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Sample records for bacteriorhodopsin-like proton pump

  1. Strongly hydrogen-bonded water molecule present near the retinal chromophore of Leptosphaeria rhodopsin, the bacteriorhodopsin-like proton pump from a eukaryote.

    PubMed

    Sumii, Masayo; Furutani, Yuji; Waschuk, Stephen A; Brown, Leonid S; Kandori, Hideki

    2005-11-22

    Leptosphaeria rhodopsin (LR) is an archaeal-type rhodopsin found in fungi, and is the first light-driven proton-pumping retinal protein from eukaryotes. LR pumps protons in a manner similar to that of bacteriorhodopsin (BR), a light-driven proton pump of haloarchaea. The amino acid sequence of LR is more homologous to that of Neurospora rhodopsin (NR) than BR, whereas NR has no proton-pumping activity. These facts raise the question of how the proton-pumping function is achieved. In this paper, we studied structural changes of LR following the retinal photoisomerization by means of low-temperature Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and compared the obtained spectra with those for BR and NR. While the light-induced photoisomerization from the all-trans to 13-cis form was commonly observed among LR, BR, and NR, we found that the structural changes of LR are closer to those of BR than to those of NR in terms of detailed vibrational bands of retinal and protein. The most prominent difference was seen for the water O-D stretching vibrations (measured in D2O). LR exhibits an O-D stretch of water at 2257 cm(-1), indicating the presence of a strongly hydrogen-bonded water molecule. Such strongly hydrogen-bonded water molecules (O-D stretch at <2400 cm(-1)) were observed for BR, but not for NR. Comprehensive studies of BR mutants and archaeal rhodopsins have revealed that strongly hydrogen-bonded water molecules are found only in the proteins exhibiting proton-pumping activity, suggesting that strongly hydrogen-bonded water molecules and transient weakening of their binding are essential for the proton-pumping function of rhodopsins. This observation for LR provided additional experimental evidence of the correlation between strongly hydrogen-bonded water molecules and proton-pumping activity of archaeal rhodopsins.

  2. Proton pump inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines that work by reducing the amount of stomach acid made by ... Proton pump inhibitors are used to: Relieve symptoms of acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This ...

  3. Protons and how they are transported by proton pumps.

    PubMed

    Buch-Pedersen, M J; Pedersen, B P; Veierskov, B; Nissen, P; Palmgren, M G

    2009-01-01

    The very high mobility of protons in aqueous solutions demands special features of membrane proton transporters to sustain efficient yet regulated proton transport across biological membranes. By the use of the chemical energy of ATP, plasma-membrane-embedded ATPases extrude protons from cells of plants and fungi to generate electrochemical proton gradients. The recently published crystal structure of a plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase contributes to our knowledge about the mechanism of these essential enzymes. Taking the biochemical and structural data together, we are now able to describe the basic molecular components that allow the plasma membrane proton H(+)-ATPase to carry out proton transport against large membrane potentials. When divergent proton pumps such as the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, bacteriorhodopsin, and F(O)F(1) ATP synthase are compared, unifying mechanistic premises for biological proton pumps emerge. Most notably, the minimal pumping apparatus of all pumps consists of a central proton acceptor/donor, a positively charged residue to control pK(a) changes of the proton acceptor/donor, and bound water molecules to facilitate rapid proton transport along proton wires.

  4. Pharmacology of Proton Pump Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jai Moo; Sachs, George

    2010-01-01

    The gastric H,K-ATPase is the primary target for the treatment of acid-related diseases. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are weak bases composed of two moieties, a substituted pyridine with a primary pKa of about 4.0, which allows selective accumulation in the secretory canaliculus of the parietal cell, and a benzimidazole with a second pKa of about 1.0. PPIs are acid-activated prodrugs that convert to sulfenic acids or sulfenamides that react covalently with one or more cysteines accessible from the luminal surface of the ATPase. Because of covalent binding, their inhibitory effects last much longer than their plasma half-life. However, the short half-life of the drug in the blood and the requirement for acid activation impair their efficacy in acid suppression, particularly at night. PPIs with longer half-life promise to improve acid suppression. All PPIs give excellent healing of peptic ulcers and produce good results in reflux esophagitis. PPIs combined with antibiotics eradicate Helicobacter pylori. PMID:19006606

  5. [Safety of proton pump inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Esplugues, Juan V; Martí-Cabrera, Miguel; Ponce, Julio

    2006-11-25

    The significant inhibitory capacity of gastric acid secretion of PPIs makes them the drugs of choice for treating acid-related diseases. The considerable prevalence of these diseases and the need for maintaining the administration of the drug during considerably long periods results in this therapeutic group being one of the most widely used. However, in spite of their extensive use, there continue to emerge concerns about their potential toxicity; concerns surrounding the specificity of their mechanism of action and a consequential suspicion that something so potent must involve harmful effects. PPIs act selectively on the final stage of the process of gastric acid secretion, namely the H+/K+-ATPase or proton pump. This enzyme represents an essential step in the process of secretion of H+, and PPIs exert a very specific action on the parietal cell, as they need an environment with very low pH levels, which only exist in this cell. In the present article, the adverse effects of PPIs are reviewed, with special emphasis on those related to their continued administration and on the special circumstances of patients, as in the case of the elderly, those with liver failure, pregnant and breastfeeding mothers and children. All the PPIs on the market share a common chemical basis and there are no great differences in their potential adverse effects, the possibility of them promoting opportunist infections or their capacity to generate pharmacokinetic interactions with other drugs, which, if occur, are generally insignificant. After two decades of use, PPIs have proved to be very effective and safe drugs.

  6. Dynamics of the Plasma Membrane Proton Pump.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Federico; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta

    2015-06-01

    Proton transfer over distances longer than that of a hydrogen bond often requires water molecules and protein motions. Following transfer of the proton from the donor to the acceptor, the change in the charge distribution may alter the dynamics of protein and water. To begin to understand how protonation dynamics couple to protein and water dynamics, here we explore how changes in the protonation state affect water and protein dynamics in the AHA2 proton pump. We find that the protonation state of the proton donor and acceptor groups largely affects the dynamics of internal waters and of specific hydrogen bonds, and the orientation of transmembrane helical segments that couple remote regions of the protein. The primary proton donor/acceptor group D684, can interact with water molecules from the cytoplasmic bulk and/or other protein groups.

  7. Proton pumping accompanies calcification in foraminifera

    PubMed Central

    Toyofuku, Takashi; Matsuo, Miki Y.; de Nooijer, Lennart Jan; Nagai, Yukiko; Kawada, Sachiko; Fujita, Kazuhiko; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Nomaki, Hidetaka; Tsuchiya, Masashi; Sakaguchi, Hide; Kitazato, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Ongoing ocean acidification is widely reported to reduce the ability of calcifying marine organisms to produce their shells and skeletons. Whereas increased dissolution due to acidification is a largely inorganic process, strong organismal control over biomineralization influences calcification and hence complicates predicting the response of marine calcifyers. Here we show that calcification is driven by rapid transformation of bicarbonate into carbonate inside the cytoplasm, achieved by active outward proton pumping. Moreover, this proton flux is maintained over a wide range of pCO2 levels. We furthermore show that a V-type H+ ATPase is responsible for the proton flux and thereby calcification. External transformation of bicarbonate into CO2 due to the proton pumping implies that biomineralization does not rely on availability of carbonate ions, but total dissolved CO2 may not reduce calcification, thereby potentially maintaining the current global marine carbonate production. PMID:28128216

  8. Proton pumping accompanies calcification in foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyofuku, Takashi; Matsuo, Miki Y.; de Nooijer, Lennart Jan; Nagai, Yukiko; Kawada, Sachiko; Fujita, Kazuhiko; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Nomaki, Hidetaka; Tsuchiya, Masashi; Sakaguchi, Hide; Kitazato, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Ongoing ocean acidification is widely reported to reduce the ability of calcifying marine organisms to produce their shells and skeletons. Whereas increased dissolution due to acidification is a largely inorganic process, strong organismal control over biomineralization influences calcification and hence complicates predicting the response of marine calcifyers. Here we show that calcification is driven by rapid transformation of bicarbonate into carbonate inside the cytoplasm, achieved by active outward proton pumping. Moreover, this proton flux is maintained over a wide range of pCO2 levels. We furthermore show that a V-type H+ ATPase is responsible for the proton flux and thereby calcification. External transformation of bicarbonate into CO2 due to the proton pumping implies that biomineralization does not rely on availability of carbonate ions, but total dissolved CO2 may not reduce calcification, thereby potentially maintaining the current global marine carbonate production.

  9. Proton Pumps: Mechanism of Action and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, Janos K.; Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recent progress in understanding molecular structures and mechanisms of action of proton pumps has paved the way to their novel applications in biotechnology. Proton pumps, in particular bacteriorhodopsin and ATP synthases, are capable of continuous, renewable conversion of light to chemical, mechanical or electrical energy, which can be used in macro- or nano-scale devices. The capability of protein systems incorporated into liposomes to generate ATP, which can be further used to drive chemical reactions, and to act as molecular motors has been already demonstrated. Other possible applications of such biochemical devices include targeted drug delivery and biocatalytic re actors. All these devices might prove superior to their inorganic alternatives.

  10. (Mechanism of proton pumping by bacteriorhodopsin)

    SciTech Connect

    Ebrey, T.G.

    1987-01-01

    Two methods were used to test the hypothesis that proteolysis of the C-terminal tail of bacteriorhodopsin affects the quantum efficiency of proton pumping. An apparent good correlation was found between the amount of the slowly decaying forms of the M intermediate and the number of protons pumped. This also suggests that the photocycle may contain M (fast) and M (slow) in different branches. Using artificial analogues of bacteriorhodopsin, the ring portion of the retinal was shown not to be an important factor in determining the photochemical and proton pumping properties of the artificial pigments, but that modification of the chain is. At least four double bonds along the chain are necessary for efficient proton pumping. The purple membrane normally contains several different cations tightly bound and it was shown that removal of these cations changes the color of the membrane from purple to blue. We proposed that cations acted by modulation of the surface potential and hence the local proton concentration near the membrane. A new intermediate was found in the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle, R. This new intermediate can explain several quite perplexing observations that have been made about the photocycle. The conformation of the retinal of the third rhodopsin-like pigment in Halobacteria, sensory rhodopsin, is all-trans and that light isomerizes the chromophore to the 13-cis conformation. 26 refs.

  11. [Safety of the proton pump inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Oscanoa Espinoza, Teodoro Julio

    2011-01-01

    Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPI) are consumed by millions of people around the world, either by prescription or self-medication, some medications of this group are Over-the-counter (OTC) medicines. PPIs have been associated with hypergastrinemia, rebound acid hypersecretion, malabsorption, osteoporosis and infections. This is an updated review of clinical pharmacology aspects of IPBS, with emphasis on safety aspects.

  12. Proton pump of clathrin-coated vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, X.

    1985-01-01

    Clathrin-coated vesicles were prepared from bovine brain catalyze ATP-driven proton translocation and a /sup 32/Pi-ATP exchange reaction. N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) at 1 mM and dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) at 0.5 mM inhibit the pump completely, whereas neither vanadate, efrapeptin, NaN/sub 3/, nor mitochondrial ATPase inhibitor has an effect. The coated vesicle proton pump is characterized by ATP specificity. dATP, but no other nucleotide, can replace ATP as a substrate. The pump is electrogenic and the electrogenicity is neutralized by chloride or bromide serving as co-ions. ATP-driven proton translocation can be observed in the absence of chloride, provided that the membrane potential is collapsed by K/sup +/ moving out in the presence of valinomycin. Chloride transport can be observed independent of proton movements in the absence of ATP, provided that an inside positive membrane potential is generated by K/sup +/ influx in the presence of valinomycin. The proton-translocating ATPase of coated vesicles was solubilized with a nonionic detergent polyoxyethylene 9 lauryl ether, and purified about 700 fold to near homogeneity. During purification the enzymatic activity was lost. A purified brain phospholipid fraction restored the activity and was subsequently identified as phosphatidylserine.

  13. Water pathways in the bacteriorhodopsin proton pump.

    PubMed

    Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta; Fischer, Stefan; Smith, Jeremy C

    2011-01-01

    Internal water molecules play key roles in the functioning of the light-driven bacteriorhodopsin proton pump. Of particular importance is whether during the proton-pumping cycle the critical water molecule w402 can relocate from the extracellular to the cytoplasmic side of the retinal Schiff base. Here, classical mechanical and combined quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical reaction path computations are performed to investigate pathways and energetic factors influencing w402 relocation. Hydrogen bonding between w402 and the negatively charged Asp85 and Asp212 largely opposes repositioning of the water molecule. In contrast, favorable contributions from hydrogen bonding of w402 with the Schiff base and Thr89 and from the untwisting of the retinal polyene chain lower the energetic cost for water relocation. The delicate balance between the competing contributions underlies the need for highly accurate calculations and structural information.

  14. Hypomagnesemia associated with a proton pump inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Jun; Tsuji, Kunihiro; Doyama, Hisashi; Kim, Fae; Takeda, Yasuhito; Kito, Yosuke; Ito, Renma; Nakanishi, Hiroyoshi; Hayashi, Tomoyuki; Waseda, Yohei; Tsuji, Shigetsugu; Takemura, Kenichi; Yamada, Shinya; Okada, Toshihide; Kanaya, Honin

    2012-01-01

    Severe hypomagnesemia is a serious clinical condition. Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) induced hypomagnesemia has been recognized since 2006. In March 2011 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration advised that long-term use of PPI can induce hypomagnesemia. We report the first Japanese case of hypomagnesemia associated with chronic use of PPIs in a 64-year-old man hospitalized for nausea, bilateral ankle arthritis, and tremor of the extremities who had convulsions 3 days after admission. Blood analysis showed severe hypomagnesemia. He had been taking rabeprazole (10 mg/day) for 5 years. After stopping rabeprazole and correcting the electrolytes imbalances, his symptoms improved without recurrence.

  15. The Value of Branded Proton Pump Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Peura, David A.; Berardi, Rosemary R.; Gonzalez, Javier; Brunetti, Louis

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) continues to rise, placing an increasing burden on our health care system. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are the most effective and widely used therapy for GERD. Many PPIs are now available in generic and over-the-counter forms, and managed care formularies often choose these as their preferred drug for GERD treatment. However, newer-generation branded PPIs, as a result of differences in their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles, may offer clinical advantages over generic PPIs. This article discusses these differences and the advantages they offer and suggests possible ways to incorporate the newer PPIs into formularies. PMID:21931475

  16. Adverse Risks Associated With Proton Pump Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are among the most commonly utilized agents for treatment of symptomatic disorders of the upper gastrointestinal tract, accounting for a significant proportion of sales of both over-the-counter and prescription formulations. A systematic review of the literature was conducted via MEDLINE to evaluate the most rigorous studies linking the potential risk of PPI therapy with adverse events. Emerging data illustrate the potential risks associated with both short-and long-term PPI therapy, including Clostridium difficile–associated diarrhea, community-acquired pneumonia, osteoporotic fracture, vitamin B12 deficiency, and inhibition of antiplatelet therapy. Due to these associations, it is recommended that clinicians assess the continuing need for PPI therapy and use the lowest possible dose to achieve the desired therapeutic goals.

  17. Computer-aided design of a proton pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    New, Michael H.; Pohorille, Andrew; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The use of transmembrane proton gradients in energy transduction is an almost universal feature of life on earth. These proton gradients are established and maintained by specialized assemblies of proteins which actively pump protons across membranes. One broad class of proton pumps uses captured light energy to drive the proton pumping. Our goal is to elucidate the minimum structural requirements of a light-driven proton-pump. There are two basic components to a simple light-driven proton pump: a source of photo-generated protons and a "gate-keeper" which prevents these protons from reattaching themselves to their source. A wide variety of molecules in the membrane, even as simple as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, are capable of releasing protons when illuminated. Our work is therefore focused on the design of the "gate-keeper." Our initial model involves a pair of proton acceptors, coupled to each other by a transient water bridge, and supported in the membrane by a small bundle of peptide helices. Upon illumination, the proton source transfers its proton to the:- first acceptor of the gate-keeper. While the reverse reaction is highly probable, all that is needed to ensure irreversibility is a nonvanishing probability that the proton will be transferred to the second acceptor across a transient water bridge. Back transfer of the proton to the first acceptor, and thence to the proton source, is impeded by the free energy required to move the proton uphill towards the. proton source and by the disruption of the transient water bridge. As a prototypical water-bridged proton transfer system, we are studying the transfer of a proton across a water bridge from a formic acid to a formate anion. With a pK(sub alpha), of 3.7. formic acid is a good model for the acidic amino acids glutamate and aspartate which are good candidates for gate-keeper proton acceptors. Simulations of proton transfer reactions in a membrane are complicated by the quantum mechanical nature of

  18. Proton Pump Inhibitors and Risk of Rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Scott J; Howden, Colin W

    2017-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been associated with a variety of adverse events, although the level of evidence for many of these is weak at best. Recently, one national regulatory authority has mandated a change to the labeling of one PPI based on reports of possible associated rhabdomyolysis. Thus, in this review we summarize the available evidence linking PPI use with rhabdomyolysis. The level of evidence is insufficient to establish a causal relationship and is largely based on sporadic case reports. In general, patients with suspected PPI-associated rhabdomyolysis have not been re-challenged with a PPI after recovery. The mechanism whereby PPIs might have been associated with rhabdomyolysis is unclear but possibly related to interaction with concomitantly administered drugs such as HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins). For patients with rhabdomyolysis, a careful search must be made for possible etiological factors. In patients who recover from an episode of possible PPI-related rhabdomyolysis but do not have a genuine requirement for PPI treatment, the PPI should not be re-introduced. For those with a definite indication for ongoing PPI treatment, the PPI can be re-introduced but should preferably not be administered with a statin.

  19. Antiplatelet drug interactions with proton pump inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Stuart A; Obeng, Aniwaa Owusu; Hulot, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Non-aspirin antiplatelet agents (e.g., clopidogrel, prasugrel, ticagrelor) are commonly prescribed for the prevention of recurrent cardiovascular events among patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and/or those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). In addition, combination therapy with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) is often recommended to attenuate gastrointestinal bleeding risk, particularly during dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) with clopidogrel and aspirin. Importantly, a pharmacological interaction between clopidogrel and some PPIs has been proposed based on mutual CYP450-dependent metabolism, but available evidence is inconsistent. Areas covered This article provides an overview of the currently approved antiplatelet agents and PPIs, including their metabolic pathways. Additionally, the CYP450 isoenzyme at the center of the drug interaction, CYP2C19, is described in detail, and the available evidence on both the potential pharmacological interaction and influence on clinical outcomes are summarized and evaluated. Expert opinion Although concomitant DAPT and PPI use reduces clopidogrel active metabolite levels and ex vivo-measured platelet inhibition, the influence of the drug interaction on clinical outcomes has been conflicting and largely reported from non-randomized observational studies. Despite this inconsistency, a clinically important interaction cannot be definitively excluded, particularly among patient subgroups with higher overall cardiovascular risk and potentially among CYP2C19 loss-of-function allele carriers. PMID:24205916

  20. Proton pump inhibitors and risk of dementia

    PubMed Central

    Thongprayoon, Charat; Panjawatanan, Panadeekarn; Ungprasert, Patompong

    2016-01-01

    Background Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are one of the most commonly prescribed medications. Recent studies have raised a concern over increased risk of dementia among PPIs users but the results of those studies were inconsistent. We conducted this systematic review and meta-analysis to summarize all available data. Methods A literature search was performed in MEDLINE and EMBASE database from inception to April 2016. Observational studies that reported risk of dementia among PPIs users compared with non-users were included. Point estimates were extracted from individual studies and pooled risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using a random-effect, generic inverse variance method. Results Four studies were included in the analysis. Pooled RR of dementia among PPIs users compared with non-users was 1.08 (95% CI, 0.82–1.43). Sensitivity analysis including only cohort studies demonstrated a higher risk with pooled RR of 1.44 (95% CI, 1.36–1.52). Conclusions Our study demonstrated an increased risk of dementia among PPIs users. Whether this association is causal requires further investigations. PMID:27429966

  1. Recent safety concerns with proton pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Joan; Yuan, Yuhong Cathy; Leontiadis, Grigorios I; Howden, Colin W

    2012-02-01

    There have been recent concerns about the safety of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). We focus here on 3 specific concerns-the possible interaction between PPIs and clopidogrel, the postulated link between PPI use and fractures, and the possibility that long-term PPI use might lead to hypomagnesemia. There is evidence for an in vitro interaction between clopidogrel and at least some PPIs. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has warned against the use of certain PPIs by patients on clopidogrel. However, a randomized controlled trial that compared clopidogrel alone with the combination of clopidogrel and omeprazole found no increase in adverse cardiovascular outcomes and a reduction in the rate of adverse gastrointestinal outcomes attributable to omeprazole. PPI use may be a weak risk factor for certain fractures, but the quality of evidence is relatively poor and there is a strong possibility of confounding. The mechanism whereby PPI use might increase fracture risk is unknown. Currently, no additional measures concerning calcium supplementation or bone mineral density monitoring are recommended for patients on a PPI. The FDA has suggested monitoring serum magnesium levels in patients on PPI therapy. The mechanism and frequency of PPI-induced hypomagnesemia are unclear. PPI treatment should not be withheld from patients who genuinely require it, but the PPI should be taken in the lowest effective dose and only for as long as clinically indicated. The same is, of course, true for all medicines. The benefits of PPI therapy greatly outweigh the risks.

  2. Do proton pump inhibitors decrease calcium absorption?

    PubMed

    Hansen, Karen E; Jones, Andrea N; Lindstrom, Mary J; Davis, Lisa A; Ziegler, Toni E; Penniston, Kristina L; Alvig, Amy L; Shafer, Martin M

    2010-12-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) increase osteoporotic fracture risk presumably via hypochlorhydria and consequent reduced fractional calcium absorption (FCA). Existing studies provide conflicting information regarding the direct effects of PPIs on FCA. We evaluated the effect of PPI therapy on FCA. We recruited women at least 5 years past menopause who were not taking acid suppressants. Participants underwent three 24-hour inpatient FCA studies using the dual stable isotope method. Two FCA studies were performed 1 month apart to establish baseline calcium absorption. The third study occurred after taking omeprazole (40 mg/day) for 30 days. Each participant consumed the same foods during all FCA studies; study meals replicated subjects' dietary habits based on 7-day diet diaries. Twenty-one postmenopausal women ages 58 ± 7 years (mean ± SD) completed all study visits. Seventeen women were white, and 2 each were black and Hispanic. FCA (mean ± SD) was 20% ± 10% at visit 1, 18% ± 10% at visit 2, and 23% ± 10% following 30 ± 3 days of daily omeprazole (p = .07, ANOVA). Multiple linear regression revealed that age, gastric pH, serum omeprazole levels, adherence to omeprazole, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were unrelated to changes in FCA between study visits 2 and 3. The 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) level at visit 2 was the only variable (p = .049) associated with the change in FCA between visits 2 and 3. PPI-associated hypochlorhydria does not decrease FCA following 30 days of continuous use. Future studies should focus on identifying mechanisms by which PPIs increase the risk of osteoporotic fracture.

  3. Biological Proton Pumping in an Oscillating Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young C.; Furchtgott, Leon A.; Hummer, Gerhard

    2009-12-01

    Time-dependent external perturbations provide powerful probes of the function of molecular machines. Here we study biological proton pumping in an oscillating electric field. The protein cytochrome c oxidase is the main energy transducer in aerobic life, converting chemical energy into an electric potential by pumping protons across a membrane. With the help of master-equation descriptions that recover the key thermodynamic and kinetic properties of this biological “fuel cell,” we show that the proton pumping efficiency and the electronic currents in steady state depend significantly on the frequency and amplitude of the applied field, allowing us to distinguish between different microscopic mechanisms of the machine. A spectral analysis reveals dominant reaction steps consistent with an electron-gated pumping mechanism.

  4. Blockage of intracellular proton extrusion with proton extrusions with proton pump inhibitor induces apoptosis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Marie; Kim, Dong-Kyu; Park, Hee Jin; Cho, Sung Won; Cheong, Jae Youn; Lee, Kwang Jae

    2008-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors have been used for treatment of acid-related gastroesophageal diseases and they act as potent inhibitors of gastric acid pump, H(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Since cancer cells in vivo often exist in an ischemic microenvironment with a lower pH, maintenance of cellular pH is important for cell survival. In this study, we evaluated whether blocking of proton extrusion with proton pump inhibitors could inhibit the viability of gastric cancer cells. Treatment of human gastric cancer cells with proton pump inhibitors significantly attenuated cell viability in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The pro-apoptotic activity of proton pump inhibitors was mediated by release of cytochrome c and caspases activation. Gastric cancer cells showed the resistance to acidity of culture medium, which was related with a remarkable increase of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation in the acidic condition. This ERK1/2 phosphorylation was completely inhibited by pretreatment with proton pump inhibitors, suggesting that its inhibitory action on phosphorylation of ERK1/2 might contribute to the induction of apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. In conclusion, our results suggest novel therapeutic approaches for gastric cancer with proton pump inhibitors.

  5. Exploring the proton pump and exit pathway for pumped protons in cytochrome ba3 from Thermus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsin-Yang; Choi, Sylvia K; Vakkasoglu, Ahmet Selim; Chen, Ying; Hemp, James; Fee, James A; Gennis, Robert B

    2012-04-03

    The heme-copper oxygen reductases are redox-driven proton pumps. In the current work, the effects of mutations in a proposed exit pathway for pumped protons are examined in the ba(3)-type oxygen reductase from Thermus thermophilus, leading from the propionates of heme a(3) to the interface between subunits I and II. Recent studies have proposed important roles for His376 and Asp372, both of which are hydrogen-bonded to propionate-A of heme a(3), and for Glu126(II) (subunit II), which is hydrogen-bonded to His376. Based on the current results, His376, Glu126(II), and Asp372 are not essential for either oxidase activity or proton pumping. In addition, Tyr133, which is hydrogen-bonded to propionate-D of heme a(3), was also shown not to be essential for function. However, two mutations of the residues hydrogen-bonded to propionate-A, Asp372Ile and His376Asn, retain high electron transfer activity and normal spectral features but, in different preparations, either do not pump protons or exhibit substantially diminished proton pumping. It is concluded that either propionate-A of heme a(3) or possibly the cluster of groups centered about the conserved water molecule that hydrogen-bonds to both propionates-A and -D of heme a(3) is a good candidate to be the proton loading site.

  6. M2 Proton Channel: Toward a Model of a Primitive Proton Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chenyu; Pohorille, Andrew

    2015-06-01

    Transmembrane proton transfer was essential to early cellular systems in order to transduce energy for metabolic functions. The reliable, efficient and controlled generation of proton gradients became possible only with the emergence of active proton pumps. On the basis of features shared by most modern proton pumps we identify the essential mechanistic steps in active proton transport. Further, we discuss the mechanism of action of a small, transmembrane M2 proton channel from influenza A virus as a model for proton transport in protocells. The M2 channel is a 94-residue long, α-helical tetramer that is activated at low pH and exhibits high selectivity and directionality. A shorter construct, built of transmembrane fragments that are only 24 amino acids in length, exhibits very similar proton transport properties. Molecular dynamics simulations on the microsecond time-scale carried out for the M2 channel provided atomic level details on the activation of the channel in response to protonation of the histidine residue, His37. The pathway of proton conduction is mediated by His37, which accepts and donates protons at different interconverting conformation states when pH is lower than 6.5. The Val27 and Trp41 gates and the salt bridge between Asp44 and Arg45 further enhance the directionality of proton transport. It is argued that the architecture and the mechanism of action similar to that found in the M2 channel might have been the perfect starting point for evolution towards the earliest proton pumps, indicating that active proton transport could have readily emerged from simple, passive proton channels.

  7. M2 proton channel: toward a model of a primitive proton pump.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chenyu; Pohorille, Andrew

    2015-06-01

    Transmembrane proton transfer was essential to early cellular systems in order to transduce energy for metabolic functions. The reliable, efficient and controlled generation of proton gradients became possible only with the emergence of active proton pumps. On the basis of features shared by most modern proton pumps we identify the essential mechanistic steps in active proton transport. Further, we discuss the mechanism of action of a small, transmembrane M2 proton channel from influenza A virus as a model for proton transport in protocells. The M2 channel is a 94-residue long, α-helical tetramer that is activated at low pH and exhibits high selectivity and directionality. A shorter construct, built of transmembrane fragments that are only 24 amino acids in length, exhibits very similar proton transport properties. Molecular dynamics simulations on the microsecond time-scale carried out for the M2 channel provided atomic level details on the activation of the channel in response to protonation of the histidine residue, His37. The pathway of proton conduction is mediated by His37, which accepts and donates protons at different interconverting conformation states when pH is lower than 6.5. The Val27 and Trp41 gates and the salt bridge between Asp44 and Arg45 further enhance the directionality of proton transport. It is argued that the architecture and the mechanism of action similar to that found in the M2 channel might have been the perfect starting point for evolution towards the earliest proton pumps, indicating that active proton transport could have readily emerged from simple, passive proton channels.

  8. Proton pump inhibitor responsive esophageal eosinophilia, a distinct disease entity?

    PubMed

    Munday, William; Zhang, Xuchen

    2014-08-14

    Recent studies have suggested the existence of a patient population with esophageal eosinophilia that responds to proton pump inhibitor therapy. These patients are being referred to as having proton pump inhibitor responsive esophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE), which is currently classified as a distinct and separate disease entity from both gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). The therapeutic effect of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) on PPI-REE is thought to act directly at the level of the esophageal mucosa with an anti-inflammatory capacity, and completely independent of gastric acid suppression. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the mechanistic data of the proposed immune modulation/anti-inflammatory role of the PPI at the esophageal mucosa, and the existence of PPI-REE as a distinct disease entity from GERD and EoE.

  9. A natural light-driven inward proton pump

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Keiichi; Ito, Shota; Kato, Yoshitaka; Nomura, Yurika; Shibata, Mikihiro; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Tsunoda, Satoshi P.; Kandori, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Light-driven outward H+ pumps are widely distributed in nature, converting sunlight energy into proton motive force. Here we report the characterization of an oppositely directed H+ pump with a similar architecture to outward pumps. A deep-ocean marine bacterium, Parvularcula oceani, contains three rhodopsins, one of which functions as a light-driven inward H+ pump when expressed in Escherichia coli and mouse neural cells. Detailed mechanistic analyses of the purified proteins reveal that small differences in the interactions established at the active centre determine the direction of primary H+ transfer. Outward H+ pumps establish strong electrostatic interactions between the primary H+ donor and the extracellular acceptor. In the inward H+ pump these electrostatic interactions are weaker, inducing a more relaxed chromophore structure that leads to the long-distance transfer of H+ to the cytoplasmic side. These results demonstrate an elaborate molecular design to control the direction of H+ transfers in proteins. PMID:27853152

  10. Potential of light-harvesting proton pumps for bioenergy applications.

    PubMed

    Walter, Jessica M; Greenfield, Derek; Liphardt, Jan

    2010-06-01

    Concerns about the security and longevity of traditional energy sources have increased interest in alternative methods of energy production, particularly those which utilize abundantly available solar energy. Solar energy can be harvested either indirectly through the conversion of plant or algal byproducts into biofuels or directly using engineered microorganisms. Here we summarize the main features of light-harvesting proton pumps, which may provide a relatively simple way to boost the efficiency of energy-limited biological processes in fuel production. This family of proton pumps, which includes bacteriorhodopsin and proteorhodopsin, directly uses light energy to create a proton motive force (pmf) which can be used by other enzymes to facilitate active transport, regulate transmembrane proteins, or to generate ATP and NADH.

  11. Sodium and proton effects on inward proton transport through Na/K pumps.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Travis J; Zugarramurdi, Camila; Olivera, J Fernando; Gatto, Craig; Artigas, Pablo

    2014-06-17

    The Na/K pump hydrolyzes ATP to export three intracellular Na (Nai) as it imports two extracellular K (Ko) across animal plasma membranes. Within the protein, two ion-binding sites (sites I and II) can reciprocally bind Na or K, but a third site (site III) exclusively binds Na in a voltage-dependent fashion. In the absence of Nao and Ko, the pump passively imports protons, generating an inward current (IH). To elucidate the mechanisms of IH, we used voltage-clamp techniques to investigate the [H]o, [Na]o, and voltage dependence of IH in Na/K pumps from ventricular myocytes and in ouabain-resistant pumps expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Lowering pHo revealed that Ho both activates IH (in a voltage-dependent manner) and inhibits it (in a voltage-independent manner) by binding to different sites. Nao effects depend on pHo; at pHo where no Ho inhibition is observed, Nao inhibits IH at all concentrations, but when applied at pHo that inhibits pump-mediated current, low [Na]o activates IH and high [Na]o inhibits it. Our results demonstrate that IH is a property inherent to Na/K pumps, not linked to the oocyte expression environment, explains differences in the characteristics of IH previously reported in the literature, and supports a model in which 1), protons leak through site III; 2), binding of two Na or two protons to sites I and II inhibits proton transport; and 3), pumps with mixed Na/proton occupancy of sites I and II remain permeable to protons.

  12. Proton pumping in cytochrome c oxidase: energetic requirements and the role of two proton channels.

    PubMed

    Blomberg, Margareta R A; Siegbahn, Per E M

    2014-07-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase is a superfamily of membrane bound enzymes catalyzing the exergonic reduction of molecular oxygen to water, producing an electrochemical gradient across the membrane. The gradient is formed both by the electrogenic chemistry, taking electrons and protons from opposite sides of the membrane, and by proton pumping across the entire membrane. In the most efficient subfamily, the A-family of oxidases, one proton is pumped in each reduction step, which is surprising considering the fact that two of the reduction steps most likely are only weakly exergonic. Based on a combination of quantum chemical calculations and experimental information, it is here shown that from both a thermodynamic and a kinetic point of view, it should be possible to pump one proton per electron also with such an uneven distribution of the free energy release over the reduction steps, at least up to half the maximum gradient. A previously suggested pumping mechanism is developed further to suggest a reason for the use of two proton transfer channels in the A-family. Since the rate of proton transfer to the binuclear center through the D-channel is redox dependent, it might become too slow for the steps with low exergonicity. Therefore, a second channel, the K-channel, where the rate is redox-independent is needed. A redox-dependent leakage possibility is also suggested, which might be important for efficient energy conservation at a high gradient. A mechanism for the variation in proton pumping stoichiometry over the different subfamilies of cytochrome oxidase is also suggested. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 18th European Bioenergetic Conference.

  13. Hypersensitivity to proton pump inhibitors: lansoprazole-induced Kounis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vlahos, Nicholas P; Vavilis, George K; Giannelou, Ageliki G; Georgopoulou, Christina N; Kommata, Varvara J; Kougias, Constantinos T; Tsartsalis, Dimitrios N; Kounis, George N; Mazarakis, Andreas; Batsolaki, Maria; Gouvelou-Deligianni, Geogia V; Hahalis, George; Kounis, Nicholas G

    2009-05-29

    Proton pump inhibitors are commonly used in clinical practice for the treatment of peptic ulcer and gastroesophageal reflux and are well tolerated by the patients. Their use is rarely associated with hypersensitivity and anaphylactic reactions. According to the reports in the Uppsala Monitoring Center database the frequency of hypersensitivity reactions out of all reported adverse reactions for proton pump inhibitors and H2-histamine receptor antagonists was between 0.2% and 0.7%. A few cases of hypersensitivity to lansoprazole have been reported. We report a patient who developed Kounis syndrome after taking 30 mg of lansoprazole. This is the first report of Kounis syndrome associated with lansoprazole administration in the world literature.

  14. Spectrophotometric Determination of Certain Benzimidazole Proton Pump Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Syed, A. A.; Syeda, Ayesha

    2008-01-01

    Spectrophotometric method for the determination of certain proton pump inhibitors belonging to the benzimidazole class of compounds has been developed. The method is based on the reaction of omeprazole, lansoprazole, pantoprazole, rabeprazole and esomeprazole with iron (III) and subsequent reaction with ferricyanide under neutral condition which yields Prussian blue product with maximum absorption at 720–730 nm. The commonly encountered excipients and additives that often accompany pharmaceutical preparations did not interfere with the determination. The method was applied for the determination of omeprazole, lansoprazole, pantoprazole, rabeprazole and esomeprazole in pharmaceutical preparations and no difference was found statistically. Thus, the spectrophotometric method can be applied as inexpensive, rapid, easy, accurate and precise method for the routine analysis of the five proton pump inhibitors in pharmaceutical preparations. PMID:20046782

  15. Proton pump inhibitors: the good, the bad, and the unwanted.

    PubMed

    Chubineh, Saman; Birk, John

    2012-11-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are one of the most commonly prescribed classes of medications in the United States. By inhibiting gastric H/K adenosine triphosphatase via covalent binding to the cysteine residues of the proton pump, they provide the most potent acid suppression available. Long-term PPI use accounts for the majority of total PPI use. Absolute indications include peptic ulcer disease, chronic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs use, treatment of Helicobacter pylori, and erosive esophagitis. Although PPIs are generally considered safe, numerous adverse effects, particularly associated with long-term use have been reported. Many patients receiving chronic PPI therapy do not have clear indications for their use, prompting consideration for reduction or discontinuation of their use. This article reviews the indications for PPI use, the adverse effects/risks involved with their use, and conditions in which their use is controversial.

  16. [Mechanisms of proton pumping in bacteriorhodopsin]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Ebrey, T.G.

    1995-12-31

    This report consists of two parts namely a brief statement of the progress made during the past four years of the project and more extensive discussion of the current state of understanding of molecular mechanisms controlling the proton pump (bacteriorhodopsin). Detailed descriptions are provided of how the protein undergoes conformational changes on absorbing a photon. Studies are described where the protein structure has been manipulated and the biochemical properties are assessed.

  17. How May Proton Pump Inhibitors Impair Cardiovascular Health?

    PubMed

    Sukhovershin, Roman A; Cooke, John P

    2016-06-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are among the most widely used drugs worldwide. They are used to treat a number of gastroesophageal disorders and are usually prescribed as a long-term medication or even taken without a prescription. There are a number of clinical studies that associate PPI use with an increased cardiovascular risk. In this article, we review the clinical evidence for adverse cardiovascular effects of PPIs, and we discuss possible biological mechanisms by which PPIs can impair cardiovascular health.

  18. Retinal-Based Proton Pumping in the Near Infrared.

    PubMed

    Ganapathy, Srividya; Venselaar, Hanka; Chen, Que; de Groot, Huub J M; Hellingwerf, Klaas J; de Grip, Willem J

    2017-02-15

    Proteorhodopsin (PR) and Gloeobacter rhodopsin (GR) are retinal-based light-driven proton pumps that absorb visible light (maxima at 520-540 nm). Shifting the action spectra of these proton pumps beyond 700 nm would generate new prospects in optogenetics, membrane sensor technology, and complementation of oxygenic phototrophy. We therefore investigated the effect of red-shifting analogues of retinal, combined with red-shifting mutations, on the spectral properties and pump activity of the resulting pigments. We investigated a variety of analogues, including many novel ones. One of the novel analogues we tested, 3-methylamino-16-nor-1,2,3,4-didehydroretinal (MMAR), produced exciting results. This analogue red-shifted all of the rhodopsin variants tested, accompanied by a strong broadening of the absorbance band, tailing out to 850-950 nm. In particular, MMAR showed a strong synergistic effect with the PR-D212N,F234S double mutant, inducing an astonishing 200 nm red shift in the absorbance maximum. To our knowledge, this is by far the largest red shift reported for any retinal protein. Very importantly, all MMAR-containing holoproteins are the first rhodopsins retaining significant pump activity under near-infrared illumination (730 nm light-emitting diode). Such MMAR-based rhodopsin variants present very promising opportunities for further synthetic biology modification and for a variety of biotechnological and biophysical applications.

  19. Retinal-Based Proton Pumping in the Near Infrared

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Proteorhodopsin (PR) and Gloeobacter rhodopsin (GR) are retinal-based light-driven proton pumps that absorb visible light (maxima at 520–540 nm). Shifting the action spectra of these proton pumps beyond 700 nm would generate new prospects in optogenetics, membrane sensor technology, and complementation of oxygenic phototrophy. We therefore investigated the effect of red-shifting analogues of retinal, combined with red-shifting mutations, on the spectral properties and pump activity of the resulting pigments. We investigated a variety of analogues, including many novel ones. One of the novel analogues we tested, 3-methylamino-16-nor-1,2,3,4-didehydroretinal (MMAR), produced exciting results. This analogue red-shifted all of the rhodopsin variants tested, accompanied by a strong broadening of the absorbance band, tailing out to 850–950 nm. In particular, MMAR showed a strong synergistic effect with the PR-D212N,F234S double mutant, inducing an astonishing 200 nm red shift in the absorbance maximum. To our knowledge, this is by far the largest red shift reported for any retinal protein. Very importantly, all MMAR-containing holoproteins are the first rhodopsins retaining significant pump activity under near-infrared illumination (730 nm light-emitting diode). Such MMAR-based rhodopsin variants present very promising opportunities for further synthetic biology modification and for a variety of biotechnological and biophysical applications. PMID:28094925

  20. The proton pump of heme-copper oxidases.

    PubMed

    Papa, S; Capitanio, N; Glaser, P; Villani, G

    1994-05-01

    Proton pumping heme-copper oxidases represent the terminal, energy-transfer enzymes of respiratory chains in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The CuB-heme a3 (or heme o) binuclear center, associated with the largest subunit I of cytochrome c and quinol oxidases, is directly involved in the coupling between dioxygen reduction and proton pumping. The role of the other subunits is less clear. The following aspects will be covered in this paper: i) the efficiency of coupling in the mitochondrial aa3 cytochrome c oxidase. In particular, the effect of respiratory rate and protonmotive force on the H+/e- stoichiometry and the role of subunit IV; ii) mutational analysis of the aa3 quinol oxidase of Bacillus subtilis addressed to the role of subunit III, subunit IV and specific residues in subunit I; iii) possible models of the protonmotive catalytic cycle at the binuclear center. The observations available suggest that H+/e- coupling is based on the combination of protonmotive redox catalysis at the binuclear center and co-operative proton transfer in the protein.

  1. A nanomechanical device based on light-driven proton pumps.

    PubMed

    Ren, Quan; Zhao, Ya-Pu; Han, Li; Zhao, Hui-Bin

    2006-03-28

    In this paper, a hybrid device based on a microcantilever interfaced with bacteriorhodopsin (bR) is constructed. The microcantilever, on which the highly oriented bR film is self-assembled, undergoes controllable and reversible bending when the light-driven proton pump protein, bR, on the microcantilever surface is activated by visible light. Several control experiments are carried out to preclude the influence of heat and photothermal effects. It is shown that the nanomechanical motion is induced by the resulting gradient of protons, which are transported from the KCl solution on the cytoplasmic side of the bR film towards the extracellular side of the bR film. Along with a simple physical interpretation, the microfabricated cantilever interfaced with the organized molecular film of bR can simulate the natural machinery in converting solar energy to mechanical energy.

  2. Exchangers man the pumps: Functional interplay between proton pumps and proton-coupled Ca(2+) exchangers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tonoplast-localised proton-coupled Ca(2+) transporters encoded by cation/H(+) exchanger (CAX) genes play a critical role in sequestering Ca(2+) into the vacuole. These transporters may function in coordination with Ca(2+) release channels, to shape stimulus-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) elevations. Recen...

  3. Proton Pumping of the Yeast Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-16

    function of the yeast plasma membrane H+- ATPase. This ATPase is a P-type cation transporter composed of a single protein of 100,000 Da molecular...August 16, 1993 ] Final 25 Sep 89 - 14 May 94 / 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S UDN UBR Proton Pumping of the Yeast Plasma Membrane HW-AT~ase G. AUTOR(S)DAALO3...Maximum 200 words) This proposal was to study the structure and function of the yeast plasma membrane H+-ATPase. We I proposed to study I )the

  4. The Proton Pump Inhibitor Non-Responder: A Clinical Conundrum

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Zilla H; Henderson, Emily E; Maradey-Romerao, Carla; George, Nina; Fass, Ronnie; Lacy, Brian E

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a highly prevalent chronic condition where in stomach contents reflux into the esophagus causing symptoms, esophageal injury, and subsequent complications. Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) remain the mainstay of therapy for acid suppression. Despite their efficacy, significant proportions of GERD patients are either partial or non-responders to PPI therapy. Patients should be assessed for mechanisms that can lead to PPI failure and may require further evaluation to investigate for alternative causes. This monograph will outline a diagnostic approach to the PPI non-responder, review mechanisms associated with PPI failure, and discuss therapeutic options for those who fail to respond to PPI therapy. PMID:26270485

  5. Proton pump inhibitor-induced hypomagnesemia: A new challenge

    PubMed Central

    Florentin, Matilda; Elisaf, Moses S

    2012-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are commonly used in clinical practice for the prevention and treatment of peptic ulcer, gastritis, esophagitis and gastroesophageal reflux. Hypomagnesemia has recently been recognized as a side effect of PPIs. Low magnesium levels may cause symptoms from several systems, some of which being potentially serious, such as tetany, seizures and arrhythmias. It seems that PPIs affect the gastrointestinal absorption of magnesium. Clinicians should be vigilant in order to timely consider and prevent or reverse hypomagnesemia in patients who take PPIs, especially if they are prone to this electrolyte disorder. PMID:24175253

  6. Proton Pump Inhibitor-Induced Remission of Lymphocytic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Naemat; Miick, Ronald; Govil, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    Lymphocytic esophagitis is a chronic condition that has been described in the literature; however, there is little information describing its characteristics and treatment. We present a case of lymphocytic esophagitis that was identified following food impaction. Repeat esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) with biopsy showed a marked decrease in lymphocytic infiltration after a 6-week course of twice-daily high-dose proton pump inhibitor (PPI). After initiation of the high-dose PPI regimen, the patient had no further episodes of dysphagia or food impaction. We propose that treating lymphocytic esophagitis with twice-daily PPI can improve symptoms and show histologic evidence of improvement. PMID:28119946

  7. Occupational Airborne Contact Dermatitis From Proton Pump Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    DeKoven, Joel G; Yu, Ashley M

    2015-01-01

    Few published reports have described occupational contact dermatitis from proton pump inhibitor (PPI) exposure in the literature. We present an additional case of a 58-year-old male pharmaceutical worker with an occupational airborne allergic contact dermatitis to PPIs confirmed by patch testing. This is a novel report of workplace exposure to dexlansoprazole and esomeprazole PPIs with resultant clinical contact allergy and relevant positive patch test results to these 2 agents. A literature review of all previously reported cases of occupational contact dermatitis to PPI is summarized. The case also emphasizes the importance of even minute exposures when considering workplace accommodation.

  8. Proton Pump Inhibitors Display Antitumor Effects in Barrett's Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chueca, Eduardo; Apostolova, Nadezda; Esplugues, Juan V.; García-González, María A.; Lanas, Ángel; Piazuelo, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence has reported that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) can exert antineoplastic effects through the disruption of pH homeostasis by inhibiting vacuolar ATPase (H+-VATPase), a proton pump overexpressed in several tumor cells, but this aspect has not been deeply investigated in EAC yet. In the present study, the expression of H+-VATPase was assessed through the metaplasia-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence in Barrett's esophagus (BE) and the antineoplastic effects of PPIs and cellular mechanisms involved were evaluated in vitro. H+-VATPase expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry in paraffined-embedded samples or by immunofluorescence in cultured BE and EAC cell lines. Cells were treated with different concentrations of PPIs and parameters of citotoxicity, oxidative stress, and autophagy were evaluated. H+-VATPase expression was found in all biopsies and cell lines evaluated, showing differences in the location of the pump between the cell lines. Esomeprazole inhibited proliferation and cell invasion and induced apoptosis of EAC cells. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) seemed to be involved in the cytotoxic effects observed since the addition of N-acetylcysteine significantly reduced esomeprazole-induced apoptosis in EAC cells. Esomeprazole also reduced intracellular pH of tumor cells, whereas only disturbed the mitochondrial membrane potential in OE33 cells. Esomeprazole induced autophagy in both EAC cells, but also triggered a blockade in autophagic flux in the metastatic cell line. These data provide in vitro evidence supporting the potential use of PPIs as novel antineoplastic drugs for EAC and also shed some light on the mechanisms that trigger PPIs cytotoxic effects, which differ upon the cell line evaluated. PMID:27932981

  9. A new group of eubacterial light-driven retinal-binding proton pumps with an unusual cytoplasmic proton donor.

    PubMed

    Harris, Andrew; Ljumovic, Milena; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta; Shibata, Yohei; Ito, Shota; Inoue, Keiichi; Kandori, Hideki; Brown, Leonid S

    2015-12-01

    One of the main functions of microbial rhodopsins is outward-directed light-driven proton transport across the plasma membrane, which can provide sources of energy alternative to respiration and chlorophyll photosynthesis. Proton-pumping rhodopsins are found in Archaea (Halobacteria), multiple groups of Bacteria, numerous fungi, and some microscopic algae. An overwhelming majority of these proton pumps share the common transport mechanism, in which a proton from the retinal Schiff base is first transferred to the primary proton acceptor (normally an Asp) on the extracellular side of retinal. Next, reprotonation of the Schiff base from the cytoplasmic side is mediated by a carboxylic proton donor (Asp or Glu), which is located on helix C and is usually hydrogen-bonded to Thr or Ser on helix B. The only notable exception from this trend was recently found in Exiguobacterium, where the carboxylic proton donor is replaced by Lys. Here we describe a new group of efficient proteobacterial retinal-binding light-driven proton pumps which lack the carboxylic proton donor on helix C (most often replaced by Gly) but possess a unique His residue on helix B. We characterize the group spectroscopically and propose that this histidine forms a proton-donating complex compensating for the loss of the carboxylic proton donor.

  10. Mammalian complex I pumps 4 protons per 2 electrons at high and physiological proton motive force in living cells.

    PubMed

    Ripple, Maureen O; Kim, Namjoon; Springett, Roger

    2013-02-22

    Mitochondrial complex I couples electron transfer between matrix NADH and inner-membrane ubiquinone to the pumping of protons against a proton motive force. The accepted proton pumping stoichiometry was 4 protons per 2 electrons transferred (4H(+)/2e(-)) but it has been suggested that stoichiometry may be 3H(+)/2e(-) based on the identification of only 3 proton pumping units in the crystal structure and a revision of the previous experimental data. Measurement of proton pumping stoichiometry is challenging because, even in isolated mitochondria, it is difficult to measure the proton motive force while simultaneously measuring the redox potentials of the NADH/NAD(+) and ubiquinol/ubiquinone pools. Here we employ a new method to quantify the proton motive force in living cells from the redox poise of the bc(1) complex measured using multiwavelength cell spectroscopy and show that the correct stoichiometry for complex I is 4H(+)/2e(-) in mouse and human cells at high and physiological proton motive force.

  11. 25 Years of Proton Pump Inhibitors: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Strand, Daniel S; Kim, Daejin; Peura, David A

    2017-01-15

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) were clinically introduced more than 25 years ago and have since proven to be invaluable, safe, and effective agents for the management of a variety of acid-related disorders. Although all members in this class act in a similar fashion, inhibiting active parietal cell acid secretion, there are slight differences among PPIs relating to their pharmacokinetic properties, metabolism, and Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved clinical indications. Nevertheless, each is effective in managing gastroesophageal reflux disease and uncomplicated or complicated peptic ulcer disease. Despite their overall efficacy, PPIs do have some limitations related to their short plasma half-lives and requirement for meal-associated dosing, which can lead to breakthrough symptoms in some individuals, especially at night. Longer-acting PPIs and technology to prolong conventional PPI activity have been developed to specifically address these limitations and may improve clinical outcomes.

  12. A bacterial proteorhodopsin proton pump in marine eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Slamovits, Claudio H; Okamoto, Noriko; Burri, Lena; James, Erick R; Keeling, Patrick J

    2011-02-08

    Proteorhodopsins are light-driven proton pumps involved in widespread phototrophy. Discovered in marine proteobacteria just 10 years ago, proteorhodopsins are now known to have been spread by lateral gene transfer across diverse prokaryotes, but are curiously absent from eukaryotes. In this study, we show that proteorhodopsins have been acquired by horizontal gene transfer from bacteria at least twice independently in dinoflagellate protists. We find that in the marine predator Oxyrrhis marina, proteorhodopsin is indeed the most abundantly expressed nuclear gene and its product localizes to discrete cytoplasmic structures suggestive of the endomembrane system. To date, photosystems I and II have been the only known mechanism for transducing solar energy in eukaryotes; however, it now appears that some abundant zooplankton use this alternative pathway to harness light to power biological functions.

  13. Proton pump inhibitor-induced hypomagnesaemia and hypocalcaemia: case review

    PubMed Central

    Sivakumar, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-induced hypomagnesaemia is a rare but serious adverse effect of a widely prescribed medication. It has become an increasingly recognised complication since 2006, with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issuing a warning for this risk with regards to long-term PPI use. We present the case of PPI-associated hypomagnesaemia and hypocalcaemia. A 91 year old male presented with tetany from severe hypomagnesaemia and hypocalcaemia. This condition occurred in the context of 18 months of PPI use, and resolved following cessation of PPI therapy and the replenishment of magnesium and calcium stores. Monitoring of magnesium, calcium and potassium levels is crucial in patients prescribed PPIs long-term; especially the elderly patient. PMID:28078056

  14. 25 Years of Proton Pump Inhibitors: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Strand, Daniel S.; Kim, Daejin; Peura, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) were clinically introduced more than 25 years ago and have since proven to be invaluable, safe, and effective agents for the management of a variety of acid-related disorders. Although all members in this class act in a similar fashion, inhibiting active parietal cell acid secretion, there are slight differences among PPIs relating to their pharmacokinetic properties, metabolism, and Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved clinical indications. Nevertheless, each is effective in managing gastroesophageal reflux disease and uncomplicated or complicated peptic ulcer disease. Despite their overall efficacy, PPIs do have some limitations related to their short plasma half-lives and requirement for meal-associated dosing, which can lead to breakthrough symptoms in some individuals, especially at night. Longer-acting PPIs and technology to prolong conventional PPI activity have been developed to specifically address these limitations and may improve clinical outcomes. PMID:27840364

  15. Do proton pump inhibitors protect against cancer progression in GERD?

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Tomoharu; Shah, Furhawn A; Harmon, John W; Marti, Guy P; Matsui, Daisuke; Okamoto, Koichi; Makino, Isamu; Hayashi, Hironori; Oyama, Katsunobu; Nakagawara, Hisatoshi; Tajima, Hidehiro; Fujita, Hideto; Takamura, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Manabu; Ninomiya, Itasu; Kitagawa, Hirohisa; Fushida, Sachio; Fujimura, Takashi; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2013-08-01

    Gastro-duodenal content reflux from gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) induces the inflammation-metaplasia-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are potent blockers of gastric acid secretion, which are widely used for treating GERD and peptic ulcer-associated acid-secreting diseases. The effect of PPI therapy on esophageal carcinogenesis remains unclear. While some studies suggest PPIs result in a significant reduction in the risk of developing dysplasia and adenocarcinoma in patients with Barrett's esophagus, others suggest that PPIs have no effect. Recent studies have revealed that PPIs can exert anti-inflammatory effects such as anti-oxidant properties and immunomodulatory effects through their interactions with neutrophils, monocytes, endothelial and epithelial cells. In addition, PPIs have the ability to prevent adhesion molecule binding in malignant cells and suppress metastasis. This article reviews the role of PPIs in esophageal carcinogenesis and their use as antitumor agents.

  16. Long-term safety concerns with proton pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ali, Tauseef; Roberts, David Neil; Tierney, William M

    2009-10-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are among the most widely prescribed medications worldwide. Their use has resulted in dramatic improvements in treatment of peptic ulcer disease and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Despite an acceptable safety profile, mounting data demonstrate concerns about the long-term use of PPIs. To provide a comprehensive review regarding the concerns of long-term PPI use, a literature search was performed to identify pertinent original and review articles. Despite study shortcomings, the collective body of information overwhelmingly suggests an increased risk of infectious complications and nutritional deficiencies. Data regarding any increased risk in gastric or colon malignancy are less convincing. PPIs have revolutionized the management and complications of acid-related disorders with a high margin of safety; however, with the data available, efforts to reduce the dosing of or discontinue the use of PPIs must be reassessed frequently.

  17. [All proton pump inhibitors are equally efficacious in standard dosages].

    PubMed

    Hellström, Per M; Vitols, Sigurd

    2003-06-19

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are today used at different recommended doses for treatment of acid-related gastro-esophageal, gastric and gastro-duodenal diseases. We reviewed the literature regarding inhibition of acid secretion and healing rates for the different PPIs. Acid secretion in vitro and in vivo as well as healing and relapse rates were similar on a milligram basis for omeprazole, lansoprazole, rabeprazole, and pantoprazole. Rabeprazole had a somewhat faster onset of inhibition of acid secretion; the clinical value of this however seems limited. Esomeprazole had a somewhat stronger inhibitory effect on acid secretion in vivo compared with other PPIs. Studies demonstrating an important clinical advantage of esomeprazole compared to other PPIs are however lacking.

  18. Proton pump inhibition--the ultimate control of acid secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Zdon, M.J.; Ballantyne, G.H.; Schafer, D.E.; Tyshkov, M.; Cambria, R.P.; Modlin, I.M.

    1986-04-01

    The cellular mechanisms of acid secretion by the parietal cell (PC) include stimulation of membrane receptors, increases in cytosolic cyclic AMP levels, and activation of protein kinase systems. These events culminate in stimulation of a membrane-based proton pump. This consists of a non-electrogenic H+-K+-ATPase which transports H+ ions into the secretory canaliculus of the PC in exchange for the cation K+. It has been proposed that blockade of this proton pump would result in inhibition of acid secretion by all classes of acid secretagogues. Thus, the effects of membrane receptor agonists as well as any agents which augment cellular cAMP levels should be inhibited. Substituted benzimidazoles are weak bases which prevent acid secretion by blocking the H+-K+-ATPase system. In order to test the above hypothesis, we investigated the effects of the substituted benzimidazole H168/68 and cimetidine (C) on histamine (H) and 8B-stimulated acid secretion. The rabbit isolated gastric gland (IGG) model was used and acid secretion assessed by the accumulation of /sup 14/C-labeled weak base aminopyrine (AP) within the IGG in response to secretagogue stimulation. H168/68 and C both inhibited H (5 X 10(-5) M)-stimulated (/sup 14/C)AP accumulation in a concentration-dependent manner (P less than 0.05). H168/68 inhibited both H- and 8B-stimulated (/sup 14/C)AP accumulation (P less than 0.05), while C inhibited only H-stimulated (/sup 14/C)AP accumulation (P less than 0.05). H168/68 suppressed (/sup 14/C)AP below even unstimulated levels of (/sup 14/C)AP accumulation. These results support the hypothesis that H168/68 inhibits the PC distal to cAMP stimulation.

  19. Aspartic acid substitutions affect proton translocation by bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Mogi, T; Stern, L J; Marti, T; Chao, B H; Khorana, H G

    1988-01-01

    We have substituted each of the aspartic acid residues in bacteriorhodopsin to determine their possible role in proton translocation by this protein. The aspartic acid residues were replaced by asparagines; in addition, Asp-85, -96, -115, and -112 were changed to glutamic acid and Asp-212 was also replaced by alanine. The mutant bacteriorhodopsin genes were expressed in Escherichia coli and the proteins were purified. The mutant proteins all regenerated bacteriorhodopsin-like chromophores when treated with a detergent-phospholipid mixture and retinal. However, the rates of regeneration of the chromophores and their lambda max varied widely. No support was obtained for the external point charge model for the opsin shift. The Asp-85----Asn mutant showed not detectable proton pumping, the Asp-96----Asn and Asp-212----Glu mutants showed less than 10% and the Asp-115----Glu mutant showed approximately equal to 30% of the normal proton pumping. The implications of these findings for possible mechanisms of proton translocation by bacteriorhodopsin are discussed. PMID:3288985

  20. Converting a light-driven proton pump into a light-gated proton channel.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Keiichi; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Shimono, Kazumi; Suzuki, Yuto; Miyauchi, Seiji; Hayashi, Shigehiko; Kandori, Hideki; Sudo, Yuki

    2015-03-11

    There are two types of membrane-embedded ion transport machineries in nature. The ion pumps generate electrochemical potential by energy-coupled active ion transportation, while the ion channels produce action potential by stimulus-dependent passive ion transportation. About 80% of the amino acid residues of the light-driven proton pump archaerhodopsin-3 (AR3) and the light-gated cation channel channelrhodopsin (ChR) differ although they share the close similarity in architecture. Therefore, the question arises: How can these proteins function differently? The absorption maxima of ion pumps are red-shifted about 30-100 nm compared with ChRs, implying a structural difference in the retinal binding cavity. To modify the cavity, a blue-shifted AR3 named AR3-T was produced by replacing three residues located around the retinal (i.e., M128A, G132V, and A225T). AR3-T showed an inward H(+) flux across the membrane, raising the possibility that it works as an inward H(+) pump or an H(+) channel. Electrophysiological experiments showed that the reverse membrane potential was nearly zero, indicating light-gated ion channeling activity of AR3-T. Spectroscopic characterization of AR3-T revealed similar photochemical properties to some of ChRs, including an all-trans retinal configuration, a strong hydrogen bond between the protonated retinal Schiff base and its counterion, and a slow photocycle. From these results, we concluded that the functional determinant in the H(+) transporters is localized at the center of the membrane-spanning domain, but not in the cytoplasmic and extracellular domains.

  1. Hypomagnesemia Induced by Long-Term Treatment with Proton-Pump Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Janett, Simone; Camozzi, Pietro; Peeters, Gabriëlla G. A. M.; Lava, Sebastiano A. G.; Simonetti, Giacomo D.; Goeggel Simonetti, Barbara; Bianchetti, Mario G.; Milani, Gregorio P.

    2015-01-01

    In 2006, hypomagnesemia was first described as a complication of proton-pump inhibitors. To address this issue, we systematically reviewed the literature. Hypomagnesemia, mostly associated with hypocalcemic hypoparathyroidism and hypokalemia, was reported in 64 individuals on long-term proton-pump inhibitors. Hypomagnesemia recurred following replacement of one proton-pump inhibitor with another but not with a histamine type-2 receptor antagonist. The association between proton-pump inhibitors and magnesium metabolism was addressed in 14 case-control, cross-sectional studies. An association was found in 11 of them: 6 reports found that the use of proton-pump inhibitors is associated per se with a tendency towards hypomagnesemia, 2 found that this tendency is more pronounced in patients concurrently treated with diuretics, carboplatin, or cisplatin, and 2 found a relevant tendency to hypomagnesemia in patients with poor renal function. Finally, findings likely reflecting decreased intestinal magnesium uptake were observed on treatment with proton-pump inhibitors. Three studies did not disclose any relationship between magnesium metabolism and treatment with histamine type-2 receptor antagonists. In conclusion, proton-pump inhibitors may cause hypomagnesemia. In these cases, switching to a histamine type-2 receptor antagonist is advised. PMID:26064102

  2. Hypomagnesemia Induced by Long-Term Treatment with Proton-Pump Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Janett, Simone; Camozzi, Pietro; Peeters, Gabriëlla G A M; Lava, Sebastiano A G; Simonetti, Giacomo D; Goeggel Simonetti, Barbara; Bianchetti, Mario G; Milani, Gregorio P

    2015-01-01

    In 2006, hypomagnesemia was first described as a complication of proton-pump inhibitors. To address this issue, we systematically reviewed the literature. Hypomagnesemia, mostly associated with hypocalcemic hypoparathyroidism and hypokalemia, was reported in 64 individuals on long-term proton-pump inhibitors. Hypomagnesemia recurred following replacement of one proton-pump inhibitor with another but not with a histamine type-2 receptor antagonist. The association between proton-pump inhibitors and magnesium metabolism was addressed in 14 case-control, cross-sectional studies. An association was found in 11 of them: 6 reports found that the use of proton-pump inhibitors is associated per se with a tendency towards hypomagnesemia, 2 found that this tendency is more pronounced in patients concurrently treated with diuretics, carboplatin, or cisplatin, and 2 found a relevant tendency to hypomagnesemia in patients with poor renal function. Finally, findings likely reflecting decreased intestinal magnesium uptake were observed on treatment with proton-pump inhibitors. Three studies did not disclose any relationship between magnesium metabolism and treatment with histamine type-2 receptor antagonists. In conclusion, proton-pump inhibitors may cause hypomagnesemia. In these cases, switching to a histamine type-2 receptor antagonist is advised.

  3. V-type ATPase proton pump expression during enamel formation.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Juni; Wen, Xin; Simanian, Emil J; Paine, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    Several diseases such as proximal and distal renal tubular acidosis and osteoporosis are related to intracellular pH dysregulation resulting from mutations in genes coding for ion channels, including proteins comprising the proton-pumping V-type ATPase. V-type ATPase is a multi-subunit protein complex expressed in enamel forming cells. V-type ATPase plays a key role in enamel development, specifically lysosomal acidification, yet our understanding of the relationship between the endocytotic activities and dental health and disease is limited. The objective of this study is to better understand the ameloblast-associated pH regulatory networks essential for amelogenesis. Quantitative RT-PCR was performed on tissues from secretory-stage and maturation-stage enamel organs to determine which of the V-type ATPase subunits are most highly upregulated during maturation-stage amelogenesis: a time when ameloblast endocytotic activity is highest. Western blot analyses, using specific antibodies to four of the V-type ATPase subunits (Atp6v0d2, Atp6v1b2, Atp6v1c1 and Atp6v1e1), were then applied to validate much of the qPCR data. Immunohistochemistry using these same four antibodies was also performed to identify the spatiotemporal expression profiles of individual V-type ATPase subunits. Our data show that cytoplasmic V-type ATPase is significantly upregulated in enamel organ cells during maturation-stage when compared to secretory-stage. These data likely relate to the higher endocytotic activities, and the greater need for lysosomal acidification, during maturation-stage amelogenesis. It is also apparent from our immunolocalization data, using antibodies against two of the V-type ATPase subunits (Atp6v1c1 and Atp6v1e1), that significant expression is seen at the apical membrane of maturation-stage ameloblasts. Others have also identified this V-type ATPase expression profile at the apical membrane of maturation ameloblasts. Collectively, these data better define the

  4. A case series of proton pump inhibitor-induced hypomagnesemia.

    PubMed

    Hoorn, Ewout J; van der Hoek, Joost; de Man, Rob A; Kuipers, Ernst J; Bolwerk, Clemens; Zietse, Robert

    2010-07-01

    Proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-induced hypomagnesemia has been recognized since 2006. Our aim was to further characterize the clinical consequences and possible mechanisms of this electrolyte disorder using 4 cases. Two men (aged 63 and 81 years) and 2 women (aged 73 and 62 years) had been using a PPI (esomeprazole, pantoprazole, omeprazole, and rabeprazole, 20-40 mg) for 1-13 years. They developed severe hypomagnesemia (magnesium, 0.30 +/- 0.28 mEq/L; reference, 1.40-2.10 mEq/L) with hypocalcemia (calcium, 6.4 +/- 1.8 mg/dL), relative hypoparathyroidism (parathyroid hormone, 43 +/- 6 pg/mL), and extremely low urinary calcium and magnesium excretion. One patient was admitted with postanoxic encephalopathy after a collapse likely caused by arrhythmia. The others had electrocardiogram abnormalities (prolonged QT interval, ST depression, and U waves). Concomitant hypokalemia (potassium, 2.8 +/- 0.1 mEq/L) was considered the trigger for these arrhythmias. Hypomagnesemia-induced kaliuresis (potassium excretion, 65 +/- 24 mEq/L) was identified as the cause of hypokalemia. This series of PPI-induced hypomagnesemia shows that this is a generic effect. It also indicates that hypomagnesemia may occur within 1 year of PPI therapy initiation and can have serious clinical consequences, likely triggered by the associated hypokalemia. A high index of suspicion is required in PPI users for unexplained hypomagnesemia, hypocalcemia, hypokalemia, or associated symptoms.

  5. Hypomagnesemia Among Outpatient Long-Term Proton Pump Inhibitor Users.

    PubMed

    Biyik, Murat; Solak, Yalcin; Ucar, Ramazan; Cifci, Sami; Tekis, Dilek; Polat, İlker; Göktepe, Mevlüt Hakan; Sakiz, Davut; Ataseven, Huseyin; Demir, Ali

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are extensively prescribed drugs usually used for a long period. Recent reports linked PPI use with development of hypomagnesemia. However, there is still uncertainty regarding risk of hypomagnesemia in outpatients who were on long-term PPI use. Thus, we aimed to evaluate frequency of hypomagnesemia among a well-defined outpatient patient cohort with no other possible risk factors affecting serum magnesium levels. This was a case-control study carried out at the outpatient gastroenterology clinic of a University hospital. Patients who were on PPI therapy for at least 6 months without diuretic use and chronic kidney disease were included. Patients who were subjected to the same inclusion and exclusion criteria and not using PPI were included as control subjects. One hundred fifty-four patients and 84 control subjects were included. The mean duration of PPI use was 27.5 ± 2.5 months. Mean serum magnesium levels of PPI users and nonusers were 2.17 ± 0.20 mg/dL and 2.19 ± 0.15 mg/dL, respectively. None of the patient had a serum magnesium level below laboratory lower range of 1.7 mg/dL. Our results showed that for typical gastroenterology outpatient clinic patients with no other risk factors affecting serum magnesium levels, long-term PPI use did not affect serum magnesium levels.

  6. Multiscale simulations reveal key features of the proton-pumping mechanism in cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ruibin; Swanson, Jessica M J; Peng, Yuxing; Wikström, Mårten; Voth, Gregory A

    2016-07-05

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) reduces oxygen to water and uses the released free energy to pump protons across the membrane. We have used multiscale reactive molecular dynamics simulations to explicitly characterize (with free-energy profiles and calculated rates) the internal proton transport events that enable proton pumping during first steps of oxidation of the fully reduced enzyme. Our results show that proton transport from amino acid residue E286 to both the pump loading site (PLS) and to the binuclear center (BNC) are thermodynamically driven by electron transfer from heme a to the BNC, but that the former (i.e., pumping) is kinetically favored whereas the latter (i.e., transfer of the chemical proton) is rate-limiting. The calculated rates agree with experimental measurements. The backflow of the pumped proton from the PLS to E286 and from E286 to the inside of the membrane is prevented by large free-energy barriers for the backflow reactions. Proton transport from E286 to the PLS through the hydrophobic cavity and from D132 to E286 through the D-channel are found to be strongly coupled to dynamical hydration changes in the corresponding pathways and, importantly, vice versa.

  7. Multiscale simulations reveal key features of the proton-pumping mechanism in cytochrome c oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Ruibin; Swanson, Jessica M. J.; Peng, Yuxing; Wikström, Mårten; Voth, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) reduces oxygen to water and uses the released free energy to pump protons across the membrane. We have used multiscale reactive molecular dynamics simulations to explicitly characterize (with free-energy profiles and calculated rates) the internal proton transport events that enable proton pumping during first steps of oxidation of the fully reduced enzyme. Our results show that proton transport from amino acid residue E286 to both the pump loading site (PLS) and to the binuclear center (BNC) are thermodynamically driven by electron transfer from heme a to the BNC, but that the former (i.e., pumping) is kinetically favored whereas the latter (i.e., transfer of the chemical proton) is rate-limiting. The calculated rates agree with experimental measurements. The backflow of the pumped proton from the PLS to E286 and from E286 to the inside of the membrane is prevented by large free-energy barriers for the backflow reactions. Proton transport from E286 to the PLS through the hydrophobic cavity and from D132 to E286 through the D-channel are found to be strongly coupled to dynamical hydration changes in the corresponding pathways and, importantly, vice versa. PMID:27339133

  8. Pathways of proton transfer in the light-driven pump bacteriorhodopsin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1993-01-01

    The mechanism of proton transport in the light-driven pump bacteriorhodopsin is beginning to be understood. Light causes the all-trans to 13-cis isomerization of the retinal chromophore. This sets off a sequential and directed series of transient decreases in the pKa's of a) the retinal Schiff base, b) an extracellular proton release complex which includes asp-85, and c) a cytoplasmic proton uptake complex which includes asp-96. The timing of these pKa changes during the photoreaction cycle causes sequential proton transfers which result in the net movement of a proton across the protein, from the cytoplasmic to the extracellular surface.

  9. Clinical predictors associated with proton pump inhibitor-induced hypomagnesemia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunyong; Lee, Hyuk; Park, Chan Hyuk; Shim, Choong Nam; Lee, Hyun Jik; Park, Jun Chul; Shin, Sung Kwan; Lee, Sang Kil; Lee, Yong Chan; Kim, Ha Yan; Kang, Dae Ryong

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence and case reports regarding proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-induced hypomagnesemia. Our study aimed to clarify the relationship between PPI use and serum magnesium levels and to specify high-risk patients. We retrospectively studied 112 consecutive patients aged 20 years or older who were treated with PPI for ≥30 days and whose serum magnesium levels were available for the PPI treatment period. We compared the mean level of serum magnesium of the enrolled patients with PPI treatment with matched controls. There were no significant differences between the matched PPI users (n = 105) and nonusers (n = 210) in the magnesium levels (0.85 ± 0.09 vs. 0.86 ± 0.16 mM, P = 0.297). In a subgroup analysis of a PPI user group, hypomagnesemia could be observed in 32 patients but not in 80 patients. In multivariate analyses, PPI use for >1 year, age less than 45 years, and concurrent cisplatin or carboplatin use were significantly associated with PPI-induced hypomagnesemia {P = 0.042, odds ratio [OR; 95% confidence interval (CI)]: 5.388 [1.056-27.493]; P = 0.007, OR [95% CI]: 4.710 [1.523-14.571]; P = 0.007, OR [95% CI]: 13.404 [2.066-86.952], respectively} after adjusting for confounders. This study shows that long-term PPI use is associated with hypomagnesemia in hospitalized adult patients. Therefore, serum magnesium levels should be checked before the initiation of PPI treatment and during the treatment period in patients, particularly those concurrently using platinum-based chemotherapy or who are expected to use PPI for long periods.

