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Sample records for bacterium cupriavidus metallidurans

  1. The stress response of bacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 into simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houdt, Rob; de Boever, Patrick; Coninx, Ilse; Janssen, Ann; Benotmane, Rafi; Leys, Natalie; Mergeay, Max

    The stress response of bacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 into simulated microgravity R. Van Houdt, P. De Boever, I. Coninx, A. Janssen, M.A. Benotmane, N. Leys, and M. Mergeay Expertise group for Molecular and Cellular Biology, Institute for Environment, Health and Safety, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK•CEN), Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol, Belgium. We have studied the response of Cupriavidus (formerly Ralstonia) metallidurans CH34 to simulated microgravity by culturing in a Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) bioreactor. This bioreactor technology generates a unique Low-Shear Modeled Microgravity (LSMMG) environment and is exploited as analogue for in vivo medical and space environments. Cupriavidus and Ralstonia species are relevant model bacteria since they are often isolated from the floor, air and surfaces of spacecraft assembly rooms and not only contaminate the clean rooms but have also been found prior-to-flight on surfaces of space robots such as the Mars Odyssey Orbiter and even in-flight in ISS cooling water and Shuttle drinking water. In addition, C. metallidurans CH34 is also being used in fundamental space flight experiments aimed to gain a better insight in the bacterial adaptation to space. The first objective was to elucidate the stress response of C. metallidurans CH34 grown in LSMMG compared to a normal gravity control. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that a significant part of the heat shock response was induced in LSMMG. Transcription of d naK, encoding the major heat-shock protein and a prokaryotic homologue of the eukaryotic Hsp70 protein, was induced 6.4 fold in LSMMG. DnaK is assisted by partner chaperones DnaJ and GrpE for which transcription respectively were induced 2.0 and 2.6 fold. Transcription of other chaperones known to belong to the heat shock response was also induced in LSMMG: hslV and hsl U, encoding the HslVU protease, were induced respectively 5.5 and 3.4 fold; htpG, encoding a Hsp90 family chaperone, was induced 4.6 fold

  2. The interactions of the bacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 with basalt rock, on Earth and in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byloos, Bo; Van Houdt, Rob; Leys, Natalie; Ilyin, Vyacheslav; Nicholson, Natasha; Childers, Delma; Cockell, Charles; Boon, Nico

    2016-07-01

    Microbe-mineral interactions have become of interest for space exploration as microorganisms can biomine elements from extra-terrestrial materials, which could be used as nutrients in a life support system. This research is aimed at identifying the molecular mechanisms behind the interaction of Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 with basalt, a lunar-type rock, and determining the influence of space flight conditions on this interaction. Survival and physiology of CH34 was monitored, with and without basalt, in mineral water over several months by flow cytometry, plate counts, ICP-MS, microscopy and proteomics. To study the influence of space conditions, a flight experiment on board the Russian FOTON-M4 capsule was performed. The results obtained from from water survival experiments on ground showed that CH34 was able to survive in mineral water, in the absence and presence of basalt, for several months. The total cell concentration remained stable but the cultivable fraction dropped to 10%, indicating a transition to a more dormant state. In the presence of basalt, this transition was less pronounced and cultivability was enhanced. In addition, with basalt, CH34 attached to the rock surface and formed a biofilm. The space flight experiment indicated more viable and cultivable cells compared to the ground experiment, both in the absence and presence of basalt, indicating a positive effect of space flight on survival. Chemical analysis indicated that basalt leaches out elements which may contribute to a positive effect of basalt on survival. Basalt may thus enhance survival and viability of CH34 both in ground and space flight experimental conditions. This study hopefully can contribute to a better understanding of microbe-mineral interactions, opening the door to future applications, in space, and on Earth. Acknowledgments: This work is supported by the European Space Agency (ESA-PRODEX) and the Belgian Science Policy (Belspo) through the BIOROCK project. We thank Kai

  3. Synthetic phytochelatin surface display in Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 for enhanced metals bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Biondo, Ronaldo; da Silva, Felipe Almeida; Vicente, Elisabete José; Souza Sarkis, Jorge Eduardo; Schenberg, Ana Clara Guerrini

    2012-08-07

    This work describes the effects of the cell surface display of a synthetic phytochelatin in the highly metal tolerant bacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34. The EC20sp synthetic phytochelatin gene was fused between the coding sequences of the signal peptide (SS) and of the autotransporter β-domain of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae IgA protease precursor (IgAβ), which successfully targeted the hybrid protein toward the C. metallidurans outer membrane. The expression of the SS-EC20sp-IgAβ gene fusion was driven by a modified version of the Bacillus subtilis mrgA promoter showing high level basal gene expression that is further enhanced by metal presence in C. metallidurans. The recombinant strain showed increased ability to immobilize Pb(2+), Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Cd(2+), Mn(2+), and Ni(2+) ions from the external medium when compared to the control strain. To ensure plasmid stability and biological containment, the MOB region of the plasmid was replaced by the E. coli hok/sok coding sequence.

  4. The Components of the Unique Zur Regulon of Cupriavidus metallidurans Mediate Cytoplasmic Zinc Handling

    PubMed Central

    Bütof, Lucy; Schmidt-Vogler, Christopher; Herzberg, Martin; Große, Cornelia

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Zinc is an essential trace element, yet it is toxic at high concentrations. In the betaproteobacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans, the highly efficient removal of surplus zinc from the periplasm is responsible for the outstanding metal resistance of the organism. Rather than having a typical Zur-dependent, high-affinity ATP-binding cassette transporter of the ABC protein superfamily for zinc uptake at low concentrations, C. metallidurans has the secondary zinc importer ZupT of the zinc-regulated transporter, iron-regulated transporter (ZRT/IRT)-like protein (ZIP) family. It is important to understand, therefore, how this zinc-resistant bacterium copes with exposure to low zinc concentrations. Members of the Zur regulon in C. metallidurans were identified by comparing the transcriptomes of a Δzur mutant and its parent strain. The consensus sequence of the Zur-binding box was derived for the zupTp promoter-regulatory region by use of a truncation assay. The motif was used to predict possible Zur boxes upstream of Zur regulon members. The binding of Zur to these boxes was confirmed. Two Zur boxes upstream of the cobW1 gene, encoding a putative zinc chaperone, proved to be required for complete repression of cobW1 and its downstream genes in cells cultivated in mineral salts medium. A Zur box upstream of each of zur-cobW2, cobW3, and zupT permitted both low expression levels of these genes and their upregulation under conditions of zinc starvation. This demonstrates a compartmentalization of zinc homeostasis in C. metallidurans, where the periplasm is responsible for the removal of surplus zinc, cytoplasmic components are responsible for the management of zinc as an essential cofactor, and the two compartments are connected by ZupT. IMPORTANCE Elucidating zinc homeostasis is necessary for understanding both host-pathogen interactions and the performance of free-living bacteria in their natural environments. Escherichia coli acquires zinc under conditions of

  5. The components of the unique Zur regulon of Cupriavidus metallidurans mediate cytoplasmic zinc handling.

    PubMed

    Bütof, Lucy; Schmidt-Vogler, Christopher; Herzberg, Martin; Große, Cornelia; Nies, Dietrich H

    2017-08-14

    Zinc is an essential trace element and at the same time it is toxic at high concentrations. In the beta-proteobacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans the highly efficient removal of surplus zinc from the periplasm is responsible for its outstanding metal resistance. Rather than having a typical Zur-dependent, high-affinity ATP-binding cassette transporter of the ABC protein superfamily for zinc uptake at low concentrations, C. metallidurans instead has the secondary zinc importer ZupT of the ZRT/IRT (ZIP) family. It is important to understand, therefore, how this zinc-resistant bacterium copes when it is exposed to low zinc concentrations. Members of the Zur regulon in C. metallidurans were identified by comparing the transcriptomes of a Δ zur mutant and its parent strain. The consensus sequence of the Zur-binding box was derived for the zupTp promoter-regulatory region using a truncation assay. The motif was used to predict possible Zur-boxes upstream of Zur regulon members. Binding of Zur to these boxes was confirmed. Two Zur-boxes upstream of the cobW 1 gene, encoding a putative zinc chaperone, proved to be required for complete repression of cobW 1 and its downstream genes in cells cultivated in mineral salts medium. A Zur box upstream of each of zur-cobW 2 , cobW 3 and zupT permitted low-expression level of these genes plus their up-regulation under zinc starvation conditions. This demonstrates a compartmentalization of zinc homeostasis in C. metallidurans with the periplasm being responsible for removal of surplus zinc and cytoplasmic components for management of zinc as an essential co-factor, with both compartments connected by ZupT. Importance Elucidating zinc homeostasis is necessary to understand both host-pathogen interactions and performance of free-living bacteria in their natural environment. Escherichia coli acquires zinc under low zinc concentrations by the Zur-controlled ZnuABC importer of the ABC superfamily, and this was also the paradigm for other

  6. Purification and Characterization of the Acetone Carboxylase of Cupriavidus metallidurans Strain CH34

    PubMed Central

    Rosier, Caroline; Leys, Natalie; Henoumont, Céline; Mergeay, Max

    2012-01-01

    Acetone carboxylase (Acx) is a key enzyme involved in the biodegradation of acetone by bacteria. Except for the Helicobacteraceae family, genome analyses revealed that bacteria that possess an Acx, such as Cupriavidus metallidurans strain CH34, are associated with soil. The Acx of CH34 forms the heterohexameric complex α2β2γ2 and can carboxylate only acetone and 2-butanone in an ATP-dependent reaction to acetoacetate and 3-keto-2-methylbutyrate, respectively. PMID:22492439

  7. Influence of Copper Resistance Determinants on Gold Transformation by Cupriavidus metallidurans Strain CH34

    PubMed Central

    Wiesemann, Nicole; Mohr, Juliane; Grosse, Cornelia; Herzberg, Martin; Hause, Gerd; Reith, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Cupriavidus metallidurans is associated with gold grains and may be involved in their formation. Gold(III) complexes influence the transcriptome of C. metallidurans (F. Reith et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 106:17757–17762, 2009), leading to the upregulation of genes involved in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species and metal ions. In a systematic study, the involvement of these systems in gold transformation was investigated. Treatment of C. metallidurans cells with Au(I) complexes, which occur in this organism's natural environment, led to the upregulation of genes similar to those observed for treatment with Au(III) complexes. The two indigenous plasmids of C. metallidurans, which harbor several transition metal resistance determinants, were not involved in resistance to Au(I/III) complexes nor in their transformation to metallic nanoparticles. Upregulation of a cupA-lacZ fusion by the MerR-type regulator CupR with increasing Au(III) concentrations indicated the presence of gold ions in the cytoplasm. A hypothesis stating that the Gig system detoxifies gold complexes by the uptake and reduction of Au(III) to Au(I) or Au(0) reminiscent to detoxification of Hg(II) was disproven. ZupT and other secondary uptake systems for transition metal cations influenced Au(III) resistance but not the upregulation of the cupA-lacZ fusion. The two copper-exporting P-type ATPases CupA and CopF were also not essential for gold resistance. The copABCD determinant on chromosome 2, which encodes periplasmic proteins involved in copper resistance, was required for full gold resistance in C. metallidurans. In conclusion, biomineralization of gold particles via the reduction of mobile Au(I/III) complexes in C. metallidurans appears to primarily occur in the periplasmic space via copper-handling systems. PMID:23475973

  8. Characterization of the Metabolically Modified Heavy Metal-Resistant Cupriavidus metallidurans Strain MSR33 Generated for Mercury Bioremediation

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Luis A.; Yáñez, Carolina; González, Myriam; Lobos, Soledad; Smalla, Kornelia; Seeger, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background Mercury-polluted environments are often contaminated with other heavy metals. Therefore, bacteria with resistance to several heavy metals may be useful for bioremediation. Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 is a model heavy metal-resistant bacterium, but possesses a low resistance to mercury compounds. Methodology/Principal Findings To improve inorganic and organic mercury resistance of strain CH34, the IncP-1β plasmid pTP6 that provides novel merB, merG genes and additional other mer genes was introduced into the bacterium by biparental mating. The transconjugant Cupriavidus metallidurans strain MSR33 was genetically and biochemically characterized. Strain MSR33 maintained stably the plasmid pTP6 over 70 generations under non-selective conditions. The organomercurial lyase protein MerB and the mercuric reductase MerA of strain MSR33 were synthesized in presence of Hg2+. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (mM) for strain MSR33 were: Hg2+, 0.12 and CH3Hg+, 0.08. The addition of Hg2+ (0.04 mM) at exponential phase had not an effect on the growth rate of strain MSR33. In contrast, after Hg2+ addition at exponential phase the parental strain CH34 showed an immediate cessation of cell growth. During exposure to Hg2+ no effects in the morphology of MSR33 cells were observed, whereas CH34 cells exposed to Hg2+ showed a fuzzy outer membrane. Bioremediation with strain MSR33 of two mercury-contaminated aqueous solutions was evaluated. Hg2+ (0.10 and 0.15 mM) was completely volatilized by strain MSR33 from the polluted waters in presence of thioglycolate (5 mM) after 2 h. Conclusions/Significance A broad-spectrum mercury-resistant strain MSR33 was generated by incorporation of plasmid pTP6 that was directly isolated from the environment into C. metallidurans CH34. Strain MSR33 is capable to remove mercury from polluted waters. This is the first study to use an IncP-1β plasmid directly isolated from the environment, to generate a novel and stable bacterial strain

  9. The Complete Genome Sequence of Cupriavidus metallidurans Strain CH34, a Master Survivalist in Harsh and Anthropogenic Environments

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Paul J.; Van Houdt, Rob; Moors, Hugo; Monsieurs, Pieter; Morin, Nicolas; Michaux, Arlette; Benotmane, Mohammed A.; Leys, Natalie; Vallaeys, Tatiana; Lapidus, Alla; Monchy, Sébastien; Médigue, Claudine; Taghavi, Safiyh; McCorkle, Sean; Dunn, John; van der Lelie, Daniël; Mergeay, Max

    2010-01-01

    Many bacteria in the environment have adapted to the presence of toxic heavy metals. Over the last 30 years, this heavy metal tolerance was the subject of extensive research. The bacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans strain CH34, originally isolated by us in 1976 from a metal processing factory, is considered a major model organism in this field because it withstands milli-molar range concentrations of over 20 different heavy metal ions. This tolerance is mostly achieved by rapid ion efflux but also by metal-complexation and -reduction. We present here the full genome sequence of strain CH34 and the manual annotation of all its genes. The genome of C. metallidurans CH34 is composed of two large circular chromosomes CHR1 and CHR2 of, respectively, 3,928,089 bp and 2,580,084 bp, and two megaplasmids pMOL28 and pMOL30 of, respectively, 171,459 bp and 233,720 bp in size. At least 25 loci for heavy-metal resistance (HMR) are distributed over the four replicons. Approximately 67% of the 6,717 coding sequences (CDSs) present in the CH34 genome could be assigned a putative function, and 9.1% (611 genes) appear to be unique to this strain. One out of five proteins is associated with either transport or transcription while the relay of environmental stimuli is governed by more than 600 signal transduction systems. The CH34 genome is most similar to the genomes of other Cupriavidus strains by correspondence between the respective CHR1 replicons but also displays similarity to the genomes of more distantly related species as a result of gene transfer and through the presence of large genomic islands. The presence of at least 57 IS elements and 19 transposons and the ability to take in and express foreign genes indicates a very dynamic and complex genome shaped by evolutionary forces. The genome data show that C. metallidurans CH34 is particularly well equipped to live in extreme conditions and anthropogenic environments that are rich in metals. PMID:20463976

  10. The complete genome sequence of Cupriavidus metallidurans strain CH34, a master survivalist in harsh and anthropogenic environments.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Paul J; Van Houdt, Rob; Moors, Hugo; Monsieurs, Pieter; Morin, Nicolas; Michaux, Arlette; Benotmane, Mohammed A; Leys, Natalie; Vallaeys, Tatiana; Lapidus, Alla; Monchy, Sébastien; Médigue, Claudine; Taghavi, Safiyh; McCorkle, Sean; Dunn, John; van der Lelie, Daniël; Mergeay, Max

    2010-05-05

    Many bacteria in the environment have adapted to the presence of toxic heavy metals. Over the last 30 years, this heavy metal tolerance was the subject of extensive research. The bacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans strain CH34, originally isolated by us in 1976 from a metal processing factory, is considered a major model organism in this field because it withstands milli-molar range concentrations of over 20 different heavy metal ions. This tolerance is mostly achieved by rapid ion efflux but also by metal-complexation and -reduction. We present here the full genome sequence of strain CH34 and the manual annotation of all its genes. The genome of C. metallidurans CH34 is composed of two large circular chromosomes CHR1 and CHR2 of, respectively, 3,928,089 bp and 2,580,084 bp, and two megaplasmids pMOL28 and pMOL30 of, respectively, 171,459 bp and 233,720 bp in size. At least 25 loci for heavy-metal resistance (HMR) are distributed over the four replicons. Approximately 67% of the 6,717 coding sequences (CDSs) present in the CH34 genome could be assigned a putative function, and 9.1% (611 genes) appear to be unique to this strain. One out of five proteins is associated with either transport or transcription while the relay of environmental stimuli is governed by more than 600 signal transduction systems. The CH34 genome is most similar to the genomes of other Cupriavidus strains by correspondence between the respective CHR1 replicons but also displays similarity to the genomes of more distantly related species as a result of gene transfer and through the presence of large genomic islands. The presence of at least 57 IS elements and 19 transposons and the ability to take in and express foreign genes indicates a very dynamic and complex genome shaped by evolutionary forces. The genome data show that C. metallidurans CH34 is particularly well equipped to live in extreme conditions and anthropogenic environments that are rich in metals.

  11. Toluene degradation by Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 in nitrate-reducing conditions and in Bioelectrochemical Systems.

    PubMed

    Tofalos, Anna Espinoza; Daghio, Matteo; González, Myriam; Papacchini, Maddalena; Franzetti, Andrea; Seeger, Michael

    2018-05-16

    Bioelectrochemical remediation of hydrocarbons is a technology that exploits the ability of specific microorganisms to use as electron acceptor an electrode, thus potentially lowering the operational costs related to classical bioremediation. Several well-characterized hydrocarbonoclastic strains might be electroactive, thus their biodegradation performances in Bioelectrochemical Systems should be studied. Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 is a model metal-resistant strain whose capacity to degrade benzene aerobically has recently been described. In this study, toluene degradation under anaerobic conditions and the exoelectrogenic capacity of Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 were determined. Strain CH34 was grown anaerobically with toluene as sole carbon source in sealed serum bottles and then inoculated in a Microbial Electrolysis Cell (MEC) to assess its exoelectrogenic capacity. It was demonstrated for the first time that strain CH34 is able to degrade toluene under nitrate-reducing conditions (up to 45 mgtoluene/L were removed within 17 days, corresponding to 73% of toluene amended). Nitrate consumption and cellular growth were observed during toluene removal. In the MEC, toluene degradation was linked to current production, showing current peaks after every toluene addition (maximum current density 48 mA/m2). Coulombic efficiency of the toluene biodegradation process increased with time, from 11% (first batch cycle), up to 77% (last batch cycle).

  12. Potential of Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 for in situ resource utilization from basalt by determining the molecular micro-mineral interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byloos, Bo; Van Houdt, Rob; Boon, Nico; Leys, Natalie

    In order to maintain a persistent human presence in space, materials must either be provided from Earth or generated from material already present in space, in a process referred to as 'in situ resource utilization (ISRU)'. Microorganisms can biomine useful elements from extra-terrestrial materials for use as nutrients in a life support system or to aid in the creation of soil. To effectively use bacteria in an ISRU process more needs to be known about the molecular mechanisms behind microbe-mineral interaction and the influence of microgravity and radiation that affect bioleaching. The aim of this research project is to define the microbe-mineral interactions on basalt, which is a major constituent of Lunar or Martian regolith, the mechanisms that are important in bioleaching and how this process will be altered by space flight conditions. In particular, the research will be focussed on the determination of the genes and proteins involved in the biosynthesis of metallophores and exopolysaccharides (EPS), and biofilm formation. Iron, copper and phosphate uptake mechanisms are investigated in detail because these have been shown to be essential for life and bacteria are faced with limitation of these nutrients in the environment. In this study the bacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 is used to study these interactions. C. metallidurans CH34 is a soil bacterium which is resistant to up to 20 different heavy metal ions. Its behaviour in space has already been determined with earlier flight experiments to the ISS. It was recently discovered that C. metallidurans forms a biofilm and is capable of leaching calcium, magnesium and iron from basalt to sustain its growth First, C. metallidurans was grown in conditions with and without basalt, iron, copper and phosphate and the production of EPS and metallophores was examined. The iron, copper and phosphate concentrations which are limiting and optimal to allow C. metallidurans cell proliferation could be determined as

  13. Uranium Interaction with Two Multi-Resistant Environmental Bacteria: Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 and Rhodopseudomonas palustris

    PubMed Central

    Llorens, Isabelle; Untereiner, Guillaume; Jaillard, Danielle; Gouget, Barbara; Chapon, Virginie; Carriere, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Depending on speciation, U environmental contamination may be spread through the environment or inversely restrained to a limited area. Induction of U precipitation via biogenic or non-biogenic processes would reduce the dissemination of U contamination. To this aim U oxidation/reduction processes triggered by bacteria are presently intensively studied. Using X-ray absorption analysis, we describe in the present article the ability of Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 and Rhodopseudomonas palustris, highly resistant to a variety of metals and metalloids or to organic pollutants, to withstand high concentrations of U and to immobilize it either through biosorption or through reduction to non-uraninite U(IV)-phosphate or U(IV)-carboxylate compounds. These bacterial strains are thus good candidates for U bioremediation strategies, particularly in the context of multi-pollutant or mixed-waste contaminations. PMID:23251623

  14. Cupriavidus metallidurans biomineralization ability and its application as a bioconsolidation enhancer for ornamental marble stone.

    PubMed

    Daskalakis, Markos I; Magoulas, Antonis; Kotoulas, Georgios; Katsikis, Ioannis; Bakolas, Asterios; Karageorgis, Aristomenis P; Mavridou, Athena; Doulia, Danae; Rigas, Fotis

    2014-08-01

    Bacterially induced calcium carbonate precipitation of a Cupriavidus metallidurans isolate was investigated to develop an environmentally friendly method for restoration and preservation of ornamental stones. Biomineralization performance was carried out in a growth medium via a Design of Experiments (DoE) approach using, as design factors, the temperature, growth medium concentration, and inoculum concentration. The optimum conditions were determined with the aid of consecutive experiments based on response surface methodology (RSM) and were successfully validated thereafter. Statistical analysis can be utilized as a tool for screening bacterial bioprecipitation as it considerably reduced the experimental time and effort needed for bacterial evaluation. Analytical methods provided an insight to the biomineral characteristics, and sonication tests proved that our isolate could create a solid new layer of vaterite on marble substrate withstanding sonication forces. C. metallidurans ACA-DC 4073 provided a compact vaterite layer on the marble substrate with morphological characteristics that assisted in its differentiation. The latter proved valuable during spraying minimum amount of inoculated media on marble substrate under conditions close to an in situ application. A sufficient and clearly distinguishable layer was identified.

  15. ArsR arsenic-resistance regulatory protein from Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; van der Lelie, D.; Monchy, S.

    The Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 arsR gene, which is part of the arsRIC{sub 2}BC{sub 1}HP operon, and its putative arsenic-resistance regulatory protein were identified and characterized. The arsenic-induced transcriptome of C. metallidurans CH34 showed that the genes most upregulated in the presence of arsenate were all located within the ars operon, with none of the other numerous heavy metal resistance systems present in CH34 being induced. A transcriptional fusion between the luxCDABE operon and the arsR promoter/operator (P/O) region was used to confirm the in vivo induction of the ars operon by arsenite and arsenate. The arsR gene was cloned intomore » expression vectors allowing for the overexpression of the ArsR protein as either his-tagged or untagged protein. The ability of the purified ArsR proteins to bind to the ars P/O region was analyzed in vitro by gel mobility shift assays. ArsR showed an affinity almost exclusively to its own ars P/O region. Dissociation of ArsR and its P/O region was metal dependent, and based on decreasing degrees of dissociation three groups of heavy metals could be distinguished: As(III), Bi(III), Co(II), Cu(II), Ni(II); Cd(II); Pb(II) and Zn(II), while no dissociation was observed in the presence of As(V).« less

  16. Raman Spectroscopic Analysis of Cupriavidus metallidurans LMG 1195 (CH34) Cultured in Low-shear Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gelder, Joke; Vandenabeele, Peter; De Boever, Patrick; Mergeay, Max; Moens, Luc; De Vos, Paul

    2009-07-01

    In this study, the effect of low-shear microgravity on the metabolism of Cupriavidus metallidurans LMG 1195 was studied with Raman spectroscopy. Therefore, the strain was cultured for 24 or 48 h in a rotating wall vessel to simulate microgravity (SMG) and in a control setup. The differences in Raman spectra recorded from both setups after 24 h of culturing were small. The most prominent features in a difference spectrum, calculated between the mean spectra from the microgravity and the control setup separately, could be assigned to the presence of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB). SMG seems to yield a higher PHB production after 24 h of culturing. Additional processing of the spectra suggested that SMG induced also other changes in the carbon-metabolism. After 48 h, similar results were found for the carbon metabolism, while PHB concentrations were reduced in SMG compared to the control. However, these differences could also be caused by interfering effects that may occur in the bioreactors after a prolonged incubation time.

  17. The Impact of Space Flight on Survival and Interaction of Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 with Basalt, a Volcanic Moon Analog Rock

    PubMed Central

    Byloos, Bo; Coninx, Ilse; Van Hoey, Olivier; Cockell, Charles; Nicholson, Natasha; Ilyin, Vyacheslav; Van Houdt, Rob; Boon, Nico; Leys, Natalie

    2017-01-01

    Microbe-mineral interactions have become of interest for space exploration as microorganisms could be used to biomine from extra-terrestrial material and extract elements useful as micronutrients in life support systems. This research aimed to identify the impact of space flight on the long-term survival of Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 in mineral water and the interaction with basalt, a lunar-type rock in preparation for the ESA spaceflight experiment, BIOROCK. Therefore, C. metallidurans CH34 cells were suspended in mineral water supplemented with or without crushed basalt and send for 3 months on board the Russian FOTON-M4 capsule. Long-term storage had a significant impact on cell physiology and energy status (by flow cytometry analysis, plate count and intracellular ATP measurements) as 60% of cells stored on ground lost their cell membrane potential, only 17% were still active, average ATP levels per cell were significantly lower and cultivability dropped to 1%. The cells stored in the presence of basalt and exposed to space flight conditions during storage however showed less dramatic changes in physiology, with only 16% of the cells lost their cell membrane potential and 24% were still active, leading to a higher cultivability (50%) and indicating a general positive effect of basalt and space flight on survival. Microbe-mineral interactions and biofilm formation was altered by spaceflight as less biofilm was formed on the basalt during flight conditions. Leaching from basalt also changed (measured with ICP-OES), showing that cells release more copper from basalt and the presence of cells also impacted iron and magnesium concentration irrespective of the presence of basalt. The flight conditions thus could counteract some of the detrimental effects observed after the 3 month storage conditions. PMID:28503167

  18. The Impact of Space Flight on Survival and Interaction of Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 with Basalt, a Volcanic Moon Analog Rock.

    PubMed

    Byloos, Bo; Coninx, Ilse; Van Hoey, Olivier; Cockell, Charles; Nicholson, Natasha; Ilyin, Vyacheslav; Van Houdt, Rob; Boon, Nico; Leys, Natalie

    2017-01-01

    Microbe-mineral interactions have become of interest for space exploration as microorganisms could be used to biomine from extra-terrestrial material and extract elements useful as micronutrients in life support systems. This research aimed to identify the impact of space flight on the long-term survival of Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 in mineral water and the interaction with basalt, a lunar-type rock in preparation for the ESA spaceflight experiment, BIOROCK. Therefore, C. metallidurans CH34 cells were suspended in mineral water supplemented with or without crushed basalt and send for 3 months on board the Russian FOTON-M4 capsule. Long-term storage had a significant impact on cell physiology and energy status (by flow cytometry analysis, plate count and intracellular ATP measurements) as 60% of cells stored on ground lost their cell membrane potential, only 17% were still active, average ATP levels per cell were significantly lower and cultivability dropped to 1%. The cells stored in the presence of basalt and exposed to space flight conditions during storage however showed less dramatic changes in physiology, with only 16% of the cells lost their cell membrane potential and 24% were still active, leading to a higher cultivability (50%) and indicating a general positive effect of basalt and space flight on survival. Microbe-mineral interactions and biofilm formation was altered by spaceflight as less biofilm was formed on the basalt during flight conditions. Leaching from basalt also changed (measured with ICP-OES), showing that cells release more copper from basalt and the presence of cells also impacted iron and magnesium concentration irrespective of the presence of basalt. The flight conditions thus could counteract some of the detrimental effects observed after the 3 month storage conditions.

  19. Swimming, swarming, twitching, and chemotactic responses of Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 and Pseudomonas putida mt2 in the presence of cadmium.

    PubMed

    Shamim, Saba; Rehman, Abdul; Qazi, Mahmood Hussain

    2014-04-01

    To use of microorganisms for bioremediation purposes, the study of their motility behavior toward metals is essential. In the present study, Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 and Pseudomonas putida mt2 were used as cadmium (Cd)-resistant and -sensitive bacteria, respectively, to evaluate the effects of Cd on their motility behaviors. Potassium morpholinopropane sulfonate (MOPS) buffer was used to observe the motility behavior of both isolates. Movement of mt2 was less in MOPS buffer compared with CH34, likely reflecting the mono-flagellated nature of mt2 and the peritrichous nature of CH34. The swimming, swarming, twitching, and chemotaxis behaviors of mt2 were greater in the presence of glucose than that of Cd. mt2 exhibited negative motility behaviors when exposed to Cd, but the opposite effect was seen in CH34. Cd was found to be a chemorepellent for mt2 but a chemoattractant for CH34, suggesting that CH34 is a potential candidate for metal (Cd) bioremediation.

  20. Cupriavidus pampae sp. nov., a novel herbicide-degrading bacterium isolated from agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Cuadrado, Virginia; Gomila, Margarita; Merini, Luciano; Giulietti, Ana M; Moore, Edward R B

    2010-11-01

    A bacterial consortium able to degrade the herbicide 4-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy) butyric acid (2,4-DB) was obtained from an agricultural soil of the Argentinean Humid Pampa region which has a history of long-term herbicide use. Four bacterial strains were isolated from the consortium and identified as members of the genera Cupriavidus, Labrys and Pseudomonas. A polyphasic systematic analysis was carried out on strain CPDB6(T), the member of the 2,4-DB-degrading consortium able to degrade 2,4-DB as a sole carbon and energy source. The Gram-negative, rod-shaped, motile, non-sporulating, non-fermenting bacterium was shown to belong to the genus Cupriavidus on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses. Strain CPDB6(T) did not reduce nitrate, which differentiated it from the type species of the genus, Cupriavidus necator; it did not grow in 0.5-4.5 % NaCl, although most species of Cupriavidus are able to grow at NaCl concentrations as high as 1.5 %; and it was able to deamidate acetamide, which differentiated it from all other species of Cupriavidus. DNA-DNA hybridization data revealed low levels of genomic DNA similarity (less than 30 %) between strain CPDB6(T) and the type strains of Cupriavidus species with validly published names. The major cellular fatty acids detected were cis-9-hexadecenoic (16 : 1ω7c) and hexadecanoic (16 : 0) acids. On the basis of phenotypic and genotypic characterizations, strain CPDB6(T) was recognized as a representative of a novel species within the genus Cupriavidus. The name Cupriavidus pampae sp. nov. is proposed, with strain CPDB6(T) (=CCUG 55948(T)=CCM-A-29:1289(T)) as the type strain.

  1. Whole-Genome Sequence of Cupriavidus sp. Strain BIS7, a Heavy-Metal-Resistant Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Kar Wai; Thinagaran, Dinaiz a/l; Gan, Han Ming; Yin, Wai-Fong

    2012-01-01

    Cupriavidus sp. strain BIS7 is a Malaysian tropical soil bacterium that exhibits broad heavy-metal resistance [Co(II), Zn(II), Ni(II), Se(IV), Cu(II), chromate, Co(III), Fe(II), and Fe(III)]. It is particularly resistant to Fe(II), Fe(III), and Zn(II). Here we present the assembly and annotation of its genome. PMID:23115161

  2. Whole-genome sequence of Cupriavidus sp. strain BIS7, a heavy-metal-resistant bacterium.

    PubMed

    Hong, Kar Wai; Thinagaran, Dinaiz al; Gan, Han Ming; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2012-11-01

    Cupriavidus sp. strain BIS7 is a Malaysian tropical soil bacterium that exhibits broad heavy-metal resistance [Co(II), Zn(II), Ni(II), Se(IV), Cu(II), chromate, Co(III), Fe(II), and Fe(III)]. It is particularly resistant to Fe(II), Fe(III), and Zn(II). Here we present the assembly and annotation of its genome.

  3. Chemical Forms of Selenium in the Metal-Resistant Bacterium Ralstonia metallidurans CH34 Exposed to Selenite and Selenate

    PubMed Central

    Sarret, Géraldine; Avoscan, Laure; Carrière, Marie; Collins, Richard; Geoffroy, Nicolas; Carrot, Francine; Covès, Jacques; Gouget, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    Ralstonia metallidurans CH34, a soil bacterium resistant to a variety of metals, is known to reduce selenite to intracellular granules of elemental selenium (Se0). We have studied the kinetics of selenite (SeIV) and selenate (SeVI) accumulation and used X-ray absorption spectroscopy to identify the accumulated form of selenate, as well as possible chemical intermediates during the transformation of these two oxyanions. When introduced during the lag phase, the presence of selenite increased the duration of this phase, as previously observed. Selenite introduction was followed by a period of slow uptake, during which the bacteria contained Se0 and alkyl selenide in equivalent proportions. This suggests that two reactions with similar kinetics take place: an assimilatory pathway leading to alkyl selenide and a slow detoxification pathway leading to Se0. Subsequently, selenite uptake strongly increased (up to 340 mg Se per g of proteins) and Se0 was the predominant transformation product, suggesting an activation of selenite transport and reduction systems after several hours of contact. Exposure to selenate did not induce an increase in the lag phase duration, and the bacteria accumulated approximately 25-fold less Se than when exposed to selenite. SeIV was detected as a transient species in the first 12 h after selenate introduction, Se0 also occurred as a minor species, and the major accumulated form was alkyl selenide. Thus, in the present experimental conditions, selenate mostly follows an assimilatory pathway and the reduction pathway is not activated upon selenate exposure. These results show that R. metallidurans CH34 may be suitable for the remediation of selenite-, but not selenate-, contaminated environments. PMID:15870319

  4. Genome Sequence Analysis of the Naphthenic Acid Degrading and Metal Resistant Bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii CR3

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jingfa; Hao, Lirui; Crowley, David E.; Zhang, Zhewen; Yu, Jun; Huang, Ning; Huo, Mingxin; Wu, Jiayan

    2015-01-01

    Cupriavidus sp. are generally heavy metal tolerant bacteria with the ability to degrade a variety of aromatic hydrocarbon compounds, although the degradation pathways and substrate versatilities remain largely unknown. Here we studied the bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii strain CR3, which was isolated from a natural asphalt deposit, and which was shown to utilize naphthenic acids as a sole carbon source. Genome sequencing of C. gilardii CR3 was carried out to elucidate possible mechanisms for the naphthenic acid biodegradation. The genome of C. gilardii CR3 was composed of two circular chromosomes chr1 and chr2 of respectively 3,539,530 bp and 2,039,213 bp in size. The genome for strain CR3 encoded 4,502 putative protein-coding genes, 59 tRNA genes, and many other non-coding genes. Many genes were associated with xenobiotic biodegradation and metal resistance functions. Pathway prediction for degradation of cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, a representative naphthenic acid, suggested that naphthenic acid undergoes initial ring-cleavage, after which the ring fission products can be degraded via several plausible degradation pathways including a mechanism similar to that used for fatty acid oxidation. The final metabolic products of these pathways are unstable or volatile compounds that were not toxic to CR3. Strain CR3 was also shown to have tolerance to at least 10 heavy metals, which was mainly achieved by self-detoxification through ion efflux, metal-complexation and metal-reduction, and a powerful DNA self-repair mechanism. Our genomic analysis suggests that CR3 is well adapted to survive the harsh environment in natural asphalts containing naphthenic acids and high concentrations of heavy metals. PMID:26301592

  5. Rhizobium metallidurans sp. nov., a symbiotic heavy metal resistant bacterium isolated from the Anthyllis vulneraria Zn-hyperaccumulator.

    PubMed

    Grison, Claire M; Jackson, Stephen; Merlot, Sylvain; Dobson, Alan; Grison, Claude

    2015-05-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming bacterium (ChimEc512(T)) was isolated from 56 host seedlings of the hyperaccumulating Anthyllis vulneraria legume, which was on an old zinc mining site at Les Avinières, Saint-Laurent-Le-Minier, Gard, South of France. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities, strain ChimEc512(T) was shown to belong to the genus Rhizobium and to be most closely related to Rhizobium endophyticum CCGE 2052(T) (98.4%), Rhizobium tibeticum CCBAU 85039(T) (98.1%), Rhizobium grahamii CCGE 502(T) (98.0%) and Rhizobium mesoamericanum CCGE 501(T) (98.0%). The phylogenetic relationships of ChimEc512(T) were confirmed by sequencing and analyses of recA and atpD genes. DNA-DNA relatedness values of strain ChimEc512(T) with R. endophyticum CCGE 2052(T), R. tibeticum CCBAU 85039(T), R. mesoamericanum CCGE 52(T), Rhizobium grahamii CCGE 502(T), Rhizobium etli CCBAU 85039(T) and Rhizobium radiobacter KL09-16-8-2(T) were 27, 22, 16, 18, 19 and 11%, respectively. The DNA G+C content of strain ChimEc512(T) was 58.9 mol%. The major cellular fatty acid was C18 : 1ω7c, characteristic of the genus Rhizobium . The polar lipid profile included phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylcholine and moderate amounts of aminolipids, phospholipid and sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol. Although ChimEc512(T) was able to nodulate A. vulneraria, the nodC and nifH genes were not detected by PCR. The rhizobial strain was tolerant to high concentrations of heavy metals: up to 35 mM Zn and up to 0.5 mM Cd and its growth kinetics was not impacted by Zn. The results of DNA-DNA hybridizations and physiological tests allowed genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of strain ChimEc512(T) from species of the genus Rhizobium with validly published names. Strain ChimEc512(T), therefore, represents a novel species, for which the name Rhizobium metallidurans sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain

  6. Reduction of cadmium uptake in rice endophytically colonized with the cadmium-tolerant bacterium Cupriavidus taiwanensis KKU2500-3.

    PubMed

    Punjee, Putthita; Siripornadulsil, Wilailak; Siripornadulsil, Surasak

    2018-02-01

    The effects of the cadmium (Cd)-tolerant bacterium Cupriavidus taiwanensis KKU2500-3 on the growth, yield, and Cd concentration in rice grains were investigated in the rice variety Phitsanulok 2 (PL2), which was cultivated in a hydroponic greenhouse. The numbers of Cd-tolerant bacteria isolated from the roots and shoots of plants under the RB (rice with bacteria) and RBC (rice with bacteria and Cd) treatments ranged from 2.60 to 9.03 and from 3.99 to 9.60 log cfu·g -1 of PL2, respectively. This KKU2500-3 strain was successfully colonized in rice, indicating that it was not only nontoxic to the plants but also became distributed and reproduced throughout the plants. Scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed attachment of the bacterium to the root surface, whereas the internally colonized bacteria were located in the vascular tissue, cell wall, and intercellular space. Although the Cd contents found in PL2 were very high (189.10 and 79.49 mg·kg -1 in the RC (rice with Cd) and RBC roots, respectively), the Cd accumulated inside the rice seeds at densities of only 3.10 and 1.31 mg·kg -1 , respectively; thus, the bacteria reduced the Cd content to 57.74% of the control content. Therefore, the colonizing bacteria likely acted as an inhibitor of Cd translocation in PL2.

  7. Genome Sequence of an Efficient Indole-Degrading Bacterium, Cupriavidus sp. Strain IDO, with Potential Polyhydroxyalkanoate Production Applications.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiao; Qu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Zhaojing; Li, Pengpeng; Tang, Hongzhi

    2015-03-12

    Cupriavidus sp. strain IDO has been shown to efficiently transform indole, and the genus of Cupriavidus has been described as a promising cell factory for polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis from low-cost wastes. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of strain IDO, which may provide useful genetic information on indole metabolism and polyhydroxyalkanoate production. Copyright © 2015 Ma et al.

  8. Genetic and Biochemical Characterization of 2-Chloro-5-Nitrophenol Degradation in a Newly Isolated Bacterium, Cupriavidus sp. Strain CNP-8

    PubMed Central

    Min, Jun; Chen, Weiwei; Wang, Jinpei; Hu, Xiaoke

    2017-01-01

    Compound 2-chloro-5-nitrophenol (2C5NP) is a typical chlorinated nitroaromatic pollutant. To date, the bacteria with the ability to degrade 2C5NP are rare, and the molecular mechanism of 2C5NP degradation remains unknown. In this study, Cupriavidus sp. strain CNP-8 utilizing 2-chloro-5-nitrophenol (2C5NP) and meta-nitrophenol (MNP) via partial reductive pathways was isolated from pesticide-contaminated soil. Biodegradation kinetic analysis indicated that 2C5NP degradation by this strain was concentration dependent, with a maximum specific degradation rate of 21.2 ± 2.3 μM h−1. Transcriptional analysis showed that the mnp genes are up-regulated in both 2C5NP- and MNP-induced strain CNP-8. Two Mnp proteins were purified to homogeneity by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. In addition to catalyzing the reduction of MNP, MnpA, a NADPH-dependent nitroreductase, also catalyzes the partial reduction of 2C5NP to 2-chloro-5-hydroxylaminophenol via 2-chloro-5-nitrosophenol, which was firstly identified as an intermediate of 2C5NP catabolism. MnpC, an aminohydroquinone dioxygenase, is likely responsible for the ring-cleavage reaction of 2C5NP degradation. Gene knockout and complementation indicated that mnpA is necessary for both 2C5NP and MNP catabolism. To our knowledge, strain CNP-8 is the second 2C5NP-utilizing bacterium, and this is the first report of the molecular mechanism of microbial 2C5NP degradation. PMID:28959252

  9. Mobilization of Selenite by Ralstonia metallidurans CH34

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Murielle; Sarret, Géraldine; Pignot-Paintrand, Isabelle; Fontecave, Marc; Coves, Jacques

    2001-01-01

    Ralstonia metallidurans CH34 (formerly Alcaligenes eutrophus CH34) is a soil bacterium characteristic of metal-contaminated biotopes, as it is able to grow in the presence of a variety of heavy metals. R. metallidurans CH34 is reported now to resist up to 6 mM selenite and to reduce selenite to elemental red selenium as shown by extended X-ray absorption fine-structure analysis. Growth kinetics analysis suggests an adaptation of the cells to the selenite stress during the lag-phase period. Depending on the culture conditions, the medium can be completely depleted of selenite. Selenium accumulates essentially in the cytoplasm as judged from electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. Elemental selenium, highly insoluble, represents a nontoxic storage form for the bacterium. The ability of R. metallidurans CH34 to reduce large amounts of selenite may be of interest for bioremediation processes targeting selenite-polluted sites. PMID:11157242

  10. Polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) degradation potential of a new acid tolerant, diazotrophic P-solubilizing and heavy metal resistant bacterium Cupriavidus sp. MTS-7 isolated from long-term mixed contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Kuppusamy, Saranya; Thavamani, Palanisami; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Lee, Yong Bok; Naidu, Ravi

    2016-11-01

    An isolate of Cupriavidus (strain MTS-7) was identified from a long-term PAHs and heavy metals mixed contaminated soil with the potential to biodegrade both LMW and HMW PAHs with added unique traits of acid and alkali tolerance, heavy metal tolerance, self-nutrient assimilation by N fixation and P solubilization. This strain completely degraded the model 3 (150 mg L(-1) Phe), 4 (150 mg L(-1) Pyr) and 5 (50 mg L(-1) BaP) ring PAHs in 4, 20 and 30 days, respectively. It could mineralize 90-100% of PAHs (200 mg L(-1) of Phe and Pyr) within 15 days across pH ranging from 5 to 8 and even in the presence of toxic metal contaminations. During biodegradation, the minimum inhibitory concentrations were 5 (Cu(2+)) and 3 (Cd(2+), Pb(2+), Zn(2+)) mg L(-1) of the potentially bioavailable metal ions and over 17 mg L(-1) metal levels was lethal for the microbe. Further, it could fix 217-274 μg mL(-1) of N and solubilize 79-135 μg mL(-1) of P while PAHs degradation. MTS-7 as a superior candidate could be thus used in the enhanced bioaugmentation and/or phytoremediation of long-term mixed contaminated sites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Inventorying the molecular potential of Cupriavidus and Ralstonia strains surviving harsh space-related environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mijnendonckx, Kristel; van Houdt, Rob; Provoost, Ann; Bossus, Albert; Ott, C. Mark; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Leys, Natalie

    The craving of modern man to explore life beyond earth presents a lot of challenges. The control of microbial contamination of the confined manned spacecraft is an important aspect that has to be taken into account in this journey. Because the human body contains a huge amount of microorganisms, the crew itself is the most important contamination source. But contamination can also originate from residing environmental microorganisms or from materials that are supplied from the Earth. These microbial contaminations can cause problems for the astronauts -well documented to have a decreased immunity -and the infrastructure of the space station. In this study, 14 different Cupriavidus metallidurans and Ralstonia pickettii strains, isolated from such space-related environments, where characterised in detail. These unique strains were isolated from drinking water that returned from ISS (3), from the cooling water system of the American ISS segment (4), from a swab sample of the Mars Odyssey Orbitor surface prior to flight (4), and from an air sample taken in the space assembly facility PHSF during Mars exploration Rover assembly (3). Their resistance to heavy metals and antibiotics was screened. The C. metallidurans isolates were more resistant to Zn2+ and Hg+ but more sensitive to Ni2+ than the R. pickettii strains. The MIC values for Cu2+ ranged from 1,5mM to 12mM, for Co2+ from 1,58mM to 12,63mM and for Cd2+ from 0,25mM to 1mM. For Ni2+ , the MIC values were between 2 and 8mM, except for the strain C. metallidurans IV (0502478) that was able to grow on Ni+2 concentrations up to 48mM. A metal of special interest was Ag+ because it is used to sanitize ISS drinking water. The strains isolated from air and surface samples showed a MIC value ranging from 0,35µM to 4µM. The isolates from the water samples had MIC values from 0,3µM to 2µM, which is lower than (or comparable with) the lowest limit of the silver concentration used in the ISS (1,9µM -4,6µM). However, all

  12. Aerobic biotransformation of 3-methylindole to ring cleavage products by Cupriavidus sp. strain KK10.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Kimiko; Ozeki, Yasuhiro; Kanaly, Robert A

    2015-09-01

    3-Methylindole, also referred to as skatole, is a pollutant of environmental concern due to its persistence, mobility and potential health impacts. Petroleum refining, intensive livestock production and application of biosolids to agricultural lands result in releases of 3-methylindole to the environment. Even so, little is known about the aerobic biodegradation of 3-methylindole and comprehensive biotransformation pathways have not been established. Using glycerol as feedstock, the soil bacterium Cupriavidus sp. strain KK10 biodegraded 100 mg/L of 3-methylindole in 24 h. Cometabolic 3-methylindole biodegradation was confirmed by the identification of biotransformation products through liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry analyses. In all, 14 3-methylindole biotransformation products were identified which revealed that biotransformation occurred through different pathways that included carbocyclic aromatic ring-fission of 3-methylindole to single-ring pyrrole carboxylic acids. This work provides first comprehensive evidence for the aerobic biotransformation mechanisms of 3-methylindole by a soil bacterium and expands our understanding of the biodegradative capabilities of members of the genus Cupriavidus towards heteroaromatic pollutants.

  13. Biodegradation of pentachloronitrobenzene by Cupriavidus sp. YNS-85 and its potential for remediation of contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Teng, Ying; Wang, Xiaomi; Zhu, Ye; Chen, Wei; Christie, Peter; Li, Zhengao; Luo, Yongming

    2017-04-01

    Pentachloronitrobenzene (PCNB) is a toxic chlorinated nitroaromatic compound. However, only a few bacteria have been reported to be able to utilize PCNB. In the present study, one pentachloronitrobenzene (PCNB)-degrading bacterium, Cupriavidus sp. YNS-85, was isolated from a contaminated Panax notoginseng plantation. The strain co-metabolized 200 mg L -1 PCNB in aqueous solution with a removal rate of 73.8% after 5 days. The bacterium also degraded PCNB effectively under acid conditions (pH 4-6) and showed resistance to toxic trace elements (arsenic, copper, and cadmium). Its ability to utilize proposed PCNB intermediates as sole carbon sources was also confirmed. The soil microcosm experiment further demonstrated that bacterial bioaugmentation enhanced the removal of PCNB (37.8%) from soil and the accumulation of pentachloroaniline (89.3%) after 30 days. Soil enzyme activity and microbial community functional diversity were positively influenced after bioremediation. These findings indicate that Cupriavidus sp. YNS-85 may be a suitable inoculant for in situ bioremediation of PCNB-polluted sites, especially those with acid soils co-contaminated with heavy metal(loid)s.

  14. Polyhydroxyalkanoate production from sucrose by Cupriavidus necator strains harboring csc genes from Escherichia coli W.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, Hisashi; Matsumoto, Keiji; Fujiki, Tetsuya

    2017-10-01

    Cupriavidus necator H16 is the most promising bacterium for industrial production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) because of their remarkable ability to accumulate them in the cells. With genetic modifications, this bacterium can produce poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (PHBHHx), which has better physical properties, as well as poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) using plant oils and sugars as a carbon source. Considering production cost, sucrose is a very attractive raw material because it is inexpensive; however, this bacterium cannot assimilate sucrose. Here, we used the sucrose utilization (csc) genes of Escherichia coli W to generate C. necator strains that can assimilate sucrose. Especially, glucose-utilizing recombinant C. necator strains harboring the sucrose hydrolase gene (cscA) and sucrose permease gene (cscB) of E. coli W grew well on sucrose as a sole carbon source and accumulated PHB. In addition, strains introduced with a crotonyl-CoA reductase gene (ccr), ethylmalonyl-CoA decarboxylase gene (emd), and some other genetic modifications besides the csc genes and the glucose-utilizing mutations produced PHBHHx with a 3-hydroxyhexanoate (3HHx) content of maximum approximately 27 mol% from sucrose. Furthermore, when one of the PHBHHx-producing strains was cultured with sucrose solution in a fed-batch fermentation, PHBHHx with a 3HHx content of approximately 4 mol% was produced and reached 113 g/L for 65 h, which is approximately 1.5-fold higher than that produced using glucose solution.

  15. Isolation and characterization of Cupriavidus basilensis HMF14 for biological removal of inhibitors from lignocellulosic hydrolysate

    PubMed Central

    Wierckx, Nick; Koopman, Frank; Bandounas, Luaine; De Winde, Johannes H.; Ruijssenaars, Harald J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The formation of toxic fermentation inhibitors such as furfural and 5‐hydroxy‐2‐methylfurfural (HMF) during acid (pre‐)treatment of lignocellulose, calls for the efficient removal of these compounds. Lignocellulosic hydrolysates can be efficiently detoxified biologically with microorganisms that specifically metabolize the fermentation inhibitors while preserving the sugars for subsequent use by the fermentation host. The bacterium Cupriavidus basilensis HMF14 was isolated from enrichment cultures with HMF as the sole carbon source and was found to metabolize many of the toxic constituents of lignocellulosic hydrolysate including furfural, HMF, acetate, formate and a host of aromatic compounds. Remarkably, this microorganism does not grow on the most abundant sugars in lignocellulosic hydrolysates: glucose, xylose and arabinose. In addition, C. basilensis HMF14 can produce polyhydroxyalkanoates. Cultivation of C. basilensis HMF14 on wheat straw hydrolysate resulted in the complete removal of furfural, HMF, acetate and formate, leaving the sugar fraction intact. This unique substrate profile makes C. basilensis HMF14 extremely well suited for biological removal of inhibitors from lignocellulosic hydrolysates prior to their use as fermentation feedstock. PMID:21255332

  16. Accumulation of PHA granules in Cupriavidus necator as seen by confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mravec, Filip; Obruca, Stanislav; Krzyzanek, Vladislav; Sedlacek, Petr; Hrubanova, Kamila; Samek, Ota; Kucera, Dan; Benesova, Pavla; Nebesarova, Jana

    2016-05-01

    Many bacteria are capable of accumulating intracellular granules of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA). In this work, we developed confocal microscopy analysis of bacterial cells to study changes in the diameters of cells as well as PHA granules during growth and PHA accumulation in the bacterium Cupriavidus necator H16 (formerly Ralstonia eutropha). The cell envelope was stained by DiD(®) fluorescent probe and PHA granules by Nile Red. Signals from both probes were separated based on their spectral and fluorescence life-time properties. During growth and PHA accumulation, bacterial cells increased their length but the width of the cells remained constant. The volume fraction of PHA granules in cells increased during PHA accumulation, nevertheless, its value did not exceed 40 vol. % regardless of the PHA weight content. It seems that bacterial cultures lengthen the cells in order to control the PHA volume portion. However, since similar changes in cell length were also observed in a PHA non-accumulating mutant, it seems that there is no direct control mechanism, which regulates the prolongation of the cells with respect to PHA granules volume. It is more likely that PHA biosynthesis and the length of cells are influenced by the same external stimuli such as nutrient limitation. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Complete Genome Sequences of Three Cupriavidus Strains Isolated from Various Malaysian Environments.

    PubMed

    Shafie, Nur Asilla Hani; Lau, Nyok-Sean; Ramachandran, Hema; Amirul, Al-Ashraf Abdullah

    2017-01-19

    Cupriavidus sp. USMAA1020, USMAA2-4, and USMAHM13 are capable of producing polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA). This biopolymer is an alternative solution to synthetic plastics, whereby polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase is the key enzyme involved in PHA biosynthesis. Here, we report the complete genomes of three Cupriavidus sp. strains: USMAA1020, USMAA2-4, and USMAHM13. Copyright © 2017 Shafie et al.

  18. Production of polyhydroxyalkanoates from waste frying oil by Cupriavidus necator

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are biopolymers, which can replace petrochemical plastics in many applications. However, these bioplastics are currently far more expensive than petrochemical plastics. Many researchers are investigating the use of inexpensive substrates derived from waste streams. Waste frying oil is abundant and can be used in PHA production without filtration. Cupriavidus necator (formerly known as Ralstonia eutropha) is a versatile organism for the production of PHAs. Small-scale batch fermentation studies have been set up, using different concentrations of pure vegetable oil, heated vegetable oil and waste frying oil. These oils are all rapeseed oils. It has been shown that Cupriavidus necator produced the homopolymer polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) from the rapeseed oils. The achieved PHB concentration from waste frying oil was 1.2 g/l, which is similar to a concentration that can be obtained from glucose. The PHB harvest from pure oil and heated oil was 0.62 g/l and 0.9 g/l respectively. A feed of waste frying oil could thus achieve more biopolymer than pure vegetable oil. While the use of a waste product is beneficial from a life-cycle perspective, PHB is not the only product that can be made from waste oil. The collection of waste frying oil is becoming more widespread, making waste oil a good alternative to purified oil or glucose for PHB production. PMID:21906352

  19. Revisiting the Single Cell Protein Application of Cupriavidus necator H16 and Recovering Bioplastic Granules Simultaneously

    PubMed Central

    Kunasundari, Balakrishnan; Murugaiyah, Vikneswaran; Kaur, Gurjeet; Maurer, Frans H. J.; Sudesh, Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Cupriavidus necator H16 (formerly known as Hydrogenomonas eutropha) was famous as a potential single cell protein (SCP) in the 1970s. The drawback however was the undesirably efficient accumulation of non-nutritive polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) storage compound in the cytoplasm of this bacterium. Eventually, competition from soy-based protein resulted in SCP not receiving much attention. Nevertheless, C. necator H16 remained in the limelight as a producer of PHB, which is a material that resembles commodity plastics such as polypropylene. PHB is a 100% biobased and biodegradable polyester. Although tremendous achievements have been attained in the past 3 decades in the efficient production of PHB, this bioplastic is still costly. One of the main problems has been the recovery of PHB from the cell cytoplasm. In this study, we showed for the first time that kilogram quantities of PHB can be easily recovered in the laboratory without the use of any solvents and chemicals, just by using the cells as SCP. In addition, the present study also demonstrated the safety and tolerability of animal model used, Sprague Dawley given lyophilized cells of C. necator H16. The test animals readily produced fecal pellets that were whitish in color, as would be expected of PHB granules. The pellets were determined to contain about 82-97 wt% PHB and possessed molecular mass of around 930 kg/mol. The PHB granules recovered biologically possessed similar molecular mass compared to chloroform extracted PHB [950 kg/mol]. This method now allows the production and purification of substantial quantities of PHB for various experimental trials. The method reported here is easy, does not require expensive instrumentation, scalable and does not involve extensive use of solvents and strong chemicals. PMID:24205250

  20. Coexistence of Burkholderia, Cupriavidus, and Rhizobium sp. nodule bacteria on two Mimosa spp. in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Craig F; Parker, Matthew A

    2006-02-01

    rRNA gene sequencing and PCR assays indicated that 215 isolates of root nodule bacteria from two Mimosa species at three sites in Costa Rica belonged to the genera Burkholderia, Cupriavidus, and Rhizobium. This is the first report of Cupriavidus sp. nodule symbionts for Mimosa populations within their native geographic range in the neotropics. Burkholderia spp. predominated among samples from Mimosa pigra (86% of isolates), while there was a more even distribution of Cupriavidus, Burkholderia, and Rhizobium spp. on Mimosa pudica (38, 37, and 25% of isolates, respectively). All Cupriavidus and Burkholderia genotypes tested formed root nodules and fixed nitrogen on both M. pigra and M. pudica, and sequencing of rRNA genes in strains reisolated from nodules verified identity with inoculant strains. Inoculation tests further indicated that both Cupriavidus and Burkholderia spp. resulted in significantly higher plant growth and nodule nitrogenase activity (as measured by acetylene reduction assays) relative to plant performance with strains of Rhizobium. Given the prevalence of Burkholderia and Cupriavidus spp. on these Mimosa legumes and the widespread distribution of these plants both within and outside the neotropics, it is likely that both beta-proteobacterial genera are more ubiquitous as root nodule symbionts than previously believed.

  1. Coexistence of Burkholderia, Cupriavidus, and Rhizobium sp. Nodule Bacteria on two Mimosa spp. in Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Craig F.; Parker, Matthew A.

    2006-01-01

    rRNA gene sequencing and PCR assays indicated that 215 isolates of root nodule bacteria from two Mimosa species at three sites in Costa Rica belonged to the genera Burkholderia, Cupriavidus, and Rhizobium. This is the first report of Cupriavidus sp. nodule symbionts for Mimosa populations within their native geographic range in the neotropics. Burkholderia spp. predominated among samples from Mimosa pigra (86% of isolates), while there was a more even distribution of Cupriavidus, Burkholderia, and Rhizobium spp. on Mimosa pudica (38, 37, and 25% of isolates, respectively). All Cupriavidus and Burkholderia genotypes tested formed root nodules and fixed nitrogen on both M. pigra and M. pudica, and sequencing of rRNA genes in strains reisolated from nodules verified identity with inoculant strains. Inoculation tests further indicated that both Cupriavidus and Burkholderia spp. resulted in significantly higher plant growth and nodule nitrogenase activity (as measured by acetylene reduction assays) relative to plant performance with strains of Rhizobium. Given the prevalence of Burkholderia and Cupriavidus spp. on these Mimosa legumes and the widespread distribution of these plants both within and outside the neotropics, it is likely that both β-proteobacterial genera are more ubiquitous as root nodule symbionts than previously believed. PMID:16461667

  2. Complete genome sequence of Cupriavidus basilensis 4G11, isolated from the Oak Ridge Field Research Center site

    DOE PAGES

    Ray, Jayashree; Waters, R. Jordan; Skerker, Jeffrey M.; ...

    2015-05-14

    Cupriavidus basilensis 4G11 was isolated from groundwater at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (FRC) site. Here, we report the complete genome sequence and annotation of Cupriavidus basilensis 4G11. The genome contains 8,421,483 bp, 7,661 predicted protein-coding genes, and a total GC content of 64.4%.

  3. American origin of Cupriavidus bacteria associated with invasive Mimosa legumes in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Andrus, Alexis D; Andam, Cheryl; Parker, Matthew A

    2012-06-01

    To identify the origins of Cupriavidus nodule symbionts associated with two invasive Mimosa species in the Philippines, 22 isolates were sequenced for portions of three chromosomal genes and two symbiotic plasmid loci. Eleven isolates were identical at all gene loci (2713 bp) to a lineage found in Central America. Four other Philippine isolates were identical to a second Cupriavidus lineage distributed both in Central America and in the Caribbean. None of the remaining Philippine strains had more than 0.6% sequence divergence from American Cupriavidus lineages. These results imply that the Philippine population was founded by multiple introductions from the native range of their Mimosa hosts. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The initial metabolic conversion of levulinic acid in Cupriavidus necator.

    PubMed

    Jaremko, Matt; Yu, Jian

    2011-09-20

    Levulinic acid or 4-ketovaleric acid is a potential renewable substrate for production of polyhydroxyalkanoates. In this work, the initial reactions of LA metabolism by Cupriavidus necator were examined in vitro. The organic acid was converted by membrane-bound crude enzymes obtained from the cells pre-grown on LA, while no LA activity was detected from cells pre-grown on acetic acid. Acetyl-CoA and propionyl-CoA were two major intermediates in the initial reactions of LA conversion. A mass balance on propionyl-CoA accounts for 84 mol% of LA added in vitro. It explains an interesting phenomenon that 3-hydroxbutyrate and 3-hydroxyvalerate are two major monomers of the biopolyester formed from LA, instead of 4-hydroxvalerate that has the similar chemical structure of LA as the precursor. A Monod model was used to describe the kinetics of LA utilization as a sole carbon source or a co-substrate of glucose and fructose. The μ(max) and K(m) of LA alone were 0.26 h⁻¹ and 0.01 g/L, respectively. The content and composition of PHA are also dependent on the culture conditions such as carbon to nitrogen ratio. The in vitro observation is supported by the high utilization rate of LA and the high molar percentage of 3HB and 3HV in the PHA derived from LA. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A New Ochratoxin A Biodegradation Strategy Using Cupriavidus basilensis Őr16 Strain

    PubMed Central

    Krifaton, Csilla; Szoboszlay, Sándor; Kukolya, József; Szőke, Zsuzsanna; Kőszegi, Balázs; Albert, Mihály; Barna, Teréz; Mézes, Miklós; Kovács, Krisztina J.; Kriszt, Balázs

    2014-01-01

    Ochratoxin-A (OTA) is a mycotoxin with possibly carcinogenic and nephrotoxic effects in humans and animals. OTA is often found as a contaminant in agricultural commodities. The aim of the present work was to evaluate OTA-degrading and detoxifying potential of Cupriavidus basilensis ŐR16 strain. In vivo administration of OTA in CD1 male mice (1 or 10 mg/kg body weight for 72 hours or 0.5 mg/kg body weight for 21 days) resulted in significant elevation of OTA levels in the blood, histopathological alterations- and transcriptional changes in OTA-dependent genes (annexinA2, clusterin, sulphotransferase and gadd45 and gadd153) in the renal cortex. These OTA-induced changes were not seen in animals that have been treated with culture supernatants in which OTA was incubated with Cupriavidus basilensis ŐR16 strain for 5 days. HPLC and ELISA methods identified ochratoxin α as the major metabolite of OTA in Cupriavidus basilensis ŐR16 cultures, which is not toxic in vivo. This study has demonstrated that Cupriavidus basilensis ŐR16 efficiently degrade OTA without producing toxic adventitious metabolites. PMID:25302950

  6. First case of pneumonia caused by Cupriavidus pauculus in an infant in the Gulf Cooperation Council.

    PubMed

    Yahya, Raghda; Alyousef, Wafaa; Omara, Abdelwahab; Alamoudi, Suha; Alshami, Alanoud; Abdalhamid, Baha

    2017-02-28

    Cupriavidus pauculus is an emerging organism causing infections in immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. We report a C.pauculus pneumonia case susceptible to cefepime in an infant with end-stage renal failure. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of C. pauculus causing respiratory infections in the Gulf Cooperation Council.

  7. Cupriavidus taiwanensis Bacteroids in Mimosa pudica Indeterminate Nodules Are Not Terminally Differentiated ▿

    PubMed Central

    Marchetti, Marta; Catrice, Olivier; Batut, Jacques; Masson-Boivin, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    The beta-rhizobium Cupriavidus taiwanensis forms indeterminate nodules on Mimosa pudica. C. taiwanensis bacteroids resemble free-living bacteria in terms of genomic DNA content, cell size, membrane permeability, and viability, in contrast to bacteroids in indeterminate nodules of the galegoid clade. Bacteroid differentiation is thus unrelated to nodule ontogeny. PMID:21257807

  8. Cupriavidus taiwanensis bacteroids in Mimosa pudica Indeterminate nodules are not terminally differentiated.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Marta; Catrice, Olivier; Batut, Jacques; Masson-Boivin, Catherine

    2011-03-01

    The beta-rhizobium Cupriavidus taiwanensis forms indeterminate nodules on Mimosa pudica. C. taiwanensis bacteroids resemble free-living bacteria in terms of genomic DNA content, cell size, membrane permeability, and viability, in contrast to bacteroids in indeterminate nodules of the galegoid clade. Bacteroid differentiation is thus unrelated to nodule ontogeny.

  9. Burkholderia and Cupriavidus spp. are the preferred symbionts of Mimosa spp. in southern China.

    PubMed

    Liu, XiaoYun; Wei, Shuang; Wang, Fang; James, Euan K; Guo, XiaoYe; Zagar, Catherine; Xia, Liu Gui; Dong, Xin; Wang, Yi Peng

    2012-05-01

    Rhizobia were isolated from invasive Mimosa spp. (M. diplotricha and M. pudica) in Dehong district of the province of Yunnan in subtropical southern China. Almost all of the 98 isolates were β-rhizobia in the genera Burkholderia and Cupriavidus. These strains were analysed for their distribution characteristics together with strains from a previous study from Sishuangbanna. The proportion of nodules containing each β-rhizobial genus varied between Mimosa species, with Cupriavidus being predominant in M. diplotricha nodules (63.3% compared to 36.7% occupation with Burkholderia), but with M. pudica showing a slight preference for Burkholderia over Cupriavidus, with them occupying 56.5% and 43.5% of nodules, respectively. The symbiosis-essential genes nodA and nifH were present in all the Burkholderia and Cupriavidus strains tested, and their phylogenies indicated that these Mimosa symbionts share symbiotic genes with native South American rhizobia. The evolutionary discrepancies among 16S rRNA genes, nodA and nifH of Mimosa spp. symbionts, suggests that the nod and nif genes of β-rhizobia evolved independently. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cupriavidus necator H16 Uses Flavocytochrome c Sulfide Dehydrogenase To Oxidize Self-Produced and Added Sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Lü, Chuanjuan; Xia, Yongzhen; Liu, Daixi; Zhao, Rui; Gao, Rui

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Production of sulfide (H2S, HS−, and S2−) by heterotrophic bacteria during aerobic growth is a common phenomenon. Some bacteria with sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (SQR) and persulfide dioxygenase (PDO) can oxidize self-produced sulfide to sulfite and thiosulfate, but other bacteria without these enzymes release sulfide into the medium, from which H2S can volatilize into the gas phase. Here, we report that Cupriavidus necator H16, with the fccA and fccB genes encoding flavocytochrome c sulfide dehydrogenases (FCSDs), also oxidized self-produced H2S. A mutant in which fccA and fccB were deleted accumulated and released H2S. When fccA and fccB were expressed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain Pa3K with deletions of its sqr and pdo genes, the recombinant rapidly oxidized sulfide to sulfane sulfur. When PDO was also cloned into the recombinant, the recombinant with both FCSD and PDO oxidized sulfide to sulfite and thiosulfate. Thus, the proposed pathway is similar to the pathway catalyzed by SQR and PDO, in which FCSD oxidizes sulfide to polysulfide, polysulfide spontaneously reacts with reduced glutathione (GSH) to produce glutathione persulfide (GSSH), and PDO oxidizes GSSH to sulfite, which chemically reacts with polysulfide to produce thiosulfate. About 20.6% of sequenced bacterial genomes contain SQR, and only 3.9% contain FCSD. This is not a surprise, since SQR is more efficient in conserving energy because it passes electrons from sulfide oxidation into the electron transport chain at the quinone level, while FCSD passes electrons to cytochrome c. The transport of electrons from the latter to O2 conserves less energy. FCSDs are grouped into three subgroups, well conserved at the taxonomic level. Thus, our data show the diversity in sulfide oxidation by heterotrophic bacteria. IMPORTANCE Heterotrophic bacteria with SQR and PDO can oxidize self-produced sulfide and do not release H2S into the gas phase. C. necator H16 has FCSD but not SQR, and it does

  11. Novel Cupriavidus Strains Isolated from Root Nodules of Native Uruguayan Mimosa Species

    PubMed Central

    James, Euan K.; Rios, Cecilia; Iriarte, Andrés; Sandes, Laura; Zabaleta, María; Battistoni, Federico; Fabiano, Elena

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The large legume genus Mimosa is known to be associated with both alphaproteobacterial and betaproteobacterial symbionts, depending on environment and plant taxonomy, e.g., Brazilian species are preferentially nodulated by Burkholderia, whereas those in Mexico are associated with alphaproteobacterial symbionts. Little is known, however, about the symbiotic preferences of Mimosa spp. at the southern subtropical limits of the genus. In the present study, rhizobia were isolated from field-collected nodules from Mimosa species that are native to a region in southern Uruguay. Phylogenetic analyses of sequences of the 16S rRNA, recA, and gyrB core genome and the nifH and nodA symbiosis-essential loci confirmed that all the isolates belonged to the genus Cupriavidus. However, none were in the well-described symbiotic species C. taiwanensis, but instead they were closely related to other species, such as C. necator, and to species not previously known to be symbiotic (or diazotrophic), such as C. basilensis and C. pinatubonensis. Selection of these novel Cupriavidus symbionts by Uruguayan Mimosa spp. is most likely due to their geographical separation from their Brazilian cousins and to the characteristics of the soils in which they were found. IMPORTANCE With the aim of exploring the diversity of rhizobia associated with native Mimosa species, symbionts were isolated from root nodules on five Mimosa species that are native to a region in southern Uruguay, Sierra del Abra de Zabaleta. In contrast to data obtained in the major centers of diversification of the genus Mimosa, Brazil and Mexico, where it is mainly associated with Burkholderia and Rhizobium/Ensifer, respectively, the present study has shown that all the isolated symbiotic bacteria belonged to the genus Cupriavidus. Interestingly, none of nodules contained bacteria belonging to the well-described symbiotic species C. taiwanensis, but instead they were related to other Cupriavidus species such as C

  12. Novel Cupriavidus Strains Isolated from Root Nodules of Native Uruguayan Mimosa Species.

    PubMed

    Platero, Raúl; James, Euan K; Rios, Cecilia; Iriarte, Andrés; Sandes, Laura; Zabaleta, María; Battistoni, Federico; Fabiano, Elena

    2016-06-01

    The large legume genus Mimosa is known to be associated with both alphaproteobacterial and betaproteobacterial symbionts, depending on environment and plant taxonomy, e.g., Brazilian species are preferentially nodulated by Burkholderia, whereas those in Mexico are associated with alphaproteobacterial symbionts. Little is known, however, about the symbiotic preferences of Mimosa spp. at the southern subtropical limits of the genus. In the present study, rhizobia were isolated from field-collected nodules from Mimosa species that are native to a region in southern Uruguay. Phylogenetic analyses of sequences of the 16S rRNA, recA, and gyrB core genome and the nifH and nodA symbiosis-essential loci confirmed that all the isolates belonged to the genus Cupriavidus However, none were in the well-described symbiotic species C. taiwanensis, but instead they were closely related to other species, such as C. necator, and to species not previously known to be symbiotic (or diazotrophic), such as C. basilensis and C. pinatubonensis Selection of these novel Cupriavidus symbionts by Uruguayan Mimosa spp. is most likely due to their geographical separation from their Brazilian cousins and to the characteristics of the soils in which they were found. With the aim of exploring the diversity of rhizobia associated with native Mimosa species, symbionts were isolated from root nodules on five Mimosa species that are native to a region in southern Uruguay, Sierra del Abra de Zabaleta. In contrast to data obtained in the major centers of diversification of the genus Mimosa, Brazil and Mexico, where it is mainly associated with Burkholderia and Rhizobium/Ensifer, respectively, the present study has shown that all the isolated symbiotic bacteria belonged to the genus Cupriavidus Interestingly, none of nodules contained bacteria belonging to the well-described symbiotic species C. taiwanensis, but instead they were related to other Cupriavidus species such as C. necator and C

  13. Fixation of carbon dioxide by a hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium for value-added products.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian

    2018-06-09

    With rapid technology progress and cost reduction, clean hydrogen from water electrolysis driven by renewable powers becomes a potential feedstock for CO 2 fixation by hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria. Cupriavidus necator (formally Ralstonia eutropha), a representative member of the lithoautotrophic prokaryotes, is a promising producer of polyhydroxyalkanoates and single cell proteins. This paper reviews the fundamental properties of the hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium, the metabolic activities under limitation of individual gases and nutrients, and the value-added products from CO 2 , including the products with large potential markets. Gas fermentation and bioreactor safety are discussed for achieving high cell density and high productivity of desired products under chemolithotrophic conditions. The review also updates the recent research activities in metabolic engineering of C. necator to produce novel metabolites from CO 2 .

