with a device that employs N2(g) to control the evaporation of solvent from a micro-volume crystallization hanging drop. The number of crystals was found to vary with the rate at which the final supersaturation level was achieved. It was found that the more rapid the approach to supersaturation the larger the number of crystals. Accordingly, the crystals reached a smaller terminal size. Elongation of the (110) face parallel to the four-fold axis was observed with the slower evaporation rates.

  16. Biosynthesis of 3-Iodothyronamine From T4 in Murine Intestinal Tissue.

    PubMed

    Hoefig, Carolin S; Wuensch, Tilo; Rijntjes, Eddy; Lehmphul, Ina; Daniel, Hannelore; Schweizer, Ulrich; Mittag, Jens; Köhrle, Josef

    2015-11-01

    The endogenous metabolite 3-iodothyronamine (3-T1AM) induces strong hypothermia and bradycardia at pharmacological doses. Although its biosynthesis from thyroid hormone precursors appears likely, the sequence and sites of reactions are still controversial: studies in T4-substituted thyroid cancer patients lacking functional thyroid tissue suggested extrathyroidal 3-T1AM production, whereas studies using labeled T4 in mice indicated intrathyroidal formation. However, because the patients received T4 orally, whereas the mice were injected ip, we hypothesized that 3-T1AM synthesis requires the intestinal passage of T4. Using the everted gut sac model in combination with mass spectrometry, we demonstrate 3-T1AM production from T4 in mouse intestine via several deiodination and decarboxylation steps. Gene expression analysis confirmed the expression of all 3 deiodinases as well as ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) in intestine. Subsequent experiments employing purified human ODC revealed that this enzyme can in fact mediate decarboxylation of 3,5-T2 and T4 to the respective thyronamines (TAMs), demonstrating that the intestine expresses the entire molecular machinery required for 3-T1AM biosynthesis. Interestingly, TAM production was strongly affected by the antithyroid treatment methimazole and perchlorate independently of thyroid status, limiting the validity of the respective mouse models in this context. Taken together, our data demonstrate intestinal 3-T1AM biosynthesis from T4 involving decarboxylation through ODC with subsequent deiodination, and explain the apparent discrepancy between 3-T1AM serum levels in patients substituted orally and mice injected ip with T4. Identifying ODC as the first enzyme capable of decarboxylating thyroid hormone, our findings open the path to further investigations of TAM metabolism on molecular and cellular levels. PMID:26348473

  17. Bacteriophages and bacteriophage-derived endolysins as potential therapeutics to combat Gram-positive spore forming bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nakonieczna, A; Cooper, C J; Gryko, R

    2015-09-01

    Since their discovery in 1915, bacteriophages have been routinely used within Eastern Europe to treat a variety of bacterial infections. Although initially ignored by the West due to the success of antibiotics, increasing levels and diversity of antibiotic resistance is driving a renaissance for bacteriophage-derived therapy, which is in part due to the highly specific nature of bacteriophages as well as their relative abundance. This review focuses on the bacteriophages and derived lysins of relevant Gram-positive spore formers within the Bacillus cereus group and Clostridium genus that could have applications within the medical, food and environmental sectors.

  18. Bacteriophage exclusion, a new defense system.

    PubMed

    Barrangou, Rodolphe; van der Oost, John

    2015-01-13

    The ability to withstand viral predation is critical for survival of most microbes. Accordingly, a plethora of phage resistance systems has been identified in bacterial genomes (Labrie et al, 2010), including restriction‐modification systems (R‐M) (Tock & Dryden, 2005), abortive infection (Abi) (Chopin et al, 2005), Argonaute‐based interference (Swarts et al, 2014), as well as clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and associated protein (Cas) adaptive immune system (CRISPR‐Cas) (Barrangou & Marraffini, 2014; Van der Oost et al, 2014). Predictably, the dark matter of bacterial genomes contains a wealth of genetic gold. A study published in this issue of The EMBO Journal by Goldfarb et al (2015) unveils bacteriophage exclusion (BREX) as a novel, widespread bacteriophage resistance system that provides innate immunity against virulent and temperate phage in bacteria.

  19. Application of bacteriophages in sensor development.

    PubMed

    Peltomaa, Riikka; López-Perolio, Irene; Benito-Peña, Elena; Barderas, Rodrigo; Moreno-Bondi, María Cruz

    2016-03-01

    Bacteriophage-based bioassays are a promising alternative to traditional antibody-based immunoassays. Bacteriophages, shortened to phages, can be easily conjugated or genetically engineered. Phages are robust, ubiquitous in nature, and harmless to humans. Notably, phages do not usually require inoculation and killing of animals; and thus, the production of phages is simple and economical. In recent years, phage-based biosensors have been developed featuring excellent robustness, sensitivity, and selectivity in combination with the ease of integration into transduction devices. This review provides a critical overview of phage-based bioassays and biosensors developed in the last few years using different interrogation methods such as colorimetric, enzymatic, fluorescence, surface plasmon resonance, quartz crystal microbalance, magnetoelastic, Raman, or electrochemical techniques.

  20. Detection of bacteria with bioluminescent reporter bacteriophage.

    PubMed

    Klumpp, Jochen; Loessner, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that exclusively infect bacteria. They are ideally suited for the development of highly specific diagnostic assay systems. Bioluminescent reporter bacteriophages are designed and constructed by integration of a luciferase gene in the virus genome. Relying on the host specificity of the phage, the system enables rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of bacterial pathogens. A bioluminescent reporter phage assay is superior to any other molecular detection method, because gene expression and light emission are dependent on an active metabolism of the bacterial cell, and only viable cells will yield a signal. In this chapter we introduce the concept of creating reporter phages, discuss their advantages and disadvantages, and illustrate the advances made in developing such systems for different Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogens. The application of bioluminescent reporter phages for the detection of foodborne pathogens is emphasized.

  1. Bacteriophage ecology in environmental biotechnology processes.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Orr H; Kushmaro, Ariel

    2011-06-01

    Heterotrophic bacteria are an integral part of any environmental biotechnology process (EBP). Therefore, factors controlling bacterial abundance, activity, and community composition are central to the understanding of such processes. Among these factors, top-down control by bacteriophage predation has so far received very limited attention. With over 10(8) particles per ml, phage appear to be the most numerous biological entities in EBP. Phage populations in EBP appear to be highly dynamic and to correlate with the population dynamics of their hosts and genomic evidence suggests bacteria evolve to avoid phage predation. Clearly, there is much to learn regarding bacteriophage in EBP before we can truly understand the microbial ecology of these globally important systems. PMID:21354780

  2. Diameter-selective dispersion of double-walled carbon nanotubes by lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Nie, Haiyu; Wang, Haifang; Cao, Aoneng; Shi, Zujin; Yang, Sheng-Tao; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Yuanfang

    2011-03-01

    We have utilized lysozyme to non-covalently functionalize and disperse double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) in aqueous solution. Lysozyme preferentially binds and disperses DWNTs with larger diameters. This is a facile and effective method to fractionalize and enrich DWNTs with certain diameters. PMID:21264438

  3. Lysozyme as an alternative to antibiotics improves performance in nursery pigs during an indirect immune challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lysozyme is a 1,4-ß-N-acetylmuramidase that has antimicrobial properties. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of lysozyme and antibiotics on growth performance and immune response during an indirect immune challenge. Two replicates of 600 pigs each were weaned from the sow at 2...

  4. Effect of lysozyme or antibiotics on fecal zoonotic pathogens in nursery pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lysozyme is a 1,4-ß-N-acetylmuramidase that has antimicrobial properties. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of lysozyme and antibiotics on zoonotic pathogen shedding in feces in nursery pigs housed without and with an indirect disease challenge. Two replicates of 600 pigs eac...

  5. Lysozyme as an alternative to antibiotics improves growth performance and small intestinal morphology in nursery pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lysozyme is a 1,4-ß-N-acetylmuramidase that has antimicrobial properties. The objective of this experiment was to determine if lysozyme in nursery diets improved growth performance and gastrointestinal health of pigs weaned from the sow at 24 d of age. Two replicates of 96 pigs (192 total 96 males,...

  6. Three in one: Identification, expression and enzymatic activity of lysozymes in amphioxus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Na; Pan, Junli; Liu, Shousheng; Xue, Qinggang; Zhang, Shicui

    2014-10-01

    The lysozymes identified so far in animals belong to the g-type, c-type, and i-type. Vertebrate animals possess only the former two types, i.e., g- and c-types, while all the three types have been reported in invertebrates. Here we demonstrate that (1) three cDNAs that encode g-, c-, and i-type lysozymes, respectively, were identified in a single species of the amphioxus Branchiostoma japonicum; (2) all the 3-type genes displayed distinct tissue-specific expression pattern; (3) recombinant g-, c-, and i-type lysozymes all exhibited enzymatic activities; and (4) native g-, c-, and i-type lysozymes were identified in the different tissues of amphioxus. Collectively, these results suggest the presence of all the 3-type lysozymes in a single animal species, first such data ever reported. The presence of biologically active i-type lysozyme in amphioxus also suggests that i-type lysozyme gene is retained at least in Protochordata, contrasting to the previous proposal that i-type lysozyme gene has been lost in a common ancestor of all chordates.

  7. Genetic control of the humoral immune response to avian egg white lysozymes in the chicken

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, M.P.

    1987-01-01

    Chickens from two closely related sublines, GHs-B6 and GHs-B13, differing serologically at the major histocompatibility complex, were significantly different in their humoral response to three avian egg white lysozymes. Specific antisera levels were measured by radioimmunoassay using /sup 125/I-labeled lysozymes. Antibodies elicited in response to these lysozymes are assumed to be directed against sites on these lysozymes where their amino acid sequence differs from that of the recipient G. domesticus egg white lysozyme (HEL). GHs-B6 birds produced a high level of antibody in response to immunization of turkey (TEL), pheasant (PhL) and guinea hen (GHL) lysozymes. GHs-B13 birds produced no detectable antibody to TEL, were intermediate in their response to PhL and equaled the antibody production of GHs-B6 birds in response to GHL. Antisera to each lysozyme were examined for crossreactivity with all other lysozymes by use of a competitive binding assay.

  8. Sensitive fluorescence detection of lysozyme using a tris(bipyridine)ruthenium(II) complex containing multiple cyclodextrins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Zhao, Ying-Ying; Chen, Hong; Wang, Xiu-Hua; Chen, Qiong; He, Pin-Gang

    2015-04-18

    A new series of photoactive metallocyclodextrins with increased fluorescence intensity upon binding with ssDNAs/aptamers has been demonstrated to sensitively and selectively detect lysozyme. The detection mechanism relies on the formation of an aptamer-lysozyme complex, which leads to reduction of fluorescence intensity.

  9. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry and Macromolecular Visualization for the Interaction of Lysozyme and Its Inhibitors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Chin-Chuan; Jensen, Drake; Boyle, Tiffany; O'Brien, Leah C.; De Meo, Cristina; Shabestary, Nahid; Eder, Douglas J.

    2015-01-01

    To provide a research-like experience to upper-division undergraduate students in a biochemistry teaching laboratory, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is employed to determine the binding constants of lysozyme and its inhibitors, N-acetyl glucosamine trimer (NAG[subscript 3]) and monomer (NAG). The extremely weak binding of lysozyme/NAG is…

  10. Mixed macromolecular crowding inhibits amyloid formation of hen egg white lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bing-Rui; Zhou, Zheng; Hu, Qing-Lian; Chen, Jie; Liang, Yi

    2008-03-01

    The effects of two single macromolecular crowding agents, Ficoll 70 and bovine serum albumin (BSA), and one mixed macromolecular crowding agent containing both BSA and Ficoll 70, on amyloid formation of hen egg white lysozyme have been examined by thioflavin T binding, Congo red binding, transmission electron microscopy, and activity assay, as a function of crowder concentration and composition. Both the mixed crowding agent and the protein crowding agent BSA at 100 g/l almost completely inhibit amyloid formation of lysozyme and stabilize lysozyme activity on the investigated time scale, but Ficoll 70 at the same concentration neither impedes amyloid formation of lysozyme effectively nor stabilizes lysozyme activity. Further kinetic and isothermal titration calorimetry analyses indicate that a mixture of 5 g/l BSA and 95 g/l Ficoll 70 inhibits amyloid formation of lysozyme and maintains lysozyme activity via mixed macromolecular crowding as well as weak, nonspecific interactions between BSA and nonnative lysozyme. Our data demonstrate that BSA and Ficoll 70 cooperatively contribute to both the inhibitory effect and the stabilization effect of the mixed crowding agent, suggesting that mixed macromolecular crowding inside the cell may play a role in posttranslational quality control mechanism.

