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Sample records for bacteriophage t4 lysozyme

  1. Systematic mutation of bacteriophage T4 lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Rennell, D; Bouvier, S E; Hardy, L W; Poteete, A R

    1991-11-05

    Amber mutations were introduced into every codon (except the initiating AUG) of the bacteriophage T4 lysozyme gene. The amber alleles were introduced into a bacteriophage P22 hybrid, called P22 e416, in which the normal P22 lysozyme gene is replaced by its T4 homologue, and which consequently depends upon T4 lysozyme for its ability to form a plaque. The resulting amber mutants were tested for plaque formation on amber suppressor strains of Salmonella typhimurium. Experiments with other hybrid phages engineered to produce different amounts of wild-type T4 lysozyme have shown that, to score as deleterious, a mutation must reduce lysozyme activity to less than 3% of that produced by wild-type P22 e416. Plating the collection of amber mutants covering 163 of the 164 codons of T4 lysozyme, on 13 suppressor strains that each insert a different amino acid substitutions at every position in the protein (except the first). Of the resulting 2015 single amino acid substitutions in T4 lysozyme, 328 were found to be sufficiently deleterious to inhibit plaque formation. More than half (55%) of the positions in the protein tolerated all substitutions examined. Among (N-terminal) amber fragments, only those of 161 or more residues are active. The effects of many of the deleterious substitutions are interpretable in light of the known structure of T4 lysozyme. Residues in the molecule that are refractory to replacements generally have solvent-inaccessible side-chains; the catalytic Glu11 and Asp20 residues are notable exceptions. Especially sensitive sites include residues involved in buried salt bridges near the catalytic site (Asp10, Arg145 and Arg148) and a few others that may have critical structural roles (Gly30, Trp138 and Tyr161).

  2. Control of Bacteriophage T4 Tail Lysozyme Activity During the Infection Process

    SciTech Connect

    Kanamaru, Shuji; Ishiwata, Yasutaka; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Rossmann, Michael G.; Arisaka, Fumio

    2010-07-19

    Bacteriophage T4 has an efficient mechanism for injecting the host Escherichia coli cell with genomic DNA. Its gene product 5 (gp5) has a needle-like structure attached to the end of a tube through which the DNA passes on its way out of the head and into the host. The gp5 needle punctures the outer cell membrane and then digests the peptidoglycan cell wall in the periplasmic space. gp5 is normally post-translationally cleaved between residues 351 and 352. The function of this process in controlling the lysozyme activity of gp5 has now been investigated. When gp5 is over-expressed in E. coli, two mutants (S351H and S351A) showed a reduction of cleavage products and five other mutants (S351L, S351K, S351Y, S351Q, and S351T) showed no cleavage. Furthermore, in a complementation assay at 20 C, the mutants that had no cleavage of gp5 produced a reduced number of plaques compared to wild-type T4. The crystal structure of the non-cleavage phenotype mutant of gp5, S351L, complexed with gene product 27, showed that the 18 residues in the vicinity of the potential cleavage site (disordered in the wild-type structure) had visible electron density. The polypeptide around the potential cleavage site is exposed, thus allowing access for an E. coli protease. The lysozyme activity is inhibited in the wild-type structure by a loop from the adjacent gp5 monomer that binds into the substrate-binding site. The same inhibition is apparent in the mutant structure, showing that the lysozyme is inhibited before gp5 is cleaved and, presumably, the lysozyme is activated only after gp5 has penetrated the outer membrane.

  3. Reexamination of the role of Asp20 in catalysis by bacteriophage T4 lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Hardy, L W; Poteete, A R

    1991-10-01

    Replacement of Asp20 in T4 lysozyme by Cys produces a variant with (1) nearly wild-type specific activity, (2) a newly acquired sensitivity to thiol-modifying reagents, and (3) a pH-activity profile that is very similar to that of the wild-type enzyme. These results indicate that the residue at position 20 has a significant nucleophilic function rather than merely an electrostatic role. The intermediate in catalysis by lysozyme is probably a covalent glycosyl-enzyme instead of the ion pair originally proposed.

  4. SRLS analysis of 15N relaxation from bacteriophage T4 lysozyme: a tensorial perspective that features domain motion.

    PubMed

    Meirovitch, Eva

    2012-05-31

    Bacteriophage T4L lysozyme (T4L) comprises two domains connected by a helical linker. Several methods detected ns domain motion associated with the binding of the peptidoglycan substrate. An ESR study of nitroxide-labeled T4L, based on the slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) approach, detected ns local motion involving the nitroxide and the helix housing it. (15)N−H spin relaxation data from T4L acquired at magnetic fields of 11.7 and 18.8 T, and 298 K, were analyzed previously with the model-free (MF) method. The results did not detect domain motion. SRLS is the generalization of MF. Here, we apply it to the same data analyzed previously with MF. The restricted local N−H motion is described in terms of tilted axial local ordering (S) and local diffusion (D(2)) tensors; dynamical coupling to the global tumbling is accounted for. We find that D(2,⊥) is 1.62 × 10(7) (1.56 × 10(7)) s(−1) for the N-terminal (C-terminal) domain. This dynamic mode represents domain motion. For the linker D(2,⊥) is the same as the rate of global tumbling, given by (1.46 ± 0.04) × 10(7) s(−1). D(2,∥) is 1.3 × 10(9), 1.8 × 10(9) and 5.3 × 10(9) s(−1) for the N-terminal domain, the C-terminal domain, and the linker, respectively. This dynamic mode represents N−H bond vector fluctuations. The principal axis of D(2) is virtually parallel to the N−H bond. The order parameter, S(0)(2), is 0.910 ± 0.046 for most N−H bonds. The principal axis of S is tilted from the C(i−1)(α) −C(i)(α) axis by −2° to 6° for the N-, and C-terminal domains, and by 2.5° for the linker. The tensorial-perspective-based and mode-coupling-based SRLS picture provides new insights into the structural dynamics of bacteriophage T4 lysozyme.

  5. Bacteriophage T4 genome.

    PubMed

    Miller, Eric S; Kutter, Elizabeth; Mosig, Gisela; Arisaka, Fumio; Kunisawa, Takashi; Rüger, Wolfgang

    2003-03-01

    Phage T4 has provided countless contributions to the paradigms of genetics and biochemistry. Its complete genome sequence of 168,903 bp encodes about 300 gene products. T4 biology and its genomic sequence provide the best-understood model for modern functional genomics and proteomics. Variations on gene expression, including overlapping genes, internal translation initiation, spliced genes, translational bypassing, and RNA processing, alert us to the caveats of purely computational methods. The T4 transcriptional pattern reflects its dependence on the host RNA polymerase and the use of phage-encoded proteins that sequentially modify RNA polymerase; transcriptional activator proteins, a phage sigma factor, anti-sigma, and sigma decoy proteins also act to specify early, middle, and late promoter recognition. Posttranscriptional controls by T4 provide excellent systems for the study of RNA-dependent processes, particularly at the structural level. The redundancy of DNA replication and recombination systems of T4 reveals how phage and other genomes are stably replicated and repaired in different environments, providing insight into genome evolution and adaptations to new hosts and growth environments. Moreover, genomic sequence analysis has provided new insights into tail fiber variation, lysis, gene duplications, and membrane localization of proteins, while high-resolution structural determination of the "cell-puncturing device," combined with the three-dimensional image reconstruction of the baseplate, has revealed the mechanism of penetration during infection. Despite these advances, nearly 130 potential T4 genes remain uncharacterized. Current phage-sequencing initiatives are now revealing the similarities and differences among members of the T4 family, including those that infect bacteria other than Escherichia coli. T4 functional genomics will aid in the interpretation of these newly sequenced T4-related genomes and in broadening our understanding of the complex

  6. Bacteriophage T4 Genome†

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Eric S.; Kutter, Elizabeth; Mosig, Gisela; Arisaka, Fumio; Kunisawa, Takashi; Rüger, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    Phage T4 has provided countless contributions to the paradigms of genetics and biochemistry. Its complete genome sequence of 168,903 bp encodes about 300 gene products. T4 biology and its genomic sequence provide the best-understood model for modern functional genomics and proteomics. Variations on gene expression, including overlapping genes, internal translation initiation, spliced genes, translational bypassing, and RNA processing, alert us to the caveats of purely computational methods. The T4 transcriptional pattern reflects its dependence on the host RNA polymerase and the use of phage-encoded proteins that sequentially modify RNA polymerase; transcriptional activator proteins, a phage sigma factor, anti-sigma, and sigma decoy proteins also act to specify early, middle, and late promoter recognition. Posttranscriptional controls by T4 provide excellent systems for the study of RNA-dependent processes, particularly at the structural level. The redundancy of DNA replication and recombination systems of T4 reveals how phage and other genomes are stably replicated and repaired in different environments, providing insight into genome evolution and adaptations to new hosts and growth environments. Moreover, genomic sequence analysis has provided new insights into tail fiber variation, lysis, gene duplications, and membrane localization of proteins, while high-resolution structural determination of the “cell-puncturing device,” combined with the three-dimensional image reconstruction of the baseplate, has revealed the mechanism of penetration during infection. Despite these advances, nearly 130 potential T4 genes remain uncharacterized. Current phage-sequencing initiatives are now revealing the similarities and differences among members of the T4 family, including those that infect bacteria other than Escherichia coli. T4 functional genomics will aid in the interpretation of these newly sequenced T4-related genomes and in broadening our understanding of the

  7. Structure and function of bacteriophage T4

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Moh Lan; Rossmann, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophage T4 is the most well-studied member of Myoviridae, the most complex family of tailed phages. T4 assembly is divided into three independent pathways: the head, the tail and the long tail fibers. The prolate head encapsidates a 172 kbp concatemeric dsDNA genome. The 925 Å-long tail is surrounded by the contractile sheath and ends with a hexagonal baseplate. Six long tail fibers are attached to the baseplate’s periphery and are the host cell’s recognition sensors. The sheath and the baseplate undergo large conformational changes during infection. X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy have provided structural information on protein–protein and protein–nucleic acid interactions that regulate conformational changes during assembly and infection of Escherichia coli cells. PMID:25517898

  8. An improved 96-well turbidity assay for T4 lysozyme activity

    PubMed Central

    Toro, Tasha B.; Nguyen, Thao P.; Watt, Terry J.

    2015-01-01

    T4 lysozyme (T4L) is an important model system for investigating the relationship between protein structure and function. Despite being extensively studied, a reliable, quantitative activity assay for T4L has not been developed. Here, we present an improved T4L turbidity assay as well as an affinity-based T4L expression and purification protocol. This assay is designed for 96-well format and utilizes conditions amenable for both T4L and other lysozymes. This protocol enables easy, efficient, and quantitative characterization of T4L variants and allows comparison between different lysozymes. Our method: • Is applicable for all lysozymes, with enhanced sensitivity for T4 lysozyme compared to other 96-well plate turbidity assays; • Utilizes standardized conditions for comparing T4 lysozyme variants and other lysozymes; and • Incorporates a simplified expression and purification protocol for T4 lysozyme. PMID:26150996

  9. Solid-state synthesis and mechanical unfolding of polymers of T4 lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Yang, G; Cecconi, C; Baase, W A; Vetter, I R; Breyer, W A; Haack, J A; Matthews, B W; Dahlquist, F W; Bustamante, C

    2000-01-04

    Recent advances in single molecule manipulation methods offer a novel approach to investigating the protein folding problem. These studies usually are done on molecules that are naturally organized as linear arrays of globular domains. To extend these techniques to study proteins that normally exist as monomers, we have developed a method of synthesizing polymers of protein molecules in the solid state. By introducing cysteines at locations where bacteriophage T4 lysozyme molecules contact each other in a crystal and taking advantage of the alignment provided by the lattice, we have obtained polymers of defined polarity up to 25 molecules long that retain enzymatic activity. These polymers then were manipulated mechanically by using a modified scanning force microscope to characterize the force-induced reversible unfolding of the individual lysozyme molecules. This approach should be general and adaptable to many other proteins with known crystal structures. For T4 lysozyme, the force required to unfold the monomers was 64 +/- 16 pN at the pulling speed used. Refolding occurred within 1 sec of relaxation with an efficiency close to 100%. Analysis of the force versus extension curves suggests that the mechanical unfolding transition follows a two-state model. The unfolding forces determined in 1 M guanidine hydrochloride indicate that in these conditions the activation barrier for unfolding is reduced by 2 kcal/mol.

  10. Genetic Exclusion in Bacteriophage T4.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    185-197. Maniatus, T., E. F. Fritsch and J. Sambrook (1982). Molecular Clan ing: A Laboratory Manual Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Mathews, C. K...the sp gene to a region between 21.647 and 22.014 kbp on the T4 restrictior map and determined its molecular weight as aporo’,i tel,,- 15 IDa. This...e:xplained by a temrer t e induced L conformational rearrangement hypo".. ". This wori: lini:s molecular cieneic.r" the ecological concept of

  11. Gamma-Ray Mutagenesis in Bacteriophage T4

    PubMed Central

    Conkling, Mark A.; Grunau, John A.; Drake, John W.

    1976-01-01

    137Cs-gamma irradiation of bacteriophage T4 induces large deletions plus a variety of types of point mutations. All mutations arise with single-hit kinetics, and all by a misrepair process. The estimated point mutation rate is 1.5 x 10-9 per locus per rad. PMID:1269910

  12. REDOR NMR Characterization of DNA Packaging in Bacteriophage T4

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tsyr-Yan; Schaefer, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Bacteriophage T4 is a large-tailed E. coli virus whose capsid is 120 × 86 nm. ATP-driven DNA packaging of the T4 capsid results in the loading of a 171-kb genome in less than 5 minutes during viral infection. We have isolated 50-mg quantities of uniform 15N and [ε-15N]lysine-labeled bacteriophage T4. We have also introduced 15NH4+ into filled, unlabeled capsids from synthetic medium by exchange. We have examined lyo- and cryoprotected lyophilized T4 using 15N{31P} and 31P{15N} rotational-echo double resonance. The results of these experiments have shown that: (i) packaged DNA is in an unperturbed duplex B-form conformation; (ii) the DNA phosphate negative charge is balanced by lysyl amines (3.2%), polyamines (5.8%), and monovalent cations (40%); and (iii) 11% of lysyl amines, 40% of –NH2 groups of polyamines, and 80% of monovalent cations within the lyophilized T4 capsid, are involved in the DNA charge balance. The NMR evidence suggests that DNA enters the T4 capsid in a charge-unbalanced state. We propose that electrostatic interactions may provide free energy to supplement the nanomotor-driven T4 DNA packaging. PMID:18703073

  13. Co-option of bacteriophage lysozyme genes by bivalve genomes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunyang; Jin, Min; Lan, Jiangfeng; Ye, Ting; Hui, Kaimin; Tan, Jingmin; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Wen; Han, Guan-Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotes have occasionally acquired genetic material through horizontal gene transfer (HGT). However, little is known about the evolutionary and functional significance of such acquisitions. Lysozymes are ubiquitous enzymes that degrade bacterial cell walls. Here, we provide evidence that two subclasses of bivalves (Heterodonta and Palaeoheterodonta) acquired a lysozyme gene via HGT, building on earlier findings. Phylogenetic analyses place the bivalve lysozyme genes within the clade of bacteriophage lysozyme genes, indicating that the bivalves acquired the phage-type lysozyme genes from bacteriophages, either directly or through intermediate hosts. These bivalve lysozyme genes underwent dramatic structural changes after their co-option, including intron gain and fusion with other genes. Moreover, evidence suggests that recurrent gene duplication occurred in the bivalve lysozyme genes. Finally, we show the co-opted lysozymes exhibit a capacity for antibacterial action, potentially augmenting the immune function of related bivalves. This represents an intriguing evolutionary strategy in the eukaryote–microbe arms race, in which the genetic materials of bacteriophages are co-opted by eukaryotes, and then used by eukaryotes to combat bacteria, using a shared weapon against a common enemy. PMID:28100665

  14. Bacteriophage T4 deoxynucleotide kinase: gene cloning and enzyme purification.

    PubMed Central

    Brush, G S; Bhatnagar, S K; Bessman, M J

    1990-01-01

    Gene 1 of bacteriophage T4 has been cloned into a lambda pL expression vector, resulting in the overproduction of deoxynucleotide kinase. A procedure that includes affinity chromatography on Cibacron Blue F3GA-agarose has been used to purify milligram quantities of enzymes from a 2-liter culture. The enzyme has been partially characterized in vitro and in vivo, and it appears to be identical to the deoxynucleotide kinase isolated from T4-infected Escherichia coli. These results prove the earlier contention that the phosphorylation of three dissimilar deoxynucleotides (5-hydroxymethyldeoxycytidylate, dTMP, and dGMP), to the exclusion of most others, is catalyzed by a single protein. Images PMID:2160930

  15. Mechanisms of Spontaneous and Induced Frameshift Mutation in Bacteriophage T4

    PubMed Central

    Streisinger, George; Owen, Joyce Emrich

    1985-01-01

    Frequencies of spontaneous and proflavine-induced frameshift mutations increase dramatically as a function of the number of reiterated base pairs at each of two sites in the lysozyme gene of bacteriophage T4. At each site, proflavine induces addition mutations more frequently than deletion mutations. We confirm that the steroidal diamine, irehdiamine A, induces frameshift addition mutations. At sites of reiterated bases, we propose that base pairing is misaligned adjacent to a gap. The misaligned configuration is stabilized by the stacking of mutagen molecules around the extrahelical base, forming a sandwich. Proflavine induces addition mutations efficiently at a site without any reiterated bases. Mutagenesis at such sites may be due to mutagen-induced stuttering of the replication complex. PMID:3988038

  16. Bunching effect in single-molecule T4 lysozyme nonequilibrium conformational dynamics under enzymatic reactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanmin; Lu, H Peter

    2010-05-20

    The bunching effect, implying that conformational motion times tend to bunch in a finite and narrow time window, is observed and identified to be associated with substrate-enzyme complex formation in T4 lysozyme conformational dynamics under enzymatic reactions. Using single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, we have probed T4 lysozyme conformational motions under the hydrolysis reaction of polysaccharide of E. coli B cell walls by monitoring the fluorescence resonant energy transfer (FRET) between a donor-acceptor probe pair tethered to T4 lysozyme domains involving open-close hinge-bending motions. On the basis of the single-molecule spectroscopic results, molecular dynamics simulation, and a random walk model analysis, multiple intermediate states have been estimated in the evolution of T4 lysozyme enzymatic reaction active complex formation (Chen, Y.; Hu, D.; Vorpagel, E. R.; Lu, H. P. Probing single-molecule T4 lysozyme conformational dynamics by intramolecular fluorescence energy transfer. J. Phys. Chem. B 2003, 107, 7947-7956). In this Article, we report progress on the analysis of the reported experimental results, and we have identified the bunching effect of the substrate-enzyme active complex formation time in T4 lysozyme enzymatic reactions. We show that the bunching effect, a dynamic behavior observed for the catalytic hinge-bending conformational motions of T4 lysozyme, is a convoluted outcome of multiple consecutive Poisson rate processes that are defined by protein functional motions under substrate-enzyme interactions; i.e., convoluted multiple Poisson rate processes give rise to the bunching effect in the enzymatic reaction dynamics. We suggest that the bunching effect is likely common in protein conformational dynamics involved in conformation-gated protein functions.

  17. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of intact bacteriophage T4D particles.

    PubMed Central

    Childs, J D; Birnboim, H C

    1975-01-01

    A method for the electrophoresis of intact bacteriophage T4D particles through polyacrylamide gels has been developed. It was found that phage particles will migrate through dilute polyacrylamide gels (less than 2.1%) in the presence of a low concentration of MgCl2. As few as 5 x 10(9) phage particles can be seen directly as a light-scattering band during the course of electrophoresis. The band can also be detected by scanning gels at 260 to 265 nm or by eluting viable phage particles from gel slices. A new mutant (eph1) has been identified on the basis of its decreased electrophoretic mobility compared with that of the wild type; mutant particles migrated 14% slower than the wild type particles at pH 8.3 and 35% slower at pH 5.0. The isoelectric points of both the wild type and eph1 mutant were found to be between pH 4.0 and 5.0. Particles of T4 with different head lengths were also studied. Petite particles (heads 20% shorter than normal) migrated at the same rate as normal-size particles. Giant particles, heterogenous with respect to head length (two to nine times normal), migrated faster than normal-size particles as a diffuse band. This diffuseness was due to separation within the band of particles having mobilities ranging from 8 to 35% faster than those of normal-size particles. These observations extend the useful range of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to include much larger particles than have previously been studied, including most viruses. Images PMID:240037

  18. Adsorption of T4 bacteriophages on planar indium tin oxide surface via controlled surface tailoring.

    PubMed

    Liana, Ayu Ekajayanthi; Chia, Ed Win; Marquis, Christopher P; Gunawan, Cindy; Gooding, J Justin; Amal, Rose

    2016-04-15

    The work investigates the influence of surface physicochemical properties of planar indium tin oxide (ITO) as a model substrate on T4 bacteriophage adsorption. A comparative T4 bacteriophage adsorption study shows a significant difference in bacteriophage adsorption observed on chemically modified planar ITO when compared to similarly modified particulate ITO, which infers that trends observed in virus-particle interaction studies are not necessarily transferrable to predict virus-planar surface adsorption behaviour. We also found that ITO surfaces modified with methyl groups, (resulting in increased surface roughness and hydrophobicity) remained capable of adsorbing T4 bacteriophage. The adsorption of T4 onto bare, amine and carboxylic functionalised planar ITO suggests the presence of a unique binding behaviour involving specific functional groups on planar ITO surface beyond the non-specific electrostatic interactions that dominate phage to particle interactions. The paper demonstrates the significance of physicochemical properties of surfaces on bacteriophage-surface interactions.

  19. T4 phage lysozyme: a protein designed for understanding tryptophan photophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Bruce S.; Harris, Dan

    1990-05-01

    Bacteriophage T4 lysozyme in its wild type form contains three tryptophan residues (at sequence postions 126, 138 and 158). These three residues are in rather different environments in the protein: 126 and 158 are near the protein surface while residue 138 is more buried. T4 lysozyme has been genetically engineered to prepare all possible variants in which one or more of the tryptophan residues have been replaced by tyrosine. The available data supports the hypothesis that this substitution has, at most, a very minor effect on the structure of the protein. The three species with single tryptophan residues have been investigated in detail. The surface location of residue 126 compared to the buried location of residue 138 is reflected in the difference in collisional quenching observed with added potassium iodide. It is found that the spectral and radiative properties of the three proteins are very similar but that their radiationless decay properties are quite distinct. This is apparently due to short-range collisional quenching by neighboring side chains. Comparison with solution quenching measurements permits the identification of the specific quenching groups involved for each tryptophan residue and provides a semi-quantitative rationale for the radiationless decay rate. This collisional quenching interpretation is supported by mutational effects on fluorescence quantum yield. This simple picture of the behavior of these single-tryptophan proteins is clearly revealed in this particular case because of the unambiguous choice of collisional quenching groups. The time dependence of the fluorescence decay of each of these single-tryptophan proteins is quite complex. Several methods of analysis are presented and discussed in terms of their underlying physical basis. Internal collisional quenching, as suggested from the comparative studies, is expected to lead to non-exponential behavior. This is consistent with the observed time dependence. Analysis of the temporal

  20. Excision repair and patch size in UV-irradiated bacteriophage T4

    SciTech Connect

    Yarosh, D.B.; Rosenstein, B.S.; Setlow, R.B.

    1981-11-01

    We determined the average size of excision repair patches in repair of UV lesions in bacteriophage T4 by measuring the photolysis of bromodeoxyuridine incorporated during repair. The average patch was small, approximately four nucleotides long. In control, experiments with the denV/sub 1/ excision-deificient mutant, we encountered an artifact, a protein(s) which remained bound to phenol-extracted DNA and prevented nicking by the UV-specific endonucleases of Micrococcus luteus and bacteriophage T4.

  1. Excision repair and patch size in UV-irradiated bacteriophage T4

    SciTech Connect

    Yarosh, D.B.; Rosenstein, B.S.; Setlow, R.B.

    1981-11-01

    We determined the average size of excision repair patches in repair of UV lesions in bacteriophage T4 by measuring the photolysis of bromodeoxyuridine incorporated during repair. The average patch was small, approximately four nucleotides long. In control experiments with the denV1 excision-deficient mutant, we encountered an artifact, a protein(s) which remained bound to phenol-extracted DNA and prevented nicking by the UV-specific endonucleases of Micrococcus luteus and bacteriophage T4.

  2. T4-lysozyme fusion for the production of human formyl peptide receptors for structural determination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqiang; Cui, Ying; Wang, Jiqian

    2014-03-01

    T4-lysozyme (T4L) fusion was introduced in the intracellular loop of a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) of human formyl peptide receptor 3 (FPR3), and the ability of T4L fusion to be used in the production of human FPR3 for structural determination was evaluated in this work. The T4L variant of human FPR3 termed FPR3-T4L was expressed in stable tetracycline-inducible HEK293 cells. A systematic detergent screening showed that fos-choline-14 was the optimal detergent to solubilize and subsequently purify FPR3-T4L from HEK293 cells. Immunoaffinity purification in combination with gel filtration was employed to purify the T4L-fused receptor to high homogeneity. The final yield of the human FPR3-T4L monomer from 2 g of cells was 0.2 mg. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that the receptor adopted a correct secondary structure after purification, while ligand binding measurement indicated that the receptor was functional. Thus, the presence of T4L fusion did not evidently disturb the expression in HEK293 cells, proper folding, and functionality of human FPR3. Our study of evaluating T4L fusion for the recombinant production of human formyl peptide receptor would facilitate ongoing efforts in the structural characterization of GPCRs.

  3. Single-Molecule Measurements of T4 Lysozyme using Carbon Nanotube Electronic Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, Patrick Craig

    Because of their unique electronic and chemical properties, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are attractive candidates for label-free, single-molecule sensing and detection applications. In this work, a field-effect transistor (FET) architecture comprised of an individual SWNT is used to transduce the conformational motion of a single T4 lysozyme protein, conjugated to the SWNT side wall, into a corresponding electrical current signal. The SWNTs are grown using chemical vapor deposition, and metal electrical contacts are formed using electron beam evaporation. Using N-(1-Pyrene)maleimide, the protein is conjugated to the SWNT side wall. After conjugation, the sensing area of the device is submerged in an electrolyte solution, and the source-drain current is measured while applying an electrolyte-gate. Analysis of the signal provided single-molecule resolution of the dynamical activity of lysozyme as it hydrolyzes macromolecular peptidoglycan, a component of bacterial cell walls. This analysis revealed seven different independent time scales that govern the activity of lysozyme, the pH dependence of these time scales, and a lower limit on the number rate-limiting steps in lysozyme's hinge opening and closing motions. Furthermore, the signals elucidated differences in how lysozyme traverses and catalyzes structurally varying peptidoglycan constructs.

  4. Introduction of Ca(2+)-binding amino-acid sequence into the T4 lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Leontiev, V V; Uversky, V N; Permyakov, E A; Murzin, A G

    1993-03-05

    The 51-62 loop of T4 phage lysozyme was altered by site-directed mutagenesis to obtain maximal homology with the typical EF-hand motif. A Ca(2+)-binding site was designed and created by replacing both Gly-51 and Asn-53 with aspartic acid. The mutant T4 lysozyme (G51D/N53D) was expressed in Escherichia coli. The activity of the G51D/N53D-mutant was about 60% of that of the wild-type protein. This mutant can bind Ca2+ ions specifically, while the effective dissociation constant was essentially greater than that of the EF-hand proteins. Stability of the G51D/N53D-mutant apo-form to urea- or temperature-induced denaturation was the same as that of the wild-type protein. In the presence of Ca2+ ions in solution the stability of the mutant T4 phage lysozyme was less than that of the wild-type protein. It is suggested that the binding of Ca2+ by the mutant is accompanied by the considerable conformational changes in the 'corrected' loop, which can lead to the Ca(2+)-induced destabilization of the protein.

  5. T4 bacteriophage conjugated magnetic particles for E. coli capturing: Influence of bacteriophage loading, temperature and tryptone.

    PubMed

    Liana, Ayu Ekajayanthi; Marquis, Christopher P; Gunawan, Cindy; Gooding, J Justin; Amal, Rose

    2017-03-01

    This work demonstrates the use of bacteriophage conjugated magnetic particles (Fe3O4) for the rapid capturing and isolation of Escherichia coli. The investigation of T4 bacteriophage adsorption to silane functionalised Fe3O4 with amine (NH2), carboxylic (COOH) and methyl (CH3) surface functional groups reveals the domination of net electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions in governing bacteriophage adsorption. The bare Fe3O4 and Fe3O4-NH2 with high T4 loading captured 3-fold more E. coli (∼70% capturing efficiency) compared to the low loading T4 on Fe3O4-COOH, suggesting the significance of T4 loading in E. coli capturing efficiency. Importantly, it is further revealed that E. coli capture is highly dependent on the incubation temperature and the presence of tryptone in the media. Effective E. coli capturing only occurs at 37°C in tryptone-containing media with the absence of either conditions resulted in poor bacteria capture. The incubation temperature dictates the capturing ability of Fe3O4/T4, whereby T4 and E. coli need to establish an irreversible binding that occurred at 37°C. The presence of tryptophan-rich tryptone in the suspending media was also critical, as shown by a 3-fold increase in E. coli capture efficiency of Fe3O4/T4 in tryptone-containing media compared to that in tryptone-free media. This highlights for the first time that successful bacteria capturing requires not only an optimum tailoring of the particle's surface physicochemical properties for favourable bacteriophage loading, but also an in-depth understanding of how factors, such as temperature and solution chemistry influence the subsequent bacteriophage-bacteria interactions.

  6. The bacteriophage T4 gene for the small subunit of ribonucleotide reductase contains an intron.

    PubMed Central

    Sjöberg, B M; Hahne, S; Mathews, C Z; Mathews, C K; Rand, K N; Gait, M J

    1986-01-01

    The bacteriophage T4 gene nrdB codes for the small subunit of the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase. The T4 nrdB gene was localized between 136.1 kb and 137.8 kb in the T4 genetic map according to the deduced structural homology of the protein to the amino acid sequence of its bacterial counterpart, the B2 subunit of Escherichia coli. This positions the C-terminal end of the T4 nrdB gene approximately 2 kb closer to the T4 gene 63 than earlier anticipated from genetic recombinational analyses. The most surprising feature of the T4 nrdB gene is the presence of an approximately 625 bp intron which divides the structural gene into two parts. This is the second example of a prokaryotic structural gene with an intron. The first prokaryotic intron was reported in the nearby td gene, coding for the bacteriophage T4-specific thymidylate synthase enzyme. The nucleotide sequence at the exon-intron junctions of the T4 nrdB gene is similar to that of the junctions of the T4 td gene: the anticipated exon-intron boundary at the donor site ends with a TAA stop codon and there is an ATG start codon at the putative downstream intron-exon boundary of the acceptor site. In the course of this work the denA gene of T4 (endonuclease II) was also located. PMID:3530746

  7. Encapsulation of T4 bacteriophage in electrospun poly(ethylene oxide)/cellulose diacetate fibers.

    PubMed

    Korehei, Reza; Kadla, John F

    2014-01-16

    Phage therapy is a potentially beneficial approach to food preservation and storage. Sustained delivery of bacteriophage can prevent bacterial growth on contaminated food surfaces. Using coaxial electrospinning bacteriophage can be encapsulated in electrospun fibers with high viability. The resulting bio-based electrospun fibers may have potential as a food packaging material. In the present work, T4 bacteriophage (T4 phage) was incorporated into core/shell electrospun fibers made from poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), cellulose diacetate (CDA), and their blends. Fibers prepared using PEO as the shell polymer showed an immediate burst release of T4 phage upon submersion in buffer. The blending of CDA with PEO significantly decreased the rate of phage release, with no released T4 phage being detected from the solely CDA fibers. Increasing the PEO molecular weight increased the electrospun fiber diameter and viscosity of the releasing medium, which resulted in a relatively slower T4 phage release profile. SEM analyses of the electrospun fiber morphologies were in good agreement with the T4 phage release profiles. Depending on the PEO/CDA ratio, the post-release electrospun fiber morphologies varied from discontinuous fibers to minimally swollen fibers. From these results it is suggested that the T4 phage release mechanism is through solvent activation/polymer dissolution in the case of the PEO fibers and/or by diffusion control from the PEO/CDA blend fibers.

  8. Structural analysis of bacteriophage T4 DNA replication: a review in the Virology Journal series on bacteriophage T4 and its relatives

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The bacteriophage T4 encodes 10 proteins, known collectively as the replisome, that are responsible for the replication of the phage genome. The replisomal proteins can be subdivided into three activities; the replicase, responsible for duplicating DNA, the primosomal proteins, responsible for unwinding and Okazaki fragment initiation, and the Okazaki repair proteins. The replicase includes the gp43 DNA polymerase, the gp45 processivity clamp, the gp44/62 clamp loader complex, and the gp32 single-stranded DNA binding protein. The primosomal proteins include the gp41 hexameric helicase, the gp61 primase, and the gp59 helicase loading protein. The RNaseH, a 5' to 3' exonuclease and T4 DNA ligase comprise the activities necessary for Okazaki repair. The T4 provides a model system for DNA replication. As a consequence, significant effort has been put forth to solve the crystallographic structures of these replisomal proteins. In this review, we discuss the structures that are available and provide comparison to related proteins when the T4 structures are unavailable. Three of the ten full-length T4 replisomal proteins have been determined; the gp59 helicase loading protein, the RNase H, and the gp45 processivity clamp. The core of T4 gp32 and two proteins from the T4 related phage RB69, the gp43 polymerase and the gp45 clamp are also solved. The T4 gp44/62 clamp loader has not been crystallized but a comparison to the E. coli gamma complex is provided. The structures of T4 gp41 helicase, gp61 primase, and T4 DNA ligase are unknown, structures from bacteriophage T7 proteins are discussed instead. To better understand the functionality of T4 DNA replication, in depth structural analysis will require complexes between proteins and DNA substrates. A DNA primer template bound by gp43 polymerase, a fork DNA substrate bound by RNase H, gp43 polymerase bound to gp32 protein, and RNase H bound to gp32 have been crystallographically determined. The preparation and

  9. Bacteriophage T4 whiskers: a rudimentary environment-sensing device.

    PubMed Central

    Conley, M P; Wood, W B

    1975-01-01

    The 400 A filaments or "whiskers," which extend outward from the collar region of the phage, control retraction and extension of the tail fibers in response to certain environmental conditions. The tail fibers of normal phage retract in the absence of a required adsorption cofactor, at low pH, at low ionic strength, at low temperature, and at high concentrations of polyethylene glycol. The tail fibers of mutant whiskerless (wac) phage still retract under the first two conditions, but not the last three. Antibodies to whiskers neutralize T4, probably by fixing tail fibers in the retracted configuration. Phage with retracted tail fibers adsorb poorly to host bacterial cells, and their adsorption rate increases as the fibers become extended. These results suggest that one function of the whiskers is to retract the tail fibers and thereby prevent adsorption to host cells under certain conditions that might be unfavorable for production of phage progeny following infection. PMID:242007

  10. EPR Relaxation-Enhancement-Based Distance Measurements on Orthogonally Spin-Labeled T4-Lysozyme

    PubMed Central

    Razzaghi, Sahand; Brooks, Evan K.; Bordignon, Enrica; Hubbell, Wayne L.; Yulikov, Maxim; Jeschke, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    Lanthanide-induced enhancement of the longitudinal relaxation of nitroxide radicals in combination with orthogonal site-directed spin labeling is presented as a systematic distance measurement method intended for studies of biomacromolecules and biomacromolecular complexes. The approach is tested on a water soluble protein (T4-lysozyme) for two different commercially available lanthanide labels, and complemented by previously reported data on a membrane inserted polypeptide. Single temperature measurements are shown to be sufficient for reliable distance determination, with an upper measurable distance limit of about 5-6 nm. The extracted averaged distances represent the closest approach in LnIII-nitroxide distance distributions. Studies of conformational changes and of biomacromolecule association-dissociation are proposed as possible application area of the RE-based distance measurements. PMID:23775845

  11. The isolation and characterization of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia T4-like bacteriophage DLP6.

    PubMed

    Peters, Danielle L; Stothard, Paul; Dennis, Jonathan J

    2017-01-01

    Increasing isolation of the extremely antibiotic resistant bacterium Stenotrophomonas maltophilia has caused alarm worldwide due to the limited treatment options available. A potential treatment option for fighting this bacterium is 'phage therapy', the clinical application of bacteriophages to selectively kill bacteria. Bacteriophage DLP6 (vB_SmoM-DLP6) was isolated from a soil sample using clinical isolate S. maltophilia strain D1571 as host. Host range analysis of phage DLP6 against 27 clinical S. maltophilia isolates shows successful infection and lysis in 13 of the 27 isolates tested. Transmission electron microscopy of DLP6 indicates that it is a member of the Myoviridae family. Complete genome sequencing and analysis of DLP6 reveals its richly recombined evolutionary history, featuring a core of both T4-like and cyanophage genes, which suggests that it is a member of the T4-superfamily. Unlike other T4-superfamily phages however, DLP6 features a transposase and ends with 229 bp direct terminal repeats. The isolation of this bacteriophage is an exciting discovery due to the divergent nature of DLP6 in relation to the T4-superfamily of phages.

  12. The isolation and characterization of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia T4-like bacteriophage DLP6

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Danielle L.; Stothard, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Increasing isolation of the extremely antibiotic resistant bacterium Stenotrophomonas maltophilia has caused alarm worldwide due to the limited treatment options available. A potential treatment option for fighting this bacterium is ‘phage therapy’, the clinical application of bacteriophages to selectively kill bacteria. Bacteriophage DLP6 (vB_SmoM-DLP6) was isolated from a soil sample using clinical isolate S. maltophilia strain D1571 as host. Host range analysis of phage DLP6 against 27 clinical S. maltophilia isolates shows successful infection and lysis in 13 of the 27 isolates tested. Transmission electron microscopy of DLP6 indicates that it is a member of the Myoviridae family. Complete genome sequencing and analysis of DLP6 reveals its richly recombined evolutionary history, featuring a core of both T4-like and cyanophage genes, which suggests that it is a member of the T4-superfamily. Unlike other T4-superfamily phages however, DLP6 features a transposase and ends with 229 bp direct terminal repeats. The isolation of this bacteriophage is an exciting discovery due to the divergent nature of DLP6 in relation to the T4-superfamily of phages. PMID:28291834

  13. Role of cavities and hydration in the pressure unfolding of T4 lysozyme

    PubMed Central

    Nucci, Nathaniel V.; Fuglestad, Brian; Athanasoula, Evangelia A.; Wand, A. Joshua

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that high hydrostatic pressures can induce the unfolding of proteins. The physical underpinnings of this phenomenon have been investigated extensively but remain controversial. Changes in solvation energetics have been commonly proposed as a driving force for pressure-induced unfolding. Recently, the elimination of void volumes in the native folded state has been argued to be the principal determinant. Here we use the cavity-containing L99A mutant of T4 lysozyme to examine the pressure-induced destabilization of this multidomain protein by using solution NMR spectroscopy. The cavity-containing C-terminal domain completely unfolds at moderate pressures, whereas the N-terminal domain remains largely structured to pressures as high as 2.5 kbar. The sensitivity to pressure is suppressed by the binding of benzene to the hydrophobic cavity. These results contrast to the pseudo-WT protein, which has a residual cavity volume very similar to that of the L99A–benzene complex but shows extensive subglobal reorganizations with pressure. Encapsulation of the L99A mutant in the aqueous nanoscale core of a reverse micelle is used to examine the hydration of the hydrophobic cavity. The confined space effect of encapsulation suppresses the pressure-induced unfolding transition and allows observation of the filling of the cavity with water at elevated pressures. This indicates that hydration of the hydrophobic cavity is more energetically unfavorable than global unfolding. Overall, these observations point to a range of cooperativity and energetics within the T4 lysozyme molecule and illuminate the fact that small changes in physical parameters can significantly alter the pressure sensitivity of proteins. PMID:25201963

  14. Mutation of active site residues in synthetic T4-lysozyme gene and their effect on lytic activity.

    PubMed

    Anand, N N; Stephen, E R; Narang, S A

    1988-06-16

    The active site amino acids (Glu11 and Asp20) in T4-lysozyme have been mutated to their isosteric residues Gln or Asn and/or acidic residues such as Glu----Asp or Asp----Glu by the oligonucleotide-replacement method. Out of eight mutants so generated the mutant T4-lysozyme obtained from pTLY.Asp11 retains maximum amount of activity (approximately 16%), pTLY.Asn20 the least (0.9%) whereas pTLY.Gln11 lost completely. A systematic study of the active and inactive mutants thus generated supports the important role of Glu11 and Asp20 in T4-lysozyme activity as predicted in earlier studies.

  15. Structure of the bacteriophage T4 long tail fiber receptor-binding tip

    PubMed Central

    Bartual, Sergio G.; Otero, José M.; Garcia-Doval, Carmela; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; Kahn, Richard; Fox, Gavin C.; van Raaij, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Bacteriophages are the most numerous organisms in the biosphere. In spite of their biological significance and the spectrum of potential applications, little high-resolution structural detail is available on their receptor-binding fibers. Here we present the crystal structure of the receptor-binding tip of the bacteriophage T4 long tail fiber, which is highly homologous to the tip of the bacteriophage lambda side tail fibers. This structure reveals an unusual elongated six-stranded antiparallel beta-strand needle domain containing seven iron ions coordinated by histidine residues arranged colinearly along the core of the biological unit. At the end of the tip, the three chains intertwine forming a broader head domain, which contains the putative receptor interaction site. The structure reveals a previously unknown beta-structured fibrous fold, provides insights into the remarkable stability of the fiber, and suggests a framework for mutations to expand or modulate receptor-binding specificity. PMID:21041684

  16. Ultraviolet Mutagenesis in Bacteriophage T4 I. Irradiation of Extracellular Phage Particles

    PubMed Central

    Drake, John W.

    1966-01-01

    Drake, John W. (University of Illinois, Urbana). Ultraviolet mutagenesis in bacteriophage T4. I. Irradiation of extracellular phage particles. J. Bacteriol. 91:1775–1780. 1966.—Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of extracellular T4 phage particles induces about 2 × 10−4r mutations per lethal hit. The mutants largely escape detection unless the irradiated phages are plated with very soft overlay agar. Multiplicity reactivation is not a prerequisite for mutagenesis. A much higher frequency of base pair substitution-type mutants is induced than is found in the spontaneous background, but sign mutants are also induced. Nearly half of the mutants map into previously identified UV hot spots. The rII mutants induced extracellularly are very similar to those induced intracellularly. The mutants also appear to result from direct radiation effects upon the bacteriophage deoxyribonucleic acid. PMID:5937237

  17. Assembly and dynamics of the bacteriophage T4 homologous recombination machinery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Morrical, Scott W

    2010-12-03

    Homologous recombination (HR), a process involving the physical exchange of strands between homologous or nearly homologous DNA molecules, is critical for maintaining the genetic diversity and genome stability of species. Bacteriophage T4 is one of the classic systems for studies of homologous recombination. T4 uses HR for high-frequency genetic exchanges, for homology-directed DNA repair (HDR) processes including DNA double-strand break repair, and for the initiation of DNA replication (RDR). T4 recombination proteins are expressed at high levels during T4 infection in E. coli, and share strong sequence, structural, and/or functional conservation with their counterparts in cellular organisms. Biochemical studies of T4 recombination have provided key insights on DNA strand exchange mechanisms, on the structure and function of recombination proteins, and on the coordination of recombination and DNA synthesis activities during RDR and HDR. Recent years have seen the development of detailed biochemical models for the assembly and dynamics of presynaptic filaments in the T4 recombination system, for the atomic structure of T4 UvsX recombinase, and for the roles of DNA helicases in T4 recombination. The goal of this chapter is to review these recent advances and their implications for HR and HDR mechanisms in all organisms.

  18. Multiplicity Reactivation of 5-Iodouracil-Substituted, Nonviable Bacteriophage T4td8

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, Daniel M.; Prusoff, William H.

    1975-01-01

    Nonviable, 5-iodouracil (IUra)-substituted bacteriophage T4td8 can be multiplicity reactivated. The data indicate that two nonviable, IUra-substituted T4td8 phage can complement each other intracellularly to produce viable progeny. Phage particles in lysates of T4td8-infected Escherichia coli BT−, prepared in the presence of varying mole fractions of IUra plus thymine, were examined by infecting with low and high dilutions of lysate. The yields of multiplicity reactivable particles were identical, regardless of the mole fractions of IUra present in the growth media. However, the yields of viable phage, measured at low multiplicities of infection, decreased with increasing mole fraction of IUra. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that the lethal effect of IUra is a consequence of its incorporation into DNA. Further, the IUra-induced lesion cannot involve genetic damage that shuts off expression at a single region of the genome. PMID:1108777

  19. High diversity and potential origins of T4-type bacteriophages on the surface of Arctic glaciers.

    PubMed

    Bellas, Christopher M; Anesio, Alexandre M

    2013-09-01

    Tailed bacteriophages are the most abundant viruses in the biosphere. Here we examined the T4-type bacteriophage community inhabiting the surface of two glaciers in Svalbard. We used a molecular approach to target g23, the major capsid protein gene, to demonstrate that in the extreme cryoconite hole habitats the T4-type phages are surprisingly diverse. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that cryoconite hole sediments harbour a mixed phage community spanning multiple T4-type phage subgroups. The majority (71 %) of phage sequences clustered into three novel phylogenetically distinct groups, whilst the remainder clustered with known marine and soil derived phage sequences. The meltwater in cryoconite holes also contained a further distinct phage community which was related to previously detected marine phage variants. The ability of phages to move between marine and glacial habitats was tested in a transplantation experiment. Phages from the nearby marine fjord were found to be capable of initiating infection of supraglacial bacteria, suggesting suitable hosts could be found by non-native phages. Together this evidence suggests that the surface of glaciers contain both novel and cosmopolitan phages, some of which may have arrived in the cryosphere from other biomes.

  20. Probing the folded state and mechanical unfolding pathways of T4 lysozyme using all-atom and coarse-grained molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenjun; Glenn, Paul

    2015-01-21

    The Bacteriophage T4 Lysozyme (T4L) is a prototype modular protein comprised of an N-terminal and a C-domain domain, which was extensively studied to understand the folding/unfolding mechanism of modular proteins. To offer detailed structural and dynamic insights to the folded-state stability and the mechanical unfolding behaviors of T4L, we have performed extensive equilibrium and steered molecular dynamics simulations of both the wild-type (WT) and a circular permutation (CP) variant of T4L using all-atom and coarse-grained force fields. Our all-atom and coarse-grained simulations of the folded state have consistently found greater stability of the C-domain than the N-domain in isolation, which is in agreement with past thermostatic studies of T4L. While the all-atom simulation cannot fully explain the mechanical unfolding behaviors of the WT and the CP variant observed in an optical tweezers study, the coarse-grained simulations based on the Go model or a modified elastic network model (mENM) are in qualitative agreement with the experimental finding of greater unfolding cooperativity in the WT than the CP variant. Interestingly, the two coarse-grained models predict different structural mechanisms for the observed change in cooperativity between the WT and the CP variant--while the Go model predicts minor modification of the unfolding pathways by circular permutation (i.e., preserving the general order that the N-domain unfolds before the C-domain), the mENM predicts a dramatic change in unfolding pathways (e.g., different order of N/C-domain unfolding in the WT and the CP variant). Based on our simulations, we have analyzed the limitations of and the key differences between these models and offered testable predictions for future experiments to resolve the structural mechanism for cooperative folding/unfolding of T4L.

  1. Probing the folded state and mechanical unfolding pathways of T4 lysozyme using all-atom and coarse-grained molecular simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wenjun; Glenn, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The Bacteriophage T4 Lysozyme (T4L) is a prototype modular protein comprised of an N-terminal and a C-domain domain, which was extensively studied to understand the folding/unfolding mechanism of modular proteins. To offer detailed structural and dynamic insights to the folded-state stability and the mechanical unfolding behaviors of T4L, we have performed extensive equilibrium and steered molecular dynamics simulations of both the wild-type (WT) and a circular permutation (CP) variant of T4L using all-atom and coarse-grained force fields. Our all-atom and coarse-grained simulations of the folded state have consistently found greater stability of the C-domain than the N-domain in isolation, which is in agreement with past thermostatic studies of T4L. While the all-atom simulation cannot fully explain the mechanical unfolding behaviors of the WT and the CP variant observed in an optical tweezers study, the coarse-grained simulations based on the Go model or a modified elastic network model (mENM) are in qualitative agreement with the experimental finding of greater unfolding cooperativity in the WT than the CP variant. Interestingly, the two coarse-grained models predict different structural mechanisms for the observed change in cooperativity between the WT and the CP variant—while the Go model predicts minor modification of the unfolding pathways by circular permutation (i.e., preserving the general order that the N-domain unfolds before the C-domain), the mENM predicts a dramatic change in unfolding pathways (e.g., different order of N/C-domain unfolding in the WT and the CP variant). Based on our simulations, we have analyzed the limitations of and the key differences between these models and offered testable predictions for future experiments to resolve the structural mechanism for cooperative folding/unfolding of T4L.

  2. Probing the folded state and mechanical unfolding pathways of T4 lysozyme using all-atom and coarse-grained molecular simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Wenjun Glenn, Paul

    2015-01-21

    The Bacteriophage T4 Lysozyme (T4L) is a prototype modular protein comprised of an N-terminal and a C-domain domain, which was extensively studied to understand the folding/unfolding mechanism of modular proteins. To offer detailed structural and dynamic insights to the folded-state stability and the mechanical unfolding behaviors of T4L, we have performed extensive equilibrium and steered molecular dynamics simulations of both the wild-type (WT) and a circular permutation (CP) variant of T4L using all-atom and coarse-grained force fields. Our all-atom and coarse-grained simulations of the folded state have consistently found greater stability of the C-domain than the N-domain in isolation, which is in agreement with past thermostatic studies of T4L. While the all-atom simulation cannot fully explain the mechanical unfolding behaviors of the WT and the CP variant observed in an optical tweezers study, the coarse-grained simulations based on the Go model or a modified elastic network model (mENM) are in qualitative agreement with the experimental finding of greater unfolding cooperativity in the WT than the CP variant. Interestingly, the two coarse-grained models predict different structural mechanisms for the observed change in cooperativity between the WT and the CP variant—while the Go model predicts minor modification of the unfolding pathways by circular permutation (i.e., preserving the general order that the N-domain unfolds before the C-domain), the mENM predicts a dramatic change in unfolding pathways (e.g., different order of N/C-domain unfolding in the WT and the CP variant). Based on our simulations, we have analyzed the limitations of and the key differences between these models and offered testable predictions for future experiments to resolve the structural mechanism for cooperative folding/unfolding of T4L.

  3. Covalent Modification of Bacteriophage T4 DNA Inhibits CRISPR-Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Bryson, Alexandra L.; Hwang, Young; Sherrill-Mix, Scott; Wu, Gary D.; Lewis, James D.; Black, Lindsay; Clark, Tyson A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genomic DNAs of tailed bacteriophages are commonly modified by the attachment of chemical groups. Some forms of DNA modification are known to protect phage DNA from cleavage by restriction enzymes, but others are of unknown function. Recently, the CRISPR-Cas nuclease complexes were shown to mediate bacterial adaptive immunity by RNA-guided target recognition, raising the question of whether phage DNA modifications may also block attack by CRISPR-Cas9. We investigated phage T4 as a model system, where cytosine is replaced with glucosyl-hydroxymethylcytosine (glc-HMC). We first quantified the extent and distribution of covalent modifications in T4 DNA by single-molecule DNA sequencing and enzymatic probing. We then designed CRISPR spacer sequences targeting T4 and found that wild-type T4 containing glc-HMC was insensitive to attack by CRISPR-Cas9 but mutants with unmodified cytosine were sensitive. Phage with HMC showed only intermediate sensitivity. While this work was in progress, another group reported examples of heavily engineered CRISRP-Cas9 complexes that could, in fact, overcome the effects of T4 DNA modification, indicating that modifications can inhibit but do not always fully block attack. PMID:26081634

  4. Marine T4-type bacteriophages, a ubiquitous component of the dark matter of the biosphere

    PubMed Central

    Filée, Jonathan; Tétart, Françoise; Suttle, Curtis A.; Krisch, H. M.

    2005-01-01

    Tailed bacteriophages are the most abundant biological entities in marine environments. However, most of these marine phages are uncharacterized because few of their hosts have been cultivated. To learn more about such phages, we designed a set of degenerate PCR primers for phage T4 g23, which encodes the major capsid protein in all of the T4-type phages, an important family of the tailed phage. These primers were used to amplify g23-related sequences from diverse marine environments (fjords and bays of British Columbia, the eastern Gulf of Mexico, and the western Arctic Ocean) revealing a remarkable level of molecular diversity, which in some cases was correlated with morphological variation of the virions. Phylogenetic analysis showed that although some of these sequences were closely related to well studied subgroups of the T4-type phage, such as the T-evens, the majority of them belong to five previously uncharacterized subgroups. These data indicate that the host range of T4-type phages is much broader than previously imagined and that the laboratory isolate T4 belongs to a phage family that is extraordinarily widespread and diverse in the biosphere. PMID:16116082

  5. Cryo-electron microscopy study of bacteriophage T4 displaying anthrax toxin proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fokine, Andrei; Bowman, Valorie D.; Battisti, Anthony J.; Li Qin; Chipman, Paul R.; Rao, Venigalla B.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2007-10-25

    The bacteriophage T4 capsid contains two accessory surface proteins, the small outer capsid protein (Soc, 870 copies) and the highly antigenic outer capsid protein (Hoc, 155 copies). As these are dispensable for capsid formation, they can be used for displaying proteins and macromolecular complexes on the T4 capsid surface. Anthrax toxin components were attached to the T4 capsid as a fusion protein of the N-terminal domain of the anthrax lethal factor (LFn) with Soc. The LFn-Soc fusion protein was complexed in vitro with Hoc{sup -}Soc{sup -}T4 phage. Subsequently, cleaved anthrax protective antigen heptamers (PA63){sub 7} were attached to the exposed LFn domains. A cryo-electron microscopy study of the decorated T4 particles shows the complex of PA63 heptamers with LFn-Soc on the phage surface. Although the cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction is unable to differentiate on its own between different proposed models of the anthrax toxin, the density is consistent with a model that had predicted the orientation and position of three LFn molecules bound to one PA63 heptamer.

  6. Multifrequency electron spin resonance study of the dynamics of spin labeled T4 lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ziwei; Fleissner, Mark R; Tipikin, Dmitriy S; Liang, Zhichun; Moscicki, Jozef K; Earle, Keith A; Hubbell, Wayne L; Freed, Jack H

    2010-04-29

    An extensive set of electron spin resonance spectra was obtained over a wide range of frequencies (9, 95, 170, and 240 GHz) and temperatures (2 to 32 degrees C) to explore the dynamic modes of nitroxide-labeled T4 lysozyme in solution. A commonly used nitroxide side chain (R1), or a methylated analogue with hindered internal motion (R2), was substituted for the native side chain at solvent-exposed helical sites, 72 or 131. The spectra at all four frequencies were simultaneously fit with the slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) model. Good fits were achieved at all the temperatures. Two principle dynamic modes are included in the SRLS model, the global tumbling of the protein and the internal motion consisting of backbone fluctuations and side chain isomerizations. Three distinct spectral components were required for R1 and two for R2 to account for the spectra at all temperatures. One is a highly ordered and slow motional component, which is observed in the spectra of both R1 and R2; it may correspond to conformers stabilized by interaction with the protein surface. The fraction of this component decreases with increasing temperature and is more populated in the R2 spectra, possibly arising from stronger interaction of the nitroxide ring with the protein surface due to the additional methyl group. The other two components of R1 and the second component of R2 are characterized by fast anisotropic diffusion and relatively low ordering, most likely corresponding to conformers having little or no interactions with nearby residues. Ficoll of different concentrations was added to increase the solution viscosity, thereby slowing down the global tumbling of the protein. A significant effect of Ficoll on the internal motion of an immobilized component was apparent in R2 but not in R1. The ability of such multifrequency studies to separate the effects of faster internal modes of motion from slower overall motions is clearly demonstrated, and its utility in future studies

  7. Structure, assembly, and DNA packaging of the bacteriophage T4 head.

    PubMed

    Black, Lindsay W; Rao, Venigalla B

    2012-01-01

    The bacteriophage T4 head is an elongated icosahedron packed with 172 kb of linear double-stranded DNA and numerous proteins. The capsid is built from three essential proteins: gp23*, which forms the hexagonal capsid lattice; gp24*, which forms pentamers at 11 of the 12 vertices; and gp20, which forms the unique dodecameric portal vertex through which DNA enters during packaging and exits during infection. Intensive work over more than half a century has led to a deep understanding of the phage T4 head. The atomic structure of gp24 has been determined. A structural model built for gp23 using its similarity to gp24 showed that the phage T4 major capsid protein has the same fold as numerous other icosahedral bacteriophages. However, phage T4 displays an unusual membrane and portal initiated assembly of a shape determining self-sufficient scaffolding core. Folding of gp23 requires the assistance of two chaperones, the Escherichia coli chaperone GroEL acting with the phage-coded gp23-specific cochaperone, gp31. The capsid also contains two nonessential outer capsid proteins, Hoc and Soc, which decorate the capsid surface. Through binding to adjacent gp23 subunits, Soc reinforces the capsid structure. Hoc and Soc have been used extensively in bipartite peptide display libraries and to display pathogen antigens, including those from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Neisseria meningitides, Bacillus anthracis, and foot and mouth disease virus. The structure of Ip1*, one of a number of multiple (>100) copy proteins packed and injected with DNA from the full head, shows it to be an inhibitor of one specific restriction endonuclease specifically targeting glycosylated hydroxymethyl cytosine DNA. Extensive mutagenesis, combined with atomic structures of the DNA packaging/terminase proteins gp16 and gp17, elucidated the ATPase and nuclease functional motifs involved in DNA translocation and headful DNA cutting. The cryoelectron microscopy structure of the T4 packaging

  8. Role of the host cell in bacteriophage T4 development. II. Characterization of host mutants that have pleiotropic effects on T4 growth.

    PubMed Central

    Stitt, B L; Revel, H R; Lielausis, I; Wood, W B

    1980-01-01

    Mutant host-defective Escherichi coli that fail to propagate bacteriophage T4 and have a pleiotropic effect on T4 development have been isolated and characterized. In phage-infected mutant cells, specific early phage proteins are absent or reduced in amount, phage DNA synthesis is depressed by about 50%, specific structural phage proteins, including some tail and collar components, are deficient or missing, and host-cell lysis is delayed and slow. Almost all phage that can overcome the host block carry mutantions that map in functionally undefined 'nonessential' regions of the T4 genome, most near gene 39. The mutant host strains are temperature sensitive for growth and show simultaneous reversion of the ts phenotype and the inability to propagate T4+. The host mutations are cotransduced with ilv (83 min) and may lie in the gene for transcription termination factor rho. Images PMID:6999171

  9. Evidence for an electrostatic mechanism of force generation by the bacteriophage T4 DNA packaging motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliori, Amy D.; Keller, Nicholas; Alam, Tanfis I.; Mahalingam, Marthandan; Rao, Venigalla B.; Arya, Gaurav; Smith, Douglas E.

    2014-06-01

    How viral packaging motors generate enormous forces to translocate DNA into viral capsids remains unknown. Recent structural studies of the bacteriophage T4 packaging motor have led to a proposed mechanism wherein the gp17 motor protein translocates DNA by transitioning between extended and compact states, orchestrated by electrostatic interactions between complimentarily charged residues across the interface between the N- and C-terminal subdomains. Here we show that site-directed alterations in these residues cause force dependent impairments of motor function including lower translocation velocity, lower stall force and higher frequency of pauses and slips. We further show that the measured impairments correlate with computed changes in free-energy differences between the two states. These findings support the proposed structural mechanism and further suggest an energy landscape model of motor activity that couples the free-energy profile of motor conformational states with that of the ATP hydrolysis cycle.

  10. The tail sheath structure of bacteriophage T4: a molecular machine for infecting bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Aksyuk, Anastasia A.; Leiman, Petr G.; Kurochkina, Lidia P.; Shneider, Mikhail M.; Kostyuchenko, Victor A.; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2009-07-22

    The contractile tail of bacteriophage T4 is a molecular machine that facilitates very high viral infection efficiency. Its major component is a tail sheath, which contracts during infection to less than half of its initial length. The sheath consists of 138 copies of the tail sheath protein, gene product (gp) 18, which surrounds the central non-contractile tail tube. The contraction of the sheath drives the tail tube through the outer membrane, creating a channel for the viral genome delivery. A crystal structure of about three quarters of gp18 has been determined and was fitted into cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of the tail sheath before and after contraction. It was shown that during contraction, gp18 subunits slide over each other with no apparent change in their structure.

  11. Control of helicase loading in the coupled DNA replication and recombination systems of bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed

    Branagan, Amy M; Klein, Jenny A; Jordan, Christian S; Morrical, Scott W

    2014-01-31

    The Gp59 protein of bacteriophage T4 promotes DNA replication by loading the replicative helicase, Gp41, onto replication forks and recombination intermediates. Gp59 also blocks DNA synthesis by Gp43 polymerase until Gp41 is loaded, ensuring that synthesis is tightly coupled to unwinding. The distinct polymerase blocking and helicase loading activities of Gp59 likely involve different binding interactions with DNA and protein partners. Here, we investigate how interactions of Gp59 with DNA and Gp32, the T4 single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein, are related to these activities. A previously characterized mutant, Gp59-I87A, exhibits markedly reduced affinity for ssDNA and pseudo-fork DNA substrates. We demonstrate that on Gp32-covered ssDNA, the DNA binding defect of Gp59-I87A is not detrimental to helicase loading and translocation. In contrast, on pseudo-fork DNA the I87A mutation is detrimental to helicase loading and unwinding in the presence or absence of Gp32. Other results indicate that Gp32 binding to lagging strand ssDNA relieves the blockage of Gp43 polymerase activity by Gp59, whereas the inhibition of Gp43 exonuclease activity is maintained. Our findings suggest that Gp59-Gp32 and Gp59-DNA interactions perform separate but complementary roles in T4 DNA metabolism; Gp59-Gp32 interactions are needed to load Gp41 onto D-loops, and other nucleoprotein structures containing clusters of Gp32. Gp59-DNA interactions are needed to load Gp41 onto nascent or collapsed replication forks lacking clusters of Gp32 and to coordinate bidirectional replication from T4 origins. The dual functionalities of Gp59 allow it to promote the initiation or re-start of DNA replication from a wide variety of recombination and replication intermediates.

  12. Membrane interaction of the portal protein gp20 of bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed

    Quinten, Tobias A; Kuhn, Andreas

    2012-10-01

    Assembly of the bacteriophage T4 head structure occurs at the cytoplasmic face of the inner membrane of Escherichia coli with the formation of proheads. The proheads contain an internal scaffolding core that determines the size and the structure of the capsid. In a mutant where the major shell protein gp23 was compromised, core structures without a shell had been detected. Such core structures were also found in the mutant T4am20am23. Since the mutation in gene 20 is at the N terminus of gp20, it was assumed that these core structures assemble in the absence of gp20. However, sequencing showed that the mutation introduces a new ribosome binding site that leads to a restart at codon 15. Although the mutant protein gp20s lacks the very N-terminal sequence, we found that it still binds to the membrane of the host cell and can initiate prohead assembly. This explains its activity to allow the assembly of core structures and proheads at the membrane surface. With a cross-linking approach, we show here that gp20 and gp20s are escorted by the chaperones DnaK, trigger factor, and GroEL and dock on the membrane at the membrane protein YidC.

  13. In vitro synthesis of large peptide molecules using glucosylated single-stranded bacteriophage T4D DNA template.

    PubMed Central

    Hulen, C; Legault-Demare, J

    1975-01-01

    Denatured Bacteriophage T4D DNA is able to stimulate aminoacid incorporation into TCA-precipitable material in an in vitro protein synthesis system according to base DNA sequences. Newly synthesized polypeptides remain associated with ribosomes and have a molecular weight in range of 15,000 to 45,000 Daltons. PMID:1052527

  14. Crystallization of the carboxy-terminal region of the bacteriophage T4 proximal long tail fibre protein gp34

    SciTech Connect

    Granell, Meritxell; Namura, Mikiyoshi; Alvira, Sara; Garcia-Doval, Carmela; Singh, Abhimanyu K.; Gutsche, Irina; Raaij, Mark J. van Kanamaru, Shuji

    2014-06-19

    The crystallization of three C-terminal fragments of the bacteriophage T4 protein gp34 is reported. Diffraction data have been obtained for three native crystal forms and two selenomethionine derivatives, one of which contained high-quality anomalous signal.

  15. A bacteriophage T4 in vitro system to clone long DNA molecules. Final report, June 1, 1990--January 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, V.B.

    1997-09-01

    A summary is presented of the following objectives: development of a bacteriophage T4 in vitro system, and techniques to clone long segments of foreign DNA; development of a giant prohead DNA packaging system that could potentially be used to clone even a megabase size DNA; and development of techniques to rapidly map the cloned DNA inserts.

  16. Partial suppression of bacteriophage T4 ligase mutations by T4 endonuclease II deficiency: role of host ligase.

    PubMed

    Warner, H R

    1971-04-01

    Endonuclease II-deficient, ligase-deficient double mutants of phage T4 induce considerably more deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis after infection of Escherichia coli B than does the ligase-deficient single mutant. Furthermore, the double mutant can replicate 10 to 15% as well as wild-type T4, whereas the single mutant fails to replicate. When the E. coli host is also deficient in ligase, the double mutant resembles the single mutant. The results indicate that host ligase can substitute for phage ligase when the host DNA is not attacked by the phage-induced endonuclease II.

  17. Exclusion of small terminase mediated DNA threading models for genome packaging in bacteriophage T4

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Song; Zhang, Liang; Rao, Venigalla B.

    2016-01-01

    Tailed bacteriophages and herpes viruses use powerful molecular machines to package their genomes. The packaging machine consists of three components: portal, motor (large terminase; TerL) and regulator (small terminase; TerS). Portal, a dodecamer, and motor, a pentamer, form two concentric rings at the special five-fold vertex of the icosahedral capsid. Powered by ATPase, the motor ratchets DNA into the capsid through the portal channel. TerS is essential for packaging, particularly for genome recognition, but its mechanism is unknown and controversial. Structures of gear-shaped TerS rings inspired models that invoke DNA threading through the central channel. Here, we report that mutations of basic residues that line phage T4 TerS (gp16) channel do not disrupt DNA binding. Even deletion of the entire channel helix retained DNA binding and produced progeny phage in vivo. On the other hand, large oligomers of TerS (11-mers/12-mers), but not small oligomers (trimers to hexamers), bind DNA. These results suggest that TerS oligomerization creates a large outer surface, which, but not the interior of the channel, is critical for function, probably to wrap viral genome around the ring during packaging initiation. Hence, models involving TerS-mediated DNA threading may be excluded as an essential mechanism for viral genome packaging. PMID:26984529

  18. Analysis of the cooperative thermal unfolding of the td intron of bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed

    Brion, P; Michel, F; Schroeder, R; Westhof, E

    1999-06-15

    The thermal stability of folded transcripts of the td intron of bacteriophage T4 that carried up to three base substitutions was investigated by temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) and UV melting. The unfolding of this autocatalytic group I intron is endothermic and entropically driven. Although the effects of mutations in base pairs follow in most cases the expected order G-C>A-U>G.U>A.C, the extent of global destabilization varies strongly according to the helix in which substitutions are located. Effects are more pronounced in the P7 helix which forms, together with the P3 helix, the central pseudoknot of group I introns. The stability of the tertiary fold was also monitored as a function of ionic concentration and of the nature of the ion. At low ionic strength, the stabilizing effect of divalent ions is independent of the nature of the ion. However, with increasing ionic concentration, stabilization is most pronounced for Mg2+and less for Mn2+with Ca2+having intermediate effects. Ammonium ions stabilize folding with a similar slope, but at concentrations about 400 times higher than divalent ions. The apparent enthalpic change associated with the tertiary structure thermal unfolding increases strongly with increasing concentrations of divalent ions. A similar increase is observed with the monovalent ammonium ions. However, in the presence of NH4+ions, the apparent enthalpy peaks at 2.0 M and decreases beyond.