  14. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of the Parapiptadenia rigida-nodulating Cupriavidus sp. strain UYPR2.512

    SciTech Connect

    De Meyer, Sofie E.; Fabiano, Elena; Tian, Rui

    Cupriavidus sp. strain UYPR2.512 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from a root nodule of Parapiptadenia rigida grown in soils from a native forest of Uruguay. Here we describe the features of Cupriavidus sp. strain UYPR2.512, together with sequence and annotation. We find the 7,858,949 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged in 365 scaffolds of 369 contigs, contains 7,411 protein-coding genes and 76 RNA-only encoding genes, and is part of the GEBA-RNB project proposal.

  15. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of the Parapiptadenia rigida-nodulating Cupriavidus sp. strain UYPR2.512

    DOE PAGES

    De Meyer, Sofie E.; Fabiano, Elena; Tian, Rui; ...

    2015-04-11

    Cupriavidus sp. strain UYPR2.512 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from a root nodule of Parapiptadenia rigida grown in soils from a native forest of Uruguay. Here we describe the features of Cupriavidus sp. strain UYPR2.512, together with sequence and annotation. We find the 7,858,949 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged in 365 scaffolds of 369 contigs, contains 7,411 protein-coding genes and 76 RNA-only encoding genes, and is part of the GEBA-RNB project proposal.

  16. The Complete Multipartite Genome Sequence of Cupriavidus necator JMP134, a Versatile Pollutant Degrader

    SciTech Connect

    Lykidis, Athanasios; Perez-Pantoja, Danilo; Ledger, Thomas

    Cupriavidus necator JMP134 (formerly Ralstonia eutropha JMP134) is a Gram-negative {beta}-proteobacterium able to degrade a variety of chloroaromatic compounds and chemically-related pollutants. It was originally isolated based on its ability to use 2,4 dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) as a sole carbon and energy source [1]. In addition to 2,4-D, this strain can also grow on a variety of aromatic substrates, such as 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetate (MCPA), 3-chlorobenzoic acid (3-CB) [2], 2,4,6-trichlorophenol [3], and 4-fluorobenzoate [4]. The genes necessary for 2,4-D utilization have been identified. They are located in two clusters on plasmid pPJ4: tfd{sub I} and tfd{sub II} [5,6,7,8]. The sequence and analysismore » of plasmid pJP4 was reported and a congruent model for bacterial adaptation to chloroaromatic pollutants was proposed [9]. According to this model, catabolic gene clusters assemble in a modular manner into broad-host-range plasmid backbones by means of repeated chromosomal capture events. Cupriavidus and related Burkholderia genomes are typically multipartite, composed of two large replicons (chromosomes) accompanied by classical plasmids. Previous work with Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 revealed a differential gene distribution with core functions preferentially encoded by the larger chromosome and secondary functions by the smaller [10]. It has been proposed that the secondary chromosomes in many bacteria originated from ancestral plasmids which, in turn, had been the recipient of genes transferred earlier from ancestral primary chromosomes [11]. The existence of multiple Cupriavidus and Burkholderia genomes provides the opportunity for comparative studies that will lead to a better understanding of the evolutionary mechanisms for the formation of multipartite genomes and the relation with biodegradation abilities.« less

  17. Pseudo-outbreak of Cupriavidus pauculus infection at an outpatient clinic related to rinsing culturette swabs in tap water.

    PubMed

    Balada-Llasat, Joan-Miquel; Elkins, Camille; Swyers, Lettie; Bannerman, Tammy; Pancholi, Preeti

    2010-07-01

    Cupriavidus pauculus is a water microorganism rarely isolated from clinical specimens. We describe a pseudo-outbreak in which multiple strains that were associated with moistening of culturette swabs with tap water were isolated from a single clinic before collecting the patient specimen.

  18. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of the Mimosa asperata - nodulating Cupriavidus sp. strain AMP6

    DOE PAGES

    De Meyer, Sofie E.; Parker, Matthew; Van Berkum, Peter; ...

    2015-10-16

    Cupriavidus sp. strain AMP6 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from a root nodule of Mimosa asperata collected in Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge, Texas, in 2005. Mimosa asperata is the only legume described so far to exclusively associates with Cupriavidus symbionts. Furthermore, strain AMP6 represents an early-diverging lineage within the symbiotic Cupriavidus group and has the capacity to develop an effective nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with three other species of Mimosa. Here, we describe the genome of Cupriavidus sp. strain AMP6 which enables comparative analyses of symbiotic trait evolution in this genus; the general features, together withmore » sequence and annotation are further discussed. Finally, the 7,579,563 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged in 260 scaffolds of 262 contigs, contains 7,033 protein-coding genes and 97 RNA-only encoding genes, and is part of the GEBA-RNB project proposal.« less

  19. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of the Mimosa asperata - nodulating Cupriavidus sp. strain AMP6

    SciTech Connect

    De Meyer, Sofie E.; Parker, Matthew; Van Berkum, Peter

    Cupriavidus sp. strain AMP6 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from a root nodule of Mimosa asperata collected in Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge, Texas, in 2005. Mimosa asperata is the only legume described so far to exclusively associates with Cupriavidus symbionts. Furthermore, strain AMP6 represents an early-diverging lineage within the symbiotic Cupriavidus group and has the capacity to develop an effective nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with three other species of Mimosa. Here, we describe the genome of Cupriavidus sp. strain AMP6 which enables comparative analyses of symbiotic trait evolution in this genus; the general features, together withmore » sequence and annotation are further discussed. Finally, the 7,579,563 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged in 260 scaffolds of 262 contigs, contains 7,033 protein-coding genes and 97 RNA-only encoding genes, and is part of the GEBA-RNB project proposal.« less

  20. Evaluation of the Biocidal Efficacy of Different Forms of Silver Against Cupriavidus (formerly Wautersia) Species Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gazda, Daniel B.; Schultz, John R.; Wong, Wing; Algate, Michelle T.; Bryant, Becky; Castro, Victoria A.

    2009-01-01

    Contingency Water Containers (CWCs) are used to store potable and technical water that is transferred to the International Space Station (ISS) from the Shuttle orbiter vehicles. When CWCs are filled, water from the orbiter galley is passed through an ion exchange/activated carbon cartridge that removes the residual iodine biocide used on Shuttle before silver biocide is added. Removal of iodine and addition of silver is necessary to inhibit microbial growth inside CWCs and maintain compatibility with the water systems in the Russian segment of ISS. As part of nominal water transfer activities, crewmembers collect samples from several CWCs for postflight analysis. Results from the analysis of water transfer samples collected during the docked phases of STS-118/13A.1 and STS-120/10A showed that several of the CWCs contained up to 10(exp 4) CFU/mL of bacteria despite the fact that the silver concentrations in the CWCs were within acceptable limits. The samples contained pure cultures of a single bacteria, a Cupriavidus (formerly Wautersia) species that has been shown to be resistant to metallic biocides. As part of the investigation into the cause and remediation of the bacterial contamination in these CWCs, ground studies were initiated to evaluate the resistance of the Cupriavidus species to the silver biocides used on ISS and to determine the minimum effective concentration for the different forms of silver present in the biocides. The initial findings from those experiments are discussed herein.

  1. Rapid Biodegradation of the Herbicide 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid by Cupriavidus gilardii T-1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiangwei; Wang, Wenbo; Liu, Junwei; Pan, Dandan; Tu, Xiaohui; Lv, Pei; Wang, Yi; Cao, Haiqun; Wang, Yawen; Hua, Rimao

    2017-05-10

    Phytotoxicity and environmental pollution of residual herbicides have caused much public concern during the past several decades. An indigenous bacterial strain capable of degrading 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), designated T-1, was isolated from soybean field soil and identified as Cupriavidus gilardii. Strain T-1 degraded 2,4-D 3.39 times more rapidly than the model strain Cupriavidus necator JMP134. T-1 could also efficiently degrade 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA), MCPA isooctyl ester, and 2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)propionic acid (2,4-DP). Suitable conditions for 2,4-D degradation were pH 7.0-9.0, 37-42 °C, and 4.0 mL of inoculums. Degradation of 2,4-D was concentration-dependent. 2,4-D was degraded to 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) by cleavage of the ether bond and then to 3,5-dichlorocatechol (3,5-DCC) via hydroxylation, followed by ortho-cleavage to cis-2-dichlorodiene lactone (CDL). The metabolites 2,4-DCP or 3,5-DCC at 10 mg L -1 were completely degraded within 16 h. Fast degradation of 2,4-D and its analogues highlights the potential for use of C. gilardii T-1 in bioremediation of phenoxyalkanoic acid herbicides.

  2. Genome characteristics dictate poly-R-(3)-hydroxyalkanoate production in Cupriavidus necator H16.

    PubMed

    Kutralam-Muniasamy, Gurusamy; Peréz-Guevara, Fermín

    2018-05-24

    Cupriavidus necator H16 is a well-recognized enterprise with efficient manufacturing machineries to produce diverse polymers belonging to polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) family. The genome fingerprints, including PHA machinery proteins and fatty acid metabolism, had educated engineering strategies to enhance PHAs production. This outstanding progress has enlightened us to present an exhaustive examination of the ongoing research, addressing the great potential design of genome features towards PHA production and furthermore, we show how those acquired knowledge have been explored in other biotechnological applications. This updated-review concludes that the combination of an optimal strain selection, suitable metabolic engineering and a large-scale fermentation on oil substrates is critical to endow the ability of incorporating mcl-PHAs monomers in this organism.

  3. Effect of glucose on the fatty acid composition of Cupriavidus necator JMP134 during 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid degradation: implications for lipid-based stable isotope probing methods.

    PubMed

    Lerch, Thomas Z; Dignac, Marie-France; Barriuso, Enrique; Mariotti, André

    2011-10-01

    Combining lipid biomarker profiling with stable isotope probing (SIP) is a powerful technique for studying specific microbial populations responsible for the degradation of organic pollutants in various natural environments. However, the presence of other easily degradable substrates may induce significant physiological changes by altering both the rate of incorporation of the target compound into the biomass and the microbial lipid profiles. In order to test this hypothesis, Cupriavidus necator JMP134, a 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)-degrading bacterium, was incubated with [(13)C]2,4-D, [(13)C]glucose, or mixtures of both substrates alternatively labeled with (13)C. C. necator JMP134 exhibited a preferential use of 2,4-D over glucose. The isotopic analysis showed that glucose had only a small effect on the incorporation of the acetic chain of 2,4-D into the biomass (at days 2 and 3) and no effect on that of the benzenic ring. The addition of glucose did change the fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) composition. However, the overall FAME isotopic signature reflected that of the entire biomass. Compound-specific individual isotopic analyses of FAME composition showed that the (13)C-enriched FAME profiles were slightly or not affected when tracing the 2,4-D acetic chain or 2,4-D benzenic ring, respectively. This batch study is a necessary step for validating the use of lipid-based SIP methods in complex environments.

  4. Effect of Glucose on the Fatty Acid Composition of Cupriavidus necator JMP134 during 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid Degradation: Implications for Lipid-Based Stable Isotope Probing Methods▿†

    PubMed Central

    Lerch, Thomas Z.; Dignac, Marie-France; Barriuso, Enrique; Mariotti, André

    2011-01-01

    Combining lipid biomarker profiling with stable isotope probing (SIP) is a powerful technique for studying specific microbial populations responsible for the degradation of organic pollutants in various natural environments. However, the presence of other easily degradable substrates may induce significant physiological changes by altering both the rate of incorporation of the target compound into the biomass and the microbial lipid profiles. In order to test this hypothesis, Cupriavidus necator JMP134, a 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)-degrading bacterium, was incubated with [13C]2,4-D, [13C]glucose, or mixtures of both substrates alternatively labeled with 13C. C. necator JMP134 exhibited a preferential use of 2,4-D over glucose. The isotopic analysis showed that glucose had only a small effect on the incorporation of the acetic chain of 2,4-D into the biomass (at days 2 and 3) and no effect on that of the benzenic ring. The addition of glucose did change the fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) composition. However, the overall FAME isotopic signature reflected that of the entire biomass. Compound-specific individual isotopic analyses of FAME composition showed that the 13C-enriched FAME profiles were slightly or not affected when tracing the 2,4-D acetic chain or 2,4-D benzenic ring, respectively. This batch study is a necessary step for validating the use of lipid-based SIP methods in complex environments. PMID:21856833

  5. Acid pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification of brown seaweed for polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) production using Cupriavidus necator.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Nahid; Najafpour, Ghasem; Younesi, Habibollah

    2017-08-01

    The brown seaweed Sargassum sp. was used as a feedstock to produce polyhydroxybutyarte (PHB) using Cupriavidus necator PTCC 1615. In order to release monomeric sugars, dilute acid hydrolysis of Sargassum sp. biomass was followed by enzymatic saccharification. In addition, the effect of different nitrogen sources was evaluated for PHB production. The fermentation of hydrolysate with the ammonium sulfate as selected nitrogen source resulted PHB yield of 0.54±0.01g/g reducing sugar. Then, NaCl was used as external stress factor which was added to the media. Addition of 8g/L NaCl had a positive impact on high PHB yield of 0.74±0.01g/g reducing sugar. Increasing trend of NaCl concentration to 16g/L was found to inhibit the production of PHB. Based on obtained results using 20g/L of reducing sugar, at desired condition the highest cell dry weight and PHB concentrations were 5.36±0.22 and 3.93±0.24g/L, respectively. The findings of this study reveal that Sargassum sp. is a promising feedstock for biopolymer production. The characteristics of produced PHB were analyzed by FTIR, differential scanning calorimetry and 1 H NMR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Unveiling the biotransformation mechanism of indole in a Cupriavidus sp. strain.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yuanyuan; Ma, Qiao; Liu, Ziyan; Wang, Weiwei; Tang, Hongzhi; Zhou, Jiti; Xu, Ping

    2017-12-01

    Indole, an important signaling molecule as well as a typical N-heterocyclic aromatic pollutant, is widespread in nature. However, the biotransformation mechanisms of indole are still poorly studied. Here, we sought to unlock the genetic determinants of indole biotransformation in strain Cupriavidus sp. SHE based on genomics, proteomics and functional studies. A total of 177 proteins were notably altered (118 up- and 59 downregulated) in cells grown in indole mineral salt medium when compared with that in sodium citrate medium. RT-qPCR and gene knockout assays demonstrated that an indole oxygenase gene cluster was responsible for the indole upstream metabolism. A functional indole oxygenase, termed IndA, was identified in the cluster, and its catalytic efficiency was higher than those of previously reported indole oxidation enzymes. Furthermore, the indole downstream metabolism was found to proceed via the atypical CoA-thioester pathway rather than conventional gentisate and salicylate pathways. This unusual pathway was catalyzed by a conserved 2-aminobenzoyl-CoA gene cluster, among which the 2-aminobenzoyl-CoA ligase initiated anthranilate transformation. This study unveils the genetic determinants of indole biotransformation and will provide new insights into our understanding of indole biodegradation in natural environments and its functional studies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Effect of limonene on the heterotrophic growth and polyhydroxybutyrate production by Cupriavidus necator H16.

    PubMed

    Guzman Lagunes, F; Winterburn, J B

    2016-12-01

    The inhibitory effect of limonene on polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) production in Cupriavidus necator H16 was studied. Firstly, results demonstrate the feasibility of using orange juicing waste (OJW) as a substrate for PHB production. An intracellular PHB content of 81.4% (w/w) was attained for a total dry matter concentration of 9.58gL -1 , when the OJW medium was used. Later, a mineral medium designed to mimic the nutrient levels found in the complex medium derived from OJW was used to study the effect of limonene on the production of PHB. Results showed a drop in specific growth rate (μ) of more than 50% when the initial limonene concentration was 2% (v/v) compared to the limonene free medium. This work highlights the importance of a limonene recovery stage prior to fermentation, to maintain levels below 1% (v/v) in the medium, adding value to the OJW and enhancing the fermentation process productivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Low frequency sonic waves assisted cloud point extraction of polyhydroxyalkanoate from Cupriavidus necator.

    PubMed

    Murugesan, Sivananth; Iyyaswami, Regupathi

    2017-08-15

    Low frequency sonic waves, less than 10kHz were introduced to assist cloud point extraction of polyhydroxyalkanoate from Cupriavidus necator present within the crude broth. Process parameters including surfactant system variables and sonication parameters were studied for their effect on extraction efficiency. Introduction of low frequency sonic waves assists in the dissolution of microbial cell wall by the surfactant micelles and release of cellular content, polyhydroxyalkanoate granules released were encapsulated by the micelle core which was confirmed by crotonic acid assay. In addition, sonic waves resulted in the separation of homogeneous surfactant and broth mixture into two distinct phases, top aqueous phase and polyhydroxyalkanoate enriched bottom surfactant rich phase. Mixed surfactant systems showed higher extraction efficiency compared to that of individual Triton X-100 concentrations, owing to increase in the hydrophobicity of the micellar core and its interaction with polyhydroxyalkanoate. Addition of salts to the mixed surfactant system induces screening of charged surfactant head groups and reduces inter-micellar repulsion, presence of ammonium ions lead to electrostatic repulsion and weaker cation sodium enhances the formation of micellar network. Addition of polyethylene glycol 8000 resulted in increasing interaction with the surfactant tails of the micelle core there by reducing the purity of polyhydroxyalkanoate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The use of NaCl addition for the improvement of polyhydroxyalkanoate production by Cupriavidus necator.

    PubMed

    Passanha, Pearl; Kedia, Gopal; Dinsdale, Richard M; Guwy, Alan J; Esteves, Sandra R

    2014-07-01

    External stress factors in the form of ionic species or temperature increases have been shown to produce a stress response leading to enhanced PHA production. The effect of five different NaCl concentrations, namely 3.5, 6.5, 9, 12 and 15 g/l NaCl on PHA productivity using Cupriavidus necator has been investigated alongside a control (no added NaCl). A dielectric spectroscopy probe was used to measure PHA accumulation online in conjunction with the chemical offline analysis of PHA. The highest PHA production was obtained with the addition of 9 g/l NaCl, which yielded 30% higher PHA than the control. Increasing the addition of NaCl to 15 g/l was found to inhibit the production of PHA. NaCl addition can therefore be used as a simple, low cost, sustainable, non toxic and non reactive external stress strategy for increasing PHA productivity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Furfural reduction mechanism of a zinc-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase from Cupriavidus necator JMP134

    PubMed Central

    Kang, ChulHee; Hayes, Robert; Sanchez, Emiliano J.; Webb, Brian N.; Li, Qunrui; Hooper, Travis; Nissen, Mark S.; Xun, Luying

    2012-01-01

    Summary FurX is a tetrameric Zn-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from Cupriavidus necator JMP134. The enzyme rapidly reduces furfural with NADH as the reducing power. For the first time among characterized ADHs, the high-resolution structures of all reaction steps were obtained in a time-resolved manner, thereby illustrating the complete catalytic events of NADH-dependent reduction of furfural and the dynamic Zn2+ coordination among Glu66, water, substrate and product. In the fully closed conformation of the NADH complex, the catalytic turnover proved faster than observed for the partially closed conformation due to an effective proton transfer network. The domain motion triggered by NAD(H) association/dissociation appeared to facilitate dynamic interchanges in Zn2+ coordination with substrate and product molecules, ultimately increasing the enzymatic turnover rate. NAD+ dissociation appeared to be a slow process, involving multiple steps in concert with a domain opening and reconfiguration of Glu66. This agrees with the report that the cofactor is not dissociated from FurX during ethanol-dependent reduction of furfural, in which ethanol reduces NAD+ to NADH that is subsequently used for furfural reduction. PMID:22081946

  11. Production and optimization of polyhydroxyalkanoates from non-edible Calophyllum inophyllum oil using Cupriavidus necator.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, A; Senthamizhan, S G; Ponnusami, V; Sudalai, S

    2018-06-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) are biodegradable polymers found in the cellular masses of a wide range of bacterial species and the demand for PHA is steadily growing. In this work we have produced PHA from a low-cost substrate, Calophyllum inophyllum oil, using Cupriavidus necator. Effects of various process parameters such as Oil concentration, Nitrogen source and inoculum size on the production of PHA were studied using Response Surface Methodology. A quadratic equation was used in the model to fit the experimental data. It was found that the model could satisfactorily predict the PHA yield (R 2 =99.17%). Linear, quadratic and interaction terms used in the model were found to be statistically significant. Maximum PHA yield of 10.6gL -1 was obtained under the optimized conditions of oil concentration - 17.5%, inoculum concentration - 50mL/L and nitrogen content - 1.125gL -1 , respectively. The product obtained was characterized using FTIR and NMR to confirm that it was PHA. The results demonstrate that C. inophyllum oil, a non-edible oil, can be potentially used as a low-cost substrate for the production of PHA. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Pseudomonas, Pantoea and Cupriavidus isolates induce calcium carbonate precipitation for biorestoration of ornamental stone.

    PubMed

    Daskalakis, M I; Magoulas, A; Kotoulas, G; Catsikis, I; Bakolas, A; Karageorgis, A P; Mavridou, A; Doulia, D; Rigas, F

    2013-08-01

    Bacterially induced calcium carbonate precipitation from various isolates was investigated aiming at developing an environmentally friendly technique for ornamental stone protection and restoration. Micro-organisms isolated from stone samples and identified using 16S rDNA and biochemical tests promoted calcium carbonate precipitation in solid and novel liquid growth media. Biomineral morphology was studied on marble samples with scanning electron microscopy. Most isolates demonstrated specimen weight increase, covering partially or even completely the marble surfaces mainly with vaterite. The conditions under which vaterite precipitated and its stability throughout the experimental runs are presented. A growth medium that facilitated bacterial growth of different species and promoted biomineralization was formulated. Most isolates induced biomineralization of CaCO3 . Micro-organisms may actually be a milestone in the investigation of vaterite formation facilitating our understanding of geomicrobiological interactions. Pseudomonas, Pantoea and Cupriavidus strains could be candidates for bioconsolidation of ornamental stone protection. Characterization of biomineralization capacity of different bacterial species improves understanding of the bacterially induced mineralization processes and enriches the list of candidates for biorestoration applications. Knowledge of biomineral morphology assists in differentiating mineral from biologically induced precipitates. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Effect of sodium accumulation on heterotrophic growth and polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) production by Cupriavidus necator.

    PubMed

    Mozumder, Md Salatul Islam; Garcia-Gonzalez, Linsey; De Wever, Heleen; Volcke, Eveline I P

    2015-09-01

    This study evaluates the effect of sodium (Na(+)) concentration on the growth and PHB production by Cupriavidus necator. Both biomass growth and PHB production were inhibited by Na(+): biomass growth became zero at 8.9 g/L Na(+) concentration while PHB production was completely stopped at 10.5 g/L Na(+). A mathematical model for pure culture heterotrophic PHB production was set up to describe the Na(+) inhibition effect. The parameters related to Na(+) inhibition were estimated based on shake flask experiments. The accumulated Na(+) showed non-linear inhibition effect on biomass growth but linear inhibition effect on PHB production kinetics. Fed-batch experiments revealed that a high accumulation of Na(+) due to a prolonged growth phase, using NaOH for pH control, decreased the subsequent PHB production. The model was validated based on independent experimental data sets, showing a good agreement between experimental data and simulation results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Increasing polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) yields from Cupriavidus necator by using filtered digestate liquors.

    PubMed

    Passanha, Pearl; Esteves, Sandra R; Kedia, Gopal; Dinsdale, Richard M; Guwy, Alan J

    2013-11-01

    The production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) using digestate liquor as culture media is a novel application to extend the existing uses of digestates. In this study, two micro-filtered digestates (0.22 μm) were evaluated as a source of complex culture media for the production of PHA by Cupriavidus necator as compared to a conventional media. Culture media using a mixture of micro-filtered liquors from food waste and from wheat feed digesters showed a maximum PHA accumulation of 12.29 g/l PHA, with 90% cell dry weight and a yield of 0.48 g PHA/g VFA consumed, the highest reported to date for C. necator studies. From the analysis of the starting and residual media, it was concluded that ammonia, potassium, magnesium, sulfate and phosphate provided in the digestate liquors were vital for the initial growth of C. necator whereas copper, iron and nickel may have played a significant role in PHA accumulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cupriavidus necator JMP134 rapidly reduces furfural with a Zn-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Li, Qunrui; Metthew Lam, L K; Xun, Luying

    2011-11-01

    Ethanol is a renewable biofuel, and it can be produced from lignocellulosic biomass. The biomass is usually converted to hydrolysates that consist of sugar and sugar derivatives, such as furfural. Yeast ferments sugar to ethanol, but furfural higher than 3 mM is inhibitory. It can take several days for yeast cells to reduce furfural to non-inhibitory furfuryl alcohol before producing ethanol. Bioreduction of furfural to furfuryl alcohol before fermentation may relieve yeast from furfural toxicity. We observed that Cupriavidus necator JMP134, a strict aerobe, rapidly reduced 17 mM furfural to less than 3 mM within 14 min with cell turbidity of 1.0 at 600 nm at 50°C. The rapid reduction consumed ethanol. The "furfural reductase" (FurX) was purified, and it oxidized ethanol to acetaldehyde and reduced furfural to furfuryl alcohol with NAD(+) as the cofactor. The protein was identified with mass spectrometry fingerprinting to be a hypothetical protein belonging to Zn-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase family. The furX-inactivation mutant of C. necator JMP134 lost the ability to rapidly reduce furfural, and Escherichia coli producing recombinant FurX gained the ability. Thus, an alcohol dehydrogenase enabled bacteria to rapidly reduce furfural with ethanol as the reducing power.

  16. Single Bacterium Detection Using Sers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonchukov, S. A.; Baikova, T. V.; Alushin, M. V.; Svistunova, T. S.; Minaeva, S. A.; Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Saraeva, I. N.; Zayarny, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    This work is devoted to the study of a single Staphylococcus aureus bacterium detection using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and resonant Raman spectroscopy (RS). It was shown that SERS allows increasing sensitivity of predominantly low frequency lines connected with the vibrations of Amide, Proteins and DNA. At the same time the lines of carotenoids inherent to this kind of bacterium are well-detected due to the resonance Raman scattering mechanism. The reproducibility and stability of Raman spectra strongly depend on the characteristics of nanostructured substrate, and molecular structure and size of the tested biological object.

  17. Biofilm Formation by a Metabolically Versatile Bacterium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-19

    ABSTRACT Rhodopseudomonas palustris is a photosynthetic bacterium that has good potential as a biocatalyst for the production ofhydrogen gas, a biofuel...Biofilm formation by a metabolically versatile bacterium: final report Report Title ABSTRACT Rhodopseudomonas palustris is a photosynthetic bacterium...agricultural waste. We characterized five new Rhodopseudomonas genome sequences and isolated and described R. palustris mutant strains that produce

  18. Isolation and 2,4-D-degrading characteristics of Cupriavidus campinensis BJ71

    PubMed Central

    Han, Lizhen; Zhao, Degang; Li, Cuicui

    2015-01-01

    An indigenous bacterial strain capable of utilizing 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid as the sole carbon and energy source was isolated from a soil used for grown wheat with a long-term history of herbicide use in Beijing, China. The strain BJ71 was identified as Cupriavidus campinensis based on its 16S rRNA sequence analysis and morphological, physiological, and biochemical characteristics. The degradation characteristics of strain BJ71 were evaluated. The optimal conditions for 2,4-D degradation were as follows: pH 7.0, 30 °C, 3% (v/v) inoculum size, and an initial 2,4-D concentration of 350 mg L−1. Up to 99.57% of the 2,4-D was degraded under optimal conditions after 6 days of incubation. Strain BJ71 was also able to degrade quizalofop and fluroxypyr. This is the first report of a 2,4-D-degrader containing tfdA gene that can utilize these two herbicides. In a biodegradation experiment, 87.13% and 42.53% of 2,4-D (initial concentration, 350 mg kg−1) was degraded in non-sterile and sterilized soil inoculated with BJ71, respectively, after 14 days. The 2,4-D degradation was more rapid in a soil microcosm including BJ71 than in a soil microcosm without BJ71. These results indicate that strain BJ71 is a potential candidate for the bioremediation of soil contaminated with the herbicide 2,4-D. PMID:26273258

  19. Isolation and 2,4-D-degrading characteristics of Cupriavidus campinensis BJ71.

    PubMed

    Han, Lizhen; Zhao, Degang; Li, Cuicui

    2015-06-01

    An indigenous bacterial strain capable of utilizing 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid as the sole carbon and energy source was isolated from a soil used for grown wheat with a long-term history of herbicide use in Beijing, China. The strain BJ71 was identified as Cupriavidus campinensis based on its 16S rRNA sequence analysis and morphological, physiological, and biochemical characteristics. The degradation characteristics of strain BJ71 were evaluated. The optimal conditions for 2,4-D degradation were as follows: pH 7.0, 30 °C, 3% (v/v) inoculum size, and an initial 2,4-D concentration of 350 mg L(-1). Up to 99.57% of the 2,4-D was degraded under optimal conditions after 6 days of incubation. Strain BJ71 was also able to degrade quizalofop and fluroxypyr. This is the first report of a 2,4-D-degrader containing tfdA gene that can utilize these two herbicides. In a biodegradation experiment, 87.13% and 42.53% of 2,4-D (initial concentration, 350 mg kg(-1)) was degraded in non-sterile and sterilized soil inoculated with BJ71, respectively, after 14 days. The 2,4-D degradation was more rapid in a soil microcosm including BJ71 than in a soil microcosm without BJ71. These results indicate that strain BJ71 is a potential candidate for the bioremediation of soil contaminated with the herbicide 2,4-D.

  20. Characterization and evolution of an activator-independent methanol dehydrogenase from Cupriavidus necator N-1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tung-Yun; Chen, Chang-Ting; Liu, Jessica Tse-Jin; Bogorad, Igor W; Damoiseaux, Robert; Liao, James C

    2016-06-01

    Methanol utilization by methylotrophic or non-methylotrophic organisms is the first step toward methanol bioconversion to higher carbon-chain chemicals. Methanol oxidation using NAD-dependent methanol dehydrogenase (Mdh) is of particular interest because it uses NAD(+) as the electron carrier. To our knowledge, only a limited number of NAD-dependent Mdhs have been reported. The most studied is the Bacillus methanolicus Mdh, which exhibits low enzyme specificity to methanol and is dependent on an endogenous activator protein (ACT). In this work, we characterized and engineered a group III NAD-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (Mdh2) from Cupriavidus necator N-1 (previously designated as Ralstonia eutropha). This enzyme is the first NAD-dependent Mdh characterized from a Gram-negative, mesophilic, non-methylotrophic organism with a significant activity towards methanol. Interestingly, unlike previously reported Mdhs, Mdh2 does not require activation by known activators such as B. methanolicus ACT and Escherichia coli Nudix hydrolase NudF, or putative native C. necator activators in the Nudix family under mesophilic conditions. This enzyme exhibited higher or comparable activity and affinity toward methanol relative to the B. methanolicus Mdh with or without ACT in a wide range of temperatures. Furthermore, using directed molecular evolution, we engineered a variant (CT4-1) of Mdh2 that showed a 6-fold higher K cat/K m for methanol and 10-fold lower K cat/K m for n-butanol. Thus, CT4-1 represents an NAD-dependent Mdh with much improved catalytic efficiency and specificity toward methanol compared with the existing NAD-dependent Mdhs with or without ACT activation.

  1. Cleaning-resistant Cupriavidus and Ralstonia bacteria contaminating spacecrafts and the ultra clean rooms they are assembled in.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leys, N.; Dams, A.; Bossus, A.; Provoost, A.; Venkateswaran, K.; Mergeay, M.

    Background Planetary Protection is preventing microbial contamination of both the target planet and the Earth when sending spacecrafts on interplanetary space mission It is important to preserve the natural conditions of other planets and to not bring with robots earthly microbes forward contamination when looking for spores of extra terrestrial life Spacecrafts and the ultra clean rooms they are assembled in are routinely monitored for microbial contamination It was shown that the floor air and surfaces of such spacecraft assembly rooms often contain Cupriavidu s and Ralstonia bacteria These bacteria not only contaminated the clean rooms but have also been found prior-to-flight on surfaces of space robots such as the Mars Odyssey Orbiter La Duc et al 2003 and even in-flight in ISS cooling water and Shuttle drinking water unpublished Aim In this study several Cupriavidus and Ralstonia strains isolated from space craft assembling rooms and spacecrafts were characterized and analysed in detail Results The analysis showed that all the Cupriavidus and Ralstonia clean-room isolates are able to use a wide variety of substrates as carbon sources including ethanol and acetone In addition they all have accumulated moderate resistances to an extraordinary collection of physical and chemical antimicrobial agents Some of the test strains were able to form biofilms on plastic and metal materials used for space robots a nutritional and

  2. Identification and characterization of the furfural and 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural degradation pathways of Cupriavidus basilensis HMF14

    PubMed Central

    Koopman, Frank; Wierckx, Nick; de Winde, Johannes H.; Ruijssenaars, Harald J.

    2010-01-01

    The toxic fermentation inhibitors in lignocellulosic hydrolysates pose significant problems for the production of second-generation biofuels and biochemicals. Among these inhibitors, 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF) and furfural are specifically notorious. In this study, we describe the complete molecular identification and characterization of the pathway by which Cupriavidus basilensis HMF14 metabolizes HMF and furfural. The identification of this pathway enabled the construction of an HMF and furfural-metabolizing Pseudomonas putida. The genetic information obtained furthermore enabled us to predict the HMF and furfural degrading capabilities of sequenced bacterial species that had not previously been connected to furanic aldehyde metabolism. These results pave the way for in situ detoxification of lignocellulosic hydrolysates, which is a major step toward improved efficiency of utilization of lignocellulosic feedstock. PMID:20194784

  3. An Engineered Device for Indoleacetic Acid Production under Quorum Sensing Signals Enables Cupriavidus pinatubonensis JMP134 To Stimulate Plant Growth.

    PubMed

    Zúñiga, Ana; Fuente, Francisco de la; Federici, Fernán; Lionne, Corinne; Bônnet, Jérome; de Lorenzo, Victor; González, Bernardo

    2018-06-15

    The environmental effects of chemical fertilizers and pesticides have encouraged the quest for new strategies to increase crop productivity with minimal impacts on the natural medium. Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) can contribute to this endeavor by improving fitness through better nutrition acquisition and stress tolerance. Using the neutral (non PGPR) rhizobacterium Cupriavidus pinatubonensis JMP134 as the host, we engineered a regulatory forward loop that triggered the synthesis of the phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) in a manner dependent on quorum sensing (QS) signals. Implementation of the device in JMP134 yielded synthesis of IAA in an autoregulated manner, improving the growth of the roots of inoculated Arabidopsis thaliana. These results not only demonstrated the value of the designed genetic module, but also validated C. pinatubonensis JMP134 as a suitable vehicle for agricultural applications, as it is amenable to genetic manipulations.

  4. Chicken feather hydrolysate as an inexpensive complex nitrogen source for PHA production by Cupriavidus necator on waste frying oils.

    PubMed

    Benesova, P; Kucera, D; Marova, I; Obruca, S

    2017-08-01

    The chicken feather hydrolysate (FH) has been tested as a potential complex nitrogen source for the production of polyhydroxyalkanoates by Cupriavidus necator H16 when waste frying oil was used as a carbon source. The addition of FH into the mineral salt media with decreased inorganic nitrogen source concentration improved the yields of biomass and polyhydrohyalkanoates. The highest yields were achieved when 10 vol.% of FH prepared by microwave-assisted alkaline hydrolysis of 60 g l -1 feather was added. In this case, the poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) yields were improved by more than about 50% as compared with control cultivation. A positive impact of FH was also observed for accumulation of copolymer poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) when sodium propionate was used as a precursor. The copolymer has superior processing and mechanical properties in comparison with PHB homopolymer. The application of FH eliminated the inhibitory effect of propionate and resulted in altered content of 3-hydroxyvalerate (3HV) in copolymer. Therefore, the hydrolysed feather can serve as an excellent complex source of nitrogen for the polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) production. Moreover, by the combination of two inexpensive types of waste, such as waste frying oil and feather hydrolysate, it is possible to produce PHA with substantially improved efficiency and sustainability. Millions of tons of feathers, important waste product of poultry-processing industry, are disposed off annually without any further benefits. Thus, there is an inevitable need for new technologies that enable ecologically and economically sensible processing of this waste. Herein, we report that alkali-hydrolysed feathers can be used as a complex nitrogen source considerably improving polyhydroxyalkanoates production on waste frying oil employing Cupriavidus necator. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Heavy Metal-Resistant Cupriavidus alkaliphilus ASC-732 T, Isolated from Agave Rhizosphere in the Northeast of Mexico

    DOE PAGES

    Rojas-Rojas, Fernando Uriel; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia; ...

    2016-09-22

    Cupriavidus alkaliphilus ASC-732 T was isolated from the rhizosphere of agave plant growing in alkaline soils in San Carlos, Tamaulipas, Mexico. The species is able to grow in the presence of arsenic, zinc, and copper. The genome sequence of strain ASC-732 T is 6,125,055 bp with 5,586 genes and an average G+C content of 67.81%.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Heavy Metal-Resistant Cupriavidus alkaliphilus ASC-732 T, Isolated from Agave Rhizosphere in the Northeast of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Rojas-Rojas, Fernando Uriel; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia

    Cupriavidus alkaliphilus ASC-732 T was isolated from the rhizosphere of agave plant growing in alkaline soils in San Carlos, Tamaulipas, Mexico. The species is able to grow in the presence of arsenic, zinc, and copper. The genome sequence of strain ASC-732 T is 6,125,055 bp with 5,586 genes and an average G+C content of 67.81%.

  7. Construction and use of a Cupriavidus necator H16 soluble hydrogenase promoter (PSH) fusion to gfp (green fluorescent protein)

    PubMed Central

    Jugder, Bat-Erdene; Welch, Jeffrey; Braidy, Nady

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogenases are metalloenzymes that reversibly catalyse the oxidation or production of molecular hydrogen (H2). Amongst a number of promising candidates for application in the oxidation of H2 is a soluble [Ni–Fe] uptake hydrogenase (SH) produced by Cupriavidus necator H16. In the present study, molecular characterisation of the SH operon, responsible for functional SH synthesis, was investigated by developing a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter system to characterise PSH promoter activity using several gene cloning approaches. A PSH promoter-gfp fusion was successfully constructed and inducible GFP expression driven by the PSH promoter under de-repressing conditions in heterotrophic growth media was demonstrated in the recombinant C. necator H16 cells. Here we report the first successful fluorescent reporter system to study PSH promoter activity in C. necator H16. The fusion construct allowed for the design of a simple screening assay to evaluate PSH activity. Furthermore, the constructed reporter system can serve as a model to develop a rapid fluorescent based reporter for subsequent small-scale process optimisation experiments for SH expression. PMID:27547572

  8. Effective recovery of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) biopolymer from Cupriavidus necator using a novel and environmentally friendly solvent system.

    PubMed

    Fei, Tao; Cazeneuve, Stacy; Wen, Zhiyou; Wu, Lei; Wang, Tong

    2016-05-01

    This work demonstrates a significant advance in bioprocessing for a high-melting lipid polymer. A novel and environmental friendly solvent mixture, acetone/ethanol/propylene carbonate (A/E/P, 1:1:1 v/v/v) was identified for extracting poly-hydroxybutyrate (PHB), a high-value biopolymer, from Cupriavidus necator. A set of solubility curves of PHB in various solvents was established. PHB recovery of 85% and purity of 92% were obtained from defatted dry biomass (DDB) using A/E/P. This solvent mixture is compatible with water, and from non-defatted wet biomass, PHB recovery of 83% and purity of 90% were achieved. Water and hexane were evaluated as anti-solvents to assist PHB precipitation, and hexane improved recovery of PHB from biomass to 92% and the purity to 93%. A scale-up extraction and separation reactor was designed, built and successfully tested. Properties of PHB recovered were not significantly affected by the extraction solvent and conditions, as shown by average molecular weight (1.4 × 10(6) ) and melting point (175.2°C) not being different from PHB extracted using chloroform. Therefore, this biorenewable solvent system was effective and versatile for extracting PHB biopolymers. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:678-685, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  9. Biosynthesis of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) by Cupriavidus necator H16 from jatropha oil as carbon source.

    PubMed

    Batcha, Abeed Fatima Mohidin; Prasad, D M Reddy; Khan, Maksudur R; Abdullah, Hamidah

    2014-05-01

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) is a biodegradable polymer that can be synthesized through bacterial fermentation. In this study, Cupriavidus necator H16 is used to synthesize PHB by using Jatropha oil as its sole carbon source. Different variables mainly jatropha oil and urea concentrations, and agitation rate were investigated to determine the optimum condition for microbial fermentation in batch culture. Based on the results, the highest cell dry weight and PHB concentrations of 20.1 and 15.5 g/L, respectively, were obtained when 20 g/L of jatropha oil was used. Ethanol was used as external stress factor and the addition of 1.5 % ethanol at 38 h had a positive effect with a high PHB yield of 0.987 g PHB/g jatropha oil. The kinetic studies for cell growth rate and PHB production were conducted and the data were fitted with Logistic and Leudeking–Piret models. The rate constants were evaluated and the theoretical values were in accordance with the experimental data obtained

  10. Biosynthesis and characterization of polyhydroxyalkanoate containing high 3-hydroxyhexanoate monomer fraction from crude palm kernel oil by recombinant Cupriavidus necator.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yoke-Ming; Brigham, Christopher J; Rha, ChoKyun; Sinskey, Anthony J; Sudesh, Kumar

    2012-10-01

    The potential of plant oils as sole carbon sources for production of P(3HB-co-3HHx) copolymer containing a high 3HHx monomer fraction using the recombinant Cupriavidus necator strain Re2160/pCB113 has been investigated. Various types and concentrations of plant oils were evaluated for efficient conversion of P(3HB-co-3HHx) copolymer. Crude palm kernel oil (CPKO) at a concentration of 2.5 g/L was found to be most suitable for production of copolymer with a 3HHx content of approximately 70 mol%. The time profile of these cells was also examined in order to study the trend of 3HHx monomer incorporation, PHA production and PHA synthase activity. (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR analyses confirmed the presence of P(3HB-co-3HHx) copolymer containing a high 3HHx monomer fraction, in which monomers were not randomly distributed. The results of various characterization analyses revealed that the copolymers containing a high 3HHx monomer fraction demonstrated soft and flexible mechanical properties. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Carbon source pulsed feeding to attain high yield and high productivity in poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) production from soybean oil using Cupriavidus necator.

    PubMed

    Pradella, José Geraldo da Cruz; Ienczak, Jaciane Lutz; Delgado, Cecília Romero; Taciro, Marilda Keico

    2012-06-01

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) biosynthesis from soybean oil by Cupriavidus necator was studied using a bench scale bioreactor. The highest cell concentration (83 g l(-1)) was achieved using soybean oil at 40 g l(-1) and a pulse of the same concentration. The PHB content was 81% (w/w), PHB productivity was 2.5 g l(-1) h(-1), and the calculated Y(p/s) value was 0.85 g g(-1). Growth limitation and the onset of PHB biosynthesis took place due to exhaustion of P, and probably also Cu, Ca, and Fe.

  12. Single Upconversion Nanoparticle-Bacterium Cotrapping for Single-Bacterium Labeling and Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xin, Hongbao; Li, Yuchao; Xu, Dekang; Zhang, Yueli; Chen, Chia-Hung; Li, Baojun

    2017-04-01

    Detecting and analyzing pathogenic bacteria in an effective and reliable manner is crucial for the diagnosis of acute bacterial infection and initial antibiotic therapy. However, the precise labeling and analysis of bacteria at the single-bacterium level are a technical challenge but very important to reveal important details about the heterogeneity of cells and responds to environment. This study demonstrates an optical strategy for single-bacterium labeling and analysis by the cotrapping of single upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) and bacteria together. A single UCNP with an average size of ≈120 nm is first optically trapped. Both ends of a single bacterium are then trapped and labeled with single UCNPs emitting green light. The labeled bacterium can be flexibly moved to designated locations for further analysis. Signals from bacteria of different sizes are detected in real time for single-bacterium analysis. This cotrapping method provides a new approach for single-pathogenic-bacterium labeling, detection, and real-time analysis at the single-particle and single-bacterium level. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Factors Affecting Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) Production from Oil Palm Frond Juice by Cupriavidus necator (CCUG52238T)

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Zahari, Mior Ahmad Khushairi; Ariffin, Hidayah; Mokhtar, Mohd Noriznan; Salihon, Jailani; Shirai, Yoshihito; Hassan, Mohd Ali

    2012-01-01

    Factors influencing poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) P(3HB) production by  Cupriavidus necator  CCUG52238T utilizing oil palm frond (OPF) juice were clarified in this study. Effects of initial medium pH, agitation speed, and ammonium sulfate (NH4)2SO4 concentration on the production of P(3HB) were investigated in shake flasks experiments using OPF juice as the sole carbon source. The highest P(3HB) content was recorded at pH 7.0, agitation speed of 220 rpm, and (NH4)2SO4 concentration at 0.5 g/L. By culturing the wild-type strain of C. necator under the aforementioned conditions, the cell dry weight (CDW) and P(3HB) content obtained were 9.31 ± 0.13 g/L and 45 ± 1.5 wt.%, respectively. This accounted for 40% increment of P(3HB) content compared to the nonoptimized condition. In the meanwhile, the effect of dissolved oxygen tension (DOT) on P(3HB) production was investigated in a 2-L bioreactor. Highest CDW (11.37 g/L) and P(3HB) content (44 wt.%) were achieved when DOT level was set at 30%. P(3HB) produced from OPF juice had a tensile strength of 40 MPa and elongation at break of 8% demonstrated that P(3HB) produced from renewable and cheap carbon source is comparable to those produced from commercial substrate. PMID:23133311

  14. Factors affecting poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) production from oil palm frond juice by Cupriavidus necator (CCUG52238(T)).

    PubMed

    Mohd Zahari, Mior Ahmad Khushairi; Ariffin, Hidayah; Mokhtar, Mohd Noriznan; Salihon, Jailani; Shirai, Yoshihito; Hassan, Mohd Ali

    2012-01-01

    Factors influencing poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) P(3HB) production by Cupriavidus necator CCUG52238(T) utilizing oil palm frond (OPF) juice were clarified in this study. Effects of initial medium pH, agitation speed, and ammonium sulfate (NH(4))(2)SO(4) concentration on the production of P(3HB) were investigated in shake flasks experiments using OPF juice as the sole carbon source. The highest P(3HB) content was recorded at pH 7.0, agitation speed of 220 rpm, and (NH(4))(2)SO(4) concentration at 0.5 g/L. By culturing the wild-type strain of C. necator under the aforementioned conditions, the cell dry weight (CDW) and P(3HB) content obtained were 9.31 ± 0.13 g/L and 45 ± 1.5 wt.%, respectively. This accounted for 40% increment of P(3HB) content compared to the nonoptimized condition. In the meanwhile, the effect of dissolved oxygen tension (DOT) on P(3HB) production was investigated in a 2-L bioreactor. Highest CDW (11.37 g/L) and P(3HB) content (44 wt.%) were achieved when DOT level was set at 30%. P(3HB) produced from OPF juice had a tensile strength of 40 MPa and elongation at break of 8% demonstrated that P(3HB) produced from renewable and cheap carbon source is comparable to those produced from commercial substrate.

  15. Two Polyhydroxyalkanoate Synthases from Distinct Classes from the Aromatic Degrader Cupriavidus pinatubonensis JMP134 Exhibit the Same Substrate Preference.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xuan; Luo, Xi; Zhou, Ning-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Cupriavidus pinatubonensis JMP134 utilizes a variety of aromatic substrates as sole carbon sources, including meta-nitrophenol (MNP). Two polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase genes, phaC1 and phaC2, were annotated and categorized as class I and class II PHA synthase genes, respectively. In this study, both His-tagged purified PhaC1 and PhaC2 were shown to exhibit typical class I PHA synthase substrate specificity to make short-chain-length (SCL) PHA from 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA and failed to make medium-chain-length (MCL) PHA from 3-hydroxyoctanoyl-CoA. The phaC1 or phaC2 deletion strain could also produce SCL PHA when grown in fructose or octanoate, but the double mutant of phaC1 and phaC2 lost this ability. The PhaC2 also exhibited substrate preference towards SCL substrates when expressed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 phaC mutant strain. On the other hand, the transcriptional level of phaC1 was 70-fold higher than that of phaC2 in MNP-grown cells, but 240-fold lower in octanoate-grown cells. Further study demonstrated that only phaC1 was involved in PHA synthesis in MNP-grown cells. These findings suggested that phaC1 and phaC2 genes were differentially regulated under different growth conditions in this strain. Within the phaC2-containing gene cluster, a single copy of PHA synthase gene was present clustering with genes encoding enzymes in the biosynthesis of PHA precursors. This is markedly different from the genetic organization of all other previously reported class II PHA synthase gene clusters and this cluster likely comes from a distinct evolutionary path.

  16. Two Polyhydroxyalkanoate Synthases from Distinct Classes from the Aromatic Degrader Cupriavidus pinatubonensis JMP134 Exhibit the Same Substrate Preference

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xuan; Luo, Xi; Zhou, Ning-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Cupriavidus pinatubonensis JMP134 utilizes a variety of aromatic substrates as sole carbon sources, including meta-nitrophenol (MNP). Two polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase genes, phaC1 and phaC2, were annotated and categorized as class I and class II PHA synthase genes, respectively. In this study, both His-tagged purified PhaC1 and PhaC2 were shown to exhibit typical class I PHA synthase substrate specificity to make short-chain-length (SCL) PHA from 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA and failed to make medium-chain-length (MCL) PHA from 3-hydroxyoctanoyl-CoA. The phaC1 or phaC2 deletion strain could also produce SCL PHA when grown in fructose or octanoate, but the double mutant of phaC1 and phaC2 lost this ability. The PhaC2 also exhibited substrate preference towards SCL substrates when expressed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 phaC mutant strain. On the other hand, the transcriptional level of phaC1 was 70-fold higher than that of phaC2 in MNP-grown cells, but 240-fold lower in octanoate-grown cells. Further study demonstrated that only phaC1 was involved in PHA synthesis in MNP-grown cells. These findings suggested that phaC1 and phaC2 genes were differentially regulated under different growth conditions in this strain. Within the phaC2-containing gene cluster, a single copy of PHA synthase gene was present clustering with genes encoding enzymes in the biosynthesis of PHA precursors. This is markedly different from the genetic organization of all other previously reported class II PHA synthase gene clusters and this cluster likely comes from a distinct evolutionary path. PMID:26544851

  17. Biofilm vs. Planktonic Lifestyle: Consequences for Pesticide 2,4-D Metabolism by Cupriavidus necator JMP134

    PubMed Central

    Lerch, Thomas Z.; Chenu, Claire; Dignac, Marie F.; Barriuso, Enrique; Mariotti, André

    2017-01-01

    The development of bacterial biofilms in natural environments may alter important functions, such as pollutant bioremediation by modifying both the degraders' physiology and/or interactions within the matrix. The present study focuses on the influence of biofilm formation on the metabolism of a pesticide, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), by Cupriavidus necator JMP134. Pure cultures were established in a liquid medium with 2,4-D as a sole carbon source with or without sand grains for 10 days. Bacterial numbers and 2,4-D concentrations in solution were followed by spectrophotometry, the respiration rate by gas chromatography and the surface colonization by electron microscopy. In addition, isotopic techniques coupled with Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME) profiling were used to determine possible metabolic changes. After only 3 days, approximately 80% of the cells were attached to the sand grains and microscopy images showed that the porous medium was totally clogged by the development of a biofilm. After 10 days, there was 25% less 2,4-D in the solution in samples with sand than in control samples. This difference was due to (1) a higher (+8%) mineralization of 2,4-D by sessile bacteria and (2) a retention (15%) of 2,4-D in the biofilm matrix. Besides, the amount of carbohydrates, presumably constituting the biofilm polysaccharides, increased by 63%. Compound-specific isotope analysis revealed that the FAME isotopic signature was less affected by the biofilm lifestyle than was the FAME composition. These results suggest that sessile bacteria differ more in their anabolism than in their catabolism compared to their planktonic counterparts. This study stresses the importance of considering interactions between microorganisms and their habitat when studying pollutant dynamics in porous media. PMID:28588567

  18. Bacterial sulfite dehydrogenases in organotrophic metabolism: separation and identification in Cupriavidus necator H16 and in Delftia acidovorans SPH-1.

    PubMed

    Denger, Karin; Weinitschke, Sonja; Smits, Theo H M; Schleheck, David; Cook, Alasdair M

    2008-01-01

    The utilization of organosulfonates as carbon sources by aerobic or nitrate-reducing bacteria usually involves a measurable, uncharacterized sulfite dehydrogenase. This is tacitly assumed to be sulfite : ferricytochrome-c oxidoreductase [EC 1.8.2.1], despite negligible interaction with (eukaryotic) cytochrome c: the enzyme is assayed at high specific activity with ferricyanide as electron acceptor. Purified periplasmic sulfite dehydrogenases (SorAB, SoxCD) are known from chemoautotrophic growth and are termed 'sulfite oxidases' by bioinformatic services. The catalytic unit (SorA, SoxC; termed 'sulfite oxidases' cd02114 and cd02113, respectively) binds a molybdenum-cofactor (Moco), and involves a cytochrome c (SorB, SoxD) as electron acceptor. The genomes of several bacteria that express a sulfite dehydrogenase during heterotrophic growth contain neither sorAB nor soxCD genes; others contain at least four paralogues, for example Cupriavidus necator H16, which is known to express an inducible sulfite dehydrogenase during growth with taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonate). This soluble enzyme was enriched 320-fold in four steps. The 40 kDa protein (denatured) had an N-terminal amino acid sequence which started at position 42 of the deduced sequence of H16_B0860 (termed 'sulfite oxidase' cd02114), which we named SorA. The neighbouring gene is an orthologue of sorB, and the sorAB genes were co-transcribed. Cell fractionation showed SorA to be periplasmic. The corresponding enzyme in Delftia acidovorans SPH-1 was enriched 270-fold, identified as Daci_0055 (termed 'sulfite oxidase' cd02110) and has a cytochrome c encoded downstream. We presume, from genomic data for bacteria and archaea, that there are several subgroups of sulfite dehydrogenases, which all contain a Moco, and transfer electrons to a specific cytochrome c.

  19. Overproduction of Hydrogen From an Anaerobic Bacterium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    fixation of nitrogen ( Haber - Bosch process), mostly to produce fertilizer. Nitrogenase provides a catalytic alternative to the commercial fixation of...the culture and suggests a uniquely simple hydrogen reactor design based on renewable feedstocks. 1. INTRODUCTION Hydrogen is an ideal... renewable feedstocks. Clostridium phytofermentans is a recently- discovered anaerobic bacterium, reported to possess cellulase enzymes that degrade

  20. Biodiversity of Mimosa pudica rhizobial symbionts (Cupriavidus taiwanensis, Rhizobium mesoamericanum) in New Caledonia and their adaptation to heavy metal-rich soils.

    PubMed

    Klonowska, Agnieszka; Chaintreuil, Clémence; Tisseyre, Pierre; Miché, Lucie; Melkonian, Rémy; Ducousso, Marc; Laguerre, Gisèle; Brunel, Brigitte; Moulin, Lionel

    2012-09-01

    Rhizobia are soil bacteria able to develop a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with legumes. They are taxonomically spread among the alpha and beta subclasses of the Proteobacteria. Mimosa pudica, a tropical invasive weed, has been found to have an affinity for beta-rhizobia, including species within the Burkholderia and Cupriavidus genera. In this study, we describe the diversity of M. pudica symbionts in the island of New Caledonia, which is characterized by soils with high heavy metal content, especially of Ni. By using a plant-trapping approach on four soils, we isolated 96 strains, the great majority of which belonged to the species Cupriavidus taiwanensis (16S rRNA and recA gene phylogenies). A few Rhizobium strains in the newly described species Rhizobium mesoamericanum were also isolated. The housekeeping and nod gene phylogenies supported the hypothesis of the arrival of the C. taiwanensis and R. mesoamericanum strains together with their host at the time of the introduction of M. pudica in New Caledonia (NC) for its use as a fodder. The C. taiwanensis strains exhibited various tolerances to Ni, Zn and Cr, suggesting their adaptation to the specific environments in NC. Specific metal tolerance marker genes were found in the genomes of these symbionts, and their origin was investigated by phylogenetic analyses. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. NREL Researchers Discover How a Bacterium, Clostridium thermocellum,

    Science.gov Websites

    containing the bacterium actually promotes the growth of C. thermocellum, yet its mechanistic details remained a puzzle. This enhanced growth implied the bacterium had the ability to use CO2 and prompted NREL researchers to investigate the phenomena enhancing the bacterium's growth. "It took us by surprise that

  2. Swimming efficiency of bacterium Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Suddhashil; Moldovan, Radu; Yeung, Chuck; Wu, X. L.

    2006-01-01

    We use measurements of swimming bacteria in an optical trap to determine fundamental properties of bacterial propulsion. In particular, we directly measure the force required to hold the bacterium in the optical trap and determine the propulsion matrix, which relates the translational and angular velocity of the flagellum to the torques and forces propelling the bacterium. From the propulsion matrix, dynamical properties such as torques, swimming speed, and power can be obtained by measuring the angular velocity of the motor. We find significant heterogeneities among different individuals even though all bacteria started from a single colony. The propulsive efficiency, defined as the ratio of the propulsive power output to the rotary power input provided by the motors, is found to be ≈2%, which is consistent with the efficiency predicted theoretically for a rigid helical coil. PMID:16954194

  3. Paradigms: examples from the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The history of advances in research on Xylella fastidiosa provides excellent examples of how paradigms both advance and limit our scientific understanding of plant pathogens and the plant diseases they cause. I describe this from a personal perspective, having been directly involved with many persons who made paradigm-changing discoveries, beginning with the discovery that a bacterium, not a virus, causes Pierce's disease of grape and other plant diseases in numerous plant species, including important crop and forest species.

  4. Characterization of a novel extremely alkalophilic bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Souza, K. A.; Deal, P. H.

    1977-01-01

    A new alkalophilic bacterium, isolated from a natural spring of high pH is characterized. It is a Gram-positive, non-sporulating, motile rod requiring aerobic and alkaline conditions for growth. The characteristics of this organism resemble those of the coryneform group of bacteria; however, there are no accepted genera within this group with which this organism can be closely matched. Therefore, a new genus may be warranted.

  5. Biofilm Formation by a Metabolically Versatile Bacterium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-02

    Rhodopseudomonas palustris is a photosynthetic bacterium that has good potential to be developed as a biocatalyst for the production of hydrogen, a...A for none) Samanta, S. K and C. S. Harwood. 2005. Use of the Rhodopseudomonas palustris genome to identify a single amino acid that contributes to...operon from Rhodopseudomonas palustris mediates dicarboxylic acid degradation and participates in anaerobic benzoate degradation. Microbiology 151

  6. Mutations Derived from the Thermophilic Polyhydroxyalkanoate Synthase PhaC Enhance the Thermostability and Activity of PhaC from Cupriavidus necator H16

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Ming; Lai, Yung-Wei; Chang, Rey-Chang

    2012-01-01

    The thermophile Cupriavidus sp. strain S-6 accumulated polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) from glucose at 50°C. A 9.0-kbp EcoRI fragment cloned from the genomic DNA of Cupriavidus sp. S-6 enabled Escherichia coli XL1-Blue to synthesize PHB at 45°C. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed a pha locus in the clone. The thermophilic polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase (PhaCCsp) shared 81% identity with mesophilic PhaC of Cupriavidus necator H16. The diversity between these two strains was found dominantly on their N and C termini, while the middle regions were highly homologous (92% identity). We constructed four chimeras of mesophilic and thermophilic phaC genes to explore the mutations related to its thermostability. Among the chimeras, only PhaCH16β, which was PhaCH16 bearing 30 point mutations derived from the middle region of PhaCCsp, accumulated a high content of PHB (65% [dry weight]) at 45°C. The chimera phaCH16β and two parental PHA synthase genes were overexpressed in E. coli BLR(DE3) cells and purified. At 30°C, the specific activity of the chimera PhaCH16β (172 ± 17.8 U/mg) was 3.45-fold higher than that of the parental enzyme PhaCH16 (50 ± 5.2 U/mg). At 45°C, the half-life of the chimera PhaCH16β (11.2 h) was 127-fold longer than that of PhaCH16 (5.3 min). Furthermore, the chimera PhaCH16β accumulated 1.55-fold (59% [dry weight]) more PHA content than the parental enzyme PhaCH16 (38% [dry weight]) at 37°C. This study reveals a limited number of point mutations which enhance not only thermostability but also PhaCH16 activity. The highly thermostable and active PHA synthase will provide advantages for its promising applications to in vitro PHA synthesis and recombinant E. coli PHA fermentation. PMID:22408158

  7. Physiological changes induced in bacteria following pH stress as a model for space research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baatout, Sarah; Leys, Natalie; Hendrickx, Larissa; Dams, Annik; Mergeay, Max

    2007-02-01

    The physiology of the environmental bacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 (previously Ralstonia metallidurans) is being studied in comparison to the clinical model bacterium Escherichia coli in order to understand its behaviour and resistance under extreme conditions (pH, temperature, etc.). This knowledge is of importance in the light of the potential use and interest of this strain for space biology and bioremediation. Flow cytometry provides powerful means to measure a wide range of cell characteristics in microbiological research. In order to estimate physiological changes associated with pH stress, flow cytometry was employed to estimate the extent of damage on cell size, membrane integrity and potential, and production of superoxides in the two bacterial strains. Suspensions of C. metallidurans and E. coli were submitted to a 1-h pH stress (2 to 12). For flow cytometry, fluorochromes, including propidium iodide, 3, 3'-dihexyloxacarbocyanine iodide and hydroethidine were chosen as analytical parameters for identifying the physiological state and the overall fitness of individual cells. A physiologic state of the bacterial population was assessed with a Coulter EPICS XL analyser based on the differential uptakes of these fluorescent stains. C. metallidurans cells exhibited a different staining intensity than E. coli cells. For both bacterial strains, the physiological status was only slightly affected between pH 6 and 8 in comparison with pH 7 which represents the reference pH. Moderate physiological damage could be observed at pH 4 and 5 as well as at pH 9 in both strains. At pH 2, 10 and 12, membrane permeability and potential and superoxide anion production were increased to high levels showing dramatic physiological changes. It is apparent that a range of significant physiological alterations occurs after pH stress. Fluorescent staining methods coupled with flow cytometry are useful and complementary for monitoring physiological changes induced not only

  8. Production of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) by Cupriavidus necator from waste rapeseed oil using propanol as a precursor of 3-hydroxyvalerate.

    PubMed

    Obruca, Stanislav; Marova, Ivana; Snajdar, Ondrej; Mravcova, Ludmila; Svoboda, Zdenek

    2010-12-01

    Waste rapeseed oil is a useful substrate for polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) production employing Cupriavidus necator H16. In fed-batch mode, we obtained biomass and PHA yields of 138 and 105 g l(-1), respectively. Yield coefficient and volumetric productivity were 0.83 g PHA per g oil and 1.46 g l(-1) h(-1), respectively. Propanol at 1% (v/v) enhanced both PHA and biomass formation significantly and, furthermore, resulted in incorporation of 3-hydroxyvalerate units into PHA structure. Thus, propanol can be used as an effective precursor of 3-hydroxyvalarete for production of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) copolymer. During the fed-batch cultivation, propanol concentration was maintained at 1% which resulted in 8% content of 3-hydroxyvalerate in copolymer.

  9. Global changes in the proteome of Cupriavidus necator H16 during poly-(3-hydroxybutyrate) synthesis from various biodiesel by-product substrates.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Parveen K; Fu, Jilagamazhi; Spicer, Victor; Krokhin, Oleg V; Cicek, Nazim; Sparling, Richard; Levin, David B

    2016-12-01

    Synthesis of poly-[3-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB) by Cupriavidus necator H16 in batch cultures was evaluated using three biodiesel-derived by-products as the sole carbon sources: waste glycerol (REG-80, refined to 80 % purity with negligible free fatty acids); glycerol bottom (REG-GB, with up to 65 % glycerol and 35 % free fatty acids), and free fatty acids (REG-FFA, with up to 75 % FFA and no glycerol). All the three substrates supported growth and PHB production by C. necator, with polymer accumulation ranging from 9 to 84 % cell dry weight (cdw), depending on the carbon source. To help understand these differences, proteomic analysis indicated that although C. necator H16 was able to accumulate PHB during growth on all three biodiesel by-products, no changes in the levels of PHB synthesis enzymes were observed. However, significant changes in the levels of expression were observed for two Phasin proteins involved with PHB accumulation, and for a number of gene products in the fatty acid β-oxidation pathway, the Glyoxylate Shunt, and the hydrogen (H2) synthesis pathways in C. necator cells cultured with different substrates. The glycerol transport protein (GlpF) was induced in REG-GB and REG-80 glycerol cultures only. Cupriavidus necator cells cultured with REG-GB and REG-FFA showed up-regulation of β-oxidation and Glyoxylate Shunt pathways proteins at 24 h pi, but H2 synthesis pathways enzymes were significantly down-regulated, compared with cells cultured with waste glycerol. Our data confirmed earlier observations of constitutive expression of PHB synthesis proteins, but further suggested that C. necator H16 cells growing on biodiesel-derived glycerol were under oxidative stress.

  10. Detection of Salmonella bacterium in drinking water using microring resonator.

    PubMed

    Bahadoran, Mahdi; Noorden, Ahmad Fakhrurrazi Ahmad; Mohajer, Faeze Sadat; Abd Mubin, Mohamad Helmi; Chaudhary, Kashif; Jalil, Muhammad Arif; Ali, Jalil; Yupapin, Preecha

    2016-01-01

    A new microring resonator system is proposed for the detection of the Salmonella bacterium in drinking water, which is made up of SiO2-TiO2 waveguide embedded inside thin film layer of the flagellin. The change in refractive index due to the binding of the Salmonella bacterium with flagellin layer causes a shift in the output signal wavelength and the variation in through and drop port's intensities, which leads to the detection of Salmonella bacterium in drinking water. The sensitivity of proposed sensor for detecting of Salmonella bacterium in water solution is 149 nm/RIU and the limit of detection is 7 × 10(-4)RIU.

  11. Oxidation of Ethylene Glycol by a Salt-Requiring Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Caskey, William H.; Taber, Willard A.

    1981-01-01

    Bacterium T-52, cultured on ethylene glycol, readily oxidized glycolate and glyoxylate and exhibited elevated activities of ethylene glycol dehydrogenase and glycolate oxidase. Labeled glyoxylate was identified in reaction mixtures containing [14C]-ethylene glycol, but no glycolate was detected. The most likely pathway of ethylene glycol catabolism by bacterium T-52 is sequential oxidation to glycolate and glyoxylate. PMID:16345810

  12. The chemical formula of a magnetotactic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Naresh, Mohit; Das, Sayoni; Mishra, Prashant; Mittal, Aditya

    2012-05-01

    Elucidation of the chemical logic of life is one of the grand challenges in biology, and essential to the progress of the upcoming field of synthetic biology. Treatment of microbial cells explicitly as a "chemical" species in controlled reaction (growth) environments has allowed fascinating discoveries of elemental formulae of a few species that have guided the modern views on compositions of a living cell. Application of mass and energy balances on living cells has proved to be useful in modeling of bioengineering systems, particularly in deriving optimized media compositions for growing microorganisms to maximize yields of desired bio-derived products by regulating intra-cellular metabolic networks. In this work, application of elemental mass balance during growth of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense in bioreactors has resulted in the discovery of the chemical formula of the magnetotactic bacterium. By developing a stoichiometric equation characterizing the formation of a magnetotactic bacterial cell, coupled with rigorous experimental measurements and robust calculations, we report the elemental formula of M. gryphiswaldense cell as CH(2.06)O(0.13)N(0.28)Fe(1.74×10(-3)). Remarkably, we find that iron metabolism during growth of this magnetotactic bacterium is much more correlated individually with carbon and nitrogen, compared to carbon and nitrogen with each other, indicating that iron serves more as a nutrient during bacterial growth rather than just a mineral. Magnetotactic bacteria have not only invoked some interest in the field of astrobiology for the last two decades, but are also prokaryotes having the unique ability of synthesizing membrane bound intracellular organelles. Our findings on these unique prokaryotes are a strong addition to the limited repertoire, of elemental compositions of living cells, aimed at exploring the chemical logic of life. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) anabolism in Cupriavidus necator cultivated at various carbon-to-nitrogen ratios: insights from single-cell Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Zhanhua; Zhang, Pengfei; Qin, Zhaojun; Li, Yong-Qing; Wang, Guiwen

    2016-09-01

    Cupriavidus necator accumulates large amounts of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB), a biodegradable substitute for petroleum-based plastics, under certain nutrient conditions. Conventional solvent-extraction-based methods for PHB quantification only obtain average information from cell populations and, thus, mask the heterogeneity among individual cells. Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) was used to monitor dynamic changes in the contents of PHB, nucleic acids, and proteins in C. necator at the population and single-cell levels when the microorganism cells were cultivated at various carbon-to-nitrogen ratios. The biosynthetic activities of nucleic acids and proteins were maintained at high levels, and only a small amount of PHB was produced when the bacterial cells were cultured under balanced growth conditions. By contrast, the syntheses of nucleic acids and proteins were blocked, and PHB was accumulated in massive amount inside the microbial cells under nitrogen-limiting growth circumstances. Single-cell analysis revealed a relatively high heterogeneity in PHB level at the early stage of the bacterial growth. Additionally, bacterial cells in populations at certain cultivation stages were composed of two or three subpopulations on the basis of their PHB abundance. Overall, LTRS is a reliable single-cell analysis tool that can provide insights into PHB fermentation.

  14. Biodegradation potential of cyano-based ionic liquid anions in a culture of Cupriavidus spp. and their in vitro enzymatic hydrolysis by nitrile hydratase.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Jennifer; Pawlik, Magdalena; Bryniok, Dieter; Thöming, Jorg; Stolte, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradation tests with bacteria from activated sludge revealed the probable persistence of cyano-based ionic liquid anions when these leave waste water treatment plants. A possible biological treatment using bacteria capable of biodegrading similar compounds, namely cyanide and cyano-complexes, was therefore examined. With these bacteria from the genera Cupriavidus, the ionic liquid anions B(CN)₄(-), C(CN)₃(-), N(CN)₂(-) combined with alkaline cations were tested in different growth media using ion chromatography for the examination of their primary biodegradability. However, no enhanced biodegradability of the tested cyano-based ionic liquids was observed. Therefore, an in vitro enzymatic hydrolysis test was additionally run showing that all tested ionic liquid (IL) anions can be hydrolysed to their corresponding amides by nitrile hydratase, but not by nitrilase under the experimental conditions. The biological stability of the cyano-based anions is an advantage in technological application, but the occurrence of enzymes that are able to hydrolyse the parent compound gives a new perspective on future cyano-based IL anion treatment.