  11. Synergistic inhibition of Clostridium difficile with nisin-lysozyme combination treatment.

    PubMed

    Chai, Changhoon; Lee, Kyung-Soo; Oh, Se-Wook

    2015-08-01

    Clostridium difficile vegetative cells were not inhibited completely after a 120-min treatment with 40 nM nisin or 0.8 mM lysozyme. However, these cells were completely inhibited after only a 30-min incubation with both 20 nM nisin and 0.2 mM lysozyme.

  12. Midgut lysozymes of Lucilia sericata - new antimicrobials involved in maggot debridement therapy.

    PubMed

    Valachova, I; Takac, P; Majtan, J

    2014-12-01

    Larvae of Lucilia sericata are used for maggot debridement therapy (MDT) because of their ability to remove necrotic tissue and eradicate bacterial pathogens of infected wounds. So far, very few antibacterial factors have been fully characterized (eg lucifensin). Using a molecular approach, some other putative antimicrobial compounds, including three novel lysozymes, have been previously identified and predicted to be involved in MDT. Nevertheless, data on lysozymes tissue origin and their functions have never been elucidated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the expression of three lysozymes in L. sericata and confirm their antibacterial effects within MDT. Moreover, we characterized the eradication process of bacteria within the digestive system of maggots and determined the role of lysozymes in this process. We found that three lysozymes are expressed in specific sections of the L. sericata midgut. Recombinant lysozymes displayed comparable antibacterial activity against Micrococcus luteus. Furthermore, the majority of Gram-positive bacteria were destroyed in vivo within the particular section of the L. sericata midgut where lysozymes are produced. Larval ingestion and subsequent eradication of wound pathogens during their passage through the intestine of maggots are due to, at least in part, antibacterial action of three midgut lysozymes.

  13. Three in one: Identification, expression and enzymatic activity of lysozymes in amphioxus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Na; Pan, Junli; Liu, Shousheng; Xue, Qinggang; Zhang, Shicui

    2014-10-01

    The lysozymes identified so far in animals belong to the g-type, c-type, and i-type. Vertebrate animals possess only the former two types, i.e., g- and c-types, while all the three types have been reported in invertebrates. Here we demonstrate that (1) three cDNAs that encode g-, c-, and i-type lysozymes, respectively, were identified in a single species of the amphioxus Branchiostoma japonicum; (2) all the 3-type genes displayed distinct tissue-specific expression pattern; (3) recombinant g-, c-, and i-type lysozymes all exhibited enzymatic activities; and (4) native g-, c-, and i-type lysozymes were identified in the different tissues of amphioxus. Collectively, these results suggest the presence of all the 3-type lysozymes in a single animal species, first such data ever reported. The presence of biologically active i-type lysozyme in amphioxus also suggests that i-type lysozyme gene is retained at least in Protochordata, contrasting to the previous proposal that i-type lysozyme gene has been lost in a common ancestor of all chordates. PMID:24968076

  14. Thermodynamic Exploration of Eosin-Lysozyme Binding: A Physical Chemistry and Biochemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huisman, Andrew J.; Hartsell, Lydia R.; Krueger, Brent P.; Pikaart, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    We developed a modular pair of experiments for use in the undergraduate physical chemistry and biochemistry laboratories. Both experiments examine the thermodynamics of the binding of a small molecule, eosin Y, to the protein lysozyme. The assay for binding is the quenching of lysozyme fluorescence by eosin through resonant energy transfer. In…

  15. Protist-type lysozymes of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans contribute to resistance against pathogenic Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Boehnisch, Claudia; Wong, Daniel; Habig, Michael; Isermann, Kerstin; Michiels, Nicolaas K; Roeder, Thomas; May, Robin C; Schulenburg, Hinrich

    2011-01-01

    Pathogens represent a universal threat to other living organisms. Most organisms express antimicrobial proteins and peptides, such as lysozymes, as a protection against these challenges. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans harbours 15 phylogenetically diverse lysozyme genes, belonging to two distinct types, the protist- or Entamoeba-type (lys genes) and the invertebrate-type (ilys genes) lysozymes. In the present study we characterized the role of several protist-type lysozyme genes in defence against a nematocidal strain of the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis. Based on microarray and subsequent qRT-PCR gene expression analysis, we identified protist-type lysozyme genes as one of the differentially transcribed gene classes after infection. A functional genetic analysis was performed for three of these genes, each belonging to a distinct evolutionary lineage within the protist-type lysozymes (lys-2, lys-5, and lys-7). Their knock-out led to decreased pathogen resistance in all three cases, while an increase in resistance was observed when two out of three tested genes were overexpressed in transgenic lines (lys-5, lys-7, but not lys-2). We conclude that the lysozyme genes lys-5, lys-7, and possibly lys-2 contribute to resistance against B. thuringiensis, thus highlighting the particular role of lysozymes in the nematode's defence against pathogens.

  16. Molecular cloning, characterization, expression and antibacterial analysis of a lysozyme homologue from Fenneropenaeus merguiensis.

    PubMed

    Mai, Wei-jun; Hu, Chao-qun

    2009-07-01

    The gene coding for lysozyme in banana prawn (Fenneropenaeus merguiensis) was cloned, sequenced and expressed in pET-32a vector. The deduced amino acid sequence of F. merguiensis lysozyme showed 37-93% similarity with the mouse, human, chicken, and tiger prawn counterparts. The lysozyme was purified to homogeneity and observed as a band of approximately 15 kDa in 12% SDS-PAGE. Semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that mRNA transcripts of lysozyme could be mainly detected in the tissues of hemocytes, gill, gonad and lymphoid organ of unchallenged shrimps, whereas the expression of lysozyme transcripts was increased in all the tested tissues after heat-killed Vibrio alginolyticus challenge. The temporal expression of lysozyme mRNA in hemolymph challenged by Micrococcus luteus and V. alginolyticus was both up-regulated and reached the maximum level at 8 and 16 h post stimulation, respectively, and then dropped back to the original level. Bacteriolytic activity of lysozyme against different bacterial cultures was determined by solid phase as well as turbidimetric assay. Lysis was obtained against gram positive and gram negative bacteria with strong inhibition against shrimp pathogens V. alginolyticus and V. parahemolyticus. In addition, the study of inhibition mechanism revealed that the antibacterial activity of lysozyme was a result of bactericidal effect.

  17. Spectroscopic investigations on the interactions of AgTiO2 nanoparticles with lysozyme and its influence on the binding of lysozyme with drug molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revathi, R.; Rameshkumar, A.; Sivasudha, T.

    2016-01-01

    Binding of lysozyme with AgTiO2 nanoparticles was analyzed by using absorption, fluorescence, time resolved and synchronous fluorescence measurements. In the presence of AgTiO2 nanoparticles, the fluorescence intensity of lysozyme was decreased. Static type of binding was confirmed through lifetime and ground state absorption measurements. From the fluorescence quenching data, the binding constant and the number of binding sites were found to be 1.5 × 104 M-1 and 1.03, respectively. From the synchronous fluorescence spectroscopic measurements, tryptophan residue in lysozyme was found to have interaction with the nanoparticles. Further, the influence of AgTiO2 nanoparticles on the binding strength of lysozyme with a drug molecule was analyzed through fluorescence quenching methods. The presence of nanoparticles decreases the binding capability of drug with protein. Overall, the observed results will provide basic insights on the utilization of nanoparticles in drug delivery applications.

  18. Spectroscopic investigations on the interactions of AgTiO2 nanoparticles with lysozyme and its influence on the binding of lysozyme with drug molecule.

    PubMed

    Revathi, R; Rameshkumar, A; Sivasudha, T

    2016-01-01

    Binding of lysozyme with AgTiO2 nanoparticles was analyzed by using absorption, fluorescence, time resolved and synchronous fluorescence measurements. In the presence of AgTiO2 nanoparticles, the fluorescence intensity of lysozyme was decreased. Static type of binding was confirmed through lifetime and ground state absorption measurements. From the fluorescence quenching data, the binding constant and the number of binding sites were found to be 1.5×10(4)M(-1) and 1.03, respectively. From the synchronous fluorescence spectroscopic measurements, tryptophan residue in lysozyme was found to have interaction with the nanoparticles. Further, the influence of AgTiO2 nanoparticles on the binding strength of lysozyme with a drug molecule was analyzed through fluorescence quenching methods. The presence of nanoparticles decreases the binding capability of drug with protein. Overall, the observed results will provide basic insights on the utilization of nanoparticles in drug delivery applications.

  19. Normal ranges of T4 screening values in low birthweight infants.

    PubMed Central

    Kok, J H; Hart, G; Endert, E; Koppe, J G; de Vijlder, J J

    1983-01-01

    Thyroxine (T4) screening values in infants of low birthweight in relation to birthweight and gestational age are reported. There were 86 healthy infants of low birthweight (group 1), and 29 preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (group 2). All the group 2 infants and 36% of those in group 1 had a T4 screening value below the cut-off point (-2.1 SD). In group 1 there was a significant increase in T4 with birthweight at a given gestational age, as well as with gestational age at a given birthweight. In group 2 there was also a significant increase in T4 values in relation to birthweight and gestational age, but it could not be ascertained whether this increase existed at a given gestational age or birthweight. A statistical model giving normal ranges of T4 for both groups of infants is presented, which, if applied to low birthweight infants, makes it possible to estimate the effect of low birthweight on T4 screening values, provided the birthweight and gestational age are known. In this manner the sensitivity of screening for congenital hypothyroidism is enhanced and the recall rate reduced. PMID:6838250

  20. Drugs against superbugs: private lessons from bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Brown, Eric D

    2004-09-01

    Bacterial genomics has provided a plethora of potential targets for antibacterial drug discovery, however, success in the hunt for new antibiotics will hinge on selecting targets with the highest potential. A recent paper by Liu and coworkers describes a new approach to target selection that uncovers strategies used by bacteriophage to disable bacteria. The method uses key phage proteins to identify and validate vulnerable targets and exploits them further in the identification of new antibacterial leads.

  1. Genomic impact of CRISPR immunization against bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Barrangou, Rodolphe; Coûté-Monvoisin, Anne-Claire; Stahl, Buffy; Chavichvily, Isabelle; Damange, Florian; Romero, Dennis A; Boyaval, Patrick; Fremaux, Christophe; Horvath, Philippe

    2013-12-01

    CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) together with CAS (RISPR-associated) genes form the CRISPR-Cas immune system, which provides sequence-specific adaptive immunity against foreign genetic elements in bacteria and archaea. Immunity is acquired by the integration of short stretches of invasive DNA as novel 'spacers' into CRISPR loci. Subsequently, these immune markers are transcribed and generate small non-coding interfering RNAs that specifically guide nucleases for sequence-specific cleavage of complementary sequences. Among the four CRISPR-Cas systems present in Streptococcus thermophilus, CRISPR1 and CRISPR3 have the ability to readily acquire new spacers following bacteriophage or plasmid exposure. In order to investigate the impact of building CRISPR-encoded immunity on the host chromosome, we determined the genome sequence of a BIM (bacteriophage-insensitive mutant) derived from the DGCC7710 model organism, after four consecutive rounds of bacteriophage challenge. As expected, active CRISPR loci evolved via polarized addition of several novel spacers following exposure to bacteriophages. Although analysis of the draft genome sequence revealed a variety of SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) and INDELs (insertions/deletions), most of the in silico differences were not validated by Sanger re-sequencing. In addition, two SNPs and two small INDELs were identified and tracked in the intermediate variants. Overall, building CRISPR-encoded immunity does not significantly affect the genome, which allows the maintenance of important functional properties in isogenic CRISPR mutants. This is critical for the development and formulation of sustainable and robust next-generation starter cultures with increased industrial lifespans.