  19. Role of bacteriophage T4 baseplate in regulating assembly and infection

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Moh Lan; Klose, Thomas; Arisaka, Fumio; Speir, Jeffrey A.; Veesler, David; Fokine, Andrei; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophage T4 consists of a head for protecting its genome and a sheathed tail for inserting its genome into a host. The tail terminates with a multiprotein baseplate that changes its conformation from a “high-energy” dome-shaped to a “low-energy” star-shaped structure during infection. Although these two structures represent different minima in the total energy landscape of the baseplate assembly, as the dome-shaped structure readily changes to the star-shaped structure when the virus infects a host bacterium, the dome-shaped structure must have more energy than the star-shaped structure. Here we describe the electron microscopy structure of a 3.3-MDa in vitro-assembled star-shaped baseplate with a resolution of 3.8 Å. This structure, together with other genetic and structural data, shows why the high-energy baseplate is formed in the presence of the central hub and how the baseplate changes to the low-energy structure, via two steps during infection. Thus, the presence of the central hub is required to initiate the assembly of metastable, high-energy structures. If the high-energy structure is formed and stabilized faster than the low-energy structure, there will be insufficient components to assemble the low-energy structure. PMID:26929357

  20. Role of the host cell in bacteriophage T4 development. I. Characterization of host mutants that block T4 head assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Revel, H R; Stitt, B L; Lielausis, I; Wood, W B

    1980-01-01

    To study the role of the host cell in bacteriophage T4 infection, we selected more than 600 mutant host-defective bacteria that absorbed and were killed by phage T4+ but were unable to support its growth. The mutants were grouped into seven classes by the growth patterns of T4 phages carrying compensating mutations (go mutants [grows on]), selected on four prototype host-defective strains. Lysis and DNA synthesis experiments indicated that classes A, AD, D, and B (the majority of the host-defective mutants) block T4+ development at an assembly step, class C mutants affect an early stage in phage development, and class F mutants appear to act at more than one stage. Analysis of T4+ infection in the assembly-defective mutants by in vitro complementation, electron microscopy, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that the host-defective mutations interfere with T4+ capsid formation at the level of phage gene 31 function, before assembly of any recognizable capsid structure. The mutations map near purA, but at two or possibly three different sites. The go mutant phages able to overcome the host defect carry mutations in either gene 31, as found by others for similar defective hosts, or in the gene for the major capsid protein (gene 23). The gene 23 go mutations do not bypass the requirement for gene 31 function. These results suggest that at least three components must interact to initiate T4 head assembly: gp31, gp23, and one or more host factors. The compensatory effects of mutational alterations in these components are highly allele specific, consistent with the view that phage and host components interact directly in protein complexes. Images PMID:6988606

  1. Bacteriophage T4 Infection of Stationary Phase E. coli: Life after Log from a Phage Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Daniel; El-Shibiny, Ayman; Hobbs, Zack; Porter, Jillian; Kutter, Elizabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    Virtually all studies of phage infections investigate bacteria growing exponentially in rich media. In nature, however, phages largely encounter non-growing cells. Bacteria entering stationary phase often activate well-studied stress defense mechanisms that drastically alter the cell, facilitating its long-term survival. An understanding of phage-host interactions in such conditions is of major importance from both an ecological and therapeutic standpoint. Here, we show that bacteriophage T4 can efficiently bind to, infect and kill E. coli in stationary phase, both in the presence and absence of a functional stationary-phase sigma factor, and explore the response of T4-infected stationary phase cells to the addition of fresh nutrients 5 or 24 h after that infection. An unexpected new mode of response has been identified. “Hibernation” mode is a persistent but reversible dormant state in which the infected cells make at least some phage enzymes, but halt phage development until appropriate nutrients become available before producing phage particles. Our evidence indicates that the block in hibernation mode occurs after the middle-mode stage of phage development; host DNA breakdown and the incorporation of the released nucleotides into phage DNA indicate that the enzymes of the nucleotide synthesizing complex, under middle-mode control, have been made and assembled into a functional state. Once fresh glucose and amino acids become available, the standard lytic infection process rapidly resumes and concentrations of up to 1011 progeny phage (an average of about 40 phage per initially present cell) are produced. All evidence is consistent with the hibernation-mode control point lying between middle mode and late mode T4 gene expression. We have also observed a “scavenger” response, where the infecting phage takes advantage of whatever few nutrients are available to produce small quantities of progeny within 2 to 5 h after infection. The scavenger response seems

  2. Isolation and Genomic Characterization of the T4-Like Bacteriophage PM2 Infecting Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jeong-A; Lee, Dong Hwan; Heu, Sunggi

    2015-03-01

    In order to control Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum, a novel virulent bacteriophage PM2 was isolated. Bacteriophage PM2 can infect 48% of P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum and 78% of P. carotovorum subsp. brasilliensis but none of atrosepticum, betavasculorum, odoriferum and wasabiae isolates had been infected with PM2. PM2 phage belongs to the family Myoviridae, and contains a large head and contractile tail. It has a 170,286 base pair genome that encodes 291 open reading frames (ORFs) and 12 tRNAs. Most ORFs in bacteriophage PM2 share a high level of homology with T4-like phages including IME08, RB69, and JS98. Phylogenetic analysis based on the amino acid sequence of terminase large subunits confirmed that PM2 is classified as a T4-like phage. It contains no integrase- or no repressor-coding genes related to the lysogenic cycle, and lifestyle prediction using PHACT software suggested that PM2 is a virulent bacteriophage.

  3. Immunoprecipitation of SV40 replicating minichromosomes complexed with bacteriophage T4 gene 32 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, E I; Garrido-Guerrero, E; Garcia-Carranca, A; Gariglio, P

    1992-01-01

    Simian Virus 40 (SV40) DNA replication is a useful model to study eukaryotic cell DNA replication because it encodes only one replication protein and its genome has a nucleoprotein structure ('minichromosome') indistinguishable from cellular chromatin. Late after infection SV40 replicating DNA molecules represent about 5% of total viral minichromosomes. Since gene 32 protein (P32) from bacteriophage T4 interacts with single-stranded DNA and SV40 replication complexes are expected to contain single-stranded regions at the replication forks, we asked whether P32 might be used to isolate replicating SV40 minichromosomes. When nuclear extracts from SV40 infected cells were treated sequentially with P32 and anti-P32 antibodies, pulse-labeled minichromosomes were selectively immunoprecipitated. Agarose gel electrophoresis analysis confirmed that immunoprecipitated material corresponded to SV40 replicative intermediates. Protein analysis of the pelleted material revealed several proteins of viral and cellular origin. Among them, T antigen and histones were found to be complexed with at least other three proteins from cellular origin, to the replicative complexes. Additionally, anti-P32 antibodies were able to detect three cellular proteins of approximately 70, 32 and 13 kDa in western blots. These proteins could correspond to those found as part of an eukaryotic multisubunit single-stranded DNA binding protein. The use of P32 and anti-P32 antibodies thus allows the separation of replicating from mature SV40 minichromosomes and can constitute a novel method to enrich and to study replicative active chromatin. Images PMID:1311833

  4. Secondary structure of bacteriophage T4 gene 60 mRNA: implications for translational bypassing.

    PubMed

    Todd, Gabrielle C; Walter, Nils G

    2013-05-01

    Translational bypassing is a unique phenomenon of bacteriophage T4 gene 60 mRNA wherein the bacterial ribosome produces a single polypeptide chain from a discontinuous open reading frame (ORF). Upon reaching the 50-nucleotide untranslated region, or coding gap, the ribosome either dissociates or bypasses the interruption to continue translating the remainder of the ORF, generating a subunit of a type II DNA topoisomerase. Mutational and computational analyses have suggested that a compact structure, including a stable hairpin, forms in the coding gap to induce bypassing, yet direct evidence is lacking. Here we have probed the secondary structure of gene 60 mRNA with both Tb³⁺ ions and the selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE) reagent 1M7 under conditions where bypassing is observed. The resulting experimentally informed secondary structure models strongly support the presence of the predicted coding gap hairpin and highlight the benefits of using Tb³⁺ as a second, complementary probing reagent. Contrary to several previously proposed models, however, the rest of the coding gap is highly reactive with both probing reagents, suggesting that it forms only a short stem-loop. Mutational analyses coupled with functional assays reveal that two possible base-pairings of the coding gap with other regions of the mRNA are not required for bypassing. Such structural autonomy of the coding gap is consistent with its recently discovered role as a mobile genetic element inserted into gene 60 mRNA to inhibit cleavage by homing endonuclease MobA.

  5. Comparison of the cleavage of pyrimidine dimers by the bacteriophage T4 and Micrococcus luteus uv-specific endonucleases

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, L.K.; Haseltine, W.A.

    1980-12-25

    A comparison was made of the activity of the uv-specific endonucleases of bacteriophage T4 (T4 endonuclease V) and of Micrococcus luteus on ultraviolet light-irradiated DNA substrates of defined sequence. The two enzyms cleave DNA at the site of pyrimidine dimers with the same frequency. The products of the cleavage reaction are the same. The pyrimidine dimer DNA-glycosylase activity of both enzymes is more active on double-stranded DNA than it is on single-stranded DNA.

  6. Cryo-EM structure of the bacteriophage T4 portal protein assembly at near-atomic resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lei; Zhang, Xinzheng; Gao, Song; Rao, Prashant A.; Padilla-Sanchez, Victor; Chen, Zhenguo; Sun, Siyang; Xiang, Ye; Subramaniam, Sriram; Rao, Venigalla B.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2015-07-01

    The structure and assembly of bacteriophage T4 has been extensively studied. However, the detailed structure of the portal protein remained unknown. Here we report the structure of the bacteriophage T4 portal assembly, gene product 20 (gp20), determined by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to 3.6 Å resolution. In addition, analysis of a 10 Å resolution cryo-EM map of an empty prolate T4 head shows how the dodecameric portal assembly interacts with the capsid protein gp23 at the special pentameric vertex. The gp20 structure also verifies that the portal assembly is required for initiating head assembly, for attachment of the packaging motor, and for participation in DNA packaging. Comparison of the Myoviridae T4 portal structure with the known portal structures of φ29, SPP1 and P22, representing Podo- and Siphoviridae, shows that the portal structure probably dates back to a time when self-replicating microorganisms were being established on Earth.

  7. Cryo-EM structure of the bacteriophage T4 portal protein assembly at near-atomic resolution.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lei; Zhang, Xinzheng; Gao, Song; Rao, Prashant A; Padilla-Sanchez, Victor; Chen, Zhenguo; Sun, Siyang; Xiang, Ye; Subramaniam, Sriram; Rao, Venigalla B; Rossmann, Michael G

    2015-07-06

    The structure and assembly of bacteriophage T4 has been extensively studied. However, the detailed structure of the portal protein remained unknown. Here we report the structure of the bacteriophage T4 portal assembly, gene product 20 (gp20), determined by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to 3.6 Å resolution. In addition, analysis of a 10 Å resolution cryo-EM map of an empty prolate T4 head shows how the dodecameric portal assembly interacts with the capsid protein gp23 at the special pentameric vertex. The gp20 structure also verifies that the portal assembly is required for initiating head assembly, for attachment of the packaging motor, and for participation in DNA packaging. Comparison of the Myoviridae T4 portal structure with the known portal structures of φ29, SPP1 and P22, representing Podo- and Siphoviridae, shows that the portal structure probably dates back to a time when self-replicating microorganisms were being established on Earth.

  8. Cryo-EM structure of the bacteriophage T4 portal protein assembly at near-atomic resolution

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lei; Zhang, Xinzheng; Gao, Song; Rao, Prashant A.; Padilla-Sanchez, Victor; Chen, Zhenguo; Sun, Siyang; Xiang, Ye; Subramaniam, Sriram; Rao, Venigalla B.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    The structure and assembly of bacteriophage T4 has been extensively studied. However, the detailed structure of the portal protein remained unknown. Here we report the structure of the bacteriophage T4 portal assembly, gene product 20 (gp20), determined by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to 3.6 Å resolution. In addition, analysis of a 10 Å resolution cryo-EM map of an empty prolate T4 head shows how the dodecameric portal assembly interacts with the capsid protein gp23 at the special pentameric vertex. The gp20 structure also verifies that the portal assembly is required for initiating head assembly, for attachment of the packaging motor, and for participation in DNA packaging. Comparison of the Myoviridae T4 portal structure with the known portal structures of φ29, SPP1 and P22, representing Podo- and Siphoviridae, shows that the portal structure probably dates back to a time when self-replicating microorganisms were being established on Earth. PMID:26144253

  9. The Effects of T4 and A3/R Bacteriophages on Differentiation of Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bocian, Katarzyna; Borysowski, Jan; Zarzycki, Michał; Pacek, Magdalena; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Machcińska, Maja; Korczak-Kowalska, Grażyna; Górski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) are viruses of bacteria. Here we evaluated the effects of T4 and A3/R bacteriophages, as well as phage-generated bacterial lysates, on differentiation of human myeloid dendritic cells (DCs) from monocytes. Neither of the phages significantly reduced the expression of markers associated with differentiation of DCs and their role in the activation of T cells (CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86, CD1c, CD11c, MHC II, PD-L1, PD-L2, TLR2, TLR4, and CCR7) and phagocytosis receptors (CD64 and DEC-205). By contrast, bacterial lysate of T4 phage significantly decreased the percentages of DEC-205- and CD1c-positive cells. The percentage of DEC-205-positive cells was also significantly reduced in DCs differentiated in the presence of lysate of A3/R phage. Thus while bacteriophages do not substantially affect differentiation of DCs, some products of phage-induced lysis of bacterial cells may influence the differentiation and potentially also some functions of DCs. Our results have important implications for phage therapy of bacterial infections because during infections monocytes recruited to the site of inflammation are an important source of inflammatory DCs. PMID:27582733

  10. Genetic effects of cosmic radiation on bacteriophage T4Br+ (on materials of biological experiment "Soyuz-Apollo").

    PubMed

    Yurov, S S; Akoev, I G; Akhmadieva, A K; Livanova, I A; Leont'eva, G A; Marennyi, A M; Popov, V I

    1979-01-01

    During the experiment "Spore-ring Forming Fungi Biorhythm" of the Apollo-Soyuz test project the Rhythm-1 apparatus contained a dried film culture of bacteriophage T4Br+, growing cultures of Actinomyces and plastic nuclear particle detectors. The following were studied: the frequency of induction of r mutations in the bacteriophage film per 2 X 10(4) surviving particles, the spectrum of mutant types obtained (rI, rII, rIII), and the possible molecular mechanisms for the occurrence of rII mutants with due regard to the registered tracks of heavy nuclear particles. The studies showed that the local radiation due to heavy nuclear particle tracks plays a major role in space radiation damage.

  11. Capturing Invisible Motions in the Transition from Ground to Rare Excited States of T4 Lysozyme L99A.

    PubMed

    Schiffer, Jamie M; Feher, Victoria A; Malmstrom, Robert D; Sida, Roxana; Amaro, Rommie E

    2016-10-18

    Proteins commonly sample a number of conformational states to carry out their biological function, often requiring transitions from the ground state to higher-energy states. Characterizing the mechanisms that guide these transitions at the atomic level promises to impact our understanding of functional protein dynamics and energy landscapes. The leucine-99-to-alanine (L99A) mutant of T4 lysozyme is a model system that has an experimentally well characterized excited sparsely populated state as well as a ground state. Despite the exhaustive study of L99A protein dynamics, the conformational changes that permit transitioning to the experimentally detected excited state (∼3%, ΔG ∼2 kcal/mol) remain unclear. Here, we describe the transitions from the ground state to this sparsely populated excited state of L99A as observed through a single molecular dynamics (MD) trajectory on the Anton supercomputer. Aside from detailing the ground-to-excited-state transition, the trajectory samples multiple metastates and an intermediate state en route to the excited state. Dynamic motions between these states enable cavity surface openings large enough to admit benzene on timescales congruent with known rates for benzene binding. Thus, these fluctuations between rare protein states provide an atomic description of the concerted motions that illuminate potential path(s) for ligand binding. These results reveal, to our knowledge, a new level of complexity in the dynamics of buried cavities and their role in creating mobile defects that affect protein dynamics and ligand binding.

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of the Broad-Host-Range Vibriophage KVP40: Comparative Genomics of a T4-Related Bacteriophage

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Eric S.; Heidelberg, John F.; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Nelson, William C.; Durkin, A. Scott; Ciecko, Ann; Feldblyum, Tamara V.; White, Owen; Paulsen, Ian T.; Nierman, William C.; Lee, Jong; Szczypinski, Bridget; Fraser, Claire M.

    2003-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of the T4-like, broad-host-range vibriophage KVP40 has been determined. The genome sequence is 244,835 bp, with an overall G+C content of 42.6%. It encodes 386 putative protein-encoding open reading frames (CDSs), 30 tRNAs, 33 T4-like late promoters, and 57 potential rho-independent terminators. Overall, 92.1% of the KVP40 genome is coding, with an average CDS size of 587 bp. While 65% of the CDSs were unique to KVP40 and had no known function, the genome sequence and organization show specific regions of extensive conservation with phage T4. At least 99 KVP40 CDSs have homologs in the T4 genome (Blast alignments of 45 to 68% amino acid similarity). The shared CDSs represent 36% of all T4 CDSs but only 26% of those from KVP40. There is extensive representation of the DNA replication, recombination, and repair enzymes as well as the viral capsid and tail structural genes. KVP40 lacks several T4 enzymes involved in host DNA degradation, appears not to synthesize the modified cytosine (hydroxymethyl glucose) present in T-even phages, and lacks group I introns. KVP40 likely utilizes the T4-type sigma-55 late transcription apparatus, but features of early- or middle-mode transcription were not identified. There are 26 CDSs that have no viral homolog, and many did not necessarily originate from Vibrio spp., suggesting an even broader host range for KVP40. From these latter CDSs, an NAD salvage pathway was inferred that appears to be unique among bacteriophages. Features of the KVP40 genome that distinguish it from T4 are presented, as well as those, such as the replication and virion gene clusters, that are substantially conserved. PMID:12923095

  13. Characterization of the major capsid genes (g23) of T4-type bacteriophages in the wetlands of northeast China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chunyu; Wang, Guanghua; Liu, Junjie; Song, Changchun; Gao, Hongxing; Liu, Xiaobing

    2013-04-01

    To obtain genetic information and to evaluate the composition of T4-type bacteriophage (phage) communities in wetlands, environmental soil and water DNAs were obtained from two natural wetlands dominated by Carex lasiocarpa and Deyeuxia angustifolia plant species, and a neighboring paddy field in Sanjiang plain of northeast China. The biomarker gene of g23, which encodes the major capsid protein of T4-type phages, was amplified with primers MZIA1bis and MZIA6, and the PCR products were cloned and sequenced. In total, 96 and 50 different g23 clones were obtained from natural wetlands and a paddy field, respectively. A larger number of clones with low levels of identity to known sequences were found in water than in soil both in the natural wetlands and the paddy field, suggesting that many of T4-type phages in wetland water and paddy floodwater in Sanjiang plain are uncharacterized. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the g23 clones in natural wetlands, irrespective of water and soil, were distinctly different from those in marine waters, lake waters, and upland black soils, but were similar to those in paddy fields. The UniFrac analysis of g23 assemblages indicated that T4-type phage community compositions were different between soils and waters, and also were different between the natural wetlands and the paddy field. In general, the global analysis of g23 clone assemblages demonstrated that T4-type phage community compositions were different among natural wetlands, marines, lakes, paddy fields, and upland black soils.

  14. Coordinate Variation in Lengths of Deoxyribonucleic Acid Molecules and Head Lengths in Morphological Variants of Bacteriophage T4

    PubMed Central

    Mosig, Gisela; Carnighan, Janet Renshaw; Bibring, Jane Baxandall; Cole, Robert; Bock, Hans-Georg Otto; Bock, Susan

    1972-01-01

    We have investigated three classes of small bacteriophage T4 particles which differ from normal T4 particles in length of their deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), in head length, in protein content, and in density. The different particles contain DNA molecules measuring 0.90, 0.77, or 0.67, respectively, of the normal T4 length. An additional class of viable particles contains DNA molecules of 1.1 unit length. These discrete differences in DNA length correspond to discrete differences in length (but not width) of the respective heads and are roughly proportional to the resulting differences in head volumes. The measured relative dimensions of the different heads fit best the relative dimensions predicted by a quasi-icosahedral model in which the smallest T4 head corresponds to an icosahedron with a triangulation number T = 21. The mid-portion of this structure is thought to be elongated by adding successive rows of gene 23 protein hexamers, the normal T4 head having three added rows. Different mutants produce small particles of the three classes in varying proportions, but no mutant produces exclusively particles of a single class. Particles of each class, with indistinguishable DNA content, show additional minor differences in protein content, as measured by differences in buoyant density and in the relative ratio of 32P to 35S. Images PMID:5025493

  15. Substitutions in Bacteriophage T4 AsiA and Escherichia coli ς70 That Suppress T4 motA Activation Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Cicero, Marco P.; Sharp, Meghan M.; Gross, Carol A.; Kreuzer, Kenneth N.

    2001-01-01

    Bacteriophage T4 middle-mode transcription requires two phage-encoded proteins, the MotA transcription factor and AsiA coactivator, along with Escherichia coli RNA polymerase holoenzyme containing the ς70 subunit. A motA positive control (pc) mutant, motA-pc1, was used to select for suppressor mutations that alter other proteins in the transcription complex. Separate genetic selections isolated two AsiA mutants (S22F and Q51E) and five ς70 mutants (Y571C, Y571H, D570N, L595P, and S604P). All seven suppressor mutants gave partial suppressor phenotypes in vivo as judged by plaque morphology and burst size measurements. The S22F mutant AsiA protein and glutathione S-transferase fusions of the five mutant ς70 proteins were purified. All of these mutant proteins allowed normal levels of in vitro transcription when tested with wild-type MotA protein, but they failed to suppress the mutant MotA-pc1 protein in the same assay. The ς70 substitutions affected the 4.2 region, which binds the −35 sequence of E. coli promoters. In the presence of E. coli RNA polymerase without T4 proteins, the L595P and S604P substitutions greatly decreased transcription from standard E. coli promoters. This defect could not be explained solely by a disruption in −35 recognition since similar results were obtained with extended −10 promoters. The generalized transcriptional defect of these two mutants correlated with a defect in binding to core RNA polymerase, as judged by immunoprecipitation analysis. The L595P mutant, which was the most defective for in vitro transcription, failed to support E. coli growth. PMID:11244069

  16. The kinetics of Escherichia coli B growth and bacteriophage T4 multiplication in SM-1 novel minimal culture medium.

    PubMed

    Sochocka, Marta; Tomczyk, Tomasz; Sobczyński, Maciej; Szermer-Olearnik, Bożena; Boratyński, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a minimal medium for the cultivation of Escherichia coli B, which could be especially suitable for the industrial propagation of bacteriophage T4. The new defined, minimal SM-1 culture medium, contains free amino acids as the only nitrogen source and enables the bacteria generation time to be prolonged and satisfactory phage titers to be achieved. The presence of organic ingredients, such as meat extracts, yeast hydrolysates, enzymatic protein hydrolysates, in a culture medium may cause problems in the case of bacteria or phage cultures for therapeutic purposes. In the present study, we introduce a new medium, together with some procedures and applications for its usage. We also present new kinetics of E. coli B growth. Some traits such as the lack of high molecular proteins, a bacterial growth comparable to that in a rich medium, and the cost effectiveness of the medium, makes it highly competitive with currently used microbiological media. The surprisingly high titers of bacteriophage T4 obtained in our experiments suggest that SM-1 medium has the potential to find a broad application in medicine, especially in infectious disease therapy, pharmacy and biotechnology.

  17. Rapid Degradation of Host mRNAs by Stimulation of RNase E Activity by Srd of Bacteriophage T4

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Dan; Alawneh, Abdulraheem M.; Yonesaki, Tetsuro; Otsuka, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are rapidly degraded immediately after bacteriophage T4 infection, and the host RNase E contributes to this process. Here, we found that a previously uncharacterized factor of T4 phage, Srd (Similarity with rpoD), was involved in T4-induced host mRNA degradation. The rapid decay of ompA and lpp mRNAs was partially alleviated and a decay intermediate of lpp mRNA rapidly accumulated in cells infected with T4 phage lacking srd. Exogenous expression of Srd in uninfected cells significantly accelerated the decay of these mRNAs. In addition, lpp(T) RNA, with a sequence identical to the decay intermediate of lpp mRNA and a triphosphate at 5′-end, was also destabilized by Srd. The destabilization of these RNAs by Srd was not observed in RNase E-defective cells. The initial cleavage of a primary transcript by RNase E can be either direct or dependent on the 5′-end of transcript. In the latter case, host RppH is required to convert the triphosphate at 5′-end to a monophosphate. lpp(T) RNA, but not lpp and ompA mRNAs, required RppH for Srd-stimulated degradation, indicating that Srd stimulates both 5′-end-dependent and -independent cleavage activities of RNase E. Furthermore, pull-down and immunoprecipitation analyses strongly suggested that Srd physically associates with the N-terminal half of RNase E containing the catalytic moiety and the membrane target sequence. Finally, the growth of T4 phage was significantly decreased by the disruption of srd. These results strongly suggest that the stimulation of RNase E activity by T4 Srd is required for efficient phage growth. PMID:26323881

  18. Comparison of bactericidal activity of six lysozymes at atmospheric pressure and under high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Nakimbugwe, Dorothy; Masschalck, Barbara; Atanassova, Miroslava; Zewdie-Bosüner, Abebetch; Michiels, Chris W

    2006-05-01

    The antibacterial working range of six lysozymes was tested under ambient and high pressure, on a panel of five gram-positive (Enterococcus faecalis, Bacillus subtilis, Listeria innocua, Staphylococcus aureus and Micrococcus lysodeikticus) and five gram-negative bacteria (Yersinia enterocolitica, Shigella flexneri, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella typhimurium). The lysozymes included two that are commercially available (hen egg white lysozyme or HEWL, and mutanolysin from Streptomyces globisporus or M1L), and four that were chromatographically purified (bacteriophage lambda lysozyme or LaL, bacteriophage T4 lysozyme or T4L, goose egg white lysozyme or GEWL, and cauliflower lysozyme or CFL). T4L, LaL and GEWL were highly pure as evaluated by silver staining of SDS-PAGE gels and zymogram analysis while CFL was only partially pure. At ambient pressure each gram-positive test organism displayed a specific pattern of sensitivity to the six lysozymes, but none of the gram-negative bacteria was sensitive to any of the lysozymes. High pressure treatment (130-300 MPa, 25 degrees C, 15 min) sensitised several gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria for one or more lysozymes. M. lysodeikticus and P. aeruginosa became sensitive to all lysozymes under high pressure, S. typhimurium remained completely insensitive to all lysozymes, and the other bacteria showed sensitisation to some of the lysozymes. The possible applications of the different lysozymes as biopreservatives, and the possible reasons for the observed differences in bactericidal specificity are discussed.

  19. Inhibition of transcription of cytosine-containing DNA in vitro by the alc gene product of bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed Central

    Drivdahl, R H; Kutter, E M

    1990-01-01

    The alc gene product (gpalc) of bacteriophage T4 inhibits the transcription of cytosine-containing DNA in vivo. We examined its effect on transcription in vitro by comparing RNA polymerase isolated from Escherichia coli infected with either wild-type T4D+ or alc mutants. A 50 to 60% decline in RNA polymerase activity, measured on phage T7 DNA, was observed by 1 min after infection with either T4D+ or alc mutants; this did not occur when the infecting phage lacked gpalt. In the case of the T4D+ strain but not alc mutants, this was followed by a further decrease. By 5 min after infection the activity of alc mutants was 1.5 to 2.5 times greater than that of the wild type on various cytosine-containing DNA templates, whereas there was little or no difference in activity on T4 HMdC-DNA, in agreement with the in vivo specificity. Effects on transcript initiation and elongation were distinguished by using a T7 phage DNA template. Rifampin challenge, end-labeling with [gamma-32P]ATP, and selective initiation with a dinucleotide all indicate that the decreased in vitro activity of the wild-type polymerase relative to that of the alc mutants was due to inhibition of elongation, not to any difference in initiation rates. Wild-type (but not mutated) gpalc copurified with RNA polymerase on heparin agarose but not in subsequent steps. Immunoprecipitation of modified RNA polymerase also indicated that gpalc was not tightly bound to RNA polymerase intracellularly. It thus appears likely that gpalc inhibits transcript elongation on cytosine-containing DNA by interacting with actively transcribing core polymerase as a complex with the enzyme and cytosine-rich stretches of the template. Images PMID:2185231

  20. Structure of the Three N-Terminal Immunoglobulin Domains of the Highly Immunogenic Outer Capsid Protein from a T4-Like Bacteriophage

    SciTech Connect

    Fokine, Andrei; Islam, Mohammad Z.; Zhang, Zhihong; Bowman, Valorie D.; Rao, Venigalla B.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2011-09-16

    The head of bacteriophage T4 is decorated with 155 copies of the highly antigenic outer capsid protein (Hoc). One Hoc molecule binds near the center of each hexameric capsomer. Hoc is dispensable for capsid assembly and has been used to display pathogenic antigens on the surface of T4. Here we report the crystal structure of a protein containing the first three of four domains of Hoc from bacteriophage RB49, a close relative of T4. The structure shows an approximately linear arrangement of the protein domains. Each of these domains has an immunoglobulin-like fold, frequently found in cell attachment molecules. In addition, we report biochemical data suggesting that Hoc can bind to Escherichia coli, supporting the hypothesis that Hoc could attach the phage capsids to bacterial surfaces and perhaps also to other organisms. The capacity for such reversible adhesion probably provides survival advantages to the bacteriophage.

  1. Nucleotide sequence and analysis of the 58.3 to 65.5-kb early region of bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed Central

    Valerie, K; Stevens, J; Lynch, M; Henderson, E E; de Riel, J K

    1986-01-01

    The complete 7.2-kb nucleotide sequence from the 58.3 to 65.5-kb early region of bacteriophage T4 has been determined by Maxam and Gilbert sequencing. Computer analysis revealed at least 20 open reading frames (ORFs) within this sequence. All major ORFs are transcribed from the left strand, suggesting that they are expressed early during infection. Among the ORFs, we have identified the ipIII, ipII, denV and tk genes. The ORFs are very tightly spaced, even overlapping in some instances, and when ORF interspacing occurs, promoter-like sequences can be implicated. Several of the sequences preceding the ORFs, in particular those at ipIII, ipII, denV, and orf61.9, can potentially form stable stem-loop structures. PMID:3024113

  2. Structure and function of the small terminase component of the DNA packaging machine in T4-like bacteriophages

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Siyang; Gao, Song; Kondabagil, Kiran; Xiang, Ye; Rossmann, Michael G.; Rao, Venigalla B.

    2012-04-04

    Tailed DNA bacteriophages assemble empty procapsids that are subsequently filled with the viral genome by means of a DNA packaging machine situated at a special fivefold vertex. The packaging machine consists of a 'small terminase' and a 'large terminase' component. One of the functions of the small terminase is to initiate packaging of the viral genome, whereas the large terminase is responsible for the ATP-powered translocation of DNA. The small terminase subunit has three domains, an N-terminal DNA-binding domain, a central oligomerization domain, and a C-terminal domain for interacting with the large terminase. Here we report structures of the central domain in two different oligomerization states for a small terminase from the T4 family of phages. In addition, we report biochemical studies that establish the function for each of the small terminase domains. On the basis of the structural and biochemical information, we propose a model for DNA packaging initiation.

  3. Suppressors of Mutations in the rII Gene of Bacteriophage T4 Affect Promoter Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Dwight H.; Snyder, Ronald D.

    1981-01-01

    Homyk, Rodriguez and Weil (1976) have described T4 mutants, called sip, that partially suppress the inability of T4rII mutants to grow in λ lysogens. We have found that mutants sip1 and sip2 are resistant to folate analogs and overproduce FH2 reductase. The results of recombination and complementation studies indicate that sip mutations are in the mot gene. Like other mot mutations (Mattson, Richardson and Goodin 1974; Chace and Hall 1975; Sauerbier, Hercules and Hall 1976), the sip2 mutation affects the expression of many genes and appears to affect promoter utilization. The mot gene function is not required for T4 growth on most hosts, but we have found that it is required for good growth on E. coli CTr5X. Homyk, Rodriguez and Weil (1976) also described L mutations that reverse the effects of sip mutations. L2 decreases the folate analog resistance and the inability of sip2 to grow on CTr5X. L2 itself is partially resistant to a folate analog, and appears to reverse the effects of sip2 on gene expression. These results suggest that L2 affects another regulatory gene related to the mot gene. PMID:7262547

  4. Translational regulation: identification of the site on bacteriophage T4 rIIB mRNA recognized by the regA gene function.

    PubMed Central

    Karam, J; Gold, L; Singer, B S; Dawson, M

    1981-01-01

    The bacteriophage T4 gene regA encodes a protein that diminishes the expression of many unlinked early T4 genes. Previous work demonstrated that regA-mediated repression occurs after transcription. We report here on the identification of the target site on one regA-sensitive mRNA, the message encoding the phage T4 rIIB protein. The target for regA-mediated action overlaps the translational initiation domain of the rIIB messenger. The regA protein may be a repressor that operates translationally on a significant and interesting set of early phage T4 mRNAs. Images PMID:7029523

  5. Highly Effective Soluble and Bacteriophage T4 Nanoparticle Plague Vaccines Against Yersinia pestis

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Pan; Mahalingam, Marthandan; Rao, Venigalla B.

    2016-01-01

    Plague caused by Yersinia pestis is an ancient disease, responsible for millions of deaths in human history. Unfortunately, there is no FDA-approved vaccine available. Recombinant subunit vaccines based on two major antigens, Caf 1 (F1) and LcrV (V), have been under investigation and showed promise. However, there are two main problems associated with these vaccines. First, the Yersinia capsular protein F1 has high propensity to aggregate, particularly when expressed in heterologous systems such as Escherichia coli, thus affecting vaccine quality and efficacy. Second, the subunit vaccines do not induce adequate cell-mediated immune responses that also appear to be essential for optimal protection against plague. We have developed two basic approaches, structure-based immunogen design and phage T4 nanoparticle delivery, to construct new plague vaccines that may overcome these problems. First, by engineering F1 protein, we generated a monomeric and soluble F1V mutant (F1mutV) which has similar immunogenicity as wild-type F1V. The NH2-terminal β-strand of F1 was transplanted to the COOH-terminus and the sequence flanking the β-strand was duplicated to retain a key CD4+ T cell epitope. Second, we generated a nanoparticle plague vaccine that can induce balanced antibody- and cell-mediated immune responses. This was done by arraying the F1mutV on phage T4 via the small outer capsid (Soc) protein which binds to T4 capsid at nanomolar affinity. Preparation of these vaccines is described in detail and we hope that these would be considered as candidates for licensing a next-generation plague vaccine. PMID:27076150

  6. Structure and Biophysical Properties of a Triple-Stranded Beta-Helix Comprising the Central Spike of Bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed

    Buth, Sergey A; Menin, Laure; Shneider, Mikhail M; Engel, Jürgen; Boudko, Sergei P; Leiman, Petr G

    2015-08-18

    Gene product 5 (gp5) of bacteriophage T4 is a spike-shaped protein that functions to disrupt the membrane of the target cell during phage infection. Its C-terminal domain is a long and slender β-helix that is formed by three polypeptide chains wrapped around a common symmetry axis akin to three interdigitated corkscrews. The folding and biophysical properties of such triple-stranded β-helices, which are topologically related to amyloid fibers, represent an unsolved biophysical problem. Here, we report structural and biophysical characterization of T4 gp5 β-helix and its truncated mutants of different lengths. A soluble fragment that forms a dimer of trimers and that could comprise a minimal self-folding unit has been identified. Surprisingly, the hydrophobic core of the β-helix is small. It is located near the C-terminal end of the β-helix and contains a centrally positioned and hydrated magnesium ion. A large part of the β-helix interior comprises a large elongated cavity that binds palmitic, stearic, and oleic acids in an extended conformation suggesting that these molecules might participate in the folding of the complete β-helix.

  7. Interaction of bacteriophage T4 and T7 single-stranded DNA-binding proteins with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri, Leila; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark C.

    2009-06-01

    Bacteriophages T4 and T7 are well-studied model replication systems, which have allowed researchers to determine the roles of many proteins central to DNA replication, recombination and repair. Here we summarize and discuss the results from two recently developed single-molecule methods to determine the salt-dependent DNA-binding kinetics and thermodynamics of the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding proteins (SSBs) from these systems. We use these methods to characterize both the equilibrium double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and ssDNA binding of the SSBs T4 gene 32 protein (gp32) and T7 gene 2.5 protein (gp2.5). Despite the overall two-orders-of-magnitude weaker binding of gp2.5 to both forms of DNA, we find that both proteins exhibit four-orders-of-magnitude preferential binding to ssDNA relative to dsDNA. This strong preferential ssDNA binding as well as the weak dsDNA binding is essential for the ability of both proteins to search dsDNA in one dimension to find available ssDNA-binding sites at the replication fork.

  8. Structure and Biophysical Properties of a Triple-Stranded Beta-Helix Comprising the Central Spike of Bacteriophage T4

    PubMed Central

    Buth, Sergey A.; Menin, Laure; Shneider, Mikhail M.; Engel, Jürgen; Boudko, Sergei P.; Leiman, Petr G.

    2015-01-01

    Gene product 5 (gp5) of bacteriophage T4 is a spike-shaped protein that functions to disrupt the membrane of the target cell during phage infection. Its C-terminal domain is a long and slender β-helix that is formed by three polypeptide chains wrapped around a common symmetry axis akin to three interdigitated corkscrews. The folding and biophysical properties of such triple-stranded β-helices, which are topologically related to amyloid fibers, represent an unsolved biophysical problem. Here, we report structural and biophysical characterization of T4 gp5 β-helix and its truncated mutants of different lengths. A soluble fragment that forms a dimer of trimers and that could comprise a minimal self-folding unit has been identified. Surprisingly, the hydrophobic core of the β-helix is small. It is located near the C-terminal end of the β-helix and contains a centrally positioned and hydrated magnesium ion. A large part of the β-helix interior comprises a large elongated cavity that binds palmitic, stearic, and oleic acids in an extended conformation suggesting that these molecules might participate in the folding of the complete β-helix. PMID:26295253

  9. Photodynamic inactivation and mutagenesis by angelicin (isopsoralen) or thiopyronin (methylene red) in wild-type and repair-deficient strains of bacteriophage T4

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, J.W.

    1985-06-01

    Photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophage T4 particles, mediated by either angelicin or thiopyronin, is enhanced by defects in the T4 uvsW-uvsX-uvsY postreplication repair system but not by a defect in the denV pyrimidine-dimer-excision system. There was no evidence for functional interactions between the two repair systems. As observed previously with 8-methoxypsoralen, photodynamic mutagenesis with angelicin is abolished by defects in the uvsW-uvsX-uvsY system.

  10. Genetic recombination induced by DNA double-strand break in bacteriophage T4: nature of the left/right bias.

    PubMed

    Shcherbakov, Victor P; Shcherbakova, Tamara; Plugina, Lidiya; Sizova, Svetlana; Kudryashova, Elena; Granovsky, Igor

    2008-06-01

    The experimental system combining double-strand breaks (DSBs), produced site-specifically by SegC endonuclease, with the famous advantages of the bacteriophage T4 rII mutant recombination analysis was used here to elucidate the origin of the recombination bias on two sides of the DSB, especially pronounced in gene 39 (topoisomerase II) and gene 59 (41-helicase loader) mutants. Three sources were found to contribute to the bias: (1) the SegC endonuclease may remain bound to the end of the broken DNA and thus protect it from exonuclease degradation; (2) in heteroduplex heterozygotes (HHs), arising as the recombinant products in the left-hand crosses, the transcribed strands are of rII mutant phenotype, so they, in contrast to the right-hand HHs, do not produce plaques on the lawn of the lambda-lysogenic host; and (3) the intrinsic polarity of T4 chromosome, reflected in transcription, may be a cause for discrimination of promoter-proximal and promoter-distal DNA sequences. It is shown that the apparent recombination bias does not imply one-sidedness of the DSB repair but just reflects a different depth of the end processing. It is inferred that the cause, underlying the "intrinsic" bias, might be interference between strand exchange and transcription. Topoisomerase and helicase functions are necessary to turn the process in favor of strand exchange. The idea is substantiated that the double-stranded to single-stranded DNA transition edge (not ss-DNA tip) serves as an actual recombinogenic element.

  11. The Structure of Gene Product 6 of Bacteriophage T4, the Hinge-Pin of the Baseplate

    SciTech Connect

    Aksyuk, Anastasia A.; Leiman, Petr G.; Shneider, Mikhail M.; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2009-07-21

    The baseplate of bacteriophage T4 is a multicomponent protein complex, which controls phage attachment to the host. It assembles from six wedges and a central hub. During infection the baseplate undergoes a large conformational change from a dome-shaped to a flat, star-shaped structure. We report the crystal structure of the C-terminal half of gene product (gp) 6 and investigate its motion with respect to the other proteins during the baseplate rearrangement. Six gp6 dimers interdigitate, forming a ring that maintains the integrity of the baseplate in both conformations. One baseplate wedge contains an N-terminal dimer of gp6, whereas neighboring wedges are tied together through the C-terminal dimer of gp6. The dimeric interactions are preserved throughout the rearrangement of the baseplate. However, the hinge angle between the N- and C-terminal parts of gp6 changes by {approx}15{sup o}, accounting for a 10 {angstrom} radial increase in the diameter of the gp6 ring.

  12. Analyzing indirect secondary electron contrast of unstained bacteriophage T4 based on SEM images and Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ogura, Toshihiko

    2009-03-06

    The indirect secondary electron contrast (ISEC) condition of the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) produces high contrast detection with minimal damage of unstained biological samples mounted under a thin carbon film. The high contrast image is created by a secondary electron signal produced under the carbon film by a low acceleration voltage. Here, we show that ISEC condition is clearly able to detect unstained bacteriophage T4 under a thin carbon film (10-15 nm) by using high-resolution field emission (FE) SEM. The results show that FE-SEM provides higher resolution than thermionic emission SEM. Furthermore, we investigated the scattered electron area within the carbon film under ISEC conditions using Monte Carlo simulation. The simulations indicated that the image resolution difference is related to the scattering width in the carbon film and the electron beam spot size. Using ISEC conditions on unstained virus samples would produce low electronic damage, because the electron beam does not directly irradiate the sample. In addition to the routine analysis, this method can be utilized for structural analysis of various biological samples like viruses, bacteria, and protein complexes.

  13. Overexpression, purification, and partial characterization of ADP-ribosyltransferases modA and modB of bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed

    Tiemann, B; Depping, R; Rüger, W

    1999-01-01

    There is increasing experimental evidence that ADP-ribosylation of host proteins is an important means to regulate gene expression of bacteriophage T4. Surprisingly, this phage codes for three different ADP-ribosyltransferases, gene products Alt, ModA, and ModB, modifying partially overlapping sets of host proteins. While gene product Alt already has been isolated as a recombinant protein and its action on host RNA polymerases and transcription regulation have been studied, the nucleotide sequences of the two mod genes was published only recently. Their mode of action in the course of the infection cycle and the consequences of the ADP-ribosylations catalyzed by these enzymes remain to be investigated. Here we describe the cloning of the genes, the overexpression, purification, and partial characterization of ADP-ribosyltransferases ModA and ModB. Both proteins seem to act independently, and the ADP-ribosyl moieties are transferred to different sets of host proteins. While gene product ModA, similarly to the Alt protein, acts also on the alpha-subunit of host RNA polymerase, the ModB activity serves another set of proteins, one of which was identified as the S1 protein associated with the 30S subunit of the E. coli ribosomes.

  14. Necessity of quantum coherence to account for the spectrum of time-dependent mutations exhibited by bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed

    Cooper, W Grant

    2009-12-01

    Transcriptase measurements of quantum expectations due to time-dependent coherent states populating informational DNA base-pair sites, designated by G-C --> *G-*C, G-C --> G'-C', and A-T --> *A-*T, provide a model for transcription and replication of time-dependent DNA lesions exhibited by bacteriophage T4. Coherent states are introduced as consequences of hydrogen bond arrangement, keto-amino --> enol-imine, where product protons are shared between two sets of indistinguishable electron lone-pairs and thus participate in coupled quantum oscillations at frequencies of ~10(13) s(-1). The transcriptase deciphers and executes genetic specificity instructions by implementing measurements on superposition proton states at *G-*C, G'-C', and *A-*T sites in an interval Δt < 10(-13) s. Decohered states participate in Topal-Fresco replication, which introduces substitutions *C --> T, *G --> A, G' --> T, and G' --> C, but superposition *A-*T states are deleted. These results imply an evolutionary shift favoring A-T richness.

  15. Cryoelectron microscopy analysis of small heat shock protein 16.5 (Hsp16.5) complexes with T4 lysozyme reveals the structural basis of multimode binding.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jian; Koteiche, Hanane A; McDonald, Ezelle T; Fox, Tara L; Stewart, Phoebe L; McHaourab, Hassane S

    2013-02-15

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) are ubiquitous chaperones that bind and sequester non-native proteins preventing their aggregation. Despite extensive studies of sHSPs chaperone activity, the location of the bound substrate within the sHSP oligomer has not been determined. In this paper, we used cryoelectron microscopy (cryoEM) to visualize destabilized mutants of T4 lysozyme (T4L) bound to engineered variants of the small heat shock protein Hsp16.5. In contrast to wild type Hsp16.5, binding of T4L to these variants does not induce oligomer heterogeneity enabling cryoEM analysis of the complexes. CryoEM image reconstruction reveals the sequestration of T4L in the interior of the Hsp16.5 oligomer primarily interacting with the buried N-terminal domain but also tethered by contacts with the α-crystallin domain shell. Analysis of Hsp16.5-WT/T4L complexes uncovers oligomer expansion as a requirement for high affinity binding. In contrast, a low affinity mode of binding is found to involve T4L binding on the outer surface of the oligomer bridging the formation of large complexes of Hsp16.5. These mechanistic principles were validated by cryoEM analysis of an expanded variant of Hsp16.5 in complex with T4L and Hsp16.5-R107G, which is equivalent to a mutant of human αB-crystallin linked to cardiomyopathy. In both cases, high affinity binding is found to involve conformational changes in the N-terminal region consistent with a central role of this region in substrate recognition.

  16. Orally delivered foot-and-mouth disease virus capsid protomer vaccine displayed on T4 bacteriophage surface: 100% protection from potency challenge in mice.

    PubMed

    Ren, Z J; Tian, C J; Zhu, Q S; Zhao, M Y; Xin, A G; Nie, W X; Ling, S R; Zhu, M W; Wu, J Y; Lan, H Y; Cao, Y C; Bi, Y Z

    2008-03-10

    An orally delivered foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccine has not previously been reported. By using a T4 bacteriophage nanoparticle surface gene-protein display system (T4-S-GPDS), we created a foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) entire capsid protein vaccine candidate. On the T4 phage surface SOC site, a full length FMDV capsid precursor polyprotein (P1, 755 aa) and proteinase 3C (213 aa) derived from an infected pig of serotype O strain GD-10 (1999), were separately displayed on different T4 phage particle surfaces through inserting their coding region DNAs into the T4 phage genome, yielding phage strains T4-P1 and T4-3C. We also constructed a series of FMDV sub-full length capsid structural protein (subunit) containing T4 phage recombinant vaccines. Both sucking and young BALB/c mice were used as two kinds of FMDV vaccine potency evaluation models. Many groups of both model mice were vaccinated orally or by subcutaneous injection with varying FMDV-T4 phage recombinant vaccines, with and without addition of adjuvant, then challenged with a lethal dose of cattle source virulent FMDV. In the case of immunization with a mixture of phage T4-P1 and phage T4-3C particles without any adjuvant added, all mice were 100% protected following either oral or injection immunization, whereas 100% of the control, non-immunized mice and mice immunized with only T4 phage vector Z1/Zh(-) or wild-type T4(+)D phage died; in contrast, with FMDV subunit vaccine, less than 75% protection followed the same potency challenge in both mice model groups. In addition, two pigs immunized with a phage T4-P1 and phage T4-3C mix were protected upon housing together with infected pigs. This study represents a clear example of how FMD and other pathogenic disease vaccines can be prepared by a simple and efficient bacteriophage route.

  17. Triple point mutation Asp10-->His, Asn101-->Asp, Arg148-->Ser in T4 phage lysozyme leads to the molten globule.

    PubMed

    Uversky, V N; Leontiev, V V; Gudkov, A T

    1992-12-01

    The triple amino acid replacement (Asp10-->His, Asn101-->Asp, Arg148-->Ser) in T4 phage lysozyme was carried out by site-directed mutagenesis. At acid pH (2.7) the mutant is in a conformational state with the properties of the molten globule: (i) the mutant protein molecule is essentially compact; (ii) its CD spectrum in the near UV region is drastically reduced in intensity as compared with the wild type protein spectrum; (iii) the CD spectrum in the far UV region indicates the presence of pronounced secondary structure in the mutant; (iv) unlike the wild type protein the mutant protein can bind the hydrophobic fluorescent probe, ANS.

  18. A test of the "jigsaw puzzle" model for protein folding by multiple methionine substitutions within the core of T4 lysozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Gassner, N C; Baase, W A; Matthews, B W

    1996-01-01

    To test whether the structure of a protein is determined in a manner akin to the assembly of a jigsaw puzzle, up to 10 adjacent residues within the core of T4 lysozyme were replaced by methionine. Such variants are active and fold cooperatively with progressively reduced stability. The structure of a seven-methionine variant has been shown, crystallographically, to be similar to wild type and to maintain a well ordered core. The interaction between the core residues is, therefore, not strictly comparable with the precise spatial complementarity of the pieces of a jigsaw puzzle. Rather, a certain amount of give and take in forming the core structure is permitted. A simplified hydrophobic core sequence, imposed without genetic selection or computer-based design, is sufficient to retain native properties in a globular protein. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8901549

  19. In Vitro Ligation of Oligodeoxynucleotides Containing C8-Oxidized Purine Lesions using Bacteriophage T4 DNA Ligase†

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaobei; Muller, James G.; Halasyam, Mohan; David, Sheila S.; Burrows, Cynthia J.

    2008-01-01

    Ligases conduct the final stage of repair of DNA damage by sealing a single-stranded nick after excision of damaged nucleotides and reinsertion of correct nucleotides. Depending upon the circumstances and the success of the repair process, lesions may remain at the ligation site, either in the template or at the oligomer termini to be joined. Ligation experiments using bacteriophage T4 DNA ligase were carried out with purine lesions in four positions surrounding the nick site in a total of 96 different duplexes. The oxidized lesion 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine (OG) showed, as expected, that the enzyme is most sensitive to lesions on the 3′ end of the nick compared to the 5′ end and to lesions located in the intact template strand. In general, substrates containing the OG·A mismatch were more readily ligated than OG·C. Ligations of duplexes containing the OA·T base pair (OA=8-oxo-7,8- dihydroadenosine) that could adopt an anti-anti conformation proceeded in high efficiencies. An OI·Acontaining duplex (OI = 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroinosine) behaved similarly to OG·A. Due to its low reduction potential, OG is readily oxidized to secondary oxidation products, such as the guanidinohydantoin (Gh) and spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp) nucleosides; these lesions also contain an oxo group at the original C8 position of the purine. Ligation of oligomers containing Gh and Sp occurred when opposite A and G although the overall ligation efficiencies were much lower than most OG base pairs. Steady-state kinetic studies were carried out for representative examples of lesions in the template. Km increased by 90–100-fold for OG·C, OI·C, OI·A and OA·T containing duplexes compared to G·C. Substrates containing Gh·A, Gh·G, Sp·A and Sp·G base pairs showed Km values 20–70-fold higher than G·C while the Km value for OG·A was 5 times lower than G·C. PMID:17323928

  20. Double-strand break repair and genetic recombination in topoisomerase and primase mutants of bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed

    Shcherbakov, Victor P; Kudryashova, Elena

    2014-09-01

    The effects of primase and topoisomerase II deficiency on the double-strand break (DSB) repair and genetic recombination in bacteriophage T4 were studied in vivo using focused recombination. Site-specific DSBs were induced by SegC endonuclease in the rIIB gene of one of the parents. The frequency/distance relationship was determined in crosses of the wild-type phage, topoisomerase II mutant amN116 (gene 39), and primase mutant E219 (gene 61). Ordinary two-factor (i×j) and three-factor (i k×j) crosses between point rII mutations were also performed. These data provide information about the frequency and distance distribution of the single-exchange (splice) and double-exchange (patch) events. In two-factor crosses ets1×i, the topoisomerase and primase mutants had similar recombinant frequencies in crosses at ets1-i distances longer than 1000 bp, comprising about 80% of the corresponding wild-type values. They, however, differ remarkably in crosses at shorter distances. In the primase mutant, the recombinant frequencies are similar to those in the wild-type crosses at distances less than 100 bp, being a bit diminished at longer distances. In two-factor crosses ets1×i of the topoisomerase mutant, the recombinant frequencies were reduced ten-fold at the shortest distances. In three-factor crosses a6 ets1×i, where we measure patch-related recombination, the primase mutant was quite proficient across the entire range of distances. The topoisomerase mutant crosses demonstrated virtually complete absence of rII(+) recombinants at distances up to 33 bp, with the frequencies increasing steadily at longer distances. The data were interpreted as follows. The primase mutant is fully recombination-proficient. An obvious difference from the wild-type state is some shortage of EndoVII function leading to prolonged existence of HJs and thus stretched out ds-branch migration. This is also true for the topoisomerase mutant. However, the latter is deficient in the ss

  1. Molecular mechanisms in alkylation mutagenesis. Induced reversion of bacteriophage T4rII AP72 by ethyl methanesulphonate in relation to extent and mode of ethylation of purines in bacteriophage deoxyribonucleic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Lawley, P D; Martin, C N

    1975-01-01

    Survival and reversion to T4r+ of bacteriophage T4rII AP72 after treatment with ethyl methanesulphonate at 37 degrees or 45 degrees C were studied in relation to the extent and mode of alkylation of purines in DNA of ethylated bacteriophage. A single-burst technique was used for reversion assay. Survival was lower at 45 degrees C than at 37 degrees C at a given extent of ethylation of bacteriophage DNA, confirming that events subsequent to ethylation, probably depurinations, are the main cause of decreased survival. Reversion was positively correlated (approximately linearly except at low extents at 37 degrees C) with ethylation of bacteriophage DNA, showing that ethylation itself causes mutation. Following the concept that reversion results from G-C leads to A-T transition at a single site (Krieg, 1963a,b) and the suggestion that O6-alkylation of guanine generates the miscoding base (Loveless, 1969), it was calculated that about one-third of induced O6-ethylguanines at this site would miscode to induce mutation. PMID:172067

  2. ModA and ModB, two ADP-ribosyltransferases encoded by bacteriophage T4: catalytic properties and mutation analysis.

    PubMed

    Tiemann, Bernd; Depping, Reinhard; Gineikiene, Egle; Kaliniene, Laura; Nivinskas, Rimas; Rüger, Wolfgang

    2004-11-01

    Bacteriophage T4 encodes three ADP-ribosyltransferases, Alt, ModA, and ModB. These enzymes participate in the regulation of the T4 replication cycle by ADP-ribosylating a defined set of host proteins. In order to obtain a better understanding of the phage-host interactions and their consequences for regulating the T4 replication cycle, we studied cloning, overexpression, and characterization of purified ModA and ModB enzymes. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that amino acids, as deduced from secondary structure alignments, are indeed decisive for the activity of the enzymes, implying that the transfer reaction follows the Sn1-type reaction scheme proposed for this class of enzymes. In vitro transcription assays performed with Alt- and ModA-modified RNA polymerases demonstrated that the Alt-ribosylated polymerase enhances transcription from T4 early promoters on a T4 DNA template, whereas the transcriptional activity of ModA-modified polymerase, without the participation of T4-encoded auxiliary proteins for middle mode or late transcription, is reduced. The results presented here support the conclusion that ADP-ribosylation of RNA polymerase and of other host proteins allows initial phage-directed mRNA synthesis reactions to escape from host control. In contrast, subsequent modification of the other cellular target proteins limits transcription from phage early genes and participates in redirecting transcription to phage middle and late genes.

  3. Analysis of five presumptive protein-coding sequences clustered between the primosome genes, 41 and 61, of bacteriophages T4, T2, and T6.

    PubMed Central

    Selick, H E; Stormo, G D; Dyson, R L; Alberts, B M

    1993-01-01

    In bacteriophage T4, there is a strong tendency for genes that encode interacting proteins to be clustered on the chromosome. There is 1.6 kb of DNA between the DNA helicase (gene 41) and the DNA primase (gene 61) genes of this virus. The DNA sequence of this region suggests that it contains five genes, designated as open reading frames (ORFs) 61.1 to 61.5, predicted to encode proteins ranging in size from 5.94 to 22.88 kDa. Are these ORFs actually genes? As one test, we compared the DNA sequence of this region in bacteriophages T2, T4, and T6 and found that ORFs 61.1, 61.3, 61.4, and 61.5 are highly conserved among the three closely related viruses. In contrast, ORF 61.2 is conserved between phages T4 and T6 yet is absent from phage T2, where it is replaced by another ORF, T2 ORF 61.2, which is not found in the T4 and T6 genomes. As a second, independent test for coding sequences, we calculated the codon base position preferences for all ORFs in this region that could encode proteins that contain at least 30 amino acids. Both the T4/T6 and T2 versions of ORF 61.2, as well as the other ORFs, have codon base position preferences that are indistinguishable from those of known T4 genes (coefficients of 0.81 to 0.94); the six other possible ORFs of at least 90 bp in this region are ruled out as genes by this test (coefficients less than zero). Thus, both evolutionary conservation and codon usage patterns lead us to conclude that ORFs 61.1 to 61.5 represent important protein-coding sequences for this family of bacteriophages. Because they are located between the genes that encode the two interacting proteins of the T4 primosome (DNA helicase plus DNA primase), one or more may function in DNA replication by modulating primosome function. Images PMID:8383243

  4. An N-terminal mutation in the bacteriophage T4 motA gene yields a protein that binds DNA but is defective for activation of transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, J S; Hinton, D M

    1996-01-01

    The bacteriophage T4 MotA protein is a transcriptional activator of T4-modified host RNA polymerase and is required for activation of the middle class of T4 promoters. MotA alone binds to the -30 region of T4 middle promoters, a region that contains the MotA box consensus sequence [(t/a)(t/a)TGCTT(t/c)A]. We report the isolation and characterization of a protein designated Mot21, in which the first 8 codons of the wild-type motA sequence have been replaced with 11 different codons. In gel retardation assays, Mot21 and MotA bind DNA containing the T4 middle promoter P(uvsX) similarly, and the proteins yield similar footprints on P(uvsX). However, Mot21 is severely defective in the activation of transcription. On native protein gels, a new protein species is seen after incubation of the sigma70 subunit of RNA polymerase and wild-type MotA protein, suggesting a direct protein-protein contact between MotA and sigma70. Mot21 fails to form this complex, suggesting that this interaction is necessary for transcriptional activation and that the Mot21 defect arises because Mot21 cannot form this contact like the wild-type activator. PMID:8892810

  5. Ergothioneine, histidine, and two naturally occurring histidine dipeptides as radioprotectors against gamma-irradiation inactivation of bacteriophages T4 and P22

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, P.E.; Hartman, Z.; Citardi, M.J.

    1988-05-01

    Bacteriophages P22, T4+, and T4os (osmotic shock-resistant mutant with altered capsids) were diluted in 0.85% NaCl and exposed to gamma irradiation (2.79 Gy/min) at room temperature (24 degrees C). T4+ was more sensitive to inactivation than was P22, and the T4os mutant was even more sensitive than T4+. Catalase exhibited a strong protective effect and superoxide dismutase a weaker protection, indicating that H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ or some product derived therefrom was predominant in causing inactivation of plaque formation. Low but significant (0.1-0.3 mM) reduced glutathione (GSH) enhanced phage inactivation, but a higher (1 mM) GSH concentration protected. A similar effect was found for the polyamine, spermidine. In contrast, 0.1 mM L-ergothioneine (2-thiol-L-histidine betaine) exhibited strong protection and 1 mM afforded essentially complete protection. L-Ergothioneine is present in millimolar concentrations in some fungi and is conserved up to millimolar concentrations in critical tissues when consumed by man. L-Histidine and two histidine-containing dipeptides, carnosine and anserine, protected at a concentration of 1 mM, a level at which they are present in striated muscles of various animals.

  6. Genetic Recombination in Bacteriophage T4: Single-Burst Analysis of Cosegregants and Evidence in Favor of a Splice/Patch Coupling Model

    PubMed Central

    Shcherbakov, V. P.; Plugina, L. A.; Nesheva, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    To reveal the structure of penultimate DNA intermediates in T4 bacteriophage recombination, resolution of which produces free recombinant molecules, a single-burst analysis of the recombinant progeny was made in multifactor crosses, enabling one to determine quantitatively the different recombinants generated by one or two exchanges within the same chromosome segment. It was found that double and single exchanges are highly correlated in T4 recombination. These results were interpreted as evidence for simultaneous formation of a splice/patch pair as the primary recombination products. A recombination model called here the ``splice/patch coupling model'' is presented according to which resolution of a single DNA intermediate results in two linear heterozygous molecules containing a patch and a splice, respectively, in homologous positions. PMID:1516814

  7. Off-resonance R1rho relaxation outside of the fast exchange limit: an experimental study of a cavity mutant of T4 lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Korzhnev, Dmitry M; Orekhov, Vladislav Yu; Dahlquist, Frederick W; Kay, Lewis E

    2003-05-01

    An (15)N off-resonance R(1rho) spin relaxation study of an L99A point mutant of T4 lysozyme is presented. Previous CPMG-based relaxation dispersion studies of exchange in this protein have established that the molecule interconverts between a populated ground state and an excited state (3.4%) with an exchange rate constant of 1450 s(-1) at 25 degrees C. It is shown that for the majority of residues in this protein the offset dependence of the R(1rho) relaxation rates cannot be well fit using models which are only valid in the fast exchange regime. In contrast, a recently derived expression by Trott and Palmer (J. Magn. Reson., 154, 157-160, 2002) which is valid over a wider window of exchange than other relations, is shown to fit the data well. Values of (signed) chemical shift differences between exchanging sites have been extracted and are in reasonable agreement with shift differences measured using CPMG methods. A set of simulations is presented which help establish the exchange regimes that are best suited to analysis by off-resonance R(1rho) techniques.

  8. Effect of freezing conditions on distances and their distributions derived from Double Electron Electron Resonance (DEER): A study of doubly-spin-labeled T4 lysozyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgieva, Elka R.; Roy, Aritro S.; Grigoryants, Vladimir M.; Borbat, Petr P.; Earle, Keith A.; Scholes, Charles P.; Freed, Jack H.

    2012-03-01

    Pulsed dipolar ESR spectroscopy, DEER and DQC, require frozen samples. An important issue in the biological application of this technique is how the freezing rate and concentration of cryoprotectant could possibly affect the conformation of biomacromolecule and/or spin-label. We studied in detail the effect of these experimental variables on the distance distributions obtained by DEER from a series of doubly spin-labeled T4 lysozyme mutants. We found that the rate of sample freezing affects mainly the ensemble of spin-label rotamers, but the distance maxima remain essentially unchanged. This suggests that proteins frozen in a regular manner in liquid nitrogen faithfully maintain the distance-dependent structural properties in solution. We compared the results from rapidly freeze-quenched (⩽100 μs) samples to those from commonly shock-frozen (slow freeze, 1 s or longer) samples. For all the mutants studied we obtained inter-spin distance distributions, which were broader for rapidly frozen samples than for slowly frozen ones. We infer that rapid freezing trapped a larger ensemble of spin label rotamers; whereas, on the time-scale of slower freezing the protein and spin-label achieve a population showing fewer low-energy conformers. We used glycerol as a cryoprotectant in concentrations of 10% and 30% by weight. With 10% glycerol and slow freezing, we observed an increased slope of background signals, which in DEER is related to increased local spin concentration, in this case due to insufficient solvent vitrification, and therefore protein aggregation. This effect was considerably suppressed in slowly frozen samples containing 30% glycerol and rapidly frozen samples containing 10% glycerol. The assignment of bimodal distributions to tether rotamers as opposed to protein conformations is aided by comparing results using MTSL and 4-Bromo MTSL spin-labels. The latter usually produce narrower distance distributions.

  9. Effect of freezing conditions on distances and their distributions derived from Double Electron Electron Resonance (DEER): a study of doubly-spin-labeled T4 lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Georgieva, Elka R; Roy, Aritro S; Grigoryants, Vladimir M; Borbat, Petr P; Earle, Keith A; Scholes, Charles P; Freed, Jack H

    2012-03-01

    Pulsed dipolar ESR spectroscopy, DEER and DQC, require frozen samples. An important issue in the biological application of this technique is how the freezing rate and concentration of cryoprotectant could possibly affect the conformation of biomacromolecule and/or spin-label. We studied in detail the effect of these experimental variables on the distance distributions obtained by DEER from a series of doubly spin-labeled T4 lysozyme mutants. We found that the rate of sample freezing affects mainly the ensemble of spin-label rotamers, but the distance maxima remain essentially unchanged. This suggests that proteins frozen in a regular manner in liquid nitrogen faithfully maintain the distance-dependent structural properties in solution. We compared the results from rapidly freeze-quenched (≤100 μs) samples to those from commonly shock-frozen (slow freeze, 1 s or longer) samples. For all the mutants studied we obtained inter-spin distance distributions, which were broader for rapidly frozen samples than for slowly frozen ones. We infer that rapid freezing trapped a larger ensemble of spin label rotamers; whereas, on the time-scale of slower freezing the protein and spin-label achieve a population showing fewer low-energy conformers. We used glycerol as a cryoprotectant in concentrations of 10% and 30% by weight. With 10% glycerol and slow freezing, we observed an increased slope of background signals, which in DEER is related to increased local spin concentration, in this case due to insufficient solvent vitrification, and therefore protein aggregation. This effect was considerably suppressed in slowly frozen samples containing 30% glycerol and rapidly frozen samples containing 10% glycerol. The assignment of bimodal distributions to tether rotamers as opposed to protein conformations is aided by comparing results using MTSL and 4-Bromo MTSL spin-labels. The latter usually produce narrower distance distributions.

  10. Properties of bacteriophage T4 mutants defective in gene 30 (deoxyribonucleic acid ligase) and the rII gene.

    PubMed

    Karam, J D; Barker, B

    1971-02-01

    In Escherichia coli K-12 strains infected with phage T4 which is defective in gene 30 [deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) ligase] and in the rII gene (product unknown), near normal levels of DNA and viable phage were produced. Growth of such T4 ligase-rII double mutants was less efficient in E. coli B strains which show the "rapidlysis" phenotype of rII mutations. In pulse-chase experiments coupled with temperature shifts and with inhibition of DNA synthesis, it was observed that DNA synthesized by gene 30-defective phage is more susceptible to breakdown in vivo when the phage is carrying a wild-type rII gene. Breakdown was delayed or inhibited by continued DNA synthesis. Mutations of the rII gene decreased but did not completely abolish the breakdown. T4 ligase-rII double mutants had normal sensitivity to ultraviolet irradiation.

  11. Purification and characterization of the SegA protein of bacteriophage T4, an endonuclease related to proteins encoded by group I introns.

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, M; Hinton, D M

    1994-01-01

    Although not encoded by an intron, the bacteriophage T4 SegA protein shares common amino acid motifs with a family of proteins found within mobile group I introns present in fungi and phage. Each of these intron-encoded proteins is thought to initiate the homing of its own intron by cleaving the intronless DNA at or near the site of insertion. Previously, we have found that SegA also cleaves DNA. In this report, we have purified the SegA protein and characterized this endonuclease activity extensively. SegA protein cleaved circular and linear plasmids, DNA containing unmodified cytosines, and wild-type T4 DNA containing hydroxymethylated, glucosylated cytosines. In all cases, certain sites on the DNA were highly preferred for cleavage, but with increasing protein concentration or time of incubation, cleavage occurred at many sites. SegA cleaving activity was stimulated by the presence of ATP or ATP gamma S. Sequence analysis of three highly preferred cleavage sites did not reveal a simple consensus sequence, suggesting that even among highly preferred sites, SegA tolerates many different sequences. A T4 segA amber mutant that we constructed had no phenotype, and PCR analyses indicated that several T-even-related phages lack the segA gene. Taken together, our results show that SegA is an endonuclease with a hierarchy of site specificity, and these results are consistent with the insertion of segA DNA into the T4 genome some time after the divergence of the closely consistent with the insertion of segA DNA into the T4 genome some time after the divergence of the closely related T-even phages. Images PMID:7961394

  12. Interaction of Escherichia coli B and B/4 and Bacteriophage T4D with Berea Sandstone Rock in Relation to Enhanced Oil Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Philip L.; Yen, Teh Fu

    1984-01-01

    Much research and development is needed to recover oil reserves presently unattainable, and microbially enhanced oil recovery is a technology that may be used for this purpose. To address the problem of bacterial contamination in an oil field injection well region, we connected each end of a Teflon-sleeved Berea sandstone rock to a flask containing nutrient medium. By inoculating one flask with Escherichia coli B, we could observe bacterial growth in the uninoculated flask resulting from the transport and establishment of cells across the rock. Differences in bacterial populations occurred depending on whether bacteriophage T4D was first adsorbed to the rock. The results of these experiments indicate that the inhibition of bacterial establishment within a rock matrix is possible via lytic interaction. Some nonlytic effects are also implied by experiments with B/4 cells, which are T4D-resistant mutants of E. coli B. A 10 to 40% retention of T4 by the rock occurred when it was loaded with 105 to 106 PFU. We also describe a lysogenic system for possible use in microbially enhanced oil recovery techniques. PMID:16346492

  13. Accessory proteins assist exonuclease-deficient bacteriophage T4 DNA polymerase in replicating past an abasic site

    PubMed Central

    Blanca, Giuseppina; Delagoutte, Emmanuelle; Tanguy le gac, Nicolas; Johnson, Neil P.; Baldacci, Giuseppe; Villani, Giuseppe

    2006-01-01

    Replicative DNA polymerases, such as T4 polymerase, possess both elongation and 3′–5′ exonuclease proofreading catalytic activities. They arrest at the base preceding DNA damage on the coding DNA strand and specialized DNA polymerases have evolved to replicate across the lesion by a process known as TLS (translesion DNA synthesis). TLS is considered to take place in two steps that often require different enzymes, insertion of a nucleotide opposite the damaged template base followed by extension from the inserted nucleotide. We and others have observed that inactivation of the 3′–5′ exonuclease function of T4 polymerase enables TLS across a single site-specific abasic [AP (apurinic/apyrimidinic)] lesion. In the present study we report a role for auxiliary replicative factors in this reaction. When replication is performed with a large excess of DNA template over DNA polymerase in the absence of auxiliary factors, the exo− polymerase (T4 DNA polymerase deficient in the 3′–5′ exonuclease activity) inserts one nucleotide opposite the AP site but does not extend past the lesion. Addition of the clamp processivity factor and the clamp loader complex restores primer extension across an AP lesion on a circular AP-containing DNA substrate by the exo− polymerase, but has no effect on the wild-type enzyme. Hence T4 DNA polymerase exhibits a variety of responses to DNA damage. It can behave as a replicative polymerase or (in the absence of proofreading activity) as a specialized DNA polymerase and carry out TLS. As a specialized polymerase it can function either as an inserter or (with the help of accessory proteins) as an extender. The capacity to separate these distinct functions in a single DNA polymerase provides insight into the biochemical requirements for translesion DNA synthesis. PMID:17064253

  14. Partial replication of UV-irradiated T4 bacteriophage DNA results in amplification of specific genetic areas

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, S.; Vogelbacker, H.H.; Restifo, L.L.; Mattson, T.; Kozinski, A.W.