  15. Characterization of d-succinylase from Cupriavidus sp. P4-10-C and its application in d-amino acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Sumida, Yosuke; Iwai, Sachio; Nishiya, Yoshiaki; Kumagai, Shinya; Yamada, Toshihide; Azuma, Masayuki

    2018-03-01

    d-Amino acids are important building blocks for various compounds, such as pharmaceuticals and agrochemicals. A more cost-effective enzymatic method for d-amino acid production is needed in the industry. We improved a one-pot enzymatic method for d-amino acid production by the dynamic kinetic resolution of N-succinyl amino acids using two enzymes: d-succinylase (DSA) from Cupriavidus sp. P4-10-C, which hydrolyzes N-succinyl-d-amino acids enantioselectively to their corresponding d-amino acid, and N-succinyl amino acid racemase (NSAR, EC.4.2.1.113) from Geobacillus stearothermophilus NCA1503. In this study, DSA and NSAR were purified and their properties were investigated. The optimum temperature of DSA was 50°C and it was stable up to 55°C. The optimum pH of DSA and NSAR was around 7.5. In d-phenylalanine production, the optical purity of product was improved to 91.6% ee from the examination about enzyme concentration. Moreover, 100 mM N-succinyl-dl-tryptophan was converted to d-tryptophan at 81.8% yield with 94.7% ee. This enzymatic method could be useful for the industrial production of various d-amino acids. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Genome Sequence of the Soil Bacterium Janthinobacterium sp. KBS0711

    PubMed Central

    Shoemaker, William R.; Muscarella, Mario E.

    2015-01-01

    We present a draft genome of Janthinobacterium sp. KBS0711 that was isolated from agricultural soil. The genome provides insight into the ecological strategies of this bacterium in free-living and host-associated environments. PMID:26089434

  17. Characterization of the cellulose-degrading bacterium NCIMB 10462

    SciTech Connect

    Dees, C.; Scott, T.C.; Phelps, T.J.

    The gram-negative cellulase-producing bacterium NCIMB 10462 has been previously named Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. or var. cellulose. Because of renewed interest in cellulose-degrading bacteria for use in the bioconversion of cellulose to chemical feed stocks and fuels, we re-examined the characteristics of this microorganism to determine its true metabolic potential. Metabolic and physical characterization of NCIMB 10462 revealed that this is an alkalophilic, non-fermentative, gram-negative, oxidase-positive, motile, cellulose-degrading bacterium. The aerobic substrate utilization profile of this bacterium has few characteristics consistent with a classification of P. fluorescens and a very low probability match with the genus Sphingomonas. However, total lipid analysismore » did not reveal that any sphingolipid bases are produced by this bacterium. NCIMB 10462 grows best aerobically, but also grows well in complex media under reducing conditions. NCIMB 10462 grows slowly under anaerobic conditions on complex media, but growth on cellulosic media occurred only under aerobic conditions. Total fatty acid analysis (MIDI) of NCIMB 10462 failed to group this bacterium with a known pseudomonas species. However, fatty acid analysis of the bacteria when grown at temperatures below 37{degrees}C suggest that the organism is a pseudomonad. Since a predominant characteristic of this bacterium is its ability to degrade cellulose, we suggest that it be called Pseudomonas cellulosa.« less

  18. Taxonomic characterization of the cellulose-degrading bacterium NCIB 10462

    SciTech Connect

    Dees, C.; Ringleberg, D.; Scott, T.C.

    The gram negative cellulase-producing bacterium NCIB 10462 has been previously named Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. or var. cellulosa. Since there is renewed interest in cellulose-degrading bacteria for use in bioconversion of cellulose to chemical feed stocks and fuels, we re-examined the characteristics of this microorganism to determine its proper taxonomic characterization and to further define it`s true metabolic potential. Metabolic and physical characterization of NCIB 10462 revealed that this was an alkalophilic, non-fermentative, gram negative, oxidase positive, motile, cellulose-degrading bacterium. The aerobic substrate utilization profile of this bacterium was found to have few characteristics consistent with a classification of P. fluorescensmore » with a very low probability match with the genus Sphingomonas. Total lipid analysis did not reveal that any sphingolipid bases are produced by this bacterium. NCIB 10462 was found to grow best aerobically but also grows well in complex media under reducing conditions. NCIB 10462 grew slowly under full anaerobic conditions on complex media but growth on cellulosic media was found only under aerobic conditions. Total fatty acid analysis (MIDI) of NCIB 10462 failed to group this bacterium with a known pseudomonas species. However, fatty acid analysis of the bacteria when grown at temperatures below 37{degrees}C suggest that the organism is a pseudomonad. Since a predominant characteristic of this bacterium is it`s ability to degrade cellulose, we suggest it be called Pseudomonas cellulosa.« less

  19. Bio-Augmentation of Cupriavidus sp. CY-1 into 2,4-D Contaminated Soil: Microbial Community Analysis by Culture Dependent and Independent Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Young-Cheol; Reddy, M. Venkateswar; Umemoto, Honoka; Sato, Yuki; Kang, Mi-Hye; Yajima, Yuka; Kikuchi, Shintaro

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, a 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) degrading bacterial strain CY-1 was isolated from the forest soil. Based on physiological, biochemical and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis it was identified as Cupriavidus sp. CY-1. Further 2,4-D degradation experiments at different concentrations (200 to 800 mg l-1) were carried out using CY-1. Effect of NaCl and KNO3 on 2,4-D degradation was also evaluated. Degradation of 2,4-D and the metabolites produced during degradation process were analyzed using high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and GC-MS respectively. The amount of chloride ions produced during the 2,4-D degradation were analyzed by Ion chromatography (IC) and it is stoichiometric with 2,4-D dechlorination. Furthermore two different types of soils collected from two different sources were used for 2,4-D degradation studies. The isolated strain CY-1 was bio-augmented into 2,4-D contaminated soils to analyze its degradation ability. Culture independent methods like denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), and culture dependent methods like colony forming units (CFU) and most probable number (MPN) were used to analyze the survivability of strain CY-1 in contaminated soil. Results of T-RFLP were coincident with the DGGE analysis. From the DGGE, T-RFLP, MPN and HPLC results it was concluded that strain CY-1 effectively degraded 2,4-D without disturbing the ecosystem of soil indigenous microorganisms. PMID:26710231

  20. Cloud-point extraction of green-polymers from Cupriavidus necator lysate using thermoseparating-based aqueous two-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Leong, Yoong Kit; Lan, John Chi-Wei; Loh, Hwei-San; Ling, Tau Chuan; Ooi, Chien Wei; Show, Pau Loke

    2017-03-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), a class of renewable and biodegradable green polymers, have gained attraction as a potential substitute for the conventional plastics due to the increasing concern towards environmental pollution as well as the rapidly depleting petroleum reserve. Nevertheless, the high cost of downstream processing of PHA has been a bottleneck for the wide adoption of PHAs. Among the options of PHAs recovery techniques, aqueous two-phase extraction (ATPE) outshines the others by having the advantages of providing a mild environment for bioseparation, being green and non-toxic, the capability to handle a large operating volume and easily scaled-up. Utilizing unique properties of thermo-responsive polymer which has decreasing solubility in its aqueous solution as the temperature rises, cloud point extraction (CPE) is an ATPE technique that allows its phase-forming component to be recycled and reused. A thorough literature review has shown that this is the first time isolation and recovery of PHAs from Cupriavidus necator H16 via CPE was reported. The optimum condition for PHAs extraction (recovery yield of 94.8% and purification factor of 1.42 fold) was achieved under the conditions of 20 wt/wt % ethylene oxide-propylene oxide (EOPO) with molecular weight of 3900 g/mol and 10 mM of sodium chloride addition at thermoseparating temperature of 60°C with crude feedstock limit of 37.5 wt/wt %. Recycling and reutilization of EOPO 3900 can be done at least twice with satisfying yield and PF. CPE has been demonstrated as an effective technique for the extraction of PHAs from microbial crude culture. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Mobile genetic elements, a key to microbial adaptation in extreme environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houdt, Rob; Mijnendonckx, Kristel; Provoost, Ann; Monsieurs, Pieter; Mergeay, Max; Leys, Natalie

    To ensure well-being of the crew during manned spaceflight, continuous monitoring of different microbial contaminants in air, in water and on surfaces in the spacecraft is vital. Next to microorganisms originating mainly from human activity, strains from the closely related gen-era Cupriavidus and Ralstonia have been identified and isolated during numerous monitoring campaigns from different space-related environments. These strains have been found in the air of the Mars Exploration Rover assembly room, on the surface of the Mars Odyssey Orbiter and in different water sources from the International Space Station, Shuttle and Mir space station. In previous studies, we investigated the response of the model bacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 when cultured in the international space station (ISS) and space gravity and radiation simulation facilities, to understand it's ways to adapt to space flight conditions. It was also demonstrated that genetic rearrangements due to the movement of IS (insertion sequence) elements, enabled CH34 to adapt to toxic zinc concentrations, in space flight and on ground. In this study, we screened the full genome sequence of C. metallidurans CH34 for the presence of mobile genetic elements (MGEs), with the purpose to identified their putative role in adaptation to the new environments. Eleven genomic islands (GI) were identified in chro-mosome 1, three on the native plasmid pMOL28 and two on the native plasmid pMOL30. On the plasmids pMOL28 and pMOL30, all genes involved in the response to metals were located within GIs. Three of the GIs on chromosome 1 contained genes involved in the response to metals. Three GIs (CMGI-2, -3 and -4) on chromosome 1 belonged to the Tn4371 family, with CMGI-2 containing at least 25 genes involved in the degradation of toluene corresponding to CH34's ability to grow at expense of toluene, benzene or xylene as sole carbon source. CMGI-3 sheltered accessory genes involved in CO2 fixation and

  2. Mechanisms of Nutrient Acquisition by Rock Eating Microbes Revealed by Proteomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryce, C. C.; Martin, S.; LeBihan, T.; Cockell, C.

    2013-12-01

    In nutrient poor terrestrial environments such as fresh lava flows, bioessential elements contained within surrounding rocks can be an important source of nutrients for the microbial community. The role of microbes in the alteration of rock surfaces, driven by this nutrient requirement, is widely accepted and is known to play an important role in CO2 drawdown as well as influencing nutrient flux to the biosphere. There is, however, limited knowledge of the biological processes which facilitate the uptake of bioessential elements from rocks. Using a technique known as 'shotgun' proteomics we have investigated the cellular processes involved in the uptake of iron, calcium and magnesium from fresh basalt in the heavy metal resistant bacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34. Quantitative proteomics allows us to obtain a detailed snapshot of the protein complement of cells. By comparing cultures grown under normal growth conditions to cultures grown with basalt as an alternative iron, calcium or magnesium source, we can highlight proteins which are differentially expressed and therefore important for life in a rocky environment. We observe that the use of rock-bound nutrients induces a complex metabolic response in C.metallidurans which is distinct from the effects observed in the presence of rocks in normal growth medium. This is evidenced, for example, by the upregulation of a number of proteins involved in alternative energy-producing processes such as chemolithotrophy, sulphur oxidation and hydrogen oxidation compared to control cultures. This work has implications for the understanding of how microbes forge a life for themselves from the Earth's crust and highlights the importance of the field of proteomics for the study of life in terrestrial environments.

  3. Extreme Ionizing-Radiation-Resistant Bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Schwendner, Petra

    2012-01-01

    potential for transfer, and subsequent proliferation, on another solar body such as Mars and Europa. These organisms are more likely to escape planetary protection assays, which only take into account presence of spores. Hence, presences of extreme radiation-resistant Deinococcus in the cleanroom facility where spacecraft are assembled pose a serious risk for integrity of life-detection missions. The microorganism described herein was isolated from the surfaces of the cleanroom facility in which the Phoenix Lander was assembled. The isolated bacterial strain was subjected to a comprehensive polyphasic analysis to characterize its taxonomic position. This bacterium exhibits very low 16SrRNA similarity with any other environmental isolate reported to date. Both phenotypic and phylogenetic analyses clearly indicate that this isolate belongs to the genus Deinococcus and represents a novel species. The name Deinococcus phoenicis was proposed after the Phoenix spacecraft, which was undergoing assembly, testing, and launch operations in the spacecraft assembly facility at the time of isolation. D. phoenicis cells exhibited higher resistance to ionizing radiation (cobalt-60; 14 kGy) than the cells of the D. radiodurans (5 kGy). Thus, it is in the best interest of NASA to thoroughly characterize this organism, which will further assess in determining the potential for forward contamination. Upon the completion of genetic and physiological characteristics of D. phoenicis, it will be added to a planetary protection database to be able to further model and predict the probability of forward contamination.

  4. Extreme Ionizing-Radiation-Resistant Bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Schwendner, Petra

    2013-01-01

    potential for transfer, and subsequent proliferation, on another solar body such as Mars and Europa. These organisms are more likely to escape planetary protection assays, which only take into account presence of spores. Hence, presences of extreme radiation-resistant Deinococcus in the cleanroom facility where spacecraft are assembled pose a serious risk for integrity of life-detection missions. The microorganism described herein was isolated from the surfaces of the cleanroom facility in which the Phoenix Lander was assembled. The isolated bacterial strain was subjected to a comprehensive polyphasic analysis to characterize its taxonomic position. This bacterium exhibits very low 16SrRNA similarity with any other environmental isolate reported to date. Both phenotypic and phylogenetic analyses clearly indicate that this isolate belongs to the genus Deinococcus and represents a novel species. The name Deinococcus phoenicis was proposed after the Phoenix spacecraft, which was undergoing assembly, testing, and launch operations in the spacecraft assembly facility at the time of isolation. D. phoenicis cells exhibited higher resistance to ionizing radiation (cobalt-60; 14 kGy) than the cells of the D. radiodurans (5 kGy). Thus, it is in the best interest of NASA to thoroughly characterize this organism, which will further assess in determining the potential for forward contamination. Upon the completion of genetic and physiological characteristics of D. phoenicis, it will be added to a planetary protection database to be able to further model and predict the probability of forward contamination.

  5. Coiled to diffuse: Brownian motion of a helical bacterium.

    PubMed

    Butenko, Alexander V; Mogilko, Emma; Amitai, Lee; Pokroy, Boaz; Sloutskin, Eli

    2012-09-11

    We employ real-time three-dimensional confocal microscopy to follow the Brownian motion of a fixed helically shaped Leptospira interrogans (LI) bacterium. We extract from our measurements the translational and the rotational diffusion coefficients of this bacterium. A simple theoretical model is suggested, perfectly reproducing the experimental diffusion coefficients, with no tunable parameters. An older theoretical model, where edge effects are neglected, dramatically underestimates the observed rates of translation. Interestingly, the coiling of LI increases its rotational diffusion coefficient by a factor of 5, compared to a (hypothetical) rectified bacterium of the same contour length. Moreover, the translational diffusion coefficients would have decreased by a factor of ~1.5, if LI were rectified. This suggests that the spiral shape of the spirochaete bacteria, in addition to being employed for their active twisting motion, may also increase the ability of these bacteria to explore the surrounding fluid by passive Brownian diffusion.

  6. Gut bacterium of Dendrobaena veneta (Annelida: Oligochaeta) possesses antimycobacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Fiołka, Marta J; Zagaja, Mirosław P; Piersiak, Tomasz D; Wróbel, Marek; Pawelec, Jarosław

    2010-09-01

    The new bacterial strain with antimycobacterial activity has been isolated from the midgut of Dendrobaena veneta (Annelida). Biochemical and molecular characterization of isolates from 18 individuals identified all as Raoultella ornithinolytica genus with 99% similarity. The bacterium is a possible symbiont of the earthworm D. veneta. The isolated microorganism has shown the activity against four strains of fast-growing mycobacteria: Mycobacterium butiricum, Mycobacterium jucho, Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium phlei. The multiplication of the gut bacterium on plates with Sauton medium containing mycobacteria has caused a lytic effect. After the incubation of the cell free extract prepared from the gut bacterium with four strains of mycobacteria in liquid Sauton medium, the cells of all tested strains were deformed and divided to small oval forms and sometimes created long filaments. The effect was observed by the use of light, transmission and scanning microscopy. Viability of all examined species of mycobacteria was significantly decreased. The antimycobacterial effect was probably the result of the antibiotic action produced by the gut bacterium of the earthworm. The application of ultrafiltration procedure allowed to demonstrate that antimicrobial substance with strong antimycobacterial activity from bacterial culture supernatant, is a protein with the molecular mass above 100 kDa. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Partial biological characteristics and algicidal activity of an algicidal bacterium].

    PubMed

    Li, San-Hua; Zhang, Qi-Ya

    2013-02-01

    An algicidal bacterium was isolated from freshwater (Lake Donghu in Wuhan) and coded as A01. The morphology of the algicidal bacterium was observed using optical microscope and electron microscopes, the results showed that A01 was rod-shaped, approximately 1.5 microm in length and 0.45 microm in width and with no flagella structure. A01 was Gram-negative and belongs to the family Acinetobacter sp. though identification by Gram's staining and 16S rDNA gene analysis. A01 exhibited strong algicidal activity on the bloom-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena eucompacta under laboratory conditions. The removal rate of chlorophyll a after 7-day incubation with the culture supernatant of A01 and thalli were 77% and 61%, respectively. Microscopic observation showed that almost all cyanobacterial cells were destroyed within 3 d of co-incubation with the supernatant of algicidal bacterium, but a mass of the cyanobacterial cell lysis was observed only after 5 d of co-incubation with the thalli of algicidal bacterium. These results indicated that the main algicidal component of A01 was in its culture supernatant. In other words, the strain A01 could secrete algicidal component against Anabaena eucompacta.

  8. Genome sequence of the algicidal bacterium Kordia algicida OT-1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Sook; Kang, Sung Gyun; Kwon, Kae Kyoung; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Sang-Jin

    2011-08-01

    Kordia algicida OT-1 is an algicidal bacterium against the bloom-forming microalgae. The genome sequence of K. algicida revealed a number of interesting features, including the degradation of macromolecules, the biosynthesis of carotenoid pigment and secondary metabolites, and the capacity for gliding motility, which might facilitate the understanding of algicidal mechanisms.

  9. Complete genome of the cellulolytic ruminal bacterium Ruminococcus albus 7

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ruminococcus albus 7 is a highly cellulolytic rumen bacterium that is a member of the phylum Firmicutes. Here, we describe the complete genome for this microbe. This genome will be useful for rumen microbiology, cellulosome biology, and in biofuel production, as one of its major fermentation product...

  10. An Innovative Cloning Platform Enables Large-Scale Production and Maturation of an Oxygen-Tolerant [NiFe]-Hydrogenase from Cupriavidus necator in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Schiffels, Johannes; Pinkenburg, Olaf; Schelden, Maximilian; Aboulnaga, El-Hussiny A. A.; Baumann, Marcus E. M.; Selmer, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    Expression of multiple heterologous genes in a dedicated host is a prerequisite for approaches in synthetic biology, spanning from the production of recombinant multiprotein complexes to the transfer of tailor-made metabolic pathways. Such attempts are often exacerbated, due in most cases to a lack of proper directional, robust and readily accessible genetic tools. Here, we introduce an innovative system for cloning and expression of multiple genes in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Using the novel methodology, genes are equipped with individual promoters and terminators and subsequently assembled. The resulting multiple gene cassettes may either be placed in one vector or alternatively distributed among a set of compatible plasmids. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the developed tool by production and maturation of the NAD+reducing soluble [NiFe]-hydrogenase (SH) from Cupriavidus necator H16 (formerly Ralstonia eutropha H16) in E. coli BL21Star™ (DE3). The SH (encoded in hoxFUYHI) was successfully matured by co-expression of a dedicated set of auxiliary genes, comprising seven hyp genes (hypC1D1E1A2B2F2X) along with hoxW, which encodes a specific endopeptidase. Deletion of genes involved in SH maturation reduced maturation efficiency substantially. Further addition of hoxN1, encoding a high-affinity nickel permease from C. necator, considerably increased maturation efficiency in E. coli. Carefully balanced growth conditions enabled hydrogenase production at high cell-densities, scoring mg·(Liter culture)−1 yields of purified functional SH. Specific activities of up to 7.2±1.15 U·mg−1 were obtained in cell-free extracts, which is in the range of the highest activities ever determined in C. necator extracts. The recombinant enzyme was isolated in equal purity and stability as previously achieved with the native form, yielding ultrapure preparations with anaerobic specific activities of up to 230 U·mg−1. Owing to the combinatorial power exhibited by the

  11. Trichloroethylene Biodegradation by a Methane-Oxidizing Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Little, C. Deane; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Herbes, Stephen E.; Lidstrom, Mary E.; Tyndall, Richard L.; Gilmer, Penny J.

    1988-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE), a common groundwater contaminant, is a suspected carcinogen that is highly resistant to aerobic biodegradation. An aerobic, methane-oxidizing bacterium was isolated that degrades TCE in pure culture at concentrations commonly observed in contaminated groundwater. Strain 46-1, a type I methanotrophic bacterium, degraded TCE if grown on methane or methanol, producing CO2 and water-soluble products. Gas chromatography and 14C radiotracer techniques were used to determine the rate, methane dependence, and mechanism of TCE biodegradation. TCE biodegradation by strain 46-1 appears to be a cometabolic process that occurs when the organism is actively metabolizing a suitable growth substrate such as methane or methanol. It is proposed that TCE biodegradation by methanotrophs occurs by formation of TCE epoxide, which breaks down spontaneously in water to form dichloroacetic and glyoxylic acids and one-carbon products. Images PMID:16347616

  12. Influence of geogenic factors on microbial communities in metallogenic Australian soils.

    PubMed

    Reith, Frank; Brugger, Joel; Zammit, Carla M; Gregg, Adrienne L; Goldfarb, Katherine C; Andersen, Gary L; DeSantis, Todd Z; Piceno, Yvette M; Brodie, Eoin L; Lu, Zhenmei; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Wakelin, Steven A

    2012-11-01

    Links between microbial community assemblages and geogenic factors were assessed in 187 soil samples collected from four metal-rich provinces across Australia. Field-fresh soils and soils incubated with soluble Au(III) complexes were analysed using three-domain multiplex-terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism, and phylogenetic (PhyloChip) and functional (GeoChip) microarrays. Geogenic factors of soils were determined using lithological-, geomorphological- and soil-mapping combined with analyses of 51 geochemical parameters. Microbial communities differed significantly between landforms, soil horizons, lithologies and also with the occurrence of underlying Au deposits. The strongest responses to these factors, and to amendment with soluble Au(III) complexes, was observed in bacterial communities. PhyloChip analyses revealed a greater abundance and diversity of Alphaproteobacteria (especially Sphingomonas spp.), and Firmicutes (Bacillus spp.) in Au-containing and Au(III)-amended soils. Analyses of potential function (GeoChip) revealed higher abundances of metal-resistance genes in metal-rich soils. For example, genes that hybridised with metal-resistance genes copA, chrA and czcA of a prevalent aurophillic bacterium, Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34, occurred only in auriferous soils. These data help establish key links between geogenic factors and the phylogeny and function within soil microbial communities. In particular, the landform, which is a crucial factor in determining soil geochemistry, strongly affected microbial community structures.

  13. Influence of geogenic factors on microbial communities in metallogenic Australian soils

    PubMed Central

    Reith, Frank; Brugger, Joel; Zammit, Carla M; Gregg, Adrienne L; Goldfarb, Katherine C; Andersen, Gary L; DeSantis, Todd Z; Piceno, Yvette M; Brodie, Eoin L; Lu, Zhenmei; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Wakelin, Steven A

    2012-01-01

    Links between microbial community assemblages and geogenic factors were assessed in 187 soil samples collected from four metal-rich provinces across Australia. Field-fresh soils and soils incubated with soluble Au(III) complexes were analysed using three-domain multiplex-terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism, and phylogenetic (PhyloChip) and functional (GeoChip) microarrays. Geogenic factors of soils were determined using lithological-, geomorphological- and soil-mapping combined with analyses of 51 geochemical parameters. Microbial communities differed significantly between landforms, soil horizons, lithologies and also with the occurrence of underlying Au deposits. The strongest responses to these factors, and to amendment with soluble Au(III) complexes, was observed in bacterial communities. PhyloChip analyses revealed a greater abundance and diversity of Alphaproteobacteria (especially Sphingomonas spp.), and Firmicutes (Bacillus spp.) in Au-containing and Au(III)-amended soils. Analyses of potential function (GeoChip) revealed higher abundances of metal-resistance genes in metal-rich soils. For example, genes that hybridised with metal-resistance genes copA, chrA and czcA of a prevalent aurophillic bacterium, Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34, occurred only in auriferous soils. These data help establish key links between geogenic factors and the phylogeny and function within soil microbial communities. In particular, the landform, which is a crucial factor in determining soil geochemistry, strongly affected microbial community structures. PMID:22673626

  14. Analysis of metal tolerance in Rhizobium leguminosarum strains isolated from an ultramafic soil.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Sanz, Laura; Brito, Belén; Palacios, Jose

    2018-02-01

    Natural habitats containing high amounts of heavy metals provide a valuable source of bacteria adapted to deal with metal toxicity. A functional analysis of the population of legume endosymbiotic bacteria in an ultramafic soil was undertaken by studying a collection of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv viciae (Rlv) isolates obtained using pea as trap plant. One of the isolates, Rlv UPM1137, was selected on the basis of its higher tolerance to nickel and cobalt and presence of inducible mechanisms for such tolerance. A random transposon mutagenesis of Rlv UPM1137 allowed the generation of 14 transposant derivatives with increased nickel sensitivity; five of these transposants were also more sensitive to cobalt. Sequencing of the insertion sites revealed that one of the transposants (D2250) was affected in a gene homologous to the cation diffusion facilitator gene dmeF first identified in the metal-resistant bacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34. The symbiotic performance of D2250 and two other transposants bearing single transposon insertions was unaffected under high-metal conditions, suggesting that, in contrast to previous observations in other Rlv strain, metal tolerance in UPM1137 under symbiotic conditions might be supported by functional redundancy between several mechanisms. © FEMS 2018. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Thermostable purified endoglucanase from thermophilic bacterium acidothermus cellulolyticus

    DOEpatents

    Tucker, Melvin P.; Grohmann, Karel; Himmel, Michael E.; Mohagheghi, Ali

    1992-01-01

    A substantially purified high molecular weight cellulase enzyme having a molecular weight of between about 156,000 to about 203,400 daltons isolated from the bacterium Acidothermus cellulolyticus (ATCC 43068) and a method of producing it are disclosed. The enzyme is water soluble, possesses both C.sub.1 and C.sub.x types of enzymatic activity, has a high degree of stability toward heat and exhibits both a high optimum temperature activity and high inactivation characteristics.

  16. [A rarely isolated bacterium in microbiology laboratories: Streptococcus uberis].

    PubMed

    Eryıldız, Canan; Bukavaz, Şebnem; Gürcan, Şaban; Hatipoğlu, Osman

    2017-04-01

    Streptococcus uberis is a gram-positive bacterium that is mostly responsible for mastitis in cattle. The bacterium rarely has been associated with human infections. Conventional phenotyphic methods can be inadequate for the identification of S.uberis; and in microbiology laboratories S.uberis is confused with the other streptococci and enterococci isolates. Recently, molecular methods are recommended for the accurate identification of S.uberis isolates. The aim of this report is to present a lower respiratory tract infection case caused by S.uberis and the microbiological methods for identification of this bacterium. A 66-year-old male patient with squamous cell lung cancer who received radiotherapy was admitted in our hospital for the control. According to the chest X-Ray, patient was hospitalized with the prediagnosis of ''cavitary tumor, pulmonary abscess''. In the first day of the hospitalization, blood and sputum cultures were drawn. Blood culture was negative, however, Candida albicans was isolated in the sputum culture and it was estimated to be due to oral lesions. After two weeks from the hospitalization, sputum sample was taken from the patient since he had abnormal respiratory sounds and cough complaint. In the Gram stained smear of the sputum there were abundant leucocytes and gram-positive cocci, and S.uberis was isolated in both 5% sheep blood and chocolate agar media. Bacterial identification and antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed by VITEK 2 (Biomerieux, France) and also, the bacterium was identified by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) based VITEK MS system as S.uberis. The isolate was determined susceptible to ampicillin, erythromycin, clindamycin, levofloxacin, linezolid, penicillin, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, tetracycline and vancomycin. 16S, 23S ribosomal RNA and 16S-23S intergenic spacer gene regions were amplified with specific primers and partial DNA sequence analysis of 16S

  17. Chitin utilization by the insect-transmitted bacterium Xylella fastidiosa.

    PubMed

    Killiny, Nabil; Prado, Simone S; Almeida, Rodrigo P P

    2010-09-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is an insect-borne bacterium that colonizes xylem vessels of a large number of host plants, including several crops of economic importance. Chitin is a polysaccharide present in the cuticle of leafhopper vectors of X. fastidiosa and may serve as a carbon source for this bacterium. Biological assays showed that X. fastidiosa reached larger populations in the presence of chitin. Additionally, chitin induced phenotypic changes in this bacterium, notably increasing adhesiveness. Quantitative PCR assays indicated transcriptional changes in the presence of chitin, and an enzymatic assay demonstrated chitinolytic activity by X. fastidiosa. An ortholog of the chitinase A gene (chiA) was identified in the X. fastidiosa genome. The in silico analysis revealed that the open reading frame of chiA encodes a protein of 351 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 40 kDa. chiA is in a locus that consists of genes implicated in polysaccharide degradation. Moreover, this locus was also found in the genomes of closely related bacteria in the genus Xanthomonas, which are plant but not insect associated. X. fastidiosa degraded chitin when grown on a solid chitin-yeast extract-agar medium and grew in liquid medium with chitin as the sole carbon source; ChiA was also determined to be secreted. The gene encoding ChiA was cloned into Escherichia coli, and endochitinase activity was detected in the transformant, showing that the gene is functional and involved in chitin degradation. The results suggest that X. fastidiosa may use its vectors' foregut surface as a carbon source. In addition, chitin may trigger X. fastidiosa's gene regulation and biofilm formation within vectors. Further work is necessary to characterize the role of chitin and its utilization in X. fastidiosa.

  18. Triazine herbicide resistance in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Alfred E.; Gilbert, Carl W.; Guy, Rachel; Arntzen, Charles J.

    1984-01-01

    The photoaffinity herbicide azidoatrazine (2-azido-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) selectively labels the L subunit of the reaction center of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides. Herbicide-resistant mutants retain the L subunit and have altered binding properties for methylthio- and chloro-substituted triazines as well as altered equilibrium constants for electron transfer between primary and secondary electron acceptors. We suggest that a subtle alteration in the L subunit is responsible for herbicide resistance and that the L subunit is the functional analog of the 32-kDa QB protein of chloroplast membranes. Images PMID:16593520

  19. Tyrosine sulfation in a Gram-negative bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sang-Wook; Lee, Sang-Won; Bahar, Ofir; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Robinson, Michelle R.; Shaw, Jared B.; Madsen, James A.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine sulfation, a well-characterized post-translation modification in eukaryotes, has not previously been reported in prokaryotes. Here we demonstrate that the RaxST protein from the Gram-negative bacterium, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, is a tyrosine sulfotransferase. We used a newly developed sulfotransferase assay and ultraviolet photodissociation mass spectrometry (UVPD) to demonstrate that RaxST catalyzes sulfation of tyrosine 22 of the Xoo Ax21 (activator of XA21-mediated immunity). These results demonstrate a previously undescribed post-translational modification in a prokaryotic species with implications extending to host immune response and bacterial cell-cell communication system. PMID:23093190

  20. Factors Affecting Zebra Mussel Kill by the Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2004-02-24

    The specific purpose of this research project was to identify factors that affect zebra mussel kill by the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens. Test results obtained during this three-year project identified the following key variables as affecting mussel kill: treatment concentration, treatment duration, mussel siphoning activity, dissolved oxygen concentration, water temperature, and naturally suspended particle load. Using this latter information, the project culminated in a series of pipe tests which achieved high mussel kill inside power plants under once-through conditions using service water in artificial pipes.

  1. Magnetic guidance of the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense.

    PubMed

    Loehr, Johannes; Pfeiffer, Daniel; Schüler, Dirk; Fischer, Thomas M

    2016-04-21

    Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense is a magnetotactic bacterium with a permanent magnetic moment capable of swimming using two bipolarly located flagella. In their natural environment these bacteria swim along the field lines of the homogeneous geomagnetic field in a typical run and reversal pattern and thereby create non-differentiable trajectories with sharp edges. In the current work we nevertheless achieve stable guidance along curved lines of mechanical instability by using a heterogeneous magnetic field of a garnet film. The successful guidance of the bacteria depends on the right balance between motility and the magnetic moment of the magnetosome chain.

  2. Vector potential of houseflies for the bacterium Aeromonas caviae.

    PubMed

    Nayduch, D; Noblet, G Pittman; Stutzenberger, F J

    2002-06-01

    Houseflies, Musca domestica Linnaeus (Diptera: Muscidae), have been implicated as vectors or transporters of numerous gastrointestinal pathogens encountered during feeding and ovipositing on faeces. The putative enteropathogen Aeromonas caviae (Proteobacteria: Aeromonadaceae) may be present in faeces of humans and livestock. Recently A. caviae was detected in houseflies by PCR and isolated by culture methods. In this study, we assessed the vector potential of houseflies for A. caviae relative to multiplication and persistence of the bacterium in the fly and to contamination of other flies and food materials. In experimentally fed houseflies, the number of bacteria increased up to 2 days post-ingestion (d PI) and then decreased significantly 3 d PI. A large number of bacteria was detected in the vomitus and faeces of infected flies at 2-3 d PI. The bacteria persisted in flies for up to 8 d PI, but numbers were low. Experimentally infected flies transmitted A. caviae to chicken meat, and transmissibility was directly correlated with exposure time. Flies contaminated the meat for up to 7 d PI; however, a significant decrease in contamination was observed 2-3 d PI. In the fly-to-fly transmission experiments, the transmission of A. caviae was observed and was apparently mediated by flies sharing food. These results support houseflies as potential vectors for A. caviae because the bacterium multiplied, persisted in flies for up to 8 d PI, and could be transmitted to human food items.

  3. Polysaccharide degradation systems of the saprophytic bacterium Cellvibrio japonicus

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, Jeffrey G.

    Study of recalcitrant polysaccharide degradation by bacterial systems is critical for understanding biological processes such as global carbon cycling, nutritional contributions of the human gut microbiome, and the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. One bacterium that has a robust ability to degrade polysaccharides is the Gram-negative saprophyte Cellvibrio japonicus. A bacterium with a circuitous history, C. japonicus underwent several taxonomy changes from an initially described Pseudomonas sp. Most of the enzymes described in the pre-genomics era have also been renamed. Furthermore, this review aims to consolidate the biochemical, structural, and genetic data published on C. japonicus and its remarkablemore » ability to degrade cellulose, xylan, and pectin substrates. Initially, C. japonicus carbohydrate-active enzymes were studied biochemically and structurally for their novel polysaccharide binding and degradation characteristics, while more recent systems biology approaches have begun to unravel the complex regulation required for lignocellulose degradation in an environmental context. Also included is a discussion for the future of C. japonicus as a model system, with emphasis on current areas unexplored in terms of polysaccharide degradation and emerging directions for C. japonicus in both environmental and biotechnological applications.« less

  4. Polysaccharide degradation systems of the saprophytic bacterium Cellvibrio japonicus

    DOE PAGES

    Gardner, Jeffrey G.

    2016-06-04

    Study of recalcitrant polysaccharide degradation by bacterial systems is critical for understanding biological processes such as global carbon cycling, nutritional contributions of the human gut microbiome, and the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. One bacterium that has a robust ability to degrade polysaccharides is the Gram-negative saprophyte Cellvibrio japonicus. A bacterium with a circuitous history, C. japonicus underwent several taxonomy changes from an initially described Pseudomonas sp. Most of the enzymes described in the pre-genomics era have also been renamed. Furthermore, this review aims to consolidate the biochemical, structural, and genetic data published on C. japonicus and its remarkablemore » ability to degrade cellulose, xylan, and pectin substrates. Initially, C. japonicus carbohydrate-active enzymes were studied biochemically and structurally for their novel polysaccharide binding and degradation characteristics, while more recent systems biology approaches have begun to unravel the complex regulation required for lignocellulose degradation in an environmental context. Also included is a discussion for the future of C. japonicus as a model system, with emphasis on current areas unexplored in terms of polysaccharide degradation and emerging directions for C. japonicus in both environmental and biotechnological applications.« less

  5. Biodegradation of polyethylene by the thermophilic bacterium Brevibacillus borstelensis.

    PubMed

    Hadad, D; Geresh, S; Sivan, A

    2005-01-01

    To select a polyethylene-degrading micro-organism and to study the factors affecting its biodegrading activity. A thermophilic bacterium Brevibaccillus borstelensis strain 707 (isolated from soil) utilized branched low-density polyethylene as the sole carbon source and degraded it. Incubation of polyethylene with B. borstelensis (30 days, 50 degrees C) reduced its gravimetric and molecular weights by 11 and 30% respectively. Brevibaccillus borstelensis also degraded polyethylene in the presence of mannitol. Biodegradation of u.v. photo-oxidized polyethylene increased with increasing irradiation time. Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) analysis of photo-oxidized polyethylene revealed a reduction in carbonyl groups after incubation with the bacteria. This study demonstrates that polyethylene--considered to be inert--can be biodegraded if the right microbial strain is isolated. Enrichment culture methods were effective for isolating a thermophilic bacterium capable of utilizing polyethylene as the sole carbon and energy source. Maximal biodegradation was obtained in combination with photo-oxidation, which showed that carbonyl residues formed by photo-oxidation play a role in biodegradation. Brevibaccillus borstelensis also degraded the CH2 backbone of nonirradiated polyethylene. Biodegradation of polyethylene by a single bacterial strain contributes to our understanding of the process and the factors affecting polyethylene biodegradation.

  6. Chromatin organization and radio resistance in the bacterium Gemmata obscuriglobus.

    PubMed

    Lieber, Arnon; Leis, Andrew; Kushmaro, Ariel; Minsky, Abraham; Medalia, Ohad

    2009-03-01

    The organization of chromatin has a major impact on cellular activities, such as gene expression. For bacteria, it was suggested that the spatial organization of the genetic material correlates with transcriptional levels, implying a specific architecture of the chromosome within the cytoplasm. Accordingly, recent technological advances have emphasized the organization of the genetic material within nucleoid structures. Gemmata obscuriglobus, a member of the phylum Planctomycetes, exhibits a distinctive nucleoid structure in which chromatin is encapsulated within a discrete membrane-bound compartment. Here, we show that this soil and freshwater bacterium tolerates high doses of UV and ionizing radiation. Cryoelectron tomography of frozen hydrated sections and electron microscopy of freeze-substituted cells have indicated a more highly ordered condensed-chromatin organization in actively dividing and stationary-phase G. obscuriglobus cells. These three-dimensional analyses revealed a complex network of double membranes that engulf the condensed DNA. Bioinformatics analysis has revealed the existence of a putative component involved in nonhomologous DNA end joining that presumably plays a role in maintaining chromatin integrity within the bacterium. Thus, our observations further support the notion that packed chromatin organization enhances radiation tolerance.

  7. Structure and morphology of magnetite anaerobically-produced by a marine magnetotactic bacterium and a dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparks, N.H.C.; Mann, S.; Bazylinski, D.A.; Lovley, D.R.; Jannasch, H.W.; Frankel, R.B.

    1990-01-01

    Intracellular crystals of magnetite synthesized by cells of the magnetotactic vibroid organism, MV-1, and extracellular crystals of magnetite produced by the non-magnetotactic dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium strain GS-15, were examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction and 57Fe Mo??ssbauer spectroscopy. The magnetotactic bacterium contained a single chain of approximately 10 crystals aligned along the long axis of the cell. The crystals were essentially pure stoichiometric magnetite. When viewed along the crystal long axis the particles had a hexagonal cross-section whereas side-on they appeared as rectangules or truncated rectangles of average dimension, 53 ?? 35 nm. These findings are explained in terms of a three-dimensional morphology comprising a hexagonal prism of {110} faces which are capped and truncated by {111} end faces. Electron diffraction and lattice imaging studies indicated that the particles were structurally well-defined single crystals. In contrast, magnetite particles produced by the strain, GS-15 were irregular in shape and had smaller mean dimensions (14 nm). Single crystals were imaged but these were not of high structural perfection. These results highlight the influence of intracellular control on the crystallochemical specificity of bacterial magnetites. The characterization of these crystals is important in aiding the identification of biogenic magnetic materials in paleomagnetism and in studies of sediment magnetization. ?? 1990.

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of the Cellulolytic Bacterium Clostridium papyrosolvens C7 (ATCC 700395).

    PubMed

    Zepeda, Veronica; Dassa, Bareket; Borovok, Ilya; Lamed, Raphael; Bayer, Edward A; Cate, Jamie H D

    2013-09-12

    We report the draft genome sequence of the cellulose-degrading bacterium Clostridium papyrosolvens C7, originally isolated from mud collected below a freshwater pond in Massachusetts. This Gram-positive bacterium grows in a mesophilic anaerobic environment with filter paper as the only carbon source, and it has a simple cellulosome system with multiple carbohydrate-degrading enzymes.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of the Cellulolytic Bacterium Clostridium papyrosolvens C7 (ATCC 700395)

    PubMed Central

    Zepeda, Veronica; Dassa, Bareket; Borovok, Ilya; Lamed, Raphael; Bayer, Edward A.

    2013-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of the cellulose-degrading bacterium Clostridium papyrosolvens C7, originally isolated from mud collected below a freshwater pond in Massachusetts. This Gram-positive bacterium grows in a mesophilic anaerobic environment with filter paper as the only carbon source, and it has a simple cellulosome system with multiple carbohydrate-degrading enzymes. PMID:24029755

  10. Near-complete genome sequence of the cellulolytic Bacterium Bacteroides ( Pseudobacteroides) cellulosolvens ATCC 35603

    DOE PAGES

    Dassa, Bareket; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Hurt, Richard A.; ...

    2015-09-24

    We report the single-contig genome sequence of the anaerobic, mesophilic, cellulolytic bacterium, Bacteroides cellulosolvens. The bacterium produces a particularly elaborate cellulosome system, whereas the types of cohesin-dockerin interactions are opposite of other known cellulosome systems: cell-surface attachment is thus mediated via type-I interactions whereas enzymes are integrated via type-II interactions.

  11. The O-antigen structure of bacterium Comamonas aquatica CJG.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiqian; Kondakova, Anna N; Zhu, Yutong; Knirel, Yuriy A; Han, Aidong

    2017-11-01

    Genus Comamonas is a group of bacteria that are able to degrade a variety of environmental waste. Comamonas aquatica CJG (C. aquatica) in this genus is able to absorb low-density lipoprotein but not high-density lipoprotein of human serum. Using 1 H and 13 C NMR spectroscopy, we found that the O-polysaccharide (O-antigen) of this bacterium is comprised of a disaccharide repeat (O-unit) of d-glucose and 2-O-acetyl-l-rhamnose, which is shared by Serratia marcescens O6. The O-antigen gene cluster of C. aquatica, which is located between coaX and tnp4 genes, contains rhamnose synthesis genes, glycosyl and acetyl transferase genes, and ATP-binding cassette transporter genes, and therefore is consistent with the O-antigen structure determined here.

  12. Growth of a Strictly Anaerobic Bacterium on Furfural (2-Furaldehyde)

    PubMed Central

    Brune, Gerhard; Schoberth, Siegfried M.; Sahm, Hermann

    1983-01-01

    A strictly anaerobic bacterium was isolated from a continuous fermentor culture which converted the organic constituents of sulfite evaporator condensate to methane and carbon dioxide. Furfural is one of the major components of this condensate. This furfural isolate could degrade furfural as the sole source of carbon and energy in a defined mineral-vitamin-sulfate medium. Acetic acid was the major fermentation product. This organism could also use ethanol, lactate, pyruvate, or fumarate and contained cytochrome c3 and desulfoviridin. Except for furfural degradation, the characteristics of the furfural isolate were remarkably similar to those of the sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio gigas. The furfural isolate has been tentatively identified as Desulfovibrio sp. strain F-1. Images PMID:16346423

  13. The domestication of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus

    PubMed Central

    Bull, Matthew J.; Jolley, Keith A.; Bray, James E.; Aerts, Maarten; Vandamme, Peter; Maiden, Martin C. J.; Marchesi, Julian R.; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus is a Gram-positive lactic acid bacterium that has had widespread historical use in the dairy industry and more recently as a probiotic. Although L. acidophilus has been designated as safe for human consumption, increasing commercial regulation and clinical demands for probiotic validation has resulted in a need to understand its genetic diversity. By drawing on large, well-characterised collections of lactic acid bacteria, we examined L. acidophilus isolates spanning 92 years and including multiple strains in current commercial use. Analysis of the whole genome sequence data set (34 isolate genomes) demonstrated L. acidophilus was a low diversity, monophyletic species with commercial isolates essentially identical at the sequence level. Our results indicate that commercial use has domesticated L. acidophilus with genetically stable, invariant strains being consumed globally by the human population. PMID:25425319

  14. The domestication of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus.

    PubMed

    Bull, Matthew J; Jolley, Keith A; Bray, James E; Aerts, Maarten; Vandamme, Peter; Maiden, Martin C J; Marchesi, Julian R; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar

    2014-11-26

    Lactobacillus acidophilus is a Gram-positive lactic acid bacterium that has had widespread historical use in the dairy industry and more recently as a probiotic. Although L. acidophilus has been designated as safe for human consumption, increasing commercial regulation and clinical demands for probiotic validation has resulted in a need to understand its genetic diversity. By drawing on large, well-characterised collections of lactic acid bacteria, we examined L. acidophilus isolates spanning 92 years and including multiple strains in current commercial use. Analysis of the whole genome sequence data set (34 isolate genomes) demonstrated L. acidophilus was a low diversity, monophyletic species with commercial isolates essentially identical at the sequence level. Our results indicate that commercial use has domesticated L. acidophilus with genetically stable, invariant strains being consumed globally by the human population.

  15. Production of a Pyrrole Antibiotic by a Marine Bacterium1

    PubMed Central

    Burkholder, Paul R.; Pfister, Robert M.; Leitz, Frederick H.

    1966-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the isolation and identification of bacteria able to synthesize an unusual antibiotic containing five bromine atoms per molecule. The identification and taxonomic position of these bacteria was made by use of a computer in conjunction with traditional methods. These microorganisms and closely related strains have been isolated on various occasions from tropical water in the vicinity of Puerto Rico. One bacterium, a pseudomonad, has been given the name Pseudomonas bromoutilis because of its distinctive capability. The antibiotic has been extracted, purified, and obtained in crystal form, and its structure has been determined. Although clinical tests of its properties were not encouraging, it may be of significant value and interest from an ecological standpoint. Images Fig. 1 PMID:4380876

  16. A bacterium that degrades and assimilates poly(ethylene terephthalate).

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shosuke; Hiraga, Kazumi; Takehana, Toshihiko; Taniguchi, Ikuo; Yamaji, Hironao; Maeda, Yasuhito; Toyohara, Kiyotsuna; Miyamoto, Kenji; Kimura, Yoshiharu; Oda, Kohei

    2016-03-11

    Poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) is used extensively worldwide in plastic products, and its accumulation in the environment has become a global concern. Because the ability to enzymatically degrade PET has been thought to be limited to a few fungal species, biodegradation is not yet a viable remediation or recycling strategy. By screening natural microbial communities exposed to PET in the environment, we isolated a novel bacterium, Ideonella sakaiensis 201-F6, that is able to use PET as its major energy and carbon source. When grown on PET, this strain produces two enzymes capable of hydrolyzing PET and the reaction intermediate, mono(2-hydroxyethyl) terephthalic acid. Both enzymes are required to enzymatically convert PET efficiently into its two environmentally benign monomers, terephthalic acid and ethylene glycol. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. Improved fed-batch production of high-purity PHB (poly-3 hydroxy butyrate) by Cupriavidus necator (MTCC 1472) from sucrose-based cheap substrates under response surface-optimized conditions.

    PubMed

    Dey, Pinaki; Rangarajan, Vivek

    2017-10-01

    Experimental investigations were carried out for Cupriavidus necator (MTCC 1472)-based improved production of poly-3 hydroxy butyrate (PHB) through induced nitrogen limiting fed-batch cultivation strategies. Initially Plackett-Burman design and response surface methodology were implemented to optimize most influencing process parameters. With optimized process parameter values, continuous feeding strategies ware applied in a 5-l fermenter with table sugar concentration of 100 g/l, nitrogen concentration of 0.12 g/l for fed-batch fermentation with varying dilution rates of 0.02 and 0.046 1/h. To get enriched production of PHB, concentration of the sugar was further increased to 150 and 200 g/l in feeding. Maximum concentrations of PHB achieved were 22.35 and 23.07 g/l at those dilution rates when sugar concentration maintains at 200 g/l in feeding. At maximum concentration of PHB (23.07 g/l), productivity of 0.58 g/l h was achieved with maximum PHB accumulation efficiency up to 64% of the dry weight of biomass. High purity of PHB, close to medical grade was achieved after surfactant hypochlorite extraction method, and it was further confirmed by SEM, EDX, and XRD studies.

  18. Influence of Feeding and Controlled Dissolved Oxygen Level on the Production of Poly(3-Hydroxybutyrate-co-3-Hydroxyvalerate) Copolymer by Cupriavidus sp. USMAA2-4 and Its Characterization.

    PubMed

    Shantini, K; Yahya, A R M; Amirul, A A

    2015-07-01

    Copolymer poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) [P(3HB-co-3HV)] has been the center of attention in the bio-industrial fields, as it possesses superior mechanical properties compared to poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) [P(3HB)]. The usage of oleic acid and 1-pentanol was exploited as the carbon source for the production of P(3HB-co-3HV) copolymer by using a locally isolated strain Cupriavidus sp. USMAA2-4. In this study, the productivity of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) was improved by varying the frequency of feeding in fed-batch culture. The highest productivity (0.48 g/L/h) that represents 200 % increment was obtained by feeding the carbon source and nitrogen source three times and also by considering the oxygen uptake rate (OUR) and oxygen transfer rate (OTR). A significantly higher P(3HB-co-3HV) concentration of 25.7 g/L and PHA content of 66 wt% were obtained. The 3-hydroxyvalerate (3HV) monomer composition obtained was 24 mol% with the growth of 13.3 g/L. The different frequency of feeding carried out has produced a blend copolymer and has broadened the monomer distribution. In addition, increase in number of granules was also observed as the frequency of feeding increases. In general, the most glaring increment in productivity offer advantage for industrial P(3HB-co-3HV) production, and it is crucial in developing cost-effective processes for commercialization.

  19. Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium with Unusual Morphology and Pigment Content

    PubMed Central

    Jones, H. E.

    1971-01-01

    A dissimilatory sulfate-reducing bacterium was isolated which differed in morphology and pigment content from previously described species. The organism was mesophilic, obligately anaerobic, gram-negative, nonsporulating, long, and slender with one polar flagellum. Whole cells fluoresced red at neutral pH when excited with light at 365 nm owing to the presence of a pink pigment. Desulfoviridin was present. Reduced minus oxidized spectra of whole cells showed peaks in the position of a c-type cytochrome characteristic of Desulfovibrio species and peaks at about 629 and 603 nm. CO difference spectra showed the presence of a CO-binding pigment with a peak at 593 nm. Lactate and pyruvate supported growth in the presence of sulfate but not in its absence. Sulfate, sulfite, and thiosulfate served as electron acceptors for growth. Hydrogenase was present. The deoxyribonucleic acid had a buoyant density of 1.722 g/cm3 and a guanosine plus cystosine molar percentage of total bases calculated by two different methods of 61.2 or 63.2. Images PMID:4929856

  20. Bioconversion of methane to lactate by an obligate methanotrophic bacterium

    DOE PAGES

    Henard, Calvin A.; Smith, Holly; Dowe, Nancy; ...

    2016-02-23

    Methane is the second most abundant greenhouse gas (GHG), with nearly 60% of emissions derived from anthropogenic sources. Microbial conversion of methane to fuels and value-added chemicals offers a means to reduce GHG emissions, while also valorizing this otherwise squandered high-volume, high-energy gas. However, to date, advances in methane biocatalysis have been constrained by the low-productivity and limited genetic tractability of natural methane-consuming microbes. Here, leveraging recent identification of a novel, tractable methanotrophic bacterium, Methylomicrobium buryatense, we demonstrate microbial biocatalysis of methane to lactate, an industrial platform chemical. Heterologous overexpression of a Lactobacillus helveticus L-lactate dehydrogenase in M. buryatense resultedmore » in an initial titer of 0.06 g lactate/L from methane. Cultivation in a 5 L continuously stirred tank bioreactor enabled production of 0.8 g lactate/L, representing a 13-fold improvement compared to the initial titer. The yields (0.05 g lactate/g methane) and productivity (0.008 g lactate/L/h) indicate the need and opportunity for future strain improvement. Additionally, real-time analysis of methane utilization implicated gas-to-liquid transfer and/or microbial methane consumption as process limitations. This work opens the door to develop an array of methanotrophic bacterial strain-engineering strategies currently employed for biocatalytic sugar upgrading to “green” chemicals and fuels.« less

  1. Bioconversion of methane to lactate by an obligate methanotrophic bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Henard, Calvin A.; Smith, Holly; Dowe, Nancy

    Methane is the second most abundant greenhouse gas (GHG), with nearly 60% of emissions derived from anthropogenic sources. Microbial conversion of methane to fuels and value-added chemicals offers a means to reduce GHG emissions, while also valorizing this otherwise squandered high-volume, high-energy gas. However, to date, advances in methane biocatalysis have been constrained by the low-productivity and limited genetic tractability of natural methane-consuming microbes. Here, leveraging recent identification of a novel, tractable methanotrophic bacterium, Methylomicrobium buryatense, we demonstrate microbial biocatalysis of methane to lactate, an industrial platform chemical. Heterologous overexpression of a Lactobacillus helveticus L-lactate dehydrogenase in M. buryatense resultedmore » in an initial titer of 0.06 g lactate/L from methane. Cultivation in a 5 L continuously stirred tank bioreactor enabled production of 0.8 g lactate/L, representing a 13-fold improvement compared to the initial titer. The yields (0.05 g lactate/g methane) and productivity (0.008 g lactate/L/h) indicate the need and opportunity for future strain improvement. Additionally, real-time analysis of methane utilization implicated gas-to-liquid transfer and/or microbial methane consumption as process limitations. This work opens the door to develop an array of methanotrophic bacterial strain-engineering strategies currently employed for biocatalytic sugar upgrading to “green” chemicals and fuels.« less

  2. Novel Rickettsiella Bacterium in the Leafhopper Orosius albicinctus (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae)

    PubMed Central

    Iasur-Kruh, Lilach; Weintraub, Phyllis G.; Mozes-Daube, Netta; Robinson, Wyatt E.; Perlman, Steve J.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria in the genus Rickettsiella (Coxiellaceae), which are mainly known as arthropod pathogens, are emerging as excellent models to study transitions between mutualism and pathogenicity. The current report characterizes a novel Rickettsiella found in the leafhopper Orosius albicinctus (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), a major vector of phytoplasma diseases in Europe and Asia. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and pyrosequencing were used to survey the main symbionts of O. albicinctus, revealing the obligate symbionts Sulcia and Nasuia, and the facultative symbionts Arsenophonus and Wolbachia, in addition to Rickettsiella. The leafhopper Rickettsiella is allied with bacteria found in ticks. Screening O. albicinctus from the field showed that Rickettsiella is highly prevalent, with over 60% of individuals infected. A stable Rickettsiella infection was maintained in a leafhopper laboratory colony for at least 10 generations, and fluorescence microscopy localized bacteria to accessory glands of the female reproductive tract, suggesting that the bacterium is vertically transmitted. Future studies will be needed to examine how Rickettsiella affects host fitess and its ability to vector phytopathogens. PMID:23645190

  3. Bioconversion of methane to lactate by an obligate methanotrophic bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Henard, Calvin A.; Smith, Holly; Dowe, Nancy; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G.; Pienkos, Philip T.; Guarnieri, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Methane is the second most abundant greenhouse gas (GHG), with nearly 60% of emissions derived from anthropogenic sources. Microbial conversion of methane to fuels and value-added chemicals offers a means to reduce GHG emissions, while also valorizing this otherwise squandered high-volume, high-energy gas. However, to date, advances in methane biocatalysis have been constrained by the low-productivity and limited genetic tractability of natural methane-consuming microbes. Here, leveraging recent identification of a novel, tractable methanotrophic bacterium, Methylomicrobium buryatense, we demonstrate microbial biocatalysis of methane to lactate, an industrial platform chemical. Heterologous overexpression of a Lactobacillus helveticus L-lactate dehydrogenase in M. buryatense resulted in an initial titer of 0.06 g lactate/L from methane. Cultivation in a 5 L continuously stirred tank bioreactor enabled production of 0.8 g lactate/L, representing a 13-fold improvement compared to the initial titer. The yields (0.05 g lactate/g methane) and productivity (0.008 g lactate/L/h) indicate the need and opportunity for future strain improvement. Additionally, real-time analysis of methane utilization implicated gas-to-liquid transfer and/or microbial methane consumption as process limitations. This work opens the door to develop an array of methanotrophic bacterial strain-engineering strategies currently employed for biocatalytic sugar upgrading to “green” chemicals and fuels. PMID:26902345

  4. Novel Trypanosomatid-Bacterium Association: Evolution of Endosymbiosis in Action

    PubMed Central

    Kostygov, Alexei Y.; Dobáková, Eva; Grybchuk-Ieremenko, Anastasiia; Váhala, Dalibor; Maslov, Dmitri A.; Votýpka, Jan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We describe a novel symbiotic association between a kinetoplastid protist, Novymonas esmeraldas gen. nov., sp. nov., and an intracytoplasmic bacterium, “Candidatus Pandoraea novymonadis” sp. nov., discovered as a result of a broad-scale survey of insect trypanosomatid biodiversity in Ecuador. We characterize this association by describing the morphology of both organisms, as well as their interactions, and by establishing their phylogenetic affinities. Importantly, neither partner is closely related to other known organisms previously implicated in eukaryote-bacterial symbiosis. This symbiotic association seems to be relatively recent, as the host does not exert a stringent control over the number of bacteria harbored in its cytoplasm. We argue that this unique relationship may represent a suitable model for studying the initial stages of establishment of endosymbiosis between a single-cellular eukaryote and a prokaryote. Based on phylogenetic analyses, Novymonas could be considered a proxy for the insect-only ancestor of the dixenous genus Leishmania and shed light on the origin of the two-host life cycle within the subfamily Leishmaniinae. PMID:26980834

  5. Yersinia ruckeri sp. nov., the redmouth (RM) bacterium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ewing, W.H.; Ross, A.J.; Brenner, Don J.; Fanning, G. R.

    1978-01-01

    Cultures of the redmouth (RM) bacterium, one of the etiological agents of redmouth disease in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) and certain other fishes, were characterized by means of their biochemical reactions, by deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) hybridization, and by determination of guanine-plus-cytosine (G+C) ratios in DNA. The DNA relatedness studies confirmed the fact that the RM bacteria are members of the family Enterobacteriaceae and that they comprise a single species that is not closely related to any other species of Enterobacteriaceae. They are about 30% related to species of both Serratia and Yersinia. A comparison of the biochemical reactions of RM bacteria and serratiae indicated that there are many differences between these organisms and that biochemically the RM bacteria are most closely related to yersiniae. The G+C ratios of RM bacteria were approximated to be between 47.5 and 48.5% These values are similar to those of yersiniae but markedly different from those of serratiae. On the basis of their biochemical reactions and their G+C ratios, the RM bacteria are considered to be a new species of Yersinia, for which the name Yersinia ruckeri is proposed. Strain 2396-61 (= ATCC 29473) is designated the type strain of the species.

  6. Discovery of a Novel Periodontal Disease-Associated Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Torres, Pedro J; Thompson, John; McLean, Jeffrey S; Kelley, Scott T; Edlund, Anna

    2018-06-02

    One of the world's most common infectious disease, periodontitis (PD), derives from largely uncharacterized communities of oral bacteria growing as biofilms (a.k.a. plaque) on teeth and gum surfaces in periodontal pockets. Bacteria associated with periodontal disease trigger inflammatory responses in immune cells, which in later stages of the disease cause loss of both soft and hard tissue structures supporting teeth. Thus far, only a handful of bacteria have been characterized as infectious agents of PD. Although deep sequencing technologies, such as whole community shotgun sequencing have the potential to capture a detailed picture of highly complex bacterial communities in any given environment, we still lack major reference genomes for the oral microbiome associated with PD and other diseases. In recent work, by using a combination of supervised machine learning and genome assembly, we identified a genome from a novel member of the Bacteroidetes phylum in periodontal samples. Here, by applying a comparative metagenomics read-classification approach, including 272 metagenomes from various human body sites, and our previously assembled draft genome of the uncultivated Candidatus Bacteroides periocalifornicus (CBP) bacterium, we show CBP's ubiquitous distribution in dental plaque, as well as its strong association with the well-known pathogenic "red complex" that resides in deep periodontal pockets.

  7. Diagnosis of cancer multidrug resistance by bacterium-mediated imaging.

    PubMed

    Elkadi, Omar Anwar; Abdelbasset, Muhammad

    2016-04-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a phenomenon expressed by many tumors affecting the chemotherapy efficacy, treatment decision, and the disease prognosis. Considering its great implication, non-invasive approaches are needed to identify this phenomenon in early stages of the disease. This article discusses the potential of the emerging non-invasive bacterium-mediated imaging of cancer in diagnosis of MDR. This potential is derived from the effect of cancer MDR on the pharmacokinetics of certain antibiotics, which are substrates of the MDR proteins. Since MDR proteins actively pump their substrates outside the resistant cancer cells, the elimination of the employed reporter bacteria, proliferating within MDR cancer cells, would require a larger dose of these antibiotics compared to those inside non-MDR cancer cells. These bacteria bear reporter genes that produce specific signals such as bioluminescent, fluorescent, magnetic, or radioactive signals that can be detected by non-invasive imaging modalities. Therefore, the presence, degree, and mechanism of MDR can be estimated by comparing the concentration of the employed antibiotic, required to cease these signals (reflecting the elimination of the bacteria), to a pre-determined reference. The real time imaging of MDR cancer and the early diagnosis of MDR, offered by this approach, would provide a better tool for preclinical studies of MDR, and allow a prompt choice of the most appropriate therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterization of a Neochlamydia-like Bacterium Associated with Epitheliocystis in Cultured Artic Char Salvelinus alpinus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infections of branchial epithelium by intracellular gram-negative bacteria, termed epitheliocystis, have limited culture of Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus). To characterize a bacterium associated with epitheliocystis in cultured char, gills were sampled for histopathologic examination, conventional...

  9. Characterization of the promising poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) producing halophilic bacterium Halomonas halophila.

    PubMed

    Kucera, Dan; Pernicová, Iva; Kovalcik, Adriana; Koller, Martin; Mullerova, Lucie; Sedlacek, Petr; Mravec, Filip; Nebesarova, Jana; Kalina, Michal; Marova, Ivana; Krzyzanek, Vladislav; Obruca, Stanislav

    2018-05-01

    This work explores molecular, morphological as well as biotechnological features of the highly promising polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) producer Halomonas halophila. Unlike many other halophiles, this bacterium does not require expensive complex media components and it is capable to accumulate high intracellular poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) fractions up to 82% of cell dry mass. Most remarkably, regulating the concentration of NaCl apart from PHB yields influences also the polymer's molecular mass and polydispersity. The bacterium metabolizes various carbohydrates including sugars predominant in lignocelluloses and other inexpensive substrates. Therefore, the bacterium was employed for PHB production on hydrolysates of cheese whey, spent coffee grounds, sawdust and corn stover, which were hydrolyzed by HCl; required salinity of cultivation media was set up during neutralization by NaOH. The bacterium was capable to use all the tested hydrolysates as well as sugar beet molasses for PHB biosynthesis, indicating its potential for industrial PHB production. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Isolation of Bacteriophages of the Marine Bacterium Beneckea natriegens from Coastal Salt Marshes1

    PubMed Central

    Zachary, Arthur

    1974-01-01

    Bacteriophages of the marine bacterium Beneckea natriegens were isolated from coastal marshes where they were limited to brackish and marine waters. The phages were widely distributed and morphologically diverse in the marshes. Images PMID:4133830

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Sphingobium fuliginis OMI, a Bacterium That Degrades Alkylphenols and Bisphenols.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Masashi; Ogata, Yuka; Yahara, Tatsuya; Yokoyama, Takashi; Ishizawa, Hidehiro; Takada, Kazuki; Inoue, Daisuke; Sei, Kazunari; Ike, Michihiko

    2017-11-22

    Sphingobium fuliginis OMI is a bacterium that can degrade a variety of recalcitrant alkylphenols and bisphenols. This study reports the draft genome sequence of S. fuliginis OMI. Copyright © 2017 Kuroda et al.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Sphingobium fuliginis OMI, a Bacterium That Degrades Alkylphenols and Bisphenols

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Yuka; Yahara, Tatsuya; Yokoyama, Takashi; Ishizawa, Hidehiro; Takada, Kazuki; Inoue, Daisuke; Sei, Kazunari

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sphingobium fuliginis OMI is a bacterium that can degrade a variety of recalcitrant alkylphenols and bisphenols. This study reports the draft genome sequence of S. fuliginis OMI. PMID:29167253

  13. IN SITU RT-PCR WITH A SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIUM ISOLATED FROM SEAGRASS ROOTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacteria considered to be obligate anaerobes internally colonize roots of the submerged macrophyte Halodule wrightii. A sulfate reducing bacterium, Summer lac 1, was isolated on lactate from H. wrightii roots. The isolate has physiological characteristics typical of Desulfovibri...

  14. Transcriptomic profiling of Burkholderia phymatum STM815, Cupriavidus taiwanensis LMG19424 and Rhizobium mesoamericanum STM3625 in response to Mimosa pudica root exudates illuminates the molecular basis of their nodulation competitiveness and symbiotic evolutionary history.

    PubMed

    Klonowska, Agnieszka; Melkonian, Rémy; Miché, Lucie; Tisseyre, Pierre; Moulin, Lionel

    2018-01-30

    Rhizobial symbionts belong to the classes Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria (called "alpha" and "beta"-rhizobia). Most knowledge on the genetic basis of symbiosis is based on model strains belonging to alpha-rhizobia. Mimosa pudica is a legume that offers an excellent opportunity to study the adaptation toward symbiotic nitrogen fixation in beta-rhizobia compared to alpha-rhizobia. In a previous study (Melkonian et al., Environ Microbiol 16:2099-111, 2014) we described the symbiotic competitiveness of M. pudica symbionts belonging to Burkholderia, Cupriavidus and Rhizobium species. In this article we present a comparative analysis of the transcriptomes (by RNAseq) of B. phymatum STM815 (BP), C. taiwanensis LMG19424 (CT) and R. mesoamericanum STM3625 (RM) in conditions mimicking the early steps of symbiosis (i.e. perception of root exudates). BP exhibited the strongest transcriptome shift both quantitatively and qualitatively, which mirrors its high competitiveness in the early steps of symbiosis and its ancient evolutionary history as a symbiont, while CT had a minimal response which correlates with its status as a younger symbiont (probably via acquisition of symbiotic genes from a Burkholderia ancestor) and RM had a typical response of Alphaproteobacterial rhizospheric bacteria. Interestingly, the upregulation of nodulation genes was the only common response among the three strains; the exception was an up-regulated gene encoding a putative fatty acid hydroxylase, which appears to be a novel symbiotic gene specific to Mimosa symbionts. The transcriptional response to root exudates was correlated to each strain nodulation competitiveness, with Burkholderia phymatum appearing as the best specialised symbiont of Mimosa pudica.

  15. Complete genome of Martelella sp. AD-3, a moderately halophilic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons-degrading bacterium.