  2. Going viral: designing bioactive surfaces with bacteriophage.

    PubMed

    Hosseinidoust, Zeinab; Olsson, Adam L J; Tufenkji, Nathalie

    2014-12-01

    Bacteriophage-functionalized bioactive surfaces are functional materials that can be used as antimicrobial surfaces in medical applications (e.g., indwelling medical devices or wound dressings) or as biosensors for bacterial capture and detection. Despite offering immense potential, designing efficient phage-functionalized bioactive surfaces is hampered by a number of challenges. This review offers an overview of the current state of knowledge in this field and presents a critical perspective of the technological promises and challenges.

  3. Genetically modified bacteriophages in applied microbiology.

    PubMed

    Bárdy, P; Pantůček, R; Benešík, M; Doškař, J

    2016-09-01

    Bacteriophages represent a simple viral model of basic research with many possibilities for practical application. Due to their ability to infect and kill bacteria, their potential in the treatment of bacterial infection has been examined since their discovery. With advances in molecular biology and gene engineering, the phage application spectrum has been expanded to various medical and biotechnological fields. The construction of bacteriophages with an extended host range or longer viability in the mammalian bloodstream enhances their potential as an alternative to conventional antibiotic treatment. Insertion of active depolymerase genes to their genomes can enforce the biofilm disposal. They can also be engineered to transfer various compounds to the eukaryotic organisms and the bacterial culture, applicable for the vaccine, drug or gene delivery. Phage recombinant lytic enzymes can be applied as enzybiotics in medicine as well as in biotechnology for pathogen detection or programmed cell death in bacterial expression strains. Besides, modified bacteriophages with high specificity can be applied as bioprobes in detection tools to estimate the presence of pathogens in food industry, or utilized in the control of food-borne pathogens as part of the constructed phage-based biosorbents.

  4. THE PREPARATION OF RELATIVELY PURE BACTERIOPHAGE.

    PubMed

    Krueger, A P; Tamada, H T

    1929-11-20

    The method described above, based on the electrophoretic migration of bacteriophage particles into an agar gel and their subsequent re-suspension in a suitable medium, has the following advantages: It is simple and can be readily carried out on a comparatively large scale by merely inserting additional units between the same electrode cups. It requires but one extraction and the resulting phage suspension is strongly lytic, an average sample being capable of completely lysing susceptible bacteria at a dilution of 10(-16). The suspension contains no proteins demonstrable by the biuret, alcohol, xanthoproteic, Millon or Hopkins-Cole reactions and yields but 0.044 mg. N/cc. directly attributable to the phage. Each corpuscle contains no more nitrogen than a single molecule of protein. In addition the method is applicable to determinations of the electric charge carried by biologically active substances of small dimensions, e.g., phage, toxins, and perhaps some viruses. It offers as well a possible means of purification of these substances. The purified bacteriophage obtained by such a procedure or similar ones is relatively unstable. Work now in progress indicates that it does not possess nearly the resistance to chemical agents, drying, etc., that non-purified phage displays. It is suggested that experiments designed to test the therapeutic value of bacteriophage be conducted, when possible, with purified suspensions thereby avoiding any possibility of obscure non-specific reactions due to other constituents of the lysates.

  5. Genetically modified bacteriophages in applied microbiology.

    PubMed

    Bárdy, P; Pantůček, R; Benešík, M; Doškař, J

    2016-09-01

    Bacteriophages represent a simple viral model of basic research with many possibilities for practical application. Due to their ability to infect and kill bacteria, their potential in the treatment of bacterial infection has been examined since their discovery. With advances in molecular biology and gene engineering, the phage application spectrum has been expanded to various medical and biotechnological fields. The construction of bacteriophages with an extended host range or longer viability in the mammalian bloodstream enhances their potential as an alternative to conventional antibiotic treatment. Insertion of active depolymerase genes to their genomes can enforce the biofilm disposal. They can also be engineered to transfer various compounds to the eukaryotic organisms and the bacterial culture, applicable for the vaccine, drug or gene delivery. Phage recombinant lytic enzymes can be applied as enzybiotics in medicine as well as in biotechnology for pathogen detection or programmed cell death in bacterial expression strains. Besides, modified bacteriophages with high specificity can be applied as bioprobes in detection tools to estimate the presence of pathogens in food industry, or utilized in the control of food-borne pathogens as part of the constructed phage-based biosorbents. PMID:27321680

  6. Call for a dedicated European legal framework for bacteriophage therapy.

    PubMed

    Verbeken, Gilbert; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Lavigne, Rob; Jennes, Serge; De Vos, Daniel; Casteels, Minne; Huys, Isabelle

    2014-04-01

    The worldwide emergence of antibiotic resistances and the drying up of the antibiotic pipeline have spurred a search for alternative or complementary antibacterial therapies. Bacteriophages are bacterial viruses that have been used for almost a century to combat bacterial infections, particularly in Poland and the former Soviet Union. The antibiotic crisis has triggered a renewed clinical and agricultural interest in bacteriophages. This, combined with new scientific insights, has pushed bacteriophages to the forefront of the search for new approaches to fighting bacterial infections. But before bacteriophage therapy can be introduced into clinical practice in the European Union, several challenges must be overcome. One of these is the conceptualization and classification of bacteriophage therapy itself and the extent to which it constitutes a human medicinal product regulated under the European Human Code for Medicines (Directive 2001/83/EC). Can therapeutic products containing natural bacteriophages be categorized under the current European regulatory framework, or should this framework be adapted? Various actors in the field have discussed the need for an adapted (or entirely new) regulatory framework for the reintroduction of bacteriophage therapy in Europe. This led to the identification of several characteristics specific to natural bacteriophages that should be taken into consideration by regulators when evaluating bacteriophage therapy. One important consideration is whether bacteriophage therapy development occurs on an industrial scale or a hospital-based, patient-specific scale. More suitable regulatory standards may create opportunities to improve insights into this promising therapeutic approach. In light of this, we argue for the creation of a new, dedicated European regulatory framework for bacteriophage therapy.

  7. Call for a dedicated European legal framework for bacteriophage therapy.

    PubMed

    Verbeken, Gilbert; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Lavigne, Rob; Jennes, Serge; De Vos, Daniel; Casteels, Minne; Huys, Isabelle

    2014-04-01

    The worldwide emergence of antibiotic resistances and the drying up of the antibiotic pipeline have spurred a search for alternative or complementary antibacterial therapies. Bacteriophages are bacterial viruses that have been used for almost a century to combat bacterial infections, particularly in Poland and the former Soviet Union. The antibiotic crisis has triggered a renewed clinical and agricultural interest in bacteriophages. This, combined with new scientific insights, has pushed bacteriophages to the forefront of the search for new approaches to fighting bacterial infections. But before bacteriophage therapy can be introduced into clinical practice in the European Union, several challenges must be overcome. One of these is the conceptualization and classification of bacteriophage therapy itself and the extent to which it constitutes a human medicinal product regulated under the European Human Code for Medicines (Directive 2001/83/EC). Can therapeutic products containing natural bacteriophages be categorized under the current European regulatory framework, or should this framework be adapted? Various actors in the field have discussed the need for an adapted (or entirely new) regulatory framework for the reintroduction of bacteriophage therapy in Europe. This led to the identification of several characteristics specific to natural bacteriophages that should be taken into consideration by regulators when evaluating bacteriophage therapy. One important consideration is whether bacteriophage therapy development occurs on an industrial scale or a hospital-based, patient-specific scale. More suitable regulatory standards may create opportunities to improve insights into this promising therapeutic approach. In light of this, we argue for the creation of a new, dedicated European regulatory framework for bacteriophage therapy. PMID:24500660

  8. Isolation and characterization of bacteriophages of Salmonella enterica serovar Pullorum.

    PubMed

    Bao, H; Zhang, H; Wang, R

    2011-10-01

    In this study, 2 bacteriophages of Salmonella Pullorum were isolated using an enrichment protocol and the double agar layer method. They were named PSPu-95 and PSPu-4-116, respectively, against clinical isolates of Salmonella Pullorum SPu-95 and SPu-116. The host ranges of the 2 bacteriophages were determined by performing spot tests with 20 bacteria strains. Both bacteriophages had wide host ranges. Bacteriophage PSPu-95 had a lytic effect on 17 of the 20 isolates (85%), and PSPu-4-116 produced a lytic effect on 14 isolates (70%) and was the only bacteriophage that produced a clear plaque on enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the bacteriophages belonged to the order Caudovirales. Bacteriophage PSPu-95 was a member of the family Siphoviridae, but bacteriophage PSPu-4-116 belonged to the family Myoviridae. Both had a double-stranded DNA, which was digested with HindIII or EcoRI, that was estimated to be 58.3 kbp (PSPu-95) and 45.2 kbp (PSPu-4-116) by 1% agar electrophoresis. One-step growth kinetics showed that the latent periods were all less than 20 min, and the burst size was 77.5 pfu/cell for PSPu-95 and 86 pfu/cell for PSPu-4-116. The bacteriophages were able to survive in a pH range between 4 and 10, and they were able to survive in a treatment of 70°C for 60 min. The characterizations of these 2 bacteriophages were helpful in establishing a basis for adopting the most effective bacteriophage to control bacteria in the poultry industry.

  9. Equation to Line the Borders of the Folding-Unfolding Transition Diagram of Lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Mohammad Amin; Grimsey, Ian M; Forbes, Robert T

    2016-07-21

    It is important for the formulators of biopharmaceuticals to predict the folding-unfolding transition of proteins. This enables them to process proteins under predetermined conditions, without denaturation. Depending on the apparent denaturation temperature (Tm) of lysozyme, we have derived an equation describing its folding-unfolding transition diagram. According to the water content and temperature, this diagram was divided into three different areas, namely, the area of the water-folded lysozyme phase, the area of the water-folded lysozyme phase and the bulk water phase, and the area of the denatured lysozyme phase. The water content controlled the appearance and intensity of the Raman band at ∼1787 cm(-1) when lysozyme powders were thermally denatured at temperatures higher than Tm. PMID:27341101

  10. Design and evaluation of a novel nanoparticulate-based formulation encapsulating a HIP complex of lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Gaudana, Ripal; Gokulgandhi, Mitan; Khurana, Varun; Kwatra, Deep; Mitra, Ashim K

    2013-01-01

    Formulation development of protein therapeutics using polymeric nanoparticles has found very little success in recent years. Major formulation challenges include rapid denaturation, susceptibility to lose bioactivity in presence of organic solvents and poor encapsulation in polymeric matrix. In the present study, we have prepared hydrophobic ion pairing (HIP) complex of lysozyme, a model protein, using dextran sulfate (DS) as a complexing polymer. We have optimized the process of formation and dissociation of HIP complex between lysozyme and DS. The effect of HIP complexation on enzymatic activity of lysozyme was also studied. Nanoparticles were prepared and characterized using spontaneous emulsion solvent diffusion method. Furthermore, we have also investigated release of lysozyme from nanoparticles along with its enzymatic activity. Results of this study indicate that nanoparticles can sustain the release of lysozyme without compromising its enzymatic activity. HIP complexation using a polymer may also be employed to formulate sustained release dosage forms of other macromolecules with enhanced encapsulation efficiency.