    1981-11-01

    Upon infection of Escherichia coli with bormodeoxyuridine-labeled T4 phage that had received 10 lethal hits of UV irradiation, a sizable amount of phage DNA was synthesized (approximately 36 phage equivalent units of DNA per infected bacterium), although very little multiplicity reactivation occurs. This progeny DNA was isolated and analyzed. This DNA was biased in its genetic representation, as shown by hybridization to cloned segments of the T4 genome immobilized on nitrocellulose filters. Preferentially amplified areas corresponded to regions containing origins of T4 DNA replication. The size of the progeny DNA increased with time after infection, possibly due to recombination between partial replicas and nonreplicated subunits or due to the gradual overcoming of the UV damage. As the size of the progeny DNA increased, all of the genes were more equally represented, resulting in a decrease in the genetic bias. Amplification of specific genetic areas was also observed upon infection with UV-irradiated, non-bromo-deoxyuridine-substituted (light) phage. However, the genetic bias observed in this case was not as great as that observed with bromodeoxyuridine-substituted phage. This is most likely due to the higher efficiency of multiplicity reactivation of the light phage.

  15. Coordination and processing of DNA ends during double-strand break repair: the role of the bacteriophage T4 Mre11/Rad50 (MR) complex.

    PubMed

    Almond, Joshua R; Stohr, Bradley A; Panigrahi, Anil K; Albrecht, Dustin W; Nelson, Scott W; Kreuzer, Kenneth N

    2013-11-01

    The in vivo functions of the bacteriophage T4 Mre11/Rad50 (MR) complex (gp46/47) in double-strand-end processing, double-strand break repair, and recombination-dependent replication were investigated. The complex is essential for T4 growth, but we wanted to investigate the in vivo function during productive infections. We therefore generated a suppressed triple amber mutant in the Rad50 subunit to substantially reduce the level of complex and thereby reduce phage growth. Growth-limiting amounts of the complex caused a concordant decrease in phage genomic recombination-dependent replication. However, the efficiencies of double-strand break repair and of plasmid-based recombination-dependent replication remained relatively normal. Genetic analyses of linked markers indicated that double-strand ends were less protected from nuclease erosion in the depleted infection and also that end coordination during repair was compromised. We discuss models for why phage genomic recombination-dependent replication is more dependent on Mre11/Rad50 levels when compared to plasmid recombination-dependent replication. We also tested the importance of the conserved histidine residue in nuclease motif I of the T4 Mre11 protein. Substitution with multiple different amino acids (including serine) failed to support phage growth, completely blocked plasmid recombination-dependent replication, and led to the stabilization of double-strand ends. We also constructed and expressed an Mre11 mutant protein with the conserved histidine changed to serine. The mutant protein was found to be completely defective for nuclease activities, but retained the ability to bind the Rad50 subunit and double-stranded DNA. These results indicate that the nuclease activity of Mre11 is critical for phage growth and recombination-dependent replication during T4 infections.

  16. gpwac of the T4-Type Bacteriophages: Structure, Function, and Evolution of a Segmented Coiled-Coil Protein That Controls Viral Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Letarov, A.; Manival, X.; Desplats, C.; Krisch, H. M.

    2005-01-01

    The wac gene product (gpwac) or fibritin of bacteriophage T4 forms the six fibers that radiate from the phage neck. During phage morphogenesis these whiskers bind the long tail fibers (LTFs) and facilitate their attachment to the phage baseplate. After the cell lysis, the gpwac fibers function as part of an environmental sensing device that retains the LTFs in a retracted configuration and thus prevents phage adsorption in unfavorable conditions. A comparative analysis of the sequences of 5 wac gene orthologs from various T4-type phages reveals that the ∼50-amino-acid N-terminal domain is the only highly conserved segment of the protein. This sequence conservation is probably a direct consequence of the domain's strong and specific interactions with the neck proteins. The sequence of the central fibrous region of gpwac is highly plastic, with only the heptad periodicity of the coiled-coil structure being conserved. In the various gpwac sequences, the small C-terminal domain essential for initiation of the folding of T4 gpwac is replaced by unrelated sequences of unknown origin. When a distant T4-type phage has a novel C-terminal gpwac sequence, the phage's gp36 sequence that is located at the knee joint of the LTF invariably has a novel domain in its C terminus as well. The covariance of these two sequences is compatible with genetic data suggesting that the C termini of gpwac and gp36 engage in a protein-protein interaction that controls phage infectivity. These results add to the limited evidence for domain swapping in the evolution of phage structural proteins. PMID:15659683

  17. Mutated and bacteriophage T4 nanoparticle arrayed F1-V immunogens from Yersinia pestis as next generation plague vaccines.

    PubMed

    Tao, Pan; Mahalingam, Marthandan; Kirtley, Michelle L; van Lier, Christina J; Sha, Jian; Yeager, Linsey A; Chopra, Ashok K; Rao, Venigalla B

    2013-01-01

    Pneumonic plague is a highly virulent infectious disease with 100% mortality rate, and its causative organism Yersinia pestis poses a serious threat for deliberate use as a bioterror agent. Currently, there is no FDA approved vaccine against plague. The polymeric bacterial capsular protein F1, a key component of the currently tested bivalent subunit vaccine consisting, in addition, of low calcium response V antigen, has high propensity to aggregate, thus affecting its purification and vaccine efficacy. We used two basic approaches, structure-based immunogen design and phage T4 nanoparticle delivery, to construct new plague vaccines that provided complete protection against pneumonic plague. The NH₂-terminal β-strand of F1 was transplanted to the COOH-terminus and the sequence flanking the β-strand was duplicated to eliminate polymerization but to retain the T cell epitopes. The mutated F1 was fused to the V antigen, a key virulence factor that forms the tip of the type three secretion system (T3SS). The F1mut-V protein showed a dramatic switch in solubility, producing a completely soluble monomer. The F1mut-V was then arrayed on phage T4 nanoparticle via the small outer capsid protein, Soc. The F1mut-V monomer was robustly immunogenic and the T4-decorated F1mut-V without any adjuvant induced balanced TH1 and TH2 responses in mice. Inclusion of an oligomerization-deficient YscF, another component of the T3SS, showed a slight enhancement in the potency of F1-V vaccine, while deletion of the putative immunomodulatory sequence of the V antigen did not improve the vaccine efficacy. Both the soluble (purified F1mut-V mixed with alhydrogel) and T4 decorated F1mut-V (no adjuvant) provided 100% protection to mice and rats against pneumonic plague evoked by high doses of Y. pestis CO92. These novel platforms might lead to efficacious and easily manufacturable next generation plague vaccines.

  18. Two recombination-dependent DNA replication pathways of bacteriophage T4, and their roles in mutagenesis and horizontal gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Mosig, Gisela; Gewin, John; Luder, Andreas; Colowick, Nancy; Vo, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Two major pathways of recombination-dependent DNA replication, “join-copy” and “join-cut-copy,” can be distinguished in phage T4: join-copy requires only early and middle genes, but two late proteins, endonuclease VII and terminase, are uniquely important in the join-cut-copy pathway. In wild-type T4, timing of these pathways is integrated with the developmental program and related to transcription and packaging of DNA. In primase mutants, which are defective in origin-dependent lagging-strand DNA synthesis, the late pathway can bypass the lack of primers for lagging-strand DNA synthesis. The exquisitely regulated synthesis of endo VII, and of two proteins from its gene, explains the delay of recombination-dependent DNA replication in primase (as well as topoisomerase) mutants, and the temperature-dependence of the delay. Other proteins (e.g., the single-stranded DNA binding protein and the products of genes 46 and 47) are important in all recombination pathways, but they interact differently with other proteins in different pathways. These homologous recombination pathways contribute to evolution because they facilitate acquisition of any foreign DNA with limited sequence homology during horizontal gene transfer, without requiring transposition or site-specific recombination functions. Partial heteroduplex repair can generate what appears to be multiple mutations from a single recombinational intermediate. The resulting sequence divergence generates barriers to formation of viable recombinants. The multiple sequence changes can also lead to erroneous estimates in phylogenetic analyses. PMID:11459968

  19. The C-terminal domain of the bacteriophage T4 terminase docks on the prohead portal clip region during DNA packaging.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Aparna Banerjee; Ray, Krishanu; Thomas, Julie A; Black, Lindsay W

    2013-11-01

    Bacteriophage ATP-based packaging motors translocate DNA into a pre-formed prohead through a dodecameric portal ring channel to high density. We investigated portal-terminase docking interactions at specifically localized residues within a terminase-interaction region (aa279-316) in the phage T4 portal protein gp20 equated to the clip domain of the SPP1 portal crystal structure by 3D modeling. Within this region, three residues allowed A to C mutations whereas three others did not, consistent with informatics analyses showing the tolerated residues are not strongly conserved evolutionarily. About 7.5nm was calculated by FCS-FRET studies employing maleimide Alexa488 dye labeled A316C proheads and gp17 CT-ReAsH supporting previous work docking the C-terminal end of the T4 terminase (gp17) closer to the N-terminal GFP-labeled portal (gp20) than the N-terminal end of the terminase. Such a terminase-portal orientation fits better to a proposed "DNA crunching" compression packaging motor and to portal determined DNA headful cutting.

  20. The C-terminal domain of the bacteriophage T4 terminase docks on the prohead portal clip region during DNA packaging

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Aparna Banerjee; Ray, Krishanu; Thomas, Julie A.; Black, Lindsay W.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriophage ATP-based packaging motors translocate DNA into a pre-formed prohead through a dodecameric portal ring channel to high density. We investigated portal–terminase docking interactions at specifically localized residues within a terminase-interaction region (aa279–316) in the phage T4 portal protein gp20 equated to the clip domain of the SPP1 portal crystal structure by 3D modeling. Within this region, three residues allowed A to C mutations whereas three others did not, consistent with informatics analyses showing the tolerated residues are not strongly conserved evolutionarily. About 7.5 nm was calculated by FCS-FRET studies employing maleimide Alexa488 dye labeled A316C proheads and gp17 CT-ReAsH supporting previous work docking the C-terminal end of the T4 terminase (gp17) closer to the N-terminal GFP-labeled portal (gp20) than the N-terminal end of the terminase. Such a terminase–portal orientation fits better to a proposed “DNA crunching” compression packaging motor and to portal determined DNA headful cutting. PMID:24074593

  1. Core-sigma interaction: probing the interaction of the bacteriophage T4 gene 55 promoter recognition protein with E.coli RNA polymerase core.

    PubMed Central

    Léonetti, J P; Wong, K; Geiduschek, E P

    1998-01-01

    The bacterial RNA polymerase sigma subunits are key participants in the early steps of RNA synthesis, conferring specificity of promoter recognition, facilitating promoter opening and promoter clearance, and responding to diverse transcriptional regulators. The T4 gene 55 protein (gp55), the sigma protein of the bacteriophage T4 late genes, is one of the smallest and most divergent members of this family. Protein footprinting was used to identify segments of gp55 that become buried upon binding to RNA polymerase core, and are therefore likely to constitute its interface with the core enzyme. Site-directed mutagenesis in two parts of this contact surface generated gene 55 proteins that are defective in polymerase-binding to different degrees. Alignment with the sequences of the sigma proteins and with a recently determined structure of a large segment of sigma70 suggests that the gp55 counterpart of sigma70 regions 2.1 and 2.2 is involved in RNA polymerase core binding, and that sigma70 and gp55 may be structurally similar in this region. The diverse phenotypes of the mutants implicate this region of gp55 in multiple aspects of sigma function. PMID:9482743

  2. Mapping the interactions of the single-stranded DNA binding protein of bacteriophage T4 (gp32) with DNA lattices at single nucleotide resolution: gp32 monomer binding

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Davis; Weitzel, Steven E.; Baase, Walter A.; von Hippel, Peter H.

    2015-01-01

    Combining biophysical measurements on T4 bacteriophage replication complexes with detailed structural information can illuminate the molecular mechanisms of these ‘macromolecular machines’. Here we use the low energy circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescent properties of site-specifically introduced base analogues to map and quantify the equilibrium binding interactions of short (8 nts) ssDNA oligomers with gp32 monomers at single nucleotide resolution. We show that single gp32 molecules interact most directly and specifically near the 3′-end of these ssDNA oligomers, thus defining the polarity of gp32 binding with respect to the ssDNA lattice, and that only 2–3 nts are directly involved in this tight binding interaction. The loss of exciton coupling in the CD spectra of dimer 2-AP (2-aminopurine) probes at various positions in the ssDNA constructs, together with increases in fluorescence intensity, suggest that gp32 binding directly extends the sugar-phosphate backbone of this ssDNA oligomer, particularly at the 3′-end and facilitates base unstacking along the entire 8-mer lattice. These results provide a model (and ‘DNA map’) for the isolated gp32 binding to ssDNA targets, which serves as the nucleation step for the cooperative binding that occurs at transiently exposed ssDNA sequences within the functioning T4 DNA replication complex. PMID:26275775

  3. The MotA transcription factor from bacteriophage T4 contains a novel DNA-binding domain : the 'double wing' motif.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, N.; Sickmier, E. A.; Zhang, R.; Joachimiak, A.; White, S. W.; Biosciences Division; St. Jude Children's Research Hospital; Univ. of Tennessee Health Science Center; Corixa Inc.

    2002-01-01

    MotA is a transcription factor from bacteriophage T4 that helps adapt the host Escherichia coli transcription apparatus to T4 middle promoters. We have determined the crystal structure of the C-terminal DNA-binding domain of MotA (MotCF) to 1.6 A resolution using multiwavelength, anomalous diffraction methods. The structure reveals a novel DNA-binding alpha/beta motif that contains an exposed beta-sheet surface that mediates interactions with the DNA. Independent biochemical experiments have shown that MotCF binds to one surface of a single turn of DNA through interactions in adjacent major and minor grooves. We present a model of the interaction in which beta-ribbons at opposite corners of the six-stranded beta-sheet penetrate the DNA grooves, and call the motif a 'double wing' to emphasize similarities to the 'winged-helix' motif. The model is consistent with data on how MotA functions at middle promoters, and provides an explanation for why MotA can form non-specific multimers on DNA.

  4. Physical mapping of the restriction fragments obtained from bacteriophage T4 dC-DNA with the restriction endonucleases SmaI, KpnI and BglII.

    PubMed

    Kiko, H; Niggemann, E; Rüger, W

    1979-01-01

    The cytosine-containing DNA of a mutant of bacteriophage T4 was digested with restriction endonucleases SmaI, KpnI and BglII producing 5, 7 and 13 fragments respectively. Complete physical maps of the T4 genome were constructed with the enzymes SmaI and KpnI and an almost complete map with the enzyme BglII.

  5. A single-molecule view of the assembly pathway, subunit stoichiometry, and unwinding activity of the bacteriophage T4 primosome (helicase-primase) complex.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonbae; Jose, Davis; Phelps, Carey; Marcus, Andrew H; von Hippel, Peter H

    2013-05-07

    Single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) methods were used to study the assembly pathway and DNA unwinding activity of the bacteriophage T4 helicase-primase (primosome) complex. The helicase substrates used were surface-immobilized model DNA replication forks "internally" labeled in the duplex region with opposed donor/acceptor (iCy3/iCy5) chromophore pairs in the lagging and leading strands. The time dependence of the smFRET signals was monitored during the unwinding process, and helicase rates and processivities were measured as a function of GTP concentration. This smFRET approach was also used to investigate the subunit stoichiometry of the primosome and the assembly pathway required to form functional and fully active primosome-DNA complexes. We confirmed that gp41 helicase monomer subunits form stable hexameric helicases in the presence of GTP and that the resulting (gp41)(6) complexes bind only weakly at DNA fork junctions. The addition of a single subunit of gp61 primase stabilized the resulting primosome complex at the fork and resulted in fully active and processive primosome helicases with gp41:gp61 subunit ratios of 6:1, while higher and lower subunit ratios substantially reduced the primosome unwinding activity. The use of alternative assembly pathways resulted in a loss of helicase activity and the formation of metastable DNA-protein aggregates, which were easily detected in our smFRET experiments as intense light-scattering foci. These single-molecule experiments provide a detailed real-time visualization of the assembly pathway and duplex DNA unwinding activity of the T4 primosome and are consistent with more indirect equilibrium and steady state results obtained in bulk solution studies.

  6. Selective inhibition by methoxyamine of the apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease activity associated with pyrimidine dimer-DNA glycosylases from Micrococcus luteus and bacteriophage T4

    SciTech Connect

    Liuzzi, M.; Weinfeld, M.; Paterson, M.C.

    1987-06-16

    The UV endonucleases from Micrococcus luteus and bacteriophage T4 possess two catalytic activities specific for the site of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in UV-irradiated DNA: a DNA glycosylase that cleaves the 5'-glycosyl bond of the dimerized pyrimidines and an apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease that thereupon incises the phosphodiester bond 3' to the resulting apyrimidinic site. The authors have explored the potential use of methoxyamine, a chemical that reacts at neutral pH with AP sites in DNA, as a selective inhibitor of the AP endonuclease activities residing in the M. luteus and T4 enzymes. The presence of 50 mM methoxyamine during incubation of UV-treated, (/sup 3/H)thymine-labeled poly(dA) x poly(dT) with either enzyme preparation was found to protect completely the irradiated copolymer from endonucleolytic attack at dimer sites, as assayed by yield of acid-soluble radioactivity. In contrast, the dimer-DNA glycosylase activity of each enzyme remained fully functional, as monitored retrospectively by release of free thymine after either photochemical-(5 kJ/m/sup 2/, 254 nm) or photoenzymic- (Escherichia coli photolyase plus visible light) induced reversal of pyrimidine dimers in the UV-damaged substrate. The data demonstrate that the inhibition of the strand-incision reaction arises because of chemical modification of the AP sites and is not due to inactivation of the enzyme by methoxyamine. The results, combined with earlier findings for 5'-acting AP endonucleases, strongly suggest that methoxyamine is a highly specific inhibitor of virtually all AP endonucleases, irrespective of their modes of action, and may therefore prove useful in a wide variety of DNA repair studies.

  7. Assembly of the small outer capsid protein, Soc, on bacteriophage T4: a novel system for high density display of multiple large anthrax toxins and foreign proteins on phage capsid.

    PubMed

    Li, Qin; Shivachandra, Sathish B; Zhang, Zhihong; Rao, Venigalla B

    2007-07-27

    Bacteriophage T4 capsid is a prolate icosahedron composed of the major capsid protein gp23*, the vertex protein gp24*, and the portal protein gp20. Assembled on its surface are 810 molecules of the non-essential small outer capsid protein, Soc (10 kDa), and 155 molecules of the highly antigenic outer capsid protein, Hoc (39 kDa). In this study Soc, a "triplex" protein that stabilizes T4 capsid, is targeted for molecular engineering of T4 particle surface. Using a defined in vitro assembly system, anthrax toxins, protective antigen, lethal factor and their domains, fused to Soc were efficiently displayed on the capsid. Both the N and C termini of the 80 amino acid Soc polypeptide can be simultaneously used to display antigens. Proteins as large as 93 kDa can be stably anchored on the capsid through Soc-capsid interactions. Using both Soc and Hoc, up to 1662 anthrax toxin molecules are assembled on the phage T4 capsid under controlled conditions. We infer from the binding data that a relatively high affinity capsid binding site is located in the middle of the rod-shaped Soc, with the N and C termini facing the 2- and 3-fold symmetry axes of the capsid, respectively. Soc subunits interact at these interfaces, gluing the adjacent capsid protein hexamers and generating a cage-like outer scaffold. Antigen fusion does interfere with the inter-subunit interactions, but these interactions are not essential for capsid binding and antigen display. These features make the T4-Soc platform the most robust phage display system reported to date. The study offers insights into the architectural design of bacteriophage T4 virion, one of the most stable viruses known, and how its capsid surface can be engineered for novel applications in basic molecular biology and biotechnology.

  8. Partial Complementation of the UV Sensitivity of Deinococcus Radiodurans Excision Repair Mutants by the Cloned denv Gene of Bacteriophage T4

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-19

    ligated with the denV gene containing fragment from pTACdenV using T4 DNA ligase . T4 DNA ligase catalyzes the formation of phosphodiester bonds between...MgClj, lOmM DTT, 1 ug DNA, 0. 5mM ATP, 50 ug/ml BSA and 1 U T4 DNA ligase . Incubation was at 15°C overnight. Transformation of E. coli with DNA

  9. Map of restriction sites on bacteriophage T4 cytosine-containing DNA for endonucleases bamHI, BglII, KpnI, PvuI, SalI, and XbaI.

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, R C; Hepburn, M L

    1981-01-01

    A complete map of the cleavage sites of restriction endonucleases BamHI, BglII, KpnI, PvuI, SalI, and XbaI was determined for the cytosine-containing DNA of a bacteriophage T4 alc mutant. The 56 sequence-specific sites were assigned map coordinates based on a least-squares analysis of measured fragment lengths. Altogether, the lengths of 118 fragments from single and double enzyme digestions were measured by electrophoresis of the fragments in agarose gels. DNA fragments of known sequence or DNA fragments calibrated with fragments of known sequence were used as standards. The greatest deviation between an experimentally measured fragment length and its computed map coordinates was 3.0%; the average deviation was 0.8%. The total length of the wild-type T4 genome was calculated to be 166,200 base pairs. Images PMID:6264096

  10. In vitro binding of anthrax protective antigen on bacteriophage T4 capsid surface through Hoc-capsid interactions: A strategy for efficient display of large full-length proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shivachandra, Sathish B.; Rao, Mangala; Janosi, Laszlo; Sathaliyawala, Taheri; Matyas, Gary R.; Alving, Carl R.; Leppla, Stephen H.; Rao, Venigalla B. . E-mail: rao@cua.edu

    2006-02-05

    An in vitro binding system is described to display large full-length proteins on bacteriophage T4 capsid surface at high density. The phage T4 icosahedral capsid features 155 copies of a nonessential highly antigenic outer capsid protein, Hoc, at the center of each major capsid protein hexon. Gene fusions were engineered to express the 83-kDa protective antigen (PA) from Bacillus anthracis fused to the N-terminus of Hoc and the 130-kDa PA-Hoc protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The purified PA-Hoc was assembled in vitro on hoc {sup -} phage particles. Binding was specific, stable, and of high affinity. This defined in vitro system allowed manipulation of the copy number of displayed PA and imposed no significant limitation on the size of the displayed antigen. In contrast to in vivo display systems, the in vitro approach allows all the capsid binding sites to be occupied by the 130-kDa PA-Hoc fusion protein. The PA-T4 particles were immunogenic in mice in the absence of an adjuvant, eliciting strong PA-specific antibodies and anthrax lethal toxin neutralizing antibodies. The in vitro display on phage T4 offers a novel platform for potential construction of customized vaccines against anthrax and other infectious diseases.

  11. Mapping the interactions of the single-stranded DNA binding protein of bacteriophage T4 (gp32) with DNA lattices at single nucleotide resolution: polynucleotide binding and cooperativity

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Davis; Weitzel, Steven E.; Baase, Walter A.; Michael, Miya M.; von Hippel, Peter H.

    2015-01-01

    We here use our site-specific base analog mapping approach to study the interactions and binding equilibria of cooperatively-bound clusters of the single-stranded DNA binding protein (gp32) of the T4 DNA replication complex with longer ssDNA (and dsDNA) lattices. We show that in cooperatively bound clusters the binding free energy appears to be equi-partitioned between the gp32 monomers of the cluster, so that all bind to the ssDNA lattice with comparable affinity, but also that the outer domains of the gp32 monomers at the ends of the cluster can fluctuate on and off the lattice and that the clusters of gp32 monomers can slide along the ssDNA. We also show that at very low binding densities gp32 monomers bind to the ssDNA lattice at random, but that cooperatively bound gp32 clusters bind preferentially at the 5′-end of the ssDNA lattice. We use these results and the gp32 monomer-binding results of the companion paper to propose a detailed model for how gp32 might bind to and interact with ssDNA lattices in its various binding modes, and also consider how these clusters might interact with other components of the T4 DNA replication complex. PMID:26275774

  12. Single-molecule FRET studies of the cooperative and non-cooperative binding kinetics of the bacteriophage T4 single-stranded DNA binding protein (gp32) to ssDNA lattices at replication fork junctions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wonbae; Gillies, John P.; Jose, Davis; Israels, Brett A.; von Hippel, Peter H.; Marcus, Andrew H.

    2016-01-01

    Gene 32 protein (gp32) is the single-stranded (ss) DNA binding protein of the bacteriophage T4. It binds transiently and cooperatively to ssDNA sequences exposed during the DNA replication process and regulates the interactions of the other sub-assemblies of the replication complex during the replication cycle. We here use single-molecule FRET techniques to build on previous thermodynamic studies of gp32 binding to initiate studies of the dynamics of the isolated and cooperative binding of gp32 molecules within the replication complex. DNA primer/template (p/t) constructs are used as models to determine the effects of ssDNA lattice length, gp32 concentration, salt concentration, binding cooperativity and binding polarity at p/t junctions. Hidden Markov models (HMMs) and transition density plots (TDPs) are used to characterize the dynamics of the multi-step assembly pathway of gp32 at p/t junctions of differing polarity, and show that isolated gp32 molecules bind to their ssDNA targets weakly and dissociate quickly, while cooperatively bound dimeric or trimeric clusters of gp32 bind much more tightly, can ‘slide’ on ssDNA sequences, and exhibit binding dynamics that depend on p/t junction polarities. The potential relationships of these binding dynamics to interactions with other components of the T4 DNA replication complex are discussed. PMID:27694621

  13. Mutational analysis of bacteriophage T4 RNA ligase 1. Different functional groups are required for the nucleotidyl transfer and phosphodiester bond formation steps of the ligation reaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li Kai; Ho, C Kiong; Pei, Yi; Shuman, Stewart

    2003-08-08

    T4 RNA ligase 1 (Rnl1) exemplifies an ATP-dependent RNA ligase family that includes fungal tRNA ligase (Trl1) and a putative baculovirus RNA ligase. Rnl1 acts via a covalent enzyme-AMP intermediate generated by attack of Lys-99 N zeta on the alpha phosphorus of ATP. Mutation of Lys-99 abolishes ligase activity. Here we tested the effects of alanine mutations at 19 conserved positions in Rnl1 and thereby identified 9 new residues essential for ligase activity: Arg-54, Lys-75, Phe-77, Gly-102, Lys-119, Glu-227, Gly-228, Lys-240, and Lys-242. Seven of the essential residues are located within counterparts of conserved nucleotidyltransferase motifs I (99KEDG102), Ia (118SK119), IV (227EGYVA231), and V (238HFKIK242) that comprise the active sites of DNA ligases, RNA capping enzymes, and T4 RNA ligase 2. Three other essential residues, Arg-54, Lys-75 and Phe-77, are located upstream of the AMP attachment site within a conserved domain unique to the Rnl1-like ligase family. We infer a shared evolutionary history and active site architecture in Rnl1 (a tRNA repair enzyme) and Trl1 (a tRNA splicing enzyme). We determined structure-activity relationships via conservative substitutions and examined mutational effects on the isolated steps of Rnl1 adenylylation (step 1) and phosphodiester bond formation (step 3). Lys-75, Lys-240, and Lys-242 were found to be essential for step 1 and overall ligation of 5'-phosphorylated RNA but not for phosphodiester bond formation. These results suggest that the composition of the Rnl1 active site is different during steps 1 and 3. Mutations at Arg-54 and Lys-119 abolished the overall RNA ligation reaction without affecting steps 1 and 3. Arg-54 and Lys-119 are thereby implicated as specific catalysts of the RNA adenylation reaction (step 2) of the ligation pathway.

  14. Models for the Binary Complex of Bacteriophage T4 Gp59 Helicase Loading Protein. GP32 Single-Stranded DNA-Binding Protein and Ternary Complex with Pseudo-Y Junction DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Hinerman, Jennifer M.; Dignam, J. David; Mueser, Timothy C.

    2012-04-05

    The bacteriophage T4 gp59 helicase assembly protein (gp59) is required for loading of gp41 replicative helicase onto DNA protected by gp32 single-stranded DNA-binding protein. The gp59 protein recognizes branched DNA structures found at replication and recombination sites. Binding of gp32 protein (full-length and deletion constructs) to gp59 protein measured by isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrates that the gp32 protein C-terminal A-domain is essential for protein-protein interaction in the absence of DNA. Sedimentation velocity experiments with gp59 protein and gp32ΔB protein (an N-terminal B-domain deletion) show that these proteins are monomers but form a 1:1 complex with a dissociation constant comparable with that determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. Small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) studies indicate that the gp59 protein is a prolate monomer, consistent with the crystal structure and hydrodynamic properties determined from sedimentation velocity experiments. SAXS experiments also demonstrate that gp32ΔB protein is a prolate monomer with an elongated A-domain protruding from the core. Moreover, fitting structures of gp59 protein and the gp32 core into the SAXS-derived molecular envelope supports a model for the gp59 protein-gp32ΔB protein complex. Our earlier work demonstrated that gp59 protein attracts full-length gp32 protein to pseudo-Y junctions. A model of the gp59 protein-DNA complex, modified to accommodate new SAXS data for the binary complex together with mutational analysis of gp59 protein, is presented in the accompanying article (Dolezal, D., Jones, C. E., Lai, X., Brister, J. R., Mueser, T. C., Nossal, N. G., and Hinton, D. M. (2012) J. Biol. Chem. 287, 18596–18607).

  15. Isolation of Lactococcus lactis Mutants Simultaneously Resistant to the Cell Wall-Active Bacteriocin Lcn972, Lysozyme, Nisin, and Bacteriophage c2

    PubMed Central

    Roces, Clara; Courtin, Pascal; Kulakauskas, Saulius; Rodríguez, Ana; Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Lactococcin 972 (Lcn972) is a nonlantibiotic bacteriocin that inhibits cell wall biosynthesis by binding to lipid II. In this work, two mutants resistant to Lcn972, Lactococcus lactis D1 and D1-20, with high (>320 arbitrary units [AU]/ml) and low (80 AU/ml) susceptibilities, respectively, have been isolated. Resistance to Lcn972 did not impose a burden to growth under laboratory conditions, nor did it substantially alter the physicochemical properties of the cell surface. However, the peptidoglycan of the mutants featured a higher content of muropeptides with tripeptide side chains than the wild-type strain, linking for the first time peptidoglycan remodelling to bacteriocin resistance. Moreover, L. lactis lacking a functional d,d-carboxypeptidase DacA (i.e., with a high content of pentapeptide side chain muropeptides) was shown to be more susceptible to Lcn972. Cross-resistance to lysozyme and nisin and enhanced susceptibility to penicillin G and bacitracin was also observed. Intriguingly, the Lcn972-resistant mutants were not infected by the lytic phage c2 and less efficiently infected by phage sk1. Lack of c2 infectivity was linked to a 22.6-kbp chromosomal deletion encompassing the phage receptor protein gene pip. The deletion also included maltose metabolic genes and the two-component system (TCS) F. However, a clear correlation between these genes and resistance to Lcn972 could not be clearly established, pointing to the presence of as-yet-unidentified mutations that account for Lcn972 resistance. PMID:22504807

  16. Structural analysis of bacteriophage-encoded peptidoglycan hydrolase domain KMV36C: crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hecke, Kristof; Briers, Yves; Derua, Rita; Waelkens, Etienne; Lavigne, Rob; Van Meervelt, Luc

    2008-04-01

    Crystallization and X-ray data collection of the C-terminus of gp36 from bacteriophage ϕKMV (KMV36C) are reported. The C-terminus of gp36 of bacteriophage ϕKMV (KMV36C) functions as a particle-associated muramidase, presumably as part of the injection needle of the ϕKMV genome during infection. Crystals of KMV36C were obtained by hanging-drop vapour diffusion and diffracted to a resolution of 1.6 Å. The crystals belong to the cubic space group P432, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 102.52 Å. KMV36C shows 30% sequence identity to T4 lysozyme (PDB code)

  17. T4 test

    MedlinePlus

    ... normal level of T4 may be due to: Hypothyroidism (including Hashimoto disease and other disorders involving an ... disease) Goiter - simple Graves disease Hyperthyroidism Hypopituitarism Hypothalamus Hypothyroidism Kwashiorkor T3 test Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis Review Date ...

  18. Transfection with replicating DNA from the temperate Bacillus bacteriophage phi 105 and with T4-ligase treated phi105 DNA: the importance in transfection of being longer than genome-length.

    PubMed

    Flock, J I

    1978-07-06

    Replicating phage DNA extracted from Bacillus subtilis infected with phage phi 105 has a higher activity in transfection than mature DNA. By heteroduplex analysis it was shown that this DNA contains concatemeric molecules. Concatemers, constructed in vitro by treatment of mature DNA with T4-ligase also have an increased activity in transfection. DNA showing an increased activity in transfection does not have a requirement for more than one molecule per transfection event as is typically found for transfection with mature phi 105 DNA. An explanation is given for this difference suggesting that the structure of the ends of the transfecting molecules play an important role intransfection.

  19. Lysozyme Crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    To the crystallographer, this may not be a diamond but it is just as priceless. A Lysozyme crystal grown in orbit looks great under a microscope, but the real test is X-ray crystallography. The colors are caused by polarizing filters. Proteins can form crystals generated by rows and columns of molecules that form up like soldiers on a parade ground. Shining X-rays through a crystal will produce a pattern of dots that can be decoded to reveal the arrangement of the atoms in the molecules making up the crystal. Like the troops in formation, uniformity and order are everything in X-ray crystallography. X-rays have much shorter wavelengths than visible light, so the best looking crystals under the microscope won't necessarily pass muster under the X-rays. In order to have crystals to use for X-ray diffraction studies, crystals need to be fairly large and well ordered. Scientists also need lots of crystals since exposure to air, the process of X-raying them, and other factors destroy them. Growing protein crystals in space has yielded striking results. Lysozyme's structure is well known and it has become a standard in many crystallization studies on Earth and in space.

  20. Differential bacteriophage mortality on exposure to copper.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinyu; Dennehy, John J

    2011-10-01

    Many studies report that copper can be used to control microbial growth, including that of viruses. We determined the rates of copper-mediated inactivation for a wide range of bacteriophages. We used two methods to test the effect of copper on bacteriophage survival. One method involved placing small volumes of bacteriophage lysate on copper and stainless steel coupons. Following exposure, metal coupons were rinsed with lysogeny broth, and the resulting fluid was serially diluted and plated on agar with the corresponding bacterial host. The second method involved adding copper sulfate (CuSO(4)) to bacteriophage lysates to a final concentration of 5 mM. Aliquots were removed from the mixture, serially diluted, and plated with the appropriate bacterial host. Significant mortality was observed among the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) bacteriophages Φ6 and Φ8, the single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) bacteriophage PP7, the ssDNA bacteriophage ΦX174, and the dsDNA bacteriophage PM2. However, the dsDNA bacteriophages PRD1, T4, and λ were relatively unaffected by copper. Interestingly, lipid-containing bacteriophages were most susceptible to copper toxicity. In addition, in the first experimental method, the pattern of bacteriophage Φ6 survival over time showed a plateau in mortality after lysates dried out. This finding suggests that copper's effect on bacteriophage is mediated by the presence of water.

  1. Expression of lysozymes from Erwinia amylovora phages and Erwinia genomes and inhibition by a bacterial protein.

    PubMed

    Müller, Ina; Gernold, Marina; Schneider, Bernd; Geider, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Genes coding for lysozyme-inhibiting proteins (Ivy) were cloned from the chromosomes of the plant pathogens Erwinia amylovora and Erwinia pyrifoliae. The product interfered not only with activity of hen egg white lysozyme, but also with an enzyme from E. amylovora phage ΦEa1h. We have expressed lysozyme genes from the genomes of three Erwinia species in Escherichia coli. The lysozymes expressed from genes of the E. amylovora phages ΦEa104 and ΦEa116, Erwinia chromosomes and Arabidopsis thaliana were not affected by Ivy. The enzyme from bacteriophage ΦEa1h was fused at the N- or C-terminus to other peptides. Compared to the intact lysozyme, a His-tag reduced its lytic activity about 10-fold and larger fusion proteins abolished activity completely. Specific protease cleavage restored lysozyme activity of a GST-fusion. The bacteriophage-encoded lysozymes were more active than the enzymes from bacterial chromosomes. Viral lyz genes were inserted into a broad-host range vector, and transfer to E. amylovora inhibited cell growth. Inserted in the yeast Pichia pastoris, the ΦEa1h-lysozyme was secreted and also inhibited by Ivy. Here we describe expression of unrelated cloned 'silent' lyz genes from Erwinia chromosomes and a novel interference of bacterial Ivy proteins with a viral lysozyme.

  2. The refined structures of goose lysozyme and its complex with a bound trisaccharide show that the "goose-type" lysozymes lack a catalytic aspartate residue.

    PubMed

    Weaver, L H; Grütter, M G; Matthews, B W

    1995-01-06

    The structure of goose egg-white lysozyme (GEWL) has been refined to an R-value of 15.9% at 1.6 A resolution. Details of the structure determination, the refinement and the structure itself are presented. The structure of a complex of the enzyme with the trisaccharide of N-acetyl glucosamine has also been determined and refined at 1.6 A resolution. The trisaccharide occupies sites analogous to the B, C and D subsites of chicken (HEWL) and phage T4 (T4L) lysozymes. All three lysozymes (GEWL, HEWL and T4L) display the same characteristic set of bridging hydrogen bonds between backbone atoms of the protein and the 2-acetamido group of the saccharide in subsite C. Glu73 of GEWL is seen to correspond closely to Glu35 of HEWL (and to Glu11 of T4L) and supports the established view that this group is critically involved in the catalytic mechanism. There is, however, no obvious residue in goose lysozyme that is a counterpart of Asp52 of chicken lysozyme (or of Asp20 in T4L), suggesting that a second acidic residue is not essential for the catalytic activity of goose lysozyme, and may not be required for the activity of other lysozymes.

  3. Campylobacter bacteriophages and bacteriophage therapy.

    PubMed

    Connerton, P L; Timms, A R; Connerton, I F

    2011-08-01

    Members of the genus Campylobacter are frequently responsible for human enteric disease with occasionally very serious outcomes. Much of this disease burden is thought to arise from consumption of contaminated poultry products. More than 80% of poultry in the UK harbour Campylobacter as a part of their intestinal flora. To address this unacceptably high prevalence, various interventions have been suggested and evaluated. Among these is the novel approach of using Campylobacter-specific bacteriophages, which are natural predators of the pathogen. To optimize their use as therapeutic agents, it is important to have a comprehensive understanding of the bacteriophages that infect Campylobacter, and how they can affect their host bacteria. This review will focus on many aspects of Campylobacter-specific bacteriophages including: their first isolation in the 1960s, their use in bacteriophage typing schemes, their isolation from the different biological sources and genomic characterization. As well as their use as therapeutic agents to reduce Campylobacter in poultry their future potential, including their use in bio-sanitization of food, will be explored. The evolutionary consequences of naturally occurring bacteriophage infection that have come to light through investigations of bacteriophages in the poultry ecosystem will also be discussed.

  4. Nanoscale bacteriophage biosensors beyond phage display.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Wook; Song, Jangwon; Hwang, Mintai P; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriophages are traditionally used for the development of phage display technology. Recently, their nanosized dimensions and ease with which genetic modifications can be made to their structure and function have put them in the spotlight towards their use in a variety of biosensors. In particular, the expression of any protein or peptide on the extraluminal surface of bacteriophages is possible by genetically engineering the genome. In addition, the relatively short replication time of bacteriophages offers researchers the ability to generate mass quantities of any given bacteriophage-based biosensor. Coupled with the emergence of various biomarkers in the clinic as a means to determine pathophysiological states, the development of current and novel technologies for their detection and quantification is imperative. In this review, we categorize bacteriophages by their morphology into M13-based filamentous bacteriophages and T4- or T7-based icosahedral bacteriophages, and examine how such advantages are utilized across a variety of biosensors. In essence, we take a comprehensive approach towards recent trends in bacteriophage-based biosensor applications and discuss their outlook with regards to the field of biotechnology.

  5. Bacteriophage assembly.

    PubMed

    Aksyuk, Anastasia A; Rossmann, Michael G

    2011-03-01

    Bacteriophages have been a model system to study assembly processes for over half a century. Formation of infectious phage particles involves specific protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions, as well as large conformational changes of assembly precursors. The sequence and molecular mechanisms of phage assembly have been elucidated by a variety of methods. Differences and similarities of assembly processes in several different groups of bacteriophages are discussed in this review. The general principles of phage assembly are applicable to many macromolecular complexes.

  6. A novel approach for separating bacteriophages from other bacteriophages using affinity chromatography and phage display.

    PubMed

    Ceglarek, Izabela; Piotrowicz, Agnieszka; Lecion, Dorota; Miernikiewicz, Paulina; Owczarek, Barbara; Hodyra, Katarzyna; Harhala, Marek; Górski, Andrzej; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2013-11-14

    Practical applications of bacteriophages in medicine and biotechnology induce a great need for technologies of phage purification. None of the popular methods offer solutions for separation of a phage from another similar phage. We used affinity chromatography combined with competitive phage display (i) to purify T4 bacteriophage from bacterial debris and (ii) to separate T4 from other contaminating bacteriophages. In 'competitive phage display' bacterial cells produced both wild types of the proteins (expression from the phage genome) and the protein fusions with affinity tags (expression from the expression vectors). Fusion proteins were competitively incorporated into the phage capsid. It allowed effective separation of T4 from a contaminating phage on standard affinity resins.

  7. Lytic bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Manan

    2013-01-01

    Foodborne illnesses resulting from the consumption of produce commodities contaminated with enteric pathogens continue to be a significant public health issue. Lytic bacteriophages may provide an effective and natural intervention to reduce bacterial pathogens on fresh and fresh-cut produce commodities. The use of multi-phage cocktails specific for a single pathogen has been most frequently assessed on produce commodities to minimize the development of bacteriophage insensitive mutants (BIM) in target pathogen populations. Regulatory approval for the use of several lytic phage products specific for bacterial pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in foods and on food processing surfaces has been granted by various agencies in the US and other countries, possibly allowing for the more widespread use of bacteriophages in the decontamination of fresh and minimally processed produce. Research studies have shown lytic bacteriophages specific for E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes have been effective in reducing pathogen populations on leafy greens, sprouts and tomatoes. PMID:24228223

  8. Hoc protein regulates the biological effects of T4 phage in mammals.

    PubMed

    Dabrowska, Krystyna; Zembala, Maria; Boratynski, Janusz; Switala-Jelen, Kinga; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Opolski, Adam; Szczaurska, Katarzyna; Kujawa, Marek; Godlewska, Joanna; Gorski, Andrzej

    2007-06-01

    We previously investigated the biological, non-antibacterial effects of bacteriophage T4 in mammals (binding to cancer cells in vitro and attenuating tumour growth and metastases in vivo); we selected the phage mutant HAP1 that was significantly more effective than T4. In this study we describe a non-sense mutation in the hoc gene that differentiates bacteriophage HAP1 and its parental strain T4. We found no substantial effects of the mutation on the mutant morphology, and its effects on electrophoretic mobility and hydrodynamic size were moderate. Only the high ionic strength of the environment resulted in a size difference of about 10 nm between T4 and HAP1. We compared the antimetastatic activity of the T2 phage, which does not express protein Hoc, with those of T4 and HAP1 (B16 melanoma lung colonies). We found that HAP1 and T2 decreased metastases with equal effect, more strongly than did T4. We also investigated concentrations of T4 and HAP1 in the murine blood, tumour (B16), spleen, liver, or muscle. We found that HAP1 was rapidly cleared from the organism, most probably by the liver. Although HAP1 was previously defined to bind cancer cells more effectively (than T4), its rapid elimination precluded its higher concentration in tumours.

  9. Purification of lysozyme using ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, R; Cui, Z F

    2000-04-20

    This article examines the separation of lysozyme from chicken egg white by ultrafiltration with 25 kDa and 50 kDa MWCO polysulfone membranes. The effects of pH, system hydrodynamics, feed concentration, and transmembrane pressure on permeate flux, lysozyme transmission, purification factor, and productivity have been discussed. With both types of membranes, higher permeate flux and lysozyme transmission were observed at higher pH. Higher lysozyme purity was generally obtained with the 25 kDa MWCO membrane. Purity of lysozyme decreased when the feed concentration was increased. With the 50 kDa MWCO membrane permeate flux, productivity and the purity of lysozyme were found to increase with increase in transmembrane pressure. The possibility of using a two-step ultrafiltration process for achieving high productivity along with high purity of lysozyme was also investigated.

  10. Chlamydia bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Śliwa-Dominiak, Joanna; Suszyńska, Ewa; Pawlikowska, Małgorzata; Deptuła, Wiesław

    2013-11-01

    Phages are called "good viruses" due to their ability to infect and kill pathogenic bacteria. Chlamydia are small, Gram-negative (G-) microbes that can be dangerous to human and animals. In humans, these bacteria are etiological agents of diseases such as psittacosis or respiratory tract diseases, while in animals, the infection may result in enteritis in cattle and chronic bowel diseases, as well as miscarriages in sheep. The first-known representative of chlamydiaphages was Chp1. It was discovered in Chlamydia psittaci isolates. Since then, four more species of chlamydiaphages have been identified [Chp2, Chp3, φCPG1 φCPAR39 (φCpn1) and Chp4]. All of them were shown to infect Chlamydia species. This paper described all known chlamydiaphages. They were characterised in terms of origin, host range, and their molecular structure. The review concerns the characterisation of bacteriophages that infects pathogenic and dangerous bacteria with unusual, intracellular life cycles that are pathogenic. In the era of antibiotic resistance, it is difficult to cure chlamydophilosis. Those bacteriophages can be an alternative to antibiotics, but before this happens, we need to get to know chlamydiaphages better.

  11. Lysozymes in the animal kingdom.

    PubMed

    Callewaert, Lien; Michiels, Chris W

    2010-03-01

    Lysozymes (EC 3.2.1.17) are hydrolytic enzymes, characterized by their ability to cleave the beta-(1,4)-glycosidic bond between N-acetylmuramic acid and N-acetylglucosamine in peptidoglycan, the major bacterial cell wall polymer. In the animal kingdom, three major distinct lysozyme types have been identified--the c-type (chicken or conventional type), the g-type (goose-type) and the i-type (invertebrate type) lysozyme. Examination of the phylogenetic distribution of these lysozymes reveals that c-type lysozymes are predominantly present in the phylum of the Chordata and in different classes of the Arthropoda. Moreover, g-type lysozymes (or at least their corresponding genes) are found in members of the Chordata, as well as in some bivalve mollusks belonging to the invertebrates. In general, the latter animals are known to produce i-type lysozymes. Although the homology in primary structure for representatives of these three lysozyme types is limited, their three-dimensional structures show striking similarities. Nevertheless, some variation exists in their catalytic mechanisms and the genomic organization of their genes. Regarding their biological role, the widely recognized function of lysozymes is their contribution to antibacterial defence but, additionally, some lysozymes (belonging to different types) are known to function as digestive enzymes.

  12. Template reporter bacteriophage platform and multiple bacterial detection assays based thereon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodridge, Lawrence (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The invention is a method for the development of assays for the simultaneous detection of multiple bacteria. A bacteria of interest is selected. A host bacteria containing plasmid DNA from a T even bacteriophage that infects the bacteria of interest is infected with T4 reporter bacteriophage. After infection, the progeny bacteriophage are plating onto the bacteria of interest. The invention also includes single-tube, fast and sensitive assays which utilize the novel method.

  13. Structure of the small outer capsid protein, Soc: a clamp for stabilizing capsids of T4-like phages.

    PubMed

    Qin, Li; Fokine, Andrei; O'Donnell, Erin; Rao, Venigalla B; Rossmann, Michael G

    2010-01-29

    Many viruses need to stabilize their capsid structure against DNA pressure and for survival in hostile environments. The 9-kDa outer capsid protein (Soc) of bacteriophage T4, which stabilizes the virus, attaches to the capsid during the final stage of maturation. There are 870 Soc molecules that act as a "glue" between neighboring hexameric capsomers, forming a "cage" that stabilizes the T4 capsid against extremes of pH and temperature. Here we report a 1.9 A resolution crystal structure of Soc from the bacteriophage RB69, a close relative of T4. The RB69 crystal structure and a homology model of T4 Soc were fitted into the cryoelectron microscopy reconstruction of the T4 capsid. This established the region of Soc that interacts with the major capsid protein and suggested a mechanism, verified by extensive mutational and biochemical studies, for stabilization of the capsid in which the Soc trimers act as clamps between neighboring capsomers. The results demonstrate the factors involved in stabilizing not only the capsids of T4-like bacteriophages but also many other virus capsids.

  14. Structure of the Small Outer Capsid Protein, Soc: A Clamp for Stabilizing Capsids of T4-like Phages

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Li; Fokine, Andrei; O'Donnell, Erin; Rao, Venigalla B.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2010-07-22

    Many viruses need to stabilize their capsid structure against DNA pressure and for survival in hostile environments. The 9-kDa outer capsid protein (Soc) of bacteriophage T4, which stabilizes the virus, attaches to the capsid during the final stage of maturation. There are 870 Soc molecules that act as a 'glue' between neighboring hexameric capsomers, forming a 'cage' that stabilizes the T4 capsid against extremes of pH and temperature. Here we report a 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of Soc from the bacteriophage RB69, a close relative of T4. The RB69 crystal structure and a homology model of T4 Soc were fitted into the cryoelectron microscopy reconstruction of the T4 capsid. This established the region of Soc that interacts with the major capsid protein and suggested a mechanism, verified by extensive mutational and biochemical studies, for stabilization of the capsid in which the Soc trimers act as clamps between neighboring capsomers. The results demonstrate the factors involved in stabilizing not only the capsids of T4-like bacteriophages but also many other virus capsids.

  15. Bacteriophage prehistory

    PubMed Central

    Thomas-Abedon, Cameron; Thomas, Anne; Mazure, Hubert

    2011-01-01

    We identified 30 actual or presumptive “bacteriophage” references dating between the years 1895 and 1917 and have further explored one of the oldest: Hankin's 1896 study of a bactericidal action associated with the waters of the Ganges and Jumna rivers in India. As Hankin's work took place approximately 20 years prior to the actual discovery of bacteriophages, no claims were made as to a possible phage nature of the phenomenon. Here we suggest that it may be imprudent to assume nevertheless that it represents an early observation of phagemediated bactericidal activity. Our principal argument is that the antibacterial aspect of these river waters was able to retain full potency following “heating” for one-half hour in hermetically sealed tubes, where heating in “open” tubes resulted in loss of antibacterial activity. We also suggest that environmental phage counts would have had to have been unusually high—greater than 106/ml impacting a single host strain—to achieve the rates of bacterial loss that Hankin observed. PMID:22164351

  16. Head Proteins from T-Even Bacteriophage

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Gerald L.; Cummings, Donald J.

    1970-01-01

    T-even bacteriophage capsid proteins were separated on 6% agarose columns by use of 6 m guanidine hydrochloride containing 5 mm dithiothreitol both to dissociate and to elute the proteins. The head capsids of T2H, T4B, T4B01, T4D, and T6r+ contained at least three structural proteins with molecular weights of 40,000, 18,000, and 11,000 daltons, amounting to 76, 2, and 8%, respectively, of the total capsid protein. On the other hand, T2L head capsids contained only two structural proteins with molecular weights of 40,000 and 18,000 daltons (81 and 2.5%, respectively, of the total protein). A discussion of the possible role of these structural head proteins and a T-even phage head model suggesting a structural arrangement of the 40,000 dalton subunit are presented. Images PMID:5438109

  17. The Tape Measure Protein of the Staphylococcus aureus Bacteriophage vB_SauS-phiIPLA35 Has an Active Muramidase Domain

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Rubio, Lorena; Gutiérrez, Dolores; Martínez, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Ana; Götz, Friedrich

    2012-01-01

    Tailed double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) bacteriophages frequently harbor structural proteins displaying peptidoglycan hydrolytic activities. The tape measure protein from Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophage vB_SauS-phiIPLA35 has a lysozyme-like and a peptidase_M23 domain. This report shows that the lysozyme-like domain (TG1) has muramidase activity and exhibits in vitro lytic activity against live S. aureus cells, an activity that could eventually find use in the treatment of infections. PMID:22729533

  18. Bacteriophages infecting Propionibacterium acnes.

    PubMed

    Brüggemann, Holger; Lood, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Viruses specifically infecting bacteria, or bacteriophages, are the most common biological entity in the biosphere. As such, they greatly influence bacteria, both in terms of enhancing their virulence and in terms of killing them. Since the first identification of bacteriophages in the beginning of the 20th century, researchers have been fascinated by these microorganisms and their ability to eradicate bacteria. In this review, we will cover the history of the Propionibacterium acnes bacteriophage research and point out how bacteriophage research has been an important part of the research on P. acnes itself. We will further discuss recent findings from phage genome sequencing and the identification of phage sequence signatures in clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs). Finally, the potential to use P. acnes bacteriophages as a therapeutic strategy to combat P. acnes-associated diseases will be discussed.

  19. Plasticity of the gene functions for DNA replication in the T4-like phages.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Vasiliy M; Nolan, James M; Bertrand, Claire; Levy, Dawn; Desplats, Carine; Krisch, H M; Karam, Jim D

    2006-08-04

    We have completely sequenced and annotated the genomes of several relatives of the bacteriophage T4, including three coliphages (RB43, RB49 and RB69), three Aeromonas salmonicida phages (44RR2.8t, 25 and 31) and one Aeromonas hydrophila phage (Aeh1). In addition, we have partially sequenced and annotated the T4-like genomes of coliphage RB16 (a close relative of RB43), A. salmonicida phage 65, Acinetobacter johnsonii phage 133 and Vibrio natriegens phage nt-1. Each of these phage genomes exhibited a unique sequence that distinguished it from its relatives, although there were examples of genomes that are very similar to each other. As a group the phages compared here diverge from one another by several criteria, including (a) host range, (b) genome size in the range between approximately 160 kb and approximately 250 kb, (c) content and genetic organization of their T4-like genes for DNA metabolism, (d) mutational drift of the predicted T4-like gene products and their regulatory sites and (e) content of open-reading frames that have no counterparts in T4 or other known organisms (novel ORFs). We have observed a number of DNA rearrangements of the T4 genome type, some exhibiting proximity to putative homing endonuclease genes. Also, we cite and discuss examples of sequence divergence in the predicted sites for protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions of homologues of the T4 DNA replication proteins, with emphasis on the diversity in sequence, molecular form and regulation of the phage-encoded DNA polymerase, gp43. Five of the sequenced phage genomes are predicted to encode split forms of this polymerase. Our studies suggest that the modular construction and plasticity of the T4 genome type and several of its replication proteins may offer resilience to mutation, including DNA rearrangements, and facilitate the adaptation of T4-like phages to different bacterial hosts in nature.

  20. Effects of DNA-binding drugs on T4 DNA ligase.

    PubMed Central

    Montecucco, A; Pedrali-Noy, G; Spadari, S; Lestingi, M; Ciarrocchi, G

    1990-01-01

    A number of DNA intercalating and externally binding drugs have been found to inhibit nick sealing, cohesive and blunt end ligation, AMP-dependent DNA topoisomerization and EDTA-induced DNA nicking mediated by bacteriophage T4 DNA ligase. The inhibition seems to arise from drug-substrate interaction so that formation of active DNA-Mg2(+)-AMP-enzyme complex is impaired while assembled and active complexes are not disturbed by drug binding to the substrate. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2156493

  1. Human lung lysozyme: sources and properties.

    PubMed

    Konstan, M W; Chen, P W; Sherman, J M; Thomassen, M J; Wood, R E; Boat, T F

    1981-01-01

    Lysozyme in human airway secretions is thought to defend the lung against airborne bacteria. Although lysozyme has been purified and characterized from human tears, milk, saliva, and other sources (1-5), human lung lysozyme has received little attention except for measurements of concentrations in sputum (6, 7), immunocytochemical and histochemical localization (8-12),and studies of secretion by alveolar macrophages (13). This study was designed to identify the sources of secreted lung lysozyme, to quantitate the secretory activities of the various sources,and to compare the properties of lysozyme from lung cells with those from other tissues.

  2. The Relationship between Population T4/TSH Set Point Data and T4/TSH Physiology.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Stephen Paul; Bean, Nigel Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    Context. Population studies of the distribution of T4/TSH set points suggest a more complex inverse relationship between T4 and TSH than that suggested by physiological studies. The reasons for the similarities and differences between the curves describing these relationships are unresolved. Methods. We subjected the curve, derived from empiric data, describing the TSH suppression response to T4, and the more mathematically derived curve describing the T4 response to TSH, to the different possible models of population variation. The implied consequences of these in terms of generating a population distribution of T4/TSH equilibrium points (a "population curve") were generated and compared to the empiric population curve. The physiological responses to primary hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism were incorporated into the analysis. Conclusions. Though the population curve shows a similarly inverse relationship, it is describing a different relationship than the curve describing the suppression of TSH by T4. The population curve is consistent with the physiological studies of the TSH response to T4 and implies a greater interindividual variation in the positive thyroid T4 response to TSH than in the central inhibitory TSH response to T4. The population curve in the dysthyroid states is consistent with known physiological responses to these states.

  3. Lysozyme-lysozyme and lysozyme-salt interactions in the aqueous saline solution: a new square-well potential.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bong Ho; Bae, Young Chan

    2003-01-01

    We investigate lysozyme-lysozyme and lysozyme-salt interactions in electrolyte solutions using a molecular-thermodynamic model. An equation of state based on the statistical mechanical perturbation theory is applied to describe the interactions. The perturbation term includes a new square-well potential of mean force, which implies the information about the lysozyme surface and salt type. The attractive energy of the potential of mean force is correlated with experimental cloud-point temperatures of lysozyme in various solution conditions. The same attractive energy is used to predict osmotic pressure of a given system with no additional parameters. The new potential shows a satisfactory improvement in understanding the interactions between lysozymes in aqueous salt solutions.

  4. BACTERIOPHAGE T4 MULTIPLICATION IN A GLUCOSE-LIMITED ESCHERICHIA COLI BIOFILM. (R825503)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  5. Scientist prepare Lysozyme Protein Crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Dan Carter and Charles Sisk center a Lysozyme Protein crystal grown aboard the USML-2 shuttle mission. Protein isolated from hen egg-white and functions as a bacteriostatic enzyme by degrading bacterial cell walls. First enzyme ever characterized by protein crystallography. It is used as an excellent model system for better understanding parameters involved in microgravity crystal growth experiments. The goal is to compare kinetic data from microgravity experiments with data from laboratory experiments to study the equilibrium.

  6. Morphogenesis of the T4 tail and tail fibers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Remarkable progress has been made during the past ten years in elucidating the structure of the bacteriophage T4 tail by a combination of three-dimensional image reconstruction from electron micrographs and X-ray crystallography of the components. Partial and complete structures of nine out of twenty tail structural proteins have been determined by X-ray crystallography and have been fitted into the 3D-reconstituted structure of the "extended" tail. The 3D structure of the "contracted" tail was also determined and interpreted in terms of component proteins. Given the pseudo-atomic tail structures both before and after contraction, it is now possible to understand the gross conformational change of the baseplate in terms of the change in the relative positions of the subunit proteins. These studies have explained how the conformational change of the baseplate and contraction of the tail are related to the tail's host cell recognition and membrane penetration function. On the other hand, the baseplate assembly process has been recently reexamined in detail in a precise system involving recombinant proteins (unlike the earlier studies with phage mutants). These experiments showed that the sequential association of the subunits of the baseplate wedge is based on the induced-fit upon association of each subunit. It was also found that, upon association of gp53 (gene product 53), the penultimate subunit of the wedge, six of the wedge intermediates spontaneously associate to form a baseplate-like structure in the absence of the central hub. Structure determination of the rest of the subunits and intermediate complexes and the assembly of the hub still require further study. PMID:21129200

  7. Lysozyme separation by hollow-fibre ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Ghosh; Silva1; Cui

    2000-08-01

    This paper discusses the purification of lysozyme from chicken egg white using hollow-fibre ultrafiltration (30kDa MWCO, polysulphone membrane). Lysozyme is preferentially transmitted through the membrane while the membrane largely retains other egg white proteins. Improvement in system hydrodynamics resulted in an increase in permeate flux while lysozyme transmission remained unaffected, leading to higher productivity. The percentage purity of lysozyme obtained was generally insensitive to system hydrodynamics. The permeate flux and productivity increased with increase in transmembrane pressure (TMP) before levelling off around 0.7bar. However, the TMP did not have any pronounced effect on the transmission and the purity of lysozyme. Experiments carried out in the diafiltration mode showed that moderately pure lysozyme (80-90%) could be obtained in an extended operation.

  8. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated phage resistance is not impeded by the DNA modifications of phage T4.

    PubMed

    Yaung, Stephanie J; Esvelt, Kevin M; Church, George M

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria rely on two known DNA-level defenses against their bacteriophage predators: restriction-modification and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated (Cas) systems. Certain phages have evolved countermeasures that are known to block endonucleases. For example, phage T4 not only adds hydroxymethyl groups to all of its cytosines, but also glucosylates them, a strategy that defeats almost all restriction enzymes. We sought to determine whether these DNA modifications can similarly impede CRISPR-based defenses. In a bioinformatics search, we found naturally occurring CRISPR spacers that potentially target phages known to modify their DNA. Experimentally, we show that the Cas9 nuclease from the Type II CRISPR system of Streptococcus pyogenes can overcome a variety of DNA modifications in Escherichia coli. The levels of Cas9-mediated phage resistance to bacteriophage T4 and the mutant phage T4 gt, which contains hydroxymethylated but not glucosylated cytosines, were comparable to phages with unmodified cytosines, T7 and the T4-like phage RB49. Our results demonstrate that Cas9 is not impeded by N6-methyladenine, 5-methylcytosine, 5-hydroxymethylated cytosine, or glucosylated 5-hydroxymethylated cytosine.

  9. Hyperexpansion of RNA Bacteriophage Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, Siddharth R.; Janowski, Andrew B.; Zhao, Guoyan; Barouch, Dan; Wang, David

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophage modulation of microbial populations impacts critical processes in ocean, soil, and animal ecosystems. However, the role of bacteriophages with RNA genomes (RNA bacteriophages) in these processes is poorly understood, in part because of the limited number of known RNA bacteriophage species. Here, we identify partial genome sequences of 122 RNA bacteriophage phylotypes that are highly divergent from each other and from previously described RNA bacteriophages. These novel RNA bacteriophage sequences were present in samples collected from a range of ecological niches worldwide, including invertebrates and extreme microbial sediment, demonstrating that they are more widely distributed than previously recognized. Genomic analyses of these novel bacteriophages yielded multiple novel genome organizations. Furthermore, one RNA bacteriophage was detected in the transcriptome of a pure culture of Streptomyces avermitilis, suggesting for the first time that the known tropism of RNA bacteriophages may include gram-positive bacteria. Finally, reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR)-based screening for two specific RNA bacteriophages in stool samples from a longitudinal cohort of macaques suggested that they are generally acutely present rather than persistent. PMID:27010970

  10. Hyperexpansion of RNA Bacteriophage Diversity.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Siddharth R; Janowski, Andrew B; Zhao, Guoyan; Barouch, Dan; Wang, David

    2016-03-01

    Bacteriophage modulation of microbial populations impacts critical processes in ocean, soil, and animal ecosystems. However, the role of bacteriophages with RNA genomes (RNA bacteriophages) in these processes is poorly understood, in part because of the limited number of known RNA bacteriophage species. Here, we identify partial genome sequences of 122 RNA bacteriophage phylotypes that are highly divergent from each other and from previously described RNA bacteriophages. These novel RNA bacteriophage sequences were present in samples collected from a range of ecological niches worldwide, including invertebrates and extreme microbial sediment, demonstrating that they are more widely distributed than previously recognized. Genomic analyses of these novel bacteriophages yielded multiple novel genome organizations. Furthermore, one RNA bacteriophage was detected in the transcriptome of a pure culture of Streptomyces avermitilis, suggesting for the first time that the known tropism of RNA bacteriophages may include gram-positive bacteria. Finally, reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR)-based screening for two specific RNA bacteriophages in stool samples from a longitudinal cohort of macaques suggested that they are generally acutely present rather than persistent.

  11. Genetic Dissection of T4 Lysis

    PubMed Central

    Moussa, Samir H.; Lawler, Jessica L.

    2014-01-01

    t is the holin gene for coliphage T4, encoding a 218-amino-acid (aa) protein essential for the inner membrane hole formation that initiates lysis and terminates the phage infection cycle. T is predicted to be an integral membrane protein that adopts an Nin-Cout topology with a single transmembrane domain (TMD). This holin topology is different from those of the well-studied holins S105 (3 TMDs; Nout-Cin) of the coliphage lambda and S68 (2 TMDs; Nin-Cin) of the lambdoid phage 21. Here, we used random mutagenesis to construct a library of lysis-defective alleles of t to discern residues and domains important for holin function and for the inhibition of lysis by the T4 antiholin, RI. The results show that mutations in all 3 topological domains (N-terminal cytoplasmic, TMD, and C-terminal periplasmic) can abrogate holin function. Additionally, several lysis-defective alleles in the C-terminal domain are no longer competent in binding RI. Taken together, these results shed light on the roles of the previously uncharacterized N-terminal and C-terminal domains in lysis and its real-time regulation. PMID:24706740

  12. Fluorescence Studies of Lysozyme Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Smith, Lori

    1998-01-01

    Fluorescence is one of the most powerful tools available for the study of macromolecules. For example, fluorescence can be used to study self association through methods such as anisotropy (the rotational rate of the molecule in solution), quenching (the accessibility of a bound probe to the bulk solution), and resonance energy transfer (measurement of the distance between two species). Fluorescence can also be used to study the local environment of the probe molecules, and the changes in that environment which accompany crystal nucleation and growth. However fluorescent techniques have been very much underutilized in macromolecular growth studies. One major advantage is that the fluorescent species generally must be at low concentration, typically ca 10-5 to 10-6 M. Thus one can study a very wide range of solution conditions, ranging from very high to very low protein concentration, he latter of which are not readily accessible to scattering techniques. We have prepared a number of fluorescent derivatives of chicken egg white lysozyme (CEWL). Fluorescent probes have been attached to two different sites, ASP 101 and the N-terrninal amine, with a sought for use in different lines of study. Preliminary resonance energy transfer studies have been -carried out using pyrene acetic acid (Ex 340 mn, Em 376 nm) lysozyme as a donor and cascade blue (Ex 377 run, Em 423 nm) labeled lysozyme as an acceptor. The emission of both the pyrene and cascade blue probes was followed as a function of the salt protein concentrations. The data show an increase in cascade blue and a concomitant decrease in the pyrene fluorescence as either the salt or protein concentrations are increased, suggesting that the two species are approaching each other close enough for resonance energy transfer to occur. This data can be analyzed to measure the distance between the probe molecules and, knowing their locations on the protein molecule their distances from and orientations with respect to each

  13. BACTERIOPHAGE THERAPY AND CAMPYLOBACTER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The book chapter reports efforts to exploit Campylobacter-specific bacteriophages to reduce the numbers of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli colonizing poultry and contaminating poultry meat products. Controlling campylobacters in poultry represents one of the greatest challenges to the agriculture a...

  14. Bacteriophages of Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The specific aims of the book chapter are to: (1) Briefly review the nomenclature of bacteriophages and how these agents are classified. (2) Discuss the problems associated with addition/removal of antibiotics in commercial animal feeds. (3) Provide a brief overview of Clostridium perfringens biolog...

  15. Chlamydial plasmids and bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Pawlikowska-Warych, Małgorzata; Śliwa-Dominiak, Joanna; Deptuła, Wiesław

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia are absolute pathogens of humans and animals; despite being rather well recognised, they are still open for discovery. One such discovery is the occurrence of extrachromosomal carriers of genetic information. In prokaryotes, such carriers include plasmids and bacteriophages, which are present only among some Chlamydia species. Plasmids were found exclusively in Chlamydia (C.) trachomatis, C. psittaci, C. pneumoniae, C. suis, C. felis, C. muridarum and C. caviae. In prokaryotic organisms, plasmids usually code for genes that facilitate survival of the bacteria in the environment (although they are not essential). In chlamydia, their role has not been definitely recognised, apart from the fact that they participate in the synthesis of glycogen and encode proteins responsible for their virulence. Furthermore, in C. suis it was evidenced that the plasmid is integrated in a genomic island and contains the tetracycline-resistance gene. Bacteriophages specific for chlamydia (chlamydiaphages) were detected only in six species: C. psittaci, C. abortus, C. felis, C. caviae C. pecorum and C. pneumoniae. These chlamydiaphages cause inhibition of the developmental cycle, and delay transformation of reticulate bodies (RBs) into elementary bodies (EBs), thus reducing the possibility of infecting other cells in time. Plasmids and bacteriophages can be used in the diagnostics of chlamydioses; although especially in the case of plasmids, they are already used for detection of chlamydial infections. In addition, bacteriophages could be used as therapeutic agents to replace antibiotics, potentially addressing the problem of increasing antibiotic-resistance among chlamydia.

  16. [Bacteriophages as antibacterial agents].

    PubMed

    Shasha, Shaul M; Sharon, Nehama; Inbar, Michael

    2004-02-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that only infect bacteria. They have played an important role in the development of molecular biology and have been used as anti-bacterial agents. Since their independent discovery by Twort and d'Herelle, they have been extensively used to prevent and treat bacterial infections, mainly in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. In western countries this method has been sporadically employed on humans and domesticated animals. However, the discovery and widespread use of antibiotics, coupled with doubts about the efficacy of phage therapy, led to an eclipse in the use of phage in medicine. The emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria, especially strains that are multiply resistant, has resulted in a renewed interest in alternatives to conventional drugs. One of the possible replacements for antibiotics is the use of bacteriophages as antimicrobial agents. This brief review aims to describe the history of bacteriophage and early clinical studies on their use in bacterial disease prophylaxis and therapy, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of bacteriophage in this regard.