  10. Inappropriate use of proton pump inhibitors in a local setting

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Christopher Tze Wei; Lim, Wan Peng; Vu, Charles Kien Fong

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION There are growing concerns that the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may be inappropriate in instances that do not conform to evidence-based indications. This point-prevalence study aimed to investigate the frequency, indications and appropriateness of use of PPIs in hospitalised patients on a randomly chosen day. METHODS On a randomly chosen day, all inpatients were documented, and those on any form of PPIs on that day were determined. Indications for maintaining these patients on PPIs were obtained from the electronic medical records, which were then recorded and cross-referenced against a list of accepted indications adapted from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved list. RESULTS In all, 1,025 inpatients were documented. Of the 477 (46.5%) inpatients using PPIs, only 219 (45.9%) fulfilled the FDA-approved indications, while the majority (n = 258, 54.1%) did not. Overall, PPIs were not strictly indicated for use in 206 (43.2%) inpatients, according to FDA criteria. Of the 477 inpatients on PPIs, 52 (10.9%) had borderline indications based on expert consensus/guidelines other than FDA criteria. CONCLUSION Although the use of PPIs is prevalent in hospitals, less than half of the hospitalised patients using PPIs in our study had evidence-based indications that supported such use. The overuse of PPIs has a negative impact on healthcare costs and may lead to adverse effects. Steps to curb the inappropriate use of PPIs should address factors such as indications for the initiation of PPIs, and reassessment of the need for ongoing PPI use in inpatients upon discharge and during outpatient reviews. PMID:25091884

  11. Photoresponsive hydrogel microvalve activated by bacteriorhodopsin proton pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Aribe, Khaled; Knopf, George K.

    2010-04-01

    A light driven microvalve activated by a thin organic photoelectric film that controls the expansion and shrinkage of a pH sensitive HEMA-AA hydrogel actuator is described in this paper. The self-assembled monolayer of oriented bacteriorhodopsin (bR) purple membrane patches are immobilized on a porous bio-functionalized gold (Au) surface using a biotin molecular recognition technique. When exposed to visible light, each bR molecule in the monolayer acts as a simple proton pump which transports hydrogen ions from the cytoplasmic to the extracellular side through a transmembrane ion channel that connects both sides of the membrane. The flow of ions from the photon activated bR changes the pH value of the ionic solution that surrounds the gel microactuator. The chargeable polymeric network undergoes a measureable geometric change when the pH of the ionic solution is shifted to the phase transition point pKa. The fabrication of the thin bR film and photo-responsive hybrid hydrogel are discussed. Preliminary experiments show that the 13nm self-assembled photoelectric layer can generate approximately 1.3mV/(mW.cm2) when exposed to an 18mW, 568nm light source. The photo-voltage produced by the monolayer is believed to be sufficient to change the pH of the surrounding ionic solution from its neutral state and trigger the swelling of the gel. Several design issues that need to be resolved before a fully functional light-driven microvalve can be created are identified and discussed.

  12. Does Barrett's esophagus regress after surgery (or proton pump inhibitors)?

    PubMed

    Spechler, Stuart Jon

    2014-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus, the condition in which metaplastic columnar epithelium that predisposes to cancer development replaces the squamous epithelium that normally lines the distal esophagus, is a complication of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Metaplasia is a potentially reversible condition, and partial regression of Barrett's metaplasia has been documented with effective medical or surgical therapy for GERD. The important issue for patient management is not whether antireflux treatment causes Barrett's esophagus to regress, but rather whether antireflux therapy prevents cancer in Barrett's esophagus. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) would be expected to prevent this cancer because they heal reflux esophagitis, reduce exposure to a potential carcinogen (acid), and might prevent acid-induced proliferation and cancer-promoting cytokine secretion by esophageal epithelial cells. Furthermore, observational studies have shown that PPI use is associated with a decreased incidence of neoplasia in Barrett's esophagus. In theory, successful antireflux surgery, which eliminates the reflux of both acid and bile, should be better for cancer prevention than medical therapy, which only decreases the reflux of acid. However, high-quality studies show no significant difference in cancer incidence between medically and surgically treated patients with GERD and Barrett's esophagus. Furthermore, for individual patients with nondysplastic Barrett's metaplasia, the cancer risk is so small and the number needed to treat for cancer prevention with surgery so large, that it does not matter whether or not surgery provides a tiny margin of extra protection against cancer beyond that provided by medical therapy. The cost and risks of the operation overwhelm any small, additional cancer protective benefit. Antireflux surgery is very effective at controlling the endoscopic signs and symptoms of GERD, but the operation should not be recommended to patients solely with the rationale that it

  13. Proton-pumping mechanism of cytochrome c oxidase: a kinetic master-equation approach.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young C; Hummer, Gerhard

    2012-04-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase is an efficient energy transducer that reduces oxygen to water and converts the released chemical energy into an electrochemical membrane potential. As a true proton pump, cytochrome c oxidase translocates protons across the membrane against this potential. Based on a wealth of experiments and calculations, an increasingly detailed picture of the reaction intermediates in the redox cycle has emerged. However, the fundamental mechanism of proton pumping coupled to redox chemistry remains largely unresolved. Here we examine and extend a kinetic master-equation approach to gain insight into redox-coupled proton pumping in cytochrome c oxidase. Basic principles of the cytochrome c oxidase proton pump emerge from an analysis of the simplest kinetic models that retain essential elements of the experimentally determined structure, energetics, and kinetics, and that satisfy fundamental physical principles. The master-equation models allow us to address the question of how pumping can be achieved in a system in which all reaction steps are reversible. Whereas proton pumping does not require the direct modulation of microscopic reaction barriers, such kinetic gating greatly increases the pumping efficiency. Further efficiency gains can be achieved by partially decoupling the proton uptake pathway from the active-site region. Such a mechanism is consistent with the proposed Glu valve, in which the side chain of a key glutamic acid shuttles between the D channel and the active-site region. We also show that the models predict only small proton leaks even in the absence of turnover. The design principles identified here for cytochrome c oxidase provide a blueprint for novel biology-inspired fuel cells, and the master-equation formulation should prove useful also for other molecular machines. .

  14. A conserved asparagine in a P-type proton pump is required for efficient gating of protons.

    PubMed

    Ekberg, Kira; Wielandt, Alex G; Buch-Pedersen, Morten J; Palmgren, Michael G

    2013-04-05

    The minimal proton pumping machinery of the Arabidopsis thaliana P-type plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase isoform 2 (AHA2) consists of an aspartate residue serving as key proton donor/acceptor (Asp-684) and an arginine residue controlling the pKa of the aspartate. However, other important aspects of the proton transport mechanism such as gating, and the ability to occlude protons, are still unclear. An asparagine residue (Asn-106) in transmembrane segment 2 of AHA2 is conserved in all P-type plasma membrane H(+)-ATPases. In the crystal structure of the plant plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, this residue is located in the putative ligand entrance pathway, in close proximity to the central proton donor/acceptor Asp-684. Substitution of Asn-106 resulted in mutant enzymes with significantly reduced ability to transport protons against a membrane potential. Sensitivity toward orthovanadate was increased when Asn-106 was substituted with an aspartate residue, but decreased in mutants with alanine, lysine, glutamine, or threonine replacement of Asn-106. The apparent proton affinity was decreased for all mutants, most likely due to a perturbation of the local environment of Asp-684. Altogether, our results demonstrate that Asn-106 is important for closure of the proton entrance pathway prior to proton translocation across the membrane.

  15. Review article: immediate-release proton-pump inhibitor therapy--potential advantages.

    PubMed

    Howden, C W

    2005-12-01

    The absorption of most oral proton-pump inhibitors is delayed by the enteric coating required to protect the acid-labile proton-pump inhibitor from degradation in the stomach and, as a result, antisecretory effect is also delayed. This article provides an overview of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a new immediate-release omeprazole [(IR-OME) Zegerid power for oral suspension; Santarus Inc., San Diego, CA, USA] and its potential advantages over delayed-release proton-pump inhibitors. Immediate-release omeprazole has a higher mean peak plasma omeprazole concentration (C(max)) and a significantly shorter mean time to reach C(max) (t(max)) than delayed-release omeprazole. Immediate-release omeprazole 40 mg has a prolonged antisecretory effect with median intragastric pH above 4.0 for 18.6 h/day at steady-state, after 7 days of once daily dosing. The sodium bicarbonate in immediate-release omeprazole protects the uncoated omeprazole from degradation by gastric acid. The accelerated antisecretory action of immediate-release omeprazole compared with delayed-release omeprazole may be due to the activation of proton pumps by the rapid neutralization of intragastric acid by the sodium bicarbonate. The faster onset of action seen with immediate-release omeprazole is not achieved by using an antacid with a delayed-release proton-pump inhibitor, because administering antacids with conventional delayed-release proton-pump inhibitors does not significantly enhance absorption of the proton-pump inhibitor. In conclusion, immediate-release omeprazole is associated with rapid absorption of omeprazole and rapid onset of antisecretory effect, without compromising the duration of acid suppression.

  16. Molecular mechanisms controlling proton pumping by bacteriorhodopsin. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Crouch, Rosalie K.; Ebrey, Thomas G.

    2000-02-10

    Bacteriorhodopsin (bR) is the simplest biological system for the transduction of light energy. Light energy is directly converted to transmembrane proton gradient by a single, small membrane protein. The extraordinary stability of bR makes it an outstanding subject for bioenergetic studies. This project has focused on the role of interactions between key residues of the pigment involved in light-induced proton transfer. Methods to estimate the strength of these interactions and their correlation with the rate and efficiency of proton transfer have been developed. The concept of the coupling of the protonation states of key groups has been applied to individual steps of the proton transfer with the ultimate goal of understanding on the molecular level the driving forces for proton transport and the pathway of the transported proton in bT. The mechanism of light-induced proton release, uptake and the mechanism of recovery of initial state of bT has been examined. The experiments were performed with genetically engineered, site-specific mutants of bR. This has enabled us to characterize the role of individual amino acid residues in bR. Time resolved and low temperature absorption spectroscopy and light-induced photocurrent measurements were used in order to study the photochemical cycle and proton transfer in mutant pigments. Chemical modification and crosslinking of both the specific amino acids to the chromophore or to other amino acids were used to elucidate the role of light-induced conformational changes in the photocycle and the structure of the protein in the ground state. The results of this project provided new knowledge on the architecture of the proton transfer pathways inside the protein, on the mechanism of proton release in bR, and on the role of specific amino acid residues in the structure and function of bR.

  17. Review article: similarities and differences among delayed-release proton-pump inhibitor formulations.

    PubMed

    Horn, J R; Howden, C W

    2005-12-01

    Proton-pump inhibitors are acid-labile, and require an enteric coating to protect them from degradation in the stomach when given orally. However, this leads to delayed absorption and onset of action of the proton-pump inhibitor. This article aims to review the similarities and differences between the various formulations of delayed release proton-pump inhibitors. Delayed-release omeprazole and delayed-release lansoprazole have been suspended in sodium bicarbonate for tube administration; however, for omeprazole, absorption is further impaired and antisecretory effects are disappointing. Although such formulations may be more convenient for clinical use in certain patient groups, absorption of the proton-pump inhibitor is still influenced by residual enteric coating. There are few differences among the currently available delayed-release proton-pump inhibitors with respect to their pharmacodynamic effects during chronic administration. There are minor formulation-based pharmacokinetic differences among these agents, primarily reflected in their bioavailability following the first few doses. Differences in bioavailability may explain slight differences in the rate of onset of maximal antisecretory effect. However, minor pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic differences are not associated with meaningful differences in clinical outcomes.

  18. Characterization of a Cyanobacterial Chloride-pumping Rhodopsin and Its Conversion into a Proton Pump.

    PubMed

    Hasemi, Takatoshi; Kikukawa, Takashi; Kamo, Naoki; Demura, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Light-driven ion-pumping rhodopsins are widely distributed in microorganisms and are now classified into the categories of outward H(+) and Na(+) pumps and an inward Cl(-) pump. These different types share a common protein architecture and utilize the photoisomerization of the same chromophore, retinal, to evoke photoreactions. Despite these similarities, successful pump-to-pump conversion had been confined to only the H(+) pump bacteriorhodopsin, which was converted to a Cl(-) pump in 1995 by a single amino acid replacement. In this study we report the first success of the reverse conversion from a Cl(-) pump to a H(+) pump. A novel microbial rhodopsin (MrHR) from the cyanobacterium Mastigocladopsis repens functions as a Cl(-) pump and belongs to a cluster that is far distant from the known Cl(-) pumps. With a single amino acid replacement, MrHR is converted to a H(+) pump in which dissociable residues function almost completely in the H(+) relay reactions. MrHR most likely evolved from a H(+) pump, but it has not yet been highly optimized into a mature Cl(-) pump.

  19. Proton pumping by cytochrome oxidase as studied by time-resolved stopped-flow spectrophotometry.

    PubMed Central

    Antonini, G; Malatesta, F; Sarti, P; Brunori, M

    1993-01-01

    The H+/e- stoichiometry for the proton pump of cytochrome c oxidase reportedly varies between 0 and 1, depending on experimental conditions. In this paper, we report the results obtained by a combination of transient optical spectroscopy with a time resolution of 10 ms and a singular value decomposition analysis to follow the kinetics, separate the observed spectral components, and quantitate the stoichiometry of the pump. By using cytochrome oxidase reconstituted into small unilamellar vesicles, we show that the time courses of ferrocytochrome c oxidation and phenol red acidification or alkalinization fit a simple kinetic scheme. The fitting procedure leads to unbiased and objective determination of the H+/e- ratio under various experimental conditions. The proton-pumping stoichiometry was found to be 1.01 +/- 0.10, independent of the number of turnovers, proton back-leak rate, or type of experiment (oxidant or reductant pulse). PMID:8392182

  20. Piston-assisted proton pumping in Complex I of mitochondria membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourokh, Lev; Filonenko, Ilan

    2014-03-01

    Proton-pumping mechanism of Complex I remains mysterious because its electron and proton paths are well separated and the direct Coulomb interaction seems to be negligible. The structure of this enzyme was resolved very recently and its functionality was connected the shift of the helix HL. We model the helix as a piston oscillating between the protons and electrons. We assume that positive charges are accumulated near the edges of the helix. In the oxidized state, the piston is attracted to electrons, so its distance to the proton sites increases, the energy of these sites decreases and the sites can be populated. When electrons proceed to the drain, elastic forces return the piston to the original position and the energies of populated proton sites increase, so the protons can be transferred to the positive site of the membrane. In this work, we explore a simplified model when the interaction of the piston with electrons is replaced by a periodic force. We derive quantum Heisenberg equations for the proton operators and solve them jointly with the Langevin equation for the piston position. We show that the proton pumping is possible in such structure with parameters closely resembling the real system. We also address the feasibility of using such mechanism in nanoelectronics.

  1. [Proton pump inhibitors in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: what is the further step?].

    PubMed

    Simon, Mireille; Zerbib, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Optimisation of proton pump inhibitors use may improve reflux symptoms in 20-25% of the patients. Pathological gastro-oesophageal reflux should be documented in a patient with refractory reflux symptoms using upper endoscopy and/or pH testing. While on proton pump inhibitors twice daily, persistent symptoms are not related to gastro-oesophageal refluxdisease(GERD) in 50% of the patients. The new anti-reflux compounds have yet a limited efficacy and side effects that currently limit their development.

  2. Electrostatic study of the proton pumping mechanism in bovine heart cytochrome C oxidase.

    PubMed

    Popović, Dragan M; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei A

    2004-02-18

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) is the terminal enzyme of the cell respiratory chain in mitochondria and aerobic bacteria. It catalyzes the reduction of oxygen to water and utilizes the free energy of the reduction reaction for proton pumping across the inner-mitochondrial membrane, a process that results in a membrane electrochemical proton gradient. Although the structure of the enzyme has been solved for several organisms, the molecular mechanism of proton pumping remains unknown. In the present paper, continuum electrostatic calculations were employed to evaluate the electrostatic potential, energies, and protonation state of bovine heart cytochrome c oxidase for different redox states of the enzyme along its catalytic cycle. Three different computational models of the enzyme were employed to test the stability of the results. The energetics and pH dependence of the P-->F, F-->O, and O-->E steps of the cycle have been investigated. On the basis of electrostatic calculations, two possible schemes of redox-linked proton pumping are discussed. The first scheme involves His291 as a pump element, whereas the second scheme involves a group linked to propionate D of heme a(3). In both schemes, loading of the pump site is coupled to ET between the two hemes of the enzyme, while transfer of a chemical proton is accompanied by ejection of the pumped H(+). The two models, as well as the energetics results are compared with recent experimental kinetic data. The proton pumping across the membrane is an endergonic process, which requires a sufficient amount of energy to be provided by the chemical reaction in the active site. In our calculations, the conversion of OH(-) to H(2)O provides 520 meV of energy to displace pump protons from a loading site and overall about 635 meV for each electron passing through the system. Assuming that the two charges are translocated per electron against the membrane potential of 200 meV, the model predicts an overall efficiency of 63%.

  3. A study on the relation between proton pump inhibitor and gastric giardiasis.

    PubMed

    Kader, S A; Mansour, A M; Mohran, Z; el-Taoil, A; Abdalla, K F

    1998-04-01

    Thirty patients treated with proton pump inhibitor and still having symptoms related to gastritis or peptic ulcers were subjected to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and gastric biopsy for detection of giardiasis in these cases. Results showed presence of 3 (10%) cases of gastric giardiasis, intestinal metaplasia and presence of H. pylori in these cases. It is concluded that there may be a relation between the presence of gastric giardiasis and the intake of proton pump inhibitor. The endoscopists have to search for gastric giardiasis especially in the presence of H. pylori and/or intestinal metaplasia.

  4. Optimal use of proton pump inhibitors for treating acid peptic diseases in primary care.

    PubMed

    Tack, J; Louis, E; Persy, V; Urbain, D

    2013-12-01

    Heartburn, reflux and epigastric pain are frequently encountered symptoms in primary care medicine. Acid peptic diseases such as peptic ulcer and gastrointestinal reflux disease have a high prevalence, can have important impact on patient quality of life and represent a considerable health care cost. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are the most potent pharmacological inhibitors of gastric acid secretion currently available and are the mainstay medical therapy for acid peptic diseases. This review summarizes current evidence on treatment of acid-peptic diseases with proton pump inhibitors and provides primary care clinicians with best practice guidelines for optimal use of these drugs.

  5. Are higher doses of proton pump inhibitors better in acute peptic bleeding?

    PubMed

    Villalón, Alejandro; Olmos, Roberto; Rada, Gabriel

    2016-06-24

    Although there is broad consensus about the benefits of proton pump inhibitors in acute upper peptic bleeding, there is still controversy over their optimal dosing. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified six systematic reviews including 27 randomized trials addressing this question. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded high-dose proton pump inhibitors probably result in little or no difference in re-bleeding rate or mortality. The risk/benefit and cost/benefit balance probably favor use of low-doses.

  6. Crystallographic Structure of Xanthorhodopsin, the Light-Driven Proton Pump With a Dual Chromophore

    SciTech Connect

    Luecke, H.; Schobert, B.; Stagno, J.; Imasheva, E.S.; Wang, J.M.; Balashov, S.P.; Lanyi, J.K.

    2009-05-19

    Homologous to bacteriorhodopsin and even more to proteorhodopsin, xanthorhodopsin is a light-driven proton pump that, in addition to retinal, contains a noncovalently bound carotenoid with a function of a light-harvesting antenna. We determined the structure of this eubacterial membrane protein-carotenoid complex by X-ray diffraction, to 1.9-{angstrom} resolution. Although it contains 7 transmembrane helices like bacteriorhodopsin and archaerhodopsin, the structure of xanthorhodopsin is considerably different from the 2 archaeal proteins. The crystallographic model for this rhodopsin introduces structural motifs for proton transfer during the reaction cycle, particularly for proton release, that are dramatically different from those in other retinal-based transmembrane pumps. Further, it contains a histidine-aspartate complex for regulating the pK{sub a} of the primary proton acceptor not present in archaeal pumps but apparently conserved in eubacterial pumps. In addition to aiding elucidation of a more general proton transfer mechanism for light-driven energy transducers, the structure defines also the geometry of the carotenoid and the retinal. The close approach of the 2 polyenes at their ring ends explains why the efficiency of the excited-state energy transfer is as high as {approx}45%, and the 46{sup o} angle between them suggests that the chromophore location is a compromise between optimal capture of light of all polarization angles and excited-state energy transfer.

  7. The cytochrome ba3 oxygen reductase from Thermus thermophilus uses a single input channel for proton delivery to the active site and for proton pumping.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsin-Yang; Hemp, James; Chen, Ying; Fee, James A; Gennis, Robert B

    2009-09-22

    The heme-copper oxygen reductases are redox-driven proton pumps that generate a proton motive force in both prokaryotes and mitochondria. These enzymes have been divided into 3 evolutionarily related groups: the A-, B- and C-families. Most experimental work on proton-pumping mechanisms has been performed with members of the A-family. These enzymes require 2 proton input pathways (D- and K-channels) to transfer protons used for oxygen reduction chemistry and for proton pumping, with the D-channel transporting all pumped protons. In this work we use site-directed mutagenesis to demonstrate that the ba(3) oxygen reductase from Thermus thermophilus, a representative of the B-family, does not contain a D-channel. Rather, it utilizes only 1 proton input channel, analogous to that of the A-family K-channel, and it delivers protons to the active site for both O2 chemistry and proton pumping. Comparison of available subunit I sequences reveals that the only structural elements conserved within the oxygen reductase families that could perform these functions are active-site components, namely the covalently linked histidine-tyrosine, the Cu(B) and its ligands, and the active-site heme and its ligands. Therefore, our data suggest that all oxygen reductases perform the same chemical reactions for oxygen reduction and comprise the essential elements of the proton-pumping mechanism (e.g., the proton-loading and kinetic-gating sites). These sites, however, cannot be located within the D-channel. These results along with structural considerations point to the A-propionate region of the active-site heme and surrounding water molecules as the proton-loading site.

  8. Characteristics of redox-linked proton ejection in cytochrome c oxidase reconstituted in phospholipid vesicles. New observations support mechanisms different from proton pumping.

    PubMed

    Papa, S; Lorusso, M; Capitanio, N; De Nitto, E

    1983-06-27

    Experimental observations reveal a number of characteristics of the redox-linked proton ejection from cytochrome c oxidase vesicles, which apparently cannot be explained by a proton pumping activity of the oxidase. These observations seem, on the other hand, to provide useful elements for alternative explanation(s) of the proton ejection. It is proposed here that the process is scalar and not vectorial and can derive from redox-linked rupture of protonated salt-bridges in the oxidase-lipid complex.

  9. What are the precautions with proton pump inhibitor use for reflux disease?

    PubMed

    Mospan, Cortney M

    2015-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) affects 10% to 20% of the western world's population. Current treatment guidelines recommend proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) as first-line therapy. Although PPIs cause mild adverse reactions, they pose risks, particularly for older adults with comorbidities.

  10. Time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of the polarizable proton continua and the proton pump mechanism of bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J; El-Sayed, M A

    2001-01-01

    Nanosecond-to-microsecond time-resolved Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy in the 3000-1000-cm(-1) region has been used to examine the polarizable proton continua observed in bacteriorhodopsin (bR) during its photocycle. The difference in the transient FTIR spectra in the time domain between 20 ns and 1 ms shows a broad absorption continuum band in the 2100-1800-cm(-1) region, a bleach continuum band in the 2500-2150-cm(-1) region, and a bleach continuum band above 2700 cm(-1). According to Zundel (G., J. Mol. Struct. 322:33-42), these continua appear in systems capable of forming polarizable hydrogen bonds. The formation of a bleach continuum suggests the presence of a polarizable proton in the ground state that changes during the photocycle. The appearance of a transient absorption continuum suggests a change in the polarizable proton or the appearance of new ones. It is found that each continuum has a rise time of less than 80 ns and a decay time component of approximately 300 micros. In addition, it is found that the absorption continuum in the 2100-1800-cm(-1) region has a slow rise component of 190 ns and a fast decay component of approximately 60 micros. Using these results and those of the recent x-ray structural studies of bR(570) and M(412) (H. Luecke, B. Schobert, H.T. Richter, J.-P. Cartailler, and J. K., Science 286:255-260), together with the already known spectroscopic properties of the different intermediates in the photocycle, the possible origins of the polarizable protons giving rise to these continua during the bR photocycle are proposed. Models of the proton pump are discussed in terms of the changes in these polarizable protons and the hydrogen-bonded chains and in terms of previously known results such as the simultaneous deprotonation of the protonated Schiff base (PSB) and Tyr185 and the disappearance of water molecules in the proton release channel during the proton pump process. PMID:11159463

  11. Development of a tritium monitor combined with an electrochemical tritium pump using a proton conducting oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, M.; Sugiyama, T.

    2015-03-15

    The detection of low level tritium is one of the key issues for tritium management in tritium handling facilities. Such a detection can be performed by tritium monitors based on proton conducting oxide technique. We tested a tritium monitoring system composed of a commercial proportional counter combined with an electrochemical hydrogen pump equipped with CaZr{sub 0.9}In{sub 0.1}O{sub 3-α} as proton conducting oxide. The hydrogen pump operated at 973 K under electrolysis conditions using tritiated water vapor (HTO). The proton conducting oxide extracts tritium molecules (HT) from HTO and tritium concentration is measured by the proportional counter. The advantage of the proposed tritium monitoring system is that it is able to convert HTO into molecular hydrogen.

  12. Optical silencing of C. elegans cells with light-driven proton pumps.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Ayako; Takahashi, Megumi; Toyoda, Naoya; Takagi, Shin

    2014-08-01

    Recent development of optogenetic techniques, which utilize light-driven ion channels or ion pumps for controlling the activity of excitable cells, has greatly facilitated the investigation of nervous systems in vivo. A new generation of optical silencers includes outward-directed proton pumps, such as Arch, which have several advantages over currently widely used halorhodopsin (NpHR). These advantages include the resistance to inactivation during prolonged illumination and the ability to generate a larger optical current from low intensity light. C. elegans, with its small transparent body and well-characterized neural circuits, is especially suitable for optogenetic analyses. In this article, we will outline the practical aspects of using of Arch and other proton pumps as optogenetic tools in C. elegans.

  13. Redox-Coupled Proton Pumping in Cytochrome c Oxidase: Further insights from Computer Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiancong; Voth, Gregory A.

    2008-01-01

    The membrane-bound enzyme cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal member in the respiratory chain, converts oxygen into water and generates an electrochemical gradient by coupling the electron transfer to proton-pumping across the membrane. Here we have investigated the dynamics of an excess proton and the surrounding protein environment near the active sites. The multi-state empirical valence bond (MS-EVB) molecular dynamics method was used to simulate the explicit dynamics of proton transfer through the critically important hydrophobic channel between Glu242 (bovine notation) and the D-propionate of heme a3 (PRDa3) for the first time. The results from these molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the PRDa3 can indeed re-orientate and dissociate from Arg438, despite the high stability of such an ion pair, and has the ability to accept protons via bound water molecules. Any large conformational change of the adjacent heme a D-propionate group is, however, sterically blocked directly by the protein. Free energy calculations of the PRDa3 side chain isomerization and the proton translocation between Glu242 and the PRDa3 site have also been performed. The results exhibit a redox state-dependent dynamical behavior and indicate that reduction of the low-spin heme a may initiate internal transfer of the pumped proton from Glu242 to the PRDa3 site. PMID:18155154

  14. High-performance genetically targetable optical neural silencing by light-driven proton pumps.

    PubMed

    Chow, Brian Y; Han, Xue; Dobry, Allison S; Qian, Xiaofeng; Chuong, Amy S; Li, Mingjie; Henninger, Michael A; Belfort, Gabriel M; Lin, Yingxi; Monahan, Patrick E; Boyden, Edward S

    2010-01-07

    The ability to silence the activity of genetically specified neurons in a temporally precise fashion would provide the opportunity to investigate the causal role of specific cell classes in neural computations, behaviours and pathologies. Here we show that members of the class of light-driven outward proton pumps can mediate powerful, safe, multiple-colour silencing of neural activity. The gene archaerhodopsin-3 (Arch) from Halorubrum sodomense enables near-100% silencing of neurons in the awake brain when virally expressed in the mouse cortex and illuminated with yellow light. Arch mediates currents of several hundred picoamps at low light powers, and supports neural silencing currents approaching 900 pA at light powers easily achievable in vivo. Furthermore, Arch spontaneously recovers from light-dependent inactivation, unlike light-driven chloride pumps that enter long-lasting inactive states in response to light. These properties of Arch are appropriate to mediate the optical silencing of significant brain volumes over behaviourally relevant timescales. Arch function in neurons is well tolerated because pH excursions created by Arch illumination are minimized by self-limiting mechanisms to levels comparable to those mediated by channelrhodopsins or natural spike firing. To highlight how proton pump ecological and genomic diversity may support new innovation, we show that the blue-green light-drivable proton pump from the fungus Leptosphaeria maculans (Mac) can, when expressed in neurons, enable neural silencing by blue light, thus enabling alongside other developed reagents the potential for independent silencing of two neural populations by blue versus red light. Light-driven proton pumps thus represent a high-performance and extremely versatile class of 'optogenetic' voltage and ion modulator, which will broadly enable new neuroscientific, biological, neurological and psychiatric investigations.

  15. Antagonism of Fluconazole and a Proton Pump Inhibitor against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning-Ning; Köhler, Julia R

    2016-02-01

    Hospitalized ill patients, at risk for invasive candidiasis, often receive multiple medications, including proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). The antifungal fluconazole perturbs the vacuolar proton ATPase. The PPI omeprazole antagonized Candida albicans growth inhibition by fluconazole. A C. albicans codon-adapted pHluorin, Ca.pHluorin, was generated to measure cytosolic pH. The fungal cytosol was acidified by omeprazole and realkalinized by coexposure to fluconazole. Vacuolar pH was alkalinized by fluconazole. Off-target effects of any medication on fungal pathogens may occur.

  16. Proton pump inhibitor-amoxicillin-clarithromycin versus proton pump inhibitor-amoxicillin-metronidazole as first-line Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, Toshihiro; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Suzuki, Masayuki; Takahashi, Masahiko; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and tolerability of the first-line Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication regimen composed of proton pump inhibitor, clarithromycin, and amoxicillin, with those of a regimen composed of proton pump inhibitor, metronidazole, and amoxicillin. Data of patients, who were administered the first-line H. pylori eradication regimen at Tokyo Medical Center between 2008 and 2011, were reviewed. All patients had H. pylori gastritis without peptic ulcer disease. The 7-day triple regimen composed of lansoprazole, clarithromycin, and amoxicillin was administered to 55 patients, and that composed of omeprazole, metronidazole, and amoxicillin was administered to 55 patients. Intention-to-treat and per-protocol eradication rates were 74.5 and 80.4%, respectively, for the regimen of lansoprazole, clarithromycin, and amoxicillin, whereas the corresponding rates were 96.4 and 100%, respectively, for the regimen of omeprazole, metronidazole, and amoxicillin. In conclusion, first-line H. pylori eradication therapy composed of omeprazole, metronidazole, and amoxicillin was significantly more effective than that composed of lansoprazole, clarithromycin, and amoxicillin, without differences in tolerability.

  17. Cooperative coupling and role of heme a in the proton pump of heme-copper oxidases.

    PubMed

    Papa, S; Capitanio, N; Villani, G; Capitanio, G; Bizzoca, A; Palese, L L; Carlino, V; De Nitto, E

    1998-10-01

    In the last few years, evidence has accumulated supporting the applicability of the cooperative model of proton pumps in cytochrome systems, vectorial Bohr mechanisms, to heme-copper oxidases. The vectorial Bohr mechanism is based on short- and long-range protonmotive cooperative effects linked to redox transitions of the metal centers. The crystal structure of oxidized and reduced bovine-heart cytochrome c oxidase reveals, upon reduction, the occurrence of long-range conformational changes in subunit I of the oxidase. Analysis of the crystal structure of cytochrome c oxidase shows the existence of hydrogen-bonded networks of amino acid residues which could undergo redox-linked pK shifts resulting in transmembrane proton translocation. Our group has identified four proteolytic groups undergoing reversible redox-linked pK shifts. Two groups result in being linked to redox transitions of heme a3. One group is apparently linked to CuB. The fourth group is linked to oxido-reduction of heme a. We have shown that the proton transfer resulting from the redox Bohr effects linked to heme a and CuB in the bovine oxidase displays membrane vectorial asymmetry, i.e., protons are taken up from the inner aqueous space (N), upon reduction, and released in the external space (P), upon oxidation of the metals. This direction of proton uptake and release is just what is expected from the vectorial Bohr mechanism. The group linked to heme a, which can transfer up to 0.9 H+/e- at pHs around neutrality, can provide the major contribution to the proton pump. It is proposed that translocation of pumped protons, linked to electron flow through heme a, utilizes a channel (channel D) which extends from a conserved aspartate at the N entrance to a conserved glutamate located between heme a and the binuclear center. The carboxylic group of this glutamic acid, after having delivered, upon electron flow through heme a, pumped protons towards the P phase, once reprotonated from the N phase, moves

  18. Proton pump inhibitor-induced exfoliative dermatitis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhihong; Liu, Hongtao; He, Lien; Ma, Yinling; Song, Haojing; Bai, Wanjun; Yu, Meiling

    2016-02-01

    A 74-year-old female patient was admitted to hospital following a road accident with pains in the chest, abdomen, waist, back, nose, left wrist and lower limbs. After 1 week, the patient presented with gastrointestinal bleeding, and thus was treated with protein pump inhibitors (PPIs), including lansoprazole, esomeprazole and omeprazole enteric-coated tablets, in order to inhibit acid secretion and attenuate bleeding. However, the patient developed skin rashes on the chest and right lower limb and foot 28 days following treatment initiation. The skin rashes spread and ulcerated after 3 days, and were associated with tracheal mucosal injury and hemoptysis. Subsequently, treatment of the patient with PPIs was terminated, after which the tracheal hemoptysis and skin rashes markedly improved. In addition, no new skin rashes appeared following termination of the PPI treatment. In the present case, long-term treatment of an elderly patient with PPIs may have induced exfoliative dermatitis, due to hepatic ischemia, hypoxia and acute renal failure, which may have decreased the metabolism of PPIs, resulting in the accumulation of PPI metabolites.

  19. Atomistic Characterization of the First Step of Calcium Pump Activation Associated with Proton Countertransport.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Salinas, G Lizbeth; Espinoza-Fonseca, L Michel

    2015-08-25

    The calcium pump [sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA)] transports Ca(2+) from the cytosol to the SR lumen at the expense of ATP hydrolysis and proton countertransport, thus playing a central role in Ca(2+) homeostasis and muscle contractility. Proton countertransport via deprotonation of transport site residue Glu309 is a critical first step in SERCA activation because it accelerates the E2-E1 structural transition. Previous studies have suggested that flipping of Glu309 toward the cytosol constitutes the primary mechanism for Glu309 deprotonation, but no conclusive data to support this hypothesis have been published. Therefore, we performed three independent 1 μs molecular dynamics simulations of the E2 state protonated at transport site residues Glu309, Glu771, and Glu908. Structural analysis and pKa calculations showed that Glu309 deprotonation occurs by an inward-to-outward side-chain transition. We also found that Glu309 deprotonation and proton countertransport occur through transient (~113 ps) water wires connecting Glu309 with the cytosol. Although both mechanisms are operational, we found that transient water wire formation, and not Glu309 flipping, is the primary mechanism for Glu309 deprotonation and translocation of protons to the cytosol. The outward-to-inward transition of protonated Glu309 and the presence of water wires suggest that protons from the cytosol might be passively transported to the lumen via Glu309. However, structural analysis indicates that passive SR proton leakage into the lumen unlikely occurs through Glu309 in the E2 state. These findings provide a time-resolved visualization of the first step in the molecular mechanism of SERCA activation and proton transport across the SR.

  20. The relationship between long-term proton pump inhibitor therapy and skeletal frailty.

    PubMed

    Lau, Arthur N; Tomizza, Michael; Wong-Pack, Matthew; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Adachi, Jonathan D

    2015-08-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are a commonly prescribed class of medications. Their use has been associated with an increased rate of fractures, most notably hip fractures. However, there does not seem to be a clear association between PPI use and bone mineral density measurements, assessed by dual X-ray absorptiometry. The mechanism by which PPI use increases the risk of fractures remains unclear. This review will summarize the current evidence on this topic.

  1. A proton pumping pyrophosphatase in acidocalcisomes of Herpetomonas sp.

    PubMed

    Soares Medeiros, Lia Carolina A; Moreira, Bernardo Luis Moraes; Miranda, Kildare; de Souza, Wanderley; Plattner, Helmut; Hentschel, Joachim; Barrabin, Hector

    2005-04-01

    Acidocalcisomes are acidic calcium storage organelles found in several microorganisms. They are characterized by their acidic nature, high electron density, high content of polyphosphates and several cations. Electron microscopy contrast tuned images of Herpetomonas sp. showed the presence of several electron dense organelles ranging from 100 to 300 nm in size. In addition, X-ray element mapping associated with energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy showed that most of the cations, namely Na, Mg, P, K, Fe and Zn, are located in their matrix. Using acridine orange as an indicator dye, a pyrophosphate-driven H+ uptake was measured in cells permeabilized by digitonin. This uptake has an optimal pH of 6.5-6.7 and was inhibited by sodium fluoride (NaF) and imidodiphosphate (IDP), two H+-pyrophosphatase inhibitors. H+ uptake was not promoted by ATP. Addition of 50 microM Ca2+ induced the release of H+, suggesting the presence of a Ca2+/H+ countertransport system in the membranes of the acidic compartments. Na+ was unable to release protons from the organelles. The pyrophosphate-dependent H+ uptake was dependent of ion K+ and inhibited by Na+ Herpetomonas sp. immunolabeled with monoclonal antibodies raised against a Trypanosoma cruzi V-H+-pyrophosphatase shows intense fluorescence in cytoplasmatic organelles of size and distribution similar to the electron-dense vacuoles. Together, these results suggest that the electron dense organelles found in Herpetomonas sp. are homologous to the acidocalcisomes described in other trypanosomatids. They possess a vacuolar H+-pyrophosphatase and a Ca2+/H+ antiport. However, in contrast to the other trypanosomatids so far studied, we were not able to measure any ATP promoted H+ transport in the acidocalcisomes of this parasite.

  2. Proton pump inhibitors as anti vacuolar-ATPases drugs: a novel anticancer strategy.

    PubMed

    Spugnini, Enrico P; Citro, Gennaro; Fais, Stefano

    2010-05-08

    The vacuolar ATPases are ATP-dependent proton pumps whose functions include the acidification of intracellular compartments and the extrusion of protons through the cell cytoplasmic membrane. These pumps play a pivotal role in the regulation of cell pH in normal cells and, to a much greater extent, in tumor cells. In fact, the glucose metabolism in hypoxic conditions by the neoplasms leads to an intercellular pH drift towards acidity. The acid microenvironment is modulated through the over-expression of H+ transporters that are also involved in tumor progression, invasiveness, distant spread and chemoresistance. Several strategies to block/downmodulate the efficiency of these transporters are currently being investigated. Among them, proton pump inhibitors have shown to successfully block the H+ transporters in vitro and in vivo, leading to apoptotic death. Furthermore, their action seems to synergize with conventional chemotherapy protocols, leading to chemosensitization and reversal of chemoresistance. Aim of this article is to critically revise the current knowledge of this cellular machinery and to summarize the therapeutic strategies developed to counter this mechanism.

  3. A thermo-physical analysis of the proton pump vacuolar-ATPase: the constructal approach.

    PubMed

    Lucia, Umberto; Ponzetto, Antonio; Deisboeck, Thomas S

    2014-10-24

    Pumping protons across a membrane was a critical step at the origin of life on earth, and it is still performed in all living organisms, including in human cells. Proton pumping is paramount to keep normal cells alive, e.g. for lysosomal digestion and for preparing peptides for immune recognition, but it goes awry in cancer cells. They acidify their microenvironment hence membrane voltage is lowered, which in turn induces cell proliferation, a hallmark of cancer. Proton pumping is achieved by means of rotary motors, namely vacuolar ATPases (V-ATPase), which are present at many of the multiple cellular interfaces. Therefore, we undertook an examination of the thermodynamic properties of V-ATPases. The principal result is that the V-ATPase-mediated control of the cell membrane potential and the related and consequent environmental pH can potentially represent a valuable support strategy for anticancer therapies. A constructal theory approach is used as a new viewpoint to study how V-ATPase can be modulated for therapeutic purposes. In particular, V-ATPase can be regulated by using external fields, such as electromagnetic fields, and a theoretical approach has been introduced to quantify the appropriate field strength and frequency for this new adjuvant therapeutic strategy.

  4. Proton Pump Inhibition Increases Rapid Eye Movement Sleep in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Sushil K.

    2014-01-01

    Increased bodily CO2 concentration alters cellular pH as well as sleep. The proton pump, which plays an important role in the homeostatic regulation of cellular pH, therefore, may modulate sleep. We investigated the effects of the proton pump inhibitor “lansoprazole” on sleep-wakefulness. Male Wistar rats were surgically prepared for chronic polysomnographic recordings. Two different doses of lansoprazole (low: 1 mg/kg; high: 10 mg/kg) were injected intraperitoneally in the same animal (n = 7) and sleep-wakefulness was recorded for 6 hrs. The changes in sleep-wakefulness were compared statistically. Percent REM sleep amount in the vehicle and lansoprazole low dose groups was 9.26 ± 1.03 and 9.09 ± 0.54, respectively, which increased significantly in the lansoprazole high dose group by 31.75% (from vehicle) and 34.21% (from low dose). Also, REM sleep episode numbers significantly increased in lansoprazole high dose group. Further, the sodium-hydrogen exchanger blocker “amiloride” (10 mg/kg; i.p.) (n = 5) did not alter sleep-wake architecture. Our results suggest that the proton pump plays an important role in REM sleep modulation and supports our view that REM sleep might act as a sentinel to help maintain normal CO2 level for unperturbed sleep. PMID:24701564

  5. Architecture of complex I and its implications for electron transfer and proton pumping

    PubMed Central

    Zickermann, Volker; Kerscher, Stefan; Zwicker, Klaus; Tocilescu, Maja A.; Radermacher, Michael; Brandt, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Proton pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) is the largest and remains by far the least understood enzyme complex of the respiratory chain. It consists of a peripheral arm harbouring all known redox active prosthetic groups and a membrane arm with a yet unknown number of proton translocation sites. The ubiquinone reduction site close to iron-sulfur cluster N2 at the interface of the 49-kDa and PSST subunits has been mapped by extensive site directed mutagenesis. Independent lines of evidence identified electron transfer events during reduction of ubiquinone to be associated with the potential drop that generates the full driving force for proton translocation with a 4 H+/2e− stoichiometry. Electron microscopic analysis of immuno-labelled native enzyme and of a subcomplex lacking the electron input module indicated a distance of 35–60 Å of cluster N2 to the membrane surface. Resolution of the membrane arm into subcomplexes showed that even the distal part harbours subunits that are prime candidates to participate in proton translocation because they are homologous to sodium/proton antiporters and contain conserved charged residues in predicted transmembrane helices. The mechanism of redox linked proton translocation by complex I is largely unknown but has to include steps where energy is transmitted over extremely long distances. In this review we compile the available structural information on complex I and discuss implications for complex I function. PMID:19366614

  6. [Alteration of transport activity of proton pumps in coleoptile cells during early development stages of maize seedlings].

    PubMed

    Shishova, M F; Tankeliun, O V; Rudashevskaia, E L; Emel'ianov, V V; Shakhova, N V; Kirpichnikova, A A

    2012-01-01

    Comparative analysis of the transport activity of proton pumps (plasmalemma H+-ATPase, vacuolar H+-ATPase, and vacuolar H+-pyrophosphatase) in the membrane preparations obtained from coleoptile cells ofetiolated maize seedlings (Zea mays L.) was carried out. The highest level ofvacuolar pyrophosphatase activity was observed during the early development of coleoptile cells under growth intensification through the elongation. The role of ATPase pumps of tonoplast and plasmalemma in the transport of hydrogen ions increases during further development. The plasmalemma activity in this process is higher. When the growth stops, the activity of proton pumps becomes significantly lower. Nevertheless, their substrate specificity and sensitivity to proton pump inhibitors do not change, which can be an evidence of physiological significance of pumps in the maintenance of cell homeostasis.

  7. Route, mechanism, and implications of proton import during Na+/K+ exchange by native Na+/K+-ATPase pumps.

    PubMed

    Vedovato, Natascia; Gadsby, David C

    2014-04-01

    A single Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase pumps three Na(+) outwards and two K(+) inwards by alternately exposing ion-binding sites to opposite sides of the membrane in a conformational sequence coupled to pump autophosphorylation from ATP and auto-dephosphorylation. The larger flow of Na(+) than K(+) generates outward current across the cell membrane. Less well understood is the ability of Na(+)/K(+) pumps to generate an inward current of protons. Originally noted in pumps deprived of external K(+) and Na(+) ions, as inward current at negative membrane potentials that becomes amplified when external pH is lowered, this proton current is generally viewed as an artifact of those unnatural conditions. We demonstrate here that this inward current also flows at physiological K(+) and Na(+) concentrations. We show that protons exploit ready reversibility of conformational changes associated with extracellular Na(+) release from phosphorylated Na(+)/K(+) pumps. Reversal of a subset of these transitions allows an extracellular proton to bind an acidic side chain and to be subsequently released to the cytoplasm. This back-step of phosphorylated Na(+)/K(+) pumps that enables proton import is not required for completion of the 3 Na(+)/2 K(+) transport cycle. However, the back-step occurs readily during Na(+)/K(+) transport when external K(+) ion binding and occlusion are delayed, and it occurs more frequently when lowered extracellular pH raises the probability of protonation of the externally accessible carboxylate side chain. The proton route passes through the Na(+)-selective binding site III and is distinct from the principal pathway traversed by the majority of transported Na(+) and K(+) ions that passes through binding site II. The inferred occurrence of Na(+)/K(+) exchange and H(+) import during the same conformational cycle of a single molecule identifies the Na(+)/K(+) pump as a hybrid transporter. Whether Na(+)/K(+) pump-mediated proton inflow may have any physiological or

  8. Redox-induced activation of the proton pump in the respiratory complex I

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vivek; Belevich, Galina; Gamiz-Hernandez, Ana P.; Róg, Tomasz; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Verkhovskaya, Marina L.; Wikström, Mårten; Hummer, Gerhard; Kaila, Ville R. I.

    2015-01-01

    Complex I functions as a redox-linked proton pump in the respiratory chains of mitochondria and bacteria, driven by the reduction of quinone (Q) by NADH. Remarkably, the distance between the Q reduction site and the most distant proton channels extends nearly 200 Å. To elucidate the molecular origin of this long-range coupling, we apply a combination of large-scale molecular simulations and a site-directed mutagenesis experiment of a key residue. In hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations, we observe that reduction of Q is coupled to its local protonation by the His-38/Asp-139 ion pair and Tyr-87 of subunit Nqo4. Atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations further suggest that formation of quinol (QH2) triggers rapid dissociation of the anionic Asp-139 toward the membrane domain that couples to conformational changes in a network of conserved charged residues. Site-directed mutagenesis data confirm the importance of Asp-139; upon mutation to asparagine the Q reductase activity is inhibited by 75%. The current results, together with earlier biochemical data, suggest that the proton pumping in complex I is activated by a unique combination of electrostatic and conformational transitions. PMID:26330610

  9. Redox-induced activation of the proton pump in the respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vivek; Belevich, Galina; Gamiz-Hernandez, Ana P; Róg, Tomasz; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Verkhovskaya, Marina L; Wikström, Mårten; Hummer, Gerhard; Kaila, Ville R I

    2015-09-15

    Complex I functions as a redox-linked proton pump in the respiratory chains of mitochondria and bacteria, driven by the reduction of quinone (Q) by NADH. Remarkably, the distance between the Q reduction site and the most distant proton channels extends nearly 200 Å. To elucidate the molecular origin of this long-range coupling, we apply a combination of large-scale molecular simulations and a site-directed mutagenesis experiment of a key residue. In hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations, we observe that reduction of Q is coupled to its local protonation by the His-38/Asp-139 ion pair and Tyr-87 of subunit Nqo4. Atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations further suggest that formation of quinol (QH2) triggers rapid dissociation of the anionic Asp-139 toward the membrane domain that couples to conformational changes in a network of conserved charged residues. Site-directed mutagenesis data confirm the importance of Asp-139; upon mutation to asparagine the Q reductase activity is inhibited by 75%. The current results, together with earlier biochemical data, suggest that the proton pumping in complex I is activated by a unique combination of electrostatic and conformational transitions.

  10. Effects of rikkunshito on quality of life in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease refractory to proton pump inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Takashi; Hirayama, Yoji; Oguchi, Aiko; Ishii, Fumi; Matushita, Masanao; Kitayama, Naoya; Morishita, Shinji; Hiratsuka, Noboru; Ohata, Ken; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Kishino, Maiko; Nakamura, Shinichi

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the effects of rikkunshito, in combination with a proton pump inhibitor, on symptoms and quality of life in patients with proton pump inhibitor-refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease. The subjects were 47 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease with residual symptoms such as heartburn following 8 weeks of proton pump inhibitor therapy. We administered these subjects rikkunshito in combination with a proton pump inhibitor for 6–8 weeks. We scored their symptoms of heartburn, fullness, abdominal discomfort, and abdominal pain, and surveyed their quality of life using the Reflux Esophagitis Symptom Questionnaire, comprising questions concerning daily activities, meals (changes in amount and favorite foods), and sleep (getting to sleep and early morning waking). Improvement was seen in all symptoms, and quality of life scores for meals and sleep also improved. These results indicate that combination therapy with rikkunshito and a proton pump inhibitor improves quality of life related to eating and sleep in patients with patients with proton pump inhibitor-refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease.

  11. Voltage Dependence of Proton Pumping by Bacteriorhodopsin Mutants with Altered Lifetime of the M Intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Geibel, Sven; Lörinczi, Èva; Bamberg, Ernst; Friedrich, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin (BR) from Halobacterium salinarum is tightly regulated by the [H+] gradient and transmembrane potential. BR exhibits optoelectric properties, since spectral changes during the photocycle are kinetically controlled by voltage, which predestines BR for optical storage or processing devices. BR mutants with prolonged lifetime of the blue-shifted M intermediate would be advantageous, but the optoelectric properties of such mutants are still elusive. Using expression in Xenopus oocytes and two-electrode voltage-clamping, we analyzed photocurrents of BR mutants with kinetically destabilized (F171C, F219L) or stabilized (D96N, D96G) M intermediate in response to green light (to probe H+ pumping) and blue laser flashes (to probe accumulation/decay of M). These mutants have divergent M lifetimes. As for BR-WT, this strictly correlates with the voltage dependence of H+ pumping. BR-F171C and BR-F219L showed photocurrents similar to BR-WT. Yet, BR-F171C showed a weaker voltage dependence of proton pumping. For both mutants, blue laser flashes applied during and after green-light illumination showed reduced M accumulation and shorter M lifetime. In contrast, BR-D96G and BR-D96N exhibited small photocurrents, with nonlinear current-voltage curves, which increased strongly in the presence of azide. Blue laser flashes showed heavy M accumulation and prolonged M lifetime, which accounts for the strongly reduced H+ pumping rate. Hyperpolarizing potentials augmented these effects. The combination of M-stabilizing and -destabilizing mutations in BR-D96G/F171C/F219L (BR-tri) shows that disruption of the primary proton donor Asp-96 is fatal for BR as a proton pump. Mechanistically, M destabilizing mutations cannot compensate for the disruption of Asp-96. Accordingly, BR-tri and BR-D96G photocurrents were similar. However, BR-tri showed negative blue laser flash-induced currents even without actinic green light, indicating that Schiff base

  12. How cytochrome c oxidase can pump four protons per oxygen molecule at high electrochemical gradient.

    PubMed

    Blomberg, Margareta R A; Siegbahn, Per E M

    2015-03-01

    Experiments have shown that the A-family cytochrome c oxidases pump four protons per oxygen molecule, also at a high electrochemical gradient. This has been considered a puzzle, since two of the reduction potentials involved, Cu(II) and Fe(III), were estimated from experiments to be too low to afford proton pumping at a high gradient. The present quantum mechanical study (using hybrid density functional theory) suggests a solution to this puzzle. First, the calculations show that the charge compensated Cu(II) potential for CuB is actually much higher than estimated from experiment, of the same order as the reduction potentials for the tyrosyl radical and the ferryl group, which are also involved in the catalytic cycle. The reason for the discrepancy between theory and experiment is the very large uncertainty in the experimental observations used to estimate the equilibrium potentials, mainly caused by the lack of methods for direct determination of reduced CuB. Second, the calculations show that a high energy metastable state, labeled EH, is involved during catalytic turnover. The EH state mixes the low reduction potential of Fe(III) in heme a3 with another, higher potential, here suggested to be that of the tyrosyl radical, resulting in enough exergonicity to allow proton pumping at a high gradient. In contrast, the corresponding metastable oxidized state, OH, is not significantly higher in energy than the resting state, O. Finally, to secure the involvement of the high energy EH state it is suggested that only one proton is taken up via the K-channel during catalytic turnover.

  13. Apical endosomes isolated from kidney collecting duct principal cells lack subunits of the proton pumping ATPase

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Endocytic vesicles that are involved in the vasopressin-stimulated recycling of water channels to and from the apical membrane of kidney collecting duct principal cells were isolated from rat renal papilla by differential and Percoll density gradient centrifugation. Fluorescence quenching measurements showed that the isolated vesicles maintained a high, HgCl2-sensitive water permeability, consistent with the presence of vasopressin-sensitive water channels. They did not, however, exhibit ATP-dependent luminal acidification, nor any N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive ATPase activity, properties that are characteristic of most acidic endosomal compartments. Western blotting with specific antibodies showed that the 31- and 70-kD cytoplasmically oriented subunits of the vacuolar proton pump were not detectable in these apical endosomes from the papilla, whereas they were present in endosomes prepared in parallel from the cortex. In contrast, the 56-kD subunit of the proton pump was abundant in papillary endosomes, and was localized at the apical pole of principal cells by immunocytochemistry. Finally, an antibody that recognizes the 16-kD transmembrane subunit of oat tonoplast ATPase cross-reacted with a distinct 16-kD band in cortical endosomes, but no 16-kD band was detectable in endosomes from the papilla. This antibody also recognized a 16-kD band in affinity- purified H+ ATPase preparations from bovine kidney medulla. Therefore, early endosomes derived from the apical plasma membrane of collecting duct principal cells fail to acidify because they lack functionally important subunits of a vacuolar-type proton pumping ATPase, including the 16-kD transmembrane domain that serves as the proton-conducting channel, and the 70-kD cytoplasmic subunit that contains the ATPase catalytic site. This specialized, non-acidic early endosomal compartment appears to be involved primarily in the hormonally induced recycling of water channels to and from the apical plasma membrane of

  14. The Mg2+-containing Water Cluster of Mammalian Cytochrome c Oxidase Collects Four Pumping Proton Equivalents in Each Catalytic Cycle.

    PubMed

    Yano, Naomine; Muramoto, Kazumasa; Shimada, Atsuhiro; Takemura, Shuhei; Baba, Junpei; Fujisawa, Hidenori; Mochizuki, Masao; Shinzawa-Itoh, Kyoko; Yamashita, Eiki; Tsukihara, Tomitake; Yoshikawa, Shinya

    2016-11-11

    Bovine heart cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) pumps four proton equivalents per catalytic cycle through the H-pathway, a proton-conducting pathway, which includes a hydrogen bond network and a water channel operating in tandem. Protons are transferred by H3O(+) through the water channel from the N-side into the hydrogen bond network, where they are pumped to the P-side by electrostatic repulsion between protons and net positive charges created at heme a as a result of electron donation to O2 bound to heme a3 To block backward proton movement, the water channel remains closed after O2 binding until the sequential four-proton pumping process is complete. Thus, the hydrogen bond network must collect four proton equivalents before O2 binding. However, a region with the capacity to accept four proton equivalents was not discernable in the x-ray structures of the hydrogen bond network. The present x-ray structures of oxidized/reduced bovine CcO are improved from 1.8/1.9 to 1.5/1.6 Å resolution, increasing the structural information by 1.7/1.6 times and revealing that a large water cluster, which includes a Mg(2+) ion, is linked to the H-pathway. The cluster contains enough proton acceptor groups to retain four proton equivalents. The redox-coupled x-ray structural changes in Glu(198), which bridges the Mg(2+) and CuA (the initial electron acceptor from cytochrome c) sites, suggest that the CuA-Glu(198)-Mg(2+) system drives redox-coupled transfer of protons pooled in the water cluster to the H-pathway. Thus, these x-ray structures indicate that the Mg(2+)-containing water cluster is the crucial structural element providing the effective proton pumping in bovine CcO.

  15. Enhancement of survival and electricity production in an engineered bacterium by light-driven proton pumping.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ethan T; Baron, Daniel B; Naranjo, Belén; Bond, Daniel R; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia; Gralnick, Jeffrey A

    2010-07-01

    Microorganisms can use complex photosystems or light-dependent proton pumps to generate membrane potential and/or reduce electron carriers to support growth. The discovery that proteorhodopsin is a light-dependent proton pump that can be expressed readily in recombinant bacteria enables development of new strategies to probe microbial physiology and to engineer microbes with new light-driven properties. Here, we describe functional expression of proteorhodopsin and light-induced changes in membrane potential in the bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. We report that there were significant increases in electrical current generation during illumination of electrochemical chambers containing S. oneidensis expressing proteorhodopsin. We present evidence that an engineered strain is able to consume lactate at an increased rate when it is illuminated, which is consistent with the hypothesis that proteorhodopsin activity enhances lactate uptake by increasing the proton motive force. Our results demonstrate that there is coupling of a light-driven process to electricity generation in a nonphotosynthetic engineered bacterium. Expression of proteorhodopsin also preserved the viability of the bacterium under nutrient-limited conditions, providing evidence that fulfillment of basic energy needs of organisms may explain the widespread distribution of proteorhodopsin in marine environments.

  16. Design of photoactive ruthenium complexes to study electron transfer and proton pumping in cytochrome oxidase.

    PubMed

    Durham, Bill; Millett, Francis

    2012-04-01

    This review describes the development and application of photoactive ruthenium complexes to study electron transfer and proton pumping reactions in cytochrome c oxidase (CcO). CcO uses four electrons from Cc to reduce O(2) to two waters, and pumps four protons across the membrane. The electron transfer reactions in cytochrome oxidase are very rapid, and cannot be resolved by stopped-flow mixing techniques. Methods have been developed to covalently attach a photoactive tris(bipyridine)ruthenium group [Ru(II)] to Cc to form Ru-39-Cc. Photoexcitation of Ru(II) to the excited state Ru(II*), a strong reductant, leads to rapid electron transfer to the ferric heme group in Cc, followed by electron transfer to Cu(A) in CcO with a rate constant of 60,000s(-1). Ruthenium kinetics and mutagenesis studies have been used to define the domain for the interaction between Cc and CcO. New ruthenium dimers have also been developed to rapidly inject electrons into Cu(A) of CcO with yields as high as 60%, allowing measurement of the kinetics of electron transfer and proton release at each step in the oxygen reduction mechanism.

  17. A blue-shifted light-driven proton pump for neural silencing.

    PubMed

    Sudo, Yuki; Okazaki, Ayako; Ono, Hikaru; Yagasaki, Jin; Sugo, Seiya; Kamiya, Motoshi; Reissig, Louisa; Inoue, Keiichi; Ihara, Kunio; Kandori, Hideki; Takagi, Shin; Hayashi, Shigehiko

    2013-07-12

    Ion-transporting rhodopsins are widely utilized as optogenetic tools both for light-induced neural activation and silencing. The most studied representative is Bacteriorhodopsin (BR), which absorbs green/red light (∼570 nm) and functions as a proton pump. Upon photoexcitation, BR induces a hyperpolarization across the membrane, which, if incorporated into a nerve cell, results in its neural silencing. In this study, we show that several residues around the retinal chromophore, which are completely conserved among BR homologs from the archaea, are involved in the spectral tuning in a BR homolog (HwBR) and that the combination mutation causes a large spectral blue shift (λmax = 498 nm) while preserving the robust pumping activity. Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations revealed that, compared with the wild type, the β-ionone ring of the chromophore in the mutant is rotated ∼130° because of the lack of steric hindrance between the methyl groups of the retinal and the mutated residues, resulting in the breakage of the π conjugation system on the polyene chain of the retinal. By the same mutations, similar spectral blue shifts are also observed in another BR homolog, archearhodopsin-3 (also called Arch). The color variant of archearhodopsin-3 could be successfully expressed in the neural cells of Caenorhabditis elegans, and illumination with blue light (500 nm) led to the effective locomotory paralysis of the worms. Thus, we successfully produced a blue-shifted proton pump for neural silencing.

  18. Potential regulatory phosphorylation sites in a Medicago truncatula plasma membrane proton pump implicated during early symbiotic signaling in roots.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thao T; Volkening, Jeremy D; Rose, Christopher M; Venkateshwaran, Muthusubramanian; Westphall, Michael S; Coon, Joshua J; Ané, Jean-Michel; Sussman, Michael R

    2015-08-04

    In plants and fungi the plasma membrane proton pump generates a large proton-motive force that performs essential functions in many processes, including solute transport and the control of cell elongation. Previous studies in yeast and higher plants have indicated that phosphorylation of an auto-inhibitory domain is involved in regulating pump activity. In this report we examine the Medicago truncatula plasma membrane proton pump gene family, and in particular MtAHA5. Yeast complementation assays with phosphomimetic mutations at six candidate sites support a phosphoregulatory role for two residues, suggesting a molecular model to explain early Nod factor-induced changes in the plasma membrane proton-motive force of legume root cells.

  19. Respiratory Complex I in Bos taurus and Paracoccus denitrificans Pumps Four Protons across the Membrane for Every NADH Oxidized.

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew J Y; Blaza, James N; Varghese, Febin; Hirst, Judy

    2017-03-24

    Respiratory complex I couples electron transfer between NADH and ubiquinone to proton translocation across an energy-transducing membrane to support the proton-motive force that drives ATP synthesis. The proton-pumping stoichiometry of complex I (i.e. the number of protons pumped for each two electrons transferred) underpins all mechanistic proposals. However, it remains controversial and has not been determined for any of the bacterial enzymes that are exploited as model systems for the mammalian enzyme. Here, we describe a simple method for determining the proton-pumping stoichiometry of complex I in inverted membrane vesicles under steady-state ADP-phosphorylating conditions. Our method exploits the rate of ATP synthesis, driven by oxidation of NADH or succinate with different sections of the respiratory chain engaged in catalysis as a proxy for the rate of proton translocation and determines the stoichiometry of complex I by reference to the known stoichiometries of complexes III and IV. Using vesicles prepared from mammalian mitochondria (from Bos taurus) and from the bacterium Paracoccus denitrificans, we show that four protons are pumped for every two electrons transferred in both cases. By confirming the four-proton stoichiometry for mammalian complex I and, for the first time, demonstrating the same value for a bacterial complex, we establish the utility of P. denitrificans complex I as a model system for the mammalian enzyme. P. denitrificans is the first system described in which mutagenesis in any complex I core subunit may be combined with quantitative proton-pumping measurements for mechanistic studies.

  20. Respiratory Complex I in Bos taurus and Paracoccus denitrificans Pumps Four Protons across the Membrane for Every NADH Oxidized*

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Andrew J. Y.; Blaza, James N.; Varghese, Febin; Hirst, Judy

    2017-01-01

    Respiratory complex I couples electron transfer between NADH and ubiquinone to proton translocation across an energy-transducing membrane to support the proton-motive force that drives ATP synthesis. The proton-pumping stoichiometry of complex I (i.e. the number of protons pumped for each two electrons transferred) underpins all mechanistic proposals. However, it remains controversial and has not been determined for any of the bacterial enzymes that are exploited as model systems for the mammalian enzyme. Here, we describe a simple method for determining the proton-pumping stoichiometry of complex I in inverted membrane vesicles under steady-state ADP-phosphorylating conditions. Our method exploits the rate of ATP synthesis, driven by oxidation of NADH or succinate with different sections of the respiratory chain engaged in catalysis as a proxy for the rate of proton translocation and determines the stoichiometry of complex I by reference to the known stoichiometries of complexes III and IV. Using vesicles prepared from mammalian mitochondria (from Bos taurus) and from the bacterium Paracoccus denitrificans, we show that four protons are pumped for every two electrons transferred in both cases. By confirming the four-proton stoichiometry for mammalian complex I and, for the first time, demonstrating the same value for a bacterial complex, we establish the utility of P. denitrificans complex I as a model system for the mammalian enzyme. P. denitrificans is the first system described in which mutagenesis in any complex I core subunit may be combined with quantitative proton-pumping measurements for mechanistic studies. PMID:28174301

  1. Prescribing patterns and economic costs of proton pump inhibitors in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Alejandra; Castrillón, Juan Daniel; Campo, Carlos Felipe; Echeverri, Luis Felipe; Gaviria, Andrés; Londoño, Manuel José; Ochoa, Sergio Andrés; Ruíz, Joaquín Octavio

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prescribing patterns for proton pump inhibitors and to estimate the economic cost of their use in a group of patients affiliated with the Colombian Health System. Methods: This is a descriptive observational study. Data for analysis consisted of prescriptions dispensed between October 1st, 2010 and October 31st, 2010 and were collected from a systematic database of 4.2 million members. Socio-demographic variables were considered along with the defined daily dose,comedication, convenience of the indication for proton pump inhibitor use and costs. Results: In this study, 113,560 prescriptions were dispensed in 89 cities, mostly to women (57.6%) with a mean age of 54.4 ± 18.7 years; the drugs were omeprazole (n= 111.294; 97.81%),esomeprazole (n= 1.378; 1.2%), lansoprazole (n= 524; 0.4%), pantoprazole and rabeprazole. The indication for 87.349 of the formulas (76.9%) was justified and statistically associated with the use of NSAIDs, antithrombotics, corticosteroids, anti-ulcer, antibiotics and prokinetics. No justification was found for 26.211 (23.1%) of the prescriptions, which were associated with antidiabetics, antihypertensives, hypolipidemics and others (p <0.001).The annual justified cost was estimated to be US$ 1,654,701 and the unjustified cost was estimated to be U.S. $2,202,590, as calculated using the minimum reference prices. Discussion: Each month, the Colombian health system is overloaded by unjustified costs that include payments for non-approved indications of proton pump inhibitors and for drugs outside the list of essential medications. This issue is contributing to rising costs of healthcare in Colombia. PMID:24892316

  2. Proton Pump Inhibitor Prophylaxis After Gastric Bypass Does Not Cause Hypomagnesemia.

    PubMed

    Boerlage, Thomas C C; van Hees, Charlotte L E; Huitema, Alwin D R; Lauw, Fanny N

    2016-03-01

    Proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-induced hypomagnesemia is currently a major topic. Patients undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass are generally prescribed PPI prophylaxis after surgery. We investigated the prevalence of hypomagnesemia in our bariatric population. We reviewed the files of 1000 postoperative patients for serum magnesium level during PPI use. We found only five cases of hypomagnesemia, none of which was evidently related to PPI use. We conclude that the risk of hypomagnesemia during 1 year of prophylactic PPI use after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is minimal and laboratory screening is probably not necessary.

  3. Proton Pump Inhibitor use in Hospitalized Patients: Is Overutilization Becoming a Problem?

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Cheryl; Willett, Kristine C.; Desilets, Alicia R.

    2012-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are among the most common classes of medications prescribed. Though they were previously thought of as safe, recent literature has shown risks associated with their use including increased risk for Clostridium difficile infection, pneumonia, and fractures. Due to these risks, it is important to determine if PPIs are being used appropriately. This review evaluates seven studies in hospitalized patients. Additionally, this review evaluates literature pertaining to recently discovered adverse reactions; all studies found PPIs are being overutilized. Findings highlight the importance of evaluating appropriate therapy with these agents and recommending discontinuation if a proper indication does not exist. PMID:24833936

  4. Evidence-based assessment of proton-pump inhibitors in Helicobacter pylori eradication: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraja, Vinayak; Eslick, Guy D

    2014-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease continues to be issue especially due to its high prevalence in the developing world. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection associated duodenal ulcers should undergo eradication therapy. There are many regimens offered for H. pylori eradication which include triple, quadruple, or sequential therapy regimens. The central aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the evidence for H. pylori therapy from a meta-analytical outlook. The consequence of the dose, type of proton-pump inhibitor, and the length of the treatment will be debated. The most important risk factor for eradication failure is resistance to clarithromycin and metronidazole. PMID:25356018

  5. Conformational changes in the archaerhodopsin-3 proton pump: detection of conserved strongly hydrogen bonded water networks.

    PubMed

    Clair, Erica C Saint; Ogren, John I; Mamaev, Sergey; Kralj, Joel M; Rothschild, Kenneth J

    2012-01-01

    Archaerhodopsin-3 (AR3) is a light-driven proton pump from Halorubrum sodomense, but little is known about its photocycle. Recent interest has focused on AR3 because of its ability to serve both as a high-performance, genetically-targetable optical silencer of neuronal activity and as a membrane voltage sensor. We examined light-activated structural changes of the protein, retinal chromophore, and internal water molecules during the photocycle of AR3. Low-temperature and rapid-scan time-resolved FTIR-difference spectroscopy revealed that conformational changes during formation of the K, M, and N photocycle intermediates are similar, although not identical, to bacteriorhodopsin (BR). Positive/negative bands in the region above 3,600 cm( - 1), which have previously been assigned to structural changes of weakly hydrogen bonded internal water molecules, were substantially different between AR3 and BR. This included the absence of positive bands recently associated with a chain of proton transporting water molecules in the cytoplasmic channel and a weakly hydrogen bonded water (W401), which is part of a hydrogen-bonded pentagonal cluster located near the retinal Schiff base. However, many of the broad IR continuum absorption changes below 3,000 cm( - 1) assigned to networks of water molecules involved in proton transport through cytoplasmic and extracellular portions in BR were very similar in AR3. This work and subsequent studies comparing BR and AR3 structural changes will help identify conserved elements in BR-like proton pumps as well as bioengineer AR3 to optimize neural silencing and voltage sensing.

  6. Towards theoretical analysis of long-range proton transfer kinetics in biomolecular pumps

    PubMed Central

    König, P. H.; Ghosh, N.; Hoffmann, M.; Elstner, M.; Tajkhorshid, E.; Frauenheim, Th.; Cui, Q.

    2008-01-01

    Motivated by the long-term goal of theoretically analyzing long-range proton transfer (PT) kinetics in biomolecular pumps, a number of technical developments were made in the framework of QM/MM simulations. A set of collective reaction co-ordinates is proposed for characterizing the progress of long-range proton transfers; unlike previous suggestions, the new coordinates can describe PT along highly non-linear three-dimensional pathways. Calculations using a realistic model of carbonic anhydrase demonstrated that adiabatic mapping using these collective coordinates gives reliable energetics and critical geometrical parameters as compared to minimum energy path calculations, which suggests that the new coordinates can be effectively used as reaction coordinate in potential of mean force calculations for long-range PT in complex systems. In addition, the generalized solvent boundary potential was implemented in the QM/MM framework for rectangular geometries, which is useful for studying reactions in membrane systems. The resulting protocol was found to produce water structure in the interior of aquaporin consistent with previous studies including much larger number of explicit solvent and lipid molecules. The effect of electrostatics for PT through membrane protein was also illustrated with a simple model channel embedded in different dielectric continuum environments. The encouraging results observed so far suggest that robust theoretical analysis of long-range PT kinetics in biomolecular pumps can soon be realized in a QM/MM framework. PMID:16405327

  7. Structure of a Prokaryotic Virtual Proton Pump at 3.2 Astroms Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Y.; Jayaram, H; Shane, T; Partensky, L; Wu, F; williams, C; Xiong, Y; Miller, C

    2009-01-01

    To reach the mammalian gut, enteric bacteria must pass through the stomach. Many such organisms survive exposure to the harsh gastric environment (pH 1.5-4) by mounting extreme acid-resistance responses, one of which, the arginine-dependent system of Escherichia coli, has been studied at levels of cellular physiology, molecular genetics and protein biochemistry. This multiprotein system keeps the cytoplasm above pH 5 during acid challenge by continually pumping protons out of the cell using the free energy of arginine decarboxylation. At the heart of the process is a 'virtual proton pump' in the inner membrane, called AdiC, that imports L-arginine from the gastric juice and exports its decarboxylation product agmatine. AdiC belongs to the APC superfamily of membrane proteins, which transports amino acids, polyamines and organic cations in a multitude of biological roles, including delivery of arginine for nitric oxide synthesis, facilitation of insulin release from pancreatic beta-cells, and, when inappropriately overexpressed, provisioning of certain fast-growing neoplastic cells with amino acids. High-resolution structures and detailed transport mechanisms of APC transporters are currently unknown. Here we describe a crystal structure of AdiC at 3.2 A resolution. The protein is captured in an outward-open, substrate-free conformation with transmembrane architecture remarkably similar to that seen in four other families of apparently unrelated transport proteins.