  11. Lysozyme net charge and ion binding in concentrated aqueous electrolyte solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehner, Daniel E.; Engmann, Jan; Fergg, Florian; Wernick, Meredith; Blanch, Harvey W.; Prausnitz, John M.

    1999-02-01

    Hydrogen-ion titrations were conducted for hen-egg-white lysozyme in solutions of potassium chloride over the range pH 2.5--11.5 and for ionic strengths to 2.0 M. The dependence of lysozyme`s net proton charge, z{sub p}, on pH and ionic strength in potassium chloride solution is measured. From the ionic-strength dependence of z{sub p}, interactions of lysozyme with potassium and chloride ions are calculated using the molecular-thermodynamic theory of Fraaije and Lyklema. Lysozyme interacts preferentially with up to 12 chloride ions at pH 2.5. The observed dependence of ion-protein interactions on pH and ionic strength is explained in terms of electric-double-layer theory. New experimental pK{sub a} data are reported for 11 amino acids in potassium chloride solutions of ionic strength to 3.0 M.

  12. Structure and evolution of the Ivy protein family, unexpected lysozyme inhibitors in Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Abergel, Chantal; Monchois, Vincent; Byrne, Deborah; Chenivesse, Sabine; Lembo, Frédérique; Lazzaroni, Jean-Claude; Claverie, Jean-Michel

    2007-01-01

    Part of an ancestral bactericidal system, vertebrate C-type lysozyme targets the peptidoglycan moiety of bacterial cell walls. We report the crystal structure of a protein inhibitor of C-type lysozyme, the Escherichia coli Ivy protein, alone and in complex with hen egg white lysozyme. Ivy exhibits a novel fold in which a protruding five-residue loop appears essential to its inhibitory effect. This feature guided the identification of Ivy orthologues in other Gram-negative bacteria. The structure of the evolutionary distant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Ivy orthologue was also determined in complex with hen egg white lysozyme, and its antilysozyme activity was confirmed. Ivy expression protects porous cell-wall E. coli mutants from the lytic effect of lysozyme, suggesting that it is a response against the permeabilizing effects of the innate vertebrate immune system. As such, Ivy acts as a virulence factor for a number of Gram-negative bacteria-infecting vertebrates. PMID:17405861

  13. The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Matsumoto, T; Torikata, T

    1998-10-01

    The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity were analyzed. Carboxymethylated lysozyme was digested with trypsin and the resulting peptides were sequenced. The established amino acid sequence had one amino acid substitution at position 102 (Arg to Gly) comparing with Indian peafowl lysozyme and four amino acid substitutions at positions 3 (Phe to Tyr), 15 (His to Leu), 41 (Gln to His), and 121 (Gln to His) with chicken lysozyme. Analysis of the time-courses of reaction using N-acetylglucosamine pentamer as a substrate showed a difference of binding free energy change (-0.4 kcal/mol) at subsites A between monal pheasant and Indian peafowl lysozyme. This was assumed to be caused by the amino acid substitution at subsite A with loss of a positive charge at position 102 (Arg102 to Gly).

  14. The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Matsumoto, T; Torikata, T

    1998-10-01

    The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity were analyzed. Carboxymethylated lysozyme was digested with trypsin and the resulting peptides were sequenced. The established amino acid sequence had one amino acid substitution at position 102 (Arg to Gly) comparing with Indian peafowl lysozyme and four amino acid substitutions at positions 3 (Phe to Tyr), 15 (His to Leu), 41 (Gln to His), and 121 (Gln to His) with chicken lysozyme. Analysis of the time-courses of reaction using N-acetylglucosamine pentamer as a substrate showed a difference of binding free energy change (-0.4 kcal/mol) at subsites A between monal pheasant and Indian peafowl lysozyme. This was assumed to be caused by the amino acid substitution at subsite A with loss of a positive charge at position 102 (Arg102 to Gly). PMID:9836434

  15. Bacteriophage P70: unique morphology and unrelatedness to other Listeria bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Schmuki, Martina M; Erne, Doris; Loessner, Martin J; Klumpp, Jochen

    2012-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important food-borne pathogen, and its bacteriophages find many uses in detection and biocontrol of its host. The novel broad-host-range virulent phage P70 has a unique morphology with an elongated capsid. Its genome sequence was determined by a hybrid sequencing strategy employing Sanger and PacBio techniques. The P70 genome contains 67,170 bp and 119 open reading frames (ORFs). Our analyses suggest that P70 represents an archetype of virus unrelated to other known Listeria bacteriophages.

  16. The Latex of Hevea brasiliensis Contains High Levels of Both Chitinases and Chitinases/Lysozymes 1

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Melinda N.

    1991-01-01

    The latex of the commercial rubber tree, Hevea brasiliensis, was fractionated by ultracentrifugation as described by G. F. J. Moir ([1959] Nature 184: 1626-1628) into a top layer of rubber particles, a cleared cytoplasm, and a pellet that contains primarily specialized vacuoles known as lutoids. The proteins in each fraction were resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Both the pellet fraction and cleared cytoplasm contained large amounts of relatively few proteins, suggesting that laticifers serve a very specialized function in the plant. More than 75% of the total soluble protein in latex was found in the pellet fraction. Twenty-five percent of the protein in the pellet was identified as chitinases/lysozymes, which are capable of degrading the chitin component of fungal cell walls and the peptidoglycan component of bacterial cell walls. Both the chitinase and lysozyme activities were localized exclusively in the pellet or lutoid fraction. The chitinases/lysozymes were resolved into acidic and basic classes of proteins and further purified. An acidic protein (molecular mass 25.5 kD) represented 20% of the chitinase activity in latex; this protein lacked the low level of lysozyme activity that is associated with many plant chitinases. Six basic proteins, having both chitinase and lysozyme activities in various ratios and molecular mass of 27.5 or 26 kD, were resolved. Two of the basic proteins had very high lysozyme specific activities which were comparable to the specific activities reported for animal lysozymes. Like animal lysozymes, but unlike previously characterized plant chitinases/lysozymes, these basic chitinases/lysozymes were also capable of completely lysing or clearing suspensions of bacterial cell walls. These results suggest that laticifers may serve a defensive role in the plant. Images Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:16668007

  17. The Anti-sigma Factor RsiV Is a Bacterial Receptor for Lysozyme: Co-crystal Structure Determination and Demonstration That Binding of Lysozyme to RsiV Is Required for σV Activation.

    PubMed

    Hastie, Jessica L; Williams, Kyle B; Bohr, Lindsey L; Houtman, Jon C; Gakhar, Lokesh; Ellermeier, Craig D

    2016-09-01

    σ factors provide RNA polymerase with promoter specificity in bacteria. Some σ factors require activation in order to interact with RNA polymerase and transcribe target genes. The Extra-Cytoplasmic Function (ECF) σ factor, σV, is encoded by several Gram-positive bacteria and is specifically activated by lysozyme. This activation requires the proteolytic destruction of the anti-σ factor RsiV via a process of regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP). In many cases proteases that cleave at site-1 are thought to directly sense a signal and initiate the RIP process. We previously suggested binding of lysozyme to RsiV initiated the proteolytic destruction of RsiV and activation of σV. Here we determined the X-ray crystal structure of the RsiV-lysozyme complex at 2.3 Å which revealed that RsiV and lysozyme make extensive contacts. We constructed RsiV mutants with altered abilities to bind lysozyme. We find that mutants that are unable to bind lysozyme block site-1 cleavage of RsiV and σV activation in response to lysozyme. Taken together these data demonstrate that RsiV is a receptor for lysozyme and binding of RsiV to lysozyme is required for σV activation. In addition, the co-structure revealed that RsiV binds to the lysozyme active site pocket. We provide evidence that in addition to acting as a sensor for the presence of lysozyme, RsiV also inhibits lysozyme activity. Thus we have demonstrated that RsiV is a protein with multiple functions. RsiV inhibits σV activity in the absence of lysozyme, RsiV binds lysozyme triggering σV activation and RsiV inhibits the enzymatic activity of lysozyme. PMID:27602573

  18. The Anti-sigma Factor RsiV Is a Bacterial Receptor for Lysozyme: Co-crystal Structure Determination and Demonstration That Binding of Lysozyme to RsiV Is Required for σV Activation

    PubMed Central

    Houtman, Jon C.

    2016-01-01

    σ factors provide RNA polymerase with promoter specificity in bacteria. Some σ factors require activation in order to interact with RNA polymerase and transcribe target genes. The Extra-Cytoplasmic Function (ECF) σ factor, σV, is encoded by several Gram-positive bacteria and is specifically activated by lysozyme. This activation requires the proteolytic destruction of the anti-σ factor RsiV via a process of regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP). In many cases proteases that cleave at site-1 are thought to directly sense a signal and initiate the RIP process. We previously suggested binding of lysozyme to RsiV initiated the proteolytic destruction of RsiV and activation of σV. Here we determined the X-ray crystal structure of the RsiV-lysozyme complex at 2.3 Å which revealed that RsiV and lysozyme make extensive contacts. We constructed RsiV mutants with altered abilities to bind lysozyme. We find that mutants that are unable to bind lysozyme block site-1 cleavage of RsiV and σV activation in response to lysozyme. Taken together these data demonstrate that RsiV is a receptor for lysozyme and binding of RsiV to lysozyme is required for σV activation. In addition, the co-structure revealed that RsiV binds to the lysozyme active site pocket. We provide evidence that in addition to acting as a sensor for the presence of lysozyme, RsiV also inhibits lysozyme activity. Thus we have demonstrated that RsiV is a protein with multiple functions. RsiV inhibits σV activity in the absence of lysozyme, RsiV binds lysozyme triggering σV activation and RsiV inhibits the enzymatic activity of lysozyme. PMID:27602573

  19. Preliminary investigations into solutal flow about growing tetragonal lysozyme crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc; Witherow, William; Naumann, Robert

    1988-01-01

    A series of preliminary experiments were done to investigate solutal flow about growing lysozyme crystals and its effects. Density-gradient-driven flow was observed using a schlieren optical system. Crystals used ranged from 0.3 to 1.72 mm across the (110) face, and protein concentrations were from 3.7 to 23.7 mg/ml. The convective plume velocities were found to be from 10 to 50 microns/s, which correlated with those predicted to occur based upon a diffusive-convective model. When microcrystals of lysozyme, less than 20 microns across the (110) face were subjected to directed solution flows, the growth rate was found to rapidly decrease over the 8-20 h course of the experiment. Solution flow rates used ranged from 18 to 40 microns/s, and protein concentrations were from 7.3 to 11.7 mg/ml, conditions typical of larger (greater than 0.5 mm) crystals in the terminal phases of a typical crystal growth procedure.

  20. Lysozyme Aggregation and Fibrillation Monitored by Dynamic Light Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemzer, Louis; Flanders, Bret; Schmit, Jeremy; Sorensen, Christopher

    2012-02-01

    The aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins provides a rich phase space with significant biomedical implications, including a link with several age-related diseases. We employed dynamic light scattering to monitor the aggregation of lysozyme, a model protein, from a monomeric state until the formation of micron-sized fibrils. For an aqueous lysozyme solution buffered at pH 2, the auto-correlation function of the scattered light intensity was found to be well-fit by a single exponential function with decay time τ = 1/(2Dq^2) = 0.25 ms, which corresponds to a mean hydrodynamic radius (RH) of 2.2 nm, very likely generated by monomers. Ethanol (4% v/v final concentration) induced a partial unfolding, to RH = 4.6 nm. The subsequent addition of 70 mM KCl was found to shrink the size back to RH = 2.5 nm, as expected when a denatured protein refolds due to partial screening of the intramolecular repulsion. However, further aggregation was not observed. At pH 4, using a low-salt acetate buffer, more ethanol (10% v/v) was required to initiate unfolding, but once it occurred, larger aggregates formed. These results are consistent with the model that partial unfolding, which exposes beta-motif secondary structure, is a prerequisite for aggregation and fibrillation, but the aggregation fate depends on the protein charge state (pH) and screening (salt concentration).