  17. Stability and in vitro DNA packaging of bacteriophages: effects of dextrans, sugars, and polyols

    SciTech Connect

    Serwer, P.; Masker, W.E.; Allen, J.L.

    1983-02-01

    Attempts were made to increase the efficiency of infectious particle formation during the in vitro assembly of bacteriophage T7 from procapsids and DNA. It was found that dextrans and some smaller, related compounds (sucrose and sorbitol) increase this efficiency by a factor of 8 to 50. Dextrans also inhibited elevated temperature-induced emptying of DNA from bacteriophages T7, P22, and T4, suggesting that the stimulation of assembly is caused, at least in part, by the stabilization of packaged DNA in capsids. The data indicated that the sugars and polyols can slow DNA emptying from bacteriophages at elevated temperature whether they permeate the bacteriophage capsid or not. In contrast, the data suggested that permeation of some particle, probably a capsid, results in inhibition of in vitro T7 assembly.

  18. Problem-Solving Test: RNA and Protein Synthesis in Bacteriophage-Infected "E. coli" Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2008-01-01

    The classic experiment presented in this problem-solving test was designed to identify the template molecules of translation by analyzing the synthesis of phage proteins in "Escherichia coli" cells infected with bacteriophage T4. The work described in this test led to one of the most seminal discoveries of early molecular biology: it dealt a…

  19. Crystal Structure of the Phage T4 Recombinase UvsX and Its Functional Interaction with the T4 SF2 Helicase UvsW

    SciTech Connect

    Gajewski, Stefan; Webb, Michael R.; Galkin, Vitold; Egelman, Edward H.; Kreuzer, Kenneth N.; White, Stephen W.

    2012-07-11

    Bacteriophage T4 provides an important model system for studying the mechanism of homologous recombination. We have determined the crystal structure of the T4 UvsX recombinase, and the overall architecture and fold closely resemble those of RecA, including a highly conserved ATP binding site. Based on this new structure, we reanalyzed electron microscopy reconstructions of UvsX-DNA filaments and docked the UvsX crystal structure into two different filament forms: a compressed filament generated in the presence of ADP and an elongated filament generated in the presence of ATP and aluminum fluoride. In these reconstructions, the ATP binding site sits at the protomer interface, as in the RecA filament crystal structure. However, the environment of the ATP binding site is altered in the two filament reconstructions, suggesting that nucleotide cannot be as easily accommodated at the protomer interface of the compressed filament. Finally, we show that the phage helicase UvsW completes the UvsX-promoted strand-exchange reaction, allowing the generation of a simple nicked circular product rather than complex networks of partially exchanged substrates.

  20. Comparative analysis of microsatellites and compound microsatellites in T4-like viruses.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lan; Deng, Liang; Fu, Yongzhuo; Wu, Xiaolong; Zhao, Xiangyan; Chen, Yubao; Li, Mingfu; Tan, Zhongyang

    2016-01-10

    Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are known to present ubiquitously in genomes of eukaryotes and prokaryotes, as well as viruses. A comprehensive analysis of microsatellites and compound microsatellites (CM) was performed for 67 T4-like bacteriophage genomes. We found that the number of repeats was generally proportional to the size of the genome. CM were more abundant in genic regions, while their relative abundance was higher in intergenic regions. Meanwhile, the number of CM rapidly decreased with the increase of complexity but gradually increased with higher dMAX (maximum distance between any two adjacent microsatellites). (A)n/(T)n, (AT)n/(TA)n and (AAG)n were the most abundant repeats of mono-, di- and trinucleotide microsatellites, respectively. The number of microsatellites in reference sequences was significantly lower than that in corresponding random sequences. This result was mainly attributed to mono- and dinucleotide repeats which hardly exceeded 6bp in T4-like viruses. These observations may be helpful to understand the distribution of microsatellites and viral genetic diversity in T4-like viruses.

  1. Acetylated lysozyme as impurity in lysozyme crystals: constant distribution coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, B. R.; Chernov, A. A.

    2001-11-01

    Hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) was acetylated to modify molecular charge keeping the molecular size and weight nearly constant. Two derivatives, A and B, more and less acetylated, respectively, were obtained, separated, purified and added to the solution from which crystals of tetragonal HEWL crystals were grown. Amounts of the A and B impurities added were 0.76, 0.38 and 0.1 mg/ml and 0.43, 0.22, 0.1 mg/ml, respectively. The HEWL concentration were 20, 30 and 40 mg/ml. The crystals grown in 18 experiments for each impurity concentration and supersaturation were dissolved and quantities of A or B additives in these crystals were analyzed by cation exchange high performance liquid chromatography. All the data for each set of 18 samples with the different impurity and regular HEWL concentrations is well described by one distribution coefficient K=2.15±0.13 for A and K=3.42±0.25 for B. According to definition of K by Eq. (1) in the text, the condition K=const is equivalent to a decrease of impurity amount in the crystal as the supersaturation increases. The observed independence of the distribution coefficient on both the impurity concentration and supersaturation is explained by the dilution model described in this paper. It shows that the impurity adsorption and incorporation rates are proportional to the impurity concentration and that the growth rate is proportional to the concentration of crystallizing protein in solution. The frequency at which an impurity molecules irreversibly join the crystal was estimated to be 3 s -1, much higher than such frequency for regular crystal molecules 5×10 -2 s -1 at 30 mg/ml lysozyme concentration. Reasons for this inequality are discussed.

  2. Macroporous chitin affinity membranes for lysozyme separation.

    PubMed

    Ruckenstein, E; Zeng, X

    1997-12-20

    Macroporous chitin membranes with high, controlled porosity and good mechanical properties have been prepared using a technique developed in this laboratory based on silica particles as porogen. They were employed for the affinity separation of lysozyme. Chitin membranes (1 mm thickness) can be operated at high fluxes (>/=1.1 mL/min/cm(2)) corresponding to pressure drops >/=2 psi. Their adsorption capacity for lysozyme ( approximately 50 mg/mL membrane) is by an order of magnitude higher than that of the chitin beads employed in column separation. In a binary mixture of lysozyme and ovalbumin, the membranes showed very high selectivity towards lysozyme. The effect of some important operation parameters, such as the flow rates during loading and elution were investigated. Lysozyme of very high purity (>98%) was obtained from a mixture of lysozyme and ovalbumin, and from egg white. The results indicate that the macroporous chitin membranes can be used for the separation, purification, and recovery of lysozyme at large scale. (c) 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 56: 610-617, 1997.

  3. Structural aberrations in T-even bacteriophage. IX. Effect of mixed infection on the production of giant bacteriophage.

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, D J; Chapman, V A; DeLong, S S

    1977-01-01

    To date, the production of T-even bacteriophage with giant heads has been achieved in two ways: (i) by use of canavanine-arginine treatment of Escherichia coli B cultures infected by wild-type bacteriophage (Cummings and Bolin, Bacteriol. Rev. 40:314-359, 1976; Cummings et al., Virology 54:245-261, 1973), which give a size distribution of giants that is phage specific (Cummings et al., Virology 54:245-261, 1973); and (ii) by infection with certain missense mutants of T4D gene 23 (Doermann et al., J. Virol. 12:374-385, 1973; ICN-UCLA Symposium on Molecular Biology, p. 243-285, 1973) or temperature-sensitive mutants of gene 24 (Aebi et al., J. Supramol. Struct. 2:253-275, 1974; Biljenga et al., J. Mol. Biol. 103:469-498, 1976). We now report the effect of mixed infection with several mutants of T4D on both the production and the size of giant bacteriophage. We found that gene 24 mutant is a critical partner for the production of giants. Infection using T4.24 mutants together with either T4.23 mutants, T4B+ or T6+ led to the formation of giants with heads 10- to 14-fold longer than normal-length heads. Infection with amber 24-bypass 24 double mutants of T4D led to the production of giants when gene 23 mutant was used to co-infect. Addition of canavanine to the co-infected cultures could alter the size distribution of giants, depending on which phage were used to coinfect. Gene 22 mutants had a modifying effect on these results. In the absence of canavanine co-infection with gene 22 mutants prevented the production of giants, and in the presence of canavanine giants of 1.5 to 5 head lengths were found. We have interpreted these results to mean that critical concentrations of gene products 22, 23, and 24 interact to control head length in T-even bacteriophage. Images PMID:864836

  4. Bacteriophage-induced Inhibition of Host Functions 1

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Richard J.; Bose, Subir K.

    1968-01-01

    The kinetics of degradation of bacterial deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) after infection of Escherichia coli with T4D, ultraviolet-irradiated T4D, and two amber mutants, N122 and N94, was studied by zone sedimentation through linear glycerol gradients. Within 5 min after infection with any of the bacteriophages, breakdown of host genome was evident. The first product was a high-molecular-weight material (50S to 70S) and further degradation appeared to occur in discrete steps. Rapid and extensive breakdown of bacterial DNA was seen after infection with am N122 and T4D. Infection with ultraviolet-irradiated phage or with am N94 resulted in an accumulation of high-molecular-weight material. These results suggest that the observed degradation of host DNA begins early and requires sequential action of several phage-induced endo- as well as exodeoxyribonucleases. PMID:4911847

  5. Innate and acquired bacteriophage-mediated immunity

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Jeremy J.; Youle, Merry; Rohwer, Forest

    2013-01-01

    We recently described a novel, non-host-derived, phage-mediated immunity active at mucosal surfaces, the main site of pathogen entry in metazoans. In that work, we showed that phage T4 adheres to mucus glycoproteins via immunoglobulin-like domains displayed on its capsid. This adherence positions the phage in mucus surfaces where they are more likely to encounter and kill bacteria, thereby benefiting both the phage and its metazoan host. We presented this phage-metazoan symbiosis based on an exclusively lytic model of phage infection. Here we extend our bacteriophage adherence to mucus (BAM) model to consider the undoubtedly more complex dynamics in vivo. We hypothesize how mucus-adherent phages, both lytic and temperate, might impact the commensal microbiota as well as protect the metazoan epithelium from bacterial invasion. We suggest that BAM may provide both an innate and an acquired antimicrobial immunity. PMID:24228227

  6. Cytoplasmic bacteriophage display system

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.; Rosenberg, A.H.

    1998-06-16

    Disclosed are display vectors comprising DNA encoding a portion of a structural protein from a cytoplasmic bacteriophage, joined covalently to a protein or peptide of interest. Exemplified are display vectors wherein the structural protein is the T7 bacteriophage capsid protein. More specifically, in the exemplified display vectors the C-terminal amino acid residue of the portion of the capsid protein is joined to the N-terminal residue of the protein or peptide of interest. The portion of the T7 capsid protein exemplified comprises an N-terminal portion corresponding to form 10B of the T7 capsid protein. The display vectors are useful for high copy number display or lower copy number display (with larger fusion). Compositions of the type described herein are useful in connection with methods for producing a virus displaying a protein or peptide of interest. 1 fig.

  7. Cytoplasmic bacteriophage display system

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Rosenberg, Alan H.

    1998-06-16

    Disclosed are display vectors comprising DNA encoding a portion of a structural protein from a cytoplasmic bacteriophage, joined covalently to a protein or peptide of interest. Exemplified are display vectors wherein the structural protein is the T7 bacteriophage capsid protein. More specifically, in the exemplified display vectors the C-terminal amino acid residue of the portion of the capsid protein is joined to the N-terminal residue of the protein or peptide of interest. The portion of the T7 capsid protein exemplified comprises an N-terminal portion corresponding to form 10B of the T7 capsid protein. The display vectors are useful for high copy number display or lower copy number display (with larger fusion). Compositions of the type described herein are useful in connection with methods for producing a virus displaying a protein or peptide of interest.

  8. T4 Phage Tail Adhesin Gp12 Counteracts LPS-Induced Inflammation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Miernikiewicz, Paulina; Kłopot, Anna; Soluch, Ryszard; Szkuta, Piotr; Kęska, Weronika; Hodyra-Stefaniak, Katarzyna; Konopka, Agnieszka; Nowak, Marcin; Lecion, Dorota; Kaźmierczak, Zuzanna; Majewska, Joanna; Harhala, Marek; Górski, Andrzej; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages that infect Gram-negative bacteria often bind to the bacterial surface by interaction of specific proteins with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Short tail fiber proteins (tail adhesin, gp12) mediate adsorption of T4-like bacteriophages to Escherichia coli, binding surface proteins or LPS. Produced as a recombinant protein, gp12 retains its ability to bind LPS. Since LPS is able to exert a major impact on the immune response in animals and in humans, we have tested LPS-binding phage protein gp12 as a potential modulator of the LPS-induced immune response. We have produced tail adhesin gp12 in a bacterial expression system and confirmed its ability to form trimers and to bind LPS in vitro by dynamic light scattering. This product had no negative effect on mammalian cell proliferation in vitro. Further, no harmful effects of this protein were observed in mice. Thus, gp12 was used in combination with LPS in a murine model, and it decreased the inflammatory response to LPS in vivo, as assessed by serum levels of cytokines IL-1 alpha and IL-6 and by histopathological analysis of spleen, liver, kidney and lungs. Thus, in future studies gp12 may be considered as a potential tool for modulating and specifically for counteracting LPS-related physiological effects in vivo. PMID:27471503

  9. Phylogeny of the Major Head and Tail Genes of the Wide-Ranging T4-Type Bacteriophages†

    PubMed Central

    Tétart, Françoise; Desplats, Carine; Kutateladze, Mzia; Monod, Caroline; Ackermann, Hans-Wolfgang; Krisch, H. M.

    2001-01-01

    We examined a number of bacteriophages with T4-type morphology that propagate in different genera of enterobacteria, Aeromonas, Burkholderia, and Vibrio. Most of these phages had a prolate icosahedral head, a contractile tail, and a genome size that was similar to that of T4. A few of them had more elongated heads and larger genomes. All these phages are phylogenetically related, since they each had sequences homologous to the capsid gene (gene 23), tail sheath gene (gene 18), and tail tube gene (gene 19) of T4. On the basis of the sequence comparison of their virion genes, the T4-type phages can be classified into three subgroups with increasing divergence from T4: the T-evens, pseudoT-evens, and schizoT-evens. In general, the phages that infect closely related host species have virion genes that are phylogenetically closer to each other than those of phages that infect distantly related hosts. However, some of the phages appear to be chimeras, indicating that, at least occasionally, some genetic shuffling has occurred between the different T4-type subgroups. The compilation of a number of gene 23 sequences reveals a pattern of conserved motifs separated by sequences that differ in the T4-type subgroups. Such variable patches in the gene 23 sequences may determine the size of the virion head and consequently the viral genome length. This sequence analysis provides molecular evidence that phages related to T4 are widespread in the biosphere and diverged from a common ancestor in acquiring the ability to infect different host bacteria and to occupy new ecological niches. PMID:11114936

  10. Structural and Mechanistic Studies of Pesticin, a Bacterial Homolog of Phage Lysozymes*

    PubMed Central

    Patzer, Silke I.; Albrecht, Reinhard; Braun, Volkmar; Zeth, Kornelius

    2012-01-01

    Yersinia pestis produces and secretes a toxin named pesticin that kills related bacteria of the same niche. Uptake of the bacteriocin is required for activity in the periplasm leading to hydrolysis of peptidoglycan. To understand the uptake mechanism and to investigate the function of pesticin, we combined crystal structures of the wild type enzyme, active site mutants, and a chimera protein with in vivo and in vitro activity assays. Wild type pesticin comprises an elongated N-terminal translocation domain, the intermediate receptor binding domain, and a C-terminal activity domain with structural analogy to lysozyme homologs. The full-length protein is toxic to bacteria when taken up to the target site via the outer or the inner membrane. Uptake studies of deletion mutants in the translocation domain demonstrate their critical size for import. To further test the plasticity of pesticin during uptake into bacterial cells, the activity domain was replaced by T4 lysozyme. Surprisingly, this replacement resulted in an active chimera protein that is not inhibited by the immunity protein Pim. Activity of pesticin and the chimera protein was blocked through introduction of disulfide bonds, which suggests unfolding as the prerequisite to gain access to the periplasm. Pesticin, a muramidase, was characterized by active site mutations demonstrating a similar but not identical residue pattern in comparison with T4 lysozyme. PMID:22593569

  11. Functional assay for T4 lysozyme-engineered G Protein-Coupled Receptors with an ion channel reporter

    PubMed Central

    Niescierowicz, Katarzyna; Caro, Lydia; Cherezov, Vadim; Vivaudou, Michel; Moreau, Christophe J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Structural studies of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) extensively use the insertion of globular soluble protein domains in order to facilitate their crystallization. However, when inserted in the third intracellular loop (i3 loop), the soluble protein domain disrupts their coupling to G proteins and impedes the GPCRs functional characterization by standard G protein-based assays. Therefore, activity tests of crystallization-optimized GPCRs are essentially limited to their ligand binding properties using radioligand binding assays. Functional characterization of additional thermostabilizing mutations requires the insertion of similar mutations in the wild-type receptor to allow G protein-activation tests. We demonstrate that Ion Channel-Coupled Receptor technology is a complementary approach for a comprehensive functional characterization of crystallization-optimized GPCRs and potentially of any engineered GPCR. Ligand-induced conformational changes of the GPCRs are translated into electrical signal and detected by simple current recordings, even though binding of G proteins is sterically blocked by the added soluble protein domain. PMID:24268646

  12. T-4G Simulator and T-4 Ground Training Devices in USAF Undergraduate Pilot Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, Robert R.; Smith, James F.

    The objective of the project was to investigate the utility of using an A/F37A-T4G T-37 flight simulator within the context of Air Force undergraduate pilot training. Twenty-one subjects, selected from three undergraduate pilot training classes, were given contact flight training in a TP4G/EPT simulator before going to T-37 aircraft for further…

  13. Bacteriophage application to control the contaminated water with Shigella

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Jin Woo; Giri, Sib Sankar; Kim, Hyoun Joong; Yun, Sae Kil; Chi, Cheng; Chai, Ji Young; Lee, Byeong Chun; Park, Se Chang

    2016-01-01

    Shigella is one of the most important waterborne and foodborne pathogens around the world. Emergence of antibiotic-resistant Shigella has made the development of alternatives to conventional antibiotics necessary. In this study, a virulent Myoviridae bacteriophage, pSs-1 was isolated from environmental water in South Korea and showed infectivity to S. flexneri as well as S. sonnei strains. One-step growth analysis showed that pSs-1 has a short latent period (25 min) and a large burst size (97 PFU/cell). According to the genomic analysis, pSs-1 contains 164,999 bp of genome with a G + C content of 35.54% and it is considered as a member of the T4-like bacteriophage group. These results showed that pSs-1 may have potential as a biocontrol agent instead of conventional antibiotics for shigellosis. PMID:26971572

  14. Enzymatic characterization of a lysin encoded by bacteriophage EL.

    PubMed

    Tafoya, Diana A; Hildenbrand, Zacariah L; Herrera, Nadia; Molugu, Sudheer K; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V; Miroshnikov, Konstantin A; Bernal, Ricardo A

    2013-04-01

    The bacteriophage EL is a virus that specifically attacks the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This phage carries a large genome that encodes for its own chaperonin which presumably facilitates the proper folding of phage proteins independently of the host chaperonin system. EL also encodes a lysin enzyme, a critical component of the lytic cycle that is responsible for digesting the peptidoglycan layer of the host cell wall. Previously, this lysin was believed to be a substrate of the chaperonin encoded by phage EL. In order to characterize the activity of the EL lysin, and to determine whether lysin activity is contingent on chaperonin-mediated folding, a series of peptidoglycan hydrolysis activity assays were performed. Results indicate that the EL-encoded lysin has similar enzymatic activity to that of the Gallus gallus lysozyme and that the EL lysin folds into a functional enzyme in the absence of phage chaperonin and should not be considered a substrate.

  15. THE MORTALITY OF BACTERIOPHAGE CONTAINING ASSIMILATED RADIOACTIVE PHOSPHORUS

    PubMed Central

    Hershey, A. D.; Kamen, M. D.; Kennedy, J. W.; Gest, H.

    1951-01-01

    The bacteriophage T4 containing assimilated radioactive phosphorus is inactivated at a rate proportional to the specific radioactivity of the constituent phosphorus. The beta radiation from the phosphorus makes a negligible contribution to this effect. The inactivation is therefore a direct consequence of the nuclear reaction, which kills the phage with an efficiency of about 1/12. Several phages related to T4 behave similarly. When radioactive phage is grown from a seed of non-radioactive phage, all of the phage progeny are subject to killing by radioactive decay. The phage is killed by beta radiation from P32 with an efficiency of about 1/100 per ionization within the particle volume. Bacteriophage T4 and its relatives contain about 500,000 atoms of phosphorus per infective particle. Virtually all this phosphorus is adsorbed to bacteria with the specificity characteristic of the infective particles, and none of it can be removed from the particles by the enzyme desoxyribonuclease. The phosphorus content per particle, together with the published data on analytical composition, indicates a particle diameter close to 110 mµ for the varieties of phage studied. PMID:14824499

  16. T4 virus-based toolkit for the direct synthesis and 3D organization of metal quantum particles.

    PubMed

    Hou, Li; Gao, Faming; Li, Na

    2010-12-27

    One of the challenges in building superstructures based on small metal particles is producing stable interparticle separation. Herein, we present a novel assembly method based on the use of the T4 bacteriophage capsid as a scaffold for the construction of 3D monodisperse metal-particle arrays. The highly regular and symmetrical protein surface of the T4 capsid allows the site-directed adsorption and subsequent reduction of metal ions, thus permitting the growth of metal particles in situ to enable them to exist at a quantum size with a high degree of monodispersity. Both these characteristics contribute to a great improvement in the electrocatalytic activity of the patterned noble-metal particles. Organized magnetic particles as small as 2-4 nm still maintain an observable ferromagnetic behavior, which makes them promising for a variety of possible biomedical applications.

  17. The Structure of the Phage T4 DNA Packaging Motor Suggests a Mechanism Dependent on Electrostatic Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Siyang; Kondabagil, Kiran; Draper, Bonnie; Alam, Tanfis I.; Bowman, Valorie D.; Zhang, Zhihong; Hegde, Shylaja; Fokine, Andrei; Rossmann, Michael G.; Rao, Venigalla B.

    2009-06-30

    Viral genomes are packaged into procapsids by powerful molecular motors. We report the crystal structure of the DNA packaging motor protein, gene product 17 (gp17), in bacteriophage T4. The structure consists of an N-terminal ATPase domain, which provides energy for compacting DNA, and a C-terminal nuclease domain, which terminates packaging. We show that another function of the C-terminal domain is to translocate the genome into the procapsid. The two domains are in close contact in the crystal structure, representing a tensed state. A cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of the T4 procapsid complexed with gp17 shows that the packaging motor is a pentamer and that the domains within each monomer are spatially separated, representing a relaxed state. These structures suggest a mechanism, supported by mutational and other data, in which electrostatic forces drive the DNA packaging by alternating between tensed and relaxed states. Similar mechanisms may occur in other molecular motors.

  18. T4-like phage Bp7, a potential antimicrobial agent for controlling drug-resistant Escherichia coli in chickens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Can; Li, Wenli; Liu, Wenhua; Zou, Ling; Yan, Chen; Lu, Kai; Ren, Huiying

    2013-09-01

    Chicken-pathogenic Escherichia coli is severely endangering the poultry industry in China and worldwide, and antibiotic therapy is facing an increasing problem of antibiotic resistance. Bacteriophages can kill bacteria with no known activity in human or animal cells, making them an attractive alternative to antibiotics. In this study, we present the characteristics of a novel virulent bacteriophage, Bp7, specifically infecting pathogenic multidrug-resistant E. coli. Phage Bp7 was isolated from chicken feces. Bp7 belongs to the family Myoviridae, possessing an elongated icosahedral head and contractile sheathed tail. It has a 168-kb double-stranded DNA genome. For larger yields, its optimal multiplicity of infection (MOI) to infect E. coli was about 0.001. The latent period was 10 to 15 min, and the burst size was 90 PFU/infected cell. It was stable both at pH 5.0 to 10.0 and at 40°C or 50°C for at least 1 h. Bp7 could infect 46% of pathogenic clinical E. coli strains. Bp7 harbored 791 open reading frames (ORFs) and 263 possible genes. Among the 263 genes, 199 possessed amino acid sequence identities with ORFs of phage T4, 62 had identities with other T4-like phages, and only one lacked any database match. The genome of Bp7 manifested obvious division and rearrangement compared to phages T4, JS98, and IME08. Bp7 is a new member of the "T4-like" genus, family Myoviridae. Its wide host range, strong cell-killing activity, and high stability to pH make it an alternative to antimicrobials for controlling drug-resistant E. coli in chickens.

  19. Visualizing the phage T4 activated transcription complex of DNA and E. coli RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    James, Tamara D.; Cardozo, Timothy; Abell, Lauren E.; Hsieh, Meng-Lun; Jenkins, Lisa M. Miller; Jha, Saheli S.; Hinton, Deborah M.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of RNA polymerase (RNAP) to select the right promoter sequence at the right time is fundamental to the control of gene expression in all organisms. However, there is only one crystallized structure of a complete activator/RNAP/DNA complex. In a process called σ appropriation, bacteriophage T4 activates a class of phage promoters using an activator (MotA) and a co-activator (AsiA), which function through interactions with the σ70 subunit of RNAP. We have developed a holistic, structure-based model for σ appropriation using multiple experimentally determined 3D structures (Escherichia coli RNAP, the Thermus aquaticus RNAP/DNA complex, AsiA /σ70 Region 4, the N-terminal domain of MotA [MotANTD], and the C-terminal domain of MotA [MotACTD]), molecular modeling, and extensive biochemical observations indicating the position of the proteins relative to each other and to the DNA. Our results visualize how AsiA/MotA redirects σ, and therefore RNAP activity, to T4 promoter DNA, and demonstrate at a molecular level how the tactful interaction of transcriptional factors with even small segments of RNAP can alter promoter specificity. Furthermore, our model provides a rational basis for understanding how a mutation within the β subunit of RNAP (G1249D), which is far removed from AsiA or MotA, impairs σ appropriation. PMID:27458207

  20. Visualizing the phage T4 activated transcription complex of DNA and E. coli RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    James, Tamara D; Cardozo, Timothy; Abell, Lauren E; Hsieh, Meng-Lun; Jenkins, Lisa M Miller; Jha, Saheli S; Hinton, Deborah M

    2016-09-19

    The ability of RNA polymerase (RNAP) to select the right promoter sequence at the right time is fundamental to the control of gene expression in all organisms. However, there is only one crystallized structure of a complete activator/RNAP/DNA complex. In a process called σ appropriation, bacteriophage T4 activates a class of phage promoters using an activator (MotA) and a co-activator (AsiA), which function through interactions with the σ(70) subunit of RNAP. We have developed a holistic, structure-based model for σ appropriation using multiple experimentally determined 3D structures (Escherichia coli RNAP, the Thermus aquaticus RNAP/DNA complex, AsiA /σ(70) Region 4, the N-terminal domain of MotA [MotA(NTD)], and the C-terminal domain of MotA [MotA(CTD)]), molecular modeling, and extensive biochemical observations indicating the position of the proteins relative to each other and to the DNA. Our results visualize how AsiA/MotA redirects σ, and therefore RNAP activity, to T4 promoter DNA, and demonstrate at a molecular level how the tactful interaction of transcriptional factors with even small segments of RNAP can alter promoter specificity. Furthermore, our model provides a rational basis for understanding how a mutation within the β subunit of RNAP (G1249D), which is far removed from AsiA or MotA, impairs σ appropriation.

  1. Structure and mechanism of the phage T4 recombination mediator protein UvsY

    SciTech Connect

    Gajewski, Stefan; Waddell, Michael Brett; Vaithiyalingam, Sivaraja; Nourse, Amanda; Li, Zhenmei; Woetzel, Nils; Alexander, Nathan; Meiler, Jens; White, Stephen W.

    2016-03-07

    The UvsY recombination mediator protein is critical for efficient homologous recombination in bacteriophage T4 and is the functional analog of the eukaryotic Rad52 protein. During T4 homologous recombination, the UvsX recombinase has to compete with the prebound gp32 single-stranded binding protein for DNA-binding sites and UvsY stimulates this filament nucleation event. We report here the crystal structure of UvsY in four similar open-barrel heptameric assemblies and provide structural and biophysical insights into its function. The UvsY heptamer was confirmed in solution by centrifugation and light scattering, and thermodynamic analyses revealed that the UvsY–ssDNA interaction occurs within the assembly via two distinct binding modes. Using surface plasmon resonance, we also examined the binding of UvsY to both ssDNA and the ssDNA–gp32 complex. These analyses confirmed that ssDNA can bind UvsY and gp32 independently and also as a ternary complex. They also showed that residues located on the rim of the heptamer are required for optimal binding to ssDNA, thus identifying the putative ssDNA-binding surface. We propose a model in which UvsY promotes a helical ssDNA conformation that disfavors the binding of gp32 and initiates the assembly of the ssDNA–UvsX filament.

  2. Structure and mechanism of the phage T4 recombination mediator protein UvsY

    PubMed Central

    Gajewski, Stefan; Waddell, Michael Brett; Vaithiyalingam, Sivaraja; Nourse, Amanda; Li, Zhenmei; Woetzel, Nils; Alexander, Nathan; Meiler, Jens; White, Stephen W.

    2016-01-01

    The UvsY recombination mediator protein is critical for efficient homologous recombination in bacteriophage T4 and is the functional analog of the eukaryotic Rad52 protein. During T4 homologous recombination, the UvsX recombinase has to compete with the prebound gp32 single-stranded binding protein for DNA-binding sites and UvsY stimulates this filament nucleation event. We report here the crystal structure of UvsY in four similar open-barrel heptameric assemblies and provide structural and biophysical insights into its function. The UvsY heptamer was confirmed in solution by centrifugation and light scattering, and thermodynamic analyses revealed that the UvsY–ssDNA interaction occurs within the assembly via two distinct binding modes. Using surface plasmon resonance, we also examined the binding of UvsY to both ssDNA and the ssDNA–gp32 complex. These analyses confirmed that ssDNA can bind UvsY and gp32 independently and also as a ternary complex. They also showed that residues located on the rim of the heptamer are required for optimal binding to ssDNA, thus identifying the putative ssDNA-binding surface. We propose a model in which UvsY promotes a helical ssDNA conformation that disfavors the binding of gp32 and initiates the assembly of the ssDNA–UvsX filament. PMID:26951671

  3. Structure and mechanism of the phage T4 recombination mediator protein UvsY

    DOE PAGES

    Gajewski, Stefan; Waddell, Michael Brett; Vaithiyalingam, Sivaraja; ...

    2016-03-07

    The UvsY recombination mediator protein is critical for efficient homologous recombination in bacteriophage T4 and is the functional analog of the eukaryotic Rad52 protein. During T4 homologous recombination, the UvsX recombinase has to compete with the prebound gp32 single-stranded binding protein for DNA-binding sites and UvsY stimulates this filament nucleation event. We report here the crystal structure of UvsY in four similar open-barrel heptameric assemblies and provide structural and biophysical insights into its function. The UvsY heptamer was confirmed in solution by centrifugation and light scattering, and thermodynamic analyses revealed that the UvsY–ssDNA interaction occurs within the assembly via twomore » distinct binding modes. Using surface plasmon resonance, we also examined the binding of UvsY to both ssDNA and the ssDNA–gp32 complex. These analyses confirmed that ssDNA can bind UvsY and gp32 independently and also as a ternary complex. They also showed that residues located on the rim of the heptamer are required for optimal binding to ssDNA, thus identifying the putative ssDNA-binding surface. We propose a model in which UvsY promotes a helical ssDNA conformation that disfavors the binding of gp32 and initiates the assembly of the ssDNA–UvsX filament.« less

  4. Cloning and expression of autogenes encoding RNA polymerases of T7-like bacteriophages

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.; Dubendorff, J.W.

    1998-11-03

    This invention relates to the cloning and expression of autogenes encoding RNA polymerases of T7 and T7-like bacteriophages, in which the RNA polymerase gene is transcribed from a promoter which is recognized by the encoded RNA polymerase. Cloning of T7 autogenes was achieved by reducing the activity of the RNA polymerase sufficiently to permit host cell growth. T7 RNA polymerase activity was controlled by combining two independent methods: lac-repression of the recombinant lac operator-T7 promoter in the autogene and inhibition of the polymerase by T7 lysozyme. Expression systems for producing the RNA polymerases of T7 and other T7-like bacteriophages, and expression systems for producing selected gene products are described, as well as other related materials and methods. 12 figs.

  5. Cloning and expression of autogenes encoding RNA poly,erases of T7-like bacteriophages

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Dubendorff, John W.

    1998-01-01

    This invention relates to the cloning and expression of autogenes encoding RNA polymerases of T7 and T7-like bacteriophages, in which the RNA polymerase gene is transcribed from a promoter which is recognized by the encoded RNA polymerase. Cloning of T7 autogenes was achieved by reducing the activity of the RNA polymerase sufficiently to permit host cell growth. T7 RNA polymerase activity was controlled by combining two independent methods: lac-repression of the recombinant lac operator-T7 promoter in the autogene and inhibition of the polymerase by T7 lysozyme. Expression systems for producing the RNA polymerases of T7 and other T7-like bacteriophages, and expression systems for producing selected gene products are described, as well as other related materials and methods.

  6. Cloning and expression of autogenes encoding RNA polymerases of T7-like bacteriophages

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.; Dubendorff, J.W.

    1998-10-20

    This invention relates to the cloning and expression of autogenes encoding RNA polymerases of T7 and T7-like bacteriophages, in which the RNA polymerase gene is transcribed from a promoter which is recognized by the encoded RNA polymerase. Cloning of T7 autogenes was achieved by reducing the activity of the RNA polymerase sufficiently to permit host cell growth. T7 RNA polymerase activity was controlled by combining two independent methods: lac-repression of the recombinant lac operator-T7 promoter in the autogene and inhibition of the polymerase by T7 lysozyme. Expression systems for producing the RNA polymerases of T7 and other T7-like bacteriophages, and expression systems for producing selected gene products are described, as well as other related materials and methods. 12 figs.

  7. Cloning and expression of autogenes encoding RNA polymerases of T7-like bacteriophages

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Dubendorff, John W.

    1998-01-01

    This invention relates to the cloning and expression of autogenes encoding RNA polymerases of T7 and T7-like bacteriophages, in which the RNA polymerase gene is transcribed from a promoter which is recognized by the encoded RNA polymerase. Cloning of T7 autogenes was achieved by reducing the activity of the RNA polymerase sufficiently to permit host cell growth. T7 RNA polymerase activity was controlled by combining two independent methods: lac-repression of the recombinant lac operator-T7 promoter in the autogene and inhibition of the polymerase by T7 lysozyme. Expression systems for producing the RNA polymerases of T7 and other T7-like bacteriophages, and expression systems for producing selected gene products are described, as well as other related materials and methods.

  8. Observing lysozyme's closing and opening motions by high-resolution single-molecule enzymology.

    PubMed

    Akhterov, Maxim V; Choi, Yongki; Olsen, Tivoli J; Sims, Patrick C; Iftikhar, Mariam; Gul, O Tolga; Corso, Brad L; Weiss, Gregory A; Collins, Philip G

    2015-06-19

    Single-molecule techniques can monitor the kinetics of transitions between enzyme open and closed conformations, but such methods usually lack the resolution to observe the underlying transition pathway or intermediate conformational dynamics. We have used a 1 MHz bandwidth carbon nanotube transistor to electronically monitor single molecules of the enzyme T4 lysozyme as it processes substrate. An experimental resolution of 2 μs allowed the direct recording of lysozyme's opening and closing transitions. Unexpectedly, both motions required 37 μs, on average. The distribution of transition durations was also independent of the enzyme's state: either catalytic or nonproductive. The observation of smooth, continuous transitions suggests a concerted mechanism for glycoside hydrolysis with lysozyme's two domains closing upon the polysaccharide substrate in its active site. We distinguish these smooth motions from a nonconcerted mechanism, observed in approximately 10% of lysozyme openings and closings, in which the enzyme pauses for an additional 40-140 μs in an intermediate, partially closed conformation. During intermediate forming events, the number of rate-limiting steps observed increases to four, consistent with four steps required in the stepwise, arrow-pushing mechanism. The formation of such intermediate conformations was again independent of the enzyme's state. Taken together, the results suggest lysozyme operates as a Brownian motor. In this model, the enzyme traces a single pathway for closing and the reverse pathway for enzyme opening, regardless of its instantaneous catalytic productivity. The observed symmetry in enzyme opening and closing thus suggests that substrate translocation occurs while the enzyme is closed.

  9. Induced structural defects in T-even bacteriophage.

    PubMed

    Cummings, D J; Chapman, V A; De Long, S S; Mondale, L

    1967-02-01

    Multiple aberrant substructures of T-even bacteriophage particles occurred when amino acid analogues or antimetabolites were present during phage growth. Certain aberrant substructures were induced by specific analogues or antimetabolites. In particular, it was observed by electron microscopy that l-canavanine, an arginine analogue, gave rise to polyheads; l-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid, a proline analogue, gave rise to polytail tubes; and 1,2,4-trizaole-3-alanine, a histidine analogue, proflavine, and actinomycin D all gave rise to small heads. These aberrant substructures were similar to those reported earlier with conditional lethal mutants (amber) of T4D in a restrictive host.

  10. Induced Structural Defects in T-Even Bacteriophage

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Donald J.; Chapman, V. A.; De Long, S. S.; Mondale, L.

    1967-01-01

    Multiple aberrant substructures of T-even bacteriophage particles occurred when amino acid analogues or antimetabolites were present during phage growth. Certain aberrant substructures were induced by specific analogues or antimetabolites. In particular, it was observed by electron microscopy that l-canavanine, an arginine analogue, gave rise to polyheads; l-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid, a proline analogue, gave rise to polytail tubes; and 1,2,4-trizaole-3-alanine, a histidine analogue, proflavine, and actinomycin D all gave rise to small heads. These aberrant substructures were similar to those reported earlier with conditional lethal mutants (amber) of T4D in a restrictive host. Images PMID:5623954

  11. Genetic evidence for an additional function of phage T4 gene 32 protein: interaction with ligase.

    PubMed

    Mosig, G; Breschkin, A M

    1975-04-01

    Gene 32 of bacteriophage T4 is essential for DNA replication, recombination, and repair. In an attempt to clarify the role of the corresponding gene product, we have looked for mutations that specifically inactivate one but not all of its functions and for compensating suppressor mutations in other genes. Here we describe a gene 32 ts mutant that does not produce progeny, but in contrast to an am mutant investigated by others, is capable of some primary and secondary DNA replication and of forming "joint" recombinational intermediates after infection of Escherichia coli B at the restrictive temperature. However, parental and progeny DNA strands are not ligated to covalently linked "recombinant" molecules, and single strands of vegetative DNA do not exceed unit length. Progeny production as well as capacity for covalent linkage in this gene 32 ts mutant are partially restored by additional rII mutations. Suppression by rII depends on functioning host ligase [EC 6.5.1.2; poly(deoxyribonucleotide):poly(deoxyribonucleotide) ligase (AMP-forming, NMN-forming)]. This gene 32 ts mutation (unlike some others) in turn suppresses the characteristic plaque morphology of rII mutants. We conclude that gene 32 protein, in addition to its role in DNA replication and in the formation of "joint" recombinational intermediates, interacts with T4 ligase [EC 6.5.1.1; poly(deoxyribonucleotide):poly(deoxyribonucleotide) ligase (AMP-forming)] when recombining DNA strands are covalently linked. The protein of the mutant that we describe here is mainly defective in this interaction, thus inactivating T4 ligase in recombination. Suppressing rII mutations facilitate substitution of host ligase. There is suggestive evidence that these interactions occur at the membrane.

  12. Bacteriophage in polar inland waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Säwström, Christin; Lisle, John; Anesio, A.M.; Priscu, John C.; Laybourn-Parry, J.

    2008-01-01

    Bacteriophages are found wherever microbial life is present and play a significant role in aquatic ecosystems. They mediate microbial abundance, production, respiration, diversity, genetic transfer, nutrient cycling and particle size distribution. Most studies of bacteriophage ecology have been undertaken at temperate latitudes. Data on bacteriophages in polar inland waters are scant but the indications are that they play an active and dynamic role in these microbially dominated polar ecosystems. This review summarises what is presently known about polar inland bacteriophages, ranging from subglacial Antarctic lakes to glacial ecosystems in the Arctic. The review examines interactions between bacteriophages and their hosts and the abiotic and biotic variables that influence these interactions in polar inland waters. In addition, we consider the proportion of the bacteria in Arctic and Antarctic lake and glacial waters that are lysogenic and visibly infected with viruses. We assess the relevance of bacteriophages in the microbial loop in the extreme environments of Antarctic and Arctic inland waters with an emphasis on carbon cycling.

  13. Thermophysical properties of lysozyme (protein) solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Jiaching; Yang, Wen-Jei

    1992-01-01

    Thermophysical properties of protein solutions composed of the lysozyme crystals with a 0.1 M sodium acetate and 5 percent NaCl solution as the buffer (pH = 4.0) are determined. The properties being measured include specific heat, thermal conductivity, dynamic viscosity, and surface tension. The protein concentrations are varied. Thermal diffusivity is calculated using the measured results. The purpose of the research is to measure thermophysical properties of lysozyme solutions which would serve as the data bank for controlling and modeling the crystal growth process on earth as well as in space.

  14. Genetically modified bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Sagona, Antonia P; Grigonyte, Aurelija M; MacDonald, Paul R; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2016-04-18

    Phages or bacteriophages, viruses that infect and replicate inside bacteria, are the most abundant microorganisms on earth. The realization that antibiotic resistance poses a substantial risk to the world's health and global economy is revitalizing phage therapy as a potential solution. The increasing ease by which phage genomes can be modified, owing to the influx of new technologies, has led to an expansion of their natural capabilities, and a reduced dependence on phage isolation from environmental sources. This review will discuss the way synthetic biology has accelerated the construction of genetically modified phages and will describe the wide range of their applications. It will further provide insight into the societal and economic benefits that derive from the use of recombinant phages in various sectors, from health to biodetection, biocontrol and the food industry.

  15. Jumbo Bacteriophages: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yihui; Gao, Meiying

    2017-01-01

    Tailed bacteriophages with genomes larger than 200 kbp are classified as Jumbo phages, and are rarely isolated by conventional methods. These phages are designated “jumbo” owing to their most notable features of a large phage virion and large genome size. However, in addition to these, jumbo phages also exhibit several novel characteristics that have not been observed for phages with smaller genomes, which differentiate jumbo phages in terms of genome organization, virion structure, progeny propagation, and evolution. In this review, we summarize available reports on jumbo phages and discuss the differences between jumbo phages and small-genome phages. We also discuss data suggesting that jumbo phages might have evolved from phages with smaller genomes by acquiring additional functional genes, and that these additional genes reduce the dependence of the jumbo phages on the host bacteria. PMID:28352259

  16. Bacteriophages of Erwinia amylovora

    PubMed Central

    Gill, J. J.; Svircev, A. M.; Smith, R.; Castle, A. J.

    2003-01-01

    Fifty bacteriophage isolates of Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight, were collected from sites in and around the Niagara region of southern Ontario and the Royal Botanical Gardens, Hamilton, Ontario. Forty-two phages survived the isolation, purification, and storage processes. The majority of the phages in the collection were isolated from the soil surrounding trees exhibiting fire blight symptoms. Only five phages were isolated from infected aerial tissue in pear and apple orchards. To avoid any single-host selection bias, six bacterial host strains were used in the initial isolation and enrichment processes. Molecular characterization of the phages with a combination of PCR and restriction endonuclease digestions showed that six distinct phage types, described as groups 1 to 6, were recovered. Ten phage isolates were related to the previously characterized E. amylovora PEa1, with some divergence of molecular markers between phages isolated from different sites. A study of the host ranges of the phages revealed that certain types were unable to efficiently lyse some E. amylovora strains and that some isolates were able to lyse the epiphytic bacterium Pantoea agglomerans. Representatives from the six molecular groups were studied by electron microscopy to determine their morphology. The phages exhibited distinct morphologies when examined by an electron microscope. Group 1 and 2 phages were tailed and contractile, and phages belonging to groups 3 to 6 had short tails or openings with thin appendages. Based on morphotypes, the bacteriophages of E. amylovora were placed in the order Caudovirales, in the families Myoviridae and Podoviridae. PMID:12676693

  17. Recombinant goose-type lysozyme in channel catfish: Lysozyme activity and efficacy as plasmid DNA immunostimulant against Aeromonas hydrophila infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were: 1) to investigate whether recombinant channel catfish lysozyme g (CC-Lys-g) produced in E. coli expression system possesses any lysozyme activity; and 2) to evaluate whether channel catfish lysozyme g plasmid DNA could be used as an immunostimulant to protect chann...

  18. Recombinant goose-type lysozyme in channel catfish: lysozyme activity and efficacy as plasmid DNA immunostimulant against Aeromonas hydrophila infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were: 1) to investigate whether recombinant channel catfish lysozyme g (CC-Lys-g) produced in E. coli expression system possesses any lysozyme activity; and 2) to evaluate whether channel catfish lysozyme g plasmid DNA could be used as an immunostimulant to protect chann...

  19. Characterization of T-Even Bacteriophage Substructures

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Donald J.; Kusy, A. R.; Chapman, V. A.; DeLong, S. S.; Stone, K. R.

    1970-01-01

    T-even bacteriophages were grown and purified in bulk quantities. The protein coats were disrupted into their component substructures by treatment with 67% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Tail fibers and tubes were purified on glycerol-CsCl-D2O gradients and examined with respect to sedimentation properties, subunit molecular weights, amino acid composition, isoelectric points, and morphology. It was found that intact tail fibers had a sedimentation coefficient of 12 to 13S and that dissociated fibers consisted of three classes of proteins having molecular weights of 150 K ± 10, 42 K ± 4, and 28 K ± 3 daltons. A model was constructed in which the 150-K subunit folded back on itself twice to give a three-stranded rope. Each 150-K subunit then represented a half-fiber and it was proposed that the role of the 42- and 28-K subunits was to hold each half-fiber together as well as serve as a possible link with other substructures. Isoelectric point studies also indicated that there were three different proteins with pI values of 3.5, 5.7, and 8.0. Amino acid analyses indicated that fibers had a composition distinct from other phage substructures. In addition, a striking difference was noted in the content of tryptophan among the phages examined. T4B had three to five times more tryptophan than did T2L, T2H, T4D, and T6. Intact tail tubes had an S20,w of 31 to 38S and dissociated tubes consisted of three proteins of molecular weights 57 K ± 5, 38 K ± 4, and 25 K ± 3 daltons. Based on degradation studies with DMSO, it was proposed that these three proteins were arranged in a helical array yielding the tube structure. Isoelectric point studies indicated that there were three major proteins in the tube whose pI values were 5.1, 5.7, and 8.5. No significant differences were observed in the amino acid content of tubes obtained from all the T-even bacteriophages. Images PMID:5497900

  20. Monolithic molecularly imprinted cryogel for lysozyme recognition.

    PubMed

    Rabieizadeh, Mohammadmahdi; Kashefimofrad, Seyed Mohammadreza; Naeimpoor, Fereshteh

    2014-10-01

    The application of molecularly imprinted polymers in the selective adsorption of macromolecules such as proteins by monolithic protein-imprinted columns requires a macroporous structure, which can be provided by cryogelation at low temperature in which the formation of ice crystals gives a porous structure to the molecularly imprinted polymer. In this study, we applied this technique to synthesize lysozyme-imprinted polyacrylamide cryogels containing 8% w/v of total monomers and 0.3% w/v of lysozyme. The synthesized cryogel was sponge-like and elastic with very fast swelling and reshaping properties, showing a swelling ratio of 24.5 ± 3 and gel fraction yield of about 72%. It showed an imprinting effect of 1.58 and a separation factor of 1.37 for cytochrome c as the competing protein. Adsorption studies on the cryogel revealed that it follows the Langmuir isotherm, with a maximum theoretical adsorption capacity of 36.3 mg lysozyme per gram of cryogel. Additionally, it was shown that a salt-free rebinding solution at low flow rate and pH = 7.0 is favorable for lysozyme rebinding. This kind of monolithic column promises a wide range of application in separation of various biomolecules due to its preparation simplicity, good rebinding characteristics, and macroporosity.

  1. Production and Ultrastructure of Lysozyme and Ethylenediaminetetraacetate-Lysozyme Spheroplasts of Escherichia coli1

    PubMed Central

    Birdsell, D. C.; Cota-Robles, E. H.

    1967-01-01

    Spheroplast production by lysozyme and ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) was examined as a means of obtaining osmotically sensitive cells for studies of enzyme localization. Physiologically young cells plasmolyzed with 0.5 m sucrose in 0.01 m tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) buffer (pH 7, 8, or 9) were quantitatively converted to plasmolyzed osmotically sensitive rods after lysozyme treatment. Although such cells were osmotically sensitive, a 1:1 dilution in Tris buffer was necessary for conversion of rods into spheroplasts. Addition of EDTA resulted in a rapid conversion of the plasmolyzed spheroplasts into spherical structures devoid of a plasmolysis vacuole. These structures, which we call EDTA-lysozyme spheroplasts, contained a number of attached membranes. We believe that this conversion results from a weakening of the outer trilaminar component of the cell wall by EDTA, resulting in the collapse of the plasmolysis vacuole. Dilution of sucrose below 0.15 m also resulted in the collapse of the plasmolysis vacuole. Both the lysozyme spheroplasts and the EDTA-lysozyme spheroplasts were osmotically sensitive. Thin sections of the EDTA-lysozyme spheroplasts demonstrated that the outer trilaminar component of the cell wall was broken, exposing large areas of the cytoplasmic membrane to the environment. Images PMID:4960155

  2. Recent advances for the production and recovery methods of lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Ercan, Duygu; Demirci, Ali

    2016-12-01

    Lysozyme is an antimicrobial peptide with a high enzymatic activity and positive charges. Therefore, it has applications in food and pharmaceutical industries as an antimicrobial agent. Lysozyme is ubiquitous in both animal and plant kingdoms. Currently, egg-white lysozyme is the most commercially available form of lysozyme. The main concerns of egg-white lysozyme are high recovery cost, low activity and most importantly the immunological problems to some people. Therefore, human lysozyme production has gained importance in recent years. Scientists have developed transgenic plants, animals and microorganisms that can produce human lysozyme. Out of these, microbial production has advantages for commercial productions, because high production levels are achievable in a relatively short time. It has been reported that fermentation parameters, such as pH, temperature, aeration, are key factors to increase the effectiveness of the human lysozyme production. Moreover, purification of the lysozyme from the fermentation broth needs to be optimized for the economical production. In conclusion, this review paper covers the mechanism of lysozyme, its sources, production methods and recovery of lysozyme.

  3. Bacteriophage typing of Shigella sonnei.

    PubMed

    Pruneda, R C; Farmer, J J

    1977-01-01

    A bacteriophage-typing schema was developed for differentiating strains of Shigella sonnei. Sixty-seven bacteriophages were obtained from other collections, and 36 bacteriophages were isolated from sewage. From these 103 bacteriophages, a provisional set of 12 was chosen by computer analysis as being the most sensitive in differentiating strains of S. sonnei isolated in the United States. The provisional schema was used to type 265 strains from different geographical areas. It divided them into 87 different lysis patterns, and all 265 strains were typable. Smooth and rough colonial variants of the same strain had different lysis patterns, so the technique was standardized to type rough colonies only. Reproducibility was difficult to obtain until all conditions were carefully standardized. Changes in results were noted even on different lot numbers of Trypticase soy agar, which was defined as the standard medium. So that the medium would not be a variable, 100 pounds (ca 453.5 kg) of the same lot number was purchased. Bacteriophage typing was very useful in differentiating strains, and work should continue on establishing a standarized schema.

  4. Acanthamoeba T4 genotype associated with keratitis infections in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Dendana, F; Sellami, H; Trabelsi, H; Neji, S; Cheikhrouhou, F; Makni, F; Ayadi, A

    2013-01-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) is a sight-threatening infection. We report five cases of AK diagnosed from 2005 to 2009 in the Laboratory of Parasitology-Mycology at Habib Bourguiba Sfax Hospital, Tunisia. All were associated with improper care of contact lenses (rinsing of contact lenses with tap water and inappropriate cleaning) and lens storage. The patients displayed different clinical presentations: corneal inflammation, corneal ulceration, and corneal abscess. The diagnosis was made after direct examination, culture, and polymerase chain reaction amplification with specific primers. The genotype classification was based on the highly variable DF3 region in the 18S rRNA gene. This is the first study characterizing Acanthamoeba genotype in Tunisia and North Africa. All Acanthamoeba isolates were associated to the T4 genotype. Three different DF3 sequence types were related to AK infections T4/10, T4/15, and T4/16.

  5. Brucella T4SS: the VIP pass inside host cells.

    PubMed

    Lacerda, Thais Lourdes Santos; Salcedo, Suzana Pinto; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre

    2013-02-01

    For many Gram-negative bacteria, like Brucella, the type IV secretion system (T4SS) has a critical role in bacterial virulence. In Brucella, the VirB T4SS permits the injection of bacterial effectors inside host cells, leading to subversion of signaling pathways and favoring bacterial growth and pathogenesis. The virB operon promoter is tightly regulated by a combination of transcriptional activators and repressors that are expressed according to the environmental conditions encountered by Brucella. Recent advances have shed light on the Brucella T4SS regulatory mechanisms and also its substrates. Characterization of the targets and functions of these translocated effectors is underway and will help understand the role of the T4SS in the establishment of a replication niche inside host cells.

  6. Lysozyme Photochemistry as a Function of Temperature. The Protective Effect of Nanoparticles on Lysozyme Photostability.

    PubMed

    Oliveira Silva, Catarina; Petersen, Steffen B; Pinto Reis, Catarina; Rijo, Patrícia; Molpeceres, Jesús; Vorum, Henrik; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa

    2015-01-01

    The presence of aromatic residues and their close spatial proximity to disulphide bridges makes hen egg white lysozyme labile to UV excitation. UVB induced photo-oxidation of tryptophan and tyrosine residues leads to photochemical products, such as, kynurenine, N-formylkynurenine and dityrosine and to the disruption of disulphide bridges in proteins. We here report that lysozyme UV induced photochemistry is modulated by temperature, excitation power, illumination time, excitation wavelength and by the presence of plasmonic quencher surfaces, such as gold, and by the presence of natural fluorescence quenchers, such as hyaluronic acid and oleic acid. We show evidence that the photo-oxidation effects triggered by 295 nm at 20°C are reversible and non-reversible at 10°C, 25°C and 30°C. This paper provides evidence that the 295 nm damage threshold of lysozyme lies between 0.1 μW and 0.3 μW. Protein conformational changes induced by temperature and UV light have been detected upon monitoring changes in the fluorescence emission spectra of lysozyme tryptophan residues and SYPRO® Orange. Lysozyme has been conjugated onto gold nanoparticles, coated with hyaluronic acid and oleic acid (HAOA). Steady state and time resolved fluorescence studies of free and conjugated lysozyme onto HAOA gold nanoparticles reveals that the presence of the polymer decreased the rate of the observed photochemical reactions and induced a preference for short fluorescence decay lifetimes. Size and surface charge of the HAOA gold nanoparticles have been determined by dynamic light scattering and zeta potential measurements. TEM analysis of the particles confirms the presence of a gold core surrounded by a HAOA matrix. We conclude that HAOA gold nanoparticles may efficiently protect lysozyme from the photochemical effects of UVB light and this nanocarrier could be potentially applied to other proteins with clinical relevance. In addition, this study confirms that the temperature plays a

  7. Thyroid Hormones, T3 and T4, in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Amy C.; Privalsky, Martin L.

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) are essential for fetal and post-natal nervous system development and also play an important role in the maintenance of adult brain function. Of the two major THs, T4 (3,5,3′,5′-tetraiodo-l-thyronine) is classically viewed as an pro-hormone that must be converted to T3 (3,5,3′-tri-iodo-l-thyronine) via tissue-level deiodinases for biological activity. THs primarily mediate their effects by binding to thyroid hormone receptor (TR) isoforms, predominantly TRα1 and TRβ1, which are expressed in different tissues and exhibit distinctive roles in endocrinology. Notably, the ability to respond to T4 and to T3 differs for the two TR isoforms, with TRα1 generally more responsive to T4 than TRβ1. TRα1 is also the most abundantly expressed TR isoform in the brain, encompassing 70–80% of all TR expression in this tissue. Conversion of T4 into T3 via deiodinase 2 in astrocytes has been classically viewed as critical for generating local T3 for neurons. However, deiodinase-deficient mice do not exhibit obvious defectives in brain development or function. Considering that TRα1 is well-established as the predominant isoform in brain, and that TRα1 responds to both T3 and T4, we suggest T4 may play a more active role in brain physiology than has been previously accepted. PMID:24744751

  8. Thyroid hormones, t3 and t4, in the brain.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Amy C; Privalsky, Martin L

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) are essential for fetal and post-natal nervous system development and also play an important role in the maintenance of adult brain function. Of the two major THs, T4 (3,5,3',5'-tetraiodo-l-thyronine) is classically viewed as an pro-hormone that must be converted to T3 (3,5,3'-tri-iodo-l-thyronine) via tissue-level deiodinases for biological activity. THs primarily mediate their effects by binding to thyroid hormone receptor (TR) isoforms, predominantly TRα1 and TRβ1, which are expressed in different tissues and exhibit distinctive roles in endocrinology. Notably, the ability to respond to T4 and to T3 differs for the two TR isoforms, with TRα1 generally more responsive to T4 than TRβ1. TRα1 is also the most abundantly expressed TR isoform in the brain, encompassing 70-80% of all TR expression in this tissue. Conversion of T4 into T3 via deiodinase 2 in astrocytes has been classically viewed as critical for generating local T3 for neurons. However, deiodinase-deficient mice do not exhibit obvious defectives in brain development or function. Considering that TRα1 is well-established as the predominant isoform in brain, and that TRα1 responds to both T3 and T4, we suggest T4 may play a more active role in brain physiology than has been previously accepted.

  9. Lysogenic bacteriophage isolated from acidophilium

    DOEpatents

    Ward, Thomas W.; Bruhn, Debby F.; Bulmer, Deborah K.

    1992-01-01

    A bacteriophage identified as .phi.Ac1 capable of infecting acidophilic heterotropic bacteria (such as Acidiphilium sp.) and processes for genetically engineering acidophilic bacteria for biomining or sulfur removal from coal are disclosed. The bacteriophage is capable of growth in cells existing at pH at or below 3.0. Lytic forms of the phage introduced into areas experiencing acid drainage kill the bacteria causing such drainage. Lysogenic forms of the phase having genes for selective removal of metallic or nonmetallic elements can be introduced into acidophilic bacteria to effect removal of the desired element form ore or coal.

  10. Preparation of lysozyme molecularly imprinted polymers and purification of lysozyme from egg white.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuejiao; Dong, Shaohua; Bai, Quan

    2014-06-01

    Molecular imprinting as a promising and facile separation technique has received much attention because of its high selectivity for target molecules. In this study, lysozyme molecularly imprinted polymers (Lys-MIPs) were successfully prepared by the entrapment method with lysozyme as the template molecule, acrylamide as the functional monomer and N,N-methylenebisacrylamide as the cross-linker. The removal of the template lysozyme from the molecularly imprinted polymers was investigated in detail by two methods. The synthesized Lys-MIPs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform-infrared, and the adsorption capacity, selectivity and reproducibility of the Lys-MIPs were also evaluated. The maximum adsorption capacity reached 94.8 mg/g, which is twice that of nonmolecularly imprinted polymers, and satisfactory selectivity and reproducibility were achieved. Using the Lys-MIP column, lysozyme could be separated completely from egg white, with purity close to 100% and mass recovery of 98.2%. This illustrated that the synthesized Lys-MIPs had high specific recognition and selectivity to the template lysozyme when they were applied to a mixture of protein standards and a real sample.

  11. Elasticity and Strength of Biomacromolecular Crystals: Lysozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, A. M.; Witherow, W. K.; Chen, L. Q.; Chernov, A. A.

    2003-01-01

    The static Young modulus, E = 0.1 to 0.5 GPa, the crystal critical strength (sigma(sub c)) and its ratio to E,sigma(sub c)/E is approximately 10(exp 3), were measured for the first time for non cross-linked lysozyme crystals in solution. By using a triple point bending apparatus, we also demonstrated that the crystals were purely elastic. Softness of protein crystals built of hard macromolecules (26 GPa for lysozyme) is explained by the large size of the macromolecules as compared to the range of intermolecular forces and by the weakness of intermolecular bonds as compared to the peptide bond strength. The relatively large reported dynamic elastic moduli (approximately 8 GPa) from resonance light scattering should come from averaging over the moduli of intracrystalline water and intra- and intermolecular bonding.

  12. Dynamics of Lysozyme in Trehalose solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghatty, Pavan; Uberbacher, Edward C.

    2008-03-01

    Anhydrobiosis in Tardigrades and Nematodes has been a topic of constant interest and intrigue in the scientific community. An increase in the concentration of Trehalose has been attributed to the ability of some organisms to survive extreme conditions of temperature, pressure and pH. Although there exist many experimental studies attributing this effect to Trehalose, the molecular details governing the interaction between Trehalose and proteins remains unclear. We have conducted a 20ns study of Lysozyme in varying concentrations of Trehalose in water. Strong and weak hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions between water, Trehalose and protein seem to dictate the interactions in the system. We have observed a hydrogen bonded network of Trehalose around the protein entrapping a layer of water between itself and protein. Lysozyme remains in a near-native conformation throughout the simulation giving hints on the ability of Trehalose in preserving the structure of protiens.

  13. Membrane effects of lysozyme amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Kastorna, Anna; Trusova, Valeriya; Gorbenko, Galyna; Kinnunen, Paavo

    2012-04-01

    The influence of mature lysozyme fibrils on the structural and physical properties of model membranes composed of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and its mixtures with cardiolipin (CL) (10 mol%) and cholesterol (Chol) (30 mol%) was studied using fluorescent probes DPH, pyrene, Laurdan and MBA. Analysis of pyrene fluorescence spectra along with the measurements of DPH fluorescence anisotropy revealed that the structure of hydrocarbon chains region of lipid bilayer is not affected by the fibrillar aggregates of lysozyme. In contrast, probing the membrane effects by Laurdan and MBA showed the rise of both the generalized polarization of Laurdan and the MBA fluorescence anisotropy, suggesting that amyloid protein induces reduction of bilayer hydration and increase of lipid packing in the interfacial region of model membranes.

  14. Growth and dissolution kinetics of tetragonal lysozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monaco, L. A.; Rosenberger, F.

    1993-01-01

    The growth and dissolution kinetics of lysozyme in a 25 ml solution bridge inside a closed growth cell was investigated. It was found that, under all growth conditions, the growth habit forming (110) and (101) faces grew through layer spreading with different growth rate dependence on supersaturation/temperature. On the other hand, (100) faces which formed only at low temperatures underwent a thermal roughening transition around 12 C.

  15. THz characterization of lysozyme at different conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Globus, Tatiana; Khromova, Tatyana; Lobo, Rebecca; Woolard, Dwight; Swami, Nathan; Fernandez, Erik

    2005-05-01

    This work demonstrates application of Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) technique in the low terahertz frequency range of 10-25 cm-1 to discriminate between different protein conformations and evaluate possible application of THz spectroscopy for monitoring of protein folding-unfolding process. A specific procedure developed earlier for unfolding lysozyme by salt (KSCN) precipitation and refolding the lysozyme molecules by removing of KSCN and dissolving in sodium acetate was used to prepare three different forms of lysozyme. In addition, two standard procedures were used to prepare samples in unfolded conformation: denaturation at high temperature ~95° C followed by fast freezing, and dissolution in 6 M guanidine. Thin, air dried protein films were characterized as well as material in the form of gel. Spectra reveal resonance features in transmission which represent vibrational modes in the protein samples. A great variability of spectral features for the different conformational states showed the sensitivity of vibrational frequencies to the three dimensional structure of proteins. The results obtained on liquid (gel) samples indicate that THz transmission spectroscopy can be used for monitoring folding-unfolding process in a realistic, aqueous environment.

  16. Lysozyme binds onto functionalized carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Bomboi, Francesca; Tardani, Franco; Gazzoli, Delia; Bonincontro, Adalberto; La Mesa, Camillo

    2013-08-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes have singular physicochemical properties making them attractive in a wide range of applications. Studies on carbon nanotubes and biological macromolecules exist in literature. However, ad hoc investigations are helpful to better understand the interaction mechanisms. We report on a system consisting of single walled carbon nanotubes and lysozyme. The phenomenology of nanotube-protein interactions and its effects on protein conformation were determined. We investigated the formation of oxidized nanotube-lysozyme conjugates, by studying the effect of both protein concentration and pH. Electrophoretic mobility, dielectric spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering were used to determine the interaction pathways, monitoring the surface charge density and the size of the complexes. The results allowed identifying the conditions of surface saturation at different pH values. The secondary structure of nanotube-adsorbed protein was controlled by circular dichroism; it was observed that it substantially retains its native conformation. Interestingly, we found that the interactions among oxidized nanotubes and lysozyme molecules are mainly of electrostatic nature and easily tunable by varying the pH of the solutions.

  17. Lysozyme binding onto cat-anionic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Bonincontro, A; Spigone, E; Ruiz Peña, M; Letizia, C; La Mesa, C

    2006-12-15

    Mixing aqueous sodium dodecylsulfate with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide solutions in mole ratios close to (1.7/1.0) allows the formation of cat-anionic vesicles with an excess of negative charges on the outer surface. The vesicular dispersions are mixed with lysozyme, and interact electrostatically with the positive charges on the protein, forming lipo-plexes. Dielectric relaxation, zeta-potential, and light scattering indicate the occurrence of interactions between vesicles and the protein. According to CD, the vesicle-adsorbed protein retains its native conformation. Binding and surface saturation, inferred by dielectric relaxation and zeta-potential, fulfil a charge neutralisation stoichiometry. Adsorbed lysozyme promotes the vesicle clustering and is concomitant with the lipo-plexes flocculation. Above the charge neutralisation threshold, lysozyme in excess remains dispersed in molecular form. Attempts were made to determine in what conditions protein release from the vesicles occurs. Accordingly, the full neutralisation of sodium dodecylsulfate in excess by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide ensures the lipo-plexes break-up, the precipitation of the mixed surfactants and the protein release in native form.

  18. Low-frequency spectroscopic analysis of monomeric and fibrillar lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Hidayatul A; Fischer, Bernd M; Bradley, Andrew P; Jones, Inke; Abbott, Derek; Middelberg, Anton P J; Falconer, Robert J

    2011-03-01

    Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy were used to generate far-infrared and low-frequency spectral measurements of monomeric lysozyme and lysozyme fibrils. The formation of lysozyme fibrils was verified by the Thioflavin T assay and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was evident in the FT-IR spectra that between 150 and 350 cm(-1) the two spectra diverge, with the lysozyme fibrils showing higher absorbance intensity than the monomeric form. The broad absorption phenomenon is likely due to light scattered from the fibrillar architecture of lysozyme fibrils as supported by simulation of Rayleigh light scattering. The lack of discrete phonon-like peaks suggest that far-infrared spectroscopy cannot detect vibrational modes between the highly ordered hydrogen-bonded beta-pleated sheets of the lysozyme subunit.

  19. DNA unwinding by ring-shaped T4 helicase gp41 is hindered by tension on the occluded strand.

    PubMed

    Ribeck, Noah; Saleh, Omar A

    2013-01-01

    The replicative helicase for bacteriophage T4 is gp41, which is a ring-shaped hexameric motor protein that achieves unwinding of dsDNA by translocating along one strand of ssDNA while forcing the opposite strand to the outside of the ring. While much study has been dedicated to the mechanism of binding and translocation along the ssDNA strand encircled by ring-shaped helicases, relatively little is known about the nature of the interaction with the opposite, 'occluded' strand. Here, we investigate the interplay between the bacteriophage T4 helicase gp41 and the ss/dsDNA fork by measuring, at the single-molecule level, DNA unwinding events on stretched DNA tethers in multiple geometries. We find that gp41 activity is significantly dependent on the geometry and tension of the occluded strand, suggesting an interaction between gp41 and the occluded strand that stimulates the helicase. However, the geometry dependence of gp41 activity is the opposite of that found previously for the E. coli hexameric helicase DnaB. Namely, tension applied between the occluded strand and dsDNA stem inhibits unwinding activity by gp41, while tension pulling apart the two ssDNA tails does not hinder its activity. This implies a distinct variation in helicase-occluded strand interactions among superfamily IV helicases, and we propose a speculative model for this interaction that is consistent with both the data presented here on gp41 and the data that had been previously reported for DnaB.

  20. Bacteriophage endolysins as novel antimicrobials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endolysins are enzymes used by bacteriophages at the end of their replication cycle to degrade the peptidoglycan of the bacterial host from within, resulting in cell lysis and release of progeny virions. Due to the absence of an outer membrane in the Gram-positive bacterial cell wall, endolysins can...

  1. Bacteriophage therapy in animal production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concerns over the consequences of bacterial resistance to antibiotics with the use of antibiotics in animal production have led to an increase in research on alternatives to antibiotics. Bacteriophages kill bacteria, are natural, safe, plentiful, self replicating, self limiting, can be used to spec...

  2. Crystal and cryoEM structural studies of a cell wall degrading enzyme in the bacteriophage [psi]29 tail

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Ye; Morais, Marc C.; Cohen, Daniel N.; Bowman, Valorie D.; Anderson, Dwight L.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2009-08-28

    The small bacteriophage {phi}29 must penetrate the {approx}250-{angstrom} thick external peptidoglycan cell wall and cell membrane of the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis, before ejecting its dsDNA genome through its tail into the bacterial cytoplasm. The tail of bacteriophage {phi}29 is noncontractile and {approx}380 {angstrom} long. A 1.8-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of gene product 13 (gp13) shows that this tail protein has spatially well separated N- and C-terminal domains, whose structures resemble lysozyme-like enzymes and metallo-endopeptidases, respectively. CryoEM reconstructions of the WT bacteriophage and mutant bacteriophages missing some or most of gp13 shows that this enzyme is located at the distal end of the {phi}29 tail knob. This finding suggests that gp13 functions as a tail-associated, peptidoglycan-degrading enzyme able to cleave both the polysaccharide backbone and peptide cross-links of the peptidoglycan cell wall. Comparisons of the gp13{sup -} mutants with the {phi}29 mature and emptied phage structures suggest the sequence of events that occur during the penetration of the tail through the peptidoglycan layer.