    PubMed

    Cui, Changzheng; Li, Zhijie; Qian, Jiangchao; Shi, Jie; Huang, Ling; Tang, Hongzhi; Chen, Xin; Lin, Kuangfei; Xu, Ping; Liu, Yongdi

    2016-05-10

    Martelella sp. strain AD-3, a moderate halophilic bacterium, was isolated from a petroleum-contaminated soil with high salinity in China. Here, we report the complete genome of strain AD-3, which contains one circular chromosome and two circular plasmids. An array of genes related to metabolism of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and halophilic mechanism in this bacterium was identified by the whole genome analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of the p-Nitrophenol-Degrading Bacterium Pseudomonas putida DLL-E4

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaojun; Wang, Jue; Wang, Fei; Chen, Qiongzhen; Huang, Yan

    2014-01-01

    The first complete genome sequence of a p-nitrophenol (PNP)-degrading bacterium is reported here. Pseudomonas putida DLL-E4, a Gram-negative bacterium isolated from methyl-parathion-polluted soil, can utilize PNP as the sole carbon and nitrogen source. P. putida DLL-E4 has a 6,484,062 bp circular chromosome that contains 5,894 genes, with a G+C content of 62.46%. PMID:24948765

  17. Endohyphal Bacterium Enhances Production of Indole-3-Acetic Acid by a Foliar Fungal Endophyte

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Michele T.; Gunatilaka, Malkanthi K.; Wijeratne, Kithsiri; Gunatilaka, Leslie; Arnold, A. Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Numerous plant pathogens, rhizosphere symbionts, and endophytic bacteria and yeasts produce the important phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), often with profound effects on host plants. However, to date IAA production has not been documented among foliar endophytes -- the diverse guild of primarily filamentous Ascomycota that live within healthy, above-ground tissues of all plant species studied thus far. Recently bacteria that live within hyphae of endophytes (endohyphal bacteria) have been detected, but their effects have not been studied previously. Here we show not only that IAA is produced in vitro by a foliar endophyte (here identified as Pestalotiopsis aff. neglecta, Xylariales), but that IAA production is enhanced significantly when the endophyte hosts an endohyphal bacterium (here identified as Luteibacter sp., Xanthomonadales). Both the endophyte and the endophyte/bacterium complex appear to rely on an L-tryptophan dependent pathway for IAA synthesis. The bacterium can be isolated from the fungus when the symbiotic complex is cultivated at 36°C. In pure culture the bacterium does not produce IAA. Culture filtrate from the endophyte-bacterium complex significantly enhances growth of tomato in vitro relative to controls and to filtrate from the endophyte alone. Together these results speak to a facultative symbiosis between an endophyte and endohyphal bacterium that strongly influences IAA production, providing a new framework in which to explore endophyte-plant interactions. PMID:24086270

  18. Metabolomics evaluation of the impact of smokeless tobacco exposure on the oral bacterium Capnocytophaga sputigena

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jinchun; Jin, Jinshan; Beger, Richard D.; Cerniglia, Carl E.; Yang, Maocheng; Chen, Huizhong

    2017-01-01

    The association between exposure to smokeless tobacco products (STP) and oral diseases is partially due to the physiological and pathological changes in the composition of the oral microbiome and its metabolic profile. However, it is not clear how STPs affect the physiology and ecology of oral microbiota. A UPLC/QTof-MS-based metabolomics study was employed to analyze metabolic alterations in oral bacterium, Capnocytophaga sputigena as a result of smokeless tobacco exposure and to assess the capability of the bacterium to metabolize nicotine. Pathway analysis of the metabolome profiles indicated that smokeless tobacco extracts caused oxidative stress in the bacterium. The metabolomics data also showed that the argininenitric oxide pathway was perturbed by the smokeless tobacco treatment. Results also showed that LC/MS was useful in identifying STP constituents and additives, including caffeine and many flavoring compounds. No significant changes in levels of nicotine and its major metabolites were found when C. sputigena was cultured in a nutrient rich medium, although hydroxylnicotine and cotinine N-oxide were detected in the bacterial metabolites suggesting that nicotine metabolism might be present as a minor degradation pathway in the bacterium. Study results provide new insights regarding the physiological and toxicological effects of smokeless tobacco on oral bacterium C. sputigena and associated oral health as well as measuring the ability of the oral bacterium to metabolize nicotine. PMID:27480511

  19. Capsule-Transmitted Gut Symbiotic Bacterium of the Japanese Common Plataspid Stinkbug, Megacopta punctatissima

    PubMed Central

    Fukatsu, Takema; Hosokawa, Takahiro

    2002-01-01

    The Japanese common plataspid stinkbug, Megacopta punctatissima, deposits small brown particles, or symbiont capsules, on the underside of the egg mass for the purpose of transmission of symbiotic bacteria to the offspring. We investigated the microbiological aspects of the bacteria contained in the capsule, such as microbial diversity, phylogenetic placement, localization in vivo, and fitness effects on the host insect. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA clones revealed that a single bacterial species dominates the microbiota in the capsule. The bacterium was not detected in the eggs but in the capsules, which unequivocally demonstrated that the bacterium is transmitted to the offspring of the insect orally rather than transovarially, through probing of the capsule content. Molecular phylogenetic analysis showed that the bacterium belongs to the γ-subdivision of the Proteobacteria. In adult insects the bacterium was localized in the posterior section of the midgut. Deprivation of the bacterium from the nymphs resulted in retarded development, arrested growth, abnormal body coloration, and other symptoms, suggesting that the bacterium is essential for normal development and growth of the host insect. PMID:11772649

  20. Metabolomics evaluation of the impact of smokeless tobacco exposure on the oral bacterium Capnocytophaga sputigena.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jinchun; Jin, Jinshan; Beger, Richard D; Cerniglia, Carl E; Yang, Maocheng; Chen, Huizhong

    2016-10-01

    The association between exposure to smokeless tobacco products (STP) and oral diseases is partially due to the physiological and pathological changes in the composition of the oral microbiome and its metabolic profile. However, it is not clear how STPs affect the physiology and ecology of oral microbiota. A UPLC/QTof-MS-based metabolomics study was employed to analyze metabolic alterations in oral bacterium, Capnocytophaga sputigena as a result of smokeless tobacco exposure and to assess the capability of the bacterium to metabolize nicotine. Pathway analysis of the metabolome profiles indicated that smokeless tobacco extracts caused oxidative stress in the bacterium. The metabolomics data also showed that the arginine-nitric oxide pathway was perturbed by the smokeless tobacco treatment. Results also showed that LC/MS was useful in identifying STP constituents and additives, including caffeine and many flavoring compounds. No significant changes in levels of nicotine and its major metabolites were found when C. sputigena was cultured in a nutrient rich medium, although hydroxylnicotine and cotinine N-oxide were detected in the bacterial metabolites suggesting that nicotine metabolism might be present as a minor degradation pathway in the bacterium. Study results provide new insights regarding the physiological and toxicological effects of smokeless tobacco on oral bacterium C. sputigena and associated oral health as well as measuring the ability of the oral bacterium to metabolize nicotine. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Quorum Sensing in a Methane-Oxidizing Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Puri, Aaron W; Schaefer, Amy L; Fu, Yanfen; Beck, David A C; Greenberg, E Peter; Lidstrom, Mary E

    2017-03-01

    Aerobic methanotrophic bacteria use methane as their sole source of carbon and energy and serve as a major sink for the potent greenhouse gas methane in freshwater ecosystems. Dissecting the molecular details of how these organisms interact in the environment may increase our understanding of how they perform this important ecological role. Many bacterial species use quorum sensing (QS) systems to regulate gene expression in a cell density-dependent manner. We have identified a QS system in the genome of Methylobacter tundripaludum , a dominant methane oxidizer in methane enrichments of sediment from Lake Washington (Seattle, WA). We determined that M. tundripaludum produces primarily N -3-hydroxydecanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (3-OH-C 10 -HSL) and that its production is governed by a positive feedback loop. We then further characterized this system by determining which genes are regulated by QS in this methane oxidizer using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) and discovered that this system regulates the expression of a putative nonribosomal peptide synthetase biosynthetic gene cluster. Finally, we detected an extracellular factor that is produced by M. tundripaludum in a QS-dependent manner. These results identify and characterize a mode of cellular communication in an aerobic methane-oxidizing bacterium. IMPORTANCE Aerobic methanotrophs are critical for sequestering carbon from the potent greenhouse gas methane in the environment, yet the mechanistic details of chemical interactions in methane-oxidizing bacterial communities are not well understood. Understanding these interactions is important in order to maintain, and potentially optimize, the functional potential of the bacteria that perform this vital ecosystem function. In this work, we identify a quorum sensing system in the aerobic methanotroph Methylobacter tundripaludum and use both chemical and genetic methods to characterize this system at the molecular level. Copyright © 2017 American Society for

  2. Phenotypic Variation in the Plant Pathogenic Bacterium Acidovorax citrulli

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Ram Kumar; Rosenberg, Tally; Makarovsky, Daria; Eckshtain-Levi, Noam; Zelinger, Einat; Kopelowitz, June; Sikorski, Johannes; Burdman, Saul

    2013-01-01

    Acidovorax citrulli causes bacterial fruit blotch (BFB) of cucurbits, a disease that threatens the cucurbit industry worldwide. Despite the economic importance of BFB, little is known about pathogenicity and fitness strategies of the bacterium. We have observed the phenomenon of phenotypic variation in A. citrulli. Here we report the characterization of phenotypic variants (PVs) of two strains, M6 and 7a1, isolated from melon and watermelon, respectively. Phenotypic variation was observed following growth in rich medium, as well as upon isolation of bacteria from inoculated plants or exposure to several stresses, including heat, salt and acidic conditions. When grown on nutrient agar, all PV colonies possessed a translucent appearance, in contrast to parental strain colonies that were opaque. After 72 h, PV colonies were bigger than parental colonies, and had a fuzzy appearance relative to parental strain colonies that are relatively smooth. A. citrulli colonies are generally surrounded by haloes detectable by the naked eye. These haloes are formed by type IV pilus (T4P)-mediated twitching motility that occurs at the edge of the colony. No twitching haloes could be detected around colonies of both M6 and 7a1 PVs, and microscopy observations confirmed that indeed the PVs did not perform twitching motility. In agreement with these results, transmission electron microscopy revealed that M6 and 7a1 PVs do not produce T4P under tested conditions. PVs also differed from their parental strain in swimming motility and biofilm formation, and interestingly, all assessed variants were less virulent than their corresponding parental strains in seed transmission assays. Slight alterations could be detected in some DNA fingerprinting profiles of 7a1 variants relative to the parental strain, while no differences at all could be seen among M6 variants and parental strain, suggesting that, at least in the latter, phenotypic variation is mediated by slight genetic and/or epigenetic

  3. [Chlorobaculum macestae sp. nov., a new green sulfur bacterium].

    PubMed

    Koppen, O I; Berg, I A; Lebedeva, N V; Taisova, A S; Kolganova, T V; Slobodova, N V; Bulygina, E S; Turova, T P; Ivanovskiĭ, R N

    2008-01-01

    The investigated green sulfur bacterium, strain M, was isolated from a sulfidic spring on the Black Sea Coast of the Caucasus. The cells of strain M are straight or curved rods 0.6-0.9 x 1.8-4.2 microm in size. According to the cell wall structure, the bacteria are gram-negative. Chlorosomes are located along the cell periphery. Strain M is an obligate anaerobe capable of photoautotrophic growth on sulfide, thiosulfate, and H2. It utilizes ammonium, urea, casein hydrolysate, and N2 as nitrogen sources and sulfide, thiosulfate, and elemental sulfur as sulfur sources. Bacteriochlorophyll c and the carotenoid chlorobactene are the main pigments. The optimal growth temperature is 25-28 degrees C; the optimal pH is 6.8. The strain does not require NaCl. Vitamin B12 stimulates growth. The content of the G+C base pairs in the DNA of strain M is 58.3 mol %. In the phylogenetic tree constructed on the basis of analysis of nucleotide sequences of 16S rRNA genes, strain M forms a separate branch, which occupies an intermediate position between the phylogenetic cluster containing representatives of the genus Chlorobaculum (94.9-96.8%) and the cluster containing species of the genus Chlorobium (94.1-96.5%). According to the results of analysis of the amino acid sequence corresponding to the fmo gene, strain M represents a branch which, unlike that in the "ribosomal" tree, falls into the cluster of the genus Chlorobaculum (95.8-97.2%). Phylogenetic analysis of the amino acid sequence corresponding to the nifH gene placed species of the genera Chlorobaculum and Chlorobium into a single cluster, whereas strain M formed a separate branch. The results obtained allow us to describe strain M as a new species of the genus Chlorobaculum. Chlorobaculum macestae sp. nov.

  4. A Genetic System for the Thermophilic Acetogenic Bacterium Thermoanaerobacter kivui.

    PubMed

    Basen, Mirko; Geiger, Irina; Henke, Laura; Müller, Volker

    2018-02-01

    Thermoanaerobacter kivui is one of the very few thermophilic acetogenic microorganisms. It grows optimally at 66°C on sugars but also lithotrophically with H 2 + CO 2 or with CO, producing acetate as the major product. While a genome-derived model of acetogenesis has been developed, only a few physiological or biochemical experiments regarding the function of important enzymes in carbon and energy metabolism have been carried out. To address this issue, we developed a method for targeted markerless gene deletions and for integration of genes into the genome of T. kivui The strain naturally took up plasmid DNA in the exponential growth phase, with a transformation frequency of up to 3.9 × 10 -6 A nonreplicating plasmid and selection with 5-fluoroorotate was used to delete the gene encoding the orotate phosphoribosyltransferase ( pyrE ), resulting in a Δ pyrE uracil-auxotrophic strain, TKV002. Reintroduction of pyrE on a plasmid or insertion of pyrE into different loci within the genome restored growth without uracil. We subsequently studied fructose metabolism in T. kivui The gene fruK (TKV_c23150) encoding 1-phosphofructosekinase (1-PFK) was deleted, using pyrE as a selective marker via two single homologous recombination events. The resulting Δ fruK strain, TKV003, did not grow on fructose; however, growth on glucose (or on mannose) was unaffected. The combination of pyrE as a selective marker and the natural competence of the strain for DNA uptake will be the basis for future studies on CO 2 reduction and energy conservation and their regulation in this thermophilic acetogenic bacterium. IMPORTANCE Acetogenic bacteria are currently the focus of research toward biotechnological applications due to their potential for de novo synthesis of carbon compounds such as acetate, butyrate, or ethanol from H 2 + CO 2 or from synthesis gas. Based on available genome sequences and on biochemical experiments, acetogens differ in their energy metabolism. Thus, there is an

  5. Regulation of Polyhydroxybutyrate Synthesis in the Soil Bacterium Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens

    PubMed Central

    Quelas, J. I.; Mesa, S.; Mongiardini, E. J.; Jendrossek, D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is a carbon and energy reserve polymer in various prokaryotic species. We determined that, when grown with mannitol as the sole carbon source, Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens produces a homopolymer composed only of 3-hydroxybutyrate units (PHB). Conditions of oxygen limitation (such as microoxia, oxic stationary phase, and bacteroids inside legume nodules) were permissive for the synthesis of PHB, which was observed as cytoplasmic granules. To study the regulation of PHB synthesis, we generated mutations in the regulator gene phaR and the phasin genes phaP1 and phaP4. Under permissive conditions, mutation of phaR impaired PHB accumulation, and a phaP1 phaP4 double mutant produced more PHB than the wild type, which was accumulated in a single, large cytoplasmic granule. Moreover, PhaR negatively regulated the expression of phaP1 and phaP4 as well as the expression of phaA1 and phaA2 (encoding a 3-ketoacyl coenzyme A [CoA] thiolases), phaC1 and phaC2 (encoding PHB synthases), and fixK2 (encoding a cyclic AMP receptor protein [CRP]/fumarate and nitrate reductase regulator [FNR]-type transcription factor of genes for microoxic lifestyle). In addition to the depressed PHB cycling, phaR mutants accumulated more extracellular polysaccharides and promoted higher plant shoot dry weight and competitiveness for nodulation than the wild type, in contrast to the phaC1 mutant strain, which is defective in PHB synthesis. These results suggest that phaR not only regulates PHB granule formation by controlling the expression of phasins and biosynthetic enzymes but also acts as a global regulator of excess carbon allocation and symbiosis by controlling fixK2. IMPORTANCE In this work, we investigated the regulation of polyhydroxybutyrate synthesis in the soybean-nodulating bacterium Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens and its influence in bacterial free-living and symbiotic lifestyles. We uncovered a new interplay between the synthesis of this carbon reserve

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, Mun Su; Moritz, Brelan E.; Xie, Gary

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 and fer- ments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this spo- rogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attrac- tive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemi- cellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome se- quence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strainmore » 36D1, is presented and discussed.« less

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Gary; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 and fer-ments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this sporogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attractive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemi-cellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome squence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed.

  8. Characterization of a bacterium of the genus Azospirillum from cellulolytic nitrogen-fixing mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Wong, P P; Stenberg, N E; Edgar, L

    1980-03-01

    A bacterium with the taxonomic characteristics of the genus Azospirillum was isolated from celluloytic N2-fixing mixed cultures. Its characteristics fit the descriptions of both Azopirillum lipoferum (Beijerinck) comb. nov. and Azospirillum brasilense sp. nov. It may be a variant strain of A. lipoferum. In mixed cultures with cellulolytic organisms, the bacterium grew and fixed N2 with cellelose as a sole source of energy and carbon. The mixed cultures used cellulose from leaves of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), corn (Zea mays L.), and big bluestem grass (Andropogon gerardii Vitm). Microaerophilic N2-fixing bacteria of the genus Azospirillum, such as the bacterium we isolated, may be important contributors of fixed N2 in soil with partial anaerobiosis and cellulose decomposition.

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Mun Su; Moritz, Brélan E.; Xie, Gary; Glavina del Rio, T.; Dalin, E.; Tice, H.; Bruce, D.; Goodwin, L.; Chertkov, O.; Brettin, T.; Han, C.; Detter, C.; Pitluck, S.; Land, Miriam L.; Patel, Milind; Ou, Mark; Harbrucker, Roberta; Ingram, Lonnie O.; Shanmugam, K. T.

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 °C and pH 5.0 and ferments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this sporogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 °C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attractive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemicellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome sequence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed. PMID:22675583

  10. Deinococcus mumbaiensis sp. nov., a radiation-resistant pleomorphic bacterium isolated from Mumbai, India.

    PubMed

    Shashidhar, Ravindranath; Bandekar, Jayant R

    2006-01-01

    A radiation-resistant, Gram-negative and pleomorphic bacterium (CON-1) was isolated from a contaminated tryptone glucose yeast extract agar plate in the laboratory. It was red pigmented, nonmotile, nonsporulating, and aerobic, and contained MK-8 as respiratory quinone. The cell wall of this bacterium contained ornithine. The major fatty acids were C16:0, C16:1, C17:0, C18:1 and iso C18:0. The DNA of CON-1 had a G+C content of 70 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that CON-1 exhibited a maximum similarity (94.72%) with Deinococcus grandis. Based on the genotypic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, the bacterium CON-1 was identified as a new species of the genus Deinococcus, for which the name Deinococcus mumbaiensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of D. mumbaiensis is CON-1 (MTCC 7297(T)=DSM 17424(T)).

  11. Halomonas maura is a physiologically versatile bacterium of both ecological and biotechnological interest.

    PubMed

    Llamas, Inmaculada; del Moral, Ana; Martínez-Checa, Fernando; Arco, Yolanda; Arias, Soledad; Quesada, Emilia

    2006-01-01

    Halomonas maura is a bacterium of great metabolic versatility. We summarise in this work some of the properties that make it a very interesting microorganism both from an ecological and biotechnological point of view. It plays an active role in the nitrogen cycle, is capable of anaerobic respiration in the presence of nitrate and has recently been identified as a diazotrophic bacterium. Of equal interest is mauran, the exopolysaccharide produced by H. maura, which contributes to the formation of biofilms and thus affords the bacterium advantages in the colonisation of its saline niches. Mauran is highly viscous, shows thixotropic and pseudoplastic behaviour, has the capacity to capture heavy metals and exerts a certain immunomodulator effect in medicine. All these attributes have prompted us to make further investigations into its molecular characteristics. To date we have described 15 open reading frames (ORF's) related to exopolysaccharide production, nitrogen fixation and nitrate reductase activity among others.

  12. [Study on anti-bacterium activity of ginkgolic acids and their momomers].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoming; Zhu, Wei; Chen, Jun; Qian, Zhiyu; Xie, Jimin

    2004-09-01

    Ginkgolic acids and their three monomers were separated from ginkgo sarcotestas. The anti-bacterium activity of ginkgolic acids were tested. The relation between the anti-bacterium activity and side chain of ginkgolic acid were studied. The MIC of ginkgolic acids and their three monomers and salicylic acid were tested. Ginkgolic acid has strong inhibitive effect on G+-bacterium. Salicylic acid has no side chain, so no anti-bacterial activity. When the length of gingkolic acid side chain is C13:0, it has the strongest anti-bacterial activity in three monomers. The side chain of ginkgolic acid is the key functional group that possessed anti-bacterial activity. The length of Ginkgolic acid was the main effective factor of anti-bacterial activity.

  13. Ammonificins C and D, Hydroxyethylamine Chromene Derivatives from a Cultured Marine Hydrothermal Vent Bacterium, Thermovibrio ammonificans

    PubMed Central

    Andrianasolo, Eric H.; Haramaty, Liti; Rosario-Passapera, Richard; Vetriani, Costantino; Falkowski, Paul; White, Eileen; Lutz, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Chemical and biological investigation of the cultured marine hydrothermal vent bacterium, Thermovibrio ammonifican led to the isolation of two hydroxyethylamine chromene derivatives, ammonificins C and D. Their structures were elucidated using combination of NMR and mass spectrometry. Absolute stereochemistry was ascertained by comparison of experimental and calculated CD spectra. Biological evaluation and assessment were determined using the patented ApopScreen cell-based screen for apoptosis-induction. Ammonificins C and D induce apoptosis in micromolar concentrations. To our knowledge, this finding is the first report of chemical compounds that induce apoptosis from the cultured deep-sea marine organism, hydrothermal vent bacterium, Thermovibrio ammonificans. PMID:23170085

  14. Investigations of Iron Minerals Formed by Dissimilatory Alkaliphilic Bacterium with 57Fe Mössbauer Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chistyakova, N. I.; Rusakov, V. S.; Shapkin, A. A.; Zhilina, T. N.; Zavarzina, D. G.; Lančok, A.; Kohout, J.

    2010-07-01

    Anaerobic alkaliphilic bacterium of Geoalkalibacter ferrihydriticus type (strain Z-0531), isolated from a bottom sediment sample from the weakly mineralized soda Lake Khadyn, have been analyzed. The strain uses the amorphous Fe(III)-hydroxide (AFH) as an electron acceptor and acetate CH3COO- as an electron donor. Mössbauer investigations of solid phase samples obtained during the process of the bacterium growth were carried out at room temperature, 77.8 K, 4.2 K without and with the presence of an external magnetic field (6 T) applied perpendicular to the γ-bebam.

  15. From Genome to Function: Systematic Analysis of the Soil Bacterium Bacillus Subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Crawshaw, Samuel G.; Wipat, Anil

    2001-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis is a sporulating Gram-positive bacterium that lives primarily in the soil and associated water sources. Whilst this bacterium has been studied extensively in the laboratory, relatively few studies have been undertaken to study its activity in natural environments. The publication of the B. subtilis genome sequence and subsequent systematic functional analysis programme have provided an opportunity to develop tools for analysing the role and expression of Bacillus genes in situ. In this paper we discuss analytical approaches that are being developed to relate genes to function in environments such as the rhizosphere. PMID:18628943

  16. Description of a bacterium associated with redmouth disease of rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, A.J.; Rucker, R.R.; Ewing, W.H.

    1966-01-01

    A description was given of a gram-negative, peritrichously flagellated, fermentative bacterium that was isolated on numerous occasions from kidney tissues of rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) afflicted with redmouth disease. Although the bacteria apparently were members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, it was impossible to determine their taxonomic position within the family with certainty. Hence it was recommended that their taxonomic position remain sub judice for the present. As a temporary designation RM bacterium was used. Redmouth disease was transmitted from infected to normal fish through the medium of water.

  17. Cadherin Domains in the Polysaccharide-Degrading Marine Bacterium Saccharophagus degradans 2-40 Are Carbohydrate-Binding Modules▿

    PubMed Central

    Fraiberg, Milana; Borovok, Ilya; Bayer, Edward A.; Weiner, Ronald M.; Lamed, Raphael

    2011-01-01

    The complex polysaccharide-degrading marine bacterium Saccharophagus degradans strain 2-40 produces putative proteins that contain numerous cadherin and cadherin-like domains involved in intercellular contact interactions. The current study reveals that both domain types exhibit reversible calcium-dependent binding to different complex polysaccharides which serve as growth substrates for the bacterium. PMID:21036994

  18. Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis CNRZ327, a Dairy Bacterium with Anti-Inflammatory Properties.

    PubMed

    El Kafsi, Hela; Binesse, Johan; Loux, Valentin; Buratti, Julien; Boudebbouze, Samira; Dervyn, Rozenn; Hammani, Amal; Maguin, Emmanuelle; van de Guchte, Maarten

    2014-07-17

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis CNRZ327 is a dairy bacterium with anti-inflammatory properties both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we report the genome sequence of this bacterium, which appears to contain no less than 215 insertion sequence (IS) elements, an exceptionally high number regarding the small genome size of the strain. Copyright © 2014 El Kafsi et al.

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of an Anaerobic and Extremophilic Bacterium, Caldanaerobacter yonseiensis, Isolated from a Geothermal Hot Stream

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Jae; Lee, Yong-Jik; Park, Gun-Seok; Kim, Byoung-Chan; Lee, Sang Jun; Shin, Jae-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Caldanaerobacter yonseiensis is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, spore-forming bacterium, which was isolated from a geothermal hot stream in Indonesia. This bacterium utilizes xylose and produces a variety of proteases. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of C. yonseiensis, which reveals insights into the pentose phosphate pathway and protein degradation metabolism in thermophilic microorganisms. PMID:24201201

  20. Response to comments on "A bacterium that can grow using arsenic instead of phosphorus"

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfe-Simon, Felisa; Blum, Jodi Switzer; Kulp, Thomas R.; Gordon, Gwyneth W.; Hoeft, Shelley E.; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Stolz, John F.; Webb, Samuel M.; Weber, Peter K.; Davies, Paul C.W.; Anbar, Ariel D.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2011-01-01

    Concerns have been raised about our recent study suggesting that arsenic (As) substitutes for phosphorus in major biomolecules of a bacterium that tolerates extreme As concentrations. We welcome the opportunity to better explain our methods and results and to consider alternative interpretations. We maintain that our interpretation of As substitution, based on multiple congruent lines of evidence, is viable.

  1. Colwellia agarivorans sp. nov., an agar-digesting marine bacterium isolated from coastal seawater

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A novel Gram-stain-negative, facultatively anaerobic, yellowish and agar-digesting marine bacterium, designated strain QM50**T, was isolated from coastal seawater in an aquaculture site near Qingdao, China. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequences revealed that the novel isolate represented...

  2. Draft genome sequence of ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma pruni’ strain CX, a plant pathogenic bacterium

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma pruni’ strain CX, belonging to subgroup 16SrIII-A, is a plant pathogenic bacterium causing economically important diseases in many fruit crops. Here we report the draft genome sequence that consists of 598,508 bases, with a G+C content of 27.21 mol%. ...

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus paracasei DmW181, a Bacterium Isolated from Wild Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Austin J; Walters, Amber; Carroll, Courtney; Newell, Peter D; Chaston, John M

    2017-07-06

    The draft genome sequence of Lactobacillus paracasei DmW181, an anaerobic bacterium isolate from wild Drosophila flies, is reported here. Strain DmW181 possesses genes for sialic acid and mannose metabolism. The assembled genome is 3,201,429 bp, with 3,454 predicted genes. Copyright © 2017 Hammer et al.

  4. Hydrogen Production by Co-cultures of Rhizopus oryzae and a Photosynthetic Bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asada, Yasuo; Ishimi, Katsuhiro; Nagata, Yoko; Wakayama, Tatsuki; Miyake, Jun; Kohno, Hideki

    Hydrogen production with glucose by using co-immobilized cultures of a fungus, Rhizopus oryzae NBRC5384, and a photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV, in agar gels was studied. The co-immobilized cultures converted glucose to hydrogen via lactate in a high molar yield of about 8moles of hydrogen per glucose at a maximum under illuminated conditions.

  5. Genome Sequence of Pedobacter arcticus sp. nov., a Sea Ice Bacterium Isolated from Tundra Soil

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Ye; Yue, Guidong; Gao, Qiang; Wang, Zhiyong; Peng, Fang; Fang, Chengxiang; Yang, Xu

    2012-01-01

    Pedobacter arcticus sp. nov. was originally isolated from tundra soil collected from Ny-Ålesund, in the Arctic region of Norway. It is a Gram-negative bacterium which shows bleb-shaped appendages on the cell surface. Here, we report the draft annotated genome sequence of Pedobacter arcticus sp. nov., which belongs to the genus Pedobacter. PMID:23144423

  6. Genome Sequence of Sphingobium indicum B90A, a Hexachlorocyclohexane-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Shailly; Sangwan, Naseer; Lata, Pushp; Kaur, Jasvinder; Dua, Ankita; Singh, Amit Kumar; Verma, Mansi; Kaur, Jaspreet; Khurana, Jitendra P.; Khurana, Paramjit; Mathur, Saloni

    2012-01-01

    Sphingobium indicum B90A, an efficient degrader of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) isomers, was isolated in 1990 from sugarcane rhizosphere soil in Cuttack, India. Here we report the draft genome sequence of this bacterium, which has now become a model system for understanding the genetics, biochemistry, and physiology of HCH degradation. PMID:22843598

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of the Deinococcus-Thermus Bacterium Meiothermus ruber Strain A

    DOE PAGES

    Thiel, Vera; Tomsho, Lynn P.; Burhans, Richard; ...

    2015-03-26

    The draft genome sequence of the Deinococcus-Thermus group bacterium Meiothermus ruber strain A, isolated from a cyanobacterial enrichment culture obtained from Octopus Spring (Yellowstone National Park, WY), comprises 2,968,099 bp in 170 contigs. It is predicted to contain 2,895 protein-coding genes, 44 tRNA-coding genes, and 2 rRNA operons.

  8. Complete genome sequence of the haloalkaliphilic, hydrogen-producing bacterium Halanaerobium hydrogeniformans.

    PubMed

    Brown, Steven D; Begemann, Matthew B; Mormile, Melanie R; Wall, Judy D; Han, Cliff S; Goodwin, Lynne A; Pitluck, Samuel; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren J; Elias, Dwayne A

    2011-07-01

    Halanaerobium hydrogenoformans is an alkaliphilic bacterium capable of biohydrogen production at pH 11 and 7% (wt/vol) salt. We present the 2.6-Mb genome sequence to provide insights into its physiology and potential for bioenergy applications.

  9. The Production, Purification and Properties of the Biopolymer Levan Produced by the Bacterium Erwinia Herbicola

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-01

    standard and an inulin standard provided by Dr. Elwin Reese of this laboratory and a sample of levan from a different bacterium provided by the USDA.23 A...polymyxa 24 Levan standard Continuous culture Tangential Flow purified levan (this study) >■• <-■-’•«■ i-I-» r Inulin standard tu 25 Figure 5. NMR

  10. Genome Sequence of Lysinibacillus sphaericus, a Lignin-Degrading Bacterium Isolated from Municipal Solid Waste Soil.

    PubMed

    Persinoti, Gabriela F; Paixão, Douglas A A; Bugg, Timothy D H; Squina, Fabio M

    2018-05-03

    We report here the draft genome sequence of Lysinibacillus sphaericus strain A1, a potential lignin-degrading bacterium isolated from municipal solid waste (MSW) soil and capable of enhancing gas release from lignocellulose-containing soil. Copyright © 2018 Persinoti et al.

  11. Isolation of a New Polysaccharide-Digesting Bacterium from a Salt Marsh

    PubMed Central

    Andrykovitch, George; Marx, Irene

    1988-01-01

    A new marine bacterium that digested a variety of storage and structural polysaccharides, including agar, was isolated. Strain 2-40 is a nonfermentative gram-negative, polarly flagellated rod that sometimes grew as a filamentous helix and secreted a melaninlike pigment. Its characteristics conform to those of no previously described species. PMID:16347602

  12. Five new amicoumacins isolated from a marine-derived bacterium Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongxin; Xu, Ying; Liu, Lingli; Han, Zhuang; Lai, Pok Yui; Guo, Xiangrong; Zhang, Xixiang; Lin, Wenhan; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2012-02-01

    Four novel amicoumacins, namely lipoamicoumacins A-D (1-4), and one new bacilosarcin analog (5) were isolated from culture broth of a marine-derived bacterium Bacillus subtilis, together with six known amicoumacins. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic (2D NNR, IR, CD and MS) analysis and in comparison with data in literature.

  13. Partial proteome of the corynetoxin-producing Gram-positive bacterium, Rathayibacter toxicus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rathayibacter toxicus is a Gram-positive bacterium that is the causative agent of annual ryegrass toxicity (ARGT), a disease that causes devastating losses in the Australian livestock industry. R. toxicus exhibits a complex life cycle, using the nematode Anguina funesta as a physical vector to carry...

  14. Transcriptome analysis of the rhizosphere bacterium Azospirillum brasilense reveals an extensive auxin response.

    PubMed

    Van Puyvelde, Sandra; Cloots, Lore; Engelen, Kristof; Das, Frederik; Marchal, Kathleen; Vanderleyden, Jos; Spaepen, Stijn

    2011-05-01

    The rhizosphere bacterium Azospirillum brasilense produces the auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) through the indole-3-pyruvate pathway. As we previously demonstrated that transcription of the indole-3-pyruvate decarboxylase (ipdC) gene is positively regulated by IAA, produced by A. brasilense itself or added exogenously, we performed a microarray analysis to study the overall effects of IAA on the transcriptome of A. brasilense. The transcriptomes of A. brasilense wild-type and the ipdC knockout mutant, both cultured in the absence and presence of exogenously added IAA, were compared.Interfering with the IAA biosynthesis/homeostasis in A. brasilense through inactivation of the ipdC gene or IAA addition results in much broader transcriptional changes than anticipated. Based on the multitude of changes observed by comparing the different transcriptomes, we can conclude that IAA is a signaling molecule in A. brasilense. It appears that the bacterium, when exposed to IAA, adapts itself to the plant rhizosphere, by changing its arsenal of transport proteins and cell surface proteins. A striking example of adaptation to IAA exposure, as happens in the rhizosphere, is the upregulation of a type VI secretion system (T6SS) in the presence of IAA. The T6SS is described as specifically involved in bacterium-eukaryotic host interactions. Additionally, many transcription factors show an altered regulation as well, indicating that the regulatory machinery of the bacterium is changing.

  15. Robinsoniella peoriensis: A model anaerobic commensal bacterium for acquisition of antibiotic resistance?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: R. peoriensis was characterized in our laboratories from swine manure and feces as a Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium. Since then strains of this species have been identified from a variety of mammalian and other gastrointestinal (GI) tracts, suggesting it is a member of the commensal ...

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of the Algicidal Bacterium Mangrovimonas yunxiaonensis Strain LY01.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Zhu, Hong; Li, Chongping; Zhang, Huajun; Chen, Zhangran; Zheng, Wei; Xu, Hong; Zheng, Tianling

    2014-11-26

    Mangrovimonas yunxiaonensis LY01, a novel bacterium isolated from mangrove sediment, showed high algicidal effects on harmful algal blooms of Alexandrium tamarense. Here, we present the first draft genome sequence of this strain to further understanding of the functional genes related to algicidal activity. Copyright © 2014 Li et al.

  17. Genome Sequence of the Algicidal Bacterium Kordia algicida OT-1 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Sook; Kang, Sung Gyun; Kwon, Kae Kyoung; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Sang-Jin

    2011-01-01

    Kordia algicida OT-1 is an algicidal bacterium against the bloom-forming microalgae. The genome sequence of K. algicida revealed a number of interesting features, including the degradation of macromolecules, the biosynthesis of carotenoid pigment and secondary metabolites, and the capacity for gliding motility, which might facilitate the understanding of algicidal mechanisms. PMID:21622754

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of the Algicidal Bacterium Mangrovimonas yunxiaonensis Strain LY01

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Zhu, Hong; Li, Chongping; Zhang, Huajun; Chen, Zhangran; Zheng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Mangrovimonas yunxiaonensis LY01, a novel bacterium isolated from mangrove sediment, showed high algicidal effects on harmful algal blooms of Alexandrium tamarense. Here, we present the first draft genome sequence of this strain to further understanding of the functional genes related to algicidal activity. PMID:25428978

  19. Aerobic mineralization of vinyl chloride by a bacterium of the order Actinomycetales.

    PubMed Central

    Phelps, T J; Malachowsky, K; Schram, R M; White, D C

    1991-01-01

    A gram-positive branched bacterium isolated from a trichloroethylene-degrading consortium mineralized vinyl chloride in growing cultures and cell suspensions. Greater than 67% of the [1,2-14C]vinyl chloride was mineralized to carbon dioxide, with approximately 10% of the radioactivity appearing in cell biomass and another 10% appearing in 14C-aqueous-phase products. PMID:1905522

  20. Aerobic mineralization of vinyl chlorides by a bacterium of the order Actinomycetales

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, T.J.; Malachowsky, K.; Schram, R.M.

    1991-04-01

    A gram-positive branched bacterium isolated from a trichloroethylene-degrading consortium mineralized vinyl chloride in growing cultures and cell suspensions. Greater than 67% of the (1,2-{sup 14}C)vinyl chloride was mineralized to carbon dioxide, with approximately 10% of the radioactivity appearing in {sup 14}C-aqueous-phase products.

  1. Direct measurement of interaction forces between a single bacterium and a flat plate.

    PubMed

    Klein, Jonah D; Clapp, Aaron R; Dickinson, Richard B

    2003-05-15

    A technique for precisely measuring the equilibrium and viscous interaction forces between a single bacterium and a flat surface as functions of separation distance is described. A single-beam gradient optical trap was used to micromanipulate the bacterium against a flat surface while evanescent wave light scattering was used to measure separation distances. Calibrating the optical trap far from the surface allowed the trapped bacterium to be used as a force probe. Equilibrium force-distance profiles were determined by measuring the deflection of the cell from the center of the optical trap at various trap positions. Simultaneously, viscous forces were determined by measuring the relaxation time for the fluctuating bacterium. Absolute distances were determined using a best-fit approximation to the theoretical prediction for the hindered mobility of a diffusing sphere near a wall. Using this approach, forces in the range from 0.01 to 4 pN were measured at near-nanometer resolution between Staphylococcus aureus and glass that was bare or coated with adsorbed protein.

  2. Expression of Heterogenous Arsenic Resistance Genes in the Obligately Autotrophic Biomining Bacterium Thiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Peng, J B; Yan, W M; Bao, X Z

    1994-07-01

    Two arsenic-resistant plasmids were constructed and introduced into Thiobacillus ferrooxidans strains by conjugation. The plasmids with the replicon of wide-host-range plasmid RSF1010 were stable in T. ferrooxidans. The arsenic resistance genes originating from the heterotroph were expressed in this obligately autotrophic bacterium, but the promoter derived from T. ferrooxidans showed no special function in its original host.

  3. Complete genome sequence of the bioleaching bacterium Leptospirillum sp. group II strain CF-1.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Alonso; Bunk, Boyke; Spröer, Cathrin; Biedendieck, Rebekka; Valdés, Natalia; Jahn, Martina; Jahn, Dieter; Orellana, Omar; Levicán, Gloria

    2016-03-20

    We describe the complete genome sequence of Leptospirillum sp. group II strain CF-1, an acidophilic bioleaching bacterium isolated from an acid mine drainage (AMD). This work provides data to gain insights about adaptive response of Leptospirillum spp. to the extreme conditions of bioleaching environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of a Bacillus Bacterium from the Atacama Desert Wetlands Metagenome

    PubMed Central

    Vilo, Claudia; Galetovic, Alexandra; Araya, Jorge E.; Dong, Qunfeng

    2015-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of a Bacillus bacterium isolated from the microflora of Nostoc colonies grown at the Andean wetlands in northern Chile. We consider this genome sequence to be a molecular tool for exploring microbial relationships and adaptation strategies to the prevailing extreme conditions at the Atacama Desert. PMID:26294639

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of the 2-Chloro-4-Nitrophenol-Degrading Bacterium Arthrobacter sp. Strain SJCon

    PubMed Central

    Vikram, Surendra; Kumar, Shailesh; Vaidya, Bhumika; Pinnaka, Anil Kumar

    2013-01-01

    We report the 4.39-Mb draft genome sequence of the 2-chloro-4-nitrophenol-degrading bacterium Arthrobacter sp. strain SJCon, isolated from a pesticide-contaminated site. The draft genome sequence of strain SJCon will be helpful in studying the genetic pathways involved in the degradation of several aromatic compounds. PMID:23516196

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of the Obligately Alkaliphilic Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfonatronum thiodismutans Strain MLF1

    PubMed Central

    Trubitsyn, Denis; Geurink, Corey; Pikuta, Elena; Lefèvre, Christopher T.; McShan, W. Michael; Gillaspy, Allison F.

    2014-01-01

    Desulfonatronum thiodismutans strain MLF1, an alkaliphilic bacterium capable of sulfate reduction, was isolated from Mono Lake, California. Here we report the 3.92-Mb draft genome sequence comprising 34 contigs and some results of its automated annotation. These data will improve our knowledge of mechanisms by which bacteria withstand extreme environments. PMID:25081260

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of the Obligately Alkaliphilic Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfonatronum thiodismutans Strain MLF1.

    PubMed

    Trubitsyn, Denis; Geurink, Corey; Pikuta, Elena; Lefèvre, Christopher T; McShan, W Michael; Gillaspy, Allison F; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2014-07-31

    Desulfonatronum thiodismutans strain MLF1, an alkaliphilic bacterium capable of sulfate reduction, was isolated from Mono Lake, California. Here we report the 3.92-Mb draft genome sequence comprising 34 contigs and some results of its automated annotation. These data will improve our knowledge of mechanisms by which bacteria withstand extreme environments. Copyright © 2014 Trubitsyn et al.

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of the Naphthalene-Degrading Bacterium Pseudomonas stutzeri AN10 (CCUG 29243)

    PubMed Central

    Brunet-Galmés, Isabel; Busquets, Antonio; Peña, Arantxa; Gomila, Margarita; Nogales, Balbina; García-Valdés, Elena; Lalucat, Jorge; Bennasar, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas stutzeri AN10 (CCUG 29243) can be considered a model strain for aerobic naphthalene degradation. We report the complete genome sequence of this bacterium. Its 4.71-Mb chromosome provides insights into other biodegradative capabilities of strain AN10 (i.e., benzoate catabolism) and suggests a high number of horizontal gene transfer events. PMID:23144395

  9. Complete genome sequence of the xylan-degrading subseafloor bacterium Microcella alkaliphila JAM-AC0309.

    PubMed

    Kurata, Atsushi; Hirose, Yuu; Misawa, Naomi; Wakazuki, Sachiko; Kishimoto, Noriaki; Kobayashi, Tohru

    2016-03-10

    Here we report the complete genome sequence of Microcella alkaliphila JAM-AC0309, which was newly isolated from the deep subseafloor core sediment from offshore of the Shimokita Peninsula of Japan. An array of genes related to utilization of xylan in this bacterium was identified by whole genome analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of the Thermophilic Bacterium Geobacillus thermoleovorans CCB_US3_UF5

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Rahman, Ahmad Yamin; Saito, Jennifer A.; Hou, Shaobin

    2012-01-01

    Geobacillus thermoleovorans CCB_US3_UF5 is a thermophilic bacterium isolated from a hot spring in Malaysia. Here, we report the complete genome of G. thermoleovorans CCB_US3_UF5, which shows high similarity to the genome of Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA 426 in terms of synteny and orthologous genes. PMID:22328744

  11. The construction of an engineered bacterium to remove cadmium from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Chang, S; Shu, H

    2014-01-01

    The removal of cadmium (Cd) from wastewater before it is released from factories is important for protecting human health. Although some researchers have developed engineered bacteria, the resistance of these engineered bacteria to Cd have not been improved. In this study, two key genes involved in glutathione synthesis (gshA and gshB), a serine acetyltransferase gene (cysE), a Thlaspi caerulescens phytochelatin synthase gene (TcPCS1), and a heavy metal ATPase gene (TcHMA3) were transformed into Escherichia coli BL21. The resistance of the engineered bacterium to Cd was significantly greater than that of the initial bacterium and the Cd accumulation in the engineered bacterium was much higher than in the initial bacterium. In addition, the Cd resistance of the bacteria harboring gshB, gshA, cysE, and TcPCS1 was higher than that of the bacteria harboring gshA, cysE, and TcPCS1. This finding demonstrated that gshB played an important role in glutathione synthesis and that the reaction catalyzed by glutathione synthase was the limiting step for producing phytochelatins. Furthermore, TcPCS1 had a greater specificity and a higher capacity for removing Cd than SpPCS1, and TcHMA3 not only played a role in T. caerulescens but also functioned in E. coli.

  12. Extracellular nucleic acids of the marine bacterium Rhodovulum sulfidophilum and recombinant RNA production technology using bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Yo; Umekage, So

    2018-02-01

    Extracellular nucleic acids of high molecular weight are detected ubiquitously in seawater. Recent studies have indicated that these nucleic acids are, at least in part, derived from active production by some bacteria. The marine bacterium Rhodovulum sulfidophilum is one of those bacteria. Rhodovulumsulfidophilum is a non-sulfur phototrophic marine bacterium that is known to form structured communities of cells called flocs, and to produce extracellular nucleic acids in culture media. Recently, it has been revealed that this bacterium produces gene transfer agent-like particles and that this particle production may be related to the extracellular nucleic acid production mechanism. This review provides a summary of recent physiological and genetic studies of these phenomena and also introduces a new method for extracellular production of artificial and biologically functional RNAs using this bacterium. In addition, artificial RNA production using Escherichia coli, which is related to this topic, will also be described. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa NA04 Bacterium Isolated from an Entomopathogenic Nematode.

    PubMed

    Salgado-Morales, Rosalba; Rivera-Gómez, Nancy; Lozano-Aguirre Beltrán, Luis Fernando; Hernández-Mendoza, Armando; Dantán-González, Edgar

    2017-09-07

    We report the draft genome sequence of Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa NA04, isolated from the entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis indica MOR03. The draft genome consists of 54 contigs, a length of 6.37 Mb, and a G+C content 66.49%. Copyright © 2017 Salgado-Morales et al.

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Pontibacter sp. nov. BAB1700, a Halotolerant, Industrially Important Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, M. N.; Sharma, A. C.; Pandya, R. V.; Patel, R. P.; Saiyed, Z. M.; Saxena, A. K.

    2012-01-01

    Pontibacter sp. nov. BAB1700 is a halotolerant, Gram-negative, rod-shaped, pink-pigmented, menaquinone-7-producing bacterium isolated from sediments of a drilling well. The draft genome sequence of the strain, consisting of one chromosome of 4.5 Mb, revealed vital gene clusters involved in vitamin biosynthesis and resistance against various metals and antibiotics. PMID:23105068

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of the Efficient Bioflocculant-Producing Bacterium Paenibacillus sp. Strain A9

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin-liang; Hu, Xiao-min

    2013-01-01

    Paenibacillus sp. strain A9 is an important bioflocculant-producing bacterium, isolated from a soil sample, and is pale pink-pigmented, aerobic, and Gram-positive. Here, we report the draft genome sequence and the initial findings from a preliminary analysis of strain A9, which is a novel species of Paenibacillus. PMID:23618713

  16. Studying the Symbiotic Bacterium Xenorhabdus nematophila in Individual, Living Steinernema carpocapsae Nematodes Using Microfluidic Systems.

    PubMed

    Stilwell, Matthew D; Cao, Mengyi; Goodrich-Blair, Heidi; Weibel, Douglas B

    2018-01-01

    Animal-microbe symbioses are ubiquitous in nature and scientifically important in diverse areas, including ecology, medicine, and agriculture. Steinernema nematodes and Xenorhabdus bacteria compose an established, successful model system for investigating microbial pathogenesis and mutualism. The bacterium Xenorhabdus nematophila is a species-specific mutualist of insect-infecting Steinernema carpocapsae nematodes. The bacterium colonizes a specialized intestinal pocket within the infective stage of the nematode, which transports the bacteria between insects that are killed and consumed by the pair for reproduction. Current understanding of the interaction between the infective-stage nematode and its bacterial colonizers is based largely on population-level, snapshot time point studies on these organisms. This limitation arises because investigating temporal dynamics of the bacterium within the nematode is impeded by the difficulty of isolating and maintaining individual living nematodes and tracking colonizing bacterial cells over time. To overcome this challenge, we developed a microfluidic system that enables us to spatially isolate and microscopically observe individual, living Steinernema nematodes and monitor the growth and development of the associated X. nematophila bacterial communities-starting from a single cell or a few cells-over weeks. Our data demonstrate, to our knowledge, the first direct, temporal, in vivo visual analysis of a symbiosis system and the application of this system to reveal continuous dynamics of the symbiont population in the living host animal. IMPORTANCE This paper describes an experimental system for directly investigating population dynamics of a symbiotic bacterium, Xenorhabdus nematophila , in its host-the infective stage of the entomopathogenic nematode Steinernema carpocapsae . Tracking individual and groups of bacteria in individual host nematodes over days and weeks yielded insight into dynamic growth and topology changes

  17. Isolation and biological characteristics of aerobic marine magnetotactic bacterium YSC-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jun; Pan, Hongmiao; Yue, Haidong; Song, Tao; Zhao, Yong; Chen, Guanjun; Wu, Longfei; Xiao, Tian

    2006-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria have become a hot spot of research in microbiology attracting intensive interest of researchers in multiple disciplinary fields. However, the studies were limited in few fastidious bacteria. The objective of this study aims at isolating new marine magnetic bacteria and better comprehension of magnetotactic bacteria. In this study, an aerobic magnetotactic bacterium YSC-1 was isolated from sediments in the Yellow Sea Cold Water Mass (YSCWM). In TEM, magnetic cells have one or several circular magnetosomes in diameter of 100nm, and consist of Fe and Co shown on energy dispersive X-ray spectrum. The biological and physiological characteristics of this bacterium were also described. The colour of YSC-1 colony is white in small rod. The gram stain is negative. Results showed that Strain YSC-1 differs from microaerophile magnetotactic bacteria MS-1 and WD-1 in biology.

  18. Economic Game Theory to Model the Attenuation of Virulence of an Obligate Intracellular Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Tago, Damian; Meyer, Damien F

    2016-01-01

    Diseases induced by obligate intracellular pathogens have a large burden on global human and animal health. Understanding the factors involved in the virulence and fitness of these pathogens contributes to the development of control strategies against these diseases. Based on biological observations, a theoretical model using game theory is proposed to explain how obligate intracellular bacteria interact with their host. The equilibrium in such a game shows that the virulence and fitness of the bacterium is host-triggered and by changing the host's defense system to which the bacterium is confronted, an evolutionary process leads to an attenuated strain. Although, the attenuation procedure has already been conducted in practice in order to develop an attenuated vaccine (e.g., with Ehrlichia ruminantium), there was a lack of understanding of the theoretical basis behind this process. Our work provides a model to better comprehend the existence of different phenotypes and some underlying evolutionary mechanisms for the virulence of obligate intracellular bacteria.

  19. Experimental study of the quasi 1d motion of a ``robot bacterium'' within a tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kai; Jiao, Yusheng; Li, Shutong; Ding, Yang; Xu, Xinliang; Complex Fluids Team

    2017-11-01

    Understanding how solid boundary influences the motion of a micro-swimmer can be quite important. Here we experimentally study the problem with a system of centi-meter size ``robot bacterium'' immersed in the solvent silicon oil. Equipped with build-in battery and motor, the robot mimics a free swimmer and the overall Reynolds number of the system is kept very small as we use silicon oil with very high viscosity. The motion of centi-meter size ``robot bacterium'' within cylindrical tube is experimentally studied in detail. Our results show that robot bacteria with different shapes respond very different to the solid boundary. For certain shapes the swimmers actually swim much faster within a tube, when compared to their motions without any confinement, in good agreement with our numerical evaluations of the hydrodynamics of the system.

  20. Gene function analysis in extremophiles: the "nif" regulon of the strict iron oxidizing bacterium "Leptospirillum ferrooxidans"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parro, Victor; Moreno-Paz, Mercedes

    2004-03-01

    In Centro de Astrobiologia it has been considered the Tinto river as a model ecosystem to study life based on iron. The final goal is to study the biological and metabolic diversity in microorganisms living there, following a genomic approach, to get insights to the mechanisms of adaptation to this environment. The Gram-negative bacterium Leptospirillum ferrooxidans is one of the most abundant microorganisms in the river, and it is one of the main responsible in maintenance of pH balance and, as a consequence, the physico-chemical properties of the exosystem. We have constructed a Shotgun DNA microarrays from this bacterium and we have used it to studied its genetic capacity for nitrogen fixation. With this approach we have identified most of the genes necessary for dinitrogen (N2) reduction, confirming the capacity of L. ferrooxidans as a free diazotrophic (nitrogen fixer) microorganism.

  1. Economic Game Theory to Model the Attenuation of Virulence of an Obligate Intracellular Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Tago, Damian; Meyer, Damien F.

    2016-01-01

    Diseases induced by obligate intracellular pathogens have a large burden on global human and animal health. Understanding the factors involved in the virulence and fitness of these pathogens contributes to the development of control strategies against these diseases. Based on biological observations, a theoretical model using game theory is proposed to explain how obligate intracellular bacteria interact with their host. The equilibrium in such a game shows that the virulence and fitness of the bacterium is host-triggered and by changing the host's defense system to which the bacterium is confronted, an evolutionary process leads to an attenuated strain. Although, the attenuation procedure has already been conducted in practice in order to develop an attenuated vaccine (e.g., with Ehrlichia ruminantium), there was a lack of understanding of the theoretical basis behind this process. Our work provides a model to better comprehend the existence of different phenotypes and some underlying evolutionary mechanisms for the virulence of obligate intracellular bacteria. PMID:27610355

  2. Comment on "A bacterium that degrades and assimilates poly(ethylene terephthalate)".

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Yang, Jun; Jiang, Lei

    2016-08-19

    Yoshida et al (Report, 11 March 2016, p. 1196) reported that the bacterium Ideonella sakaiensis 201-F6 can degrade and assimilate poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET). However, the authors exaggerated degradation efficiency using a low-crystallinity PET and presented no straightforward experiments to verify depolymerization and assimilation of PET. Thus, the authors' conclusions are rather misleading. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Sphingobium ummariense Strain RL-3, a Hexachlorocyclohexane-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, Puneet; Dua, Ankita; Sangwan, Naseer; Oldach, Phoebe; Khurana, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH)-degrading bacterium Sphingobium ummariense strain RL-3, which was isolated from the HCH dumpsite located in Lucknow, India (27°00′N and 81°09′E). The annotated draft genome sequence (4.75 Mb) of strain RL-3 consisted of 139 contigs, 4,645 coding sequences, and 65% G+C content. PMID:24233594

  4. Halobacterium saccharovorum sp. nov., a carbohydrate-metabolizing, extremely halophilic bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomlinson, G. A.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1976-01-01

    The previously described extremely halophilic bacterium, strain M6, metabolizes a variety of carbohydrates with the production of acid. In addition, the organism produces nitrite (but no gas) from nitrate, is motile, and grows most rapidly at about 50 C. These characteristics distinguish it from all previously described halophilic bacteria in the genus Halobacterium. It is suggested that it be designated as a new species, Halobacterium saccharovorum.

  5. Sexual Transmission of a Plant Pathogenic Bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, between Conspecific Insect Vectors during Mating

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Rajinder S.; Pelz-Stelinski, Kirsten; Hermann, Sara L.; Tiwari, Siddharth; Stelinski, Lukasz L.

    2011-01-01

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus is a fastidious, phloem-inhabiting, gram-negative bacterium transmitted by Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae). The bacterium is the presumed causal agent of huanglongbing (HLB), one of the most destructive and economically important diseases of citrus. We investigated whether Las is transmitted between infected and uninfected D. citri adults during courtship. Our results indicate that Las was sexually transmitted from Las-infected male D. citri to uninfected females at a low rate (<4%) during mating. Sexual transmission was not observed following mating of infected females and uninfected males or among adult pairs of the same sex. Las was detected in genitalia of both sexes and also in eggs of infected females. A latent period of 7 days or more was required to detect the bacterium in recipient females. Rod shaped as well as spherical structures resembling Las were observed in ovaries of Las-infected females with transmission electron microscopy, but were absent in ovaries from uninfected D. citri females. The size of the rod shaped structures varied from 0.39 to 0.67 µm in length and 0.19 to 0.39 µm in width. The spherical structures measured from 0.61 to 0.80 µm in diameter. This investigation provides convincing evidence that a plant pathogenic bacterium is sexually transmitted from male to female insects during courtship and established evidence that bacteria persist in reproductive organs. Moreover, these findings provide an alternative sexually horizontal mechanism for the spread of Las within populations of D. citri, even in the absence of infected host trees. PMID:22216209

  6. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic study of intact cells of the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Azospirillum brasilense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamnev, A. A.; Ristić, M.; Antonyuk, L. P.; Chernyshev, A. V.; Ignatov, V. V.

    1997-06-01

    The data of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic measurements performed on intact cells of the soil nitrogen-fixing bacterium Azospirillum brasilense grown in a standard medium and under the conditions of an increased metal uptake are compared and discussed. The structural FTIR information obtained is considered together with atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) data on the content of metal cations in the bacterial cells. Some methodological aspects concerning preparation of bacterial cell samples for FTIR measurements are also discussed.

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of the Endophytic Bacterium Burkholderia sp. Strain KJ006

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Min-Jung; Song, Ju Yeon; Kim, Seon-Young; Jeong, Haeyoung; Kang, Sung Gyun; Kim, Byung Kwon; Kwon, Soon-Kyeong; Lee, Choong Hoon; Yu, Dong Su

    2012-01-01

    Endophytes live inside plant tissues without causing any harm and may even benefit plants. Here, we provide the high-quality genome sequence of Burkholderia sp. strain KJ006, an endophytic bacterium of rice with antifungal activity. The 6.6-Mb genome, consisting of three chromosomes and a single plasmid, contains genes related to plant growth promotion or degradation of aromatic compounds. PMID:22843575

  8. Stress of algicidal substances from a bacterium Exiguobacterium sp. h10 on Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Liu, L; Xu, Y; Li, P; Zhang, K; Jiang, X; Zheng, T; Wang, H

    2017-01-01

    Microcystis aeruginosa is a cyanobacterial bloom-causing species and is considered a serious threat to human health and biological safety. In this study, the algicidal bacterium h10 showed high algicidal effects on M. aeruginosa 7820, and strain h10 was confirmed to belong to the genus Exiguobacterium, for which the name Exiguobacterium sp. h10 is proposed. Algicidal activity and mode analysis revealed that the supernatant, rather than the bacterial cells, was responsible for the algicidal activity, indicating that the algicidal mode of strain h10 is by indirect attack through the production of algicidal substances. Analysis of the algicidal substance characteristics showed a molecular weight of <1000 Da and that algicidal substances exhibit high thermal stability and pH instability, and the characteristic functional groups of the algicidal substance mainly included carbonyl, amino and hydroxyl groups. Under the effects of the algicidal substance, the cellular pigment content was significantly decreased, and the algal cell structure and morphology were seriously damaged. The results indicate that the algicidal bacterium Exiguobacterium sp. h10 could be a potential bio-agent for controlling cyanobacterial blooms of M. aeruginosa. In this study, the effects of algicidal substances from an algicidal bacterium Exiguobacterium sp. h10 on the toxic cyanobacterium, Microcystis aeruginosa 7820, were first investigated. The algicidal mode of action was confirmed as an indirect attack through the production of algicidal substances. The characteristics of the algicidal substance were determined, especially the functional groups analysis that confirmed the algicidal substances were glycolipid mixtures. With the stress of algicidal substances, the algal chlorophyll a synthesis, cell structure and morphology were seriously damaged. This study proved that algicidal bacteria are promising sources of potential cyanobacterial bloom-control, and provided good procedures for the

  9. Expression of Heterogenous Arsenic Resistance Genes in the Obligately Autotrophic Biomining Bacterium Thiobacillus ferrooxidans

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ji-Bin; Yan, Wang-Ming; Bao, Xue-Zhen

    1994-01-01

    Two arsenic-resistant plasmids were constructed and introduced into Thiobacillus ferrooxidans strains by conjugation. The plasmids with the replicon of wide-host-range plasmid RSF1010 were stable in T. ferrooxidans. The arsenic resistance genes originating from the heterotroph were expressed in this obligately autotrophic bacterium, but the promoter derived from T. ferrooxidans showed no special function in its original host. PMID:16349341

  10. Catalytic Biomineralization of Fluorescent Calcite by the Thermophilic Bacterium Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius▿

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Naoto; Higashimura, Eiji; Saeki, Yuichi

    2010-01-01

    The thermophilic Geobacillus bacterium catalyzed the formation of 100-μm hexagonal crystals at 60°C in a hydrogel containing sodium acetate, calcium chloride, and magnesium sulfate. Under fluorescence microscopy, crystals fluoresced upon excitation at 365 ± 5, 480 ± 20, or 545 ± 15 nm. X-ray diffraction indicated that the crystals were magnesium-calcite in calcite-type calcium carbonate. PMID:20851984

  11. Outbreak of meningitis in weaner pigs caused by unidentified asaccharolytic gram-negative bacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, K; Holmes, B; Kock, N; Muvavarirwa, P

    1996-01-01

    Several organisms are known to cause outbreaks of meningitis in pigs, with Haemophilus species being the most frequently implicated. We report such an outbreak in which necropsied pigs manifested an unusual combination of meningitis, tracheitis, and bronchitis. The causative agent appeared to be an asaccharolytic gram-negative nonfermentative bacterium whose classification has yet to be determined. The organism was isolated from the brain and was extremely capnophilic, growing in air only after several serial subcultures. PMID:8815112

  12. Insights in Nanoparticle-Bacterium Interactions: New Frontiers to Bypass Bacterial Resistance to Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Diab, Roudayna; Khameneh, Bahman; Joubert, Olivier; Duval, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology has been revealed as a fundamental approach for antibiotics delivery. In this paper, recent findings demonstrating the superiority of nanocarried-antibiotics over "naked" ones and the ways by which nanoparticles can help to overwhelm bacterial drug resistance are reviewed. The second part of this paper sheds light on nanoparticle-bacterium interaction patterns. Finally, key factors affecting the effectiveness of nanoparticles interactions with bacteria are discussed.

  13. Draft genome sequence of a strictly anaerobic dichloromethane-degrading bacterium

    DOE PAGES

    Kleindienst, Sara; Higgins, Steven A.; Tsementzi, Despina; ...

    2016-03-03

    Here, an anaerobic, dichloromethane-degrading bacterium affiliated with novel Peptococcaceae was maintained in a microbial consortium. The organism originated from pristine freshwater sediment collected from Rio Mameyes in Luquillo, Puerto Rico, in October 2009 (latitude 18°21'43.9", longitude –65°46'8.4"). The draft genome sequence is 2.1 Mb and has a G+C content of 43.5%.

  14. Permanent draft genome of the malachite-green-tolerant bacterium Rhizobium sp. MGL06.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Runping; Zeng, Runying

    2014-12-01

    Rhizobium sp. MGL06, the first Rhizobium isolate from a marine environment, is a malachite-green-tolerant bacterium with a broader salinity tolerance (range: 0.5% to 9%) than other rhizobia. This study sequences and annotates the draft genome sequence of this strain. Genome sequence information provides a basis for analyzing the malachite green tolerance, broad salinity adaptation, nitrogen fixation properties, and taxonomic classification of the isolate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of Tannic Acid on the Transcriptome of the Soil Bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chee Kent; Penesyan, Anahit; Hassan, Karl A.

    2013-01-01

    Tannins are a diverse group of plant-produced, polyphenolic compounds with metal-chelating and antimicrobial properties that are prevalent in many soils. Using transcriptomics, we determined that tannic acid, a form of hydrolysable tannin, broadly affects the expression of genes involved in iron and zinc homeostases, sulfur metabolism, biofilm formation, motility, and secondary metabolite biosynthesis in the soil- and rhizosphere-inhabiting bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5. PMID:23435890

  16. Massilia sp. BS-1, a novel violacein-producing bacterium isolated from soil.

    PubMed

    Agematu, Hitosi; Suzuki, Kazuya; Tsuya, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    A novel bacterium, Massilia sp. BS-1, producing violacein and deoxyviolacein was isolated from a soil sample collected from Akita Prefecture, Japan. The 16S ribosomal DNA of strain BS-1 displayed 93% homology with its nearest violacein-producing neighbor, Janthinobacterium lividum. Strain BS-1 grew well in a synthetic medium, but required both L-tryptophan and a small amount of L-histidine to produce violacein.

  17. Bacterium induces cryptic meroterpenoid pathway in the pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    König, Claudia C; Scherlach, Kirstin; Schroeckh, Volker; Horn, Fabian; Nietzsche, Sandor; Brakhage, Axel A; Hertweck, Christian

    2013-05-27

    Stimulating encounter: The intimate, physical interaction between the soil-derived bacterium Streptomyces rapamycinicus and the human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus led to the activation of an otherwise silent polyketide synthase (PKS) gene cluster coding for an unusual prenylated polyphenol (fumicycline A). The meroterpenoid pathway is regulated by a pathway-specific activator gene as well as by epigenetic factors. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of a New Ruminococcaceae Bacterium Isolated from Anaerobic Biomass Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Hahnke, Sarah; Abendroth, Christian; Langer, Thomas; Codoñer, Francisco M; Ramm, Patrice; Porcar, Manuel; Luschnig, Olaf; Klocke, Michael

    2018-04-05

    A new Ruminococcaceae bacterium, strain HV4-5-B5C, participating in the anaerobic digestion of grass, was isolated from a mesophilic two-stage laboratory-scale leach bed biogas system. The draft annotated genome sequence presented in this study and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated the affiliation of HV4-5-B5C with the family Ruminococcaceae outside recently described genera. Copyright © 2018 Hahnke et al.

  19. Characterization of a potentially novel 'blown pack' spoilage bacterium isolated from bovine hide.

    PubMed

    Moschonas, G; Bolton, D J

    2013-03-01

    To characterize a psychrotrophic bacterium, designated TC1, previously isolated from a cattle hide in Ireland, and to investigate the ability of this strain to cause 'blown pack' spoilage (BPS) of vacuum-packaged beef primals. TC1 was characterized using a combination of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and genotypic analyses and was assessed for its ability to spoil vacuum-packaged beef at refrigerated temperatures. TC1 was Gram-positive and formed elliptical subterminal endospores. The strain was able to grow between 0 and 33 °C, with optimal growth between 23 and 24 °C. TC1 could be differentiated from its phylogenetically closest neighbour (Clostridium lituseburense DSM 797(T)) by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and cellular fatty acid composition. TC1 spoiled (BPS) beef within 42 days when inoculated in cold-stored (1 °C) vacuum-packed beef. The phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and genotypic characterization indicated that TC1 may represent a potentially novel, cold-tolerant, gas-producing bacterium of considerable economic significance to the beef industry. This study reports and characterizes an emerging BPS bacterium, which should be considered in future activities designed to minimize the psychrophilic and psychrotrophic spoilage of vacuum-packaged beef. © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Phosphate enhances levan production in the endophytic bacterium Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus Pal5

    PubMed Central

    Idogawa, Nao; Amamoto, Ryuta; Murata, Kousaku; Kawai, Shigeyuki

    2014-01-01

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a gram-negative and endophytic nitrogen-fixing bacterium that has several beneficial effects in host plants; thus, utilization of this bacterium as a biofertilizer in agriculture may be possible. G. diazotrophicus synthesizes levan, a D-fructofuranosyl polymer with β-(2→6) linkages, as an exopolysaccharide and the synthesized levan improves the stress tolerance of the bacterium. In this study, we found that phosphate enhances levan production by G. diazotrophicus Pal5, a wild type strain that showed a stronger mucous phenotype on solid medium containing 28 mM phosphate than on solid medium containing 7 mM phosphate. A G. diazotrophicus Pal5 levansucrase disruptant showed only a weak mucous phenotype regardless of the phosphate concentration, indicating that the mucous phenotype observed on 28 mM phosphate medium was caused by levan. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the effect of a high concentration of phosphate on exopolysaccharide production. PMID:24717418

  1. The gene transfer agent-like particle of the marine phototrophic bacterium Rhodovulum sulfidophilum.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Nobuyoshi; Yamamoto, Junya; Komatsu, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Hirose, Yuu; Umekage, So; Ohyama, Takashi; Kikuchi, Yo

    2015-12-01

    Gene transfer agents (GTAs) are shaped like bacteriophage particles but have many properties that distinguish them from bacteriophages. GTAs play a role in horizontal gene transfer in nature and thus affect the evolution of prokaryotic genomes. In the course of studies on the extracellular production of designed RNAs using the marine bacterium Rhodovulum sulfidophilum , we found that this bacterium produces a GTA-like particle. The particle contains DNA fragments of 4.5 kb, which consist of randomly fragmented genomic DNA from the bacterium. This 4.5-kb DNA production was prevented while quorum sensing was inhibited. Direct observation of the particle by transmission electron microscopy revealed that the particle resembles a tailed phage and has a head diameter of about 40 nm and a tail length of about 60 nm. We also identified the structural genes for the GTA in the genome. Translated amino acid sequences and gene positions are closely related to those of the genes that encode the Rhodobacter capsulatus GTA. This is the first report of a GTA-like particle from the genus Rhodovulum . However, gene transfer activity of this particle has not yet been confirmed. The differences between this particle and other GTAs are discussed.

  2. Purification and Characterization of Haloalkaline, Organic Solvent Stable Xylanase from Newly Isolated Halophilic Bacterium-OKH

    PubMed Central

    Sanghvi, Gaurav; Jivrajani, Mehul; Patel, Nirav; Jivrajani, Heta; Bhaskara, Govinal Badiger; Patel, Shivani

    2014-01-01

    A novel, alkali-tolerant halophilic bacterium-OKH with an ability to produce extracellular halophilic, alkali-tolerant, organic solvent stable, and moderately thermostable xylanase was isolated from salt salterns of Mithapur region, Gujarat, India. Identification of the bacterium was done based upon biochemical tests and 16S rRNA sequence. Maximum xylanase production was achieved at pH 9.0 and 37°C temperature in the medium containing 15% NaCl and 1% (w/v) corn cobs. Sugarcane bagasse and wheat straw also induce xylanase production when used as carbon source. The enzyme was active over a range of 0–25% sodium chloride examined in culture broth. The optimum xylanase activity was observed at 5% sodium chloride. Xylanase was purified with 25.81%-fold purification and 17.1% yield. Kinetic properties such as Km and Vmax were 4.2 mg/mL and 0.31 μmol/min/mL, respectively. The enzyme was stable at pH 6.0 and 50°C with 60% activity after 8 hours of incubation. Enzyme activity was enhanced by Ca2+, Mn2+, and Mg2+ but strongly inhibited by heavy metals such as Hg2+, Fe3+, Ni2+, and Zn2+. Xylanase was found to be stable in organic solvents like glutaraldehyde and isopropanol. The purified enzyme hydrolysed lignocellulosic substrates. Xylanase, purified from the halophilic bacterium-OKH, has potential biotechnological applications. PMID:27350996

  3. Multiple cellobiohydrolases and cellobiose phosphorylases cooperate in the ruminal bacterium Ruminococcus albus 8 to degrade cellooligosaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devendran, Saravanan; Abdel-Hamid, Ahmed M.; Evans, Anton F.; Iakiviak, Michael; Kwon, In Hyuk; Mackie, Roderick I.; Cann, Isaac

    2016-10-01

    Digestion of plant cell wall polysaccharides is important in energy capture in the gastrointestinal tract of many herbivorous and omnivorous mammals, including humans and ruminants. The members of the genus Ruminococcus are found in both the ruminant and human gastrointestinal tract, where they show versatility in degrading both hemicellulose and cellulose. The available genome sequence of Ruminococcus albus 8, a common inhabitant of the cow rumen, alludes to a bacterium well-endowed with genes that target degradation of various plant cell wall components. The mechanisms by which R. albus 8 employs to degrade these recalcitrant materials are, however, not clearly understood. In this report, we demonstrate that R. albus 8 elaborates multiple cellobiohydrolases with multi-modular architectures that overall enhance the catalytic activity and versatility of the enzymes. Furthermore, our analyses show that two cellobiose phosphorylases encoded by R. albus 8 can function synergistically with a cognate cellobiohydrolase and endoglucanase to completely release, from a cellulosic substrate, glucose which can then be fermented by the bacterium for production of energy and cellular building blocks. We further use transcriptomic analysis to confirm the over-expression of the biochemically characterized enzymes during growth of the bacterium on cellulosic substrates compared to cellobiose.

  4. Enhancement of survival and electricity production in an engineered bacterium by light-driven proton pumping.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ethan T; Baron, Daniel B; Naranjo, Belén; Bond, Daniel R; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia; Gralnick, Jeffrey A

    2010-07-01

    Microorganisms can use complex photosystems or light-dependent proton pumps to generate membrane potential and/or reduce electron carriers to support growth. The discovery that proteorhodopsin is a light-dependent proton pump that can be expressed readily in recombinant bacteria enables development of new strategies to probe microbial physiology and to engineer microbes with new light-driven properties. Here, we describe functional expression of proteorhodopsin and light-induced changes in membrane potential in the bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. We report that there were significant increases in electrical current generation during illumination of electrochemical chambers containing S. oneidensis expressing proteorhodopsin. We present evidence that an engineered strain is able to consume lactate at an increased rate when it is illuminated, which is consistent with the hypothesis that proteorhodopsin activity enhances lactate uptake by increasing the proton motive force. Our results demonstrate that there is coupling of a light-driven process to electricity generation in a nonphotosynthetic engineered bacterium. Expression of proteorhodopsin also preserved the viability of the bacterium under nutrient-limited conditions, providing evidence that fulfillment of basic energy needs of organisms may explain the widespread distribution of proteorhodopsin in marine environments.

  5. Fine Structure and Host-Virus Relationship of a Marine Bacterium and Its Bacteriophage

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, Artrice F.; Chapman, George B.

    1966-01-01

    Valentine, Artrice F. (Georgetown University, Washington, D.C.), and George B. Chapman. Fine structure and host-virus relationship of a marine bacterium and its bacteriophage. J. Bacteriol. 92:1535–1554. 1966.—The fine structure of a gram-negative marine bacterium, Cytophaga marinoflava sp. n., has been revealed by ultrathin sectioning and electron microscopy. Stages in the morphogenesis of the bacterial virus NCMB 385, which has been shown to be highly specific for this organism, were also demonstrated in bacterial cells fixed according to the Kellenberger technique. The bacterium possessed a cell wall, cytoplasmic membrane, and nuclear and cytoplasmic regions typical of bacterial cells. Both the cell wall and the cytoplasmic membrane showed a tripartite structure, i.e., each was composed of two dense layers separated by a low-density zone. Intracytoplasmic membrane systems were also observed, especially in dividing cells and in cells in which new viruses were being formed. As many as 18 hexagonally shaped, empty phage heads (membranes only) were observed in untreated, infected bacterial cells. Phage heads, intermediate in density to empty heads and fully condensed ones, possibly representing stages in the morphological development of the virus, were also seen. Images PMID:5924277

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Arthrobacter sp. Strain SPG23, a Hydrocarbon-Degrading and Plant Growth-Promoting Soil Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Gkorezis, Panagiotis; Bottos, Eric M; Van Hamme, Jonathan D; Thijs, Sofie; Rineau, Francois; Franzetti, Andrea; Balseiro-Romero, Maria; Weyens, Nele; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2015-12-23

    We report here the 4.7-Mb draft genome of Arthrobacter sp. SPG23, a hydrocarbonoclastic Gram-positive bacterium belonging to the Actinobacteria, isolated from diesel-contaminated soil at the Ford Motor Company site in Genk, Belgium. Strain SPG23 is a potent plant growth promoter useful for diesel fuel remediation applications based on plant-bacterium associations. Copyright © 2015 Gkorezis et al.

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus licheniformis Strain GB2, a Hydrocarbon-Degrading and Plant Growth-Promoting Soil Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Gkorezis, Panagiotis; Van Hamme, Jonathan; Bottos, Eric; Thijs, Sofie; Balseiro-Romero, Maria; Monterroso, Carmela; Kidd, Petra Suzan; Rineau, Francois; Weyens, Nele; Sillen, Wouter; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2016-06-23

    We report the 4.39 Mb draft genome of Bacillus licheniformis GB2, a hydrocarbonoclastic Gram-positive bacterium of the family Bacillaceae, isolated from diesel-contaminated soil at the Ford Motor Company site in Genk, Belgium. Strain GB2 is an effective plant-growth promoter useful for diesel fuel remediation applications based on plant-bacterium associations. Copyright © 2016 Gkorezis et al.

  8. [Diversity analysis of desulfuration bacterium from the oxidation ditch of city sewage treatment plant with SO2 gas].