  8. Structure of a prokaryotic virtual proton pump at 3.2 Å resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Yiling; Jayaram, Hariharan; Shane, Tania; Kolmakova-Partensky, Ludmila; Wu, Fang; Williams, Carole; Xiong, Yong; Miller, Christopher

    2009-09-15

    To reach the mammalian gut, enteric bacteria must pass through the stomach. Many such organisms survive exposure to the harsh gastric environment (pH 1.5-4) by mounting extreme acid-resistance responses, one of which, the arginine-dependent system of Escherichia coli, has been studied at levels of cellular physiology, molecular genetics and protein biochemistry. This multiprotein system keeps the cytoplasm above pH 5 during acid challenge by continually pumping protons out of the cell using the free energy of arginine decarboxylation. At the heart of the process is a 'virtual proton pump' in the inner membrane, called AdiC, that imports L-arginine from the gastric juice and exports its decarboxylation product agmatine. AdiC belongs to the APC superfamily of membrane proteins, which transports amino acids, polyamines and organic cations in a multitude of biological roles, including delivery of arginine for nitric oxide synthesis, facilitation of insulin release from pancreatic {beta}-cells, and, when inappropriately overexpressed, provisioning of certain fast-growing neoplastic cells with amino acids. High-resolution structures and detailed transport mechanisms of APC transporters are currently unknown. Here we describe a crystal structure of AdiC at 3.2 {angstrom} resolution. The protein is captured in an outward-open, substrate-free conformation with transmembrane architecture remarkably similar to that seen in four other families of apparently unrelated transport proteins.

  9. The vacuolar H+-ATPase: a universal proton pump of eukaryotes.

    PubMed Central

    Finbow, M E; Harrison, M A

    1997-01-01

    The vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) is a universal component of eukaryotic organisms. It is present in the membranes of many organelles, where its proton-pumping action creates the low intra-vacuolar pH found, for example, in lysosomes. In addition, there are a number of differentiated cell types that have V-ATPases on their surface that contribute to the physiological functions of these cells. The V-ATPase is a multi-subunit enzyme composed of a membrane sector and a cytosolic catalytic sector. It is related to the familiar FoF1 ATP synthase (F-ATPase), having the same basic architectural construction, and many of the subunits from the two display identity with one another. All the core subunits of the V-ATPase have now been identified and much is known about the assembly, regulation and pharmacology of the enzyme. Recent genetic analysis has shown the V-ATPase to be a vital component of higher eukaryotes. At least one of the subunits, i.e. subunit c (ductin), may have multifunctional roles in membrane transport, providing a possible pathway of communication between cells. The structure of the membrane sector is known in some detail, and it is possible to begin to suggest how proton pumping is coupled to ATP hydrolysis. PMID:9210392

  10. Review article: prevention of stress-related mucosal bleeding with proton-pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Maton, P N

    2005-12-01

    Stress-related gastric mucosal bleeding occurs in a substantial number of critically ill patients, with clinically important gastrointestinal bleeding prolonging intensive care stay and increasing mortality. This paper reviews the role of proton-pump inhibitors in the prevention of stress-related mucosal bleeding. Bleeding prophylaxis appears to be warranted in patients in intensive care units on mechanical ventilation or those who have coagulopathy. Intravenous histamine H2 receptor antagonists, particularly cimetidine, have demonstrated efficacy for the prevention of bleeding in critically ill patients. Standard delayed-release proton-pump inhibitors have not been extensively studied in this patient group, but there are some data to support their efficacy in increasing intragastric pH, and in the case of intravenous pantoprazole in preventing gastrointestinal bleeding. In a large, randomized controlled trial, immediate-release omeprazole [(IR-OME) Zegerid powder for oral suspension; Santarus Inc., San Diego, CA, USA] administered via gastric tube, was as effective as intravenous cimetidine in the prevention of clinically significant bleeding, and more effective in increasing gastric pH. Effective antisecretory therapy does not appear to increase the risk of nosocomial pneumonia. In conclusion, immediate-release omeprazole provides a safe and effective alternative to intravenous cimetidine for the prevention of stress-related mucosal bleeding in critically ill patients.

  11. Toward theoretical analysis of long-range proton transfer kinetics in biomolecular pumps.

    PubMed

    König, P H; Ghosh, N; Hoffmann, M; Elstner, M; Tajkhorshid, E; Frauenheim, Th; Cui, Q

    2006-01-19

    Motivated by the long-term goal of theoretically analyzing long-range proton transfer (PT) kinetics in biomolecular pumps, researchers made a number of technical developments in the framework of quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations. A set of collective reaction coordinates is proposed for characterizing the progress of long-range proton transfers; unlike previous suggestions, the new coordinates can describe PT along highly nonlinear three-dimensional pathways. Calculations using a realistic model of carbonic anhydrase demonstrated that adiabatic mapping using these collective coordinates gives reliable energetics and critical geometrical parameters as compared to minimum energy path calculations, which suggests that the new coordinates can be effectively used as reaction coordinate in potential of mean force calculations for long-range PT in complex systems. In addition, the generalized solvent boundary potential was implemented in the QM/MM framework for rectangular geometries, which is useful for studying reactions in membrane systems. The resulting protocol was found to produce water structure in the interior of aquaporin consistent with previous studies including a much larger number of explicit solvent and lipid molecules. The effect of electrostatics for PT through a membrane protein was also illustrated with a simple model channel embedded in different dielectric continuum environments. The encouraging results observed so far suggest that robust theoretical analysis of long-range PT kinetics in biomolecular pumps can soon be realized in a QM/MM framework.

  12. Characteristics of the proton pump in rat renal cortical endocytotic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Sabolić, I; Burckhardt, G

    1986-05-01

    The characteristics of the H+ pump in isolated rat renal endocytotic vesicles were studied by the delta pH-sensitive dye acridine orange, the voltage-sensitive dye 3,3'-dipropylthiadicarbocyanine iodide, and by a coupled optical ATPase assay. Intravesicular acidification depended on ATP and Mg2+ concentrations with half-maximal activations at 73 and 77 microM, respectively. CTP, GTP, UTP, and ITP partially supported acidification, but ADP and AMP did not. Ouabain, ethoxzolamide, levamisole, and vanadate did not inhibit H+ uptake into endocytotic vesicles. Oligomycin inhibited partially. Depending on concentration and preincubation time, Dio-9, filipin, N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), and dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) inhibited H+ uptake completely. Filipin and, partially, DCCD acted nonspecifically by dissipating pH gradients. A specific cation was not required for the H+ pump; Zn2+ inhibited. Compared with mannitol, ATP-driven H+ uptake was stimulated by SCN- greater than Cl- greater than Br- greater than I- much greater than HPO4(2-) = gluconate = HCO3- = F-, but not by SO4(2-), NO3-, CH3COO-, S2O3(2-), and S4O6(2-). Chloride stimulated H+ uptake from the outside of the vesicles with an apparent Km of 27 mM. In the absence of Cl-, ATP-driven proton uptake was increased by intravesicular K+ and valinomycin, suggesting that the pump is electrogenic. The electrogenicity, however, could not be demonstrated with voltage-sensitive dyes. The vesicle membrane contains no significant K+ and Cl- conductances; only a conductance for H+ was found. The vesicles exhibited an ouabain-, oligomycin-, and vanadate-insensitive ATPase activity that was inhibited by DCCD and NEM. Our data indicate the presence of an electrogenic H+ pump in endocytotic vesicles from rat renal proximal tubules with similar characteristics as H+ pumps present in various intracellular (nonmitochondrial) membranes.

  13. Engineering a Chemical Switch into the Light-driven Proton Pump Proteorhodopsin by Cysteine Mutagenesis and Thiol Modification.

    PubMed

    Harder, Daniel; Hirschi, Stephan; Ucurum, Zöhre; Goers, Roland; Meier, Wolfgang; Müller, Daniel J; Fotiadis, Dimitrios

    2016-07-25

    For applications in synthetic biology, for example, the bottom-up assembly of biomolecular nanofactories, modules of specific and controllable functionalities are essential. Of fundamental importance in such systems are energizing modules, which are able to establish an electrochemical gradient across a vesicular membrane as an energy source for powering other modules. Light-driven proton pumps like proteorhodopsin (PR) are excellent candidates for efficient energy conversion. We have extended the versatility of PR by implementing an on/off switch based on reversible chemical modification of a site-specifically introduced cysteine residue. The position of this cysteine residue in PR was identified by structure-based cysteine mutagenesis combined with a proton-pumping assay using E. coli cells overexpressing PR and PR proteoliposomes. The identified PR mutant represents the first light-driven proton pump that can be chemically switched on/off depending on the requirements of the molecular system.

  14. A quantum chemical study of the mechanism for proton-coupled electron transfer leading to proton pumping in cytochrome c oxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.; Siegbahn, Per E. M.

    2010-10-01

    The proton pumping mechanism in cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal enzyme in the respiratory chain, has been investigated using hybrid DFT with large chemical models. In previous studies, a gating mechanism was suggested based on electrostatic interpretations of kinetic experiments. The predictions from that analysis are tested here. The main result is that the suggestion of a positively charged transition state for proton transfer is confirmed, while some other suggestions for the gating are not supported. It is shown that a few critical relative energy values from the earlier studies are reproduced with quite high accuracy using the present model calculations. Examples are the forward barrier for proton transfer from the N-side of the membrane to the pump-loading site when the heme a cofactor is reduced, and the corresponding back leakage barrier when heme a is oxidised. An interesting new finding is an unexpected double-well potential for proton transfer from the N-side to the pump-loading site. In the intermediate between the two transition states found, the proton is bound to PropD on heme a. A possible purpose of this type of potential surface is suggested here. The accuracy of the present values are discussed in terms of their sensitivity to the choice of dielectric constant. Only one energy value, which is not critical for the present mechanism, varies significantly with this choice and is therefore less certain.

  15. The voltage-dependent proton pumping in bacteriorhodopsin is characterized by optoelectric behavior.

    PubMed

    Geibel, S; Friedrich, T; Ormos, P; Wood, P G; Nagel, G; Bamberg, E

    2001-10-01

    The light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin (bR) was functionally expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and in HEK-293 cells. The latter expression system allowed high time resolution of light-induced current signals. A detailed voltage clamp and patch clamp study was performed to investigate the DeltapH versus Deltapsi dependence of the pump current. The following results were obtained. The current voltage behavior of bR is linear in the measurable range between -160 mV and +60 mV. The pH dependence is less than expected from thermodynamic principles, i.e., one DeltapH unit produces a shift of the apparent reversal potential of 34 mV (and not 58 mV). The M(2)-BR decay shows a significant voltage dependence with time constants changing from 20 ms at +60 mV to 80 ms at -160 mV. The linear I-V curve can be reconstructed by this behavior. However, the slope of the decay rate shows a weaker voltage dependence than the stationary photocurrent, indicating that an additional process must be involved in the voltage dependence of the pump. A slowly decaying M intermediate (decay time > 100 ms) could already be detected at zero voltage by electrical and spectroscopic means. In effect, bR shows optoelectric behavior. The long-lived M can be transferred into the active photocycle by depolarizing voltage pulses. This is experimentally demonstrated by a distinct charge displacement. From the results we conclude that the transport cycle of bR branches via a long-lived M(1)* in a voltage-dependent manner into a nontransporting cycle, where the proton release and uptake occur on the extracellular side.

  16. Mechanism of proton pumping by plant plasma membrane H+-ATPase: role of residues in transmembrane segments 5 and 6.

    PubMed

    Palmgren, M G; Buch-Pedersen, M J; Møller, A L

    2003-04-01

    The mechanism of proton pumping by P-type plasma membrane H(+)-ATPases is not well clarified. Site-directed mutagenesis studies suggest that Asp684, situated in transmembrane segment M6, is involved in coordination of proton(s) in plant plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase. This hypothesis is supported by atomic models of H(+)-ATPases built on the basis of the crystal structure of the related SERCA1a Ca(2+)-ATPase. However, more biochemical, genetic, and structural studies are required before we will be able to understand the nature of the proton binding site(s) in P-type H(+)-ATPases and the mechanism of action of these pumps.

  17. Redox Bohr effects and the role of heme a in the proton pump of bovine heart cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Capitanio, Giuseppe; Martino, Pietro Luca; Capitanio, Nazzareno; Papa, Sergio

    2011-10-01

    Structural and functional observations are reviewed which provide evidence for a central role of redox Bohr effect linked to the low-spin heme a in the proton pump of bovine heart cytochrome c oxidase. Data on the membrane sidedness of Bohr protons linked to anaerobic oxido-reduction of the individual metal centers in the liposome reconstituted oxidase are analysed. Redox Bohr protons coupled to anaerobic oxido-reduction of heme a (and Cu(A)) and Cu(B) exhibit membrane vectoriality, i.e. protons are taken up from the inner space upon reduction of these centers and released in the outer space upon their oxidation. Redox Bohr protons coupled to anaerobic oxido-reduction of heme a(3) do not, on the contrary, exhibit vectorial nature: protons are exchanged only with the outer space. A model of the proton pump of the oxidase, in which redox Bohr protons linked to the low-spin heme a play a central role, is described. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Allosteric cooperativity in respiratory proteins.

  18. Protein-bound water as the determinant of asymmetric functional conversion between light-driven proton and chloride pumps.

    PubMed

    Muroda, Kosuke; Nakashima, Keisuke; Shibata, Mikihiro; Demura, Makoto; Kandori, Hideki

    2012-06-12

    Bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and halorhodopsin (HR) are light-driven outward proton and inward chloride pumps, respectively. They have similar protein architecture, being composed of seven-transmembrane helices that bind an all-trans-retinal. BR can be converted into a chloride pump by a single amino acid replacement at position 85, suggesting that BR and HR share a common transport mechanism, and the ionic specificity is determined by the amino acid at that position. However, HR cannot be converted into a proton pump by the corresponding reverse mutation. Here we mutated 6 and 10 amino acids of HR into BR-like, whereas such multiple HR mutants never pump protons. Light-induced Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed that hydrogen bonds of the retinal Schiff base and water are both strong for BR and both weak for HR. Multiple HR mutants exhibit strong hydrogen bonds of the Schiff base, but the hydrogen bond of water is still weak. We concluded that the cause of nonfunctional conversion of HR is the lack of strongly hydrogen-bonded water, the functional determinant of the proton pump.

  19. [In vitro susceptibility of Trichomonas vaginalis to metronidazole, ornidazole and proton pump inhibitors pantoprazole and esomeprazole].

    PubMed

    Aksoy Gökmen, Ayşegül; Girginkardeşler, Nogay; Kilimcioğlu, Ali Ahmet; Şirin, Mümtaz Cem; Özbilgin, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    The current treatment of trichomoniasis is based on the use of 5-nitroimidazole derivatives. Although metronidazole is reliable, inexpensive and highly effective against anaerobic microorganisms and protozoa, the development of metronidazole-resistant T.vaginalis strains pose to an increasing problem. Nitroimidazoles are compounds having azomycin (2-nitroimidazole) chemical structure and are obtained from Streptomyces strains. Benzimidazole, which is found in the structure of proton pump inhibitors, is also present in the other components that have antiprotozoal activity. In this study, the in vitro susceptibility of T.vaginalis against metronidazole, ornidazole, and the proton pump inhibitors which are tested recently as antiprotozoal agents; pantoprazole and esomeprazole was investigated. For this purpose a clinical T.vaginalis strain which was formerly isolated and stored after cryopreservation process in our laboratory was used. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum lethal concentration (MLC) values of those agents against to this strain were determined in vitro by dilution method in 24-well cell culture plates. Trypticase yeast extract maltose medium, horse serum and antibiotic (penicillin + streptomycin) were distributed to each well of cell culture plates and after metronidazole, ornidazole, pantoprazole and esomeprazole solutions were added to two wells for each as 800, 400, 200, 100, 50 and 25 µg/ml, followed by the addition of 1 ml 5x10(3) T.vaginalis trophozoites into each well. Plates were incubated at 37°C, and viability and motility of the trophozoites were evaluated under light microscope at 24, 48 and 72 hours after incubation. MIC and MLC values of metronidazole/ornidazole in the 72(th) hour were found as 50 µg/ml and 100 µg/ml, respectively. MIC and MLC values for pantoprazole in the 72th hour were 200 µg/ml and 400 µg/ml, while the values for esomeprazole were 400 µg/ml ve 800 µg/ml, respectively. As a result, T

  20. Negative chronotropic effect of proton pump inhibitors on frog-heart preparation.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Chander Shekhar; Utreja, Amita; Goel, Divya; Sandhu, Gurpreet; Gogia, Nidhi

    2009-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been known to cause bradycardia. We evaluated the effect of three PPIs, i.e. omeprazole, rabeprazole and pantoprazole on the heart rate of frog. The in situ frog heart preparation was set up. Heart rate and amplitude of contraction were studied following administration of different doses of the three PPIs. Statistical analysis was done by using Graphpad statistical software system. After 1 mg of omeprazole and rabeprazole, and 2 mg pantoprazole, the heart rate was similar as compared to baseline (p >0.05). After 2 mg of omeprazole and rabeprazole, and 4 mg pantoprazole, the reduction in heart rate was significant (p <0.05). In addition, pantoprazole caused negative ionotropic effect. The three PPIs showed a dose-dependent negative chronotropic effect in the frog heart prepration.

  1. Which is the best choice for gastroesophageal disorders: Melatonin or proton pump inhibitors?

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Torres, Joanna Dulce Favacho; de Souza Pereira, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    Melatonin is used in many countries to improve sleep disorders. Melatonin is a hormone produced by the pineal gland and enterochromaffin cells which control sleep and gastrointestinal motility. Low levels of melatonin lead to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Most of patients with GERD have a sleep disorder. So, low melatonin levels is the main cause of insomnia. Beyond this, it has an inhibitory action on gastric acid secretion and seems to control the lower esophageal sphincter. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are a group of drugs whose main action is a pronounced and long-lasting reduction of gastric acid production. They are the most potent inhibitors of acid secretion available today. Omeprazole (one of the PPIs) and melatonin have similarities in their chemical structures. Therefore, we could consider omeprazole as a rough copy of melatonin. In this paper, we compare the advantages and disadvantages of the clinical use of melatonin and PPIs. PMID:21577303

  2. Magnesium Deficiency and Proton-Pump Inhibitor Use: A Clinical Review.

    PubMed

    William, Jeffrey H; Danziger, John

    2016-06-01

    The association of proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) use and hypomagnesemia has garnered much attention over the last 5 years. A large body of observational data has linked chronic PPI use with hypomagnesemia, presumably due to decreased intestinal absorption and consequent magnesium deficiency. However, despite the increasing prevalence of this highly popular class of medicine, and despite potential significant risks associated with magnesium depletion, including cardiac arrhythmias and seizures, there are no well-designed studies to delineate the nature of this observed association. Consequently, providers must use best judgment to inform clinical decision making. This review summarizes the current body of evidence linking PPI use with hypomagnesemia, acknowledges the possibility of significant residual confounding in the observational data, explains potential physiologic mechanisms, and offers clinical recommendations.

  3. Proton-pump inhibitor-induced hypomagnesemia: Current research and proposed mechanisms.

    PubMed

    William, Jeffrey H; Danziger, John

    2016-03-06

    Since the early reports nearly a decade ago, proton-pump inhibitor-induced hypomagnesemia (PPIH) has become a well-recognized phenomenon. While many observational studies in the inpatient and outpatient populations have confirmed the association of PPI exposure and serum magnesium concentrations, there are no prospective, controlled studies to support causation. Molecular mechanisms of magnesium transporters, including the pH-dependent regulation of transient receptor potential melastatin-6 transporters in the colonic enterocyte, have been proposed to explain the effect of PPIs on magnesium reabsorption, but may be a small part of a more complicated interplay of molecular biology, pharmacology, and genetic predisposition. This review explores the current state of research in the field of PPIH and the proposed mechanisms of this effect.

  4. Proton-pump inhibitor-induced hypomagnesemia: Current research and proposed mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    William, Jeffrey H; Danziger, John

    2016-01-01

    Since the early reports nearly a decade ago, proton-pump inhibitor-induced hypomagnesemia (PPIH) has become a well-recognized phenomenon. While many observational studies in the inpatient and outpatient populations have confirmed the association of PPI exposure and serum magnesium concentrations, there are no prospective, controlled studies to support causation. Molecular mechanisms of magnesium transporters, including the pH-dependent regulation of transient receptor potential melastatin-6 transporters in the colonic enterocyte, have been proposed to explain the effect of PPIs on magnesium reabsorption, but may be a small part of a more complicated interplay of molecular biology, pharmacology, and genetic predisposition. This review explores the current state of research in the field of PPIH and the proposed mechanisms of this effect. PMID:26981439

  5. Proton-pump inhibition and gastric giardiasis: a causal or casual association?

    PubMed

    Reynaert, H; Fernandes, E; Bourgain, C; Smekens, L; Devis, G

    1995-12-01

    Two patients who developed gastric giardiasis after 2 weeks of treatment with omeprazole 20 mg b.i.d. followed by omeprazole 20 mg per day for 2-6 weeks are described. In one patient, gastric giardiasis occurred in the presence of only mild intestinal metaplasia. In the other patient, Giardia lamblia infection had resolved 4 weeks after the cessation of omeprazole treatment, which, to our knowledge, is the first case reported in the literature. It is tempting to speculate that gastric giardiasis can develop in the absence of mucosal abnormalities during hypochlorhydria induced by treatment with a high dose of a proton-pump inhibitor. Specific treatment may not be required if the drug can be stopped and no other gastric disease causing hypochlorhydria is present.

  6. Beyond gastric acid reduction: Proton pump inhibitors induce heme oxygenase-1 in gastric and endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Jan C. . E-mail: beckeja@uni-muenster.de; Grosser, Nina; Waltke, Christian; Schulz, Stephanie; Erdmann, Kati; Domschke, Wolfram; Schroeder, Henning; Pohle, Thorsten

    2006-07-07

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been demonstrated to prevent gastric mucosal injury by mechanisms independent of acid inhibition. Here we demonstrate that both omeprazole and lansoprazole protect human gastric epithelial and endothelial cells against oxidative stress. This effect was abrogated in the presence of the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibitor ZnBG. Exposure to either PPI resulted in a strong induction of HO-1 expression on mRNA and protein level, and led to an increased activity of this enzyme. Expression of cyclooxygenase isoforms 1 and 2 remained unaffected, and COX-inhibitors did not antagonize HO-1 induction by PPIs. Our results suggest that the antioxidant defense protein HO-1 is a target of PPIs in both endothelial and gastric epithelial cells. HO-1 induction might account for the gastroprotective effects of PPIs independently of acid inhibition, especially in NSAID gastropathy. Moreover, our findings provide additional perspectives for a possible but yet unexplored use of PPIs in vasoprotection.

  7. Immediate and Delayed Hypersensitivity Reactions to Proton Pump Inhibitors: Evaluation and Management.

    PubMed

    Otani, Iris M; Banerji, Aleena

    2016-03-01

    PPIs are among the most commonly administered medications in the USA and are generally well tolerated. Immediate and delayed immune-mediated hypersensitivity reactions are rare but increasingly recognized adverse effects of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Immediate hypersensitivity reactions can occur due to IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to PPIs and can be evaluated by immediate hypersensitivity skin testing and oral provocation challenge testing. A desensitization protocol can be used when PPI use cannot be avoided in an allergic patient. Delayed hypersensitivity reactions to PPIs have also been reported. Occupational exposures causing cutaneous reactions to PPIs are the most commonly reported delayed hypersensitivity reaction, followed by drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus. This review presents a summary of the clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and management of immune-mediated hypersensitivity reactions to PPIs.

  8. Complete Resolution of Pseudomalignant Erosion in a Reflux Gastroesophageal Polyp with Proton Pump Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Takahiko; Yagi, Haruo; Baba, Hayato; Minamisaka, Takashi; Miwa, Shigeharu; Hayashi, Shinichi; Nishida, Takeshi; Hatta, Hideki; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Imura, Johji

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomalignant erosion is a diagnostic pitfall for pathologists in the differential diagnosis of malignant neoplasms. Here, we present a challenging case of a biopsy specimen from the eroded head of a polyp at the esophagogastric junction. A malignant neoplasm could not be ruled out due to the presence of bizarre stromal cells. A second biopsy performed after the administration of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) for 4 weeks revealed endoscopic resolution of the polyp along with the complete histological resolution of the bizarre stromal cells and led to the diagnosis of pseudomalignant erosion in a reflux gastroesophageal polyp. In conclusion, histological and endoscopic response to PPI therapy is an important clue for the correct diagnosis of reflux gastroesophageal polyps with pseudomalignant erosion. PMID:26688768

  9. Review of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling and safety of proton pump inhibitors and aspirin.

    PubMed

    Gesheff, Martin G; Franzese, Christopher J; Bliden, Kevin P; Contino, Chase J; Rafeedheen, Rahil; Tantry, Udaya S; Gurbel, Paul A

    2014-09-01

    The efficacy of aspirin in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases has been convincingly demonstrated. Gastrointestinal (GI) adverse effects with aspirin may lead to poor adherence and/or discontinuation of treatment. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been used for more than 20 years as the first choice for treating peptic ulcers and their bleeding complications, gastroesophageal reflux disease, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced GI lesions and dyspepsia. Adherence becomes a major concern when aspirin is co-prescribed with PPIs to prevent GI adverse effects. Combining aspirin and PPIs into one tablet is an effective approach to address aspirin-related GI adverse effects and increase adherence to aspirin therapy for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases.

  10. Persistent gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms despite proton pump inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Daphne; How, Choon How; Ang, Tiing Leong

    2016-01-01

    About one-third of patients with suspected gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) do not respond symptomatically to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Many of these patients do not suffer from GERD, but may have underlying functional heartburn or atypical chest pain. Other causes of failure to respond to PPIs include inadequate acid suppression, non-acid reflux, oesophageal hypersensitivity, oesophageal dysmotility and psychological comorbidities. Functional oesophageal tests can exclude cardiac and structural causes, as well as help to confi rm or exclude GERD. The use of PPIs should only be continued in the presence of acid reflux or oesophageal hypersensitivity for acid reflux-related events that is proven on functional oesophageal tests. PMID:27779277

  11. Management of proton pump inhibitor responsive-esophageal eosinophilia and eosinophilic esophagitis: controversies in treatment approaches.

    PubMed

    Kochar, Bharati; Dellon, Evan S

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic immune-mediated clinicopathologic disease. The prevalence of EoE is approximately 1/2000 persons, EoE is now the most common cause of food impactions, with healthcare expenditures approaching US$ 1 billion annually. This article will discuss challenges related to proton pump inhibitor responsive esophageal eosinophilia, including distinguishing this condition from EoE and understanding the mechanisms behind the PPI response. For EoE, we will review multiple ongoing debates about treatment and monitoring strategies, including selecting treatment outcomes, optimizing medication formulations, approaching the steroid-refractory patient, conducting dietary elimination, prescribing long-term maintenance therapy and performing esophageal dilation.

  12. Teaching the Fundamentals of Biological Research with Primary Literature: Learning from the Discovery of the Gastric Proton Pump

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Lixin

    2011-01-01

    For the purpose of teaching collegians the fundamentals of biological research, literature explaining the discovery of the gastric proton pump was presented in a 50-min lecture. The presentation included detailed information pertaining to the discovery process. This study was chosen because it demonstrates the importance of having a broad range of…

  13. Delirium in the geriatric unit: proton-pump inhibitors and other risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Otremba, Iwona; Wilczyński, Krzysztof; Szewieczek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Background Delirium remains a major nosocomial complication of hospitalized elderly. Predictive models for delirium may be useful for identification of high-risk patients for implementation of preventive strategies. Objective Evaluate specific factors for development of delirium in a geriatric ward setting. Methods Prospective cross-sectional study comprised 675 consecutive patients aged 79.2±7.7 years (66% women and 34% men), admitted to the subacute geriatric ward of a multiprofile university hospital after exclusion of 113 patients treated with antipsychotic medication because of behavioral disorders before admission. Comprehensive geriatric assessments including a structured interview, physical examination, geriatric functional assessment, blood sampling, ECG, abdominal ultrasound, chest X-ray, Confusion Assessment Method for diagnosis of delirium, Delirium-O-Meter to assess delirium severity, Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale to assess sedation or agitation, visual analog scale and Doloplus-2 scale to assess pain level were performed. Results Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed five independent factors associated with development of delirium in geriatric inpatients: transfer between hospital wards (odds ratio [OR] =2.78; confidence interval [CI] =1.54–5.01; P=0.001), preexisting dementia (OR =2.29; CI =1.44–3.65; P<0.001), previous delirium incidents (OR =2.23; CI =1.47–3.38; P<0.001), previous fall incidents (OR =1.76; CI =1.17–2.64; P=0.006), and use of proton-pump inhibitors (OR =1.67; CI =1.11–2.53; P=0.014). Conclusion Transfer between hospital wards, preexisting dementia, previous delirium incidents, previous fall incidents, and use of proton-pump inhibitors are predictive of development of delirium in the geriatric inpatient setting. PMID:27103793

  14. Intravenous proton pump inhibitors for peptic ulcer bleeding: Clinical benefits and limits.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hsiu-Chi; Sheu, Bor-Shyang

    2011-03-16

    Peptic ulcer bleeding is a common disease and recurrent bleeding is an independent risk factor of mortality. Infusion with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) prevents recurrent bleeding after successful endoscopic therapy. A gastric acidic environment of less than pH 5.4 alters coagulation function and activates pepsin to disaggregate platelet plugs. Gastric acid is secreted by H(+), K(+)-ATPase, naming the proton pump. This update review focuses on the mechanism and the role of PPIs in the clinical management of patients with peptic ulcer bleeding. An intravenous omeprazole bolus followed by high-dose continuous infusion for 72 h after successful endoscopic therapy can prevent the recurrent bleeding. In the Asian, however, the infusion dosage can possibly be diminished whilst preserving favorable control of the intragastric pH and thereby still decreasing rates of recurrent bleeding. Irrespective of the infusion dosage of PPIs, rates of recurrent bleeding remain high in patients with co-morbidities. Because recurrent peptic ulcer bleeding may be prolonged in those with co-morbidities, a low-dose infusion of IV PPIs for up to 7-day may result in better control of recurrent bleeding of peptic ulcers. Due to the inter-patient variability in CYP2C19 genotypes, the infusion form of new generation PPIs, such as esomeprazole, should be promising for the prevention of recurrent bleeding. This article offers a comprehensive review of clinical practice, highlighting the indication, the optimal dosage, the duration, and the potential limitation of PPIs infusion for peptic ulcer bleeding.

  15. Roles of subunit NuoL in the proton pumping coupling mechanism of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Madhavan; Sakyiama, Joseph A; Elguindy, Mahmoud M; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko

    2016-10-01

    Respiratory complex I has an L-shaped structure formed by the hydrophilic arm responsible for electron transfer and the membrane arm that contains protons pumping machinery. Here, to gain mechanistic insights into the role of subunit NuoL, we investigated the effects of Mg(2+), Zn(2+) and the Na(+)/H(+) antiporter inhibitor 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)-amiloride (EIPA) on proton pumping activities of various isolated NuoL mutant complex I after reconstitution into Escherichia coli double knockout (DKO) membrane vesicles lacking complex I and the NADH dehydrogenase type 2. We found that Mg(2+) was critical for proton pumping activity of complex I. At 2 µM Zn(2+), proton pumping of the wild-type was selectively inhibited without affecting electron transfer; no inhibition in proton pumping of D178N and D400A was observed, suggesting the involvement of these residues in Zn(2+) binding. Fifteen micromolar of EIPA caused up to ∼40% decrease in the proton pumping activity of the wild-type, D303A and D400A/E, whereas no significant change was detected in D178N, indicating its possible involvement in the EIPA binding. Furthermore, when menaquinone-rich DKO membranes were used, the proton pumping efficiency in the wild-type was decreased significantly (∼50%) compared with NuoL mutants strongly suggesting that NuoL is involved in the high efficiency pumping mechanism in complex I.

  16. Proton pump inhibitor induced collagen expression in colonocytes is associated with collagenous colitis

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Shiori; Kadochi, Yui; Luo, Yi; Fujiwara-Tani, Rina; Nishiguchi, Yukiko; Kishi, Shingo; Fujii, Kiyomu; Ohmori, Hitoshi; Kuniyasu, Hiroki

    2017-01-01

    AIM To elucidate the role of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in collagenous disease, direct effect of PPI on colonocytes was examined. METHODS Collagenous colitis is a common cause of non-bloody, watery diarrhea. Recently, there has been increasing focus on the use of proton PPIs as a risk factor for developing collagenous colitis. Mouse CT26 colonic cells were treated with PPI and/or PPI-induced alkaline media. Expression of fibrosis-associated genes was examined by RT-PCR. In human materials, collagen expression was examined by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS CT26 cells expressed a Na+-H+ exchanger gene (solute carrier family 9, member A2). Treatment with PPI and/or PPI-induced alkaline media caused growth inhibition and oxidative stress in CT26 cells. The treatment increased expression of fibrosis inducing factors, transforming growth factor β and fibroblast growth factor 2. The treatment also decreased expression of a negative regulator of collagen production, replication factor C1, resulting in increased expression of collagen types III and IV in association with lipid peroxide. In biopsy specimens from patients with collagenous colitis, type III and IV collagen were increased. Increase of type III collagen was more pronounced in PPI-associated collagenous colitis than in non-PPI-associated disease. CONCLUSION From these findings, the reaction of colonocytes to PPI might participate in pathogenesis of collagenous colitis. PMID:28321159

  17. Water exit pathways and proton pumping mechanism in B-type cytochrome c oxidase from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Longhua; Skjevik, Åge A; Han Du, Wen-Ge; Noodleman, Louis; Walker, Ross C; Götz, Andreas W

    2016-09-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) is a vital enzyme that catalyzes the reduction of molecular oxygen to water and pumps protons across mitochondrial and bacterial membranes. While proton uptake channels as well as water exit channels have been identified for A-type CcOs, the means by which water and protons exit B-type CcOs remain unclear. In this work, we investigate potential mechanisms for proton transport above the dinuclear center (DNC) in ba3-type CcO of Thermus thermophilus. Using long-time scale, all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for several relevant protonation states, we identify a potential mechanism for proton transport that involves propionate A of the active site heme a3 and residues Asp372, His376 and Glu126(II), with residue His376 acting as the proton-loading site. The proposed proton transport process involves a rotation of residue His376 and is in line with experimental findings. We also demonstrate how the strength of the salt bridge between residues Arg225 and Asp287 depends on the protonation state and that this salt bridge is unlikely to act as a simple electrostatic gate that prevents proton backflow. We identify two water exit pathways that connect the water pool above the DNC to the outer P-side of the membrane, which can potentially also act as proton exit transport pathways. Importantly, these water exit pathways can be blocked by narrowing the entrance channel between residues Gln151(II) and Arg449/Arg450 or by obstructing the entrance through a conformational change of residue Tyr136, respectively, both of which seem to be affected by protonation of residue His376.

  18. A vacuolar-type proton pump in a vesicle fraction enriched with potassium transporting plasma membranes from tobacco hornworm midgut

    SciTech Connect

    Wieczorek, H.; Weerth, S.; Schindlbeck, M.; Klein, U.

    1989-07-05

    Mg-ATP dependent electrogenic proton transport, monitored with fluorescent acridine orange, 9-aminoacridine, and oxonol V, was investigated in a fraction enriched with potassium transporting goblet cell apical membranes of Manduca sexta larval midgut. Proton transport and the ATPase activity from the goblet cell apical membrane exhibited similar substrate specificity and inhibitor sensitivity. ATP and GTP were far better substrates than UTP, CTP, ADP, and AMP. Azide and vanadate did not inhibit proton transport, whereas 100 microM N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and 30 microM N-ethylmaleimide were inhibitors. The pH gradient generated by ATP and limiting its hydrolysis was 2-3 pH units. Unlike the ATPase activity, proton transport was not stimulated by KCl. In the presence of 20 mM KCl, a proton gradient could not be developed or was dissipated. Monovalent cations counteracted the proton gradient in an order of efficacy like that for stimulation of the membrane-bound ATPase activity: K+ = Rb+ much greater than Li+ greater than Na+ greater than choline (chloride salts). Like proton transport, the generation of an ATP dependent and azide- and vanadate-insensitive membrane potential (vesicle interior positive) was prevented largely by 100 microM N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and 30 microM N-ethylmaleimide. Unlike proton transport, the membrane potential was not affected by 20 mM KCl. In the presence of 150 mM choline chloride, the generation of a membrane potential was suppressed, whereas the pH gradient increased 40%, indicating an anion conductance in the vesicle membrane. Altogether, the results led to the following new hypothesis of electrogenic potassium transport in the lepidopteran midgut. A vacuolar-type electrogenic ATPase pumps protons across the apical membrane of the goblet cell, thus energizing electroneutral proton/potassium antiport. The result is a net active and electrogenic potassium flux.

  19. Phytoremediation potential of Arabidopsis thaliana, expressing ectopically a vacuolar proton pump, for the industrial waste phosphogypsum.

    PubMed

    Khoudi, Habib; Maatar, Yafa; Brini, Faïçal; Fourati, Amine; Ammar, Najoua; Masmoudi, Khaled

    2013-01-01

    Phosphogypsum (PG) is a by-product of the phosphorus-fertiliser industry and represents an environmental concern since it contains pollutants such as cadmium (Cd). We have recently shown that the overexpression of a proton pump gene (TaVP1) in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) led to an enhanced Cd tolerance and accumulation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants harbouring the TaVP1 gene to phytoremediate phosphogypsum. A pot experiment was carried out under greenhouse conditions. Transgenic A. thaliana plants harbouring the TaVP1 gene were grown on various substrates containing phosphogypsum (0, 25, 50 and 100 %) for 40 days. At the end of the growth period, we examined the growth (germination, root length, fresh weight) and physiological parameters (chlorophyll and protein contents, catalase activity and proteolysis) as well as the cadmium, Mg, Ca, and P contents of the A. thaliana plants. In order to evaluate Cd tolerance of the A. thaliana lines harbouring the TaVP1 gene, an in vitro experiment was also carried out. One week-old seedlings were transferred to Murashige and Skoog agar plates containing various concentrations of cadmium; the germination, total leaf area and root length were determined. The growth and physiological parameters of all A. thaliana plants were significantly altered by PG. The germination capacity, root growth and biomass production of wild-type (WT) plants were more severely inhibited by PG compared with the TaVP1 transgenic A. thaliana lines. In addition, TaVP1 transgenic A. thaliana plants maintained a higher antioxidant capacity than the WT. Interestingly, elemental analysis of leaf material derived from plants grown on PG revealed that the transgenic A. thaliana line accumulated up to ten times more Cd than WT. Despite its higher Cd content, the transgenic A. thaliana line performed better than the WT counterpart. In vitro evaluation of Cd tolerance showed that TaVP1

  20. Proton pump inhibitors in GORD An overview of their pharmacology, efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Savarino, Vincenzo; Di Mario, Francesco; Scarpignato, Carmelo

    2009-03-01

    Gastric acid secretion is a complex phenomenon under nervous and hormonal influence. The stimulation of proton pump (H(+), K(+)-ATPase) in the parietal cell represents the final step of acid secretion and this knowledge has led to the development of a class of drugs, the proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which are targeted at blocking this enzyme. Chemically, all the available PPIs consist of a benzimidazole ring and a pyridine ring, but vary in the specific side ring substitution. As a class, they are the most potent inhibitors of gastric acid secretion available. Although there are differences among PPIs concerning their pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, influence by food and antacids as well as potential for drug interactions, it is not always evident whether these often subtle differences are clinically relevant. A careful evaluation of the available studies reveals that rabeprazole and esomeprazole achieve more rapid acid inhibition than other PPIs. Also, the effect of rabeprazole is less dependent upon genetic make-up than all other PPIs, giving rise to less inter-subject variability and leading to a more predictable effect. Esomeprazole, by inhibiting its own catabolism, makes all patients slow metabolizers, but could expose them to potential drug interactions. PPIs are the mainstay of medical treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD), in that they are able to provide 80-85% healing rate of oesophageal lesions, including ulcers, and to reduce the incidence of complications like strictures as well as dysplasia and adenocarcinoma in Barrett's oesophagus (BO). Also relief of symptoms can be achieved in about 80% of cases, even though this benefit is reduced by a factor of approximately 20% in patients with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). Their effect on Barrett's oesophagus and the extra-oesophageal manifestations of GORD is much less consistent. In general, the tolerability profile of PPIs is good in both short- and long-term clinical trials

  1. Proton pump inhibitor chemosensitization in human osteosarcoma: from the bench to the patients’ bed

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Major goals in translational oncology are to reduce systemic toxicity of current anticancer strategies and improve effectiveness. An extremely efficient cancer cell mechanism to avoid and/or reduce the effects of highly cytotoxic drugs is the establishment of an acidic microenvironment, an hallmark of all malignant tumors. The H + −rich milieu that anticancer drugs meet once they get inside the tumor leads to their protonation and neutralization, therefore hindering their access into tumor cells. We have previously shown that proton pump inhibitors (PPI) may efficiently counterattack this tumor advantage leading to a consistent chemosensitization of tumors. In this study, we investigated the effects of PPI in chemosensitizing osteosarcoma. Method MG-63 and Saos-2 cell lines were used as human osteosarcoma models. Cell proliferation after pretreatment with PPI and subsequent treatment with cisplatin was evaluated by using erythrosin B dye vital staining. Tumour growth was evaluated in xenograft treated with cisplatin after PPI pretreatment. Subsequently, a multi-centre historically controlled trial, was performed to evaluate the activity of a pre-treatment administration of PPIs as chemosensitizers during neoadjuvant chemotherapy based on methotrexate, cisplatin, and adriamycin. Results Preclinical experiments showed that PPI sensitize both human osteosarcoma cell lines and xenografts to cisplatin. A clinical study subsequently showed that pretreatment with PPI drug esomeprazole leads to an increase in the local effect of chemotherapy, as expressed by percentage of tumor necrosis. This was particularly evident in chondroblastic osteosarcoma, an histological subtype that normally shows a poor histological response. Notably, no significant increase in toxicity was recorded in PPI treated patients. Conclusion This study provides the first evidence that PPI may be beneficially added to standard regimens in combination to conventional chemotherapy. PMID

  2. Aspartate-histidine interaction in the retinal schiff base counterion of the light-driven proton pump of Exiguobacterium sibiricum.

    PubMed

    Balashov, S P; Petrovskaya, L E; Lukashev, E P; Imasheva, E S; Dioumaev, A K; Wang, J M; Sychev, S V; Dolgikh, D A; Rubin, A B; Kirpichnikov, M P; Lanyi, J K

    2012-07-24

    One of the distinctive features of eubacterial retinal-based proton pumps, proteorhodopsins, xanthorhodopsin, and others, is hydrogen bonding of the key aspartate residue, the counterion to the retinal Schiff base, to a histidine. We describe properties of the recently found eubacterium proton pump from Exiguobacterium sibiricum (named ESR) expressed in Escherichia coli, especially features that depend on Asp-His interaction, the protonation state of the key aspartate, Asp85, and its ability to accept a proton from the Schiff base during the photocycle. Proton pumping by liposomes and E. coli cells containing ESR occurs in a broad pH range above pH 4.5. Large light-induced pH changes indicate that ESR is a potent proton pump. Replacement of His57 with methionine or asparagine strongly affects the pH-dependent properties of ESR. In the H57M mutant, a dramatic decrease in the quantum yield of chromophore fluorescence emission and a 45 nm blue shift of the absorption maximum with an increase in the pH from 5 to 8 indicate deprotonation of the counterion with a pK(a) of 6.3, which is also the pK(a) at which the M intermediate is observed in the photocycle of the protein solubilized in detergent [dodecyl maltoside (DDM)]. This is in contrast with the case for the wild-type protein, for which the same experiments show that the major fraction of Asp85 is deprotonated at pH >3 and that it protonates only at low pH, with a pK(a) of 2.3. The M intermediate in the wild-type photocycle accumulates only at high pH, with an apparent pK(a) of 9, via deprotonation of a residue interacting with Asp85, presumably His57. In liposomes reconstituted with ESR, the pK(a) values for M formation and spectral shifts are 2-3 pH units lower than in DDM. The distinctively different pH dependencies of the protonation of Asp85 and the accumulation of the M intermediate in the wild-type protein versus the H57M mutant indicate that there is strong Asp-His interaction, which substantially lowers

  3. A new hypothesis on the simultaneous direct and indirect proton pump mechanisms in NADH-quinone oxidoreductase (complex I).

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Tomoko; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Ohnishi, S Tsuyoshi

    2010-10-08

    Recently, Sazanov's group reported the X-ray structure of whole complex I [Nature, 465, 441 (2010)], which presented a strong clue for a "piston-like" structure as a key element in an "indirect" proton pump. We have studied the NuoL subunit which has a high sequence similarity to Na(+)/H(+) antiporters, as do the NuoM and N subunits. We constructed 27 site-directed NuoL mutants. Our data suggest that the H(+)/e(-) stoichiometry seems to have decreased from (4H(+)/2e(-)) in the wild-type to approximately (3H(+)/2e(-)) in NuoL mutants. We propose a revised hypothesis that each of the "direct" and the "indirect" proton pumps transports 2H(+) per 2e(-).

  4. A new hypothesis on the simultaneous direct and indirect proton pump mechanisms in NADH-quinone oxidoreductase (complex I)

    PubMed Central

    Ohnishi, Tomoko; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Ohnishi, S. Tsuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Recently, Sazanov’s group reported the X-ray structure of whole complex I [Nature, 465, 441 (2010)], which presented a strong clue for a “piston-like” structure as a key element in an “indirect” proton pump. We have studied the NuoL subunit which has a high sequence similarity to Na+/H+ antiporters, as do the NuoM and N subunits. We constructed 27 site-directed NuoL mutants. Our data suggest that the H+/e− stoichiometry seems to have decreased from (4H+/2e−) in the wild-type to approximately (3H+/2e−) in NuoL mutants. We propose a revised hypothesis that each of the “direct” and the “indirect” proton pumps transports 2H+ per 2e−. PMID:20816962

  5. Protons pump inhibitor treatment and lower gastrointestinal bleeding: Balancing risks and benefits

    PubMed Central

    Lué, Alberto; Lanas, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) represent a milestone in the treatment of acid-related diseases, and are the mainstay in preventing upper gastrointestinal bleeding in high-risk patients treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or low-dose aspirin. However, this beneficial effect does not extend to the lower gastrointestinal tract. PPIs do not prevent NSAID or aspirin-associated lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGB). PPIs may increase both small bowel injury related to NSAIDs and low-dose aspirin treatment and the risk of LGB. Recent studies suggested that altering intestinal microbiota by PPIs may be involved in the pathogenesis of NSAID-enteropathy. An increase in LGB hospitalization rates may occur more frequently in older patients with more comorbidities and are associated with high hospital resource utilization, longer hospitalization, and increased mortality. Preventive strategies for NSAID and aspirin-associated gastrointestinal bleeding should be directed toward preventing both upper and lower gastrointestinal damage. Future research should be directed toward identifying patients at low-risk for gastrointestinal events associated with the use of NSAIDs or aspirin to avoid inappropriate PPI prescribing. Alternatively, the efficacy of new pharmacologic strategies should be evaluated in high-risk groups, with the aim of reducing the risk of both upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding in these patients. PMID:28082800

  6. Addition of cranberry to proton pump inhibitor-based triple therapy for Helicobacter pylori eradication

    PubMed Central

    Seyyedmajidi, Mohammadreza; Ahmadi, Anahita; Hajiebrahimi, Shahin; Seyedmajidi, Seyedali; Rajabikashani, Majid; Firoozabadi, Mona; Vafaeimanesh, Jamshid

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Proton pump inhibitor-based triple therapy with two antibiotics for Helicobacter pylori eradication is widely accepted, but this combination fails in a considerable number of cases. Some studies have shown that cranberry inhibits the adhesion of a wide range of microbial pathogens, including H. pylori. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of cranberry on H. pylori eradication with a standard therapy including lansoprazole, clarithromycin, and amoxicillin (LCA) in patients with peptic ulcer disease (PUD). Methods: In this study, H. pylori-positive patients with PUD were randomized into two groups: Group A: A 14-day LCA triple therapy with 30 mg lansoprazole bid, 1000 mg amoxicillin bid, and 500 mg clarithromycin bid; Group B: A 14-day 500 mg cranberry capsules bid plus LCA triple therapy. A 13C-urea breath test was performed for eradication assessment 6 weeks after the completion of the treatment. Findings: Two hundred patients (53.5% males, between 23 and 77 years, mean age ± standard deviation: 50.29 ± 17.79 years) continued treatment protocols and underwent 13C-urea breath testing. H. pylori eradication was achieved in 74% in Group A (LCA without cranberry) and 89% in Group B (LCA with cranberry) (P = 0.042). Conclusion: The addition of cranberry to LCA triple therapy for H. pylori has a higher rate of eradication than the standard regimen alone (up to 89% and significant). PMID:27843960

  7. Effect of food or proton pump inhibitor treatment on the bioavailability of dacomitinib in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Garcia, Ana; Masters, Joanna C; Mendes da Costa, Laure; LaBadie, Robert R; Liang, Yali; Ni, Grace; Ellery, Craig A; Boutros, Tanya; Goldberg, Zelanna; Bello, Carlo L

    2016-02-01

    This phase 1, open-label crossover study evaluated the relative bioavailability of dacomitinib in healthy volunteers under fed and fasted conditions and following coadministration with rabeprazole, a potent acid-reducing proton pump inhibitor (PPI). Twenty-four male subjects received a single dacomitinib 45-mg dose under 3 different conditions separated by washout periods of ≥ 16 days: coadministered with rabeprazole 40 mg under fasting conditions; alone under fasting conditions; and alone after a high-fat, high-calorie meal. Increased peak exposure of 23.7% (90% confidence interval [CI], 5.3%-45.2%) was detected with dacomitinib taken after food versus fasting. The adjusted geometric mean ratio (fed/fasted) for area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity (AUCinf ) was 114.2% (90%CI, 104.7%-124.5%) and not considered clinically meaningful. In the fasted state, a decrease in dacomitinib AUCinf was observed following rabeprazole versus dacomitinib alone (PPI+fasted/fasted alone): 71.1% (90%CI, 61.7%-81.8%). Dacomitinib was generally well tolerated. Dacomitinib may be taken with or without food. Use of long-acting acid-reducing agents, such as PPIs with dacomitinib should be avoided if possible. Shorter-acting agents such as antacids and H2-receptor antagonists may have lesser impact on dacomitinib exposure and may be preferable to PPIs if acid reduction is clinically required.

  8. Proton Pump Inhibitors and the Risk of Osseointegrated Dental Implant Failure: A Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xixi; Al-Abedalla, Khadijeh; Abi-Nader, Samer; Daniel, Nach G; Nicolau, Belinda; Tamimi, Faleh

    2017-04-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have a negative impact on bone accrual. Because osseointegration is influenced by bone metabolism, this study investigates the association between PPIs and the risk of osseointegrated implant failure. This retrospective cohort study included a total of 1,773 osseointegrated dental implants in 799 patients (133 implants in 58 PPIs users and 1,640 in 741 non-users) who were treated at the East Coast Oral Surgery Clinic in Moncton, Canada, from January 2007 to September 2015. Kaplan-Meier estimator was used to describe the hazard function of dental implant failure by PPIs usage. Multilevel mixed effects parametric survival analyses were used to test the association between PPIs exposure and risk of implant failure adjusting for potential confounders. The failure rates were 6.8% for people using PPIs compared to 3.2% for non-users. Subjects using PPIs had a higher risk of dental implant failure (HR = 2.73; 95% CI = 1.10-6.78) compared to those who did not use the drugs. The findings suggest that treatment with PPIs may be associated with an increased risk of osseointegrated dental implant failure.

  9. The impact of proton pump inhibitors on the human gastrointestinal microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Freedberg, Daniel E.; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Abrams, Julian A.

    2014-01-01

    Potent gastric acid suppression using proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) is common in clinical practice yet may have important effects on human health that are mediated through changes in the gastrointestinal microbiome. Acting through pH-dependent or pH-independent mechanisms, PPIs have the potential to alter the normal microbiota throughout the human gastrointestinal lumen. In the esophagus, PPIs change the normal bacterial milieu to decrease distal esophageal exposure to inflammatory Gram-negative bacteria which may lower the risk of Barrett's esophagus. In the stomach, PPIs alter the abundance and location of gastric Helicobacter pylori and other bacteria, which has implications for peptic ulcer disease and gastric malignancy. In the small bowel, PPIs cause polymicrobial small bowel bacterial overgrowth and have been associated with the diagnosis of celiac disease. In the colon, PPIs associate with incident but not recurrent Clostridium difficile infection, putatively through alterations in commensal colonic anaerobes. Our understanding of the effect of gastric acid suppression on the human gastrointestinal microbiome is incomplete but is rapidly advancing. PMID:25439276

  10. The power of pharmacological sciences: the example of proton pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Spector, Reynold; Vesell, Elliot S

    2006-01-01

    Critics have questioned the foundational principles of pharmacological sciences and modern drug therapy; they also claim that drug therapy is often too expensive or of uncertain value. Contemporaneously, alternative medicine has bloomed. Yet the US government began to pay for drug therapy under Medicare in 2006, an explicit recognition of the value of modern drug therapy. To clarify this confusion, we review the philosophical and scientific foundations of pharmacology, drug discovery and development, the attendant strategies and successful results. We also review and answer the major attacks on the philosophical and scientific foundations of modern pharmacology and drug therapy. Finally, we define the characteristics of an ideal drug. As an example of the principles and strategies of modern pharmacological sciences and their successful application, we focus on the discovery and development of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) of stomach acid production. This class of drugs approaches the ideal and exemplifies successful application of modern pharmacological principles to drug discovery and development. Moreover, the use of PPIs as a pharmacological tool allowed the resolution of important scientific questions, e.g., the role of stomach acid in peptic diseases of the stomach, duodenum and esophagus.

  11. Long-term pretreatment with proton pump inhibitor and Helicobacter pylori eradication rates

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Seung Bae; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, Jong-Yul; Baeg, Myong Ki; Lim, Chul-Hyun; Kim, Jin Soo; Cho, Yu Kyung; Lee, In Seok; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether proton pump inhibitor (PPI) pretreatment influences Helicobacter pylori eradication rate. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed H. pylori-infected patients who were treated with a standard triple regimen (PPI, amoxicillin 1 g, and clarithromycin 500 mg, all twice daily for 7 d). The diagnosis of H. pylori infection and its eradication was assessed with the rapid urease test, histological examination by silver staining, or the 13C-urea breath test. We divided the patients into two groups: one received the standard eradication regimen without PPI pretreatment (Group A), and the other received PPI pretreatment (Group B). The patients in Group B were reclassified into three groups based on the duration of PPI pretreatment: Group B-I (3-14 d), Group B-II (15-55 d), and Group B-III (≥ 56 d). RESULTS: A total of 1090 patients were analyzed and the overall eradication rate was 80.9%. The cure rate in Group B (81.2%, 420/517) was not significantly different from that in Group A (79.2%, 454/573). The eradication rates in Group B-I, B-II and B-III were 80.1% (117/146), 81.8% (224/274) and 81.4% (79/97), respectively. CONCLUSION: PPI pretreatment did not affect H. pylori eradication rate, regardless of the medication period. PMID:24574779

  12. Verbascoside isolated from Tectona grandis mediates gastric protection in rats via inhibiting proton pump activity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neetu; Shukla, Nivedita; Singh, Pratibha; Sharma, Rolee; Rajendran, S M; Maurya, Rakesh; Palit, Gautam

    2010-10-01

    Evidences have suggested that Tectona grandis (TG) attenuates gastric mucosal injury; however its mechanism has not yet been established. The aim of present study was to evaluate the gastroprotective mechanism of ethanolic extract of TG (E-EtOH), butanolic fraction (Fr-Bu) and to identify its active constituents. Anti-ulcer activities were evaluated against cold restraint (CRU) and pyloric ligation (PL) induced gastric ulcer models and further confirmed through H(+) K(+)-ATPase inhibitory activity. Cytoprotective activity was evaluated in alcohol (AL) induced gastric ulcer model and further through PGE(2) level. E-EtOH and Fr-Bu attenuated ulcer formation in CRU. Moreover E-EtOH and Fr-Bu displayed potent anti-secretory activity as evident through reduced free acidity and pepsin activity in PL, confirmed further by in vitro inhibition of H(+) K(+)-ATPase activity. In addition cytoprotective potential of E-EtOH and Fr-Bu were apparent with protection in AL model, increased PGE(2) content and enhanced mucin level in PL. Phytochemical investigations of Fr-Bu yielded terpenoides and a phenolic glycoside, verbascoside. The anti-secretory mechanism of verbascoside mediated apparently through inhibition of H(+) K(+)-ATPase with corresponding decrease in plasma gastrin level, is novel to our finding. Gastroprotection elicited by TG might be through proton pump inhibition and consequent augmentation of the defensive mechanism.

  13. Use of proton-pump inhibitors among adults: a Danish nationwide drug utilization study

    PubMed Central

    Pottegård, Anton; Broe, Anne; Hallas, Jesper; de Muckadell, Ove B. Schaffalitzky; Lassen, Annmarie T.; Lødrup, Anders B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The use of proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) has increased over the last decade. The objective of this study was to provide detailed utilization data on PPI use over time, with special emphasis on duration of PPI use and concomitant use of ulcerogenic drugs. Methods: Using the nationwide Danish Prescription Registry, we identified all Danish adults filling a PPI between 2002 and 2014. Using descriptive statistics, we reported (i) the distribution of use between single PPI entities, (ii) the development in incidence and prevalence of use over time, (iii) measures of duration and intensity of treatment, and (iv) the prevalence of use of ulcerogenic drugs among users of PPIs. Results: We identified 1,617,614 adults using PPIs during the study period. The prevalence of PPI use increased fourfold during the study period to 7.4% of all Danish adults in 2014. PPI use showed strong age dependency, reaching more than 20% among those aged at least 80 years. The proportion of users maintaining treatment over time increased with increasing age, with less than10% of those aged 18–39 years using PPIs 2 years after their first prescription, compared with about 40% among those aged at least 80 years. The overall use of ulcerogenic drugs among PPI users increased moderately, from 35% of users of PPI in 2002 to 45% in 2014. Conclusions: The use of PPIs is extensive and increasing rapidly, especially among the elderly. PMID:27582879

  14. Prenatal exposure to H2 blockers and to proton pump inhibitors and asthma development in offspring.

    PubMed

    Yitshak-Sade, Maayan; Gorodischer, Rafael; Aviram, Micha; Novack, Lena

    2016-01-01

    Fetal exposure to H2 blockers (H2 Bs) or proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) has been reported to be associated with asthma in children. We evaluated the risk of asthma in offspring following prenatal H2 Bs. We enrolled 91 428 children and their mothers who resided in southern Israel during 1998-2011. The computerized medications database was linked with records from the district hospital. Of the eligible children, 11 227 developed asthma, and overall 5.5% had been exposed to H2 Bs or PPIs prenatally. The risk of developing asthma was slightly higher in the group exposed to H2 Bs or PPIs (RR, 1.09; P = .023). At greater risk were children whose mothers purchased these medications more than 3 times (RR, 1.22; P = .038) or exposed to >20 defined daily doses or prenatally exposed to lansoprazole. The statistical association was significant and depended on magnitude of exposure and specific medication, but the absolute risk was low. The association between maternal consumption of H2 Bs or PPIs and asthma and childhood remained statistically significant 2 years after delivery, raising the possibility of confounding by the indication phenomenon. In view of the findings, a causal relationship could not be ascertained, and an unidentified etiological factor could be operative.

  15. Accumulating Evidence for a Drug–Drug Interaction Between Methotrexate and Proton Pump Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, Ann Corken; Kluetz, Paul; Jappar, Dilara; Korvick, Joyce

    2012-01-01

    Background. A number of medications are known to interact with methotrexate through various mechanisms. The aim of this article is to apprise practitioners of a new labeling change based on the accumulating evidence for a possible drug–drug interaction between methotrexate (primarily at high doses) and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Methods. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) database of spontaneous adverse event reports and the published literature were searched for cases reporting an interaction between methotrexate and PPIs. Results. A search of the AERS database and existing literature found several individual case reports of drug–drug interactions and three additional supportive studies that suggest potential underlying mechanisms for the interaction. Conclusion. There is evidence to suggest that concomitant use of methotrexate (primarily at high doses) with PPIs such as omeprazole, esomeprazole, and pantoprazole may decrease methotrexate clearance, leading to elevated serum levels of methotrexate and/or its metabolite hydroxymethotrexate, possibly leading to methotrexate toxicities. In several case reports, no methotrexate toxicity was found when a histamine H2 blocker was substituted for a PPI. Based on the reviewed data, the FDA updated the methotrexate label to include the possible drug–drug interaction between high-dose methotrexate and PPIs. Physicians should be alerted to this potential drug–drug interaction in patients receiving concomitant high-dose methotrexate and PPIs. PMID:22477728

  16. Gastric neuroendocrine carcinoma after long-term use of proton pump inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Jianu, Constantin S; Lange, Ove J; Viset, Trond; Qvigstad, Gunnar; Martinsen, Tom C; Fougner, Reidun; Kleveland, Per M; Fossmark, Reidar; Hauso, Øyvind; Waldum, Helge L

    2012-01-01

    We present a case of a gastric neuroendocrine carcinoma in a patient with a history of long-term proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use. A 49-year-old man using PPI for the last 15 years due to gastroesophageal reflux disease developed progressive dysphagia, dyspepsia and weight loss. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasonography and abdominal CT diagnosed a malignant tumor localized to a hiatal hernia. Fasting serum chromogranin A and gastrin concentrations were elevated (32 nmol/l and 159 pmol/l, respectively). Helicobacter pylori PCR analysis of antral biopsies was negative. Biopsies from endoscopically normal oxyntic mucosa showed enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cell hyperplasia. Tumor biopsies revealed a poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma. Sevier-Munger staining, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy indicated ECL cell as origin of the tumor cells. Concerns have previously been raised about the safety of long-term PPI use due to a possible increased risk of cancer. This case illustrates a patient with a poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma with ECL cell characteristics probably induced by hypergastrinemia secondary to long-term PPI use.

  17. Bacterial Overgrowth and Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Unifying Hypothesis or a Spurious Consequence of Proton Pump Inhibitors?

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, Brennan M.R.; Chey, William D.; Chang, Lin

    2010-01-01

    Some studies indicate that small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), as measured by hydrogen breath tests (HBT), is more prevalent in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) vs. matched controls without IBS. Although the data are conflicting, this observation has led to the hypothesis that SIBO may be a primary cause of IBS. Yet, it remains unclear whether SIBO is truly fundamental to the pathophysiology of IBS, or is instead a mere epiphenomenon or bystander of something else altogether. We hypothesize that SIBO might be a byproduct of the disproportionate use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in IBS, as follows: (1) IBS patients are more likely than controls to receive PPI therapy; (2) PPI therapy may promote varying forms of SIBO by eliminating gastric acid; and (3) existing studies linking SIBO to IBS have not adjusted for or excluded the use of PPI therapy. When linked together, these premises form the basis for a simple and testable hypothesis: the relationship between SIBO and IBS may be confounded by PPIs. Our article explores these premises, lays out the argument supporting this “PPI hypothesis,” discusses potential implications, and outlines next steps to further investigate this possibility. PMID:19086951

  18. What are the effects of proton pump inhibitors on the small intestine?

    PubMed

    Fujimori, Shunji

    2015-06-14

    Generally, proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) have great benefit for patients with acid related disease with less frequently occurring side effects. According to a recent report, PPIs provoke dysbiosis of the small intestinal bacterial flora, exacerbating nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced small intestinal injury. Several meta-analyses and systematic reviews have reported that patients treated with PPIs, as well as post-gastrectomy patients, have a higher frequency of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) compared to patients who lack the aforementioned conditions. Furthermore, there is insufficient evidence that these conditions induce Clostridium difficile infection. At this time, PPI-induced dysbiosis is considered a type of SIBO. It now seems likely that intestinal bacterial flora influence many diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease, diabetes mellitus, obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and autoimmune diseases. When attempting to control intestinal bacterial flora with probiotics, prebiotics, and fecal microbiota transplantation, etc., the influence of acid suppression therapy, especially PPIs, should not be overlooked.

  19. Comparative risk of ischemic stroke among users of clopidogrel together with individual proton pump inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Bilker, Warren B.; Brensinger, Colleen M.; Flockhart, David A.; Freeman, Cristin P.; Kasner, Scott E.; Kimmel, Stephen E.; Hennessy, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose There is controversy and little information concerning whether individual proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) differentially alter the effectiveness of clopidogrel in reducing ischemic stroke risk. We therefore aimed to elucidate the risk of ischemic stroke among concomitant users of clopidogrel and individual PPIs. Methods We conducted a propensity score-adjusted cohort study of adult new users of clopidogrel, using 1999–2009 Medicaid claims from 5 large states. Exposures were defined by prescriptions for esomeprazole, lansoprazole, omeprazole, rabeprazole and pantoprazole—with pantoprazole serving as the referent. The endpoint was hospitalization for acute ischemic stroke, defined by International Classification of Diseases 9th Revision Clinical Modification codes in the principal position on inpatient claims, within 180 days of concomitant therapy initiation. Results Among 325,559 concomitant users of clopidogrel and a PPI, we identified 1,667 ischemic strokes for an annual incidence of 2.4% (95% confidence interval: 2.3–2.5). Adjusted hazard ratios for ischemic stroke vs. pantoprazole were: 0.98 (0.82–1.17) for esomeprazole; 1.06 (0.92–1.21) for lansoprazole; 0.98 (0.85–1.15) for omeprazole; and 0.85 (0.63–1.13) for rabeprazole. Conclusions PPIs of interest did not increase the rate of ischemic stroke among clopidogrel users when compared to pantoprazole, a PPI thought to be devoid of the potential to interact with clopidogrel. PMID:25657176

  20. Gastric juice for the diagnosis of H pylori infection in patients on proton pump inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Yakoob, Javed; Rasool, Shahid; Abbas, Zaigham; Jafri, Wasim; Abid, Shahab; Islam, Muhammad; Ahmad, Zubair

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To determine the efficacy of gastric juice polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of H pylori infection in comparison with histology and gastric antral biopsy PCR in patients on a proton pump inhibitor (PPI). METHODS: Eighty-five consecutive patients with dyspeptic symptoms were enrolled. Gastric biopsies for histology, PCR and gastric juice were collected at endoscopy for PCR of the H pylori urease C gene (ure C). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), accuracy, positive and negative likelihood ratio for PCR of gastric juice for the H pylori ure C gene was compared to histology and gastric antral biopsy H pylori ure C PCR in patients with and without PPI. RESULTS: Gastric juice PCR was positive in 66 (78%) patients. Histology showed H pylori associated gastritis in 57 (67%). Gastric biopsy PCR was positive in 72 (85%). In patients not taking PPI, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, accuracy and positive and negative likelihood ratio for gastric juice PCR were 89%, 72%, 91%, 67%, 90%, 85%, 3.1 and 0.1 respectively. In patients on PPI these values were 86%, 100%%, 100%, 29%, 86%, 9.5 and 1.4, respectively. CONCLUSION: Gastric juice PCR for the diagnosis of H pylori infection has increased sensitivity compared to histology with PPI. The use of gastric juice PCR is recommended to confirm H pylori status in patients taking PPIs. PMID:18330944

  1. Comparative safety and efficacy of proton pump inhibitors in paediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Kierkus, Jaroslaw; Oracz, Grzegorz; Korczowski, Bartosz; Szymanska, Edyta; Wiernicka, Anna; Woynarowski, Marek

    2014-05-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is one of the most common reasons for referrals to paediatricians or paediatric gastroenterologists. Gastric acid-buffering agents, mucosal surface barriers and gastric anti-secretory agents are the main groups of medications currently used for treating gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in children. Recently, the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) for the treatment of GERD in children has increased considerably. Their effectiveness in healing erosive oesophagitis in paediatric subjects and in improving GERD symptoms has been established in many studies. However, the effectiveness in other clinical conditions and the long-term safety of PPIs for paediatric GERD have not been fully established yet and thus are still under debate. Therefore, the aim of this article is to provide a comparative review of the efficacy, safety and tolerability of PPIs in paediatric GERD. The available data suggest that short-term use of PPIs is well tolerated. Adverse events tend to be of a mild-to-moderate nature, with headache being the most frequently reported treatment-related adverse event. However, further well-designed trials and observational studies are still needed to clarify the efficacy and safety of PPIs in the paediatric population, especially in infants under the age of 12 months.

  2. [Safety and interactions of proton pump inhibitors: lessons learned in millions of patients].

    PubMed

    Esplugues, Juan V; Martí-Cabrera, Miguel

    2010-05-01

    After many years of widespread use, proton pump inhibitors (PPI) have been demonstrated to be relatively safe. The most frequently associated adverse reactions are mild with scarce clinical effects. These agents produce hypergastrinemia but this adverse effect has not been related to the development of malignancies. PPI seem to facilitate certain bacterial infections in the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts. However, these infections are easily treated and therefore do not limit the prescription of PPI. From the pharmacokinetic point of view, the possibility of interactions with other drugs metabolized by the cytochrome P450 system has been described but these interactions generally seem to have little clinical or therapeutic importance. However, regulatory agencies are currently stressing the hypothetical interaction between PPI (especially omeprazole) and clopidogrel, which reduces the latter's antiplatelet effect. Although this recommendation should be followed, this interaction should be specifically evaluated to determine its clinical effect and the possible alternatives in patients at risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. Lastly, the present article reviews PPI administration in special, currently debated situations, such as in pregnant or breastfeeding women.

  3. Efficacy and safety of proton pump inhibitors in the management of pediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Tjon, James A; Pe, Michael; Soscia, Joanna; Mahant, Sanjay

    2013-09-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are commonly prescribed to infants and children for managing gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Recently published literature illustrates conflicting evidence on the efficacy of PPIs in infants and children. Randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews have demonstrated a lack of efficacy of PPIs, specifically in young infants. Furthermore, emerging evidence also suggests that PPIs are not as benign as once thought, with newer data implicating a potential association of PPIs with an increased risk of respiratory tract infections, gastrointestinal infections, bone fractures, hypomagnesemia, and the occurrence of rebound hyperacidity after discontinuation of PPI therapy. To summarize the emerging data in children, we reviewed the literature to assess the efficacy and safety of PPIs in managing pediatric GERD. Despite conflicting evidence on the efficacy of PPIs, most studies in children demonstrated some benefit when compared with placebo. With respect to the safety of PPIs in children, only a few small studies and case reports indicated a potential association of PPIs with an increased risk of respiratory tract or gastrointestinal infections, bone fractures, and hypomagnesemia; however, many of those studies had their own limitations. From the review, it is clear that further well-designed trials and observational studies are needed to shed more light on the efficacy and safety of PPIs in the pediatric population.

  4. Drug-Induced Subacute Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus Associated with Proton Pump Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Nitish

    2016-06-01

    Subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) is an autoimmune disease that may be induced by proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in at-risk populations. The US FDA does not recognize SCLE as an adverse event associated with PPIs. We queried the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System database, which contains adverse event case reports submitted by the public as well as by industry, and analyzed the data to quantify passive pharmacovigilance signals for SCLE associated with PPIs. A disproportionality analysis of the signals yielded a significant association between SCLE and PPIs. Discontinuation of PPI resulted in remission, with PPI re-challenge causing SCLE to reoccur. A follow-up analysis also yielded a significant association between SCLE and H2 receptor antagonists. We conducted a brief literature survey of published case reports and studies to discern the validity of PPI-induced SCLE signals. Healthcare prescribers and patients should be made aware that SCLE can be induced by PPIs. In such cases, PPIs should be discontinued and alternative clinical treatment sought. Regulatory bodies such as the FDA should incorporate the adverse reaction in PPI prescription labels.

  5. Proton pump inhibitor resistance, the real challenge in gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Cicala, Michele; Emerenziani, Sara; Guarino, Michele Pier Luca; Ribolsi, Mentore

    2013-10-21

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases. Although proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) represent the mainstay of treatment both for healing erosive esophagitis and for symptom relief, several studies have shown that up to 40% of GERD patients reported either partial or complete lack of response of their symptoms to a standard PPI dose once daily. Several mechanisms have been proposed as involved in PPIs resistance, including ineffective control of gastric acid secretion, esophageal hypersensitivity, ultrastructural and functional changes in the esophageal epithelium. The diagnostic evaluation of a refractory GERD patients should include an accurate clinical evaluation, upper endoscopy, esophageal manometry and ambulatory pH-impedance monitoring, which allows to discriminate non-erosive reflux disease patients from those presenting esophageal hypersensitivity or functional heartburn. Treatment has been primarily based on doubling the PPI dose or switching to another PPI. Patients with proven disease, not responding to PPI twice daily, are eligible for anti-reflux surgery.