  3. Dose-dependent effect of lysozyme upon Candida albicans biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Sebaa, Sarra; Hizette, Nicolas; Boucherit-Otmani, Zahia; Courtois, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated the in vitro effect of lysozyme (0–1,000 µg/ml) on Candida albicans (C. albicans) biofilm development. Investigations were conducted on C. albicans ATCC 10231 and on 10 clinical isolates from dentures. Strains were cultured aerobically at 37°C in Sabouraud broth. Yeast growth was evaluated by turbidimetry. Biofilm biomass was quantified on a polystyrene support by crystal violet staining and on acrylic surfaces by counts of colony forming units. Lysozyme affected biofilm formation to a greater extent than it affected growth. For the ATCC 10231 reference strain, lysozyme acted as a biofilm promotor on polystyrene at the highest concentration tested (1,000 µg/ml, non-physiological). When the reference strain was investigated on acrylic resin support, lysozyme acted as a significant biofilm promotor on rough resin, but less on smooth resin. The attached biomass in the presence of physiological concentrations of lysozyme (10–30 µg/ml) was significantly decreased compared with the hypothetical value of 100% using a one-sample t-test, but a comparison between the different lysozyme conditions using analysis of variance and post hoc tests did not reveal significant differences. In 10 wild strains, different patterns of biofilm formation on polystyrene were observed in the presence of lysozyme. Some strains, characterized by large amounts of biofilm formation in the presence of 1,000 µg/ml lysozyme, were poor biofilm producers at low concentrations of lysozyme. In contrast, some strains that were poor biofilm producers with a high lysozyme concentration were more inhibited by low concentrations of lysozyme. The present study emphasizes the need to develop strategies for biofilm control based on in vitro experiments, and to implement these in clinical trials prior to approval of hygiene products enriched with exocrine proteins, such as lysozyme. Further studies will extend these investigations to other Candida species, and to fungi

  4. Lysozyme pattern formation in evaporating droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorr, Heather Meloy

    Liquid droplets containing suspended particles deposited on a solid, flat surface generally form ring-like structures due to the redistribution of solute during evaporation (the "coffee ring effect"). The forms of the deposited patterns depend on complex interactions between solute(s), solvent, and substrate in a rapidly changing, far from equilibrium system. Solute self-organization during evaporation of colloidal sessile droplets has attracted the attention of researchers over the past few decades due to a variety of technological applications. Recently, pattern formation during evaporation of various biofluids has been studied due to potential applications in medical screening and diagnosis. Due to the complexity of 'real' biological fluids and other multicomponent systems, a comprehensive understanding of pattern formation during droplet evaporation of these fluids is lacking. In this PhD dissertation, the morphology of the patterns remaining after evaporation of droplets of a simplified model biological fluid (aqueous lysozyme solutions + NaCl) are examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical microscopy. Lysozyme is a globular protein found in high concentration, for example, in human tears and saliva. The drop diameters, D, studied range from the micro- to the macro- scale (1 microm -- 2 mm). In this work, the effect of evaporation conditions, solution chemistry, and heat transfer within the droplet on pattern formation is examined. In micro-scale deposits of aqueous lysozyme solutions (1 microm < D < 50 microm), the protein motion and the resulting dried residue morphology are highly influenced by the decreased evaporation time of the drop. The effect of electrolytes on pattern formation is also investigated by adding varying concentrations NaCl to the lysozyme solutions. Finally, a novel pattern recognition program is described and implemented which classifies deposit images by their solution chemistries. The results presented in this Ph

  5. Subdiffusive motion of bacteriophage in mucosal surfaces increases the frequency of bacterial encounters

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Jeremy J.; Auro, Rita; Sam-Soon, Nicholas; Kassegne, Sam; Peters, Gregory; Bonilla, Natasha; Hatay, Mark; Mourtada, Sarah; Bailey, Barbara; Youle, Merry; Felts, Ben; Baljon, Arlette; Nulton, Jim; Salamon, Peter; Rohwer, Forest

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) defend mucosal surfaces against bacterial infections. However, their complex interactions with their bacterial hosts and with the mucus-covered epithelium remain mostly unexplored. Our previous work demonstrated that T4 phage with Hoc proteins exposed on their capsid adhered to mucin glycoproteins and protected mucus-producing tissue culture cells in vitro. On this basis, we proposed our bacteriophage adherence to mucus (BAM) model of immunity. Here, to test this model, we developed a microfluidic device (chip) that emulates a mucosal surface experiencing constant fluid flow and mucin secretion dynamics. Using mucus-producing human cells and Escherichia coli in the chip, we observed similar accumulation and persistence of mucus-adherent T4 phage and nonadherent T4∆hoc phage in the mucus. Nevertheless, T4 phage reduced bacterial colonization of the epithelium >4,000-fold compared with T4∆hoc phage. This suggests that phage adherence to mucus increases encounters with bacterial hosts by some other mechanism. Phages are traditionally thought to be completely dependent on normal diffusion, driven by random Brownian motion, for host contact. We demonstrated that T4 phage particles displayed subdiffusive motion in mucus, whereas T4∆hoc particles displayed normal diffusion. Experiments and modeling indicate that subdiffusive motion increases phage–host encounters when bacterial concentration is low. By concentrating phages in an optimal mucus zone, subdiffusion increases their host encounters and antimicrobial action. Our revised BAM model proposes that the fundamental mechanism of mucosal immunity is subdiffusion resulting from adherence to mucus. These findings suggest intriguing possibilities for engineering phages to manipulate and personalize the mucosal microbiome. PMID:26483471

  6. Galleria mellonella lysozyme induces apoptotic changes in Candida albicans cells.

    PubMed

    Sowa-Jasiłek, Aneta; Zdybicka-Barabas, Agnieszka; Stączek, Sylwia; Wydrych, Jerzy; Skrzypiec, Krzysztof; Mak, Paweł; Deryło, Kamil; Tchórzewski, Marek; Cytryńska, Małgorzata

    2016-12-01

    The greater wax moth Galleria mellonella has been increasingly used as a model host to determine Candida albicans virulence and efficacy of antifungal treatment. The G. mellonella lysozyme, similarly to its human counterpart, is a member of the c-type family of lysozymes that exhibits antibacterial and antifungal activity. However, in contrast to the relatively well explained bactericidal action, the mechanism of fungistatic and/or fungicidal activity of lysozymes is still not clear. In the present study we provide the direct evidences that the G. mellonella lysozyme binds to the protoplasts as well as to the intact C. albicans cells and decreases the survival rate of both these forms in a time-dependent manner. No enzymatic activity of the lysozyme towards typical chitinase and β-glucanase substrates was detected, indicating that hydrolysis of main fungal cell wall components is not responsible for anti-Candida activity of the lysozyme. On the other hand, pre-treatment of cells with tetraethylammonium, a potassium channel blocker, prevented them from the lysozyme action, suggesting that lysozyme acts by induction of programmed cell death. In fact, the C. albicans cells treated with the lysozyme exhibited typical apoptotic features, i.e. loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, phosphatidylserine exposure in the outer leaflet of the cell membrane, as well as chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation.

  7. Classification of Myoviridae bacteriophages using protein sequence similarity

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background We advocate unifying classical and genomic classification of bacteriophages by integration of proteomic data and physicochemical parameters. Our previous application of this approach to the entirely sequenced members of the Podoviridae fully supported the current phage classification of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV). It appears that horizontal gene transfer generally does not totally obliterate evolutionary relationships between phages. Results CoreGenes/CoreExtractor proteome comparison techniques applied to 102 Myoviridae suggest the establishment of three subfamilies (Peduovirinae, Teequatrovirinae, the Spounavirinae) and eight new independent genera (Bcep781, BcepMu, FelixO1, HAP1, Bzx1, PB1, phiCD119, and phiKZ-like viruses). The Peduovirinae subfamily, derived from the P2-related phages, is composed of two distinct genera: the "P2-like viruses", and the "HP1-like viruses". At present, the more complex Teequatrovirinae subfamily has two genera, the "T4-like" and "KVP40-like viruses". In the genus "T4-like viruses" proper, four groups sharing >70% proteins are distinguished: T4-type, 44RR-type, RB43-type, and RB49-type viruses. The Spounavirinae contain the "SPO1-"and "Twort-like viruses." Conclusion The hierarchical clustering of these groupings provide biologically significant subdivisions, which are consistent with our previous analysis of the Podoviridae. PMID:19857251

  8. Multiple specialised goose-type lysozymes potentially compensate for an exceptional lack of chicken-type lysozymes in Atlantic cod.

    PubMed

    Seppola, Marit; Bakkemo, Kathrine Ryvold; Mikkelsen, Helene; Myrnes, Bjørnar; Helland, Ronny; Irwin, David M; Nilsen, Inge W

    2016-06-21

    Previous analyses of the Atlantic cod genome showed unique combinations of lacking and expanded number of genes for the immune system. The present study examined lysozyme activity, lysozyme gene distribution and expression in cod. Enzymatic assays employing specific bacterial lysozyme inhibitors provided evidence for presence of g-type, but unexpectedly not for c-type lysozyme activity. Database homology searches failed to identify any c-type lysozyme gene in the cod genome or in expressed sequence tags from cod. In contrast, we identified four g-type lysozyme genes (LygF1a-d) constitutively expressed, although differentially, in all cod organs examined. The active site glutamate residue is replaced by alanine in LygF1a, thus making it enzymatic inactive, while LygF1d was found in two active site variants carrying alanine or glutamate, respectively. In vitro and in vivo infection by the intracellular bacterium Francisella noatunensis gave a significantly reduced LygF1a and b expression but increased expression of the LygF1c and d genes as did also the interferon gamma (IFNγ) cytokine. These results demonstrate a lack of c-type lysozyme that is unprecedented among vertebrates. Our results further indicate that serial gene duplications have produced multiple differentially regulated cod g-type lysozymes with specialised functions potentially compensating for the lack of c-type lysozymes.

  9. Bacteriophages in dairy products: pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Mc Grath, Stephen; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2007-04-01

    Since the time bacteriophages were first identified as a major cause of fermentation failure in the dairy industry, researchers have been struggling to develop strategies to exclude them from the dairy environment. Over 70 years of research has led to huge improvements in the consistency and quality of fermented dairy products, while also facilitating an appreciation of the beneficial properties of bacteriophages with respect to dairy product development. With specific reference to Lactococcus lactis and cheese production, this review outlines some recently reported novel methods aimed at limiting the bacteriophage infection as well as highlighting some beneficial aspects of bacteriophage activity.

  10. Mobile DNA elements in T4 and related phages

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Mobile genetic elements are common inhabitants of virtually every genome where they can exert profound influences on genome structure and function in addition to promoting their own spread within and between genomes. Phage T4 and related phage have long served as a model system for understanding the molecular mechanisms by which a certain class of mobile DNA, homing endonucleases, promote their spread. Homing endonucleases are site-specific DNA endonucleases that initiate mobility by introducing double-strand breaks at defined positions in genomes lacking the endonuclease gene, stimulating repair and recombination pathways that mobilize the endonuclease coding region. In phage T4, homing endonucleases were first discovered as encoded within the self-splicing td, nrdB and nrdD introns of T4. Genomic data has revealed that homing endonucleases are extremely widespread in T-even-like phage, as evidenced by the astounding fact that ~11% of the T4 genome encodes homing endonuclease genes, with most of them located outside of self-splicing introns. Detailed studies of the mobile td intron and its encoded endonuclease, I-TevI, have laid the foundation for genetic, biochemical and structural aspects that regulate the mobility process, and more recently have provided insights into regulation of homing endonuclease function. Here, we summarize the current state of knowledge regarding T4-encoded homing endonucleases, with particular emphasis on the td/I-TevI model system. We also discuss recent progress in the biology of free-standing endonucleases, and present areas of future research for this fascinating class of mobile genetic elements. PMID:21029434

  11. Lysozyme Photochemistry as a Function of Temperature. The Protective Effect of Nanoparticles on Lysozyme Photostability

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira Silva, Catarina; Petersen, Steffen B.; Pinto Reis, Catarina; Rijo, Patrícia; Molpeceres, Jesús; Vorum, Henrik; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa

    2015-01-01

    The presence of aromatic residues and their close spatial proximity to disulphide bridges makes hen egg white lysozyme labile to UV excitation. UVB induced photo-oxidation of tryptophan and tyrosine residues leads to photochemical products, such as, kynurenine, N–formylkynurenine and dityrosine and to the disruption of disulphide bridges in proteins. We here report that lysozyme UV induced photochemistry is modulated by temperature, excitation power, illumination time, excitation wavelength and by the presence of plasmonic quencher surfaces, such as gold, and by the presence of natural fluorescence quenchers, such as hyaluronic acid and oleic acid. We show evidence that the photo-oxidation effects triggered by 295 nm at 20°C are reversible and non-reversible at 10°C, 25°C and 30°C. This paper provides evidence that the 295 nm damage threshold of lysozyme lies between 0.1 μW and 0.3 μW. Protein conformational changes induced by temperature and UV light have been detected upon monitoring changes in the fluorescence emission spectra of lysozyme tryptophan residues and SYPRO® Orange. Lysozyme has been conjugated onto gold nanoparticles, coated with hyaluronic acid and oleic acid (HAOA). Steady state and time resolved fluorescence studies of free and conjugated lysozyme onto HAOA gold nanoparticles reveals that the presence of the polymer decreased the rate of the observed photochemical reactions and induced a preference for short fluorescence decay lifetimes. Size and surface charge of the HAOA gold nanoparticles have been determined by dynamic light scattering and zeta potential measurements. TEM analysis of the particles confirms the presence of a gold core surrounded by a HAOA matrix. We conclude that HAOA gold nanoparticles may efficiently protect lysozyme from the photochemical effects of UVB light and this nanocarrier could be potentially applied to other proteins with clinical relevance. In addition, this study confirms that the temperature plays a

  12. Tetragonal Lysozyme, From Monomer to Crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The data now leads us to a comprehensive model for the process by which tetragonal lysozyme crystals are nucleated and subsequently grow. Lysozyme is typically desolubilized by addition of ionic salts. The salt anions bind to basic and other sites on the protein and promote protein-protein interactions, i.e., initiate the nucleation self assembly process. Formation of protein-protein interactions occurs at the expense of the protein-anion interactions, with the anions being released to the solution. The association follows a defined pattern, forming the "head to side" interactions of the crystal 4(3) helix. The presence of the high salt also promotes hydrophobic interactions between the protein molecules, further tightening their interaction. The solute assembly process persists after crystal nucleation, and the 4(3) helical structures form the subsequent growth units. AFM measurements show that the growth units follow the dimensions of these helices, and that those on the surface are more compact about the c-axis than in the bulk crystal, with adjacent helices riot being in contact. This further supports the role of hydrophobic interactions, as the surface is still in contact with the bulk solution. Once buried within the crystal the protein:salt ratio radically changes and the hydrophobic interactions relax to those measured crystallographically. Thus the crystal growth process recapitulates the initial stages of the nucleation process, and the two seamlessly merge. Experimental evidence, based upon face growth rate, AFM, and fluorescence energy transfer data, for a postulated model of the nucleation of tetragonal lysozyme crystals and how it transitions into crystal growth will be presented.

  13. Removal of endotoxins from bacteriophage preparations by extraction with organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Szermer-Olearnik, Bożena; Boratyński, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin, pyrogen) constitutes a very troubling contaminant of crude phage lysates produced in Gram-negative bacteria. Toxicity of LPS depends on the strong innate immunity response including the cytokines. Therefore, its removal is important for bacteriophage applications. In this paper, we present a procedure for extractive removal of endotoxin from bacteriophage preparations with water immiscible solvents (1-octanol or 1-butanol). During extraction most of the phage lytic activity is retained in the aqueous phase, while endotoxin accumulates in the organic solvent. The levels of endotoxin (expressed as endotoxin units, EU) in the aqueous bacteriophage-containing fraction determined by limulus amebocyte lysate or EndoLISA assay were exceptionally low. While the initial endotoxin levels in the crude phage lysates ranged between 10(3) and 10(5) EU/ml the average level after organic extraction remaining in the aqueous fraction was 5.3 EU/ml. These values when related to phage titers decreased from 10(3)-10(5) EU/10(9) PFU (plaque forming units) down to an average of 2.8 EU/10(9) PFU. The purification procedure is scalable, efficient and applicable to all the bacteriophages tested: T4, HAP1 (E. coli) and F8 (P. aeruginosa).

  14. Removal of Endotoxins from Bacteriophage Preparations by Extraction with Organic Solvents

    PubMed Central

    Szermer-Olearnik, Bożena; Boratyński, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin, pyrogen) constitutes a very troubling contaminant of crude phage lysates produced in Gram-negative bacteria. Toxicity of LPS depends on the strong innate immunity response including the cytokines. Therefore, its removal is important for bacteriophage applications. In this paper, we present a procedure for extractive removal of endotoxin from bacteriophage preparations with water immiscible solvents (1-octanol or 1-butanol). During extraction most of the phage lytic activity is retained in the aqueous phase, while endotoxin accumulates in the organic solvent. The levels of endotoxin (expressed as endotoxin units, EU) in the aqueous bacteriophage-containing fraction determined by limulus amebocyte lysate or EndoLISA assay were exceptionally low. While the initial endotoxin levels in the crude phage lysates ranged between 103 and 105 EU/ml the average level after organic extraction remaining in the aqueous fraction was 5.3 EU/ml. These values when related to phage titers decreased from 103-105 EU/109 PFU (plaque forming units) down to an average of 2.8 EU/109 PFU. The purification procedure is scalable, efficient and applicable to all the bacteriophages tested: T4, HAP1 (E. coli) and F8 (P. aeruginosa). PMID:25811193

  15. Bacteriophage Procurement for Therapeutic Purposes

    PubMed Central

    Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Jończyk-Matysiak, Ewa; Żaczek, Maciej; Łobocka, Małgorzata; Łusiak-Szelachowska, Marzanna; Górski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages), discovered 100 years ago, are able to infect and destroy only bacterial cells. In the current crisis of antibiotic efficacy, phage therapy is considered as a supplementary or even alternative therapeutic approach. Evolution of multidrug-resistant and pandrug-resistant bacterial strains poses a real threat, so it is extremely important to have the possibility to isolate new phages for therapeutic purposes. Our phage laboratory and therapy center has extensive experience with phage isolation, characterization, and therapeutic application. In this article we present current progress in bacteriophages isolation and use for therapeutic purposes, our experience in this field and its practical implications for phage therapy. We attempt to summarize the state of the art: properties of phages, the methods for their isolation, criteria of phage selection for therapeutic purposes and limitations of their use. Perspectives for the use of genetically engineered phages to specifically target bacterial virulence-associated genes are also briefly presented. PMID:27570518

  16. Immobilization of lysozyme on cotton fabrics; synthesis, characterication, and activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The antimicrobial activity of lysozyme derives from the hydrolysis of the bacterial cell wall polysaccharide at the glycosidic bond that links N-acetyl-glucosamine and N-acetyl-muramic acid. Maintaining the activity of lysozyme while bound to a cellulose substrate is a goal toward developing enzyme...

  17. Regenerated cellulose fiber and film immobilized with lysozyme

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present work reports an initial engineering approach for fabricating lysozyme-bound regenerated cellulose fiber and film. Glycine-esterified cotton was dissolved in an ionic liquid solvent 1–Butyl–3–methylimidazolium Chloride (BMIMCl) in which lysozyme was activated and covalently attached to c...

  18. Purification of Lysozyme by Intrinsically Shielded Hydrogel Beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cong; Zhang, R.; Wang, L.; Bowyer, A.; Eisenthal, R.; Shen, Yehua; Hubble, J.

    2013-07-01

    Macro-sized intrinsically shielded hydrogel beads have been prepared from BSA and CM-dextran grafted with CB using a technique based on freeze-thawing gelation method. The size of the beads lies in around 500 μm. Isothemal titration calorimetry (ITC) showed that the relative binding affinities of the lysozyme for CB, compared with BSA, at pH 3.0 was stronger than that at pH 7.4. They were employed for the affinity separation of lysozyme using chromatography column. Their adsorption capacity for lysozyme at pH 3.0 is higher than that at pH 9. In a binary mixture of lysozyme and ovalbumin, the beads showed very high selectivity toward lysozyme. Lysozyme of very high purity (> 93%) was obtained from a mixture of lysozyme and ovalbumin, and 85% from egg white solution. The results indicate that the macro-sized bead can be used for the separation, purification, and recovery of lysozyme in a chromatograph column.

  19. Adaptive functional diversification of lysozyme in insectivorous bats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; He, Guimei; Xu, Huihui; Han, Xiuqun; Jones, Gareth; Rossiter, Stephen J; Zhang, Shuyi

    2014-11-01

    The role of gene duplication in generating new genes and novel functions is well recognized and is exemplified by the digestion-related protein lysozyme. In ruminants, duplicated chicken-type lysozymes facilitate the degradation of symbiotic bacteria in the foregut. Chicken-type lysozyme has also been reported to show chitinase-like activity, yet no study has examined the molecular evolution of lysozymes in species that specialize on eating insects. Insectivorous bats number over 900 species, and lysozyme expression in the mouths of some of these species is associated with the ingestion of insect cuticle, suggesting a chitinase role. Here, we show that chicken-type lysozyme has undergone multiple duplication events in a major family of insect-eating bats (Vespertilionidae) and that new duplicates have undergone molecular adaptation. Examination of duplicates from two insectivorous bats-Pipistrellus abramus and Scotophilus kuhlii-indicated that the new copy was highly expressed in the tongue, whereas the other one was less tissue-specific. Functional assays applied to pipistrelle lysozymes confirmed that, of the two copies, the tongue duplicate was more efficient at breaking down glycol chitin, a chitin derivative. These results suggest that the evolution of lysozymes in vespertilionid bats has likely been driven in part by natural selection for insectivory.

  20. In vitro and in vivo activities of T4 endonuclease V mutants altered in the C-terminal aromatic region

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, M.; Kanamori, Y.; Hori, N.; Inaoka, T.; Ohtsuka, E. )

    1990-04-24

    Genes encoding mutants of the thymine photodimer repair enzyme from bacteriophage T4 (T4 endonuclease V) having an amino acid substitution (T127M, W128A, W128S, Y129A, K130L, Y131A, Y132A) were constructed by use of a previously obtained synthetic gene and expressed in Escherichia coli under the control of the E. coli tryptophan promoter. An in vitro assay of partially fractionated mutant proteins for glycosylase activity was performed with chemically synthesized substrates containing a thymine photodimer. T127M and K130L showed almost the same activity as the wild-type protein. Although W128S, Y131A, and Y132A were slightly active, W128A and Y129A lost activity. The results indicated that the aromatic amino acids around position 130 may be important for the glycosylase activity. Mutant T127M was purified, and the Km value was found to be of the same order as that of the wild type (10(-8) M). In vivo activities for all mutants were characterized with UV-sensitive E. coli. The results showed that substitution of Thr-127 with Met or Lys-130 with Leu did not have an effect on the survival of the bacteria but substitution of aromatic amino acids (128-132) had various effects on survival.

  1. Bacteriophage Transduction in Staphylococcus epidermidis

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Michael E.; Horswill, Alexander R.

    2016-01-01

    The genetic manipulation of Staphylococcus epidermidis for molecular experimentation has long been an area of difficulty. Many of the traditional laboratory techniques for strain construction are laborious and hampered by poor efficiency. The ability to move chromosomal genetic markers and plasmids using bacteriophage transduction has greatly increased the speed and ease of S. epidermidis studies. These molecular genetic advances have advanced the S. epidermidis research field beyond a select few genetically tractable strains and facilitated investigations of clinically relevant isolates. PMID:24222465

  2. Effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes on lysozyme gelation.

    PubMed

    Tardani, Franco; La Mesa, Camillo

    2014-09-01

    The possibility to disperse carbon nanotubes in biocompatible matrices has got substantial interest from the scientific community. Along this research line, the inclusion of single walled carbon nanotubes in lysozyme-based hydrogels was investigated. Experiments were performed at different nanotube/lysozyme weight ratios. Carbon nanotubes were dispersed in protein solutions, in conditions suitable for thermal gelation. The state of the dispersions was determined before and after thermal treatment. Rheology, dynamic light scattering and different microscopies investigated the effect that carbon nanotubes exert on gelation. The gelation kinetics and changes in gelation temperature were determined. The effect of carbon and lysozyme content on the gel properties was, therefore, determined. At fixed lysozyme content, moderate amounts of carbon nanotubes do not disturb the properties of hydrogel composites. At moderately high volume fractions in carbon nanotubes, the gels become continuous in both lysozyme and nanotubes. This is because percolating networks are presumably formed. Support to the above statements comes by rheology.

  3. Immobilization of Active Bacteriophages on Polyhydroxyalkanoate Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chanchan; Sauvageau, Dominic; Elias, Anastasia

    2016-01-20

    A rapid, efficient technique for the attachment of bacteriophages (phages) onto polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) surfaces has been developed and compared to three reported methods for phage immobilization. Polymer surfaces were modified to facilitate phage attachment using (1) plasma treatment alone, (2) plasma treatment followed by activation by 1-ethyl-3-(3-(dimethylamino)propyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide (sulfo-NHS), (3) plasma-initiated acrylic acid grafting, or (4) plasma-initiated acrylic acid grafting with activation by EDC and sulfo-NHS. The impact of each method on the surface chemistry of PHA was investigated using contact angle analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Each of the four treatments was shown to result in both increased hydrophilicity and in the modification of the surface functional groups. Modified surfaces were immersed in suspensions of phage T4 for immobilization. The highest level of phage binding was observed for the surfaces modified by plasma treatment alone. The change in chemical bond states observed for surfaces that underwent plasma treatment is suspected to be the cause of the increased binding of active phages. Plasma-treated surfaces were further analyzed through phage-staining and fluorescence microscopy to assess the surface density of immobilized phages and their capacity to capture hosts. The infective capability of attached phages was confirmed by exposing the phage-immobilized surfaces to the host bacteria Escherichia coli in both plaque and infection dynamic assays. Plasma-treated surfaces with immobilized phages displayed higher infectivity than surfaces treated with other methods; in fact, the equivalent initial multiplicity of infection was 2 orders of magnitude greater than with other methods. Control samples - prepared by immersing polymer surfaces in phage suspensions (without prior plasma treatment) - did not show any bacterial growth inhibition, suggesting they did not bind

  4. Splint ligation of RNA with T4 DNA ligase

    PubMed Central

    Kershaw, Christopher J.; O’Keefe, Raymond T.

    2014-01-01

    Splint ligation of RNA, whereby specific RNA molecules are ligated together, can be carried out using T4 DNA ligase and a bridging DNA oligonucleotide complementary to the RNAs. This method takes advantage of the property of T4 DNA ligase to join RNA molecules when they are in an RNA:DNA hybrid. Splint ligation is a useful tool for the introduction of modified nucleotides into RNA molecules, insertion of a radiolabel into a specific position within an RNA and for the assembly of smaller synthetic RNAs into longer RNA molecules. Such modifications enable a wide range of experiments to be carried out with the modified RNA including structural studies, co-immunoprecipitations, and the ability to map sites of RNA:RNA and RNA:protein interactions. PMID:23065567

  5. Lysozyme activity of the Ruminococcus champanellensis cellulosome.

    PubMed

    Moraïs, Sarah; Cockburn, Darrell W; Ben-David, Yonit; Koropatkin, Nicole M; Martens, Eric C; Duncan, Sylvia H; Flint, Harry J; Mizrahi, Itzhak; Bayer, Edward A

    2016-12-01

    Ruminococcus champanellensis is a keystone species in the human gut that produces an intricate cellulosome system of various architectures. A variety of cellulosomal enzymes have been identified, which exhibit a range of hydrolytic activities on lignocellulosic substrates. We describe herein a unique R. champanellensis scaffoldin, ScaK, which is expressed during growth on cellobiose and comprises a cohesin module and a family 25 glycoside hydrolase (GH25). The GH25 is non-autolytic and exhibits lysozyme-mediated lytic activity against several bacterial species. Despite the narrow acidic pH curve, the enzyme is active along a temperature range from 2 to 85°C and is stable at very high temperatures for extended incubation periods. The ScaK cohesin was shown to bind selectively to the dockerin of a monovalent scaffoldin (ScaG), thus enabling formation of a cell-free cellulosome, whereby ScaG interacts with a divalent scaffodin (ScaA) that bears the enzymes either directly or through additional monovalent scaffoldins (ScaC and ScaD). The ScaK cohesin also interacts with the dockerin of a protein comprising multiple Fn3 domains that can potentially promote adhesion to carbohydrates and the bacterial cell surface. A cell-free cellulosomal GH25 lysozyme may provide a bacterial strategy to both hydrolyze lignocellulose and repel eventual food competitors and/or cheaters.

  6. Use of Bacteriophages to control bacterial pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lytic bacteriophages can provide a natural method and an effective alternative to antibiotics to reduce bacterial pathogens in animals, foods, and other environments. Bacteriophages (phages) are viruses which infect bacterial cells and eventually kill them through lysis, and represent the most abun...

  7. Bacteriophage: laboratorial diagnosis and phage therapy

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Joas L. Da; Hirata, Rosario D.C.; Hirata, Mario H.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteriophages have been researched as a new alternative to antibiotics. These viruses inject their genetic material into bacteria and use their host machinery to multiply themselves. The research of bacteriophages in Brazil will certainly provide low-cost treatment of multidrug resistant bacteria, new microbiological diagnosis and advantages for the Brazilian food industry. PMID:24031398

  8. Surface plasmon resonance detection of E. coli and methicillin-resistant S. aureus using bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Tawil, Nancy; Sacher, Edward; Mandeville, Rosemonde; Meunier, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157:H7 and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are key elements in preventing resultant life-threatening illnesses, such as hemorrhagic colitis, hemolytic uremic syndrome, and septicemia. In this report, we describe the use of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) for the biodetection of pathogenic bacteria, using bacteriophages as the recognition elements. T4 bacteriophages were used to detect E. coli, while a novel, highly specific phage was used to detect MRSA. We found that the system permits label-free, real-time, specific, rapid and cost-effective detection of pathogens, for concentrations of 10(3) colony forming units/milliliter, in less than 20 min. This system promises to become a diagnostic tool for bacteria that cause major public concern for food safety, bioterrorism, and nosocomial infections.

  9. Lysozyme loading and release from Se doped hydroxyapatite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanhua; Hao, Hang; Zhang, Shengmin

    2016-04-01

    Element-substituted hydroxyapatite (HA) based nanocomposites have become a promising therapeutic material for improving bone defect repair. Selenium substituted HA nanoparticles can both induce apoptosis of bone tumor cells and enhance osteointegration. However, the effect of selenite ions on the proteins in combination with the HA nanoparticles remains to be elucidated. Here, we investigated the influence of selenium doping concentration on the loading and release of lysozyme (LSM) as a model protein drug. The selenium substituted HA-LSM composites with different doping concentrations were synthesized and characterized. The subsequent delivery of lysozyme was studied in a phosphate buffer solution (PBS). We found that selenium substituted HA-LSM composites with Se:P=10% showed the highest amount of lysozyme loading (41.7%), whereas the amount of lysozyme loaded in undoped HA nanoparticles was the lowest (34.1%). The doped selenium interacts with lysozyme molecules, which leads to the increase of β-sheet and unordered, and the decrease of self-association, α-helix and β-turns in protein structures. Moreover, selenium addition significantly slows the protein release from HA-LSM composites. The composites with Se:P=10% release lysozyme at the slightly slower rate among the samples with different Se doping concentrations. It also shows that the released lysozyme retains most of its enzymatic activity.

  10. [Purification and characterization of a lysozyme from a marine microorganism].

    PubMed

    Zou, Yan-Li; Sun, Mi; Wang, Yue-Jun

    2005-05-01

    A novel lysozyme was purified from a marine microorganism and its major characteristics were studied. Cell-free supernatant was prepared by centrifugation of culture broth, ultrafiltration using a hollow fiber (molecular weight cut off, 50kD) and concentration using a hollow fiber (molecular weight cut off, 10kD). The crude lysozyme was purified 34.7 fold to electrophoretic homogeneity with a recovery of 24.1% by CM-Sepharose FF cationic-exchange and Sephadex G-100 gel chromatography. The relative molecular weight of this lysozyme was determined as about 39 kD. The optimum pH and temperature towards Micrococcus lysodleikticus were pH 8.0 and 35 degrees C respectively, and the enzyme was stable at temperature below 50 degrees C and pH 5.0 - 10.0. The lysozyme activity was slightly enhanced by Zn2+ and Cu2+ and slightly inhibited by Mn2+ and Ag+. The lysozyme showed good compatibility to many common chemical agents such as EDTA (0.1%) and KH2 PO4 (1.0%). The lysozyme had broad-spectrum against many bacteria, including a number of pathogens, which were resistant to egg-white lysozyme.

  11. The Effects of Acetate Buffer Concentration on Lysozyme Solubility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1996-01-01

    The micro-solubility column technique was employed to systematically investigate the effects of buffer concentration on tetragonal lysozyme solubility. While keeping the NaCl concentrations constant at 2%, 3%, 4%, 5% and 7%, and the pH at 4.0, we have studied the solubility of tetragonal lysozyme over an acetate buffer concentration range of 0.01M to 0.5M as a function of temperature. The lysozyme solubility decreased with increasing acetate concentration from 0.01M to 0.1M. This decrease may simply be due to the net increase in solvent ionic strength. Increasing the acetate concentration beyond 0.1M resulted in an increase in the lysozyme solubility, which reached a peak at - 0.3M acetate concentration. This increase was believed to be due to the increased binding of acetate to the anionic binding sites of lysozyme, preventing their occupation by chloride. In keeping with the previously observed reversal of the Hoffmeister series for effectiveness of anions in crystallizing lysozyme, acetate would be a less effective precipitant than chloride. Further increasing the acetate concentration beyond 0.3M resulted in a subsequent gradual decrease in the lysozyme solubility at all NaCl concentrations.

  12. Mesoscopic coarse-grained simulations of lysozyme adsorption.

    PubMed

    Yu, Gaobo; Liu, Jie; Zhou, Jian

    2014-05-01

    Coarse-grained simulations are adopted to study the adsorption behavior of lysozyme on different (hydrophobic, neutral hydrophilic, zwitterionic, negatively charged, and positively charged) surfaces at the mesoscopic microsecond time scale (1.2 μs). Simulation results indicate the following: (i) the conformation change of lysozyme on the hydrophobic surface is bigger than any other studied surfaces; (ii) the active sites of lysozyme are faced to the hydrophobic surface with a "top end-on" orientation, while they are exposed to the liquid phase on the hydrophilic surface with a "back-on" orientation; (iii) the neutral hydrophilic surface can induce the adsorption of lysozyme, while the nonspecific protein adsorption can be resisted by the zwitterionic surface; (iv) when the solution ionic strength is low, lysozyme can anchor on the negatively charged surface easily but cannot adsorb on the positively charged surface; (v) when the solution ionic strength is high, the positively charged lysozyme can also adsorb on the like-charged surface; (vi) the major positive potential center of lysozyme, especially the residue ARG128, plays a vital role in leading the adsorption of lysozyme on charged surfaces; (vii) when the ionic strength is high, a counterion layer is formed above the positively charged surface, which is the key factor why lysozyme can adsorb on a like-charged surface. The coarse-grained method based on the MARTINI force field for proteins and the BMW water model could provide an efficient way to understand protein interfacial adsorption behavior at a greater length scale and time scale.

  13. Separation of lysozyme using superparamagnetic carboxymethyl chitosan nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jun; Su, Yujie; Rao, Shengqi; Yang, Yanjun

    2011-08-01

    Functionalized Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles conjugated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and carboxymethyl chitosan (CM-CTS) were developed and used as a novel magnetic absorbing carrier for the separation and purification of lysozyme from the aqueous solution and chicken egg white, respectively. The morphology of magnetic CM-CTS nanoparticles was observed by transmission electron microscope (TEM). It was found that the diameter of superparamagnetic carboxymethyl chitosan nanoparticles (Fe(3)O(4) (PEG+CM-CTS)) was about 15 nm, and could easily aggregate by a magnet when suspending in the aqueous solution. The adsorption capacity of lysozyme onto the superparamagnetic Fe(3)O(4) (PEG+CM-CTS) nanoparticles was determined by changing the medium pH, temperature, ionic strength and the concentration of lysozyme. The maximum adsorption loading reached 256.4 mg/g. Due to the small diameter, the adsorption equilibrium of lysozyme onto the nanoparticles reached very quickly within 20 min. The adsorption equilibrium of lysozyme onto the superparamagnetic nanoparticles fitted well with the Langmuir model. The nanoparticles were stable when subjected to six repeated adsorption-elution cycles. Separation and purification were monitored by determining the lysozyme activity using Micrococcus lysodeikticus as substrate. The lysozyme was purified from chicken egg white in a single step had higher purity, as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Considering that the superparamagnetic nanoparticles possess the advantages of high efficiency, cost-effectiveness and excellent binding of a larger amount of lysozyme and easier separation from the reaction system, thus this type of superparamagnetic nanoparticles would bring advantages to the conventional separation techniques of lysozyme from chicken egg white.

  14. Reentrant condensation of lysozyme: Implications for studying dynamics of lysozyme in aqueous solutions of lithium chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Mamontov, Eugene; O'Neill, Hugh Michael

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have outlined the use of eutectic solution of lithium chloride in water to study microscopic dynamics of lysozyme in an aqueous solvent that is remarkably similar to pure water in many respects, yet allows experiments over a wide temperature range without the solvent crystallization. The eutectic point in (H2O)R(LiCl) system corresponds to R 7.3, and it is of interest to investigate whether less concentrated aqueous solutions of LiCl could be employed in low-temperature studies of a solvated protein. We have investigated a range of concentrations of lysozyme and LiCl in aqueous solutions to identify systems that do not show phase separation and avoid solvent crystallization on cooling down. Compared to the lysozyme concentration in solution, the concentration of LiCl in the aqueous solvent plays the major role in determining systems suitable for low-temperature studies. We have observed interesting and rich phase behavior reminiscent of reentrant condensation of proteins.

  15. Structure of the Bacteriophage [phi]KZ Lytic Transglycosylase gp144

    SciTech Connect

    Fokine, Andrei; Miroshnikov, Konstantin A.; Shneider, Mikhail M.; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2008-04-02

    Lytic transglycosylases are enzymes that act on the peptidoglycan of bacterial cell walls. They cleave the glycosidic linkage between N-acetylmuramoyl and N-acetylglucosaminyl residues with the concomitant formation of a 1,6-anhydromuramoyl product. The x-ray structure of the lytic transglycosylase gp144 from the Pseudomonas bacteriophage {phi}KZ has been determined to 2.5-{angstrom} resolution. This protein is probably employed by the bacteriophage in the late stage of the virus reproduction cycle to destroy the bacterial cell wall to release the phage progeny. {phi}KZ gp144 is a 260-residue {alpha}-helical protein composed of a 70-residue N-terminal cell wall-binding domain and a C-terminal catalytic domain. The fold of the N-terminal domain is similar to the peptidoglycan-binding domain from Streptomyces albus G d-Ala-d-Ala carboxypeptidase and to the N-terminal prodomain of human metalloproteinases that act on extracellular matrices. The C-terminal catalytic domain of gp144 has a structural similarity to the catalytic domain of the transglycosylase Slt70 from Escherichia coli and to lysozymes. The gp144 catalytic domain has an elongated groove that can bind at least five sugar residues at sites A-E. As in other lysozymes, the peptidoglycan cleavage (catalyzed by Glu{sup 115} in gp144) occurs between sugar-binding subsites D and E. The x-ray structure of the {phi}KZ transglycosylase complexed with the chitotetraose (N-acetylglucosamine){sub 4} has been determined to 2.6-{angstrom} resolution. The N-acetylglucosamine residues of the chitotetraose bind in sites A-D.

  16. Single molecule studies of DNA packaging by bacteriophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Derek Nathan

    The DNA packaging dynamics of bacteriophages φ29, gamma, and T4 were studied at the single molecule level using a dual trap optical tweezers. Also, a method for producing long DNA molecules by PCR for optical tweezers studies of protein DNA interactions is presented and thoroughly characterized. This DNA preparation technique provided DNA samples for the φ29 and T4 studies. In the studies of φ29, the role of charge was investigated by varying the ionic conditions of the packaging buffer. Ionic conditions in which the DNA charge was highly screened due to divalent and trivalent cations showed the lowest resistance to packaging of the DNA to high density. This confirmed the importance of counterions in shielding the DNA interstrand repulsion when packaged to high density. While the ionic nature of the packaging buffer had a strong effect on packaging velocities, there was no clear trend between the counterion-screened charge of the DNA and the maximum packaging velocity. The packaging studies of lambda and T4 served as systems for comparative studies with φ29. Each system showed similarities to the φ29 system and unique differences. Both the lambda and T4 packaging motors were capable of generating forces in excess of 50 pN and showed remarkably high processivity, similar to φ29. However, dynamic structural transitions were observed with lambda that are not observed with φ29. The packaging of the lambda genome showed capsid expansion at approximately 30 percent of the genome packaged and capsid rupture at 90 percent of the genome packaged in the absence of capsid stabilizing protein gpD. Unique to the T4 packaging motor, packaging dynamics showed a remarkable amount of variability in velocities. This variability was seen both within individual packaging phages and from one phage to the next. This is possibly due to different conformational states of the packaging machinery. Additionally, lambda and T4 had average packaging velocities under minimal load of 600

  17. Structural characteristics of hydration sites in lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Soda, Kunitsugu; Shimbo, Yudai; Seki, Yasutaka; Taiji, Makoto

    2011-06-01

    A new method is presented for determining the hydration site of proteins, where the effect of structural fluctuations in both protein and hydration water is explicitly considered by using molecular dynamics simulation (MDS). The whole hydration sites (HS) of lysozyme are composed of 195 single HSs and 38 clustered ones (CHS), and divided into 231 external HSs (EHS) and 2 internal ones (IHS). The largest CHSs, 'Hg' and 'Lβ', are the IHSs having 2.54 and 1.35 mean internal hydration waters respectively. The largest EHS, 'Clft', is located in the cleft region. The real hydration structure of a CHS is an ensemble of multiple structures. The transition between two structures occurs through recombinations of some H-bonds. The number of the experimental X-ray crystal waters is nearly the same as that of the estimated MDS hydration waters for 70% of the HSs, but significantly different for the rest of HSs.

  18. Transcription regulation mechanisms of bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Haiquan; Ma, Yingfang; Wang, Yitian; Yang, Haixia; Shen, Wei; Chen, Xianzhong

    2014-01-01

    Phage diversity significantly contributes to ecology and evolution of new bacterial species through horizontal gene transfer. Therefore, it is essential to understand the mechanisms underlying phage-host interactions. After initial infection, the phage utilizes the transcriptional machinery of the host to direct the expression of its own genes. This review presents a view on the transcriptional regulation mechanisms of bacteriophages, and its contribution to phage diversity and classification. Through this review, we aim to broaden the understanding of phage-host interactions while providing a reference source for researchers studying the regulation of phage transcription. PMID:25482231

  19. The future of bacteriophage biology.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Allan

    2003-06-01

    After an illustrious history as one of the primary tools that established the foundations of molecular biology, bacteriophage research is now undergoing a renaissance in which the primary focus is on the phages themselves rather than the molecular mechanisms that they explain. Studies of the evolution of phages and their role in natural ecosystems are flourishing. Practical questions, such as how to use phages to combat human diseases that are caused by bacteria, how to eradicate phage pests in the food industry and what role they have in the causation of human diseases, are receiving increased attention. Phages are also useful in the deeper exploration of basic molecular and biophysical questions.

  20. Refolding of denatured lysozyme by water-in-oil microemulsions of sucrose fatty acid esters.

    PubMed

    Noritomi, Hidetaka; Takasugi, Tsubasa; Kato, Satoru

    2008-04-01

    Water-in-oil (w/o) microemulsion of sucrose fatty acid ester was used to renature denatured hen egg white lysozyme without aggregation. After lysozyme was denatured in 5 M guanidine hydrochloride for 24 h, the resultant denatured lysozyme was held in the microemulsion, overnight at 25 degrees C. Renatured lysozyme was transferred from the microemulsion phase to the recovery aqueous phase by conventional liquid-liquid extraction. The enzymatic activity of the recovered lysozyme was 93%.

  1. Purification, Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Diffraction Analysis of the Phage T4 Vertex Protein Gp24 and its Mutant Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Boeshans,K.; Liu, F.; Peng, G.; Idler, W.; Jang, S.; Marekov, L.; Black, L.; Ahvazi, B.

    2006-01-01

    The study of bacteriophage T4 assembly has revealed regulatory mechanisms pertinent not only to viruses but also to macromolecular complexes. The capsid of bacteriophage T4 is composed of the major capsid protein gp23, and a minor capsid protein gp24, which is arranged as pentamers at the vertices of the capsid. In this study the T4 capsid protein gp24 and its mutant forms were overexpressed and purified to homogeneity. The overexpression from plasmid vectors of all the constructs in Escherichia coli yields biologically active protein in vivo as determined by assembly of active virus following infection with inactivated gene 24 mutant viruses. The gp24 mutant was subjected to surface entropy reduction by mutagenesis and reductive alkylation in order to improve its crystallization properties and diffraction quality. To determine if surface mutagenesis targeting would result in diffractable crystals, two glutamate to alanine mutations (E89A,E90A) were introduced. We report here the biochemical observations and consequent mutagenesis experiment that resulted in improvements in the stability, crystallizability and crystal quality of gp24 without affecting the overall folding. Rational modification of the protein surface to achieve crystallization appears promising for improving crystallization behavior and crystal diffracting qualities. The crystal of gp24(E89A,E90A) diffracted to 2.6 {angstrom} resolution compared to wild-type gp24 at 3.80 {angstrom} resolution under the same experimental conditions. Surface mutation proved to be a better method than reductive methylation for improving diffraction quality of the gp24 crystals.

  2. Immobilization of lysozyme on polyvinylalcohol films for active packaging applications.

    PubMed

    Conte, A; Buonocore, G G; Bevilacqua, A; Sinigaglia, M; Del Nobile, M A

    2006-04-01

    A new technique for the immobilization of lysozyme onto the surface of polyvinylalcohol films is presented. The active compound was sprayed along with a suitable bonding agent onto the surface of the cross-linked polymeric matrix. Active compound release tests determined the amount of lysozyme immobilized on the film surface. With the use of Micrococcus lysodeikticus, the antimicrobial activity of the films was determined and the results correlated with the amount of immobilized lysozyme. This new technique was effective for immobilizing the enzyme, and the developed films were active against the test microorganism. Results were compared with those obtained with a different immobilizing technique, in which the active compound was bound into the bulk of the polymeric film. As expected, the surface-immobilized lysozyme films have a higher antimicrobial activity than bulk-bound films.

  3. Dielectric and gravimetric studies of water binding to lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Bone, S

    1996-08-01

    Time domain dielectric spectroscopy and hydration isotherm measurements as a function of temperature have been applied to hydrated lysozyme powder. Two dielectric dispersions were identified, the first centred at approximately 8 MHz and a second above 1 GHz. The higher dispersion is considered to be the result of rotational relaxation of water molecules bound to the enzyme. In this case the results indicate the existence of a population of 32 water molecules per lysozyme molecule which are irrotationally bound to the lysozyme structure. A larger population of water molecules is relatively free to respond to the electric field and exhibits a dipole moment close to that of vapour phase water molecules. Multi-temperature hydration isotherm measurements are used to calculate enthalpies and entropies associated with the binding of water to lysozyme. Discontinuities both in dielectric and in thermodynamic characteristics in the range 10-14% hydration are interpreted as a re-ordering of the water structure on the enzyme surface.

  4. Fabrication of polypyrrole nano-arrays in lysozyme single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, Matt W.; Lambert, Elizabeth M.; Li, Mei; Turyanska, Lyudmila; Patil, Avinash J.; Mann, Stephen

    2012-10-01

    A template-directed method for the synthesis and organization of partially oxidized polypyrrole (PPy) nanoscale arrays within the solvent channels of glutaraldehyde-cross-linked lysozyme single crystals is presented. Macroscopic single crystals of the periodically arranged protein-polymer superstructure are electrically conductive, insoluble in water and organic solvents, and display increased levels of mechanical plasticity compared with native cross-linked lysozyme crystals.A template-directed method for the synthesis and organization of partially oxidized polypyrrole (PPy) nanoscale arrays within the solvent channels of glutaraldehyde-cross-linked lysozyme single crystals is presented. Macroscopic single crystals of the periodically arranged protein-polymer superstructure are electrically conductive, insoluble in water and organic solvents, and display increased levels of mechanical plasticity compared with native cross-linked lysozyme crystals. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Optical microscopy, SEM, TEM images, FTIR spectra and tables, conductivity plot. Experimental methods. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr32413j

  5. Self-assembly of beta-casein and lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoyun; Yu, Shaoyong; Yao, Ping; Shao, Zhengzhong

    2007-12-15

    The self-assembly of beta-casein and lysozyme, a linear and a globular protein with isoelectric point of pH 5.0 and 10.7, respectively, was studied. Polydisperse electrostatic complex micelles formed when mixing beta-casein and lysozyme aqueous solutions. After the micelle solution was heated, lysozyme gelated and beta-casein was trapped in the gel, producing narrowly dispersed nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were characterized with laser light scattering, zeta-potential, steady state fluorescence, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The nanoparticles have spherical shape and their sizes depend on the pH of the heat treatment and the molar ratio of beta-casein to lysozyme. The nanoparticles display amphoteric property and are relatively hydrophobic at pH around 5 and around 10. The net charges on the surface stabilize the nanoparticles in the solution.

  6. Location of Bromide Ions in Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Kap; Nadarajah, Arunan; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    Anions have been shown to play a dominant role in the crystallization of chicken egg white lysozyme from salt solutions. Previous studies employing X-ray crystallography had found one chloride ion binding site in the tetragonal crystal form of the protein and four nitrate ion binding sites in the monoclinic form. In this study the anion positions in the tetragonal form were determined from the difference Fourier map obtained from lysozyme crystal grown in bromide and chloride solutions. Five possible anion binding sites were found in this manner. Some of these sites were in pockets containing basic residues while others were near neutral, but polar, residues. The sole chloride ion binding site found in previous studies was confirmed, while four of these sites corresponded to four binding sites found for nitrate ions in monoclinic crystals. The study suggests that most of the anion binding sites in lysozyme remain unchanged, even when different anions and different crystal forms of lysozyme are employed.

  7. 21 CFR 862.1490 - Lysozyme (muramidase) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... serum, plasma, leukocytes, and urine. Lysozyme measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of monocytic leukemia and kidney disease. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is...

  8. Bioengineered lysozyme in combination therapies for Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections

    PubMed Central

    Griswold, Karl E; Bement, Jenna L; Teneback, Charlotte C; Scanlon, Thomas C; Wargo, Matthew J; Leclair, Laurie W

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing urgency in the battle against drug-resistant bacterial pathogens, and this public health crisis has created a desperate need for novel antimicrobial agents. Recombinant human lysozyme represents one interesting candidate for treating pulmonary infections, but the wild type enzyme is subject to electrostatic mediated inhibition by anionic biopolymers that accumulate in the infected lung. We have redesigned lysozyme’s electrostatic potential field, creating a genetically engineered variant that is less susceptible to polyanion inhibition, yet retains potent bactericidal activity. A recent publication demonstrated that the engineered enzyme outperforms wild type lysozyme in a murine model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection. Here, we expand upon our initial studies and consider dual therapies that combine lysozymes with an antimicrobial peptide. Consistent with our earlier results, the charge modified lysozyme combination outperformed its wild type counterpart, yielding more than an order-of-magnitude reduction in bacterial burden following treatment with a single dose. PMID:24637705

  9. Preliminary crystallographic examination of a novel fungal lysozyme from Chalaropsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.; He, Xiao-Min; Lyne, James E.; Stubbs, Gerald; Hash, John H.

    1990-01-01

    The lysozyme from the fungus of the Chalaropsis species has been crystallized. This lysozyme displays no sequence homology with avian, phage, or mammalian lysozymes, however, preliminary studies indicate significant sequence homology with the bacterial lysozyme from Streptomyces. Both enzymes are unusual in possessing beta-1,4-N-acetylmuramidase and beta-1,4-N,6-O-diacetylmuramidase activity. The crystals grow from solutions of ammonium sulfate during growth periods from several months to a year. The space group is P2(1)2(1)2(1) with a = 34.0 A, b = 42.6 A, c = 122.1 A. Preliminary data indicate that there is 1 molecule/asymmetric unit.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of lysozyme in water/sugar solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerbret, A.; Affouard, F.; Bordat, P.; Hédoux, A.; Guinet, Y.; Descamps, M.

    2008-04-01

    Structural and dynamical properties of the solvent at the protein/solvent interface have been investigated by molecular dynamics simulations of lysozyme in trehalose, maltose and sucrose solutions. Results are discussed in the framework of the bioprotection phenomena. The analysis of the relative concentration of water oxygen atoms around lysozyme suggests that lysozyme is preferentially hydrated. When comparing the three sugars, trehalose is seen more excluded than maltose and sucrose. The preferential exclusion of sugars from the protein surface induces some differences in the behavior of trehalose and maltose, particularly at 50 and 60 wt% concentrations, that are not observed experimentally in binary sugar/mixtures. The dynamical slowing down of the solvent is suggested to mainly arise from the homogeneity of the water/sugar matrices controlled by the percolation of the sugar hydrogen bonds networks. Furthermore, lysozyme strongly increases relaxation times of solvent molecules at the protein/solvent interface.

  11. Characterization of bacteriophages virulent for Clostridium perfringens and identification of phage lytic enzymes as alternatives to antibiotics for potential control of the bacterium.

    PubMed

    Seal, Bruce S

    2013-02-01

    There has been a resurgent interest in the use of bacteriophages or their gene products to control bacterial pathogens as alternatives to currently used antibiotics. Clostridium perfringens is a gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a significant role in human foodborne disease as well as non-foodborne human, animal, and avian diseases. Countries that have complied with the ban on antimicrobial growth promoters in feeds have reported increased incidences of C. perfringens-associated diseases in poultry. To address these issues, new antimicrobial agents, putative lysins encoded by the genomes of bacteriophages, are being identified in our laboratory. Poultry intestinal material, soil, sewage, and poultry processing drainage water were screened for virulent bacteriophages that could lyse C. perfringens and produce clear plaques in spot assays. Bacteriophages were isolated that had long noncontractile tails, members of the family Siphoviridae, and with short noncontractile tails, members of the family Podoviridae. Several bacteriophage genes were identified that encoded N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidases, lysozyme-endopeptidases, and a zinc carboxypeptidase domain that has not been previously reported in viral genomes. Putative phage lysin genes (ply) were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant lysins were amidases capable of lysing both parental phage host strains of C. perfringens as well as other strains of the bacterium in spot and turbidity reduction assays, but did not lyse any clostridia beyond the species. Consequently, bacteriophage gene products could eventually be used to target bacterial pathogens, such as C. perfringens via a species-specific strategy, to control animal and human diseases without having deleterious effects on beneficial probiotic bacteria.

  12. An intrinsically shielded hydrogel for the adsorptive recovery of lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Zhang, Rongsheng; Eisenthal, Robert; Hubble, John

    2006-07-01

    The present paper addresses the selective recovery of lysozyme from egg white using CM-dextran (carboxymethyldextran)-based hydrogels containing Cibacron Blue as an affinity ligand and co-immobilized BSA intended to act as a shielding agent to reduce non-specific adsorption. Initial studies using pure lysozyme were conducted that indicated that the adsorption capacity increased with ligand density and that adsorption was well described by a Langmuir-type isotherm. The inclusion of BSA as a putative shielding agent did not decrease the adsorption capacity for lysozyme in single-adsorbate experiments. To assess the effectiveness of the shielding strategy, subsequent experiments were conducted with both defined lysozyme/ovalbumin mixtures and hen's-egg white. From these studies, the optimal operating conditions for lysozyme recovery have been determined. These include: optimal initial egg-white concentration [a 10% (v/v) solution of native egg white in the chosen buffer], affinity-ligand density (1.86 mM) and ligand-to-shielding-agent ratio (4:1). The purity of lysozyme obtained from egg white was improved from 69% with a non-shielded hydrogel to 94% with an intrinsically shielded hydrogel. Finally, the possibility of using a protein, rather than dextran-backbone-based, hydrogel was investigated. It was found that BSA could take the place of CM-dextran as the gel backbone in a simplified synthesis, producing a gel which also proved effective for lysozyme recovery with a 30% lysozyme in egg-white solution purified to approx. 92% in a single adsorption-desorption cycle.

  13. Enterococcus faecalis Constitutes an Unusual Bacterial Model in Lysozyme Resistance▿

    PubMed Central

    Hébert, Laurent; Courtin, Pascal; Torelli, Riccardo; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre; Auffray, Yanick; Benachour, Abdellah

    2007-01-01

    Lysozyme is an important and widespread compound of the host constitutive defense system, and it is assumed that Enterococcus faecalis is one of the few bacteria that are almost completely lysozyme resistant. On the basis of the sequence analysis of the whole genome of E. faecalis V583 strain, we identified two genes that are potentially involved in lysozyme resistance, EF_0783 and EF_1843. Protein products of these two genes share significant homology with Staphylococcus aureus peptidoglycan O-acetyltransferase (OatA) and Streptococcus pneumoniae N-acetylglucosamine deacetylase (PgdA), respectively. In order to determine whether EF_0783 and EF_1843 are involved in lysozyme resistance, we constructed their corresponding mutants and a double mutant. The ΔEF_0783 mutant and ΔEF_0783 ΔEF_1843 double mutant were shown to be more sensitive to lysozyme than the parental E. faecalis JH2-2 strain and ΔEF_1843 mutant were. However, compared to other bacteria, such as Listeria monocytogenes or S. pneumoniae, the tolerance of ΔEF_0783 and ΔEF_0783 ΔEF_1843 mutants towards lysozyme remains very high. Peptidoglycan structure analysis showed that EF_0783 modifies the peptidoglycan by O acetylation of N-acetyl muramic acid, while the EF_1843 deletion has no obvious effect on peptidoglycan structure under the same conditions. Moreover, the EF_0783 and EF_1843 deletions seem to significantly affect the ability of E. faecalis to survive within murine macrophages. In all, while EF_0783 is currently involved in the lysozyme resistance of E. faecalis, peptidoglycan O acetylation and de-N-acetylation are not the main mechanisms conferring high levels of lysozyme resistance to E. faecalis. PMID:17785473

  14. Destroying activity of magnetoferritin on lysozyme amyloid fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopcansky, Peter; Siposova, Katarina; Melnikova, Lucia; Bednarikova, Zuzana; Timko, Milan; Mitroova, Zuzana; Antosova, Andrea; Garamus, Vasil M.; Petrenko, Viktor I.; Avdeev, Mikhail V.; Gazova, Zuzana

    2015-03-01

    Presence of protein amyloid aggregates (oligomers, protofilaments, fibrils) is associated with many diseases as diabetes mellitus or Alzheimer's disease. The interaction between lysozyme amyloid fibrils and magnetoferritin loaded with different amount of iron atoms (168 or 532 atoms) has been investigated by small-angle X-rays scattering and thioflavin T fluorescence measurements. Results suggest that magnetoferritin caused an iron atom-concentration dependent reduction of lysozyme fibril size.

  15. FORMATION OF PROTOPLASTS FROM STREPTOCOCCUS FAECALIS BY LYSOZYME1

    PubMed Central

    Bibb, William R.; Straughn, W. R.

    1962-01-01

    Bibb, William R. (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill) and W. R. Straughn. Formation of protoplasts from Streptococcus faecalis by lysozyme. J. Bacteriol. 84:1094–1098. 1962.—Incubation of whole cells of Streptococcus faecalis F24 in the presence of the crystalline egg-white lysozyme and appropriate sucrose concentration resulted in the formation of discrete spherical structures. On dilution, these osmotically fragile structures lysed immediately. Methyl pentose determinations on isolated cell walls and protoplast membranes verified the presence of rhamnose in the cell walls and its essentially complete absence in protoplast membranes. Cell walls were rendered soluble by lysozyme. After lysozyme treatment of cell walls, 96% of the rhamnose present was not sedimented by centrifugation at 12,500 × g for 30 min. No cell-wall structures were recognized by phasecontrast or electron microscopy. After direct lysis of whole cells of S. faecalis F24 by lysozyme, protoplast membranes were isolated. It is concluded that, in the strain of group D streptococcus studied, lysozyme effectively removes the cell wall. Images PMID:13968087

  16. Penetration and fusion of phospholipid vesicles by lysozyme

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.; Kim, H.

    1989-10-01

    The lysozyme-induced fusion of phosphatidylserine/phosphatidylethanolamine vesicles as studied at a wide range of pH is found to correlate well with the binding of this protein to the vesicles. An identical 6000 molecular weight segment of lysozyme at the N-terminal region is found to be protected from tryptic digestion when initially incubated with vesicles at several pH values. Only this segment is labeled by dansyl chloride, which is partitioned into the bilayer. These results suggest the penetration of one segment of lysozyme into the bilayer. Photoactivated labeling of the membrane-penetrating segment of lysozyme with 3-(trifluoromethyl)-3-(({sup 125}I)iodophenyl)diazirine (({sup 125}I)TID) and subsequent identification of the labeled residues by Edman degradation and gamma-ray counting indicate that four amino acids from the N-terminal are located outside the hydrophobic core of the bilayer. Although treatment of the membrane-embedded segment with aminopeptidase failed to cleave any amino acids from the N-terminal, it appears that a loop of lysozyme segment near the N-terminal penetrates into the bilayer at acidic pH. A helical wheel diagram shows that the labeling is done mainly on one surface of the alpha-helix. The penetration kinetics as studied by time-dependent ({sup 125}I)TID labeling coincide with the fusion kinetics, strongly suggesting that the penetration of the lysozyme segment into the vesicles is the cause of the fusion.

  17. Fluorescence study of the membrane effects of aggregated lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Kutsenko, Olga K; Trusova, Valeriya M; Gorbenko, Galyna P; Lipovaya, Anna S; Slobozhanina, Ekaterina I; Lukyanenko, Lyudmila M; Deligeorgiev, Todor; Vasilev, Aleksey

    2013-11-01

    The last decade has seen unprecedented upsurge of interest in the structural and toxic properties of particular type of protein aggregates, amyloid fibrils, associated with a number of pathological states. In the present study fluorescence spectroscopy technique has been employed to gain further insight into the membrane-related mechanisms of amyloid toxicity. To this end, erythrocyte model system composed of liposomes and hemoglobin was subjected to the action of oligomeric and fibrillar lysozyme. Acrylamide quenching of lysozyme fluorescence showed that solvent accessibility of Trp62 and Trp108 increases upon the protein fibrillization. Resonance energy transfer measurements suggested the possibility of direct complexation between hemoglobin and aggregated lysozyme. Using the novel squaraine dye SQ-1 it was demonstrated that aggregated lysozyme is capable of inhibiting lipid peroxidation processes. Fluorescent probes pyrene, Prodan and diphenylhexatriene were employed to characterize the membrane-modifying properties of hemoglobin and lysozyme. Both oligomeric and fibrillar forms of lysozyme were found to exert condensing influence on lipid bilayer structure, with the membrane effects of fibrils being less amenable to modulation by hemoglobin.

  18. Lytic Clostridium perfringens Bacteriophage 39-O Genomic

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Screening for bacteriophages lytic for Clostridium perfringens was completed utilizing filtered samples obtained from poultry (intestinal material), soil, sewage and poultry processing drainage water. Following limit dilution cloning and three rounds of plaque purification lytic phage preparations ...

  19. The next generation of bacteriophage therapy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Timothy K; Koeris, Michael S

    2011-10-01

    Bacteriophage therapy for bacterial infections is a concept with an extensive but controversial history. There has been a recent resurgence of interest into bacteriophages owing to the increasing incidence of antibiotic resistance and virulent bacterial pathogens. Despite these efforts, bacteriophage therapy remains an underutilized option in Western medicine due to challenges such as regulation, limited host range, bacterial resistance to phages, manufacturing, side effects of bacterial lysis, and delivery. Recent advances in biotechnology, bacterial diagnostics, macromolecule delivery, and synthetic biology may help to overcome these technical hurdles. These research efforts must be coupled with practical and rigorous approaches at academic, commercial, and regulatory levels in order to successfully advance bacteriophage therapy into clinical settings.

  20. Lysozyme dimer association: Similarities and differences compared with lysozyme monomer association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onuma, Kazuo; Inaka, Koji

    2008-03-01

    The protein with a molecular weight of 28.6 kDa in lysozyme solution, which has been recognized as a lysozyme dimer, was purified and its association was observed using time-resolved static light scattering and dynamic light scattering under the same buffer condition as that used in lysozyme monomer association. The chromatography results and SDS-PAGE analysis showed that the bonding state of each molecule in a dimer unit was not uniform, i.e., there were at least two kinds of bonds, strong and weak. Some of the weak-bonded dimmers dissociated to monomers (molecular weight: 14.3 kDa) in the SDS-PAGE process. The relative amount of weak-bonded dimers greatly affected the association kinetics. With a 99% pure dimer solution (1% monomers in SDS-PAGE), association proceeded in the same manner as that of a monomer solution: the Zimm-square plot had a concave shape with a maximum at a particular q2 for apparent protein concentrations, up to 2.4 mg/mL. The dynamic light-scattering data showed clear bimodal (dimer and aggregate), distributions. With a 95% pure dimer solution, the association behavior drastically changed when the apparent concentration exceeded 2.0 mg/mL. The Zimm-square plot had a bending point at a low q2, and two discrete lines fitted the plot. The particles in the solution were either oligomers or large aggregates, both of which had polydispersity distributions, and an amorphous phase formed from the aggregates. This was not observed for monomer association.

  1. Calcium-binding and structural stability of echidna and canine milk lysozymes.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, M; Kawano, K; Nitta, K

    1998-10-01

    For echidna and canine milk lysozymes, which were presumed to be the calcium-binding lysozymes by their amino acid sequences, we have quantitated their calcium-binding strength and examined their guanidine unfolding profiles. The calcium-binding constants of echidna and canine lysozymes were determined to be 8.6 x 10(6) M(-1) and 8.9 x 10(6) M(-1) in 0.1 M KCl at pH 7.1 and 20 C, respectively. The unfolding of decalcified canine lysozyme proceeds in the same manner as that of alpha-lactalbumin, through a stable molten globule intermediate. However, neither calcium-bound nor decalcified echidna lysozyme shows a stable molten globule intermediate. This unfolding profile of echidna lysozyme is identical to that of conventional lysozymes and pigeon egg-white lysozyme, avian calcium-binding lysozyme. This result supports the suggestion of Prager and Jolles (Prager EM, Jolles P. 1996. Animal lysozymes c and g: An overview. In: Jolles P, ed. Lysozymes: Model enzymes in biochemistry and biology. Basel-Boston-Berlin: Birkhauzer Verlag. pp 9-31) that the lineage of avian and echidna calcium-binding lysozymes and that of eutherian calcium-binding lysozymes diverged separately from that of conventional lysozymes.

  2. [Spontaneous bacteriophage induction in Bacillus thuringiensis].

    PubMed

    Besaeva, S G; Mikhaĭlov, A A; Petrova, T M; Tur, A I; Bystrova, E V

    1987-01-01

    The production of temperate bacteriophages was studied in the process of batch cultivation of three Bacillus thuringiensis lysogenic strains. Phage titres were determined using an indicator culture (IPM-1148). The growth of bacteriophages was induced when thermoactivated spores germinated. Some cells (1.10(-3)-2.10(-3)) underwent lysis without their division. The subsequent lytic cycles occurred in the actively growing culture. Phage titres ceased to rise before the exponential growth phase was over.

  3. Arthrobacter globiformis and its bacteriophage in soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casida, L. E., Jr.; Liu, K.-C.

    1974-01-01

    An attempt was made to correlate bacteriophages for Arthrobacter globiformis with soils containing that bacterium. The phages were not detected unless the soil was nutritionally amended (with glucose or sucrose) and incubated for several days. Phage was continuously produced after amendment without the addition of host Arthrobacter. These results indicate that the bacteriophage is present in a masked state and that the bacteria are present in an insensitive form which becomes sensitive after addition of nutrient.

  4. Inactivation of E. coli, B. subtilis spores, and MS2, T4, and T7 phage using UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation.

    PubMed

    Mamane, Hadas; Shemer, Hilla; Linden, Karl G

    2007-07-31

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the potential of an advanced oxidation process (AOP) for microbiocidal and virucidal inactivation. The viruses chosen for this study were bacteriophage MS2, T4, and T7. In addition, Bacillus subtilis spores and Escherichia coli were studied. By using H(2)O(2) in the presence of filtered ultraviolet (UV) irradiation (UV/H(2)O(2)) to generate wavelengths above 295nm, the direct UV photolysis disinfection mechanism was minimized, while disinfection by H(2)O(2) was also negligible. Virus T4 and E. coli in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were sensitive to >295nm filtered UV irradiation (without H(2)O(2)), while MS2 was very resistant. Addition of H(2)O(2) at 25mg/l in the presence of filtered UV irradiation over a 15min reaction time did not result in any additional disinfection of virus T4, while an additional one log inactivation for T7 and 2.5 logs for MS2 were obtained. With E. coli, only a slight additional effect was observed when H(2)O(2) was added. B. subtilis spores did not show any inactivation at any of the conditions used in this study. The OH radical exposure (CT value) was calculated to present the relationship between the hydroxyl radical dose and microbial inactivation.