    PubMed

    Huang, Bing; Zhang, Shi-Ling; Zhang, Jiang-Hong; Ao, Yong; Shi, Zhe

    2011-07-01

    A group of removing SO2 bacterium was obtained from the oxidation ditch of city sewage treatment plant by inductive domestication over 6 d with low concentration SO2 gas, and they have an ability with biodegradation rate of 888 mg x (L x h)(-1) and a degradation efficiency of 85% during 1.5 h for SO2 dissolved in water with their synergy. The clone library and two phylogenetic trees of the removing SO2 bacterium communities were obtained based on 16S rRNA DNA comparison by DNA extraction of the sample and in situ polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The phylogenetic analysis showed that 8 dominant desulfuration bacterium occupy about 69% of all removing SO2 bacterium, and some of them have a kindred with discovered desulfuration bacterium but not homogeneity, and there are four belong to alpha-Proteobacteria, another four belong to beta-Proteobacteria in them. The gene information about 16S rRNA sequence of the dominant desulfuration bacteria and domestication method provide a basic of looking for or domesticating removing SO2 bacterium for development microbial desulfurization technology of contained SO2 tail gas.

  9. Understanding the interaction between an obligate hyperparasitic bacterium, Pasteuria penetrans and its obligate plant-parasitic nematode host, Meloidogyne spp.

    PubMed

    Davies, Keith G

    2009-01-01

    Pasteuria penetrans is an endospore-forming bacterium, which is a hyperparasite of root-knot nematodes Meloidogyne spp. that are economically important pests of a wide range of crops. The life cycle of the bacterium and nematode are described with emphasis on the bacterium's potential as a biocontrol agent. Two aspects that currently prohibit the commercial development of the bacterium as a biocontrol agent are the inability to culture it outside its host and its host specificity. Vegetative growth of the bacterium is possible in vitro; however, getting the vegetative stages of the bacterium to enter sporogenesis has been problematic. Insights from genomic survey sequences regarding the role of cation concentration and the phosphorylation of Spo0F have proved useful in inducing vegetative bacteria to sporulate. Similarly, genomic data have also proved useful in understanding the attachment of endospores to the cuticle of infective nematode juveniles, and a Velcro-like model of spore attachment is proposed that involves collagen-like fibres on the surface of the endospore interacting with mucins on the nematode cuticle. Ecological studies of the interactions between Daphnia and Pasteuria ramosa are examined and similarities are drawn between the co-evolution of virulence in the Daphnia system and that of plant-parasitic nematodes.

  10. Pathogenicity of Moraxella osloensis, a Bacterium Associated with the Nematode Phasmarhabditis hermaphrodita, to the Slug Deroceras reticulatum

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Li; Grewal, Parwinder S.

    2001-01-01

    Moraxella osloensis, a gram-negative bacterium, is associated with Phasmarhabditis hermaphrodita, a nematode parasite of slugs. This bacterium-feeding nematode has potential for the biological control of slugs, especially the grey garden slug, Deroceras reticulatum. Infective juveniles of P. hermaphrodita invade the shell cavity of the slug, develop into self-fertilizing hermaphrodites, and produce progeny, resulting in host death. However, the role of the associated bacterium in the pathogenicity of the nematode to the slug is unknown. We discovered that M. osloensis alone is pathogenic to D. reticulatum after injection into the shell cavity or hemocoel of the slug. The bacteria from 60-h cultures were more pathogenic than the bacteria from 40-h cultures, as indicated by the higher and more rapid mortality of the slugs injected with the former. Coinjection of penicillin and streptomycin with the 60-h bacterial culture reduced its pathogenicity to the slug. Further work suggested that the reduction and loss of pathogenicity of the aged infective juveniles of P. hermaphrodita to D. reticulatum result from the loss of M. osloensis from the aged nematodes. Also, axenic J1/J2 nematodes were nonpathogenic after injection into the shell cavity. Therefore, we conclude that the bacterium is the sole killing agent of D. reticulatum in the nematode-bacterium complex and that P. hermaphrodita acts only as a vector to transport the bacterium into the shell cavity of the slug. The identification of the toxic metabolites produced by M. osloensis is being pursued. PMID:11679319

  11. Pathogenicity of Moraxella osloensis, a bacterium associated with the nematode Phasmarhabditis hermaphrodita, to the slug Deroceras reticulatum.

    PubMed

    Tan, L; Grewal, P S

    2001-11-01

    Moraxella osloensis, a gram-negative bacterium, is associated with Phasmarhabditis hermaphrodita, a nematode parasite of slugs. This bacterium-feeding nematode has potential for the biological control of slugs, especially the grey garden slug, Deroceras reticulatum. Infective juveniles of P. hermaphrodita invade the shell cavity of the slug, develop into self-fertilizing hermaphrodites, and produce progeny, resulting in host death. However, the role of the associated bacterium in the pathogenicity of the nematode to the slug is unknown. We discovered that M. osloensis alone is pathogenic to D. reticulatum after injection into the shell cavity or hemocoel of the slug. The bacteria from 60-h cultures were more pathogenic than the bacteria from 40-h cultures, as indicated by the higher and more rapid mortality of the slugs injected with the former. Coinjection of penicillin and streptomycin with the 60-h bacterial culture reduced its pathogenicity to the slug. Further work suggested that the reduction and loss of pathogenicity of the aged infective juveniles of P. hermaphrodita to D. reticulatum result from the loss of M. osloensis from the aged nematodes. Also, axenic J1/J2 nematodes were nonpathogenic after injection into the shell cavity. Therefore, we conclude that the bacterium is the sole killing agent of D. reticulatum in the nematode-bacterium complex and that P. hermaphrodita acts only as a vector to transport the bacterium into the shell cavity of the slug. The identification of the toxic metabolites produced by M. osloensis is being pursued.

  12. Determination of phenanthrene bioavailability by using a self-dying reporter bacterium: test with model solids and soil.

    PubMed

    Shin, Doyun; Nam, Kyoungphile

    2012-02-20

    The present study was conducted to investigate the performance and feasibility of a self-dying reporter bacterium to visualize and quantify phenanthrene bioavailability in soil. The self-dying reporter bacterium was designed to die on the initiation of phenanthrene biodegradation. The viability of the reporter bacterium was determined by a fluorescence live/dead cell staining method and visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopic observation. Phenanthrene was spiked into four types of model solids and a sandy loam. The bioavailability of phenanthrene to the reporter bacterium was remarkably declined with the hydrophobicity of the model solids: essentially no phenanthrene was biodegraded in the presence of 9-nm pores and about 35.8% of initial phenanthrene was biodegraded without pores. Decrease in bioavailability was not evident in the nonporous hydrophilic bead, but a small decrease was observed in the porous hydrophilic bead at 1000 mg/kg of phenanthrene. The fluorescence intensity was commensurate with the extent of phenanthrene biodegradation by the reporter bacterium at the concentration range from 50 to 500 mg/kg. Such a quantitative relationship was also confirmed with a sandy loam spiked up to 1000 mg/kg of phenanthrene. This reporter bacterium may be a useful means to determine phenanthrene bioavailability in soil. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of arsenite-oxidizing bacterium B. laterosporus on arsenite toxicity and arsenic translocation in rice seedlings.

    PubMed

    Yang, Gui-Di; Xie, Wan-Ying; Zhu, Xi; Huang, Yi; Yang, Xiao-Jun; Qiu, Zong-Qing; Lv, Zhen-Mao; Wang, Wen-Na; Lin, Wen-Xiong

    2015-10-01

    Arsenite [As (III)] oxidation can be accelerated by bacterial catalysis, but the effects of the accelerated oxidation on arsenic toxicity and translocation in rice plants are poorly understood. Herein we investigated how an arsenite-oxidizing bacterium, namely Brevibacillus laterosporus, influences As (III) toxicity and translocation in rice plants. Rice seedlings of four cultivars, namely Guangyou Ming 118 (GM), Teyou Hang II (TH), Shanyou 63 (SY) and Minghui 63 (MH), inoculated with or without the bacterium were grown hydroponically with As (III) to investigate its effects on arsenic toxicity and translocation in the plants. Percentages of As (III) oxidation in the solutions with the bacterium (100%) were all significantly higher than those without (30-72%). The addition of the bacterium significantly decreased As (III) concentrations in SY root, GM root and shoot, while increased the As (III) concentrations in the shoot of SY, MH and TH and in the root of MH. Furthermore, the As (III) concentrations in the root and shoot of SY were both the lowest among the treatments with the bacterium. On the other hand, its addition significantly alleviated the As (III) toxicity on four rice cultivars. Among the treatments amended with B. laterosporus, the bacterium showed the best remediation on SY seedlings, with respect to the subdued As (III) toxicity and decreased As (III) concentration in its roots. These results indicated that As (III) oxidation accelerated by B. laterosporus could be an effective method to alleviate As (III) toxicity on rice seedlings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Studies of the Extracellular Glycocalyx of the Anaerobic Cellulolytic Bacterium Ruminococcus albus 7▿

    PubMed Central

    Weimer, Paul J.; Price, Neil P. J.; Kroukamp, Otini; Joubert, Lydia-Marie; Wolfaardt, Gideon M.; Van Zyl, Willem H.

    2006-01-01

    Anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria are thought to adhere to cellulose via several mechanisms, including production of a glycocalyx containing extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). As the compositions and structures of these glycocalyces have not been elucidated, variable-pressure scanning electron microscopy (VP-SEM) and chemical analysis were used to characterize the glycocalyx of the ruminal bacterium Ruminococcus albus strain 7. VP-SEM revealed that growth of this strain was accompanied by the formation of thin cellular extensions that allowed the bacterium to adhere to cellulose, followed by formation of a ramifying network that interconnected individual cells to one another and to the unraveling cellulose microfibrils. Extraction of 48-h-old whole-culture pellets (bacterial cells plus glycocalyx [G] plus residual cellulose [C]) with 0.1 N NaOH released carbohydrate and protein in a ratio of 1:5. Boiling of the cellulose fermentation residue in a neutral detergent solution removed almost all of the adherent cells and protein while retaining a residual network of adhering noncellular material. Trifluoroacetic acid hydrolysis of this residue (G plus C) released primarily glucose, along with substantial amounts of xylose and mannose, but only traces of galactose, the most abundant sugar in most characterized bacterial exopolysaccharides. Linkage analysis and characterization by nuclear magnetic resonance suggested that most of the glucosyl units were not present as partially degraded cellulose. Calculations suggested that the energy demand for synthesis of the nonprotein fraction of EPS by this organism represents only a small fraction (<4%) of the anabolic ATP expenditure of the bacterium. PMID:17028224

  15. Diversity in bacterium-host interactions within the species Helicobacter heilmannii sensu stricto

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter (H.) heilmannii sensu stricto (s.s.) is a zoonotic bacterium that naturally colonizes the stomach of dogs and cats. In humans, this microorganism has been associated with gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. Little information is available about the pathogenesis of H. heilmannii s.s. infections in humans and it is unknown whether differences in virulence exist within this species. Therefore, a Mongolian gerbil model was used to study bacterium-host interactions of 9 H. heilmannii s.s. strains. The colonization ability of the strains, the intensity of gastritis and gene expression of various inflammatory cytokines in the stomach were determined at 9 weeks after experimental infection. The induction of an antrum-dominant chronic active gastritis with formation of lymphocytic aggregates was shown for 7 strains. High-level antral colonization was seen for 4 strains, while colonization of 4 other strains was more restricted and one strain was not detected in the stomach at 9 weeks post infection. All strains inducing a chronic active gastritis caused an up-regulation of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β in the antrum. A reduced antral expression of H+/K+ ATPase was seen in the stomach after infection with 3 highly colonizing strains and 2 highly colonizing strains caused an increased gastrin expression in the fundus. In none of the H. heilmannii s.s.-infected groups, IFN-γ expression was up-regulated. This study demonstrates diversity in bacterium-host interactions within the species H. heilmannii s.s. and that the pathogenesis of gastric infections with this microorganism is not identical to that of an H. pylori infection. PMID:23895283

  16. NH4+ transport system of a psychrophilic marine bacterium, Vibrio sp. strain ABE-1.

    PubMed

    Chou, M; Matsunaga, T; Takada, Y; Fukunaga, N

    1999-05-01

    NH4(+) transport system of a psychrophilic marine bacterium Vibrio sp. strain ABE-1 (Vibrio ABE-1) was examined by measuring the uptake of [14C]methylammonium ion (14CH3NH3+) into the intact cells. 14CH3NH3+ uptake was detected in cells grown in medium containing glutamate as the sole nitrogen source, but not in those grown in medium containing NH4Cl instead of glutamate. Vibrio ABE-1 did not utilize CH3NH3+ as a carbon or nitrogen source. NH4Cl and nonradiolabeled CH3NH3+ completely inhibited 14CH3NH3+ uptake. These results indicate that 14CH3NH3+ uptake in this bacterium is mediated via an NH4+ transport system and not by a specific carrier for CH3NH3+. The respiratory substrate succinate was required to drive 14CH3NH3+ uptake and the uptake was completely inhibited by KCN, indicating that the uptake was energy dependent. The electrochemical potentials of H+ and/or Na+ across membranes were suggested to be the driving forces for the transport system because the ionophores carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone and monensin strongly inhibited uptake activities at pH 6.5 and 8.5, respectively. Furthermore, KCl activated 14CH3NH3+ uptake. The 14CH3NH3+ uptake activity of Vibrio ABE-1 was markedly high at temperatures between 0 degrees and 15 degrees C, and the apparent Km value for CH3NH3+ of the uptake did not change significantly over the temperature range from 0 degrees to 25 degrees C. Thus, the NH4+ transport system of this bacterium was highly active at low temperatures.

  17. Antimicrobial polyketide furanoterpenoids from seaweed-associated heterotrophic bacterium Bacillus subtilis MTCC 10403.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Kajal; Thilakan, Bini; Raola, Vamshi Krishna

    2017-10-01

    Brown seaweed Anthophycus longifolius (Turner) Kützing (family Sargassaceae) associated heterotrophic bacterium Bacillus subtilis MTCC 10403 was found to be a potent isolate with broad range of antibacterial activity against important perceptive food pathogens Vibrio parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus, and Aeromonas hydrophila. This bacterium was positive for polyketide synthetase gene (KC589397), and therefore, was selected to bioprospect specialized metabolites bearing polyketide backbone. Bioactivity-guided chromatographic fractionation of the ethyl acetate extract of the seaweed-associated bacterium segregated four homologous polyketide furanoterpenoids with potential antibacterial activities against clinically important pathogens. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay showed that the referral antibiotics tetracycline and ampicillin were active at 25 μg/mL against the test pathogens, whereas the previously undescribed (4E)-methyl 13-((16-(furan-2-yl) ethyl)-octahydro-7-hydroxy-4-((E)-23-methylbut-21-enyl)-2H-chromen-6-yl)-4-methylpent-4-enoate (compound 1) and methyl 3-(hexahydro-9-((E)-3-methylpent-1-enyl)-4H-furo[3,2-g]isochromen-6-yl) propanoate (compound 3) displayed antibacterial activities against the test pathogens at a lesser concentration (MIC < 7 μg/mL). The title compounds were characterized by comprehensive nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopic experiments. Polyketide synthase catalyzed putative biosynthetic mechanism additionally corroborated the structural ascriptions of the hitherto undescribed furanoterpenoids from seaweed-associated bacterial symbiont. The electronic and hydrophobic parameters appeared to hold a conspicuous part in directing the antibacterial properties of the compounds. Seaweed-associated B. subtilis MTCC 10403 demonstrated to represent a potential source of antimicrobial polyketides for pharmaceutical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Chitin Utilization by the Insect-Transmitted Bacterium Xylella fastidiosa▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Killiny, Nabil; Prado, Simone S.; Almeida, Rodrigo P. P.

    2010-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is an insect-borne bacterium that colonizes xylem vessels of a large number of host plants, including several crops of economic importance. Chitin is a polysaccharide present in the cuticle of leafhopper vectors of X. fastidiosa and may serve as a carbon source for this bacterium. Biological assays showed that X. fastidiosa reached larger populations in the presence of chitin. Additionally, chitin induced phenotypic changes in this bacterium, notably increasing adhesiveness. Quantitative PCR assays indicated transcriptional changes in the presence of chitin, and an enzymatic assay demonstrated chitinolytic activity by X. fastidiosa. An ortholog of the chitinase A gene (chiA) was identified in the X. fastidiosa genome. The in silico analysis revealed that the open reading frame of chiA encodes a protein of 351 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 40 kDa. chiA is in a locus that consists of genes implicated in polysaccharide degradation. Moreover, this locus was also found in the genomes of closely related bacteria in the genus Xanthomonas, which are plant but not insect associated. X. fastidiosa degraded chitin when grown on a solid chitin-yeast extract-agar medium and grew in liquid medium with chitin as the sole carbon source; ChiA was also determined to be secreted. The gene encoding ChiA was cloned into Escherichia coli, and endochitinase activity was detected in the transformant, showing that the gene is functional and involved in chitin degradation. The results suggest that X. fastidiosa may use its vectors' foregut surface as a carbon source. In addition, chitin may trigger X. fastidiosa's gene regulation and biofilm formation within vectors. Further work is necessary to characterize the role of chitin and its utilization in X. fastidiosa. PMID:20656858

  19. Treatment of Alkaline Cr(VI)-Contaminated Leachate with an Alkaliphilic Metal-Reducing Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Watts, Mathew P; Khijniak, Tatiana V; Boothman, Christopher; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2015-08-15

    Chromium in its toxic Cr(VI) valence state is a common contaminant particularly associated with alkaline environments. A well-publicized case of this occurred in Glasgow, United Kingdom, where poorly controlled disposal of a cementitious industrial by-product, chromite ore processing residue (COPR), has resulted in extensive contamination by Cr(VI)-contaminated alkaline leachates. In the search for viable bioremediation treatments for Cr(VI), a variety of bacteria that are capable of reduction of the toxic and highly soluble Cr(VI) to the relatively nontoxic and less mobile Cr(III) oxidation state, predominantly under circumneutral pH conditions, have been isolated. Recently, however, alkaliphilic bacteria that have the potential to reduce Cr(VI) under alkaline conditions have been identified. This study focuses on the application of a metal-reducing bacterium to the remediation of alkaline Cr(VI)-contaminated leachates from COPR. This bacterium, belonging to the Halomonas genus, was found to exhibit growth concomitant to Cr(VI) reduction under alkaline conditions (pH 10). Bacterial cells were able to rapidly remove high concentrations of aqueous Cr(VI) (2.5 mM) under anaerobic conditions, up to a starting pH of 11. Cr(VI) reduction rates were controlled by pH, with slower removal observed at pH 11, compared to pH 10, while no removal was observed at pH 12. The reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) resulted in the precipitation of Cr(III) biominerals, which were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (TEM-EDX) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The effectiveness of this haloalkaliphilic bacterium for Cr(VI) reduction at high pH suggests potential for its use as an in situ treatment of COPR and other alkaline Cr(VI)-contaminated environments. Copyright © 2015, Watts et al.

  20. Novel insights into the algicidal bacterium DH77-1 killing the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoru; Li, Xinyi; Zhou, Yanyan; Zheng, Wei; Yu, Changping; Zheng, Tianling

    2014-06-01

    Algicidal bacteria may play a major role in controlling harmful algal blooms (HABs) dynamics. Bacterium DH77-1 was isolated with high algicidal activity against the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense and identified as Joostella sp. DH77-1. The results showed that DH77-1 exhibited algicidal activity through indirect attack, which excreted active substance into the filtrate. It had a relatively wide host range and the active substance of DH77-1 was relatively stable since temperature, pH and storage condition had no obvious effect on the algicidal activity. The algicidal compound from bacterium DH77-1 was isolated based on activity-guided bioassay and the molecular weight was determined to be 125.88 by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometer, however further identification via nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra is ongoing. The physiological responses of algal cells after exposure to the DH77-1 algicidal substances were as follows: the antioxidant system of A. tamarense responded positively in self-defense; total protein content decreased significantly as did the photosynthetic pigment content; superoxide dismutase, peroxidase enzyme and malondialdehyde content increased extraordinarily and algal cell nucleic acid leaked seriously ultimately inducing cell death. Furthermore, DH77-1 is the first record of a Joostella sp. bacterium being algicidal to the harmful dinoflagellate A. tamarense, and the bacterial culture and the active compounds might be potentially used as a bio-agent for controlling harmful algal blooms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Haloanaerobium salsugo sp. nov., a moderately halophilic, anaerobic bacterium from a subterranean brine

    SciTech Connect

    Bhupathiraju, V.K.; Sharma, P.K.; Tanner, R.S.

    A strictly anaerobic, moderately halophilic, gram-negative bacterium was isolated from a highly saline oil field brine. The bacterium was a non-spore-forming, nonmotile rod, appearing singly, in pairs, or occasionally as long chains, and measured 0.3 to 0.4 by 2.6 to 4 {micro}m. The bacterium had a specific requirement for NaCl and grew at NaCl concentrations of between 6 and 24%, with optimal growth at 9% NaCl. The isolate grew at temperatures of between 22 and 51 C and pH values of between 5.6 and 8.0. The doubling time in a complex medium containing 10% NaCl was 9 h. Growth wasmore » inhibited by chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and penicillin but not by cycloheximide or azide. Fermentable substrates were predominantly carbohydrates. The end products of glucose fermentation were acetate, ethanol, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}. The major components of the cellular fatty acids were C{sub 14:0}, C{sub 16:0}, C{sub 16:1}, and C{sub 17:0 cyc} acids. The DNA base composition of the isolate was 34 mol% G+C. Oligonucleotide catalog and sequence analyses of the 16S rRNA showed that strain VS-752{sup T} was most closely related to Haloanaerobium praevalens GSL{sup T} (ATCC 33744), the sole member of the genus Haloanaerobium. The authors propose that strain VS-752 (ATCC 51327) by established as the type strain of a new species, Haloanaerobium salsugo, in the genus Haloanaerobium. 40 refs., 3 figs, 5 tabs.« less

  2. Gene cloning and overexpression of a geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase of an extremely thermophilic bacterium, Thermus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Ohto, C; Ishida, C; Koike-Takeshita, A; Yokoyama, K; Muramatsu, M; Nishino, T; Obata, S

    1999-02-01

    A geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) synthase gene of an extremely thermophilic bacterium, Thermus thermophilus, was cloned and sequenced. T. thermophilus GGPP synthase, overexpressed in Escherichia coli cells as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein, was purified and characterized. The fusion protein, retaining thermostability, formed a homodimer, and showed higher specific activity than did a partially purified thermostable enzyme previously reported. Optimal reaction conditions and kinetic parameters were also examined. The deduced amino acid sequence indicated that T. thermophilus GGPP synthase was excluded from the group of bacterial type GGPP synthases and lacked the insertion amino acid residues in the first aspartate-rich motif as do archaeal and eukaryotic short-chain prenyltransferases.

  3. Novel oxidized derivatives of antifungal pyrrolnitrin from the bacterium Burkholderia cepacia K87.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Zakir; Park, Kyungseok; Lee, Sang Yeob; Park, Jung Kon; Varughese, Titto; Moon, Surk-Sik

    2008-07-01

    The screening of antifungal active compounds from the fermentation extracts of soil-borne bacterium Burkholderia cepacia K87 afforded pyrrolnitrin (1) and two new pyrrolnitrin analogs, 3-chloro-4-(3-chloro-2-nitrophenyl)-5-methoxy-3-pyrrolin-2-one (2) and 4-chloro-3-(3-chloro-2-nitrophenyl)-5-methoxy-3-pyrrolin-2-one (3). Pyrrolnitrin showed strong antifungal activity against Rhizoctonia solani but the analogs (2 and 3) were found to be marginally active. The isolates, 2 and 3, are believed to be biodegraded derivatives of pyrrolnitrin.

  4. A bacterium that can grow by using arsenic instead of phosphorus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfe-Simon, Felisa; Blum, J.S.; Kulp, T.R.; Gordon, G.W.; Hoeft, S.E.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Stolz, J.F.; Webb, S.M.; Weber, P.K.; Davies, P.C.W.; Anbar, A.D.; Oremland, R.S.

    2011-01-01

    Life is mostly composed of the elements carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur, and phosphorus. Although these six elements make up nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids and thus the bulk of living matter, it is theoretically possible that some other elements in the periodic table could serve the same functions. Here, we describe a bacterium, strain GFAJ-1 of the Halomonadaceae, isolated from Mono Lake, California, that is able to substitute arsenic for phosphorus to sustain its growth. Our data show evidence for arsenate in macromolecules that normally contain phosphate, most notably nucleic acids and proteins. Exchange of one of the major bio-elements may have profound evolutionary and geochemical importance.

  5. Illuminating the landscape of host–pathogen interactions with the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Cossart, Pascale

    2011-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes has, in 25 y, become a model in infection biology. Through the analysis of both its saprophytic life and infectious process, new concepts in microbiology, cell biology, and pathogenesis have been discovered. This review will update our knowledge on this intracellular pathogen and highlight the most recent breakthroughs. Promising areas of investigation such as the increasingly recognized relevance for the infectious process, of RNA-mediated regulations in the bacterium, and the role of bacterially controlled posttranslational and epigenetic modifications in the host will also be discussed. PMID:22114192

  6. Partial genome sequence of the haloalkaliphilic soda lake bacterium Thioalkalivibrio thiocyanoxidans ARh 2 T

    DOE PAGES

    Berben, Tom; Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Ivanova, Natalia; ...

    2015-10-26

    Thioalkalivibrio thiocyanoxidans strain ARh 2 T is a sulfur-oxidizing bacterium isolated from haloalkaline soda lakes. It is a motile, Gram-negative member of the Gammaproteobacteria. Remarkable properties include the ability to grow on thiocyanate as the sole energy, sulfur and nitrogen source, and the capability of growth at salinities of up to 4.3 M total Na +. This draft genome sequence consists of 61 scaffolds comprising 2,765,337 bp, and contains 2616 protein-coding and 61 RNA-coding genes. In conclusion, this organism was sequenced as part of the Community Science Program of the DOE Joint Genome Institute.

  7. Aerobic Reduction of Arsenate by a Bacterium Isolated From Activated Sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozai, N.; Ohnuki, T.; Hanada, S.; Nakamura, K.; Francis, A. J.

    2006-12-01

    Microlunatus phosphovorus strain NM-1 is a polyphosphate-accumulating bacterium isolated from activated sludge. This bacterium takes up a large amount of polyphosphate under aerobic conditions and release phosphate ions by hydrolysis of polyphosphate to orthophosphate under anaerobic conditions to derive energy for taking up substrates. To understand the nature of this strain, especially, influence of potential contaminants in sewage and wastewater on growth, we have been investigating behavior of this bacterium in media containing arsenic. The present paper mainly reports reduction of arsenate by this bacterium under aerobic conditions. The strain NM-1 (JCM 9379) was aerobically cultured at 30 °C in a nutrient medium containing 2.5 g/l peptone, 0.5 g/l glucose, 1.5 g/l yeast extract, and arsenic [Na2HAsO4 (As(V)) or Na3AsO3 (As(III))] at concentrations between 0 and 50 mM. The cells collected from arsenic-free media were dispersed in buffer solutions containing 2mM HEPES, 10mM NaCl, prescribed concentrations of As(V), and 0-0.2 percent glucose. Then, this cell suspension was kept at 20 °C under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. The speciation of arsenic was carried out by ion chromatography and ICP-MS. The growth of the strain under aerobic conditions was enhanced by the addition of As(V) at the concentration between 1 and 10 mM. The maximum optical density of the culture in the medium containing 5mM As(V) was 1.4 times greater than that of the control culture. Below the As(V) concentration of 10mM, most of the As(V) was reduced to As(III). The growth of the strain under anaerobic conditions has not been observed so far. The cells in the buffer solutions reduced As(V) under aerobic condition. The reduction was enhanced by the addition of glucose. However, the cell did not reduce As(V) under anaerobic conditions. The strain NM-1 showed high resistance to As(V) and As(III). The maximum optical density of the culture grown in a medium containing 50 mM As(V) was only

  8. Pneumonia and bacteremia caused by a previously undescribed Moraxella-like bacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Goetz, M B; Jones, J

    1982-01-01

    Immunocompromised patients are frequently subject to unusual infections. We recently treated a renal allograft recipient for pneumonia due to a hitherto undescribed Moraxella-like bacterium which most closely resembles M-5. M-5 has previously been associated in humans only with dog bites and wound infections. The patient responded well to treatment with aminoglycosides and cephalosporins. Susceptibility to these drugs was demonstrated in vitro by a broth dilution technique. On the basis of the known ability of Moraxella species to colonize the oropharynx and the patient's lack of animal exposure, we propose that our patient's illness was secondary to aspiration of colonized oropharyngeal contents. Images PMID:7040467

  9. Complete genome sequence of the aerobically denitrifying thermophilic bacterium Chelatococcus daeguensis TAD1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yunlong; Lin, Ershu; Huang, Shaobin

    Chelatococcus daeguensis TAD1 is a themophilic bacterium isolated from a biotrickling filter used to treat NOx in Ruiming Power Plant, located in Guangzhou, China, which shows an excellent aerobic denitrification activity at high temperature. The complete genome sequence of this strain was reported in the present study. Genes related to the aerobic denitrification were identified through whole genome analysis. This work will facilitate the mechanism of aerobic denitrification and provide evidence for its potential application in the nitrogen removal. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Aggregation of the rhizospheric bacterium Azospirillum brasilense in response to oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdoun, Hamid; McMillan, Mary; Pereg, Lily

    2016-04-01

    Azospirillum brasilense spp. have ecological, scientific and agricultural importance. As model plant growth promoting rhizobacteria they interact with a large variety of plants, including important food and cash crops. Azospirillum strains are known for their production of plant growth hormones that enhance root systems and for their ability to fix nitrogen. Azospirillum cells transform in response to environmental cues. The production of exopolysaccharides and cell aggregation during cellular transformation are important steps in the attachment of Azospirillum to roots. We investigate signals that induce cellular transformation and aggregation in the Azospirillum and report on the importance of oxygen to the process of aggregation in this rhizospheric bacterium.

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of the Filamentous Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Kuo-Hsiang; Barry, Kerrie; Chertkov, Olga

    Chloroflexus aurantiacus is a thermophilic filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic (FAP) bacterium, and can grow phototrophically under anaerobic conditions or chemotrophically under aerobic and dark conditions. According to 16S rRNA analysis, Chloroflexi species are the earliest branching bacteria capable of photosynthesis, and Cfl. aurantiacus has been long regarded as a key organism to resolve the obscurity of the origin and early evolution of photosynthesis. Cfl. aurantiacus contains a chimeric photosystem that comprises some characters of green sulfur bacteria and purple photosynthetic bacteria, and also has some unique electron transport proteins compared to other photosynthetic bacteria.

  12. A marine bacterium, Micrococcus MCCB 104, antagonistic to vibrios in prawn larval rearing systems.

    PubMed

    Jayaprakash, N S; Pai, S Somnath; Anas, A; Preetha, R; Philip, Rosamma; Singh, I S Bright

    2005-12-30

    A marine bacterium, Micrococcus MCCB 104, isolated from hatchery water, demonstrated extracellular antagonistic properties against Vibrio alginolyticus, V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus, V. fluviallis, V. nereis, V. proteolyticus, V. mediterranei, V cholerae and Aeromonas sp., bacteria associated with Macrobrachium rosenbergii larval rearing systems. The isolate inhibited the growth of V. alginolyticus during co-culture. The antagonistic component of the extracellular product was heat-stable and insensitive to proteases, lipase, catalase and alpha-amylase. Micrococcus MCCB 104 was demonstrated to be non-pathogenic to M. rosenbergii larvae.

  13. Isolation of an unidentified pink-pigmented bacterium in a clinical specimen.

    PubMed Central

    Odugbemi, T; Nwofor, C; Joiner, K T

    1988-01-01

    An unidentified pink-pigmented bacterium isolated from a clinical specimen is reported. The organism was oxidase, urease, and catalase positive; it grew on Thayer-Martin and MacConkey media. The isolate is possibly similar to an unnamed taxon (G.L. Gilardi and Y.C. Faur, J. Clin. Microbiol. 20:626-629, 1984); however, it had unique characteristics of nonmotility with no flagellum detectable and was a gram-negative coccoid with a few rods in pairs and negative for starch hydrolysis. PMID:3384903

  14. Isolation of an unidentified pink-pigmented bacterium in a clinical specimen.

    PubMed

    Odugbemi, T; Nwofor, C; Joiner, K T

    1988-05-01

    An unidentified pink-pigmented bacterium isolated from a clinical specimen is reported. The organism was oxidase, urease, and catalase positive; it grew on Thayer-Martin and MacConkey media. The isolate is possibly similar to an unnamed taxon (G.L. Gilardi and Y.C. Faur, J. Clin. Microbiol. 20:626-629, 1984); however, it had unique characteristics of nonmotility with no flagellum detectable and was a gram-negative coccoid with a few rods in pairs and negative for starch hydrolysis.

  15. Enhanced biosynthesis of dihydrodaidzein and dihydrogenistein by a newly isolated bovine rumen anaerobic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiu-Ling; Shin, Kwang-Hee; Hur, Hor-Gil; Kim, Su-Il

    2005-02-09

    A rod-shaped and Gram-positive anaerobic bacterium, named Niu-O16, which was isolated from bovine rumen contents, was found to be capable of anaerobically converting isoflavones daidzein and genistein to dihydrodaidzein (DHD) and dihydrogenistein (DHG), respectively. The metabolites DHD and DHG were identified using EI-MS and NMR spectrometric analyses. Stereoisomeric metabolites, which were separated on chiral stationary phase HPLC, were formed in equal amounts by the strain Niu-O16. Tautomerization reaction occurred on the B-ring of DHD and DHG seems to be attributed to the equal production of stereoisomeric metabolites. For the synthesis of DHD, the strain Niu-O16 showed an optimal pH range from 6.0 to 7.0 and completely reduced up to 800 microM of daidzein to DHD with the initial OD600nm=1.0 and pH 7.0 for 3 days incubation. The strain Niu-O16, showed relatively faster reduction activity toward daidzein to produce DHD than the previously isolated human intestinal bacterium Clostridium sp. HGH6.

  16. Physiological characterization of strain DCB-1, a unique dehalogenating sulfidogenic bacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, T O; Linkfield, T G; Tiedje, J M

    1988-01-01

    Strain DCB-1 is an obligately anaerobic bacterium which carries out the reductive dehalogenation of halobenzoates and was previously known to grow only on pyruvate plus 20% ruminal fluid. When various electron acceptors were supplied, thiosulfate and sulfite were found to stimulate growth. Sulfide was produced from thiosulfate. Cytochrome c and desulfoviridin were detected. The mol% G+C was 49 (at the thermal denaturation temperature). Of 55 carbon sources tested, only pyruvate supported growth as the sole carbon source in mineral medium. Lactate, acetate, L- and D-malate, glycerol, and L- and D-arabinose stimulated growth when supplemented with 10% ruminal fluid and 20 mM thiosulfate. In mineral medium, pyruvate was converted to acetate and lactate, with small amounts of succinate and fumarate accumulating transiently. During growth with thiosulfate, all of these products accumulated transiently. Addition of excess hydrogen to pyruvate-grown cultures resulted in diversion of carbon to formate, lactate, and butyrate, which caused a decrease in cell yield. We conclude that strain DCB-1 is a new type of sulfidogenic bacterium. PMID:3223760

  17. Biodegradation of Ethylene Glycol by a Salt-Requiring Bacterium1

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Carlos F.; Taber, Willard A.; Zeitoun, M. A.

    1972-01-01

    A gram-negative nonmotile rod which was capable of using 1,2-14C-ethylene glycol as a sole carbon source for growth was isolated from a brine pond, Great Salt Lake, Utah. The bacterium (ATCC 27042) required at least 0.85% NaCl for growth and, although the chloride ion was replaceable by sulfate ion, the sodium ion was not replaceable by potassium ion. The maximal concentration of salt tolerated for growth was approximately 12%. The bacterium was oxidase-negative when N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine was used and weakly positive when N,N,N′,N′-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine was used. It grows on many sugars but does not ferment them, it does not have an exogenous vitamin requirement, and it possesses a guanine plus cytosine ratio of 64.3%. Incorporation of ethylene glycol carbon into cell and respired CO2 was quantitated by use of radioactive ethylene glycol and a force-aerated fermentor. Glucose suppressed ethylene glycol metabolism. Cells grown on ethylene and propylene glycol respired ethylene glycol in a Warburg respirometer more rapidly than cells grown on glucose. Spectrophotometric evidence was obtained for oxidation of glycolate to glyoxylate by a dialyzed cell extract. PMID:4568254

  18. Systematic mapping of two component response regulators to gene targets in a model sulfate reducing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, Lara; Luning, Eric G; Dehal, Paramvir S; Price, Morgan N; Arkin, Adam P; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2011-10-12

    Two component regulatory systems are the primary form of signal transduction in bacteria. Although genomic binding sites have been determined for several eukaryotic and bacterial transcription factors, comprehensive identification of gene targets of two component response regulators remains challenging due to the lack of knowledge of the signals required for their activation. We focused our study on Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, a sulfate reducing bacterium that encodes unusually diverse and largely uncharacterized two component signal transduction systems. We report the first systematic mapping of the genes regulated by all transcriptionally acting response regulators in a single bacterium. Our results enabled functional predictions for several response regulators and include key processes of carbon, nitrogen and energy metabolism, cell motility and biofilm formation, and responses to stresses such as nitrite, low potassium and phosphate starvation. Our study also led to the prediction of new genes and regulatory networks, which found corroboration in a compendium of transcriptome data available for D. vulgaris. For several regulators we predicted and experimentally verified the binding site motifs, most of which were discovered as part of this study. The gene targets identified for the response regulators allowed strong functional predictions to be made for the corresponding two component systems. By tracking the D. vulgaris regulators and their motifs outside the Desulfovibrio spp. we provide testable hypotheses regarding the functions of orthologous regulators in other organisms. The in vitro array based method optimized here is generally applicable for the study of such systems in all organisms.

  19. Removal of arsenic from groundwater by using a native isolated arsenite-oxidizing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Kao, An-Chieh; Chu, Yu-Ju; Hsu, Fu-Lan; Liao, Vivian Hsiu-Chuan

    2013-12-01

    Arsenic (As) contamination of groundwater is a significant public health concern. In this study, the removal of arsenic from groundwater using biological processes was investigated. The efficiency of arsenite (As(III)) bacterial oxidation and subsequent arsenate (As(V)) removal from contaminated groundwater using bacterial biomass was examined. A novel As(III)-oxidizing bacterium (As7325) was isolated from the aquifer in the blackfoot disease (BFD) endemic area in Taiwan. As7325 oxidized 2300μg/l As(III) using in situ As(III)-contaminated groundwater under aerobic conditions within 1d. After the oxidation of As(III) to As(V), As(V) removal was further examined using As7325 cell pellets. The results showed that As(V) could be adsorbed efficiently by lyophilized As7325 cell pellets, the efficiency of which was related to lyophilized cell pellet concentration. Our study conducted the examination of an alternative technology for the removal of As(III) and As(V) from groundwater, indicating that the oxidation of As(III)-contaminated groundwater by native isolated bacterium, followed by As(V) removal using bacterial biomass is a potentially effective technology for the treatment of As(III)-contaminated groundwater. © 2013.

  20. Quorum sensing activity of Citrobacter amalonaticus L8A, a bacterium isolated from dental plaque.

    PubMed

    Goh, Share-Yuan; Khan, Saad Ahmed; Tee, Kok Keng; Abu Kasim, Noor Hayaty; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2016-02-10

    Cell-cell communication is also known as quorum sensing (QS) that happens in the bacterial cells with the aim to regulate their genes expression in response to increased cell density. In this study, a bacterium (L8A) isolated from dental plaque biofilm was identified as Citrobacter amalonaticus by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). Its N-acylhomoserine-lactone (AHL) production was screened by using two types of AHL biosensors namely Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Escherichia coli [pSB401]. Citrobacter amalonaticus strain L8A was identified and confirmed producing numerous types of AHL namely N-butyryl-L-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL), N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C6-HSL), N-octanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C8-HSL) and N-hexadecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C16-HSL). We performed the whole genome sequence analysis of this oral isolate where its genome sequence reveals the presence of QS signal synthase gene and our work will pave the ways to study the function of the related QS genes in this bacterium.

  1. Quorum sensing activity of Citrobacter amalonaticus L8A, a bacterium isolated from dental plaque

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Share-Yuan; Khan, Saad Ahmed; Tee, Kok Keng; Abu Kasim, Noor Hayaty; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2016-01-01

    Cell-cell communication is also known as quorum sensing (QS) that happens in the bacterial cells with the aim to regulate their genes expression in response to increased cell density. In this study, a bacterium (L8A) isolated from dental plaque biofilm was identified as Citrobacter amalonaticus by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). Its N-acylhomoserine-lactone (AHL) production was screened by using two types of AHL biosensors namely Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Escherichia coli [pSB401]. Citrobacter amalonaticus strain L8A was identified and confirmed producing numerous types of AHL namely N-butyryl-L-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL), N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C6-HSL), N-octanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C8-HSL) and N-hexadecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C16-HSL). We performed the whole genome sequence analysis of this oral isolate where its genome sequence reveals the presence of QS signal synthase gene and our work will pave the ways to study the function of the related QS genes in this bacterium. PMID:26860259

  2. Characterization of Acrylamidase isolated from a newly isolated acrylamide-utilizing bacterium, Ralstonia eutropha AUM-01.

    PubMed

    Cha, Minseok; Chambliss, Glenn H

    2011-02-01

    A mesophilic bacterium capable of utilizing acrylamide was isolated, AUM-01, from soil collected from leaf litter at Picnic Point on the UW-Madison campus. In minimal medium with acrylamide as the sole carbon and nitrogen source, a batch culture of AUM-01 completely converted 28.0 mM acrylamide to acrylic acid in 8 h and reached a cell density of 0.3 (A₆₀₀)). Afterward all the acrylic acid was degraded by 20 h with the cell density increasing to 1.9 (A₆₀₀). The acrylamide-utilizing bacterium was identified as Ralstonia eutropha based on morphological observations, the BiOLOG GN2 MicroPlate™ identification system for Gram-negative bacteria, and additional physiological tests. An acrylamidase that hydrolyzes acrylamide to acrylic acid was purified from the strain AUM-01. The molecular weight of the enzyme from AUM-01 was determined to be 38 kDa by SDS-PAGE. The enzyme had pH and temperature optima of 6.3 and 55°C, and the influence of different metals and amino acids on the ability of the purified protein to transform acrylamide to acrylic acid was evaluated. The enzyme from AUM-01 was totally inhibited by ZnSO₄ and AgNO₃.

  3. Isolation of a thermophilic bacterium capable of low-molecular-weight polyethylene degradation.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Mal Nam

    2013-02-01

    A thermophilic bacterium capable of low-molecular-weight polyethylene (LMWPE) degradation was isolated from a compost sample, and was identified as Chelatococcus sp. E1, through sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. LMWPE was prepared by thermal degradation of commercial PE in a strict nitrogen atmosphere. LMWPE with a weight-average-molecular-weight (Mw) in the range of 1,700-23,700 was noticeably mineralized into CO(2) by the bacterium. The biodegradability of LMWPE decreased as the Mw increased. The low molecular weight fraction of LMWPE decreased significantly as a result of the degradation process, and thereby both the number-average-molecular-weight and Mw increased after biodegradation. The polydispersity of LMWPE was either narrowed or widened, depending on the initial Mw of LMWPE, due to the preferential elimination of the low molecular weight fraction, in comparison to the high molecular weight portion. LMWPE free from an extremely low molecular weight fraction was also mineralized by the strain at a remarkable rate, and FTIR peaks assignable to C-O stretching appeared as a result of microbial action. The FTIR peaks corresponding to alkenes also became more intense, indicating that dehydrogenations occurred concomitantly with microbial induced oxidation.

  4. Soil-Bacterium Compatibility Model as a Decision-Making Tool for Soil Bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Horemans, Benjamin; Breugelmans, Philip; Saeys, Wouter; Springael, Dirk

    2017-02-07

    Bioremediation of organic pollutant contaminated soil involving bioaugmentation with dedicated bacteria specialized in degrading the pollutant is suggested as a green and economically sound alternative to physico-chemical treatment. However, intrinsic soil characteristics impact the success of bioaugmentation. The feasibility of using partial least-squares regression (PLSR) to predict the success of bioaugmentation in contaminated soil based on the intrinsic physico-chemical soil characteristics and, hence, to improve the success of bioaugmentation, was examined. As a proof of principle, PLSR was used to build soil-bacterium compatibility models to predict the bioaugmentation success of the phenanthrene-degrading Novosphingobium sp. LH128. The survival and biodegradation activity of strain LH128 were measured in 20 soils and correlated with the soil characteristics. PLSR was able to predict the strain's survival using 12 variables or less while the PAH-degrading activity of strain LH128 in soils that show survival was predicted using 9 variables. A three-step approach using the developed soil-bacterium compatibility models is proposed as a decision making tool and first estimation to select compatible soils and organisms and increase the chance of success of bioaugmentation.

  5. Characterization of carbon dioxide concentrating chemolithotrophic bacterium Serratia sp. ISTD04 for production of biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manish; Morya, Raj; Gnansounou, Edgard; Larroche, Christian; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2017-11-01

    Proteomics and metabolomics analysis has become a powerful tool for characterization of microbial ability for fixation of Carbon dioxide. Bacterial community of palaeoproterozoic metasediments was enriched in the shake flask culture in the presence of NaHCO 3 . One of the isolate showed resistance to NaHCO 3 (100mM) and was identified as Serratia sp. ISTD04 by 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Carbon dioxide fixing ability of the bacterium was established by carbonic anhydrase enzyme assay along with proteomic analysis by LC-MS/MS. In proteomic analysis 96 proteins were identified out of these 6 protein involved in carbon dioxide fixation, 11 in fatty acid metabolism, indicating the carbon dioxide fixing potency of bacterium along with production of biofuel. GC-MS analysis revealed that hydrocarbons and FAMEs produced by bacteria within the range of C 13 -C 24 and C 11 -C 19 respectively. Presence of 59% saturated and 41% unsaturated organic compounds, make it a better fuel composition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Engineering cellulolytic bacterium Clostridium thermocellum to co-ferment cellulose- and hemicellulose-derived sugars simultaneously

    DOE PAGES

    Xiong, Wei; Reyes, Luis H.; Michener, William E.; ...

    2018-04-10

    Here, cellulose and hemicellulose are the most abundant components in plant biomass. A preferred Consolidated Bioprocessing (CBP) system is one which can directly convert both cellulose and hemicellulose into target products without adding the costly hydrolytic enzyme cocktail. In this work, the thermophilic, cellulolytic, and anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium thermocellum DSM 1313, was engineered to grow on xylose in addition to cellulose. Both xylA (encoding for xylose isomerase) and xylB (encoding for xylulokinase) genes from the thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus were introduced to enable xylose utilization while still retaining its inherent ability to grow on 6-carbon substrates. Targeted integration ofmore » xylAB into C. thermocellum genome realized simultaneous fermentation of xylose with glucose, with cellobiose (glucose dimer), and with cellulose, respectively, without carbon catabolite repression. We also showed that the respective H 2 and ethanol production were twice as much when both xylose and cellulose were consumed simultaneously than when consuming cellulose alone. Moreover, the engineered xylose consumer can also utilize xylo-oligomers (with degree of polymerization of 2-7) in the presence of xylose. Isotopic tracer studies also revealed that the engineered xylose catabolism contributed to the production of ethanol from xylan which is a model hemicellulose in mixed sugar fermentation, demonstrating immense potential of this enhanced CBP strain in co-utilizing both cellulose and hemicellulose for the production of fuels and chemicals.« less

  7. Engineering cellulolytic bacterium Clostridium thermocellum to co-ferment cellulose- and hemicellulose-derived sugars simultaneously

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Wei; Reyes, Luis H.; Michener, William E.

    Here, cellulose and hemicellulose are the most abundant components in plant biomass. A preferred Consolidated Bioprocessing (CBP) system is one which can directly convert both cellulose and hemicellulose into target products without adding the costly hydrolytic enzyme cocktail. In this work, the thermophilic, cellulolytic, and anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium thermocellum DSM 1313, was engineered to grow on xylose in addition to cellulose. Both xylA (encoding for xylose isomerase) and xylB (encoding for xylulokinase) genes from the thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus were introduced to enable xylose utilization while still retaining its inherent ability to grow on 6-carbon substrates. Targeted integration ofmore » xylAB into C. thermocellum genome realized simultaneous fermentation of xylose with glucose, with cellobiose (glucose dimer), and with cellulose, respectively, without carbon catabolite repression. We also showed that the respective H 2 and ethanol production were twice as much when both xylose and cellulose were consumed simultaneously than when consuming cellulose alone. Moreover, the engineered xylose consumer can also utilize xylo-oligomers (with degree of polymerization of 2-7) in the presence of xylose. Isotopic tracer studies also revealed that the engineered xylose catabolism contributed to the production of ethanol from xylan which is a model hemicellulose in mixed sugar fermentation, demonstrating immense potential of this enhanced CBP strain in co-utilizing both cellulose and hemicellulose for the production of fuels and chemicals.« less

  8. Isolation and Characterization of a Novel, Highly Selective Astaxanthin-Producing Marine Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Asker, Dalal

    2017-10-18

    A high-throughput screening approach for astaxanthin-producing bacteria led to the discovery of a novel, highly selective astaxanthin-producing marine bacterium (strain N-5). Phylogenetic analysis based on partial 16S rRNA gene and phenotypic metabolic testing indicated it belongs to the genus Brevundimonas. Therefore, it was designated as Brevundimonas sp. strain N-5. To identify and quantify carotenoids produced by strain N-5, HPLC-DAD and HPLC-MS methods were used. The culture conditions including media, shaking, and time had significant effects on cell growth and carotenoids production including astaxanthin. The total carotenoids were ∼601.2 μg g -1 dry cells including a remarkable amount (364.6 μg g -1 dry cells) of optically pure astaxanthin (3S, 3'S) isomer, with high selectivity (∼60.6%) under medium aeration conditions. Notably, increasing the culture aeration enhanced astaxanthin production up to 85% of total carotenoids. This is the first report that describes a natural, highly selective astaxanthin-producing marine bacterium.

  9. Extreme furfural tolerance of a soil bacterium Enterobacter cloacae GGT036.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sun Young; Gong, Gyeongtaek; Park, Hong-Sil; Um, Youngsoon; Sim, Sang Jun; Woo, Han Min

    2015-01-10

    Detoxification process of cellular inhibitors including furfural is essential for production of bio-based chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass. Here we isolated an extreme furfural-tolerant bacterium Enterobacter cloacae GGT036 from soil sample collected in Mt. Gwanak, Republic of Korea. Among isolated bacteria, only E. cloacae GGT036 showed cell growth with 35 mM furfural under aerobic culture. Compared to the maximal half inhibitory concentration (IC50) of well-known industrial strains Escherichia coli (24.9 mM furfural) and Corynebacterium glutamicum (10 mM furfural) based on the cell density, IC50 of E. cloacae GGT036 (47.7 mM) was significantly higher after 24 h, compared to E. coli and C. glutamicum. Since bacterial cell growth was exponentially inhibited depending on linearly increased furfural concentrations in the medium, we concluded that E. cloacae GGT036 is an extreme furfural-tolerant bacterium. Recently, the complete genome sequence of E. cloacae GGT036 was announced and this could provide an insight for engineering of E. cloacae GGT036 itself or other industrially relevant bacteria. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A highly infective plant-associated bacterium influences reproductive rates in pea aphids

    PubMed Central

    Hendry, Tory A.; Clark, Kelley J.; Baltrus, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Pea aphids, Acyrthosiphon pisum, have the potential to increase reproduction as a defence against pathogens, though how frequently this occurs or how infection with live pathogens influences this response is not well understood. Here we determine the minimum infective dose of an environmentally common bacterium and possible aphid pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae, to determine the likelihood of pathogenic effects to pea aphids. Additionally, we used P. syringae infection to investigate how live pathogens may alter reproductive rates. We found that oral bacterial exposure decreased subsequent survival of aphids in a dose-dependent manner and we estimate that ingestion of less than 10 bacterial cells is sufficient to increase aphid mortality. Pathogen dose was positively related to aphid reproduction. Aphids exposed to low bacterial doses showed decreased, although statistically indistinguishable, fecundity compared to controls. Aphids exposed to high doses reproduced significantly more than low dose treatments and also more, but not significantly so, than controls. These results are consistent with previous studies suggesting that pea aphids may use fecundity compensation as a response to pathogens. Consequently, even low levels of exposure to a common plant-associated bacterium may therefore have significant effects on pea aphid survival and reproduction. PMID:26998321

  11. Adopt a Bacterium - an active and collaborative learning experience in microbiology based on social media.

    PubMed

    Piantola, Marco Aurélio Floriano; Moreno, Ana Carolina Ramos; Matielo, Heloísa Alonso; Taschner, Natalia Pasternak; Cavalcante, Rafael Ciro Marques; Khan, Samia; Ferreira, Rita de Cássia Café

    2018-04-24

    The "Adopt a Bacterium" project is based on the use of social network as a tool in Microbiology undergraduate education, improving student learning and encouraging students to participate in collaborative learning. The approach involves active participation of both students and teachers, emphasizing knowledge exchange, based on widely used social media. Students were organized in groups and asked to adopt a specific bacterial genus and, subsequently, submit posts about "adopted genus". The formative assessment is based on posting information on Facebook®, and the summative assessment involves presentation of seminars about the adopted theme. To evaluate the project, students filled out three anonymous and voluntary surveys. Most of the students enjoyed the activities and positively evaluated the experience. A large amount of students declared a change in their attitude towards the way they processed information, especially regarding the use of scientific sources. Finally, we evaluated knowledge retention six months after the end of the course and students were able to recall relevant Microbiology concepts. Our results suggest that the "Adopt a Bacterium" project represents a useful strategy in Microbiology learning and may be applied to other academic fields. Copyright © 2018 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Detection of the Bacterium, Xylella fastidiosa, in Saliva of Glassy-Winged Sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Jose L.; Lacava, Paulo T.; Miller, Thomas A.

    2008-01-01

    Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), the glassy-winged sharpshooter, is one of the most important vectors of the bacterium, Xylella fastidiosa subsp. piercei (Xanthomonadales: Xanthomonadaceae) that causes Pierce's Disease in grapevines in California. In the present study we report a new method for studying pathogen transmission or probing behavior of H. vitripennis. When confined, H. vitripennis attempt to probe the surface of sterile containers 48 hours post-acquisition of X. f. piercei. The saliva deposited during attempted feeding probes was found to contain X. f. piercei. We observed no correlation between X. f. piercei titers in the foregut of H. vitripennis that fed on Xylella-infected grapevines and the presence of this bacterium in the deposited saliva. The infection rate after a 48 h post-acquisition feeding on healthy citrus and grapevines was observed to be 77% for H. vitripennis that fed on grapevines and 81% for H. vitripennis that fed on citrus, with no difference in the number of positive probing sites from H. vitripennis that fed on either grapevine or citrus. This method is amenable for individual assessment of X. f. piercei-infecuvity, with samples less likely to be affected by tissue contamination that is usually present in whole body extracts. PMID:20233080

  13. Co-infections and transmission dynamics in a tick-borne bacterium community exposed to songbirds.

    PubMed

    Heylen, Dieter; Fonville, Manoj; van Leeuwen, Arieke Docters; Sprong, Hein

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the transmission dynamics of a community of tick-borne pathogenic bacteria in a common European songbird (Parus major). Tick-naïve birds were infested with three successive batches (spaced 5 days apart) of field-collected Ixodes ricinus nymphs, carrying the following tick-borne bacteria: Rickettsia helvetica (16.9%), Borrelia garinii (1.9%), Borrelia miyamotoi (1.6%), Anaplasma phagocytophilum (1.2%) and Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis (0.4%). Fed ticks were screened for the pathogens after moulting to the next developmental phase. We found evidence for early transmission (within 2.75 days after exposure) of R. helvetica and B. garinii, and to a lesser extent of A. phagocytophilum based on the increased infection rates of ticks during the first infestation. The proportion of ticks infected with R. helvetica remained constant over the three infestations. In contrast, the infection rate of B. garinii in the ticks increased over the three infestations, indicating a more gradual development of host tissue infection. No interactions were found among the different bacterium species during transmission. Birds did not transmit or amplify the other bacterial species. We show that individual birds can transmit several pathogenic bacterium species at the same time using different mechanisms, and that the transmission facilitation by birds increases the frequency of co-infections in ticks. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Nematode-bacterium symbioses--cooperation and conflict revealed in the "omics" age.

    PubMed

    Murfin, Kristen E; Dillman, Adler R; Foster, Jeremy M; Bulgheresi, Silvia; Slatko, Barton E; Sternberg, Paul W; Goodrich-Blair, Heidi

    2012-08-01

    Nematodes are ubiquitous organisms that have a significant global impact on ecosystems, economies, agriculture, and human health. The applied importance of nematodes and the experimental tractability of many species have promoted their use as models in various research areas, including developmental biology, evolutionary biology, ecology, and animal-bacterium interactions. Nematodes are particularly well suited for the investigation of host associations with bacteria because all nematodes have interacted with bacteria during their evolutionary history and engage in a variety of association types. Interactions between nematodes and bacteria can be positive (mutualistic) or negative (pathogenic/parasitic) and may be transient or stably maintained (symbiotic). Furthermore, since many mechanistic aspects of nematode-bacterium interactions are conserved, their study can provide broader insights into other types of associations, including those relevant to human diseases. Recently, genome-scale studies have been applied to diverse nematode-bacterial interactions and have helped reveal mechanisms of communication and exchange between the associated partners. In addition to providing specific information about the system under investigation, these studies also have helped inform our understanding of genome evolution, mutualism, and innate immunity. In this review we discuss the importance and diversity of nematodes, "omics"' studies in nematode-bacterial systems, and the wider implications of the findings.

  15. Isolation, cloning and characterization of an azoreductase from the halophilic bacterium Halomonas elongata.

    PubMed

    Eslami, Maryam; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Asad, Sedigheh

    2016-04-01

    Azo dyes are a major class of colorants used in various industries including textile, paper and food. These dyes are regarded as pollutant since they are not readily reduced under aerobic conditions. Halomonas elongata, a halophilic bacterium, has the ability to decolorize different mono and di-azo dyes in anoxic conditions. In this study the putative azoreductase gene of H. elongata, formerly annotated as acp, was isolated, heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and characterized. The gene product, AzoH, was found to have a molecular mass of 22 kDa. The enzyme requires NADH, as an electron donor for its activity. The apparent Km was 63 μM for NADH and 12 μM for methyl red as a mono-azo dye substrate. The specific activity for methyl red was 0.27 μmol min(-1)mg(-1). The optimum enzyme activity was achieved in 50mM sodium phosphate buffer at pH 6. Although increased salinity resulted in reduced activity, AzoH could decolorize azo dye at NaCl concentrations up to 15% (w/v). The enzyme was also shown to be able to decolorize remazol black B as a representative of di-azo dyes. This is the first report describing the sequence and activity of an azo-reducing enzyme from a halophilic bacterium. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Systematic mapping of two component response regulators to gene targets in a model sulfate reducing bacterium

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Two component regulatory systems are the primary form of signal transduction in bacteria. Although genomic binding sites have been determined for several eukaryotic and bacterial transcription factors, comprehensive identification of gene targets of two component response regulators remains challenging due to the lack of knowledge of the signals required for their activation. We focused our study on Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, a sulfate reducing bacterium that encodes unusually diverse and largely uncharacterized two component signal transduction systems. Results We report the first systematic mapping of the genes regulated by all transcriptionally acting response regulators in a single bacterium. Our results enabled functional predictions for several response regulators and include key processes of carbon, nitrogen and energy metabolism, cell motility and biofilm formation, and responses to stresses such as nitrite, low potassium and phosphate starvation. Our study also led to the prediction of new genes and regulatory networks, which found corroboration in a compendium of transcriptome data available for D. vulgaris. For several regulators we predicted and experimentally verified the binding site motifs, most of which were discovered as part of this study. Conclusions The gene targets identified for the response regulators allowed strong functional predictions to be made for the corresponding two component systems. By tracking the D. vulgaris regulators and their motifs outside the Desulfovibrio spp. we provide testable hypotheses regarding the functions of orthologous regulators in other organisms. The in vitro array based method optimized here is generally applicable for the study of such systems in all organisms. PMID:21992415

  17. Structural characterization and anticancer activity of extracellular polysaccharides from ascidian symbiotic bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Ramamoorthy, Sathishkumar; Gnanakan, Ananthan; S Lakshmana, Senthil; Meivelu, Moovendhan; Jeganathan, Arun

    2018-06-15

    In the present study, extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) producing bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis RSK CAS4 was isolated from ascidian Didemnum granulatum and its production was optimized by response surface methodology. Fructose and galactose were found as the major monosaccharides in the EPS from the strain RSK CAS4. Functional groups and structural characteristics of the EPS were characterized with FT-IR and 1 HNMR. The purified EPS showed potent antioxidant properties in investigation against DPPH, hydroxyl, superoxide free radicals. In vitro anticancer activity of purified EPS was evaluated on HEp-2 cells, A549 and Vero cell lines. Growth of cancer cells was inhibited by the EPS in a dose-dependent manner and maximum anticancer activity was found to be 76% against liver cancer at 1000 μg/ml. The antioxidant and anticancer potentials of theEPS from marine bacterium Bacillusthuringiensis RSK CAS4 suggests it as a potential natural source and its scopeas an alternative to synthetics for pharmaceutical application. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Lytic and Chemotactic Features of the Plaque-Forming Bacterium KD531 on Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhangran; Zheng, Wei; Yang, Luxi; Boughner, Lisa A.; Tian, Yun; Zheng, Tianling; Xu, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Phaeodactylum tricornutum is a dominant bloom forming species and potential biofuel feedstock. To control P. tricornutum bloom or to release lipids from P. tricornutum, we previously screened and identified the lytic bacterium Labrenzia sp. KD531 toward P. tricornutum. In the present study, we evaluated the lytic activity of Labrenzia sp. KD531 on microalgae and investigated its lytic mechanism. The results indicated that the lytic activity of KD531 was temperature- and pH-dependent, but light-independent. In addition to P. tricornutum, KD531 also showed lytic activity against other algal species, especially green algae. A quantitative analysis of algal cellular protein, carbohydrate and lipid content together with measurements of dry weight after exposure to bacteria-infected algal lysate indicated that the bacterium KD531 influenced the algal biomass by disrupting the algal cells. Both chemotactic analysis and microscopic observations of subsamples from different regions of formed plaques showed that KD531 could move toward and then directly contact algal cells. Direct contact between P. tricornutum and KD531 cells was essential for the lytic process. PMID:29312256

  19. A novel marine bacterium algicidal to the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense.

    PubMed

    Wang, B X; Zhou, Y Y; Bai, S J; Su, J Q; Tian, Y; Zheng, T L; Yang, X R

    2010-11-01

    This work is aiming at investigating algicidal characterization of a bacterium isolate DHQ25 against harmful alga Alexandrium tamarense. 16S rDNA sequence analysis showed that the most probable affiliation of DHQ25 belongs to the γ-proteobacteria subclass and the genus Vibrio. Bacterial isolate DHQ25 showed algicidal activity through an indirect attack. Xenic culture of A. tamarense was susceptible to the culture filtrate of DHQ25 by algicidal activity assay. Algicidal process demonstrated that the alga cell lysed and cellular substances released under the visual field of microscope. DHQ25 was a challenge controller of A. tamarense by the above characterizations of algicidal activity assay and algicidal process. Interactions between bacteria and harmful algal bloom (HAB) species proved to be an important factor regulating the population of these algae. This is the first report of a Vibrio sp. bacterium algicidal to the toxic dinoflagellate A. tamarense. The findings increase our knowledge of the role of bacteria in algal-bacterial interaction. © 2010 The Authors. © 2010 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Geovibrio ferrireducens, a phylogenetically distinct dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caccavo, F.; Coates, J.D.; Rossello-Mora, R. A.; Ludwig, W.; Schleifer, K.H.; Lovley, D.R.; McInerney, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    A new, phylogenetically distinct, dissimilatory, Fe(III)-reducing bacterium was isolated from surface sediment of a hydrocarbon-contaminated ditch. The isolate, designated strain PAL-1, was an obligately anaerobic, non-fermentative, motile, gram-negative vibrio. PAL-1 grew in a defined medium with acetate as electron donor and ferric pyrophosphate, ferric oxyhydroxide, ferric citrate, Co(III)-EDTA, or elemental sulfur as sole electron acceptor. PAL-1 also used proline, hydrogen, lactate, propionate, succinate, fumarate, pyruvate, or yeast extract as electron donors for Fe(III) reduction. It is the first bacterium known to couple the oxidation of an amino acid to Fe(III) reduction. PAI-1 did not reduce oxygen, Mn(IV), U(VI), Cr(VI), nitrate, sulfate, sulfite, or thiosulfate with acetate as the electron donor. Cell suspensions of PAL-1 exhibited dithionite-reduced minus air-oxidized difference spectra that were characteristic of c-type cytochromes. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of PAL-1 showed that the strain is not related to any of the described metal-reducing bacteria in the Proteobacteria and, together with Flexistipes sinusarabici, forms a separate line of descent within the Bacteria. Phenotypically and phylogenetically, strain PAI-1 differs from all other described bacteria, and represents the type strain of a new genus and species. Geovibrio ferrireducens.

  1. Application of agglomerative clustering for analyzing phylogenetically on bacterium of saliva

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustamam, A.; Fitria, I.; Umam, K.

    2017-07-01

    Analyzing population of Streptococcus bacteria is important since these species can cause dental caries, periodontal, halitosis (bad breath) and more problems. This paper will discuss the phylogenetically relation between the bacterium Streptococcus in saliva using a phylogenetic tree of agglomerative clustering methods. Starting with the bacterium Streptococcus DNA sequence obtained from the GenBank, then performed characteristic extraction of DNA sequences. The characteristic extraction result is matrix form, then performed normalization using min-max normalization and calculate genetic distance using Manhattan distance. Agglomerative clustering technique consisting of single linkage, complete linkage and average linkage. In this agglomerative algorithm number of group is started with the number of individual species. The most similar species is grouped until the similarity decreases and then formed a single group. Results of grouping is a phylogenetic tree and branches that join an established level of distance, that the smaller the distance the more the similarity of the larger species implementation is using R, an open source program.

  2. Identification and Characterization of a High Efficiency Aniline Resistance and Degrading Bacterium MC-01.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liu; Ying, Chen; Fang, Ni; Zhong, Yao; Zhao-Xiang, Zhong; Yun, Sun

    2017-05-01

    Biodegradation is one of the important methods for the treatment of industrial wastewater containing aniline. In this paper, a degrading bacterium named MC-01, which could survive in high concentration aniline wastewater, was screened from industrial wastewater containing aniline and sludge. MC-01 was preliminarily identified as Ochrobactrum sp. based on the amplified 16S rDNA gene sequence and Biolog system identification. MC-01 was highly resistant to aniline. After 24-h culture under aniline concentration of 6500 mg/L, the amount of bacterium survived still remained 0.05 × 10 6  CFU/mL. Experiments showed that there was no coupling expression between the growth of MC-01 and aniline degradation. The optimum growth conditions in LB culture were pH 6.0, 30 °C of temperature, and 4% of incubation amount, respectively. And the optimum conditions of aniline degradation of MC-01 were pH 7.0, 45 °C of temperature, and 3.0% of salt concentration, respectively. The degradation rate of MC-01 (48 h) in different aniline concentrations (200~1600 mg/L) was stable under the optimum conditions, which could reach more than 75%.

  3. Functional diversity of carbohydrate-active enzymes enabling a bacterium to ferment plant biomass.

    PubMed

    Boutard, Magali; Cerisy, Tristan; Nogue, Pierre-Yves; Alberti, Adriana; Weissenbach, Jean; Salanoubat, Marcel; Tolonen, Andrew C

    2014-11-01

    Microbial metabolism of plant polysaccharides is an important part of environmental carbon cycling, human nutrition, and industrial processes based on cellulosic bioconversion. Here we demonstrate a broadly applicable method to analyze how microbes catabolize plant polysaccharides that integrates carbohydrate-active enzyme (CAZyme) assays, RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), and anaerobic growth screening. We apply this method to study how the bacterium Clostridium phytofermentans ferments plant biomass components including glucans, mannans, xylans, galactans, pectins, and arabinans. These polysaccharides are fermented with variable efficiencies, and diauxies prioritize metabolism of preferred substrates. Strand-specific RNA-seq reveals how this bacterium responds to polysaccharides by up-regulating specific groups of CAZymes, transporters, and enzymes to metabolize the constituent sugars. Fifty-six up-regulated CAZymes were purified, and their activities show most polysaccharides are degraded by multiple enzymes, often from the same family, but with divergent rates, specificities, and cellular localizations. CAZymes were then tested in combination to identify synergies between enzymes acting on the same substrate with different catalytic mechanisms. We discuss how these results advance our understanding of how microbes degrade and metabolize plant biomass.

  4. Accurate Cell Division in Bacteria: How Does a Bacterium Know Where its Middle Is?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Martin; Rutenberg, Andrew

    2004-03-01

    I will discuss the physical principles lying behind the acquisition of accurate positional information in bacteria. A good application of these ideas is to the rod-shaped bacterium E. coli which divides precisely at its cellular midplane. This positioning is controlled by the Min system of proteins. These proteins coherently oscillate from end to end of the bacterium. I will present a reaction-diffusion model that describes the diffusion of the Min proteins, and their binding/unbinding from the cell membrane. The system possesses an instability that spontaneously generates the Min oscillations, which control accurate placement of the midcell division site. I will then discuss the role of fluctuations in protein dynamics, and investigate whether fluctuations set optimal protein concentration levels. Finally I will examine cell division in a different bacteria, B. subtilis. where different physical principles are used to regulate accurate cell division. See: Howard, Rutenberg, de Vet: Dynamic compartmentalization of bacteria: accurate division in E. coli. Phys. Rev. Lett. 87 278102 (2001). Howard, Rutenberg: Pattern formation inside bacteria: fluctuations due to the low copy number of proteins. Phys. Rev. Lett. 90 128102 (2003). Howard: A mechanism for polar protein localization in bacteria. J. Mol. Biol. 335 655-663 (2004).

  5. Optimization of liquid media and biosafety assessment for algae-lysing bacterium NP23.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chunli; Liu, Xiaobo; Shan, Linna

    2014-09-01

    To control algal bloom caused by nutrient pollution, a wild-type algae-lysing bacterium was isolated from the Baiguishan reservoir in Henan province of China and identified as Enterobacter sp. strain NP23. Algal culture medium was optimized by applying a Placket-Burman design to obtain a high cell concentration of NP23. Three minerals (i.e., 0.6% KNO3, 0.001% MnSO4·H2O, and 0.3% K2HPO4) were found to be independent factors critical for obtaining the highest cell concentration of 10(13) CFU/mL, which was 10(4) times that of the control. In the algae-lysing experiment, the strain exhibited a high lysis rate for the 4 algae test species, namely, Chlorella vulgari, Scenedesmus, Microcystis wesenbergii, and Chlorella pyrenoidosa. Acute toxicity and mutagenicity tests showed that the bacterium NP23 had no toxic and mutagenic effects on fish, even in large doses such as 10(7) or 10(9) CFU/mL. Thus, Enterobacter sp. strain NP23 has strong potential application in the microbial algae-lysing project.