  1. Binding stoichiometry of the gene 32 protein of phage T4 in the complex with single stranded DNA deduced from boundary sedimentation.

    PubMed

    Scheerhagen, M A; Vlaanderen, C A; Blok, J; van Grondelle, R

    1986-04-01

    Short 145 base DNA fragments in complex with the helix destabilizing protein of bacteriophage T4, GP32, have been studied with boundary sedimentation. The sedimentation coefficient was determined as a function of concentration, protein-nucleic acid ratio, temperature and salt concentration. It can be concluded that the measured values reflect the properties of the saturated DNA-GP32 complex. A combination of the earlier obtained translational diffusion coefficient of the complex with the sedimentation coefficient yields its anhydrous molecular weight (Mw = 5.4.10(5) D), which corresponds to a size of the binding site of 10 nucleotides per protein. This procedure is not sensitive to the presence of non-binding protein molecules and to the assumed protein concentration, and therefore, it seems more reliable than a determination from titration experiments. Similar sedimentation measurements were performed with tRNA-complexes containing 76 nucleotides. The translational diffusion coefficient can be calculated from the measured rotational diffusion coefficient and assuming the same hydrodynamic diameter for this complex as obtained for the 145 b DNA complex. The molecular weight derived from the data then also leads to a binding site size of about 10 nucleotides. This suggests that also the short tRNA-complex forms an open, strongly solvated structure, as was proposed for the 145 b DNA-GP32 complex.

  2. Studies on T4-head maturation. 2. Substrate specificity of gene-49-controlled endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Kemper, B; Garabett, M; Courage, U

    1981-03-16

    The substrate specificity of 49+-enzyme was investigated in vitro. The enzyme showed a marked preference for rapidly sedimenting T4 DNA (greater than 1000 S) when helix-destabilizing proteins from Escherichia coli or phage T4 were added to the reaction. Regular replicative T4 DNA (200-S DNA) or denatured T4 DNA was not cleaved by the enzyme in the presence of these proteins but if they were omitted from the reaction both DNAs become good substrates for the enzyme. 200-S DNA was cleaved at its natural sites of single strandedness which occur at one-genome intervals. Gaps in T4 DNA which were constructed by treatment of a nicked DNA with exonuclease III were also cleaved by 49+-enzyme in the absence of helix-destabilizing proteins. Single-stranded T4 DNA was extensively degraded and up to 50% of the material was found to be acid-soluble in a limit digest. The degradation products were predominantly oligonucleotides of random size. No preference for a 5'-terminal nucleotide was observed in material from a limit digest with M13 DNA. Double-stranded DNA was nicked upon exposure to 49+-enzyme and double-strand breakage finally occurred by an accumulation of single-strand interruptions. No acid-soluble material was produced from native T4 DNA. The introduction of nicks in native DNA did not improve its properties as a substrate for the enzyme. Double-stranded DNA was about 100-fold less sensitive to the enzyme than single-stranded DNA. PMID:6262078

  3. Expression of a bioactive bacteriophage endolysin in Nicotiana benthamiana plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogens has led to an increased interest in alternative antimicrobial treatments, such as bacteriophage, bacteriophage-encoded peptidoglycan hydrolases (endolysins) and antimicrobial peptides. In our study, the antimicrobial activity of the CP933 en...

  4. Potential of Bacteriophage to Prevent and Treat Poultry Diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteriophage are viruses plentiful in nature that kill bacteria, and represent a safe alternative to antibiotics. Bacteriophage lytic to Escherichia coli were isolated from municipal waste water treatment and poultry processing plants. This E. coli isolate is pathogenic to poultry, causing a sev...

  5. [THE IDENTIFICATION AND DIFFERENTIATION OF BACTERIOPHAGES OF HUMAN PATHOGENIC VIBRIO].

    PubMed

    Gaevskaia, N E; Kudriakova, T A; Makedonova, L D; Kachkina, G V

    2015-04-01

    The issue of identification and differentiation of large group of bacteriophages of human pathogenic vibrio is still unresolved. In research and practical applied purposes it is important to consider characteristics of bacteriophages for establishing similarity and differences between them. The actual study was carried out to analyze specimens of DNA-containing bacteriophages of pathogenic vibrio. The overwhelming majority of them characterized by complicated type of symmetry--phages with double-helical DNA and also phages with mono-helical DNA structure discovered recently in vibrio. For the first time, the general framework of identification and differentiation of bacteriophages of pathogenic vibrio was developed. This achievement increases possibility to establish species assignment of phages and to compare with phages registered in the database. "The collection of bacteriophages and test-strains of human pathogenic vibrio" (No2010620549 of 24.09.210).

  6. The effects of bacteriophage and nanoparticles on microbial processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Austin L.

    There are approximately 1031 tailed phages in the biosphere, making them the most abundant organism. Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria. Due to the large diversity and abundance, no two bacteriophages that have been isolated are genetically the same. Phage products have potential in disease therapy to solve bacteria-related problems, such as infections resulting from resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus. A bacteriophage capable of infecting methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was isolated from bovine hair. The bacteriophage, named JB phage, was characterized using purification, amplification, cesium chloride banding, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. JB phage and nanoparticles were used in various in vitro and in vivo models to test their effects on microbial processes. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy studies revealed strong interactions between JB phage and nanoparticles, which resulted in increased bacteriophage infectivity. JB phage and nanoparticle cocktails were used as a therapeutic to treat skin and systemic infections in mice caused by MRSA.

  7. Performance Evaluation of the MyT4 Technology for Determining ART Eligibility

    PubMed Central

    Macamo, Rosa; Meggi, Bindiya; Tobaiwa, Ocean; Loquiha, Osvaldo; Bollinger, Timothy; Vojnov, Lara; Jani, Ilesh

    2016-01-01

    Background In resource-limited countries, CD4 T-cell (CD4) testing continues to be used for determining antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation eligibility and opportunistic infection monitoring. To support expanded access to CD4 testing, simple and robust technologies are necessary. We conducted this study to evaluate the performance of a new Point-of-Care (POC) CD4 technology, the MyT4, compared to conventional laboratory CD4 testing. Methods EDTA venous blood from 200 HIV-positive patients was tested in the laboratory using the MyT4 and BD FACSCalibur™. Results The MyT4 had an r2 of 0.82 and a mean bias of 12.3 cells/μl. The MyT4 had total misclassifications of 14.7% and 8.8% when analyzed using ART eligibility thresholds of 350 and 500 cells/μl, respectively. Conclusions We conclude that the MyT4 performed well in classifying patients using the current ART initiation eligibility thresholds in Mozambique when compared to the conventional CD4 technology. PMID:27780216

  8. Inactivation of gram-negative bacteria in milk and banana juice by hen egg white and lambda lysozyme under high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Nakimbugwe, Dorothy; Masschalck, Barbara; Anim, Grace; Michiels, Chris W

    2006-10-15

    The effect of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) and bacteriophage lambda lysozyme (LaL) in combination with high pressure (HP) treatment on the inactivation of four gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli O157:H7, Shigella flexneri, Yersinia enterocolitica and Salmonella typhimurium), was studied in skim milk (pH 6.8; a(w) 0.997) and in banana juice (pH 3.8; a(w) 0.971). In the absence of lysozymes, S. flexneri was more sensitive to HP in milk than in banana juice, while the opposite was observed for the other three bacteria. In combination with HP treatment, LaL was more effective than HEWL on all bacteria in both milk and banana juice. Depending on the bacteria, inactivation levels in banana juice were increased from 0.4-2.7 log units by HP treatment alone to 3.6-6.5 log units in the presence of 224 U/ml LaL. Bacterial inactivation in milk was also enhanced by LaL but only by 0.5-2.1 log units. Under the experimental conditions used, LaL was more effective in banana juice than in milk, while the effectiveness of HEWL under the same conditions was not significantly affected by the food matrix. This effect could be ascribed to the low pH of the banana juice since LaL was also more effective on E. coli in buffer at pH 3.8 than at pH 6.8. Since neither LaL nor HEWL are enzymatically active at pH 3.8, we analysed bacterial lysis after HP treatment in the presence of these enzymes, and found that inactivation proceeds through a non-lytic mechanism at pH 3.8 and a lytic mechanism at pH 6.8. Based on these results, LaL may offer interesting perspectives for use as an extra hurdle in high pressure food preservation. PMID:16843561

  9. Potential toxicity and affinity of triphenylmethane dye malachite green to lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Ding, Fei; Li, Xiu-Nan; Diao, Jian-Xiong; Sun, Ye; Zhang, Li; Ma, Lin; Yang, Xin-Ling; Zhang, Li; Sun, Ying

    2012-04-01

    Malachite green is a triphenylmethane dye that is used extensively in many industrial and aquacultural processes, generating environmental concerns and health problems to human being. In this contribution, the complexation between lysozyme and malachite green was verified by means of computer-aided molecular modeling, steady state and time-resolved fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) approaches. The precise binding patch of malachite green in lysozyme has been identified from molecular modeling and ANS displacement, Trp-62, Trp-63, and Trp-108 residues of lysozyme were earmarked to possess high-affinity for this dye, the principal forces in the lysozyme-malachite green adduct are hydrophobic and π-π interactions. Steady state fluorescence proclaimed the complex of malachite green with lysozyme yields quenching through static type, which substantiates time-resolved fluorescence measurements that lysozyme-malachite green conjugation formation has an affinity of 10(3)M(-1). Moreover, via molecular modeling and also CD data, we can safely arrive at a conclusion that the polypeptide chain of lysozyme partially destabilized upon complexation with malachite green. The data emerged here will help to further understand the toxicological action of malachite green in human body.

  10. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Lysozyme Against HMGB1 in Human Endothelial Cells and in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonhwa; Ku, Sae-Kwang; Na, Dong Hee; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2015-10-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) was recently shown to be an important extracellular mediator of severe vascular inflammatory disease, sepsis. Lysozyme protects us from the ever-present danger of bacterial infection and binds to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with a high affinity. Here, we show, for the first time, the anti-septic effects of lysozyme in HMGB1-mediated inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo. The data showed that lysozyme posttreatment suppressed LPS-mediated release of HMGB1 and HMGB1-mediated cytoskeletal rearrangement. Lysozyme also inhibited HMGB1-mediated hyperpermeability and leukocyte migration in human endothelial cells. In addition, lysozyme inhibited the HMGB1-mediated activation of Akt, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), extracellular regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2 and production of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in HUVECs. Furthermore, lysozyme reduced the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced release of HMGB1, migration of leukocytes, septic mortality, and pulmonary damage in mice. Collectively, these results suggest lysozyme as a candidate therapeutic agent for the treatment of vascular inflammatory diseases via inhibition of the HMGB1 signaling pathway.