  5. Taking Bacteriophage Therapy Seriously: A Moral Argument

    PubMed Central

    Verbeken, Gilbert; Huys, Isabelle; Jennes, Serge; Chanishvili, Nina; Górski, Andrzej; De Vos, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The excessive and improper use of antibiotics has led to an increasing incidence of bacterial resistance. In Europe the yearly number of infections caused by multidrug resistant bacteria is more than 400.000, each year resulting in 25.000 attributable deaths. Few new antibiotics are in the pipeline of the pharmaceutical industry. Early in the 20th century, bacteriophages were described as entities that can control bacterial populations. Although bacteriophage therapy was developed and practiced in Europe and the former Soviet republics, the use of bacteriophages in clinical setting was neglected in Western Europe since the introduction of traditional antibiotics. Given the worldwide antibiotic crisis there is now a growing interest in making bacteriophage therapy available for use in modern western medicine. Despite the growing interest, access to bacteriophage therapy remains highly problematic. In this paper, we argue that the current state of affairs is morally unacceptable and that all stakeholders (pharmaceutical industry, competent authorities, lawmakers, regulators, and politicians) have the moral duty and the shared responsibility towards making bacteriophage therapy urgently available for all patients in need. PMID:24868534

  6. Structural Aberrations in T-Even Bacteriophage IV. Parameters of Induction and Formation of Lollipops

    PubMed Central

    Bolin, Rex W.; Cummings, Donald J.

    1974-01-01

    Previous results from our laboratory have shown that when a T-even bacteriophage-infected bacterial cell was exposed to l-canavanine followed by an l-arginine chase, a monster phage particle, termed a lollipop, was formed. We now describe certain parameters concerning (i) the induction and (ii) the formation of T4 lollipops. The induction step involves a T4 late function, and can require only a 3-min exposure to l-canavanine. Short pulses of l-canavanine result in the formation of shorter lollipops indicating the presence of a possible “precursor substance” which is influenced by l-canavanine. DNA synthesis is inhibited by l-canavanine but is stimulated 20 to 40 min after the addition of l-arginine. Chloramphenicol prevents both responses indicating a possible protein involvement. The appearance of lollipops and phage was noted only after 25 min after the addition of l-arginine. Images PMID:4833613

  7. Incidence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus Bacteriophages and Other Vibrio Bacteriophages in Marine Samples †

    PubMed Central

    Baross, John A.; Liston, John; Morita, Richard Y.

    1978-01-01

    Vibrio bacteriophages were isolated by enrichment from 177 of 643 samples of marine molluscan shellfish, crustaceans, seawater, and sediments. The predominant bacteriophage types isolated were specific for some strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. A high frequency of phage isolations was also observed with strains of agar-digesting vibrios (21 of 56) and psychrophilic vibrios (14 of 72) that were originally isolated from non-shellfish growing areas. No bacteriophages were isolated against V. alginolyticus and only rarely for V. anguillarum even though these were the two most abundant species found in near-shore environments. No V. cholerae phages were isolated. It was also determined from quantitative studies on the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) obtained from two environments in Washington and Oregon that the titers of V. parahaemolyticus bacteriophages increased with increasing seasonal water temperatures and that this was proportional to the increase in numbers of mesophilic vibrios and not with the incidence of V. parahaemolyticus. Titers of V. parahaemolyticus bacteriophages occasionally exceeded 106 per g of oyster during the summer months. Specific V. parahaemolyticus bacteriophages were also isolated from market seafoods and other marine samples that originated in cold environments where no mesophilic vibrios are expected to be found. The possibility that V. parahaemolyticus bacteriophages originate from Vibrio spp. other than V. parahaemolyticus and the role of these bacteriophages in the ecology of marine vibrios are discussed. PMID:727781

  8. Tradeoffs in bacteriophage life histories.

    PubMed

    Keen, Eric C

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are the most abundant biological entities on the planet, yet most classical principles of evolutionary biology and ecology were not developed with viruses in mind. Here, the concept of biological tradeoffs, a fundamental tenet of life history theory, is examined in the context of bacteriophage biology. Specifically, several important parameters of phage life histories-replication, persistence, host range, and adsorption-are evaluated for tradeoffs. Available data indicate that replication rate is strongly negatively correlated with both persistence and host range, suggesting that the well-documented tradeoff in macroorganisms between offspring production and offspring quality also applies to phages. The biological tradeoffs that appear to characterize viruses' life histories have potential importance for viral evolution, ecology, and pathogenesis.

  9. Pathogen detection using engineered bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Smartt, Abby E; Xu, Tingting; Jegier, Patricia; Carswell, Jessica J; Blount, Samuel A; Sayler, Gary S; Ripp, Steven

    2012-04-01

    Bacteriophages, or phages, are bacterial viruses that can infect a broad or narrow range of host organisms. Knowing the host range of a phage allows it to be exploited in targeting various pathogens. Applying phages for the identification of microorganisms related to food and waterborne pathogens and pathogens of clinical significance to humans and animals has a long history, and there has to some extent been a recent revival in these applications as phages have become more extensively integrated into novel detection, identification, and monitoring technologies. Biotechnological and genetic engineering strategies applied to phages are responsible for some of these new methods, but even natural unmodified phages are widely applicable when paired with appropriate innovative detector platforms. This review highlights the use of phages as pathogen detector interfaces to provide the reader with an up-to-date inventory of phage-based biodetection strategies.

  10. Low-temperature T4-like coliphages vB_EcoM-VR5, vB_EcoM-VR7 and vB_EcoM-VR20.

    PubMed

    Kaliniene, Laura; Klausa, Vytautas; Truncaite, Lidija

    2010-06-01

    Bacteriophages vB_EcoM-VR5, vB_EcoM-VR7 and vB_EcoM-VR20, showing an unusual low-temperature plating profile and producing constantly growing plaques, were isolated from aquatic environments of Lithuania. Although vB_EcoM-VR5, vB_EcoM-VR7 and vB_EcoM-VR20 resembled phage T4 both in their genome size and in their major structural protein (gp23) pattern, physiological properties of all three phages tested differed significantly from those of T4. With an optimum temperature for plating around 24 degrees C and a high efficiency of plating in the range 7-30 degrees C, bacteriophages vB_EcoM-VR7 and vB_EcoM-VR20 failed to plate at 37 degrees C, whereas phage vB_EcoM-VR5 could not be plated at 40 degrees C. Sequence analysis of diagnostic g23 PCR products revealed that g23 of vB_EcoM-VR5, vB_EcoM-VR7 and vB_EcoM-VR20 differed from the corresponding T4 g23 DNA sequence by 21, 21 and 20%, respectively.

  11. Impurity effects on orientation of lysozyme crystals nucleated on fatty acid thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, T.; Hondoh, H.; Nakada, T.

    2008-04-01

    Commercially available lysozyme samples that have different lot numbers (E02Z04 and E05802) were crystallized on fatty acid thin films. The orientation of lysozyme crystals nucleated on the films was investigated by atomic force microscopy and optical microscopy. The numbers of lysozyme crystals with specific planes parallel to the films are different. In other words, the impurities contained in commercial lysozyme significantly affect the orientation of lysozyme crystals. Detailed analysis of the orientation distribution of the lysozyme crystals nucleated from the purified sample showed that acetic acid is one of the substances promote the epitaxy.

  12. Characterization of tail sheath protein of giant bacteriophage phiKZ Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Kurochkina, Lidia P.; Sachkova, Maria Yu.; Sykilinda, Nina N.; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V.

    2009-12-20

    The tail sheath protein of giant bacteriophage phiKZ Pseudomonas aeruginosa encoded by gene 29 was identified and its expression system was developed. Localization of the protein on the virion was confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy. Properties of gene product (gp) 29 were studied by electron microscopy, immunoblotting and limited trypsinolysis. Recombinant gp29 assembles into the regular tubular structures (polysheaths) of variable length. Trypsin digestion of gp29 within polysheaths or extended sheath of virion results in specific cleavage of the peptide bond between Arg135 and Asp136. However, this cleavage does not affect polymeric structure of polysheaths, sheaths and viral infectivity. Digestion by trypsin of the C-truncated gp29 mutant, lacking the ability to self-assemble, results in formation of a stable protease-resistant fragment. Although there is no sequence homology of phiKZ proteins to proteins of other bacteriophages, some characteristic biochemical properties of gp29 revealed similarities to the tail sheath protein of bacteriophage T4.

  13. Lytic sensitivity of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 to lysozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Iacono, V J; Boldt, P R; MacKay, B J; Cho, M I; Pollock, J J

    1983-01-01

    The ability of both human and hen egg white lysozymes to lyse Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 was investigated. Lysis was followed optically at 540 nm by measuring the percent reduction in turbidity of freshly harvested log-phase cells suspended in Tris-maleate buffers within a wide range of pH (5.2 to 8.5) and molarity (0.01 to 0.2 M) and containing various amounts of enzyme and EDTA. In several instances, treated microorganisms were subsequently examined in thin sections by electron microscopy. Reductions in turbidity and clearing of suspensions occurred with small amounts of lysozyme (less than 1 microgram) under relatively alkaline conditions and at low ionic strength and in the presence of small amounts of EDTA (greater than 0.01 mM). Under the most alkaline conditions, EDTA alone effected turbidity reductions similar to those observed in the presence of lysozyme, which suggested that EDTA not only increased outer membrane permeability but also caused cell lysis. Ultrastructural analysis did not always correspond to turbidimetric observations. Cell lysis was virtually complete in suspensions containing both lysozyme and EDTA. However, in contrast to turbidimetric findings, a significant percentage of cells (greater than 25%) was lysed in the presence of lysozyme alone. Furthermore, significant damage occurred in the presence of EDTA alone. Spheroplast-like cell ghosts were present which surrounded condensed cytoplasm or relatively clear spaces. These findings further support the concept of the requirement for electron microscopy to assess lytic damage in addition to turbidimetric and biochemical methods. Our results are the first to demonstrate the remarkable sensitivity of A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 to lysozyme and to show that EDTA not only affects outer membrane permeability but effects cell lysis, possibly through activation of autolytic enzymes at the cytoplasmic membrane. The exquisite sensitivity of A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 to lysis could be

  14. Foam fractionation of binary mixtures of lysozyme and albumin.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, C E; Jay, M; Bummer, P M

    2000-06-01

    A nitrogen gas-based foam fractionation method was employed to separate model proteins, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and hen egg white lysozyme, from each other. Fractionation was characterized by the separation ratio and by recovery of proteins in the retentate as a function of the nominal pore size of the gas dispersion frit and solution conditions (pH and ionic strength). For binary mixtures of the proteins at pH 7.4, and ionic strength (mu) of 0.18 M, the recovery of lysozyme and the separation ratio were both dependent on the frit size employed to generate the foam. At low ionic strength (mu = 0.01 M), separation was only somewhat greater with the small pore size frits, although at values significantly lower than those found for high ionic strength. The diminished separations appear to be due to the only slight changes in recoveries observed for BSA and lysozyme.%Separation ratios of lysozyme from BSA in solutions either of high or low ionic strength were maximal at pH values equal to or less than the isoelectric point (pI) of BSA. Separation ratios were lower when foaming was carried out under low compared with high ionic strength. The recovery of lysozyme was enhanced by foaming from solutions of low pH and high ionic strength. Recoveries of BSA were greatest when the molecule was negatively charged. Electrical interactions between the positively charged lysozyme and negatively charged BSA may explain the diminished separation ratios and enhanced recoveries. Enzyme activity studies of lysozyme remaining in the retentate showed no change from prefoam activity.

  15. Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Analysis of Bacteriophasge T4 UvsY Recombination Mediator Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,H.; Beernink, H.; Rould, M.; Morrical, S.

    2006-01-01

    Bacteriophage T4 UvsY protein is considered to be the prototype of recombination mediator proteins, a class of proteins which assist in the loading of recombinases onto DNA. Wild-type and Se-substituted UvsY protein have been expressed and purified and crystallized by hanging-drop vapor diffusion. The crystals diffract to 2.4 {angstrom} using in-house facilities and to 2.2 {angstrom} at NSLS, Brookhaven National Laboratory. The crystals belong to space group P422, P4{sub 2}22, P42{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 2}2{sub 1}2, the ambiguity arising from pseudo-centering, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 76.93, c = 269.8 {angstrom}. Previous biophysical characterization of UvsY indicates that it exists primarily as a hexamer in solution. Along with the absence of a crystallographic threefold, this suggests that the asymmetric unit of these crystals is likely to contain either three monomers, giving a solvent content of 71%, or six monomers, giving a solvent content of 41%.

  16. Partial characterization of Acanthamoeba castellanii (T4 genotype) DNase activity.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Junaid; Panjwani, Shamvil; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2015-02-01

    The deoxyribonuclease (DNase) activities of Acanthamoeba castellanii belonging to the T4 genotype were investigated. Using zymographic assays, the DNase activities had approximate molecular masses of 25 and 35 kDa. A. castellanii DNases exhibited activity at wide-ranging temperature of up to 60 °C and at pH ranging from 4 to 9. The DNases activities were unaffected by proteinase-K treatment, divalent cations such as Ca(++), Cu(++), Mg(++), and Zn(++), or divalent cation chelating agent ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The non-reliance on divalent cations and homology data suggests that A. castellanii DNases belong to the class of eukaryotic lysosomal DNase II but exhibit robust properties. The DNases activity in A. castellanii interfered with the genomic DNA extraction. Extraction methods involving EDTA, SDS, and proteinase-K resulted in low yield of genomic DNA. On the other hand, these methods resulted in high yield of genomic DNA from human cells suggesting the robust nature of A. castellanii DNases that are unaffected by reagents normally used in blocking eukaryotic DNases. In contrast, the use of chaotropic agent such as guanidine thiocyanate improved the yield of genomic DNA from A. castellanii cells significantly. Further purification and characterization of Acanthamoeba DNases is needed to study their non-classic distinct properties and to determine their role in the biology, cellular differentiation, cell cycle progression, and arrest of Acanthamoeba.

  17. A three-way junction aptasensor for lysozyme detection.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yunfeng; Gan, Siwen; Xu, Qinghao; Qiu, Xiaowen; Gao, Peiyi; Huang, Shasheng

    2013-01-15

    A well-designed three-way junction (TWJ) aptasensor for lysozyme detection was developed based on target-binding-induced conformational change of aptamer-complementary DNA (cDNA) as probe. A ferrocene (Fc)-tagged cDNA is partially hybridized with an anti-lysozyme aptamer to form a folded structure where there is a coaxial stacking of two helices and the third one at an acute angle. In addition, the fabrication of the sensor was achieved via the single-step method, which offered a good condition for sensing. In the absence of lysozyme, electron transfer (eT), through the coaxial two helices called "conductive path", is allowed between Fc-labeled moiety and the electrode. The binding of lysozyme to the aptamer blocks eT, leading to diminished redox signal. This aptasensor with an instinct signal attenuation factor shows a high sensitivity to lysozyme, and the response data is fitted by nonlinear least-squares to Hill equation. Detection limit is 0.2nM with a dynamic range extending to 100nM. Compared with existing electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)-based approaches, TWJ-DNA aptasensor was demonstrated to be more specific for detection and simpler for regeneration procedure.

  18. Effects of Purification on the Crystallization of Lysozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewing, Felecia L.; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Van Der Woerd, Mark; Pusey, Marc L.

    1996-01-01

    We have additionally purified a commercial lysozyme preparation by cation exchange chromatography, followed by recrystallization. This material is 99.96% pure with respect to macromolecular impurities. At basic pH, the purified lysozyme gave only tetragonal crystals at 20 C. Protein used directly from the bottle, prepared by dialysis against distilled water, or which did not bind to the cation exchange column had considerably altered crystallization behavior. Lysozyme which did not bind to the cation exchange column was subsequently purified by size exclusion chromatography. This material gave predominately bundles of rod-shaped crystals with some small tetragonal crystals at lower pHs. The origin of the bundled rod habit was postulated to be a thermally dependent tetragonal- orthorhombic change in the protein structure. This was subsequently ruled out on the basis of crystallization behavior and growth rate experiments. This suggests that heterogeneous forms of lysozyme may be responsible. These results demonstrate three classes of impurities: (1) small molecules, which may be removed by dialysis; (2) macromolecules, which are removable by chromatographic techniques; and (3) heterogeneous forms of the protein, which can be removed in this case by cation exchange chromatography. Of these, heterogeneous forms of the lysozyme apparently have the greatest affect on its crystallization behavior.

  19. Interplay between the mechanics of bacteriophage fibers and the strength of virus-host links.

    PubMed

    Ares, P; Garcia-Doval, C; Llauró, A; Gómez-Herrero, J; van Raaij, M J; de Pablo, P J

    2014-05-01

    Viral fibers play a central role in many virus infection mechanisms since they recognize the corresponding host and establish a mechanical link to its surface. Specifically, bacteriophages have to anchor to bacteria through the fibers surrounding the tail before starting the viral DNA translocation into the host. The protein gene product (gp) 37 from bacteriophage T4 long tail fibers forms a fibrous parallel homotrimer located at the distal end of the long tail fibers. Biochemical data indicate that, at least, three of these fibers are required for initial host cell interaction but do not reveal why three and no other numbers are required. By using atomic force microscopy, we obtained high-resolution images of gp37 fibers adsorbed on a mica substrate in buffer conditions and probed their local mechanical properties. Our experiments of radial indentation at the nanometer scale provided a radial stiffness of ∼ 0.08 N/m and a breaking force of ∼ 120 pN. In addition, we performed finite element analysis and determined a Young's modulus of ∼ 20 MPa. From these mechanical parameters, we hypothesize that three viral fibers provide enough mechanical strength to prevent a T4 virus from being detached from the bacteria by the viral particle Brownian motion, delivering a biophysical justification for the previous biochemical data.

  20. Interplay between the mechanics of bacteriophage fibers and the strength of virus-host links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ares, P.; Garcia-Doval, C.; Llauró, A.; Gómez-Herrero, J.; van Raaij, M. J.; de Pablo, P. J.

    2014-05-01

    Viral fibers play a central role in many virus infection mechanisms since they recognize the corresponding host and establish a mechanical link to its surface. Specifically, bacteriophages have to anchor to bacteria through the fibers surrounding the tail before starting the viral DNA translocation into the host. The protein gene product (gp) 37 from bacteriophage T4 long tail fibers forms a fibrous parallel homotrimer located at the distal end of the long tail fibers. Biochemical data indicate that, at least, three of these fibers are required for initial host cell interaction but do not reveal why three and no other numbers are required. By using atomic force microscopy, we obtained high-resolution images of gp37 fibers adsorbed on a mica substrate in buffer conditions and probed their local mechanical properties. Our experiments of radial indentation at the nanometer scale provided a radial stiffness of ˜0.08 N/m and a breaking force of ˜120 pN. In addition, we performed finite element analysis and determined a Young's modulus of ˜20 MPa. From these mechanical parameters, we hypothesize that three viral fibers provide enough mechanical strength to prevent a T4 virus from being detached from the bacteria by the viral particle Brownian motion, delivering a biophysical justification for the previous biochemical data.

  1. Deformation behavior of aluminum alloy 6111-T4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Carol

    2000-10-01

    Although aluminum alloys have found increasing usage in the automotive industry, their lower tensile elongations as compared with the low carbon steels they replace has raised concern about their lower formability. Lower formability imposes design and economic constraints on the automakers. The cause behind this lower elongation is the primary focus of this research. The specific alloy studied is 6111-T4 (Al-0.76Si-0.61Mg-0.82Cu in w/o), which is used in automobile outer body panels. In order to determine the factors that are limiting the elongation, it is critical to understand the deformation behavior of this alloy. To investigate the deformation behavior of this alloy, uniaxial tensile tests were performed at various temperatures (300K, 77K and 4.2K), strain rates (10-4, 5 x 10-4 , 10-3, 10-2, 10 -1/s) and specimen geometries. The work hardening and deformation behavior were examined both qualitatively and quantitatively. Ex-situ and in-situ observations were made on the tensile samples by using videography and optical microscopy. Several important findings resulted from this study. First, oscillations in the work hardening are due to the formation and propagation of deformation islands and deformation bands. Deformation islands are areas of localized deformation that occur in a cluster of grains. Second, the microstructural feature dominating the formation and propagation of the islands are the clustering of similarly oriented grains and the clustering of large sized grains. Third, the sharp drop in work hardening near the diffuse necking criterion for the 300K, 10-4 is test samples is due to the inhomogeneous deformation arising from these clusters. Finally, diffuse and local necks form before the theoretical predictions. The inhomogeneous microstructures causing the deformation islands and bands to form and propagate, thus leading to strain localization and eventual premature failure.

  2. 21 CFR 866.2050 - Staphylococcal typing bacteriophage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Staphylococcal typing bacteriophage. 866.2050 Section 866.2050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Staphylococcal typing bacteriophage. (a) Identification. A staphylococcal typing bacteriophage is a...

  3. 21 CFR 866.2050 - Staphylococcal typing bacteriophage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Staphylococcal typing bacteriophage. 866.2050 Section 866.2050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Staphylococcal typing bacteriophage. (a) Identification. A staphylococcal typing bacteriophage is a...

  4. 21 CFR 866.2050 - Staphylococcal typing bacteriophage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Staphylococcal typing bacteriophage. 866.2050 Section 866.2050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Staphylococcal typing bacteriophage. (a) Identification. A staphylococcal typing bacteriophage is a...

  5. 21 CFR 172.785 - Listeria-specific bacteriophage preparation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Listeria-specific bacteriophage preparation. 172... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.785 Listeria-specific bacteriophage...) bacteriophages (phages) specific against L. monocytogenes. (2) Each phage is deposited at, and assigned...

  6. 21 CFR 172.785 - Listeria-specific bacteriophage preparation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Listeria-specific bacteriophage preparation. 172... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.785 Listeria-specific bacteriophage...) bacteriophages (phages) specific against L. monocytogenes. (2) Each phage is deposited at, and assigned...

  7. 21 CFR 172.785 - Listeria-specific bacteriophage preparation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Listeria-specific bacteriophage preparation. 172... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.785 Listeria -specific bacteriophage...) bacteriophages (phages) specific against L. monocytogenes. (2) Each phage is deposited at, and assigned...

  8. 21 CFR 172.785 - Listeria-specific bacteriophage preparation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Listeria-specific bacteriophage preparation. 172... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.785 Listeria-specific bacteriophage...) bacteriophages (phages) specific against L. monocytogenes. (2) Each phage is deposited at, and assigned...

  9. 21 CFR 866.2050 - Staphylococcal typing bacteriophage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Staphylococcal typing bacteriophage. 866.2050 Section 866.2050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Staphylococcal typing bacteriophage. (a) Identification. A staphylococcal typing bacteriophage is a...

  10. Analysis of Monomer Aggregation and Crystal Growth Rates of Lysozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadarajah, Arunan

    1996-01-01

    This project was originally conceived to analyze the extensive data of tetragonal lysozyme crystal growth rates collected at NASA/MSFC by Dr. Marc L. Pusey's research group. At that time the lack of analysis of the growth rates was hindering progress in understanding the growth mechanism of tetragonal lysozyme and other protein crystals. After the project was initiated our initial analysis revealed unexpected complexities in the growth rate behavior. This resulted in an expansion in the scope of the project to include a comprehensive investigation of the growth mechanisms of tetragonal lysozyme crystals. A discussion of this research is included as well a list of presentations and publications resulting from the research. This project contributed significantly toward the education of several students and fostered extensive collaborations between investigators.

  11. Cloning of linear DNAs in vivo by overexpressed T4 DNA ligase: construction of a T4 phage hoc gene display vector.

    PubMed

    Ren, Z J; Baumann, R G; Black, L W

    1997-08-22

    A method was developed to clone linear DNAs by overexpressing T4 phage DNA ligase in vivo, based upon recombination deficient E. coli derivatives that carry a plasmid containing an inducible T4 DNA ligase gene. Integration of this ligase-plasmid into the chromosome of such E. coli allows standard plasmid isolation following linear DNA transformation of the strains containing high levels of T4 DNA ligase. Intramolecular ligation allows high efficiency recircularization of cohesive and blunt-end terminated linear plasmid DNAs following transformation. Recombinant plasmids could be constructed in vivo by co-transformation with linearized vector plus insert DNAs, followed by intermolecular ligation in the T4 ligase strains to yield clones without deletions or rearrangements. Thus, in vitro packaged lox-site terminated plasmid DNAs injected from phage T4 were recircularized by T4 ligase in vivo with an efficiency comparable to CRE recombinase. Clones that expressed a capsid-binding 14-aa N-terminal peptide extension derivative of the HOC (highly antigenic outer capsid) protein for T4 phage hoc gene display were constructed by co-transformation with a linearized vector and a PCR-synthesized hoc gene. Therefore, the T4 DNA ligase strains are useful for cloning linear DNAs in vivo by transformation or transduction of DNAs with nonsequence-specific but compatible DNA ends.

  12. Probing lysozyme conformation with light reveals a new folding intermediate.

    PubMed

    Hamill, Andrea C; Wang, Shao-Chun; Lee, C Ted

    2005-11-22

    A means to control lysozyme conformation with light illumination has been developed using the interaction of the protein with a photoresponsive surfactant. Upon exposure to the appropriate wavelength of light, the azobenzene surfactant undergoes a reversible photoisomerization, with the visible-light (trans) form being more hydrophobic than the UV-light (cis) form. As a result, surfactant binding to the protein and, thus, protein unfolding, can be tuned with light. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements were used to provide detailed information of the protein conformation in solution. Shape-reconstruction methods applied to the SANS data indicate that under visible light the protein exhibits a native-like form at low surfactant concentrations, a partially swollen form at intermediate concentrations, and a swollen/unfolded form at higher surfactant concentrations. Furthermore, the SANS data combined with FT-IR spectroscopic analysis of the protein secondary structure reveal that unfolding occurs primarily in the alpha domain of lysozyme, while the beta domain remains relatively intact. Thus, the surfactant-unfolded intermediate of lysozyme appears to be a separate structure than the well-known alpha-domain intermediate of lysozyme that contains a folded alpha domain and unfolded beta domain. Because the interactions between the photosurfactant and protein can be tuned with light, illumination with UV light returns the protein to a native-like conformation. Fluorescence emission data of the nonpolar probe Nile red indicate that hydrophobic domains become available for probe partitioning in surfactant-protein solutions under visible light, while the availability of these hydrophobic domains to the probe decrease under UV light. Dynamic light scattering and UV-vis spectroscopic measurements further confirm the shape-reconstruction findings and reveal three discrete conformations of lysozyme. The results clearly demonstrate that visible light causes a

  13. The solubility of hen egg-white lysozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Sandra B.; Twigg, Pamela J.; Baird, James K.; Meehan, Edward J.

    1988-01-01

    The equilibrium solubility of chicken egg-white lysozyme in the presence of crystalline solid state was determined as a function of NaCl concentration, pH, and temperature. The solubility curves obtained represent a region of the lysozyme phase diagram. This diagram makes it possible to determine the supersaturation of a given set of conditions or to achieve identical supersaturations by different combinations of parameters. The temperature dependence of the solubility permits the evaluation of Delta-H of crystallization. The data indicate a negative heat of crystallization for the tetragonal crystal form but a positive heat of crystallization for the high-temperature orthorhombic form.

  14. The boundary molecules in a lysozyme pattern exhibit preferential antibody binding.

    PubMed

    Gao, Pei; Cai, Yuguang

    2008-09-16

    Lysozyme was immobilized on a prefabricated carboxylic acid terminated chemical template, forming a tightly packed, one monolayer thick lysozyme pattern. Polyclonal anti-lysozyme antibodies can bind to the immobilized lysozyme pattern. Atomic force microscope (AFM) observation reveals that the antibodies bind to the lysozyme molecules on the pattern edge before they bind to the lysozyme molecules in the pattern interior. Better spatial accessibility and flexibility of the lysozyme molecules on the pattern edge are used to explain the observed antibody binding preference. The topographies of the lysozyme pattern also affect the antibody binding. The antibodies bind to the edge lysozyme from the top if the lysozyme pattern is half-buried in a 10 A deep channel, whereas the antibodies bind to the edge lysozyme from the side if the lysozyme pattern is immobilized on a protruding terrace. The observed "edge effect" suggests that, for the same protein coverage, reducing the protein pattern feature to the nanoscale will improve the overall binding activity of the immobilized protein toward the antibody.

  15. Fast Screening of Whole Blood Samples and Pharmaceutical Compounds for Enantiorecognition of Free L-T3 , L-T4 , and D-T4.

    PubMed

    Mitrofan, Grigorina; Stefan-van Staden, Raluca-Ioana; Comnea-Stancu, Ionela Raluca; van Staden, Jacobus Frederick; Bazylak, Grzegorz; Kapnissi-Christodoulou, Constantina P; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2015-12-01

    A fast screening method of whole blood was proposed for enantiorecognition of free L-T3 , L-T4 , and D-T4 . Stochastic microsensors based on four inulins (IN, IQ, TEX, and HD) immobilized on diamond paste (DP) were used for recognition of free L-T3 , L-T4 , and D-T4 . For the enantiorecognition of free L-T4 and D-T4 in whole blood and pharmaceutical samples, the best microsensor was the one based on TEX/DP (wide linear concentration ranges, and low limits of quantification). The best limit of detection for the assay of free L-T3 (400 fmol/L) was recorded using the microsensors based on HD/DP, while for the assay of free L-T4, and D-T4 the best limit of determination (1 pmol/L) was recorded using the TX/DP-based microsensor. For the enantiorecognition of free L-T3 in whole blood and pharmaceutical samples the best microsensor was the one based on HD/DP (the wider linear concentration range, and the lower limit of quantification - of pmol/L magnitude order). For the enantiorecognition of free L-T3 in whole blood and pharmaceutical samples the best microsensor was the one based on HD/DP (the wider linear concentration range, and the lower limit of quantification - of pmol/L magnitude order). Free L-T3 , L-T4 , and D-T4 were recovered with high reliabilities in whole blood samples (recoveries higher than 99.00%, with RSD values lower than 1.00%) and pharmaceutical samples (recoveries higher than 95.00% with RSD values lower than 1.00%).

  16. Bacteriophages and Bacterial Plant Diseases.

    PubMed

    Buttimer, Colin; McAuliffe, Olivia; Ross, R P; Hill, Colin; O'Mahony, Jim; Coffey, Aidan

    2017-01-01

    Losses in crop yields due to disease need to be reduced in order to meet increasing global food demands associated with growth in the human population. There is a well-recognized need to develop new environmentally friendly control strategies to combat bacterial crop disease. Current control measures involving the use of traditional chemicals or antibiotics are losing their efficacy due to the natural development of bacterial resistance to these agents. In addition, there is an increasing awareness that their use is environmentally unfriendly. Bacteriophages, the viruses of bacteria, have received increased research interest in recent years as a realistic environmentally friendly means of controlling bacterial diseases. Their use presents a viable control measure for a number of destructive bacterial crop diseases, with some phage-based products already becoming available on the market. Phage biocontrol possesses advantages over chemical controls in that tailor-made phage cocktails can be adapted to target specific disease-causing bacteria. Unlike chemical control measures, phage mixtures can be easily adapted for bacterial resistance which may develop over time. In this review, we will examine the progress and challenges for phage-based disease biocontrol in food crops.

  17. Bacteriophages and Bacterial Plant Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Buttimer, Colin; McAuliffe, Olivia; Ross, R. P.; Hill, Colin; O’Mahony, Jim; Coffey, Aidan

    2017-01-01

    Losses in crop yields due to disease need to be reduced in order to meet increasing global food demands associated with growth in the human population. There is a well-recognized need to develop new environmentally friendly control strategies to combat bacterial crop disease. Current control measures involving the use of traditional chemicals or antibiotics are losing their efficacy due to the natural development of bacterial resistance to these agents. In addition, there is an increasing awareness that their use is environmentally unfriendly. Bacteriophages, the viruses of bacteria, have received increased research interest in recent years as a realistic environmentally friendly means of controlling bacterial diseases. Their use presents a viable control measure for a number of destructive bacterial crop diseases, with some phage-based products already becoming available on the market. Phage biocontrol possesses advantages over chemical controls in that tailor-made phage cocktails can be adapted to target specific disease-causing bacteria. Unlike chemical control measures, phage mixtures can be easily adapted for bacterial resistance which may develop over time. In this review, we will examine the progress and challenges for phage-based disease biocontrol in food crops. PMID:28163700

  18. Characterization of Bacillus subtilis Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Brodetsky, Anna M.; Romig, W. R.

    1965-01-01

    Brodetsky, Anna M. (University of California, Los Angeles), and W. R. Romig. Characterization of Bacillus subtilis bacteriophages. J. Bacteriol. 90:1655–1663. 1965.—A group of six phages, SP5, SP6, SP7, SP8, SP9, and SP13, which use the Marburg strain of Bacillus subtilis as host was characterized. These phages, referred to as group 1, were examined for the following properties: host range, plaque morphology, stability, adsorption kinetics, one-step growth characteristics, calcium requirements, serum neutralization, thermal inactivation, and inactivation by ultraviolet irradiation. Five unrelated B. subtilis phages, SP3, SP10, PBS1, SP alpha, and SP beta, were included in the studies. When first isolated, none of the group 1 phages was able to replicate efficiently on B. subtilis SB19, a mutant of the “transforming” B. subtilis 168. Host range mutants capable of growth in SB19 were isolated for all of the group 1 phages except SP13, and are designated the “star” phages (SP5* through SP9*). For characterization, SB19 was used as host for the star phages, and another B. subtilis mutant, 168B, was host for SP13. PMID:4955056

  19. Bacteriophage-Based Pathogen Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripp, Steven

    Considered the most abundant organism on Earth, at a population approaching 1031, bacteriophage, or phage for short, mediate interactions with myriad bacterial hosts that has for decades been exploited in phage typing schemes for signature identification of clinical, food-borne, and water-borne pathogens. With over 5,000 phage being morphologically characterized and grouped as to susceptible host, there exists an enormous cache of bacterial-specific sensors that has more recently been incorporated into novel bio-recognition assays with heightened sensitivity, specificity, and speed. These assays take many forms, ranging from straightforward visualization of labeled phage as they attach to their specific bacterial hosts to reporter phage that genetically deposit trackable signals within their bacterial hosts to the detection of progeny phage or other uniquely identifiable elements released from infected host cells. A comprehensive review of these and other phage-based detection assays, as directed towards the detection and monitoring of bacterial pathogens, will be provided in this chapter.

  20. Photodynamic inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Costa, Liliana; Faustino, Maria Amparo F; Neves, Maria Graça P M S; Cunha, Angela; Almeida, Adelaide

    2012-07-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of photosensitizers. The inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages by photosensitization has been applied with success since the first decades of the last century. Due to the fact that mammalian viruses are known to pose a threat to public health and that bacteriophages are frequently used as models of mammalian viruses, it is important to know and understand the mechanisms and photodynamic procedures involved in their photoinactivation. The aim of this review is to (i) summarize the main approaches developed until now for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophages and mammalian viruses and, (ii) discuss and compare the present state of the art of mammalian viruses PDI with phage photoinactivation, with special focus on the most relevant mechanisms, molecular targets and factors affecting the viral inactivation process.

  1. Photodynamic Inactivation of Mammalian Viruses and Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Liliana; Faustino, Maria Amparo F.; Neves, Maria Graça P. M. S.; Cunha, Ângela; Almeida, Adelaide

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of photosensitizers. The inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages by photosensitization has been applied with success since the first decades of the last century. Due to the fact that mammalian viruses are known to pose a threat to public health and that bacteriophages are frequently used as models of mammalian viruses, it is important to know and understand the mechanisms and photodynamic procedures involved in their photoinactivation. The aim of this review is to (i) summarize the main approaches developed until now for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophages and mammalian viruses and, (ii) discuss and compare the present state of the art of mammalian viruses PDI with phage photoinactivation, with special focus on the most relevant mechanisms, molecular targets and factors affecting the viral inactivation process. PMID:22852040

  2. Effect of secondary structure on the interactions of peptide T4 LYS (11-36) in mixtures of aqueous sodium chloride and 2,2,2,-Trifluoroethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Camille O.; Spiegelberg, Susanne; Prausnitz, John M.; Blanch, Harvey W.

    2001-10-01

    The potential of mean force for protein-protein interactions is key to the development of a statistical-mechanical model for salt-induced protein precipitation and crystallization, and for understanding certain disease states, including cataract formation and {beta}-amyloid pathology in Alzheimer's disease. Fluorescence anisotropy provides a method for quantitative characterization of intermolecular interactions due to reversible association. Monomer-dimer equilibria for the peptide T4 LYS(11-36) were studied by fluorescence anisotropy. This peptide, derived from the {beta}-sheet region of the T4 lysozyme molecule, has the potential to form amyloid fibrils. 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) induces a change in peptide secondary structure, and was used in aqueous solutions at concentrations from 0 to 50% (v/v) at 25 and 37 C to examine the role of peptide conformation on peptide-peptide interactions. The association constant for dimerization increased with rising TFE concentration and with falling temperature. The peptide-peptide potential of mean force was computed from these association constants. Circular-dichroism measurements showed that the secondary structure of the peptide plays an important role in these strong attractive interactions due to intermolecular hydrogen-bond formation and hydrophobic interactions.

  3. High Negative Interference and Recombination in Bacteriophage T5

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Barbara North

    1980-01-01

    The process of close recombinant formation in bacteriophage T5 crosses has been studied by examining the structure of internal heterozygotes (HETs), the immediate products of recombination events. The T5 system was chosen because it permits the study of internal heterozygotes exclusively, thus avoiding the ambiguities inherent in previous studies with T4. The heterozygotes were obtained by the nonselective screening of progeny phage in a prematurely lysed sample from an eight-factor cross. The molecular structure of each HET was inferred from the strand genotypes displayed among its progeny. This investigation presents unequivocal evidence that both overlap and insertion HETs are intermediates in recombinant formation and that insertion HETs are a significant source of close double recombinants. There is evidence suggesting that mismatch repair of overlap HETs could be the source of close triple exchanges. Thus, a significant part, and perhaps all, of the high negative interference for close-marker recombination observed in this system is a direct consequence of the fine structure of the recombinational intermediates. These findings are compatible with recombination models proposed by others, in which a single branched intermediate can give rise to HETs of both the overlap and insertion types. PMID:6937420

  4. Bacteriophages as Potential Treatment for Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Sybesma, Wilbert; Zbinden, Reinhard; Chanishvili, Nino; Kutateladze, Mzia; Chkhotua, Archil; Ujmajuridze, Aleksandre; Mehnert, Ulrich; Kessler, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most prevalent microbial diseases and their financial burden on society is substantial. The continuing increase of antibiotic resistance worldwide is alarming so that well-tolerated, highly effective therapeutic alternatives are urgently needed. Objective: To investigate the effect of bacteriophages on Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae strains isolated from the urine of patients suffering from UTIs. Material and methods: Forty-one E. coli and 9 K. pneumoniae strains, isolated from the urine of patients suffering from UTIs, were tested in vitro for their susceptibility toward bacteriophages. The bacteriophages originated from either commercially available bacteriophage cocktails registered in Georgia or from the bacteriophage collection of the George Eliava Institute of Bacteriophage, Microbiology and Virology. In vitro screening of bacterial strains was performed by use of the spot-test method. The experiments were implemented three times by different groups of scientists. Results: The lytic activity of the commercial bacteriophage cocktails on the 41 E. coli strains varied between 66% (Pyo bacteriophage) and 93% (Enko bacteriophage). After bacteriophage adaptation of the Pyo bacteriophage cocktail, its lytic activity was increased from 66 to 93% and only one E. coli strain remained resistant. One bacteriophage of the Eliava collection could lyse all 9 K. pneumoniae strains. Conclusions: Based on the high lytic activity and the potential of resistance optimization by direct adaption of bacteriophages as reported in this study, and in view of the continuing increase of antibiotic resistance worldwide, bacteriophage therapy is a promising treatment option for UTIs highly warranting randomized controlled trials. PMID:27148173

  5. On the mutagenicity of homologous recombination and double-strand break repair in bacteriophage.

    PubMed

    Shcherbakov, Victor P; Plugina, Lidiya; Shcherbakova, Tamara; Sizova, Svetlana; Kudryashova, Elena

    2011-01-02

    The double-strand break (DSB) repair via homologous recombination is generally construed as a high-fidelity process. However, some molecular genetic observations show that the recombination and the recombinational DSB repair may be mutagenic and even highly mutagenic. Here we developed an effective and precise method for studying the fidelity of DSB repair in vivo by combining DSBs produced site-specifically by the SegC endonuclease with the famous advantages of the recombination analysis of bacteriophage T4 rII mutants. The method is based on the comparison of the rate of reversion of rII mutation in the presence and in the absence of a DSB repair event initiated in the proximity of the mutation. We observed that DSB repair may moderately (up to 6-fold) increase the apparent reversion frequency, the effect of being dependent on the mutation structure. We also studied the effect of the T4 recombinase deficiency (amber mutation in the uvsX gene) on the fidelity of DSB repair. We observed that DSBs are still repaired via homologous recombination in the uvsX mutants, and the apparent fidelity of this repair is higher than that seen in the wild-type background. The mutator effect of the DSB repair may look unexpected given that most of the normal DNA synthesis in bacteriophage T4 is performed via a recombination-dependent replication (RDR) pathway, which is thought to be indistinguishable from DSB repair. There are three possible explanations for the observed mutagenicity of DSB repair: (1) the origin-dependent (early) DNA replication may be more accurate than the RDR; (2) the step of replication initiation may be more mutagenic than the process of elongation; and (3) the apparent mutagenicity may just reflect some non-randomness in the pool of replicating DNA, i.e., preferential replication of the sequences already involved in replication. We discuss the DSB repair pathway in the absence of UvsX recombinase.

  6. Locations of Bromide Ions in Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Kap; Nadarajah, Arunan; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    Anions have been shown to play a dominant role in the crystallization of chicken egg-white lysozyme from salt solutions. Previous studies employing X-ray crystallography have found one chloride ion binding site in the tetragonal crystal form of the protein and four nitrate ion binding sites in the monoclinic form. In this study the anion positions in the tetragonal form were determined from the difference Fourier map obtained from lysozyme crystals grown in bromide and chloride solutions. Five possible anion-binding sites were found in this manner. Some of these sites were in pockets containing basic residues while others were near neutral, but polar, residues. The sole chloride ion binding site found in previous studies was confirmed, while four further sites were found which corresponded to the four binding sites found for nitrate ions in monoclinic crystals. The study suggests that most of the anion-binding sites in lysozyme remain unchanged even when different anions and different crystal forms of lysozyme are employed.

  7. Science Study Aids 6: Lysozyme - The Cooperative Enzyme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boeschen, John; Alderton, Gordon

    This publication is the sixth of a series of seven supplementary investigative materials for use in secondary science classes providing up-to-date research-related investigations. This unit is structured for grade levels 10 through 12. It is concerned with the crystallization of an enzyme, lysozyme, from egg white. The first part of this guide…

  8. Kinetic Roughening Transition and Energetics of Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, Sridhar; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    2004-01-01

    Interpretation of lysozyme crystal growth rates using well-established physical theories enabled the discovery of a phenomenon possibly indicative of kinetic roughening. For example, lysozyme crystals grown above a critical supersaturation sigma, (where supersaturation sigma = ln c/c(sub eq), c = the protein concentration and c(sub eq) = the solubility concentration) exhibit microscopically rough surfaces due to the continuous addition of growth units anywhere on the surface of a crystal. The rate of crystal growth, V(sub c), for the continuous growth process is determined by the continuous flux of macromolecules onto a unit area of the crystal surface, a, from a distance, xi, per unit time due to diffusion, and a probability of attachment onto the crystal surface, expressed. Based upon models applied, the energetics of lysozyme crystal growth was determined. The magnitudes of the energy barriers of crystal growth for both the (110) and (101) faces of tetragonal lysozyme crystals are compared. Finally, evidence supportive of the kinetic roughening hypothesis is presented.

  9. Direct AFM observations of impurity effects on a lysozyme crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakada, Toshitaka; Sazaki, Gen; Miyashita, Satoru; Durbin, Stephen D.; Komatsu, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    Impurity effects on the growth of tetragonal lysozyme crystals have been studied using in situ atomic force microscopy. Commercially available hen egg white lysozyme was characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with silver staining, and purified by re-crystallization and successive high pressure liquid chromatography. On the (1 1 0) crystal surface, there was no significant difference in morphology between crystals grown in commercial and in purified solutions. On the (1 0 1) surface, however, a large number of small particles were found when the crystal was grown in the commercial solution, while the surface grown in the purified solution was quite smooth. Among the typical residual impurities contained in commercial lysozyme, only covalently bound lysozyme dimer yielded such particles. From measurements of particle separation and an estimate of the critical nucleation size, we infer that the particles reduced the step velocity according to the mechanism described by Cabrera et al. [N. Cabrera, D.A. Vermilyea, in: R.H. Doremus et al. (Eds.), Growth and Perfection of Crystals, 1958, P. 393].

  10. The folding-unfolding transition of equine lysozyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haezebrouck, P.; Van Dael, H.

    1993-03-01

    A detailed study of the chemical and thermal unfolding transition of equine lysozyme in the presence and in the absence of Ca 2+ gives evidence for a two-step unfolding process. The pretransition can be related to the transfer of exposed Trp groups to the protein interior.

  11. Effects of oligomeric lysozyme on structural state of model membranes.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, Galyna; Trusova, Valeriya

    2011-03-01

    The ability of oligomeric lysozyme to modify the molecular organization of the model bilayer membranes composed of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and its mixtures with phosphatidylglycerol (PG) or cholesterol (Chol) was assessed using fluorescent probes 6-propionyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (Prodan), 4-dimethylaminochalcone (DMC), pyrene and 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH). The observed changes in the fluorescence characteristics of polarity-sensitive probes Prodan and DMC, located in interfacial bilayer region, were interpreted due to the partial dehydration of the glycerol backbone, which was under the influence of aggregated protein. Cholesterol was found to prevent the perturbations of membrane polar part by lysozyme aggregates. Analysis of the pyrene excimerization data revealed an oligomer-induced reduction in bilayer free volume, presumably caused by an increased packing density of hydrocarbon chains. This effect proved to be virtually independent of membrane composition. It was demonstrated that membranotropic activity of oligomeric lysozyme markedly exceeds that of monomeric protein. The biological significance of the results obtained is twofold, implicating the general membrane-mediated mechanisms of oligomer toxicity and specific pathways of lysozyme fibrillogenesis in vivo associated with familial nonneuropathic systemic amyloidosis.

  12. Resonance energy transfer study of lysozyme-lipid interactions.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, Galyna P; Ioffe, Valeriya M; Molotkovsky, Julian G; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2008-05-01

    Resonance energy transfer (RET) between the tryptophan residues of lysozyme as donors and anthrylvinyl-labeled phosphatidylcholine (AV-PC) or phosphatidylglycerol (AV-PG) as acceptors has been examined to gain insight into molecular level details of the interactions of lysozyme with the lipid bilayers composed of PC with 10, 20, or 40 mol% PG. Energy transfer efficiency determined from the enhanced acceptor fluorescence was found to increase with content of the acidic lipid and surface coverage. The results of RET experiments performed with lipid vesicles containing 40 mol% PG were quantitatively analyzed in terms of the model of energy transfer in two-dimensional systems taking into account the distance dependence of orientation factor. Evidence for an interfacial location of the two predominant lysozyme fluorophores, Trp62 and Trp108, was obtained. The RET enhancement observed while employing AV-PG instead of AV-PC as an energy acceptor was interpreted as arising from the ability of lysozyme to bring about local demixing of the neutral and charged lipids in PC/PG model membranes.

  13. Bacteriophage lysis: mechanism and regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Young, R

    1992-01-01

    Bacteriophage lysis involves at least two fundamentally different strategies. Most phages elaborate at least two proteins, one of which is a murein hydrolase, or lysin, and the other is a membrane protein, which is given the designation holin in this review. The function of the holin is to create a lesion in the cytoplasmic membrane through which the murein hydrolase passes to gain access to the murein layer. This is necessary because phage-encoded lysins never have secretory signal sequences and are thus incapable of unassisted escape from the cytoplasm. The holins, whose prototype is the lambda S protein, share a common organization in terms of the arrangement of charged and hydrophobic residues, and they may all contain at least two transmembrane helical domains. The available evidence suggests that holins oligomerize to form nonspecific holes and that this hole-forming step is the regulated step in phage lysis. The correct scheduling of the lysis event is as much an essential feature of holin function as is the hole formation itself. In the second strategy of lysis, used by the small single-stranded DNA phage phi X174 and the single-stranded RNA phage MS2, no murein hydrolase activity is synthesized. Instead, there is a single species of small membrane protein, unlike the holins in primary structure, which somehow causes disruption of the envelope. These lysis proteins function by activation of cellular autolysins. A host locus is required for the lytic function of the phi X174 lysis gene E. Images PMID:1406491

  14. Toward modern inhalational bacteriophage therapy: nebulization of bacteriophages of Burkholderia cepacia complex.

    PubMed

    Golshahi, Laleh; Seed, Kimberley D; Dennis, Jonathan J; Finlay, Warren H

    2008-12-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections have renewed interest in finding substitute methods of treatment. The purpose of the present in vitro study was to investigate the possibility of respiratory delivery of a Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) bacteriophage by nebulized aerosol administration. Bacteriophages in isotonic saline were aerosolized with Pari LC star and eFlow nebulizers, at titers with mean value (standard deviation) of 2.15 x 10(8) (1.63 x 10(8)) plaque-forming unit (PFU)/mL in 2.5-mL nebulizer fills. The breathing pattern of an adult was simulated using a pulmonary waveform generator. During breath simulation, the size distributions of the nebulized aerosol were measured using phase doppler anemometry (PDA). Efficiency of nebulizer delivery was subsequently determined by collection of aerosol on low resistance filters and measurement of bacteriophage titers. These filter titers were used as input data to a mathematical lung deposition model to predict regional deposition of bacteriophages in the lung and initial bacteriophage titers in the liquid surface layer of each conducting airway generation. The results suggest that BCC bacteriophages can be nebulized successfully within a reasonable delivery time and predicted titers in the lung indicate that this method may hold potential for treatment of bacterial lung infections common among cystic fibrosis patients.

  15. Use of Lysozyme as a Feed Additive on In vitro Rumen Fermentation and Methane Emission

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Ashraf A.; Lee, Sung Sill; Mamuad, Lovelia L.; Kim, Seon-Ho; Choi, Yeon-Jae; Bae, Gui-Seck; Lee, Kichoon; Sung, Ha-Guyn; Lee, Sang-Suk

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of lysozyme addition on in vitro rumen fermentation and to identify the lysozyme inclusion rate for abating methane (CH4) production. An in vitro ruminal fermentation technique was done using a commercial concentrate to rice straw ratio of 8:2 as substrate. The following treatments were applied wherein lysozyme was added into 1 mg dry matter substrate at different levels of inclusion: Without lysozyme, 2,000, 4,000, and 8,000 U lysozyme. Results revealed that, lysozyme addition had a significant effect on pH after 24 h of incubation, with the highest pH (p<0.01) observed in 8,000 U lysozyme, followed by the 4,000 U, 2,000 U, and without lysozyme. The highest amounts of acetic acid, propionic acid (p<0.01) and total volatile fatty acid (TVFA) (p<0.05) were found in 8,000 U after 24 h of incubation. The CH4 concentration was the lowest in the 8,000 U and the highest in the without lysozyme addition after 24 h of incubation. There was no significant differences in general bacteria, methanogen, or protozoan DNA copy number. So far, addition of lysozyme increased the acetate, propionate, TVFA, and decreased CH4 concentration. These results suggest that lysozyme supplementation may improve in vitro rumen fermentation and reduce CH4 emission. PMID:27703130

  16. Effect of PEG end-group hydrophobicity on lysozyme interactions in solution characterized by light scattering.

    PubMed

    Priya, M Hamsa; Pratt, L R; Paulaitis, M E

    2011-11-15

    We compare protein-protein and protein-polymer osmotic virial coefficients measured by static light scattering for aqueous solutions of lysozyme with low-molecular-weight, hydroxy-terminated (hPEG) and methyl-terminated (mPEG) poly(ethylene glycol) at two solution conditions: pH 7.0 and 0.01 M ionic strength, and pH 6.2 and 0.8 M ionic strength. We find that adding PEG to aqueous lysozyme solutions makes a net repulsive contribution to lysozyme-lysozyme interactions, independent of ionic strength and PEG end-group hydrophobicity. PEG end-group hydrophobicity has a profound effect on the magnitude of this contribution, however, at low ionic strength where mPEG-lysozyme attractive interactions become significant. The enhanced attractions promote mPEG-lysozyme preferential interactions at the expense of lysozyme self-interactions, which leads to lysozyme-lysozyme interactions that are more repulsive in the presence of mPEG. These preferential interactions also lead to the preferential exclusion of diffusable ions locally around the protein, which results in a pronounced ionic strength dependence of mPEG-mediated lysozyme-lysozyme interactions.

  17. Digestive function of lysozyme in synanthropic acaridid mites enables utilization of bacteria as a food source.

    PubMed

    Erban, Tomas; Hubert, Jan

    2008-03-01

    The activity of lysozyme, the enzyme that hydrolyzes peptidoglycan in G(+) bacterial cell walls, was detected in whole mite extracts (WME) and in spent growth medium extracts (SGME) of 14 species of synanthropic mites (Acari: Acaridida). The adaptation of lysozyme for digestive activity and bacteriophagy was based on: (i) high lysozyme activity in SGME, and (ii) the correlation of maximum lysozyme activity at acidic pH values, corresponding to pH in the ventriculus and caeca. We show that the digestion of fluorescein-labeled Micrococcus lysodeikticus cells began in ventriculus and continued during the passage of a food bolus through the gut. The fluorescein was absorbed by midgut cells and penetrated to parenchymal tissues. Eight species showed a higher rate of population growth on a M. lysodeikticus diet than on a control diet. The lysozyme activity in SGME was positively correlated to the standardized rate (r (s)) of population growth, although no correlation was found between r (s) and lysozyme activity in WME. The lysozyme activity in WME was negatively correlated to that in SGME. The highest activity of digestive lysozyme was found in Lepidoglyphus destructor, Chortoglyphus arcuatus and Dermatophagoides farinae. All of these findings indicate that lysozyme in acaridid mites possesses both defensive and digestive functions. The enzymatic properties of mite lysozyme are similar to those of the lysozymes present in the ruminant stomach and in the insect midgut.

  18. Design of Synthetic Polymer Nanoparticles That Facilitate Resolubilization and Refolding of Aggregated Positively Charged Lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Masahiko; Nonaka, Tadashi; Shea, Kenneth J; Miura, Yoshiko; Hoshino, Yu

    2016-04-06

    Designed polymer hydrogel nanoparticles (NPs) capable of facilitating resolubilization and refolding of an aggregated protein, positively charged lysozyme, are prepared. NPs designed to interact strongly with denatured lysozyme and relatively weakly with native lysozyme, facilitated resolubilization and refolding of aggregated lysozyme. Such NPs could be prepared by copolymerizing optimized combinations and populations of functional monomers. The refolded lysozyme showed native conformation and enzymatic activity. Eleven grams of aggregated protein was refolded by 1 g of NPs. However, NPs having low affinity to denatured lysozyme and NPs having high affinity to both denatured and native lysozyme showed relatively low facilitation activity. Our results suggest a potential strategy for the design of artificial chaperones with high facilitating activity.

  19. Does Warming a Lysozyme Solution Cook Ones Data?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc; Burke, Michael; Judge, Russell

    2000-01-01

    Chicken egg white lysozyme has a well characterized thermally driven phase transition. Between pH 4.0 and 5.2, the transition temperature, as defined by the point where the tetragonal and orthorhombic solubility are equal, is a function of the pH, salt (precipitant) type and concentration, and most likely of the buffer concentration as well. This phase transition can be carried out with protein solution alone, prior to the initiation of the crystallization process. We have now measured the kinetics of this process and investigated its reversibility. An aliquot of a stock protein solution is held at a given temperature, and at periodic intervals used to set up batch crystallization experiments. The batch solutions were incubated at 20 C until macroscopic crystals were obtained, at which point the number of crystals in each well were counted. The transition effects increased with temperature, slowly falling off at 30 C with a half time (time to approx. 1/2 the t = 0 number of crystals) of approx. 5 hours, and an estimated half time of approx. 0.5 hours at 43 C. Further, the process was not reversible by simple cooling. After holding a lysozyme solution at 37 C (prior to addition of precipitant) for 16 hours, then cooling and holding it at 4 C, no return to the pre-warmed nucleation kinetics are observed after at least 4 weeks. Thus every thermal excursion above the phase transition point results in a further decrease in the nucleation rate of that solution, the extent being a function of the time and temperature. Orthorhombic lysozyme crystals apparently do not undergo the flow-induced growth cessation of tetragonal lysozyme crystals. We have previously shown that putting the protein in the orthorhombic form does not affect the averaged face growth kinetics, only nucleation, for tetragonal crystals. We may be able to use this differential behavior to elucidate how flow affects tile lysozyme crystal growth process.

  20. Chicken-type lysozyme in channel catfish: expression analysis, lysozyme activity, and efficacy as immunostimulant against Aeromonas hydrophila infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To understand whether chicken-type lysozyme (Lys-c) in channel catfish was induced by infection of Aeromonas hydrophila, the transcriptional levels of Lys-c in skin, gut, liver, spleen, posterior kidney, and blood cells in healthy channel catfish was compared to that in channel catfish infected with...

  1. Chicken-type lysozyme in channel catfish: Expression analysis, lysozyme activity and efficacy as immunostimulant against Aeromonas hydrophila infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To understand whether chicken-type lysozyme (Lys-c) in channel catfish was induced by infection of Aeromonas hydrophila, the transcriptional levels of Lys-c in skin, gut, liver, spleen, posterior kidney, and blood cells in healthy channel catfish was compared to that in channel catfish infected with...

  2. Comparative genomics of Shiga toxin encoding bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Stx bacteriophages are responsible for driving the dissemination of Stx toxin genes (stx) across their bacterial host range. Lysogens carrying Stx phages can cause severe, life-threatening disease and Stx toxin is an integral virulence factor. The Stx-bacteriophage vB_EcoP-24B, commonly referred to as Ф24B, is capable of multiply infecting a single bacterial host cell at a high frequency, with secondary infection increasing the rate at which subsequent bacteriophage infections can occur. This is biologically unusual, therefore determining the genomic content and context of Ф24B compared to other lambdoid Stx phages is important to understanding the factors controlling this phenomenon and determining whether they occur in other Stx phages. Results The genome of the Stx2 encoding phage, Ф24B was sequenced and annotated. The genomic organisation and general features are similar to other sequenced Stx bacteriophages induced from Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), however Ф24B possesses significant regions of heterogeneity, with implications for phage biology and behaviour. The Ф24B genome was compared to other sequenced Stx phages and the archetypal lambdoid phage, lambda, using the Circos genome comparison tool and a PCR-based multi-loci comparison system. Conclusions The data support the hypothesis that Stx phages are mosaic, and recombination events between the host, phages and their remnants within the same infected bacterial cell will continue to drive the evolution of Stx phage variants and the subsequent dissemination of shigatoxigenic potential. PMID:22799768

  3. ADSORPTION OF BACTERIOPHAGES ON CLAY MINERALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Theability to predict the fate of microorganisms in soil is dependent on an understanding of the process of their sorption on soil and subsurface materials. Presently, we have focused on studying the thermodynamics of sorption of bacteriophages (T-2, MS-2, and

  4. Use of wide-host-range bacteriophages to reduce Salmonella on poultry products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteriophages used to treat infections are typically amplified in a pathogenic host. However, this practice introduces the risk of administering any remaining bacteriophage-resistant pathogen during bacteriophage application if separate techniques are less than perfect. In this study, bacteriopha...

  5. Enhanced Antibacterial Activity of Acinetobacter baumannii Bacteriophage ØABP-01 Endolysin (LysABP-01) in Combination with Colistin

    PubMed Central

    Thummeepak, Rapee; Kitti, Thawatchai; Kunthalert, Duangkamol; Sitthisak, Sutthirat

    2016-01-01

    Endolysins are lytic enzymes produced by bacteriophages with their ability to degrade the cell wall of bacterial hosts. Endolysin (LysABP-01) from Acinetobacter baumannii bacteriophage ØABP-01 was cloned, overexpressed and characterized. Endolysin LysABP-01 has a globular structure consisting of lysozyme-like (N-acetyl-β-D-muramidase) catalytic domain. It contains 185 amino acids which correspond to a 21.1 kDa protein. The lytic activity of the recombinant endolysin protein was determined by a plate lysis assay for its ability to lyse the autoclaved cell (crude cell wall) of the different bacterial species. LysABP-01 can degrade the crude cell wall of A. baumannii strains, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa but not of Staphylococcus aureus. The antibacterial activity of LysABP-01 and its synergism with various antibiotics were tested. The results exhibited elevated antibacterial activity in a combination of the sub-MIC LysABP-01 and colistin. The checkerboard assay for measuring antibiotic synergy of LysABP-01 and colistin was performed. This combination was synergistic against various drug-resistant strains of A. baumannii (FIC index < 0.5). In summary, our study highlights the ability of LysABP-01 endolysin to hydrolyze the A. baumannii cell wall and its synergistic interaction with colistin. PMID:27656173

  6. STUDIES ON THE PURIFICATION OF BACTERIOPHAGE.

    PubMed

    Kalmanson, G; Bronfenbrenner, J

    1939-11-20

    A simple method of concentrating and purifying bacteriophage has been described. The procedure consisted essentially in collecting the active agent on a reinforced collodion membrane of a porosity that would just retain all the active agent and permit extraneous material to pass through. Advantage was taken of the fact that B. coli will proliferate and regenerate bacteriophage in a completely diffusible synthetic medium with ammonia as the only source of nitrogen, which permitted the purification of the bacteriophage by copious washing. The material thus obtained was concentrated by suction and after thorough washing possessed all the activity of the original filtrate. It was labile, losing its activity in a few days on standing, and was quickly and completely inactivated upon drying. This material contained approximately 15 per cent of nitrogen and with 2 or 3 mg. samples of inactive dry residue it was possible to obtain positive protein color tests. The concentrated and purified bacteriophage has about 10(-14) mg. of nitrogen, or 6 x 10(-17) gm. of protein per unit of lytic activity. Assuming that each unit of activity represents a molecule, the calculated maximum average molecular weight would be approximately 36,000,000, and on the assumption of a spherical shape of particles and a density of 1.3, the calculated radius would be about 22 millimicra. By measurement of the diffusion rate, the average radius of particle of the fraction of the purified bacteriophage which diffuses most readily through a porous plate was found to be of the order of magnitude of 9 millimicra, or of a calculated molecular weight of 2,250,000. Furthermore, when this purified bacteriophage was fractionated by forcing it through a thin collodion membrane, which permits the passage of only the smaller particles, it was possible to demonstrate in the ultrafiltrate active particles of about 2 millimicra in radius, and of a calculated molecular weight of 25,000. It was of interest to apply

  7. Structure and expression of the human and mouse T4 genes.

    PubMed Central

    Maddon, P J; Molineaux, S M; Maddon, D E; Zimmerman, K A; Godfrey, M; Alt, F W; Chess, L; Axel, R

    1987-01-01

    The T4 molecule may serve as a T-cell receptor recognizing molecules on the surface of specific target cells and also serves as the receptor for the human immunodeficiency virus. To define the mechanisms of interaction of T4 with the surface of antigen-presenting cells as well as with human immunodeficiency virus, we have further analyzed the sequence, structure, and expression of the human and mouse T4 genes. T4 consists of an extracellular segment comprised of a leader sequence followed by four tandem variable-joining (VJ)-like domains, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic segment. The structural domains of the T4 protein deduced from amino acid sequence are precisely reflected in the intron-exon organization of the gene. Analysis of the expression of the T4 gene indicates that T4 RNA is expressed not only in T lymphocytes, but in B cells, macrophages, and granulocytes. T4 is also expressed in a developmentally regulated manner in specific regions of the brain. It is, therefore, possible that T4 plays a more general role in mediating cell recognition events that are not restricted to the cellular immune response. Images PMID:3501122

  8. Maturational changes in T4 to T3 conversion in domestic fowl.

    PubMed

    Klandorf, H; Harvey, S

    1985-01-01

    The in vivo conversion of thyroxine (T4) to triiodothyronine (T3) has been determined in fed and 24 hr-fasted thyroidectomized cockerels at 4, 7, 13 and 23 weeks of age. The conversion of T4 to T3 in pubertal (13-week-old) and adult (22-week-old) cockerels was greater than that in immature (less than 7-week-old) chicks. The deprivation of food for 24 hr markedly reduced the rate of T4 to T3 conversion, especially in immature chicks. These maturational changes in T4 to T3 conversion may be related to differences in metabolic rate.

  9. Pluronic-lysozyme conjugates as anti-adhesive and antibacterial bifunctional polymers for surface coating.

    PubMed

    Muszanska, Agnieszka K; Busscher, Henk J; Herrmann, Andreas; van der Mei, Henny C; Norde, Willem

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes the preparation and characterization of polymer-protein conjugates composed of a synthetic triblock copolymer with a central polypropylene oxide (PPO) block and two terminal polyethylene oxide (PEO) segments, Pluronic F-127, and the antibacterial enzyme lysozyme attached to the telechelic groups of the PEO chains. Covalent conjugation of lysozyme proceeded via reductive amination of aldehyde functionalized PEO blocks (CHO-Pluronic) and the amine groups of the lysine residues in the protein. SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis together with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis revealed formation of conjugates of one or two lysozyme molecules per Pluronic polymer chain. The conjugated lysozyme showed antibacterial activity towards Bacillus subtilis. Analysis with a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation revealed that Pluronic-lysozyme conjugates adsorb in a brush conformation on a hydrophobic gold-coated quartz surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated surface coverage of 32% by lysozyme when adsorbed from a mixture of unconjugated Pluronic and Pluronic-lysozyme conjugate (ratio 99:1) and of 47% after adsorption of 100% Pluronic-lysozyme conjugates. Thus, bifunctional brushes were created, possessing both anti-adhesive activity due to the polymer brush, combined with the antibacterial activity of lysozyme. The coating having a lower degree of lysozyme coverage proved to be more bactericidal.

  10. Thyroxine softgel capsule in patients with gastric-related T4 malabsorption.

    PubMed

    Santaguida, Maria Giulia; Virili, Camilla; Del Duca, Susanna Carlotta; Cellini, Miriam; Gatto, Ilenia; Brusca, Nunzia; De Vito, Corrado; Gargano, Lucilla; Centanni, Marco

    2015-05-01

    The key role of an intact gastric acid secretion for subsequent intestinal T4 absorption is supported by an increased requirement of thyroxine in patients with gastric disorders. A better pH-related dissolution profile has been described in vitro for softgel T4 preparation than for T4 tablets. Our study was aimed at comparing softgel and tablet T4 requirements in patients with gastric disorders. A total of 37 patients with gastric-related T4 malabsorption were enrolled, but only 31 (28F/3M; median age = 50 years; median T4 dose = 2.04 μg/kg/day) completed the study. All patients were in long-lasting treatment (>2 years) with the same dose of T4 tablets when treatment was switched to a lower dose of softgel T4 capsules (-17 %; p = 0.0002). Assessment of serum FT4 and TSH was carried out at baseline and after 3, 6, 12, and 18 months after the treatment switch. In more than 2/3 of patients (good-responders n = 21), despite the reduced dose of T4, median TSH values were similar at each time point (p = 0.3934) with no change in FT4 levels. In the remaining patients (poor-responders n = 10), TSH levels were significantly higher at each time point than at baseline (p < 0.0001). To note, in five of them intestinal comorbidity was subsequently detected. Comorbidity associated with poor-responders status was the only significant predictor in multivariate analysis (OR = 11.333). Doses of softgel T4 capsules lower than T4 tablet preparation are required to maintain the therapeutic goal in 2/3 of patients with impaired gastric acid secretion.

  11. Campylobacter jejuni Group III Phage CP81 Contains Many T4-Like Genes without Belonging to the T4-Type Phage Group: Implications for the Evolution of T4 Phages▿†

    PubMed Central

    Hammerl, Jens A.; Jäckel, Claudia; Reetz, Jochen; Beck, Sebastian; Alter, Thomas; Lurz, Rudi; Barretto, Caroline; Brüssow, Harald; Hertwig, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    CP81 is a virulent Campylobacter group III phage whose linear genome comprises 132,454 bp. At the nucleotide level, CP81 differs from other phages. However, a number of its structural and replication/recombination proteins revealed a relationship to the group II Campylobacter phages CP220/CPt10 and to T4-type phages. Unlike the T4-related phages, the CP81 genome does not contain conserved replication and virion modules. Instead, the respective genes are scattered throughout the phage genome. Moreover, most genes for metabolic enzymes of CP220/CPt10 are lacking in CP81. On the other hand, the CP81 genome contains nine similar genes for homing endonucleases which may be involved in the attrition of the conserved gene order for the virion core genes of T4-type phages. The phage apparently possesses an unusual modification of C or G bases. Efficient cleavage of its DNA was only achieved with restriction enzymes recognizing pure A/T sites. Uncommonly, phenol extraction leads to a significant loss of CP81 DNA from the aqueous layer, a property not yet described for other phages belonging to the T4 superfamily. PMID:21697478

  12. Elastic Properties of Lysozyme Confined in Nanoporous Polymer Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haoyu; Akcora, Pinar

    Retaining the conformational structure and bioactivity of immobilized proteins is important for biosensor designs and drug delivery systems. It is known that confined media provide a protective environment to the encapsulated proteins and prevent diffusion of the denaturant. In this study, different types of proteins (streptavidin, lysozyme and fibrinogen) were chemically attached into the nanopores of poly(methyl methacrylate) thin films. Heterogeneous flat surfaces with varying cylinder pore sizes (10-50 nm) were used to confine proteins of different sizes and shapes. Stiffness of protein functionalized nanopores was measured in nanoindentation experiments. Our results showed that streptavidin behaved more stiffly when pore dimension changed from micron to nanosize. Further, it was found that lysozyme confined within nanopores showed higher specific bioactivity than proteins on flat surfaces. These results on surface elasticity and protein activity may help in understanding protein interactions with surfaces of different topologies and chemistry.