  6. Gastroesophageal reflux symptoms not responding to proton pump inhibitor: GERD, NERD, NARD, esophageal hypersensitivity or dyspepsia?

    PubMed

    Bashashati, Mohammad; Hejazi, Reza A; Andrews, Christopher N; Storr, Martin A

    2014-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a common gastrointestinal process that can generate symptoms of heartburn and chest pain. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are the gold standard for the treatment of GER; however, a substantial group of GER patients fail to respond to PPIs. In the past, it was believed that acid reflux into the esophagus causes all, or at least the majority, of symptoms attributed to GER, with both erosive esophagitis and nonerosive outcomes. However, with modern testing techniques it has been shown that, in addition to acid reflux, the reflux of nonacid gastric and duodenal contents into the esophagus may also induce GER symptoms. It remains unknown how weakly acidic or alkaline refluxate with a pH similar to a normal diet induces GER symptoms. Esophageal hypersensitivity or functional dyspepsia with superimposed heartburn may be other mechanisms of symptom generation, often completely unrelated to GER. Detailed studies investigating the pathophysiology of esophageal hypersensitivity are not conclusive, and definitions of the various disease states may overlap and are often confusing. The authors aim to clarify the pathophysiology, definition, diagnostic techniques and medical treatment of patients with heartburn symptoms who fail PPI therapy.

  7. Pump

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.W.; Abdul.Hye, A.B.M.

    1983-10-25

    A pump for injecting chemicals into a well employs a pivot arm for synchronous movement with a well pump. The pivot arm causes reciprocation of a plunger within the body of the chemical pump. The plunger, during its upward stroke causes the entry of chemicals from an outside source into the pump body and, during its downward stroke, causes the exiting of the chemicals into the well. (2 claims.

  8. Evaluation of a Proton Pump Inhibitor for Sleep Bruxism: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Ohmure, H; Kanematsu-Hashimoto, K; Nagayama, K; Taguchi, H; Ido, A; Tominaga, K; Arakawa, T; Miyawaki, S

    2016-12-01

    Bruxism is a repetitive jaw-muscle activity characterized by clenching or grinding of the teeth and/or bracing or thrusting of the mandible. Recent advances have clarified the relationship between gastroesophageal reflux and sleep bruxism (SB). However, the influence of pharmacological elimination of gastric acid secretion on SB has not been confirmed. The authors aimed to assess the efficacy of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) on SB and to examine the gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and endoscopic findings of the upper GI tract in SB patients. The authors performed a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study at Kagoshima University Hospital. Twelve patients with polysomnography (PSG)-diagnosed SB underwent an assessment of GI symptoms using the frequency scale for the symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (FSSG) and esophagogastroduodenoscopy. At baseline (i.e., before interventions), the mean frequencies of electromyography (EMG) bursts and rhythmic masticatory muscle activity (RMMA) episodes were 65.4 ± 49.0 bursts/h and 7.0 ± 4.8 episodes/h, respectively, and at least 1 RMMA episode with grinding noise was confirmed in all participants. The mean FSSG score was 8.4 ± 5.6, and 41.7% of patients were diagnosed with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Mild reflux esophagitis was confirmed in 6 patients. PSG, including EMG of the left masseter muscle and audio-video recording, was performed on days 4 and 5 of administration of 10 mg of the PPI (rabeprazole) or placebo. PPI administration yielded a significant reduction in the frequency of EMG bursts, RMMA episodes, and grinding noise. No significant differences were observed regarding the swallowing events and sleep variables. Since the clinical application of PPI for SB treatment should remain on hold at present, the results of this trial highlight the potential application of pharmacological gastroesophageal reflux disease treatment for SB patients. Larger scale studies are warranted to

  9. Proton pump inhibitor administration via nasogastric tube in pediatric practice: comparative analysis with protocol optimization.

    PubMed

    Ponrouch, M P; Sautou-Miranda, V; Boyer, A; Bourdeaux, D; Montagner, A; Chopineau, J

    2010-05-10

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are largely prescribed to children because their efficacy and tolerance are now well-established. One disadvantage resides in the absence of liquid form which causes problems for their administration in nasogastric tubes. Indeed, the absence of use recommendations involves many misuses responsible for inefficiency and/or tube obstruction. We tried to evaluate if PPIs can be administered through pediatric nasogastric tubes. We administered four PPIs (Omeprazole, esomeprazole, lansoprazole and lansoprazole orally disintegrating tablet) through nasogastric tubes. For each PPI a study plan was drawn up to assess the influence of different variables: the volume of water to dissolve or put in suspension the PPIs (2ml or 5ml), the volume of tube flush-through water post-PPI administration (2ml, 5ml or 10ml), the length (50cm or 125cm) and the diameter (6 or 8 French) of the polyurethane tubes. For each assay an analysis of each active ingredient at the tube outlet by UV spectrometry was carried out. All 6 F tubes were obstructed by PPIs. Through 8 F tubes, we observed a mean recovery of active ingredient of 86.2% for lansoprazole orally disintegrating tablet, 36.9% for esomeprazole but only 7.1% for lansoprazole and 3.9% for omeprazole. It is disadvised using omeprazole and lansoprazole through 8 F nasogastric tubes because no condition ensures the transit of an efficient concentration of active ingredient. For esomeprazole, the best conditions of administration were a water volume of 5ml and a rinse volume of 5ml but only a half of the microgranules administered were recovered. The most satisfactory results were obtained with lansoprazole orally disintegrating tablet. A 5ml volume of water diluent for suspension and a 10ml volume of flush-through water made it possible to deliver the full lansoprazole dose administered.

  10. Single enantiomer versus racemate: chiral distinction in the proton pump inhibitors omeprazole and esomeprazole.

    PubMed

    Marom, Hili; Pogodin, Sergey; Agranat, Israel

    2014-04-01

    Chiral distinction in the proton pump inhibitor drugs omeprazole and in its chiral-switch esomeprazole magnesium was studied employing the Density Functional Theory (DFT) method. At B3LYP/6-311G(d,p), the 6-methoxy∙∙∙6-methoxy and 5-methoxy∙∙∙5-methoxy homochiral and heterochiral dimers were calculated. The chiral distinction free energies (ΔΔG(298,(RS-SS))) between the cyclic C2-(S,S)- and Ci-(R,S)-dimers with two intermolecular hydrogen bonds are 3.8, 1.9 (with BSSE counterpoise correction), and -6.9 (with D3 dispersion and BSSE counterpoise corrections) kJ/mol. Adding water as an implicit solvent (polarized continuum model [PCM] model) resulted in a chiral distinction energy of -3.3 kJ/mol, indicating a reversal of the order of the relative stabilities of C2-(S,S)- and Ci-(R,S)-dimers. The chiral distinction free energies between the corresponding (less stable) C1-dimers with one intermolecular hydrogen bond are -9.3, -5.8 (with BSSE CC), 17.6 (D3 + BSSE CC), and -3.2 (H2O) kJ/mol. The results highlight the contention that omeprazole is not just a superposition of its enantiomer constituents. They are consistent with the pharmacological evidence of enantiomer-enantiomer interactions in omeprazole versus esomeprazole and the differences between the drugs omeprazole and esomeprazole magnesium and support the lodged application for regulatory supplementary protection certificate (SPC) exclusivity for the esomeprazole-related combination drug Vimovo.

  11. Factors associated with residual gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms in patients receiving proton pump inhibitor maintenance therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kawara, Fumiaki; Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Morita, Yoshinori; Uda, Atsushi; Masuda, Atsuhiro; Saito, Masaya; Ooi, Makoto; Ishida, Tsukasa; Kondo, Yasuyuki; Yoshida, Shiei; Okuno, Tatsuya; Yano, Yoshihiko; Yoshida, Masaru; Kutsumi, Hiromu; Hayakumo, Takanobu; Yamashita, Kazuhiko; Hirano, Takeshi; Hirai, Midori; Azuma, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    AIM To elucidate the factors associated with residual gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms in patients receiving proton pump inhibitor (PPI) maintenance therapy in clinical practice. METHODS The study included 39 GERD patients receiving maintenance PPI therapy. Residual symptoms were assessed using the Frequency Scale for Symptoms of GERD (FSSG) questionnaire and the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS). The relationships between the FSSG score and patient background factors, including the CYP2C19 genotype, were analyzed. RESULTS The FSSG scores ranged from 1 to 28 points (median score: 7.5 points), and 19 patients (48.7%) had a score of 8 points or more. The patients’ GSRS scores were significantly correlated with their FSSG scores (correlation coefficient = 0.47, P < 0.005). In erosive esophagitis patients, the FSSG scores of the CYP2C19 rapid metabolizers (RMs) were significantly higher than the scores of the poor metabolizers and intermediate metabolizers (total scores: 16.7 ± 8.6 vs 7.8 ± 5.4, P < 0.05; acid reflux-related symptom scores: 12 ± 1.9 vs 2.5 ± 0.8, P < 0.005). In contrast, the FSSG scores of the CYP2C19 RMs in the non-erosive reflux disease patients were significantly lower than those of the other patients (total scores: 5.5 ± 1.0 vs 11.8 ± 6.3, P < 0.05; dysmotility symptom-related scores: 1.0 ± 0.4 vs 6.0 ± 0.8, P < 0.01). CONCLUSION Approximately half of the GERD patients receiving maintenance PPI therapy had residual symptoms associated with a lower quality of life, and the CYP2C19 genotype appeared to be associated with these residual symptoms. PMID:28373773

  12. Aspirin and proton pump inhibitor combination therapy for prevention of cardiovascular disease and Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Peura, David A; Wilcox, C Mel

    2014-01-01

    Aspirin, used at low doses (75-325 mg daily), prevents aggregation of platelets and is prescribed for patients as pharmacologic prevention of cardiovascular disease. Despite the well-documented beneficial effects of aspirin, prolonged use is associated with damage to the gastrointestinal (GI) mucosa in the upper and lower GI tract. Patient risk of hemorrhage and peptic ulcer formation is increased with older age, previous ulcer history, Helicobacter pylori infection, and concomitant use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids, or antithrombotic agents. As termination of aspirin therapy can precipitate a cardiovascular event, patients at risk need co-therapy with gastroprotective agents, such as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), to reduce the GI side effects of aspirin treatment. Fixed-dose combinations of low-dose aspirin and gastroprotective agents have been designed to increase medication compliance, improve clinical outcomes, and reduce the overall cost of therapy. Prolonged use of PPIs may, however, lead to serious adverse effects or, in some cases, reduce the cardioprotective effects of aspirin. Hence, physicians need to carefully consider the benefits and risks associated with the condition of each patient to optimize clinical outcomes of combination therapy. A growing body of clinical evidence indicates that aspirin may decrease the risk of colorectal and other GI cancers, as well as reduce progression from Barrett's esophagus (BE) to esophageal adenocarcinoma. Furthermore, PPIs have recently been shown to reduce neoplastic transformation in patients with BE. Thus, the use of a fixed-dose aspirin/PPI combination could potentially provide chemopreventive benefit to patients with BE, and, at the same time, treat the underlying gastroesophageal reflux responsible for the condition.

  13. Predictive Factors of Response to Proton Pump Inhibitors in Korean Patients With Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Eun; Kim, Nayoung; Oh, Sooyeon; Kim, Hee Man; Park, Moo In; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are widely used in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, some patients fail to respond to PPI therapy. We investigated the efficacy of response to PPI therapy in patients with GERD symptoms. Methods A total of 179 subjects with GERD symptoms were prospectively enrolled and diagnosed with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD, n = 100) and erosive reflux disease (n = 79) by gastroscopy and Bernstein test and/or 24-hour esophageal pH testing. Subjects then received a standard dose of daily PPI therapy for at least 4 weeks. PPI therapy response was evaluated using questionnaires including questions about demographics, GERD symptoms, GERD impact scale, Epworth sleepiness scale, Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI), hospital anxiety and depression scale, and abbreviated version of the World Health Organization quality of life scale. Results The rates of complete (≥ 80%), satisfactory (≥ 50%), partial (< 50%), and refractory response in the 179 participants were 41.3%, 30.2%, 18.4%, and 10.1%, respectively. Thus, overall response rate (complete and satisfactory responses) was 71.5%. Multivariate analysis showed body mass index < 23 kg/m2 (OR, 2.20; 95% CI, 1.12–4.34), higher total PSQI score (OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.05–1.35), history of psychotherapy or neuropsychiatric medication (OR, 2.44; 95% CI, 1.23–4.85), and NERD (OR, 3.30; 95% CI, 1.54–7.11) were associated with poor response to PPI therapy. Conclusions Psychological factors, sleep dysfunction, body mass index < 23 kg/m2, and NERD seem to be the major factors that lead to a poor response to PPI treatment in patients with GERD symptoms. PMID:25537676

  14. Influence of the proton pump inhibitor lansoprazole on distribution and activity of doxorubicin in solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Man; Lee, Carol; Wang, Marina; Tannock, Ian F

    2015-10-01

    Cellular causes of resistance and limited drug distribution within solid tumors limit therapeutic efficacy of anticancer drugs. Acidic endosomes in cancer cells mediate autophagy, which facilitates survival of stressed cells, and may contribute to drug resistance. Basic drugs (e.g. doxorubicin) are sequestered in acidic endosomes, thereby diverting drugs from their target DNA and decreasing penetration to distal cells. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may raise endosomal pH, with potential to improve drug efficacy and distribution in solid tumors. We determined the effects of the PPI lansoprazole to modify the activity of doxorubicin. To gain insight into its mechanisms, we studied the effects of lansoprazole on endosomal pH, and on the spatial distribution of doxorubicin, and of biomarkers reflecting its activity, using in vitro and murine models. Lansoprazole showed concentration-dependent effects to raise endosomal pH and to inhibit endosomal sequestration of doxorubicin in cultured tumor cells. Lansoprazole was not toxic to cancer cells but potentiated the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin and enhanced its penetration through multilayered cell cultures. In solid tumors, lansoprazole improved the distribution of doxorubicin but also increased expression of biomarkers of drug activity throughout the tumor. Combined treatment with lansoprazole and doxorubicin was more effective in delaying tumor growth as compared to either agent alone. Together, lansoprazole enhances the therapeutic effects of doxorubicin both by improving its distribution and increasing its activity in solid tumors. Use of PPIs to improve drug distribution and to inhibit autophagy represents a promising strategy to enhance the effectiveness of anticancer drugs in solid tumors.

  15. The Proton Pump Inhibitor Lansoprazole Improves the Skeletal Phenotype in Dystrophin Deficient mdx Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sali, Arpana; Many, Gina M.; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; van der Meulen, Jack H.; Phadke, Aditi; Spurney, Christopher F.; Cnaan, Avital; Hoffman, Eric P.; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2013-01-01

    Background In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), loss of the membrane stabilizing protein dystrophin results in myofiber damage. Microinjury to dystrophic myofibers also causes secondary imbalances in sarcolemmic ion permeability and resting membrane potential, which modifies excitation-contraction coupling and increases proinflammatory/apoptotic signaling cascades. Although glucocorticoids remain the standard of care for the treatment of DMD, there is a need to investigate the efficacy of other pharmacological agents targeting the involvement of imbalances in ion flux on dystrophic pathology. Methodology/Principal Findings We designed a preclinical trial to investigate the effects of lansoprazole (LANZO) administration, a proton pump inhibitor, on the dystrophic muscle phenotype in dystrophin deficient (mdx) mice. Eight to ten week-old female mice were assigned to one of four treatment groups (n = 12 per group): (1) vehicle control; (2) 5 mg/kg/day LANZO; (3) 5 mg/kg/day prednisolone; and (4) combined treatment of 5 mg/kg/day prednisolone (PRED) and 5 mg/kg/day LANZO. Treatment was administered orally 5 d/wk for 3 months. At the end of the study, behavioral (Digiscan) and functional outcomes (grip strength and Rotarod) were assessed prior to sacrifice. After sacrifice, body, tissue and organ masses, muscle histology, in vitro muscle force, and creatine kinase levels were measured. Mice in the combined treatment groups displayed significant reductions in the number of degenerating muscle fibers and number of inflammatory foci per muscle field relative to vehicle control. Additionally, mice in the combined treatment group displayed less of a decline in normalized forelimb and hindlimb grip strength and declines in in vitro EDL force after repeated eccentric contractions. Conclusions/Significance Together our findings suggest that combined treatment of LANZO and prednisolone attenuates some components of dystrophic pathology in mdx mice. Our findings warrant

  16. Comparative study: Vonoprazan and proton pump inhibitors in Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Kouichi; Suda, Hiroko; Ido, Yumi; Takeichi, Takayuki; Okuda, Ayako; Hasuda, Kiwamu; Hattori, Masahiro

    2017-01-01

    AIM To compare the effectiveness and safety of vonoprazan-based therapy with proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-based therapies to treat Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). METHODS We retrospectively analysed data from first-line (vonoprazan or PPI with 200 mg clarithromycin and 750 mg amoxicillin twice daily for 7 d) (n = 1353) and second-line (vonoprazan or PPI with 250 mg metronidazole and 750 mg amoxicillin twice daily for 7 d) (n = 261) eradication treatments for H. pylori -positive patients with associated gastrointestinal diseases from April 2014 to December 2015 at Hattori Clinic, Japan. The primary endpoint was the eradication rate, which was assessed with a full analysis set. The secondary endpoints were adverse events and related factors. RESULTS After the first-line treatments, the eradication rates for vonoprazan, esomeprazol, rabeprazole, and lansoprazole were 87.9% (95%CI: 84.9%-90.5%), 71.6% (95%CI: 67.5%-75.5%), 62.9% (95%CI: 52.0%-72.9%), and 57.3% (95%CI: 50.4%-64.1%), respectively. The vonoprazan eradication rate was significantly higher than that of the PPIs (P < 0.01). Interestingly, smoking did not affect the H. pylori eradication rate in the vonoprazan group (P = 0.34), whereas it decreased the rates in the PPI groups (P = 0.013). The incidence of adverse events in the vonoprazan group was not different from the PPI group (P = 0.054), although the vonoprazan group exhibited a wider range of adverse events. Vonoprazan-based triple therapy was highly effective as a second-line treatment, with an eradication rate similar to that of PPI-based therapy. CONCLUSION Vonoprazan might be superior to PPIs in first-line H. pylori therapy, particularly for smokers. However, caution is required due to possible adverse events. PMID:28216974

  17. Proton-pump inhibitor therapy and vitamin B12 status in an inpatient hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Brenda; Donnelly-VanderLoo, Mary; Watson, Tiffany; O'Connor, Colleen; Madill, Janet

    2016-06-23

    The risk for impaired vitamin B12 status increases with age, as does the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPI). Long-term use of PPIs is associated with several nutritional deficiencies including B12. Currently, there are no recommendations for B12 screening among patients taking PPIs. Data were abstracted on B12 concentrations, B12-containing supplement use, medications, and select hematological values from a retrospective chart review of 658 adults, 391 with serum B12 concentrations, admitted to 6 different medical units at 2 regional hospitals in Southwestern Ontario between 2010 and 2012. We found no difference between PPI users and nonusers and serum B12 concentrations (404 ± 224 vs 369 ± 213 pmol/L; P = 0.0690). This may be due to use of B12 containing multivitamins in 41% of PPI users. Regression modelling found that aging increases the odds of having an impaired B12 status (<220 pmol/L) by 1.4 times and those using B12 supplements are almost 4 times more likely to have an impaired status. Mean corpuscular volume was not related to B12 status. In this population, older PPI users are more likely to be using multivitamins, which may delay nutritional deficiencies. However, the lower B12 concentrations of PPI users taking only B12 supplements is a concern and requires further research. Finally, physicians need to be aware that mean corpuscular volume is no longer recommended as an effective biomarker for B12 screening and updated screening protocols need to be used to reduce the possibility of adverse neurological effects from impaired B12 status.

  18. Trends in the coprescription of proton pump inhibitors with clopidogrel: an ecological analysis

    PubMed Central

    Juurlink, David N.; Gomes, Tara; Paterson, J. Michael; Hellings, Chelsea; Mamdani, Muhammad M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In early 2009, 2 observational studies and a US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory addressed the drug interaction between proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and clopidogrel. One study suggested that pantoprazole could be used safely in this setting, whereas the other study and the FDA advisory did not distinguish among PPIs. We examined trends in PPI prescribing among clopidogrel recipients in the period following these events. Methods: We conducted a population-based time series analysis of Ontario residents aged 66 years or older for whom clopidogrel was prescribed between Apr. 1, 1999, and Sept. 30, 2013. We determined the proportion of clopidogrel recipients dispensed a PPI during each quarter and the proportions who received pantoprazole or other PPIs. The outcome of interest was change in the use of pantoprazole. Results: In the final quarter of 2008, pantoprazole represented 23.7% of all PPI prescriptions dispensed to patients receiving clopidogrel. Following the publications and FDA advisory in early 2009, pantoprazole use increased substantially. By the end of 2009, this medication accounted for 52.5% of all PPI prescriptions issued to patients receiving clopidogrel; by the end of the study period, it accounted for 71.0% of all PPI prescriptions dispensed to such patients (p < 0. 001). We also observed a modest drop in overall PPI use among clopidogrel recipients beginning in early 2009. Interpretation: In 2009, the prescribing of PPIs with clopidogrel changed substantially in Ontario, with pantoprazole rapidly becoming the most commonly prescribed agent in its class. However, a modest decline in overall PPI use also occurred that may reflect suboptimal translation of emerging drug safety information to clinical practice. PMID:26770965

  19. Proton pump inhibitors in prevention of low-dose aspirin-associated upper gastrointestinal injuries

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Chen; Sun, Gang; Lu, Ming-Liang; Zhang, Li; Wang, Yan-Zhi; Sun, Xi; Yang, Yun-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the preventive effect and safety of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in low-dose aspirin (LDA)-associated gastrointestinal (GI) ulcers and bleeding. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register from inception to December 2013, and checked conference abstracts of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the effect of PPIs in reducing adverse GI events (hemorrhage, ulcer, perforation, or obstruction) in patients taking LDA. The preventive effects of PPIs were compared with the control group [taking placebo, a cytoprotective agent, or an H2 receptor antagonist (H2RA)] in LDA-associated upper GI injuries. The meta-analysis was performed using RevMan 5.1 software. RESULTS: We evaluated 8780 participants in 10 RCTs. The meta-analysis showed that PPIs decreased the risk of LDA-associated upper GI ulcers (OR = 0.16; 95%CI: 0.12-0.23) and bleeding (OR = 0.27; 95%CI: 0.16-0.43) compared with control. For patients treated with dual anti-platelet therapy of LDA and clopidogrel, PPIs were able to prevent the LDA-associated GI bleeding (OR = 0.36; 95%CI: 0.15-0.87) without increasing the risk of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) (OR = 1.00; 95%CI: 0.76-1.31). PPIs were superior to H2RA in prevention of LDA-associated GI ulcers (OR = 0.12; 95%CI: 0.02-0.65) and bleeding (OR = 0.32; 95%CI: 0.13-0.79). CONCLUSION: PPIs are effective in preventing LDA-associated upper GI ulcers and bleeding. Concomitant use of PPI, LDA and clopidogrel did not increase the risk of MACE. PMID:25954113

  20. [Clopidogrel--proton pump inhibitors drug interaction: implications to clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Fontes-Carvalho, Ricardo; Albuquerque, Aníbal

    2010-10-01

    Recent studies have raised the concern that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) could potentially interfere with clopidogrel antiplatelet effect. This association is frequent in clinical practice and is recommended by recent consensus guidelines in patients taking dual antiplatelet therapy to prevent gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Clopidogrel is a pro-drug which needs to be metabolized into its active metabolite, by cytochrome P450, especially by CYP2C19 isoenzyme. Various PPIs can inhibit CYP2C19, which could possibly decrease clopidogrel bioactivation process and, therefore, its antiplatelet effect. Various platelet function studies have shown that omeprazol can significantly decrease clopidogrel inhibitory effect on platelet P2Y12 receptor, leading to an increase in the number of patients who are "nonresponders" to clopidogrel. These pharmacokinetic studies also shown that this is not probably a class effect of PPIs, because they are metabolized to varying degrees by CYP2C19. The clinical impact of these observations remains uncertain, because various observational studies have shown conflicting results, and remains to demonstrate if PPIs can really increase the risk of cardiovascular events in patients taking clopidogrel. In this review we will discuss the pharmacokinetic basis underlying this drug interaction, the effect of different PPIs on platelet function tests and we will analyze in detail the potential clinical implications of using this association, both on cardiovascular and gastrointestinal events. Until further data is available, some clinical strategies can be recommended: (1) individual gastrointestinal risk assessment, with PPIs administration only to patients on dual anti-platelet therapy with additional GI risk factors; (2) preferential use of PPIs that have shown less interference with clopidogrel efficacy; (3) wide separation of PPI and clopidogrel dosing to minimize the risk of interaction (PPI may be given before breakfast and clopidogrel at

  1. The association of proton pump inhibitors and hypomagnesemia in the community setting.

    PubMed

    Markovits, Noa; Loebstein, Ronen; Halkin, Hillel; Bialik, Martin; Landes-Westerman, Janet; Lomnicky, Joseph; Kurnik, Daniel

    2014-08-01

    Evidence for the association between hypomagnesemia and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), highlighted by the 2011 FDA Drug Safety Communication, rests mainly on studies in hospitalized patients. Our objectives were to determine the prevalence of hypomagnesemia and its association with PPIs in the community setting. We performed a retrospective cross-sectional analysis of a large health maintenance organization administrative database, including ambulatory patients with ≥1 serum magnesium concentrations between 2008 and 2011, the lowest referred to as "index magnesium." In cases with any (index magnesium ≤0.7 mmol/L) or severe (≤0.55 mmol/L) hypomagnesemia, we analyzed (vs. controls, >0.7 mmol/L) the association with PPI or H2 -blocker use during the 4-12 months preceding the index magnesium by logistic regression analysis, adjusting for confounders. Among 95,205 subjects, 5,696 (6.0%) had any hypomagnesemia, which was severe in 454 (0.5%), with twofold higher prevalences in those with established risk factors. PPI use during the 4 months preceding the index magnesium was more common in cases of any hypomagnesemia (adjusted OR = 1.66; 95% CI, 1.55-1.78) and severe hypomagnesemia (adjusted OR = 3.79; 2.99-4.82) than in controls without acid suppression. Hypomagnesemia remained significantly associated with PPI use when using H2 -blocker-users as reference (adjusted OR = 1.25 [P = 0.003] and 2.65 [P < 0.001] for any and severe hypomagnesemia, respectively). We conclude that hypomagnesemia is associated with PPI use in ambulatory patients.

  2. Black Spot, a Novel Gastric Finding Potentially Induced by Proton Pump Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hatano, Yu; Haruma, Ken; Ayaki, Maki; Kamada, Tomoari; Ohtani, Hiroshi; Murao, Takahisa; Manabe, Noriaki; Mori, Hirohito; Masaki, Tsutomu; Shiotani, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    Objective We have recently discovered new gastric lesions with black spots. There have been no reports about black spots and their clinicopathological features. We therefore report the clinicopathological features of black spots and assess their causes and mechanisms. Methods Sixty-four patients with black spots among 26,620 Japanese patients that underwent endoscopy between May 2012 and October 2014 were enrolled. Endoscopic findings of black spots were defined as black pigmentations in the gastric mucosa by conventional endoscopy. We investigated the clinicopathological characteristics, including gender, age, underlying diseases and medications, endoscopic and pathologic findings of patients with black spots. Results The prevalence of patients with black spots was 0.24%. Of sixty-four cases, 44 (68.8%) were taking proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Eight (12.5%) were taking corticosteroids. There were 10 cases (15.6%) with decreased renal function. All black spots were identified only in the fundic gland region. Forty-one (64.1%) patients had multiple (more than ten) black spots. There were two different types: black spots on the flat mucosa and black spots on fundic gland polyps. Pathologically, parietal cell protrusions, fundic gland cysts and brownish pigmentation in fundic gland cysts were seen in 26 (76.5%), 23 (67.6%) and 6 (17.6%) patients, respectively. Conclusion We herein describe gastric black spots as a new gastric mucosal finding that arises only in the fundic gland region. The black spots are pathologically brownish pigmentations in fundic gland cysts. Adverse events of PPIs and parietal cell protrusion caused by PPI use are strongly considered to be one of the etiologies of black spots. PMID:27803398

  3. Proton Pump Inhibitors and Risk of Incident CKD and Progression to ESRD.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yan; Bowe, Benjamin; Li, Tingting; Xian, Hong; Balasubramanian, Sumitra; Al-Aly, Ziyad

    2016-10-01

    The association between proton pump inhibitors (PPI) use and risk of acute interstitial nephritis has been described. However, whether exposure to PPI associates with incident CKD, CKD progression, or ESRD is not known. We used Department of Veterans Affairs national databases to build a primary cohort of new users of PPI (n=173,321) and new users of histamine H2-receptor antagonists (H2 blockers; n=20,270) and followed these patients over 5 years to ascertain renal outcomes. In adjusted Cox survival models, the PPI group, compared with the H2 blockers group, had an increased risk of incident eGFR<60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) and of incident CKD (hazard ratio [HR], 1.22; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.18 to 1.26; and HR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.23 to 1.34, respectively). Patients treated with PPI also had a significantly elevated risk of doubling of serum creatinine level (HR, 1.53; 95% CI, 1.42 to 1.65), of eGFR decline >30% (HR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.28 to 1.37), and of ESRD (HR, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.21 to 3.18). Furthermore, we detected a graded association between duration of PPI exposure and risk of renal outcomes among those exposed to PPI for 31-90, 91-180, 181-360, and 361-720 days compared with those exposed for ≤30 days. Examination of risk of renal outcomes in 1:1 propensity score-matched cohorts of patients taking H2 blockers versus patients taking PPI and patients taking PPI versus controls yielded consistent results. Our results suggest that PPI exposure associates with increased risk of incident CKD, CKD progression, and ESRD.

  4. Proton pump inhibitors use in hemodialysis patients and serum magnesium levels

    PubMed Central

    Erdem, Emre

    2015-01-01

    Hypomagnesemia is reported in patients who use proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). We investigated the effect of PPIs use on serum magnesium levels in hemodialysis patients. Our study was conducted in a hemodialysis center including 75 end stage renal disease patients. PPI use and duration were investigated. All patients were dialyzed using a dialysate magnesium level of 0.5-0.75 mmol/L. After at least one month of hemodialysis with the mentioned dialysate, laboratory tests were performed. Fifty-four patients (72%) used PPIs while 21 (28%) did not. The mean duration of PPI use was 42.5 ± 35 months. There was no significant difference between serum magnesium levels of patients who used and did not use PPIs (2.73 ± 0.3 vs. 2.88 ± 0.3 mg/dL, P = ns). There were 15 patients (20%) with a dialysate magnesium level of 0.5 mmol/l and 60 patients (80%) with a dialysate magnesium level of 0.75 mmol/L. The mean serum magnesium levels of patients with a dialysate magnesium level of 0.5 mmol/L was 2.45 ± 0.3 mg/dL while that of patients with a dialysate magnesium level of 0.75 mmol/L was 2.85 ± 0.3 mg/dL (P<0.0001). In hemodialysis patients, PPI use did not affect serum magnesium levels. The most important factor affecting the serum magnesium levels in hemodialysis patients is the dialysate magnesium concentration. PMID:26885127

  5. Proton pump inhibitors enhance the effects of cytotoxic agents in chemoresistant epithelial ovarian carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ji Eun; Cho, Young Jae; Ryu, Ji Yoon; Choi, Jung-Joo; Lee, Sang Hoon; Yoon, Gun; Kim, Woo Young; Do, In-Gu; Kim, Min Kyu; Kim, Tae-Joong; Choi, Chel Hun; Lee, Jeong-Won; Bae, Duk-Soo; Kim, Byoung-Gie

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether proton pump inhibitors (PPI, V-ATPase blocker) could increase the effect of cytotoxic agents in chemoresistant epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Expression of V-ATPase protein was evaluated in patients with EOC using immunohistochemistry, and patient survival was compared based on expression of V-ATPase mRNA from a TCGA data set. In vitro, EOC cell lines were treated with chemotherapeutic agents with or without V-ATPase siRNA or PPI (omeprazole) pretreatment. Cell survival and apoptosis was assessed using MTT assay and ELISA, respectively. In vivo experiments were performed to confirm the synergistic effect with omeprazole and paclitaxel on tumor growth in orthotopic and patient-derived xenograft (PDX) mouse models. Expression of V-ATPase protein in ovarian cancer tissues was observed in 44 patients (44/59, 74.6%). Higher expression of V-ATPase mRNA was associated with poorer overall survival in TCGA data. Inhibition of V-ATPase by siRNA or omeprazole significantly increased cytotoxicity or apoptosis to paclitaxel in chemoresistant (HeyA8-MDR, SKOV3-TR) and clear cell carcinoma cells (ES-2, RMG-1), but not in chemosensitive cells (HeyA8, SKOV3ip1). Moreover, the combination of omeprazole and paclitaxel significantly decreased the total tumor weight compared with paclitaxel alone in a chemoresistant EOC animal model and a PDX model of clear cell carcinoma. However, this finding was not observed in chemosensitive EOC animal models. These results show that omeprazole pretreatment can increase the effect of chemotherapeutic agents in chemoresistant EOC and clear cell carcinoma via reduction of the acidic tumor microenvironment. PMID:26418900

  6. Acidification of endocytic vesicles by an ATP-dependent proton pump

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    One of the early events in the pathway of receptor-mediated endocytosis is the acidification of the newly formed endocytic vesicle. To examine the mechanism of acidification, we used fluorescein-labeled alpha 2- macroglobulin (F-alpha 2M) as a probe for endocytic vesicle pH. Changes in pH were determined from the change in fluorescein fluorescence at 490-nm excitation as measured with a microscope spectrofluorometer. After endocytosis of F-alpha 2M, mouse fibroblast cells were permeabilized by brief exposure to the detergent digitonin. Treatment with the ionophore monensin or the protonophore carbonyl cyanide p- trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP) caused a rapid increase in the pH of the endocytic vesicle. Upon removal of the ionophore, the endocytic vesicle rapidly acidified only when MgATP or MgGTP was added. Neither ADP nor the nonhydrolyzable analog, adenosine 5'-(beta, gamma- imido)triphosphate (AMP-PNP) could support acidification. The ATP- dependent acidification did not require a specific cation or anion in the external media. Acidification was insensitive to vanadate and amiloride but was inhibited by Zn2+ and the anion transport inhibitor diisothiocyanostilbene disulfonic acid (DIDS). We also examined the acidification of lysosomes with the permeabilized cell system, using fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran as probe. DIDS inhibited the ATP- dependent reacidification of lysosomes, although at a lower concentration than that for inhibition of endocytic vesicle reacidification. These results demonstrate that endocytic vesicles contain an ATP-dependent acidification mechanism that shares similar characteristics with the previously described lysosomal proton pump. PMID:6224803

  7. Validation of the Reflux Symptom Questionnaire Electronic Diary in Partial Responders to Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Vakil, Nimish; Björck, Karin; Denison, Hans; Halling, Katarina; Karlsson, Maria; Paty, Jean; Silberg, Debra G; Rydén, Anna

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We aimed to develop and validate the Reflux Symptom Questionnaire electronic Diary (RESQ-eD) for use in clinical trials in patients with a partial response to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy, using methods that meet US Food & Drug Administration (FDA) regulatory standards. METHODS: Patient interviews were performed to elicit new items and evaluate existing items from the Reflux Disease Questionnaire. The instrument's measurement properties were evaluated, based on data from two clinical trials of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) with a partial response to PPIs who received lesogaberan or placebo as an add-on to PPI therapy. RESULTS: The content validity phase resulted in 13 RESQ-eD items. Principal component analysis supported a four-domain structure. All domains had a high inter-item correlation (Cronbach's alpha lower 95% confidence limit: 0.87–0.95). Test-retest reliability was good to excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient: 0.65–0.85). Convergent and discriminant validity was confirmed by correlation assessments referencing the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale. The RESQ-eD demonstrated a good ability to capture change in mean intensity and proportion of symptom-free days. Confirmatory psychometric evaluation verified internal consistency reliability, test-retest reliability, and ability to capture change. CONCLUSIONS: The RESQ-eD demonstrated good content validity and psychometric properties in the clinical trial setting in patients with GERD who have a partial response to PPI therapy. To our knowledge, the RESQ-eD is the first electronic symptom diary for use in partial responders to PPI that has been developed in line with the FDA guidance on patient-reported outcomes. PMID:23238029

  8. Effect of proton pump inhibitors on glycemic control in patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Takebayashi, Kohzo; Inukai, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Gastrin is a linear peptide hormone which is secreted mostly in the stomach pyloric antrum G cells. Although the main role of this hormone is the promotion of the secretion of gastric acid from the stomach parietal cells, gastrin can also behave as a growth factor and stimulate gastric cell proliferation. It is also reported that gastrin promotes β cell neogenesis in the pancreatic ductal complex, modest pancreatic β cell replication, and improvement of glucose tolerance in animal models, in which the remodeling of pancreatic tissues is promoted. These findings suggest the possibility that gastrin has the potential to promote an increase of β cell mass in pancreas, and therefore that gastrin may improve glucose tolerance. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are wildly used clinically for the therapy of gastro-esophageal reflex disease, gastritis due to excess stomach acid, and gastric ulcers. PPIs indirectly elevate serum gastrin levels via a negative feedback effect. Recent evidence has revealed the beneficial effect of PPIs on glycemic control especially in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), probably via the elevation of the levels of serum gastrin, although the detailed mechanism remains unclear. In addition, the beneficial effects of a combination therapy of gastrin or a PPI with a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist on glycemic control in animal models have been demonstrated. Although PPIs may be possible candidates for a new approach in the therapy of diabetes, a prospective, long-term, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study is needed to establish the effect of PPIs on glycemic control in a large number of patients with T2DM. PMID:26322158

  9. Influence of proton pump inhibitor treatment on Helicobacter pylori stool antigen test

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Masaaki; Murakami, Kazunari; Okimoto, Tadayoshi; Fukuda, Yoshihiro; Shimoyama, Tadashi; Okuda, Masumi; Kato, Chieko; Kobayashi, Intetsu; Fujioka, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) treatment on stool antigen test using the TestMate pylori enzyme immunoassay. METHODS: This study assessed 28 patients [16 men and 12 women; mean age (63.1 ± 5.9) years; range, 25-84 years] who underwent stool antigen test and urea breath test (UBT) before and after PPI administration. RESULTS: Using the UBT as the standard, the sensitivity, specificity and agreement of the stool antigen test in all 28 patients were 95.2%, 71.4%, and 89.3%, respectively, before PPI administration, and 88.9%, 90.9%, and 89.3%, respectively, after PPI treatment. Mean UBT values were 23.98% ± 5.33% before and 16.19% ± 4.75% after PPI treatment and, in 15 patients treated for ≥ 4 wk, were significantly lower after than before 4 wk of PPI treatment (12.58% ± 4.49% vs 24.53% ± 8.53%, P = 0.048). The mean optical density (A450/630) ratios on the stool antigen test were 1.16 ± 0.20 before and 1.17 ± 0.24 after PPI treatment (P = 0.989), and were 1.02 ± 0.26 and 0.69 ± 0.28, respectively, in the group treated for > 4 wk (P = 0.099). CONCLUSION: The stool antigen test was equally sensitive to the UBT, making it a useful and reliable diagnostic method, even during PPI administration. PMID:22228969

  10. Can proton pump inhibitors reduce rebleeding following Histoacryl sclerotherapy for gastric variceal hemorrhage?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ka Rham; Jun, Chung Hwan; Cho, Kyu Man; Wi, Jin Woo; Park, Seon Young; Cho, Sung Bum; Lee, Wan Sik; Park, Chang Hwan; Joo, Young Eun; Kim, Hyun Soo; Choi, Sung Kyu; Rew, Jong Sun

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: To evaluate the efficacy of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in reducing rebleeding and bleeding-related death rates after endoscopic gastric variceal obliteration (GVO) using N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (NBC). Methods: This study enrolled 341 patients who were consecutively diagnosed with and treated for bleeding gastric varices. The patients were divided into PPI and non-PPI groups, and their endoscopic findings, initial hemostasis outcomes, rebleeding and bleeding-related death rates, and treatment-related complications were analyzed. Results: The rate of initial hemostasis was 97.1%. rebleeding occurred in 2.2% of patients within 2 weeks, 3.9% of patients within 4 weeks, 18.9% of patients within 6 months, and 27.6% of patients within 12 months of the GVO procedure. A previous history of variceal bleeding (relative risk [RR], 1.955; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.263 to 3.028; p = 0.003) and use of PPIs (RR, 0.554; 95% CI, 0.352 to 0.873; p = 0.011) were associated with rebleeding. Child-Pugh class C (RR, 10.914; 95% CI, 4.032 to 29.541; p < 0.001), failure of initial hemostasis (RR, 13.329; 95% CI, 2.795 to 63.556; p = 0.001), and the presence of red-colored concomitant esophageal varices (RR, 4.096; 95% CI, 1.320 to 12.713; p = 0.015) were associated with bleeding-related death. Conclusions: The prophylactic use of PPIs reduces rebleeding after GVO using NBC in patients with gastric variceal hemorrhage. However, prophylactic use of PPIs does not reduce bleeding-related death. PMID:26354053

  11. A retrospective analysis of the role of proton pump inhibitors in colorectal cancer disease survival

    PubMed Central

    Graham, C.; Orr, C.; Bricks, C.S.; Hopman, W.M.; Hammad, N.; Ramjeesingh, R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Proton pump inhibitors (ppis) are a commonly used medication. A limited number of studies have identified a weak-to-moderate association between ppi use and colorectal cancer (crc) risk, but none to date have identified an effect of ppi use on crc survival. We therefore postulated that an association between ppi use and crc survival might potentially exist. Methods We performed a retrospective chart review of 1304 crc patients diagnosed from January 2005 to December 2011 and treated at the Cancer Centre of Southeastern Ontario. Kaplan–Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to evaluate overall survival (os). Results We identified 117 patients (9.0%) who were taking ppis at the time of oncology consult. Those taking a ppi were also more often taking asa or statins (or both) and had a statistically significantly increased rate of cardiac disease. No identifiable difference in tumour characteristics was evident in the two groups, including tumour location, differentiation, lymph node status, and stage. Univariate analysis identified a statistically nonsignificant difference in survival, with those taking a ppi experiencing lesser 1-year (82.1% vs. 86.7%, p = 0.161), 2-year (70.1% vs. 76.8%, p = 0.111), and 5-year os (55.2% vs. 62.9%, p = 0.165). When controlling for patient demographics and tumour characteristics, multivariate Cox regression analysis identified a statistically significant effect of ppi in our patient population (hazard ratio: 1.343; 95% confidence interval: 1.011 to 1.785; p = 0.042). Conclusions Our results suggest a potential adverse effect of ppi use on os in crc patients. These results need further evaluation in prospective analyses. PMID:28050148

  12. Helicobacter gastritis induces changes in the oxyntic mucosa indistinguishable from the effects of proton pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kirthi R; Iqbal, Ramiz; Coss, Elizabeth; Park, Christina; Cryer, Byron; Genta, Robert M

    2013-12-01

    A causal relationship between oxyntic glands dilatation with protruding parietal cells, referred to as proton pump inhibitor (PPI) effects, and PPI use has been suspected but not established. We designed this study to evaluate the association between these changes and the use of PPIs and histamine2-receptor blockers (H2-blockers). We obtained five Sydney System-compliant biopsy specimens from patients recruited into a therapeutic trial for H. pylori. Medication history with details on PPI and H2-blockers use was collected. Two blinded pathologists graded gastritis and the intensity of putative PPI effects using a 0 to 3 scale. PPI and H2-blocker use was then disclosed and the accuracy of pathologists' assessment was analyzed. There were 138 H. pylori-negative and 104 positive patients. In H. pylori-negative patients the histologic assessment for PPI use had 77.5% sensitivity and 51.8% specificity, with a positive predictive value of 86.9% and a negative predictive value of 35.9%. In H. pylori-positive patients, sensitivity was 74.1% and specificity 26.1%. Positive and negative predictive values were 55.8% and 44.4%, respectively. Neither glandular dilatations nor parietal cell protrusions related to H2-blocker use. We conclude that these changes are associated with PPI use only in H. pylori-negative subjects. In H. pylori gastritis, so-called PPI-effects were equally prevalent in PPI-users and non-users, indicating that other factors are involved in the induction of oxyntic cell hyperplasia. We suggest that comments regarding the supposed evidence of PPI use are too often wrong to be useful and should be avoided in the diagnosis of gastric biopsy specimens.

  13. Proton Pump Inhibitor Usage and the Risk of Myocardial Infarction in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Bauer-Mehren, Anna; Ghebremariam, Yohannes T.; Iyer, Srinivasan V.; Marcus, Jake; Nead, Kevin T.; Cooke, John P.; Leeper, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been associated with adverse clinical outcomes amongst clopidogrel users after an acute coronary syndrome. Recent pre-clinical results suggest that this risk might extend to subjects without any prior history of cardiovascular disease. We explore this potential risk in the general population via data-mining approaches. Methods Using a novel approach for mining clinical data for pharmacovigilance, we queried over 16 million clinical documents on 2.9 million individuals to examine whether PPI usage was associated with cardiovascular risk in the general population. Results In multiple data sources, we found gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients exposed to PPIs to have a 1.16 fold increased association (95% CI 1.09–1.24) with myocardial infarction (MI). Survival analysis in a prospective cohort found a two-fold (HR = 2.00; 95% CI 1.07–3.78; P = 0.031) increase in association with cardiovascular mortality. We found that this association exists regardless of clopidogrel use. We also found that H2 blockers, an alternate treatment for GERD, were not associated with increased cardiovascular risk; had they been in place, such pharmacovigilance algorithms could have flagged this risk as early as the year 2000. Conclusions Consistent with our pre-clinical findings that PPIs may adversely impact vascular function, our data-mining study supports the association of PPI exposure with risk for MI in the general population. These data provide an example of how a combination of experimental studies and data-mining approaches can be applied to prioritize drug safety signals for further investigation. PMID:26061035

  14. Pantoprazole, a proton pump inhibitor, increases orthodontic tooth movement in rats

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Mohsen; Alimoradi, Houman; Kheirandish, Yasaman; Etemad-Moghadam, Shahroo; Alaeddini, Mojgan; Meysamie, Alipasha; Fatahi Meybodi, Seyed Amir Reza; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Pantoprazole, is a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) prescribed for the treatment of upper gastrointestinal disorders, which in high doses has been suggested to decrease calcium absorption leading to hypocalcaemia and therefore osteoporosis. The aim of this study was to assess whether pantoprazol, could alter the rate of orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) in rats. Materials and Methods: A time course study was established using 72 rats which were divided into six groups of 12 samples each (four: vehicle; eight: pantoprazole + vehicle). Pantoprazole at a dose of 200 mg/kg suspended in carboxymethyl cellulose (0.25 percent) was administered by a gastric tube. The upper incisors and first molars were ligated by a 5 mm nickel-titanium closed-coil spring to deliver an initial force of 60 g. Animals were euthanized two weeks after orthodontic treatment followed by assessment of tooth movement and histomorphometric evaluation of the detached maxillae. Lateral skull radiographs were obtained once a week, starting from the first day to the 6th week of the study. OTM and bone density data were analyzed using independent sample t-test and repeated measures ANOVA. Results: No significant changes in OTM measurements and optical density were observed in vehicle-receiving animals during the study (P=0.994). OTM was significantly increased after six weeks pantoprazole therapy which continued until the 7th week of the experiment (P=0.007). Optical density significantly increased in the pantoprazole-treated rats after six weeks. Conclusion: Long term PPI therapy at high doses could lead to osteoporosis and enhanced OTM. PMID:25140207

  15. Influence of Proton-Pump Inhibitors on the Luminal Microbiota in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Ayumi; Suda, Wataru; Morita, Hidetoshi; Takanashi, Kageyasu; Takagi, Atsushi; Koga, Yasuhiro; Hattori, Masahira

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate comparatively the influence of proton-pump inhibitors (PPI) administration on three bacterial communities in the oral cavity, stomach, and colon along the alimentary tract. Methods: Forty-five subjects including 18 patients taking PPI were enrolled. Stimulated saliva, gastric fluid (GF), and feces were obtained from each subject for the microbiota analysis through bacterial 16S rRNA gene profiling using the pyrosequencing method. Results: The species richness (alpha diversity) was similar among these three microbiota, whereas the interindividual diversity (beta diversity) was much higher in the fecal microbiota compared with that in the others. The UniFrac analysis indicated that the salivary and GF microbiota were similar to one another; however, both differed greatly from the fecal microbiota in the overall bacterial community structure. In the comparison between PPI-users and PPI-nonusers, a bacterial cell number increase of ~1,000 times was found in the GF of PPI-users using culturing methods, whereas the bacterial number and composition were nearly identical between the two groups using quantitative PCR and a similarity search based on 16S profiling. The beta diversity significantly increased in both the salivary and GF microbiota of PPI-users compared with PPI-nonusers. Conclusions: These results suggest that the GF microbiota has recently moved from the saliva. Bacterial overgrowth in the GF by PPI administration may be due to a lack of killing rather than proliferation of the bacteria in the acid-suppressed stomach. The biological significance of the increase in beta diversity by PPI administration remains unclear. PMID:26065717

  16. Development and validation of a UPLC method for rapid and simultaneous analysis of proton pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Addo, Richard T; Davis, Kenneth; Ubale, Ruhi; Owen, Joel S; Watkins, E Blake

    2015-02-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are used extensively for the relief of gastroesophageal reflux, peptic ulcers, and other hypersecretory conditions. Some of the commonly used PPIs-omeprazole, esomeprazole, lansoprazole, pantoprazole, and rabeprazole-were used in this study with the aim of developing a rapid ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) method for detecting each and allowing separation and quantification of a mixture of PPIs. An analysis of samples was performed on a UPLC system equipped with a quaternary solvent delivery system, a refrigerated sample manager, a column heater, a photo diode array detector scanning from 210 to 400 nm, and a C18 analytical column (50 mm × 3.0 mm, 1.7-μm particle size). The chromatographic analysis of the PPI samples and standards was performed using gradient elution with acetonitrile and water. The calibration curve range varied for each of the PPIs ranging from a lower limit of 0.75-1.78 μg/mL to a maximum concentration of 200 μg/mL with a regression coefficient (r (2)) of ≥0.98. The accuracy and precision were calculated, and the %RSD was determined to be ≤0.21% (intraday) and ≤5% (interday). The LOD was 0.23-0.59 μg/mL and the LOQ was 0.71-1.78 μg/mL for each of the drugs analyzed. The method was capable of detecting and quantifying each drug in a mixture with good resolution and a total run time of less than 5 min. Herein, we report an efficient and rapid analytical method for the simultaneous detection of multiple PPIs in a mixture.

  17. A phylogenetically distinctive and extremely heat stable light-driven proton pump from the eubacterium Rubrobacter xylanophilus DSM 9941(T).

    PubMed

    Kanehara, Kanae; Yoshizawa, Susumu; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Sudo, Yuki

    2017-03-14

    Rhodopsins are proteins that contain seven transmembrane domains with a chromophore retinal and that function as photoreceptors for light-energy conversion and light-signal transduction in a wide variety of organisms. Here we characterized a phylogenetically distinctive new rhodopsin from the thermophilic eubacterium Rubrobacter xylanophilus DSM 9941(T) that was isolated from thermally polluted water. Although R. xylanophilus rhodopsin (RxR) is from Actinobacteria, it is located between eukaryotic and archaeal rhodopsins in the phylogenetic tree. Escherichia coli cells expressing RxR showed a light-induced decrease in environmental pH and inhibition by a protonophore, indicating that it works as a light-driven outward proton pump. We characterized purified RxR spectroscopically, and showed that it has an absorption maximum at 541 nm and binds nearly 100% all-trans retinal. The pKa values for the protonated retinal Schiff base and its counterion were estimated to be 10.7 and 1.3, respectively. Time-resolved flash-photolysis experiments revealed the formation of a red-shifted intermediate. Of note, RxR showed an extremely high thermal stability in comparison with other proton pumping rhodopsins such as thermophilic rhodopsin TR (by 16-times) and bacteriorhodopsin from Halobacterium salinarum (HsBR, by 4-times).

  18. Effect of proton pump inhibitors on the secretion of bicarbonates and pepsinogen induced by chemical stimulation of the gastric mucosa.

    PubMed

    Zolotarev, V A; Khropycheva, R P

    2013-02-01

    Proton pump inhibitors were shown to affect the sensitivity of the gastric mucosa to chemical agents. This effect is associated with inhibition of proton back-diffusion and increase in the permeability of the gastric epithelium. We studied the effect of omeprazole on gastric secretion of bicarbonates and pepsinogen induced by irritation of the gastric mucosa in narcotized rats with a hypertonic solution of high acidity (500 mM NaCl, pH 2.0). Irritation of the gastric mucosa increased the basal secretion of bicarbonates and potentiated the secretion of HCO3(-)and pepsinogen induced by electrostimulation of the vagus nerve. Omeprazole stimulated the prostaglandin-induced increase in the basal secretion of HCO3(-)and pepsinogen. By contrast, bicarbonate production in response to vagal stimulation was suppressed in the presence of omeprazole. Our results indicate that proton pump blockade has a modulatory effect on gastric secretion of bicarbonates and pepsinogen induced by chemical stimulation of the gastric mucosa.

  19. A phylogenetically distinctive and extremely heat stable light-driven proton pump from the eubacterium Rubrobacter xylanophilus DSM 9941T

    PubMed Central

    Kanehara, Kanae; Yoshizawa, Susumu; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Sudo, Yuki

    2017-01-01

    Rhodopsins are proteins that contain seven transmembrane domains with a chromophore retinal and that function as photoreceptors for light-energy conversion and light-signal transduction in a wide variety of organisms. Here we characterized a phylogenetically distinctive new rhodopsin from the thermophilic eubacterium Rubrobacter xylanophilus DSM 9941T that was isolated from thermally polluted water. Although R. xylanophilus rhodopsin (RxR) is from Actinobacteria, it is located between eukaryotic and archaeal rhodopsins in the phylogenetic tree. Escherichia coli cells expressing RxR showed a light-induced decrease in environmental pH and inhibition by a protonophore, indicating that it works as a light-driven outward proton pump. We characterized purified RxR spectroscopically, and showed that it has an absorption maximum at 541 nm and binds nearly 100% all-trans retinal. The pKa values for the protonated retinal Schiff base and its counterion were estimated to be 10.7 and 1.3, respectively. Time-resolved flash-photolysis experiments revealed the formation of a red-shifted intermediate. Of note, RxR showed an extremely high thermal stability in comparison with other proton pumping rhodopsins such as thermophilic rhodopsin TR (by 16-times) and bacteriorhodopsin from Halobacterium salinarum (HsBR, by 4-times). PMID:28290523

  20. Hydrogen-bonding interaction of the protonated schiff base with halides in a chloride-pumping bacteriorhodopsin mutant.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Mikihiro; Ihara, Kunio; Kandori, Hideki

    2006-09-05

    Bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and halorhodopsin (HR) are light-driven proton and chloride ion pumps, respectively, in Halobacterium salinarum. The amino acid identity of these proteins is about 25%, suggesting that each has been optimized for their own functions during evolution. However, it is known that the BR mutants, D85T and D85S, can pump chloride ions. This fact implies that the Schiff base region is important in determining ionic selectivity. The X-ray crystallographic structure of D85S(Br(-)) showed the presence of a bromide ion in the Schiff base region (Facciotti, M. T., Cheung, V. S., Nguyen, D., Rouhani, S., and Glaeser, R. M. (2003) Biophys. J. 85, 451-458). In this article, we report on the study of hydrogen bonds of the Schiff base and water molecules in D85S in the absence and presence of various halides, assigning their N-D and O-D stretching vibrations in D(2)O, respectively, in low-temperature Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. We found that the hydrogen bond of the Schiff base in D85S(Cl(-)) is much stronger than that in HR, being as strong as that in wild-type BR. Similar halide dependence in D85S and in solution implies that the Schiff base forms a direct hydrogen bond with a halide, consistent with the X-ray structure. Photoisomerization causes a weakened hydrogen bond of the Schiff base, and halide dependence on the stretching frequency is lost. These spectral features are similar to those in the photocycle of proton-pumping BR, though the weakened hydrogen bond is more significant for BR. However, the spectral features of water bands in D85S are closer to chloride-pumping HR because O-D stretching vibrations of water are observed only at >2500 cm(-)(1). Unlike in BR, we did not observe strongly hydrogen-bonded water molecules for halide-pumping D85S mutants. This observation agrees with our recent hypothesis that strongly hydrogen-bonded water molecules are required for the proton-pumping activity of archaeal rhodopsins. Hydrogen

  1. A plant proton-pumping inorganic pyrophosphatase functionally complements the vacuolar ATPase transport activity and confers bafilomycin resistance in yeast.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Castiñeira, José R; Hernández, Agustín; Drake, Rocío; Serrano, Aurelio

    2011-07-15

    V-ATPases (vacuolar H+-ATPases) are a specific class of multi-subunit pumps that play an essential role in the generation of proton gradients across eukaryotic endomembranes. Another simpler proton pump that co-localizes with the V-ATPase occurs in plants and many protists: the single-subunit H+-PPase [H+-translocating PPase (inorganic pyrophosphatase)]. Little is known about the relative contribution of these two proteins to the acidification of intracellular compartments. In the present study, we show that the expression of a chimaeric derivative of the Arabidopsis thaliana H+-PPase AVP1, which is preferentially targeted to internal membranes of yeast, alleviates the phenotypes associated with V-ATPase deficiency. Phenotypic complementation was achieved both with a yeast strain with its V-ATPase specifically inhibited by bafilomycin A1 and with a vma1-null mutant lacking a catalytic V-ATPase subunit. Cell staining with vital fluorescent dyes showed that AVP1 recovered vacuole acidification and normalized the endocytic pathway of the vma mutant. Biochemical and immunochemical studies further demonstrated that a significant fraction of heterologous H+-PPase is located at the vacuolar membrane. These results raise the question of the occurrence of distinct proton pumps in certain single-membrane organelles, such as plant vacuoles, by proving yeast V-ATPase activity dispensability and the capability of H+-PPase to generate, by itself, physiologically suitable internal pH gradients. Also, they suggest new ways of engineering macrolide drug tolerance and outline an experimental system for testing alternative roles for fungal and animal V-ATPases, other than the mere acidification of subcellular organelles.

  2. Epithelial pH and ion transport regulation by proton pumps and exchangers.

    PubMed

    Harvey, B J; Ehrenfeld, J

    1988-01-01

    This study reports on the interaction between transepithelial Na+ transport and H+ secretory and intracellular pH (pHi) regulating mechanisms in the model 'tight' epithelium of frog skin. We have used 22Na isotope fluxes and fixed end-point titration to measure undirectional Na+ fluxes, net Na absorption (J(net)Na) and proton secretion (J(net)H), and electrophysiological techniques (double-barrelled ion-sensitive microelectrodes and cell membrane current--voltage relations) to determine intracellular activities of Na+, Cl- and H+ and the conductance of apical membranes to Na+ (gNa) and of basolateral membranes to K+ (gK). In dilute mucosal solutions or in the absence of a permeant anion (Cl-) or counter-current (open-circuit conditions) to accompany Na+ uptake, the J(net)Na is electrically coupled to J(net)H via an electrogenic apical H+-ATPase (located in mitochondria-rich cells). Both fluxes proceed via mitochondria-rich cells and are inhibited by blockers of carbonic anhydrase and H+-ATPase and stimulated by aldosterone and acid load. In high NaCl-containing mucosal solutions or in short-circuit conditions, the J(net)Na becomes uncoupled from J(net)H and proceeds mainly via the principal cells in the epithelium, in which pHi is regulated by basolateral Na+/H+ and Cl-/HCO3- exchangers. Under these conditions, J(net)Na, gNa and gK vary directly and in parallel with pHi, when pHi is changed by permeable weak acids or bases. There is also co-variance between gNa and pHi accompanying spontaneous variations in J(net)Na and when Na+ transport is stimulated by aldosterone or inhibited with ouabain. We conclude that the level of intracellular H+, modulated by H+ pump and Na+/H+ and Cl-/HCO3- exchangers provides an intrinsic regulation of epithelial Na+ transport.

  3. Long-term kidney outcomes among users of proton pump inhibitors without intervening acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yan; Bowe, Benjamin; Li, Tingting; Xian, Hong; Yan, Yan; Al-Aly, Ziyad

    2017-02-20

    Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use is associated with an increased risk of acute kidney injury (AKI), incident chronic kidney disease (CKD), and progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). PPI-associated CKD is presumed to be mediated by intervening AKI. However, whether PPI use is associated with an increased risk of chronic renal outcomes in the absence of intervening AKI is unknown. To evaluate this we used the Department of Veterans Affairs national databases to build a cohort of 144,032 incident users of acid suppression therapy that included 125,596 PPI and 18,436 Histamine H2 receptor antagonist (H2 blockers) consumers. Over 5 years of follow-up in survival models, cohort participants were censored at the time of AKI occurrence. Compared with incident users of H2 blockers, incident users of PPIs had an increased risk of an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) under 60 ml/min/1.73m(2) (hazard ratio 1.19; 95% confidence interval 1.15-1.24), incident CKD (1.26; 1.20-1.33), eGFR decline over 30% (1.22; 1.16-1.28), and ESRD or eGFR decline over 50% (1.30; 1.15-1.48). Results were consistent in models that excluded participants with AKI either before chronic renal outcomes, during the time in the cohort, or before cohort entry. The proportion of PPI effect mediated by AKI was 44.7%, 45.47%, 46.00%, and 46.72% for incident eGFR under 60 ml/min/1.73m(2), incident CKD, eGFR decline over 30%, and ESRD or over 50% decline in eGFR, respectively. Thus, PPI use is associated with increased risk of chronic renal outcomes in the absence of intervening AKI. Hence, reliance on antecedent AKI as warning sign to guard against the risk of CKD among PPI users is not sufficient as a sole mitigation strategy.

  4. Proton pump inhibitor-associated pneumonia: Not a breath of fresh air after all?

    PubMed

    Fohl, Alexander L; Regal, Randolph E

    2011-06-06

    Over the past two decades, proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have emerged as highly effective and relatively safe agents for the treatment of a variety of gastrointestinal disorders. Unfortunately, this desirable pharmacological profile has also contributed to superfluous and widespread use in both the inpatient and outpatient settings. While generally well-tolerated, research published over the last decade has associated these agents with increased risks of Clostridium difficile disease, fractures likely due to calcium malabsorption and both community-acquired (CAP) and hospital-acquired pneumonias (HAP). The mechanism behind PPI-associated pneumonia may be multifactorial, but is thought to stem from compromising the stomach's "acid mantle" against gastric colonization of acid-labile pathogenic bacteria which then may be aspirated. A secondary postulate is that PPIs, through their inhibition of extra-gastric H(+)/K(+)-ATPase enzymes, may reduce the acidity of the upper aerodigestive tract, thus resulting in increased bacterial colonization of the larynx, esophagus and lungs. To date, several retrospective case control studies have been published looking at the association between PPI use and CAP. Some studies found a temporal relationship between PPI exposure and the incidence of pneumonia, but only two could define a dose-response relationship. Furthermore, other studies found an inverse correlation between duration of PPI use and risk of CAP. In terms of HAP, we reviewed two retrospective cohort studies and one prospective study. One retrospective study in a medical ICU found no increased association of HAP in PPI-exposed patients compared to no acid-lowering therapy, while the other in cardiothoracic surgery patients showed a markedly increased risk compared to those receiving H(2)RAs. The one prospective study in ICU patients showed an increased risk of HAP with PPIs, but not with H(2)RAs. In conclusion, the current literature shows a slight trend toward an

  5. Regulatory assembly of the vacuolar proton pump VoV1-ATPase in yeast cells by FLIM-FRET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Stefan; Batisse, Claire; Zarrabi, Nawid; Böttcher, Bettina; Börsch, Michael

    2010-02-01

    We investigate the reversible disassembly of VOV1-ATPase in life yeast cells by time resolved confocal FRET imaging. VOV1-ATPase in the vacuolar membrane pumps protons from the cytosol into the vacuole. VOV1-ATPase is a rotary biological nanomotor driven by ATP hydrolysis. The emerging proton gradient is used for secondary transport processes as well as for pH and Ca2+ homoeostasis in the cell. The activity of the VOV1-ATPase is regulated through assembly / disassembly processes. During starvation the two parts of VOV1-ATPase start to disassemble. This process is reversed after addition of glucose. The exact mechanisms are unknown. To follow the disassembly / reassembly in vivo we tagged two subunits C and E with different fluorescent proteins. Cellular distributions of C and E were monitored using a duty cycle-optimized alternating laser excitation scheme (DCO-ALEX) for time resolved confocal FRET-FLIM measurements.

  6. Tritium Sequestration in Gen IV NGNP Gas Stream via Proton Conducting Ceramic Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Fanglin Frank; Adams, Thad M.; Brinkman, Kyle; Reifsnider, Kenneth

    2011-09-30

    Several types of high-temperature proton conductors based on SrCeO3 and BaCeO3 have been systematically investigated in this project for tritium separation in NGNP applications. One obstacle for the field application is the chemical stability issues in the presence of steam and CO2 for these proton conductors. Several strategies to overcome such issues have been evaluated, including A site doping and B site co-doping method for perovskite-structured proton conductors. Novel zirconium-free proton conductors have also been developed with improved electrical conductivity and enhanced chemical stability. Novel catalytic materials for the proton-conducting separation membranes have been investigated. A tubular geometry proton-conducting membrane has been developed for the proton separation membranes. Total dose rate estimated from tritium decay (beta emission) under realistic membrane operating conditions, combined with electron irradiation experiments, indicates that proton ceramic materials possess the appropriate radiation stability for this application.

  7. The causes of reduced proton-pumping efficiency in type B and C respiratory heme-copper oxidases, and in some mutated variants of type A.

    PubMed

    Rauhamäki, Virve; Wikström, Mårten

    2014-07-01

    The heme-copper oxidases may be divided into three categories, A, B, and C, which include cytochrome c and quinol-oxidising enzymes. All three types are known to be proton pumps and are found in prokaryotes, whereas eukaryotes only contain A-type cytochrome c oxidase in their inner mitochondrial membrane. However, the bacterial B- and C-type enzymes have often been reported to pump protons with an H(+)/e(-) ratio of only one half of the unit stoichiometry in the A-type enzyme. We will show here that these observations are likely to be the result of difficulties with the measuring technique together with a higher sensitivity of the B- and C-type enzymes to the protonmotive force that opposes pumping. We find that under optimal conditions the H(+)/e(-) ratio is close to unity in all the three heme-copper oxidase subfamilies. A higher tendency for proton leak in the B- and C-type enzymes may result from less efficient gating of a proton pump mechanism that we suggest evolved before the so-called D-channel of proton transfer. There is also a discrepancy between results using whole bacterial cells vs. phospholipid vesicles inlaid with oxidase with respect to the observed proton pumping after modification of the D-channel residue asparagine-139 (Rhodobacter sphaeroides numbering) to aspartate in A-type cytochrome c oxidase. This discrepancy might also be explained by a higher sensitivity of proton pumping to protonmotive force in the mutated variant. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 18th European Bioenergetic Conference.

  8. Luminal and Cytosolic pH Feedback on Proton Pump Activity and ATP Affinity of V-type ATPase from Arabidopsis*

    PubMed Central

    Rienmüller, Florian; Dreyer, Ingo; Schönknecht, Gerald; Schulz, Alexander; Schumacher, Karin; Nagy, Réka; Martinoia, Enrico; Marten, Irene; Hedrich, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    Proton pumping of the vacuolar-type H+-ATPase into the lumen of the central plant organelle generates a proton gradient of often 1–2 pH units or more. Although structural aspects of the V-type ATPase have been studied in great detail, the question of whether and how the proton pump action is controlled by the proton concentration on both sides of the membrane is not understood. Applying the patch clamp technique to isolated vacuoles from Arabidopsis mesophyll cells in the whole-vacuole mode, we studied the response of the V-ATPase to protons, voltage, and ATP. Current-voltage relationships at different luminal pH values indicated decreasing coupling ratios with acidification. A detailed study of ATP-dependent H+-pump currents at a variety of different pH conditions showed a complex regulation of V-ATPase activity by both cytosolic and vacuolar pH. At cytosolic pH 7.5, vacuolar pH changes had relative little effects. Yet, at cytosolic pH 5.5, a 100-fold increase in vacuolar proton concentration resulted in a 70-fold increase of the affinity for ATP binding on the cytosolic side. Changes in pH on either side of the membrane seem to be transferred by the V-ATPase to the other side. A mathematical model was developed that indicates a feedback of proton concentration on peak H+ current amplitude (vmax) and ATP consumption (Km) of the V-ATPase. It proposes that for efficient V-ATPase function dissociation of transported protons from the pump protein might become higher with increasing pH. This feature results in an optimization of H+ pumping by the V-ATPase according to existing H+ concentrations. PMID:22215665

  9. PUMPS

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, J.D.

    1959-03-24

    A pump is described for conveving liquids, particure it is not advisable he apparatus. The to be submerged in the liquid to be pumped, a conduit extending from the high-velocity nozzle of the injector,and means for applying a pulsating prcesure to the surface of the liquid in the conduit, whereby the surface oscillates between positions in the conduit. During the positive half- cycle of an applied pulse liquid is forced through the high velocity nozzle or jet of the injector and operates in the manner of the well known water injector and pumps liquid from the main intake to the outlet of the injector. During the negative half-cycle of the pulse liquid flows in reverse through the jet but no reverse pumping action takes place.

  10. Isolation and sequence of tryptic peptides from the proton-pumping ATPase of the oat plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Schaller, G E; Sussman, M R

    1988-02-01

    In crude extracts of plant tissue, the M(r) = 100,000 proton-pumping ATPase constitutes less than 0.01% of the total cell protein. A large-scale purification procedure is described that has been used to obtain extensive protein sequence information from this enzyme. Plasma membrane vesicles enriched in ATPase activity were obtained from extracts of oat roots by routine differential and density gradient centrifugation. Following a detergent wash, the ATPase was resolved from other integral membrane proteins by size fractionation at 4 degrees C in the presence of lithium dodecyl sulfate. After carboxymethylation of cysteine residues and removal of detergent, the ATPase was digested with trypsin and resultant peptide fragments separated by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography. Peptides were recovered with high yield and were readily sequenced by automated Edman degradation on a gas-phase sequencer. Of the eight peptides sequenced, six showed strong homology with known amino acid sequences of the fungal proton-pumping and other cation-transporting ATPases.

  11. [Effects of exogenous spermidine on lipid peroxidation and membrane proton pump activity of cucumber seedling leaves under high temperature stress].

    PubMed

    Tian, Jing; Guo, Shi-Rong; Sun, Jin; Wang, Li-Ping; Yang, Yan-Juan; Li, Bin

    2011-12-01

    Taking a relatively heat-resistant cucumber (Cucumis sativus) cultivar 'Jinchun No. 4' as test material, a sand culture experiment was conducted in growth chamber to investigate the effects of foliar spraying spermidine (Spd) on the lipid peroxidation, membrane proton pump activity, and corresponding gene expression of cucumber seedling leaves under high temperature stress. Compared with the control, foliar spraying Spd increased the plant height, stem diameter, dry and fresh mass, and leaf area significantly, and inhibited the increase of leaf relative conductivity, malondialdehyde (MDA) content, and lipoxygenase (LOX) activity effectively. Foliar spraying Spd also helped to the increase of leaf plasma membrane- and tonoplast H(+)-ATPase activity, but no significant difference was observed in the gene expression levels. These results suggested that exogenous Spd could significantly decrease the leaf lipid peroxidation and increase the proton pump activity, and thus, stabilize the leaf membrane structure and function, alleviate the damage induced by high temperature stress, and enhance the heat tolerance of cucumber seedlings.

  12. [Do proton pump inhibitors after endoscopic control of acute ulcer hemorrhage have an advantage over H2 receptor antagonists?].

    PubMed

    Prassler, R; Hendrich, H; Barnert, J; Richter, G; Fleischmann, R; Wienbeck, M

    1995-08-01

    During a two year period (1992-1993) we investigated whether or not, after endoscopic therapy of bleeding ulcers, the suppression of gastric acid secretion with an administration of a proton pump blocker (Omeprazol) is more effective than the administration of H2-receptor antagonist (Ranitidin) with respect to prevention of recurrent bleeding episodes, frequency of surgical intervention and mortality. 106 patients (64 men, 42 women) were treated with the proton pump blocker and 126 patients (82 men, 44 women) received the H2-receptor antagonist. Patients were treated either with an initial dose of 80 mg Omeprazol followed by 3 x 40 mg Omeprazol i.v. or with a daily dose of 3 mg/kg body weight Ranitidin i.v. No significant differences could be detected between the two treatment regimes with respect to the parameters mentioned above. Rebleeding which could be controlled by endoscopic hemostasis occurred in 19.8% vs. 17.5% (Omeprazol/Ranitidin) of patients. Surgical intervention because of rebleeding was necessary on 8.5% vs. 8.7% of the patients. Mortality due to hemorrhage was 5.7% vs. 4.0%. From these results we conclude that, following endoscopic hemostasis of bleeding ulcers, Omeprazol has no advantage over Ranitidin using our dosage regimes.