  6. Reduction of nitric oxide catalyzed by hydroxylamine oxidoreductase from an anammox bacterium.

    PubMed

    Irisa, Tatsuya; Hira, Daisuke; Furukawa, Kenji; Fujii, Takao

    2014-12-01

    The hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (HAO) from the anammox bacterium, Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis has been reported to catalyze the oxidation of hydroxylamine (NH2OH) to nitric oxide (NO) by using bovine cytochrome c as an oxidant. In contrast, we investigated whether the HAO from anammox bacterium strain KSU-1 could catalyze the reduction of NO with reduced benzyl viologen (BVred) and the NO-releasing reagent, NOC 7. The reduction proceeded, resulting in the formation of NH2OH as a product. The oxidation rate of BVred was proportional to the concentration of BVred itself for a short period in each experiment, a situation that was termed quasi-steady state. The analyses of the states at various concentrations of HAO allowed us to determine the rate constant for the catalytic reaction, (2.85 ± 0.19) × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1), governing NO reduction by BVred and HAO, which was comparable to that reported for the HAO from the ammonium oxidizer, Nitrosomonas with reduced methyl viologen. These results suggest that the anammox HAO functions to adjust anammox by inter-conversion of NO and NH2OH depending on the redox potential of the physiological electron transfer protein in anammox bacteria. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Engineering cellulolytic bacterium Clostridium thermocellum to co-ferment cellulose- and hemicellulose-derived sugars simultaneously.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei; Reyes, Luis H; Michener, William E; Maness, Pin-Ching; Chou, Katherine J

    2018-03-15

    Cellulose and hemicellulose are the most abundant components in plant biomass. A preferred Consolidated Bioprocessing (CBP) system is one which can directly convert both cellulose and hemicellulose into target products without adding the costly hydrolytic enzyme cocktail. In this work, the thermophilic, cellulolytic, and anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium thermocellum DSM 1313, was engineered to grow on xylose in addition to cellulose. Both xylA (encoding for xylose isomerase) and xylB (encoding for xylulokinase) genes from the thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus were introduced to enable xylose utilization while still retaining its inherent ability to grow on 6-carbon substrates. Targeted integration of xylAB into C. thermocellum genome realized simultaneous fermentation of xylose with glucose, with cellobiose (glucose dimer), and with cellulose, respectively, without carbon catabolite repression. We also showed that the respective H 2 and ethanol production were twice as much when both xylose and cellulose were consumed simultaneously than when consuming cellulose alone. Moreover, the engineered xylose consumer can also utilize xylo-oligomers (with degree of polymerization of 2-7) in the presence of xylose. Isotopic tracer studies also revealed that the engineered xylose catabolism contributed to the production of ethanol from xylan which is a model hemicellulose in mixed sugar fermentation, demonstrating immense potential of this enhanced CBP strain in co-utilizing both cellulose and hemicellulose for the production of fuels and chemicals. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. A novel continuous toxicity test system using a luminously modified freshwater bacterium.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jang-Cheon; Park, Kyung-Je; Ihm, Hyuk-Soon; Park, Ji-Eun; Kim, Se-Young; Kang, Ilnam; Lee, Kyu-Ho; Jahng, Deokjin; Lee, Dong-Hun; Kim, Sang-Jong

    2004-09-15

    An automated continuous toxicity test system was developed using a recombinant bioluminescent freshwater bacterium. The groundwater-borne bacterium, Janthinobacterium lividum YH9-RC, was modified with luxAB and optimized for toxicity tests using different kinds of organic carbon compounds and heavy metals. luxAB-marked YH9-RC cells were much more sensitive (average 7.3-8.6 times) to chemicals used for toxicity detection than marine Vibrio fischeri cells used in the Microtox assay. Toxicity tests for wastewater samples using the YH9-RC-based toxicity assay showed that EC50-5 min values in an untreated raw wastewater sample (23.9 +/- 12.8%) were the lowest, while those in an effluent sample (76.7 +/- 14.9%) were the highest. Lyophilization conditions were optimized in 384-multiwell plates containing bioluminescent bacteria that were pre-incubated for 15 min in 0.16 M of trehalose prior to freeze-drying, increasing the recovery of bioluminescence and viability by 50%. Luminously modified cells exposed to continuous phenol or wastewater stream showed a rapid decrease in bioluminescence, which fell below detectable range within 1 min. An advanced toxicity test system, featuring automated real-time toxicity monitoring and alerting functions, was designed and finely tuned. This novel continuous toxicity test system can be used for real-time biomonitoring of water toxicity, and can potentially be used as a biological early warning system.

  9. A highly infective plant-associated bacterium influences reproductive rates in pea aphids.

    PubMed

    Hendry, Tory A; Clark, Kelley J; Baltrus, David A

    2016-02-01

    Pea aphids, Acyrthosiphon pisum, have the potential to increase reproduction as a defence against pathogens, though how frequently this occurs or how infection with live pathogens influences this response is not well understood. Here we determine the minimum infective dose of an environmentally common bacterium and possible aphid pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae, to determine the likelihood of pathogenic effects to pea aphids. Additionally, we used P. syringae infection to investigate how live pathogens may alter reproductive rates. We found that oral bacterial exposure decreased subsequent survival of aphids in a dose-dependent manner and we estimate that ingestion of less than 10 bacterial cells is sufficient to increase aphid mortality. Pathogen dose was positively related to aphid reproduction. Aphids exposed to low bacterial doses showed decreased, although statistically indistinguishable, fecundity compared to controls. Aphids exposed to high doses reproduced significantly more than low dose treatments and also more, but not significantly so, than controls. These results are consistent with previous studies suggesting that pea aphids may use fecundity compensation as a response to pathogens. Consequently, even low levels of exposure to a common plant-associated bacterium may therefore have significant effects on pea aphid survival and reproduction.

  10. Influence of yeast and lactic acid bacterium on the constituent profile of soy sauce during fermentation.

    PubMed

    Harada, Risa; Yuzuki, Masanobu; Ito, Kotaro; Shiga, Kazuki; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2017-02-01

    Soy sauce is a Japanese traditional seasoning composed of various constituents that are produced by various microbes during a long-term fermentation process. Due to the complexity of the process, the investigation of the constituent profile during fermentation is difficult. Metabolomics, the comprehensive study of low molecular weight compounds in biological samples, is thought to be a promising strategy for deep understanding of the constituent contribution to food flavor characteristics. Therefore, metabolomics is suitable for the analysis of soy sauce fermentation. Unfortunately, only few and unrefined studies of soy sauce fermentation using metabolomics approach have been reported. Therefore, we investigated changes in low molecular weight hydrophilic and volatile compounds of soy sauce using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS)-based non-targeted metabolic profiling. The data were analyzed by statistical analysis to evaluate influences of yeast and lactic acid bacterium on the constituent profile. Consequently, our results suggested a novel finding that lactic acid bacterium affected the production of several constituents such as cyclotene, furfural, furfuryl alcohol and methional in the soy sauce fermentation process. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Melanin from the Nitrogen-Fixing Bacterium Azotobacter chroococcum: A Spectroscopic Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Raja

    2014-01-01

    Melanins, the ubiquitous hetero-polymer pigments found widely dispersed among various life forms, are usually dark brown/black in colour. Although melanins have variety of biological functions, including protection against ultraviolet radiation of sunlight and are used in medicine, cosmetics, extraction of melanin from the animal and plant kingdoms is not an easy task. Using complementary physicochemical techniques (i.e. MALDI-TOF, FTIR absorption and cross-polarization magic angle spinning solid-state 13C NMR), we report here the characterization of melanins extracted from the nitrogen-fixing non-virulent bacterium Azotobacter chroococcum, a safe viable source. Moreover, considering dihydroxyindole moiety as the main constituent, an effort is made to propose the putative molecular structure of the melanin hetero-polymer extracted from the bacterium. Characterization of the melanin obtained from Azotobacter chroococcum would provide an inspiration in extending research activities on these hetero-polymers and their use as protective agent against UV radiation. PMID:24416247

  12. Isolation and characterization of a prokaryotic cell organelle from the anammox bacterium Kuenenia stuttgartiensis.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Sarah; Wessels, Hans J C T; Rijpstra, W Irene C; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Kartal, Boran; Jetten, Mike S M; van Niftrik, Laura

    2014-11-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) bacteria oxidize ammonium with nitrite to nitrogen gas in the absence of oxygen. These microorganisms form a significant sink for fixed nitrogen in the oceans and the anammox process is applied as a cost-effective and environment-friendly nitrogen removal system from wastewater. Anammox bacteria have a compartmentalized cell plan that consists of three separate compartments. Here we report the fractionation of the anammox bacterium Kuenenia stuttgartiensis in order to isolate and analyze the innermost cell compartment called the anammoxosome. The subcellular fractions were microscopically characterized and all membranes in the anammox cell were shown to contain ladderane lipids which are unique for anammox bacteria. Proteome analyses and activity assays with the isolated anammoxosomes showed that these organelles harbor the energy metabolism in anammox cells. Together the experimental data provide the first thorough characterization of a respiratory cell organelle from a bacterium and demonstrate the essential role of the anammoxosome in the production of a major portion of the nitrogen gas in our atmosphere. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Nematode-Bacterium Symbioses - Cooperation and Conflict Revealed in the 'Omics' Age

    PubMed Central

    Murfin, Kristen E.; Dillman, Adler R.; Foster, Jeremy M.; Bulgheresi, Silvia; Slatko, Barton E.; Sternberg, Paul W.; Goodrich-Blair, Heidi

    2012-01-01

    Nematodes are ubiquitous organisms that have a significant global impact on ecosystems, economies, agriculture, and human health. The applied importance of nematodes and the experimental tractability of many species have promoted their use as models in various research areas, including developmental biology, evolutionary biology, ecology, and animal-bacterium interactions. Nematodes are particularly well suited for investigating host associations with bacteria because all nematodes have interacted with bacteria during their evolutionary history and engage in a diversity of association types. Interactions between nematodes and bacteria can be positive (mutualistic) or negative (pathogenic/parasitic) and may be transient or stably maintained (symbiotic). Furthermore, since many mechanistic aspects of nematode-bacterium interactions are conserved their study can provide broader insights into other types of associations, including those relevant to human diseases. Recently, genome-scale studies have been applied to diverse nematode-bacterial interactions, and have helped reveal mechanisms of communication and exchange between the associated partners. In addition to providing specific information about the system under investigation, these studies also have helped inform our understanding of genome evolution, mutualism, and innate immunity. In this review we will discuss the importance and diversity of nematodes, 'omics' studies in nematode-bacterial systems, and the wider implications of the findings. PMID:22983035

  14. Response of the Predatory Bacterium, Halobacteriovorax, and Virus to an Influx of a Prey Bacterium in a Natural Water Microcosm and a Three Membered Artificial Sea Water Microcosm.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, H.; Chen, H.; Laws, E. A.; Gulig, P. A.

    2016-02-01

    Halobacteriovorax (HBx) is a predatory bacterium that preys on Vibrio sp. and many other gram negative bacteria. There is strong evidence that suggest HBx has a role in bacterial mortality in marine and brackish systems. However, its role has not been appropriately explored. In this study the rate of HBx predation on Vibrio vulnificus in comparison to that of viruses has been investigated. Initial experiments compared the responses of HBx and viruses in estuarine water systems to an input of V. vulnificus. Environmental water samples were filtered to remove larger protists and other organisms and debris. The filtered samples were used to establish laboratory microcosms to which was added a suspension of V. vulnificus. To measure the responses of HBx and viruses to the influx of V. vulnificus, samples were removed at intervals over a 40 h incubation period to enumerate HBx and V. vulnificus by culture and viruses by direct microscopic counts. In a subsequent experiment we investigated the responses of a virus and HBx strain when cultured with a suspension of V. vulnificus in a laboratory controlled microcosm of artificial sea water. The results of both experiments revealed that HBx was the first and most rapid responder to the inoculum of V. vulnificus and reduced their numbers significantly. The viruses were relatively non-responsive and did not substantially reduce V. vulnifius numbers. These results show that HBx may be a major contributor to bacterial mortality in conjunction with protists and viruses

  15. Helicobacter pylori infection and chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura: long-term results of bacterium eradication and association with bacterium virulence profiles.

    PubMed

    Emilia, Giovanni; Luppi, Mario; Zucchini, Patrizia; Morselli, Monica; Potenza, Leonardo; Forghieri, Fabio; Volzone, Francesco; Jovic, Gordana; Leonardi, Giovanna; Donelli, Amedea; Torelli, Giuseppe

    2007-12-01

    Eradication of Helicobacter pylori may lead to improvement of chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), although its efficacy over time is uncertain. We report the results of H pylori screening and eradication in 75 consecutive adult patients with ITP. We also used molecular methods to investigate lymphocyte clonality and H pylori genotypes in the gastric biopsies from 10 H pylori-positive patients with ITP and 19 H pylori-positive patients without ITP with chronic gastritis. Active H pylori infection was documented in 38 (51%) patients and successfully eradicated in 34 (89%) patients. After a median follow-up of 60 months, a persistent platelet response in 23 (68%) of patients with eradicated infection was observed; 1 relapse occurred. No differences in mucosal B- or T-cell clonalities were observed between patients with ITP and control participants. Of note, the frequency of the H pylori cagA gene (P = .02) and the frequency of concomitant H pylori cagA, vacAs1, and iceA genes (triple-positive strains; P = .015) resulted statistically higher in patients with ITP than in control participants. All asymptomatic H pylori-positive patients with ITP were suffering from chronic gastritis. Our data suggest a sustained platelet recovery in a proportion of patients with ITP by H pylori eradication alone. Overrepresentation of specific H pylori genotypes in ITP suggests a possible role for bacterium-related factors in the disease pathogenesis.

  16. Evaluating the Metal Tolerance Capacity of Microbial Communities Isolated from Alberta Oil Sands Process Water

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, Mathew L.; Demeter, Marc A.; Lemire, Joe A.; Turner, Raymond J.

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic activities have resulted in the intensified use of water resources. For example, open pit bitumen extraction by Canada’s oil sands operations uses an estimated volume of three barrels of water for every barrel of oil produced. The waste tailings–oil sands process water (OSPW)–are stored in holding ponds, and present an environmental concern as they are comprised of residual hydrocarbons and metals. Following the hypothesis that endogenous OSPW microbial communities have an enhanced tolerance to heavy metals, we tested the capacity of planktonic and biofilm populations from OSPW to withstand metal ion challenges, using Cupriavidus metallidurans, a known metal-resistant organism, for comparison. The toxicity of the metals toward biofilm and planktonic bacterial populations was determined by measuring the minimum biofilm inhibitory concentrations (MBICs) and planktonic minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) using the MBEC ™ assay. We observed that the OSPW community and C. metallidurans had similar tolerances to 22 different metals. While thiophillic elements (Te, Ag, Cd, Ni) were found to be most toxic, the OSPW consortia demonstrated higher tolerance to metals reported in tailings ponds (Al, Fe, Mo, Pb). Metal toxicity correlated with a number of physicochemical characteristics of the metals. Parameters reflecting metal-ligand affinities showed fewer and weaker correlations for the community compared to C. metallidurans, suggesting that the OSPW consortia may have developed tolerance mechanisms toward metals present in their environment. PMID:26849649

  17. Metabolism of 4-chloro-2-nitrophenol in a Gram-positive bacterium, Exiguobacterium sp. PMA

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chloronitrophenols (CNPs) are widely used in the synthesis of dyes, drugs and pesticides, and constitute a major group of environmental pollutants. 4-Chloro-2-nitrophenol (4C2NP) is an isomer of CNPs that has been detected in various industrial effluents. A number of physicochemical methods have been used for treatment of wastewater containing 4C2NP. These methods are not as effective as microbial degradation, however. Results A 4C2NP-degrading bacterium, Exiguobacterium sp. PMA, which uses 4C2NP as the sole carbon and energy source was isolated from a chemically-contaminated site in India. Exiguobacterium sp. PMA degraded 4C2NP with the release of stoichiometeric amounts of chloride and ammonium ions. The effects of different substrate concentrations and various inoculum sizes on degradation of 4C2NP were investigated. Exiguobacterium sp. PMA degraded 4C2NP up to a concentration of 0.6 mM. High performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry identified 4-chloro-2-aminophenol (4C2AP) and 2-aminophenol (2AP) as possible metabolites of the 4C2NP degradation pathway. The crude extract of 4C2NP-induced PMA cells contained enzymatic activity for 4C2NP reductase and 4C2AP dehalogenase, suggesting the involvement of these enzymes in the degradation of 4C2NP. Microcosm studies using sterile and non-sterile soils spiked with 4C2NP were carried out to monitor the bioremediation potential of Exiguobacterium sp. PMA. The bioremediation of 4C2NP by Exiguobacterium sp. PMA was faster in non-sterilized soil than sterilized soil. Conclusions Our studies indicate that Exiguobacterium sp. PMA may be useful for the bioremediation of 4C2NP-contaminated sites. This is the first report of (i) the formation of 2AP in the 4C2NP degradation pathway by any bacterium and (iii) the bioremediation of 4C2NP by any bacterium. PMID:23171039

  18. Metabolism of 4-chloro-2-nitrophenol in a gram-positive bacterium, Exiguobacterium sp. PMA.

    PubMed

    Arora, Pankaj Kumar; Sharma, Ashutosh; Mehta, Richa; Shenoy, Belle Damodara; Srivastava, Alok; Singh, Vijay Pal

    2012-11-21

    Chloronitrophenols (CNPs) are widely used in the synthesis of dyes, drugs and pesticides, and constitute a major group of environmental pollutants. 4-Chloro-2-nitrophenol (4C2NP) is an isomer of CNPs that has been detected in various industrial effluents. A number of physicochemical methods have been used for treatment of wastewater containing 4C2NP. These methods are not as effective as microbial degradation, however. A 4C2NP-degrading bacterium, Exiguobacterium sp. PMA, which uses 4C2NP as the sole carbon and energy source was isolated from a chemically-contaminated site in India. Exiguobacterium sp. PMA degraded 4C2NP with the release of stoichiometeric amounts of chloride and ammonium ions. The effects of different substrate concentrations and various inoculum sizes on degradation of 4C2NP were investigated. Exiguobacterium sp. PMA degraded 4C2NP up to a concentration of 0.6 mM. High performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry identified 4-chloro-2-aminophenol (4C2AP) and 2-aminophenol (2AP) as possible metabolites of the 4C2NP degradation pathway. The crude extract of 4C2NP-induced PMA cells contained enzymatic activity for 4C2NP reductase and 4C2AP dehalogenase, suggesting the involvement of these enzymes in the degradation of 4C2NP. Microcosm studies using sterile and non-sterile soils spiked with 4C2NP were carried out to monitor the bioremediation potential of Exiguobacterium sp. PMA. The bioremediation of 4C2NP by Exiguobacterium sp. PMA was faster in non-sterilized soil than sterilized soil. Our studies indicate that Exiguobacterium sp. PMA may be useful for the bioremediation of 4C2NP-contaminated sites. This is the first report of (i) the formation of 2AP in the 4C2NP degradation pathway by any bacterium and (iii) the bioremediation of 4C2NP by any bacterium.

  19. Enhanced bactericidal potency of nanoliposomes by modification of the fusion activity between liposomes and bacterium.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yufan; Wang, Zhao; Zhao, Wen; Lu, Tingli; Wang, Rutao; Mei, Qibing; Chen, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa represents a good model of antibiotic resistance. These organisms have an outer membrane with a low level of permeability to drugs that is often combined with multidrug efflux pumps, enzymatic inactivation of the drug, or alteration of its molecular target. The acute and growing problem of antibiotic resistance of Pseudomonas to conventional antibiotics made it imperative to develop new liposome formulations to overcome these mechanisms, and investigate the fusion between liposome and bacterium. The rigidity, stability and charge properties of phospholipid vesicles were modified by varying the cholesterol, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE), and negatively charged lipids 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol sodium salt (DMPG), 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phopho-L-serine sodium salt (DMPS), 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate monosodium salt (DMPA), nature phosphatidylserine sodium salt from brain and nature phosphatidylinositol sodium salt from soybean concentrations in liposomes. Liposomal fusion with intact bacteria was monitored using a lipid-mixing assay. It was discovered that the fluid liposomes-bacterium fusion is not dependent on liposomal size and lamellarity. A similar degree of fusion was observed for liposomes with a particle size from 100 to 800 nm. The fluidity of liposomes is an essential pre-request for liposomes fusion with bacteria. Fusion was almost completely inhibited by incorporation of cholesterol into fluid liposomes. The increase in the amount of negative charges in fluid liposomes reduces fluid liposomes-bacteria fusion when tested without calcium cations due to electric repulsion, but addition of calcium cations brings the fusion level of fluid liposomes to similar or higher levels. Among the negative phospholipids examined, DMPA gave the highest degree of fusion, DMPS and DMPG had intermediate fusion levels, and PI resulted in the lowest degree of fusion. Furthermore, the fluid

  20. Enhanced bactericidal potency of nanoliposomes by modification of the fusion activity between liposomes and bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yufan; Wang, Zhao; Zhao, Wen; Lu, Tingli; Wang, Rutao; Mei, Qibing; Chen, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa represents a good model of antibiotic resistance. These organisms have an outer membrane with a low level of permeability to drugs that is often combined with multidrug efflux pumps, enzymatic inactivation of the drug, or alteration of its molecular target. The acute and growing problem of antibiotic resistance of Pseudomonas to conventional antibiotics made it imperative to develop new liposome formulations to overcome these mechanisms, and investigate the fusion between liposome and bacterium. Methods The rigidity, stability and charge properties of phospholipid vesicles were modified by varying the cholesterol, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE), and negatively charged lipids 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol sodium salt (DMPG), 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phopho-L-serine sodium salt (DMPS), 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate monosodium salt (DMPA), nature phosphatidylserine sodium salt from brain and nature phosphatidylinositol sodium salt from soybean concentrations in liposomes. Liposomal fusion with intact bacteria was monitored using a lipid-mixing assay. Results It was discovered that the fluid liposomes-bacterium fusion is not dependent on liposomal size and lamellarity. A similar degree of fusion was observed for liposomes with a particle size from 100 to 800 nm. The fluidity of liposomes is an essential pre-request for liposomes fusion with bacteria. Fusion was almost completely inhibited by incorporation of cholesterol into fluid liposomes. The increase in the amount of negative charges in fluid liposomes reduces fluid liposomes-bacteria fusion when tested without calcium cations due to electric repulsion, but addition of calcium cations brings the fusion level of fluid liposomes to similar or higher levels. Among the negative phospholipids examined, DMPA gave the highest degree of fusion, DMPS and DMPG had intermediate fusion levels, and PI resulted in the lowest degree of fusion

  1. Isolation and characterization of Leu[7]-Surfactin from the endophytic bacterium Bacillus mojavensis RRC 101, a biocontrol agent for Fusarium verticillioides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacillus mojavensis is an endophytic bacterium patented for control of fungal diseases in maize and other plants. Culture extracts and filtrates from this bacterium were antagonistic to the pathogenic and mycotoxic fungus Fusarium verticillioides. However, the identity of the inhibitory substance ...

  2. A Pathway Closely Related to the d-Tagatose Pathway of Gram-Negative Enterobacteria Identified in the Gram-Positive Bacterium Bacillus licheniformis

    PubMed Central

    Van der Heiden, Edwige; Lebrun, Sarah; Freichels, Régine; Brans, Alain; Vastenavond, Christian M.; Galleni, Moreno; Joris, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    We report the first identification of a gene cluster involved in d-tagatose catabolism in Bacillus licheniformis. The pathway is closely related to the d-tagatose pathway of the Gram-negative bacterium Klebsiella oxytoca, in contrast to the d-tagatose 6-phosphate pathway described in the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:23524682

  3. A pathway closely related to the (D)-tagatose pathway of gram-negative enterobacteria identified in the gram-positive bacterium Bacillus licheniformis.

    PubMed

    Van der Heiden, Edwige; Delmarcelle, Michaël; Lebrun, Sarah; Freichels, Régine; Brans, Alain; Vastenavond, Christian M; Galleni, Moreno; Joris, Bernard

    2013-06-01

    We report the first identification of a gene cluster involved in d-tagatose catabolism in Bacillus licheniformis. The pathway is closely related to the d-tagatose pathway of the Gram-negative bacterium Klebsiella oxytoca, in contrast to the d-tagatose 6-phosphate pathway described in the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus.

  4. A unique virulence factor for proliferation and dwarfism in plants identified from a phytopathogenic bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Hoshi, Ayaka; Oshima, Kenro; Kakizawa, Shigeyuki; Ishii, Yoshiko; Ozeki, Johji; Hashimoto, Masayoshi; Komatsu, Ken; Kagiwada, Satoshi; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Namba, Shigetou

    2009-01-01

    One of the most important themes in agricultural science is the identification of virulence factors involved in plant disease. Here, we show that a single virulence factor, tengu-su inducer (TENGU), induces witches' broom and dwarfism and is a small secreted protein of the plant-pathogenic bacterium, phytoplasma. When tengu was expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana plants, these plants showed symptoms of witches' broom and dwarfism, which are typical of phytoplasma infection. Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines expressing tengu exhibited similar symptoms, confirming the effects of tengu expression on plants. Although the localization of phytoplasma was restricted to the phloem, TENGU protein was detected in apical buds by immunohistochemical analysis, suggesting that TENGU was transported from the phloem to other cells. Microarray analyses showed that auxin-responsive genes were significantly down-regulated in the tengu-transgenic plants compared with GUS-transgenic control plants. These results suggest that TENGU inhibits auxin-related pathways, thereby affecting plant development. PMID:19329488

  5. Imaging of subunit complexes of thermophilic bacterium H(+)-ATPase with scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Masai, J; Shibata, T; Kagawa, Y; Kondo, S

    1992-07-01

    Using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), we observed reconstructed subunit complexes of H(+)-ATPase of a thermophilic bacterium. The measurement was carried out in air without conductive coating on the samples deposited on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The F1 subunit complex of the H(+)-ATPase, and an H(+)-ATPase whose F0 portion was embedded into liposomes prepared from soybean lecithin were imaged. Overall structural images of the subunit complex F1 were obtained: the structural dimensions of the STM images are in agreement with those deduced from conventional methods such as an transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAX) experimentation. Regarding the STM imaging of these samples, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the STM over those of conventional methods such as a TEM and SAX.

  6. Characterization of a new oligoalginate lyase from marine bacterium Vibrio sp.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zuochen; Zhu, Benwei; Wang, Wenxia; Tan, Haidong; Yin, Heng

    2018-06-01

    A new oligoalginate lyase encoding gene, designed oal17A, was cloned from marine bacterium Vibrio sp. W13, and then expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant Oal17A was purified by NTA-Ni resin with maximal activity at 30°C and pH7.0. Oal17A exhibited broad substrate specificity, and preferred to degrade alginate than polyM or polyG into monosaccharide acid. The specific activity of Oal17A toward alginate, polyM and polyG was 21.14U/mg, 12.31U/mg and 7.43U/mg, respectively. With features of high-level expression and broad substrate specificity, Oal17A would be a potential tool for alginate monomer production process of alginate utilizing for biofuels and bioethanol production. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The nucleotide sequence of Beneckea harveyi 5S rRNA. [bioluminescent marine bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luehrsen, K. R.; Fox, G. E.

    1981-01-01

    The primary sequence of the 5S ribosomal RNA isolated from the free-living bioluminescent marine bacterium Beneckea harveyi is reported and discussed in regard to indications of phylogenetic relationships with the bacteria Escherichia coli and Photobacterium phosphoreum. Sequences were determined for oligonucleotide products generated by digestion with ribonuclease T1, pancreatic ribonuclease and ribonuclease T2. The presence of heterogeneity is indicated for two sites. The B. harveyi sequence can be arranged into the same four helix secondary structures as E. coli and other prokaryotic 5S rRNAs. Examination of the 5S-RNS sequences of the three bacteria indicates that B. harveyi and P. phosphoreum are specifically related and share a common ancestor which diverged from an ancestor of E. coli at a somewhat earlier time, consistent with previous studies.

  8. Complete genome sequencing and analysis of Saprospira grandis str. Lewin, a predatory marine bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Saw, Jimmy H. W.; Yuryev, Anton; Kanbe, Masaomi; Hou, Shaobin; Young, Aaron G.; Aizawa, Shin-Ichi

    2012-01-01

    Saprospira grandis is a coastal marine bacterium that can capture and prey upon other marine bacteria using a mechanism known as ‘ixotrophy’. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of Saprospira grandis str. Lewin isolated from La Jolla beach in San Diego, California. The complete genome sequence comprises a chromosome of 4.35 Mbp and a plasmid of 54.9 Kbp. Genome analysis revealed incomplete pathways for the biosynthesis of nine essential amino acids but presence of a large number of peptidases. The genome encodes multiple copies of sensor globin-coupled rsbR genes thought to be essential for stress response and the presence of such sensor globins in Bacteroidetes is unprecedented. A total of 429 spacer sequences within the three CRISPR repeat regions were identified in the genome and this number is the largest among all the Bacteroidetes sequenced to date. PMID:22675601

  9. Complete genome of Nitrosospira briensis C-128, an ammonia-oxidizing bacterium from agricultural soil

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, Marlen C.; Norton, Jeanette M.; Valois, Frederica

    Nitrosospira briensis C-128 is an ammonia-oxidizing bacterium isolated from an acid agricultural soil. N. briensis C-128 was sequenced with PacBio RS technologies at the DOE-Joint Genome Institute through their Community Science Program (2010). The high-quality finished genome contains one chromosome of 3.21 Mb and no plasmids. We identified 3073 gene models, 3018 of which are protein coding. The two-way average nucleotide identity between the chromosomes of Nitrosospira multiformis ATCC 25196 and Nitrosospira briensis C-128 was found to be 77.2 %. Multiple copies of modules encoding chemolithotrophic metabolism were identified in their genomic context. The gene inventory supports chemolithotrophic metabolism withmore » implications for function in soil environments.« less

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of Adaptation of the Moderately Halophilic Bacterium Halobacillis halophilus to Its Environment

    PubMed Central

    Hänelt, Inga; Müller, Volker

    2013-01-01

    The capability of osmoadaptation is a prerequisite of organisms that live in an environment with changing salinities. Halobacillus halophilus is a moderately halophilic bacterium that grows between 0.4 and 3 M NaCl by accumulating both chloride and compatible solutes as osmolytes. Chloride is absolutely essential for growth and, moreover, was shown to modulate gene expression and activity of enzymes involved in osmoadaptation. The synthesis of different compatible solutes is strictly salinity- and growth phase-dependent. This unique hybrid strategy of H. halophilus will be reviewed here taking into account the recently published genome sequence. Based on identified genes we will speculate about possible scenarios of the synthesis of compatible solutes and the uptake of potassium ion which would complete our knowledge of the fine-tuned osmoregulation and intracellular osmolyte balance in H. halophilus. PMID:25371341

  11. Plague bacterium as a transformer species in prairie dogs and the grasslands of western North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eads, David A.; Biggins, Dean E.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive transformer species change the character, condition, form, or nature of ecosystems and deserve considerable attention from conservation scientists. We applied the transformer species concept to the plague bacterium Yersinia pestis in western North America, where the pathogen was introduced around 1900. Y. pestis transforms grassland ecosystems by severely depleting the abundance of prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) and thereby causing declines in native species abundance and diversity, including threatened and endangered species; altering food web connections; altering the import and export of nutrients; causing a loss of ecosystem resilience to encroaching invasive plants; and modifying prairie dog burrows. Y. pestis poses an important challenge to conservation biologists because it causes trophic-level perturbations that affect the stability of ecosystems. Unfortunately, understanding of the effects of Y. pestis on ecosystems is rudimentary, highlighting an acute need for continued research.

  12. Plague bacterium as a transformer species in prairie dogs and the grasslands of western North America.

    PubMed

    Eads, David A; Biggins, Dean E

    2015-08-01

    Invasive transformer species change the character, condition, form, or nature of ecosystems and deserve considerable attention from conservation scientists. We applied the transformer species concept to the plague bacterium Yersinia pestis in western North America, where the pathogen was introduced around 1900. Y. pestis transforms grassland ecosystems by severely depleting the abundance of prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) and thereby causing declines in native species abundance and diversity, including threatened and endangered species; altering food web connections; altering the import and export of nutrients; causing a loss of ecosystem resilience to encroaching invasive plants; and modifying prairie dog burrows. Y. pestis poses an important challenge to conservation biologists because it causes trophic-level perturbations that affect the stability of ecosystems. Unfortunately, understanding of the effects of Y. pestis on ecosystems is rudimentary, highlighting an acute need for continued research. © 2015 Society for Conservation Biology.

  13. Strain IMB-1, a novel bacterium for the removal of methyl bromide in fumigated agricultural soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Connell, Hancock T.L.; Costello, A.M.; Lidstrom, M.E.; Oremland, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    A facultatively methylotrophic bacterium, strain IMB-1, that has been isolated from agricultural soil grows on methyl bromide (MeBr), methyl iodide, methyl chloride, and methylated amines, as well as on glucose, pyruvate, or acetate. Phylogenetic analysis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence indicates that strain IMB-1 classes in the alpha subgroup of the class Proteobacteria and is closely related to members of the genus Rhizobium. The ability of strain IMB-1 to oxidize MeBr to CO2 is constitutive in cells regardless of the growth substrate. Addition of cell suspensions of strain IMB-1 to soils greatly accelerates the oxidation of MeBr, as does pretreatment of soils with low concentrations of methyl iodide. These results suggest that soil treatment strategies can be devised whereby bacteria can effectively consume MeBr during field fumigations, which would diminish or eliminate the outward flux of MeBr to the atmosphere.

  14. Carbohydrate hydrogels with stabilized phage particles for bacterial biosensing: bacterium diffusion studies.

    PubMed

    Balcão, Victor M; Barreira, Sérgio V P; Nunes, Thiago M; Chaud, Marco V; Tubino, Matthieu; Vila, Marta M D C

    2014-02-01

    Bacteriophage particles have been reported as potentially useful in the development of diagnosis tools for pathogenic bacteria as they specifically recognize and lyse bacterial isolates thus confirming the presence of viable cells. One of the most representative microorganisms associated with health care services is the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which alone is responsible for nearly 15% of all nosocomial infections. In this context, structural and functional stabilization of phage particles within biopolymeric hydrogels, aiming at producing cheap (chromogenic) bacterial biosensing devices, has been the goal of a previous research effort. For this, a detailed knowledge of the bacterial diffusion profile into the hydrogel core, where the phage particles lie, is of utmost importance. In the present research effort, the bacterial diffusion process into the biopolymeric hydrogel core was mathematically described and the theoretical simulations duly compared with experimental results, allowing determination of the effective diffusion coefficients of P. aeruginosa in the agar and calcium alginate hydrogels tested.

  15. Genetic diversity in natural populations of a soil bacterium across a landscape gradient

    PubMed Central

    McArthur, J. Vaun; Kovacic, David A.; Smith, Michael H.

    1988-01-01

    Genetic diversity in natural populations of the bacterium Pseudomonas cepacia was surveyed in 10 enzymes from 70 clones isolated along a landscape gradient. Estimates of genetic diversity, ranging from 0.54 to 0.70, were higher than any previously reported values of which we are aware and were positively correlated with habitat variability. Patterns of bacterial genetic diversity were correlated with habitat variability. Findings indicate that the source of strains used in genetic engineering will greatly affect the outcome of planned releases in variable environments. Selection of generalist strains may confer a large advantage to engineered populations, while selection of laboratory strains may result in quick elimination of the engineered strains. PMID:16594009

  16. Bioethanol production from mannitol by a newly isolated bacterium, Enterobacter sp. JMP3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Kim, Young Mi; Rhee, Hong Soon; Lee, Min Woo; Park, Jong Moon

    2013-05-01

    In this study a new bacterium capable of growing on brown seaweed Laminaria japonica, Enterobacter sp. JMP3 was isolated from the gut of turban shell, Batillus cornutus. In anaerobic condition, it produced high yields of ethanol (1.15 mol-EtOH mol-mannitol(-1)) as well as organic acids from mannitol, the major carbohydrate component of L. japonica. Based on carbon distribution and metabolic flux analysis, it was revealed that mannitol was more favorable than glucose for ethanol production due to their different redox states. This indicates that L. japonica is one of the promising feedstock for bioethanol production. Additionally, the mannitol dehydrogenation pathway in Enterobacter sp. JMP3 was examined and verified. Finally, an attempt was made to explore the possibility of controlling ethanol production by altering the redox potential via addition of external NADH in mannitol fermentation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Columnaris disease in fish: a review with emphasis on bacterium-host interactions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Flavobacterium columnare (F. columnare) is the causative agent of columnaris disease. This bacterium affects both cultured and wild freshwater fish including many susceptible commercially important fish species. F. columnare infections may result in skin lesions, fin erosion and gill necrosis, with a high degree of mortality, leading to severe economic losses. Especially in the last decade, various research groups have performed studies aimed at elucidating the pathogenesis of columnaris disease, leading to significant progress in defining the complex interactions between the organism and its host. Despite these efforts, the pathogenesis of columnaris disease hitherto largely remains unclear, compromising the further development of efficient curative and preventive measures to combat this disease. Besides elaborating on the agent and the disease it causes, this review aims to summarize these pathogenesis data emphasizing the areas meriting further investigation. PMID:23617544

  18. Triplet excited state spectra and dynamics of carotenoids from the thermophilic purple photosynthetic bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum

    SciTech Connect

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Blankenship, R. E.

    Light-harvesting complex 2 from the anoxygenic phototrophic purple bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum was purified and studied by steady-state absorption, fluorescence and flash photolysis spectroscopy. Steady-state absorption and fluorescence measurements show that carotenoids play a negligible role as supportive energy donors and transfer excitation to bacteriochlorophyll-a with low energy transfer efficiency of ~30%. HPLC analysis determined that the dominant carotenoids in the complex are rhodopin and spirilloxanthin. Carotenoid excited triplet state formation upon direct (carotenoid) or indirect (bacteriochlorophyll-a Q{sub x} band) excitation shows that carotenoid triplets are mostly localized on spirilloxanthin. In addition, no triplet excitation transfer between carotenoids was observed. Suchmore » specific carotenoid composition and spectroscopic results strongly suggest that this organism optimized carotenoid composition in the light-harvesting complex 2 in order to maximize photoprotective capabilities of carotenoids but subsequently drastically suppressed their supporting role in light-harvesting process.« less

  19. Complete genome of Nitrosospira briensis C-128, an ammonia-oxidizing bacterium from agricultural soil

    DOE PAGES

    Rice, Marlen C.; Norton, Jeanette M.; Valois, Frederica; ...

    2016-07-28

    Nitrosospira briensis C-128 is an ammonia-oxidizing bacterium isolated from an acid agricultural soil. N. briensis C-128 was sequenced with PacBio RS technologies at the DOE-Joint Genome Institute through their Community Science Program (2010). The high-quality finished genome contains one chromosome of 3.21 Mb and no plasmids. We identified 3073 gene models, 3018 of which are protein coding. The two-way average nucleotide identity between the chromosomes of Nitrosospira multiformis ATCC 25196 and Nitrosospira briensis C-128 was found to be 77.2 %. Multiple copies of modules encoding chemolithotrophic metabolism were identified in their genomic context. The gene inventory supports chemolithotrophic metabolism withmore » implications for function in soil environments.« less

  20. Polymicrobial infection and bacterium-mediated epigenetic modification of DNA tumor viruses contribute to pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Doolittle, J M; Webster-Cyriaque, J

    2014-04-29

    ABSTRACT The human body plays host to a wide variety of microbes, commensal and pathogenic. In addition to interacting with their host, different microbes, such as bacteria and viruses, interact with each other, sometimes in ways that exacerbate disease. In particular, gene expression of a number of viruses, including Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), is known to be regulated by epigenetic modifications induced by bacteria. These viruses establish latent infection in their host cells and can be reactivated by bacterial products. Viral reactivation has been suggested to contribute to periodontal disease and AIDS. In addition, bacterium-virus interactions may play a role in cancers, such as Kaposi's sarcoma, gastric cancer, and head and neck cancer. It is important to consider the effects of coexisting bacterial infections when studying viral diseases in vivo.

  1. A bacterium that can grow by using arsenic instead of phosphorus

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe-Simon, F; Blum, J S; Kulp, T R

    Life is mostly composed of the elements carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur and phosphorus. Although these six elements make up nucleic acids, proteins and lipids and thus the bulk of living matter, it is theoretically possible that some other elements in the periodic table could serve the same functions. Here we describe a bacterium, strain GFAJ-1 of the Halomonadaceae, isolated from Mono Lake, CA, which substitutes arsenic for phosphorus to sustain its growth. Our data show evidence for arsenate in macromolecules that normally contain phosphate, most notably nucleic acids and proteins. Exchange of one of the major bio-elements may havemore » profound evolutionary and geochemical significance.« less

  2. Proteolysin, a Novel Highly Thermostable and Cosolvent-Compatible Protease from the Thermophilic Bacterium Coprothermobacter proteolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Toplak, Ana; Wu, Bian; Fusetti, Fabrizia; Quaedflieg, Peter J. L. M.

    2013-01-01

    Through genome mining, we identified a gene encoding a putative serine protease of the thermitase subgroup of subtilases (EC 3.4.21.66) in the thermophilic bacterium Coprothermobacter proteolyticus. The gene was functionally expressed in Escherichia coli, and the enzyme, which we called proteolysin, was purified to near homogeneity from crude cell lysate by a single heat treatment step. Proteolysin has a broad pH tolerance and is active at temperatures of up to 80°C. In addition, the enzyme shows good activity and stability in the presence of organic solvents, detergents, and dithiothreitol, and it remains active in 6 M guanidinium hydrochloride. Based on its stability and activity profile, proteolysin can be an excellent candidate for applications where resistance to harsh process conditions is required. PMID:23851086

  3. Isolation and characterization of an anaerobic ruminal bacterium capable of degrading hydrolyzable tannins.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, K E; Pell, A N; Schofield, P; Zinder, S

    1995-01-01

    An anaerobic diplococcoid bacterium able to degrade hydrolyzable tannins was isolated from the ruminal fluid of a goat fed desmodium (Desmodium ovalifolium), a tropical legume which contains levels as high as 17% condensed tannins. This strain grew under anaerobic conditions in the presence of up to 30 g of tannic acid per liter and tolerated a range of phenolic monomers, including gallic, ferulic, and p-coumaric acids. The predominant fermentation product from tannic acid breakdown was pyrogallol, as detected by high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Tannic acid degradation was dependent on the presence of a sugar such as glucose, fructose, arabinose, sucrose, galactose, cellobiose, or soluble starch as an added carbon and energy source. The strain also demonstrated resistance to condensed tannins up to a level of 4 g/liter. PMID:7574640

  4. Identification of an anaerobic bacterium which reduces perchlorate and chlorate as Wolinella succinogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, W.; Attaway, H.

    1995-12-31

    Perchlorate and chlorate salts are widely used by the chemical, aerospace and defense industries as oxidizers in propellant, explosives and pyrotechnics. The authors have isolated a anaerobic bacterium which is capable of the dissimilatory reduction of both perchlorate and chlorate for energy and growth. Strain HAP-1 is a gram negative, thin rod, non-sporeforming, highly motile strict anaerobe. Antibiotic resistance profiles, utilization of carbon substrates and electron acceptors demonstrated similar physiological characteristics to Wolinella succinogenes. Pairwise comparisons of 16S RNA sequences showed only a 0.75% divergence between strain HAP-1 and W. succinogenes. Physiological, morphological and 16S RRNA sequence data indicate strainmore » HAP-1 is a subspecies of W. succinogenes that can utilize perchlorate and chlorate as terminal electron acceptors.« less

  5. Nanomechanical properties of the sea-water bacterium Paracoccus seriniphilus--a scanning force microscopy approach.

    PubMed

    Davoudi, Neda; Müller-Renno, Christine; Ziegler, Christiane; Raid, Indek; Seewig, Jörg; Schlegel, Christin; Muffler, Kai; Ulber, Roland

    2015-03-02

    The measurement of force-distance curves on a single bacterium provides a unique opportunity to detect properties such as the turgor pressure under various environmental conditions. Marine bacteria are very interesting candidates for the production of pharmaceuticals, but are only little studied so far. Therefore, the elastic behavior of Paracoccus seriniphilus, an enzyme producing marine organism, is presented in this study. After a careful evaluation of the optimal measurement conditions, the spring constant and the turgor pressure are determined as a function of ionic strength and pH. Whereas the ionic strength changes the turgor pressure passively, the results give a hint that the change to acidic pH increases the turgor pressure by an active mechanism. Furthermore, it could be shown, that P. seriniphilus has adhesive protrusions outside its cell wall.

  6. Insight into the evolution of microbial metabolism from the deep-branching bacterium, Thermovibrio ammonificans.

    PubMed

    Giovannelli, Donato; Sievert, Stefan M; Hügler, Michael; Markert, Stephanie; Becher, Dörte; Schweder, Thomas; Vetriani, Costantino

    2017-04-24

    Anaerobic thermophiles inhabit relic environments that resemble the early Earth. However, the lineage of these modern organisms co-evolved with our planet. Hence, these organisms carry both ancestral and acquired genes and serve as models to reconstruct early metabolism. Based on comparative genomic and proteomic analyses, we identified two distinct groups of genes in Thermovibrio ammonificans : the first codes for enzymes that do not require oxygen and use substrates of geothermal origin; the second appears to be a more recent acquisition, and may reflect adaptations to cope with the rise of oxygen on Earth. We propose that the ancestor of the Aquificae was originally a hydrogen oxidizing, sulfur reducing bacterium that used a hybrid pathway for CO 2 fixation. With the gradual rise of oxygen in the atmosphere, more efficient terminal electron acceptors became available and this lineage acquired genes that increased its metabolic flexibility while retaining ancestral metabolic traits.

  7. A Mutant Strain of a Surfactant-Producing Bacterium with Increased Emulsification Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingmei; Yao, Jianming; Pan, Renrui; Yu, Zengliang

    2005-06-01

    As reported in this paper, a strain of oil-degrading bacterium Sp-5-3 was determined to belong to Enterobacteriaceae, which would be useful for microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). The aim of our study was to generate a mutant using low energy N+ beam implantation. With 10 keV of energy and 5.2 × 1014 N+/cm2 of dose - the optimum condition, a mutant, S-34, was obtained, which had nearly a 5-fold higher surface and a 13-fold higher of emulsification activity than the wild type. The surface activity was measured by two methods, namely, a surface tension measuring instrument and a recording of the repulsive circle of the oil film; the emulsification activity was scaled through measuring the separating time of the oil-fermentation mixture. The metabolic acid was determined as methane by means of gas chromatography.

  8. Isolation and characterization of a new hydrogen-utilizing bacterium from the rumen.

    PubMed

    Rieu-Lesme, F; Fonty, G; Doré, J

    1995-01-01

    A new H2/CO2-utilizing acetogenic bacterium was isolated from the rumen of a mature deer. This is the first report of a spore-forming Gram-negative bacterial species from the rumen. The organism was a strictly anaerobic, motile rod and was able to grow autotrophically on hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Acetate was the major product detected. Glucose, fructose and lactate were also fermented heterotrophically. The optimum pH for growth was 7.0-7.5, and the optimum temperature was 37-42 degrees C. Yeast extract was required for growth and rumen fluid was highly stimulatory. The DNA base ratio was 52.9 +/- 0.5 mol% G+C. On the basis of these characteristics and fermentation products, the isolate was considered to be different from acetogenic bacteria described previously.

  9. Isolation and characterization of bacterium producing lipid from short-chain fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Yoshiko; Nakai, Shota; Ohkawachi, Masahiko; Suemitsu, Masahiro; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Aki, Tsunehiro; Matsumura, Yukihiko; Tajima, Takahisa; Nakashimada, Yutaka; Matsumoto, Mitsufumi

    2016-02-01

    Anaerobic fermentation generates propionic acid, which inhibits microbial growth and accumulates in wastewater containing increased amounts of organic matter. We therefore isolated a propionic acid-assimilating bacterium that could produce triacylglycerol, for use in wastewater treatment. Nitratireductor sp. strain OM-1 can proliferate in medium containing propionic, acetic, butyric, and valeric acids as well as glycerol, and produces triacylglycerol when both propionic and acetic acids or glycerol are present. In composite model wastewater containing acetic acid, propionic acid and glycerol, this strain shows an even higher conversion rate, suggesting that it is suitable for wastewater treatment. Further, nitrogen depletion in medium containing an acetic-propionic acid mixture resulted in the production of the light oil 2-butenoic acid 1-methylethyl ester, but not triacylglycerol. Collectively, our data indicate that strain OM-1 has the potential to reduce accumulation of activated sludge in wastewater treatment and may contribute to the production of biodiesel. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A cultured greigite-producing magnetotactic bacterium in a novel group of sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Christopher T; Menguy, Nicolas; Abreu, Fernanda; Lins, Ulysses; Pósfai, Mihály; Prozorov, Tanya; Pignol, David; Frankel, Richard B; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2011-12-23

    Magnetotactic bacteria contain magnetosomes--intracellular, membrane-bounded, magnetic nanocrystals of magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) or greigite (Fe(3)S(4))--that cause the bacteria to swim along geomagnetic field lines. We isolated a greigite-producing magnetotactic bacterium from a brackish spring in Death Valley National Park, California, USA, strain BW-1, that is able to biomineralize greigite and magnetite depending on culture conditions. A phylogenetic comparison of BW-1 and similar uncultured greigite- and/or magnetite-producing magnetotactic bacteria from freshwater to hypersaline habitats shows that these organisms represent a previously unknown group of sulfate-reducing bacteria in the Deltaproteobacteria. Genomic analysis of BW-1 reveals the presence of two different magnetosome gene clusters, suggesting that one may be responsible for greigite biomineralization and the other for magnetite.

  11. A hyperactive, Ca2+-dependent antifreeze protein in an Antarctic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Jack A; Davies, Peter L; Laybourn-Parry, Johanna

    2005-04-01

    In cold climates, some plants and bacteria that cannot avoid freezing use antifreeze proteins (AFPs) to lessen the destructive effects of ice recrystallization. These AFPs have weak freezing point depression activity, perhaps to avoid sudden, uncontrolled growth of ice. Here, we report on an uncharacteristically powerful bacterial AFP found in an Antarctic strain of the bacterium, Marinomonas primoryensis. It is Ca(2+)-dependent, shows evidence of cooperativity, and can produce over 2 degrees C of freezing point depression. Unlike most AFPs, it does not produce obvious crystal faceting during thermal hysteresis. This AFP might be capable of imparting freezing avoidance to M. primoryensis in ice-covered Antarctic lakes. A hyperactive bacterial AFP has not previously been reported.

  12. Biosynthesis and characterization of polyhydroxyalkanoates in the polysaccharide-degrading marine bacterium Saccharophagus degradans ATCC 43961.

    PubMed

    González-García, Yolanda; Nungaray, Jesús; Córdova, Jesús; González-Reynoso, Orfil; Koller, Martin; Atlic, Aid; Braunegg, Gerhart

    2008-06-01

    The marine bacterium Saccharophagus degradans was investigated for the synthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), using glucose as the sole source of carbon in a two-step batch culture. In the first step the microorganism grew under nutrient balanced conditions; in the second step the cells were cultivated under limitation of nitrogen source. The biopolymer accumulated in S. degradans cells was detected by Nile red staining and FT-IR analysis. From GC-MS analysis, it was found that this strain produced a homopolymer of 3-hydroxybutyric acid. The cellular polymer concentration, its molecular mass, glass transition temperature, melting point and heat of fusion were 17.2+/-2.7% of dry cell weight, 54.2+/-0.6 kDa, 37.4+/-6.0 degrees C, 165.6+/-5.5 degrees C and 59.6+/-2.2 J g(-1), respectively. This work is the first report determining the capacity of S. degradans to synthesize PHAs.

  13. Activation and manipulation of host responses by a Gram-positive bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, Vasudevan

    2008-01-01

    The interaction between tomato plants and Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis (Cmm) represents a model pathosystem to study the interplay between the virulence determinants of a Gram-positive bacterium and the attempt of a crop plant to counteract pathogen invasion. To investigate plant responses activated during this compatible interaction, we recently analyzed gene expression profiles of tomato stems infected with Cmm. This analysis revealed activation of basal defense responses that are typically observed upon plant perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns. In addition, Cmm infection upregulated the expression of host genes related to ethylene synthesis and response. Further analysis of tomato plants impaired in ethylene perception and production demonstrated an important role for ethylene in the development of disease symptoms. Here we discuss possible molecular strategies used by the plant to recognize Cmm infection and possible mechanisms employed by the pathogen to interfere with the activation of plant defense responses and promote disease. PMID:19704516

  14. Structure of ribose 5-phosphate isomerase from the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus salivarius UCC118.

    PubMed

    Lobley, Carina M C; Aller, Pierre; Douangamath, Alice; Reddivari, Yamini; Bumann, Mario; Bird, Louise E; Nettleship, Joanne E; Brandao-Neto, Jose; Owens, Raymond J; O'Toole, Paul W; Walsh, Martin A

    2012-12-01

    The structure of ribose 5-phosphate isomerase from the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus salivarius UCC188 has been determined at 1.72 Å resolution. The structure was solved by molecular replacement, which identified the functional homodimer in the asymmetric unit. Despite only showing 57% sequence identity to its closest homologue, the structure adopted the typical α and β D-ribose 5-phosphate isomerase fold. Comparison to other related structures revealed high homology in the active site, allowing a model of the substrate-bound protein to be proposed. The determination of the structure was expedited by the use of in situ crystallization-plate screening on beamline I04-1 at Diamond Light Source to identify well diffracting protein crystals prior to routine cryocrystallography.

  15. Virus-Bacterium Interactions in Water and Sediment of West African Inland Aquatic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bettarel, Yvan; Bouvy, Marc; Dumont, Claire; Sime-Ngando, Télesphore

    2006-01-01

    The ecology of virioplankton in tropical aquatic ecosystems is poorly documented, and in particular, there are no references concerning African continental waters in the literature. In this study, we examined virus-bacterium interactions in the pelagic and benthic zones of seven contrasting shallow inland waters in Senegal, including one hypersaline lake. SYBR Gold-stained samples revealed that in the surface layers of the sites, the numbers of viruses were in the same range as the numbers of viruses reported previously for productive temperate systems. Despite high bacterial production rates, the percentages of visibly infected cells (as determined by transmission electron microscopy) were similar to the lowest percentages (range, 0.3 to 1.1%; mean, 0.5%) found previously at pelagic freshwater or marine sites, presumably because of the local environmental and climatic conditions. Since the percentages of lysogenic bacteria were consistently less than 8% for pelagic and benthic samples, lysogeny did not appear to be a dominant strategy for virus propagation at these sites. In the benthic samples, viruses were highly concentrated, but paradoxically, no bacteria were visibly infected. This suggests that sediment provides good conditions for virus preservation but ironically is an unfavorable environment for proliferation. In addition, given the comparable size distributions of viruses in the water and sediment samples, our results support the paradigm that aquatic viruses are ubiquitous and may have moved between the two compartments of the shallow systems examined. Overall, this study provides additional information about the relevance of viruses in tropical areas and indicates that the intensity of virus-bacterium interactions in benthic habitats may lower than the intensity in the adjacent bodies of water. PMID:16885276

  16. Virus-bacterium coupling driven by both turbidity and hydrodynamics in an Amazonian floodplain lake.

    PubMed

    Barros, Nathan; Farjalla, Vinicius F; Soares, Maria C; Melo, Rossana C N; Roland, Fábio

    2010-11-01

    The importance of viruses in aquatic ecosystem functioning has been widely described. However, few studies have examined tropical aquatic ecosystems. Here, we evaluated for the first time viruses and their relationship with other planktonic communities in an Amazonian freshwater ecosystem. Coupling between viruses and bacteria was studied, focusing both on hydrologic dynamics and anthropogenic forced turbidity in the system (Lake Batata). Samples were taken during four hydrologic seasons at both natural and impacted sites to count virus-like particles (VLP) and bacteria. In parallel, virus-infected bacteria were identified and quantified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Viral abundance ranged from 0.5 × 10⁷ ± 0.2 × 10⁷ VLP ml⁻¹ (high-water season, impacted site) to 1.7 × 10⁷ ± 0.4 × 10⁷ VLP ml⁻¹ (low-water season, natural site). These data were strongly correlated with the bacterial abundance (r² = 0.84; P < 0.05), which ranged from 1.0 × 10⁶ ± 0.5 × 10⁶ cells ml⁻¹ (high water, impacted site) to 3.4 × 10⁶ ± 0.7 × 10⁶ cells ml⁻¹ (low water, natural site). Moreover, the viral abundance was weakly correlated with chlorophyll a, suggesting that most viruses were bacteriophages. TEM quantitative analyses revealed that the frequency of visibly infected cells was 20%, with 10 ± 3 phages per cell section. In general, we found a low virus-bacterium ratio (<7). Both the close coupling between the viral and bacterial abundances and the low virus-bacterium ratio suggest that viral abundance tends to be driven by the reduction of hosts for viral infection. Our results demonstrate that viruses are controlled by biological substrates, whereas in addition to grazing, bacteria are regulated by physical processes caused by turbidity, which affect underwater light distribution and dissolved organic carbon availability.

  17. Carbohydrate utilization patterns for the extremely thermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus reveal broad growth substrate preferences.

    PubMed

    Vanfossen, Amy L; Verhaart, Marcel R A; Kengen, Servé M W; Kelly, Robert M

    2009-12-01

    Coutilization of hexoses and pentoses derived from lignocellulose is an attractive trait in microorganisms considered for consolidated biomass processing to biofuels. This issue was examined for the H(2)-producing, extremely thermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus growing on individual monosaccharides (arabinose, fructose, galactose, glucose, mannose, and xylose), mixtures of these sugars, as well as on xylan and xylogluco-oligosacchrides. C. saccharolyticus grew at approximately the same rate (t(d), approximately 95 min) and to the same final cell density (1 x 10(8) to 3 x 10(8) cells/ml) on all sugars and sugar mixtures tested. In the monosaccharide mixture, although simultaneous consumption of all monosaccharides was observed, not all were utilized to the same extent (fructose > xylose/arabinose > mannose/glucose/galactose). Transcriptome contrasts for monosaccharide growth revealed minimal changes in some cases (e.g., 32 open reading frames [ORFs] changed >/=2-fold for glucose versus galactose), while substantial changes occurred for cases involving mannose (e.g., 353 ORFs changed >/=2-fold for glucose versus mannose). Evidence for catabolite repression was not noted for either growth on multisugar mixtures or the corresponding transcriptomes. Based on the whole-genome transcriptional response analysis and comparative genomics, carbohydrate specificities for transport systems could be proposed for most of the 24 putative carbohydrate ATP-binding cassette transporters and single phosphotransferase system identified in C. saccharolyticus. Although most transporter genes responded to individual monosaccharides and polysaccharides, the genes Csac_0692 to Csac_0694 were upregulated only in the monosaccharide mixture. The results presented here affirm the broad growth substrate preferences of C. saccharolyticus on carbohydrates representative of lignocellulosic biomass and suggest that this bacterium holds promise for biofuel applications.

  18. Aminomonas paucivorans gen. nov., sp. nov., a mesophilic, anaerobic, amino-acid-utilizing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Baena, S; Fardeau, M L; Ollivier, B; Labat, M; Thomas, P; Garcia, J L; Patel, B K

    1999-07-01

    A novel, asaccharolytic, amino-acid-degrading bacterium, designated strain GLU-3T, was isolated from an anaerobic lagoon of a dairy wastewater treatment plant. Strain GLU-3T stained Gram-negative and was an obligately anaerobic, non-spore-forming, slightly curved, rod-shaped bacterium (0.3 x 4.0-6.0 microns) which existed singly or in pairs. The DNA G+C content was 43 mol%. Optimum growth occurred at 35 degrees C and pH 7.5 on arginine with a generation time of 16 h. Good growth was obtained on arginine, histidine, threonine and glycine. Acetate was the end-product formed from all these substrates, but in addition, a trace of formate was detected from arginine and histidine, and ornithine was produced from arginine. Strain GLU-3T grew slowly on glutamate and produced acetate, carbon dioxide, formate, hydrogen and traces of propionate as the end-products. In syntrophic association with Methanobacterium formicicum, strain GLU-3T oxidized arginine, histidine and glutamate to give propionate as the major product; acetate, carbon dioxide and methane were also produced. Strain GLU-3T did not degrade alanine and the branched-chain amino acids valine, leucine and isoleucine either in pure culture or in association with M. formicicum. The nearest phylogenetic relative of strain GLU-3T was the thermophile Selenomonas acidaminovorans (similarity value of 89.5%). As strain GLU-3T is phylogenetically, physiologically and genotypically different from other amino-acid-degrading genera, it is proposed that it should be designated a new species of a new genus Aminomonas paucivorans gen. nov., sp. nov. (DSM 12260T).

  19. Reduction of Mo(VI) by the bacterium Serratia sp. strain DRY5.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M F A; Shukor, M Y; Suhaili, Z; Mustafa, S; Shamaan, N A; Syed, M A

    2009-01-01

    The need to isolate efficient heavy metal reducers for cost effective bioremediation strategy have resulted in the isolation of a potent molybdenum-reducing bacterium. The isolate was tentatively identified as Serratia sp. strain DRY5 based on the Biolog GN carbon utilization profiles and partial 16S rDNA molecular phylogeny. Strain DRY5 produced 2.3 times the amount of Mo-blue than S. marcescens strain Dr.Y6, 23 times more than E. coli K12 and 7 times more than E. cloacae strain 48. Strain DRY5 required 37 degrees C and pH 7.0 for optimum molybdenum reduction. Carbon sources such as sucrose, maltose, glucose and glycerol, supported cellular growth and molybdate reduction after 24 hr of static incubation. The most optimum carbon source that supported reduction was sucrose at 1.0% (w/v). Ammonium sulphate, ammonium chloride, glutamic acid, cysteine, and valine supported growth and molybdate reduction with ammonium sulphate as the optimum nitrogen source at 0. 2% (w/v). Molybdate reduction was optimally supported by 30 mM molybdate. The optimum concentration of phosphate for molybdate reduction was 5 mM when molybdate concentration was fixed at 30 mM and molybdate reduction was totally inhibited at 100 mM phosphate. Mo-blue produced by this strain shows a unique characteristic absorption profile with a maximum peak at 865 nm and a shoulder at 700 nm, Dialysis tubing experiment showed that 95.42% of Mo-blue was found in the dialysis tubing suggesting that the molybdate reduction seen in this bacterium was catalyzed by enzyme(s). The characteristics of isolate DRY5 suggest that it would be useful in the bioremediation ofmolybdenum-containing waste.

  20. Bacillus flexus strain As-12, a new arsenic transformer bacterium isolated from contaminated water resources.

    PubMed

    Jebeli, Mohammad Ahmadi; Maleki, Afshin; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Kalantar, Enayatollah; Izanloo, Hassan; Gharibi, Fardin

    2017-02-01

    A total of 14 arsenic-resistant bacteria were isolated from an arsenic-contaminated travertine spring water in the central district of Qorveh county, Kurdistan Province, Iran. One of strains designated As-12 was selected for further investigation because of its ability to transform arsenic. The strain was identified by cultural, morphological and biochemical tests, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Finally, the growth characteristics of the isolate were investigated in a chemically defined medium which included varied ranges of environmental factors such as pH, temperature and salinity. Moreover, the resistance of this strain to some heavy metals was evaluated. The bacterium was a Gram-positive, endospore-forming with all other characteristics of the genus Bacillus. It revealed maximum similarity at the 16S rRNA gene level with Bacillus flexus. The optimum growth of the strain was observed at 38 °C, pH 9 and 2% salinity. This strain was resistant to heavy metals such as zinc, chromium, lead, nickel, copper, mercuric and cadmium at concentrations of 15 mM, 15.5 mM, 11.5 mM, 12 mM, 11 mM, 5.5 mM, and 1 mM, respectively. The isolated bacterium was able to reduce As (V) to As (III) (about 28%) and oxidize As (III) to As (V) (about 45%) after 48 h of incubation at 37 °C. In conclusion, Bacillus flexus strain As-12, was identified as an arsenic transformer, for the first time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Osmoregulation in the Halophilic Bacterium Halomonas elongata: A Case Study for Integrative Systems Biology.

    PubMed

    Kindzierski, Viktoria; Raschke, Silvia; Knabe, Nicole; Siedler, Frank; Scheffer, Beatrix; Pflüger-Grau, Katharina; Pfeiffer, Friedhelm; Oesterhelt, Dieter; Marin-Sanguino, Alberto; Kunte, Hans-Jörg

    2017-01-01

    Halophilic bacteria use a variety of osmoregulatory methods, such as the accumulation of one or more compatible solutes. The wide diversity of compounds that can act as compatible solute complicates the task of understanding the different strategies that halophilic bacteria use to cope with salt. This is specially challenging when attempting to go beyond the pathway that produces a certain compatible solute towards an understanding of how the metabolic network as a whole addresses the problem. Metabolic reconstruction based on genomic data together with Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) is a promising tool to gain insight into this problem. However, as more of these reconstructions become available, it becomes clear that processes predicted by genome annotation may not reflect the processes that are active in vivo. As a case in point, E. coli is unable to grow aerobically on citrate in spite of having all the necessary genes to do it. It has also been shown that the realization of this genetic potential into an actual capability to metabolize citrate is an extremely unlikely event under normal evolutionary conditions. Moreover, many marine bacteria seem to have the same pathways to metabolize glucose but each species uses a different one. In this work, a metabolic network inferred from genomic annotation of the halophilic bacterium Halomonas elongata and proteomic profiling experiments are used as a starting point to motivate targeted experiments in order to find out some of the defining features of the osmoregulatory strategies of this bacterium. This new information is then used to refine the network in order to describe the actual capabilities of H. elongata, rather than its genetic potential.

  2. Extracellular polymer substance synthesized by a halophilic bacterium Chromohalobacter canadensis 28.

    PubMed

    Radchenkova, Nadja; Boyadzhieva, Ivanka; Atanasova, Nikolina; Poli, Annarita; Finore, Ilaria; Di Donato, Paola; Nicolaus, Barbara; Panchev, Ivan; Kuncheva, Margarita; Kambourova, Margarita

    2018-04-03

    Halophilic microorganisms are producers of a lot of new compounds whose properties suggest promising perspectives for their biotechnological exploration. Moderate halophilic bacterium Chromohalobacter canadensis 28 was isolated from Pomorie salterns as an extracellular polymer substance (EP) producer. The best carbon source for extracellular polymer production was found to be lactose, a sugar received as a by-product from the dairy industry. After optimization of the culture medium and physicochemical conditions for cultivation, polymer biosynthesis increased more than 2-fold. The highest level of extracellular polymer synthesis by C. canadensis 28 was observed in an unusually high NaCl concentration (15% w/v). Chemical analysis of the purified polymer revealed the presence of an exopolysaccharide (EPS) fraction (14.3% w/w) and protein fraction (72% w/w). HPLC analysis of the protein fraction showed the main presence of polyglutamic acid (PGA) (75.7% w/w). EPS fraction analysis revealed the following sugar composition (% w/w): glucosamine 36.7, glucose 32.3, rhamnose 25.4, xylose 1.7, and not identified sugar 3.9. The hydrogel formed by PGA and EPS fractions showed high swelling behavior, very good emulsifying and stabilizing properties, and good foaming ability. This is the first report for halophilic bacterium able to synthesize a polymer containing PGA fraction. The synthesized biopolymer shows an extremely high hydrophilicity, due to the simultaneous presence of PGA and EPS. The analysis of its functional properties and the presence of glucosamine in the highest proportion in EPS fraction clearly determine the potential of EP synthesized by C. canadensis 28 for application in the cosmetics industry.

  3. Zinc biosorption by the purple non-sulfur bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Magnin, Jean-Pierre; Gondrexon, Nicolas; Willison, John C

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents the first report providing information on the zinc (Zn) biosorption potentialities of the purple non-sulfur bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus. The effects of various biological, physical, and chemical parameters on Zn biosorption were studied in both the wild-type strain B10 and a strain, RC220, lacking the endogenous plasmid. At an initial Zn concentration of 10 mg·L(-1), the Zn biosorption capacity at pH 7 for bacterial biomass grown in synthetic medium containing lactate as carbon source was 17 and 16 mg Zn·(g dry mass)(-1) for strains B10 and RC220, respectively. Equilibrium was achieved in a contact time of 30-120 min, depending on the initial Zn concentration. Zn sorption by live biomass was modelled, at equilibrium, according to the Redlich-Peterson and Langmuir isotherms, in the range of 1-600 mg Zn·L(-1). The wild-type strain showed a maximal Zn uptake capacity (Qm) of 164 ± 8 mg·(g dry mass)(-1) and an equilibrium constant (Kads) of 0.017 ± 0.00085 L·(mg Zn)(-1), compared with values of 73.9 mg·(g dry mass)(-1) and 0.361 L·mg(-1) for the strain lacking the endogenous plasmid. The Qm value observed for R. capsulatus B10 is one of the highest reported in the literature, suggesting that this strain may be useful for Zn bioremediation. The lower Qm value and higher equilibrium constant observed for strain RC220 suggest that the endogenous plasmid confers an enhanced biosorption capacity in this bacterium, although no genetic determinants for Zn resistance appear to be located on the plasmid, and possible explanations for this are discussed.

  4. Characterization of Marinomonas algicida sp. nov., a novel algicidal marine bacterium isolated from seawater.

    PubMed

    Kristyanto, Sylvia; Chaudhary, Dhiraj Kumar; Lee, Sang-Seob; Kim, Jaisoo

    2017-11-01

    A novel Marinomonas-like, aerobic, Gram-reaction-negative, moderately halophilic, acidophilic, motile by a single polar flagellum, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped bacterium that showed algalytic activity, designated strain Yeongu 1-4 T , was isolated from surface seawater of Geoje Island in the South Sea, Republic of Korea. The strain was oxidase-negative and weakly positive for catalase. Growth of this bacterium was observed at temperatures from 4 to 42 °C, at salinities from 0 to 12 % and at pH from 4.5 to 9.0, and it was not able to degrade starch, gelatin, casein or Tween 80. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain Yeongu 1-4 T was related most closely to Marinomonas spartinae SMJ19 T with similarity of 99.3 %. However, levels of DNA-DNA relatedness between strain Yeongu 1-4 T and the most closely related species were lower than 70 %, confirming that they represent distinct genomic species. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain Yeongu 1-4 T was 44.2 mol%. The organism used Q-8 as the predominant respiratory quinone, and C16 : 1ω7c, C18 : 1ω7c and C16 : 0 as major cellular fatty acids. Based on data from this polyphasic taxonomic study, strain Yeongu 1-4 T belongs to a novel species of the genus Marinomonas, within the family Oceanospirillaceae, for which the name Marinomonas algicida is proposed. The type strain is Yeongu 1-4 T (=KEMB 9005-327 T =MCCC 1K00609 T ).