  13. Tetragonal Chicken Egg White Lysozyme Solubility in Sodium Chloride Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Judge, Russell A.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    The solubility of chicken egg white lysozyme, crystallized in the tetragonal form was measured in sodium chloride solutions from 1.6 to 30.7 C, using a miniature column solubility apparatus. Sodium chloride solution concentrations ranged from 1 to 7% (w/v). The solutions were buffered with 0.1 M sodium acetate buffer with the solubility being measured at pH values in 0.2 pH unit increments in the range pH 4.0 to 5.4, with data also included at pH 4.5. Lysozyme solubility was found to increase with increases in temperature and decreasing salt concentration. Solution pH has a varied and unpredictable effect on solubility.

  14. Locations of Halide Ions in Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Kap; Adimurthy, Ganapathi; Nadarajah, Arunan; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    Anions play an important role in the crystallization of lysozyme, and are known to bind to the crystalline protein. Previous studies employing X-ray crystallography had found one chloride ion binding site in the tetragonal crystal form of the protein and four nitrate ion binding sites in the monoclinic form. Studies using other approaches have reported more chloride ion binding sites, but their locations were not known. Knowing the precise location of these anions is also useful in determining the correct electrostatic fields surrounding the protein. In the first part of this study the anion positions in the tetragonal form were determined from the difference Fourier map obtained from the lysozyme crystals grown in bromide and chloride solutions under identical conditions. The anion locations were then obtained from standard crystallographic methods and five possible anion binding sites were found in this manner. The sole chloride ion binding site found in previous studies was confirmed. The remaining four sites were new ones for tetragonal lysozyme crystals. However, three of these new sites and the previously found one corresponded to the four unique binding sites found for nitrate ions in monoclinic crystals. This suggests that most of the anion binding sites in lysozyme remain unchanged, even when different anions and different crystal forms of lysozyme are employed. It is unlikely that there are many more anions in the tetragonal lysozyme crystal structure. Assuming osmotic equilibrium it can be shown that there are at most three more anions in the crystal channels. Some of the new anion binding sites found in this study were, as expected, in pockets containing basic residues. However, some of them were near neutral, but polar, residues. Thus, the study also showed the importance of uncharged, but polar groups, on the protein surface in determining its electrostatic field. This was important for the second part of this study where the electrostatic field

  15. Protein crystal growth - Growth kinetics for tetragonal lysozyme crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, M. L.; Snyder, R. S.; Naumann, R.

    1986-01-01

    Results are reported from theoretical and experimental studies of the growth rate of lysozyme as a function of diffusion in earth-gravity conditions. The investigations were carried out to form a comparison database for future studies of protein crystal growth in the microgravity environment of space. A diffusion-convection model is presented for predicting crystal growth rates in the presence of solutal concentration gradients. Techniques used to grow and monitor the growth of hen egg white lysozyme are detailed. The model calculations and experiment data are employed to discuss the effects of transport and interfacial kinetics in the growth of the crystals, which gradually diminished the free energy in the growth solution. Density gradient-driven convection, caused by presence of the gravity field, was a limiting factor in the growth rate.

  16. Functional relationship between bacteriophages G4 and phi X174.

    PubMed Central

    Borrias, W E; Hagenaar, M; Van Den Brekel, R; Kühlemeijer, C; Weisbeek, P J

    1979-01-01

    Mutants of bacteriophage G4 were isolated and characterized, and their mutations were mapped. They constitute six different genes, namely, A, B, E, F, G, and H. The functional relationship with bacteriophage phi X174 was determined by complementation experiments using amber mutants of phi X and amber mutants of G4. Bacteriophage phi X was able to use the products of G4 genes E, F, G, and H. In bacteriophage G4, however, only the phi X gene H product was functional. Images PMID:480475

  17. Bacteriophage therapy: a potential solution for the antibiotic resistance crisis.

    PubMed

    Golkar, Zhabiz; Bagasra, Omar; Pace, Donald Gene

    2014-02-13

    The emergence of multiple drug-resistant bacteria has prompted interest in alternatives to conventional antimicrobials. One of the possible replacement options for antibiotics is the use of bacteriophages as antimicrobial agents. Phage therapy is an important alternative to antibiotics in the current era of drug-resistant pathogens. Bacteriophages have played an important role in the expansion of molecular biology and have been used as antibacterial agents since 1966. In this review, we describe a brief history of bacteriophages and clinical studies on their use in bacterial disease prophylaxis and therapy. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of bacteriophages as therapeutic agents in this regard.

  18. Biogeography of bacteriophages at four hydrothermal vent sites in the Antarctic based on g23 sequence diversity.

    PubMed

    Millard, Andrew D; Pearce, David; Zwirglmaier, Katrin

    2016-04-01

    In this study, which was carried out within the ChEsSO consortium project (Chemosynthetically driven ecosystems south of the Polar Front), we sampled two hydrothermal vent sites on the East Scotia Ridge, Scotia Sea, one in the Kemp Caldera, South Sandwich Arc and one in the Bransfield Strait, north-west of the Antarctic Peninsula, which exhibit strong differences in their chemical characteristics. We compared a subset of their bacteriophage population by Sanger- and 454-sequencing of g23, which codes for the major capsid protein of T4likeviruses. We found that the sites differ vastly in their bacteriophage diversity, which reflects the differences in the chemical conditions and therefore putatively the differences in microbial hosts living at these sites. Comparing phage diversity in the vent samples to other aquatic samples, the vent samples formed a distinct separate cluster, which also included the non-vent control samples that were taken several hundred meters above the vent chimneys. This indicates that the influence of the vents on the microbial population and therefore also the bacteriophage population extends much further than anticipated.

  19. Lysozyme Catalyzes the Formation of Antimicrobial Silver Nanoparticles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-03

    Guo, C.; Sun, Y. Synthesis , Characterization, and Self - Assembly of Protein Lysozyme Monolayer-Stabilized Gold Nanoparticles. Langmuir 2007, 23, 10533...to achieve with aqueous-based synthesis , because water facilitates strong ionic interactions between forming particles.25 The hydrophobicity of...2002, 1, 169–172. 16. Xie, J.; Lee, J. Y.; Wang, D. I. C.; Ting, Y. P. Silver Nanoplates : From Biological to Biomimetic Synthesis . ACS Nano 2007, 1

  20. Lysozyme Catalyzes the Formation of Antimicrobial Silver Nanoparticles (POSTPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    Y. Synthesis , Characterization, and Self - Assembly of Protein Lysozyme Monolayer-Stabilized Gold Nanoparticles. Langmuir 2007, 23, 10533–10538. 28...aqueous-based synthesis , because water facilitates strong ionic interactions between forming particles.25 The hydrophobicity of methanol is a major factor...172. 16. Xie, J.; Lee, J. Y.; Wang, D. I. C.; Ting, Y. P. Silver Nanoplates : From Biological to Biomimetic Synthesis . ACS Nano 2007, 1, 429–439. 17

  1. RNA-Seq Transcriptome Analysis of Direction-Selective T4/T5 Neurons in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Pankova, Katarina; Borst, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal computation underlying detection of visual motion has been studied for more than a half-century. In Drosophila, direction-selective T4/T5 neurons show supralinear signal amplification in response to stimuli moving in their preferred direction, in agreement with the prediction made by the Hassenstein-Reichardt detector. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanism explaining how the Hassenstein-Reichardt model is implemented in T4/T5 cells has not been identified yet. In the present study, we utilized cell type-specific transcriptome profiling with RNA-seq to obtain a complete gene expression profile of T4/T5 neurons. We analyzed the expression of genes that affect neuronal computational properties and can underlie the molecular implementation of the core features of the Hassenstein-Reichardt model to the dendrites of T4/T5 neurons. Furthermore, we used the acquired RNA-seq data to examine the neurotransmitter system used by T4/T5 neurons. Surprisingly, we observed co-expression of the cholinergic markers and the vesicular GABA transporter in T4/T5 neurons. We verified the previously undetected expression of vesicular GABA transporter in T4/T5 cells using VGAT-LexA knock-in line. The provided gene expression dataset can serve as a useful source for studying the properties of direction-selective T4/T5 neurons on the molecular level. PMID:27684367

  2. Tailed bacteriophages: the order caudovirales.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, H W

    1998-01-01

    Tailed bacteriophages have a common origin and constitute an order with three families, named Caudovirales. Their structured tail is unique. Tailed phages share a series of high-level taxonomic properties and show many facultative features that are unique or rare in viruses, for example, tail appendages and unusual bases. They share with other viruses, especially herpesviruses, elements of morphogenesis and life-style that are attributed to convergent evolution. Tailed phages present three types of lysogeny, exemplified by phages lambda, Mu, and P1. Lysogeny appears as a secondary property acquired by horizontal gene transfer. Amino acid sequence alignments (notably of DNA polymerases, integrases, and peptidoglycan hydrolases) indicate frequent events of horizontal gene transfer in tailed phages. Common capsid and tail proteins have not been detected. Tailed phages possibly evolved from small protein shells with a few genes sufficient for some basal level of productive infection. This early stage can no longer be traced. At one point, this precursor phage became perfected. Some of its features were perfect enough to be transmitted until today. It is tempting to list major present-day properties of tailed phages in the past tense to construct a tentative history of these viruses: 1. Tailed phages originated in the early Precambrian, long before eukaryotes and their viruses. 2. The ur-tailed phage, already a quite evolved virus, had an icosahedral head of about 60 nm in diameter and a long non-contractile tail with sixfold symmetry. The capsid contained a single molecule of dsDNA of about 50 kb, and the tail was probably provided with a fixation apparatus. Head and tail were held together by a connector. a. The particle contained no lipids, was heavier than most viruses to come, and had a high DNA content proportional to its capsid size (about 50%). b. Most of its DNA coded for structural proteins. Morphopoietic genes clustered at one end of the genome, with head

  3. Design and structural analysis of an engineered thermostable chicken lysozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Shih, P.; Kirsch, J. F.

    1995-01-01

    A hyperstable (hs) variant of chicken egg-white lysozyme with enhanced thermal (delta Tm approximately +10.5 degrees C) and chemical (delta Cm for guanidine hydrochloride denaturation = +1.3 M) stabilities relative to wild-type (WT) was constructed by combining several individual stabilizing substitutions. The free energy difference between the native and denatured states of the hs variant is 3.1 (GdnHCl, 25 degrees C) to 4.0 (differential scanning calorimetry, 74 degrees C) kcal mol-1 greater than that of WT. The specific activity of the hs variant is 2.5-fold greater than that of WT. The choice of mutations came from diverse sources: (1) The I55L/S91T core construct with delta Tm = 3.3 degrees C from WT was available from the accompanying study (Shih P, Holland DR, Kirsch JF, 1995, Protein Sci 4:2050-2062). (2) The A31V mutation was suggested by the better atomic packing in the human lysozyme structure where the Ala 31 equivalent is Leu. (3) The H15L and R114H substitutions were selected on the basis of sequence comparisons with pheasant lysozymes that are more stable than the chicken enzyme. (4) The D101S variant was identified from a screen of mutants previously prepared in this laboratory. The effects of the individual mutations on stability are cumulative and nearly additive. PMID:8535242

  4. Interactions between single-walled carbon nanotubes and lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Bomboi, F; Bonincontro, A; La Mesa, C; Tardani, F

    2011-03-15

    Dispersions of single-walled and non-associated carbon nanotubes in aqueous lysozyme solution were investigated by analyzing the stabilizing effect of both protein concentration and pH. It was inferred that the medium pH, which significantly modifies the protein net charge and (presumably) conformation, modulates the mutual interactions with carbon nanotubes. At fixed pH, in addition, the formation of protein/nanotube complexes scales with increasing lysozyme concentration. Electrophoretic mobility, dielectric relaxation and circular dichroism were used to determine the above features. According to circular dichroism, lysozyme adsorbed onto nanotubes could essentially retain its native conformation, but the significant amount of free protein does not allow drawing definitive conclusions on this regard. The state of charge and charge distribution around nanotubes was inferred by combining electrophoretic mobility and dielectric relaxation methods. The former gives information on changes in the surface charge density of the complexes, the latter on modifications in the electrical double layer thickness around them. Such results are complementary each other and univocally indicate that some LYS molecules take part to binding. Above a critical protein/nanotube mass ratio, depletion phenomena were observed. They counteract the stabilization mechanism, with subsequent nanotube/nanotube aggregation and phase separation. Protein-based depletion phenomena are similar to formerly reported effects, observed in aqueous surfactant systems containing carbon nanotubes.

  5. Comparative insight into surfactants mediated amyloidogenesis of lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Sumit K; Khan, Javed M; Siddiqi, Mohammad K; Alam, Parvez; Khan, Rizwan H

    2016-02-01

    Electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions have an important role in the protein aggregation. In this study, we have investigated the effect of charge and hydrophobicity of oppositely charged surfactants i.e., anionic (AOT and SDS) and cationic (CTAB and DTAB) on hen egg white lysozyme at pH 9.0 and 13.0, respectively. We have employed various methods such as turbidity measurements, Rayleigh light scattering, ThT, Congo red and ANS dye binding assays, far-UV CD, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron and fluorescence microscopy. At lower molar ratio, both anionic and cationic surfactants promote amyloid fibril formation in lysozyme at pH 9.0 and 13.0, respectively. The aggregation was proportionally increased with respect to protein concentration and hydrophobicity of surfactant. The morphology of aggregates at both the pH was fibrillar in structure, as visualized by dye binding and microscopic imaging techniques. Initially, the interaction between surfactants and lysozyme was electrostatic and then hydrophobic as investigated by ITC. This study demonstrates the crucial role of charge and hydrophobicity during amyloid fibril formation.

  6. Relationship Between Equilibrium Forms of Lysozyme Crystals and Precipitant Anions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadarajah, Arunan

    1996-01-01

    Molecular forces, such as electrostatic, hydrophobic, van der Waals and steric forces, are known to be important in determining protein interactions. These forces are affected by the solution conditions and changing the pH, temperature or the ionic strength of the solution can sharply affect protein interactions. Several investigations of protein crystallization have shown that this process is also strongly dependent on solution conditions. As the ionic strength of the solution is increased, the initially soluble protein may either crystallize or form an amorphous precipitate at high ionic strengths. Studies done on the model protein hen egg white lysozyme have shown that different crystal forms can be easily and reproducibly obtained, depending primarily on the anion used to desolubilize the protein. In this study we employ pyranine to probe the effect of various anions on the water structure. Additionally, lysozyme crystallization was carried out at these conditions and the crystal form was determined by X-ray crystallography. The goal of the study was to understand the physico-chemical basis for the effect of changing the anion concentration on the equilibrium form of lysozyme crystals. It will also verify the hypothesis that the anions, by altering the bulk water structure in the crystallizing solutions, alter the surface energy of the between the crystal faces and the solution and, consequently, the equilibrium form of the crystals.

  7. Water in hydrated orthorhombic lysozyme crystal: Insight from atomistic simulations.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhongqiao; Jiang, Jianwen; Sandler, Stanley I

    2008-08-21

    Biologically important water in orthorhombic lysozyme crystal is investigated using atomistic simulations. A distinct hydration shell surrounding lysozyme molecules is found from the number distribution of water molecules. While the number of water molecules in the hydration shell increases, the percentage decreases as the hydration level rises. Adsorption of water in the lysozyme crystal shows type-IV behavior. At low hydration levels, water molecules primarily intercalate the minor pores and cavity in the crystal due to the strong affinity between protein and water. At high hydration levels, the major pores are filled with liquidlike water as capillary condensation occurs. A type-H4 hysteresis loop is observed in the adsorption and desorption isotherms. The locations of the water molecules identified from simulation match fairly well with the experimentally determined crystallographic hydration sites. As observed in experiment, water exhibits anomalous subdiffusion because of the geometric restrictions and interactions of protein. With increasing hydration level, this anomaly is reduced and the diffusion of water tends to progressively approach normal Brownian diffusion. The flexibility of protein framework slightly enhances water mobility, but this enhancement decreases with increasing hydration level.

  8. Water in hydrated orthorhombic lysozyme crystal: Insight from atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhongqiao; Jiang, Jianwen; Sandler, Stanley I.

    2008-08-01

    Biologically important water in orthorhombic lysozyme crystal is investigated using atomistic simulations. A distinct hydration shell surrounding lysozyme molecules is found from the number distribution of water molecules. While the number of water molecules in the hydration shell increases, the percentage decreases as the hydration level rises. Adsorption of water in the lysozyme crystal shows type-IV behavior. At low hydration levels, water molecules primarily intercalate the minor pores and cavity in the crystal due to the strong affinity between protein and water. At high hydration levels, the major pores are filled with liquidlike water as capillary condensation occurs. A type-H4 hysteresis loop is observed in the adsorption and desorption isotherms. The locations of the water molecules identified from simulation match fairly well with the experimentally determined crystallographic hydration sites. As observed in experiment, water exhibits anomalous subdiffusion because of the geometric restrictions and interactions of protein. With increasing hydration level, this anomaly is reduced and the diffusion of water tends to progressively approach normal Brownian diffusion. The flexibility of protein framework slightly enhances water mobility, but this enhancement decreases with increasing hydration level.

  9. AtlasT4SS: A curated database for type IV secretion systems

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The type IV secretion system (T4SS) can be classified as a large family of macromolecule transporter systems, divided into three recognized sub-families, according to the well-known functions. The major sub-family is the conjugation system, which allows transfer of genetic material, such as a nucleoprotein, via cell contact among bacteria. Also, the conjugation system can transfer genetic material from bacteria to eukaryotic cells; such is the case with the T-DNA transfer of Agrobacterium tumefaciens to host plant cells. The system of effector protein transport constitutes the second sub-family, and the third one corresponds to the DNA uptake/release system. Genome analyses have revealed numerous T4SS in Bacteria and Archaea. The purpose of this work was to organize, classify, and integrate the T4SS data into a single database, called AtlasT4SS - the first public database devoted exclusively to this prokaryotic secretion system. Description The AtlasT4SS is a manual curated database that describes a large number of proteins related to the type IV secretion system reported so far in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, as well as in Archaea. The database was created using the RDBMS MySQL and the Catalyst Framework based in the Perl programming language and using the Model-View-Controller (MVC) design pattern for Web. The current version holds a comprehensive collection of 1,617 T4SS proteins from 58 Bacteria (49 Gram-negative and 9 Gram-Positive), one Archaea and 11 plasmids. By applying the bi-directional best hit (BBH) relationship in pairwise genome comparison, it was possible to obtain a core set of 134 clusters of orthologous genes encoding T4SS proteins. Conclusions In our database we present one way of classifying orthologous groups of T4SSs in a hierarchical classification scheme with three levels. The first level comprises four classes that are based on the organization of genetic determinants, shared homologies, and evolutionary

  10. Thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) metabolism in normal subjects from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, B A; Rosenthal, D

    1987-01-01

    Kinetic studies of T4 and T3 metabolism were performed on 5 healthy volunteers from Rio de Janeiro to obtain normal values for thyroid hormone metabolism. 125I-T4 and 131I-T3 were administered in bolus and blood samples taken during 7 days. Circulating tracers were isolated by Sephadex G-25 chromatography. The kinetic parameters of T4 and T3 metabolism were calculated by noncompartmental methods. Metabolic clearance rates were 1.04 l/day for T4 and 20.7 l/day for T3. The daily production rate was estimated at 94 micrograms/day for T4 and 23 micrograms/day for T3 and their exchangeable pools at 914 micrograms and 25.5 micrograms, respectively. These values are well within the range of those reported by North American or European authors for normal subjects.

  11. One-step assay for the quantification of T4 DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Franke, Steffi; Kreisig, Thomas; Buettner, Karin; Zuchner, Thole

    2015-02-01

    As one of the most commonly used enzyme in molecular biology, the T4 DNA ligase presents an important tool for the manipulation of DNA. T4 DNA ligase activity measurements are based on the use of radioactivity or rather labor-intense procedures including gel-based analysis. We therefore established a homogeneous T4 DNA ligase assay utilizing a specifically designed fluorescein- and dark quencher-labeled DNA molecule. Upon ligation of both DNA molecules, a quenching occurs and the fluorescence intensity decreases with increasing ligase concentrations. The assay allows a sensitive and precise quantification (CV, 4.6-5.5 %) of T4 DNA ligase activities and showed a high specificity when tested against other ligases of related and different species. Most importantly, this T4 DNA ligase assay requires only one working and incubation step before measurement can take place at room temperature and may therefore offer an interesting alternative to existing, more laborious ligase assays.

  12. Rejoining of DNA strand breaks by T4 DNA ligase in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, T; Edreira, A; Piñero, J

    2002-06-01

    We have tested the ability of T4 DNA ligase to rejoin radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in living hamster cells (CHO-K1, EM9, xrs-5). T4 DNA ligase was introduced into cells by electroporation prior to x-irradiation. Single- and double-strand breaks were measured by the alkaline comet assay technique, and double-strand breaks (DSBs) were evaluated by the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis method. In the comet assay, the three cell lines showed reduced tail moments following pretreatment with T4 DNA ligase, both directly after irradiation and after repair incubation for 4 h. Similarly, the results obtained from pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed reduced DSB frequencies after pretreatment with T4 DNA ligase. We conclude that exogeneous T4 ligase contributes to rejoining of radiation-induced strand breaks.

  13. Large Terminase Conformational Change Induced by Connector Binding in Bacteriophage T7*

    PubMed Central

    Daudén, María I.; Martín-Benito, Jaime; Sánchez-Ferrero, Juan C.; Pulido-Cid, Mar; Valpuesta, José M.; Carrascosa, José L.

    2013-01-01

    During bacteriophage morphogenesis DNA is translocated into a preformed prohead by the complex formed by the portal protein, or connector, plus the terminase, which are located at an especial prohead vertex. The terminase is a powerful motor that converts ATP hydrolysis into mechanical movement of the DNA. Here, we have determined the structure of the T7 large terminase by electron microscopy. The five terminase subunits assemble in a toroid that encloses a channel wide enough to accommodate dsDNA. The structure of the complete connector-terminase complex is also reported, revealing the coupling between the terminase and the connector forming a continuous channel. The structure of the terminase assembled into the complex showed a different conformation when compared with the isolated terminase pentamer. To understand in molecular terms the terminase morphological change, we generated the terminase atomic model based on the crystallographic structure of its phage T4 counterpart. The docking of the threaded model in both terminase conformations showed that the transition between the two states can be achieved by rigid body subunit rotation in the pentameric assembly. The existence of two terminase conformations and its possible relation to the sequential DNA translocation may shed light into the molecular bases of the packaging mechanism of bacteriophage T7. PMID:23632014

  14. Isolation and characterization of a bacteriophage with broad host range, displaying potential in preventing bovine diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Anand, Taruna; Vaid, Rajesh K; Bera, Bidhan Ch; Barua, Sanjay; Riyesh, T; Virmani, N; Yadav, Neeraj; Malik, Praveen

    2015-10-01

    Phage therapy has been previously tried for treatment of diarrhoea in calves, pigs and lambs but those trials were conducted without any detailed information of used phages. Here, we report isolation of a broad-spectrum phage which showed bactericidal activity against 47.3 % of calf diarrhoeal isolates of Escherichia coli, in vitro. The isolated phage resembled the characteristics of Myoviridae family and showed ~97 % similarity with earlier reported bacteriophages of sub family-Tevenvirinae, genus-T4-like virus, based on nucleotide sequence of major head protein-gp23 gene. The phage exhibits the potential to be used as drug substitute tool against E. coli causing diarrhoea in cattle in farm environments.

  15. Bacteriophages and bacteriophage-derived endolysins as potential therapeutics to combat Gram-positive spore forming bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nakonieczna, A; Cooper, C J; Gryko, R

    2015-09-01

    Since their discovery in 1915, bacteriophages have been routinely used within Eastern Europe to treat a variety of bacterial infections. Although initially ignored by the West due to the success of antibiotics, increasing levels and diversity of antibiotic resistance is driving a renaissance for bacteriophage-derived therapy, which is in part due to the highly specific nature of bacteriophages as well as their relative abundance. This review focuses on the bacteriophages and derived lysins of relevant Gram-positive spore formers within the Bacillus cereus group and Clostridium genus that could have applications within the medical, food and environmental sectors.

  16. Inflammation boosts bacteriophage transfer between Salmonella spp.

    PubMed

    Diard, Médéric; Bakkeren, Erik; Cornuault, Jeffrey K; Moor, Kathrin; Hausmann, Annika; Sellin, Mikael E; Loverdo, Claude; Aertsen, Abram; Ackermann, Martin; De Paepe, Marianne; Slack, Emma; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2017-03-17

    Bacteriophage transfer (lysogenic conversion) promotes bacterial virulence evolution. There is limited understanding of the factors that determine lysogenic conversion dynamics within infected hosts. A murine Salmonella Typhimurium (STm) diarrhea model was used to study the transfer of SopEΦ, a prophage from STm SL1344, to STm ATCC14028S. Gut inflammation and enteric disease triggered >55% lysogenic conversion of ATCC14028S within 3 days. Without inflammation, SopEΦ transfer was reduced by up to 10(5)-fold. This was because inflammation (e.g., reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen species, hypochlorite) triggers the bacterial SOS response, boosts expression of the phage antirepressor Tum, and thereby promotes free phage production and subsequent transfer. Mucosal vaccination prevented a dense intestinal STm population from inducing inflammation and consequently abolished SopEΦ transfer. Vaccination may be a general strategy for blocking pathogen evolution that requires disease-driven transfer of temperate bacteriophages.

  17. Bacteriophage ecology in environmental biotechnology processes.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Orr H; Kushmaro, Ariel

    2011-06-01

    Heterotrophic bacteria are an integral part of any environmental biotechnology process (EBP). Therefore, factors controlling bacterial abundance, activity, and community composition are central to the understanding of such processes. Among these factors, top-down control by bacteriophage predation has so far received very limited attention. With over 10(8) particles per ml, phage appear to be the most numerous biological entities in EBP. Phage populations in EBP appear to be highly dynamic and to correlate with the population dynamics of their hosts and genomic evidence suggests bacteria evolve to avoid phage predation. Clearly, there is much to learn regarding bacteriophage in EBP before we can truly understand the microbial ecology of these globally important systems.

  18. Application of bacteriophages in sensor development.

    PubMed

    Peltomaa, Riikka; López-Perolio, Irene; Benito-Peña, Elena; Barderas, Rodrigo; Moreno-Bondi, María Cruz

    2016-03-01

    Bacteriophage-based bioassays are a promising alternative to traditional antibody-based immunoassays. Bacteriophages, shortened to phages, can be easily conjugated or genetically engineered. Phages are robust, ubiquitous in nature, and harmless to humans. Notably, phages do not usually require inoculation and killing of animals; and thus, the production of phages is simple and economical. In recent years, phage-based biosensors have been developed featuring excellent robustness, sensitivity, and selectivity in combination with the ease of integration into transduction devices. This review provides a critical overview of phage-based bioassays and biosensors developed in the last few years using different interrogation methods such as colorimetric, enzymatic, fluorescence, surface plasmon resonance, quartz crystal microbalance, magnetoelastic, Raman, or electrochemical techniques.

  19. Detection of bacteria with bioluminescent reporter bacteriophage.

    PubMed

    Klumpp, Jochen; Loessner, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that exclusively infect bacteria. They are ideally suited for the development of highly specific diagnostic assay systems. Bioluminescent reporter bacteriophages are designed and constructed by integration of a luciferase gene in the virus genome. Relying on the host specificity of the phage, the system enables rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of bacterial pathogens. A bioluminescent reporter phage assay is superior to any other molecular detection method, because gene expression and light emission are dependent on an active metabolism of the bacterial cell, and only viable cells will yield a signal. In this chapter we introduce the concept of creating reporter phages, discuss their advantages and disadvantages, and illustrate the advances made in developing such systems for different Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogens. The application of bioluminescent reporter phages for the detection of foodborne pathogens is emphasized.

  20. A feasible method for indirect quantification of L-T4 in drugs by iodine determination.

    PubMed

    Mesko, Marcia Foster; Teotonio, Alessandra Cortes; Teixeira Oliveira, Dirce Taina; Rosa Novo, Diogo La; Costa, Vanize Caldeira

    2017-05-01

    In this work, a method combining microwave-induced combustion (MIC) for sample preparation of commercial levothyroxine sodium (L-T4) drugs (L-T4: 25-200µg/tablet), and potentiometry with ion selective electrode (ISE) for iodine determination and subsequent indirect quantification of L-T4 was proposed. The type and concentration of the absorbing solution were evaluated to select the most suitable conditions for this study. Using the MIC method, it was possible to use solutions as diluted as 150mmolL(-1) (NH4)2CO3 (for samples containing 25-200µg of L-T4/tablet) for I absorption. In these conditions, recoveries for L-T4 were between 99% and 101%, and relative standard deviations were lower than 10%. The limit of detection for L-T4 was 11.2µg/tablet, which is almost two times lower than the minimum concentration of L-T4 in commercially available drugs. Thus, the MIC was suitable for the digestion of several L-T4 drugs for subsequent I determination by ISE and indirect quantification of L-T4. Furthermore, the proposed method presents high throughput with low reagent consumption and consequently lower waste generation, making it suitable for routine determination of L-T4 in drugs. From the obtained results, it was possible to observe that one of the analyzed samples is not in agreement with the limits established by the United States Pharmacopeia, indicating the importance of the drug quality control. The United States Pharmacopeia establishes that each tablet must contain between 90% and 110% of the amount of active substance declared by the manufacturer.

  1. Genomic characteristics and environmental distributions of the uncultivated Far-T4 phages

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Simon; Enault, François; Ravet, Viviane; Pereira, Olivier; Sullivan, Matthew B.

    2015-01-01

    Viral metagenomics (viromics) is a tremendous tool to reveal viral taxonomic and functional diversity across ecosystems ranging from the human gut to the world's oceans. As with microbes however, there appear vast swaths of “dark matter” yet to be documented for viruses, even among relatively well-studied viral types. Here, we use viromics to explore the “Far-T4 phages” sequence space, a neighbor clade from the well-studied T4-like phages that was first detected through PCR study in seawater and subsequently identified in freshwater lakes through 454-sequenced viromes. To advance the description of these viruses beyond this single marker gene, we explore Far-T4 genome fragments assembled from two deeply-sequenced freshwater viromes. Single gene phylogenetic trees confirm that the Far-T4 phages are divergent from the T4-like phages, genome fragments reveal largely collinear genome organizations, and both data led to the delineation of five Far-T4 clades. Three-dimensional models of major capsid proteins are consistent with a T4-like structure, and highlight a highly conserved core flanked by variable insertions. Finally, we contextualize these now better characterized Far-T4 phages by re-analyzing 196 previously published viromes. These suggest that Far-T4 are common in freshwater and seawater as only four of 82 aquatic viromes lacked Far-T4-like sequences. Variability in representation across the five newly identified clades suggests clade-specific niche differentiation may be occurring across the different biomes, though the underlying mechanism remains unidentified. While complete genome assembly from complex communities and the lack of host linkage information still bottleneck virus discovery through viromes, these findings exemplify the power of metagenomics approaches to assess the diversity, evolutionary history, and genomic characteristics of novel uncultivated phages. PMID:25852662

  2. Isolation of Bacteriophages Active Against Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    Cary, Sylvia G.; Hunter, Donald H.

    1967-01-01

    Five distinct bacteriophages have been isolated from strains of Neisseria meningitidis. Filtrates with titers of 10−4 to 10−6 were produced with a modified Swanstrom and Adams semisolid agar procedure, employing Eugonbroth with added agar and an incubation temperature of 30 C. Of 49 strains of N. meningitidis (groups B and C), 25 were lysed by one or more of the phages, but there was no lysis of other Neisseria and Mima polymorpha strains. Images PMID:4990042

  3. Drugs against superbugs: private lessons from bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Brown, Eric D

    2004-09-01

    Bacterial genomics has provided a plethora of potential targets for antibacterial drug discovery, however, success in the hunt for new antibiotics will hinge on selecting targets with the highest potential. A recent paper by Liu and coworkers describes a new approach to target selection that uncovers strategies used by bacteriophage to disable bacteria. The method uses key phage proteins to identify and validate vulnerable targets and exploits them further in the identification of new antibacterial leads.

  4. Genomic impact of CRISPR immunization against bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Barrangou, Rodolphe; Coûté-Monvoisin, Anne-Claire; Stahl, Buffy; Chavichvily, Isabelle; Damange, Florian; Romero, Dennis A; Boyaval, Patrick; Fremaux, Christophe; Horvath, Philippe

    2013-12-01

    CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) together with CAS (RISPR-associated) genes form the CRISPR-Cas immune system, which provides sequence-specific adaptive immunity against foreign genetic elements in bacteria and archaea. Immunity is acquired by the integration of short stretches of invasive DNA as novel 'spacers' into CRISPR loci. Subsequently, these immune markers are transcribed and generate small non-coding interfering RNAs that specifically guide nucleases for sequence-specific cleavage of complementary sequences. Among the four CRISPR-Cas systems present in Streptococcus thermophilus, CRISPR1 and CRISPR3 have the ability to readily acquire new spacers following bacteriophage or plasmid exposure. In order to investigate the impact of building CRISPR-encoded immunity on the host chromosome, we determined the genome sequence of a BIM (bacteriophage-insensitive mutant) derived from the DGCC7710 model organism, after four consecutive rounds of bacteriophage challenge. As expected, active CRISPR loci evolved via polarized addition of several novel spacers following exposure to bacteriophages. Although analysis of the draft genome sequence revealed a variety of SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) and INDELs (insertions/deletions), most of the in silico differences were not validated by Sanger re-sequencing. In addition, two SNPs and two small INDELs were identified and tracked in the intermediate variants. Overall, building CRISPR-encoded immunity does not significantly affect the genome, which allows the maintenance of important functional properties in isogenic CRISPR mutants. This is critical for the development and formulation of sustainable and robust next-generation starter cultures with increased industrial lifespans.

  5. Identification and expression analysis of three c-type lysozymes in Oreochromis aureus.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng-ying; Qu, Lan; Yu, Shao-guo; Ye, Xing; Tian, Yuan-yuan; Zhang, Li-li; Bai, Jun-jie; Lu, Maixin

    2012-05-01

    Lysozyme is an important molecule of innate immune system for the defense against bacterial infections. Three genes encoding chicken-type (c-type) lysozymes, C1-, C2-, C3-type, were obtained from tilapia Oreochromis aureus by RT-PCR and the RACE method. Catalytic and other conserved structure residues required for functionality were identified. The amino acid sequence identities between C1- and C2-type, C1- and C3-type, C2- and C3-type were 67.8%, 65.7% and 63.9%, respectively. Phylogenetic tree analyze indicated the three genes were firstly grouped to those of higher teleosteans, Pleuronectiformes and Tetraodontiformes fishes, and then clustered to those of lower teleosteans, Cypriniformes fishes. Bioinformatic analysis of mature peptide showed that the three genes possess typical sequence characteristics, secondary and tertiary structure of c-type lysozymes. The three tilapia c-type lysozymes mRNAs were mainly expressed in liver and muscle, and C1-type lysozyme also highly expressed in intestine. C1-type lysozyme mRNA was weakly expressed in stomach, C2- and C3-type mRNAs were weakly expressed in intestine. After bacterial challenge, up-regulation was obvious in kidney and spleen for C1-type lysozyme mRNA, while for C2- and C3-type lysozyme obvious increase were observed in stomach and liver, suggesting that C1-type lysozyme may mainly play roles in defense, while C2- and C3-type lysozyme mainly conduct digestive function against bacteria infection. All the three c-type recombinant lysozymes displayed lytic activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. These results indicated that three c-type lysozymes play important roles in the defense of O. aureus against bacteria infections.

  6. Analysis of Two Lysozyme Genes and Antimicrobial Functions of Their Recombinant Proteins in Asian Seabass

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Gui Hong; Bai, Zhi Yi; Xia, Jun Hong; Liu, Feng; Liu, Peng; Yue, Gen Hua

    2013-01-01

    Lysozymes are important proteins of the innate immune system for the defense against bacterial infection. We cloned and analyzed chicken-type (c-type) and goose-type (g-type) lysozymes from Asian seabass (Lates calcarifer). The deduced amino acid sequence of the c-type lysozyme contained 144 residues and possessed typical structure residues, conserved catalytic residues (Glu50 and Asp67) and a “GSTDYGIFQINS” motif. The deduced g-type lysozyme contained 187 residues and possessed a goose egg white lysozyme (GEWL) domain containing three conserved catalytic residues (Glu71, Asp84, Asp95) essential for catalytic activity. Real time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed that the two lysozyme genes were constitutively expressed in all the examined tissues. The c-type lysozyme was most abundant in liver, while the g-type lysozyme was predominantly expressed in intestine and weakly expressed in muscle. The c-type and g-type transcripts were up-regulated in the kidney, spleen and liver in response to a challenge with Vibrio harveyi. The up-regulation of the c-type lysozyme was much stronger than that of the g-type lysozyme in kidney and spleen. The recombinant proteins of the c-type and g-type lysozymes showed lytic activities against the bacterial pathogens Vibrio harveyi and Photobacterium damselae in a dosage-dependent manner. We identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the two lysozyme genes. There were significant associations of these polymorphisms with resistance to the big belly disease. These results suggest that the c- and g-type genes play an important role in resistance to bacterial pathogens in fish. The SNP markers in the two genes associated with the resistance to bacterial pathogens may facilitate the selection of Asian seabass resistant to bacterial diseases. PMID:24244553

  7. Biochemical characterization of lysozymes present in egg white of selected species of anatid birds.

    PubMed

    D'Surney, S J; deKloet, S R

    1985-01-01

    The isolation of lysozyme from the egg white of several representative species of waterfowl is described. The purified lysozymes were analyzed to determine the type and molecular weight of each enzyme. All enzymes found in duck egg whites were found to be of the c-type. In contrast all true geese, and the mute swan species as well as the northern blackneck screamer contain lysozyme g in their egg white.

  8. Biochemical characterization of lysozymes present in egg white of selected species of anatid birds.

    PubMed

    D'Surney, S J; deKloet, S R

    1985-01-01

    The isolation of lysozyme from the egg white of several representative species of waterfowl is described. The purified lysozymes were analyzed in order to determine the type and molecular weight of each enzyme. All enzymes found in duck egg whites were found to be of the c-type. In contrast all true geese, the Mute Swan as well as the Northern Blackneck Screamer contain lysozyme g in their egg white.

  9. Lysozyme-Mediated Formation of Protein-Silica Nano-Composites for Biosensing Applications (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-05

    reagents Lysozyme (from hen egg white ), tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) were purchased from Sigma–Aldrich (St. Louis...AFRL-RX-TY-TP-2009-4611 LYSOZYME -MEDIATED FORMATION OF PROTEIN-SILICA NANO-COMPOSITES FOR BIOSENSING APPLICATIONS (POSTPRINT) Madhumati...Include area code) 15-MAR-2009 Journal Article - POSTPRINT 01-MAR-2008 -- 01-MAR-2009 Lysozyme -Mediated Formation of Protein–Silica Nano-Composites for

  10. Antibacterial activity of hen egg white lysozyme against Listeria monocytogenes Scott A in foods.

    PubMed Central

    Hughey, V L; Wilger, P A; Johnson, E A

    1989-01-01

    Egg white lysozyme killed or prevented growth of Listeria monocytogenes Scott A in several foods. Lysozyme was more active in vegetables than in animal-derived foods that we tested. For maximum activity in certain foods, EDTA was required in addition to lysozyme. Lysozyme with EDTA effectively killed inoculated populations of 10(4) L. monocytogenes per g in fresh corn, fresh green beans, shredded cabbage, shredded lettuce, and carrots during storage at 5 degrees C. Control incubations without lysozyme supported growth of L. monocytogenes to 10(6) to 10(7)/g. Lysozyme had less activity in animal-derived foods, including fresh pork sausage (bratwurst) and Camembert cheese. In bratwurst, lysozyme with EDTA prevented L. monocytogenes from growing for 2 to 3 weeks but did not kill significant numbers of cells and did not prevent eventual growth. The control sausages not containing lysozyme supported rapid and heavy growth, which indicated that lysozyme was bacteriostatic for 2 to 3 weeks in fresh pork sausage. We also prepared Camembert cheese containing 10(4) L. monocytogenes cells per g and investigated the changes during ripening in cheeses supplemented with lysozyme and EDTA. Cheeses with lysozyme by itself or together with EDTA reduced the L. monocytogenes population by approximately 10-fold over the first 3 to 4 weeks of ripening. In the same period, the control cheese wheels without added lysozyme with and without chelator slowly started to grown and eventually reached 10(6) to 10(7) CFU/g after 55 days of ripening.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2494938

  11. Recombinant goose-type lysozyme in channel catfish: lysozyme activity and efficacy as plasmid DNA immunostimulant against Aeromonas hydrophila infection.

    PubMed

    Pridgeon, Julia W; Klesius, Phillip H; Dominowski, Paul J; Yancey, Robert J; Kievit, Michele S

    2013-10-01

    The objectives of this study were: 1) to investigate whether recombinant channel catfish lysozyme-g (CC-Lys-g) produced in Escherichia coli expression system possesses any lysozyme activity; and 2) to evaluate whether channel catfish lysozyme-g plasmid DNA could be used as an immunostimulant to protect channel catfish against Aeromonas hydrophila infection. Recombinant CC-Lys-g produced in E. coli expression system exhibited significant (P < 0.05) lytic activity against Gram-positive Micrococcus lysodeikticus and Gram-negative A. hydrophila. When pcDNA3.2-vectored recombinant channel catfish lysozyme-g (pcDNA-Lys-g) was transfected in channel catfish gill cells G1B, the over-expression of pcDNA-Lys-g offered significant (P < 0.05) protection to G1B cells against A. hydrophila infection. When channel catfish were intraperitoneally injected with pcDNA-Lys-g along with an adjuvant QCDCR, the transcriptional level of Lys-g was significantly (P < 0.05) increased. When pcDNA-Lys-g injected fish was challenged with a highly virulent A. hydrophila strain AL-09-71, pcDNA-Lys-g offered 100% protection to channel catfish at two days post DNA injection. Macrophages of fish injected with pcDNA-Lys-g produced significantly (P < 0.05) higher amounts of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide than that of fish injected with pcDNA vector alone at two days post DNA injection. Taken together, our results suggest that pcDNA-Lys-g could be used as a novel immunostimulant to offer immediate protection to channel catfish against A. hydrophila infection.

  12. Controlled expression and structural organization of a Lactococcus lactis bacteriophage lysin encoded by two overlapping genes.

    PubMed Central

    Shearman, C A; Jury, K L; Gasson, M J

    1994-01-01

    The phi vML3 bacteriophage lysin is specific for lactococci and could be used to promote enzyme release during cheese manufacture. The level of lysin expression from the cloned gene using its own upstream sequences is very low. Expression in Escherichia coli by using a synthetic hybrid lysin gene and a series of BAL 31 deletions of the original cloned DNA fragment suggested that the start of the gene had previously been incorrectly assigned. Reevaluation of homology between the lysin and Bacillus subtilis PZA protein 15 led to the identification of a new potential ribosome binding site (RBS). A 0.72-kb PCR-generated fragment including this RBS and the complete lysin gene was expressed and inducibly controlled. The translational start of the lysin gene was identified as an isoleucine codon, and this may lead to a low translation rate. During the analysis of the BAL 31 deletion fragments, two proteins of 20 and 8 kDa were shown to be expressed from the originally defined lysin gene. The DNA sequence has a second open reading frame with a good RBS and two potential start methionines. The smaller lysin protein was isolated, and the N terminus was sequenced, confirming that one methionine codon acted as the start of a second gene. The larger lysin protein has homology with lysozymes. The smaller lysin protein has some features resembling those of a holin. The possible roles of these two proteins in lysis of lactococci are discussed. Images PMID:7944354

  13. Naturally resident and exogenously applied T4-like and T5-like bacteriophages can reduce Escherichia coli O157:H7 levels in sheep guts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In preparing sheep for an in vivo Escherichia coli O157:H7 eradication trial, we found that 20/39 members of a single flock were naturally colonized by O157:H7-infecting phages. Characterization showed these were all one phage type (subsequently named CEV2) infecting 15/16 O157:H7, 7/72 ECOR, and c...

  14. Genetically modified bacteriophages in applied microbiology.

    PubMed

    Bárdy, P; Pantůček, R; Benešík, M; Doškař, J

    2016-09-01

    Bacteriophages represent a simple viral model of basic research with many possibilities for practical application. Due to their ability to infect and kill bacteria, their potential in the treatment of bacterial infection has been examined since their discovery. With advances in molecular biology and gene engineering, the phage application spectrum has been expanded to various medical and biotechnological fields. The construction of bacteriophages with an extended host range or longer viability in the mammalian bloodstream enhances their potential as an alternative to conventional antibiotic treatment. Insertion of active depolymerase genes to their genomes can enforce the biofilm disposal. They can also be engineered to transfer various compounds to the eukaryotic organisms and the bacterial culture, applicable for the vaccine, drug or gene delivery. Phage recombinant lytic enzymes can be applied as enzybiotics in medicine as well as in biotechnology for pathogen detection or programmed cell death in bacterial expression strains. Besides, modified bacteriophages with high specificity can be applied as bioprobes in detection tools to estimate the presence of pathogens in food industry, or utilized in the control of food-borne pathogens as part of the constructed phage-based biosorbents.

  15. Adsorption of bacteriophages on clay minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chattopadhyay, Sandip; Puls, Robert W.

    1999-01-01

    The ability to predict the fate of microorganisms in soil is dependent on an understanding of the process of their sorption on soil and subsurface materials. Presently, we have focused on studying the thermodynamics of sorption of bacteriophages (T-2, MS-2, and φX-174) on clays (hectorite, saponite, kaolinite, and clay fraction of samples collected from a landfill site). The thermodynamic study not only determines the feasibility of the process but also provides information on the relative magnitudes of the different forces under a particular set of conditions. The total free energy of interaction during sorption of bacteriophages on clays (ΔG) has been assumed to be the summation of ΔGH (ΔG due to hydrophobic interactions) and ΔGEL (ΔG due to electrostatic interactions). The magnitude of ΔGH was determined from the different interfacial tensions (γ) present in the system, while ΔGEL was calculated from ζ-potentials of the colloidal particles. Calculated results show that surface hydrophobicities of the selected sorbents and sorbates dictate sorption. Among the selected bacteriophages, maximum sorption was observed with T-2, while hectorite has the maximum sorption capacity. Experimental results obtained from the batch adsorption studies also corroborated those obtained from the theoretical study.

  16. Call for a dedicated European legal framework for bacteriophage therapy.

    PubMed

    Verbeken, Gilbert; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Lavigne, Rob; Jennes, Serge; De Vos, Daniel; Casteels, Minne; Huys, Isabelle

    2014-04-01

    The worldwide emergence of antibiotic resistances and the drying up of the antibiotic pipeline have spurred a search for alternative or complementary antibacterial therapies. Bacteriophages are bacterial viruses that have been used for almost a century to combat bacterial infections, particularly in Poland and the former Soviet Union. The antibiotic crisis has triggered a renewed clinical and agricultural interest in bacteriophages. This, combined with new scientific insights, has pushed bacteriophages to the forefront of the search for new approaches to fighting bacterial infections. But before bacteriophage therapy can be introduced into clinical practice in the European Union, several challenges must be overcome. One of these is the conceptualization and classification of bacteriophage therapy itself and the extent to which it constitutes a human medicinal product regulated under the European Human Code for Medicines (Directive 2001/83/EC). Can therapeutic products containing natural bacteriophages be categorized under the current European regulatory framework, or should this framework be adapted? Various actors in the field have discussed the need for an adapted (or entirely new) regulatory framework for the reintroduction of bacteriophage therapy in Europe. This led to the identification of several characteristics specific to natural bacteriophages that should be taken into consideration by regulators when evaluating bacteriophage therapy. One important consideration is whether bacteriophage therapy development occurs on an industrial scale or a hospital-based, patient-specific scale. More suitable regulatory standards may create opportunities to improve insights into this promising therapeutic approach. In light of this, we argue for the creation of a new, dedicated European regulatory framework for bacteriophage therapy.

  17. Isolation and characterization of bacteriophages of Salmonella enterica serovar Pullorum.

    PubMed

    Bao, H; Zhang, H; Wang, R

    2011-10-01

    In this study, 2 bacteriophages of Salmonella Pullorum were isolated using an enrichment protocol and the double agar layer method. They were named PSPu-95 and PSPu-4-116, respectively, against clinical isolates of Salmonella Pullorum SPu-95 and SPu-116. The host ranges of the 2 bacteriophages were determined by performing spot tests with 20 bacteria strains. Both bacteriophages had wide host ranges. Bacteriophage PSPu-95 had a lytic effect on 17 of the 20 isolates (85%), and PSPu-4-116 produced a lytic effect on 14 isolates (70%) and was the only bacteriophage that produced a clear plaque on enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the bacteriophages belonged to the order Caudovirales. Bacteriophage PSPu-95 was a member of the family Siphoviridae, but bacteriophage PSPu-4-116 belonged to the family Myoviridae. Both had a double-stranded DNA, which was digested with HindIII or EcoRI, that was estimated to be 58.3 kbp (PSPu-95) and 45.2 kbp (PSPu-4-116) by 1% agar electrophoresis. One-step growth kinetics showed that the latent periods were all less than 20 min, and the burst size was 77.5 pfu/cell for PSPu-95 and 86 pfu/cell for PSPu-4-116. The bacteriophages were able to survive in a pH range between 4 and 10, and they were able to survive in a treatment of 70°C for 60 min. The characterizations of these 2 bacteriophages were helpful in establishing a basis for adopting the most effective bacteriophage to control bacteria in the poultry industry.

  18. Bacteriophage P70: unique morphology and unrelatedness to other Listeria bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Schmuki, Martina M; Erne, Doris; Loessner, Martin J; Klumpp, Jochen

    2012-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important food-borne pathogen, and its bacteriophages find many uses in detection and biocontrol of its host. The novel broad-host-range virulent phage P70 has a unique morphology with an elongated capsid. Its genome sequence was determined by a hybrid sequencing strategy employing Sanger and PacBio techniques. The P70 genome contains 67,170 bp and 119 open reading frames (ORFs). Our analyses suggest that P70 represents an archetype of virus unrelated to other known Listeria bacteriophages.

  19. The identification and characterization of lysozyme from the hard tick Haemaphysalis longicornis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tetsuya; Kawano, Suguru; Nakao, Sumihiro; Umemiya-Shirafuji, Rika; Rahman, Md Morshedur; Boldbaatar, Damdinsuren; Battur, Banzragch; Liao, Min; Fujisaki, Kozo

    2010-12-01

    A full-length cDNA-encoding lysozyme was obtained from cDNA libraries of salivary glands of the hard tick Haemaphysalis longicornis and designated as HlLysozyme. The HlLysozyme sequence represents an open reading frame for a putative signal peptide and the mature protein composed of 121 amino acids. The calculated molecular weight of the protein is 13.7 kDa, and the theoretical isoelectric point is 9.85. HlLysozyme shares 41-79% amino acid sequence identity with the lysozymes of other organisms. The activity of recombinant HlLysozyme expressed in Escherichia coli was confirmed by a lytic zone assay using lyophilized Micrococcus lysodeikticus. The HlLysozyme activity decreased at 70 °C and was demonstrated at acidic side and neutral in a pH range. Elevated gene expression of HlLysozyme was observed when female ticks were challenged with bacteria, suggesting possible roles of lysozyme as an innate immunity of ticks against microorganisms.

  20. Synergistic action of Galleria mellonella anionic peptide 2 and lysozyme against Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zdybicka-Barabas, Agnieszka; Mak, Pawel; Klys, Anna; Skrzypiec, Krzysztof; Mendyk, Ewaryst; Fiołka, Marta J; Cytryńska, Małgorzata

    2012-11-01

    Lysozyme and antimicrobial peptides are key factors of the humoral immune response in insects. In the present work lysozyme and anionic defense peptide (GMAP2) were isolated from the hemolymph of the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella and their antibacterial activity was investigated. Adsorption of G. mellonella lysozyme on the cell surface of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria was demonstrated using immunoblotting with anti-G. mellonella lysozyme antibodies. Lysozyme effectively inhibited the growth of selected Gram-positive bacteria, which was accompanied by serious alterations of the cell surface, as revealed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging. G. mellonella lysozyme used in concentrations found in the hemolymph of naive and immunized larvae, perforated also the Escherichia coli cell membrane and the level of such perforation was considerably increased by GMAP2. GMAP2 used alone did not perforate E. coli cells nor influence lysozyme muramidase activity. However, the peptide induced a decrease in the turgor pressure of the bacterial cell. Moreover, in the samples of bacteria treated with a mixture of lysozyme and GMAP2 the sodium chloride crystals were found, suggesting disturbance of ion transport across the membrane leading to cell disruption. These results clearly indicated the synergistic action of G. mellonella lysozyme and anionic peptide 2 against Gram-negative bacteria. The reported results suggested that, thanks to immune factors constitutively present in hemolymph, G. mellonella larvae are to some extent protected against infection caused by Gram-negative bacteria.

  1. Chronopotentiometric sensing of specific interactions between lysozyme and the DNA aptamer.

    PubMed

    Ostatná, Veronika; Kasalová-Vargová, Veronika; Kékedy-Nagy, László; Černocká, Hana; Ferapontova, Elena E

    2017-04-01

    Specific DNA-protein interactions are vital for cellular life maintenance processes, such as transcriptional regulation, chromosome maintenance, replication and DNA repair, and their monitoring gives valuable information on molecular-level organization of those processes. Here, we propose a new method of label-free electrochemical sensing of sequence specific binding between the lysozyme protein and a single stranded DNA aptamer specific for lysozyme (DNAapta) that exploits the constant current chronopotentiometric stripping (CPS) analysis at modified mercury electrodes. Specific lysozyme-DNAapta binding was distinguished from nonspecific lysozyme-DNA interactions at thioglycolic acid-modified mercury electrodes, but not at the dithiothreitol-modified or bare mercury electrodes. Stability of the surface-attached lysozyme-DNAapta layer depended on the stripping current (Istr) intensity, suggesting that the integrity of the layer critically depends on the time of its exposure to negative potentials. Stabilities of different lysozyme-DNA complexes at the negatively polarized electrode surface were tested, and it was shown that structural transitions of the specific lysozyme-DNAapta complexes occur in the Istr ranges different from those observed for assemblies of lysozyme with DNA sequences capable of only nonspecific lysozyme-DNA interactions. Thus, the CPS allows distinct discrimination between specific and non-specific protein-DNA binding and provides valuable information on stability of the nucleic acid-protein interactions at the polarized interfaces.

  2. Estimation of the initial equilibrium constants in the formation of tetragonal lysozyme nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented from a study of the equilibria, kinetic rates, and the aggregation pathway which leads from a lysozyme monomer crystal to a tetragonal crystal, using dialyzed and recrystallized commercial hen eggwhite lysozyme. Relative light scattering intensity measurements were used to estimate the initial equilibrium constants for undersaturated lysozyme solutions in the tetragonal regime. The K1 value was estimated to be (1-3) x 10 exp 4 L/mol. Estimates of subsequent equilibrium constants depend on the crystal aggregation model chosen or determined. Experimental data suggest that tetragonal lysozyme crystal grows by addition of aggregates preformed in the bulk solution, rather than by monomer addition.

  3. Parallel tempering Monte Carlo simulations of lysozyme orientation on charged surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yun; Zhou, Jian; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2010-02-01

    In this work, the parallel tempering Monte Carlo (PTMC) algorithm is applied to accurately and efficiently identify the global-minimum-energy orientation of a protein adsorbed on a surface in a single simulation. When applying the PTMC method to simulate lysozyme orientation on charged surfaces, it is found that lysozyme could easily be adsorbed on negatively charged surfaces with "side-on" and "back-on" orientations. When driven by dominant electrostatic interactions, lysozyme tends to be adsorbed on negatively charged surfaces with the side-on orientation for which the active site of lysozyme faces sideways. The side-on orientation agrees well with the experimental results where the adsorbed orientation of lysozyme is determined by electrostatic interactions. As the contribution from van der Waals interactions gradually dominates, the back-on orientation becomes the preferred one. For this orientation, the active site of lysozyme faces outward, which conforms to the experimental results where the orientation of adsorbed lysozyme is co-determined by electrostatic interactions and van der Waals interactions. It is also found that despite of its net positive charge, lysozyme could be adsorbed on positively charged surfaces with both "end-on" and back-on orientations owing to the nonuniform charge distribution over lysozyme surface and the screening effect from ions in solution. The PTMC simulation method provides a way to determine the preferred orientation of proteins on surfaces for biosensor and biomaterial applications.

  4. Engineering Escherichia coli for Soluble Expression and Single Step Purification of Active Human Lysozyme

    PubMed Central

    Lamppa, John W.; Tanyos, Sam A.; Griswold, Karl E.

    2012-01-01

    Genetically engineered variants of human lysozyme represent promising leads in the battle against drug-resistant bacterial pathogens, but early stage development and testing of novel lysozyme variants is constrained by the lack of a robust, scalable and facile expression system. While wild type human lysozyme is reportedly produced at 50 – 80 kg per hectare of land in recombinant rice, this plant-based system is not readily scaled down to bench top production, and it is therefore not suitable for development and characterization of novel lysozyme variants. Here, we describe a novel and efficient expression system capable of producing folded, soluble and functional human lysozyme in E. coli cells. To achieve this goal, we simultaneously co-express multiple protein folding chaperones as well as harness the lysozyme inhibitory protein, Ivy. Our strategy exploits E. coli’s ease of culture, short doubling time, and facile genetics to yield upwards of 30 mg/L of soluble lysozyme in a bioreactor system, a 3000-fold improvement over prior efforts in E. coli. Additionally, molecular interactions between lysozyme and a his-tagged Ivy allows for one-step purification by IMAC chromatography, yielding as much as 21 mg/L of purified enzyme. We anticipate that our expression and purification platform will facilitate further development of engineered lysozymes having utility in disease treatment and other practical applications. PMID:23220215

  5. Protective properties of lysozyme on β-amyloid pathology: implications for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Helmfors, Linda; Boman, Andrea; Civitelli, Livia; Nath, Sangeeta; Sandin, Linnea; Janefjord, Camilla; McCann, Heather; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Halliday, Glenda; Brorsson, Ann-Christin; Kågedal, Katarina

    2015-11-01

    The hallmarks of Alzheimer disease are amyloid-β plaques and neurofibrillary tangles accompanied by signs of neuroinflammation. Lysozyme is a major player in the innate immune system and has recently been shown to prevent the aggregation of amyloid-β1-40 in vitro. In this study we found that patients with Alzheimer disease have increased lysozyme levels in the cerebrospinal fluid and lysozyme co-localized with amyloid-β in plaques. In Drosophila neuronal co-expression of lysozyme and amyloid-β1-42 reduced the formation of soluble and insoluble amyloid-β species, prolonged survival and improved the activity of amyloid-β1-42 transgenic flies. This suggests that lysozyme levels rise in Alzheimer disease as a compensatory response to amyloid-β increases and aggregation. In support of this, in vitro aggregation assays revealed that lysozyme associates with amyloid-β1-42 and alters its aggregation pathway to counteract the formation of toxic amyloid-β species. Overall, these studies establish a protective role for lysozyme against amyloid-β associated toxicities and identify increased lysozyme in patients with Alzheimer disease. Therefore, lysozyme has potential as a new biomarker as well as a therapeutic target for Alzheimer disease.

  6. Novel "Superspreader" Bacteriophages Promote Horizontal Gene Transfer by Transformation.

    PubMed

    Keen, Eric C; Bliskovsky, Valery V; Malagon, Francisco; Baker, James D; Prince, Jeffrey S; Klaus, James S; Adhya, Sankar L

    2017-01-17

    Bacteriophages infect an estimated 10(23) to 10(25) bacterial cells each second, many of which carry physiologically relevant plasmids (e.g., those encoding antibiotic resistance). However, even though phage-plasmid interactions occur on a massive scale and have potentially significant evolutionary, ecological, and biomedical implications, plasmid fate upon phage infection and lysis has not been investigated to date. Here we show that a subset of the natural lytic phage population, which we dub "superspreaders," releases substantial amounts of intact, transformable plasmid DNA upon lysis, thereby promoting horizontal gene transfer by transformation. Two novel Escherichia coli phage superspreaders, SUSP1 and SUSP2, liberated four evolutionarily distinct plasmids with equal efficiency, including two close relatives of prominent antibiotic resistance vectors in natural environments. SUSP2 also mediated the extensive lateral transfer of antibiotic resistance in unbiased communities of soil bacteria from Maryland and Wyoming. Furthermore, the addition of SUSP2 to cocultures of kanamycin-resistant E. coli and kanamycin-sensitive Bacillus sp. bacteria resulted in roughly 1,000-fold more kanamycin-resistant Bacillus sp. bacteria than arose in phage-free controls. Unlike many other lytic phages, neither SUSP1 nor SUSP2 encodes homologs to known hydrolytic endonucleases, suggesting a simple potential mechanism underlying the superspreading phenotype. Consistent with this model, the deletion of endonuclease IV and the nucleoid-disrupting protein ndd from coliphage T4, a phage known to extensively degrade chromosomal DNA, significantly increased its ability to promote plasmid transformation. Taken together, our results suggest that phage superspreaders may play key roles in microbial evolution and ecology but should be avoided in phage therapy and other medical applications.

  7. A novel formulation of L-thyroxine (L-T4) reduces the problem of L-T4 malabsorption by coffee observed with traditional tablet formulations.

    PubMed

    Vita, Roberto; Saraceno, Giovanna; Trimarchi, Francesco; Benvenga, Salvatore

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate if the coffee-associated malabsorption of tablet levothyroxine (L-T4) is reduced by soft gel capsule. We recruited 8 patients with coffee-associated L-T4 malabsorption including one hypothyroid patient. For 6 months, the patients were switched to the capsule maintaining the L-T4 daily dose. Patients took the capsule with water, having coffee 1 h later (proper habit, PH) on days 1-90, or with coffee ≤ 5 min later (improper habit, IH) on days 91-180. After 6 months, 2 patients volunteered for an acute loading test of 600 μg L-T4 (capsule) ingested with water (PH) or with coffee (IH). In the single hypothyroid patient, the post-switch TSH ranged 0.06-0.16 mU/L (PH) versus 5.8-22.4 mU/L pre-switch (PH) and 0.025-0.29 mU/L (IH) versus 26-34 mU/L pre-switch (IH). In the other 7 patients, post-switch TSH was 0.41 ± 0.46 (PH) versus 0.28 ± 0.20 pre-switch (PH) (P = 0.61) and 0.34 ± 0.30 (IH) versus 1.23 ± 1.47 pre-switch (IH) (P < 0.001). Importantly, TSH levels in PH versus IH habit did not differ post-switch (P = 0.90), but they did pre-switch (P < 0.0001). The proportions of post-switch TSH levels <0.10 mU/L with PH (33.3 %) or with IH (33.3 %) were borderline significantly greater than the corresponding pre-switch levels with PH (10.3 %) (P = 0.088) or with IH (0 %) (P = 0.0096). In the two volunteers, the L-T4 loading test showed that coffee influenced L-T4 pharmacokinetics minimally. Soft gel capsules can be used in patients who are unable/unwilling to change their IH of taking L-T4.

  8. Complete Genome Sequences of Five Paenibacillus larvae Bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Sheflo, Michael A; Gardner, Adam V; Merrill, Bryan D; Fisher, Joshua N B; Lunt, Bryce L; Breakwell, Donald P; Grose, Julianne H; Burnett, Sandra H

    2013-11-14

    Paenibacillus larvae is a pathogen of honeybees that causes American foulbrood (AFB). We isolated bacteriophages from soil containing bee debris collected near beehives in Utah. We announce five high-quality complete genome sequences, which represent the first completed genome sequences submitted to GenBank for any P. larvae bacteriophage.

  9. Seven Bacteriophages Isolated from the Female Urinary Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Malki, Kema; Sible, Emily; Cooper, Alexandria; Garretto, Andrea; Bruder, Katherine; Watkins, Siobhan C.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has debunked the myth that urine is sterile, having uncovered bacteria within the bladders of healthy individuals. However, the identity, diversity, and putative roles of bacteriophages in the bladder are unknown. We report the draft genome sequences of seven bacteriophages isolated from microbial communities from adult female bladders. PMID:27881533

  10. Expression of a bioactive bacteriophage endolysin in Nicotiana benthamiana plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogens has led to an increased interest in alternative antimicrobial treatments, such as bacteriophage, bacteriophage-encoded peptidoglycan hydrolases (endolysins) and antimicrobial peptides. In our study, the antimicrobial activity of the CP933 en...

  11. 21 CFR 172.785 - Listeria-specific bacteriophage preparation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Listeria-specific bacteriophage preparation. 172... Specific Usage Additives § 172.785 Listeria-specific bacteriophage preparation. The additive may be safely... proportions of six different individually purified lytic-type (lacking lysogenic activity)...

  12. Critical Evaluation of Bacteriophage to Prevent and Treat Colibacillosis in Poultry.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteriophage are viruses that infect and kill bacteria. Bacteriophage do not infect animal and plant cells making them a potentially safe alternative to antibiotics. We have conducted research on the efficacy of bacteriophage to both prevent and treat colibacillosis in poultry. Bacteriophage lyt...

  13. TSH-Based Protocol, Tablet Instability, and Absorption Effects on L-T4 Bioequivalence

    PubMed Central

    DiStefano, Joseph J.

    2009-01-01

    Background FDA Guidance for pharmacokinetic (PK) testing of levothyroxine (L-T4) for interbrand bioequivalence has evolved recently. Concerns remain about efficacy and safety of the current protocol, based on PK analysis following supraphysiological L-T4 dosing in euthyroid volunteers, and recent recalls due to intrabrand manufacturing problems also suggest need for further refinement. We examine these interrelated issues quantitatively, using simulated what-if scenarios testing efficacy of a TSH-based protocol and tablet stability and absorption, to enhance precision of L-T4 bioequivalence methods. Methods We use an updated simulation model of human thyroid hormone regulation quantified and validated from data that span a wide range of normal and abnormal thyroid system function. Bioequivalence: We explored a TSH-based protocol, using normal replacement dosing in simulated thyroidectomized patients, switching brands after 8 weeks of full replacement dosing. We simulated effects of tablet potency differences and intestinal absorption differences on predicted plasma TSH, T4, and triiodothyronine (T3) dynamics. Stability: We simulated effects of potency decay and lot-by-lot differences in realistic scenarios, using actual tablet potency data spanning 2 years, comparing the recently reduced 95–105% FDA-approved potency range with the original 90–110% range. Results A simulated decrease as small as 10–15% in L-T4 or its absorption generated TSH concentrations outside the bioequivalence target range (0.5–2.5 mU/L TSH), whereas T3 and T4 plasma levels were maintained normal. For a 25% reduction, steady-state TSH changed 300% (from 1.5 to 6 mU/L) compared with <25% for both T4 and T3 (both within their reference ranges). Stability: TSH, T4, and T3 remained within normal ranges for most potency decay scenarios, but tablets of the same dose strength and brand were not bioequivalent between lots and between fresh and near-expired tablets. Conclusions A

  14. The effects of bacteriophage and nanoparticles on microbial processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Austin L.

    There are approximately 1031 tailed phages in the biosphere, making them the most abundant organism. Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria. Due to the large diversity and abundance, no two bacteriophages that have been isolated are genetically the same. Phage products have potential in disease therapy to solve bacteria-related problems, such as infections resulting from resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus. A bacteriophage capable of infecting methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was isolated from bovine hair. The bacteriophage, named JB phage, was characterized using purification, amplification, cesium chloride banding, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. JB phage and nanoparticles were used in various in vitro and in vivo models to test their effects on microbial processes. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy studies revealed strong interactions between JB phage and nanoparticles, which resulted in increased bacteriophage infectivity. JB phage and nanoparticle cocktails were used as a therapeutic to treat skin and systemic infections in mice caused by MRSA.

  15. [THE IDENTIFICATION AND DIFFERENTIATION OF BACTERIOPHAGES OF HUMAN PATHOGENIC VIBRIO].

    PubMed

    Gaevskaia, N E; Kudriakova, T A; Makedonova, L D; Kachkina, G V

    2015-04-01

    The issue of identification and differentiation of large group of bacteriophages of human pathogenic vibrio is still unresolved. In research and practical applied purposes it is important to consider characteristics of bacteriophages for establishing similarity and differences between them. The actual study was carried out to analyze specimens of DNA-containing bacteriophages of pathogenic vibrio. The overwhelming majority of them characterized by complicated type of symmetry--phages with double-helical DNA and also phages with mono-helical DNA structure discovered recently in vibrio. For the first time, the general framework of identification and differentiation of bacteriophages of pathogenic vibrio was developed. This achievement increases possibility to establish species assignment of phages and to compare with phages registered in the database. "The collection of bacteriophages and test-strains of human pathogenic vibrio" (No2010620549 of 24.09.210).

  16. Manipulation of lysozyme phase behavior by additives as function of conformational stability.

    PubMed

    Galm, Lara; Morgenstern, Josefine; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2015-10-15

    Undesired protein aggregation in general and non-native protein aggregation in particular need to be inhibited during bio-pharmaceutical processing to ensure patient safety and to maintain product activity. In this work the potency of different additives, namely glycerol, PEG 1000, and glycine, to prevent lysozyme aggregation and selectively manipulate lysozyme phase behavior was investigated. The results revealed a strong pH dependency of the additive impact on lysozyme phase behavior, lysozyme solubility, crystal size and morphology. This work aims to link this pH dependent impact to a protein-specific parameter, the conformational stability of lysozyme. At pH 3 the addition of 10% (w/v) glycerol, 10% (w/v) PEG 1000, and 1 M glycine stabilized or destabilized lysozymes' native conformation resulting in a modified size of the crystallization area without influencing lysozyme solubility, crystal size and morphology. Addition of 1 M glycine even promoted non-native aggregation at pH 3 whereas addition of PEG 1000 completely inhibited non-native aggregation. At pH 5 the addition of 10% (w/v) glycerol, 10% (w/v) PEG 1000, and 1 M glycine did not influence lysozymes' native conformation, but strongly influenced the position of the crystallization area, lysozyme solubility, crystal size and morphology. The observed pH dependent impact of the additives could be linked to a differing lysozyme conformational stability in the binary systems without additives at pH 3 and pH 5. However, in any case lysozyme phase behavior could selectively be manipulated by addition of glycerol, PEG 1000 and glycine. Furthermore, at pH 5 crystal size and morphology could selectively be manipulated.