  13. Air swallowing can be responsible for non-response of heartburn to high-dose proton pump inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Zentilin, P; Accornero, L; Dulbecco, P; Savarino, E; Savarino, V

    2005-06-01

    Intraluminal electrical impedance is a novel technique, which is able for the first time to provide a qualitative assessment of refluxed material moving from the stomach to the oesophagus. In other words, the presence of air can be differentiated from that of liquid, because the former is characterised by high and the latter by low impedance compared with baseline. Moreover, the combined measurement of electrical impedance and pH-metry permits to distinguish acid from non-acid liquid reflux. One of the most important clinical applications of this method is to assess the reasons for poor response of GORD patients to high-dose proton pump inhibitors. This case report describes the results of impedance in the evaluation of a young woman, who did not respond to twice-daily doses of rabeprazole. She continued to complain of heartburn as major symptom and impedance allowed us to clarify that it was not related to acid or non-acid reflux, but to air swallowing. Therefore, this technique identified aerophagia to be responsible for persistent heartburn despite high-dose proton pump inhibitor and prevented the adoption of more aggressive, but probably unuseful therapies, such as the surgical one.

  14. Toward a chemical mechanism of proton pumping by the B-type cytochrome c oxidases: application of density functional theory to cytochrome ba3 of Thermus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Fee, James A; Case, David A; Noodleman, Louis

    2008-11-12

    A mechanism for proton pumping by the B-type cytochrome c oxidases is presented in which one proton is pumped in conjunction with the weakly exergonic, two-electron reduction of Fe-bound O 2 to the Fe-Cu bridging peroxodianion and three protons are pumped in conjunction with the highly exergonic, two-electron reduction of Fe(III)- (-)O-O (-)-Cu(II) to form water and the active oxidized enzyme, Fe(III)- (-)OH,Cu(II). The scheme is based on the active-site structure of cytochrome ba 3 from Thermus thermophilus, which is considered to be both necessary and sufficient for coupled O 2 reduction and proton pumping when appropriate gates are in place (not included in the model). Fourteen detailed structures obtained from density functional theory (DFT) geometry optimization are presented that are reasonably thought to occur during the four-electron reduction of O 2. Each proton-pumping step takes place when a proton resides on the imidazole ring of I-His376 and the large active-site cluster has a net charge of +1 due to an uncompensated, positive charge formally associated with Cu B. Four types of DFT were applied to determine the energy of each intermediate, and standard thermochemical approaches were used to obtain the reaction free energies for each step in the catalytic cycle. This application of DFT generally conforms with previously suggested criteria for a valid model (Siegbahn, P. E. M.; Blomberg, M. A. R. Chem. Rev. 2000, 100, 421-437) and shows how the chemistry of O 2 reduction in the heme a 3 -Cu B dinuclear center can be harnessed to generate an electrochemical proton gradient across the lipid bilayer.

  15. Toward a chemical mechanism of proton pumping by the B-type cytochrome c oxidases: Application of Density Functional Theory to cytochrome ba3 of Thermus thermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Fee, James A.; Case, David A.; Noodleman, Louis

    2009-01-01

    A mechanism for proton pumping by the B-type cytochrome c oxidases is presented in which one proton is pumped in conjunction with the weakly-exergonic, two-electron reduction of Fe-bound O2 to the Fe-Cu bridging peroxodianion, and three protons are pumped in conjunction with the highly-exergonic, two-electron reduction of Fe(III)-−O-O−-Cu(II) to form water and the active oxidized enzyme, Fe(III)-−OH, Cu(II). The scheme is based on the active site structure of cytochrome ba3 from Thermus thermophilus, which is considered to be both necessary and sufficient for coupled O2 reduction and proton pumping when appropriate gates are in place (not included in the model). Fourteen detailed structures obtained from DFT geometry optimization are presented that are reasonably thought to occur during the four-electron reduction of O2. Each proton pumping step takes place when a proton resides on the imidazole ring of I-His376 and the large active site cluster has a net charge of +1 due to an uncompensated, positive charge formally associated with CuB. Density functional theory (DFT) of four types was applied to determine the energy of each intermediate, and standard thermochemical approaches were used to obtain the reaction free energies for each step in the catalytic cycle. This application of DFT generally conforms with previously suggested criteria for a valid model [P. E. M. Siegbahn & M. A. R. Blomberg (2000) 100 421 - 437] and, shows how the chemistry of O2-reduction in the heme a3-CuB dinuclear center can be harnessed to generate an electrochemical proton gradient across the lipid bilayer. PMID:18928258

  16. The selectivity of the Na+/K+-pump is controlled by binding site protonation and self-correcting occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Rui, Huan; Artigas, Pablo; Roux, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    The Na+/K+-pump maintains the physiological K+ and Na+ electrochemical gradients across the cell membrane. It operates via an 'alternating-access' mechanism, making iterative transitions between inward-facing (E1) and outward-facing (E2) conformations. Although the general features of the transport cycle are known, the detailed physicochemical factors governing the binding site selectivity remain mysterious. Free energy molecular dynamics simulations show that the ion binding sites switch their binding specificity in E1 and E2. This is accompanied by small structural arrangements and changes in protonation states of the coordinating residues. Additional computations on structural models of the intermediate states along the conformational transition pathway reveal that the free energy barrier toward the occlusion step is considerably increased when the wrong type of ion is loaded into the binding pocket, prohibiting the pump cycle from proceeding forward. This self-correcting mechanism strengthens the overall transport selectivity and protects the stoichiometry of the pump cycle. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16616.001 PMID:27490484

  17. [Correlation between long-term proton pump ingibitor use, homocysteine and lipoproteins serum concentrations in patients with comorbidity of ischemic heart disease and acid peptic disease].

    PubMed

    Zharkova, A; Orlovsky, V

    2012-12-01

    Present article is devoted to the study of the correlation between vitamin B12 serum level, hyperhomocysteinaemia and dyslipidemia. During research there were discovered that the lowest vitamin B12 serum level and the highest homocysteine serum level have been registrated in associated pathology (ischemic heart disease and acid peptic disease according to long-term proton pump inhibitor use) patients. It was shown evident correlation between that changes and dyslipidemia. Тhe complex therapy that includes parenteral B12 supplementation leads to more effective correction of hyperhomocysteinaemia and dyslipidemia in patients with comorbidity of ischemic heart disease and acid peptic disease with long-term use of proton pump inhibitors.

  18. Biophysical comparison of ATP-driven proton pumping mechanisms suggests a kinetic advantage for the rotary process depending on coupling ratio.

    PubMed

    Anandakrishnan, Ramu; Zuckerman, Daniel M

    2017-01-01

    ATP-driven proton pumps, which are critical to the operation of a cell, maintain cytosolic and organellar pH levels within a narrow functional range. These pumps employ two very different mechanisms: an elaborate rotary mechanism used by V-ATPase H+ pumps, and a simpler alternating access mechanism used by P-ATPase H+ pumps. Why are two different mechanisms used to perform the same function? Systematic analysis, without parameter fitting, of kinetic models of the rotary, alternating access and other possible mechanisms suggest that, when the ratio of protons transported per ATP hydrolyzed exceeds one, the one-at-a-time proton transport by the rotary mechanism is faster than other possible mechanisms across a wide range of driving conditions. When the ratio is one, there is no intrinsic difference in the free energy landscape between mechanisms, and therefore all mechanisms can exhibit the same kinetic performance. To our knowledge all known rotary pumps have an H+:ATP ratio greater than one, and all known alternating access ATP-driven proton pumps have a ratio of one. Our analysis suggests a possible explanation for this apparent relationship between coupling ratio and mechanism. When the conditions under which the pump must operate permit a coupling ratio greater than one, the rotary mechanism may have been selected for its kinetic advantage. On the other hand, when conditions require a coupling ratio of one or less, the alternating access mechanism may have been selected for other possible advantages resulting from its structural and functional simplicity.

  19. Biophysical comparison of ATP-driven proton pumping mechanisms suggests a kinetic advantage for the rotary process depending on coupling ratio

    PubMed Central

    Zuckerman, Daniel M.

    2017-01-01

    ATP-driven proton pumps, which are critical to the operation of a cell, maintain cytosolic and organellar pH levels within a narrow functional range. These pumps employ two very different mechanisms: an elaborate rotary mechanism used by V-ATPase H+ pumps, and a simpler alternating access mechanism used by P-ATPase H+ pumps. Why are two different mechanisms used to perform the same function? Systematic analysis, without parameter fitting, of kinetic models of the rotary, alternating access and other possible mechanisms suggest that, when the ratio of protons transported per ATP hydrolyzed exceeds one, the one-at-a-time proton transport by the rotary mechanism is faster than other possible mechanisms across a wide range of driving conditions. When the ratio is one, there is no intrinsic difference in the free energy landscape between mechanisms, and therefore all mechanisms can exhibit the same kinetic performance. To our knowledge all known rotary pumps have an H+:ATP ratio greater than one, and all known alternating access ATP-driven proton pumps have a ratio of one. Our analysis suggests a possible explanation for this apparent relationship between coupling ratio and mechanism. When the conditions under which the pump must operate permit a coupling ratio greater than one, the rotary mechanism may have been selected for its kinetic advantage. On the other hand, when conditions require a coupling ratio of one or less, the alternating access mechanism may have been selected for other possible advantages resulting from its structural and functional simplicity. PMID:28319179

  20. Proton pump inhibitor failure in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: a perspective aided by the Gartner hype cycle.

    PubMed

    Heading, Robert C

    2017-04-01

    Some patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) experience symptoms despite proton pump inhibitor (PPI) treatment. In the early years of their availability, these drugs were thought to be a highly effective treatment for GORD and realisation that symptom relief was often incomplete came as a disappointment. This review considers the evolution of thinking with the aid of the Gartner hype cycle - a graphical depiction of the process of innovation, evolution and adoption of new technologies. Acknowledging that over-simplistic concepts of GORD have been largely responsible for inflated expectations of PPI therapy is an important step forward in establishing how patients with persistent symptoms, despite PPIs, should be assessed and treated.

  1. Positive Darwinian Selection in the Piston That Powers Proton Pumps in Complex I of the Mitochondria of Pacific Salmon

    PubMed Central

    Garvin, Michael R.; Bielawski, Joseph P.; Gharrett, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of oxidative phosphorylation is well understood, but evolution of the proteins involved is not. We combined phylogenetic, genomic, and structural biology analyses to examine the evolution of twelve mitochondrial encoded proteins of closely related, yet phenotypically diverse, Pacific salmon. Two separate analyses identified the same seven positively selected sites in ND5. A strong signal was also detected at three sites of ND2. An energetic coupling analysis revealed several structures in the ND5 protein that may have co-evolved with the selected sites. These data implicate Complex I, specifically the piston arm of ND5 where it connects the proton pumps, as important in the evolution of Pacific salmon. Lastly, the lineage to Chinook experienced rapid evolution at the piston arm. PMID:21969854

  2. The CarO rhodopsin of the fungus Fusarium fujikuroi is a light-driven proton pump that retards spore germination

    PubMed Central

    García-Martínez, Jorge; Brunk, Michael; Avalos, Javier; Terpitz, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Rhodopsins are membrane-embedded photoreceptors found in all major taxonomic kingdoms using retinal as their chromophore. They play well-known functions in different biological systems, but their roles in fungi remain unknown. The filamentous fungus Fusarium fujikuroi contains two putative rhodopsins, CarO and OpsA. The gene carO is light-regulated, and the predicted polypeptide contains all conserved residues required for proton pumping. We aimed to elucidate the expression and cellular location of the fungal rhodopsin CarO, its presumed proton-pumping activity and the possible effect of such function on F. fujikuroi growth. In electrophysiology experiments we confirmed that CarO is a green-light driven proton pump. Visualization of fluorescent CarO-YFP expressed in F. fujikuroi under control of its native promoter revealed higher accumulation in spores (conidia) produced by light-exposed mycelia. Germination analyses of conidia from carO− mutant and carO+ control strains showed a faster development of light-exposed carO− germlings. In conclusion, CarO is an active proton pump, abundant in light-formed conidia, whose activity slows down early hyphal development under light. Interestingly, CarO-related rhodopsins are typically found in plant-associated fungi, where green light dominates the phyllosphere. Our data provide the first reliable clue on a possible biological role of a fungal rhodopsin. PMID:25589426

  3. The CarO rhodopsin of the fungus Fusarium fujikuroi is a light-driven proton pump that retards spore germination.

    PubMed

    García-Martínez, Jorge; Brunk, Michael; Avalos, Javier; Terpitz, Ulrich

    2015-01-15

    Rhodopsins are membrane-embedded photoreceptors found in all major taxonomic kingdoms using retinal as their chromophore. They play well-known functions in different biological systems, but their roles in fungi remain unknown. The filamentous fungus Fusarium fujikuroi contains two putative rhodopsins, CarO and OpsA. The gene carO is light-regulated, and the predicted polypeptide contains all conserved residues required for proton pumping. We aimed to elucidate the expression and cellular location of the fungal rhodopsin CarO, its presumed proton-pumping activity and the possible effect of such function on F. fujikuroi growth. In electrophysiology experiments we confirmed that CarO is a green-light driven proton pump. Visualization of fluorescent CarO-YFP expressed in F. fujikuroi under control of its native promoter revealed higher accumulation in spores (conidia) produced by light-exposed mycelia. Germination analyses of conidia from carO(-) mutant and carO(+) control strains showed a faster development of light-exposed carO(-) germlings. In conclusion, CarO is an active proton pump, abundant in light-formed conidia, whose activity slows down early hyphal development under light. Interestingly, CarO-related rhodopsins are typically found in plant-associated fungi, where green light dominates the phyllosphere. Our data provide the first reliable clue on a possible biological role of a fungal rhodopsin.

  4. Nitric oxide contributes to minerals absorption, proton pumps and hormone equilibrium under cadmium excess in Trifolium repens L. plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shiliang; Yang, Rongjie; Pan, Yuanzhi; Ma, Mingdong; Pan, Jiang; Zhao, Yan; Cheng, Qingsu; Wu, Mengxi; Wang, Maohua; Zhang, Lin

    2015-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a stress-signaling molecule in plants that mediates a wide range of physiological processes and responses to metal toxicity. In this work, various NO modulators (NO donor: SNP; NO scavenger: cPTIO; NO synthase inhibitor: l-NAME; and SNP analogs: sodium nitrite/nitrate and sodium ferrocyanide) were investigated to determine the role of NO in Trifolium repens L. plants exposed to Cd. Cd (100μM) markedly reduced biomass, NO production and chlorophyll (Chl a, Chl b and total Chl) concentration but stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Cd accumulation in plants. SNP (50μM) substantially attenuated growth inhibition, reduced hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and malonyldialdehyde (MDA) levels, stimulated ROS-scavenging enzymes/agents, and mitigated the H(+)-ATPase inhibition in proton pumps. Interestingly, SNP considerably up-regulated the levels of jasmonic acid (JA) and proline in plant tissues but down-regulated the levels of ethylene (ET) in both shoots and roots and the level of salicylic acid (SA) in roots only, which might be related to the elevated NO synthesis. Additionally, SNP (25-200μM) regulated mineral absorption and, particularly at 50μM, significantly enhanced the uptake of shoot magnesium (Mg) and copper (Cu) and of root calcium (Ca), Mg and iron (Fe). Nevertheless, the effects of SNP on plant growth were reversed by cPTIO and l-NAME, suggesting that the protective effect of SNP might be associated with NO synthesis in vivo. Moreover, SNP analogs did not display roles similar to that of SNP. These results indicated that NO depleted Cd toxicity by eliminating oxidative damage, enhancing minerals absorption, regulating proton pumps, and maintaining hormone equilibrium.

  5. Microbial Light-Activatable Proton Pumps as Neuronal Inhibitors to Functionally Dissect Neuronal Networks in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Husson, Steven J.; Liewald, Jana F.; Schultheis, Christian; Stirman, Jeffrey N.; Lu, Hang; Gottschalk, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Essentially any behavior in simple and complex animals depends on neuronal network function. Currently, the best-defined system to study neuronal circuits is the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, as the connectivity of its 302 neurons is exactly known. Individual neurons can be activated by photostimulation of Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) using blue light, allowing to directly probe the importance of a particular neuron for the respective behavioral output of the network under study. In analogy, other excitable cells can be inhibited by expressing Halorhodopsin from Natronomonas pharaonis (NpHR) and subsequent illumination with yellow light. However, inhibiting C. elegans neurons using NpHR is difficult. Recently, proton pumps from various sources were established as valuable alternative hyperpolarizers. Here we show that archaerhodopsin-3 (Arch) from Halorubrum sodomense and a proton pump from the fungus Leptosphaeria maculans (Mac) can be utilized to effectively inhibit excitable cells in C. elegans. Arch is the most powerful hyperpolarizer when illuminated with yellow or green light while the action spectrum of Mac is more blue-shifted, as analyzed by light-evoked behaviors and electrophysiology. This allows these tools to be combined in various ways with ChR2 to analyze different subsets of neurons within a circuit. We exemplify this by means of the polymodal aversive sensory ASH neurons, and the downstream command interneurons to which ASH neurons signal to trigger a reversal followed by a directional turn. Photostimulating ASH and subsequently inhibiting command interneurons using two-color illumination of different body segments, allows investigating temporal aspects of signaling downstream of ASH. PMID:22815873

  6. Role of proton pump inhibitors in preventing hypergastrinemia-associated carcinogenesis and in antagonizing the trophic effect of gastrin.

    PubMed

    Han, Y-M; Park, J-M; Kangwan, N; Jeong, M; Lee, S; Cho, J Y; Ko, W J; Hahm, K B

    2015-04-01

    Gastrin is the main hormone stimulating gastric acid secretion, but it exerts proliferative and anti-apoptotic actions on various cancer cell types, in addition to its well-known trophic effect on enterochromaffin-like cells. As treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) increases the biosynthesis and secretion of gastrin, it has been postulated that treatment with PPIs could increase the risk of cancer, especially in Barrett's esophagus, gastric carcinoids, and colorectal cancer (CRC). Some tumors produce gastrin of their own, which can act in an autocrine manner to promote tumor growth. In addition, gastrin is known to foster the tumor microenvironment. However, in spite of these potentially increased cancer risks due to PPI-induced hypergastrinemia, prospective, large-scale cohort studies did not show an increase in CRC prevalence. The question as to why the long-term use of PPIs was not associated with an increased cancer risk of CRC might be answered by the fact that the PPIs antagonized the trophic effects of hypergastrinemia. Furthermore, the blockade of proton pumps or potassium channels in cancer cells could limit the abnormal glycolytic energy metabolism of cancer cells. Apart from their suppressive effect on gastric acids, PPIs exert an anti-tumor effect through the selective induction of apoptosis as well as an anti-inflammatory effect, and they protect cells from developing chemo- or radiotherapeutic resistance. Moreover, the anti-carcinogenic actions of PPIs were augmented with PPI-induced hypergastrinemia. Together with their potential targeted killing of cancer stem cells, these effects demonstrate their potential anti-cancer actions.

  7. Evidence for an ATP-driven proton pump in rat thyroid phagolysosomes. Effects of protonophores and ionophores.

    PubMed

    Fouchier, F; Dang, J

    1983-11-15

    During incubations at 37 degrees C in appropriate media (buffered 0.25 M sucrose) isolated thyroid phagolysosomes degrade the thyroglobulin they contain (labelled with 131I in vivo) giving rise to trichloroacetic-acid-soluble radio-iodine. Thyroglobulin-degradation is unaffected by external pH (7 or 8) or by 20-40 mM external NaCl or KCl, while it is strongly inhibited by ionophores and protonophores. As a consequence, thyroglobulin degradation can be used as an index of the intralysosomal pH which appears to be powerfully maintained in basal conditions (no ionophore and no protonophore) by the strong impermeability of the lysosomal membranes to various compounds including ionic species MgATP which does not modify basal proteolysis prevents or minimizes the alkalinizing effects of both ionophores and protonophores. ATP can thus be concluded to promote a protonic flux inward thyroid lysosomes via the activity of a lysosomal ATP-driven proton pump regulated by the magnitude of the intralysosomal pH.

  8. Isolation of ATPase I, the proton pump of chromaffin-granule membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Percy, J M; Pryde, J G; Apps, D K

    1985-01-01

    Chromaffin-granule membranes contain two ATPases, which can be separated by (NH4)2SO4 fractionation after solubilization with detergents, or by phase segregation in Triton X-114. ATPase I (Mr 400000) is inhibited by trialkyltin, quercetin and alkylating agents, and hydrolyses both ATP and ITP. It contains up to five types of subunit, including a low-Mr hydrophobic polypeptide that reacts with dicyclohexylcarbodi-imide; these subunits are unrelated to those of mitochondrial F1F0-ATPase, as judged by size and reaction with antibodies. ATPase II (Mr 140000) is inhibited by vanadate, and is specific for ATP; it has not been extensively purified. Proton translocation by resealed chromaffin-granule 'ghosts', measured by uptake of methylamine or by quenching of the fluorescence of 9-amino-6-chloro-2-methoxyacridine, is supported by the hydrolysis of ATP or ITP, and inhibited by quercetin or alkylating agents, but not by vanadate. ATPase I must therefore be the proton translocator involved in the uptake of catecholamines and possibly of other components of the chromaffin-granule matrix, whereas ATPase II does not translocate protons. Images Fig. 1. PMID:3000354

  9. Structural and Functional Studies of a Newly Grouped Haloquadratum walsbyi Bacteriorhodopsin Reveal the Acid-resistant Light-driven Proton Pumping Activity.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Min-Feng; Fu, Hsu-Yuan; Cai, Chun-Jie; Yi, Hsiu-Pin; Yang, Chii-Shen; Wang, Andrew H-J

    2015-12-04

    Retinal bound light-driven proton pumps are widespread in eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. Among these pumps, bacteriorhodopsin (BR) proteins cooperate with ATP synthase to convert captured solar energy into a biologically consumable form, ATP. In an acidic environment or when pumped-out protons accumulate in the extracellular region, the maximum absorbance of BR proteins shifts markedly to the longer wavelengths. These conditions affect the light-driven proton pumping functional exertion as well. In this study, wild-type crystal structure of a BR with optical stability under wide pH range from a square halophilic archaeon, Haloquadratum walsbyi (HwBR), was solved in two crystal forms. One crystal form, refined to 1.85 Å resolution, contains a trimer in the asymmetric unit, whereas another contains an antiparallel dimer was refined at 2.58 Å. HwBR could not be classified into any existing subgroup of archaeal BR proteins based on the protein sequence phylogenetic tree, and it showed unique absorption spectral stability when exposed to low pH values. All structures showed a unique hydrogen-bonding network between Arg(82) and Thr(201), linking the BC and FG loops to shield the retinal-binding pocket in the interior from the extracellular environment. This result was supported by R82E mutation that attenuated the optical stability. The negatively charged cytoplasmic side and the Arg(82)-Thr(201) hydrogen bond may play an important role in the proton translocation trend in HwBR under acidic conditions. Our findings have unveiled a strategy adopted by BR proteins to solidify their defenses against unfavorable environments and maintain their optical properties associated with proton pumping.

  10. Structural and Functional Studies of a Newly Grouped Haloquadratum walsbyi Bacteriorhodopsin Reveal the Acid-resistant Light-driven Proton Pumping Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Min-Feng; Fu, Hsu-Yuan; Cai, Chun-Jie; Yi, Hsiu-Pin; Yang, Chii-Shen; Wang, Andrew H.-J.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal bound light-driven proton pumps are widespread in eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. Among these pumps, bacteriorhodopsin (BR) proteins cooperate with ATP synthase to convert captured solar energy into a biologically consumable form, ATP. In an acidic environment or when pumped-out protons accumulate in the extracellular region, the maximum absorbance of BR proteins shifts markedly to the longer wavelengths. These conditions affect the light-driven proton pumping functional exertion as well. In this study, wild-type crystal structure of a BR with optical stability under wide pH range from a square halophilic archaeon, Haloquadratum walsbyi (HwBR), was solved in two crystal forms. One crystal form, refined to 1.85 Å resolution, contains a trimer in the asymmetric unit, whereas another contains an antiparallel dimer was refined at 2.58 Å. HwBR could not be classified into any existing subgroup of archaeal BR proteins based on the protein sequence phylogenetic tree, and it showed unique absorption spectral stability when exposed to low pH values. All structures showed a unique hydrogen-bonding network between Arg82 and Thr201, linking the BC and FG loops to shield the retinal-binding pocket in the interior from the extracellular environment. This result was supported by R82E mutation that attenuated the optical stability. The negatively charged cytoplasmic side and the Arg82–Thr201 hydrogen bond may play an important role in the proton translocation trend in HwBR under acidic conditions. Our findings have unveiled a strategy adopted by BR proteins to solidify their defenses against unfavorable environments and maintain their optical properties associated with proton pumping. PMID:26483542

  11. Role of proton pump of mitochondria-rich cells for active transport of chloride ions in toad skin epithelium.

    PubMed

    Larsen, E H; Willumsen, N J; Christoffersen, B C

    1992-05-01

    1. Active Cl- currents were studied in short-circuited toad skin epithelium in which the passive voltage-activated Cl- current is zero. Under visual control double-barrelled microelectrodes were used for impaling principal cells from the serosal side, or for measuring the pH profile in the solution bathing the apical border. 2. The net inward (active) 36Cl- flux of 27 +/- 8 pmol s-1 cm-2 (16) (mean +/- S.E.M (number of observation)) was abolished by 2 mM-CN- (6.3 +/- 3.5 pmol s-1 cm-2 (8)). The active flux was maintained in the absence of active Na+ transport when the latter was eliminated by either 100 microM-mucosal amiloride, replacement of mucosal Na+ with K+, or by 3 mM-serosal ouabain. 3. In Ringer solution buffered by 24 mM-HCO3- -5% CO2 mucosal amiloride reversed the short circuit current (ISC). The outward ISC was maintained when gluconate replaced mucosal Cl-, and it was reversibly reduced in CO2-free 5 mM-Tris-buffered Ringer solution (pH = 7.40) or by the proton pump inhibitor oligomycin. These observations indicate that the source of the outward ISC is an apical proton pump. 4. Amiloride caused principal cells to hyperpolarize from a basolateral membrane potential, Vb, of -73 +/- 3 (22) to -93 +/- 1 mV (26), and superfusion with CO2-free Tris-buffered Ringer solution induced a further hyperpolarization (Vb = -101 +/- 1 mV (26)) which could be blocked by Ba2+. The CO2-sensitive current changes were null at Vb = EK (potassium reversal potential, -106 +/- 2 mV (55)) implying that they are carried by K+ channels in the basolateral membrane. Such a response cannot account for the inhibition of the outward ISC which by default seems to be located to mitochondria-rich (MR) cells. 5. In the absence of mucosal Cl- a pH gradient was built up above MR cells with pH = 7.02 +/- 0.04 (42) and pH increasing to 7.37 +/- 0.02 (10) above principal cells (pH = 7.40 in bulk solution buffered by 0.1 mM-Tris). This observation localizes a proton pump to the apical membrane

  12. Linking chemical electron-proton transfer to proton pumping in cytochrome c oxidase: broken-symmetry DFT exploration of intermediates along the catalytic reaction pathway of the iron-copper dinuclear complex.

    PubMed

    Noodleman, Louis; Han Du, Wen-Ge; Fee, James A; Götz, Andreas W; Walker, Ross C

    2014-07-07

    After a summary of the problem of coupling electron and proton transfer to proton pumping in cytochrome c oxidase, we present the results of our earlier and recent density functional theory calculations for the dinuclear Fe-a3-CuB reaction center in this enzyme. A specific catalytic reaction wheel diagram is constructed from the calculations, based on the structures and relative energies of the intermediate states of the reaction cycle. A larger family of tautomers/protonation states is generated compared to our earlier work, and a new lowest-energy pathway is proposed. The entire reaction cycle is calculated for the new smaller model (about 185-190 atoms), and two selected arcs of the wheel are chosen for calculations using a larger model (about 205 atoms). We compare the structural and redox energetics and protonation calculations with available experimental data. The reaction cycle map that we have built is positioned for further improvement and testing against experiment.

  13. A new differentially pumped plunger device to measure excited-state lifetimes in proton emitting nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. J.; Cullen, D. M.; Smith, A. J.; McFarlane, A.; Twist, V.; Alharshan, G. A.; Procter, M. G.; Braunroth, T.; Dewald, A.; Ellinger, E.; Fransen, C.; Butler, P. A.; Scheck, M.; Joss, D. T.; Saygi, B.; McPeake, C. G.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Nieminen, P.; Pakarinen, J.; Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Sarén, J.; Scholey, C.; Sorri, J.; Stolze, S.; Uusitalo, J.

    2013-04-01

    A new plunger device has been designed and built to measure the lifetimes of unbound states in exotic nuclei beyond the proton drip-line. The device has been designed to work in both vacuum and dilute-gas environments made possible through the introduction of a low-voltage stepping motor. DPUNS will be used in conjunction with the gas-filled separator RITU and the vacuum separator MARA at the accelerator laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä, Finland, to measure the lifetimes of excited states with low population cross-sections. This is achieved by eliminating the need for a carbon foil to isolate the helium gas of RITU from the beam line thus reducing the background from beam-foil reactions. The inclusion of a high-sampling rate data acquisition card increases further the sensitivity of the device. The plunger will be used to address many key facets of nuclear structure physics with particular emphasis on the effect of deformation on proton emission rates.

  14. Structural and functional analysis of aa3-type and cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidases of Paracoccus denitrificans reveals significant differences in proton-pump design.

    PubMed

    de Gier, J W; Schepper, M; Reijnders, W N; van Dyck, S J; Slotboom, D J; Warne, A; Saraste, M; Krab, K; Finel, M; Stouthamer, A H; van Spanning, R J; van der Oost, J

    1996-06-01

    In Paracoccus denitrificans the aa3-type cytochrome c oxidase and the bb3-type quinol oxidase have previously been characterized in detail, both biochemically and genetically. Here we report on the isolation of a genomic locus that harbours the gene cluster ccoNOOP, and demonstrate that it encodes an alternative cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidase. This oxidase has previously been shown to be specifically induced at low oxygen tensions, suggesting that its expression is controlled by an oxygen-sensing mechanism. This view is corroborated by the observation that the ccoNOOP gene cluster is preceded by a gene that encodes an FNR homologue and that its promoter region contains an FNR-binding motif. Biochemical and physiological analyses of a set of oxidase mutants revealed that, at least under the conditions tested, cytochromes aa3, bb3 and cbb3 make up the complete set of terminal oxidases in P. denitrificans. Proton-translocation measurements of these oxidase mutants indicate that all three oxidase types have the capacity to pump protons. Previously, however, we have reported decreased H+/e- coupling efficiencies of the cbb3-type oxidase under certain conditions. Sequence alignment suggests that many residues that have been proposed to constitute the chemical and pumped proton channels in cytochrome aa3 (and probably also in cytochrome bb3) are not conserved in cytochrome cbb3. It is concluded that the design of the proton pump in cytochrome cbb3 differs significantly from that in the other oxidase types.

  15. Is there an overprescription of proton pump inhibitors in oncohematologic patients undergoing ambulatory oncospecific treatment?

    PubMed

    Pujal Herranz, Meritxell

    2016-09-01

    Objetivo: El objetivo de este estudio es analizar la prevalencia de inhibidores de la bomba de protones (IBP) en el paciente oncohematologico de dispensacion ambulatoria y el grado de adecuacion de su indicacion. Método: Estudio observacional descriptivo en pacientes oncohematologicos en tratamiento oncoespecifico de dispensacion ambulatoria. Se elaboro un protocolo dirigido al paciente oncohematologico a partir del protocolo de uso racional de IBP de nuestro hospital. Se cuantificaron los pacientes en tratamiento activo con IBP y se analizo la idoneidad de su indicacion. Resultados: Se incluyeron 111 pacientes (71 oncologicos, 40 hematologicos). El 56% de los pacientes oncologicos y el 63% de los hematologicos estaban en tratamiento activo con IBP. Tras revisar las indicaciones de los pacientes con IBP, el 72% de los oncologicos y el 12% de los hematologicos no presentaron una indicacion que justificara el tratamiento. Conclusiones: Es importante que el farmaceutico detecte las prescripciones inadecuadas de IBP especialmente entre la poblacion oncologica y sugiera una deprescripcion del mismo.

  16. An elementary reaction step of the proton pump is revealed by mutation of tryptophan-164 to phenylalanine in cytochrome c oxidase from Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed

    Ribacka, Camilla; Verkhovsky, Michael I; Belevich, Ilya; Bloch, Dmitry A; Puustinen, Anne; Wikström, Mårten

    2005-12-20

    Cytochrome c oxidase couples reduction of dioxygen to water to translocation of protons over the inner mitochondrial or bacterial membrane. A likely proton acceptor for pumped protons is the Delta-propionate of heme a(3), which may receive the proton via water molecules from a conserved glutamic acid (E278 in subunit I of the Paracoccus denitrificans enzyme) and which receives a hydrogen bond from a conserved tryptophan, W164. Here, W164 was mutated to phenylalanine (W164F) to further explore the role of the heme a(3) Delta-propionate in proton translocation. FTIR spectroscopy showed changes in vibrations possibly attributable to heme propionates, and the midpoint redox potential of heme a(3) decreased by approximately 50 mV. The reaction of the oxidized W164F enzyme with hydrogen peroxide yielded substantial amounts of the intermediate F' even at high pH, which suggests that the mutation rearranges the local electric field in the binuclear center that controls the peroxide reaction. The steady-state proton translocation stoichiometry of the W164F enzyme dropped to approximately 0.5 H(+)/e(-) in cells and reconstituted proteoliposomes. Time-resolved electrometric measurements showed that when the fully reduced W164F enzyme reacted with O(2), the membrane potential generated in the fast phase of this reaction was far too small to account either for full proton pumping or uptake of a substrate proton from the inside of the proteoliposomes. Time-resolved optical spectroscopy showed that this fast electrometric phase occurred with kinetics corresponding to the transition from state A to P(R), whereas the subsequent transition to the F state was strongly delayed. This is due to a delay of reprotonation of E278 via the D-pathway, which was confirmed by observation of a slowed rate of Cu(A) oxidation and which explains the small amplitude of the fast charge transfer phase. Surprisingly, the W164F mutation thus mimics a weak block of the D-pathway, which is interpreted as

  17. Expression of a Translationally Fused TAP-Tagged Plasma Membrane Proton Pump in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana plasma membrane proton ATPase genes, AHA1 and AHA2, are the two most highly expressed isoforms of an 11 gene family and are collectively essential for embryo development. We report the translational fusion of a tandem affinity-purification tag to the 5′ end of the AHA1 open reading frame in a genomic clone. Stable expression of TAP-tagged AHA1 in Arabidopsis rescues the embryonic lethal phenotype of endogenous double aha1/aha2 knockdowns. Western blots of SDS-PAGE and Blue Native gels show enrichment of AHA1 in plasma membrane fractions and indicate a hexameric quaternary structure. TAP-tagged AHA1 rescue lines exhibited reduced vertical root growth. Analysis of the plasma membrane and soluble proteomes identified several plasma membrane-localized proteins with alterred abundance in TAP-tagged AHA1 rescue lines compared to wild type. Using affinity-purification mass spectrometry, we uniquely identified two additional AHA isoforms, AHA9 and AHA11, which copurified with TAP-tagged AHA1. In conclusion, we have generated transgenic Arabidopsis lines in which a TAP-tagged AHA1 transgene has complemented all essential endogenous AHA1 and AHA2 functions and have shown that these plants can be used to purify AHA1 protein and to identify in planta interacting proteins by mass spectrometry. PMID:24397334

  18. Repetitive Transient Depolarizations of the Inner Mitochondrial Membrane Induced by Proton Pumping

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Koichi; Uechi, Yukiko; Yoshioka, Hisashi; Ohta, Yoshihiro

    2005-01-01

    Single mitochondria show the spontaneous fluctuations of ΔΨm. In this study, to examine the mechanism of the fluctuations, we observed ΔΨm in single isolated heart mitochondria using time-resolved fluorescence microscopy. Addition of malate, succinate, or ascorbate plus TMPD to mitochondria induced polarization of the inner membrane followed by repeated cycles of rapid depolarizations and immediate repolarizations. ADP significantly decreased the frequency of the rapid depolarizations, but the ADP effect was counteracted by oligomycin. On the other hand, the rapid depolarizations did not occur when mitochondria were polarized by the efflux of K+ from the matrix. The rapid depolarizations became frequent with the increase in the substrate concentration or pH of the buffer. These results suggest that the rapid depolarizations depend on the net translocation of protons from the matrix. The frequency of the rapid depolarizations was not affected by ROS scavengers, Ca2+, CsA, or BA. In addition, the obvious increase in the permeability of the inner membrane to calcein (MW 623) that was entrapped in the matrix was not observed upon the transient depolarization. The mechanisms of the spontaneous oscillations of ΔΨm are discussed in relation to the matrix pH and the permeability transitions. PMID:15653749

  19. [Signal transduction and intracellular recruitment of gastric proton pump in the parietal cell].

    PubMed

    Urushidani, T; Nagao, T

    1997-12-01

    The parietal cell has three types of activating receptors for acid secretion on its basolateral membrane, i.e., histamine H2, acetylcholine M3, and gastrin CCKB. Activation of acid secretion is achieved by two concomitant functional changes namely: (i) tubulovesicles fuse with the apical secretory membrane, thus recruiting functional pumps to the expanded microvillar surface, and (ii) the apical membrane acquires a permeability to KCl. The major path for parietal cell stimulation is via H2-receptor-mediated adenylate cyclase and elevation of cAMP to activate protein kinase A (PKA), which phosphorylates key effector proteins, e.g., ezrin, a membrane-cytoskeletal linker, apical Cl- or K(+)-channels. Ca2+ is liberated from intracellular stores by IP3, which in turn is the result of M3-, CCKB-, or possibly H2-coupled activation of phospholipase C. The resulting protein kinase C activation may have both inhibitory and excitatory roles. Elevated Ca2+ activates calmodulin-dependent kinases, e.g., calmodulin kinase II and myosin light chain kinase, that could promote vesicular motor activity. Ezrin is considered to play a main role in the vesicular transport system of the parietal cell. The regulation might be conducted through the phosphorylation of the molecule to modify its property to interact with the cytoskeletal components, membranes or membrane proteins.

  20. Renal intercalated cells are rather energized by a proton than a sodium pump.

    PubMed

    Chambrey, Régine; Kurth, Ingo; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Houillier, Pascal; Purkerson, Jeffrey M; Leviel, Françoise; Hentschke, Moritz; Zdebik, Anselm A; Schwartz, George J; Hübner, Christian A; Eladari, Dominique

    2013-05-07

    The Na(+) concentration of the intracellular milieu is very low compared with the extracellular medium. Transport of Na(+) along this gradient is used to fuel secondary transport of many solutes, and thus plays a major role for most cell functions including the control of cell volume and resting membrane potential. Because of a continuous leak, Na(+) has to be permanently removed from the intracellular milieu, a process that is thought to be exclusively mediated by the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in animal cells. Here, we show that intercalated cells of the mouse kidney are an exception to this general rule. By an approach combining two-photon imaging of isolated renal tubules, physiological studies, and genetically engineered animals, we demonstrate that inhibition of the H(+) vacuolar-type ATPase (V-ATPase) caused drastic cell swelling and depolarization, and also inhibited the NaCl absorption pathway that we recently discovered in intercalated cells. In contrast, pharmacological blockade of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase had no effects. Basolateral NaCl exit from β-intercalated cells was independent of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase but critically relied on the presence of the basolateral ion transporter anion exchanger 4. We conclude that not all animal cells critically rely on the sodium pump as the unique bioenergizer, but can be replaced by the H(+) V-ATPase in renal intercalated cells. This concept is likely to apply to other animal cell types characterized by plasma membrane expression of the H(+) V-ATPase.

  1. Renal intercalated cells are rather energized by a proton than a sodium pump

    PubMed Central

    Chambrey, Régine; Kurth, Ingo; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Houillier, Pascal; Purkerson, Jeffrey M.; Leviel, Françoise; Hentschke, Moritz; Zdebik, Anselm A.; Schwartz, George J.; Hübner, Christian A.; Eladari, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    The Na+ concentration of the intracellular milieu is very low compared with the extracellular medium. Transport of Na+ along this gradient is used to fuel secondary transport of many solutes, and thus plays a major role for most cell functions including the control of cell volume and resting membrane potential. Because of a continuous leak, Na+ has to be permanently removed from the intracellular milieu, a process that is thought to be exclusively mediated by the Na+/K+-ATPase in animal cells. Here, we show that intercalated cells of the mouse kidney are an exception to this general rule. By an approach combining two-photon imaging of isolated renal tubules, physiological studies, and genetically engineered animals, we demonstrate that inhibition of the H+ vacuolar-type ATPase (V-ATPase) caused drastic cell swelling and depolarization, and also inhibited the NaCl absorption pathway that we recently discovered in intercalated cells. In contrast, pharmacological blockade of the Na+/K+-ATPase had no effects. Basolateral NaCl exit from β-intercalated cells was independent of the Na+/K+-ATPase but critically relied on the presence of the basolateral ion transporter anion exchanger 4. We conclude that not all animal cells critically rely on the sodium pump as the unique bioenergizer, but can be replaced by the H+ V-ATPase in renal intercalated cells. This concept is likely to apply to other animal cell types characterized by plasma membrane expression of the H+ V-ATPase. PMID:23610411

  2. V-ATPase Proton Pumping Activity Is Required for Adult Zebrafish Appendage Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Joana; Aires, Rita; Becker, Jörg D.; Jacinto, António; Certal, Ana C.; Rodríguez-León, Joaquín

    2014-01-01

    The activity of ion channels and transporters generates ion-specific fluxes that encode electrical and/or chemical signals with biological significance. Even though it is long known that some of those signals are crucial for regeneration, only in recent years the corresponding molecular sources started to be identified using mainly invertebrate or larval vertebrate models. We used adult zebrafish caudal fin as a model to investigate which and how ion transporters affect regeneration in an adult vertebrate model. Through the combined use of biophysical and molecular approaches, we show that V-ATPase activity contributes to a regeneration-specific H+ ef`flux. The onset and intensity of both V-ATPase expression and H+ efflux correlate with the different regeneration rate along the proximal-distal axis. Moreover, we show that V-ATPase inhibition impairs regeneration in adult vertebrate. Notably, the activity of this H+ pump is necessary for aldh1a2 and mkp3 expression, blastema cell proliferation and fin innervation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the role of V-ATPase during adult vertebrate regeneration. PMID:24671205

  3. V-ATPase proton pumping activity is required for adult zebrafish appendage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Joana; Aires, Rita; Becker, Jörg D; Jacinto, António; Certal, Ana C; Rodríguez-León, Joaquín

    2014-01-01

    The activity of ion channels and transporters generates ion-specific fluxes that encode electrical and/or chemical signals with biological significance. Even though it is long known that some of those signals are crucial for regeneration, only in recent years the corresponding molecular sources started to be identified using mainly invertebrate or larval vertebrate models. We used adult zebrafish caudal fin as a model to investigate which and how ion transporters affect regeneration in an adult vertebrate model. Through the combined use of biophysical and molecular approaches, we show that V-ATPase activity contributes to a regeneration-specific H+ ef`flux. The onset and intensity of both V-ATPase expression and H+ efflux correlate with the different regeneration rate along the proximal-distal axis. Moreover, we show that V-ATPase inhibition impairs regeneration in adult vertebrate. Notably, the activity of this H+ pump is necessary for aldh1a2 and mkp3 expression, blastema cell proliferation and fin innervation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the role of V-ATPase during adult vertebrate regeneration.

  4. An evaluation of the CYP1A induction potential of pantoprazole in primary rat hepatocytes: a comparison with other proton pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Masubuchi, N; Okazaki, O

    1997-11-06

    The ability of pantoprazole to affect the induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A subfamily was evaluated and compared with two other proton pump inhibitors, omeprazole and lansoprazole, in primary cultured hepatocytes from female Sprague-Dawley rats. The hepatocytes were cultured for 2 days, followed by treatment for 2 days with the proton pump inhibitors at 2, 5 and 10 microM, concentrations that are similar to plasma concentrations found in rats in vivo. The CYP1A inducer 3-methylcholanthrene (at 1 microM) was also evaluated as a positive control. Induction potentials of these chemicals for CYP1A were determined by 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activity and isozyme contents. The results showed that for CYP1A induction, the rank ordering in induction potential was consistently lansoprazole > omeprazole > pantoprazole. The results are consistent with the existing rat in vivo data, i.e. pantoprazole has lower CYP1A induction potential than omeprazole and lansoprazole.

  5. Proton pump inhibitors for the treatment of patients with erosive esophagitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease: current evidence and safety of dexlansoprazole.

    PubMed

    Mermelstein, Joseph; Mermelstein, Alanna Chait; Chait, Maxwell M

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is the most common upper gastroenterology disorder in the US. It is associated with a variety of complications and significantly impacts quality of life. Proton pump inhibitors are the most effective treatment. Dexlansoprazole modified release (MR) is a proton pump inhibitor that employs a novel release formulation that prolongs its absorption and allows for more flexibility in dosing. Dexlansoprazole MR can be dosed without regard to food intake or time of day, and once-daily dosing may replace twice-daily dosing of other agents. Dexlansoprazole MR is effective for healing and maintenance of erosive esophagitis, and for the treatment of nonerosive disease, including nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux disease. Dexlansoprazole MR is safe and well tolerated, and can improve quality of life.

  6. Retention behavior of proton pump inhibitors using immobilized polysaccharide-derived chiral stationary phases with organic-aqueous mobile phases.

    PubMed

    Cirilli, Roberto; Ferretti, Rosella; Gallinella, Bruno; Zanitti, Leo

    2013-08-23

    In the present study, the chromatographic behavior of two immobilized polysaccharide-derived chiral stationary phases (CSPs), the Chiralpak ID-3 and Chiralpak IE-3, under aqueous mobile phases conditions is presented. Four proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) (omeprazole, lansoprazole, pentaprazole and rabeprazole) were selected as test compounds. The effect of the concentration of water in the mobile phase was investigated with respect to its contribution to enantioselectivity and retention. Under acetonitrile-water mobile phase conditions, retention behavior evidenced an interesting pattern. At lower water content, the retention factors decreased with increasing water and at higher water content a reversed trend was observed. These findings support the hypothesis that two retention mechanisms operated successively on the same CSP: the HILIC (with water-poor eluents) and RPLC (with water-rich eluents) modes. The retention factors were minimum in the intermediate region, corresponding to a water concentration of about 20%. Interestingly, the baseline separation of all PPIs investigated was optimized under organic-aqueous mobile phases containing a high water content (from about 50 to 65%). Thus, the dual retention behavior of the PPIs on the Chiralpak ID-3 and Chiralpak IE-3 made it possible to reach greener and harmless enantioselective conditions in a short analysis time.

  7. Successful treatment of radiation-induced mucositis with proton pump inhibitor administration: A report of two laryngeal cancer cases.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Kohtaro; Suzuki, Masami; Ida, Shota; Kudo, Shigehiro; Ando, Ken; Ebara, Takeshi; Higuchi, Keiko

    2017-02-01

    Presently, the relationship between laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) and radiation-induced mucositis has not been fully explored. In the present study, we report 2 cases of laryngeal cancer in which radiation-induced mucositis ameliorated after proton pump inhibitor (PPI) administration. Case 1 was diagnosed with T1aN0M0 right glottis carcinoma and was treated with radiation therapy. Grade 3 mucositis occurred after administration of 46Gy irradiation. PPI was administered and mucositis ameliorated quickly without cessation of radiation therapy. Case 2 was diagnosed with T2N0M0 supraglottic cancer and was treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Grade 3 mucositis occurred after administration of 44Gy irradiation. PPI was administered and mucositis ameliorated quickly without cessation of chemoradiation therapy. In both cases, a remarkable therapeutic effect of PPI was observed in the perilaryngeal areas including the epiglottic vallecula, arytenoid, and postcricoid area. In both cases, LPR involvement was suspected before the onset of radiation therapy. The two cases presented here, indicated a causal relationship between LPR and radiation-induced mucositis. In cases of severe mucositis in the perilaryngeal area in patients with LPR prior to radiation therapy, PPI administration may be an effective therapeutic option.

  8. Capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons are involved in bicarbonate secretion induced by lansoprazole, a proton pump inhibitor, in rats.

    PubMed

    Inada, I; Satoh, H

    1996-04-01

    Lansoprazole, a proton pump inhibitor, exerts prominent antiulcer activity via both antisecretory and mucosal protective actions. Although the antisecretory action has been explained by inactivation of (H+, K+)-ATPase in parietal cells, the mode of mucosal protective action remains to be elucidated. In the present study, the effect of lansoprazole on duodenal bicarbonate secretion was studied in anesthetized rats to clarify the mode of the mucosal protective action. Lansoprazole (0.1 mM) applied topically to the duodenum significantly (P < 0.01) increased bicarbonate secretion by 0.36 +/- 0.11 microeq/15 min (21 +/- 5%) compared with the value in the vehicle control. Topical administration of capsaicin (10 mg/ml) in the duodenum and intravenous infusion of vasoactive intestinal peptide (10 micrograms/kg/hr) increased bicarbonate secretion. Five-minute perfusion of the duodenal loop with 100 mM HCl increased bicarbonate secretion. Administration of lansoprazole (0.3 and 1 mg/kg, intravenously) 60 min before luminal acidification enhanced the acid-induced bicarbonate secretion dose-dependently and significantly (P < 0.01). In the capsaicin-pretreated rats, the effects of lansoprazole on basal and acid-induced bicarbonate secretion were significantly (P < 0.05) decreased compared with that of control group. These results indicate that lansoprazole increases basal and acid-induced bicarbonate secretion in the duodenum in rats and that capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons may be involved in the mode of action for these effects.

  9. Proton pump inhibitors protect mice from acute systemic inflammation and induce long-term cross-tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Balza, E; Piccioli, P; Carta, S; Lavieri, R; Gattorno, M; Semino, C; Castellani, P; Rubartelli, A

    2016-01-01

    Incidence of sepsis is increasing, representing a tremendous burden for health-care systems. Death in acute sepsis is attributed to hyperinflammatory responses, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. We report here that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which block gastric acid secretion, selectively inhibited tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion by Toll-like receptor (TLR)-activated human monocytes in vitro, in the absence of toxic effects. Remarkably, the oversecretion of IL-1β that represents a hallmark of monocytes from patients affected by cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome is also blocked. Based on these propaedeutic experiments, we tested the effects of high doses of PPIs in vivo in the mouse model of endotoxic shock. Our data show that a single administration of PPI protected mice from death (60% survival versus 5% of untreated mice) and decreased TNF-α and IL-1β systemic production. PPIs were efficacious even when administered after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection. PPI-treated mice that survived developed a long-term cross-tolerance, becoming resistant to LPS- and zymosan-induced sepsis. In vitro, their macrophages displayed impaired TNF-α and IL-1β to different TLR ligands. PPIs also prevented sodium thioglycollate-induced peritoneal inflammation, indicating their efficacy also in a non-infectious setting independent of TLR stimulation. Lack of toxicity and therapeutic effectiveness make PPIs promising new drugs against sepsis and other severe inflammatory conditions. PMID:27441656

  10. Effect of the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole on the pharmacokinetics of extended-release formulations of oxybutynin and tolterodine.

    PubMed

    Dmochowski, Roger; Chen, Andrew; Sathyan, Gayatri; MacDiarmid, Scott; Gidwani, Shalini; Gupta, Suneel

    2005-08-01

    This study assessed the effect of the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole on the bioavailability of the extended-release formulations of oxybutynin and tolterodine. Forty-four healthy volunteers received each of 4 treatments in a 4-period crossover design. The treatments consisted of osmotically controlled extended-release oxybutynin chloride tablets at 10 mg/d or extended-release tolterodine tartrate capsules at 4 mg/d, with and without preceding treatment with 20 mg omeprazole daily for 4 days. Blood samples collected predose and at scheduled time points for 36 hours postdose were analyzed for oxybutynin and its active metabolite, N-desethyloxybutynin, or tolterodine and its active 5-hydroxymethyl metabolite, as appropriate. The AUCinfinity ratios for oxybutynin and its metabolite with and without prior omeprazole fell within the 80% to 125% range (accepted as the criterion for bioequivalence), as did those for tolterodine and its active moiety. The peak concentration ratios for oxybutynin and metabolite also conformed to this range; those for tolterodine did not. Increasing gastric pH with omeprazole does not substantially alter the pharmacokinetic properties of extended-release oxybutynin but may alter those of extended-release tolterodine.

  11. Association between Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy and Clostridium difficile Infection: A Contemporary Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tleyjeh, Imad M.; Alasmari, Faisal A.; Garbati, Musa A.; AlGhamdi, Mushabab; Khan, Abdur Rahman; Tannir, Mohamad Al; Erwin, Patricia J.; Ibrahim, Talal; AlLehibi, Abed; Baddour, Larry M.; Sutton, Alex J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Emerging epidemiological evidence suggests that proton pump inhibitor (PPI) acid-suppression therapy is associated with an increased risk of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Methods Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, ISI Web of Science, and Scopus were searched from 1990 to January 2012 for analytical studies that reported an adjusted effect estimate of the association between PPI use and CDI. We performed random-effect meta-analyses. We used the GRADE framework to interpret the findings. Results We identified 47 eligible citations (37 case-control and 14 cohort studies) with corresponding 51 effect estimates. The pooled OR was 1.65, 95% CI (1.47, 1.85), I2 = 89.9%, with evidence of publication bias suggested by a contour funnel plot. A novel regression based method was used to adjust for publication bias and resulted in an adjusted pooled OR of 1.51 (95% CI, 1.26–1.83). In a speculative analysis that assumes that this association is based on causality, and based on published baseline CDI incidence, the risk of CDI would be very low in the general population taking PPIs with an estimated NNH of 3925 at 1 year. Conclusions In this rigorously conducted systemic review and meta-analysis, we found very low quality evidence (GRADE class) for an association between PPI use and CDI that does not support a cause-effect relationship. PMID:23236397

  12. Impact of Long-Term Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy on Gut Microbiota in F344 Rats: Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Cheol Min; Kim, Nayoung; Kim, Yong Sung; Nam, Ryoung Hee; Park, Ji Hyun; Lee, Dong Ho; Seok, Yeong-Jae; Kim, Yeon-Ran; Kim, Joo-Hyon; Kim, Jung Min; Kim, Joo Sung; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims To evaluate changes in gut microbiota composition following long-term proton pump inhibitor (PPI) treatment. Methods Twenty-four-week-old F344 rats were fed diets with (n=6) or without (n=5) lansoprazole for 50 weeks. Profiles of luminal microbiota in the terminal ileum were then analyzed. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene was performed using an FLX genome sequencer (454 Life Sciences/Roche). Results Rats treated with lansoprazole showed significantly reduced body weights compared to controls (lansoprazole-treated rats and controls, 322.3±15.3 g vs 403.2±5.2 g, respectively, p<0.001). However, stool frequencies and consistencies did not differ between the two groups. The composition of the gut microbiota in lansoprazole-treated rats was quite different from that of the controls. In the controls, the microbiota profiles obtained from the terminal ileum showed a predominance of Proteobacteria (93.9%) due to the abundance of Escherichia and Pasteurella genera. Conversely, lansoprazole-treated rats showed an elevated population of Firmicutes (66.9%), which was attributed to an increased ratio of Clostridium g4 to Lactobacillus genera. Conclusions This preliminary study suggests that long-term administration of PPI may cause weight loss and changes to the microbiota in the terminal ileum. PMID:27458177

  13. Analysis, occurrence, fate and risks of proton pump inhibitors, their metabolites and transformation products in aquatic environment: A review.

    PubMed

    Kosma, Christina I; Lambropoulou, Dimitra A; Albanis, Triantafyllos A

    2016-11-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) which include omeprazole, esomeprazole, lansoprazole, pantoprazole and rabeprazole, are extensively used for the relief of gastro-intestinal disorders. Despite their high worldwide consumption, PPIs are extensively metabolized in human bodies and therefore are not regularly detected in monitoring studies. Very recently, however, it has been shown that some omeprazole metabolites may enter and are likely to persist in aquatic environment. Hence, to fully assess the environmental exposures and risks associated with PPIs, it is important to better understand and evaluate the fate and behavior not only of the parent compound but also of their metabolites and their transformation products arising from biotic and abiotic processes (hydrolysis, photodegradation, biodegradation etc.) in the environment. In this light, the purpose of this review is to summarize the present state of knowledge on the introduction and behavior of these chemicals in natural and engineering systems and highlight research needs and gaps. It draws attention to their transformation, the increase contamination by their metabolites/TPs in different environmental matrices and their potential adverse effects in the environment. Furthermore, existing research on analytical developments with respect to sample treatment, separation and detection of PPIs and their metabolites/TPs is provided.

  14. Intermittent and on-demand use of proton pump inhibitors in the management of symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Bardhan, Karna Dev

    2003-03-01

    The epidemic of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in industrialized nations is currently spreading to less-developed ones, with more than half of the patients having symptomatic or mild erosive GERD. The long-term management of GERD has been dominated by daily maintenance treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPI) to prevent relapse. It is common, however, for many patients with mild disease and infrequent symptom relapses to use a PPI only when symptoms demand. Patients with symptomatic or mild erosive GERD are therefore ideal for on-demand or intermittent treatment. The efficacy of such a strategy of intermittent treatment, or treatment of symptoms on demand, has recently been evaluated in four randomized controlled studies. These trials demonstrate that such therapeutic strategies reduce symptoms, improve quality of life, and are cost effective. In clinical practice, the author has found these treatment strategies suitable for approximately 60% of newly diagnosed patients with GERD for the long-term management of symptomatic GERD of mild or moderate severity.

  15. Therapeutic and cost effectiveness of proton pump inhibitor regimens for idiopathic or drug-induced peptic ulcer complication.

    PubMed

    Nam, Doo Hyun; Park, So Young; Park, Jong Min; Kim, Sung Chull

    2011-03-01

    Peptic ulcer (PU) disease has a high rate of occurrence and recurrence in Korean and the selection of drug for treatment is diverse. In this study, the therapeutical effectiveness of regimens including proton pump inhibitors (PPI) was compared with the single PPI therapy. The clinical data were collected from 1,658 patients having idiopathic or drug-induced PU complication from a Medical Center in Daegu, Korea, and analyzed retrospectively based on the results of endoscopic examination, the drug history and the therapeutic cost depending on drugs used. The comparison of complete healing rate and recurrence rate showed no significant differences between the single PPI groups and the combination group with antacids, prokinetic agent or mucosa protectants. However, the combination therapy of PPI with mucosa protectants gave a slightly better therapeutic outcome than single PPI treatment in gastric ulcer patients. Comparatively, the combination of PPI with antacids significantly reduced the therapeutic effectiveness in duodenal ulcer patients. The analysis of cost-based therapeutic effectiveness reveals that any economic benefits in PU treatment were not gained by the combination of other class of ulcer drugs. Even though the rapidity of healing rate was not considered, it can be concluded that the PPI combination therapy might be not desirable in PU treatment. Particularly triplet or quartet combination therapy in PPI regimen was absolutely economically ineffective therapy in spite of the increase of medication costs.

  16. Modification of plasma membrane proton pumps in cucumber roots as an adaptation mechanism to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Janicka-Russak, Małgorzata; Kabała, Katarzyna; Wdowikowska, Anna; Kłobus, Grażyna

    2013-07-01

    The effect of salt stress (50mM NaCl) on modification of plasma membrane (PM) H(+)-ATPase (EC 3.6.3.14) activity in cucumber roots was studied. Plants were grown under salt stress for 1, 3 or 6 days. In salt-stressed plants, weak stimulation of ATP hydrolytic activity of PM H(+)-ATPase and significant stimulation of proton transport through the plasma membrane were observed. The H(+)/ATP coupling ratio in the plasma membrane of plants subjected to salt stress significantly increased. The greatest stimulation of PM H(+)-ATPase was in 6-day stressed plants. Increased H2O2 accumulation under salt stress conditions in cucumber roots was also observed, with the greatest accumulation observed in 6-day stressed plants. Additionally, during the sixth day of salinity, there appeared heat shock proteins (HSPs) 17.7 and 101, suggesting that repair processes and adaptation to stress occurred in plants. Under salt stress conditions, fast post-translational modifications took place. Protein blot analysis with antibody against phosphothreonine and 14-3-3 proteins showed that, under salinity, the level of those elements increased. Additionally, under salt stress, activity changes of PM H(+)-ATPase can partly result from changes in the pattern of expression of PM H(+)-ATPase genes. In cucumber seedlings, there was increased expression of CsHA10 under salt stress and the transcript of a new PM H(+)-ATPase gene isoform, CsHA1, also appeared. Accumulation of the CsHA1 transcript was induced by NaCl exposure, and was not expressed at detectable levels in roots of control plants. The appearance of a new PM H(+)-ATPase transcript, in addition to the increase in enzyme activity, indicates the important role of the enzyme in maintaining ion homeostasis in plants under salt stress.

  17. The influence of changes in hospital drug formulary on the prescription of proton pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Mourelle, Raquel; Carracedo-Martínez, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    Objetivo: Analizar el impacto de introducir el omeprazol en el formulario del Hospital de Barbanza sobre las prescripciones intrahospitalarias y extrahospitalarias (consultas externas y atención primaria) de todos los Inhibidores de la Bomba de Protones (IBP). Material y métodos: Estudio descriptivo retrospectivo de 36 meses en un hospital de nivel I. Las unidades básicas de trabajo son las dosis-habitantes-día en el ámbito extrahospitalario y las dosis diarias definidas/estancias-día para hospitalización; como medida de eficiencia se utiliza el porcentaje de DDD de omeprazol sobre el resto de IBP. Para el análisis estadístico construimos un modelo de regresión segmentada. Resultados: En consultas externas sufren cambios estadísticamente significativos el pantoprazol y el rabeprazol; el primero, estacionado antes de la intervención, sufre una disminución inmediata; el rabeprazol, en crecimiento antes de la intervención, presenta una posterior tendencia decreciente. En atención primaria se constata un cambio estadísticamente significativo en el pantoprazol, con tendencia decreciente a largo plazo. En hospitalización se observan cambios estadísticamente significativos para el pantoprazol y el omeprazol; el primero con disminución inmediata y tendencia al decrecimiento a largo plazo; el segundo experimenta un aumento inmediato y crecimiento a largo plazo. La evolución del % de omeprazol respecto al total de IBP mostró aumentos en los tres escenarios. Conclusiones: Se observa un cambio hacia una prescripción de IBP más eficiente en todos los ámbitos asistenciales tras la introducción del omeprazol en la guía farmacoterapéutica del hospital. La inclusión de medicamentos eficientes, o la retirada de ineficientes, puede ser una herramienta potencialmente útil para mejorar los perfiles de prescripción.

  18. Risk of dementia from proton pump inhibitor use in Asian population: A nationwide cohort study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Shu-Yu; Chien, Chen-Yu; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Lin, Kun-Der; Ho, Bo-Lin; Chang, Yu-Han

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Concerns have been raised regarding the potential association between proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use and dementia. Objective This study aimed to examine this association in an Asian population. Methods Patients initiating PPI therapy between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2003 without a prior history of dementia were identified from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database. The outcome of interest was all-cause dementia. Cox regression models were applied to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) of dementia. The cumulative PPI dosage stratified by quartiles of defined daily doses and adjusted for baseline disease risk score served as the primary variables compared against no PPI use. Results We analyzed the data of 15726 participants aged 40 years or older and free of dementia at baseline. PPI users (n = 7863; average follow-up 8.44 years) had a significantly increased risk of dementia over non—PPI users (n = 7863; average follow-up 9.55 years) (adjusted HR [aHR] 1.22; 95% confidence interval: 1.05–1.42). A significant association was observed between cumulative PPI use and risk of dementia (P for trend = .013). Subgroup analysis showed excess frequency of dementia in PPI users diagnosed with depression (aHR 2.73 [1.91–3.89]), hyperlipidemia (aHR 1.81 [1.38–2.38]), ischemic heart disease (aHR 1.55 [1.12–2.14]), and hypertension (aHR 1.54 [1.21–1.95]). Conclusions An increased risk for dementia was identified among the Asian PPI users. Cumulative PPI use was significantly associated with dementia. Further investigation into the possible biological mechanisms underlying the relationship between dementia and PPI use is warranted. PMID:28199356

  19. Review of proton pump inhibitors for the initial treatment of heartburn: is there a dose ceiling effect?

    PubMed

    Kushner, Pamela R; Peura, David A

    2011-05-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are widely used in clinical practice. However, concerns have been expressed about their long-term use, particularly with regard to bone health, Clostridium difficile infections, and drug interactions with platelet aggregation inhibitors. There has been limited guidance for clinicians concerning appropriate dose selection of PPIs for the initial treatment of heartburn. This review explored whether published clinical trials provide evidence of a ceiling above which higher PPI doses do not provide additional clinical benefit over the lowest approved dose. All articles of randomized, controlled clinical trials in nonerosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in which the effects of two or more doses of the same PPI on symptomatic relief of heartburn were quantified as a study endpoint were identified and analyzed through PubMed searches up to the end of September 2010. The majority of trials evaluated provided no evidence that higher PPI doses were superior to the lowest approved dose for the initial treatment of heartburn. There were no clinically relevant findings with respect to dose dependence and safety outcomes in these studies. Efficacy outcomes from the trials suggest there may be a dose ceiling effect and highlight the need for further research on the use of the lowest effective PPI doses as an appropriate strategy in the initial treatment of uncomplicated heartburn. Observational studies and some meta-analyses have suggested that long-term PPI pharmacotherapy might be associated with safety concerns, which necessitate the periodic evaluation of therapeutic benefit in terms of symptom resolution and regimen tolerability. However, evidence to date suggests that use of the lowest effective dose for the indication is not associated with significant adverse events, particularly in the short term. Clinical practice suggests that patients requiring long-term treatment should be maintained on the lowest dose necessary to control

  20. Non-Specific Gastric Inflammation in Children is Associated with Proton Pump Inhibitor Treatment for More than 6 Weeks

    PubMed Central

    Rosas-Blum, Eduardo; Tatevian, Nina; Hashmi, Syed Shahrukh; Rhoads, Jon Marc; Navarro, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: Non-specific gastric inflammation (NSGI) is a commonly reported pathological finding. We investigated if it is associated with the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in children at a single tertiary center. Methods: We performed an IRB-approved chart review of all endoscopy and biopsy reports of patients who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy between July 2009 and July 2010 (n = 310). Demographic data, dose, duration of exposure to PPI, and biopsy results were collected and analyzed. All esophageal, gastric, and duodenal biopsies were independently reviewed by a pathologist. Patients with acute gastritis, moderate/severe chronic gastric inflammation, or Helicobacter pylori infection were excluded. The presence of NSGI was compared between patients exposed and not exposed to PPI as well as between patients with different doses and durations of PPI exposure to assess for potential associations. Results: A total of 193 patients were included: 88 (46%) had a history of PPI use and 48 (25%) were found to have NSGI. Compared to patients not exposed to PPI, the odds ratio of NSGI in patients exposed to PPIs was 2.81 (95% CI: 1.36–5.93). The odds ratio of NSGI in patients exposed to PPI for >3 months was 4.53 (95% CI: 1.69–11.97). Gender, ethnicity, and age were not associated with NSGI. No histological differences were found in the esophagus and duodenum between patients exposed and not exposed to PPI. Conclusion: This study found that PPI exposure is associated with NSGI with a higher risk for those exposed for >3 months. As the clinical implications of NSGI are not known, judicious use of PPIs is needed. Prospective studies are required to confirm and to determine the etiologic factors (i.e., alteration of the gastric pH, serum gastrin) that may be related with the presence of NGSI. PMID:24479108

  1. Non-prescription proton-pump inhibitors for self-treating frequent heartburn:the role of the Canadian pharmacist

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, David; Nakhla, Nardine

    2016-01-01

    Heartburn and acid regurgitation are the cardinal symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux and occur commonly in the Canadian population. Multiple non-prescription treatment options are available for managing these symptoms, including antacids, alginates, histamine-H2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs), and proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs). As a result, pharmacists are ideally positioned to recommend appropriate treatment options based upon an individual’s needs and presenting symptoms, prior treatment response, comorbid medical conditions, and other relevant factors. Individuals who experience mild heartburn and/or have symptoms that occur predictably in response to known precipitating factors can manage their symptoms by avoiding known triggers and using on-demand antacids and/or alginates or lower-dose non-prescription H2RAs (e.g. ranitidine 150 mg). For those with moderate symptoms, lifestyle changes, in conjunction with higher-dose non-prescription H2RAs, may be effective. However, for individuals with moderate-to-severe symptoms that occur frequently (i.e. ≥2 days/week), the non-prescription (Schedule II) PPI omeprazole 20 mg should be considered. The pharmacist can provide important support by inquiring about the frequency and severity of symptoms, identifying an appropriate treatment option, and recognizing other potential causes of symptoms, as well as alarm features and atypical symptoms that would necessitate referral to a physician. After recommending an appropriate treatment, the pharmacist can provide instructions for its correct use. Additionally, the pharmacist should inquire about recurrences, respond to questions about adverse events, provide monitoring parameters, and counsel on when referral to a physician is warranted. Pharmacists are an essential resource for individuals experiencing heartburn; they play a crucial role in helping individuals make informed self-care decisions and educating them to ensure that therapy is used in an optimal, safe, and

  2. Tonoplast lipid composition and proton pump of pineapple fruit during low-temperature storage and blackheart development.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuchan; Pan, Xiaoping; Qu, Hongxia; Underhill, Steven J R

    2014-05-01

    Vacuole represents a major storage organelle playing vital roles in pH homoeostasis and cellular detoxification. The chemical and functional properties of tonoplast in response to chilling temperature and their roles in chilling injury are largely unknown. In the current study, lipid composition of tonoplast and the activities of two vacuolar proton pumps, H?-ATPase (V-ATPase) and H?-pyrophosphatase (V-PPase), were investigated in accordance with the development of blackheart, a form of chilling injury in pineapple fruit (Ananas comosus). Chilling temperature at 10 °C for 1 week induced irreversible blackheart injury in concurrence with a substantial decrease in V-ATPase activity. By contrast, the activity was increased after 1 week at 25 °C. The activity of V-PPase was not changed under both temperatures. Level of total phospholipids of tonoplast decreased at 10 °C, but increased at 25 °C. There was no change at the level of total glycolipids under both temperatures. Thus, low temperature increased the ratio of total glycolipids vs. total phospholipids of tonoplast. Phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine were the predominant phospholipids of tonoplast. Low temperature increased the relative level of phosphatidic acid but decreased the percentage of both phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. Unsaturated fatty acids accounted for over 60 % of the total tonoplast fatty acids, with C18:1 and C18:2 being predominant. Low temperature significantly decreased the percentage of C18:3. Modification of membrane lipid composition and its effect on the functional property of tonoplast at low temperature were discussed in correlation with their roles in the development of chilling injury in pineapple fruit.

  3. Influence of low-dose proton pump inhibitors administered concomitantly or separately on the anti-platelet function of clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Takahisa; Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Kodaira, Chise; Nishino, Masafumi; Yamade, Mihoko; Uotani, Takahiro; Sahara, Shu; Ichikawa, Hitomi; Kagami, Takuma; Iwaizumi, Moriya; Hamaya, Yasushi; Osawa, Satoshi; Sugimoto, Ken; Umemura, Kazuo

    2017-04-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) at low doses can effectively prevent gastrointestinal bleeding due to aspirin and are widely used in Japan for gastroprotection in patients taking anti-platelet agents. We examined the influence of different PPIs at low doses administered concomitantly or separately on anti-platelet functions of clopidogrel. In 41 healthy Japanese volunteers with different CYP2C19 genotypes who took clopidogrel 75 mg in the morning alone, or with omeprazole 10 mg, esomeprazole 10 mg, lansoprazole 15 mg, or rabeprazole 10 mg, either concomitantly in the morning or separately in the evening, we measured the inhibition of platelet aggregation (IPA, %) using VerifyNow P2Y12 assay at 4 h after the last clopidogrel dose on Day 7 of each regimen. IPA by clopidogrel with rabeprazole administered at lunchtime, approximately 4 h after clopidogrel, was also measured. Mean IPAs in those concomitantly receiving omeprazole, esomeprazole, lansoprazole or rabeprazole (47.2 ± 21.1%, 43.2 ± 20.2%, 46.4 ± 18.8%, and 47.3 ± 19.2%, respectively) were significantly decreased compared with those receiving clopidogrel alone (56.0%) (all ps < 0.001). This decrease was observed when PPIs were administered separately in the evening. However, IPA by clopidogrel with rabeprazole administered at lunchtime was 51.6%, which was markedly similar to that of clopidogrel alone (p = 0.114). All tested PPIs reduce the efficacy of clopidogrel when administered concomitantly. Our preliminary data suggest that administration of rabeprazole 4 h following clopidogrel may minimize potential drug-drug interactions.