  11. Effects of Alginate Oligosaccharide Mixture on the Bioavailability of Lysozyme as an Antimicrobial Agent.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Jung; Ahn, Joo-Myung; Park, Ra-Mi; Lee, Sang-Hee; Sekhon, Simranjeet Singh; Kim, Sang Yong; Wee, Ji-Hyang; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Min, Jiho

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we report an oral drug delivery system without any additional process using pH-sensitive biopolymer, alginate, and alginate oligosaccharide with lysozyme as a model drug. These biopolymers exhibited pH-sensitive characteristics such as shrinking at acidic pH and eroding with dissolution at alkaline pH. The incorporation of lysozyme and biopolymers was performed an artificial intestinal juice (pH 6.8). The immobilization efficiency and lysozyme stability in gastric juice (pH 1.2) has been tested by E coil antimicrobial activity. The lysozyme without biopolymer immobilization lost approximately 80-90% of antimicrobial activity than that of pure lysozyme. However, the pH-sensitive biopolymer-controlled lysozyme maintained similar antimicrobial activity compared to that of pure lysozyme (50-90% of cell mortality). Therefore, this simple, easy, and rapid system can be effectively and practically applied for pathogen treatment for in vivo oral drug delivery. PMID:27433602

  12. Immobilization of lysozyme-CLEA onto electrospun chitosan nanofiber for effective antibacterial applications.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae-Min; Kim, Mina; Park, Hyun-Sung; Jang, Am; Min, Jiho; Kim, Yang-Hoon

    2013-03-01

    Chitosan (CS) nanofibers with a diameter of 150-200nm were fabricated from a mixed chitosan/poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) solution by the electrospinning method. The nascent CS/PVA nanofibers were treated with 0.5M NaOH solution to make stable CS nanofibers by removing PVA under aqueous conditions. Hen egg-white lysozyme was immobilized on electrospun CS nanofibers via cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEAs) and used for effective and continuous antibacterial applications. The maximum amount of lysozyme immobilized on the CS nanofibers was determined to be 62.3mg/g of nanofibers under the optimum conditions. The immobilized lysozyme-CLEA retained more than 75.4% of its initial activity after 80 days of storage at room temperature, while the free lysozyme lost all of its activity under the same conditions. In addition, the immobilized lysozyme-CLEA retained more than 76% of its activity after 100 consecutive uses. Finally, the durability of the lysozyme-CLEA immobilized CS nanofibers showed bacteriostasis ratios of 82.4%, 79.8%, 83.4%, and 84.1% after 10 cycles against 4 pathogenic bacteria, viz. Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Shigella flexneri, and Psedomonas aeruginosa, respectively. These results demonstrated that lysozyme-CLEA immobilized CS nanofibers could be used as a promising material for enhanced and continuous antibacterial applications.

  13. Role of Rabbit Lysozyme in In Vitro Serum and Plasma Serum Bactericidal Reactions Against Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Stephen F.; Martinez, Rafael J.

    1979-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of purified rabbit lysozyme was kinetically investigated at concentrations comparable to those in normal rabbit serum and plasma serum. The bactericidal capability, lysozyme content, and electrophoretic composition of “purified β-lysin,” fractionated from normal rabbit serum, were also examined. In contrast to the extensive antibacterial activity of dilute normal rabbit serum observed in vitro, rabbit lysozyme was only weakly bactericidal for Bacillus subtilis. Inhibition of lysozyme enzymatic and bactericidal activities in normal rabbit serum by antilysozyme immunoglobulin G slightly reduced the initial rate of killing. The addition of neutralizing antibody or histamine (another lysozyme inhibitor) to partially purified bactericidal serum fractions had no effect on killing kinetics. Increasing the ionic strength of reaction mixtures containing normal serum or partially purified bactericidal fractions to levels which completely inhibited lysozyme activity resulted in stimulation of their respective killing kinetics. The addition of inhibitors to normal rabbit plasma serum completely eliminated its bactericidal activity. With regard to the killing of B. subtilis by rabbit and human blood fractions, these analyses clearly demonstrated that (i) although lysozyme is not a significant antibacterial component of normal rabbit serum, it represents the principal factor in normal rabbit plasma serum; (ii) different primary bactericidal mechanisms which are not detectable by singlepoint analyses operate in the sera of different species; and (iii) purified β-lysin isolated from normal rabbit serum by the classical procedure is a heterogenous mixture of components. Images PMID:115789

  14. Interaction between lysozyme and procyanidin: multilevel structural nature and effect of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Liang, Miao; Liu, Rui; Qi, Wei; Su, Rongxin; Yu, Yanjun; Wang, Libing; He, Zhimin

    2013-06-01

    The interaction of procyanidins with proteins has aroused extensive attention due to its important relationship with the bioavailability and astringent property of polyphenols. In the present work, we have investigated the interactions of lysozyme with procyanidin dimer (B3) using various biophysical approaches, which aims to provide insights into the mechanism of protein/polyphenol aggregation. Procyanidin B3 spontaneously binds lysozyme, inducing the multilevel structural changes in lysozyme and the formation of insoluble complexes. The relationship between lysozyme aggregation and the loss of enzymatic activity was monitored using dynamic light scattering and fluorescence quenching. The influences of two carbohydrates (gum arabic and sucrose) on lysozyme/B3 aggregation were also studied. Gum arabic effectively inhibited the formation of insoluble aggregates, but was unable to restore the fluorescence and activity of lysozyme. However, sucrose concomitantly decreased the aggregate size with the recovery of fluorescence and lysozyme activity. These results proposed two probable mechanisms by which these two carbohydrates inhibit protein/polyphenol aggregation.

  15. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of a New C-type Lysozyme Gene from Yak Mammary Tissue.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ming Feng; Hu, Ming Jun; Ren, Hong Hui; Wang, Li

    2015-12-01

    Milk lysozyme is the ubiquitous enzyme in milk of mammals. In this study, the cDNA sequence of a new chicken-type (c-type) milk lysozyme gene (YML), was cloned from yak mammary gland tissue. A 444 bp open reading frames, which encodes 148 amino acids (16.54 kDa) with a signal peptide of 18 amino acids, was sequenced. Further analysis indicated that the nucleic acid and amino acid sequences identities between yak and cow milk lysozyme were 89.04% and 80.41%, respectively. Recombinant yak milk lysozyme (rYML) was produced by Escherichia coli BL21 and Pichia pastoris X33. The highest lysozyme activity was detected for heterologous protein rYML5 (M = 1,864.24 U/mg, SD = 25.75) which was expressed in P. pastoris with expression vector pPICZαA and it clearly inhibited growth of Staphylococcus aureus. Result of the YML gene expression using quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that the YML gene was up-regulated to maximum at 30 day postpartum, that is, comparatively high YML can be found in initial milk production. The phylogenetic tree indicated that the amino acid sequence was similar to cow kidney lysozyme, which implied that the YML may have diverged from a different ancestor gene such as cow mammary glands. In our study, we suggest that YML be a new c-type lysozyme expressed in yak mammary glands that plays a role as host immunity.

  16. Lysozyme activity in earthworm (Lumbricus terrestris) coelomic fluid and coelomocytes: Enzyme assay for immunotoxicity of xenobiotics

    SciTech Connect

    Goven, A.J.; Chen, S.C.; Fitzpatrick, L.C. . Dept. of Biological Sciences); Venables, B.J. . Dept. of Biological Sciences TRAC Laboratories Inc., Denton, TX )

    1994-04-01

    Lysozyme activity in earthworm (Lumbricus terrestris) coelomic fluid and coelomocytes appears sufficiently sensitive for use as a nonmammalian biomarker to detect toxic effects of sublethal body burdens of Cu[sup 2+]. Lysozyme, a phylogenetically conserved enzyme, is capable of bactericidal activity via action on peptidoglycan of gram-positive bacterial cell walls and functions as a component of an organism's innate antimicrobial defense mechanism. Coelomic fluid and coelomocyte lysozyme activities, which exhibit temperature-response patterns similar to those of human saliva, plasma, serum and leukocyte extracts, were sensitive to Cu[sup 2+] exposure. Lysozyme activity of coelomic fluid and coelomocyte extracts from earthworms exposed for 5 d to CuSO[sub 4], using filter paper contact exposure, decreased with increasing sublethal Cu[sup 2+] concentrations of 0.05 and 0.1 [mu]g/cm[sup 2]. Compared to controls, coelomic fluid lysozyme activity was suppressed significantly at both exposure concentrations, whereas coelomocyte extract lysozyme activity was suppressed significantly at the 0.1-[mu]g/cm[sup 2] exposure concentration. Low inherent natural variability and sensitivity to sublethal Cu[sup 2+] body burdens indicate that lysozyme activity has potential as a biomarker for assaying immunotoxicity of metals.

  17. The mucosal expression signatures of g-type lysozyme in turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) following bacterial challenge.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chengbin; Fu, Qiang; Zhou, Shun; Song, Lin; Ren, Yichao; Dong, Xiaoyu; Su, Baofeng; Li, Chao

    2016-07-01

    The mucosal surfaces constitute the first line of host defense against infection, and also serve as the dynamic interfaces that simultaneously mediate a diverse array of critical physiological processes, while in constantly contact with a wide range of pathogens. The lysozymes are considered as key components for innate immune response to pathogen infection with their strong antibacterial activities. But their activities in mucosal immune responses were always overlooked, especially for g-type lysozymes, whose expression patterns in mucosal tissues following bacterial challenge are still limited. Towards to this end, here, we characterized the g-type lysozymes, Lyg1 and Lyg2 in turbot, and determined their expression patterns in mucosal barriers following different bacterial infection. The phylogenetic analysis revealed the turbot g-type lysozyme genes showed the closest relationship to Cynoglossus semilaevis. The two lysozyme genes showed different expression patterns following challenge. Lyg2 was significantly up-regulated in mucosal tissues following Vibrio anguillarum and Streptococcus iniae challenge, while Lyg1 showed a general trend of down-regulation. The significant mucosal expression signatures of g-type lysozyme genes indicated their key roles to prevent pathogen attachment and entry in the first line of host defense system. Further functional studies should be carried out to better characterize the availability of utilization of g-type lysozyme to increase the disease resistance in the mucosal surfaces and facilitate the disease resistant breeding selection. PMID:27189917

  18. Covalent immobilization of lysozyme on ethylene vinyl alcohol films for nonmigrating antimicrobial packaging applications.

    PubMed

    Muriel-Galet, V; Talbert, J N; Hernandez-Munoz, P; Gavara, R; Goddard, J M

    2013-07-10

    The objective of this study was to develop a new antimicrobial film, in which lysozyme was covalently attached onto two different ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymers (EVOH 29 and EVOH 44). The EVOH surface was modified with UV irradiation treatment to generate carboxylic acid groups, and lysozyme was covalently attached to the functionalized polymer surface. Surface characterization of control and modified films was performed using attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and dye assay. The value of protein loading after attachment on the surface was 8.49 μg protein/cm(2) and 5.74 μg protein/cm(2) for EVOH 29 and EVOH 44, respectively, after 10 min UV irradiation and bioconjugation. The efficacy of the EVOH-lysozyme films was assessed using Micrococcus lysodeikticus. The antimicrobial activity of the films was tested against Listeria monocytogenes and was similar to an equivalent amount of free enzyme. The reduction was 1.08 log for EVOH 29-lysozyme, 0.95 log for EVOH 44-lysozyme, and 1.34 log for free lysozyme. This work confirmed the successful use of lysozyme immobilization on the EVOH surface for antimicrobial packaging.

  19. A study of the interaction between malachite green and lysozyme by steady-state fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Ding, Fei; Liu, Wei; Liu, Feng; Li, Zhi-Yuan; Sun, Ying

    2009-09-01

    The interaction of a N-methylated diaminotriphenylmethane dye, malachite green, with lysozyme was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopic techniques under physiological conditions. The binding parameters have been evaluated by fluorescence quenching methods. The results revealed that malachite green caused the fluorescence quenching of lysozyme through a static quenching procedure. The thermodynamic parameters like DeltaH and DeltaS were calculated to be -15.33 kJ mol(-1) and 19.47 J mol(-1) K(-1) according to van't Hoff equation, respectively, which proves main interaction between malachite green and lysozyme is hydrophobic forces and hydrogen bond contact. The distance r between donor (lysozyme) and acceptor (malachite green) was obtained to be 3.82 nm according to Frster's theory. The results of synchronous fluorescence, UV/vis and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra showed that binding of malachite green with lysozyme can induce conformational changes in lysozyme. In addition, the effects of common ions on the constants of lysozyme-malachite green complex were also discussed.