  17. Hydration of thermally denatured lysozyme studied by sorption calorimetry and differential scanning calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Kocherbitov, Vitaly; Arnebrant, Thomas

    2006-05-25

    We have studied hydration (and dehydration) of thermally denatured hen egg lysozyme using sorption calorimetry. Two different procedures of thermal denaturation of lysozyme were used. In the first procedure the protein was denatured in an aqueous solution at 90 degrees C, in the other procedure a sample that contained 20% of water was denatured at 150 degrees C. The protein denatured at 90 degrees C showed very similar sorption behavior to that of the native protein. The lysozyme samples denatured at 150 degrees C were studied at several temperatures in the range of 25-60 degrees C. In the beginning of sorption, the sorption isotherms of native and denatured lysozyme are almost identical. At higher water contents, however, the denatured lysozyme can absorb a greater amount of water than the native protein due to the larger number of available sorption sites. Desorption experiments did not reveal a pronounced hysteresis in the sorption isotherm of denatured lysozyme (such hysteresis is typical for native lysozyme). Despite the unfolded structure, the denatured lysozyme binds less water than does the native lysozyme in the desorption experiments at water contents up to 34 wt %. Glass transitions in the denatured lysozyme were observed using both differential scanning calorimetry and sorption calorimetry. Partial molar enthalpy of mixing of water in the glassy state is strongly exothermic, which gives rise to a positive temperature dependence of the water activity. The changes of the free energy of the protein induced by the hydration stabilize the denatured form of lysozyme with respect to the native form.

  18. Steel tanks T5 and T4 with overhead pipeline between. Redwood ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Steel tanks T5 and T4 with overhead pipeline between. Redwood tanks seen in background - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  19. The inhibition of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) by tetraiodothyronine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3).

    PubMed

    Chen, Da-Wei; Du, Zuo; Zhang, Chun-Ze; Zhang, Wei-Hua; Cao, Yun-Feng; Sun, Hong-Zhi; Zhu, Zhi-Tu; Yang, Kun; Liu, Yong-Zhe; Zhao, Ze-Wei; Fu, Zhi-Wei; Gu, Wen-Qing; Yu, Yang; Fang, Zhong-Ze

    2017-03-13

    1. UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) are important drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) catalyzing the glucuronidation elimination of various xenobiotics and endogenous substances. Endogenous substances are important regulators for the activity of various UGT isoforms. Triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) are important thyroid hormones essential for normal cellular differentiation and growth. The present study aims to elucidate the inhibition behavior of T3 and T4 on the activity of UGT isoforms. 2. In vitro recombinant UGTs-catalyzed glucuronidation of 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) was used to screen the inhibition potential of triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) on the activity of various UGT isoforms. Initial screening results showed that T4 exerted stronger inhibition potential than T3 on the activity of various UGT isoforms at 100 μM. Inhibition kinetics was determined for the inhibition of T4 on the representative UGT isoforms, including UGT1A1, -1A3, -1A7, -1A8, -1A10, and -2B7. The results showed that T4 competitively inhibited the activity of UGT1A1, -1A3, -1A7, 1A10, and -2B7, and noncompetitively inhibited the activity of UGT1A8. The inhibition kinetic parameters were calculated to be 1.5, 2.4, 11, 9.6, 4.8, and 3.0 μM for UGT1A1, -1A3, -1A7, -1A8, -1A10, and -2B7, respectively. In silico docking method was employed to demonstrate why T4 exerted stronger inhibition than T3 towards UGT1A1. Stronger hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interaction between T4 and activity cavity of UGT1A1 than T3 contributed to stronger inhibition of T4 towards UGT1A1. 3. In conclusion, more clinical monitoring should be given for the patients with the elevation of T4 level due to stronger inhibition of UGT isoforms-catalyzed metabolism of drugs or endogenous substances by T4.

  20. Albuminuria is an independent risk factor of T4 elevation in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xin; Pan, Binbin; Li, Wenwen; Zou, Yonghua; Hua, Xi; Huang, Wenjuan; Wan, Xin; Cao, Changchun

    2017-01-01

    This study was to explore the association between thyroid dysfunction and albuminuria. 581 cases with chronic kidney disease (CKD) were included in this study. The clinical characteristics consisted of sex, age, serum creatinine, urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR), thyroid function were recorded. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated by CKD-EPI four-level race equation. Prevalence of different thyroid diseases was calculated by chi-square test. Levels of thyroid hormone were compared among different albuminuria groups by Kruskal-Wallis test. Spearman’s correlation was used to assess the association between albuminuria and thyroid hormone. Our study showed that total T4 and free T4 were significantly different among ACR < 30 mg/g, 30–300 mg/g and >300 mg/g (P < 0.001 and =0.007, respectively). Positive correlation between T4 (total T4 and free T4) and albuminuria was evaluated by correlation analysis (P = 0.001 and <0.001, respectively). Albuminuria was an independent influence factor of T4 after adjustment for age, sex, serum creatinine, albumin, hs-CRP, smoking status, systolic blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, medication use for diabetes mellitus, eGFR, LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, hypertension, and medication use for hypercholesterinemia. In conclusion, T4 was positively correlated with albuminuria, and it was completely not consistent with our anticipation. Further study is needed to elucidate the causation association between albuminuria and T4. PMID:28117377

  1. The amino acid sequence of Lady Amherst's pheasant (Chrysolophus amherstiae) and golden pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) egg-white lysozymes.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Kuramoto, M; Torikata, T

    1990-09-01

    The amino acids of Lady Amherst's pheasant and golden pheasant egg-white lysozymes have been sequenced. The carboxymethylated lysozymes were digested with trypsin followed by sequencing of the tryptic peptides. Lady Amherst's pheasant lysozyme proved to consist of 129 amino acid residues, and a relative molecular mass of 14,423 Da was calculated. This lysozyme had 6 amino acids substitutions when compared with hen egg-white lysozyme: Phe3 to Tyr, His15 to Leu, Gln41 to His, Asn77 to His, Gln 121 to Asn, and a newly found substitution of Ile124 to Thr. The amino acid sequence of golden pheasant lysozyme was identical to that of Lady Amherst's phesant lysozyme. The phylogenetic tree constructured by the comparison of amino acid sequences of phasianoid birds lysozymes revealed a minimum genetic distance between these pheasants and the turkey-peafowl group.

  2. An Extremely Oligotrophic Bacterium, Rhodococcus erythropolis N9T-4, Isolated from Crude Oil▿

    PubMed Central

    Ohhata, Naoko; Yoshida, Nobuyuki; Egami, Hiroshi; Katsuragi, Tohoru; Tani, Yoshiki; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis N9T-4, which was isolated from crude oil, showed extremely oligotrophic growth and formed its colonies on a minimal salt medium solidified using agar or silica gel without any additional carbon source. N9T-4 did not grow under CO2-limiting conditions but could grow on a medium containing NaHCO3 under the same conditions, suggesting that the oligotrophic growth of N9T-4 depends on CO2. Proteomic analysis of N9T-4 revealed that two proteins, with molecular masses of 45 and 55 kDa, were highly induced under the oligotrophic conditions. The primary structures of these proteins exhibited striking similarities to those of methanol: N,N′-dimethyl-4-nitrosoaniline oxidoreductase and an aldehyde dehydrogenase from Rhodococcus sp. These enzyme activities were three times higher under oligotrophic conditions than under n-tetradecane-containing heterotrophic conditions, and gene disruption for the aldehyde dehydrogenase caused a lack of growth on the minimal salt medium. Furthermore, 3-hexulose 6-phosphate synthase and phospho-3-hexuloisomerase activities, which are key enzymes in the ribulose monophosphate pathway in methylotrophic bacteria, were detected specifically in the cell extract of oligotrophically grown N9T-4. These results suggest that CO2 fixation involves methanol (formaldehyde) metabolism in the oligotrophic growth of R. erythropolis N9T-4. PMID:17675378

  3. Normal ranges of T4 screening values in low birthweight infants.

    PubMed Central

    Kok, J H; Hart, G; Endert, E; Koppe, J G; de Vijlder, J J

    1983-01-01

    Thyroxine (T4) screening values in infants of low birthweight in relation to birthweight and gestational age are reported. There were 86 healthy infants of low birthweight (group 1), and 29 preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (group 2). All the group 2 infants and 36% of those in group 1 had a T4 screening value below the cut-off point (-2.1 SD). In group 1 there was a significant increase in T4 with birthweight at a given gestational age, as well as with gestational age at a given birthweight. In group 2 there was also a significant increase in T4 values in relation to birthweight and gestational age, but it could not be ascertained whether this increase existed at a given gestational age or birthweight. A statistical model giving normal ranges of T4 for both groups of infants is presented, which, if applied to low birthweight infants, makes it possible to estimate the effect of low birthweight on T4 screening values, provided the birthweight and gestational age are known. In this manner the sensitivity of screening for congenital hypothyroidism is enhanced and the recall rate reduced. PMID:6838250

  4. DDiT4L promotes autophagy and inhibits pathological cardiac hypertrophy in response to stress.

    PubMed

    Simonson, Bridget; Subramanya, Vinita; Chan, Mun Chun; Zhang, Aifeng; Franchino, Hannabeth; Ottaviano, Filomena; Mishra, Manoj K; Knight, Ashley C; Hunt, Danielle; Ghiran, Ionita; Khurana, Tejvir S; Kontaridis, Maria I; Rosenzweig, Anthony; Das, Saumya

    2017-02-28

    Physiological cardiac hypertrophy, in response to stimuli such as exercise, is considered adaptive and beneficial. In contrast, pathological cardiac hypertrophy that arises in response to pathological stimuli such as unrestrained high blood pressure and oxidative or metabolic stress is maladaptive and may precede heart failure. We found that the transcript encoding DNA damage-inducible transcript 4-like (DDiT4L) was expressed in murine models of pathological cardiac hypertrophy but not in those of physiological cardiac hypertrophy. In cardiomyocytes, DDiT4L localized to early endosomes and promoted stress-induced autophagy through a process involving mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Exposing cardiomyocytes to various types of pathological stress increased the abundance of DDiT4L, which inhibited mTORC1 but activated mTORC2 signaling. Mice with conditional cardiac-specific overexpression of DDiT4L had mild systolic dysfunction, increased baseline autophagy, reduced mTORC1 activity, and increased mTORC2 activity, all of which were reversed by suppression of transgene expression. Genetic suppression of autophagy also reversed cardiac dysfunction in these mice. Our data showed that DDiT4L may be an important transducer of pathological stress to autophagy through mTOR signaling in the heart and that DDiT4L could be therapeutically targeted in cardiovascular diseases in which autophagy and mTOR signaling play a major role.

  5. Control of solvent evaporation in hen egg white lysozyme crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L. J.; Suddath, F. L.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation of the role of solvent evaporation in tetragonal lysozyme crystallization was preformed with a device that employs N2(g) to control the evaporation of solvent from a micro-volume crystallization hanging drop. The number of crystals was found to vary with the rate at which the final supersaturation level was achieved. It was found that the more rapid the approach to supersaturation the larger the number of crystals. Accordingly, the crystals reached a smaller terminal size. Elongation of the (110) face parallel to the four-fold axis was observed with the slower evaporation rates.

  6. Determining the Molecular Growth Mechanisms of Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Huayu; Nadarajah, Arunan; Konnert, John H.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    Studies of the growth of tetragonal lysozyme crystals employing atomic force microscopy (AFM) have shown the advantages of this technique in investigating the growth mechanisms of protein crystals [1]. The resolution of these studies was in the micron range, which revealed surface features such as the occurrence of dislocations and 2D nucleation islands, similar to those found in inorganic systems. They clearly showed that the crystals grew by these surface growth mechanisms. However, the studies also revealed some surprising features, such as bimolecular growth step heights and pronounced growth anisotropies on the (110) face, which could not be explained. In previous studies we employed Periodic Bond Chain (PBC) theory to tetragonal lysozyme crystal growth and found that the crystals were constructed by strongly bonded molecular chains forming helices about the 43 axes [2,3]. The helices were connected to each other with weaker bonds. The growth process was shown to proceed by the formation of these 43 helices, resulting in bimolecular growth steps on the (110) face. It was also shown to explain many other observations on tetragonal lysozyme crystal growth. Although PBC analysis is not a new technique [4], it has not been widely used as the mechanisms predicted from it could not be experimentally verified. In this study the growth process of these crystals was investigated, particularly for the (110) face, employing some newly developed high resolution AFM techniques. These techniques allowed individual lysozyme molecules on the crystal faces to be resolved and predictions from PBC analyses to be tested. The analyses had shown that of the two possible packing arrangements on (110) faces, only one would actually occur. Employing the first of the newly developed techniques, these faces were scanned by high resolution AFM. The resulting images were then compared with the theoretically constructed images for the two possible packing arrangements on the (110) face

  7. Incorporation of impurity to a tetragonal lysozyme crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurihara, Kazuo; Miyashita, Satoru; Sazaki, Gen; Nakada, Toshitaka; Durbin, Stephen D.; Komatsu, Hiroshi; Ohba, Tetsuhiko; Ohki, Kazuo

    1999-01-01

    Concentration of a phosphor-labeled impurity (ovalbumin) incorporated into protein (hen egg white lysozyme) crystals during growth was measured by fluorescence.This technique enabled us to measure the local impurity concentration in a crystal quantitatively. Impurity concentration increased with growth rate, which could not be explained by two conventional models (equilibrium adsorption model and Burton-Prim-Slichter model); a modified model is proposed. Impurity concentration also increased with the pH of the solution. This result is discussed considering the electrostatic interaction between the impurity and the crystallizing species.

  8. Fluorescence study on aggregated lysozyme and lipid bilayer interactions.

    PubMed

    Trusova, Valeriya M; Gorbenko, Galyna P

    2012-08-01

    Fluorescent probes 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH), pyrene, 4-dimethylaminochalcone (DMC) and 4-p-(dimethylaminostyryl)-1-dodecylpyridinium (DSP-12) have been utilized to monitor the impact of lysozyme (Lz) oligomers on physicochemical properties of phosphatidylcholine/cardiolipin (PC/CL) membranes. Analysis of spectral responses of the employed probes revealed the reduction of membrane free volume and dehydration of lipid bilayer surface upon incorporation of Lz self-assemblies. Hydrophobic interactions were found to control the binding of Lz oligomers to the lipid bilayer. Comparison of the effects of Lz monomers, oligomers and fibrils showed that soluble oligomeric intermediates exert the most destructive influence on membrane properties.

  9. [Fluorescent energy transfer study of lysozyme complexes with liposomes].

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, G P

    1999-01-01

    The method of radiationless energy transfer was used to study the structure of lysozyme complexes with liposomes composed of phosphatidylcholine and diphosphatidylglycerol (4:3, mol:mol). 4-(n-Dimethylaminostyryl)-1-methylpyridinium n-toluenesulfonate, 4-(n-dimethylaminostyryl)-1-hexylpyridinium n-toluenesulfonate, 4-(n-dimethylaminostyryl)-1-dodecylpyridinium n-toluenesulfonate, and 3-metoxybenzanthrone were used as donors, and nile blue and rhodamine 6G, as acceptors. An increase in the surface area of model membranes upon binging of the protein to lipid bilayer was found.

  10. Molecular characterisation, evolution and expression analysis of g-type lysozymes in Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Di Falco, Felicia; Cammarata, Matteo; Vizzini, Aiti

    2017-02-01

    Lysozyme is an important defense molecule of the innate immune system. Known for its bactericidal properties, lysozyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of b-(1,4)-glycosidic bonds between the N-acetyl glucosamine and N-acetyl muramic acid in the peptidoglycan layer of bacterial cell walls. In this study, the complete coding sequence of four g-type lysozymes were identified in Ciona intestinalis. Phylogenetic analysis and modelling supported the hypothesis of a close relationship with the vertebrate g-type lysozymes suggesting that the C. intestinalis g-type lysozyme genes (CiLys-g1, Cilys-g2, CiLys-g3, CiLys-g4) share a common ancestor in the chordate lineage. Protein motif searches indicated that C. intestinalis g-type lysozymes contain a GEWL domain with a GXXQ signature, typical of goose lysozymes. Quantitative Real-Time PCR analysis results showed that transcripts are expressed in various tissues from C. intestinalis. In order to determine the involvement of C. intestinalis g-type lysozymes in immunity, their expression was analyzed in the pharynx, showing that transcripts were significantly up-regulated in response to a challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). These data support the view that CiLys g-type are molecules with potential for immune defense system against bacterial infection.

  11. Thermodynamic Exploration of Eosin-Lysozyme Binding: A Physical Chemistry and Biochemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huisman, Andrew J.; Hartsell, Lydia R.; Krueger, Brent P.; Pikaart, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    We developed a modular pair of experiments for use in the undergraduate physical chemistry and biochemistry laboratories. Both experiments examine the thermodynamics of the binding of a small molecule, eosin Y, to the protein lysozyme. The assay for binding is the quenching of lysozyme fluorescence by eosin through resonant energy transfer. In…

  12. Three in one: Identification, expression and enzymatic activity of lysozymes in amphioxus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Na; Pan, Junli; Liu, Shousheng; Xue, Qinggang; Zhang, Shicui

    2014-10-01

    The lysozymes identified so far in animals belong to the g-type, c-type, and i-type. Vertebrate animals possess only the former two types, i.e., g- and c-types, while all the three types have been reported in invertebrates. Here we demonstrate that (1) three cDNAs that encode g-, c-, and i-type lysozymes, respectively, were identified in a single species of the amphioxus Branchiostoma japonicum; (2) all the 3-type genes displayed distinct tissue-specific expression pattern; (3) recombinant g-, c-, and i-type lysozymes all exhibited enzymatic activities; and (4) native g-, c-, and i-type lysozymes were identified in the different tissues of amphioxus. Collectively, these results suggest the presence of all the 3-type lysozymes in a single animal species, first such data ever reported. The presence of biologically active i-type lysozyme in amphioxus also suggests that i-type lysozyme gene is retained at least in Protochordata, contrasting to the previous proposal that i-type lysozyme gene has been lost in a common ancestor of all chordates.

  13. Genetic control of the humoral immune response to avian egg white lysozymes in the chicken

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, M.P.

    1987-01-01

    Chickens from two closely related sublines, GHs-B6 and GHs-B13, differing serologically at the major histocompatibility complex, were significantly different in their humoral response to three avian egg white lysozymes. Specific antisera levels were measured by radioimmunoassay using /sup 125/I-labeled lysozymes. Antibodies elicited in response to these lysozymes are assumed to be directed against sites on these lysozymes where their amino acid sequence differs from that of the recipient G. domesticus egg white lysozyme (HEL). GHs-B6 birds produced a high level of antibody in response to immunization of turkey (TEL), pheasant (PhL) and guinea hen (GHL) lysozymes. GHs-B13 birds produced no detectable antibody to TEL, were intermediate in their response to PhL and equaled the antibody production of GHs-B6 birds in response to GHL. Antisera to each lysozyme were examined for crossreactivity with all other lysozymes by use of a competitive binding assay.

  14. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry and Macromolecular Visualization for the Interaction of Lysozyme and Its Inhibitors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Chin-Chuan; Jensen, Drake; Boyle, Tiffany; O'Brien, Leah C.; De Meo, Cristina; Shabestary, Nahid; Eder, Douglas J.

    2015-01-01

    To provide a research-like experience to upper-division undergraduate students in a biochemistry teaching laboratory, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is employed to determine the binding constants of lysozyme and its inhibitors, N-acetyl glucosamine trimer (NAG[subscript 3]) and monomer (NAG). The extremely weak binding of lysozyme/NAG is…

  15. M13 Bacteriophage Based Protein Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ju Hun

    Despite significant progress in biotechnology and biosensing, early detection and disease diagnosis remains a critical issue for improving patient survival rates and well-being. Many of the typical detection schemes currently used possess issues such as low sensitivity and accuracy and are also time consuming to run and expensive. In addition, multiplexed detection remains difficult to achieve. Therefore, developing advanced approaches for reliable, simple, quantitative analysis of multiple markers in solution that also are highly sensitive are still in demand. In recent years, much of the research has primarily focused on improving two key components of biosensors: the bio-recognition agent (bio-receptor) and the transducer. Particular bio-receptors that have been used include antibodies, aptamers, molecular imprinted polymers, and small affinity peptides. In terms of transducing agents, nanomaterials have been considered as attractive candidates due to their inherent nanoscale size, durability and unique chemical and physical properties. The key focus of this thesis is the design of a protein detection and identification system that is based on chemically engineered M13 bacteriophage coupled with nanomaterials. The first chapter provides an introduction of biosensors and M13 bacteriophage in general, where the advantages of each are provided. In chapter 2, an efficient and enzyme-free sensor is demonstrated from modified M13 bacteriophage to generate highly sensitive colorimetric signals from gold nanocrystals. In chapter 3, DNA conjugated M13 were used to enable facile and rapid detection of antigens in solution that also provides modalities for identification. Lastly, high DNA loadings per phage was achieved via hydrozone chemistry and these were applied in conjunction with Raman active DNA-gold/silver core/shell nanoparticles toward highly sensitive SERS sensing.

  16. Response of phage T4 polynucleotide kinase toward dinucleotides containing apurinic sites: Design of a sup 32 P-postlabeling assay for apurinic sites in DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Weinfeld, M.; Liuzzi, M.; Paterson, M.C. )

    1990-02-20

    The authors have examined the capacity of bacteriophage T4 polynucleotide kinase to phosphorylate the partially depurinated products of d-ApA, namely d-SpA and d-ApS (where S represents an apurinic deoxyribose group). It was observed that the enzyme acted only on the latter isomer. Since molecules of this type (d-NpS) are the sole apurinic site containing products resulting from the combined digestion of lightly depurinated DNA by snake venom phosphodiesterase and calf alkaline phosphatase they were able to devise a postlabeling assay for these biologically important DNA lesions. The method offers several advantages, including (a) elimination of the need for prelabeled DNA, (b) high (femtomole range) sensitivity, and (c) nearest-neighbor analysis of bases 5{prime} to apurinic/apyrimidinic sites. Using this assay, they obtained a value for the rate of depurination of form I pRSV neo plasmid DNA. The rate of depurination of poly(dA), treated in a similar fashion, was found to be {approximately}1 base per 10{sup 3} nucleotides per hour.

  17. Bacterial genome remodeling through bacteriophage recombination.

    PubMed

    Menouni, Rachid; Hutinet, Geoffrey; Petit, Marie-Agnès; Ansaldi, Mireille

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages co-exist and co-evolve with their hosts in natural environments. Virulent phages lyse infected cells through lytic cycles, whereas temperate phages often remain dormant and can undergo lysogenic or lytic cycles. In their lysogenic state, prophages are actually part of the host genome and replicate passively in rhythm with host division. However, prophages are far from being passive residents: they can modify or bring new properties to their host. In this review, we focus on two important phage-encoded recombination mechanisms, i.e. site-specific recombination and homologous recombination, and how they remodel bacterial genomes.

  18. Bacteriophage biosensors for antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sorokulova, Irina; Olsen, Eric; Vodyanoy, Vitaly

    2014-03-01

    An increasing number of disease-causing bacteria are resistant to one or more anti-bacterial drugs utilized for therapy. Early and speedy detection of these pathogens is therefore very important. Traditional pathogen detection techniques, that include microbiological and biochemical assays are long and labor-intensive, while antibody or DNA-based methods require substantial sample preparation and purification. Biosensors based on bacteriophages have demonstrated remarkable potential to surmount these restrictions and to offer rapid, efficient and sensitive detection technique for antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  19. The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Matsumoto, T; Torikata, T

    1998-10-01

    The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity were analyzed. Carboxymethylated lysozyme was digested with trypsin and the resulting peptides were sequenced. The established amino acid sequence had one amino acid substitution at position 102 (Arg to Gly) comparing with Indian peafowl lysozyme and four amino acid substitutions at positions 3 (Phe to Tyr), 15 (His to Leu), 41 (Gln to His), and 121 (Gln to His) with chicken lysozyme. Analysis of the time-courses of reaction using N-acetylglucosamine pentamer as a substrate showed a difference of binding free energy change (-0.4 kcal/mol) at subsites A between monal pheasant and Indian peafowl lysozyme. This was assumed to be caused by the amino acid substitution at subsite A with loss of a positive charge at position 102 (Arg102 to Gly).

  20. Lysozyme net charge and ion binding in concentrated aqueous electrolyte solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehner, Daniel E.; Engmann, Jan; Fergg, Florian; Wernick, Meredith; Blanch, Harvey W.; Prausnitz, John M.

    1999-02-01

    Hydrogen-ion titrations were conducted for hen-egg-white lysozyme in solutions of potassium chloride over the range pH 2.5--11.5 and for ionic strengths to 2.0 M. The dependence of lysozyme`s net proton charge, z{sub p}, on pH and ionic strength in potassium chloride solution is measured. From the ionic-strength dependence of z{sub p}, interactions of lysozyme with potassium and chloride ions are calculated using the molecular-thermodynamic theory of Fraaije and Lyklema. Lysozyme interacts preferentially with up to 12 chloride ions at pH 2.5. The observed dependence of ion-protein interactions on pH and ionic strength is explained in terms of electric-double-layer theory. New experimental pK{sub a} data are reported for 11 amino acids in potassium chloride solutions of ionic strength to 3.0 M.

  1. Evaluation of lysozyme to control vinification process and histamine production in Rioja wines.

    PubMed

    Isabel, Lopez; Santamaria, Pilar; Tenorio, Carmen; Garijo, Patrocinio; Gutierrez, Ana Rosa; Lopez, Rosa

    2009-09-01

    Lysozyme and the reduction of metabisulfite addition to red wine were evaluated during a winemaking process and after malolactic fermentation (MLF). Treatment, with lysozyme, of the must from Tempranillo grapes and at the end of alcoholic fermentation (AF) caused the 100% implantation of the inoculated bacterial strain and shortened the duration of MLF by 7 days. At the end of the MLF, wines treated with lysozyme showed lower volatile acidity, color intensity, and biogenic amine content. The differences in color intensity disappeared during wine stabilization. The lysozyme addition after MLF led to lower histamine concentrations in wines. These phenomena occurred irrespective of the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) proliferation control and of the Oenococcus oeni dominant strain identified at this period. The results of this study show the significance of preventive use of lysozyme in vinification of red wine to maintain low histamine levels and ensure a successful implantation of inoculated Oenococcus oeni starters.

  2. Performance of the lysozyme for promoting the waste activated sludge biodegradability.

    PubMed

    He, Jun-Guo; Xin, Xiao-Dong; Qiu, Wei; Zhang, Jie; Wen, Zhi-Dan; Tang, Jian

    2014-10-01

    The fresh waste activated sludge (WAS) from a lab-scale sequencing batch reactor was used to determine the performance of the lysozyme for promoting its biodegradability. The results showed that a strict linear relationship presented between the degree of disintegration (DDM) of WAS and the lysozyme incubation time from 0 to 240min (R(2) was 0.992, 0.995 and 0.999 in accordance with the corresponding lysozyme/TS, respectively). Ratio of net SCOD increase augmented significantly by lysozyme digestion for evaluating the sludge biodegradability changes. Moreover, the protein dominated both in the EPS and SMP. In addition, the logarithm of SMP contents in supernatant presented an increasing trend similar with the ascending logarithmic relation with the lysozyme incubation time from 0 to 240min (R(2) was 0.960, 0.959 and 0.947, respectively). The SMP, especially the soluble protein, had an important contribution to the improvement of WAS biodegradability.

  3. Structure and evolution of the Ivy protein family, unexpected lysozyme inhibitors in Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Abergel, Chantal; Monchois, Vincent; Byrne, Deborah; Chenivesse, Sabine; Lembo, Frédérique; Lazzaroni, Jean-Claude; Claverie, Jean-Michel

    2007-01-01

    Part of an ancestral bactericidal system, vertebrate C-type lysozyme targets the peptidoglycan moiety of bacterial cell walls. We report the crystal structure of a protein inhibitor of C-type lysozyme, the Escherichia coli Ivy protein, alone and in complex with hen egg white lysozyme. Ivy exhibits a novel fold in which a protruding five-residue loop appears essential to its inhibitory effect. This feature guided the identification of Ivy orthologues in other Gram-negative bacteria. The structure of the evolutionary distant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Ivy orthologue was also determined in complex with hen egg white lysozyme, and its antilysozyme activity was confirmed. Ivy expression protects porous cell-wall E. coli mutants from the lytic effect of lysozyme, suggesting that it is a response against the permeabilizing effects of the innate vertebrate immune system. As such, Ivy acts as a virulence factor for a number of Gram-negative bacteria-infecting vertebrates. PMID:17405861

  4. [Separation and purification of lysozyme from egg white by high performance cation-exchange chromatography].

    PubMed

    Li, Rong; Chen, Guo-liang

    2002-05-01

    A new method used to separate and purify lysozyme from egg white by high performance cation-exchange chromatography has been established. The process conditions for purifying lysozyme were also discussed in detail. The procedure involved that homogenization of the egg white sample, preliminary purification with sodium chloride, and chromatographic separation by the weak cation exchange column (XIDACE-WCX). The experimental results showed that the purified lysozyme and other impurity proteins were completely separated. By using bioactivity assay, the recovery of lysozyme was 107%, and the specific activity was 15,467 U/mg through the column. Its purity was raised 5.6-fold. The collected fraction with activity was detected by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). The purified lysozyme was homogeneous. Compared with the traditional soft-based low pressure ion-exchange chromatography, the developed method is rapid and effective.

  5. Effects of metal oxide nanoparticles on the structure and activity of lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Hong; Lai, Chia-Min; Lin, Kuen-Song; Wang, Steven S-S

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the effects of nanoparticles (NPs) on the structure and activity of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) using CeO2 and ZnO NPs. Our results showed that CeO2 NPs triggered the transition of lysozyme secondary structure from α-helix to β-sheet. CeO2 NPs also induced the hydrophobic region of lysozyme to become exposed to the solvent. In contrast, the secondary structure content and hydrophobic region of lysozyme were only slightly changed in the case of ZnO NPs. In addition, the activity of the lysozyme was observed to decrease upon adsorption on CeO2 NPs, whereas the effect of ZnO NPs on activity was negligible. The glutaraldehyde crosslinking results indicated that the percentage of the dimeric form of lysozyme was greatly enhanced by the addition of both NPs. Furthermore, the adsorption capacity, degree of favorability of adsorption, and surface heterogeneity for CeO2 NPs were found to be greater than those on ZnO NPs. Given that CeO2 NPs exhibit a higher surface area/mass than ZnO NPs, the surface concentration of lysozyme on CeO2 NPs was lower than that on ZnO NPs. This result suggested that more direct interactions were involved between CeO2 NPs and lysozyme, thereby leading to a more significant effect. Moreover, higher surface curvatures may also cause destruction of lysozyme's structure and thus affect its activity. In addition, taking into account the surface properties and protein properties, the Toth adsorption model along with the generated site energy distribution was further used to exaplain the difference between the results (e.g., structure, stability, and activity) of lysozyme adsorption on CeO2 and ZnO NPs. The results reported here may aid in better understanding the beneficial or harmful impacts of nanoparticles on the biological systems.

  6. The Anti-sigma Factor RsiV Is a Bacterial Receptor for Lysozyme: Co-crystal Structure Determination and Demonstration That Binding of Lysozyme to RsiV Is Required for σV Activation

    PubMed Central

    Houtman, Jon C.

    2016-01-01

    σ factors provide RNA polymerase with promoter specificity in bacteria. Some σ factors require activation in order to interact with RNA polymerase and transcribe target genes. The Extra-Cytoplasmic Function (ECF) σ factor, σV, is encoded by several Gram-positive bacteria and is specifically activated by lysozyme. This activation requires the proteolytic destruction of the anti-σ factor RsiV via a process of regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP). In many cases proteases that cleave at site-1 are thought to directly sense a signal and initiate the RIP process. We previously suggested binding of lysozyme to RsiV initiated the proteolytic destruction of RsiV and activation of σV. Here we determined the X-ray crystal structure of the RsiV-lysozyme complex at 2.3 Å which revealed that RsiV and lysozyme make extensive contacts. We constructed RsiV mutants with altered abilities to bind lysozyme. We find that mutants that are unable to bind lysozyme block site-1 cleavage of RsiV and σV activation in response to lysozyme. Taken together these data demonstrate that RsiV is a receptor for lysozyme and binding of RsiV to lysozyme is required for σV activation. In addition, the co-structure revealed that RsiV binds to the lysozyme active site pocket. We provide evidence that in addition to acting as a sensor for the presence of lysozyme, RsiV also inhibits lysozyme activity. Thus we have demonstrated that RsiV is a protein with multiple functions. RsiV inhibits σV activity in the absence of lysozyme, RsiV binds lysozyme triggering σV activation and RsiV inhibits the enzymatic activity of lysozyme. PMID:27602573

  7. The Effect of Protein Impurities on Lysozyme Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, Russell A.; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    While bulk crystallization from impure solutions is used industrially as a purification step for a wide variety of materials, it is a technique that has rarely been used for proteins. Proteins have a reputation for being difficult to crystallize and high purity of the initial crystallization solution is considered paramount for success in the crystallization. Although little is written on the purifying capability of protein crystallization or of the effect of impurities on the various aspects of the crystallization process, recent published reports show that crystallization shows promise and feasibility as a purification technique for proteins. In order to further examine the issue of purity in macromolecule crystallization this study investigates the effect of the protein impurities, avidin, ovalbumin and conalbumin, at concentrations up to 50%, on the solubility, crystal face growth rates and crystal purity, of the protein lysozyme. Solubility was measured in batch experiments while a computer controlled video microscope system was used to measure the f {101} and {101} lysozyme crystal face growth rates. While little effect was observed on solubility and high crystal purity was obtained (>99.99%), the effect of the impurities on the face growth rates varied from no effect to a significant face specific effect leading to growth cessation, a phenomenon that is frequently observed in protein crystal growth. The results shed interesting light on the effect of protein impurities on protein crystal growth and strengthen the feasibility of using crystallization as a unit operation for protein purification.

  8. Preliminary investigations into solutal flow about growing tetragonal lysozyme crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc; Witherow, William; Naumann, Robert

    1988-01-01

    A series of preliminary experiments were done to investigate solutal flow about growing lysozyme crystals and its effects. Density-gradient-driven flow was observed using a schlieren optical system. Crystals used ranged from 0.3 to 1.72 mm across the (110) face, and protein concentrations were from 3.7 to 23.7 mg/ml. The convective plume velocities were found to be from 10 to 50 microns/s, which correlated with those predicted to occur based upon a diffusive-convective model. When microcrystals of lysozyme, less than 20 microns across the (110) face were subjected to directed solution flows, the growth rate was found to rapidly decrease over the 8-20 h course of the experiment. Solution flow rates used ranged from 18 to 40 microns/s, and protein concentrations were from 7.3 to 11.7 mg/ml, conditions typical of larger (greater than 0.5 mm) crystals in the terminal phases of a typical crystal growth procedure.

  9. Genetically Enhanced Lysozyme Evades a Pathogen Derived Inhibitory Protein

    PubMed Central

    Dostal, Sarah M.; Fang, Yongliang; Guerrette, Jonathan C.; Scanlon, Thomas C.; Griswold, Karl E.

    2015-01-01

    The accelerating spread of drug-resistant bacteria is creating demand for novel antibiotics. Bactericidal enzymes, such as human lysozyme (hLYZ), are interesting drug candidates due to their inherent catalytic nature and lack of susceptibility to the resistance mechanisms typically directed towards chemotherapeutics. However, natural antibacterial enzymes have their own limitations. For example, hLYZ is susceptible to pathogen derived inhibitory proteins, such as Escherichia coli Ivy. Here, we describe proof of concept studies demonstrating that hLYZ can be effectively redesigned to evade this potent lysozyme inhibitor. Large combinatorial libraries of hLYZ were analyzed using an innovative screening platform based on microbial co-culture in hydrogel microdroplets. Isolated hLYZ variants were orders of magnitude less susceptible to E. coli Ivy yet retained high catalytic proficiency and inherent antibacterial activity. Interestingly, the engineered escape variants showed a disadvantageous increase in susceptibility to the related Ivy ortholog from Pseudomonas aeruginosa as well as an unrelated E. coli inhibitory protein, MliC. Thus, while we have achieved our original objective with respect to escaping E. coli Ivy, engineering hLYZ for broad-spectrum evasion of proteinaceous inhibitors will require consideration of the complex and varied determinants that underlie molecular recognition by these emerging virulence factors. PMID:25607237

  10. Spherulitic growth of hen egg-white lysozyme crystals.

    PubMed

    Heijna, Maurits C R; Theelen, Mirjam J; van Enckevort, Willem J P; Vlieg, Elias

    2007-02-22

    In protein crystallography, spherulites are considered the result of a failed crystallization experiment. Understanding the formation of these structures may contribute to finding methods to prevent their formation. Here, we present an in situ study on lysozyme spherulites grown from sodium nitrate and sodium thiocyanate solutions, investigating their morphology and growth kinetics using optical microscopy. In a morphodrom, we indicate the conditions at which spherulites form for the lysozyme-nitrate system, showing that liquid-liquid phase separation is not a prerequisite to form sheaflike spherulites and that supersaturation is not the only factor determining their creation. Despite their sheaflike morphology, the spherulites all appear to be formed through heterogeneous nucleation. The spherulites are of a new polymorphic form and are less stable than the monoclinic form. For a single needle, growth kinetics indicate surface processes to be the rate-limiting step during growth, but for an entire spherulite volume, diffusion still plays a role. Spherulites simulated by using a time-dependent, tip-splitting model are found to compare well to experimentally observed spherulites.

  11. Bacteriophage-Mediated Dispersal of Campylobacter jejuni Biofilms ▿

    PubMed Central

    Siringan, Patcharin; Connerton, Phillippa L.; Payne, Robert J. H.; Connerton, Ian F.

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria in their natural environments frequently exist as mixed surface-associated communities, protected by extracellular material, termed biofilms. Biofilms formed by the human pathogen Campylobacter jejuni may arise in the gastrointestinal tract of animals but also in water pipes and other industrial situations, leading to their possible transmission into the human food chain either directly or via farm animals. Bacteriophages are natural predators of bacteria that usually kill their prey by cell lysis and have potential application for the biocontrol and dispersal of target bacteria in biofilms. The effects of virulent Campylobacter specific-bacteriophages CP8 and CP30 on C. jejuni biofilms formed on glass by strains NCTC 11168 and PT14 at 37°C under microaerobic conditions were investigated. Independent bacteriophage treatments (n ≥ 3) led to 1 to 3 log10 CFU/cm2 reductions in the viable count 24 h postinfection compared with control levels. In contrast, bacteriophages applied under these conditions effected a reduction of less than 1 log10 CFU/ml in planktonic cells. Resistance to bacteriophage in bacteria surviving bacteriophage treatment of C. jejuni NCTC 11168 biofilms was 84% and 90% for CP8 and CP30, respectively, whereas bacteriophage resistance was not found in similarly recovered C. jejuni PT14 cells. Dispersal of the biofilm matrix by bacteriophage was demonstrated by crystal violet staining and transmission electron microscopy. Bacteriophage may play an important role in the control of attachment and biofilm formation by Campylobacter in situations where biofilms occur in nature, and they have the potential for application in industrial situations leading to improvements in food safety. PMID:21441325

  12. The role of bacteriophages in periodontal health and disease.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Graça; Silva, Maria Daniela; Peddey, Mark; Sillankorva, Sanna; Azeredo, Joana

    2016-10-01

    The human periodontium health is commonly compromised by chronic inflammatory conditions and has become a major public health concern. Dental plaque, the precursor of periodontal disease, is a complex biofilm consisting mainly of bacteria, but also archaea, protozoa, fungi and viruses. Viruses that specifically infect bacteria - bacteriophages - are most common in the oral cavity. Despite this, their role in the progression of periodontal disease remains poorly explored. This review aims to summarize how bacteriophages interact with the oral microbiota, their ability to increase bacterial virulence and mediate the transfer of resistance genes and suggests how bacteriophages can be used as an alternative to the current periodontal disease therapies.

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Phytopathogenic Pectobacterium atrosepticum Bacteriophage Peat1

    PubMed Central

    Kalischuk, Melanie; Hachey, John

    2015-01-01

    Pectobacterium atrosepticum is a common phytopathogen causing significant economic losses worldwide. To develop a biocontrol strategy for this blackleg pathogen of solanaceous plants, P. atrosepticum bacteriophage Peat1 was isolated and its genome completely sequenced. Interestingly, morphological and sequence analyses of the 45,633-bp genome revealed that phage Peat1 is a member of the family Podoviridae and most closely resembles the Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteriophage KP34. This is the first published complete genome sequence of a phytopathogenic P. atrosepticum bacteriophage, and details provide important information for the development of biocontrol by advancing our understanding of phage-phytopathogen interactions. PMID:26272557

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Phytopathogenic Pectobacterium atrosepticum Bacteriophage Peat1.

    PubMed

    Kalischuk, Melanie; Hachey, John; Kawchuk, Lawrence

    2015-08-13

    Pectobacterium atrosepticum is a common phytopathogen causing significant economic losses worldwide. To develop a biocontrol strategy for this blackleg pathogen of solanaceous plants, P. atrosepticum bacteriophage Peat1 was isolated and its genome completely sequenced. Interestingly, morphological and sequence analyses of the 45,633-bp genome revealed that phage Peat1 is a member of the family Podoviridae and most closely resembles the Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteriophage KP34. This is the first published complete genome sequence of a phytopathogenic P. atrosepticum bacteriophage, and details provide important information for the development of biocontrol by advancing our understanding of phage-phytopathogen interactions.

  15. Respirable bacteriophages for the treatment of bacterial lung infections.

    PubMed

    Hoe, Susan; Semler, Diana D; Goudie, Amanda D; Lynch, Karlene H; Matinkhoo, Sadaf; Finlay, Warren H; Dennis, Jonathan J; Vehring, Reinhard

    2013-12-01

    This review article discusses the development of respiratory therapeutics containing bacteriophages indicated for lung infections, specifically those that have become increasingly difficult to treat because of antibiotic resistance. Recent achievements and remaining problems are presented for each step necessary to develop a bacteriophage-containing dosage form for respiratory drug delivery, including selection of appropriate bacteriophages for therapy, processing and purification of phage preparations, formulation into a stable, solid dosage form, and delivery device selection. Safety and efficacy studies in animals and human subjects are also reviewed.

  16. Effects of 2'-O-methyl nucleotide on ligation capability of T4 DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bin; Tong, Zhaoxue; Zhao, Guojie; Mu, Runqing; Shang, Hong; Guan, Yifu

    2014-09-01

    To further understand the ligation mechanism, effects of 2'-O-methyl nucleotide (2'-OMeN) on the T4 DNA ligation efficiency were investigated. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay was used to monitor the nick-joining process by T4 DNA ligase. Results showed that substitutions at 5'- and 3'-ends of the nick decreased the ligation efficiency by 48.7% ± 6.7% and 70.6% ± 4.0%, respectively. Substitutions at both 5'- and 3'-ends decreased the ligation efficiency by 76.6% ± 1.3%. Corresponding kinetic parameters, Vmax, Km, and kcat, have been determined in each case by using the Michaelis-Menten equation. The kinetic data showed that the 2'-OMeN substitutions reduced the maximal initial velocity and increased the Michaelis constant of T4 DNA ligase. Mismatches at 5'- and 3'-ends of the nick have also shown different influences on the ligation. Results here showed that the sugar pucker conformation at 3'-end impairs the ligation efficiency more profoundly than that at 5'-end. Different concentrations of Mg(2+), Ca(2+), K(+), Na(+), and ATP were also demonstrated to affect the T4 DNA ligase activity. These results enriched our knowledge about the effects of 2'-OMeN substitutions on the T4 DNA ligase.

  17. Performance Evaluation of the MyT4 Technology for Determining ART Eligibility

    PubMed Central

    Macamo, Rosa; Meggi, Bindiya; Tobaiwa, Ocean; Loquiha, Osvaldo; Bollinger, Timothy; Vojnov, Lara; Jani, Ilesh

    2016-01-01

    Background In resource-limited countries, CD4 T-cell (CD4) testing continues to be used for determining antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation eligibility and opportunistic infection monitoring. To support expanded access to CD4 testing, simple and robust technologies are necessary. We conducted this study to evaluate the performance of a new Point-of-Care (POC) CD4 technology, the MyT4, compared to conventional laboratory CD4 testing. Methods EDTA venous blood from 200 HIV-positive patients was tested in the laboratory using the MyT4 and BD FACSCalibur™. Results The MyT4 had an r2 of 0.82 and a mean bias of 12.3 cells/μl. The MyT4 had total misclassifications of 14.7% and 8.8% when analyzed using ART eligibility thresholds of 350 and 500 cells/μl, respectively. Conclusions We conclude that the MyT4 performed well in classifying patients using the current ART initiation eligibility thresholds in Mozambique when compared to the conventional CD4 technology. PMID:27780216

  18. T4 DNA ligase is more than an effective trap of cyclized dsDNA.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chongli; Lou, Xiong Wen; Rhoades, Elizabeth; Chen, Huimin; Archer, Lynden A

    2007-01-01

    T4 DNA ligase is used in standard cyclization assays to trap double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) in low-probability, cyclic or highly bent conformations. The cyclization probability, deduced from the relative yield of cyclized product, can be used in conjunction with statistical mechanical models to extract the bending stiffness of dsDNA. By inserting the base analog 2-aminopurine (2-AP) at designated positions in 89 bp and 94 bp dsDNA fragments, we find that T4 DNA ligase can have a previously unknown effect. Specifically, we observe that addition of T4 ligase to dsDNA in proportions comparable to what is used in the cyclization assay leads to a significant increase in fluorescence from 2-AP. This effect is believed to originate from stabilization of local base-pair opening by formation of transient DNA-ligase complexes. Non-specific binding of T4 ligase to dsDNA is also confirmed using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) experiments, which reveal a systematic reduction of dsDNA diffusivity in the presence of ligase. ATP competes with regular DNA for non-covalent binding to the T4 ligase and is found to significantly reduce DNA-ligase complexation. For short dsDNA fragments, however, the population of DNA-ligase complexes at typical ATP concentrations used in DNA cyclization studies is determined to be large enough to dominate the cyclization reaction.

  19. [TL, the new bacteriophage of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and its application for the search of halo-producing bacteriophages].

    PubMed

    Pleteneva, E A; Burkal'tseva, M V; Shaburova, O V; Krylov, S V; Pechnikova, E V; Sokolova, O S; Krylov, V N

    2011-01-01

    The properties of new virulent bacteriophage TL of Pseudomonas aeruginosa belonging to the family Podoviridae (genome size of 46 kb) were investigated. This bacteriophage is capable of lysogenizing the bacterial lawn in halo zones around negative colonies (NC) of other bacteriophages. TL forms large NC, that are hardly distinguishable on the lawn of P. aeruginisa PAO1. At the same time, on the lawns of some phage-resistant PAO1 mutants, as well as on those produced by a number of clinical isolates, TL forms more transparent NC. It is suggested that more effective growth of the bacteriophage TL NC is associated with the differences in outer lipopolysaccharide (LPS) layer of the cell walls of different bacterial strains, as well as of the bacteria inside and outside of the halos. This TL property was used to optimize selection of bacteriophages producing halos around NC on the lawn of P. aeruginosa PAO1. As a result, a group of bacteriophages differing in the patterns of interaction between their halos and TL bacteriophage, as well as in some characters was identified. Taking into consideration the importance of cell-surfaced structures of P. aeruginosa in manifestation of virulence and pathogenicity, possible utilization of specific phage enzymes, polysacchadide depolymerases, for more effective treatment of P. aeruginosa infections is discussed.

  20. Enteroviruses and Bacteriophages in Bathing Waters

    PubMed Central

    Mocé-Llivina, Laura; Lucena, Francisco; Jofre, Juan

    2005-01-01

    A new procedure for detecting and counting enteroviruses based on the VIRADEN method applied to 10 liters of seawater was examined. It improved the efficiency of detection by taking into account both the number of positive isolations and numbers found with traditional methods. It was then used to quantify viruses in bathing waters. A number of bacterial indicators and bacteriophages were also tested. Cultivable enteroviruses were detected in 55% of the samples, most of which complied with bacteriological criteria. In contrast, viral genomes were only detected in 20% of the samples by reverse transcription-PCR. Somatic coliphages outnumbered all other indicators. F-specific RNA phages were detected in only 15% of the samples, whereas phages infecting Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron were detected in 70% of samples. A numerical relationship between the numbers of enteroviruses and the numbers of enterococci and somatic coliphages was observed. In situ inactivation experiments showed that viruses persisted significantly longer than the bacterial indicators. Only somatic coliphages and bacteriophages infecting Bacteroides persisted longer than the viruses. These results explain the numbers of enteroviruses and indicators in bathing waters attending the numbers usually found in sewage in the area. Somatic coliphages show a very good potential to predict the risk of viruses being present in bathing waters. PMID:16269717

  1. Bacteriophages and Their Role in Food Safety

    PubMed Central

    Sillankorva, Sanna M.; Oliveira, Hugo; Azeredo, Joana

    2012-01-01

    The interest for natural antimicrobial compounds has increased due to alterations in consumer positions towards the use of chemical preservatives in foodstuff and food processing surfaces. Bacteriophages fit in the class of natural antimicrobial and their effectiveness in controlling bacterial pathogens in agro-food industry has led to the development of different phage products already approved by USFDA and USDA. The majority of these products are to be used in farm animals or animal products such as carcasses, meats and also in agricultural and horticultural products. Treatment with specific phages in the food industry can prevent the decay of products and the spread of bacterial diseases and ultimately promote safe environments in animal and plant food production, processing, and handling. This is an overview of recent work carried out with phages as tools to promote food safety, starting with a general introduction describing the prevalence of foodborne pathogens and bacteriophages and a more detailed discussion on the use of phage therapy to prevent and treat experimentally induced infections of animals against the most common foodborne pathogens, the use of phages as biocontrol agents in foods, and also their use as biosanitizers of food contact surfaces. PMID:23316235

  2. Immobilization of bacteriophages on modified silica particles.

    PubMed

    Cademartiri, Rebecca; Anany, Hany; Gross, Isabelle; Bhayani, Rahul; Griffiths, Mansel; Brook, Michael A

    2010-03-01

    Bacteriophages are selective anti-bacterial agents, which are receiving increasing acceptance by regulatory agencies for use both in the food industry and in clinical settings for biocontrol. While immobilized phage could be particularly useful to create antimicrobial surfaces, current immobilization strategies require chemical bioconjugation to surfaces or more difficult processes involving modification of their head proteins to express specific binding moieties, for example, biotin or cellulose binding domains; procedures that are both time and money intensive. We report that morphologically different bacteriophages, active against a variety of food-borne bacteria: Escherichia coli; Salmonella enterica; Listeria monocytogenes; and Shigella boydii, will effectively physisorb to silica particles, prepared by silica surface modification with poly(ethylene glycol), carboxylic acid groups, or amines. The phages remain infective to their host bacteria while adsorbed on the surface of the silica particles. The number of infective phage bound to the silica is enhanced by the presence of ionic surfaces, with greater surface charge - to a maximum - correlating with greater concentration of adsorbed phage. Above the maximum charge concentration, the number of active phage drops.

  3. Making temporal maps using bacterial luciferase: Bacteriophage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Jonathan; Broza, Rachel; Verkin, Ekaterina

    2004-06-01

    A method for making temporal maps in bacteria, plasmids and bacteriophages is described. A cassette containing both the genes for bacterial luciferase and kanamycin resistance can be introduced at precise sites. The technique involves clonging followed by genetic recombination. The result is formation of structures that have the luciferase genes in place of the normal DNA and this allows the very precise measurement of transcription/translation of the substituted regions. Very low levels of transcription as well as the kinetics of induction can be easily ascertained. As a specific demonstration of this general method, the technique was used with bacteriophage λ, one of the best known organisms. By measuring light emission, the expression of luciferase was followed after induction for both early and late genes. The exact timing of initial expression of genes was also determined by sampling at very short intervals. The results show that the early genes express almost without delay implying that the function of the N antitermination system is not temporal regulation.

  4. Bacteriophage therapy in children: facts and prospects.

    PubMed

    Fortuna, Wojciech; Miedzybrodzki, Ryszard; Weber-Dabrowska, Beata; Górski, Andrzej

    2008-08-01

    Data from the World Health Organization confirm a decrease in the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy. The spread of bacteria resistant to several groups of antibiotics creates more problems in the treatment of various diseases, especially in children. It is possible that pharmacological agents may prove to be ineffective in curing infections caused by resistant pathogens, and this could lead to a post-antibiotic era. It is necessary to extend the arsenal of the available therapeutic tools. Bacteriophages have long been used therapeutically and prophylactically in children. In the beginnings of phage therapy, enthusiasm prevailed over the rational methods used in contemporary controlled studies. Many people dealing with phages described cases of successful therapy, but did not conduct comparative studies. Nevertheless, phage administration seems to be safe, even in children after intravenous administration. The therapeutic and prophylactic application of phages is now experiencing a renaissance of interest. The authors' own recent analysis demonstrated the cost effectiveness of phages over antibiotic especially in the treatment of infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria. It can be concluded that the results of the therapeutic and prophylactic application of phages against multi-drug resistant pathogens are encouraging. It seems clear that bacteriophages need further evaluation regarding the control of bacterial infection in children.

  5. Understanding Bacteriophage Specificity in Natural Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Koskella, Britt; Meaden, Sean

    2013-01-01

    Studying the coevolutionary dynamics between bacteria and the bacteriophage viruses that infect them is critical to understanding both microbial diversity and ecosystem functioning. Phages can play a key role in shaping bacterial population dynamics and can significantly alter both intra- and inter-specific competition among bacterial hosts. Predicting how phages might influence community stability and apparent competition, however, requires an understanding of how bacteria-phage interaction networks evolve as a function of host diversity and community dynamics. Here, we first review the progress that has been made in understanding phage specificity, including the use of experimental evolution, we then introduce a new dataset on natural bacteriophages collected from the phyllosphere of horse chestnut trees, and finally we highlight that bacterial sensitivity to phage is rarely a binary trait and that this variation should be taken into account and reported. We emphasize that there is currently insufficient evidence to make broad generalizations about phage host range in natural populations, the limits of phage adaptation to novel hosts, or the implications of phage specificity in shaping microbial communities. However, the combination of experimental and genomic approaches with the study of natural communities will allow new insight to the evolution and impact of phage specificity within complex bacterial communities. PMID:23478639

  6. Influence of mixed electrolytes on the adsorption of lysozyme, PEG and PEGylated lysozyme on a hydrophobic interaction chromatography resin.

    PubMed

    Hackemann, Eva; Werner, Albert; Hasse, Hans

    2017-04-03

    In a recent work(1) the influence of mixed electrolytes on the adsorption of the macromolecules lysozyme, PEG and di-PEGylated lysozyme on a hydrophobic resin has been studied, but only at one overall ionic strength (3000 mM). The present work, therefore, extends these studies to other ionic strengths (2400 mM and 2700 mM), and explores the application of a model to predict the entire data set. The adsorbent is Toyopearl PPG-600M. The solvent is a 25 mM aqueous sodium phosphate buffer at pH 7.0. The studied salts are sodium chloride, ammonium sulfate, sodium sulfate and ammonium chloride. Both pure salts as well as binary and ternary mixtures of these salts with varying ratios of the amounts of the salts are studied at 25 °C. The loading of the adsorbent increases with increasing salt concentration for all macromolecules. Synergetic effects of the mixed electrolytes are observed. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. The translocation t(4;14) can be present only in minor subclones in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Hébraud, Benjamin; Caillot, Denis; Corre, Jill; Marit, Gérald; Hulin, Cyrille; Leleu, Xavier; Lodé, Laurence; Wetterwald, Marc; Dib, Mamoun; Rodon, Philippe; Voillat, Laurent; Royer, Bruno; Voog, Eric; Fitoussi, Olivier; Stoppa, Anne-Marie; Garderet, Laurent; Kolb, Brigitte; Maigre, Michel; Boullanger, Nadine; Allangba, Olivier; Karlin, Lionel; Daguindau, Nicolas; Legros, Laurence; Sohn, Claudine; Joubert, Marie-Véronique; Lenain, Pascal; Facon, Thierry; Attal, Michel; Moreau, Philippe; Avet-Loiseau, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Although the translocation t(4;14) is supposed to be a primary event in multiple myeloma, we have been surprised to observe that in large relapse series of patients, the t(4;14) can be observed only in subpopulations of plasma cells, in contrast to what is seen at diagnosis. This observation raised the question of possible subclones harboring the translocation that would be observable only at the time of relapse. Experimental Design To address this issue, we analyzed by FISH a cohort of 306 patients for whom we had at least two samples obtained at different disease phases. Results We observed a “gain” of the t(4;14) in 14 patients, and conversely, a “loss” of the translocation in 11 patients. Two hypotheses were raised: either an acquisition of the translocation during evolution, or the existence of small t(4;14)-positive subclones at the time of diagnosis. To address this question, we had (1) the opportunity to analyze two patients at the time of diagnosis by RT-PCR to look for the chimeric Eμ-MMSET transcript, and one patient positive at diagnosis, but negative at relapse. The samples were positive, supporting the second hypothesis. Furthermore, the IGH sequences of two patients who “lose” the t(4;14) were identical at diagnosis and relapse, confirming the existence of a common ancestral clone. Conclusion Thus, the conclusion of this study is that the t(4;14) is not a primary event in multiple myeloma, and that it can be present in silent subclones at diagnosis, but also at relapse. PMID:23857603

  8. Glycosylation and epitope mapping of the 5T4 glycoprotein oncofoetal antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, David M; Woods, Andrew M; Myers, Kevin A; Westwater, Caroline; Rahi-Saund, Veena; Davies, Michael J; Renouf, David V; Hounsell, Elizabeth F; Stern, Peter L

    2002-01-01

    The human 5T4 oncofoetal antigen is a focus for development of several antibody-directed therapies on the basis of the murine monoclonal antibody against 5T4 (mAb5T4), which recognizes a conformational epitope. 5T4 molecules are highly N-glycosylated transmembrane glycoproteins whose extracellular domain contains two regions of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) and associated flanking regions, separated by an intervening hydrophilic sequence. Using a series of deletion and mutated cDNA constructs as well as chimaeras with the murine homologue, we have mapped the mAb5T4 epitope to the more membrane-proximal LRR2 or its flanking region. Analysis of the glycosylation of the seven consensus Asp-Xaa-Ser/Thr sites was consistent with all of the sites being glycosylated. A combination of two high-mannose chains (predominantly octasaccharide) and five mostly sialylated bi-, tri- and tetra-antennary complex chains with minor quantities of core fucose were detected. The two glycosylation sites, which are the most likely to have predominantly high-mannose chains, are in the only two regions that show significant differences between the human and the 81% identical mouse sequence. A site-directed mutation, which abolished glycosylation at one of these sites (position 192), did not alter antigenicity. The other, which is nearest to the N-terminus in the human, has an Asn-Leu-Thr to Asn-Leu-Leu conversion in the mouse, so cannot be glycosylated in the latter species. The large complex glycosylation at the other sites is likely to influence the antigenicity and tertiary structure generating the 5T4 epitope. PMID:11903056

  9. Primary structure and genetic organization of phage T4 DNA ligase.

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, J; Brown, R S; Tsugita, A

    1983-01-01

    The primary structure of phage T4 DNA ligase has been determined by DNA sequencing of a cloned restriction fragment containing its gene, and partial amino acid sequence analysis of the protein. The molecule has a Mr of 55,230, and contains 487 amino acids. The DNA sequence may also encode all of one and parts of two other, hitherto unidentified, T4 proteins. The four genes are closely packed, with overlaps between terminator and initiator codons of adjacent genes. Potential terminator and promoter sites for transcription are located within the coding sequence of one of the genes. PMID:6314278

  10. Acanthamoeba T3, T4 and T5 in swimming-pool waters from Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Caumo, Karin; Rott, Marilise B

    2011-03-01

    Species of Acanthamoeba, known to cause keratitis (AK) and granulomatous encephalitis in humans are frequently isolated from a variety of water sources. In this study, 13 Acanthamoeba isolates from swimming pools were classified at the genotype level based on the sequence analysis of the Acanthamoeba small-subunit rRNA gene. Nine of the 13 isolates were genotype T5, three were genotype T4, and one was T3. Several genotypes have been reported worldwide as causative agents of AK, including genotypes T3, T4, and T5. The present study indicates that genotype T5 is a common contaminant in swimming-pool water.

  11. Overview of the Lockheed Martin Compact Fusion Reactor (CFR) T4B Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    The Lockheed Martin Compact Fusion Reactor (CFR) Program endeavors to quickly develop a compact fusion power plant with favorable commercial economics and military utility. The CFR uses a diamagnetic, high beta, magnetically encapsulated, linear ring cusp plasma confinement scheme. The goal of the T4B experiment is to demonstrate a suitable plasma target for heating experiments and to characterize the behavior of plasma sources in the CFR configuration. The design of the T4B experiment will be presented, including discussion of predicted behavior, plasma sources, heating mechanisms, diagnostics suite and relevant numerical modeling. ©2016 Lockheed Martin Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

  12. X-ray studies of water in crystals of lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Blake, C C; Pulford, W C; Artymiuk, P J

    1983-07-05

    The structure of the water in crystals of human and tortoise egg-white lysozyme, which contain about 350 and about 650 water molecules per protein molecule, respectively, has been studied by X-ray refinement at high resolution. In the crystals, 60 to 80% of the total water is represented by featureless electron density filling the crystal interstices, which can be modelled to a first approximation by a single-valued, smoothed electron density continuum. The number of ordered water molecules detected is 140 for human and 128 for tortoise. These ordered water molecules are either hydrogen-bonded to protein polar groups, or hydrogen-bonded to other bound water molecules, to form a single layer around the protein molecules. Estimates of the proportion of the protein surface covered by ordered water molecules have been obtained by contact area calculations, giving a lower limit of approximately 45%, an upper limit of approximately 85% and a "best" estimate of approximately 75%. Examination of the structure of the ordered water layer shows that it is probably not any other single regular structure, and suggests that there is a local ordering controlled by the nature of the protein surface. Nearly all exposed protein polar atoms interact with ordered water molecules with, on average, protein oxygen atoms interacting with twice as many water molecules as protein nitrogen atoms. Analysis of the relation of the B-factors of the bound water molecules to the B-factors of the protein atoms to which they are bound, suggests that the 33 to 35 water molecules that make multiple hydrogen bonds with the lysozyme molecules are strongly bound, and that the 95 to 105 waters that make single hydrogen bonds to the protein or other bound water molecules are more weakly bound. Comparison of the location of the bound water molecules in the two lysozymes shows that most of the multiply bound water molecules occupy similar binding sites, suggesting that crystal packing or the presence of salt

  13. Hydrogen exchange of lysozyme powders. Hydration dependence of internal motions.

    PubMed

    Schinkel, J E; Downer, N W; Rupley, J A

    1985-01-15

    The rate of exchange of the labile hydrogens of lysozyme was measured by out-exchange of tritium from the protein in solution and from powder samples of varied hydration level, for pH 2, 3, 5, 7, and 10 at 25 degrees C. The dependence of exchange of powder samples on the level of hydration was the same for all pHs. Exchange increased strongly with increased hydration until reaching a rate of exchange that is constant above 0.15 g of H2O/g of protein (120 mol of H2O/mol of protein). This hydration level corresponds to coverage of less than half the protein surface with a monolayer of water. No additional hydrogen exchange was observed for protein powders with higher water content. Considered in conjunction with other lysozyme hydration data [Rupley, J. A., Gratton, E., & Careri, G. (1983) Trends Biochem. Sci. (Pers. Ed.) 8, 18-22], this observation indicates that internal protein dynamics are not strongly coupled to surface properties. The use of powder samples offers control of water activity through regulation of water vapor pressure. The dependence of the exchange rate on water activity was about fourth order. The order was pH independent and was constant from 114 to 8 mol of hydrogen remaining unexchanged/mol of lysozyme. These results indicate that the rate-determining step for protein hydrogen exchange is similar for all backbone amides and involves few water molecules. Powder samples were hydrated either by isopiestic equilibration, with a half-time for hydration of about 1 h, or by addition of solvent to rapidly reach final hydration. Samples hydrated slowly by isopiestic equilibration exhibited more exchange than was observed for samples of the same water content that had been hydrated rapidly by solvent addition. This difference can be explained by salt and pH effects on the nearly dry protein. Such effects would be expected to contribute more strongly during the isopiestic equilibration process. Solution hydrogen exchange measurements made for comparison

  14. Investigating the effects of erythrosine B on amyloid fibril formation derived from lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chun-Tien; Chen, Yi-Lin; Hsu, Wei-Tse; How, Su-Chun; Cheng, Yu-Hong; Hsueh, Shu-Shun; Liu, Hwai-Shen; Lin, Ta-Hsien; Wu, Josephine W; Wang, Steven S-S

    2017-05-01

    Formation of amyloid fibrils has been associated with at least 30 different protein aggregation diseases. The 129-residue polypeptide hen lysozyme, which is structurally homologous to human lysozyme, has been demonstrated to exhibit amyloid fibril-forming propensity in vitro. This study is aimed at exploring the influence of erythrosine B on the in vitro amyloid fibril formation of hen lysozyme at pH 2.0 and 55°C using ThT binding assay, transmission electron microscopy, far-UV circular dichroism absorption spectroscopy, 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid fluorescence spectroscopy, and synchronous fluorescence study. We found that lysozyme fibrillogenesis was dose-dependently suppressed by erythrosine B. In addition, our far-UV CD and ANS fluorescence data showed that, as compared with the untreated lysozyme control, the α-to-ß transition and exposure of hydrophobic clusters in lysozyme were reduced upon treatment with erythrosine B. Moreover, it could be inferred that the binding of erythrosine B occurred in the vicinity of the tryptophan residues. Finally, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations were further employed to gain some insights into the possible binding site(s) and interactions between lysozyme and erythrosine B. We believe the results obtained here may contribute to the development of potential strategies/approaches for the suppression of amyloid fibrillogenesis, which is implicated in amyloid pathology.

  15. Complex coacervates of hyaluronic acid and lysozyme: effect on protein structure and physical stability.

    PubMed

    Water, Jorrit J; Schack, Malthe M; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian; Maltesen, Morten J; van de Weert, Marco; Jorgensen, Lene

    2014-10-01

    Complex coacervates of hyaluronic acid and lysozyme, a model protein, were formed by ionic interaction using bulk mixing and were characterized in terms of binding stoichiometry and protein structure and stability. The complexes were formed at pH 7.2 at low ionic strength (6mM) and the binding stoichiometry was determined using solution depletion and isothermal titration calorimetry. The binding stoichiometry of lysozyme to hyaluronic acid (870 kDa) determined by solution depletion was found to be 225.9 ± 6.6 mol, or 0.1 bound lysozyme molecules per hyaluronic acid monomer. This corresponded well with that obtained by isothermal titration calorimetry of 0.09 bound lysozyme molecules per hyaluronic acid monomer. The complexation did not alter the secondary structure of lysozyme measured by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy overlap analysis and had no significant impact on the Tm of lysozyme determined by differential scanning calorimetry. Furthermore, the protein stability of lysozyme was found to be improved upon complexation during a 12-weeks storage study at room temperature, as shown by a significant increase in recovered protein when complexed (94 ± 2% and 102 ± 5% depending on the polymer-protein weight to weight ratio) compared to 89 ± 2% recovery for uncomplexed protein. This study shows the potential of hyaluronic acid to be used in combination with complex coacervation to increase the physical stability of pharmaceutical protein formulations.

  16. Covalent immobilization of lysozyme on ethylene vinyl alcohol films for nonmigrating antimicrobial packaging applications.

    PubMed

    Muriel-Galet, V; Talbert, J N; Hernandez-Munoz, P; Gavara, R; Goddard, J M

    2013-07-10

    The objective of this study was to develop a new antimicrobial film, in which lysozyme was covalently attached onto two different ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymers (EVOH 29 and EVOH 44). The EVOH surface was modified with UV irradiation treatment to generate carboxylic acid groups, and lysozyme was covalently attached to the functionalized polymer surface. Surface characterization of control and modified films was performed using attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and dye assay. The value of protein loading after attachment on the surface was 8.49 μg protein/cm(2) and 5.74 μg protein/cm(2) for EVOH 29 and EVOH 44, respectively, after 10 min UV irradiation and bioconjugation. The efficacy of the EVOH-lysozyme films was assessed using Micrococcus lysodeikticus. The antimicrobial activity of the films was tested against Listeria monocytogenes and was similar to an equivalent amount of free enzyme. The reduction was 1.08 log for EVOH 29-lysozyme, 0.95 log for EVOH 44-lysozyme, and 1.34 log for free lysozyme. This work confirmed the successful use of lysozyme immobilization on the EVOH surface for antimicrobial packaging.

  17. Influence of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide on the activity and conformation of lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yitong; Ming, Zhu; Cao, Yuye; Feng, Shicheng; Yang, Hua; Chen, Lingyun; Yang, Sheng-Tao

    2017-03-08

    The dramatically different bio-effects of graphene and graphene oxide (GO) have been widely observed in diverse biological systems, which determine the applications and toxicity of graphene materials. To elucidate the mechanism at molecular level, it is urgent to investigate the enzyme-graphene interaction and its consequences. In this study, we comparatively studied the influence of GO and reduced GO (RGO) on the activity and conformation of lysozyme to provide better understandings of their different bio-effects. Both GO and RGO adsorbed large quantities of lysozyme after incubation. GO inhibited lysozyme activity seriously, while RGO nearly had no influence on the enzyme activity. The different inhibitions of enzyme activity could be explained by th