  4. Changes in Practice Patterns of Clopidogrel in Combination with Proton Pump Inhibitors after an FDA Safety Communication

    PubMed Central

    Guérin, Annie; Mody, Reema; Carter, Valerie; Ayas, Charles; Patel, Haridarshan; Lasch, Karen; Wu, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In 2009, the FDA issued a warning that omeprazole–a proton pump inhibitor (PPI)–reduces the antithrombotic effect of clopidogrel by almost half when taken concomitantly. This study aims to analyze the impact of the FDA Safety Communications on prescribing clopidogrel together with PPIs. Methods This retrospective study identified clopidogrel users from the Truven Health Analytics MarketScan Databases (01/2006–12/2012). Rates of clopidogrel-PPI combination therapy were estimated in 6-month intervals for patients with ≥1 clopidogrel prescription fill, then were analyzed pre- and post-safety communication (11/17/2009). Analyses were also conducted by grouping PPIs into CYP2C19 inhibitors (omeprazole and esomeprazole) and CYP2C19 non-inhibitors (pantoprazole, lansoprazole, dexlansoprazole, and rabeprazole). Results Overall, 483,074 patients met the selection criteria; of these, 157,248 used a clopidogrel-PPI combination. On average, 30.5% of patients in the pre- and 19.9% in the post-communication period used a clopidogrel-PPI combination therapy. Among clopidogrel users, the probability of using clopidogrel-PPI combinations fell by over 40% in the post-communication period (OR = 0.57; p<0.001); the proportion of patients using esomeprazole fell from 12.9% to 5.3%, and the proportion using omeprazole fell from 10.1% to 6.3%. Among combination therapy users, the probability of patients using a combination with a CYP2C19 inhibitor decreased by 53% (OR = 0.47; p<0.001); however, 31.5% of patients were still prescribed a clopidogrel-PPI combination therapy. Trends were similar for all and newly treated patients, regardless of clopidogrel indication and physician specialty. Conclusions The FDA Safety Communication resulted in a reduction in the number of patients undergoing combination therapy; however approximately one-third of patients still used combination therapy post-communication. PMID:26727382

  5. Use of Proton-Pump Inhibitors Predicts Heart Failure and Death in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pello Lázaro, Ana María; Cristóbal, Carmen; Franco-Peláez, Juan Antonio; Tarín, Nieves; Aceña, Álvaro; Carda, Rocío; Huelmos, Ana; Martín-Mariscal, María Luisa; Fuentes-Antras, Jesús; Martínez-Millá, Juan; Alonso, Joaquín; Lorenzo, Óscar; Egido, Jesús; López-Bescós, Lorenzo; Tuñón, José

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) seem to increase the incidence of cardiovascular events in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), mainly in those using clopidogrel. We analysed the impact of PPIs on the prognosis of patients with stable CAD. Methods We followed 706 patients with CAD. Primary outcome was the combination of secondary outcomes. Secondary outcomes were 1) acute ischaemic events (any acute coronary syndrome, stroke, or transient ischaemic attack) and 2) heart failure (HF) or death. Results Patients on PPIs were older [62.0 (53.0–73.0) vs. 58.0 (50.0–70.0) years; p = 0.003] and had a more frequent history of stroke (4.9% vs. 1.1%; p = 0.004) than those from the non-PPI group, and presented no differences in any other clinical variable, including cardiovascular risk factors, ejection fraction, and therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel. Follow-up was 2.2±0.99 years. Seventy-eight patients met the primary outcome, 53 developed acute ischaemic events, and 33 HF or death. PPI use was an independent predictor of the primary outcome [hazard ratio (HR) = 2.281 (1.244–4.183); p = 0.008], along with hypertension, body-mass index, glomerular filtration rate, atrial fibrillation, and nitrate use. PPI use was also an independent predictor of HF/death [HR = 5.713 (1.628–20.043); p = 0.007], but not of acute ischaemic events. A propensity score showed similar results. Conclusions In patients with CAD, PPI use is independently associated with an increased incidence of HF and death but not with a high rate of acute ischaemic events. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:28103324

  6. In vitro dissolution of proton-pump inhibitor products intended for paediatric and geriatric use in physiological bicarbonate buffer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Shokrollahi, Honaz

    2015-05-15

    Proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) products based on enteric coated multiparticulates are design to meet the needs of patients who cannot swallow tablets such as children and older adults. Enteric coated PPI preparations exhibit delays in in vivo absorption and onset of antisecretory effects, which is not reflected by the rapid in vitro dissolution in compendial pH 6.8 phosphate buffer commonly used for assessment of these products. A more representative and physiological medium, pH 6.8 mHanks bicarbonate buffer, was used in this study to evaluate the in vitro dissolution of enteric coated multiparticulate-based PPI products. Commercially available omeprazole, lansoprazole and esomeprazole products were subject to dissolution tests using USP-II apparatus in pH 4.5 phosphate buffer saline for 45 min (acid stage) followed by pH 6.8 phosphate buffer or pH 6.8 mHanks bicarbonate buffer. In pH 6.8 phosphate buffer, all nine tested products displayed rapid and comparable dissolution profiles meeting the pharmacopeia requirements for delayed release preparations. In pH 6.8 mHanks buffer, drug release was delayed and failed the pharmacopeia requirements from most enteric coated preparations. Despite that the same enteric polymer, methacrylic acid-ethyl acrylate copolymer (1:1), was applied to all commercial multiparticulate-based products, marked differences were observed between dissolution profiles of these preparations. The use of pH 6.8 physiological bicarbonate (mHanks) buffer can serve as a useful tool to provide realistic and discriminative in vitro release assessment of enteric coated PPI preparations and to assist rational formulation development of these products.

  7. Non-prescription proton-pump inhibitors for self-treating frequent heartburn:the role of the Canadian pharmacist.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, David; Nakhla, Nardine

    2016-01-01

    Heartburn and acid regurgitation are the cardinal symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux and occur commonly in the Canadian population. Multiple non-prescription treatment options are available for managing these symptoms, including antacids, alginates, histamine-H2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs), and proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs). As a result, pharmacists are ideally positioned to recommend appropriate treatment options based upon an individual's needs and presenting symptoms, prior treatment response, comorbid medical conditions, and other relevant factors. Individuals who experience mild heartburn and/or have symptoms that occur predictably in response to known precipitating factors can manage their symptoms by avoiding known triggers and using on-demand antacids and/or alginates or lower-dose non-prescription H2RAs (e.g. ranitidine 150 mg). For those with moderate symptoms, lifestyle changes, in conjunction with higher-dose non-prescription H2RAs, may be effective. However, for individuals with moderate-to-severe symptoms that occur frequently (i.e. ≥2 days/week), the non-prescription (Schedule II) PPI omeprazole 20 mg should be considered. The pharmacist can provide important support by inquiring about the frequency and severity of symptoms, identifying an appropriate treatment option, and recognizing other potential causes of symptoms, as well as alarm features and atypical symptoms that would necessitate referral to a physician. After recommending an appropriate treatment, the pharmacist can provide instructions for its correct use. Additionally, the pharmacist should inquire about recurrences, respond to questions about adverse events, provide monitoring parameters, and counsel on when referral to a physician is warranted. Pharmacists are an essential resource for individuals experiencing heartburn; they play a crucial role in helping individuals make informed self-care decisions and educating them to ensure that therapy is used in an optimal, safe, and

  8. Acute Coronary Syndromes, Gastrointestinal Protection, and Recommendations Regarding Concomitant Administration of Proton-Pump Inhibitors (Omeprazol/Esomeprazole) and Clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Iñigo; Sanchez-Insa, Esther; de Leiras, Sergio Rodríguez; Carrillo, Pilar; Ruiz-Quevedo, Valeriano; Pinar, Eduardo; Gopar-Gopar, Silvia; Bayon, Jeremías; Mañas, Pilar; Lasa, Garikoitz; CruzGonzalez, Ignacio; Hernandez, Felipe; Fernandez-Portales, Javier; Fernandez-Fernandez, Javier; Pérez-Serradilla, Ana; de la Torre Hernandez, José M; Gomez-Jaume, Alfredo

    2016-02-01

    The Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency sent a warning in 2010 discouraging the concomitant use of clopidogrel with omeprazole or esomeprazole. The purpose is to know the gastroprotective approach in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and the level of follow-up of the alert. In 17 hospitals with catheterization laboratory in Spain, 1 per region, we studied 25 consecutive patients per hospital whose diagnosis of discharge since October 1, 2013, had been any type of ACS. We analyzed their baseline clinical profile, the gatroprotective agents at admission and discharge and the antiplatelet therapy at discharge. The number of patients included was 425: age 67.2 ± 12.5 years, women 29.8%, diabetes 36.5%. The patients presented unstable angina in 21.6%, non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction in 35.3% and ST-elevation myocardial infarction in 43.1%. Conservative approach was chosen in 17.9%, bare-metal stents 32.2%, ≥ 1 drug-eluting stent 48.5%, and surgery 1.4%. Aspirin was indicated in 1.9%, aspirin + clopidogrel 73.6%, aspirin + prasugrel 17.6%, and aspririn + ticagrelor 6.8%. Gastroprotective agents were present in 40.2% patients at admission and this percentage increased to 93.7% at discharge. Of the 313 (73.6%) on clopidogrel in 96 (30.6%) was combined with omeprazole and 3 (0.95%) with esomeprazole, whereas the most commonly used was pantoprazole with 190 patients (44.7%). In conclusion, almost the totality of the patients with an ACS receive gastroprotective agents at the moment of discharge, most of them with proton-pump inhibitors. In one every 3 cases of the patients who are on clopidogrel, the recommendation of the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency is not followed.

  9. Potential Mechanisms of Hematological Adverse Drug Reactions in Patients Receiving Clozapine in Combination With Proton Pump Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wiciński, Michał; Węclewicz, Mateusz M; Miętkiewicz, Mateusz; Malinowski, Bartosz; Grześk, Elżbieta; Klonowska, Joanna

    2017-03-01

    Clozapine is a second-generation antipsychotic which has proven efficacy in treating the symptoms of schizophrenia. Although clozapine therapy is associated with a number of adverse drug reactions, it is frequently used. One of the most common adverse drug reactions is gastroesophageal reflux disease which is an indication for treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Coadministration of clozapine and PPIs increases the risk of hematological adverse drug reactions, including neutropenia and agranulocytosis. The mechanism in idiosyncratic agranulocytosis is not dose related and involves either a direct toxic or an immune-allergic effect. It is suspected that the clozapine metabolites nitrenium ion and N-desmethylclozapine may cause apoptosis or impair growth of granulocytes. Formation of N-desmethylclozapine is correlated with activity of the cytochrome P450 enzymes 1A2 and 3A4 (CYP1A2 and CYP3A4). Nitrenium ion is produced by the flavin-containing monooxygenase system of leukocytes. A drug interaction between clozapine and a PPI is a consequence of the induction of common metabolic pathways either by the PPI or clozapine. Findings to date suggest that indirect induction of flavin-containing monooxygenase by omeprazole through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor increases the expression of the enzyme mRNA and in the long term may cause the increase in activity. Moreover, induction of CYP1A2, especially by omeprazole and lansoprazole, may increase the serum concentration of N-desmethylclozapine, which can accumulate in lymphocytes and may achieve toxic levels. Another hypothesis that may explain hematological adverse drug reactions is competitive inhibition of CYP2C19, which may contribute to increased serum concentrations of toxic metabolites.

  10. Novel application of proton pump inhibitor for the prevention of colitis-induced colorectal carcinogenesis beyond acid suppression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Jae; Lee, Jeong Sang; Hong, Kyung Sook; Chung, Jun Won; Kim, Ju Hyun; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2010-08-01

    Colitis-associated cancers arise in the setting of chronic inflammation wherein an "inflammation-dysplasia-carcinoma" sequence prevails. Based on our previous findings in which the proton pump inhibitor could impose significant levels of anti-inflammatory, antiangiogenic, and selective apoptosis induction beyond gastric acid suppression, we investigated whether omeprazole could prevent the development of colitis-associated cancer in a mouse model induced by repeated bouts of colitis. Omeprazole, 10 mg/kg, was given i.p. all through the experimental periods for colitis-associated carcinogenesis. Molecular changes regarding inflammation and carcinogenesis were compared between control groups and colitis-associated cancer groups treated with omeprazole in addition to chemopreventive outcome. Nine of 12 (75.0%) mice in the control group developed multiple colorectal tumors, whereas tumors were noted in only 3 of 12 (25.0%) mice treated with daily injections of omeprazole. The cancer-preventive results of omeprazole treatment was based on significant decreases in the levels of nitric oxide, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance, and interleukin-6 accompanied with attenuated expressions of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and cyclooxygenase-2. The expressions of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, MMP-11, and MT1-MMMP were significantly decreased in mice treated with omeprazole in accordance with significant decreases in the number of beta-catenin-accumulated crypts. A significant induction of apoptosis was observed in tumor tissue treated with omeprazole. Omeprazole could block the trophic effect of gastrin in colon epithelial cells. The significant anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and antimutagenic activities of omeprazole played a cancer-preventive role against colitis-induced carcinogenesis, and our novel in vivo evidence is suggestive of chemopreventive action independent of gastric acid suppression.

  11. The principles of infrared-x-ray pump-probe spectroscopy. Applications on proton transfer in core-ionized water dimers.

    PubMed

    Felicíssimo, V C; Guimarães, F F; Gel'mukhanov, F; Cesar, A; Agren, H

    2005-03-01

    In this paper we derive the basic physics underlying infrared-x-ray pump-probe spectroscopy (IR, infrared). Particular features of the spectroscopy are highlighted and discussed, such as dependence on phase of the infrared pulse, duration and delay time of the x-ray pulse, and molecular orientation. Numerical applications are carried out for the water dimer using wave packet techniques. It is shown that core ionization of the donor oxygen of the water dimer results in a drastic change of the potential with the global minimum placed in the proton transfer region. The results of the modeling indicate that IR-x-ray pump-probe spectroscopy can be used to study the dynamics of proton transfer in this core-ionized state, and that, contrary to conventional core level photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray core-ionization driven by an IR field is a proper method to explore the proton transfer in a system like the water dimer. We observe that the trajectory of the nuclear wave packet in the ground state potential well is strongly affected by the absolute phase of the IR pulse.

  12. Linking Chemical Electron–Proton Transfer to Proton Pumping in Cytochrome c Oxidase: Broken-Symmetry DFT Exploration of Intermediates along the Catalytic Reaction Pathway of the Iron–Copper Dinuclear Complex

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    After a summary of the problem of coupling electron and proton transfer to proton pumping in cytochrome c oxidase, we present the results of our earlier and recent density functional theory calculations for the dinuclear Fe-a3–CuB reaction center in this enzyme. A specific catalytic reaction wheel diagram is constructed from the calculations, based on the structures and relative energies of the intermediate states of the reaction cycle. A larger family of tautomers/protonation states is generated compared to our earlier work, and a new lowest-energy pathway is proposed. The entire reaction cycle is calculated for the new smaller model (about 185–190 atoms), and two selected arcs of the wheel are chosen for calculations using a larger model (about 205 atoms). We compare the structural and redox energetics and protonation calculations with available experimental data. The reaction cycle map that we have built is positioned for further improvement and testing against experiment. PMID:24960612

  13. A PCR blood test outperforms chromogranin A in carcinoid detection and is unaffected by proton pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Modlin, Irvin M; Aslanian, Harry; Bodei, Lisa; Drozdov, Ignat; Kidd, Mark

    2014-12-01

    A critical requirement in neuroendocrine tumor (NET) management is a blood biomarker test that is sensitive, specific and reproducible. We evaluated a PCR-based 51-transcript signature to detect tumors, compared it with chromogranin A (CgA) and examined the confounding effect of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which cause falsely elevated CgA levels. The multigene signature was evaluated in two groups. Group 1: 125 prospectively collected NETs: gastroenteropancreatic NETs (n=91, including 42 pancreatic and 40 small intestinal), carcinoids of unknown primary (n=18) and other sites (n=16). Group 2: prospectively collected non-NET patients receiving PPIs (>1 month; dyspepsia, n=19; GERD, n=6; and pancreatitis, n=4) and 50 controls. All samples were analyzed by PCR (marker genes) and ELISA (DAKO-CgA). Sensitivity comparisons included χ(2), non-parametric measurements, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Group 1: 123 NETs were PCR-positive (98.4%) compared with 50 (40%) CgA-positive (χ(2)=97.3, P<10(-26)). Significant differences (P<0.001) were noted between pancreas: PCR 95% vs CgA 29.2% (P<10(-9)) and small intestine: 100 vs 58% (P<10(-4)). The multigene test was elevated in all grades (G1-G3), in both local and disseminated disease, and was not normalized by somatostatin analog therapy. It was also elevated in 97% of CgA normal NETs. Group 2: PPI administration increased CgA in 83% and CgA was elevated in 26% of controls. PCR values were not elevated in either group. PCR performance metrics were as follows: sensitivity 98.4%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100%, negative predictive value 97.8%, and the ROC-derived area under the curve (AUC) was 0.997. These were significantly better than CgA (all metrics <60%; AUC, 0.54; Z-statistic, 10.44, P<0.0001). A 51-panel multigene blood transcript analysis is significantly more sensitive than plasma CgA for NET detection and is unaffected by acid suppression therapy.

  14. Doubly charged trimeric cluster ions: effective in mutual chiral recognition of tadalafil and three proton pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Chai, Yunfeng; Zhu, Wenquan; Pan, Yuanjiang; Sun, Cuirong; Zeng, Su

    2017-02-27

    Mutual chiral recognition of four stereoisomers of tadalafil and three pairs of enantiomers of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) including pantoprazole, lansoprazole, and omeprazole, as well as quantitative analysis of enantiomeric excess is achieved on the basis of the competitive fragmentation of doubly charged trimeric Ni(II) cluster ions. Compared with a singly charged trimeric cluster ion, a doubly charged trimeric cluster ion was proved efficient in the recognition of chiral drugs with one or multiple chiral centers, due to its rich fragmentation ions. Upon collision-induced dissociation (CID), the cluster ion [Ni(II)(PPIs)(tadalafil)2](2+) yielded two diagnostic ions [tadalafil + H](+) and [tadalafil - benzo[d][1,3]dixoloe](+) through electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The abundance ratio of the two fragment ions relied mainly on the configuration of PPIs and tadalafil, and therefore the chiral selectivity (Rchiral) of one enantiomer relative to the others is different. The chiral recognition of all four stereoisomers of tadalafil was achieved by using S configuration PPIs as references, and S-omeprazole showed the best selectivity. The Rchiral values for R,R/S,S, R,S/S,R, R,R/R,S and R,R/S,R-tadalafils were 1.47, 1.17, 2.37, and 2.10, respectively. In a reciprocal process, the Rchiral was 1.36 and 1.31 for R/S-pantoprazole and R/S-lansoprazole, respectively, by using R,R-tadalafil as a reference. Although omeprazole is a racemic drug, it can also be discriminated with S-omeprazole. Calibration curves were constructed with favorable correlation coefficients (r(2) > 0.991) by relating the ln(Rchiral) values to the isomeric composition in a mixture. The sensitivity of the methodology allows mixtures to be analyzed for the enantiomeric excess (ee) by recording the ratios of fragment ion abundances in a mass spectrum. The sensitivity of the methodology allowed the determination of enantiomeric impurities of 5% molar composition in

  15. Are proton pump inhibitors associated with the development of community-acquired pneumonia? A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Giuliano, Christopher; Wilhelm, Sheila M; Kale-Pradhan, Pramodini B

    2012-05-01

    This study was presented at the American College of Chest Physicians meeting in Pittsburgh (PA, USA) in October 2011. The study objective was to evaluate the association of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The design was a meta-analysis of nine case-controlled and cohort studies. 120,863 pneumonia cases from 1987 to 2006 were included in the meta-analysis. PubMed and Ovid Medline were searched from inception through May 2011 by two investigators independently using keywords: PPI, pneumonia, CAP, anti-ulcer, antacid, omeprazole, esomeprazole, lansoprazole, pantoprazole and rabeprazole. This meta-analysis only included case-controlled and cohort studies that were published in full in English and evaluated PPI use and CAP incidence. Studies were excluded if they included the following patients: pediatric, Helicobacter pylori treatment and critically ill. Bibliographies of recent review articles and systematic reviews were hand-searched. Quality of studies was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale. Two investigators independently extracted data into standardized data collection forms that were confirmed by a third investigator. Data were analyzed based on current use of PPIs, duration of PPI use (<30 days or >180 days) and PPI dose (high vs low). Overall association of PPI and CAP was analyzed using the random effects model (Comprehensive Meta analysis(®) Version 2.0). Nine studies met all criteria for the primary outcome. Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale scores ranged from 4 to 8 out of 9. Current use of PPIs (odds ratio [OR]: 1.39; 95% CI: 1.09-1.76), PPI use <30 days (OR: 1.65; 95% CI: 1.25-2.19), PPI high dose (OR: 1.50; 95% CI: 1.33-1.68) and PPI low dose (OR: 1.17; 95% CI: 1.11-1.24) were significantly associated with CAP. There was no association between CAP and PPI use >180 days (OR: 1.10; 95% CI: 1.00-1.21). In conclusion, patients currently receiving PPIs, particularly <30 days or high dose

  16. Use of proton pump inhibitors and risk of hip/femur fracture: a population-based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Pouwels, S.; Lalmohamed, A.; Souverein, P.; Cooper, C.; Veldt, B. J.; Leufkens, H. G.; de Boer, A.; van Staa, T.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Previous studies evaluated the association between proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use and subsequent fracture risk, but they showed ambiguous results. Therefore, the objective was to evaluate this association in a different study population. Our findings show that there is probably no causal relationship between PPI use and hip fracture risk. Introduction Previous studies evaluated the association between PPI use and subsequent fracture risk, but they showed ambiguous results. To further test these conflicting results, the objective of this study was to evaluate the association between the use of PPIs and the risk of hip/femur fracture in a different study population. Methods A case-control study was conducted using data from the Dutch PHARMO record linkage system. The study population included 6,763 cases aged 18 years and older with a first hip/femur fracture during enrolment and 26,341 age-, gender- and region-matched controls. Results Current users of PPIs had an increased risk of hip/femur fracture yielding an adjusted odds ratio (AOR) of 1.20 (95% CI 1.04–1.40). Fracture risk attenuated with increasing durations of use, resulting in AORs of 1.26 (95% CI 0.94–1.68) in the first 3 months, 1.31 (95% CI 0.97–1.75) between 3 and 12 months, 1.18 (95% CI 0.92–1.52) between 13 and 36 months and 1.09 (95% CI 0.81–1.47) for use longer than 36 months. Conclusion Our findings show that there is probably no causal relationship between PPI use and hip fracture risk. The observed association may be the result of unmeasured distortions: although current use of PPIs was associated with a 1.2-fold increased risk of hip/femur fracture, the positive association was attenuated with longer durations of continuous use. Our findings do not support that discontinuation of PPIs decreases risk of hip fracture in elderly patients. PMID:20585937

  17. The caa(3) terminal oxidase of Rhodothermus marinus lacking the key glutamate of the D-channel is a proton pump.

    PubMed

    Pereira, M M; Verkhovskaya, M L; Teixeira, M; Verkhovsky, M I

    2000-05-30

    The thermohalophilic bacterium Rhodothermus marinus expresses a caa(3)-type dioxygen reductase as one of its terminal oxidases. The subunit I amino acid sequence shows the presence of all the essential residues of the D- and K-proton channels, defined in most heme-copper oxidases, with the exception of the key glutamate residue located in the middle of the membrane dielectric (E278 in Paracoccus denitrificans). On the basis of homology modeling studies, a tyrosine residue (Y256, R. marinus numbering) has been proposed to act as a functional substitute [Pereira, M. M., Santana, M., Soares, C. M., Mendes, J., Carita, J. N., Fernandes, A. S., Saraste, M., Carrondo, M. A., and Teixeira, M. (1999) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1413, 1-13]. Here, R. marinus caa(3) oxidase was reconstituted in liposomes and shown to operate as a proton pump, translocating protons from the cytoplasmic side of the bacterial inner membrane to the periplasmatic space with a stoichiometry of 1H(+)/e(-), as in the case in heme-copper oxidases that contain the glutamate residue. Possible mechanisms of proton transfer in the D-channel with the participation of the tyrosine residue are discussed. The observation that the tyrosine residue is conserved in several other members of the heme-copper oxidase superfamily suggests a common alternative mode of action for the D-channel.

  18. The location of NuoL and NuoM subunits in the membrane domain of the Escherichia coli complex I: implications for the mechanism of proton pumping.

    PubMed

    Holt, Peter J; Morgan, David J; Sazanov, Leonid A

    2003-10-31

    The molecular organization of bacterial NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I or NDH-1) is not established, apart from a rough separation into dehydrogenase, connecting and membrane domains. In this work, complex I was purified from Escherichia coli and fragmented by replacing dodecylmaltoside with other detergents. Exchange into decyl maltoside led to the removal of the hydrophobic subunit NuoL from the otherwise intact complex. Diheptanoyl phosphocholine led to the loss of NuoL and NuoM subunits, whereas other subunits remained in the complex. The presence of N,N-dimethyldodecylamine N-oxide or Triton X-100 led to further disruption of the membrane domain into fragments containing NuoL/M/N, NuoA/K/N, and NuoH/J subunits. Among the hydrophilic subunits, NuoCD was most readily dissociated from the complex, whereas NuoB was partially dissociated from the peripheral arm assembly in N,N-dimethyldodecylamine N-oxide. A model of subunit arrangement in bacterial complex I based on these data is proposed. Subunits NuoL and NuoM, which are homologous to antiporters and are implicated in proton pumping, are located at the distal end of the membrane arm, spatially separated from the redox centers of the peripheral arm. This is consistent with proposals that the mechanism of proton pumping by complex I is likely to involve long range conformational changes.

  19. Electrical potential oscillations--movement relations in circumnutating sunflower stem and effect of ion channel and proton pump inhibitors on circumnutation.

    PubMed

    Kurenda, Andrzej; Stolarz, Maria; Zdunek, Artur

    2015-02-01

    The physiological control and molecular mechanism of circumnutation (CN) has not yet been fully understood. To gain information on the CN mechanism, the relationship between the changes of electrical potential and movement in the circumnutating sunflower stem and effect of ion channels and proton pump inhibitors on CN parameters were evaluated. Long-term electrophysiological measurements and injection of solutions of ion channel inhibitors (ICI) into sunflower stem with the simultaneous time-lapse recording of the movement were made. The oscillations of electrical potential (OEP) - movement relations - consist of cells depolarization on the deflected side of the stem and, at this same time, cells hyperpolarization on the opposite side of the stem. The delay of organ movement in relation to electrical changes of approximately 28 min (22% of the period) may indicate that the ionic fluxes causing the OEP are the primary phenomenon. The biggest decrease of CN period was observed after injection of proton pump (approximately 26%) and cation channel (approximately 25%) inhibitors, while length and amplitude were reduced mainly by calcium channel inhibitors (approximately 67%). Existence of OEP only in circumnutating part of sunflower stem and reduction of CN parameters and OEP amplitude after application of ICI prove that the CN cellular mechanism is associated with transmembrane ion transport.

  20. Effect of electrical stimulation of the lower esophageal sphincter in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients refractory to proton pump inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Soffer, Edy; Rodríguez, Leonardo; Rodriguez, Patricia; Gómez, Beatriz; Neto, Manoel G; Crowell, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of lower esophageal sphincter (LES)-electrical stimulation therapy (EST) in a subgroup of patients that reported only partial response to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) therapy, compared to a group of patient with complete response. METHODS: Bipolar stitch electrodes were laparoscopically placed in the LES and connected to an implantable pulse generator (EndoStim BV, the Hague, the Netherlands), placed subcutaneously in the anterior abdominal wall. Stimulation at 20 Hz, 215 μsec, 3-8 mAmp in 30 min sessions was delivered starting on day 1 post-implant. Patients were evaluated using gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)-HRQL, symptom diaries; esophageal pH and esophageal manometry before and up to 24 mo after therapy and results were compared between partial and complete responders. RESULTS: Twenty-three patients with GERD on LES-EST were enrolled and received continuous per-protocol stimulation through 12 mo and 21 patients completed 24 mo of therapy. Of the 23 patients, 16 (8 male, mean age 52.1 ± 12 years) had incomplete response to PPIs prior to LES-EST, while 7 patients (5 male, mean age 52.7 ± 4.7) had complete response to PPIs. In the sub-group with incomplete response to PPIs, median (IQR) composite GERD-HRQL score improved significantly from 9.5 (9.0-10.0) at baseline on-PPI and 24.0 (20.8-26.3) at baseline off-PPI to 2.5 (0.0-4.0) at 12-mo and 0.0 (0.0-2.5) at 24-mo follow-up (P < 0.05 compared to on-and off-PPI at baseline). Median (IQR) % 24-h esophageal pH < 4.0 at baseline in this sub-group improved significantly from 9.8% (7.8-11.5) at baseline to 3.0% (1.9-6.3) at 12 mo (P < 0.001) and 4.6% (2.0-5.8) at 24 mo follow-up (P < 0.01). At their 24-mo follow-up, 9/11 patients in this sub-group were completely free of PPI use. These results were comparable to the sub-group that reported complete response to PPI therapy at baseline. No unanticipated implantation or stimulation-related adverse events, or any untoward sensation

  1. Excitation energies of a water-bridged twisted retinal structure in the bacteriorhodopsin proton pump: a theoretical investigation.

    PubMed

    Wolter, Tino; Welke, Kai; Phatak, Prasad; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta; Elstner, Marcus

    2013-08-14

    The first proton transfer in the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle takes place during the L → M transition. Structural details of the pre proton transfer L intermediate have been investigated using experiments and computations. Here, we assess L-state structural models by performing hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical molecular dynamics and excitation energy calculations. The computations suggest that a water-bridged twisted retinal structure gives the closest agreement with the experimental L/bR shift in the excitation energy.

  2. Intracellular localisation of PPI1 (proton pump interactor, isoform 1), a regulatory protein of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Bonza, M C; Fusca, T; Homann, U; Thiel, G; De Michelis, M I

    2009-11-01

    PPI1 (proton pump interactor isoform 1) is a novel protein able to interact with the C-terminal autoinhibitory domain of the Arabidopsis thaliana plasma membrane (PM) H(+)-ATPase. In vitro, PPI1 binds the PM H(+)-ATPase in a site different from the known 14-3-3 binding site and stimulates its activity. In this study, we analysed the intracellular localisation of PPI1. The intracellular distribution was monitored in A. thaliana cultured cells by immunolocalisation using an antiserum against the PPI1 N-terminus and in Vicia faba guard cells and epidermal cells by transient expression of a GFP::PPI1 fusion. The results indicate that the bulk of PPI1 is localised at the endoplasmic reticulum, from which it might be recruited to the PM for interaction with the H(+)-ATPase in response to as yet unidentified signals.

  3. Analogies between respiration and a light-driven proton pump as sources of energy for active glutamate transport in Halobacterium halobium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belliveau, J. W.; Lanyi, J. K.

    1977-01-01

    Halobacterium halobium is known to contain sheets of bacteriorhodopsin, a pigment which upon exposure to light undergoes cyclic protonation and deprotonation, resulting in net H(+) translocation. In this paper, experiments were conducted to test H. halobium cell envelope vesicles for respiration-induced glutamate uptake. It is shown that glutamate transport in H. halobium cell envelope vesicles can occur as a result of respiration, as well as light acting on bacteriorhodopsin. Glutamate transport can be energized by the oxidation of dimethyl phenylenediamine, and the properties of the transport system are entirely analogous to those observed with illumination as the source of energy. In the case of respiration-dependent glutamate transport, the transportation is also driven by a Na(+) gradient, thereby confirming the existence of a single glutamate transport system independent of the source of energy. The analogy observed is indirect evidence that the cytochrome oxidase of H. halobium functions as a H(+) pump.

  4. Arabidopsis Type I Proton-Pumping Pyrophosphatase Expresses Strongly in Phloem, Where It Is Required for Pyrophosphate Metabolism and Photosynthate Partitioning1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Pizzio, Gaston A.; Paez-Valencia, Julio; Khadilkar, Aswad S.; Regmi, Kamesh; Patron-Soberano, Araceli; Zhang, Shangji; Sanchez-Lares, Jonathan; Furstenau, Tara; Li, Jisheng; Sanchez-Gomez, Concepcion; Valencia-Mayoral, Pedro; Yadav, Umesh P.; Ayre, Brian G.; Gaxiola, Roberto A.

    2015-01-01

    Phloem loading is a critical process in plant physiology. The potential of regulating the translocation of photoassimilates from source to sink tissues represents an opportunity to increase crop yield. Pyrophosphate homeostasis is crucial for normal phloem function in apoplasmic loaders. The involvement of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) type I proton-pumping pyrophosphatase (AVP1) in phloem loading was analyzed at genetic, histochemical, and physiological levels. A transcriptional AVP1 promoter::GUS fusion revealed phloem activity in source leaves. Ubiquitous AVP1 overexpression (35S::AVP1 cassette) enhanced shoot biomass, photoassimilate production and transport, rhizosphere acidification, and expression of sugar-induced root ion transporter genes (POTASSIUM TRANSPORTER2 [KUP2], NITRATE TRANSPORTER2.1 [NRT2.1], NRT2.4, and PHOSPHATE TRANSPORTER1.4 [PHT1.4]). Phloem-specific AVP1 overexpression (Commelina Yellow Mottle Virus promoter [pCOYMV]::AVP1) elicited similar phenotypes. By contrast, phloem-specific AVP1 knockdown (pCoYMV::RNAiAVP1) resulted in stunted seedlings in sucrose-deprived medium. We also present a promoter mutant avp1-2 (SALK046492) with a 70% reduction of expression that did not show severe growth impairment. Interestingly, AVP1 protein in this mutant is prominent in the phloem. Moreover, expression of an Escherichia coli-soluble pyrophosphatase in the phloem (pCoYMV::pyrophosphatase) of avp1-2 plants resulted in severe dwarf phenotype and abnormal leaf morphology. We conclude that the Proton-Pumping Pyrophosphatase AVP1 localized at the plasma membrane of the sieve element-companion cell complexes functions as a synthase, and that this activity is critical for the maintenance of pyrophosphate homeostasis required for phloem function. PMID:25681328

  5. Arabidopsis type I proton-pumping pyrophosphatase expresses strongly in phloem, where it is required for pyrophosphate metabolism and photosynthate partitioning.

    PubMed

    Pizzio, Gaston A; Paez-Valencia, Julio; Khadilkar, Aswad S; Regmi, Kamesh; Patron-Soberano, Araceli; Zhang, Shangji; Sanchez-Lares, Jonathan; Furstenau, Tara; Li, Jisheng; Sanchez-Gomez, Concepcion; Valencia-Mayoral, Pedro; Yadav, Umesh P; Ayre, Brian G; Gaxiola, Roberto A

    2015-04-01

    Phloem loading is a critical process in plant physiology. The potential of regulating the translocation of photoassimilates from source to sink tissues represents an opportunity to increase crop yield. Pyrophosphate homeostasis is crucial for normal phloem function in apoplasmic loaders. The involvement of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) type I proton-pumping pyrophosphatase (AVP1) in phloem loading was analyzed at genetic, histochemical, and physiological levels. A transcriptional AVP1 promoter::GUS fusion revealed phloem activity in source leaves. Ubiquitous AVP1 overexpression (35S::AVP1 cassette) enhanced shoot biomass, photoassimilate production and transport, rhizosphere acidification, and expression of sugar-induced root ion transporter genes (POTASSIUM TRANSPORTER2 [KUP2], NITRATE TRANSPORTER2.1 [NRT2.1], NRT2.4, and PHOSPHATE TRANSPORTER1.4 [PHT1.4]). Phloem-specific AVP1 overexpression (Commelina Yellow Mottle Virus promoter [pCOYMV]::AVP1) elicited similar phenotypes. By contrast, phloem-specific AVP1 knockdown (pCoYMV::RNAiAVP1) resulted in stunted seedlings in sucrose-deprived medium. We also present a promoter mutant avp1-2 (SALK046492) with a 70% reduction of expression that did not show severe growth impairment. Interestingly, AVP1 protein in this mutant is prominent in the phloem. Moreover, expression of an Escherichia coli-soluble pyrophosphatase in the phloem (pCoYMV::pyrophosphatase) of avp1-2 plants resulted in severe dwarf phenotype and abnormal leaf morphology. We conclude that the Proton-Pumping Pyrophosphatase AVP1 localized at the plasma membrane of the sieve element-companion cell complexes functions as a synthase, and that this activity is critical for the maintenance of pyrophosphate homeostasis required for phloem function.

  6. Constitutive and Companion Cell-Specific Overexpression of AVP1, Encoding a Proton-Pumping Pyrophosphatase, Enhances Biomass Accumulation, Phloem Loading, and Long-Distance Transport.

    PubMed

    Khadilkar, Aswad S; Yadav, Umesh P; Salazar, Carolina; Shulaev, Vladimir; Paez-Valencia, Julio; Pizzio, Gaston A; Gaxiola, Roberto A; Ayre, Brian G

    2016-01-01

    Plant productivity is determined in large part by the partitioning of assimilates between the sites of production and the sites of utilization. Proton-pumping pyrophosphatases (H(+)-PPases) are shown to participate in many energetic plant processes, including general growth and biomass accumulation, CO2 fixation, nutrient acquisition, and stress responses. H(+)-PPases have a well-documented role in hydrolyzing pyrophosphate (PPi) and capturing the released energy to pump H(+) across the tonoplast and endomembranes to create proton motive force (pmf). Recently, an additional role for H(+)-PPases in phloem loading and biomass partitioning was proposed. In companion cells (CCs) of the phloem, H(+)-PPases localize to the plasma membrane rather than endomembranes, and rather than hydrolyzing PPi to create pmf, pmf is utilized to synthesize PPi. Additional PPi in the CCs promotes sucrose oxidation and ATP synthesis, which the plasma membrane P-type ATPase in turn uses to create more pmf for phloem loading of sucrose via sucrose-H(+) symporters. To test this model, transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants were generated with constitutive and CC-specific overexpression of AVP1, encoding type 1 ARABIDOPSIS VACUOLAR PYROPHOSPHATASE1. Plants with both constitutive and CC-specific overexpression accumulated more biomass in shoot and root systems. (14)C-labeling experiments showed enhanced photosynthesis, phloem loading, phloem transport, and delivery to sink organs. The results obtained with constitutive and CC-specific promoters were very similar, such that the growth enhancement mediated by AVP1 overexpression can be attributed to its role in phloem CCs. This supports the model for H(+)-PPases functioning as PPi synthases in the phloem by arguing that the increases in biomass observed with AVP1 overexpression stem from improved phloem loading and transport.

  7. Interferon-inducer polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid: a potent anti-gastric ulcer agent and inhibitor of the gastric proton pump in rats.

    PubMed

    Nath, C; Rastogi, L; Dikshit, M; Patnaik, G K; Saxena, R C; Gupta, M B

    1998-01-01

    1. Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (Poly I:Poly C), an interferon inducer was studied for its effect on gastric ulceration in rats. Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (1, 2 and 4 mg/kg, i.m.) showed a dose-dependent inhibition of gastric ulcers induced by aspirin, cold restraint stress and pylorus ligation (Shay's model). Protective dose (PD50) +/- SEM values of Poly I:Poly C on these models of ulcers were 1.9 +/- 0.2, 2.3 +/- 0.4 and 2.8 +/- 0.4 (mg/kg, i.m.) respectively. 2. Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (10-60 micrograms) produced dose-dependent inhibition of gastric proton pump (H+/K(+)-ATPase) activity in the gastric parietal microsomal fraction. The concentration of Poly I:Poly C causing a 50% inhibition (IC50) +/- SEM was found to be 17.6 +/- 1.2 micrograms. 3. Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid caused a significant decrease in free and total acid and pepsin and an increase in mucin content in Shay (pylorus-ligated) rat. 4. Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid did not exert a significant influence on isolated tissue preparations for anti-cholinergic (acetylcholine-induced contraction of guinea-pig ileum) and H2-anti-histaminic (histamine-induced contraction of rat uterus and guinea-pig auricle) activities. 5. Thus, the present study indicates that Poly I:Poly C may possess anti-gastric ulcer activity as a result of inhibition of the gastric proton pump.

  8. Acidic digestion in a teleost: postprandial and circadian pattern of gastric pH, pepsin activity, and pepsinogen and proton pump mRNAs expression.

    PubMed

    Yúfera, Manuel; Moyano, Francisco J; Astola, Antonio; Pousão-Ferreira, Pedro; Martínez-Rodríguez, Gonzalo

    2012-01-01

    Two different modes for regulation of stomach acid secretion have been described in vertebrates. Some species exhibit a continuous acid secretion maintaining a low gastric pH during fasting. Others, as some teleosts, maintain a neutral gastric pH during fasting while the hydrochloric acid is released only after the ingestion of a meal. Those different patterns seem to be closely related to specific feeding habits. However, our recent observations suggest that this acidification pattern could be modified by changes in daily feeding frequency and time schedule. The aim of this study was to advance in understanding the regulation mechanisms of stomach digestion and pattern of acid secretion in teleost fish. We have examined the postprandial pattern of gastric pH, pepsin activity, and mRNA expression for pepsinogen and proton pump in white seabream juveniles maintained under a light/dark 12/12 hours cycle and receiving only one morning meal. The pepsin activity was analyzed according to the standard protocol buffering at pH 2 and using the actual pH measured in the stomach. The results show how the enzyme precursor is permanently available while the hydrochloric acid, which activates the zymogen fraction, is secreted just after the ingestion of food. Results also reveal that analytical protocol at pH 2 notably overestimates true pepsin activity in fish stomach. The expression of the mRNA encoding pepsinogen and proton pump exhibited almost parallel patterns, with notable increases during the darkness period and sharp decreases just before the morning meal. These results indicate that white seabream uses the resting hours for recovering the mRNA stock that will be quickly used during the feeding process. Our data clearly shows that both daily illumination pattern and feeding time are involved at different level in the regulation of the secretion of digestive juices.

  9. Constitutive and Companion Cell-Specific Overexpression of AVP1, Encoding a Proton-Pumping Pyrophosphatase, Enhances Biomass Accumulation, Phloem Loading, and Long-Distance Transport1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Shulaev, Vladimir; Paez-Valencia, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Plant productivity is determined in large part by the partitioning of assimilates between the sites of production and the sites of utilization. Proton-pumping pyrophosphatases (H+-PPases) are shown to participate in many energetic plant processes, including general growth and biomass accumulation, CO2 fixation, nutrient acquisition, and stress responses. H+-PPases have a well-documented role in hydrolyzing pyrophosphate (PPi) and capturing the released energy to pump H+ across the tonoplast and endomembranes to create proton motive force (pmf). Recently, an additional role for H+-PPases in phloem loading and biomass partitioning was proposed. In companion cells (CCs) of the phloem, H+-PPases localize to the plasma membrane rather than endomembranes, and rather than hydrolyzing PPi to create pmf, pmf is utilized to synthesize PPi. Additional PPi in the CCs promotes sucrose oxidation and ATP synthesis, which the plasma membrane P-type ATPase in turn uses to create more pmf for phloem loading of sucrose via sucrose-H+ symporters. To test this model, transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants were generated with constitutive and CC-specific overexpression of AVP1, encoding type 1 ARABIDOPSIS VACUOLAR PYROPHOSPHATASE1. Plants with both constitutive and CC-specific overexpression accumulated more biomass in shoot and root systems. 14C-labeling experiments showed enhanced photosynthesis, phloem loading, phloem transport, and delivery to sink organs. The results obtained with constitutive and CC-specific promoters were very similar, such that the growth enhancement mediated by AVP1 overexpression can be attributed to its role in phloem CCs. This supports the model for H+-PPases functioning as PPi synthases in the phloem by arguing that the increases in biomass observed with AVP1 overexpression stem from improved phloem loading and transport. PMID:26530315

  10. Quantitation of glandular gastric changes in rats given a proton pump inhibitor for 3 months with emphasis on sampling scheme selection.

    PubMed

    White, S L; Smith, W C; Fisher, L F; Gatlin, C L; Hanasono, G K; Jordan, W H

    1998-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors and H2-receptor antagonists suppress gastric acid secretion and secondarily induce hypergastrinemia. Sustained hypergastrinemia has a trophic effect on stomach fundic mucosa, including enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia. Histomorphometric quantitation of the pharmacologic gastric effects was conducted on 10 male and 10 female rats treated orally with LY307640 sodium, a proton pump inhibitor, at daily doses of 25, 60, 130, or 300 mg/kg for 3 mo. Histologic sections of glandular stomach, stained for chromogranin A, were evaluated by image analysis to determine stomach mucosal thickness, mucosal and nonmucosal (submucosa and muscularis) area, gastric glandular area, ECL cell number/area and cross-sectional area. Total mucosal and nonmucosal tissue volumes per animal were derived from glandular stomach volumetric and area data. Daily oral doses of compound LY307640 sodium caused slight to moderate dose-related mucosal hypertrophy and ECL cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia in all treatment groups as compared with controls. All observed effects were prominent in both sexes but were generally greater in females. The morphometric sampling schemes were explored to optimize the data collection efficiency for future studies. A comparison between the sampling schemes used in this study and alternative schemes was conducted by estimating the probability of detecting a specific percentage of change between the male control and high-dose groups based on Tukey's trend test. The sampling scheme analysis indicated that mucosal thickness and mass had been oversampled. ECL cell density quantitation efficiency would have been increased by sampling the basal mucosa only for short-term studies. The ECL cell size sampling scheme was deemed appropriate for this type of study.

  11. The Evolution of Ion Pumps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maloney, Peter C.; Wilson, T. Hastings

    1985-01-01

    Constructs an evolutionary sequence to account for the diversity of ion pumps found today. Explanations include primary ion pumps in bacteria, features and distribution of ATP-driven pumps, preference for cation transport, and proton pump reversal. The integrated evolutionary hypothesis should encourage new experimental approaches. (DH)

  12. Crystallographic and online spectral evidence for role of conformational change and conserved water in cytochrome oxidase proton pump.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Qin, Ling; Ferguson-Miller, Shelagh

    2011-01-25

    Crystal structures in both oxidized and reduced forms are reported for two bacterial cytochrome c oxidase mutants that define the D and K proton paths, showing conformational change in response to reduction and the loss of strategic waters that can account for inhibition of proton transfer. In the oxidized state both mutants of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides enzyme, D132A and K362M, show overall structures similar to wild type, indicating no long-range effects of mutation. In the reduced state, the mutants show an altered conformation similar to that seen in reduced wild type, confirming this reproducible, reversible response to reduction. In the strongly inhibited D132A mutant, positions of residues and waters in the D pathway are unaffected except in the entry region close to the mutation, where a chloride ion replaces the missing carboxyl and a 2-Å shift in N207 results in loss of its associated water. In K362M, the methionine occupies the same position as the original lysine, but K362- and T359-associated waters in the wild-type structure are missing, likely accounting for the severe inhibition. Spectra of oxidized frozen crystals taken during X-ray radiation show metal center reduction, but indicate development of a strained configuration that only relaxes to a native form upon annealing. Resistance of the frozen crystal to structural change clarifies why the oxidized conformation is observable and supports the conclusion that the reduced conformation has functional significance. A mechanism is described that explains the conformational change and the incomplete response of the D-path mutant.

  13. An investigation on the role of vacuolar-type proton pumps and luminal acidity in calcium sequestration by nonmitochondrial and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate-sensitive intracellular calcium stores in clonal insulin-secreting cells.

    PubMed

    Bode, H P; Eder, B; Trautmann, M

    1994-06-15

    To test whether in RINm5F rat insulinoma cells luminal acidity and the activity of a vacuolar-type proton pump are involved in calcium sequestration by intracellular calcium stores sensitive to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) we examined the effects of various proton-conducting ionophores and ammonium chloride, and of bafilomycin, a specific inhibitor of vacuolar proton pumps, on this parameter. Bafilomycin in concentrations up to 1 microM did not affect calcium sequestration by nonmitochondrial, InsP3-sensitive stores at all; 50 microM carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, 50 microM monensin and 30 mM NH4Cl, which are diverse ways to dissipate transmembrane pH gradients, did not inhibit calcium sequestration. This argues against signficant involvement of internal acidity and vacuolar proton pumps in calcium sequestration by InsP3-sensitive stores in RINm5F cells. The proton-potassium-exchanging ionophore nigericin (20-100 microM), however, inhibited calcium sequestration by nonmitochondrial and InsP3-sensitive stores. This effect was dependent on the presence of potassium and could be reversed by inclusion of carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone or acetate in the incubation medium. Thus, the inhibitory effect of nigericin appears to be based on proton extrusion coupled to potassium influx across the membrane of calcium stores in RINm5F cells, creating an internal alkalinization of these stores. The effect of nigericin implies the continuous maintenance of an outside-to-inside potassium concentration gradient by nonmitochondrial calcium stores in RINm5F cells. This feature will be of potential interest in the identification of InsP3-sensitive calcium-storing organelles.

  14. Adenocarcinoma arising in multiple hyperplastic polyps in a patient with Helicobacter pylori infection and hypergastrinemia during long-term proton pump inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Anjiki, Hajime; Mukaisho, Ken-Ichi; Kadomoto, Yu; Doi, Hisakazu; Yoshikawa, Kunio; Nakayama, Takahisa; Vo, Diem Thi-Ngoc; Hattori, Takanori; Sugihara, Hiroyuki

    2017-04-01

    We report a case of developing multiple adenocarcinoma foci in multiple hyperplastic polyps in a patient with Helicobacter pylori infection and hypergastrinemia during long-term proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. A 57-year-old man, who was undergoing hemodialysis for chronic renal failure, underwent an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy to elucidate the cause of anemia. Atrophic gastritis with H. pylori infection and multiple adenocarcinoma foci in multiple hyperplastic polyps were found in the endoscopic and histological examinations. Enterochromaffin-like micronests and parietal cell protrusion in the background of the polyps suggested the existence of hypergastrinemia. The serum gastrin level was markedly high-10,206 pg/ml (normal range 37-172 pg/ml). The cause of this marked hypergastrinemia was not autoimmune gastritis and gastrinoma. After discontinuing PPI therapy and successful eradication of H. pylori, the serum gastrin level decreased to normal range. These findings indicate that hypergastrinemia may be caused by long-term PPI therapy in patients with H. pylori infection. This case suggests that hypergastrinemia may mediate gastric carcinogenesis in patients with H. pylori infection.

  15. Addition of clidinium-C to the 14-day proton-pump inhibitor-based triple therapy for Helicobacter pylori eradication

    PubMed Central

    Seyyedmajidi, Mohammadreza; Homapoor, Saba; Zanganeh, Elahe; Dadjou, Mohammad; Eskandari Nejad, Shahab; Tajik Galayeri, Mohammad Hadi; Vafaeimanesh, Jamshid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Triple therapy with a proton pump inhibitor and two antibiotics in Helicobacter pylori (HP) eradication is widely accepted, but this combination fails in a considerable number of cases. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of clidinium-C addition on HP eradication and to investigate the efficacy and safety of clidinium-C in prevention of drugs' side effects. Methods: A total of 200 histopathologically confirmed HP positive peptic ulcer enrolled in this study which were randomly assigned to two treatment groups: OAC (20 mg omeprazole bid, 1000 mg amoxicillin bid and 500 mg clarithromycin bid) and OAC + clidinium-C. The effect of treatment and adverse effects were compared 6 weeks after completion of treatment. A13C-urea breath test was performed to confirm HP eradication. Results: A total of 184 patients (90 in group A and 94 in group B) completed the treatment protocols. HP eradication was achieved in 71.1% in OAC versus 72.3% in OCA+clidinium-C, (P=0.73). The frequencies of abdominal pain and stool abnormality, among the side effects recorded during the therapy period, were significantly lower in group B (OCA+clidinium-C) (P=0.01 and P=0.001, respectively). Conclusion: Addition of clidinium-C to OCA triple therapy decreases abdominal pain and frequency of stool abnormalities without affecting HP eradication rate. Based on these findings addition of clidinium-C may increase patient's compliance. PMID:27386057

  16. Review article: putting immediate-release proton-pump inhibitors into clinical practice--improving nocturnal acid control and avoiding the possible complications of excessive acid exposure.

    PubMed

    Katz, P O

    2005-12-01

    Nocturnal gastro-oesphageal reflux is an under-appreciated clinical challenge. This condition may cause symptoms such as nocturnal heartburn, or it may be asymptomatic. In addition, patients may experience sleep disturbances that can potentially lead to complications such as erosive oesophagitis and Barrett's oesophagus, and may be a risk factor for development of oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Delayed-release proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) have traditionally been effective in treating both daytime and night-time reflux symptoms, but are limited in control of nocturnal acidity by their pharmacodynamic characteristics. This narrative review addresses the prevalence, impact and pharmacologic approaches used to control nocturnal acidity. Methods to optimize nocturnal acid control include careful attention to dosing schedule, using higher doses of PPIs, adding an histamine H2-receptor antagonist at bedtime to once or twice daily delayed-release PPI, or using immediate-release omeprazole (Zegerid powder for oral suspension; Santarus, Inc., San Diego, CA, USA). This new formulation appears to provide sustained control of intragastric pH at steady state, and when dosed at bedtime, and may be effective in improving control of nocturnal pH and treating night-time GERD.

  17. A Study on the Efficacy of Proton Pump Inhibitors in Helicobacter pylori-Negative Primary Care Patients with Dyspepsia in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Fujimura, Yoshinori; Gotoh, Kensuke; Imamura, Hiroshi; Manabe, Noriaki; Kusunoki, Hiroaki; Inoue, Kazuhiko; Shiotani, Akiko; Hata, Jiro; Haruma, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims There have been few studies on the efficacy of proton pump inhibitors and the doses required to treat dyspeptic symptoms observed in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of different doses of omeprazole and different administration methods in Helicobacter pylori-negative, dyspeptic patients. Methods Patients with chronic upper abdominal symptoms within the previous 3 months were randomly divided into three groups: a daily, omeprazole 20 mg treatment group (OPZ20, n=61); a daily, omeprazole 10 mg treatment group (OPZ10, n=72); and an on-demand omeprazole 20 mg treatment group (on-demand, n=62). After 4 weeks of administration of the drug, symptom improvement rates were evaluated based on the Overall Global Severity score. Results The rates of symptom improvement after 4 weeks of treatment were 65.6% (40/61) in the OPZ20 group, 47.2% (34/72) in the OPZ10 group, and 50.0% (31/62) in the on-demand group. The OPZ20 group exhibited a significantly higher improvement rate (p=0.034) than the OPZ10 group. The OPZ20 group had significant improvements in regurgitation, postprandial fullness, vomiting, and bloating compared with the OPZ10 group. Conclusions Daily treatment with 20 mg of omeprazole was efficient in treating upper abdominal symptoms. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, number UMIN000002621. PMID:23423422

  18. Efficacy of Proton Pump Inhibitors for Patients with Duodenal Ulcers: A Pairwise and Network Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhan-Hong; Shi, Ai-Ming; Hu, Duan-Min; Bao, Jun-Jie

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aim: To compare the efficacy and tolerance of different proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in different doses for patients with duodenal ulcers. Materials and Methods: An electronic database was searched to collect all randomized clinical trials (RCTs), and a pairwise and network meta-analysis were performed. Results: A total of 24 RCTs involving 6188 patients were included. The network meta-analysis showed that there were no significant differences for the 4-week healing rate of duodenal ulcer treated with different PPI regimens except pantoprazle 40 mg/d versus lansoprazole 15 mg/d [Relative risk (RR) = 3.57; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.36–10.31)] and lansoprazole 30 mg/d versus lansoprazole 15 mg/d (RR = 2.45; 95% CI = 1.01–6.14). In comparison with H2 receptor antagonists (H2 RA), pantoprazole 40 mg/d and lansoprazole 30 mg/d significantly increase the healing rate (RR = 2.96; 95% CI = 1.78–5.14 and RR = 2.04; 95% CI = 1.13–3.53, respectively). There was no significant difference for the rate of adverse events between different regimens, including H2 RA for a duration of 4-week of follow up. Conclusion: There was no significant difference for the efficacy and tolerance between the ordinary doses of different PPIs with the exception of lansoprazle 15 mg/d. PMID:28139495

  19. Cost and burden of gastroesophageal reflux disease among patients with persistent symptoms despite proton pump inhibitor therapy: an observational study in France

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disorder that negatively impacts health-related quality of life (HRQL) and work productivity. Many patients have only a partial response to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy and continue to experience GERD symptoms despite optimized treatment. This observational study aimed to provide information on symptoms, HRQL, resource usage, costs and treatment pathways associated with partial response to PPI therapy in French patients with GERD. Methods Patients with partial response to PPI therapy, defined as persistent GERD symptoms ≥3 days/week despite optimized treatment with a PPI, were recruited for this 12-month observational study. GERD symptoms, HRQL, work productivity and resource use were assessed by patient surveys. Costs were calculated based on lost work productivity and resource use. Results The patient population (n=262; mean age, 54 years; 40% men) carried a significant symptom burden, with 98% of patients having moderate-to-severe GERD symptoms and 65% of patients experiencing daily symptoms at baseline. HRQL and work productivity were significantly impaired, with a greater degree of impairment in patients with higher symptom burden. The mean total cost per patient over the 12-month follow-up period was €5237, of which €4674 (89%) was due to lost work productivity. Conclusions Partial response to PPI therapy for GERD is associated with a high symptom burden, significant impairment of HRQL and work productivity, and substantial GERD-related costs. PMID:23448382

  20. The efficacy and safety of proton-pump inhibitors in treating patients with non-erosive reflux disease: a network meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lingxiao; Chen, Yujie; Li, Bo

    2016-09-01

    Proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been proved as safe and effective ways to treat patients with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). However, less is known about the comparisons among different PPIs and their best dosage. We aimed to synthesize the available evidence through network meta-analysis to investigate the efficacy and safety of different PPIs in treating patients with NERD. Fifteen studies with 6309 patients were included in the meta-analyses. For the rate of symptomatic relief, compared with control groups, all interventions except rabeprazole 5 mg significantly increased rate of symptomatic relief. Among the comparisons of different interventions, omeprazole 20 mg group was associated with a higher rate of symptomatic relief in contrast to omeprazole 10 mg group (odds ratio, OR: 1.89, 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.34, 2.67; p-value: 0.0005) or rabeprazole 5 mg group (OR: 2.51, 95%CI: 1.16, 5.42; p-value: 0.019); dexlansoprazole 30 mg therapy significantly improved the rate of symptomatic relief compared with rabeprazole 5 mg group (OR: 2.64, 95%CI: 1.08, 6.43; p-value: 0.03). For the rate of adverse events, there was no significant difference among all interventions.

  1. Pharmacological and Safety Profile of Dexlansoprazole: A New Proton Pump Inhibitor - Implications for Treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in the Asia Pacific Region.

    PubMed

    Goh, Khean Lee; Choi, Myung Gyu; Hsu, Ping I; Chun, Hoon Jai; Mahachai, Varocha; Kachintorn, Udom; Leelakusolvong, Somchai; Kim, Nayoung; Rani, Abdul Aziz; Wong, Benjamin C Y; Wu, Justin; Chiu, Cheng Tang; Shetty, Vikram; Bocobo, Joseph C; Chan, Melchor M; Lin, Jaw-Town

    2016-07-30

    Although gastroesophageal reflux disease is not as common in Asia as in western countries, the prevalence has increased substantially during the past decade. Gastroesophageal reflux disease is associated with considerable reductions in subjective well-being and work productivity, as well as increased healthcare use. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are currently the most effective treatment for gastroesophageal reflux disease. However, there are limitations associated with these drugs in terms of partial and non-response. Dexlansoprazole is the first PPI with a dual delayed release formulation designed to provide 2 separate releases of medication to extend the duration of effective plasma drug concentration. Dexlansoprazole has been shown to be effective for healing of erosive esophagitis, and to improve subjective well-being by controlling 24-hour symptoms. Dexlansoprazole has also been shown to achieve good plasma concentration regardless of administration with food, providing flexible dosing. Studies in healthy volunteers showed no clinically important effects on exposure to the active metabolite of clopidogrel or clopidogrel-induced platelet inhibition, with no dose adjustment of clopidogrel necessary when coprescribed. This review discusses the role of the new generation PPI, dexlansoprazole, in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease in Asia.

  2. Proton pump inhibitor pantoprazole abrogates adriamycin-resistant gastric cancer cell invasiveness via suppression of Akt/GSK-β/β-catenin signaling and epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Yang, Yan; Shi, Xiaoting; Liao, Wanyu; Chen, Min; Cheng, Alfred Sze-Lok; Yan, Hongli; Fang, Cheng; Zhang, Shu; Xu, Guifang; Shen, Shanshan; Huang, Shuling; Chen, Guangxia; Lv, Ying; Ling, Tingsheng; Zhang, Xiaoqi; Wang, Lei; Zhuge, Yuzheng; Zou, Xiaoping

    2015-01-28

    The effect of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) on cancer risk has received much attention recently. In this study, we investigated the mechanism underlying multidrug resistance and the effect of a PPI pantoprazole using an adriamycin-resistant gastric cancer cell model (SGC7901/ADR). Compared with the parental cell line, SGC7901/ADR cells showed reduced proliferation rate, but higher resistance to adriamycin under both anchorage-dependent and -independent conditions. Notably, SGC7901/ADR cells underwent epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and showed increased migrating and invading capabilities. At molecular level, SGC7901/ADR cells showed strong activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway compared with parental sensitive cells. Interestingly, we found that a PPI pantoprazole can effectively reverse the aggressiveness and EMT marker expression of SGC7901/ADR cells. Furthermore, pantoprazole treatment resulted in a profound reduction of both total and phosphorylated forms of Akt and GSK-3β, which in turn suppressed the adriamycin-induced Wnt/β-catenin signaling in SGC7901/ADR cells. Taken together, we demonstrate that the aggressive phenotype of adriamycin-resistant SGC7901/ADR cells is mediated by induction of EMT and activation of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. And for the first time, we show that it is possible to suppress the invasiveness of SGC7901/ADR cells by pantoprazole which targets the EMT and Akt/GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling.

  3. Pharmacological and Safety Profile of Dexlansoprazole: A New Proton Pump Inhibitor – Implications for Treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in the Asia Pacific Region

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Khean Lee; Choi, Myung Gyu; Hsu, Ping I; Chun, Hoon Jai; Mahachai, Varocha; Kachintorn, Udom; Leelakusolvong, Somchai; Kim, Nayoung; Rani, Abdul Aziz; Wong, Benjamin C Y; Wu, Justin; Chiu, Cheng Tang; Shetty, Vikram; Bocobo, Joseph C; Chan, Melchor M; Lin, Jaw-Town

    2016-01-01

    Although gastroesophageal reflux disease is not as common in Asia as in western countries, the prevalence has increased substantially during the past decade. Gastroesophageal reflux disease is associated with considerable reductions in subjective well-being and work productivity, as well as increased healthcare use. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are currently the most effective treatment for gastroesophageal reflux disease. However, there are limitations associated with these drugs in terms of partial and non-response. Dexlansoprazole is the first PPI with a dual delayed release formulation designed to provide 2 separate releases of medication to extend the duration of effective plasma drug concentration. Dexlansoprazole has been shown to be effective for healing of erosive esophagitis, and to improve subjective well-being by controlling 24-hour symptoms. Dexlansoprazole has also been shown to achieve good plasma concentration regardless of administration with food, providing flexible dosing. Studies in healthy volunteers showed no clinically important effects on exposure to the active metabolite of clopidogrel or clopidogrel-induced platelet inhibition, with no dose adjustment of clopidogrel necessary when coprescribed. This review discusses the role of the new generation PPI, dexlansoprazole, in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease in Asia. PMID:26932927

  4. Effects of Proton Pump Inhibitor Administration and Intake of a Combination of Yogurt and Galactooligosaccharides on Bone and Mineral Metabolism in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Takasugi, Satoshi; Shioyama, Miho; Kitade, Masami; Nagata, Masashi; Yamaji, Taketo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of proton pump inhibitor (PPI), the most potent acid-suppressing drug, administration and intake of a combination of yogurt and galactooligosaccharides (YG) on bone and mineral metabolism in adult rats. Twelve-week-old male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: a control group fed the control diet with vehicle administration, a PPI group fed the control diet with PPI administration and a YG + PPI group fed the YG diet with PPI administration. All of the groups received their respective experimental diets and daily subcutaneous injection of the vehicle or PPI for 12 weeks. The PPI group showed significantly lower bone mineral density (BMD) of the femur and the lumbar vertebrae and serum fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) and significantly higher phosphorus absorption and serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) than the control group, although PPI did not affect calcium absorption. The PPI + YG group showed significantly higher BMD and serum FGF23 and significantly lower phosphorus absorption and serum 1,25(OH)2D than the PPI group. Furthermore, the PPI + YG group showed higher calcium absorption than the control group. These results suggest that although PPI administration did not affect calcium absorption, it adversely affected BMD and influenced phosphorus metabolism in adult rats. Furthermore, the YG diet beneficially affected BMD and attenuated the effects of PPI administration on phosphorus metabolism. PMID:27775655

  5. The efficacy and safety of proton-pump inhibitors in treating patients with non-erosive reflux disease: a network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lingxiao; Chen, Yujie; Li, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been proved as safe and effective ways to treat patients with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). However, less is known about the comparisons among different PPIs and their best dosage. We aimed to synthesize the available evidence through network meta-analysis to investigate the efficacy and safety of different PPIs in treating patients with NERD. Fifteen studies with 6309 patients were included in the meta-analyses. For the rate of symptomatic relief, compared with control groups, all interventions except rabeprazole 5 mg significantly increased rate of symptomatic relief. Among the comparisons of different interventions, omeprazole 20 mg group was associated with a higher rate of symptomatic relief in contrast to omeprazole 10 mg group (odds ratio, OR: 1.89, 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.34, 2.67; p-value: 0.0005) or rabeprazole 5 mg group (OR: 2.51, 95%CI: 1.16, 5.42; p-value: 0.019); dexlansoprazole 30 mg therapy significantly improved the rate of symptomatic relief compared with rabeprazole 5 mg group (OR: 2.64, 95%CI: 1.08, 6.43; p-value: 0.03). For the rate of adverse events, there was no significant difference among all interventions. PMID:27581096

  6. [Evaluation of pharmacokinetic drug-drug-interactions. Critical considerations of the relevance of pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions of proton pump inhibitors in self medication].

    PubMed

    Petersen, Karl-Uwe

    2011-08-01

    Mechanisms and evaluation of pharmacokinetic drug interactions are discussed in general, including mechanisms beyond the hepatic phase-I reactions, and especially for the example of proton pump inhibitors (PPI), preferentially omeprazole. Particular attention is paid to the use of PPI as self-prescribed drugs. The sequelae of pharmacokinetic drug interactions can be serious. However, only the evidence of clinical consequences will convert such an interaction from a laboratory finding into a possible adverse effect. Without this, interacting drugs can still be co-administered if the specific characteristics of the concerned drugs, quantitative aspects of the interaction, and especially severity and frequency of possible clinical correlates are taken into consideration. It is encouraging that the laboratory findings reported for the PPI--in vitro or ex vivo from volunteer studies--have hardly found equivalents in clinical consequences. As of today, this is also true of the widely discussed interaction with clopidogrel. Regarding the safety of use of PPI as self-prescribed drugs, it also needs to be emphasized that a sizable number of interactions reported for omeprazole and/or pantoprazole were observed at higher dose levels than the 20 mg licensed for self medication. In conjunction with the temporal limitation of PPI self-prescription (14 days), it can be expected that pharmacokinetic drug interactions will generally be no critical factor in the usage of PPI in self-medication. However clinically relevant interactions can occur, e.g. when PPI are combined with extracts from St. John's wort, methotrexat or some inhibitors of HIV-protease with pH-dependent absorption.

  7. Proton Pump Inhibitors Do Not Reduce the Risk of Esophageal Adenocarcinoma in Patients with Barrett’s Esophagus: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qiang; Sun, Tian-Tian; Hong, Jie; Fang, Jing-Yuan; Xiong, Hua; Meltzer, Stephen J.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been used for treatment of Barrett's esophagus (BE) for many years. However, the connection between PPIs and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) in patients with BE has still been controversial. The current systematic review and meta-analysis was designed to evaluate the association between PPIs and the risk of EAC or high-grade dysplasia (HGD) in patients with BE. Methods A systematic literature search of studies reporting the association between PPIs and the risk of EAC and/or HGD in patients with BE was conducted in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library. Next, literature was screened using previously established criteria and relevant data were extracted from included studies. Finally, the software program Review Manage 5.2 was applied to aggregate data and analyze the results. Results Nine observational studies, comprising five cohort and four case-control studies (including a total of 5712 patients with BE), were identified. Upon meta-analysis, PPIs were found to have no association with the risk of EAC and/or HGD in patients with BE (unadjusted OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.17–1.08). Analysis for duration response relationship revealed no significant trend toward protection against EAC or HGD with PPIs usage for >2~3 years (one study using 7-year cutoff) when compared to usage for shorter time periods (PPIs usage >2~3 years vs. <2~3 years: OR 0.91 (95% CI 0.25–3.31) vs. 0.91 (0.40–2.07)).There also was considerable heterogeneity between studies. Conclusion No dysplasia- or cancer-protective effects of PPIs usage in patients with BE were identified by our analysis. Therefore, we conclude that clinicians who discuss the potential chemopreventive effects of PPIs with their patients, should be aware that such an effect, if exists, has not been proven with statistical significance. PMID:28072858

  8. A combination of a dairy product fermented by lactobacilli and galactooligosaccharides shows additive effects on mineral balances in growing rats with hypochlorhydria induced by a proton pump inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Takasugi, Satoshi; Ashida, Kinya; Maruyama, Suyaka; Matsukiyo, Yukari; Kaneko, Tetsuo; Yamaji, Taketo

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of a combination of a dairy product fermented by lactobacilli (DFL) and galactooligosaccharides (GOS) on mineral balances in growing rats with hypochlorhydria induced by a proton pump inhibitor (PPI). Three-week-old male rats were assigned to receive one of six diets: a control diet, control diets containing 1.6 or 5.0 % GOS, a DFL diet and DFL diets containing 1.6 or 5.0 % GOS for 9 days. From day 5 of the feeding period, half of the rats fed with control diets were subcutaneously administered with saline, whereas the remaining rats were administered with PPI for 5 days. Calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), magnesium (Mg), iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) balances were determined from days 6 to 9. PPI administration significantly decreased the apparent absorption of Ca and Fe and increased urinary P excretion, resulting in decreased Ca, Fe and P retention. GOS dose-dependently increased the apparent absorption of Ca, Mg and Fe and urinary Mg excretion and decreased urinary P excretion. DFL significantly increased the apparent absorption of Ca and Mg and urinary Mg excretion. The combination of DFL and GOS additively affected these parameters, resulting in increased Ca, P and Fe retention, and it further increased the apparent absorption and retention of Zn at 5.0 % GOS. In conclusion, the combination of DFL and GOS improves Ca, P and Fe retention in an additive manner and increases the Zn retention in growing rats with hypochlorhydria induced by PPI.

  9. Proton pump inhibitor is a risk factor for recurrence of common bile duct stones after endoscopic sphincterotomy – propensity score matching analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fukuba, Nobuhiko; Ishihara, Shunji; Sonoyama, Hiroki; Yamashita, Noritsugu; Aimi, Masahito; Mishima, Yoshiyuki; Mishiro, Tsuyoshi; Tobita, Hiroshi; Shibagaki, Koutarou; Oshima, Naoki; Moriyama, Ichiro; Kawashima, Kousaku; Miyake, Tatsuya; Ishimura, Norihisa; Sato, Shuichi; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2017-01-01

    Background and study aims Recurrence of common bile duct stones (CBDS) in patients treated with endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES) can lead to deterioration in their quality of life. Although the pathology and related factors are unclear, we speculated that proton pump inhibiter (PPI) administration increases the risk of CBDS recurrence by altering the bacterial mixture in the bile duct. Patients and methods The primary endpoint of this retrospective study was recurrence-free period. Several independent variables considered to have a relationship with CBDS recurrence including PPI use were analyzed using a COX proportional hazard model, with potential risk factors then evaluated by propensity score matching analysis. Results A total of 219 patients were analyzed, with CBDS recurrence found in 44. Analysis of variables using a COX proportional hazard model demonstrated that use of PPIs and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), as well as the presence of periampullary diverticula (PD) each had a hazard ratio (HR) value greater than 1 (HR 2.2, P = 0.007; HR 2.0, P = 0.02; HR 1.9, P = 0.07; respectively). Furthermore, propensity score matching analysis revealed that the mean recurrence-free period in the oral PPI cohort was significantly shorter as compared with the non-PPI cohort (1613 vs. 2587 days, P = 0.014). In contrast, neither UDCA administration nor PD presence was found to be a significant factor in that analysis (1557 vs. 1654 days, P = 0.508; 1169 vs. 2011 days, P = 0.121; respectively). Conclusion Our results showed that oral PPI administration is a risk factor for CBDS recurrence in patients who undergo ES. PMID:28382327

  10. Meta-analysis of the effect of proton pump inhibitors on obstructive sleep apnea symptoms and indices in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Klomjit, Saranapoom; Hosiriluck, Nattamol; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to assess evidence for an association between the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and improvement in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials and prospective cohort studies to evaluate the treatment effect of PPIs on OSA symptoms and indices in patients with GERD. EMBASE, MEDLINE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and ClinicalTrials.gov were reviewed up to October 2014. From 238 articles, two randomized trials and four prospective cohort studies were selected. In four cohort studies there were no differences in the apnea-hypopnea indices before and after treatment with PPIs (standard mean difference, 0.21; 95% confidence interval, −0.11 to 0.54). There was moderate heterogeneity among these studies. Two cohort studies revealed significantly decreased apnea indices after treatment (percent change, 31% and 35%), but one showed no significant difference. A significant improvement in the Epworth Sleepiness Scale was observed in three cohort studies and one trial. The frequency of apnea attacks recorded in diaries was decreased by 73% in one trial. In conclusion, available studies do not provide enough evidence to make firm conclusions about the effects of PPI treatment on OSA symptoms and indices in patients with concomitant GERD. Controlled clinical trials with larger sample sizes are needed to evaluate these associations. We recommend PPIs in OSA patients with concomitant GERD to treat reflux symptoms. This treatment may improve the quality of sleep without any effect on apnea-hypopnea indices. PMID:26722154

  11. Hypomagnesemia as a predictor of mortality in hemodialysis patients and the role of proton pump inhibitors: A cross-sectional, 1-year, retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ago, Rika; Shindo, Toshihiro; Banshodani, Masataka; Shintaku, Sadanori; Moriishi, Misaki; Masaki, Takao; Kawanishi, Hideki

    2016-10-01

    Introduction This study aimed to evaluate the association between proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use and serum magnesium levels, and the role of hypomagnesemia and PPI use as a risk factor for mortality in hemodialysis patients. Methods An observational study, including a cross-sectional and 1-year retrospective cohort study. The study comprised 399 hemodialysis patients at a single center, and was conducted from January to September 2014. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to investigate the independent relationship between serum magnesium levels and baseline demographic and clinical variables, including PPI and histamine-2 receptor antagonist use. Cox regression model was used to identify lower serum magnesium level and PPI as a predictor of 1-year mortality. Findings Serum magnesium levels were lower with PPI use than non-PPI use (2.39 ± 0.36 vs. 2.56 ± 0.39 mg/dL, P < 0.001). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that PPI use, low serum albumin levels, and low serum potassium and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels were significantly associated with low serum magnesium levels. A total of 29 deaths occurred during the follow-up period. According to Cox regression analysis stratified by hs-CRP, only high serum hs-CRP levels (>4.04 mg/L) in association with low serum magnesium levels was an independent risk factor for 1-year mortality (hazard ratio: 2.92; 95% CI: 1.53-6.40, P < 0.001). Discussion Serum magnesium levels are lower in PPI use. In the inflammatory state, a low serum magnesium level is a significant predictor of mortality in hemodialysis patients.