  5. Survival Strategies of the Plant-Associated Bacterium Enterobacter sp. Strain EG16 under Cadmium Stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanmei; Chao, Yuanqing; Li, Yaying; Lin, Qingqi; Bai, Jun; Tang, Lu; Wang, Shizhong; Ying, Rongrong; Qiu, Rongliang

    2016-01-04

    Plant-associated bacteria are of great interest because of their potential use in phytoremediation. However, their ability to survive and promote plant growth in metal-polluted soils remains unclear. In this study, a soilborne Cd-resistant bacterium was isolated and identified as Enterobacter sp. strain EG16. It tolerates high external Cd concentrations (Cd(2+) MIC, >250 mg liter(-1)) and is able to produce siderophores and the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), both of which contribute to plant growth promotion. Surface biosorption in this strain accounted for 31% of the total Cd accumulated. The potential presence of cadmium sulfide, shown by energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, suggested intracellular Cd binding as a Cd response mechanism of the isolate. Cd exposure resulted in global regulation at the transcriptomic level, with the bacterium switching to an energy-conserving mode by inhibiting energy-consuming processes while increasing the production of stress-related proteins. The stress response system included increased import of sulfur and iron, which become deficient under Cd stress, and the redirection of sulfur metabolism to the maintenance of intracellular glutathione levels in response to Cd toxicity. Increased production of siderophores, responding to Cd-induced Fe deficiency, not only is involved in the Cd stress response systems of EG16 but may also play an important role in promoting plant growth as well as alleviating the Cd-induced inhibition of IAA production. The newly isolated strain EG16 may be a suitable candidate for microbially assisted phytoremediation due to its high resistance to Cd and its Cd-induced siderophore production, which is likely to contribute to plant growth promotion. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Survival Strategies of the Plant-Associated Bacterium Enterobacter sp. Strain EG16 under Cadmium Stress

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yanmei; Li, Yaying; Lin, Qingqi; Bai, Jun; Tang, Lu; Wang, Shizhong; Ying, Rongrong

    2016-01-01

    Plant-associated bacteria are of great interest because of their potential use in phytoremediation. However, their ability to survive and promote plant growth in metal-polluted soils remains unclear. In this study, a soilborne Cd-resistant bacterium was isolated and identified as Enterobacter sp. strain EG16. It tolerates high external Cd concentrations (Cd2+ MIC, >250 mg liter−1) and is able to produce siderophores and the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), both of which contribute to plant growth promotion. Surface biosorption in this strain accounted for 31% of the total Cd accumulated. The potential presence of cadmium sulfide, shown by energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, suggested intracellular Cd binding as a Cd response mechanism of the isolate. Cd exposure resulted in global regulation at the transcriptomic level, with the bacterium switching to an energy-conserving mode by inhibiting energy-consuming processes while increasing the production of stress-related proteins. The stress response system included increased import of sulfur and iron, which become deficient under Cd stress, and the redirection of sulfur metabolism to the maintenance of intracellular glutathione levels in response to Cd toxicity. Increased production of siderophores, responding to Cd-induced Fe deficiency, not only is involved in the Cd stress response systems of EG16 but may also play an important role in promoting plant growth as well as alleviating the Cd-induced inhibition of IAA production. The newly isolated strain EG16 may be a suitable candidate for microbially assisted phytoremediation due to its high resistance to Cd and its Cd-induced siderophore production, which is likely to contribute to plant growth promotion. PMID:26729719

  7. Genome Sequence of the Plant Growth Promoting Endophytic Bacterium Enterobacter sp. 638

    PubMed Central

    Taghavi, Safiyh; van der Lelie, Daniel; Hoffman, Adam; Zhang, Yian-Biao; Walla, Michael D.; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Newman, Lee; Monchy, Sébastien

    2010-01-01

    Enterobacter sp. 638 is an endophytic plant growth promoting gamma-proteobacterium that was isolated from the stem of poplar (Populus trichocarpa×deltoides cv. H11-11), a potentially important biofuel feed stock plant. The Enterobacter sp. 638 genome sequence reveals the presence of a 4,518,712 bp chromosome and a 157,749 bp plasmid (pENT638-1). Genome annotation and comparative genomics allowed the identification of an extended set of genes specific to the plant niche adaptation of this bacterium. This includes genes that code for putative proteins involved in survival in the rhizosphere (to cope with oxidative stress or uptake of nutrients released by plant roots), root adhesion (pili, adhesion, hemagglutinin, cellulose biosynthesis), colonization/establishment inside the plant (chemiotaxis, flagella, cellobiose phosphorylase), plant protection against fungal and bacterial infections (siderophore production and synthesis of the antimicrobial compounds 4-hydroxybenzoate and 2-phenylethanol), and improved poplar growth and development through the production of the phytohormones indole acetic acid, acetoin, and 2,3-butanediol. Metabolite analysis confirmed by quantitative RT–PCR showed that, the production of acetoin and 2,3-butanediol is induced by the presence of sucrose in the growth medium. Interestingly, both the genetic determinants required for sucrose metabolism and the synthesis of acetoin and 2,3-butanediol are clustered on a genomic island. These findings point to a close interaction between Enterobacter sp. 638 and its poplar host, where the availability of sucrose, a major plant sugar, affects the synthesis of plant growth promoting phytohormones by the endophytic bacterium. The availability of the genome sequence, combined with metabolome and transcriptome analysis, will provide a better understanding of the synergistic interactions between poplar and its growth promoting endophyte Enterobacter sp. 638. This information can be further exploited to

  8. Transcriptional Changes Underlying Elemental Stoichiometry Shifts in a Marine Heterotrophic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Leong-Keat; Newton, Ryan J.; Sharma, Shalabh; Smith, Christa B.; Rayapati, Pratibha; Limardo, Alexander J.; Meile, Christof; Moran, Mary Ann

    2012-01-01

    Marine bacteria drive the biogeochemical processing of oceanic dissolved organic carbon (DOC), a 750-Tg C reservoir that is a critical component of the global C cycle. Catabolism of DOC is thought to be regulated by the biomass composition of heterotrophic bacteria, as cells maintain a C:N:P ratio of ∼50:10:1 during DOC processing. Yet a complicating factor in stoichiometry-based analyses is that bacteria can change the C:N:P ratio of their biomass in response to resource composition. We investigated the physiological mechanisms of resource-driven shifts in biomass stoichiometry in continuous cultures of the marine heterotrophic bacterium Ruegeria pomeroyi (a member of the Roseobacter clade) under four element limitation regimes (C, N, P, and S). Microarray analysis indicated that the bacterium scavenged for alternate sources of the scarce element when cells were C-, N-, or P-limited; reworked the ratios of biomolecules when C- and P- limited; and exerted tighter control over import/export and cytoplasmic pools when N-limited. Under S limitation, a scenario not existing naturally for surface ocean microbes, stress responses dominated transcriptional changes. Resource-driven changes in C:N ratios of up to 2.5-fold and in C:P ratios of up to sixfold were measured in R. pomeroyi biomass. These changes were best explained if the C and P content of the cells was flexible in the face of shifting resources but N content was not, achieved through the net balance of different transcriptional strategies. The cellular-level metabolic trade-offs that govern biomass stoichiometry in R. pomeroyi may have implications for global carbon cycling if extendable to other heterotrophic bacteria. Strong homeostatic responses to N limitation by marine bacteria would intensify competition with autotrophs. Modification of cellular inventories in C- and P-limited heterotrophs would vary the elemental ratio of particulate organic matter sequestered in the deep ocean. PMID:22783226

  9. Antagonistic Effect of Monovalent Cations in Maintenance of Cellular Integrity of a Marine Bacterium1

    PubMed Central

    De Voe, Irving W.; Oginsky, Evelyn L.

    1969-01-01

    The susceptibility of a marine bacterium, designated isolate c-A1, to lysis in distilled water and in salt solutions has been found to be a function of Na+ concentration. Optical densities of cells pre-exposed to 0.05 m MgCl2 were maintained in 1.0 m KCl, whereas those of cells pre-exposed to 1.0 m NaCl were not maintained at any KCl concentration tested. Cells transferred from MgCl2 to low concentrations of NaCl underwent more extensive lysis than did those transferred to distilled water. The degree of disruption of cells transferred to distilled water from mixtures of 0.05 m MgCl2 and NaCl (0 to 1.0 m) was dependent on the concentration of NaCl; similar results were obtained with LiCl, but not with KCl. In electron micrographs of thin sections, c-A1 cell envelopes consisted of two double-track layers which fractured and peeled apart on lysis after pre-exposure to NaCl-MgCl2 mixtures. Envelope eruptions or “hernias” occurred only in lysed cells pre-exposed to NaCl alone. No evidence for a functional lytic enzyme was found. Comparative studies on a terrestrial pseudomonad with a multilayered envelope indicated that preexposure to NaCl did not enhance the susceptibility of this cell to lysis in distilled water. The lytic susceptibility of the marine bacterium is considered to be the consequence of competition between specific monovalent cations and Mg++ for electrostatic interactions with components of the cell envelope of this organism. Images PMID:5788707

  10. Production of polyhydroxybutyrate by the marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodovulum sulfidophilum P5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jinling; Wei, Ying; Zhao, Yupeng; Pan, Guanghua; Wang, Guangce

    2012-07-01

    The effects of different NaCl concentrations, nitrogen sources, carbon sources, and carbon to nitrogen molar ratios on biomass accumulation and polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) production were studied in batch cultures of the marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodovulum sulfidophilum P5 under aerobic-dark conditions. The results show that the accumulation of PHB in strain P5 is a growth-associated process. Strain P5 had maximum biomass and PHB accumulation at 2%-3% NaCl, suggesting that the bacterium can maintain growth and potentially produce PHB at natural seawater salinity. In the nitrogen source test, the maximum biomass accumulation (8.10±0.09 g/L) and PHB production (1.11±0.13 g/L and 14.62%±2.2 of the cell dry weight) were observed when peptone and ammonium chloride were used as the sole nitrogen source. NH{4/+}-N was better for PHB production than other nitrogen sources. In the carbon source test, the maximum biomass concentration (7.65±0.05 g/L) was obtained with malic acid as the sole carbon source, whereas the maximum yield of PHB (5.03±0.18 g/L and 66.93%±1.69% of the cell dry weight) was obtained with sodium pyruvate as the sole carbon source. In the carbon to nitrogen ratios test, sodium pyruvate and ammonium chloride were selected as the carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. The best carbon to nitrogen molar ratio for biomass accumulation (8.77±0.58 g/L) and PHB production (6.07±0.25 g/L and 69.25%±2.05% of the cell dry weight) was 25. The results provide valuable data on the production of PHB by R. sulfidophilum P5 and further studies are on-going for best cell growth and PHB yield.

  11. Serpentine endophytic bacterium Pseudomonas azotoformans ASS1 accelerates phytoremediation of soil metals under drought stress.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ying; Rajkumar, Mani; Moreno, António; Zhang, Chang; Freitas, Helena

    2017-10-01

    This study evaluates the potential of serpentine endophytic bacterium to foster phytoremediation efficiency of Trifolium arvense grown on multi-metal (Cu, Zn and Ni) contaminated soils under drought stress. A drought resistant endophytic bacterial strain ASS1 isolated from the leaves of Alyssum serpyllifolium grown in serpentine soils was identified as Pseudomonas azotoformans based on biochemical tests and partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. P. azotoformans ASS1 possessed abiotic stress resistance (heavy metals, drought, salinity, antibiotics and extreme temperature) and plant growth promoting (PGP) properties (phosphate solubilization, nitrogen fixation, production of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase, siderophore and ammonia). Inoculation of T. arvense with ASS1 considerably increased the plant biomass and leaf relative water content in both roll towel assay and pot experiments in the absence and presence of drought stress (DS). In the pot experiments, ASS1 greatly enhanced chlorophyll content, catalase, peroxidase, superoxide dismutase activities, and proline content (only in the absence of drought) in plant leaves, whereas they decreased the concentrations of malondialdehyde. Irrespective of water stress, ASS1 significantly improved accumulation, total removal, bio-concentration factor and biological accumulation coefficient of metals (Cu, Zn and Ni), while decreased translocation factors of Cu. The effective colonization and survival in the rhizosphere and tissue interior assured improved plant growth and successful metal phytoremediation under DS. These results demonstrate the potential of serpentine endophytic bacterium ASS1 for protecting plants against abiotic stresses and helping plants to thrive in semiarid ecosystems and accelerate phytoremediation process in metal polluted soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Ca2+-stabilized adhesin helps an Antarctic bacterium reach out and bind ice.

    PubMed

    Vance, Tyler D R; Olijve, Luuk L C; Campbell, Robert L; Voets, Ilja K; Davies, Peter L; Guo, Shuaiqi

    2014-07-04

    The large size of a 1.5-MDa ice-binding adhesin [MpAFP (Marinomonas primoryensis antifreeze protein)] from an Antarctic Gram-negative bacterium, M. primoryensis, is mainly due to its highly repetitive RII (Region II). MpAFP_RII contains roughly 120 tandem copies of an identical 104-residue repeat. We have previously determined that a single RII repeat folds as a Ca2+-dependent immunoglobulin-like domain. Here, we solved the crystal structure of RII tetra-tandemer (four tandem RII repeats) to a resolution of 1.8 Å. The RII tetra-tandemer reveals an extended (~190-Å × ~25-Å), rod-like structure with four RII-repeats aligned in series with each other. The inter-repeat regions of the RII tetra-tandemer are strengthened by Ca2+ bound to acidic residues. SAXS (small-angle X-ray scattering) profiles indicate the RII tetra-tandemer is significantly rigidified upon Ca2+ binding, and that the protein's solution structure is in excellent agreement with its crystal structure. We hypothesize that >600 Ca2+ help rigidify the chain of ~120 104-residue repeats to form a ~0.6 μm rod-like structure in order to project the ice-binding domain of MpAFP away from the bacterial cell surface. The proposed extender role of RII can help the strictly aerobic, motile bacterium bind ice in the upper reaches of the Antarctic lake where oxygen and nutrients are most abundant. Ca2+-induced rigidity of tandem Ig-like repeats in large adhesins might be a general mechanism used by bacteria to bind to their substrates and help colonize specific niches.

  13. Curiously modern DNA for a "250 million-year-old" bacterium.

    PubMed

    Nickle, David C; Learn, Gerald H; Rain, Matthew W; Mullins, James I; Mittler, John E

    2002-01-01

    Studies of ancient DNA have attracted considerable attention in scientific journals and the popular press. Several of the more extreme claims for ancient DNA have been questioned on biochemical grounds (i.e., DNA surviving longer than expected) and evolutionary grounds (i.e., nucleotide substitution patterns not matching theoretical expectations for ancient DNA). A recent letter to Nature from Vreeland et al. (2000), however, tops all others with respect to age and condition of the specimen. These researchers extracted and cultured a bacterium from an inclusion body from what they claim is a 250 million-year (Myr)-old salt crystal. If substantiated, this observation could fundamentally alter views about bacterial physiology, ecology and evolution. Here we report on molecular evolutionary analyses of the 16S rDNA from this specimen. We find that 2-9-3 differs from a modern halophile, Salibacillus marismortui, by just 3 unambiguous bp in 16S rDNA, versus the approximately 59 bp that would be expected if these bacteria evolved at the same rate as other bacteria. We show, using a Poisson distribution, that unless it can be shown that S. marismortui evolves 5 to 10 times more slowly than other bacteria for which 16S rDNA substitution rates have been established, Vreeland et al.'s claim would be rejected at the 0.05 level. Also, a molecular clock test and a relative rates test fail to substantiate Vreeland et al.'s claim that strain 2-9-3 is a 250-Myr-old bacterium. The report of Vreeland et al. thus falls into a long series of suspect ancient DNA studies.

  14. Metabolism of Kaempferia parviflora polymethoxyflavones by human intestinal bacterium Bautia sp. MRG-PMF1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mihyang; Kim, Nayoung; Han, Jaehong

    2014-12-24

    Poylmethoxyflavones (PMFs) are major bioactive flavonoids, which exhibit various biological activities, such as anticancer effects. The biotransformation of PMFs and characterization of a PMF-metabolizing human intestinal bacterium were studied herein for the first time. Hydrolysis of aryl methyl ether functional groups by human fecal samples was observed from the bioconversion of various PMFs. Activity-guided screening for PMF-metabolizing intestinal bacteria under anaerobic conditions resulted in the isolation of a strict anaerobic bacterium, which was identified as Blautia sp. MRG-PMF1. The isolated MRG-PMF1 was able to metabolize various PMFs to the corresponding demethylated flavones. The microbial conversion of bioactive 5,7-dimethoxyflavone (5,7-DMF) and 5,7,4'-trimethoxyflavone (5,7,4'-TMF) was studied in detail. 5,7-DMF and 5,7,4'-TMF were completely metabolized to 5,7-dihydroxyflavone (chrysin) and 5,7,4'-trihydroxyflavone (apigenin), respectively. From a kinetics study, the methoxy group on the flavone C-7 position was found to be preferentially hydrolyzed. 5-Methoxychrysin, the intermediate of 5,7-DMF metabolism by Blautia sp. MRG-PMF1, was isolated and characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Apigenin was produced from the sequential demethylation of 5,7,4'-TMF, via 5,4'-dimethoxy-7-hydroxyflavone and 7,4'-dihydroxy-5-methoxyflavone (thevetiaflavone). Not only demethylation activity but also deglycosylation activity was exhibited by Blautia sp. MRG-PMF1, and various flavonoids, including isoflavones, flavones, and flavanones, were found to be metabolized to the corresponding aglycones. The unprecedented PMF demethylation activity of Blautia sp. MRG-PMF1 will expand our understanding of flavonoid metabolism in the human intestine and lead to novel bioactive compounds.

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of the Extremely Halophilic Bacterium Halomonas salina Strain CIFRI1, Isolated from the East Coast of India

    PubMed Central

    Das, Priyanka; Maharana, Jitendra; Paria, Prasenjit; Mandal, Shambhu Nath; Meena, Dharmendra Kumar; Sharma, Anil Prakash; Jayarajan, Rijith; Dixit, Vishal; Verma, Ankit; Vellarikkal, Shamsudheen Karuthedath; Scaria, Vinod; Sivasubbu, Sridhar; Rao, Atmakuri Ramakrishna; Mohapatra, Trilochan

    2015-01-01

    Halomonas salina strain CIFRI1 is an extremely salt-stress-tolerant bacterium isolated from the salt crystals of the east coast of India. Here we report the annotated 3.45-Mb draft genome sequence of strain CIFRI1 having 86 contigs with 3,139 protein coding loci, including 62 RNA genes. PMID:25573926

  16. Quantitative analysis of growth and volatile fatty acid production by the anaerobic ruminal bacterium Megasphaera elsdenii T81

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Megaspheara elsdenii T81 grew on either DL-lactate or D-glucose at similar rates (0.85 per h), but displayed major differences in the fermentation of these substrates. Lactate was fermented at up to 210-mM concentration to yield acetic, propionic, butyric, and valeric acids. The bacterium was able t...

  17. An Endohyphal Bacterium (Chitinophaga, Bacteroidetes) Alters Carbon Source Use by Fusarium keratoplasticum (F. solani Species Complex, Nectriaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, Justin P.; U'Ren, Jana M.; Gallery, Rachel E.; Baltrus, David A.; Arnold, A. Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial endosymbionts occur in diverse fungi, including members of many lineages of Ascomycota that inhabit living plants. These endosymbiotic bacteria (endohyphal bacteria, EHB) often can be removed from living fungi by antibiotic treatment, providing an opportunity to assess their effects on functional traits of their fungal hosts. We examined the effects of an endohyphal bacterium (Chitinophaga sp., Bacteroidetes) on substrate use by its host, a seed-associated strain of the fungus Fusarium keratoplasticum, by comparing growth between naturally infected and cured fungal strains across 95 carbon sources with a Biolog® phenotypic microarray. Across the majority of substrates (62%), the strain harboring the bacterium significantly outperformed the cured strain as measured by respiration and hyphal density. These substrates included many that are important for plant- and seed-fungus interactions, such as D-trehalose, myo-inositol, and sucrose, highlighting the potential influence of EHB on the breadth and efficiency of substrate use by an important Fusarium species. Cases in which the cured strain outperformed the strain harboring the bacterium were observed in only 5% of substrates. We propose that additive or synergistic substrate use by the fungus-bacterium pair enhances fungal growth in this association. More generally, alteration of the breadth or efficiency of substrate use by dispensable EHB may change fungal niches in short timeframes, potentially shaping fungal ecology and the outcomes of fungal-host interactions. PMID:28382021

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia gladioli Coa14, a Bacterium with Petroleum Bioremediation Potential Isolated from Coari Lake, Amazonas, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Eraldo Ferreira; Da Costa, Josemar Gurgel; Wolf, Ivan Rodrigo; Lima, José Paulo de Araújo; Astolfi-Filho, Spartaco

    2018-04-19

    Burkholderia gladioli Coa14 is a bacterium isolated from water collected from Coari Lake (Amazonas, Brazil) that shows a capacity for survival in a medium containing only oil as a carbon source. Here, we report its draft genome sequence, highlighting some genes involved with petroleum derivative degradation. Copyright © 2018 Lopes et al.

  19. A Comparative biochemical study on two marine endophytes, Bacterium SRCnm and Bacillus sp. JS, Isolated from red sea algae.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Eman Fadl; Hassan, Hossam Mokhtar; Rateb, Mostafa Ezzat; Abdel-Wahab, Noha; Sameer, Somayah; Aly Taie, Hanan Anwar; Abdel-Hameed, Mohammed Sayed; Hammouda, Ola

    2016-01-01

    Two marine endophytic bacteria were isolated from the Red Sea algae; a red alga; Acanthophora dendroides and the brown alga Sargassum sabrepandum. The isolates were identified based on their 16SrRNA sequences as Bacterium SRCnm and Bacillus sp. JS. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential anti-microbial and antioxidant activities of the extracts of the isolated bacteria grown in different nutrient conditions. Compared to amoxicillin (25μg/disk) and erythromycin (15μg/disk), the extracts of Bacterium SRCn min media II, III, IV and V were potent inhibitors of the gram-positive bacterium Sarcina maxima even at low concentrations. Also, the multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA) was more sensitive to the metabolites produced in medium (II) of the same endophyte than erythromycin (15μg/disk). A moderate activity of the Bacillus sp. JS extracts of media I and II was obtained against the same pathogen. The total compounds (500ug/ml) of both isolated endophytes showed moderate antioxidant activities (48.9% and 46.1%, respectively). LC/MS analysis of the bacterial extracts was carried out to investigate the likely natural products produced. Cyclo(D-cis-Hyp-L-Leu), dihydrosphingosine and 2-Amino-1,3-hexadecanediol were identified in the fermentation medium of Bacterium SRCnm, whereas cyclo (D-Pro-L-Tyr) and cyclo (L-Leu-L-Pro) were the suggested compounds of Bacillus sp. JS.

  20. Genome Sequence of the Enterobacter mori Type Strain, LMG 25706, a Pathogenic Bacterium of Morus alba L. ▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bo; Zhang, Guo-Qing; Lou, Miao-Miao; Tian, Wen-Xiao; Li, Bin; Zhou, Xue-Ping; Wang, Guo-Feng; Liu, He; Xie, Guan-Lin; Jin, Gu-Lei

    2011-01-01

    Enterobacter mori is a plant-pathogenic enterobacterium responsible for the bacterial wilt of Morus alba L. Here we present the draft genome sequence of the type strain, LMG 25706. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first genome sequence of a plant-pathogenic bacterium in the genus Enterobacter. PMID:21602328

  1. Boron nitride nanotube-based biosensing of various bacterium/viruses: continuum modelling-based simulation approach.

    PubMed

    Panchal, Mitesh B; Upadhyay, Sanjay H

    2014-09-01

    In this study, the feasibility of single walled boron nitride nanotube (SWBNNT)-based biosensors has been ensured considering the continuum modelling-based simulation approach, for mass-based detection of various bacterium/viruses. Various types of bacterium or viruses have been taken into consideration at the free-end of the cantilevered configuration of the SWBNNT, as a biosensor. Resonant frequency shift-based analysis has been performed with the adsorption of various bacterium/viruses considered as additional mass to the SWBNNT-based sensor system. The continuum mechanics-based analytical approach, considering effective wall thickness has been considered to validate the finite element method (FEM)-based simulation results, based on continuum volume-based modelling of the SWBNNT. As a systematic analysis approach, the FEM-based simulation results are found in excellent agreement with the analytical results, to analyse the SWBNNTs for their wide range of applications such as nanoresonators, biosensors, gas-sensors, transducers and so on. The obtained results suggest that by using the SWBNNT of smaller size the sensitivity of the sensor system can be enhanced and detection of the bacterium/virus having mass of 4.28 × 10⁻²⁴ kg can be effectively performed.

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Caenibacillus caldisaponilyticus B157T, a Thermophilic and Phospholipase-Producing Bacterium Isolated from Acidulocompost

    PubMed Central

    Tsujimoto, Yoshiyuki; Saito, Ryo; Sahara, Takehiko; Kimura, Nobutada; Tsuruoka, Naoki; Shigeri, Yasushi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Caenibacillus caldisaponilyticus B157T (= NBRC 111400T = DSM 101100T), in the family Sporolactobacillaceae, was isolated from acidulocompost as a thermophilic and phospholipid-degrading bacterium. Here, we report the 3.36-Mb draft genome sequence, with a G+C content of 51.8%, to provide the genetic information coding for phospholipases. PMID:28360164

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia gladioli Coa14, a Bacterium with Petroleum Bioremediation Potential Isolated from Coari Lake, Amazonas, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Da Costa, Josemar Gurgel; Wolf, Ivan Rodrigo; Lima, José Paulo de Araújo; Astolfi-Filho, Spartaco

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Burkholderia gladioli Coa14 is a bacterium isolated from water collected from Coari Lake (Amazonas, Brazil) that shows a capacity for survival in a medium containing only oil as a carbon source. Here, we report its draft genome sequence, highlighting some genes involved with petroleum derivative degradation. PMID:29674552

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Chryseobacterium sp. Strain GSE06, a Biocontrol Endophytic Bacterium Isolated from Cucumber (Cucumis sativus)

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jin-Ju; Park, Byeong Hyeok; Park, Hongjae

    2016-01-01

    Chryseobacterium sp. strain GSE06 is a biocontrol endophytic bacterium against the destructive soilborne oomycete Phytophthora capsici, which causes Phytophthora blight of pepper. Here, we present its draft genome sequence, which contains genes related to biocontrol traits, such as colonization, antimicrobial activity, plant growth promotion, and abiotic or biotic stress adaptation. PMID:27313310

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CFL1, a Lactic Acid Bacterium Isolated from French Handcrafted Fermented Milk.

    PubMed

    Meneghel, Julie; Dugat-Bony, Eric; Irlinger, Françoise; Loux, Valentin; Vidal, Marie; Passot, Stéphanie; Béal, Catherine; Layec, Séverine; Fonseca, Fernanda

    2016-03-03

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (L. bulgaricus) is a lactic acid bacterium widely used for the production of yogurt and cheeses. Here, we report the genome sequence of L. bulgaricus CFL1 to improve our knowledge on its stress-induced damages following production and end-use processes. Copyright © 2016 Meneghel et al.

  6. High-Quality Genome Sequence of the Highly Resistant Bacterium Staphylococcus haemolyticus, Isolated from a Neonatal Bloodstream Infection.

    PubMed

    Hosseinkhani, Farideh; Emaneini, Mohammad; van Leeuwen, Willem

    2017-07-20

    Using Illumina HiSeq and PacBio technologies, we sequenced the genome of the multidrug-resistant bacterium Staphylococcus haemolyticus , originating from a bloodstream infection in a neonate. The sequence data can be used as an accurate reference sequence. Copyright © 2017 Hosseinkhani et al.

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Limnobacter sp. Strain CACIAM 66H1, a Heterotrophic Bacterium Associated with Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Fábio Daniel Florêncio; Lima, Alex Ranieri Jerônimo; Moraes, Pablo Henrique Gonçalves; Siqueira, Andrei Santos; Dall’Agnol, Leonardo Teixeira; Baraúna, Anna Rafaella Ferreira; Martins, Luisa Carício; Oliveira, Karol Guimarães; de Lima, Clayton Pereira Silva; Nunes, Márcio Roberto Teixeira; Vianez-Júnior, João Lídio Silva Gonçalves

    2016-01-01

    Ecological interactions between cyanobacteria and heterotrophic prokaryotes are poorly known. To improve the genomic studies of heterotrophic bacterium-cyanobacterium associations, the draft genome sequence (3.2 Mbp) of Limnobacter sp. strain CACIAM 66H1, found in a nonaxenic culture of Synechococcus sp. (cyanobacteria), is presented here. PMID:27198027

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Limnobacter sp. Strain CACIAM 66H1, a Heterotrophic Bacterium Associated with Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Fábio Daniel Florêncio; Lima, Alex Ranieri Jerônimo; Moraes, Pablo Henrique Gonçalves; Siqueira, Andrei Santos; Dall'Agnol, Leonardo Teixeira; Baraúna, Anna Rafaella Ferreira; Martins, Luisa Carício; Oliveira, Karol Guimarães; de Lima, Clayton Pereira Silva; Nunes, Márcio Roberto Teixeira; Vianez-Júnior, João Lídio Silva Gonçalves; Gonçalves, Evonnildo Costa

    2016-05-19

    Ecological interactions between cyanobacteria and heterotrophic prokaryotes are poorly known. To improve the genomic studies of heterotrophic bacterium-cyanobacterium associations, the draft genome sequence (3.2 Mbp) of Limnobacter sp. strain CACIAM 66H1, found in a nonaxenic culture of Synechococcus sp. (cyanobacteria), is presented here. Copyright © 2016 da Silva et al.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Aquitalea magnusonii Strain H3, a Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterium of Duckweed (Lemna minor)

    PubMed Central

    Ishizawa, Hidehiro; Kuroda, Masashi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aquitalea magnusonii strain H3 is a promising plant growth-promoting bacterium for duckweed. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of strain H3 comprising 4,750,601 bp in 73 contigs. Several genes associated with plant root colonization were identified. PMID:28818906

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Strain P23, a Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterium of Duckweed

    PubMed Central

    Hosoyama, Akira; Yamazoe, Atsushi; Morikawa, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter calcoaceticus strain P23 is a plant growth-promoting bacterium, which was isolated from the surface of duckweed. We report here the draft genome sequence of strain P23. The genome data will serve as a valuable reference for understanding the molecular mechanism of plant growth promotion in aquatic plants. PMID:25720680

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Aquitalea magnusonii Strain H3, a Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterium of Duckweed (Lemna minor).

    PubMed

    Ishizawa, Hidehiro; Kuroda, Masashi; Ike, Michihiko

    2017-08-17

    Aquitalea magnusonii strain H3 is a promising plant growth-promoting bacterium for duckweed. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of strain H3 comprising 4,750,601 bp in 73 contigs. Several genes associated with plant root colonization were identified. Copyright © 2017 Ishizawa et al.

  12. Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas sp. Strain S9, an Extracellular Arylsulfatase-Producing Bacterium Isolated from Mangrove Soil ▿

    PubMed Central

    Long, Mengxian; Ruan, Lingwei; Yu, Ziniu; Xu, Xun

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain S9 was originally isolated from mangrove soil in Xiamen, China. It is an aerobic bacterium which shows extracellular arylsulfatase activity. Here, we describe the 4.8-Mb draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas sp. S9, which exhibits novel cysteine-type sulfatases. PMID:21622746

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Nitrosomonas cryotolerans ATCC 49181, a Phylogenetically Distinct Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterium Isolated from Arctic Waters

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, Marlen C.; Norton, Jeanette M.; Stein, Lisa Y.

    ABSTRACT Nitrosomonas cryotoleransATCC 49181 is a cold-tolerant marine ammonia-oxidizing bacterium isolated from seawater collected in the Gulf of Alaska. The high-quality complete genome contains a 2.87-Mbp chromosome and a 56.6-kbp plasmid. Chemolithoautotrophic modules encoding ammonia oxidation and CO 2 fixation were identified.

  14. Draft Genome Sequence and Description of Janthinobacterium sp. Strain CG3, a Psychrotolerant Antarctic Supraglacial Stream Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Heidi; Akiyama, Tatsuya; Franklin, Michael; Woyke, Tanja; Teshima, Hazuki; Davenport, Karen; Daligault, Hajnalka; Erkkila, Tracy; Goodwin, Lynne; Gu, Wei; Xu, Yan; Chain, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Here we present the draft genome sequence of Janthinobacterium sp. strain CG3, a psychrotolerant non-violacein-producing bacterium that was isolated from the Cotton Glacier supraglacial stream. The genome sequence of this organism will provide insight as to the mechanisms necessary for bacteria to survive in UV-stressed icy environments. PMID:24265494

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Nitrosomonas cryotolerans ATCC 49181, a Phylogenetically Distinct Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterium Isolated from Arctic Waters

    DOE PAGES

    Rice, Marlen C.; Norton, Jeanette M.; Stein, Lisa Y.; ...

    2017-03-16

    ABSTRACT Nitrosomonas cryotoleransATCC 49181 is a cold-tolerant marine ammonia-oxidizing bacterium isolated from seawater collected in the Gulf of Alaska. The high-quality complete genome contains a 2.87-Mbp chromosome and a 56.6-kbp plasmid. Chemolithoautotrophic modules encoding ammonia oxidation and CO 2 fixation were identified.

  16. ["Candidatus contubernalis alkalaceticum," an obligately syntrophic alkaliphilic bacterium capable of anaerobic acetate oxidation in a coculture with Desulfonatronum cooperativum].

    PubMed

    Zhilina, T N; Zavarzina, D G; Kolganova, T V; Turova, T P; Zavarzin, G A

    2005-01-01

    From the silty sediments of the Khadyn soda lake (Tuva), a binary sulfidogenic bacterial association capable of syntrophic acetate oxidation at pH 10.0 was isolated. An obligately syntrophic, gram-positive, spore-forming alkaliphilic rod-shaped bacterium performs acetate oxidation in a syntrophic association with a hydrogenotrophic, alkaliphilic sulfate-reducing bacterium; the latter organism was previously isolated and characterized as the new species Desulfonatronum cooperativum. Other sulfate-reducing bacteria of the genera Desulfonatronum and Desulfonatronovibrio can also act as the hydrogenotrophic partner. Apart from acetate, the syntrophic culture can oxidize ethanol, propanol, isopropanol, serine, fructose, and isobutyric acid. Selective amplification of 16S rRNA gene fragments of the acetate-utilizing syntrophic component of the binary culture was performed; it was found to cluster with clones of uncultured gram-positive bacteria within the family Syntrophomonadaceae. The acetate-oxidizing bacterium is thus the first representative of this cluster obtained in a laboratory culture. Based on its phylogenetic position, the new acetate-oxidizing syntrophic bacterium is proposed to be assigned, in a Candidate status, to a new genus and species: "Candidatus Contubernalis alkalaceticum."

  17. Complete genome sequences of two strains of the meat spoilage bacterium Brochothrix thermosphacta isolated from ground chicken

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Brochothrix thermosphacta is an important meat spoilage bacterium. Here we report the genome sequences of two strains of B. thermosphacta isolated from ground chicken. The genome sequences were determined using long-read PacBio single-molecule real-time (SMRT©) technology and are the first complete ...

  18. Complete Genome of Enterobacteriaceae Bacterium Strain FGI 57, a Strain Associated with Leaf-Cutter Ant Fungus Gardens

    PubMed Central

    Aylward, Frank O.; Tremmel, Daniel M.; Bruce, David C.; Chain, Patrick; Chen, Amy; Walston Davenport, Karen; Detter, Chris; Han, Cliff S.; Han, James; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Markowitz, Victor; Mavrommatis, Kostas; Nolan, Matt; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Pitluck, Sam; Deshpande, Shweta; Goodwin, Lynne; Woyke, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    The Enterobacteriaceae bacterium strain FGI 57 was isolated from a fungus garden of the leaf-cutter ant Atta colombica. Analysis of its single 4.76-Mbp chromosome will shed light on community dynamics and plant biomass degradation in ant fungus gardens. PMID:23469353

  19. Effects of an equol-producing bacterium isolated from human faeces on isoflavone and lignan metabolism in mice.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Motoi; Hori, Sachiko; Nakagawa, Hiroyuki; Yamauchi, Satoshi; Sugahara, Takuya

    2016-07-01

    Equol is a metabolite of daidzein that is produced by intestinal microbiota. The oestrogenic activity of equol is stronger than daidzein. Equol-producing bacteria are believed to play an important role in the gut. The rod-shaped and Gram-positive anaerobic equol-producing intestinal bacterium Slackia TM-30 was isolated from healthy human faeces and its effects on urinary phyto-oestrogen, plasma and faecal lipids were assessed in adult mice. The urinary amounts of equol in urine were significantly higher in mice receiving the equol-producing bacterium TM-30 (BAC) group than in the control (CO) group (P < 0.05). However, no significant differences were observed between the urinary amounts of daidzein, dihydrodaidzein, enterodiol, and enterolactone between the BAC and CO groups. No significant differences in the plasma lipids were observed between the two groups. The lipid content (% dry weight) in the faeces sampled on the final day of the experiment tended to be higher in the BAC group than in the CO group (P = 0.07). Administration of equol-producing bacterium TM-30 affected the urinary amounts of phyto-oestrogens and the faecal lipid contents of mice. The equol-producing bacterium TM-30 likely influences the metabolism of phyto-oestrogen via changes in the gastrointestinal environment. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Isolation and characterization of a novel simazine-degrading bacterium from agricultural soil of central Chile, Pseudomonas sp. MHP41.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Marcela; Villalobos, Patricio; Morgante, Verónica; González, Myriam; Reiff, Caroline; Moore, Edward; Seeger, Michael

    2008-09-01

    s-Triazine herbicides are used extensively in South America in agriculture and forestry. In this study, a bacterium designated as strain MHP41, capable of degrading simazine and atrazine, was isolated from agricultural soil in the Quillota valley, central Chile. Strain MHP41 is able to grow in minimal medium, using simazine as the sole nitrogen source. In this medium, the bacterium exhibited a growth rate of mu=0.10 h(-1), yielding a high biomass of 4.2 x 10(8) CFU mL(-1). Resting cells of strain MHP41 degrade more than 80% of simazine within 60 min. The atzA, atzB, atzC, atzD, atzE and atzF genes encoding the enzymes of the simazine upper and lower pathways were detected in strain MHP41. The motile Gram-negative bacterium was identified as a Pseudomonas sp., based on the Biolog microplate system and comparative sequence analyses of the 16S rRNA gene. Amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis allowed the differentiation of strain MHP41 from Pseudomonas sp. ADP. The comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses suggested that strain MHP41 is closely related to Pseudomonas nitroreducens and Pseudomonas multiresinovorans. This is the first s-triazine-degrading bacterium isolated in South America. Strain MHP41 is a potential biocatalyst for the remediation of s-triazine-contaminated environments.

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Strain GK1, a Hydrocarbon-Degrading Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizospheric Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Gkorezis, Panagiotis; Bottos, Eric M; Van Hamme, Jonathan D; Franzetti, Andrea; Abbamondi, Gennaro Roberto; Balseiro-Romero, Maria; Weyens, Nele; Rineau, Francois; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2015-08-13

    The 3.94-Mb draft genome of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus GK1, a hydrocarbonoclastic plant growth-promoting Gram-negative rhizospheric bacterium, is presented here. Isolated at the Ford Motor Company site in Genk, Belgium, from poplar trees planted on a diesel-contaminated plume, GK1 is useful for enhancing hydrocarbon phytoremediation. Copyright © 2015 Gkorezis et al.

  2. Evidence of carbon fixation pathway in a bacterium from candidate phylum SBR1093 revealed with genomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiping; Guo, Feng; Liu, Lili; Zhang, Tong

    2014-01-01

    Autotrophic CO2 fixation is the most important biotransformation process in the biosphere. Research focusing on the diversity and distribution of relevant autotrophs is significant to our comprehension of the biosphere. In this study, a draft genome of a bacterium from candidate phylum SBR1093 was reconstructed with the metagenome of an industrial activated sludge. Based on comparative genomics, this autotrophy may occur via a newly discovered carbon fixation path, the hydroxypropionate-hydroxybutyrate (HPHB) cycle, which was demonstrated in a previous work to be uniquely possessed by some genera from Archaea. This bacterium possesses all of the thirteen enzymes required for the HPHB cycle; these enzymes share 30∼50% identity with those in the autotrophic species of Archaea that undergo the HPHB cycle and 30∼80% identity with the corresponding enzymes of the mixotrophic species within Bradyrhizobiaceae. Thus, this bacterium might have an autotrophic growth mode in certain conditions. A phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene reveals that the phylotypes within candidate phylum SBR1093 are primarily clustered into 5 clades with a shallow branching pattern. This bacterium is clustered with phylotypes from organically contaminated environments, implying a demand for organics in heterotrophic metabolism. Considering the types of regulators, such as FnR, Fur, and ArsR, this bacterium might be a facultative aerobic mixotroph with potential multi-antibiotic and heavy metal resistances. This is the first report on Bacteria that may perform potential carbon fixation via the HPHB cycle, thus may expand our knowledge of the distribution and importance of the HPHB cycle in the biosphere.

  3. Genome Sequence of the Plant Growth Promoting Endophytic Bacterium Enterobacter sp. 638

    SciTech Connect

    Taghavi, S.; van der Lelie, D.; Hoffman, A.

    2010-05-13

    Enterobacter sp. 638 is an endophytic plant growth promoting gamma-proteobacterium that was isolated from the stem of poplar (Populus trichocarpa x deltoides cv. H11-11), a potentially important biofuel feed stock plant. The Enterobacter sp. 638 genome sequence reveals the presence of a 4,518,712 bp chromosome and a 157,749 bp plasmid (pENT638-1). Genome annotation and comparative genomics allowed the identification of an extended set of genes specific to the plant niche adaptation of this bacterium. This includes genes that code for putative proteins involved in survival in the rhizosphere (to cope with oxidative stress or uptake of nutrients released by plantmore » roots), root adhesion (pili, adhesion, hemagglutinin, cellulose biosynthesis), colonization/establishment inside the plant (chemiotaxis, flagella, cellobiose phosphorylase), plant protection against fungal and bacterial infections (siderophore production and synthesis of the antimicrobial compounds 4-hydroxybenzoate and 2-phenylethanol), and improved poplar growth and development through the production of the phytohormones indole acetic acid, acetoin, and 2,3-butanediol. Metabolite analysis confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR showed that, the production of acetoin and 2,3-butanediol is induced by the presence of sucrose in the growth medium. Interestingly, both the genetic determinants required for sucrose metabolism and the synthesis of acetoin and 2,3-butanediol are clustered on a genomic island. These findings point to a close interaction between Enterobacter sp. 638 and its poplar host, where the availability of sucrose, a major plant sugar, affects the synthesis of plant growth promoting phytohormones by the endophytic bacterium. The availability of the genome sequence, combined with metabolome and transcriptome analysis, will provide a better understanding of the synergistic interactions between poplar and its growth promoting endophyte Enterobacter sp. 638. This information can be further

  4. Microdiversity of an Abundant Terrestrial Bacterium Encompasses Extensive Variation in Ecologically Relevant Traits

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, Alexander B.; Karaoz, Ulas; Brodie, Eoin L.

    ABSTRACT Much genetic diversity within a bacterial community is likely obscured by microdiversity within operational taxonomic units (OTUs) defined by 16S rRNA gene sequences. However, it is unclear how variation within this microdiversity influences ecologically relevant traits. Here, we employ a multifaceted approach to investigate microdiversity within the dominant leaf litter bacterium, Curtobacterium , which comprises 7.8% of the bacterial community at a grassland site undergoing global change manipulations. We use cultured bacterial isolates to interpret metagenomic data, collected in situ over 2 years, together with lab-based physiological assays to determine the extent of trait variation within this abundant OTU. Themore » response of Curtobacterium to seasonal variability and the global change manipulations, specifically an increase in relative abundance under decreased water availability, appeared to be conserved across six Curtobacterium lineages identified at this site. Genomic and physiological analyses in the lab revealed that degradation of abundant polymeric carbohydrates within leaf litter, cellulose and xylan, is nearly universal across the genus, which may contribute to its high abundance in grassland leaf litter. However, the degree of carbohydrate utilization and temperature preference for this degradation varied greatly among clades. Overall, we find that traits within Curtobacterium are conserved at different phylogenetic depths. We speculate that similar to bacteria in marine systems, diverse microbes within this taxon may be structured in distinct ecotypes that are key to understanding Curtobacterium abundance and distribution in the environment. IMPORTANCE Despite the plummeting costs of sequencing, characterizing the fine-scale genetic diversity of a microbial community—and interpreting its functional importance—remains a challenge. Indeed, most studies, particularly studies of soil, assess community composition at a broad genetic

  5. Sphingomonas pituitosa sp. nov., an exopolysaccharide-producing bacterium that secretes an unusual type of sphingan.

    PubMed

    Denner, E B; Paukner, S; Kämpfer, P; Moore, E R; Abraham, W R; Busse, H J; Wanner, G; Lubitz, W

    2001-05-01

    Strain EDIVT, an exopolysaccharide-producing bacterium, was subjected to polyphasic characterization. The bacterium produced copious amounts of an extracellular polysaccharide, forming slimy, viscous, intensely yellow-pigmented colonies on Czapek-Dox (CZD) agar. The culture fluids of the liquid version of CZD medium were highly viscous after cultivation for 5 d. Cells of strain EDIVT were Gram-negative, catalase-positive, oxidase-negative, nonspore-forming, rod-shaped and motile. Comparisons of 16S rDNA gene sequences demonstrated that EDIVT clusters phylogenetically with the species of the genus Sphingomonas sensu stricto. The G+C content of the DNA (64.5 mol%), the presence of ubiquinone Q-10, the presence of 2-hydroxymyristic acid (14:0 2-OH) as the major hydroxylated fatty acid, the absence of 3-hydroxy fatty acids and the detection of sym-homospermidine as the major component in the polyamine pattern, together with the presence of sphingoglycolipid, supported this delineation. 16S rDNA sequence analysis indicated that strain EDIVT is most closely related (99.4% similarity) to Sphingomonas trueperi LMG 2142T. DNA-DNA hybridization showed that the level of relatedness to S. trueperi is only 45.5%. Further differences were apparent in the cellular fatty acid profile, the polar lipid pattern, the Fourier-transform infrared spectrum and whole-cell proteins and in a number of biochemical characteristics. On the basis of the estimated phylogenetic position derived from 16S rDNA sequence data, DNA-DNA reassociation and phenotypic differences, strain EDIVT (= CIP 106154T = DSM 13101T) was recognized as a new species of Sphingomonas, for which the name Sphingomonas pituitosa sp. nov. is proposed. A component analysis of the exopolysaccharide (named PS-EDIV) suggested that it represents a novel type of sphingan composed of glucose, rhamnose and an unidentified sugar. Glucuronic acid, which is commonly found in sphingans, was absent. The mean molecular mass of PS-EDIV was

  6. Microdiversity of an Abundant Terrestrial Bacterium Encompasses Extensive Variation in Ecologically Relevant Traits

    DOE PAGES

    Chase, Alexander B.; Karaoz, Ulas; Brodie, Eoin L.; ...

    2017-11-14

    Much genetic diversity within a bacterial community is likely obscured by microdiversity within operational taxonomic units (OTUs) defined by 16S rRNA gene sequences. However, it is unclear how variation within this microdiversity influences ecologically relevant traits. Here, we employ a multifaceted approach to investigate microdiversity within the dominant leaf litter bacterium,Curtobacterium, which comprises 7.8% of the bacterial community at a grassland site undergoing global change manipulations. We use cultured bacterial isolates to interpret metagenomic data, collectedin situover 2 years, together with lab-based physiological assays to determine the extent of trait variation within this abundant OTU. The response ofCurtobacteriumto seasonal variability andmore » the global change manipulations, specifically an increase in relative abundance under decreased water availability, appeared to be conserved across sixCurtobacteriumlineages identified at this site. Genomic and physiological analyses in the lab revealed that degradation of abundant polymeric carbohydrates within leaf litter, cellulose and xylan, is nearly universal across the genus, which may contribute to its high abundance in grassland leaf litter. However, the degree of carbohydrate utilization and temperature preference for this degradation varied greatly among clades. Overall, we find that traits withinCurtobacteriumare conserved at different phylogenetic depths. We speculate that similar to bacteria in marine systems, diverse microbes within this taxon may be structured in distinct ecotypes that are key to understandingCurtobacteriumabundance and distribution in the environment. IMPORTANCE. Despite the plummeting costs of sequencing, characterizing the fine-scale genetic diversity of a microbial community—and interpreting its functional importance—remains a challenge. Indeed, most studies, particularly studies of soil, assess community composition at a broad genetic level by classifying

  7. Rhodoblastus sphagnicola sp. nov., a novel acidophilic purple non-sulfur bacterium from Sphagnum peat bog.

    PubMed

    Kulichevskaya, Irina S; Guzev, Vladimir S; Gorlenko, Vladimir M; Liesack, Werner; Dedysh, Svetlana N

    2006-06-01

    An isolate of purple non-sulfur bacteria was obtained from an acidic Sphagnum peat bog and designated strain RS(T). The colour of cell suspensions of this bacterium growing in the light under anaerobic conditions is purplish red. Cells of strain RS(T) are rod-shaped, 0.8-1.0 microm wide and 2.0-6.0 microm long, motile by means of polar flagella, reproduce by budding and have a tendency to form rosette-like clusters in older cultures. The cells contain lamellar intracytoplasmic membranes underlying, and parallel to, the cytoplasmic membrane. The photosynthetic pigments are bacteriochlorophyll a and carotenoids; the absorption spectrum of living cells shows maxima at 377, 463, 492, 527, 592, 806 and 867 nm. The cells grow photoheterotrophically under anaerobic or microaerobic conditions with various organic carbon sources or grow photolithoautotrophically with H(2) and CO(2). Strain RS(T) is a moderately acidophilic organism exhibiting growth at pH values between 4.8 and 7.0 (with an optimum at pH 5.2-5.5). The major fatty acids are 16 : 1omega7c and 18 : 1omega7c; the major quinones are Q-10 and Q-9. The DNA G + C content of strain RS(T) is 62.6 mol%. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that the novel isolate is most closely related (97.3 % sequence similarity) to the type strain ATCC 25092(T) of the moderately acidophilic purple non-sulfur bacterium Rhodoblastus acidophilus, formerly named Rhodopseudomonas acidophila. However, in contrast to Rbl. acidophilus, strain RS(T) is not capable of aerobic growth in the dark, has no spirilloxanthin among the carotenoids and differs in the pattern of substrate utilization. The value for DNA-DNA hybridization between strain RS(T) and Rbl. acidophilus ATCC 25092(T) is only 22 %. Thus, strain RS(T) represents a novel species of the genus Rhodoblastus, for which the name Rhodoblastus sphagnicola sp. nov. is proposed. Strain RS(T) (=DSM 16996(T) = VKM B-2361(T)) is the type strain.

  8. Microdiversity of an Abundant Terrestrial Bacterium Encompasses Extensive Variation in Ecologically Relevant Traits

    DOE PAGES

    Chase, Alexander B.; Karaoz, Ulas; Brodie, Eoin L.; ...

    2017-11-14

    ABSTRACT Much genetic diversity within a bacterial community is likely obscured by microdiversity within operational taxonomic units (OTUs) defined by 16S rRNA gene sequences. However, it is unclear how variation within this microdiversity influences ecologically relevant traits. Here, we employ a multifaceted approach to investigate microdiversity within the dominant leaf litter bacterium, Curtobacterium , which comprises 7.8% of the bacterial community at a grassland site undergoing global change manipulations. We use cultured bacterial isolates to interpret metagenomic data, collected in situ over 2 years, together with lab-based physiological assays to determine the extent of trait variation within this abundant OTU. Themore » response of Curtobacterium to seasonal variability and the global change manipulations, specifically an increase in relative abundance under decreased water availability, appeared to be conserved across six Curtobacterium lineages identified at this site. Genomic and physiological analyses in the lab revealed that degradation of abundant polymeric carbohydrates within leaf litter, cellulose and xylan, is nearly universal across the genus, which may contribute to its high abundance in grassland leaf litter. However, the degree of carbohydrate utilization and temperature preference for this degradation varied greatly among clades. Overall, we find that traits within Curtobacterium are conserved at different phylogenetic depths. We speculate that similar to bacteria in marine systems, diverse microbes within this taxon may be structured in distinct ecotypes that are key to understanding Curtobacterium abundance and distribution in the environment. IMPORTANCE Despite the plummeting costs of sequencing, characterizing the fine-scale genetic diversity of a microbial community—and interpreting its functional importance—remains a challenge. Indeed, most studies, particularly studies of soil, assess community composition at a broad genetic

  9. A Novel Treatment Protects Chlorella at Commercial Scale from the Predatory Bacterium Vampirovibrio chlorellavorus

    PubMed Central

    Ganuza, Eneko; Sellers, Charles E.; Bennett, Braden W.; Lyons, Eric M.; Carney, Laura T.

    2016-01-01

    The predatory bacterium, Vampirovibrio chlorellavorus, can destroy a Chlorella culture in just a few days, rendering an otherwise robust algal crop into a discolored suspension of empty cell walls. Chlorella is used as a benchmark for open pond cultivation due to its fast growth. In nature, V. chlorellavorus plays an ecological role by controlling this widespread terrestrial and freshwater microalga, but it can have a devastating effect when it attacks large commercial ponds. We discovered that V. chlorellavorus was associated with the collapse of four pilot commercial-scale (130,000 L volume) open-pond reactors. Routine microscopy revealed the distinctive pattern of V. chlorellavorus attachment to the algal cells, followed by algal cell clumping, culture discoloration and ultimately, growth decline. The “crash” of the algal culture coincided with increasing proportions of 16s rRNA sequencing reads assigned to V. chlorellavorus. We designed a qPCR assay to predict an impending culture crash and developed a novel treatment to control the bacterium. We found that (1) Chlorella growth was not affected by a 15 min exposure to pH 3.5 in the presence of 0.5 g/L acetate, when titrated with hydrochloric acid and (2) this treatment had a bactericidal effect on the culture (2-log decrease in aerobic counts). Therefore, when qPCR results indicated a rise in V. chlorellavorus amplicons, we found that the pH-shock treatment prevented the culture crash and doubled the productive longevity of the culture. Furthermore, the treatment could be repeatedly applied to the same culture, at the beginning of at least two sequential batch cycles. In this case, the treatment was applied preventively, further increasing the longevity of the open pond culture. In summary, the treatment reversed the infection of V. chlorellavorus as confirmed by observations of bacterial attachment to Chlorella cells and by detection of V. chlorellavorus by 16s rRNA sequencing and qPCR assay. The p

  10. Decolourization of 4-Chloro-2-Nitrophenol by a Soil Bacterium, Bacillus subtilis RKJ 700

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Pankaj Kumar

    2012-01-01

    A 4-Chloro-2-nitrophenol (4C2NP) decolourizing strain RKJ 700 was isolated from soil collected from a pesticide contaminated site of India and identified as Bacillus subtilis on the basis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Bacillus subtilis RKJ 700 decolourized 4C2NP up to concentration of 1.5 mM in the presence of additional carbon source. The degradation pathway of 4C2NP was studied and 4-chloro-2-aminophenol, 4-chloro-2-acetaminophenol and 5-chloro-2-methylbenzoxazole (5C2MBZ) were identified as metabolites by high performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Resting cell studies showed that Bacillus subtilis RKJ 700 depleted 4C2NP completely with stoichiometric formation of 5C2MBZ. This is the first report of (i) the degradation of 4C2NP at high concentration (1.5 mM) and, (ii) the formation of 5C2MBZ by a soil bacterium. PMID:23251673

  11. Decolourization of 4-chloro-2-nitrophenol by a soil bacterium, Bacillus subtilis RKJ 700.

    PubMed

    Arora, Pankaj Kumar

    2012-01-01

    A 4-Chloro-2-nitrophenol (4C2NP) decolourizing strain RKJ 700 was isolated from soil collected from a pesticide contaminated site of India and identified as Bacillus subtilis on the basis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Bacillus subtilis RKJ 700 decolourized 4C2NP up to concentration of 1.5 mM in the presence of additional carbon source. The degradation pathway of 4C2NP was studied and 4-chloro-2-aminophenol, 4-chloro-2-acetaminophenol and 5-chloro-2-methylbenzoxazole (5C2MBZ) were identified as metabolites by high performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Resting cell studies showed that Bacillus subtilis RKJ 700 depleted 4C2NP completely with stoichiometric formation of 5C2MBZ. This is the first report of (i) the degradation of 4C2NP at high concentration (1.5 mM) and, (ii) the formation of 5C2MBZ by a soil bacterium.

  12. Isolation of Aureimonas altamirensis, a Brucella canis-like bacterium, from an edematous canine testicle.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Thomas J; Calcutt, Michael J; Wennerdahl, Laura A; Williams, Fred; Evans, Tim J; Ganjam, Irene K; Bowman, Jesse W; Fales, William H

    2014-11-01

    Microbiological and histological analysis of a sample from a swollen testicle of a 2-year-old Border Collie dog revealed a mixed infection of the fungus Blastomyces dermatitidis and the Gram-negative bacterium Aureimonas altamirensis. When subjected to an automated microbial identification system, the latter isolate was provisionally identified as Psychrobacter phenylpyruvicus, but the organism shared several biochemical features with Brucella canis and exhibited agglutination, albeit weakly, with anti-B. canis antiserum. Unequivocal identification of the organism was only achieved by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing, ultimately establishing the identity as A. altamirensis. Since its first description in 2006, this organism has been isolated infrequently from human clinical samples, but, to the authors' knowledge, has not been reported from a veterinary clinical sample. While of unknown clinical significance with respect to the pathology observed for the polymicrobial infection described herein, it highlights the critical importance to unambiguously identify the microbe for diagnostic, epidemiological, infection control, and public health purposes. © 2014 The Author(s).

  13. Partial characterization of an extracellular polysaccharide produced by the moderately halophilic bacterium Halomonas xianhensis SUR308.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Jhuma; Ganguly, J; Paul, A K

    2015-01-01

    A moderately halophilic bacterium, Halomonas xianhensis SUR308 (Genbank Accession No. KJ933394) was isolated from a multi-pond solar saltern at Surala, Ganjam district, Odisha, India. The isolate produced a significant amount (7.87 g l(-1)) of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) when grown in malt extract-yeast extract medium supplemented with 2.5% NaCl, 0.5% casein hydrolysate and 3% glucose. The EPS was isolated and purified following the conventional method of precipitation and dialysis. Chromatographic analysis (paper, GC and GC-MS) of the hydrolyzed EPS confirmed its heteropolymeric nature and showed that it is composed mainly of glucose (45.74 mol%), galactose (33.67 mol %) and mannose (17.83 mol%). Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy indicated the presence of methylene and carboxyl groups as characteristic functional groups. In addition, its proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum revealed functional groups specific for extracellular polysaccharides. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed the amorphous nature (CIxrd, 0.56) of the EPS. It was thermostable up to 250 °C and displayed pseudoplastic rheology and remarkable stability against pH and salts. These unique properties of the EPS produced by H. xianhensis indicate its potential to act as an agent for detoxification, emulsification and diverse biological activities.

  14. The Complete Genome Sequence of the Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterium Pseudomonas sp. UW4

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jin; Jiang, Wei; Cheng, Zhenyu; Heikkila, John J.; Glick, Bernard R.

    2013-01-01

    The plant growth-promoting bacterium (PGPB) Pseudomonas sp. UW4, previously isolated from the rhizosphere of common reeds growing on the campus of the University of Waterloo, promotes plant growth in the presence of different environmental stresses, such as flooding, high concentrations of salt, cold, heavy metals, drought and phytopathogens. In this work, the genome sequence of UW4 was obtained by pyrosequencing and the gaps between the contigs were closed by directed PCR. The P. sp. UW4 genome contains a single circular chromosome that is 6,183,388 bp with a 60.05% G+C content. The bacterial genome contains 5,423 predicted protein-coding sequences that occupy 87.2% of the genome. Nineteen genomic islands (GIs) were predicted and thirty one complete putative insertion sequences were identified. Genes potentially involved in plant growth promotion such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) biosynthesis, trehalose production, siderophore production, acetoin synthesis, and phosphate solubilization were determined. Moreover, genes that contribute to the environmental fitness of UW4 were also observed including genes responsible for heavy metal resistance such as nickel, copper, cadmium, zinc, molybdate, cobalt, arsenate, and chromate. Whole-genome comparison with other completely sequenced Pseudomonas strains and phylogeny of four concatenated “housekeeping” genes (16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD) of 128 Pseudomonas strains revealed that UW4 belongs to the fluorescens group, jessenii subgroup. PMID:23516524

  15. Non-Redfield, nutrient synergy and flexible internal elemental stoichiometry in a marine bacterium.

    PubMed

    Trautwein, Kathleen; Feenders, Christoph; Hulsch, Reiner; Ruppersberg, Hanna S; Strijkstra, Annemieke; Kant, Mirjam; Vagts, Jannes; Wünsch, Daniel; Michalke, Bernhard; Maczka, Michael; Schulz, Stefan; Hillebrand, Helmut; Blasius, Bernd; Rabus, Ralf

    2017-05-01

    The stoichiometric constraints of algal growth are well understood, whereas there is less knowledge for heterotrophic bacterioplankton. Growth of the marine bacterium Phaeobacter inhibens DSM 17395, belonging to the globally distributed Roseobacter group, was studied across a wide concentration range of NH4+ and PO43-. The unique dataset covers 415 different concentration pairs, corresponding to 207 different molar N:P ratios (from 10-2 to 105). Maximal growth (by growth rate and biomass yield) was observed within a restricted concentration range at N:P ratios (∼50-120) markedly above Redfield. Experimentally determined growth parameters deviated to a large part from model predictions based on Liebig's law of the minimum, thus implicating synergistic co-limitation due to biochemical dependence of resources. Internal elemental ratios of P. inhibens varied with external nutrient supply within physiological constraints, thus adding to the growing evidence that aquatic bacteria can be flexible in their internal elemental composition. Taken together, the findings reported here revealed that P. inhibens is well adapted to fluctuating availability of inorganic N and P, expected to occur in its natural habitat (e.g. colonized algae, coastal areas). Moreover, this study suggests that elemental variability in bacterioplankton needs to be considered in the ecological stoichiometry of the oceans. © FEMS 2017.

  16. A thermostable serralysin inhibitor from marine bacterium Flavobacterium sp. YS-80-122

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Pengjuan; Li, Shangyong; Wang, Kun; Wang, Fang; Xing, Mengxin; Hao, Jianhua; Sun, Mi

    2017-06-01

    Serralysin inhibitors have been proposed as potent drugs against many diseases and may help to prevent further development of antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacteria. In this study, a novel serralysin inhibitor gene, lupI, was cloned from the marine bacterium Flavobacterium sp. YS-80-122 and expressed in Escherichia coli. The deduced serralysin inhibitor, LupI, shows <40% amino acid identity to other reported serralysin inhibitors. Multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis of LupI with other serralysin inhibitors indicated that LupI was a novel type of serralysin inhibitor. The inhibitory constant for LupI towards its target metalloprotease was 0.64 μmol/L. LupI was thermostable at high temperature, in which 35.6%-90.7% of its inhibitory activity was recovered after treatment at 100°C for 1-60 min followed by incubation at 0°C. This novel inhibitor may represent a candidate drug for the treatment of serralysin-related infections.

  17. Complete Cellulase System in the Marine Bacterium Saccharophagus degradans Strain 2-40T

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Larry E.; Henrissat, Bernard; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Ekborg, Nathan A.; Hutcheson, Steven W.; Weiner, Ronald M.

    2006-01-01

    Saccharophagus degradans strain 2-40 is a representative of an emerging group of marine complex polysaccharide (CP)-degrading bacteria. It is unique in its metabolic versatility, being able to degrade at least 10 distinct CPs from diverse algal, plant and invertebrate sources. The S. degradans genome has been sequenced to completion, and more than 180 open reading frames have been identified that encode carbohydrases. Over half of these are likely to act on plant cell wall polymers. In fact, there appears to be a full array of enzymes that degrade and metabolize plant cell walls. Genomic and proteomic analyses reveal 13 cellulose depolymerases complemented by seven accessory enzymes, including two cellodextrinases, three cellobiases, a cellodextrin phosphorylase, and a cellobiose phosphorylase. Most of these enzymes exhibit modular architecture, and some contain novel combinations of catalytic and/or substrate binding modules. This is exemplified by endoglucanase Cel5A, which has three internal family 6 carbohydrate binding modules (CBM6) and two catalytic modules from family five of glycosyl hydrolases (GH5) and by Cel6A, a nonreducing-end cellobiohydrolase from family GH6 with tandem CBM2s. This is the first report of a complete and functional cellulase system in a marine bacterium with a sequenced genome. PMID:16707677

  18. Methylobacterium variabile sp. nov., a methylotrophic bacterium isolated from an aquatic environment.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Virginia; García, Maria Teresa; Ventosa, Antonio

    2005-07-01

    Strain GR3(T) was isolated from drinking water during a screening programme to monitor the bacterial population present in the distribution system of Seville (Spain), and it was studied phenotypically, genotypically and phylogenetically. This pink-pigmented bacterium was identified as a Methylobacterium sp. Members of this genus are distributed in a wide variety of natural habitats, including soil, dust, air, freshwater and aquatic sediments. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that strain GR3(T) was closely related to Methylobacterium aquaticum (97.4% sequence similarity), whereas sequence similarity values with respect to the rest of the species belonging to this genus were lower than 96%. Furthermore, the DNA-DNA hybridization data and its phenotypic characteristics clearly indicate that the isolate represents a novel Methylobacterium species, for which the name Methylobacterium variabile sp. nov. is proposed. GR3(T) (=DSM 16961(T)=CCM 7281(T)=CECT 7045(T)) is the type strain; the DNA G+C content of this strain is 69.2 mol%.

  19. Applicability of recombinant β-xylosidase from the extremely thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus thermodenitrificans in synthesizing alkylxylosides.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ira; Kumar, Vikash; Satyanarayana, T

    2014-10-01

    The β-xylosidase encoding gene (XsidB) of the extremely thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus thermodenitrificans has been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The homotrimeric recombinant XsidB is of 204.0kDa, which is optimally active at 60°C and pH 7.0 with T1/2 of 58min at 70°C. The β-xylosidase remains unaffected in the presence of most metal ions and organic solvents. The Km [p-nitrophenyl β-xyloside (pNPX)], Vmax and kcat values of the enzyme are 2×10(-3)M, 1250μmolesmg(-1)min(-1) and 13.20×10(5)min(-1), respectively. The enzyme catalyzes transxylosylation reactions in the presence of alcohols as acceptors. The pharmaceutically important β-methyl-d-xylosides could be produced using pNPX as the donor and methanol as acceptor. The products of transxylosylation were identified by TLC and HPLC, and the structure was confirmed by (1)H NMR analysis. The enzyme is also useful in synthesizing transxylosylation products from the wheat bran hydrolysate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Interactions between the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio parahaemolyticus and red-tide dinoflagellates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Kyeong Ah; Jeong, Hae Jin

    2011-06-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a common pathogenic bacterium in marine and estuarine waters. To investigate interactions between V. parahaemolyticus and co-occurring redtide dinoflagellates, we monitored the daily abundance of 5 common red tide dinoflagellates in laboratory culture; Amphidinium carterae, Cochlodinium ploykrikoides, Gymnodinium impudicum, Prorocentrum micans, and P. minimum. Additionally, we measured the ingestion rate of each dinoflagellate on V. parahaemolyticus as a function of prey concentration. Each of the dinoflagellates responded differently to the abundance of V. parahaemolyticus. The abundances of A. carterae and P. micans were not lowered by V. parahaemolyticus, whereas that of C. polykrikodes was lowered considerably. The harmful effect depended on bacterial concentration and incubation time. Most C. polykrikoides cells died after 1 hour incubation when the V. parahaemolyticus concentration was 1.4×107 cells ml-1, while cells died within 2 days of incubation when the bacterial concentration was 1.5×106 cells ml-1. With increasing V. parahaemolyticus concentration, ingestion rates of P. micans, P. minimum, and A. carterae on the prey increased, whereas that on C. polykrikoides decreased. The maximum or highest ingestion rates of P. micans, P. minimum, and A. carterae on V. parahaemolyticus were 55, 5, and 2 cells alga-1 h-1, respectively. The results of the present study suggest that V. parahaemolyticus can be both the killer and prey for some red tide dinoflagellates.

  1. Metagenomic analysis reveals a green sulfur bacterium as a potential coral symbiont.

    PubMed

    Cai, Lin; Zhou, Guowei; Tian, Ren-Mao; Tong, Haoya; Zhang, Weipeng; Sun, Jin; Ding, Wei; Wong, Yue Him; Xie, James Y; Qiu, Jian-Wen; Liu, Sheng; Huang, Hui; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2017-08-24

    Coral reefs are ecologically significant habitats. Coral-algal symbiosis confers ecological success on coral reefs and coral-microbial symbiosis is also vital to coral reefs. However, current understanding of coral-microbial symbiosis on a genomic scale is largely unknown. Here we report a potential microbial symbiont in corals revealed by metagenomics-based genomic study. Microbial cells in coral were enriched for metagenomic analysis and a high-quality draft genome of "Candidatus Prosthecochloris korallensis" was recovered by metagenome assembly and genome binning. Phylogenetic analysis shows "Ca. P. korallensis" belongs to the Prosthecochloris clade and is clustered with two Prosthecochloris clones derived from Caribbean corals. Genomic analysis reveals "Ca. P. korallensis" has potentially important ecological functions including anoxygenic photosynthesis, carbon fixation via the reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycle, nitrogen fixation, and sulfur oxidization. Core metabolic pathway analysis suggests "Ca. P. korallensis" is a green sulfur bacterium capable of photoautotrophy or mixotrophy. Potential host-microbial interaction reveals a symbiotic relationship: "Ca. P. korallensis" might provide organic and nitrogenous nutrients to its host and detoxify sulfide for the host; the host might provide "Ca. P. korallensis" with an anaerobic environment for survival, carbon dioxide and acetate for growth, and hydrogen sulfide as an electron donor for photosynthesis.

  2. FTIR and Raman spectroscopic studies of selenium nanoparticles synthesised by the bacterium Azospirillum thiophilum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tugarova, Anna V.; Mamchenkova, Polina V.; Dyatlova, Yulia A.; Kamnev, Alexander A.

    2018-03-01

    Vibrational (Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman) spectroscopic techniques can provide unique molecular-level information on the structural and compositional characteristics of complicated biological objects. Thus, their applications in microbiology and related fields are steadily increasing. In this communication, biogenic selenium nanoparticles (Se NPs) were obtained via selenite (SeO32-) reduction by the bacterium Azospirillum thiophilum (strain VKM B-2513) for the first time, using an original methodology for obtaining extracellular NPs. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed the Se NPs to have average diameters within 160-250 nm; their zeta potential was measured to be minus 18.5 mV. Transmission FTIR spectra of the Se NPs separated from bacterial cells showed typical proteinacious, polysaccharide and lipid-related bands, in line with TEM data showing a thin layer covering the Se NPs surface. Raman spectra of dried Se NPs layer in the low-frequency region (under 500 cm-1 down to 150 cm-1) showed a single very strong band with a maximum at 250 cm-1 which, in line with its increased width (ca. 30 cm-1 at half intensity), can be attributed to amorphous elementary Se. Thus, a combination of FTIR and Raman spectroscopic approaches is highly informative in non-destructive analysis of structural and compositional properties of biogenic Se NPs.

  3. Isolation of a 250 million-year-old halotolerant bacterium from a primary salt crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vreeland, Russell H.; Rosenzweig, William D.; Powers, Dennis W.

    2000-10-01

    Bacteria have been found associated with a variety of ancient samples, however few studies are generally accepted due to questions about sample quality and contamination. When Cano and Borucki isolated a strain of Bacillus sphaericus from an extinct bee trapped in 25-30 million-year-old amber, careful sample selection and stringent sterilization techniques were the keys to acceptance. Here we report the isolation and growth of a previously unrecognized spore-forming bacterium (Bacillus species, designated 2-9-3) from a brine inclusion within a 250million-year-old salt crystal from the Permian Salado Formation. Complete gene sequences of the 16S ribosomal DNA show that the organism is part of the lineage of Bacillus marismortui and Virgibacillus pantothenticus. Delicate crystal structures and sedimentary features indicate the salt has not recrystallized since formation. Samples were rejected if brine inclusions showed physical signs of possible contamination. Surfaces of salt crystal samples were sterilized with strong alkali and acid before extracting brines from inclusions. Sterilization procedures reduce the probability of contamination to less than 1 in 10 9.

  4. Extracellular proteases of Halobacillus blutaparonensis strain M9, a new moderately halophilic bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Anderson F.; Valle, Roberta S.; Pacheco, Clarissa A.; Alvarez, Vanessa M.; Seldin, Lucy; Santos, André L.S.

    2013-01-01

    Halophilic microorganisms are source of potential hydrolytic enzymes to be used in industrial and/or biotechnological processes. In the present study, we have investigated the ability of the moderately halophilic bacterium Halobacillus blutaparonensis (strain M9), a novel species described by our group, to release proteolytic enzymes. This bacterial strain abundantly proliferated in Luria-Bertani broth supplemented with 2.5% NaCl as well as secreted proteases to the extracellular environment. The production of proteases occurred in bacterial cells grown under different concentration of salt, ranging from 0.5% to 10% NaCl, in a similar way. The proteases secreted by H. blutaparonensis presented the following properties: (i) molecular masses ranging from 30 to 80 kDa, (ii) better hydrolytic activities under neutral-alkaline pH range, (iii) expression modulated according to the culture age, (iv) susceptibility to phenylmethylsulphonyl fluoride, classifying them as serine-type proteases, (v) specific cleavage over the chymotrypsin substrate, and (vi) enzymatic stability in the presence of salt (up to 20% NaCl) and organic solvents (e.g., ether, isooctane and cyclohexane). The proteases described herein are promising for industrial practices due to its haloalkaline properties. PMID:24688526

  5. Aerobic and anaerobic degradation of a range of alkyl sulfides by a denitrifying marine bacterium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Visscher, P.T.; Taylor, B.F.

    1993-01-01

    A pure culture of a bacterium was obtained from a marine microbial mat by using an anoxic medium containing dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and nitrate. The isolate grew aerobically or anaerobically as a denitrifier on alkyl sulfides, including DMS, dimethyl disulfide, diethyl sulfide (DES), ethyl methyl sulfide, dipropyl sulfide, dibutyl sulfide, and dibutyl disulfide. Cells grown on an alkyl sulfide or disulfide also oxidized the corresponding thiols, namely, methanethiol, ethanethiol, propanethiol, or butanethiol. Alkyl sulfides were metabolized by induced or derepressed cells with oxygen, nitrate, or nitrite as electron acceptor. Cells grown on DMS immediately metabolized DMS, but there was a lag before DES was consumed; with DES-grown cells, DES was immediately used but DMS was used only after a lag. Chloramphenicol prevented the eventual use of DES by DMS-grown cells and DMS use by DES-grown cells, respectively, indicating separate enzymes for the metabolism of methyl and ethyl groups. Growth was rapid on formate, acetate, propionate, and butyrate but slow on methanol. The organism also grew chemolithotrophically on thiosulfate with a decrease in pH; growth required carbonate in the medium. Growth on sulfide was also carbonate dependent but slow. The isolate was identified as a Thiobacillus sp. and designated strain ASN-1. It may have utility for removing alkyl sulfides, and also nitrate, nitrite, and sulfide, from wastewaters.