  20. Recognition of bacterial lipopolysaccharide using bacteriophage-adhesin-coated long-period gratings.

    PubMed

    Brzozowska, Ewa; Śmietana, Mateusz; Koba, Marcin; Górska, Sabina; Pawlik, Krzysztof; Gamian, Andrzej; Bock, Wojtek J

    2015-05-15

    In this paper we present a new type of highly sensitive label-free sensor based on long-period gratings (LPG) coated with T4 bacteriophage (phage) adhesin. The adhesin (gp37) binds Escherichia coli B (E. coli B) by recognizing its bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The LPG biofunctionalization methodology is based on coating LPG surface with nickel ions capable of gp37 histidine tag reversible binding. For the first time recombinant adhesive phage protein has been used as a receptor molecule in biosensing scheme. The specificity of LPS binding by adhesin has been tested with LPG-based device and confirmed using Western blot, Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) and BIACORE methods. The LPG-based sensor can measure bacterial contamination in real time and with a high accuracy. We show that T4 phage adhesin binds E. coli B LPS in its native or denatured form. The binding is highly specific and irreversible. The applied procedure allows for obtaining reusable biosensors. PMID:25067838

  1. Control of Electrostatic Interactions Between F-Actin And Genetically Modified Lysozyme in Aqueous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, L.K.; Xian, W.; Guaqueta, C.; Strohman, M.; Vrasich, C.R.; Luijten, E.; Wong, G.C.L.

    2009-06-04

    The aim for deterministic control of the interactions between macroions in aqueous media has motivated widespread experimental and theoretical work. Although it has been well established that like-charged macromolecules can aggregate under the influence of oppositely charged condensing agents, the specific conditions for the stability of such aggregates can only be determined empirically. We examine these conditions, which involve an interplay of electrostatic and osmotic effects, by using a well defined model system composed of F-actin, an anionic rod-like polyelectrolyte, and lysozyme, a cationic globular protein with a charge that can be genetically modified. The structure and stability of actin-lysozyme complexes for different lysozyme charge mutants and salt concentrations are examined by using synchrotron x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. We provide evidence that supports a structural transition from columnar arrangements of F-actin held together by arrays of lysozyme at the threefold interstitial sites of the actin sublattice to marginally stable complexes in which lysozyme resides at twofold bridging sites between actin. The reduced stability arises from strongly reduced partitioning of salt between the complex and the surrounding solution. Changes in the stability of actin-lysozyme complexes are of biomedical interest because their formation has been reported to contribute to the persistence of airway infections in cystic fibrosis by sequestering antimicrobials such as lysozyme. We present x-ray microscopy results that argue for the existence of actin-lysozyme complexes in cystic fibrosis sputum and demonstrate that, for a wide range of salt conditions, charge-reduced lysozyme is not sequestered in ordered complexes while retaining its bacterial killing activity.

  2. Control of electrostatic interactions between F-actin and genetically modified lysozyme in aqueous media

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, Lori K.; Xian, Wujing; Guaqueta, Camilo; Strohman, Michael J.; Vrasich, Chuck R.; Luijten, Erik; Wong, Gerard C.L.

    2008-07-11

    The aim for deterministic control of the interactions between macroions in aqueous media has motivated widespread experimental and theoretical work. Although it has been well established that like-charged macromolecules can aggregate under the influence of oppositely charged condensing agents, the specific conditions for the stability of such aggregates can only be determined empirically. We examine these conditions, which involve an interplay of electrostatic and osmotic effects, by using a well defined model system composed of F-actin, an anionic rod-like polyelectrolyte, and lysozyme, a cationic globular protein with a charge that can be genetically modified. The structure and stability of actin-lysozyme complexes for different lysozyme charge mutants and salt concentrations are examined by using synchrotron x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. We provide evidence that supports a structural transition from columnar arrangements of F-actin held together by arrays of lysozyme at the threefold interstitial sites of the actin sublattice to marginally stable complexes in which lysozyme resides at twofold bridging sites between actin. The reduced stability arises from strongly reduced partitioning of salt between the complex and the surrounding solution. Changes in the stability of actin-lysozyme complexes are of biomedical interest because their formation has been reported to contribute to the persistence of airway infections in cystic fibrosis by sequestering antimicrobials such as lysozyme. We present x-ray microscopy results that argue for the existence of actin-lysozyme complexes in cystic fibrosis sputum and demonstrate that, for a wide range of salt conditions, charge-reduced lysozyme is not sequestered in ordered complexes while retaining its bacterial killing activity.

  3. Activity of lysozyme on Lactobacillus hilgardii strains isolated from Port wine.

    PubMed

    Dias, Rita; Vilas-Boas, Eduardo; Campos, Francisco M; Hogg, Tim; Couto, José António

    2015-08-01

    This work evaluated the effect of lysozyme on lactobacilli isolated from Port wine. Bacterial growth experiments were conducted in MRS/TJ medium and inactivation studies were performed in phosphate buffer (KH2PO4), distilled water and wine supplemented with different concentrations of lysozyme. The response of bacteria to lysozyme was found to be highly strain dependent. Some strains of Lactobacillus hilgardii together with Lactobacillus collinoides and Lactobacillus fructivorans were found to be resistant to concentrations of lysozyme as high as 2000 mg/L. It was observed that among the L. hilgardii taxon the resistant strains possess an S-layer coat. Apparently, the strains of L. collinoides and L. fructivorans studied are also S-layer producers as suggested by the total protein profile obtained by SDS-PAGE. Thus, the hypothetical protective role of the S-layer against the action of lysozyme was investigated. From the various treatments used to remove the protein from the surface of the cells, the one employing LiCl (5 M) was the most effective. LiCl pre-treated cells exposed to lysozyme (2000 mg/L) in KH2PO4 buffer maintained its resistance. However, when cells were suspended in distilled water an increased sensitivity to lysozyme was observed. Moreover, it was found that the addition of ethanol (20% v/v) to the suspension medium (distilled water) triggered a strong inactivation effect especially on cells previously treated with LiCl (reduction of >6 CFU log cycles). The results suggest that the S-layer exerts a protective effect against lysozyme and that the cell suspension medium influences the bacteriolysis efficiency. It was also noted that ethanol enhances the inactivation effect of lysozyme.

  4. Comparative evaluation of multi-purpose solutions in the stabilization of tear lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Barniak, Vicki L; Burke, Susan E; Venkatesh, Srini

    2010-12-01

    The range and extent of tear proteins removed by various multi-purpose solutions has been investigated, but there is little information in the literature about their ability to prevent denaturation of tear proteins, particularly lysozyme. The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of Bausch+Lomb Biotrue™ multi-purpose solution and other care solutions to affect denaturation of lysozyme using a lysozyme activity assay. The test solutions used were: Biotrue multi-purpose solution, Bausch+Lomb renu(®) fresh™, formerly ReNu MultiPlus(®), Alcon OPTI-FREE RepleniSH, Alcon OPTI-FREE EXPRESS, CIBA VISION AQuify, and AMO COMPLETE Multi-Purpose Solution Easy Rub Formula. A phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution served as a control. The test and control solutions containing lysozyme were exposed to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), a known denaturant of the enzyme. The assay was based on digestion of the cell wall of Micrococcus luteus in a suspension, a substrate sensitive to active lysozyme. Enzymatic activity against M. luteus was used to assess activity of lysozyme. The decrease in the turbidity of the cell wall suspension, a measure of relative enzyme activity, was determined by following the decrease in absorbance (at 450nm) over time using a spectrophotometer. Statistically significant greater stabilization of lysozyme was observed with Biotrue multi-purpose solution and renu fresh than with OPTI-FREE RepleniSH, OPTI-FREE EXPRESS, AQuify, COMPLETE Multi-Purpose Solution Easy Rub Formula, and a PBS control. The lysozyme activity assay revealed that Biotrue multi-purpose solution and renu fresh have the ability to stabilize lysozyme under conditions that typically denature the protein.

  5. Development, characterization, and technical applications of a fish lysozyme-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb M24-2).

    PubMed

    Marsh, Marlee B; Rice, Charles D

    2010-12-01

    Lysozyme is one of several humoral and cellular factors associated with front line, innate immunity in all vertebrates. Historically, circulating lysozyme has been quantified in teleosts by measuring enzymatic activity against heat-killed Mycococcus lysodieticus using whole serum or plasma at a low pH. However, the amount of serum or plasma required for standard lysozyme activity exceeds that which can be easily acquired from small fish, thus making lysozyme a difficult endpoint to measure in limited sample volumes. Moreover, while circulating lysozyme is considered to be an indicator of proinflammatory phagocyte activity, the cellular source of this protein is not easily detected in fish. While several antibodies against lysozyme are commercially available for use in higher vertebrates, neither reacts with lysozyme in fish. In this study, a monoclonal antibody (mAb) for detecting and quantifying lysozyme was developed from mummichog, Fundulus heteroclitus, myeloid cells that also recognizes hen egg lysozyme (HEL), then tested for cross-reactivity in different species of teleosts. A single protein of ≈14-15 kDa mass was identified by the mAb in fish cell lysates and plasma samples, as well as denatured HEL. Total circulating lysozyme protein was compared to lysozyme activity using standard ELISA procedures and was found to correlate with enzymatic activity. Using mAb M24-2, intracellular lysozyme protein was detected in formalin-fixed and permeabilized lymphoid cells adhered to glass cover slips. Moreover, mAb M24-2 localizes lysozyme to myeloid cells. Finally, it was demonstrated that mAb M24-2 is suitable for immunohistochemistry in that lysozyme could be detected in plastic-embedded lymphoid tissues.

  6. M13 Bacteriophage Based Protein Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ju Hun

    Despite significant progress in biotechnology and biosensing, early detection and disease diagnosis remains a critical issue for improving patient survival rates and well-being. Many of the typical detection schemes currently used possess issues such as low sensitivity and accuracy and are also time consuming to run and expensive. In addition, multiplexed detection remains difficult to achieve. Therefore, developing advanced approaches for reliable, simple, quantitative analysis of multiple markers in solution that also are highly sensitive are still in demand. In recent years, much of the research has primarily focused on improving two key components of biosensors: the bio-recognition agent (bio-receptor) and the transducer. Particular bio-receptors that have been used include antibodies, aptamers, molecular imprinted polymers, and small affinity peptides. In terms of transducing agents, nanomaterials have been considered as attractive candidates due to their inherent nanoscale size, durability and unique chemical and physical properties. The key focus of this thesis is the design of a protein detection and identification system that is based on chemically engineered M13 bacteriophage coupled with nanomaterials. The first chapter provides an introduction of biosensors and M13 bacteriophage in general, where the advantages of each are provided. In chapter 2, an efficient and enzyme-free sensor is demonstrated from modified M13 bacteriophage to generate highly sensitive colorimetric signals from gold nanocrystals. In chapter 3, DNA conjugated M13 were used to enable facile and rapid detection of antigens in solution that also provides modalities for identification. Lastly, high DNA loadings per phage was achieved via hydrozone chemistry and these were applied in conjunction with Raman active DNA-gold/silver core/shell nanoparticles toward highly sensitive SERS sensing.

  7. Human Interleukin-2 and Hen Egg White Lysozyme: Screening for Bacteriolytic Activity against Various Bacterial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Levashov, P. A.; Ovchinnikova, E. D.; Morozova, O. A.; Matolygina, D. A.; Osipova, H. E.; Cherdyntseva, T. A.; Savin, S. S.; Zakharova, G. S.; Alekseeva, A. A.; Belogurova, N. G.; Smirnov, S. A.; Tishkov, V. I.; Levashov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    The bacteriolytic activity of interleukin-2 and hen egg white lysozyme against 34 different species of microorganisms has been studied. It was found that 6 species of microorganisms are lysed in the presence of interleukin-2. All interleukin-2-sensitive microorganisms belong either to the Enterobacteriaceae, Bacillaceae, or the Lactobacillaceae family. It was also found that 12 species of microorganisms are lysed in the presence of lysozyme, and 16 species of microorganisms are lysed in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The bacteriolytic activity of interleukin-2 and lysozyme was studied at various pH values. PMID:27099789

  8. Osmotic pressures and second virial coefficients for aqueous saline solutions of lysozyme

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Y.U.; Anderson,C.O.; Blanch, H.W.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1999-09-01

    Experimental data at 25 degrees C are reported for osmotic pressures of aqueous solutions containing lysozyme and any one of the following salts: ammonium sulfate, ammonium oxalate and ammonium phosphate at ionic strength 1 or 3M. Data were obtained using a Wescor Colloid Membrane Osmometer at lysozyme concentrations from about 4 to 20 grams per liter at pH 4, 7 or 8. Osmotic second virial coefficients for lysozyme were calculated from the osmotic-pressure data. All coefficients were negative, increasing in magnitude with ionic strength. Results are insensitive to the nature of the anion, but rise slightly in magnitude as the size of the anion increases.