  12. Proton pump inhibitors and histamine 2 blockers are associated with improved overall survival in patients with head and neck squamous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Papagerakis, Silvana; Bellile, Emily; Peterson, Lisa A; Pliakas, Maria; Balaskas, Katherine; Selman, Sara; Hanauer, David; Taylor, Jeremy M G; Duffy, Sonia; Wolf, Gregory

    2014-12-01

    It has been postulated that gastroesophageal reflux plays a role in the etiology of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) and contributes to complications after surgery or during radiotherapy. Antacid medications are commonly used in patients with HNSCC for the management of acid reflux; however, their relationship with outcomes has not been well studied. Associations between histamine receptor-2 antagonists (H2RA) and proton pump inhibitors (PPI) use and treatment outcomes were determined in 596 patients with previously untreated HNSCC enrolled in our SPORE epidemiology program from 2003 to 2008 (median follow-up 55 months). Comprehensive clinical information was entered prospectively in our database. Risk strata were created on the basis of possible confounding prognostic variables (age, demographics, socioeconomics, tumor stage, primary site, smoking status, HPV16 status, and treatment modality); correlations within risk strata were analyzed in a multivariable model. Patients taking antacid medications had significantly better overall survival (OS; PPI alone: P < 0.001; H2RA alone, P = 0.0479; both PPI + H2RA, P = 0.0133). Using multivariable Cox models and adjusting for significant prognostic covariates, both PPIs and H2RAs used were significant prognostic factors for OS, but only H2RAs use for recurrence-free survival in HPV16-positive oropharyngeal patients. We found significant associations between the use of H2RAs and PPIs, alone or in combination, and various clinical characteristics. The findings in this large cohort study indicate that routine use of antacid medications may have significant therapeutic benefit in patients with HNSCC. The reasons for this association remain an active area of investigation and could lead to identification of new treatment and prevention approaches with agents that have minimal toxicities.

  13. Proton pump inhibitors and histamine 2 blockers are associated with improved overall survival in patients with head and neck squamous carcinoma (HNSCC)

    PubMed Central

    Papagerakis, Silvana; Bellile, Emily; Peterson, Lisa A.; Pliakas, Maria; Balaskas, Katherine; Selman, Sara; Hanauer, David; Taylor, Jeremy M.G.; Duffy, Sonia; Wolf, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    It has been postulated that gastroesophageal reflux plays a role in the etiology of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) and contributes to complications after surgery or during radiotherapy. Antacid medications are commonly used in HNSCC patients for the management of acid reflux however their relationship with outcomes has not been well studied. Associations between histamine receptor-2 antagonists (H2RAs) and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) use and treatment outcomes were determined in 596 previously untreated HNSCC patients enrolled in our SPORE epidemiology program from 2003–2008 (median follow-up 55-month). Comprehensive clinical information was entered prospectively in our database. Risk strata were created based on possible confounding prognostic variables (age, demographics, socioeconomics, tumor stage, primary site, smoking status, HPV-16 status and treatment modality); correlations within risk strata were analyzed in a multivariable model. Patients taking antacid medications had significantly better overall survival (PPI alone: p<0.001: H2RA alone, p=0.0479; both PPI+H2RA, p=0.0133). Using multivariable Cox models and adjusting for significant prognostic covariates, both PPIs and H2RAs use were significant prognostic factors for overall survival, but only H2RAs use for recurrence-free survival in HPV16-positive oropharyngeal patients. We found significant associations between use of H2RAs and PPIs, alone or in combination, and various clinical characteristics. The findings in this large cohort study indicate that routine use of antacid medications may have significant therapeutic benefit in HNSCC patients. The reasons for this association remain an active area of investigation and could lead to identification of new treatment and prevention approaches with agents that have minimal toxicities. PMID:25468899

  14. Clinical outcomes associated with proton pump inhibitor use among clopidogrel-treated patients within CYP2C19 genotype groups following acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Depta, Jeremiah P.; Lenzini, Petra A.; Lanfear, David E.; Wang, Tracy Y.; Spertus, John A.; Bach, Richard G.; Cresci, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    We examined clinical outcomes with proton pump inhibitors (PPI) use within CYP2C19 genotype groups during clopidogrel treatment following acute myocardial infarction (AMI). 2062 patients were genotyped for CYP2C19*2 and *17 variants in TRIUMPH. 12 month clinical outcomes were analyzed among patients discharged on clopidogrel within CYP2C19*2 carrier, CYP2C19*17 carrier, and CYP2C19*1 homozygote genotype groups. PPI use was not associated with a difference in mortality. Among clopidogrel-treated Caucasians following AMI, PPI use was associated with a significantly higher rate of cardiac rehospitalization (HR 1.62, 95% CI 1.19-2.19; p = 0.002) compared with no PPI use. PPI users who were carriers of the CYP2C19*17 variant experienced significantly higher rates of cardiac rehospitalization (HR 2.05, 95% CI 1.26-3.33; p = 0.003), carriers of the CYP2C19*2 variant had a trend toward increased 1-year cardiac rehospitalization (HR 1.69, 95% CI 0.95-2.99; P=0.07) while no significant differences were observed among CYP2C19*1 homozygotes. These results indicate that the risks associated with PPI use among clopidogrel-treated Caucasian post-MI patients are impacted by CYP2C19 genotype, and suggest knowledge of genotype may be useful for personalizing PPI use among patients following AMI to reduce rehospitalization. PMID:25001880

  15. Incidence of cardiovascular events and gastrointestinal bleeding in patients receiving clopidogrel with and without proton pump inhibitors: an updated meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Rhanderson N; Benjo, Alexandre M; DiNicolantonio, James J; Garcia, Daniel C; Macedo, Francisco Y B; El-Hayek, Georges; Nadkarni, Girish N; Gili, Sebastiano; Iannaccone, Mario; Konstantinidis, Ioannis; Reilly, John P

    2015-01-01

    Background Dual antiplatelet therapy is the standard of care after coronary stent placement but increases the bleeding risk. The effects of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) on clopidogrel metabolism have been described, but the clinical significance is not yet definitive. We aimed to do an updated meta-analysis comparing outcomes in patients receiving clopidogrel with and without PPIs. Methods We systematically searched PubMed, Scopus and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled observational studies in patients taking clopidogrel stratified by concomitant PPI use. Heterogeneity was examined with the Cochran Q test and I2 statistics; p values inferior to 0.10 and I2 >25% were considered significant for heterogeneity. Results We included 39 studies with a total of 214 851 patients, of whom 73 731 (34.3%) received the combination of clopidogrel and a PPI. In pooled analysis, all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction, stent thrombosis and cerebrovascular accidents were more common in patients receiving both drugs. However, among 23 552 patients from eight RCTs and propensity-matched studies, there were no significant differences in mortality or ischaemic events between groups. The use of PPIs in patients taking clopidogrel was associated with a significant reduction in the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. Conclusions The results of our meta-analysis suggest that PPIs are a marker of increased cardiovascular risk in patients taking clopidogrel, rather than a direct cause of worse outcomes. The pharmacodynamic interaction between PPIs and clopidogrel most likely has no clinical significance. Furthermore, PPIs have the potential to decrease gastrointestinal bleeding in clopidogrel users. PMID:26196021

  16. Impact of concomitant use of proton pump inhibitors and clopidogrel or ticagrelor on clinical outcomes in patients with acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yan; Wang, Xiao; Fan, Jing-Yao; Nie, Shao-Ping; Raposeiras-Roubín, Sergio; Abu-Assi, Emad; Henriques, Jose P Simao; D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Saucedo, Jorge; González-Juanatey, José R; Wilton, Stephen B; Kikkert, Wouter J; Nuñez-Gil, Iván; Ariza-Sole, Albert; Song, Xian-Tao; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Liebetrau, Christoph; Kawaji, Tetsuma; Moretti, Claudio; Huczek, Zenon; Fujii, Toshiharu; Correia, Luis C; Kawashiri, Masa-aki; Kedev, Sasko

    2016-01-01

    Background There is great debate on the possible adverse interaction between proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and clopidogrel. In addition, whether the use of PPIs affects the clinical efficacy of ticagrelor remains less known. We aimed to determine the impact of concomitant administration of PPIs and clopidogrel or ticagrelor on clinical outcomes in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Methods We retrospectively analyzed data from a “real world”, international, multi-center registry between 2003 and 2014 (n = 15,401) and assessed the impact of concomitant administration of PPIs and clopidogrel or ticagrelor on 1-year composite primary endpoint (all-cause death, re-infarction, or severe bleeding) in patients with ACS after PCI. Results Of 9429 patients in the final cohort, 54.8% (n = 5165) was prescribed a PPI at discharge. Patients receiving a PPI were older, more often female, and were more likely to have comorbidities. No association was observed between PPI use and the primary endpoint for patients receiving clopidogrel (adjusted HR: 1.036; 95% CI: 0.903–1.189) or ticagrelor (adjusted HR: 2.320; 95% CI: 0.875–6.151) (Pinteraction = 0.2004). Similarly, use of a PPI was not associated with increased risk of all-cause death, re-infarction, or a decreased risk of severe bleeding for patients treated with either clopidogrel or ticagrelor. Conclusions In patients with ACS following PCI, concomitant use of PPIs was not associated with increased risk of adverse outcomes in patients receiving either clopidogrel or ticagrelor. Our findings indicate it is reasonable to use a PPI in combination with clopidogrel or ticagrelor, especially in patients with a higher risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:27103915

  17. Sources of heterogeneity in case-control studies on associations between statins, ACE-inhibitors, and proton pump inhibitors and risk of pneumonia.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Mark C H; Klungel, Olaf H; Leufkens, Hubert G M; van Dijk, Liset; Grobbee, Diederick E; van de Garde, Ewoudt M W

    2014-10-01

    The heterogeneity in case-control studies on the associations between community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and ACE-inhibitors (ACEi), statins, and proton pump inhibitors (PPI) hampers translation to clinical practice. Our objective is to explore sources of this heterogeneity by applying a common protocol in different data settings. We conducted ten case-control studies using data from five different health care databases. Databases varied on type of patients (hospitalised vs. GP), level of case validity, and mode of exposure ascertainment (prescription or dispensing based). Identified CAP patients and controls were matched on age, gender, and calendar year. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (OR) for the associations between the drugs of interest and CAP. Associations were adjusted by a common set of potential confounders. Data of 38,742 cases and 118,019 controls were studied. Comparable patterns of variation between case-control studies were observed for ACEi, statins and PPI use and pneumonia risk with adjusted ORs varying from 1.04 to 1.49, 0.82 to 1.50 and 1.16 to 2.71, respectively. Overall, higher ORs were found for hospitalised CAP patients matched to population controls versus GP CAP patients matched to population controls. Prevalence of drug exposure was higher in dispensing data versus prescription data. We show that case-control selection and methods of exposure ascertainment induce bias that cannot be adjusted for and to a considerable extent explain the heterogeneity in results obtained in case-control studies on statins, ACEi and PPIs and CAP. The common protocol approach helps to better understand sources of variation in observational studies.

  18. Esomeprazole use is independently associated with significant reduction of BMD: 1-year prospective comparative safety study of four proton pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bahtiri, Elton; Islami, Hilmi; Hoxha, Rexhep; Qorraj-Bytyqi, Hasime; Rexhepi, Sylejman; Hoti, Kreshnik; Thaçi, Kujtim; Thaçi, Shpetim; Karakulak, Çağla

    2016-09-01

    Because of the efficacy of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), their the use is increasing dramatically. The risk of adverse effects of short-term PPI therapy is low, but there are important safety concerns for potential adverse effects of prolonged PPI therapy. Findings from studies assessing the association between PPI use and bone mineral density (BMD) and/or fracture risk are contradictory. The aim of this study was to prospectively assess potential association of PPI treatment with the 12-month change in BMD of the lumbar spine, femur neck, and total hip. The study was performed in 200 PPI users and 50 PPI nonusers. Lumbar spine (L1-L4), femur neck, and total hip BMD were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at the baseline and at 12 months. A total of 209 subjects completed the entire 12 months of the study and were included in the final analysis. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test showed that at 12 months PPI use was associated with statistically significant reductions in femur neck and total hip T scores (Z = -2.764, p = 0.005 and Z = -3.281, p = 0.001, respectively). A multiple linear regression analysis showed that only esomeprazole added significantly to the prediction of total lumbar spine and femur neck T scores (p = 0.048 and p = 0.037, respectively). Compared with the baseline, 12 months of PPI treatment resulted in lower femur neck and total hip BMD T scores. Among the four PPIs studied, esomeprazole was independently associated with significant reduction of BMD, whereas omeprazole had no effects on BMD. Considering the widespread use of PPIs, BMD screening should be considered in the case of prolonged PPI use.

  19. The Safety of Appropriate Use of Over-the-Counter Proton Pump Inhibitors: An Evidence-Based Review and Delphi Consensus.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David A; Katz, Philip O; Armstrong, David; Cohen, Henry; Delaney, Brendan C; Howden, Colin W; Katelaris, Peter; Tutuian, Radu I; Castell, Donald O

    2017-04-01

    The availability of over-the-counter (OTC) proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) for the short-term (2 weeks) management of frequent heartburn (≥2 days/week) has increased markedly, yet evidence-based recommendations have not been developed. A panel of nine international experts in gastroesophageal reflux disease developed consensus statements regarding the risks and benefits of OTC PPIs using a modified Delphi process. Consensus (based on ≥80% approval) was reached through multiple rounds of remote voting and a final round of live voting. To identify relevant data, the available literature was searched and summarized. Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system terminology was used to rate the quality of evidence and strength of recommendations; consensus was based on ≥2/3 agreement. After 4 rounds of review, consensus was achieved for 18 statements. Notably, the available data did not directly reflect OTC use, but instead, prescription use; therefore, extrapolations to the OTC setting were often necessary. This limitation is regrettable, but it justifies performing this exercise to provide evidence-based expert opinion on a widely used class of drugs. The panel determined that using OTC PPIs according to label instructions is unlikely to mask the symptoms of esophageal or gastric cancer or adversely impact the natural history of related precursor conditions. OTC PPIs are not expected to substantially affect micronutrient absorption or bone mineral density or cause community-acquired pneumonia, Clostridium difficile infection, or cardiovascular adverse events. However, OTC PPI use may be associated with slightly increased risks for infectious diarrhea, certain idiosyncratic reactions, and cirrhosis-related spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. The available evidence does not suggest that OTC PPI use consistent with label instructions is associated with substantial health risks. To minimize potential risks, healthcare

  20. Proton Pump Inhibitors Decrease Soluble fms-Like Tyrosine Kinase-1 and Soluble Endoglin Secretion, Decrease Hypertension, and Rescue Endothelial Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Onda, Kenji; Tong, Stephen; Beard, Sally; Binder, Natalie; Muto, Masanaga; Senadheera, Sevvandi N; Parry, Laura; Dilworth, Mark; Renshall, Lewis; Brownfoot, Fiona; Hastie, Roxanne; Tuohey, Laura; Palmer, Kirsten; Hirano, Toshihiko; Ikawa, Masahito; Kaitu'u-Lino, Tu'uhevaha; Hannan, Natalie J

    2017-03-01

    Preeclampsia is a severe complication of pregnancy. Antiangiogenic factors soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1) and soluble endoglin are secreted in excess from the placenta, causing hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, and multiorgan injury. Oxidative stress and vascular inflammation exacerbate the endothelial injury. A drug that can block these pathophysiological steps would be an attractive treatment option. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are safe in pregnancy where they are prescribed for gastric reflux. We performed functional studies on primary human tissues and animal models to examine the effects of PPIs on sFlt-1 and soluble endoglin secretion, vessel dilatation, blood pressure, and endothelial dysfunction. PPIs decreased sFlt-1 and soluble endoglin secretion from trophoblast, placental explants from preeclamptic pregnancies, and endothelial cells. They also mitigated tumor necrosis factor-α-induced endothelial dysfunction: PPIs blocked endothelial vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression, leukocyte adhesion to endothelium, and disruption of endothelial tube formation. PPIs decreased endothelin-1 secretion and enhanced endothelial cell migration. Interestingly, the PPI esomeprazole vasodilated maternal blood vessels from normal pregnancies and cases of preterm preeclampsia, but its vasodilatory effects were lost when the vessels were denuded of their endothelium. Esomeprazole decreased blood pressure in a transgenic mouse model where human sFlt-1 was overexpressed in placenta. PPIs upregulated endogenous antioxidant defenses and decreased cytokine secretion from placental tissue and endothelial cells. We have found that PPIs decrease sFlt-1 and soluble endoglin secretion and endothelial dysfunction, dilate blood vessels, decrease blood pressure, and have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. They have therapeutic potential for preeclampsia and other diseases where endothelial dysfunction is involved.

  1. Antifungal prophylaxis with posaconazole in patients with acute myeloid leukemia: dose intensification coupled with avoidance of proton pump inhibitors is beneficial in shortening time to effective concentrations.

    PubMed

    Cojutti, Piergiorgio; Candoni, Anna; Simeone, Erica; Franceschi, Loretta; Fanin, Renato; Pea, Federico

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to assess the influence of dose frequency and the presence or absence of cotreatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) on the time to a target trough concentration (Cmin) of >700 ng/ml with posaconazole in the first 8 days of antifungal prophylaxis in hematological patients. This was a retrospective, observational study performed with 42 adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia who underwent posaconazole prophylaxis with 200 mg every 8 h (q8h) or 200 mg q6h after receiving induction chemotherapy and who had at least three subsequent therapeutic drug monitoring assessments during the first 8 days of treatment. The cohort was split into four groups (group 1, 200 mg q8h without PPI; group 2, 200 mg q8h with PPI; group 3, 200 mg q6h without PPI; group 4, 200 mg q6h with PPI). Rapid attainment of the target Cmin was obtained only in group 3 (P < 0.01) (median Cmin on day 4 of 935.5 ng/ml [interquartile range, 760.0 to 1,270.0 ng/ml] in group 3, versus 567.0 ng/ml [346 to 906 ng/ml] in group 1, 420.0 ng/ml [326.2 to 527.2 ng/ml] in group 2, and 514.0 ng/ml [403.7 to 564.7 ng/ml] in group 4). A linear accumulation of posaconazole over time was observed among patients in groups 1 and 3, regardless of the total daily dosage, differently from what occurred among those receiving PPI cotreatment (groups 2 and 4). Dose intensification (200 mg q6h) coupled with avoidance of PPI coadministration may represent a very powerful strategy to rapidly achieve effective concentrations with posaconazole in neutropenic hematological patients.

  2. Prevention by lansoprazole, a proton pump inhibitor, of indomethacin -induced small intestinal ulceration in rats through induction of heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Yoda, Y; Amagase, K; Kato, S; Tokioka, S; Murano, M; Kakimoto, K; Nishio, H; Umegaki, E; Takeuchi, K; Higuchi, K

    2010-06-01

    The effect of lansoprazole, a proton pump inhibitor (PPI), on indomethacin-induced small intestinal ulceration was examined in rats, particularly in relation to heme oxygenase (HO)-1. The animals were administered indomethacin (10 mg/kg, p.o.) and killed 24 h later. Lansoprazole (30-100 mg/kg, p.o.) and omeprazole (30-100 mg/kg, p.o.) were given 30 min before the administration of indomethacin, while tin-protoporphyrin IX (SnPP: 30 mg/kg, i.v.), an inhibitor of HO-1, was injected 10 min before indomethacin or lansoprazole. Indomethacin produced hemorrhagic lesions in the small intestine, accompanied with an increase of mucosal invasion of enterobacteria, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the mucosa. Pretreatment with lansoprazole dose- dependently reduced the severity of the indomethacin-induced intestinal lesions, with suppression of the increased MPO activity, while omeprazole had no effect. Pretreatment with SnPP significantly exacerbated these intestinal lesions and almost totally abolished the protective effect of lansoprazole. The up-regulation of iNOS mRNA expression following indomethacin was suppressed by lansoprazole in a SnPP-inhibitable manner, although the enhanced enterobacterial invasion remained unaffected. The amount of HO-1 protein in the intestinal mucosa was significantly increased by lansoprazole but not by omeprazole. Prior administration of carbon monoxide (CO)-releasing molecule-2 (CORM-2; 10 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly reduced the severity of these lesions and the enhancement of mucosal iNOS mRNA expression induced in the small intestine by indomethacin. These results suggest that lansoprazole prevents indomethacin-induced small intestinal ulceration, and this effect is associated with inhibition of iNOS expression, through up-regulation of HO-1/CO production in the mucosa.

  3. Augmentation of myelopoiesis in a murine host bearing a T cell lymphoma following in vivo administration of proton pump inhibitor pantoprazole.

    PubMed

    Vishvakarma, Naveen Kumar; Singh, Sukh Mahendra

    2011-10-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) are being proposed as potent antitumor agents, owing to their ability to specifically induce tumor cell death by reversing H(+) ion homeostasis. As tumor growth induces myelosuppression in tumor-bearing hosts, it remains unclear if PPI can also modulate tumor-induced myelosuppression. Thus, we studied the effect of in vivo administration of pantoprazole (PPZ), a PPI, on myelopoiesis in a murine model of a transplantable T cell lymphoma, designated as Dalton's lymphoma (DL). Intraperitoneal administration of PPZ to tumor-bearing mice resulted in an enhanced bone marrow cellularity, inhibited induction of apoptosis and augmented bone marrow cell (BMC) survival. BMC of PPZ-administered tumor-bearing mice showed elevated number of F4/80 positive cells, augmented colony forming ability and differentiation in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) with higher expression of F4/80 and CD11c markers. This study also presents evidences to indicate that PPZ-dependent augmentation of myelopoiesis in the tumor-bearing host is dependent on an enhanced expression of M-CSF and receptors for M-CSF & GM-CSF in BMC, along with a modulation in the expression of cell survival regulatory molecules PUMA, Bcl2, p53 and caspase-activated DNase (CAD). BMDM obtained from PPZ-administered tumor-bearing mice also showed an augmented expression of TLR-2, tumoricidal activity, production of NO and monokines: IL-1, IL-6 & TNF-α. The study discusses the possible mechanisms underlying PPZ-dependent augmentation of myelopoiesis. Taken together, the present study proposes that a PPZ-dependent alleviation of tumor-induced myelosuppression could contribute to an augmented myelopoiesis.

  4. Expression of the H+-ATPase AHA10 proton pump is associated with citric acid accumulation in lemon juice sac cells.

    PubMed

    Aprile, Alessio; Federici, Claire; Close, Timothy J; De Bellis, Luigi; Cattivelli, Luigi; Roose, Mikeal L

    2011-12-01

    The sour taste of lemons (Citrus limon (L.) Burm.) is determined by the amount of citric acid in vacuoles of juice sac cells. Faris is a "sweet" lemon variety since it accumulates low levels of citric acid. The University of California Riverside Citrus Variety Collection includes a Faris tree that produces sweet (Faris non-acid; FNA) and sour fruit (Faris acid; FA) on different branches; it is apparently a graft chimera with layer L1 derived from Millsweet limetta and layer L2 from a standard lemon. The transcription profiles of Faris sweet lemon were compared with Faris acid lemon and Frost Lisbon (L), which is a standard sour lemon genetically indistinguishable from Faris in prior work with SSR markers. Analysis of microarray data revealed that the transcriptomes of the two sour lemon genotypes were nearly identical. In contrast, the transcriptome of Faris sweet lemon was very different from those of both sour lemons. Among about 1,000 FNA-specific, presumably pH-related genes, the homolog of Arabidopsis H(+)-ATPase proton pump AHA10 was not expressed in FNA, but highly expressed in FA and L. Since Arabidopsis AHA10 is involved in biosynthesis and acidification of vacuoles, the lack of expression of the AHA10 citrus homolog represents a very conspicuous molecular feature of the FNA sweet phenotype. In addition, high expression of several 2-oxoglutarate degradation-related genes in FNA suggests activation of the GABA shunt and degradation of valine and tyrosine as components of the mechanism that reduces the level of citric acid in sweet lemon.

  5. In vitro inhibition of methadone and oxycodone cytochrome P450-dependent metabolism: reversible inhibition by H2-receptor agonists and proton-pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Moody, David E; Liu, Fenyun; Fang, Wenfang B

    2013-10-01

    In vitro inhibition of oxycodone metabolism to noroxycodone and oxymorphone and R- and S-methadone metabolism to R- and S-2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP) was measured for four H2-receptor antagonists and five proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) using human liver microsomes (HLM) and cDNA-expressed human cytochrome P450s (rCYPs). Inhibitors were first incubated with HLM at three concentrations with and without preincubation of inhibitor, enzyme source and reducing equivalents to also screen for time-dependent inhibition (TDI). Cimetidine and famotidine (10-1,000 µM) inhibited all the four pathways >50%. Nizatidine and ranitidine did not. All the five PPIs (1-200 µM) inhibited one or more pathways >50%. Half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) were then determined using rCYPs. Cimetidine and famotidine both inhibited CYP3A4-mediated formation of noroxycodone and CYP2D6-mediated formation of oxymorphone, and famotidine inhibited CYP3A4-mediated formation of R- and S-EDDP, but IC50s were so high that only >10× therapeutic concentrations may have potential for reversible in vivo inhibition. The PPIs were more potent inhibitors; many have the potential for reversible in vivo inhibition at therapeutic concentrations. Omeprazole, esomeprazole and pantoprazole had greater effects on CYP3A4-mediated reactions, whereas lansoprazole was selective for CYP2D6-mediated formation of oxymorphone. Preincubation enhanced cimetidine inhibition of noroxycodone formation and rabeprazole inhibition of all pathways. Future studies will explore irreversible TDI.

  6. Rifabutin-based High-dose Proton-pump Inhibitor and Amoxicillin Triple Regimen as the Rescue treatment for Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hyun Chul; Lee, Yong Jae; An, Byoungrak; Lee, Seung Woo; Lee, Yong Chan; Moon, Byung Soo

    2014-01-01

    Background Rifabutin has been known to be effective in multidrug-resistant Helicobacter pylori-harboring patients undergoing treatment failure for H. pylori infection. Aim To evaluate the efficacy of 7-day treatment regimen consisting rifabutin daily but increasing the dose of amoxicillin and lansoprazole in patients who have failed first and second eradication and to assess the side effect profiles in South Korea. Methods From December 2007 to May 2013, 59 H. pylori-infected patients with two previous eradication failures were enrolled for this study prospectively. The eligible patients were randomly assigned to either group A or B. Group A received lansoprazole 30 mg bid, amoxicillin 1.0 g tid and rifabutin 150 mg bid during 7 days, whereas group B received lansoprazole 60 mg bid, amoxicillin 1.0 g tid and rifabutin 150 mg bid during 7 days. Results In group A, H. pylori eradication was achieved in 25 (78.1%) of the 32 patients in the ITT analysis and in 25 (80.6%) of the 31 patients in the PP analysis. In group B, H. pylori eradication was achieved in 26 (96.3%) of the 27 patients in the ITT analysis and in 27 (100%) of the 26 patients in the PP analysis. There was statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of the eradication rates in PP analysis (p = .047), whereas a marginally statistical significance was found in terms of the eradication rates in ITT analysis (p = .051). Reported side effects were mild, and treatment was well tolerated. No major changes in physical examination or in standard laboratory parameters were observed after treatment. Conclusions Rifabutin-based high-dose proton-pump inhibitor (PPI)-combined therapy as empirical rescue treatment is more effective than standard dose PPI-combined rifabutin-based therapy, safe and best tolerable in third-line therapy in the Korean population. The key to successful rescue therapy with rifabutin–amoxicillin–PPI regimen may be to increase doses of PPI. PMID:25231089

  7. Brand name and generic proton pump inhibitor prescriptions in the United States: insights from the national ambulatory medical care survey (2006-2010).

    PubMed

    Gawron, Andrew J; Feinglass, Joseph; Pandolfino, John E; Tan, Bruce K; Bove, Michiel J; Shintani-Smith, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) are one of the most commonly prescribed medication classes with similar efficacy between brand name and generic PPI formulations. Aims. We determined demographic, clinical, and practice characteristics associated with brand name PPI prescriptions at ambulatory care visits in the United States. Methods. Observational cross sectional analysis using the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) of all adult (≥18 yrs of age) ambulatory care visits from 2006 to 2010. PPI prescriptions were identified by using the drug entry code as brand name only or generic available formulations. Descriptive statistics were reported in terms of unweighted patient visits and proportions of encounters with brand name PPI prescriptions. Global chi-square tests were used to compare visits with brand name PPI prescriptions versus generic PPI prescriptions for each measure. Poisson regression was used to determine the incidence rate ratio (IRR) for generic versus brand PPI prescribing. Results. A PPI was prescribed at 269.7 million adult ambulatory visits, based on 9,677 unweighted visits, of which 53% were brand name only prescriptions. In 2006, 76.0% of all PPI prescriptions had a brand name only formulation compared to 31.6% of PPI prescriptions in 2010. Visits by patients aged 25-44 years had the greatest proportion of brand name PPI formulations (57.9%). Academic medical centers and physician-owned practices had the greatest proportion of visits with brand name PPI prescriptions (58.9% and 55.6% of visits with a PPI prescription, resp.). There were no significant differences in terms of median income, patient insurance type, or metropolitan status when comparing the proportion of visits with brand name versus generic PPI prescriptions. Poisson regression results showed that practice ownership type was most strongly associated with the likelihood of receiving a brand name PPI over the entire study period. Compared to HMO visits

  8. Brand Name and Generic Proton Pump Inhibitor Prescriptions in the United States: Insights from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (2006–2010)

    PubMed Central

    Gawron, Andrew J.; Feinglass, Joseph; Pandolfino, John E.; Tan, Bruce K.; Bove, Michiel J.; Shintani-Smith, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) are one of the most commonly prescribed medication classes with similar efficacy between brand name and generic PPI formulations. Aims. We determined demographic, clinical, and practice characteristics associated with brand name PPI prescriptions at ambulatory care visits in the United States. Methods. Observational cross sectional analysis using the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) of all adult (≥18 yrs of age) ambulatory care visits from 2006 to 2010. PPI prescriptions were identified by using the drug entry code as brand name only or generic available formulations. Descriptive statistics were reported in terms of unweighted patient visits and proportions of encounters with brand name PPI prescriptions. Global chi-square tests were used to compare visits with brand name PPI prescriptions versus generic PPI prescriptions for each measure. Poisson regression was used to determine the incidence rate ratio (IRR) for generic versus brand PPI prescribing. Results. A PPI was prescribed at 269.7 million adult ambulatory visits, based on 9,677 unweighted visits, of which 53% were brand name only prescriptions. In 2006, 76.0% of all PPI prescriptions had a brand name only formulation compared to 31.6% of PPI prescriptions in 2010. Visits by patients aged 25–44 years had the greatest proportion of brand name PPI formulations (57.9%). Academic medical centers and physician-owned practices had the greatest proportion of visits with brand name PPI prescriptions (58.9% and 55.6% of visits with a PPI prescription, resp.). There were no significant differences in terms of median income, patient insurance type, or metropolitan status when comparing the proportion of visits with brand name versus generic PPI prescriptions. Poisson regression results showed that practice ownership type was most strongly associated with the likelihood of receiving a brand name PPI over the entire study period. Compared to HMO visits

  9. The proton pump inhibitor, omeprazole, but not lansoprazole or pantoprazole, is a metabolism-dependent inhibitor of CYP2C19: implications for coadministration with clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Ogilvie, Brian W; Yerino, Phyllis; Kazmi, Faraz; Buckley, David B; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Paris, Brandy L; Toren, Paul; Parkinson, Andrew

    2011-11-01

    As a direct-acting inhibitor of CYP2C19 in vitro, lansoprazole is more potent than omeprazole and other proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), but lansoprazole does not cause clinically significant inhibition of CYP2C19 whereas omeprazole does. To investigate this apparent paradox, we evaluated omeprazole, esomeprazole, R-omeprazole, lansoprazole, and pantoprazole for their ability to function as direct-acting and metabolism-dependent inhibitors (MDIs) of CYP2C19 in pooled human liver microsomes (HLM) as well as in cryopreserved hepatocytes and recombinant CYP2C19. In HLM, all PPIs were found to be direct-acting inhibitors of CYP2C19 with IC(50) values varying from 1.2 μM [lansoprazole; maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) = 2.2 μM] to 93 μM (pantoprazole; C(max) = 6.5 μM). In addition, we identified omeprazole, esomeprazole, R-omeprazole, and omeprazole sulfone as MDIs of CYP2C19 (they caused IC(50) shifts after a 30-min preincubation with NADPH-fortified HLM of 4.2-, 10-, 2.5-, and 3.2-fold, respectively), whereas lansoprazole and pantoprazole were not MDIs (IC(50) shifts < 1.5-fold). The metabolism-dependent inhibition of CYP2C19 by omeprazole and esomeprazole was not reversed by ultracentrifugation, suggesting that the inhibition was irreversible (or quasi-irreversible), whereas ultracentrifugation largely reversed such effects of R-omeprazole. Under various conditions, omeprazole inactivated CYP2C19 with K(I) (inhibitor concentration that supports half the maximal rate of inactivation) values of 1.7 to 9.1 μM and k(inact) (maximal rate of enzyme inactivation) values of 0.041 to 0.046 min(-1). This study identified omeprazole, and esomeprazole, but not R-omeprazole, lansoprazole, or pantoprazole, as irreversible (or quasi-irreversible) MDIs of CYP2C19. These results have important implications for the mechanism of the clinical interaction reported between omeprazole and clopidogrel, as well as other CYP2C19 substrates.

  10. Histamine H2-Blocker and Proton Pump Inhibitor Use and the Risk of Pneumonia in Acute Stroke: A Retrospective Analysis on Susceptible Patients

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Nobuhiko; Nakamizo, Tomoki; Ihara, Hikaru; Koide, Takashi; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Tabuse, Masanao; Miyazaki, Hiromichi

    2017-01-01

    Background Although histamine H2-blockers (H2B) and proton pump inhibitors (PPI) are used commonly to prevent gastrointestinal bleeding in acute stroke, they are implicated in the increased risk of pneumonia in other disease populations. In acute stroke, the presence of distinctive risk factors of pneumonia, including dysphagia and impaired consciousness, makes inclusive analysis vulnerable to confounding. Our aim was to assess whether acid-suppressive drugs increase pneumonia in acute stroke in a population controlled for confounding. Methods We analyzed acute stroke patients admitted to a tertiary care hospital. To minimize confounding, we only included subjects who could not feed orally during 14 days of hospitalization. Exposure was defined as H2B or PPI, given in days; the outcome was development of pneumonia within this period. The incidence was calculated from the total number of pneumonias divided by the sum of person-days at risk. We additionally performed multivariate Poisson regression and propensity score analyses, although the restriction largely eliminated the need for multivariate adjustment. Results A total of 132 pneumonias occurred in 3582 person-days. The incidence was 3.69%/person-day (95% confidence interval (CI); 3.03–4.37%/day). All subjects had dysphagia. Stroke severity and consciousness disturbances were well-balanced between the groups exposed to H2B, PPI, or none. The relative risk (RR) compared with the unexposed was 1.22 in H2B (95%CI; 0.83–1.81) and 2.07 in PPI (95% CI; 1.13–3.62). The RR of PPI compared with H2B was 1.69 (95%CI; 0.95–2.89). In multivariate regression analysis, the RRs of H2B and PPI were 1.24 (95% CI; 0.85–1.81) and 2.00 (95% CI; 1.12–3.57), respectively; in propensity score analyses they were 1.17 (95% CI; 0.89–1.54) and 2.13 (95% CI; 1.60–2.84). Conclusions The results of this study suggested that prophylactic acid-suppressive therapy with PPI may have to be avoided in acute stroke patients

  11. A possible involvement of Nrf2-mediated heme oxygenase-1 up-regulation in protective effect of the proton pump inhibitor pantoprazole against indomethacin-induced gastric damage in rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Proton pump is an integral membrane protein that is ubiquitous ATP binding cassette (ABC) involved in many transport processes in all living organisms, among which a specialized form of pump, so called p-type proton pump, exists in the parietal cells of stomach. Though proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are frequently prescribed to prevent nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)-induced gastric damage, the acid suppressive actions do not suffice to explain. Methods In order to document the effects of pantoprazole, one of PPIs, on the NSAIDs-induced gastric damage, in vitro and in vivo studies were performed. Immunocytochemistry, Western blot analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift assay and RT-PCR were conducted to evaluate the induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) through Nrf2 activation in normal gastric mucosal RGM-1 cells or in vivo stomach tissues from rats treated with indomethacin and/or pantoprazole. Results Pantoprazole activated Nrf2 through inactivation of Keap1, after which the expression of HO-1 was significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner in RGM-1 cells. Increased ARE-DNA binding activity was observed maximally at 1 h with 300 μM of pantoprazole. The expression of HO-1 induced by pantoprazole was significantly associated with the increased in vitro tube formation (P < 0.05) and angiogenic factors including VEGF, bFGF, and HIF-1α. Indomethacin markedly increased the expressions of TNF-α, IL-1ß, IL-8, NOX-1, ICAM-1 and VCAM, whereas pantoprazole significantly decreased the expressions of indomethacin-induced these inflammatory mediators in accord with pantoprazole-induced HO-1 (P < 0.05) as documented with HO-1 inhibitor. In vivo model of indomethacin-induced gastric damage could validate in vitro-drawn results that pantoprazole remarkably protected against indomethacin-induced gastric damage, in which zinc protoporphyrin (5 mg/kg, ip) significantly abolished the protective efficacy of pantoprazole. Conclusion These results

  12. Evidence for the presence of a proton pump of the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase type in the ruffled borders of osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Microsomal membrane vesicles prepared either from chicken medullary bone or isolated osteoclasts were shown to have ATP-dependent H(+)- transport activity. This activity was N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive but resistant to oligomycin and orthovanadate, suggesting a vacuolar-type ATPase. Furthermore, immunological cross-reactivity of 60- and 70-kD osteoclast membrane antigens with Neurospora crassa vacuolar ATPase was observed when analyzed by immunoblotting. Same antibodies labeled only osteoclasts in chicken and rat bone in immunohistochemistry. Immunoelectronmicroscopy localized these antigens in apical membranes of rat osteoclasts and kidney intercalated cells of inner stripe of outer medulla. Pretreatment of animals with parathyroid hormone enhanced the immunoreaction in the apical membranes of osteoclasts. No immunoreaction was seen in osteoclasts when antibodies against gastric H+,K(+)-ATPase were used. These results suggest that osteoclast resorbs bone by secreting protons through vacuolar H(+)-ATPase. PMID:2144003

  13. Kinetics of the acid pump in the stomach. Proton transport and hydrolysis of ATP and p-nitrophenyl phosphate by the gastric H,K-ATPase

    SciTech Connect

    Ljungstroem, M.M.; Mardh, S.

    1985-05-10

    Hydrolysis of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) and p-nitrophenyl phosphate by the hydrogen ion-transporting potassium-stimulated adenosine triphosphatase (H,K-ATPase) was investigated. Hydrolysis of ATP was studied at pH 7.4 in vesicles treated with the ionophore nigericin. The kinetic analysis showed negative cooperativity with one high affinity and one low affinity site for ATP. The rate of hydrolysis decreased at 2000 microM ATP indicating a third site for ATP. When the pH was decreased to 6.5 the experimental results followed Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetics with one low affinity site. Higher concentrations than 750 microM ATP were inhibitory. Proton transport was measured as accumulation of acridine orange in vesicles equilibrated with 150 mM KCl. The transport at various concentrations of ATP in the pH interval from 6.0 to 8.0 correlated well with the Hill equation with a Hill coefficient between 1.5-1.9. The concentration of ATP resulting in half-maximal transport rate increased from 5 microM at pH 6.0 to 420 microM at pH 8.0. At acidic pH the rate of proton transport decreased at 1000 microM ATP. The K+-stimulated p-nitrophenylphosphatase (pNPPase) activity resulted in a Hill coefficient close to 2 indicating cooperative binding of substrate. These kinetic results are used for a further development of the reaction scheme of the H,K-ATPase.

  14. Solid-phase extraction combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and chiral liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the simultaneous enantioselective determination of representative proton-pump inhibitors in water samples.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Pengfei; Deng, Miaoduo; Huang, Peiting; Yu, Jia; Guo, Xingjie; Zhao, Longshan

    2016-09-01

    This report describes, for the first time, the simultaneous enantioselective determination of proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs-omeprazole, lansoprazole, pantoprazole, and rabeprazole) in environmental water matrices based on solid-phase extraction combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (SPE-DLLME) and chiral liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The optimized results of SPE-DLLME were obtained with PEP-2 column using methanol-acetonitrile (1/1, v/v) as elution solvent, dichloroethane, and acetonitrile as extractant and disperser solvent, respectively. The separation and determination were performed using reversed-phase chromatography on a cellulose chiral stationary phase, a Chiralpak IC (250 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 μm) column, under isocratic conditions at 0.6 mL min(-1) flow rate. The analytes were detected in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode by triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. Isotopically labeled internal standards were used to compensate matrix interferences. The method provided enrichment factors of around 500. Under optimal conditions, the mean recoveries for all eight enantiomers from the water samples were 89.3-107.3 % with 0.9-10.3 % intra-day RSD and 2.3-8.1 % inter-day RSD at 20 and 100 ng L(-1) levels. Correlation coefficients (r (2)) ≥ 0.999 were achieved for all enantiomers within the range of 2-500 μg L(-1). The method detection and quantification limits were at very low levels, within the range of 0.67-2.29 ng L(-1) and 2.54-8.68 ng L(-1), respectively. This method was successfully applied to the determination of the concentrations and enantiomeric fractions of the targeted analytes in wastewater and river water, making it applicable to the assessment of the enantiomeric fate of PPIs in the environment. Graphical Abstract Simultaneous enantioselective determination of representative proton-pump inhibitors in water samples.

  15. Cloning, expression and functional characterization of the putative regeneration and tolerance factor (RTF/TJ6) as a functional vacuolar ATPase proton pump regulatory subunit with a conserved sequence of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif.

    PubMed

    Babichev, Yael; Tamir, Ami; Park, Meeyoug; Muallem, Shmuel; Isakov, Noah

    2005-10-01

    In an attempt to identify new immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-containing human molecules that may regulate hitherto unknown immune cell functions, we BLAST searched the National Center for Biotechnology Information database for ITAM-containing sequences. A human expressed sequence tag showing partial homology to the murine TJ6 (mTJ6) gene and encoding a putative ITAM sequence has been identified and used to clone the human TJ6 (hTJ6) gene from an HL-60-derived cDNA library. hTJ6 was found to encode a protein of 856 residues with a calculated mass of 98 155 Da. Immunolocalization and sequence analysis revealed that hTJ6 is a membrane protein with predicted six transmembrane-spanning regions, typical of ion channels, and a single putative ITAM (residues 452-466) in a juxtamembrane or hydrophobic intramembrane region. hTJ6 is highly homologous to Bos taurus 116-kDa subunit of the vacuolar proton-translocating ATPase. Over-expression of hTJ6 in HEK 293 cells increased H+ uptake into intracellular organelles, an effect that was sensitive to inhibition by bafilomycin, a selective inhibitor of vacuolar H+ pump. Northern blot analysis demonstrated three different hybridizing mRNA transcripts corresponding to 3.2, 5.0 and 7.3 kb, indicating the presence of several splice variants. Significant differences in hTJ6 mRNA levels in human tissues of different origins point to possible tissue-specific function. Although hTJ6 was found to be a poor substrate for tyrosine-phosphorylating enzymes, suggesting that its ITAM sequence is non-functional in protein tyrosine kinase-mediated signaling pathways, its role in organellar H+ pumping suggests that hTJ6 function may participate in protein trafficking/processing.

  16. PUMP CONSTRUCTION

    DOEpatents

    Strickland, G.; Horn, F.L.; White, H.T.

    1960-09-27

    A pump which utilizes the fluid being pumped through it as its lubricating fluid is described. This is achieved by means of an improved bearing construction in a pump of the enclosed or canned rotor type. At the outlet end of the pump, adjacent to an impeller mechanism, there is a bypass which conveys some of the pumped fluid to a chamber at the inlet end of the pump. After this chamber becomes full, the pumped fluid passes through fixed orifices in the top of the chamber and exerts a thrust on the inlet end of the pump rotor. Lubrication of the rotor shaft is accomplished by passing the pumped fluid through a bypass at the outlet end of the rotor shaft. This bypass conveys Pumped fluid to a cooling means and then to grooves on the surface of the rotor shait, thus lubricating the shaft.

  17. Limited Effect of Rebamipide in Addition to Proton Pump Inhibitor (PPI) in the Treatment of Post-Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection Gastric Ulcers: A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing PPI Plus Rebamipide Combination Therapy with PPI Monotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Ihara, Eikichi; Akiho, Hirotada; Akahoshi, Kazuya; Harada, Naohiko; Ochiai, Toshiaki; Nakamura, Norimoto; Ogino, Haruei; Iwasa, Tsutomu; Aso, Akira; Iboshi, Yoichiro; Takayanagi, Ryoichi

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The ability of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) to resect large early gastric cancers (EGCs) results in the need to treat large artificial gastric ulcers. This study assessed whether the combination therapy of rebamipide plus a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) offered benefits over PPI monotherapy. Methods In this prospective, randomized, multicenter, open-label, and comparative study, patients who had undergone ESD for EGC or gastric adenoma were randomized into groups receiving either rabeprazole monotherapy (10 mg/day, n=64) or a combination of rabeprazole plus rebamipide (300 mg/day, n=66). The Scar stage (S stage) ratio after treatment was compared, and factors independently associated with ulcer healing were identified by using multivariate analyses. Results The S stage rates at 4 and 8 weeks were similar in the two groups, even in the subgroups of patients with large amounts of tissue resected and regardless of CYP2C19 genotype. Independent factors for ulcer healing were circumferential location of the tumor and resected tissue size; the type of treatment did not affect ulcer healing. Conclusions Combination therapy with rebamipide and PPI had limited benefits compared with PPI monotherapy in the treatment of post-ESD gastric ulcer (UMIN Clinical Trials Registry, UMIN000007435). PMID:27282261

  18. Clinical Characteristics of Patients with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Refractory to Proton Pump Inhibitors and the Effects of Switching to 20 mg Esomeprazole on Reflux Symptoms and Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Takeshima, Fuminao; Hashiguchi, Keiichi; Onitsuka, Yasunori; Tanigawa, Ken; Minami, Hitomi; Matsushima, Kayoko; Akazawa, Yuko; Shiozawa, Ken; Yamaguchi, Naoyuki; Taura, Naota; Ohnita, Ken; Ichikawa, Tatsuki; Isomoto, Hajime; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Background Refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) may deteriorate patient quality of life (QOL) despite proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. Material/Methods Nineteen Japanese institutions were surveyed to determine the clinical characteristics and QOL of patients with refractory GERD. Those patients treated with a conventional PPI were switched to 20 mg esomeprazole for 4 weeks. Symptoms and QOL were assessed using Global Overall Symptom and Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS) questionnaires at baseline and at 2 and/or 4 weeks of esomeprazole treatment. Results Of 120 patients who completed the survey, 58 (48.3%) had refractory GERD. Of these, 69.0% were aged ≥65 years, 79.3% were prescribed a PPI at a standard or high dose, and 22.4% were prescribed a PPI together with another drug. After switching to esomeprazole, patients reported significant improvements in heartburn, acid regurgitation, and excessive belching at 2 weeks using a symptom diary, as well as the total score, reflux, abdominal pain, and indigestion, which were assessed using the GSRS at 4 weeks. Conclusions About half of Japanese patients with GERD may be refractory to conventional PPIs. Their reflux-related symptoms are often severe and may impair QOL. Switching to esomeprazole could be used to improve their symptoms and QOL. PMID:26719012

  19. C-terminal truncation and histidine-tagging of cytochrome c oxidase subunit II reveals the native processing site, shows involvement of the C-terminus in cytochrome c binding, and improves the assay for proton pumping.

    PubMed

    Hiser, C; Mills, D A; Schall, M; Ferguson-Miller, S

    2001-02-13

    To enable metal affinity purification of cytochrome c oxidase reconstituted into phospholipid vesicles, a histidine-tag was engineered onto the C-terminal end of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides cytochrome c oxidase subunit II. Characterization of the natively processed wildtype oxidase and artificially processed forms (truncated with and without a his-tag) reveals Km values for cytochrome c that are 6-14-fold higher for the truncated and his-tagged forms than for the wildtype. This lowered ability to bind cytochrome c indicates a previously undetected role for the C-terminus in cytochrome c binding and is mimicked by reduced affinity for an FPLC anion exchange column. The elution profiles and kinetics indicate that the removal of 16 amino acids from the C-terminus, predicted from the known processing site of the Paracoccus denitrificans oxidase, does not produce the same enzyme as the native processing reaction. MALDI-TOF MS data show the true C-terminus of subunit II is at serine 290, three amino acids longer than expected. When the his-tagged form is reconstituted into lipid vesicles and further purified by metal affinity chromatography, significant improvement is observed in proton pumping analysis by the stopped-flow method. The improved kinetic results are attributed to a homogeneous, correctly oriented vesicle population with higher activity and less buffering from extraneous lipids.

  20. Industrial Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    A flow inducer is a device that increases the pump intake capacity of a Worthington Centrifugal pump. It lifts the suction pressure sufficiently for the rotating main impeller of the centrifugal pump to operate efficiently at higher fluid intake levels. The concept derives from 1960's NASA technology which was advanced by Worthington Pump Division. The pumps are used to recirculate wood molasses, a highly viscous substance.

  1. Magnetocaloric pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.

    1973-01-01

    Very cold liquids and gases such as helium, neon, and nitrogen can be pumped by using magnetocaloric effect. Adiabatic magnetization and demagnetization are used to alternately heat and cool slug of pumped fluid contained in closed chamber.

  2. Heat pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilli, P. V.

    1982-11-01

    Heat pumps for residential/commercial space heating and hot tap water make use of free energy of direct or indirect solar heat and save from about 40 to about 70 percent of energy if compared to a conventional heating system with the same energy basis. In addition, the electrically driven compressor heat pump is able to substitute between 40% (bivalent alternative operation) to 100% (monovalent operation) of the fuel oil of an oilfired heating furnace. For average Central European conditions, solar space heating systems with high solar coverage factor show the following sequence of increasing cost effectiveness: pure solar systems (without heat pumps); heat pump assisted solar systems; solar assisted heat pump systems; subsoil/water heat pumps; air/water heat pumps; air/air heat pumps.

  3. Nature's pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Steven

    1994-10-01

    Although diverse in both form and function, the fluid-forcing devices in organisms have many of the capabilities and limitations of pumps of human design. Nature's pumps certainly look quite different from those of our technology, but all of them perform the same task. The author examines a few of these with an eye toward technological parallels and the two functional classes -- positive-displacement pumps and fluid-dynamic pumps.

  4. ELECTROMAGNETIC PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Pulley, O.O.

    1954-08-17

    This patent reiates to electromagnetic pumps for electricity-conducting fluids and, in particular, describes several modifications for a linear conduction type electromagnetic interaction pump. The invention resides in passing the return conductor for the current traversing the fiuid in the duct back through the gap in the iron circuit of the pump. Both the maximum allowable pressure and the efficiency of a linear conduction electromagnetic pump are increased by incorporation of the present invention.

  5. Non-Carriers of Reduced-Function CYP2C19 Alleles are Most Susceptible to Impairment of the Anti-Platelet Effect of Clopidogrel by Proton-Pump Inhibitors: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jen-Kuang; Wu, Cho-Kai; Juang, Jyh-Ming; Tsai, Chia-Ti; Hwang, Juey-Jen; Lin, Jiuun-Lee; Chiang, Fu-Tien

    2016-01-01

    Background The phenomenon of CYP2C19 polymorphism affects the metabolism of both clopidogrel and proton-pump inhibitors (PPI). However, concomitant use of both drugs may reduce the desired therapeutic effects. In this study, we evaluated whether individuals with different numbers of reduced-function CYP2C19 alleles were equally affected and whether PPIs with different dependencies on CYP2C19 metabolism were equally involved. Methods Thirty healthy volunteers were recruited to a six-week regimen of clopidogrel. Three PPIs with different metabolic dependencies on CYP2C19 were included and separately administered in this order. Each PPI was given for a week, followed by a one-week washout period before the intervention of the next PPI. The anti-platelet effect was examined by Thromboelastography Platelet MappingTM (TEG®) and vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) assays. Results Both TEG® and VASP tests showed the same general qualitative trend, but TEG® detected a statistically significant fluctuation of platelet aggregation in response to different drug interventions. The TEG® results also demonstrated that non-carriers experienced the most significant impairment of anti-platelet effect of clopidogrel after concomitant use of PPIs. This impairment was closely related to the metabolic dependence on CYP2C19 of PPI. Conclusions Our study indicated that non-carriers of reduced-function CYP2C19 alleles are most susceptible to impairment of the anti-platelet effect of clopidogrel after concomitant PPI use. Individual subjects are not equally affected, and PPIs are not equally involved. However, large-scale randomized clinical trials are needed to evaluate the clinical outcome. PMID:27122952

  6. Vegetative Clostridium difficile survives in room air on moist surfaces and in gastric contents with reduced acidity: a potential mechanism to explain the association between proton pump inhibitors and C. difficile-associated diarrhea?

    PubMed

    Jump, Robin L P; Pultz, Michael J; Donskey, Curtis J

    2007-08-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been identified as a risk factor for Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD), though the mechanism is unclear because gastric acid does not kill C. difficile spores. We hypothesized that the vegetative form of C. difficile, which is killed by acid, could contribute to disease pathogenesis if it survives in room air and in gastric contents with elevated pH. We compared the numbers of C. difficile spores and vegetative cells in stools of patients prior to and during the treatment of CDAD. We assessed the survival of vegetative cells on moist or dry surfaces in room air versus anaerobic conditions and in human gastric contents, in pH-adjusted gastric contents, and in gastric contents from individuals receiving PPI therapy. Stool samples obtained from patients prior to the initiation of antibiotic treatment for C. difficile contained approximately 10-fold more vegetative cells than spores. On dry surfaces, vegetative C. difficile cells died rapidly, whereas they remained viable for up to 6 h on moist surfaces in room air. Vegetative C. difficile cells had only marginal survival in gastric contents at low pH; adjustment to a pH of >5 resulted in survival similar to that in the phosphate-buffered saline control. The survival of vegetative C. difficile in gastric contents obtained from patients receiving PPIs was also increased at a pH of >5. The ability of the vegetative form of C. difficile to survive on moist surfaces and in gastric contents with an elevated pH suggests a potential mechanism by which PPI therapy could increase the risk of acquiring C. difficile.

  7. Proton Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... for e-updates Please leave this field empty Proton Therapy SHARE Home > Treatment and Care > Treatments Listen ... a nucleus, which holds two types of particles—protons and neutrons. The nucleus is surrounded by electrons. ...

  8. Enantioselective Protonation

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Justin T.; Hong, Allen Y.; Stoltz, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    Enantioselective protonation is a common process in biosynthetic sequences. The decarboxylase and esterase enzymes that effect this valuable transformation are able to control both the steric environment around the proton acceptor (typically an enolate) and the proton donor (typically a thiol). Recently, several chemical methods to achieve enantioselective protonation have been developed by exploiting various means of enantiocontrol in different mechanisms. These laboratory transformations have proven useful for the preparation of a number of valuable organic compounds. PMID:20428461

  9. OSCILLATORY PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, N.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to a pump suitable fur pumping highly corrosive gases wherein no lubricant is needed in the pumping chamber thus eliminating possible contamination sources. The chamber contains a gas inlet and outlet in each side, with a paddle like piston suspended by a sylphon seal between these pcrts. An external arrangement causes the paddle to oscillate rapidly between the ports, alternately compressing and exhausting the gas trapped on each side of the paddle. Since the paddle does nnt touch the chamber sides at any point, no lubricant is required. This pump is useful for pumping large quantities of uranium hexafluorine.

  10. Proton dynamics in cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Cancer remains a leading cause of death in the world today. Despite decades of research to identify novel therapeutic approaches, durable regressions of metastatic disease are still scanty and survival benefits often negligible. While the current strategy is mostly converging on target-therapies aimed at selectively affecting altered molecular pathways in tumor cells, evidences are in parallel pointing to cell metabolism as a potential Achilles' heel of cancer, to be disrupted for achieving therapeutic benefit. Critical differences in the metabolism of tumor versus normal cells, which include abnormal glycolysis, high lactic acid production, protons accumulation and reversed intra-extracellular pH gradients, make tumor site a hostile microenvironment where only cancer cells can proliferate and survive. Inhibiting these pathways by blocking proton pumps and transporters may deprive cancer cells of a key mechanism of detoxification and thus represent a novel strategy for a pleiotropic and multifaceted suppression of cancer cell growth. Research groups scattered all over the world have recently started to investigate various aspects of proton dynamics in cancer cells with quite encouraging preliminary results. The intent of unifying investigators involved in this research line led to the formation of the "International Society for Proton Dynamics in Cancer" (ISPDC) in January 2010. This is the manifesto of the newly formed society where both basic and clinical investigators are called to foster translational research and stimulate interdisciplinary collaboration for the development of more specific and less toxic therapeutic strategies based on proton dynamics in tumor cell biology. PMID:20550689

  11. Luminescent Immunoprecipitation System (LIPS) for Detection of Autoantibodies Against ATP4A and ATP4B Subunits of Gastric Proton Pump H+,K+-ATPase in Atrophic Body Gastritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lahner, Edith; Brigatti, Cristina; Marzinotto, Ilaria; Carabotti, Marilia; Scalese, Giulia; Davidson, Howard W; Wenzlau, Janet M; Bosi, Emanuele; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Annibale, Bruno; Lampasona, Vito

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Circulating autoantibodies targeting the H+/K+-ATPase proton pump of gastric parietal cells are considered markers of autoimmune gastritis, whose diagnostic accuracy in atrophic body gastritis, the pathological lesion of autoimmune gastritis, remains unknown. This study aimed to assess autoantibodies against ATP4A and ATP4B subunits of parietal cells H+, K+-ATPase in atrophic body gastritis patients and controls. Methods: One-hundred and four cases with atrophic body gastritis and 205 controls were assessed for serological autoantibodies specific for ATP4A or ATP4B subunits using luminescent immunoprecipitation system (LIPS). Recombinant luciferase-reporter-fused-antigens were expressed by in vitro transcription-translation (ATP4A) or after transfection in Expi293F cells (ATP4B), incubated with test sera, and immune complexes recovered using protein-A-sepharose. LIPS assays were compared with a commercial enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for parietal cell autoantibodies. Results: ATP4A and ATP4B autoantibody titers were higher in cases compared to controls (P<0.0001). The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve was 0.98 (95% CI 0.965–0.996) for ATP4A, and 0.99 (95% CI 0.979–1.000) for ATP4B, both higher as compared with that of EIA: 0.86 (95% CI 0.809–0.896), P<0.0001. Sensitivity-specificity were 100–89% for ATP4A and 100–90% for ATP4B assay. Compared with LIPS, EIA for parietal cell autoantibodies showed a lower sensitivity (72%, P<0.0001) at a similar specificity (92%, P=0.558). Conclusions: Positivity to both, ATP4A and ATP4B autoantibodies is closely associated with atrophic body gastritis. Both assays had the highest sensitivity, at the cost of diagnostic accuracy (89 and 90% specificity), outperforming traditional EIA. Once validated, these LIPS assays should be valuable screening tools for detecting biomarkers of damaged atrophic oxyntic mucosa. PMID:28102858

  12. Nuclear-Pumped Lasers. [efficient conversion of energy liberated in nuclear reactions to coherent radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The state of the art in nuclear pumped lasers is reviewed. Nuclear pumped laser modeling, nuclear volume and foil excitation of laser plasmas, proton beam simulations, nuclear flashlamp excitation, and reactor laser systems studies are covered.

  13. Molecular mechanisms for proton transport in membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Nagle, J F; Morowitz, H J

    1978-01-01

    Likely mechanisms for proton transport through biomembranes are explored. The fundamental structural element is assumed to be continuous chains of hydrogen bonds formed from the protein side groups, and a molecular example is presented. From studies in ice, such chains are predicted to have low impedance and can function as proton wires. In addition, conformational changes in the protein may be linked to the proton conduction. If this possibility is allowed, a simple proton pump can be described that can be reversed into a molecular motor driven by an electrochemical potential across the membrane. PMID:272644

  14. Axial Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor); Akkerman, James W. (Inventor); Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor); VanDamm, George Arthur (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Svejkovsky, Paul A. (Inventor); Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A rotary blood pump includes a pump housing for receiving a flow straightener, a rotor mounted on rotor bearings and having an inducer portion and an impeller portion, and a diffuser. The entrance angle, outlet angle, axial and radial clearances of blades associated with the flow straightener, inducer portion, impeller portion and diffuser are optimized to minimize hemolysis while maintaining pump efficiency. The rotor bearing includes a bearing chamber that is filled with cross-linked blood or other bio-compatible material. A back emf integrated circuit regulates rotor operation and a microcomputer may be used to control one or more back emf integrated circuits. A plurality of magnets are disposed in each of a plurality of impeller blades with a small air gap. A stator may be axially adjusted on the pump housing to absorb bearing load and maximize pump efficiency.

  15. Pumping system

    SciTech Connect

    Kime, J.A.

    1987-05-19

    This patent describes a gas-oil production system for pumping formation fluid in a well through a tubing string within which a down hole pump connects to a hydraulic stroking device through a rod string providing the pump including a plunger reciprocally driven by the hydraulic stroking device toward an upper terminal position during a plunger upstroke. The rod string normally supports the weight of a column of fluid and toward a lower terminal position at the end of a plunger downstroke during which the weight of the column fluid is normally transferred to the tubing string through fluid within the pump. The method for detecting when the well is pumped off comprises: supplying working fluid to the hydraulic stroking device to raise the hydraulic stroking device and thereby move the plunger from the lower terminal position to the upper terminal position; and removing the working fluid at a controlled rate from the hydraulic stroking device.

  16. Ferroelectric Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalink, Antony, Jr. (Inventor); Hellbaum, Richard F. (Inventor); Rohrbach, Wayne W. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A ferroelectric pump has one or more variable volume pumping chambers internal to a housing. Each chamber has at least one wall comprising a dome shaped internally prestressed ferroelectric actuator having a curvature and a dome height that varies with an electric voltage applied between an inside and outside surface of the actuator. A pumped medium flows into and out of each pumping chamber in response to displacement of the ferroelectric actuator. The ferroelectric actuator is mounted within each wall and isolates each ferroelectric actuator from the pumped medium, supplies a path for voltage to be applied to each ferroelectric actuator, and provides for positive containment of each ferroelectric actuator while allowing displacement of the entirety of each ferroelectric actuator in response to the applied voltage.

  17. Submersible pump

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, D. B.

    1985-08-27

    A method and apparatus for using a submersible pump to lift reservoir fluids in a well while having the tubing/casing annulus isolated from the produced fluids. The apparatus allows the submersible pump to be positioned above the annular packoff device. The apparatus comprises an outer shield that encloses the pump and can be attached to the production tubing. The lower end of the shield attaches to a short tubing section that seals with the annular packoff device or a receptacle above the annular packoff device.

  18. Proton Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The transport of protons across membranes is an essential process for both bioenergetics of modern cells and the origins of cellular life. All living systems make use of proton gradients across cell walls to convert environmental energy into a high-energy chemical compound, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), synthesized from adenosine diphosphate. ATP, in turn, is used as a source of energy to drive many cellular reactions. The ubiquity of this process in biology suggests that even the earliest cellular systems were relying on proton gradient for harvesting environmental energy needed to support their survival and growth. In contemporary cells, proton transfer is assisted by large, complex proteins embedded in membranes. The issue addressed in this Study was: how the same process can be accomplished with the aid of similar but much simpler molecules that could have existed in the protobiological milieu? The model system used in the study contained a bilayer membrane made of phospholipid, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) which is a good model of the biological membranes forming cellular boundaries. Both sides of the bilayer were surrounded by water which simulated the environment inside and outside the cell. Embedded in the membrane was a fragment of the Influenza-A M$_2$ protein and enough sodium counterions to maintain system neutrality. This protein has been shown to exhibit remarkably high rates of proton transport and, therefore, is an excellent model to study the formation of proton gradients across membranes. The Influenza M$_2$ protein is 97 amino acids in length, but a fragment 25 amino acids long. which contains a transmembrane domain of 19 amino acids flanked by three amino acids on each side. is sufficient to transport protons. Four identical protein fragments, each folded into a helix, aggregate to form small channels spanning the membrane. Protons are conducted through a narrow pore in the middle of the channel in response to applied voltage. This

  19. Proton exit channels in bovine cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Popović, Dragan M; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei A

    2005-02-10

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) is the terminal transmembrane enzyme of the respiratory electron transport chain in aerobic cells. It catalyzes the reduction of oxygen to water and utilizes the free energy of the reduction reaction for proton pumping, a process which results in a membrane electrochemical proton gradient. Although the structure of the enzyme has been solved for several organisms, the molecular mechanism of proton pumping and proton exit pathways remain unknown. In our previous work, the continuum electrostatic calculations were employed to evaluate the electrostatic potential, energies, and protonation state of bovine cytochrome c oxidase for different redox states of the enzyme. A possible mechanism of oxygen reduction and proton pumping via His291 was proposed. In this paper, using electrostatic calculations, we examine the proton exit pathways in the enzyme. By monitoring the changes of the protonation states, proton affinities, and energies of electrostatic interactions between the titratable groups in different redox states of CcO, we identified the clusters of strongly interacting residues. Using these data, we detected four possible proton exit points on the periplasmic side of the membrane (Lys171B/Asp173B, His24B/Asp25B, Asp51, and Asp300). We then were able to trace the proton exit pathways and to evaluate the energy profiles along the paths. On the basis of energetic considerations and the conservation of the residues in a protein sequence, the most likely exit pathway is one via the Lys171B/Asp173B site. The obtained results are fully consistent with our His291 model of proton pumping, and provide a rationale for the absence of proton leaking in CcO between the pumping strokes.

  20. ION PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1961-01-01

    An ion pump and pumping method are given for low vacuum pressures in which gases introduced into a pumping cavity are ionized and thereafter directed and accelerated into a quantity of liquid gettering metal where they are absorbed. In the preferred embodiment the metal is disposed as a liquid pool upon one electrode of a Phillips ion gauge type pump. Means are provided for continuously and remotely withdrawing and degassing the gettering metal. The liquid gettering metal may be heated if desired, although various combinations of gallium, indium, tin, bismuth, and lead, the preferred metals, have very low melting points. A background pressure of evaporated gettering metal may be provided by means of a resistance heated refractory metal wick protruding from the surface of the pcol of gettering metal.

  1. Electrokinetic pump

    DOEpatents

    Patel, Kamlesh D.

    2007-11-20

    A method for altering the surface properties of a particle bed. In application, the method pertains particularly to an electrokinetic pump configuration where nanoparticles are bonded to the surface of the stationary phase to alter the surface properties of the stationary phase including the surface area and/or the zeta potential and thus improve the efficiency and operating range of these pumps. By functionalizing the nanoparticles to change the zeta potential the electrokinetic pump is rendered capable of operating with working fluids having pH values that can range from 2-10 generally and acidic working fluids in particular. For applications in which the pump is intended to handle highly acidic solutions latex nanoparticles that are quaternary amine functionalized can be used.

  2. Slurry pumping: Pump performance prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Taccani, R.; Pediroda, V.; Reini, M.; Giadrossi, A.

    2000-07-01

    Centrifugal pumps are being used increasingly for transportation of slurries through pipelines. To design a slurry handling system it is essential to have a knowledge of the effects of suspended solids on the pump performance. A new test loop has been realized in the laboratory of the Energetics Department of the University of Trieste which allows pump performance to be determined at various pump speeds, with many different mixture concentrations and rheologies. The pump test rig consists of 150 mm diameter pipe with facilities for measuring suction and discharge pressure, flowrate, pump input power and speed, slurry density and temperature. In particular flowrate is measured by diverting flow into a weighing tank and timing a specified volume of slurry. An automatic PC based data acquisition system has been implemented. Preliminary tests with clear water show that performance can be measured with good repeatability and accuracy. The new test rig is used to verify the range of validity of the correlations to predict pump performance, available in literature and of that proposed by authors. This correlation, based on a Neural Network and not on a predefined analytical expression, can be easily improved with new experimental data.

  3. Fuel pump

    SciTech Connect

    Bellis, P.D.; Nesselrode, F.

    1991-04-16

    This patent describes a fuel pump. It includes: a fuel reservoir member, the fuel reservoir member being formed with fuel chambers, the chambers comprising an inlet chamber and an outlet chamber, means to supply fuel to the inlet chamber, means to deliver fuel from the outlet chamber to a point of use, the fuel reservoir member chambers also including a bypass chamber, means interconnecting the bypass chamber with the outlet chamber; the fuel pump also comprising pump means interconnecting the inlet chamber and the outlet chamber and adapted to suck fuel from the fuel supply means into the inlet chamber, through the pump means, out the outlet chamber, and to the fuel delivery means; the bypass chamber and the pump means providing two substantially separate paths of fuel flow in the fuel reservoir member, bypass plunger means normally closing off the flow of fuel through the bypass chamber one of the substantially separate paths including the fuel supply means and the fuel delivery means when the bypass plunger means is closed, the second of the substantially separate paths including the bypass chamber when the bypass plunger means is open, and all of the chambers and the interconnecting means therebetween being configured so as to create turbulence in the flow of any fuel supplied to the outlet chamber by the pump means and bypassed through the bypass chamber and the interconnecting means.

  4. Value of the Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Questionnaire (GerdQ) in predicting the proton pump inhibitor response in coronary artery disease patients with gastroesophageal reflux-related chest pain.

    PubMed

    He, S; Liu, Y; Chen, Y; Tang, Y; Xu, J; Tang, C

    2016-05-01

    Chest pain experienced by patients with coronary artery disease can be partly due to gastroesophageal reflux-induced chest pain (GERP). Empirical proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy has been recommended as an initial clinical approach for treating GERP. However, PPI use may lead to some health problems. The Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Questionnaire (GerdQ) may represent a noninvasive and cost-effective approach for avoiding PPI misuse and for identifying the appropriate patients for the PPI trial test. The aim of this pilot study was to prospectively evaluate the association between GerdQ scores and PPI response in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and GERP to determine whether the GerdQ predicts the PPI response in patients with CAD and GERP and to further validate the clinical application value of the GerdQ. A total of 154 consecutive patients with potential GERP were recruited to complete a GerdQ with subsequent PPI therapy. Based on the PPI trial result, patients were divided into a PPI-positive response group and a PPI-negative response group. The difference in the GerdQ scores between the two groups was assessed. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of GerdQ score was drawn according to the PPI response as the gold standard. The ability of GerdQ to predict the PPI response was assessed. A total of 96 patients completed the entire study; 62 patients (64.6%) were assigned to the PPI-positive response group, and 34 patients (35.4%) to the PPI-negative response group. The GerdQ score of the PPI-positive response group (8.11 ± 3.315) was significantly higher than that of the PPI-negative response group (4.41 ± 2.743), and the difference was statistically significant (t = 5.863, P = 0.000). The ROC curve was drawn according to a PPI response assessment result with a score above 2 as the gold standard. The area under curve was 0.806. When the critical value of GerdQ score was 7.5, Youden index was up to 0.514, the diagnostic sensitivity

  5. Proton Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... effects of the treatment. top of page What equipment is used? Proton beam therapy uses special machines, ... tumor cells. top of page Who operates the equipment? With backgrounds in mechanical, electrical, software, hardware and ...