  9. The use of lysozyme modified with fluorescein for the detection of Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Arabski, Michał; Konieczna, Iwona; Tusińska, Ewa; Wąsik, Sławomir; Relich, Inga; Zając, Krzysztof; Kamiński, Zbigniew J; Kaca, Wiesław

    2015-01-01

    Lysozyme (1,4-β-N-acetylmuramidase) is commonly applied in the food, medical, and pharmaceutical industries. In this study, we tested a novel application of fluorescein-modified lysozyme (using carboxyfluorescein with a triazine-based coupling reagent) as a new tool for the detection of Gram-positive soil bacteria. The results, obtained by cultivation methods, fluorescence analysis, and laser interferometry, showed that, after optimization, fluorescein-modified lysozyme could be used to evaluate the prevalence of Gram-positive bacteria essential in bioremediation of soils with low pH, such as those degraded by sulfur.

  10. Human Interleukin-2 and Hen Egg White Lysozyme: Screening for Bacteriolytic Activity against Various Bacterial Cells.

    PubMed

    Levashov, P A; Ovchinnikova, E D; Morozova, O A; Matolygina, D A; Osipova, H E; Cherdyntseva, T A; Savin, S S; Zakharova, G S; Alekseeva, A A; Belogurova, N G; Smirnov, S A; Tishkov, V I; Levashov, A V

    2016-01-01

    The bacteriolytic activity of interleukin-2 and hen egg white lysozyme against 34 different species of microorganisms has been studied. It was found that 6 species of microorganisms are lysed in the presence of interleukin-2. All interleukin-2-sensitive microorganisms belong either to the Enterobacteriaceae, Bacillaceae, or the Lactobacillaceae family. It was also found that 12 species of microorganisms are lysed in the presence of lysozyme, and 16 species of microorganisms are lysed in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The bacteriolytic activity of interleukin-2 and lysozyme was studied at various pH values.

  11. Effect of zinc on lysozyme-like activity of the seastar Marthasterias glacialis (Echinodermata, Asteroidea) mucus.

    PubMed

    Stabili, L; Pagliara, P

    2009-03-01

    Lysozyme represents the best characterized enzyme involved in the self-defense from bacteria. In this study we analysed the effects of zinc on the lysozyme-like activity of the seastar Marthasterias glacialis mucus. This activity, detected by measuring the cleared lysis area of dried Micrococcus lysodeikticus cell walls on Petri dishes, was significantly reduced in presence of zinc. The results are discussed in the light of elucidating the possible relationship between environmental contaminants and increased disease susceptibility in seastars due to the decrease of antibacterial protection. The benefits of using the test of lysozyme activity to monitoring environmental pollution are highlighted.

  12. Structure and Stability of Self-Assembled Actin-Lysozyme Complexes in Salty Water

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, Lori K.; Guaqueta, Camilo; Lee, Jae-Wook; Slimmer, Scott C.; Luijten, Erik; Angelini, Thomas E.; Wong, Gerard C.L.

    2005-09-02

    Interactions between actin, an anionic polyelectrolyte, and lysozyme, a cationic globular protein, have been examined using a combination of synchrotron small-angle x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. Lysozyme initially bridges pairs of actin filaments, which relax into hexagonally coordinated columnar complexes comprised of actin held together by incommensurate one-dimensional close-packed arrays of lysozyme macroions. These complexes are found to be stable even in the presence of significant concentrations of monovalent salt, which is quantitatively explained from a redistribution of salt between the condensed and the aqueous phases.

  13. Structure and stability of self-assembled actin-lysozyme complexes in salty water.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Lori K; Guáqueta, Camilo; Angelini, Thomas E; Lee, Jae-Wook; Slimmer, Scott C; Luijten, Erik; Wong, Gerard C L

    2005-09-01

    Interactions between actin, an anionic polyelectrolyte, and lysozyme, a cationic globular protein, have been examined using a combination of synchrotron small-angle x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. Lysozyme initially bridges pairs of actin filaments, which relax into hexagonally coordinated columnar complexes comprised of actin held together by incommensurate one-dimensional close-packed arrays of lysozyme macroions. These complexes are found to be stable even in the presence of significant concentrations of monovalent salt, which is quantitatively explained from a redistribution of salt between the condensed and the aqueous phases.

  14. Production of lysozyme nanofibers using deep eutectic solvent aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Silva, Nuno H C S; Pinto, Ricardo J B; Freire, Carmen S R; Marrucho, Isabel M

    2016-11-01

    Amyloid fibrils have recently gained a lot of attention due to their morphology, functionality and mechanical strength, allowing for their application in nanofiber-based materials, biosensors, bioactive membranes and tissue engineering scaffolds. The in vitro production of amyloid fibrils is still a slow process, thus hampering the massive production of nanofibers and its consequent use. This work presents a new and faster (2-3h) fibrillation method for hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) using a deep eutectic solvent based on cholinium chloride and acetic acid. Nanofibers with dimensions of 0.5-1μm in length and 0.02-0.1μm in thickness were obtained. Experimental variables such as temperature and pH were also studied, unveiling their influence in fibrillation time and nanofibers morphology. These results open a new scope for protein fibrillation into nanofibers with applications ranging from medicine to soft matter and nanotechnology. PMID:27478961

  15. Modeling the Growth Rates of Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystal Faces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Meirong; Nadarajah, Arunan; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    The measured macroscopic growth rates of the (110) and (101) faces of tetragonal lysozyme show an unexpectedly complex dependence on the supersaturation. The growth rates decay asymptotically to zero when the supersaturation is lowered to zero and increase rapidly when the supersaturation is increased. When supersaturations are increased still further the growth rates attain a maximum before starting to decrease. However, growth of these crystals is known to proceed by the classical dislocation and 2D nucleation growth mechanisms. This anomaly can be explained if growth is assumed to occur not by monomer units but by lysozyme aggregates. Analysis of the molecular packing of these crystals revealed that they were constructed of strongly bonded 4(sub 3) helices, while weaker bonds were responsible for binding the helices to each other. It follows that during crystal growth the stronger bonds are formed before the weaker ones. Thus, the growth of these crystals could be viewed as a two step process: aggregate growth units corresponding to the 4(sub 3) helix are first formed in the bulk solution by stronger intermolecular bonds and then attached to the crystal face by weaker bonds on dislocation hillocks or 2D islands. This will lead to a distribution of aggregates in the solution with monomers and lower order aggregates being predominant at low supersaturations and higher order aggregates being predominant at high supersaturations. If the crystal grows mostly by higher order aggregates, such as tetramers and octamers, it would explain the anomalous dependence of the growth rates on the supersaturation. Besides the analysis of molecular packing, a comprehensive analysis of the measured (110) and (101) growth rates was also undertaken in this study. The distribution of aggregates in lysozyme nutrient solutions at various solution conditions were determined from reversible aggregation reactions at equilibrium. The supersaturation was defined for each aggregate species

  16. Production of lysozyme nanofibers using deep eutectic solvent aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Silva, Nuno H C S; Pinto, Ricardo J B; Freire, Carmen S R; Marrucho, Isabel M

    2016-11-01

    Amyloid fibrils have recently gained a lot of attention due to their morphology, functionality and mechanical strength, allowing for their application in nanofiber-based materials, biosensors, bioactive membranes and tissue engineering scaffolds. The in vitro production of amyloid fibrils is still a slow process, thus hampering the massive production of nanofibers and its consequent use. This work presents a new and faster (2-3h) fibrillation method for hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) using a deep eutectic solvent based on cholinium chloride and acetic acid. Nanofibers with dimensions of 0.5-1μm in length and 0.02-0.1μm in thickness were obtained. Experimental variables such as temperature and pH were also studied, unveiling their influence in fibrillation time and nanofibers morphology. These results open a new scope for protein fibrillation into nanofibers with applications ranging from medicine to soft matter and nanotechnology.

  17. Destabilase-lysozyme of medicinal leech. Multifunctionality of recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Zavalova, L L; Lazarev, V N; Levitsky, S A; Yudina, T G; Baskova, I P

    2010-09-01

    Preparation and purification of a recombinant protein are described along with characteristics of its specific (for ε-(γ-Glu)-Lys and D-dimer substrates) and nonspecific (for L-γ-Glu-pNA) isopeptidase activities; the absence of peptidase function for α-(α-Glu)-Lys substrate is noted. It is shown that the protein exhibits muramidase (cell walls of Micrococcus lysodeikticus) and specific glycosidase activities. The latter was determined towards the fluorogenic substrate 4-methylumbelliferyl-tetra-N-acetyl-β-chitotetraoxide. Antimicrobial activity of recombinant destabilase-lysozyme protein (recDest-Lys) and its 11-membered amphipathic peptide was revealed towards cells of the strict anaerobic Archaean Methanosarcina barkeri, whose cell walls contain no murein. Possible mechanisms of the effect of recDest-Lys on these cells are discussed.

  18. Effective interactions in molecular dynamics simulations of lysozyme solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellicane, Giuseppe; Sarkisov, Lev

    2014-09-01

    In this article we explore a problem of effective interactions between two rotationally restrained lysozyme molecules forming a crystal contact in aqueous solution. We perform non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations in order to estimate the interaction energy as a function of the distance between the two proteins obtained from direct application of the Jarzynski equality (JE), and compare it with that calculated by means of another non-equilibrium approach (Forward-Reverse method) and constrained force methods. The performance of the JE equality when applied to solvated protein interactions is discussed. All of the equilibrium and non-equilibrium methods show clear evidence that the potentials of mean force (PMF) are short-ranged, do not exceed few kTs, and that there is an accumulation of anions in the presence of hydrophobic surfaces.

  19. Hydration of lysozyme as observed by infrared spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liltorp, K; Maréchal, Y

    2005-11-01

    Infrared spectra of a film of lysozyme 3 mum thick, immersed in an atmosphere displaying a relative humidity, or hygrometry, which spans the whole range from 0 to 1 at room temperature, are recorded. The evolution of the spectra with this relative humidity is quantitatively analyzed on the basis of a newly proposed method. It allows the precise measurement of the quantity of water that remains embedded inside the dried sample at each stage of hydration, and the definition, in terms of chemical reactions of the three hydration mechanisms that correspond to the three hydration spectra on which all experimental spectra can be decomposed. With respect to preceding similar studies, some refinements are introduced that allow improvement of the interpretation, but that also raise some new questions, which mainly concern the structure of the hydrogen-bond network around the carbonyl peptide groups. PMID:15986502

  20. Bacterial genome remodeling through bacteriophage recombination.

    PubMed

    Menouni, Rachid; Hutinet, Geoffrey; Petit, Marie-Agnès; Ansaldi, Mireille

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages co-exist and co-evolve with their hosts in natural environments. Virulent phages lyse infected cells through lytic cycles, whereas temperate phages often remain dormant and can undergo lysogenic or lytic cycles. In their lysogenic state, prophages are actually part of the host genome and replicate passively in rhythm with host division. However, prophages are far from being passive residents: they can modify or bring new properties to their host. In this review, we focus on two important phage-encoded recombination mechanisms, i.e. site-specific recombination and homologous recombination, and how they remodel bacterial genomes. PMID:25790500