  6. Molecular mechanisms for generating transmembrane proton gradients.

    PubMed

    Gunner, M R; Amin, Muhamed; Zhu, Xuyu; Lu, Jianxun

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins use the energy of light or high energy substrates to build a transmembrane proton gradient through a series of reactions leading to proton release into the lower pH compartment (P-side) and proton uptake from the higher pH compartment (N-side). This review considers how the proton affinity of the substrates, cofactors and amino acids are modified in four proteins to drive proton transfers. Bacterial reaction centers (RCs) and photosystem II (PSII) carry out redox chemistry with the species to be oxidized on the P-side while reduction occurs on the N-side of the membrane. Terminal redox cofactors are used which have pKas that are strongly dependent on their redox state, so that protons are lost on oxidation and gained on reduction. Bacteriorhodopsin is a true proton pump. Light activation triggers trans to cis isomerization of a bound retinal. Strong electrostatic interactions within clusters of amino acids are modified by the conformational changes initiated by retinal motion leading to changes in proton affinity, driving transmembrane proton transfer. Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) catalyzes the reduction of O2 to water. The protons needed for chemistry are bound from the N-side. The reduction chemistry also drives proton pumping from N- to P-side. Overall, in CcO the uptake of 4 electrons to reduce O2 transports 8 charges across the membrane, with each reduction fully coupled to removal of two protons from the N-side, the delivery of one for chemistry and transport of the other to the P-side.

  7. Molecular mechanisms for generating transmembrane proton gradients

    PubMed Central

    Gunner, M.R.; Amin, Muhamed; Zhu, Xuyu; Lu, Jianxun

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins use the energy of light or high energy substrates to build a transmembrane proton gradient through a series of reactions leading to proton release into the lower pH compartment (P-side) and proton uptake from the higher pH compartment (N-side). This review considers how the proton affinity of the substrates, cofactors and amino acids are modified in four proteins to drive proton transfers. Bacterial reaction centers (RCs) and photosystem II (PSII) carry out redox chemistry with the species to be oxidized on the P-side while reduction occurs on the N-side of the membrane. Terminal redox cofactors are used which have pKas that are strongly dependent on their redox state, so that protons are lost on oxidation and gained on reduction. Bacteriorhodopsin is a true proton pump. Light activation triggers trans to cis isomerization of a bound retinal. Strong electrostatic interactions within clusters of amino acids are modified by the conformational changes initiated by retinal motion leading to changes in proton affinity, driving transmembrane proton transfer. Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) catalyzes the reduction of O2 to water. The protons needed for chemistry are bound from the N-side. The reduction chemistry also drives proton pumping from N- to P-side. Overall, in CcO the uptake of 4 electrons to reduce O2 transports 8 charges across the membrane, with each reduction fully coupled to removal of two protons from the N-side, the delivery of one for chemistry and transport of the other to the P-side. PMID:23507617

  8. Design of a Gated Molecular Proton Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Wei; Zhou, Bo; Geyer, Tihamer; Hutter, Michael C.; Fang, Haiping; Helms, Volkhard H.

    2011-01-17

    The generation of an electrochemical pH gradient across biological membranes using energy from photosynthesis and respiration provides the universal driving force in cells for the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the energy unit of life. Creating such an electrochemical potential requires the transportation of protons against a thermodynamic gradient. In biological proton pumps, chemical energy is used to induce protein conformational changes during each catalytic cycle where one or a few protons are pumped against a proton concentration gradient across the membrane. On the other hand, membrane channels also exist that mediate continuous particle exchange and may be switched between open and closed states. Being able to design nanochannels with similar functions would be of great importance for creating novel molecular devices with a wide range of applications such as molecular motors, fuel cells, rechargeable nanobatteries that provide energy to other nanomachines, and the generation of locally and temporally controlled pH jumps on microfluidic chips.

  9. Single mutations that redirect internal proton transfer in the ba3 oxidase from Thermus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Irina; Chang, Hsin-Yang; von Ballmoos, Christoph; Ädelroth, Pia; Gennis, Robert B; Brzezinski, Peter

    2013-10-08

    The ba3-type cytochrome c oxidase from Thermus thermophilus is a membrane-bound proton pump. Results from earlier studies have shown that with the aa3-type oxidases proton uptake to the catalytic site and "pump site" occurs simultaneously. However, with ba3 oxidase the pump site is loaded before proton transfer to the catalytic site because the proton transfer to the latter is slower than that with the aa3 oxidases. In addition, the timing of formation and decay of catalytic intermediates is different in the two types of oxidases. In the present study, we have investigated two mutant ba3 CytcOs in which residues of the proton pathway leading to the catalytic site as well as the pump site were exchanged, Thr312Val and Tyr244Phe. Even though ba3 CytcO uses only a single proton pathway for transfer of the substrate and "pumped" protons, the amino-acid residue substitutions had distinctly different effects on the kinetics of proton transfer to the catalytic site and the pump site. The results indicate that the rates of these reactions can be modified independently by replacement of single residues within the proton pathway. Furthermore, the data suggest that the Thr312Val and Tyr244Phe mutations interfere with a structural rearrangement in the proton pathway that is rate limiting for proton transfer to the catalytic site.

  10. DIFFUSION PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Levenson, L.

    1963-09-01

    A high-vacuum diffusion pump is described, featuring a novel housing geometry for enhancing pumping speed. An upright, cylindrical lower housing portion is surmounted by a concentric, upright, cylindrical upper housing portion of substantially larger diameter; an uppermost nozzle, disposed concentrically within the upper portion, is adapted to eject downwardly a conical sheet of liquid outwardly to impinge upon the uppermost extremity of the interior wall of the lower portion. Preferably this nozzle is mounted upon a pedestal rising coaxially from within the lower portion and projecting up into said upper portion. (AEC)

  11. Electrokinetic pump

    DOEpatents

    Hencken, Kenneth R.; Sartor, George B.

    2004-08-03

    An electrokinetic pump in which the porous dielectric medium of conventional electrokinetic pumps is replaced by a patterned microstructure. The patterned microstructure is fabricated by lithographic patterning and etching of a substrate and is formed by features arranged so as to create an array of microchannels. The microchannels have dimensions on the order of the pore spacing in a conventional porous dielectric medium. Embedded unitary electrodes are vapor deposited on either end of the channel structure to provide the electric field necessary for electroosmotic flow.

  12. Characterizing the proton loading site in cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianxun; Gunner, M R

    2014-08-26

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) uses the energy released by reduction of O2 to H2O to drive eight charges from the high pH to low pH side of the membrane, increasing the electrochemical gradient. Four electrons and protons are used for chemistry, while four more protons are pumped. Proton pumping requires that residues on a pathway change proton affinity through the reaction cycle to load and then release protons. The protonation states of all residues in CcO are determined in MultiConformational Continuum Electrostatics simulations with the protonation and redox states of heme a, a3, Cu(B), Y288, and E286 used to define the catalytic cycle. One proton is found to be loaded and released from residues identified as the proton loading site (PLS) on the P-side of the protein in each of the four CcO redox states. Thus, the same proton pumping mechanism can be used each time CcO is reduced. Calculations with structures of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Paracoccus denitrificans, and bovine CcO derived by crystallography and molecular dynamics show the PLS functions similarly in different CcO species. The PLS is a cluster rather than a single residue, as different structures show 1-4 residues load and release protons. However, the proton affinity of the heme a3 propionic acids primarily determines the number of protons loaded into the PLS; if their proton affinity is too low, less than one proton is loaded.

  13. Substitution of amino acids Asp-85, Asp-212, and Arg-82 in bacteriorhodopsin affects the proton release phase of the pump and the pK of the Schiff base

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, H.; Marti, T.; Holz, M.; Mogi, T.; Stern, L.J.; Engel, F.; Khorana, H.G.; Heyn, M.P. )

    1990-02-01

    Photocycle and flash-induced proton release and uptake were investigated for bacteriorhodopsin mutants in which Asp-85 was replaced by Ala, Asn, or Glu; Asp-212 was replaced by Asn or Glu; Asp-115 was replaced by Ala, Asn, or Glu; Asp-96 was replaced by Ala, Asn, or Glu; and Arg-82 was replaced by Ala or Gln in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine/3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1- propanesulfonate micelles at pH 7.3. In the Asp-85----Ala and Asp-85----Asn mutants, the absence of the charged carboxyl group leads to a blue chromophore at 600 and 595 nm, respectively, and lowers the pK of the Schiff base deprotonation to 8.2 and 7, respectively, suggesting a role for Asp-85 as counterion to the Schiff base. The early part of the photocycles of the Asp-85----Ala and Asp-85----Asn mutants is strongly perturbed; the formation of a weak M-like intermediate is slowed down about 100-fold over wild type. In both mutants, proton release is also slower but clearly precedes the rise of M. The amplitude of the early reversed photovoltage component in the Asp-85----Asn mutant is very large, and the net charge displacement is close to zero, indicating proton release and uptake on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. The data suggest an obligatory role for Asp-85 in the efficient deprotonation of the Schiff base and in the proton release phase, probably as proton acceptor. In the Asp-212----Asn mutant, the rise of the absorbance change at 410 nm is slowed down to 220 microsecond, its amplitude is small, and the release of protons is delayed to 1.9 ms. The absorbance changes at 650 nm indicate perturbations in the early time range with a slow K intermediate. Thus Asp-212 also participates in the early events of charge translocation and deprotonation of the Schiff base.

  14. Timing of electron and proton transfer in the ba(3) cytochrome c oxidase from Thermus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    von Ballmoos, Christoph; Lachmann, Peter; Gennis, Robert B; Ädelroth, Pia; Brzezinski, Peter

    2012-06-05

    Heme-copper oxidases are membrane-bound proteins that catalyze the reduction of O(2) to H(2)O, a highly exergonic reaction. Part of the free energy of this reaction is used for pumping of protons across the membrane. The ba(3) oxidase from Thermus thermophilus presumably uses a single proton pathway for the transfer of substrate protons used during O(2) reduction as well as for the transfer of the protons that are pumped across the membrane. The pumping stoichiometry (0.5 H(+)/electron) is lower than that of most other (mitochondrial-like) oxidases characterized to date (1 H(+)/electron). We studied the pH dependence and deuterium isotope effect of the kinetics of electron and proton transfer reactions in the ba(3) oxidase. The results from these studies suggest that the movement of protons to the catalytic site and movement to a site located some distance from the catalytic site [proposed to be a "proton-loading site" (PLS) for pumped protons] are separated in time, which allows individual investigation of these reactions. A scenario in which the uptake and release of a pumped proton occurs upon every second transfer of an electron to the catalytic site would explain the decreased proton pumping stoichiometry compared to that of mitochondrial-like oxidases.

  15. Structure and operation of bacterial tripartite pumps.

    PubMed

    Hinchliffe, Philip; Symmons, Martyn F; Hughes, Colin; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2013-01-01

    In bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, tripartite membrane machineries, or pumps, determine the efflux of small noxious molecules, such as detergents, heavy metals, and antibiotics, and the export of large proteins including toxins. They are therefore influential in bacterial survival, particularly during infections caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens. In these tripartite pumps an inner membrane transporter, typically an ATPase or proton antiporter, binds and translocates export or efflux substrates. In cooperation with a periplasmic adaptor protein it recruits and opens a TolC family cell exit duct, which is anchored in the outer membrane and projects across the periplasmic space between inner and outer membranes. Assembled tripartite pumps thus span the entire bacterial cell envelope. We review the atomic structures of each of the three pump components and discuss how these have allowed high-resolution views of tripartite pump assembly, operation, and possible inhibition.

  16. 18. Electrically driven pumps in Armory Street Pump House. Pumps ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Electrically driven pumps in Armory Street Pump House. Pumps in background formerly drew water from the clear well. They went out of service when use of the beds was discontinued. Pumps in the foreground provide high pressure water to Hamden. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Armory Street Pumphouse, North side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  17. Kinetics of proton release and uptake by channelrhodopsin-2.

    PubMed

    Nack, Melanie; Radu, Ionela; Schultz, Bernd-Joachim; Resler, Tom; Schlesinger, Ramona; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta; del Val, Coral; Abbruzzetti, Stefania; Viappiani, Cristiano; Bamann, Christian; Bamberg, Ernst; Heberle, Joachim

    2012-05-07

    Electrophysiological experiments showed that the light-activated cation channel channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) pumps protons in the absence of a membrane potential. We determined here the kinetics of transient pH change using a water-soluble pH-indicator. It is shown that ChR2 released protons prior to uptake with a stoichiometry of 0.3 protons per ChR2. Comparison to the photocycle kinetics revealed that proton release and uptake match rise and decay of the P(3)(520) intermediate. As the P(3)(520) state also represents the conductive state of cation channeling, the concurrence of proton pumping and channel gating implies an intimate mechanistic link of the two functional modes. Studies on the E123T and S245E mutants show that these residues are not critically involved in proton translocation.

  18. The Toolbox of Proton Spin Physics in Historical Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haeberli, Willy

    2008-02-01

    This paper was part of the general-interest session on lecture day, and is thus addressed to a general audience. A 50-year historic overview of the development of the tools of proton spin physics is presented: nuclear scattering, ion sources for polarized protons and deuterons based on atomic beam and optical pumping methods, and polarized gas targets.

  19. Proton transfer in ba(3) cytochrome c oxidase from Thermus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    von Ballmoos, Christoph; Adelroth, Pia; Gennis, Robert B; Brzezinski, Peter

    2012-04-01

    The respiratory heme-copper oxidases catalyze reduction of O(2) to H(2)O, linking this process to transmembrane proton pumping. These oxidases have been classified according to the architecture, location and number of proton pathways. Most structural and functional studies to date have been performed on the A-class oxidases, which includes those that are found in the inner mitochondrial membrane and bacteria such as Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Paracoccus denitrificans (aa(3)-type oxidases in these bacteria). These oxidases pump protons with a stoichiometry of one proton per electron transferred to the catalytic site. The bacterial A-class oxidases use two proton pathways (denoted by letters D and K, respectively), for the transfer of protons to the catalytic site, and protons that are pumped across the membrane. The B-type oxidases such as, for example, the ba(3) oxidase from Thermus thermophilus, pump protons with a lower stoichiometry of 0.5 H(+)/electron and use only one proton pathway for the transfer of all protons. This pathway overlaps in space with the K pathway in the A class oxidases without showing any sequence homology though. Here, we review the functional properties of the A- and the B-class ba(3) oxidases with a focus on mechanisms of proton transfer and pumping.

  20. Proton Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Breast Esophagus Rectum Skull base sarcomas Pediatric brain tumors Head and neck - see the Head and Neck Cancer page Eye ... Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Brain Tumor Treatment Brain Tumors Prostate Cancer Lung Cancer ... related to Proton Therapy Videos related ...

  1. Proton Radiobiology

    PubMed Central

    Tommasino, Francesco; Durante, Marco

    2015-01-01

    In addition to the physical advantages (Bragg peak), the use of charged particles in cancer therapy can be associated with distinct biological effects compared to X-rays. While heavy ions (densely ionizing radiation) are known to have an energy- and charge-dependent increased Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE), protons should not be very different from sparsely ionizing photons. A slightly increased biological effectiveness is taken into account in proton treatment planning by assuming a fixed RBE of 1.1 for the whole radiation field. However, data emerging from recent studies suggest that, for several end points of clinical relevance, the biological response is differentially modulated by protons compared to photons. In parallel, research in the field of medical physics highlighted how variations in RBE that are currently neglected might actually result in deposition of significant doses in healthy organs. This seems to be relevant in particular for normal tissues in the entrance region and for organs at risk close behind the tumor. All these aspects will be considered and discussed in this review, highlighting how a re-discussion of the role of a variable RBE in proton therapy might be well-timed. PMID:25686476

  2. Solar Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pique, Charles

    1987-01-01

    Proposed pump moves liquid by action of bubbles formed by heat of sun. Tube of liquid having boiling point of 100 to 200 degrees F placed at focal axis of cylindrical reflector. Concentrated sunlight boils liquid at focus, and bubbles of vapor rise in tube, carrying liquid along with them. Pressure difference in hot tube sufficient to produce flow in large loop. Used with conventional flat solar heating panel in completely solar-powered heat-storage system.

  3. Heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Apte, A.J.

    1982-11-30

    A single working fluid heat pump system having a turbocompressor with a first fluid input for the turbine and a second fluid input for the compressor, and a single output volute or mixing chamber for combining the working fluid output flows of the turbine and the compressor. The system provides for higher efficiency than single fluid systems whose turbine and compressor are provided with separate output volutes.

  4. Energy saving pump and pumping system

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, K.C.

    1983-08-02

    A centrifugal pump and a pumping system are disclosed that recover hydraulic energy in response to flow capacity reduction and spontaneously provide a recirculating flow at low capacities when pump cooling is needed. From a upstream source the fluid is guided by two suction lines to two parallel pumping mechanisms housed by a common discharge casing. Said pumping mechanisms have a combined hydraulic characteristic that the first pumping mechanism will force a reverse flow through the second pumping mechanism, when pump discharge is reduced by the system below a certain low flow rate. The reverse flow will then return to the upstream fluid source through a suction line. The pump is the protected from overheating by a circulating flow at low flow capacities. At the same time, said reverse flow generates a turbine action on the second pumping mechanism and transmits the contained hydraulic energy back to the rotor and thereby results in power saving at low flow capacities.

  5. Proton maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensley, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    New calculations are reported which confirm the ability of an a priori random, initial-phase proton beam to drive a simple, single-stage microwave cavity maser or transit-time oscillator (TTO) to saturation conversion efficiencies of about 11 percent. The required initial TE(011) mode field can be provided from beam ramp-up bandwidth of excitation to a low level from an external source. A saturation field of 45 tesla and output power of 0.2 TW are calculated using an electron insulation field of 10 tesla and a 3 MeV, 400 Ka/sq cm beam. Results are compared to those for an electron beam of the same energy and geometry, and it is shown that proton beams potentially can provide a three order of magnitude increase in overall microwave power production density over that obtainable from electron beam TTOs.

  6. DISK PUMP FEASIBILITY INVESTIGATION,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The disk pump was investigated at the Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory (AFRPL) to determine the feasibility of using a novel viscous pumping... pump primarily for application as an inducer. The disk pump differs drastically from conventional pumps because of the following major factors: (1) The...The pump inlet relative velocity is equal only to the through flow velocity between the disks. Therefore, there is good indication that the disk pump will

  7. Well pump

    SciTech Connect

    Page, J.S.

    1983-03-08

    Well fluid pumping apparatus comprises: (A) body structure defining an upright plunger bore, (B) a plunger reciprocable in that bore, (C) the body structure also defining a chamber sidewardly offset from an axis defined by the plunger bore and communicating with the bore, and (D) valving carried by the body structure to pass intake fluid via the chamber into the plunger bore in response to stroking of the plunger in one direction in the bore, and to pass discharge fluid from the plunger bore into and from the chamber in response to stroking of the plunger in the opposite direction in the bore.

  8. Pump apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Kime, J.A.

    1987-02-17

    This patent describes a gas-oil well production system for pumping formation fluid wherein a down hole pump is provided having a barrel including a barrel fluid inlet, a barrel fluid outlet, a barrel chamber, and a plunger mounted in the barrel chamber having a plunger chamber. The plunger is reciprocally driven between an upper terminal position at the end of the plunger upstroke and a lower terminal position at the end of the plunger downstroke. The method for removing developed gaseous fluids in the formation fluid from the barrel chamber comprises: drawing formation fluid into the barrel chamber during the plunger upstroke; providing gas port means in the barrel; expelling the developed gaseous fluids from the barrel chamber through the gas port means during the occurrence of that portion of the plunger downstroke from the upper terminal position of the gas port means; and substantially blocking the gas port means and moving formation fluid into the plunger chamber during the occurrence of that portion of the plunger downstroke from below the gas port means to the lower terminal position.

  9. Squeezing at entrance of proton transport pathway in proton-translocating pyrophosphatase upon substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yun-Tzu; Liu, Tseng-Huang; Lin, Shih-Ming; Chen, Yen-Wei; Pan, Yih-Jiuan; Lee, Ching-Hung; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Tseng, Fan-Gang; Pan, Rong-Long

    2013-07-05

    Homodimeric proton-translocating pyrophosphatase (H(+)-PPase; EC 3.6.1.1) is indispensable for many organisms in maintaining organellar pH homeostasis. This unique proton pump couples the hydrolysis of PPi to proton translocation across the membrane. H(+)-PPase consists of 14-16 relatively hydrophobic transmembrane domains presumably for proton translocation and hydrophilic loops primarily embedding a catalytic site. Several highly conserved polar residues located at or near the entrance of the transport pathway in H(+)-PPase are essential for proton pumping activity. In this investigation single molecule FRET was employed to dissect the action at the pathway entrance in homodimeric Clostridium tetani H(+)-PPase upon ligand binding. The presence of the substrate analog, imidodiphosphate mediated two sites at the pathway entrance moving toward each other. Moreover, single molecule FRET analyses after the mutation at the first proton-carrying residue (Arg-169) demonstrated that conformational changes at the entrance are conceivably essential for the initial step of H(+)-PPase proton translocation. A working model is accordingly proposed to illustrate the squeeze at the entrance of the transport pathway in H(+)-PPase upon substrate binding.

  10. Proton scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, Gregory H

    2009-01-01

    This note presents analytic estimates of the performance of proton beams in remote surveillance for nuclear materials. The analysis partitions the analysis into the eight steps used by a companion note: (1) Air scattering, (2) Neutron production in the ship and cargo, (3) Target detection probability, (4) Signal produced by target, (5) Attenuation of signal by ship and cargo, (6) Attenuation of signal by air, (7) Geometric dilution, and (8) Detector Efficiency. The above analyses indicate that the dominant air scattering and loss mechanisms for particle remote sensing are calculable with reliable and accepted tools. They make it clear that the conversion of proton beams into neutron sources rapidly goes to completion in all but thinnest targets, which means that proton interrogation is for all purposes executed by neutrons. Diffusion models and limiting approximations to them are simple and credible - apart from uncertainty over the cross sections to be used in them - and uncertainty over the structure of the vessels investigated. Multiplication is essentially unknown, in part because it depends on the details of the target and its shielding, which are unlikely to be known in advance. Attenuation of neutron fluxes on the way out are more complicated due to geometry, the spectrum of fission neutrons, and the details of their slowing down during egress. The attenuation by air is large but less uncertain. Detectors and technology are better known. The overall convolution of these effects lead to large but arguably tolerable levels of attenuation of input beams and output signals. That is particularly the case for small, mobile sensors, which can more than compensate for size with proximity to operate reliably while remaining below flux limits. Overall, the estimates used here appear to be of adequate accuracy for decisions. That assessment is strengthened by their agreement with companion calculations.

  11. LMFBR with booster pump in pumping loop

    DOEpatents

    Rubinstein, H.J.

    1975-10-14

    A loop coolant circulation system is described for a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) utilizing a low head, high specific speed booster pump in the hot leg of the coolant loop with the main pump located in the cold leg of the loop, thereby providing the advantages of operating the main pump in the hot leg with the reliability of cold leg pump operation.

  12. Liquid metal pump

    DOEpatents

    Pennell, William E.

    1982-01-01

    The liquid metal pump comprises floating seal rings and attachment of the pump diffuser to the pump bowl for isolating structural deflections from the pump shaft bearings. The seal rings also eliminate precision machining on large assemblies by eliminating the need for a close tolerance fit between the mounting surfaces of the pump and the seals. The liquid metal pump also comprises a shaft support structure that is isolated from the pump housing for better preservation of alignment of shaft bearings. The shaft support structure also allows for complete removal of pump internals for inspection and repair.

  13. Winding for linear pump

    DOEpatents

    Kliman, G.B.; Brynsvold, G.V.; Jahns, T.M.

    1989-08-22

    A winding and method of winding for a submersible linear pump for pumping liquid sodium are disclosed. The pump includes a stator having a central cylindrical duct preferably vertically aligned. The central vertical duct is surrounded by a system of coils in slots. These slots are interleaved with magnetic flux conducting elements, these magnetic flux conducting elements forming a continuous magnetic field conduction path along the stator. The central duct has placed therein a cylindrical magnetic conducting core, this core having a cylindrical diameter less than the diameter of the cylindrical duct. The core once placed to the duct defines a cylindrical interstitial pumping volume of the pump. This cylindrical interstitial pumping volume preferably defines an inlet at the bottom of the pump, and an outlet at the top of the pump. Pump operation occurs by static windings in the outer stator sequentially conveying toroidal fields from the pump inlet at the bottom of the pump to the pump outlet at the top of the pump. The winding apparatus and method of winding disclosed uses multiple slots per pole per phase with parallel winding legs on each phase equal to or less than the number of slots per pole per phase. The slot sequence per pole per phase is chosen to equalize the variations in flux density of the pump sodium as it passes into the pump at the pump inlet with little or no flux and acquires magnetic flux in passage through the pump to the pump outlet. 4 figs.

  14. Winding for linear pump

    DOEpatents

    Kliman, Gerald B.; Brynsvold, Glen V.; Jahns, Thomas M.

    1989-01-01

    A winding and method of winding for a submersible linear pump for pumping liquid sodium is disclosed. The pump includes a stator having a central cylindrical duct preferably vertically aligned. The central vertical duct is surrounded by a system of coils in slots. These slots are interleaved with magnetic flux conducting elements, these magnetic flux conducting elements forming a continuous magnetic field conduction path along the stator. The central duct has placed therein a cylindrical magnetic conducting core, this core having a cylindrical diameter less than the diameter of the cylindrical duct. The core once placed to the duct defines a cylindrical interstitial pumping volume of the pump. This cylindrical interstitial pumping volume preferably defines an inlet at the bottom of the pump, and an outlet at the top of the pump. Pump operation occurs by static windings in the outer stator sequentially conveying toroidal fields from the pump inlet at the bottom of the pump to the pump outlet at the top of the pump. The winding apparatus and method of winding disclosed uses multiple slots per pole per phase with parallel winding legs on each phase equal to or less than the number of slots per pole per phase. The slot sequence per pole per phase is chosen to equalize the variations in flux density of the pump sodium as it passes into the pump at the pump inlet with little or no flux and acquires magnetic flux in passage through the pump to the pump outlet.

  15. Mechanism of proton entry into the cytoplasmic section of the proton-conducting channel of bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Checover, S; Nachliel, E; Dencher, N A; Gutman, M

    1997-11-11

    Bacteriorhodopsin is the light-driven proton-pumping protein of Halobacterium salinarum that extracts protons from the well-buffered cytoplasmic space within the time limits set by the photocycle turnover. The specific mechanism of the proton uptake by the cytoplasmic surface of the protein was investigated in this study by the laser-induced proton pulse technique. The purple membrane preparations were labeled by fluorescein at two residues (36 or 38) of the cytoplasmic surface of the protein, sites that are close to the orifice of the proton-conducting channel. The membranes were pulsed by protons discharged from photoexcited pyranine [Nachliel, E., Gutman, M., Kiryati, S., and Dencher, N.A. (1996) Proc. Nat Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 93, 10747-10752). The reaction of the discharged protons with the pyranine anion and the fluorescein was measured with sub-microsecond resolution. The experimental signals were reconstructed through numeric integration of differential rate equations which quantitated the rates of all proton transfer reactions between all reactants present in the system. The interaction of protons with the orifice of the cytoplasmic channel is enhanced by the exposed carboxylates of the protein. A cluster of three carboxylates acts as a strong proton attractor site while one carboxylate, identified as D36, acts as a mediator that delivers the proton to the channel. The combination of these reactions render the surface of the protein with properties of a proton-collecting antenna. The size of the collecting area is less than that of the protein's surface.

  16. Hydraulic pump

    SciTech Connect

    Polak, P.R.; Jantzen, D.E.

    1984-05-15

    This invention relates to an improved pump jack characterized by a hollow piston rod which telescopes down over the sucker rod to which it is clamped for reciprocating motion. The cylinder, in turn, is fastened in fixed position directly to the upper exposed end of the well casing. As fluid is introduced into the lower end of the cylinder it raises the piston into engagement with a pushrod housed in the upper cylinder head that lifts switch-actuating means associated therewith into a position operative to actuate a switch located adjacent thereto thereby causing the latter to change state and actuate a multi-function solenoid valve so as to cut off fluid flow to the cylinder. As gravity lowers the sucker rod and piston exhausting the hydraulic fluid therebeneath, an adjustable stop engages the pushrod from above so as to return it together with the switch-actuating means associated therewith to their original positions thereby resetting the switch to complete the operating cycle.

  17. Whole blood pumping with a microthrottle pump

    PubMed Central

    Davies, M. J.; Johnston, I. D.; Tan, C. K. L.; Tracey, M. C.

    2010-01-01

    We have previously reported that microthrottle pumps (MTPs) display the capacity to pump solid phase suspensions such as polystyrene beads which prove challenging to most microfluidic pumps. In this paper we report employing a linear microthrottle pump (LMTP) to pump whole, undiluted, anticoagulated, human venous blood at 200 μl min−1 with minimal erythrocyte lysis and no observed pump blockage. LMTPs are particularly well suited to particle suspension transport by virtue of their relatively unimpeded internal flow-path. Micropumping of whole blood represents a rigorous real-world test of cell suspension transport given blood’s high cell content by volume and erythrocytes’ relative fragility. A modification of the standard Drabkin method and its validation to spectrophotometrically quantify low levels of erythrocyte lysis by hemoglobin release is also reported. Erythrocyte lysis rates resulting from transport via LMTP are determined to be below one cell in 500 at a pumping rate of 102 μl min−1. PMID:21264059

  18. Proton radiography to improve proton therapy treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takatsu, J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Van Goethem, M.-J.; van Beuzekom, M.; Klaver, T.; Visser, J.; Brandenburg, S.; Biegun, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    The quality of cancer treatment with protons critically depends on an accurate prediction of the proton stopping powers for the tissues traversed by the protons. Today, treatment planning in proton radiotherapy is based on stopping power calculations from densities of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) images. This causes systematic uncertainties in the calculated proton range in a patient of typically 3-4%, but can become even 10% in bone regions [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8]. This may lead to no dose in parts of the tumor and too high dose in healthy tissues [1]. A direct measurement of proton stopping powers with high-energy protons will allow reducing these uncertainties and will improve the quality of the treatment. Several studies have shown that a sufficiently accurate radiograph can be obtained by tracking individual protons traversing a phantom (patient) [4,6,10]. Our studies benefit from the gas-filled time projection chambers based on GridPix technology [2], developed at Nikhef, capable of tracking a single proton. A BaF2 crystal measuring the residual energy of protons was used. Proton radiographs of phantom consisting of different tissue-like materials were measured with a 30×30 mm2 150 MeV proton beam. Measurements were simulated with the Geant4 toolkit.First experimental and simulated energy radiographs are in very good agreement [3]. In this paper we focus on simulation studies of the proton scattering angle as it affects the position resolution of the proton energy loss radiograph. By selecting protons with a small scattering angle, the image quality can be improved significantly.

  19. Multiple pump housing

    DOEpatents

    Donoho, II, Michael R.; Elliott, Christopher M.

    2010-03-23

    A fluid delivery system includes a first pump having a first drive assembly, a second pump having a second drive assembly, and a pump housing. At least a portion of each of the first and second pumps are located in the housing.

  20. Types of Breast Pumps

    MedlinePlus

    ... Powered and Electric Pumps A powered breast pump uses batteries or a cord plugged into an electrical outlet ... pumps rely on a power source, women who use powered breast pumps should be prepared for emergency situations when electricity or extra batteries may not be available. If breastfeeding is not ...

  1. Asymmetric Functional Conversion of Eubacterial Light-driven Ion Pumps.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Keiichi; Nomura, Yurika; Kandori, Hideki

    2016-05-06

    In addition to the well-known light-driven outward proton pumps, novel ion-pumping rhodopsins functioning as outward Na(+) and inward Cl(-) pumps have been recently found in eubacteria. They convert light energy into transmembrane electrochemical potential difference, similar to the prototypical archaeal H(+) pump bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and Cl(-) pump halorhodopsin (HR). The H(+), Na(+), and Cl(-) pumps possess the conserved respective DTE, NDQ, and NTQ motifs in the helix C, which likely serve as their functional determinants. To verify this hypothesis, we attempted functional interconversion between selected pumps from each category by mutagenesis. Introduction of the proton-pumping motif resulted in successful Na(+) → H(+) functional conversion. Introduction of the respective characteristic motifs with several additional mutations leads to successful Na(+) → Cl(-) and Cl(-) → H(+) functional conversions, whereas remaining conversions (H(+) → Na(+), H(+) → Cl(-), Cl(-) → Na(+)) were unsuccessful when mutagenesis of 4-6 residues was used. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that a H(+) pump is the common ancestor of all of these rhodopsins, from which Cl(-) pumps emerged followed by Na(+) pumps. We propose that successful functional conversions of these ion pumps are achieved exclusively when mutagenesis reverses the evolutionary amino acid sequence changes. Dependence of the observed functional conversions on the direction of evolution strongly suggests that the essential structural mechanism of an ancestral function is retained even after the gain of a new function during natural evolution, which can be evoked by a few mutations. By contrast, the gain of a new function needs accumulation of multiple mutations, which may not be easily reproduced by limited mutagenesis in vitro.

  2. Redox-controlled proton gating in bovine cytochrome c oxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Denis

    2015-03-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase is the terminal enzyme in the electron transfer chain of essentially all organisms that utilize oxygen to generate energy. It reduces oxygen to water and harnesses the energy to pump protons across the mitochondrial membrane in eukaryotes and the plasma membrane in prokaryotes. The mechanism by which proton pumping is coupled to the oxygen reduction reaction remains unresolved, owing to the difficulty of visualizing proton movement within the massive membrane-associated protein matrix. Here, with a novel hydrogen/deuterium exchange resonance Raman spectroscopy method, we have identified two critical elements of the proton pump: a proton loading site near the propionate groups of heme a, which is capable of transiently storing protons uploaded from the negative-side of the membrane prior to their release into the positive-side of the membrane and a conformational gate that controls proton translocation in response to the change in the redox state of heme a. These findings form the basis for a postulated molecular model describing a detailed mechanism by which unidirectional proton translocation is coupled to electron transfer from heme a to heme a3, associated with oxygen chemistry occurring in the heme a3 site, during enzymatic turnover. Each time heme a undergoes an oxidation-reduction transition a proton is translocated across the membrane accounting for the observation that two protons are translocated during the oxidative phase of the enzymatic cycle and two more are translocated during the reductive phase. This work was done in collaboration with Drs. Tsuyoshi Egawa and Syun-Ru Yeh. This work was supported the National Institutes of Health Grant GM098799 to D.L.R and National Science Foundation Grant NSF 0956358 to S.-R.Y.

  3. PIV Measurements in Pumps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    Pump Impeller Fig. 37 shows the top view of pump test rig for radial impeller pumps . The goal of this experiment is cavitation observation and their...PIV Measurements in Pumps 5 - 28 RTO-EN-AVT-143 Figure 37: Test Rig for Combined PIV Measurements and Cavitation Observation. Figure 38...RTO-EN-AVT-143 5 - 1 PIV Measurements in Pumps Dr. Detlev L. Wulff TU Braunschweig Institut für Strömungsmaschinen Langer Kamp 6 D-38106

  4. Synchrotron based proton drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou

    2002-09-19

    Proton drivers are the proton sources that produce intense short proton bunches. They have a wide range of applications. This paper discusses the proton drivers based on high-intensity proton synchrotrons. It gives a review of the high-intensity proton sources over the world and a brief report on recent developments in this field in the U.S. high-energy physics (HEP) community. The Fermilab Proton Driver is used as a case study for a number of challenging technical design issues.

  5. Proton Therapy - Accelerating Protons to Save Lives

    SciTech Connect

    Keppel, Cynthia

    2011-10-25

    In 1946, physicist Robert Wilson first suggested that protons could be used as a form of radiation therapy in the treatment of cancer because of the sharp drop-off that occurs on the distal edge of the radiation dose. Research soon confirmed that high-energy protons were particularly suitable for treating tumors near critical structures, such as the heart and spinal column. The precision with which protons can be delivered means that more radiation can be deposited into the tumor while the surrounding healthy tissue receives substantially less or, in some cases, no radiation. Since these times, particle accelerators have continuously been used in cancer therapy and today new facilities specifically designed for proton therapy are being built in many countries. Proton therapy has been hailed as a revolutionary cancer treatment, with higher cure rates and fewer side effects than traditional X-ray photon radiation therapy. Proton therapy is the modality of choice for treating certain small tumors of the eye, head or neck. Because it exposes less of the tissue surrounding a tumor to the dosage, proton therapy lowers the risk of secondary cancers later in life - especially important for young children. To date, over 80,000 patients worldwide have been treated with protons. Currently, there are nine proton radiation therapy facilities operating in the United States, one at the Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute. An overview of the treatment technology and this new center will be presented.

  6. Continuously pumping and reactivating gas pump

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, T.H.; Call, W.R.

    Apparatus for continuous pumping using cycling cryopumping panels. A plurality of liquid helium cooled panels are surrounded by movable nitrogen cooled panels that alternatively expose or shield the helium cooled panels from the space being pumped. Gases condense on exposed helium cooled panels until the nitrogen cooled panels are positioned to isolate the helium cooled panels. The helium cooled panels are incrementally warmed, causing captured gases to accumulate at the base of the panels, where an independant pump removes the gases. After the helium cooled panels are substantially cleaned of condensate, the nitrogen cooled panels are positioned to expose the helium cooled panels to the space being pumped.

  7. Continuously pumping and reactivating gas pump

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, Thomas H.; Call, Wayne R.

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus for continuous pumping using cycling cyropumping panels. A plurality of liquid helium cooled panels are surrounded by movable nitrogen cooled panels the alternatively expose or shield the helium cooled panels from the space being pumped. Gases condense on exposed helium cooled panels until the nitrogen cooled panels are positioned to isolate the helium cooled panels. The helium cooled panels are incrementally warmed, causing captured gases to accumulate at the base of the panels, where an independent pump removes the gases. After the helium cooled panels are substantially cleaned of condensate, the nitrogen cooled panels are positioned to expose the helium cooled panels to the space being pumped.

  8. Alternative backing up pump for turbomolecular pumps

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2003-04-22

    As an alternative to the use of a mechanical backing pump in the application of wide range turbomolecular pumps in ultra-high and extra high vacuum applications, palladium oxide is used to convert hydrogen present in the evacuation stream and related volumes to water with the water then being cryo-pumped to a low pressure of below about 1.e.sup.-3 Torr at 150.degree. K. Cryo-pumping is achieved using a low cost Kleemenco cycle cryocooler, a somewhat more expensive thermoelectric cooler, a Venturi cooler or a similar device to achieve the required minimization of hydrogen partial pressure.

  9. Optimal quantum pumps.

    PubMed

    Avron, J E; Elgart, A; Graf, G M; Sadun, L

    2001-12-03

    We study adiabatic quantum pumps on time scales that are short relative to the cycle of the pump. In this regime the pump is characterized by the matrix of energy shift which we introduce as the dual to Wigner's time delay. The energy shift determines the charge transport, the dissipation, the noise, and the entropy production. We prove a general lower bound on dissipation in a quantum channel and define optimal pumps as those that saturate the bound. We give a geometric characterization of optimal pumps and show that they are noiseless and transport integral charge in a cycle. Finally we discuss an example of an optimal pump related to the Hall effect.

  10. Fluid sampling pump

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, P.V.; Nimberger, M.; Ward, R.L.

    1991-12-24

    This patent describes a fluid sampling pump for withdrawing pressurized sample fluid from a flow line and for pumping a preselected quantity of sample fluid with each pump driving stroke from the pump to a sample vessel, the sampling pump including a pump body defining a pump bore therein having a central axis, a piston slideably moveable within the pump bore and having a fluid inlet end and an opposing operator end, a fluid sample inlet port open to sample fluid in the flow line, a fluid sample outlet port for transmitting fluid from the pump bore to the sample vessel, and a line pressure port in fluid pressure sample fluid in the flow line, an inlet valve for selectively controlling sample fluid flow from the flow line through the fluid sample inlet port, an operator unit for periodically reciprocating the piston within the pump bore, and a controller for regulating the stroke of the piston within the pump bore, and thereby the quantity of fluid pumped with each pump driving stroke. It comprises a balanced check valve seat; a balanced check valve seal; a compression member; and a central plunger.

  11. Gas pump with movable gas pumping panels

    DOEpatents

    Osher, J.L.

    Apparatus for pumping gas continuously a plurality of articulated panels of getter material, each of which absorbs gases on one side while another of its sides is simultaneously reactivated in a zone isolated by the panels themselves from a working space being pumped.

  12. Proton acceleration with a table-top TW laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seimetz, M.; Bellido, P.; Lera, R.; Ruiz-de la Cruz, A.; Mur, P.; Sánchez, I.; Galán, M.; Sánchez, F.; Roso, L.; Benlloch, J. M.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the recent demonstration of proton acceleration from a purpose-made Ti:Sapphire laser system. In the first successful series of autumn 2015, running at 2 TW peak power and 100 Hz diode pump rate, protons up to 0.7 MeV have been spectrally characterised. Subsequently, at increased laser pulse energy and improved contrast, we have obtained maximum particle energies around 1.7 MeV. These results, achieved in single-shot mode with a variety of thin foil targets, are an important step towards our aim of a stable, compact proton accelerator with high rate capacity.

  13. Proton Probing using the T-Cubed Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordell, Peter; Campbell, Paul; Willingale, Louise; Maksimchuk, Anatoly; Krushelnick, Karl; Tubman, Eleanor; Woolsey, Nigel

    2015-11-01

    The University of Michigan's 20 TW, 400 fs pulse T-cubed laser can produce proton beams of up to 7.2 MeV through target normal sheeth acceleration. The proton flux at 4 MeV produces sufficient signal on Radiochromic Film for use as an ultrafast, electromagnetic field diagnostic. A two beam experiment has been set-up to enable co-timed, pump-probe relativistic intensity interactions. We present an evaluation of the flux, uniformity, energy and laminar flow of the proton probe for future use in imaging of a simple wire target interaction. This work was supported by the DOE (Grant No. DE-SC0012327).

  14. Sizing pumps for slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Akhtar, S.Z.

    1996-11-01

    Slurry characteristics have a significant impact on centrifugal pump performance. For instance, as particle size increases or the percent solids concentration increases, pump head and efficiency decrease. Therefore, before a slurry pump is selected, it is important to define the slurry characteristics as accurately as possible. The effect of the slurry characteristics on the head and efficiency of the centrifugal pump will be emphasized (the effect on flowrate is less significant). The effect of slurry characteristics is more predominant in smaller pumps (with smaller diameter impellers) than in larger pumps. The data and relationship between the various slurry parameters have been developed from correlations and nomographs published by pump vendors from their field data and test results. The information helps to avoid specifying an undersized pump/motor assembly for slurry service.

  15. Insulin pump (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The catheter at the end of the insulin pump is inserted through a needle into the abdominal ... with diabetes. Dosage instructions are entered into the pump's small computer and the appropriate amount of insulin ...

  16. Liquid metal enabled pump

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shi-Yang; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Sivan, Vijay; Petersen, Phred; O’Mullane, Anthony P.; Abbott, Derek; Mitchell, Arnan; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2014-01-01

    Small-scale pumps will be the heartbeat of many future micro/nanoscale platforms. However, the integration of small-scale pumps is presently hampered by limited flow rate with respect to the input power, and their rather complicated fabrication processes. These issues arise as many conventional pumping effects require intricate moving elements. Here, we demonstrate a system that we call the liquid metal enabled pump, for driving a range of liquids without mechanical moving parts, upon the application of modest electric field. This pump incorporates a droplet of liquid metal, which induces liquid flow at high flow rates, yet with exceptionally low power consumption by electrowetting/deelectrowetting at the metal surface. We present theory explaining this pumping mechanism and show that the operation is fundamentally different from other existing pumps. The presented liquid metal enabled pump is both efficient and simple, and thus has the potential to fundamentally advance the field of microfluidics. PMID:24550485

  17. Photovoltaic pump systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klockgether, J.; Kiessling, K. P.

    1983-09-01

    Solar pump systems for the irrigation of fields and for water supply in regions with much sunshine are discussed. For surface water and sources with a hoisting depth of 12 m, a system with immersion pumps is used. For deep sources with larger hoisting depths, an underwater motor pump was developed. Both types of pump system meet the requirements of simple installation and manipulation, safe operation, maintenance free, and high efficiency reducing the number of solar cells needed.

  18. Rotary magnetic heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Kirol, L.D.

    1987-02-11

    A rotary magnetic heat pump constructed without flow seals or segmented rotor accomplishes recuperation and regeneration by using split flow paths. Heat exchange fluid pumped through heat exchangers and returned to the heat pump splits into two flow components: one flowing counter to the rotor rotation and one flowing with the rotation. 5 figs.

  19. Rotary magnetic heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Kirol, Lance D.

    1988-01-01

    A rotary magnetic heat pump constructed without flow seals or segmented rotor accomplishes recuperation and regeneration by using split flow paths. Heat exchange fluid pumped through heat exchangers and returned to the heat pump splits into two flow components: one flowing counter to the rotor rotation and one flowing with the rotation.

  20. Centrifugal main fuel pump

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, E.F.

    1986-08-26

    For a gas turbine power plant having a fuel supply and a fuel metering valve and variable geometry for the power plant including servo actuating mechanisms for the fuel metering valve and variable geometry, a fuel pumping system, is described to supply pressurized fuel for the servo actuating mechanisms and for the engine working fluid medium. The pumping system includes a centrifugal pump solely supplying the fuel to the fuel metering valve to be delivered to the power plant for its working fluid medium, a positive displacement pump in parallel with the centrifugal pump and solely to supply pressurized fuel to the servo actuating mechanisms for the fuel metering valve and for the variable geometry, and a boost pump means disposed in serial relationship with the positive displacement pump and the centrifugal pump for augmenting the pressure supplied by the positive displacement pump and the centrifugal pump during predetermined operating conditions of the power plant. The combined boost pump and centrifugal pump capability is sufficient to satisfy the vapor to liquid ratio requirements of the power during its entire operating envelope.

  1. Green pumped Alexandrite lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuper, Jerry W.; Brown, David C.

    2005-04-01

    Initial experiments with pulsed and CW pumping an alexandrite laser rod at 532 nm are presented. This pumping architecture holds promise for the production of scalable diode-pumped, tunable alexandrite laser systems operating in the near infrared (750 nm), and the ultraviolet (375 and 250 nm) spectral regions.

  2. Elastic proton-proton scattering at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, K.

    2011-09-03

    Here we describe elastic proton+proton (p+p) scattering measurements at RHIC in p+p collisions with a special optics run of {beta}* {approx} 21 m at STAR, at the center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 200 GeV during the last week of the RHIC 2009 run. We present preliminary results of single and double spin asymmetries.

  3. Development of a Compact, Efficient Cooling Pump for Space Suit Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    van Boeyen, Roger; Reeh, Jonathan; Trevino, Luis

    2009-01-01

    A compact, low-power electrochemically-driven fluid cooling pump is currently being developed by Lynntech, Inc. With no electric motor and minimal lightweight components, the pump is significantly lighter than conventional rotodynamic and displacement pumps. Reliability and robustness is achieved with the absence of rotating or moving components (apart from the bellows). By employing sulfonated polystyrene-based proton exchange membranes, rather than conventional Nafion membranes, a significant reduction in the actuator power consumption was demonstrated. Lynntech also demonstrated that these membranes possess the necessary mechanical strength, durability, and temperature range for long life space operation. The preliminary design for a Phase II prototype pump compares very favorably to the fluid cooling pumps currently used in space suit primary life support systems (PLSSs). Characteristics of the electrochemically-driven pump are described and the benefits of the technology as a replacement for electric motor pumps in mechanically pumped single-phase fluid loops is discussed.

  4. What's In a Proton?

    ScienceCinema

    Brookhaven Lab

    2016-07-12

    Physicist Peter Steinberg explains that fundamental particles like protons are themselves made up of still smaller particles called quarks. He discusses how new particles are produced when quarks are liberated from protons...a process that can be observed

  5. What's In a Proton?

    SciTech Connect

    Brookhaven Lab

    2009-07-08

    Physicist Peter Steinberg explains that fundamental particles like protons are themselves made up of still smaller particles called quarks. He discusses how new particles are produced when quarks are liberated from protons...a process that can be observed

  6. Proton: the particle.

    PubMed

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10(80). Protons were created at 10(-6) -1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10(10) years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10(34) years; that is, the age of the universe is 10(-24)th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W(+), W(-), Z(0), and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter.

  7. Proton: The Particle

    SciTech Connect

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10{sup 80}. Protons were created at 10{sup −6} –1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10{sup 10} years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10{sup 34} years; that is, the age of the universe is 10{sup −24}th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W{sup +}, W{sup −}, Z{sup 0}, and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter.

  8. Liquid metal electric pump

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Joseph P.; Andraka, Charles E.; Lukens, Laurance L.; Moreno, James B.

    1992-01-01

    An electrical pump for pumping liquid metals to high pressures in high temperature environments without the use of magnets or moving mechanical parts. The pump employs a non-porous solid electrolyte membrane, typically ceramic, specific to the liquid metal to be pumped. A DC voltage is applied across the thickness of the membrane causing ions to form and enter the membrane on the electrically positive surface, with the ions being neutralized on the opposite surface. This action provides pumping of the liquid metal from one side of the non-porous solid electrolyte membrane to the other.

  9. Jet pump assisted artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A procedure for priming an arterial heat pump is reported; the procedure also has a means for maintaining the pump in a primed state. This concept utilizes a capillary driven jet pump to create the necessary suction to fill the artery. Basically, the jet pump consists of a venturi or nozzle-diffuser type constriction in the vapor passage. The throat of this venturi is connected to the artery. Thus vapor, gas, liquid, or a combination of the above is pumped continuously out of the artery. As a result, the artery is always filled with liquid and an adequate supply of working fluid is provided to the evaporator of the heat pipe.

  10. Fluid sampling pump

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, P.V.; Nimberger, S.M.; Ward, R.L.

    1992-03-03

    This patent describes a pump for pumping a preselected quantity of fluid with each pump driving stroke from a fluid inlet port to a fluid outlet port, an inlet valve for selectively controlling fluid flow through the fluid inlet port, a pump body defining a pump bore therein, a piston slidably movable within the pump bore and having a fluid inlet end and an opposing operator end, an operator unit for reciprocating the piston within the pump bore, and a manifold interconnect with the pump body. It comprises a flow path therein extending from a manifold inlet port to a manifold outlet port, flow path being in communication with the fluid outlet port in the pump body, a purge passageway extending from the flow path to the outlet passageway, a purge valve for regulating fluid flow through the purge passageway, and a filter positioned within the manifold and extending across a portion of the flow path, the filter defining a filtered zone within the flow path adjoining the inlet port in the pump body, and an unfiltered zone within the flow path extending from the manifold inlet to the manifold outlet, such that filtered fluid enters the pump bore while unfiltered fluid bypasses the filter and passes out the manifold outlet port.

  11. Proton Transport in Isolated Vacuoles from Corn Coleoptiles 1

    PubMed Central

    Mandala, Suzanne; Taiz, Lincoln

    1985-01-01

    Vacuoles were isolated from corn coleoptile protoplasts and ATP-dependent proton transport was measured by quinacrine fluorescence quenching or by the uptake of [14C]methylamine. Intact vacuoles were judged to be free of a surrounding plasma membrane based on fluorescent staining with fluoroscein-diacetate. Essentially all of the detectable ATP-stimulated methylamine uptake and α-mannosidase activities present in intact protoplasts were recovered in isolated vacuoles. In contrast, the activities of marker enzymes for plasma membranes, Golgi, endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondria were reduced to 5 to 17% in vacuolar preparations. The characteristics of proton pumping by isolated vacuoles were compared to those of light microsomal membranes possibly derived from the tonoplast. ATP-dependent proton pumping by both isolated vacuoles and light microsomal vesicles was stimulated by Cl−, and inhibited by NO3−, carbonyl cyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone, N,N′-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, N-ethylmaleimide, 4,4′-diisothiocyano-2,2′-stilbene disulfonic acid, diethylstilbestrol, and 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole, but not by vanadate. Both activities also showed substrate specificity for Mg-ATP. Finally, proton transport activities of vacuolar and microsomal fractions exhibited similar profiles after flotation in linear dextran gradients. We conclude that the microsomal proton pump previously characterized in corn coleoptiles (Mettler et al. 1982 Plant Physiol 70: 1738-1742) is derived from the tonoplast. Images Fig. 1 PMID:16664181

  12. Study of proton radioactivities

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.B.; Henderson, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    About a dozen nuclei are currently known to accomplish their radioactive decay by emitting a proton. These nuclei are situated far from the valley of stability, and mark the very limits of existence for proton-rich nuclei: the proton drip line. A new 39-ms proton radioactivity was observed following the bombardment of a {sup 96}Ru target by a beam of 420-MeV {sup 78}Kr. Using the double-sided Si strip detector implantation system at the FMA, a proton group having an energy of 1.05 MeV was observed, correlated with the implantation of ions having mass 167. The subsequent daughter decay was identified as {sup 166}Os by its characteristic alpha decay, and therefore the proton emitter is assigned to the {sup 167}Ir nucleus. Further analysis showed that a second weak proton group from the same nucleus is present, indicating an isomeric state. Two other proton emitters were discovered recently at the FMA: {sup 171}Au and {sup 185}Bi, which is the heaviest known proton radioactivity. The measured decay energies and half-lives will enable the angular momentum of the emitted protons to be determined, thus providing spectroscopic information on nuclei that are beyond the proton drip line. In addition, the decay energy yields the mass of the nucleus, providing a sensitive test of mass models in this extremely proton-rich region of the chart of the nuclides. Additional searches for proton emitters will be conducted in the future, in order to extend our knowledge of the location of the proton drip line.

  13. Pitot heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Grose, R.D.

    1981-12-08

    A pitot heat pump is described wherein a multi-stage pitot pump is employed as the compression means in a heat pump thermodynamic cycle. The heat pump is comprised of a multi-stage vapor pitot pump, liquid pitot pump, turbine, vaporizer, evaporator, condenser and expansion valve. The turbine is used to rotate a shaft to which the impellers of the pitot pump are attached. Refrigerant gas from the evaporator enters the first stage of the pitot pump and the impeller therein forces the refrigerant gas outwardly where it enters the narrow end of a pitot tube provided therein. The discharge end of the pitot tube is in communication with the next stage of the pitot pump. In passing through the pitot tube, the refrigerant gas expands and the centrifugal force and the kinetic energy of the gas provide the energy whereby the refrigerant gas is compressed. After the last stage, the compressed gas is transmitted to the condenser of the heat pump.

  14. Pump isolation valve

    DOEpatents

    Kinney, Calvin L.; Wetherill, Todd M.

    1983-08-02

    The pump isolation valve provides a means by which the pump may be selectively isolated from the remainder of the coolant system while being compatible with the internal hydraulic arrangement of the pump during normal operation of the pump. The valve comprises a valve cylinder disposed around the pump and adjacent to the last pump diffuser with a turning vane attached to the lower end of the valve cylinder in a manner so as to hydraulically match with the discharge diffuser. The valve cylinder is connected to a drive means for sliding the valve cylinder relative to the diffuser support cylinder so as to block flow in either direction through the discharge diffuser when the valve is in the closed position and to aid in the flow of the coolant from the discharge diffuser by means of the turning vane when the valve is in the open position.

  15. DIRECT CURRENT ELECTROMAGNETIC PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, A.H.

    1957-11-01

    An improved d-c electromagnetic pump is presented in which the poles, and consequently the magetic gap at the poles, are tapered to be wider at the upstream end. In addition, the cross section of the tube carryiQ the liquid metal is tapered so that the velocity of the pumped liquid increases in the downstream direction at a rate such that the counter-induced voltage in the liquid metal remains constant as it traverses the region between the poles. This configuration compensates for the distortion of the magnetic field caused by the induced voltage that would otherwise result in the lowering of the pumping capacity. This improved electromagnetic pump as practical application in the pumping of liquid metal coolants for nuclear reactors where conventional positive displacement pumps have proved unsatisfactory due to the high temperatures and the corrosive properties of the liquid metals involved.

  16. Rotary blood pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J. (Inventor); Akkerman, James W. (Inventor); Aber, Greg S. (Inventor); Vandamm, George A. (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Svejkovsky, Paul A. (Inventor); Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A rotary blood pump is presented. The pump includes a pump housing for receiving a flow straightener, a rotor mounted on rotor bearings and having an inducer portion and an impeller portion, and a diffuser. The entrance angle, outlet angle, axial, and radial clearances of the blades associated with the flow straightener, inducer portion, impeller portion, and diffuser are optimized to minimize hemolysis while maintaining pump efficiency. The rotor bearing includes a bearing chamber that is filled with crosslinked blood or other bio-compatible material. A back emf integrated circuit regulates rotor operation and a microcomputer may be used to control one or more back emf integrated circuits. A plurality of magnets are disposed in each of a plurality of impeller blades with a small air gap. A stator may be axially adjusted on the pump housing to absorb bearing load and maximize pump efficiency.

  17. Electrokinetic pumps and actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Phillip M. Paul

    2000-03-01

    Flow and ionic transport in porous media are central to electrokinetic pumping as well as to a host of other microfluidic devices. Electrokinetic pumping provides the ability to create high pressures (to over 10,000 psi) and high flow rates (over 1 mL/min) with a device having no moving parts and all liquid seals. The electrokinetic pump (EKP) is ideally suited for applications ranging from a high pressure integrated pump for chip-scale HPLC to a high flow rate integrated pump for forced liquid convection cooling of high-power electronics. Relations for flow rate and current fluxes in porous media are derived that provide a basis for analysis of complex microfluidic systems as well as for optimization of electrokinetic pumps.

  18. Identification of a multidrug efflux pump in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Ankita; Mallik, Dhriti; Kar, Debasish; Ghosh, Anindya S

    2016-07-01

    Cell wall impermeability and active efflux of drugs are among the primary reasons for drug resistance in mycobacteria. Efflux pumps are tripartite membrane localized transport proteins that expel drug molecules outside the cells. Several of such efflux pumps are annotated in mycobacteria, but few have been characterized, like MSMEG_2991, a putative efflux pump permease of Mycobacterium smegmatis To substantiate this, we overexpressed MSMEG_2991 protein in Escherichia coli 2443. Expression of MSMEG_2991 elevated the resistance towards structurally unrelated groups of antibiotics. An active antibiotic efflux pump nature of MSMEG_2991 was revealed by assessing the acquisition of ciprofloxacin in the absence and presence of the efflux pump inhibitor, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone, indicating the involvement of proton-motive force (pmf) during the efflux activity. MSMEG_2991 expression elevated biofilm formation in E. coli by 4-fold, keeping parity to some of the earlier reported efflux pumps. In silico analysis suggested the presence of 12 transmembrane helices in MSMEG_2991 resembling EmrD efflux pump of E. coli Based on in vivo and in silico analyses, MSMEG_2991 may be designated as a pmf-mediated multidrug efflux pump protein that expels diverse groups of antibiotics and might as well be involved in the biofilm enhancement.

  19. Fakir fuel pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1922-01-01

    In designing the Fakir fuel pump, the fundamental idea was to obtain a simple and reliable method of conveying the fuel from a low tank to the carburetor, with the avoidance of the faults of all former methods and the simultaneous warming of the fuel by means of the heat of compression generated. The principle of the Fakir fuel pump rests on the well-known principle of the diaphragm pump, which must be suitably adapted to the present purpose.

  20. A compact cryogenic pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Caldwell, Shane; Clark, Jason A.; Gulick, Sidney; Hecht, Adam; Lascar, Daniel D.; Levand, Tony; Morgan, Graeme; Orford, Rodney; Savard, Guy; Sharma, Kumar S.; Van Schelt, Jonathon

    2016-04-01

    A centrifugal cryogenic pump has been designed at Argonne National Laboratory to circulate liquid nitrogen (LN2) in a closed circuit allowing the recovery of excess fluid. The pump can circulate LN2 at rates of 2-10 L/min, into a head of 0.5-3 m. Over four years of laboratory use the pump has proven capable of operating continuously for 50-100 days without maintenance.

  1. Detection of pump degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, R.H.; Casada, D.A.; Ayers, C.W.

    1995-08-01

    This Phase II Nuclear Plant Aging Research study examines the methods of detecting pump degradation that are currently employed in domestic and overseas nuclear facilities. This report evaluates the criteria mandated by required pump testing at U.S. nuclear power plants and compares them to those features characteristic of state-of-the-art diagnostic programs and practices currently implemented by other major industries. Since the working condition of the pump driver is crucial to pump operability, a brief review of new applications of motor diagnostics is provided that highlights recent developments in this technology. The routine collection and analysis of spectral data is superior to all other technologies in its ability to accurately detect numerous types and causes of pump degradation. Existing ASME Code testing criteria do not require the evaluation of pump vibration spectra but instead overall vibration amplitude. The mechanical information discernible from vibration amplitude analysis is limited, and several cases of pump failure were not detected in their early stages by vibration monitoring. Since spectral analysis can provide a wealth of pertinent information concerning the mechanical condition of rotating machinery, its incorporation into ASME testing criteria could merit a relaxation in the monthly-to-quarterly testing schedules that seek to verify and assure pump operability. Pump drivers are not included in the current battery of testing. Operational problems thought to be caused by pump degradation were found to be the result of motor degradation. Recent advances in nonintrusive monitoring techniques have made motor diagnostics a viable technology for assessing motor operability. Motor current/power analysis can detect rotor bar degradation and ascertain ranges of hydraulically unstable operation for a particular pump and motor set. The concept of using motor current or power fluctuations as an indicator of pump hydraulic load stability is presented.

  2. Transient proton inflows during illumination of anaerobic Halobacterium halobium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helgerson, S. L.; Stoeckenius, W.

    1985-01-01

    The roles of bacteriorhodopsin (bR), halorhodopsin (hR), and the H(+)-ATPase in the proton uptake in intact cells are examined. The Halobacterium halobium strains and solutions utilized in the experiment, and the techniques for measuring extracellular pH changes and intracellular K(+) concentrations are described. It is observed that in Halobacterium halobium strain R1, containing bR and hR, the light-driven proton uptake is divided into three transient inflows superimposed on the larger proton outflow. Under anaerobic conditions early proton uptake consists of an inflow which can be blocked with Dio-9 and a second inflow that can be eliminated by low concentrations (less than 125 nm) of triphenyltin chloride (TPT). The effects of Dio-9 and TPT on the passive proton-hydroxyl permeability of the cell membrane are investigated. A third transient light-driven proton flow observed at later times of illumination is studied. The data reveal that the first proton inflow correlates with proton dependent ATP synthesis; the second inflow is a passive uptake through an unidentified channel in response to electrogenic chloride pumping by bR and/or hR; and the third inflow correlates with the Na(+)/H(+) antiporter function.

  3. Champagne Heat Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.

    2004-01-01

    The term champagne heat pump denotes a developmental heat pump that exploits a cycle of absorption and desorption of carbon dioxide in an alcohol or other organic liquid. Whereas most heat pumps in common use in the United States are energized by mechanical compression, the champagne heat pump is energized by heating. The concept of heat pumps based on other absorption cycles energized by heat has been understood for years, but some of these heat pumps are outlawed in many areas because of the potential hazards posed by leakage of working fluids. For example, in the case of the water/ammonia cycle, there are potential hazards of toxicity and flammability. The organic-liquid/carbon dioxide absorption/desorption cycle of the champagne heat pump is similar to the water/ammonia cycle, but carbon dioxide is nontoxic and environmentally benign, and one can choose an alcohol or other organic liquid that is also relatively nontoxic and environmentally benign. Two candidate nonalcohol organic liquids are isobutyl acetate and amyl acetate. Although alcohols and many other organic liquids are flammable, they present little or no flammability hazard in the champagne heat pump because only the nonflammable carbon dioxide component of the refrigerant mixture is circulated to the evaporator and condenser heat exchangers, which are the only components of the heat pump in direct contact with air in habitable spaces.

  4. Submersible sodium pump

    DOEpatents

    Brynsvold, G.V.; Lopez, J.T.; Olich, E.E.; West, C.W.

    1989-11-21

    An electromagnetic submerged pump has an outer cylindrical stator with an inner cylindrical conductive core for the submerged pumping of sodium in the cylindrical interstitial volume defined between the stator and core. The cylindrical interstitial volume is typically vertically oriented, and defines an inlet at the bottom and an outlet at the top. The outer stator generates upwardly conveyed toroidal magnetic fields, which fields convey preferably from the bottom of the pump to the top of the pump liquid sodium in the cold leg of a sodium cooled nuclear reactor. The outer cylindrical stator has a vertically disposed duct surrounded by alternately stacked layers of coil units and laminates. 14 figs.

  5. Submersible sodium pump

    DOEpatents

    Brynsvold, Glen V.; Lopez, John T.; Olich, Eugene E.; West, Calvin W.

    1989-01-01

    An electromagnetic submerged pump has an outer cylindrical stator with an inner cylindrical conductive core for the submerged pumping of sodium in the cylindrical interstitial volume defined between the stator and core. The cylindrical interstitial volume is typically vertically oriented, and defines an inlet at the bottom and an outlet at the top. The outer stator generates upwardly conveyed toroidal magnetic fields, which fields convey preferably from the bottom of the pump to the top of the pump liquid sodium in the cold leg of a sodium cooled nuclear reactor. The outer cylindrical stator has a vertically disposed duct surrounded by alternately stacked layers of coil units and laminates.

  6. Fuel injection pump

    SciTech Connect

    Miyaki, M.

    1986-01-07

    This patent describes a fuel injection pump for delivering fuel to the cylinders of an internal combustion engine consisting of: a pump housing with a fuel chamber therein to which fuel is supplied from a fuel tank; means for compressing fuel in the pump chamber and delivering the compressed fuel to the engine cylinders with such means including a pump plunger adapted to be reciprocated so as to introduce fuel into the pump chamber and to pressurize the introduced fuel; spill means for spilling to a low-pressure side on a fuel tank side the compressed fuel which was pressurized in the pump chamber to be delivered from the pump chamber to the engine cylinders, the spill mechanism including a spill passage communicating with the pump chamber and including a solenoid valve located in the spill passage for opening and closing the spill passage with predetermined timing; escape for allowing the compressed fuel pressurized in the pump chamber to escape to the low-pressure side of the fuel tank side.

  7. Remotely operable peristaltic pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belew, R. R. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A peristaltic pump is disclosed which includes a roller assembly on which is mounted a series of pump rollers. As the roller assembly is rotated by a drive gear the pump rollers are driven in reverse rotation by means of a stationary ring gear and pump roller gears. An upper pressure shoe plate and a lower pressure shoe plate are positioned above sets of flexible tubing. The tubing is sandwiched between the pressure shoe plates and the pump rollers. A highly compact pump is provided having twice as many fluid channel lines as is conventional. The peristaltic pump device may be remotely operated by means of a rotary actuator which rotates a driving hub to move the shoe plates by means of eccentrically mounted links. The pressure shoe plates may be moved by the rotary actuator to a loaded position in which the fluid lines are pinched by the pump rollers and fluid is pumped to an unloaded position in which the fluid lines are maintained in an undeformed, uncrimped configuration so that no creases or crimps are set into the fluid lines during periods of prolonged nonuse.

  8. Thermomechanical piston pump development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabelman, E. E.

    1971-01-01

    A thermally powered reciprocating pump has been devised to replace or augment an electric pump for the transport of temperature-control fluid on the Thermoelectric Outer Planet Spacecraft (TOPS). The thermally powered pump operates cyclically by extracting heat energy from the fluid by means of a vapor-pressure expansion system and by using the heat to perform the mechanical work of pumping. A feasibility test unit has been constructed to provide an output of 7 cu in during a 10- to 100-second cycle. It operates with a fluid input temperature of 200 to 300 F and a heat sink temperature of 0 to 30 F.

  9. [Portable peristaltic perfusion pumps].

    PubMed

    Magallón Pedrera, I; Soto Torres, I

    1999-11-01

    Portable peristaltic perfusion pumps allow one to administer pharmaceuticals in hospitals as well as in primary health care centers and furthermore these pumps present multiple advantages for patients and their families since they make it possible to carry out treatment in a patient's home while at the same time lowering the costs involved. The authors analyze the most out standing aspects of portable peristaltic perfusion pumps along with their characteristics, installation, programming, and how to turn them on; in addition, the authors list the maintenance care which these pumps require.

  10. Detection of pump degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Casada, D.

    1995-04-01

    There are a variety of stressors that can affect the operation of centrifugal pumps. Although these general stressors are active in essentially all centrifugal pumps, the stressor level and the extent of wear and degradation can vary greatly. Parameters that affect the extent of stressor activity are manifold. In order to assure the long-term operational readiness of a pump, it is important to both understand the nature and magnitude of the specific degradation mechanisms and to monitor the performance of the pump. The most commonly applied method of monitoring the condition of not only pumps, but rotating machinery in general, is vibration analysis. Periodic or continuous special vibration analysis is a cornerstone of most pump monitoring programs. In the nuclear industry, non-spectral vibration monitoring of safety-related pumps is performed in accordance with the ASME code. Pump head and flow rate are also monitored, per code requirements. Although vibration analysis has dominated the condition monitoring field for many years, there are other measures that have been historically used to help understand pump condition; advances in historically applied technologies and developing technologies offer improved monitoring capabilities. The capabilities of several technologies (including vibration analysis, dynamic pressure analysis, and motor power analysis) to detect the presence and magnitude of both stressors and resultant degradation are discussed.

  11. Rotating proton pumping ATPases: subunit/subunit interactions and thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi-Matsui, Mayumi; Sekiya, Mizuki; Futai, Masamitsu

    2013-03-01

    In this article, we discuss single molecule observation of rotational catalysis by E. coli ATP synthase (F-ATPase) using small gold beads. Studies involving a low viscous drag probe showed the stochastic properties of the enzyme in alternating catalytically active and inhibited states. The importance of subunit interaction between the rotor and the stator, and thermodynamics of the catalysis are also discussed. "Single Molecule Enzymology" is a new trend for understanding enzyme mechanisms in biochemistry and physiology.

  12. Resonance wave pumping: wave mass transport pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmigniani, Remi; Violeau, Damien; Gharib, Morteza

    2016-11-01

    It has been previously reported that pinching at intrinsic resonance frequencies a valveless pump (or Liebau pump) results in a strong pulsating flow. A free-surface version of the Liebau pump is presented. The experiment consists of a closed tank with a submerged plate separating the water into a free-surface and a recirculation section connected through two openings at each end of the tank. A paddle is placed at an off-centre position at the free-surface and controlled in a heaving motion with different frequencies and amplitudes. Near certain frequencies identified as resonance frequencies through a linear potential theory analysis, the system behaves like a pump. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is performed in the near free surface region and compared with simulations using Volume of Fluid (VOF) method. The mean eulerian mass flux field (ρ) is extracted. It is observed that the flow is located in the vicinity of the surface layer suggesting Stokes Drift (or Wave Mass Transport) is the source of the pumping. A model is developped to extend the linear potential theory to the second order to take into account these observations. The authors would like to acknowledge the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation for their generous support.

  13. Lansoprazole, a proton pump inhibitor, mediates anti-inflammatory effect in gastric mucosal cells through the induction of heme oxygenase-1 via activation of NF-E2-related factor 2 and oxidation of kelch-like ECH-associating protein 1.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Tomohisa; Naito, Yuji; Okada, Hitomi; Ishii, Takeshi; Mizushima, Katsura; Akagiri, Satomi; Adachi, Satoko; Handa, Osamu; Kokura, Satoshi; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Itoh, Ken; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Matsui, Hirofumi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2009-10-01

    Induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression has been associated with cytoprotective and anti-inflammatory actions of lansoprazole, a proton pump inhibitor, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unresolved. In this study, we investigate the role of transcriptional NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), its phosphorylation/activation, and oxidation of Kelch-like ECH-associating protein 1 (Keap1) in lansoprazole-induced HO-1 up-regulation using cultured gastric epithelial cells (rat gastric mucosal cell line, RGM-1). HO-1 expression of RGM-1 cells was markedly enhanced in a time- and dose-dependent manner by the treatment with lansoprazole, and this up-regulation of HO-1 contributed to the inhibition of chemokine production from stimulated RGM-1 cells. Transfection of Nrf2-siRNA suppressed the lansoprazole-induced HO-1. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed increases in the nuclear translocation and stress-response elements (StRE) binding activity of Nrf2 proteins in RGM-1 cells treated with lansoprazole. Furthermore, in RGM-1 cells transfected with HO-1 enhancer luciferase reporter plasmid containing mutant StRE, lansoprazole-induced HO-1 reporter gene activity was diminished. Lansoprazole promoted the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and lansoprazole-induced HO-1 up-regulation was suppressed by U0126, an ERK-specific inhibitor. Phosphorylated Nrf2 protein was detected in the phosphoprotein fraction purified by a Pro-Q Diamond Phosphoprotein Enrichment kit. Finally, an oxidative form of the Keap1 protein was detected in lansoprazole-treated RGM-1 cells by analyzing S-oxidized proteins using biotinylated cysteine as a molecular probe. These results indicate that lansoprazole up-regulates HO-1 expression in rat gastric epithelial cells, and the up-regulated HO-1 contributes to the anti-inflammatory effects of the drug. Phosphorylation of ERK and Nrf2, activati