  6. Salinity fluctuation influencing biological adaptation: growth dynamics and Na+ /K+ -ATPase activity in a euryhaline bacterium.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hao; Meng, Yang; Song, Youxin; Tan, Yalin; Warren, Alan; Li, Jiqiu; Lin, Xiaofeng

    2017-07-01

    Although salinity fluctuation is a prominent characteristic of many coastal ecosystems, its effects on biological adaptation have not yet been fully recognized. To test the salinity fluctuations on biological adaptation, population growth dynamics and Na + /K + -ATPase activity were investigated in the euryhaline bacterium Idiomarina sp. DYB, which was acclimated at different salinity exposure levels, exposure times, and shifts in direction of salinity. Results showed: (1) bacterial population growth dynamics and Na + /K + -ATPase activity changed significantly in response to salinity fluctuation; (2) patterns of variation in bacterial growth dynamics were related to exposure times, levels of salinity, and shifts in direction of salinity change; (3) significant tradeoffs were detected between growth rate (r) and carrying capacity (K) on the one hand, and Na + /K + -ATPase activity on the other; and (4) beneficial acclimation was confirmed in Idiomarina sp. DYB. In brief, this study demonstrated that salinity fluctuation can change the population growth dynamics, Na + /K + -ATPase activity, and tradeoffs between r, K, and Na + /K + -ATPase activity, thus facilitating bacterial adaption in a changing environment. These findings provide constructive information for determining biological response patterns to environmental change. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Physiological traits of the symbiotic bacterium Teredinibacter turnerae isolated from the mangrove shipworm Neoteredo reynei

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Nutrition in the Teredinidae family of wood-boring mollusks is sustained by cellulolytic/nitrogen fixing symbiotic bacteria of the Teredinibacter clade. The mangrove Teredinidae Neoteredo reynei is popularly used in the treatment of infectious diseases in the north of Brazil. In the present work, the symbionts of N. reynei, which are strictly confined to the host's gills, were conclusively identified as Teredinibacter turnerae. Symbiont variants obtained in vitro were able to grow using casein as the sole carbon/nitrogen source and under reduced concentrations of NaCl. Furthermore, cellulose consumption in T. turnerae was clearly reduced under low salt concentrations. As a point of interest, we hereby report first hand that T. turnerae in fact exerts antibiotic activity. Furthermore, this activity was also affected by NaCl concentration. Finally, T. turnerae was able to inhibit the growth of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, this including strains of Sphingomonas sp., Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus sciuri. Our findings introduce new points of view on the ecology of T. turnerae, and suggest new biotechnological applications for this marine bacterium. PMID:21637522

  8. Isolation of a spiral-shaped bacterium from the cat stomach.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, A; Hazell, S L; O'Rourke, J; Kouprach, S

    1988-01-01

    A spiral- or helix-shaped bacterium that colonizes the stomachs of cats has been isolated in pure culture for the first time. The organism is tightly coiled with tufts of 10 to 17 polar flagella positioned slightly off center at the end of the cell. The body of the cell is entwined with unique periplasmic fibrils that usually occur in pairs, although groupings of one and three fibrils were also seen. The organism is strongly urease, catalase, and oxidase positive and is likely to belong to an as yet unclassified group of bacteria that are specifically adapted to the ecological niche provided by gastrointestinal mucus. Isolation of this organism will allow study of the factors influencing colonization of gastric mucosae, information relevant to the association of another mucus colonizer, Campylobacter pylori, with the human stomach. Recent reports of the isolation of other bacteria with the characteristic periplasmic surface structures suggests that the group may be more widespread than was hitherto thought. Bacteria with the morphology of the organisms seen in the cat stomach have been seen in gastric biopsies from humans. The organism whose isolation is reported here has been used in previous serological studies to support the hypothesis that spiral bacteria from animals can colonize the human stomach. Images PMID:3169989

  9. Complete genome sequence of Nitrosospira multiformis, an ammonia-oxidizing bacterium from the soil environment

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, Jeanette M.; Klotz, Martin G; Stein, Lisa Y

    2008-01-01

    The complete genome of the ammonia-oxidizing bacterium, Nitrosospira multiformis (ATCC 25196T), consists of a circular chromosome and three small plasmids totaling 3,234,309 bp and encoding 2827 putative proteins. Of these, 2026 proteins have predicted functions and 801 are without conserved functional domains, yet 747 of these have similarity to other predicted proteins in databases. Gene homologs from Nitrosomonas europaea and N. eutropha were the best match for 42% of the predicted genes in N. multiformis. The genome contains three nearly identical copies of amo and hao gene clusters as large repeats. Distinguishing features compared to N. europaea include: the presencemore » of gene clusters encoding urease and hydrogenase, a RuBisCO-encoding operon of distinctive structure and phylogeny, and a relatively small complement of genes related to Fe acquisition. Systems for synthesis of a pyoverdine-like siderophore and for acyl-homoserine lactone were unique to N. multiformis among the sequenced AOB genomes. Gene clusters encoding proteins associated with outer membrane and cell envelope functions including transporters, porins, exopolysaccharide synthesis, capsule formation and protein sorting/export were abundant. Numerous sensory transduction and response regulator gene systems directed towards sensing of the extracellular environment are described. Gene clusters for glycogen, polyphosphate and cyanophycin storage and utilization were identified providing mechanisms for meeting energy requirements under substrate-limited conditions. The genome of N. multiformis encodes the core pathways for chemolithoautotrophy along with adaptations for surface growth and survival in soil environments.« less

  10. Specificity and putative mode of action of a mosquito larvicidal toxin from the bacterium Xenorhabdus innexi.

    PubMed

    Kim, Il-Hwan; Ensign, Jerald; Kim, Do-Young; Jung, Hoe-Yune; Kim, Na-Ri; Choi, Bo-Hwa; Park, Sun-Min; Lan, Que; Goodman, Walter G

    2017-10-01

    Reduction of mosquito-borne diseases relies, in part, on the use of synthetic pesticides to control pest mosquitoes. This reliance has led to genetic resistance, environmental contamination and the nondiscriminatory elimination of both pest and non-pest species. To expand our options for control, we screened entomopathogenic bacteria for potential larvicidal activity. A lipopeptide from the bacterium, Xenorhabdus innexi, was discovered that displayed potent larvicidal activity. The LC 50 s of the lipopeptide towards Aedes aegypti, Culex pipiens and Anopheles gambiae larvae were 1.81, 1.25 and 1.86 parts-per-million, respectively. No mortality was observed in other insect species tested. The putative mode of action of the lipopeptide suggested that after orally ingestion, it bound to the apical membrane of anterior midgut cells and created pores in the cellular membranes. The rapid neutralization of midgut pH suggested the pores disabled the H + -V-ATPase on the basal membrane and led to epithelial cell death. Specificity and toxicity towards mosquito larvae and the unique mode of action makes this lipopeptide a potentially attractive bacterial insecticide for control of mosquitoes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Rapid Aggregation of Biofuel-Producing Algae by the Bacterium Bacillus sp. Strain RP1137

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Ryan J.

    2013-01-01

    Algal biofuels represent one of the most promising means of sustainably replacing liquid fuels. However, significant challenges remain before alga-based fuels become competitive with fossil fuels. One of the largest challenges is the ability to harvest the algae in an economical and low-energy manner. In this article, we describe the isolation of a bacterial strain, Bacillus sp. strain RP1137, which can rapidly aggregate several algae that are candidates for biofuel production, including a Nannochloropsis sp. This bacterium aggregates algae in a pH-dependent and reversible manner and retains its aggregation ability after paraformaldehyde fixation, opening the possibility for reuse of the cells. The optimal ratio of bacteria to algae is described, as is the robustness of aggregation at different salinities and temperatures. Aggregation is dependent on the presence of calcium or magnesium ions. The efficiency of aggregation of Nannochloropsis oceanica IMET1 is between 70 and 95% and is comparable to that obtained by other means of harvest; however, the rate of harvest is fast, with aggregates forming in 30 s. PMID:23892750

  12. Direct bioconversion of brown algae into ethanol by thermophilic bacterium Defluviitalea phaphyphila.

    PubMed

    Ji, Shi-Qi; Wang, Bing; Lu, Ming; Li, Fu-Li

    2016-01-01

    Brown algae are promising feedstocks for biofuel production with inherent advantages of no structural lignin, high growth rate, and no competition for land and fresh water. However, it is difficult for one microorganism to convert all components of brown algae with different oxidoreduction potentials to ethanol. Defluviitalea phaphyphila Alg1 is the first characterized thermophilic bacterium capable of direct utilization of brown algae. Defluviitalea phaphyphila Alg1 can simultaneously utilize mannitol, glucose, and alginate to produce ethanol, and high ethanol yields of 0.47 g/g-mannitol, 0.44 g/g-glucose, and 0.3 g/g-alginate were obtained. A rational redox balance system under obligate anaerobic condition in fermenting brown algae was revealed in D. phaphyphila Alg1 through genome and redox analysis. The excess reducing equivalents produced from mannitol metabolism were equilibrated by oxidizing forces from alginate assimilation. Furthermore, D. phaphyphila Alg1 can directly utilize unpretreated kelp powder, and 10 g/L of ethanol was accumulated within 72 h with an ethanol yield of 0.25 g/g-kelp. Microscopic observation further demonstrated the deconstruction process of brown algae cell by D. phaphyphila Alg1. The integrated biomass deconstruction system of D. phaphyphila Alg1, as well as its high ethanol yield, provided us an excellent alternative for brown algae bioconversion at elevated temperature.

  13. Oxygenated N-Acyl Alanine Methyl Esters (NAMEs) from the Marine Bacterium Roseovarius tolerans EL-164.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Hilke; Herrmann, Jennifer; Müller, Rolf; Wang, Hui; Wagner Döbler, Irene; Schulz, Stefan

    2018-01-26

    The marine bacterium Roseovarius tolerans EL-164 (Rhodobacteraceae) can produce unique N-acylalanine methyl esters (NAMEs) besides strucutrally related N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs), bacterial signaling compounds widespread in the Rhodobacteraceae. The structures of two unprecedented NAMEs carrying a rare terminally oxidized acyl chain are reported here. The compounds (Z)-N-16-hydroxyhexadec-9-enoyl-l-alanine methyl ester (Z9-16-OH-C16:1-NAME, 3) and (Z)-N-15-carboxypentadec-9-enoyl-l-alanine methyl ester (16COOH-C16:1-NAME, 4) were isolated, and the structures were determined by NMR and MS experiments. Both compounds were synthesized to prove assignments and to test their biological activity. Finally, non-natural, structurally related Z9-3-OH-C16:1-NAME (18) was synthesized to investigate the mass spectroscopy of structurally related NAMEs. Compound 3 showed moderate antibacterial activity against microorganisms such as Bacillus, Streptococcus, Micrococcus, or Mucor strains. In contrast to AHLs, quorum-sensing or quorum-quenching activity was not observed.

  14. Expression and Characterization of a Novel Thermo-Alkalistable Lipase from Hyperthermophilic Bacterium Thermotoga maritima.

    PubMed

    Tian, Rui; Chen, Huayou; Ni, Zhong; Zhang, Qing; Zhang, Zhongge; Zhang, Tianxi; Zhang, Chunxia; Yang, Shengli

    2015-07-01

    A gene coding for lipase (Tm1350) from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima MSB8 was cloned and overexpressed by Escherichia coli. The enzyme can degrade substrates with both short and long acyl chain lengths. The apparent Km and Vmax values for p-nitrophenyl butyrate were 8 mM and 333 U/mg, respectively. The enzyme displayed optimal activity at pH 7.5 and 70 °C, maintained 66 % of the original activity after 8 h of incubation, and its half-lives at pHs 9 and 10 were 8 and 1 h. The activity of Tm1350 was stimulated up to 131 or 151 % of the original activity by incubating with 4 M urea or 20 % (v/v) methanol, and 90.1 or 70.2 % of the activity was maintained after 8 h incubation of the enzyme in 20 or 75 % (v/v) of the methanol, showing potential for biodiesel production. The activity of the enzyme without cysteine residue was stimulated up to 618 and 550 % of the original activity by incubating with dithiothreitol (DTT) and reduced glutathione (GSH) at a concentration of 1 mM. However, the circular dichroism spectra of the enzyme have no obvious change after DTT treatment. It is speculated that DTT interacts with potential residues in some key active sites without influence of structure.

  15. Electricity Generation in Microbial Fuel Cell (MFC) by Bacterium Isolated from Rice Paddy Field Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhirruddin, Fakhriah; Amid, Azura; Salim, Wan Wardatul Amani Wan; Suhaida Azmi, Azlin

    2018-03-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is an alternative approach in generating renewable energy by utilising bacteria that will oxidize organic or inorganic substrates, producing electrons yielded as electrical energy. Different species of exoelectrogenic bacteria capable of generating significant amount of electricity in MFC has been identified, using various organic compounds for fuel. Soil sample taken from rice paddy field is proven to contain exoelectrogenic bacteria, thus electricity generation using mixed culture originally found in the soil, and pure culture isolated from the soil is studied. This research will isolate the exoelectrogenic bacterial species in the rice paddy field soil responsible for energy generation. Growth of bacteria isolated from the MFC is observed by measuring the optical density (OD), cell density weight (CDW) and viable cell count. Mixed bacterial species found in paddy field soil generates maximum power of 77.62 μW and 0.70 mA of current. In addition, the research also shows that the pure bacterium in rice paddy field soil can produce maximum power and current at 51.32 μW and 0.28 mA respectively.

  16. A new function of graphene oxide emerges: inactivating phytopathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas oryzae pv. Oryzae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Juanni; Wang, Xiuping; Han, Heyou

    2013-05-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae ( Xoo) is one representative phytopathogenic bacterium causing bacteria infections in rice. The antibacterial activity of graphene suspended in different dispersants against Xoo was first investigated. Bacteriological test data, fluorescence microscope and transmission electron microscopy images are provided, which yield insight into the antibacterial action of the nanoscale materials. Surprisingly, the results showed graphene oxide (GO) exhibits superior bactericidal effect even at extremely low dose in water (250 μg/mL), almost killing 94.48 % cells, in comparison to common bactericide bismerthiazol with only 13.3 % mortality. The high efficiency in inactivating the bacteria on account of considerable changes in the cell membranes caused by the extremely sharp edges of graphene oxide and generation of reactive oxygen species, which may be the fatal factor for bacterial inactivation. Given the superior antibacterial effect of GO and the fact that GO can be mass-produced with low cost, we expect a new application could be developed as bactericide for controlling plant disease, which may be a matter of great importance for agricultural development.

  17. Thalassospira xianhensis sp. nov., a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading marine bacterium.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baisuo; Wang, Hui; Li, Ruirui; Mao, Xinwei

    2010-05-01

    A polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading marine bacterium, designated strain P-4(T), was isolated from oil-polluted saline soil in Xianhe, Shangdong Province, China. Strain P-4(T) was Gram-negative-staining with curved to spiral rod-shaped cells and grew optimally with 3-6 % (w/v) NaCl and at 30 degrees C. The predominant fatty acids were C(18 : 1)omega7c (35.0 %), C(16 : 0) (25.0 %), C(16 : 1)omega7c (17.9 %), C(14 : 0) (6.2 %) and C(17 : 0) cyclo (5.2 %). The major respiratory quinone was Q-9 and the genomic DNA G+C content was 61.2+/-1.0 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain P-4(T) belonged to the genus Thalassospira of the class Alphaproteobacteria. DNA-DNA hybridization with Thalassospira xiamenensis DSM 17429(T) showed relatedness of 36.0 %, and lower values were obtained with respect to other Thalassospira species. Based on physiological and biochemical tests and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis as well as DNA-DNA relatedness, strain P-4(T) should be placed in the genus Thalassospira within a novel species. The name Thalassospira xianhensis sp. nov. is proposed, with P-4(T) (=CGMCC 1.6849(T) =JCM 14850(T)) as the type strain.

  18. Thalassospira povalilytica sp. nov., a polyvinyl-alcohol-degrading marine bacterium.

    PubMed

    Nogi, Yuichi; Yoshizumi, Masaki; Miyazaki, Masayuki

    2014-04-01

    A polyvinyl-alcohol-degrading marine bacterium was isolated from plastic rope litter found in Tokyo Bay, Japan. The isolated strain, Zumi 95(T), was a Gram-reaction-negative, non-spore-forming and facultatively anaerobic chemo-organotroph. The major respiratory quinone was Q-10. The predominant fatty acids were C18 : 1ω7c and C16 : 0. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the isolated strain was closely affiliated with members of the genus Thalassospira in the class Alphaproteobacteria. The DNA G+C content of the novel strain was 55.1 mol%. The hybridization values for DNA-DNA relatedness between this strain and four reference strains representing species of the genus Thalassospira were significantly lower than that accepted as the phylogenetic definition of a species. On the basis of differences in taxonomic characteristics, the isolated strain represents a novel species of the genus Thalassospira for which the name Thalassospira povalilytica sp. nov. (type strain Zumi 95(T) = JCM 18746(T) = DSM 26719(T)) is proposed.

  19. [Isolation and in vitro metabolic characterization of a lactate-utilizing bacterium from goat rumen].

    PubMed

    Long, Liming; Mao, Shengyong; Su, Yong; Zhu, Weiyun

    2008-12-01

    A lactate-utilizing, propionate-producing bacterium, strain L9, was isolated from rumen of goat fed with high concentrate by utilizing modified Hungate technique and anaerobic culture technique. The effect of the strain L9 culture on the rumen fermentation was further studied. According to the characteristics of morphology, physiology, biochemistry tests and sequence comparison of 16S rRNA gene, strain L9 was identified as selenomonas ruminantium. The influence of strain L9 culture on in vitro rumen fermentation was studied using mixed rumen micro-organisms of goats as inoculums. The results of the metabolism experiment showed that it was capable of using lactate as the sole carbon source, and 90 mmol/L lactate in LH medium could be completely utilized after 24 h incubation. As compared with the control, strain L9 culture addition significantly increased the total volatile fatty acids (TVFA), the percentage of propionate and pH value, while reduced the ratio of acetate to propionate and lactate production (P < 0.05). The results suggested that strain L9 can reduce lactic acid production and enhance the TVFA and propionate production in in vitro fermentation, and thus could be beneficial for the fermentation of rumen microorganisms.

  20. Deciphering a unique biotin scavenging pathway with redundant genes in the probiotic bacterium Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huimin; Wang, Qingjing; Fisher, Derek J.; Cai, Mingzhu; Chakravartty, Vandana; Ye, Huiyan; Li, Ping; Solbiati, Jose O.; Feng, Youjun

    2016-01-01

    Biotin protein ligase (BPL) is widespread in the three domains of the life. The paradigm BPL is the Escherichia coli BirA protein, which also functions as a repressor for the biotin biosynthesis pathway. Here we report that Lactococcus lactis possesses two different orthologues of birA (birA1_LL and birA2_LL). Unlike the scenario in E. coli, L. lactis appears to be auxotrophic for biotin in that it lacks a full biotin biosynthesis pathway. In contrast, it retains two biotin transporter-encoding genes (bioY1_LL and bioY2_LL), suggesting the use of a scavenging strategy to obtain biotin from the environment. The in vivo function of the two L. lactis birA genes was judged by their abilities to complement the conditional lethal E. coli birA mutant. Thin-layer chromatography and mass spectroscopy assays demonstrated that these two recombinant BirA proteins catalyze the biotinylation reaction of the acceptor biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP), through the expected biotinoyl-AMP intermediate. Gel shift assays were used to characterize bioY1_LL and BirA1_LL. We also determined the ability to uptake 3H-biotin by L. lactis. Taken together, our results deciphered a unique biotin scavenging pathway with redundant genes present in the probiotic bacterium L. lactis. PMID:27161258

  1. Deciphering a unique biotin scavenging pathway with redundant genes in the probiotic bacterium Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huimin; Wang, Qingjing; Fisher, Derek J; Cai, Mingzhu; Chakravartty, Vandana; Ye, Huiyan; Li, Ping; Solbiati, Jose O; Feng, Youjun

    2016-05-10

    Biotin protein ligase (BPL) is widespread in the three domains of the life. The paradigm BPL is the Escherichia coli BirA protein, which also functions as a repressor for the biotin biosynthesis pathway. Here we report that Lactococcus lactis possesses two different orthologues of birA (birA1_LL and birA2_LL). Unlike the scenario in E. coli, L. lactis appears to be auxotrophic for biotin in that it lacks a full biotin biosynthesis pathway. In contrast, it retains two biotin transporter-encoding genes (bioY1_LL and bioY2_LL), suggesting the use of a scavenging strategy to obtain biotin from the environment. The in vivo function of the two L. lactis birA genes was judged by their abilities to complement the conditional lethal E. coli birA mutant. Thin-layer chromatography and mass spectroscopy assays demonstrated that these two recombinant BirA proteins catalyze the biotinylation reaction of the acceptor biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP), through the expected biotinoyl-AMP intermediate. Gel shift assays were used to characterize bioY1_LL and BirA1_LL. We also determined the ability to uptake (3)H-biotin by L. lactis. Taken together, our results deciphered a unique biotin scavenging pathway with redundant genes present in the probiotic bacterium L. lactis.

  2. The chemical cue tetrabromopyrrole from a biofilm bacterium induces settlement of multiple Caribbean corals

    PubMed Central

    Sneed, Jennifer M.; Sharp, Koty H.; Ritchie, Kimberly B.; Paul, Valerie J.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial biofilms induce larval settlement for some invertebrates, including corals; however, the chemical cues involved have rarely been identified. Here, we demonstrate the role of microbial biofilms in inducing larval settlement with the Caribbean coral Porites astreoides and report the first instance of a chemical cue isolated from a marine biofilm bacterium that induces complete settlement (attachment and metamorphosis) of Caribbean coral larvae. Larvae settled in response to natural biofilms, and the response was eliminated when biofilms were treated with antibiotics. A similar settlement response was elicited by monospecific biofilms of a single bacterial strain, Pseudoalteromonas sp. PS5, isolated from the surface biofilm of a crustose coralline alga. The activity of Pseudoalteromonas sp. PS5 was attributed to the production of a single compound, tetrabromopyrrole (TBP), which has been shown previously to induce metamorphosis without attachment in Pacific acroporid corals. In addition to inducing settlement of brooded larvae (P. astreoides), TBP also induced larval settlement for two broadcast-spawning species, Orbicella (formerly Montastraea) franksi and Acropora palmata, indicating that this compound may have widespread importance among Caribbean coral species. PMID:24850918

  3. Paenibacillus profundus sp. nov., a deep sediment bacterium that produces isocoumarin and peptide antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Romanenko, Lyudmila A; Tanaka, Naoto; Svetashev, Vassilii I; Kalinovskaya, Natalia I

    2013-04-01

    A novel bacterial strain Sl 79(T) was isolated from a deep surface sediment sample obtained from the Sea of Japan and investigated by phenotypic and molecular methods. The bacterium Sl 79(T) was Gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic, spore-forming, motile and able to form two different types of colonies. It contained the major menaquinone MK-7 and anteiso-C(15:0) followed by iso-C(15:0) as predominant fatty acids. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain Sl 79(T) belonged to the genus Paenibacillus where it clustered to Paenibacillus apiarius NRRL NRS-1438(T) with a sequence similarity of 97.7 % and sharing sequence similarities below than 96.7 % to other validly named Paenibacillus species. Strain Sl 79(T) was found to possess a remarkable inhibitory activity against indicatory microorganisms. On the basis of combined spectral analyses, strain Paenibacillus sp. Sl 79(T) was established to produce isocoumarin and novel peptide antibiotics. On the basis of DNA-DNA relatedness, phenotypic and phylogenetic data obtained, it was concluded that strain Sl 79(T) represents a novel species, Paenibacillus profundus sp. nov. with the type strain Sl 79(T) = KMM 9420(T) = NRIC 0885(T).

  4. Non-Redfield, nutrient synergy and flexible internal elemental stoichiometry in a marine bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Trautwein, Kathleen; Feenders, Christoph; Hulsch, Reiner; Ruppersberg, Hanna S.; Strijkstra, Annemieke; Kant, Mirjam; Vagts, Jannes; Wünsch, Daniel; Michalke, Bernhard; Maczka, Michael; Schulz, Stefan; Hillebrand, Helmut; Blasius, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The stoichiometric constraints of algal growth are well understood, whereas there is less knowledge for heterotrophic bacterioplankton. Growth of the marine bacterium Phaeobacter inhibens DSM 17395, belonging to the globally distributed Roseobacter group, was studied across a wide concentration range of NH4+ and PO43−. The unique dataset covers 415 different concentration pairs, corresponding to 207 different molar N:P ratios (from 10−2 to 105). Maximal growth (by growth rate and biomass yield) was observed within a restricted concentration range at N:P ratios (∼50−120) markedly above Redfield. Experimentally determined growth parameters deviated to a large part from model predictions based on Liebig's law of the minimum, thus implicating synergistic co-limitation due to biochemical dependence of resources. Internal elemental ratios of P. inhibens varied with external nutrient supply within physiological constraints, thus adding to the growing evidence that aquatic bacteria can be flexible in their internal elemental composition. Taken together, the findings reported here revealed that P. inhibens is well adapted to fluctuating availability of inorganic N and P, expected to occur in its natural habitat (e.g. colonized algae, coastal areas). Moreover, this study suggests that elemental variability in bacterioplankton needs to be considered in the ecological stoichiometry of the oceans. PMID:28486660

  5. Biohydrogen Production by the Thermophilic Bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus: Current Status and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bielen, Abraham A. M.; Verhaart, Marcel R. A.; van der Oost, John; Kengen, Servé W. M.

    2013-01-01

    Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus is one of the most thermophilic cellulolytic organisms known to date. This Gram-positive anaerobic bacterium ferments a broad spectrum of mono-, di- and polysaccharides to mainly acetate, CO2 and hydrogen. With hydrogen yields approaching the theoretical limit for dark fermentation of 4 mol hydrogen per mol hexose, this organism has proven itself to be an excellent candidate for biological hydrogen production. This review provides an overview of the research on C. saccharolyticus with respect to the hydrolytic capability, sugar metabolism, hydrogen formation, mechanisms involved in hydrogen inhibition, and the regulation of the redox and carbon metabolism. Analysis of currently available fermentation data reveal decreased hydrogen yields under non-ideal cultivation conditions, which are mainly associated with the accumulation of hydrogen in the liquid phase. Thermodynamic considerations concerning the reactions involved in hydrogen formation are discussed with respect to the dissolved hydrogen concentration. Novel cultivation data demonstrate the sensitivity of C. saccharolyticus to increased hydrogen levels regarding substrate load and nitrogen limitation. In addition, special attention is given to the rhamnose metabolism, which represents an unusual type of redox balancing. Finally, several approaches are suggested to improve biohydrogen production by C. saccharolyticus. PMID:25371332

  6. The Endosymbiotic Bacterium Wolbachia Induces Resistance to Dengue Virus in Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Guowu; Xu, Yao; Lu, Peng; Xie, Yan; Xi, Zhiyong

    2010-01-01

    Genetic strategies that reduce or block pathogen transmission by mosquitoes have been proposed as a means of augmenting current control measures to reduce the growing burden of vector-borne diseases. The endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia has long been promoted as a potential vehicle for introducing disease-resistance genes into mosquitoes, thereby making them refractory to the human pathogens they transmit. Given the large overlap in tissue distribution and intracellular localization between Wolbachia and dengue virus in mosquitoes, we conducted experiments to characterize their interactions. Our results show that Wolbachia inhibits viral replication and dissemination in the main dengue vector, Aedes aegypti. Moreover, the virus transmission potential of Wolbachia-infected Ae. aegypti was significantly diminished when compared to wild-type mosquitoes that did not harbor Wolbachia. At 14 days post-infection, Wolbachia completely blocked dengue transmission in at least 37.5% of Ae. aegypti mosquitoes. We also observed that this Wolbachia-mediated viral interference was associated with an elevated basal immunity and increased longevity in the mosquitoes. These results underscore the potential usefulness of Wolbachia-based control strategies for population replacement. PMID:20368968

  7. Carboxydothermus islandicus sp. nov., a thermophilic, hydrogenogenic, carboxydotrophic bacterium isolated from a hot spring.

    PubMed

    Novikov, Andrey A; Sokolova, Tatyana G; Lebedinsky, Alexander V; Kolganova, Tatyana V; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A

    2011-10-01

    An anaerobic, thermophilic bacterium, strain SET IS-9(T), was isolated from an Icelandic hot spring. Cells of strain SET IS-9(T) are short, slightly curved, motile rods. The strain grows chemolithotrophically on CO, producing equimolar quantities of H(2) and CO(2). It also grows fermentatively on lactate or pyruvate in the presence of yeast extract (0.2 g l(-1)). Products of pyruvate fermentation are acetate, CO(2) and H(2). Growth occurs at 50-70 °C, with an optimum at 65 °C, and at pH 5.0-8.0, with an optimum at pH 5.5-6.0. The generation time during chemolithotrophic growth on CO under optimal conditions is 2.0 h. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis suggested that the organism belongs to the genus Carboxydothermus. On the basis of phenotypic features and phylogenetic analysis, Carboxydothermus islandicus sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain SET IS-9(T) ( = DSM 21830(T)  = VKM B-2561(T)). An emended description of the genus Carboxydothermus is also given.

  8. Identification of an entomopathogenic bacterium, Serratia sp. ANU101, and its hemolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yonggyun; Kim, Keunseob; Seo, Jiae; Shrestha, Sony; Kim, Hosanna H; Nalini, Madanagopal; Yi, Youngkeun

    2009-03-01

    Four different bacterial colonies were isolated from an old stock of an entomopathogenic nematode, Steinernema monticolum. They all showed entomopathogenicity to final instar larvae of beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, by hemocoelic injection. However, they varied in colony form, susceptibility to antibiotics, and postmortem change of the infected host insects. Biolog microbial identification and 16S rDNA sequence analyses indicate that these are four different species classified into different bacterial genera. owing to high entomopathogenicity and a cadaver color of infected insect host, Serratia sp. was selected as a main symbiotic bacterial species and analyzed for its pathogenicity. Although no virulence of Serratia sp. was detected at oral administration, the bacteria gave significant synergistic pathogenicity to fifth instar S. exigua when it was treated along with a spore-forming entomopathogenic bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis. The synergistic effect was explained by an immunosuppressive effect of Serratia sp. by its high cytotoxic effect on hemocytes of S. exigua, because Serratia sp. caused septicemia of S. exigua when the bacterial cells were injected into S. exigua hemocoel. The cytotoxic factor(s) was present in the culture medium because the sterilized culture broth possessed high potency in the cytotoxicity, which was specific to granular cells and plasmatocytes, two main immune-associated hemocytes in insects.

  9. Rhodoferax antarcticus sp. nov., a moderately psychrophilic purple nonsulfur bacterium isolated from an Antarctic microbial mat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madigan, M. T.; Jung, D. O.; Woese, C. R.; Achenbach, L. A.

    2000-01-01

    A new species of purple nonsulfur bacteria isolated from an Antarctic microbial mat is described. The organism, designated strain ANT.BR, was mildly psychrophilic, growing optimally at 15-18 degrees C with a growth temperature range of 0-25 degrees C. Cells of strain ANT.BR were highly motile curved rods and spirals, contained bacteriochlorophyll a, and showed a multicomponent in vivo absorption spectrum. A specific phylogenetic relationship was observed between strain ANT.BR and the purple bacterium Rhodoferax fermentans FR2T, and the two organisms shared several physiological and other phenotypic properties, with the notable exception of growth temperature optimum. Tests of genomic DNA hybridization, however, showed Rfx. fermentans FR2T and strain ANT.BR to be genetically distinct bacteria. Because of its unique set of properties, especially its requirement for low growth temperatures, we propose to recognize strain ANT.BR as a new species of the genus Rhodoferax, Rhodoferax antarcticus, named for its known habitat, the Antarctic.

  10. Caldanaerobacter uzonensis sp. nov., an anaerobic, thermophilic, heterotrophic bacterium isolated from a hot spring.

    PubMed

    Kozina, Irina V; Kublanov, Ilya V; Kolganova, Tatyana V; Chernyh, Nikolai A; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A

    2010-06-01

    An anaerobic thermophilic bacterium, strain K67(T), was isolated from a terrestrial hot spring of Uzon Caldera, Kamchatka Peninsula. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that the novel isolate belongs to the genus Caldanaerobacter, with 95 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to Caldanaerobacter subterraneus subsp. subterraneus SEBR 7858(T), suggesting that it represents a novel species of the genus Caldanaerobacter. Strain K67(T) was characterized as an obligate anaerobe, a thermophile (growth at 50-75 degrees capital ES, Cyrillic; optimum 68-70 degrees C), a neutrophile (growth at pH(25 degrees C) 4.8-8.0; optimum pH(25 degrees C) 6.8) and an obligate organotroph (growth by fermentation of various sugars, peptides and polysaccharides). Major fermentation products were acetate, H2 and CO2; ethanol, lactate and l-alanine were formed in smaller amounts. Thiosulfate stimulated growth and was reduced to hydrogen sulfide. Nitrate, sulfate, sulfite and elemental sulfur were not reduced and did not stimulate growth. Thus, according to the strain's phylogenetic position and phenotypic novelties (lower upper limit of temperature range for growth, the ability to grow on arabinose, the inability to reduce elemental sulfur and the formation of alanine as a minor fermentation product), the novel species Caldanaerobacter uzonensis sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain K67(T) (=DSM 18923(T) =VKM capital VE, Cyrillic-2408(T)).

  11. Helicobacter Catalase Devoid of Catalytic Activity Protects the Bacterium against Oxidative Stress*♦

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Stéphane L.; Maier, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Catalase, a conserved and abundant enzyme found in all domains of life, dissipates the oxidant hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori undergoes host-mediated oxidant stress exposure, and its catalase contains oxidizable methionine (Met) residues. We hypothesized catalase may play a large stress-combating role independent of its classical catalytic one, namely quenching harmful oxidants through its recyclable Met residues, resulting in oxidant protection to the bacterium. Two Helicobacter mutant strains (katAH56A and katAY339A) containing catalase without enzyme activity but that retain all Met residues were created. These strains were much more resistant to oxidants than a catalase-deletion mutant strain. The quenching ability of the altered versions was shown, whereby oxidant-stressed (HOCl-exposed) Helicobacter retained viability even upon extracellular addition of the inactive versions of catalase, in contrast to cells receiving HOCl alone. The importance of the methionine-mediated quenching to the pathogen residing in the oxidant-rich gastric mucus was studied. In contrast to a catalase-null strain, both site-change mutants proficiently colonized the murine gastric mucosa, suggesting that the amino acid composition-dependent oxidant-quenching role of catalase is more important than the well described H2O2-dissipating catalytic role. Over 100 years after the discovery of catalase, these findings reveal a new non-enzymatic protective mechanism of action for the ubiquitous enzyme. PMID:27605666

  12. Biodegradation of bisphenol A and other bisphenols by a gram-negative aerobic bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Lobos, J.H.; Leib, T.K.; Tahmun Su

    1992-06-01

    A novel bacterium designated strain MV1 was isolated from a sludge enrichmet takes from the wastewater treatment plant at a plastics manufacturing facility and shown to degrade 2,2-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)propane (4,4[prime]-isopropylidenediphenol or bisphenol A). Strain MV1 is a gram-negative, aerobic bacillus that grows on bisphenol A as a sole source of carbon and energy. Total carbon analysis for bisphenol A degradation demonstrated that 60% of the carbon was mineralized to CO[sub 2], 20% was associated with the bacterial cells, and 20% was converted to soluble organic compounds. Metabolic intermediates detected in the culture medium during growth on bisphenol A were identified asmore » 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, 4-hydroxyacetophenone, 2,2-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1-propanol, and 2,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1,2-propanediol. Most of the bisphenol A degraded by strain MV1 is cleaved in some way to form 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and 4-hydroxyacetophenone, which are subsequently mineralized or assimilated into cell carbon. In addition, about 20% of the bisphenol A is hydroxylated to form 2,2-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1-propanol, which is slowly biotransformed to 2,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1,2-propanediol. Cells that were grown on bisphenol A degraded a variety of bisphenol alkanes, hydroxylated benzoic acids, and hydroxylated acetophenones during resting-cell assays. Transmission electron microscopy of cells grown on bisphenol A revealed lipid storage granules and intracytoplasmic membranes.« less

  13. Desulfuromonas thiophila sp. nov., a new obligately sulfur-reducing bacterium from anoxic freshwater sediment.

    PubMed

    Finster, K; Coates, J D; Liesack, W; Pfennig, N

    1997-07-01

    A mesophilic, acetate-oxidizing, sulfur-reducing bacterium, strain NZ27T, was isolated from anoxic mud from a freshwater sulfur spring. The cells were ovoid, motile, and gram negative. In addition to acetate, the strain oxidized pyruvate, succinate, and fumarate. Sulfur flower could be replaced by polysulfide as an electron acceptor. Ferric nitrilotriacetic acid was reduced in the presence of pyruvate; however, this reduction did not sustain growth. These phenotypic characteristics suggested that strain NZ27T is affiliated with the genus Desulfuromonas. A phylogenetic analysis based on the results of comparative 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing confirmed that strain NZ27T belongs to the Desulfuromonas cluster in the recently proposed family "Geobacteracea" in the delta subgroup of the Proteobacteria. In addition, the results of DNA-DNA hybridization studies confirmed that strain NZ27T represents a novel species. Desulfuromonas thiophila, a name tentatively used in previous publication, is the name proposed for strain NZ27T in this paper.

  14. Desulfuromonas thiophila sp. nov., a new obligately sulfur-reducing bacterium from anoxic freshwater sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finster, K.; Coates, J.D.; Liesack, W.; Pfennig, N.

    1997-01-01

    A mesophilic, acetate-oxidizing, sulfur-reducing bacterium, strain NZ27(T), was isolated from anoxic mud from a freshwater sulfur spring. The cells were ovoid, motile, and gram negative. In addition to acetate, the strain oxidized pyruvate, succinate, and fumarate. Sulfur flower could be replaced by polysulfide as an electron acceptor. Ferric nitrilotriacetic acid was reduced in the presence of pyruvate; however, this reduction did not sustain growth. These phenotypic characteristics suggested that strain NZ27(T) is affiliated with the genus Desulfuromonas. A phylogenetic analysis based on the results of comparative 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing confirmed that strain NZ27(T) belongs to the Desulfuromonas cluster in the recently proposed family 'Geobacteraceae' in the delta subgroup of the Proteobacteria. In addition, the results of DNA-DNA hybridization studies confirmed that strain NZ27(T) represents a novel species. Desulfuromonas thiophila, a name tentatively used in previous publications, is the name proposed for strain NZ27(T) in this paper.

  15. Interactions of protamine with the marine bacterium, Pseudoalteromonas sp. NCIMB 2021.

    PubMed

    Pustam, A; Smith, C; Deering, C; Grosicki, K M T; Leng, T Y; Lin, S; Yang, J; Pink, D; Gill, T; Graham, L; Derksen, D; Bishop, C; Demont, M E; Wyeth, R C; Smith-Palmer, T

    2014-03-01

    Pseudoalteromonas sp. NCIMB 2021 (NCIMB 2021) was grown in synthetic seawater (SSW) containing pyruvate, in the presence (SSW(++) ) and absence (SSW(-) ) of divalent cations. Cultures contained single cells. Addition of the cationic antibacterial peptide (CAP), protamine, did not inhibit, but rather increased, the growth of NCIMB 2021 in SSW(++) and caused the bacteria to grow in chains. Bacterial growth was assessed using turbidity, cell counts and the sodium salt of resazurin. In SSW(-) , NCIMB 2021 was no longer resistant to protamine. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was 5 mg ml(-1) . Protamine is a cationic antimicrobial peptide (CAP), which is active against a variety of bacteria. This is the first in-depth study of the interaction of protamine with a marine bacterium, Pseudoalteromonas sp. NCIMB 2021. Our results show that protamine is only active in seawater in the absence of divalent cations. In the presence of the divalent cations, Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) , protamine enhances the growth of Pseudoalteromonas sp. NCIMB 2021 and produces chains rather than individual cells. These are important considerations when deciding on applications for protamine and in terms of understanding its mechanism of action. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Harmless, friendly and lethal: antibiotic misuse in relation to the unpredictable bacterium Group A streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Gröndal, Hedvig

    2018-04-29

    Evidence-based treatment guidelines for managing infections in health care are promoted as tools to prevent unnecessary use of antibiotics. Antibiotic misuse has been examined as regards the doctor-patient relation and the social context of medical practice. Less attention has been paid to how the very conceptualisation of human-microbial relations may influence understandings of antibiotic misuse. The article examines a medical controversy concerning guidelines for managing throat infection and antibiotic treatment in Sweden. It demonstrates how this controversy unfolds around two different ways of relating to a specific bacterium - Group A Streptococcus. The analysis shows how two 'microbiopolitics', involving different understandings of human-microbial relations, are created in the controversy and how different antibiotic prescribing practices are justified. By focusing on Group A Streptococcus, which is commonly observed, but also unpredictable and potentially dangerous, the article provides new insights into the relations between bacteria, humans and policy in an age of antimicrobial resistance. It argues, in particular, that the definition of antibiotic misuse is unstable and consequently that policy measures aimed at reducing misuse must be related to how specific infections and bacteria are conceptualised in the actual context the policy addresses. © 2018 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  17. [Screening and identification of a bacterium capable of converting agar to neoagaro oligosaccharides].

    PubMed

    Han, Junping; Huang, Yayan; Ye, Jing; Xiao, Meitian

    2015-09-04

    To screen and identify a bacterium capable of converting agar to neoagaro oligosaccharides. We took samples of porphyra haitanensis and nearby seawater, and then used the medium containing 1 per thousand agar to enrich the target bacteria. The target isolates were obtained by dilution-plate method, of which crude enzymes were further obtained by liquid culture. We adopted DNS method to determine the target bacteria which can convert agar to neoagaro oligosaccharides. The phylogenetics was identified by analyzing 16S rDNA sequence and combining the strain's morphological and bacterial colonial physiological biochemical characteristics. We isolated a gram-negative bacterial strain HJPHYXJ-1 capable of transforming agar to neoagaro oligosaccharides. Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) search of HJPHYXJ-1's 16S rDNA sequence on GenBank suggested that the similarity between this strain and Vibrio natriegens reached 99% . In addition, the morphological and physiological biochemical characteristics of HJPHYXJ-1 also showed highly similarity to Vibrio natriegens. So we identified HJPHYXJ-1 as Vibrio natriegens. The results of HPLC suggested that the metabolite of enzymatic degradation was neoagaro oligosaccharides. HJPHYXJ-1 or the new isolate of Vibrio natriegens was capable of converting agar to neoagaro oligosaccharides.

  18. One-Step Production of Amphiphilic Nanofibrillated Cellulose Using a Cellulose-Producing Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Kenji; Kusumoto, Ryo; Kose, Ryota; Kono, Hiroyuki; Matsushima, Tokuo; Isono, Takuya; Yamamoto, Takuya; Satoh, Toshifumi

    2017-10-09

    Nanofibrillated bacterial cellulose (NFBC) is produced by culturing a cellulose-producing bacterium (Gluconacetobacter intermedius NEDO-01) with rotation or agitation in medium supplemented with carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). Despite a high yield and dispersibility in water, the product immediately aggregates in organic solvents. To broaden its applicability, we prepared amphiphilic NFBC by culturing strain NEDO-01 in medium supplemented with hydroxyethylcellulose or hydroxypropylcellulose instead of CMC. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that the resultant materials (HE-NFBC and HP-NFBC, respectively) comprised relatively uniform fibers with diameters of 33 ± 7 and 42 ± 8 nm, respectively. HP-NFBC was dispersible in polar organic solvents such as methanol, acetone, isopropyl alcohol, acetonitrile, tetrahydrofuran (THF), and dimethylformamide, and was also dispersible in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) by solvent mixing using THF. HP-NFBC/PMMA composite films were highly transparent and had a higher tensile strength than neat PMMA film. Thus, HP-NFBC has a broad range of applications, including as a filler material.

  19. Metabolism of nitrodiphenyl ether herbicides by dioxin-degrading bacterium Sphingomonas wittichii RW1.

    PubMed

    Keum, Young Soo; Lee, Young Ju; Kim, Jeong-Han

    2008-10-08

    Nitrodiphenyl ether herbicides, including chlomethoxyfen, nitrofen, and oxyfluorfen are potent herbicides. Some metabolites and parent compounds are considered as possible mutagens and endocrine disruptors. Both properties pose serious hygienic and environmental risks. Sphingomonas wittichii RW1 is a well-known degrader of polychlorinated dibenzo- p-dioxins, dibenzofurans, and diphenyl ethers. However, no detailed research of its metabolic activity has been performed against pesticides with a diphenyl ether scaffold. In this study, we report S. wittichii RW1 as a very potent diphenyl ether herbicide-metabolizing bacterium with broad substrate specificity. The structures of metabolites were determined by instrumental analysis and synthetic standards. Most pesticides were rapidly removed from the culture medium in the order of nitrofen > oxyfluorfen > chlomethoxyfen. In general, herbicides were degraded through the initial reduction and N-acetylation of nitro groups, followed by ether bond cleavage. Relatively low concentrations of phenolic and catecholic metabolites throughout the study suggested that these metabolites were rapidly metabolized and incorporated into primary metabolism. These results indicate that strain RW1 has very versatile metabolic activities over a wide range of environmental contaminants.

  20. Iridescence of a Marine Bacterium and Classification of Prokaryotic Structural Colors

    PubMed Central

    Vukusic, Peter; Luke, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Iridescence is a property of structural color that is occasionally encountered in higher eukaryotes but that has been poorly documented in the prokaryotic kingdom. In the present work, we describe a marine bacterium, identified as Cellulophaga lytica, isolated from the surface of an anemone, that exhibits bright green iridescent colonies under direct epi-illumination. This phenomenon has not previously been investigated in detail. In this study, color changes of C. lytica colonies were observed at various angles of direct illumination or observation. Its iridescent green appearance was dominant on various growth media. Red and violet colors were also discerned on colony edges. Remarkable C. lytica bacterial iridescence was revealed and characterized using high-resolution optical spectrometry. In addition to this, by culturing other bacterial strains to which various forms of faintly iridescent traits have previously been attributed, we identify four principal appearance characteristics of structural color in prokaryotes. A new general classification of bacterial iridescence is therefore proposed in this study. Furthermore, a specific separate class is described for iridescent C. lytica strains because they exhibit what is so far a unique intense glitter-like iridescence in reflection. C. lytica is the first prokaryote discovered to produce the same sort of intense iridescence under direct illumination as that associated with higher eukaryotes, like some insects and birds. Due to the nature of bacterial biology, cultivation, and ubiquity, this discovery may be of significant interest for both ecological and nanoscience endeavors. PMID:22267664

  1. Gracilibacillus aidingensis sp. nov., a novel moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from Aiding salt lake.

    PubMed

    Guan, Tong-Wei; Tian, Lei; Li, En-Yuan; Tang, Shu-Kun; Zhang, Xiao-Ping

    2017-11-01

    A novel Gram-positive, aerobe, moderately halophilic bacterium was isolated from saline soil of Aiding lake in Xinjiang, north-west of China, designated strain YIM 98001 T . Cells were rod-shaped, motile and grew at 5-20% (w/v) NaCl (optimum 10%), pH 6-10 (optimum pH 7.0) and 4-45 °C (optimum 37 °C). The major cellular fatty acids were anteiso C 15:0 , anteiso C 17:0 , iso C 15:0 . The predominant respiratory quinone was MK-7. Diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphoglycolipid were the major polar lipids. Meso-diaminopimelic acid was the diagnostic diamino acid of the cell-wall peptidoglycan. The G+C content was 36.46 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that the strain belongs to the family Bacillaceae, with the highest sequence similarity to the type strain Gracilibacillus thailandensis TP2-8 T (96.84%), followed by Gracilibacillus saliphilus YIM 91119 T (96.78%) and Gracilibacillus ureilyticus MF38 T (96.57%), thus confirming the affiliation of strain YIM 98001 T to the genus Gracilibacillus. The polyphasic approach indicates that strain YIM 98001 T represents a novel species of the genus Gracilibacillus, for which the name Gracilibacillus aidingensis is proposed. The type strain is YIM 98001 T (=KCTC 42683 T  = DSMZ 104330 T ).

  2. Extracellular proteases of Halobacillus blutaparonensis strain M9, a new moderately halophilic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Santos, Anderson F; Valle, Roberta S; Pacheco, Clarissa A; Alvarez, Vanessa M; Seldin, Lucy; Santos, André L S

    2013-12-01

    Halophilic microorganisms are source of potential hydrolytic enzymes to be used in industrial and/or biotechnological processes. In the present study, we have investigated the ability of the moderately halophilic bacterium Halobacillus blutaparonensis (strain M9), a novel species described by our group, to release proteolytic enzymes. This bacterial strain abundantly proliferated in Luria-Bertani broth supplemented with 2.5% NaCl as well as secreted proteases to the extracellular environment. The production of proteases occurred in bacterial cells grown under different concentration of salt, ranging from 0.5% to 10% NaCl, in a similar way. The proteases secreted by H. blutaparonensis presented the following properties: (i) molecular masses ranging from 30 to 80 kDa, (ii) better hydrolytic activities under neutral-alkaline pH range, (iii) expression modulated according to the culture age, (iv) susceptibility to phenylmethylsulphonyl fluoride, classifying them as serine-type proteases, (v) specific cleavage over the chymotrypsin substrate, and (vi) enzymatic stability in the presence of salt (up to 20% NaCl) and organic solvents (e.g., ether, isooctane and cyclohexane). The proteases described herein are promising for industrial practices due to its haloalkaline properties.

  3. The restricted metabolism of the obligate organohalide respiring bacterium Dehalobacter restrictus: lessons from tiered functional genomics

    PubMed Central

    Rupakula, Aamani; Kruse, Thomas; Boeren, Sjef; Holliger, Christof; Smidt, Hauke; Maillard, Julien

    2013-01-01

    Dehalobacter restrictus strain PER-K23 is an obligate organohalide respiring bacterium, which displays extremely narrow metabolic capabilities. It grows only via coupling energy conservation to anaerobic respiration of tetra- and trichloroethene with hydrogen as sole electron donor. Dehalobacter restrictus represents the paradigmatic member of the genus Dehalobacter, which in recent years has turned out to be a major player in the bioremediation of an increasing number of organohalides, both in situ and in laboratory studies. The recent elucidation of the D. restrictus genome revealed a rather elaborate genome with predicted pathways that were not suspected from its restricted metabolism, such as a complete corrinoid biosynthetic pathway, the Wood–Ljungdahl (WL) pathway for CO2 fixation, abundant transcriptional regulators and several types of hydrogenases. However, one important feature of the genome is the presence of 25 reductive dehalogenase genes, from which so far only one, pceA, has been characterized on genetic and biochemical levels. This study describes a multi-level functional genomics approach on D. restrictus across three different growth phases. A global proteomic analysis allowed consideration of general metabolic pathways relevant to organohalide respiration, whereas the dedicated genomic and transcriptomic analysis focused on the diversity, composition and expression of genes associated with reductive dehalogenases. PMID:23479754

  4. Landscape Changes Influence the Occurrence of the Melioidosis Bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei in Soil in Northern Australia

    PubMed Central

    Kaestli, Mirjam; Mayo, Mark; Harrington, Glenda; Ward, Linda; Watt, Felicity; Hill, Jason V.; Cheng, Allen C.; Currie, Bart J.

    2009-01-01

    Background The soil-dwelling saprophyte bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei is the cause of melioidosis, a severe disease of humans and animals in southeast Asia and northern Australia. Despite the detection of B. pseudomallei in various soil and water samples from endemic areas, the environmental habitat of B. pseudomallei remains unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed a large survey in the Darwin area in tropical Australia and screened 809 soil samples for the presence of these bacteria. B. pseudomallei were detected by using a recently developed and validated protocol involving soil DNA extraction and real-time PCR targeting the B. pseudomallei–specific Type III Secretion System TTS1 gene cluster. Statistical analyses such as multivariable cluster logistic regression and principal component analysis were performed to assess the association of B. pseudomallei with environmental factors. The combination of factors describing the habitat of B. pseudomallei differed between undisturbed sites and environmentally manipulated areas. At undisturbed sites, the occurrence of B. pseudomallei was found to be significantly associated with areas rich in grasses, whereas at environmentally disturbed sites, B. pseudomallei was associated with the presence of livestock animals, lower soil pH and different combinations of soil texture and colour. Conclusions/Significance This study contributes to the elucidation of environmental factors influencing the occurrence of B. pseudomallei and raises concerns that B. pseudomallei may spread due to changes in land use. PMID:19156200

  5. Consensus pan-genome assembly of the specialised wine bacterium Oenococcus oeni.

    PubMed

    Sternes, Peter R; Borneman, Anthony R

    2016-04-27

    Oenococcus oeni is a lactic acid bacterium that is specialised for growth in the ecological niche of wine, where it is noted for its ability to perform the secondary, malolactic fermentation that is often required for many types of wine. Expanding the understanding of strain-dependent genetic variations in its small and streamlined genome is important for realising its full potential in industrial fermentation processes. Whole genome comparison was performed on 191 strains of O. oeni; from this rich source of genomic information consensus pan-genome assemblies of the invariant (core) and variable (flexible) regions of this organism were established. Genetic variation in amino acid biosynthesis and sugar transport and utilisation was found to be common between strains. Furthermore, we characterised previously-unreported intra-specific genetic variations in the natural competence of this microbe. By assembling a consensus pan-genome from a large number of strains, this study provides a tool for researchers to readily compare protein-coding genes across strains and infer functional relationships between genes in conserved syntenic regions. This establishes a foundation for further genetic, and thus phenotypic, research of this industrially-important species.

  6. Role of Central Metabolism in the Osmoadaptation of the Halophilic Bacterium Chromohalobacter salexigens*

    PubMed Central

    Pastor, José M.; Bernal, Vicente; Salvador, Manuel; Argandoña, Montserrat; Vargas, Carmen; Csonka, Laszlo; Sevilla, Ángel; Iborra, José L.; Nieto, Joaquín J.; Cánovas, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial osmoadaptation involves the cytoplasmic accumulation of compatible solutes to counteract extracellular osmolarity. The halophilic and highly halotolerant bacterium Chromohalobacter salexigens is able to grow up to 3 m NaCl in a minimal medium due to the de novo synthesis of ectoines. This is an osmoregulated pathway that burdens central metabolic routes by quantitatively drawing off TCA cycle intermediaries. Consequently, metabolism in C. salexigens has adapted to support this biosynthetic route. Metabolism of C. salexigens is more efficient at high salinity than at low salinity, as reflected by lower glucose consumption, lower metabolite overflow, and higher biomass yield. At low salinity, by-products (mainly gluconate, pyruvate, and acetate) accumulate extracellularly. Using [1-13C]-, [2-13C]-, [6-13C]-, and [U-13C6]glucose as carbon sources, we were able to determine the main central metabolic pathways involved in ectoines biosynthesis from glucose. C. salexigens uses the Entner-Doudoroff pathway rather than the standard glycolytic pathway for glucose catabolism, and anaplerotic activity is high to replenish the TCA cycle with the intermediaries withdrawn for ectoines biosynthesis. Metabolic flux ratios at low and high salinity were similar, revealing a certain metabolic rigidity, probably due to its specialization to support high biosynthetic fluxes and partially explaining why metabolic yields are so highly affected by salinity. This work represents an important contribution to the elucidation of specific metabolic adaptations in compatible solute-accumulating halophilic bacteria. PMID:23615905

  7. Interactions of the Algicidal Bacterium Kordia algicida with Diatoms: Regulated Protease Excretion for Specific Algal Lysis

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Carsten; Pohnert, Georg

    2011-01-01

    Interactions of planktonic bacteria with primary producers such as diatoms have great impact on plankton population dynamics. Several studies described the detrimental effect of certain bacteria on diatoms but the biochemical nature and the regulation mechanism involved in the production of the active compounds remained often elusive. Here, we investigated the interactions of the algicidal bacterium Kordia algicida with the marine diatoms Skeletonema costatum, Thalassiosira weissflogii, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, and Chaetoceros didymus. Algicidal activity was only observed towards the first three of the tested diatom species while C. didymus proved to be not susceptible. The cell free filtrate and the >30 kDa fraction of stationary K. algicida cultures is fully active, suggesting a secreted algicidal principle. The active supernatant from bacterial cultures exhibited high protease activity and inhibition experiments proved that these enzymes are involved in the observed algicidal action of the bacteria. Protease mediated interactions are not controlled by the presence of the alga but dependent on the cell density of the K. algicida culture. We show that protease release is triggered by cell free bacterial filtrates suggesting a quorum sensing dependent excretion mechanism of the algicidal protein. The K. algicida / algae interactions in the plankton are thus host specific and under the control of previously unidentified factors. PMID:21695044

  8. Lysing activity of an indigenous algicidal bacterium Aeromonas sp. against Microcystis spp. isolated from Lake Taihu.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fei; Li, Xiaoqin; Li, Yunhui; Wei, Haiyan; Yu, Guang; Yin, Lihong; Liang, Geyu; Pu, Yuepu

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to isolate and characterize an indigenous algicidal bacterium named LTH-1 and its algae-lysing compounds active against three Microcystis aeruginosa strains (toxic TH1, nontoxic TH2 and standard FACHB 905). The LTH-1 isolated from Lake Taihu, near Wuxi City in China, was identified as Aeromonas sp. based on its morphological characteristic features and phylogenetic analysis by sequencing of 16S rDNA. Extracellular compounds produced by LTH-1 showed strong algaelysing activity, and they were water-soluble and heat-tolerant, with a molecular mass lower than 2 kDa. Two algae-lysing compounds were isolated and purified from extracellular filtrate using silica gel column chromatography. One of these was identified as phenylalanine (C9H11NO2, m/z 166.0862) and the other (C8H16N2O3, m/z 189.1232) was unidentified by hybrid ion trap/time-of-flight mass spectrometry coupled with a high-performance liquid chromatography (LC/MS-IT-TOF) system. The half maximal effective concentration (EC50) of phenylalanine produced by LTH-1 against FACHB 905 was 68.2 +/- 8.2 microg mL(-1) in 48h. These results suggest that the algicidal Aeromonas sp. LTH-1 could play a role in controlling Microcystis blooms, and its extracellular compounds are also potentially useful for regulating blooms of the harmful M. aeruginosa.

  9. Interactions of the algicidal bacterium Kordia algicida with diatoms: regulated protease excretion for specific algal lysis.

    PubMed

    Paul, Carsten; Pohnert, Georg

    2011-01-01

    Interactions of planktonic bacteria with primary producers such as diatoms have great impact on plankton population dynamics. Several studies described the detrimental effect of certain bacteria on diatoms but the biochemical nature and the regulation mechanism involved in the production of the active compounds remained often elusive. Here, we investigated the interactions of the algicidal bacterium Kordia algicida with the marine diatoms Skeletonema costatum, Thalassiosira weissflogii, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, and Chaetoceros didymus. Algicidal activity was only observed towards the first three of the tested diatom species while C. didymus proved to be not susceptible. The cell free filtrate and the >30 kDa fraction of stationary K. algicida cultures is fully active, suggesting a secreted algicidal principle. The active supernatant from bacterial cultures exhibited high protease activity and inhibition experiments proved that these enzymes are involved in the observed algicidal action of the bacteria. Protease mediated interactions are not controlled by the presence of the alga but dependent on the cell density of the K. algicida culture. We show that protease release is triggered by cell free bacterial filtrates suggesting a quorum sensing dependent excretion mechanism of the algicidal protein. The K. algicida / algae interactions in the plankton are thus host specific and under the control of previously unidentified factors.

  10. Actinomyces haliotis sp. nov., a bacterium isolated from the gut of an abalone, Haliotis discus hannai.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Dong-Wook; Shin, Na-Ri; Kim, Min-Soo; Kim, Pil Soo; Kim, Joon Yong; Whon, Tae Woong; Bae, Jin-Woo

    2014-02-01

    A novel, Gram-staining-positive, facultatively anaerobic, non-motile and coccus-shaped bacterium, strain WL80(T), was isolated from the gut of an abalone, Haliotis discus hannai, collected from the northern coast of Jeju in Korea. Optimal growth occurred at 30 °C, pH 7-8 and with 1% (w/v) NaCl. Phylogenetic analyses based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain WL80(T) fell within the cluster of the genus Actinomyces, with highest sequence similarity to the type strains of Actinomyces radicidentis (98.8% similarity) and Actinomyces urogenitalis (97.0% similarity). The major cellular fatty acids were C18 : 1ω9c and C16 : 0. Menaquinone-10 (H4) was the major respiratory quinone. The genomic DNA G+C content of the isolate was 70.4 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization values with closely related strains indicated less than 7.6% genomic relatedness. The results of physiological, biochemical, chemotaxonomic and genotypic analyses indicated that strain WL80(T) represents a novel species of the genus Actinomyces, for which the name Actinomyces haliotis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is WL80(T) ( = KACC 17211(T) = JCM 18848(T)).

  11. Optimization, purification, and characterization of L-asparaginase from Actinomycetales bacterium BkSoiiA.

    PubMed

    Dash, Chitrangada; Mohapatra, Sukanti Bala; Maiti, Prasanta Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Actinobacteria are promising source of a wide range of important enzymes, some of which are produced in industrial scale, with others yet to be harnessed. L-Asparaginase is used as an antineoplastic agent. The present work deals with the production and optimization of L-asparaginase from Actinomycetales bacterium BkSoiiA using submerged fermentation in M9 medium. Production optimization resulted in a modified M9 medium with yeast extract and fructose as carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively, at pH 8.0, incubated for 120 hr at 30 ± 2 °C. The crude enzyme was purified to near homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation following dialysis, ion-exchange column chromatography, and finally gel filtration. The sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) revealed an apparent molecular weight of 57 kD. The enzyme was purified 95.06-fold and showed a final specific activity of 204.37 U/mg with 3.49% yield. The purified enzyme showed maximum activity at a pH 10.0 and was stable at pH 7.0 to 9.0. The enzyme was activated by Mn(2+) and strongly inhibited by Ba(2+). All these preliminary characterization suggests that the L-asparaginase from the source may be a tool useful to pharmaceutical industries after further research.

  12. Enterobacter siamensis sp. nov., a transglutaminase-producing bacterium isolated from seafood processing wastewater in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Khunthongpan, Suwannee; Bourneow, Chaiwut; H-Kittikun, Aran; Tanasupawat, Somboon; Benjakul, Soottawat; Sumpavapol, Punnanee

    2013-01-01

    A novel strain of Enterobacter, C2361(T), a Gram-negative, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped and facultative anaerobic bacterium with the capability to produce transglutaminase, was isolated from seafood processing wastewater collected from a treatment pond of a seafood factory in Songkhla Province, Thailand. Phylogenetic analyses and phenotypic characteristics, including chemotaxonomic characteristics, showed that the strain was a member of the genus Enterobacter. The 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities between strain C2361(T) and Enterobacter cloacae subsp. cloacae ATCC 13047(T) and Enterobacter cloacae subsp. dissolvens LMG 2683(T) were 97.5 and 97.5%, respectively. Strain C2361(T) showed a low DNA-DNA relatedness with the above-mentioned species. The major fatty acids were C16:0, C17:0cyclo and C14:0. The DNA G+C content was 53.0 mol%. On the basis of the polyphasic evidence gathered in this study, it should be classified as a novel species of the genus Enterobacter for which the name Enterobacter siamensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is C2361(T) (= KCTC 23282(T) = NBRC 107138(T)).

  13. Isolation of a 250 million-year-old halotolerant bacterium from a primary salt crystal.

    PubMed

    Vreeland, R H; Rosenzweig, W D; Powers, D W

    2000-10-19

    Bacteria have been found associated with a variety of ancient samples, however few studies are generally accepted due to questions about sample quality and contamination. When Cano and Borucki isolated a strain of Bacillus sphaericus from an extinct bee trapped in 25-30 million-year-old amber, careful sample selection and stringent sterilization techniques were the keys to acceptance. Here we report the isolation and growth of a previously unrecognized spore-forming bacterium (Bacillus species, designated 2-9-3) from a brine inclusion within a 250 million-year-old salt crystal from the Permian Salado Formation. Complete gene sequences of the 16S ribosomal DNA show that the organism is part of the lineage of Bacillus marismortui and Virgibacillus pantothenticus. Delicate crystal structures and sedimentary features indicate the salt has not recrystallized since formation. Samples were rejected if brine inclusions showed physical signs of possible contamination. Surfaces of salt crystal samples were sterilized with strong alkali and acid before extracting brines from inclusions. Sterilization procedures reduce the probability of contamination to less than 1 in 10(9).

  14. Bioinformatic prediction of gene functions regulated by quorum sensing in the bioleaching bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Banderas, Alvaro; Guiliani, Nicolas

    2013-08-16

    The biomining bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans oxidizes sulfide ores and promotes metal solubilization. The efficiency of this process depends on the attachment of cells to surfaces, a process regulated by quorum sensing (QS) cell-to-cell signalling in many Gram-negative bacteria. At. ferrooxidans has a functional QS system and the presence of AHLs enhances its attachment to pyrite. However, direct targets of the QS transcription factor AfeR remain unknown. In this study, a bioinformatic approach was used to infer possible AfeR direct targets based on the particular palindromic features of the AfeR binding site. A set of Hidden Markov Models designed to maintain palindromic regions and vary non-palindromic regions was used to screen for putative binding sites. By annotating the context of each predicted binding site (PBS), we classified them according to their positional coherence relative to other putative genomic structures such as start codons, RNA polymerase promoter elements and intergenic regions. We further used the Multiple EM for Motif Elicitation algorithm (MEME) to further filter out low homology PBSs. In summary, 75 target-genes were identified, 34 of which have a higher confidence level. Among the identified genes, we found afeR itself, zwf, genes encoding glycosyltransferase activities, metallo-beta lactamases, and active transport-related proteins. Glycosyltransferases and Zwf (Glucose 6-phosphate-1-dehydrogenase) might be directly involved in polysaccharide biosynthesis and attachment to minerals by At. ferrooxidans cells during the bioleaching process.

  15. Bioaugmentation with an acetate-type fermentation bacterium Acetobacteroides hydrogenigenes improves methane production from corn straw.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Guo, Rong-Bo; Qiu, Yan-Ling; Qiao, Jiang-Tao; Yuan, Xian-Zheng; Shi, Xiao-Shuang; Wang, Chuan-Shui

    2015-03-01

    The effect of bioaugmentation with an acetate-type fermentation bacterium in the phylum Bacteroidetes on the anaerobic digestion of corn straw was evaluated by batch experiments. Acetobacteroides hydrogenigenes is a promising strain for bioaugmentation with relatively high growth rate, hydrogen yields and acetate tolerance, which ferments a broad spectrum of pentoses, hexoses and polyoses mainly into acetate and hydrogen. During corn straw digestion, bioaugmentation with A. hydrogenigenes led to 19-23% increase of the methane yield, with maximum of 258.1 mL/g-corn straw achieved by 10% inoculation (control, 209.3 mL/g-corn straw). Analysis of lignocellulosic composition indicated that A. hydrogenigenes could increase removal rates of cellulose and hemicelluloses in corn straw residue by 12% and 5%, respectively. Further experiment verified that the addition of A. hydrogenigenes could improve the methane yields of methyl cellulose and xylan (models for cellulose and hemicelluloses, respectively) by 16.8% and 7.0%. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Suppression of pyritic sulphur during flotation tests using the bacterium Thiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Townsley, C C; Atkins, A S; Davis, A J

    1987-07-01

    Environmental concern about sulphur dioxide emissions has led to the examination of the possibility of removing pyritic sulphur from coal prior to combustion during froth flotation, a routine method for coal cleaning at the pit-head. The bacterium Thiobacillus ferrooxidans was effective in leaching 80% and 63% -53 mum pyrite at 2% and 6% pulp density in shake flasks in 240 and 340 h, respectively.The natural floatability of pyrite was significantly reduced in the Hallimond tube following 2.5 min of conditioning in membrane-filtered bacterial liquor prior to flotation. The suppression effect was greatly enhanced in the presence of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. A bacterial suspension in pH 2.0 distilled water showed 85% suppression, whereas in spent growth liquor this value was 95%. The optimum bacterial density was 3.25 x 10(10) cells/g pyrite in 230-ml distilled water (2% pulp density) in the Hallimond tube. The degree of suppression by the cells was related to particle size but not to pH or temperature. The sulphur content of a synthetic coal/pyrite mixture was reduced from 10.9 to 2.1% by flotation after bacterial preconditioning. It is postulated that pyrite removal in coals which are cleaned by froth flotation could be significantly reduced using a bacterial preconditioning stage with a short residence time of 2.5 min.

  17. Determinants of spontaneous mutation in the bacterium Escherichia coli as revealed by whole-genome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Patricia L.; Lee, Heewook; Popodi, Ellen; Townes, Jesse P.; Tang, Haixu

    2015-01-01

    A complete understanding of evolutionary processes requires that factors determining spontaneous mutation rates and spectra be identified and characterized. Using mutation accumulation followed by whole-genome sequencing, we found that the mutation rates of three widely diverged commensal Escherichia coli strains differ only by about 50%, suggesting that a rate of 1–2 × 10−3 mutations per generation per genome is common for this bacterium. Four major forces are postulated to contribute to spontaneous mutations: intrinsic DNA polymerase errors, endogenously induced DNA damage, DNA damage caused by exogenous agents, and the activities of error-prone polymerases. To determine the relative importance of these factors, we studied 11 strains, each defective for a major DNA repair pathway. The striking result was that only loss of the ability to prevent or repair oxidative DNA damage significantly impacted mutation rates or spectra. These results suggest that, with the exception of oxidative damage, endogenously induced DNA damage does not perturb the overall accuracy of DNA replication in normally growing cells and that repair pathways may exist primarily to defend against exogenously induced DNA damage. The thousands of mutations caused by oxidative damage recovered across the entire genome revealed strong local-sequence biases of these mutations. Specifically, we found that the identity of the 3′ base can affect the mutability of a purine by oxidative damage by as much as eightfold. PMID:26460006

  18. Interactions Between the Diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana and Heterotrophic Bacterium Pelagibacter ubique Examined in Co-Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, E.; Giovannoni, S. J.; Halsey, K.

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies employing network theory have focused attention on the importance of interactions between taxa in microbial plankton community ecology. In this study, the centric diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana and the heterotrophic bacterium Pelagibacter ubique HTCC1062, both coastal organisms, were cultured independently and together in co-culture to investigate phytoplankton-bacteria interactions at the molecular level. A basis for predicting synergistic interactions between these plankton taxa can be found in published descriptions of specific vitamin, nutrient, and carbon compound requirements for their growth, but no experiments have been done that measure their physiological and molecular responses to co-culturing. When grown in co-culture with T. pseudonana, HTCC1062 grew slightly, but significantly faster than in monoculture. The generation time of HTCC1062 grown in co-culture was consistently 2.5 to 6.3 hours faster than when grown in monoculture (p-value <0.05). There was no significant difference in the growth rate of T. pseudonana between co- and monoculture. These results indicate that HTCC1062 is benefiting from the presence of the diatom by an unknown mechanism. Messenger RNA sequencing is being utilized to examine transcriptional responses that may provide insight into specific interactions that contribute to the observed shift in Pelagibacter growth rates.

  19. Novel Acetone Metabolism in a Propane-Utilizing Bacterium, Gordonia sp. Strain TY-5▿

    PubMed Central

    Kotani, Tetsuya; Yurimoto, Hiroya; Kato, Nobuo; Sakai, Yasuyoshi

    2007-01-01

    In the propane-utilizing bacterium Gordonia sp. strain TY-5, propane was shown to be oxidized to 2-propanol and then further oxidized to acetone. In this study, the subsequent metabolism of acetone was studied. Acetone-induced proteins were found in extracts of cells induced by acetone, and a gene cluster designated acmAB was cloned on the basis of the N-terminal amino acid sequences of acetone-induced proteins. The acmA and acmB genes encode a Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (BVMO) and esterase, respectively. The BVMO encoded by acmA was purified from acetone-induced cells of Gordonia sp. strain TY-5 and characterized. The BVMO exhibited NADPH-dependent oxidation activity for linear ketones (C3 to C10) and cyclic ketones (C4 to C8). Escherichia coli expressing the acmA gene oxidized acetone to methyl acetate, and E. coli expressing the acmB gene hydrolyzed methyl acetate. Northern blot analyses revealed that polycistronic transcription of the acmAB gene cluster was induced by propane, 2-propanol, and acetone. These results indicate that the acmAB gene products play an important role in the metabolism of acetone derived from propane oxidation and clarify the propane metabolism pathway of strain TY-5 (propane → 2-propanol → acetone → methyl acetate → acetic acid + methanol). This paper provides the first evidence for BVMO-dependent acetone metabolism. PMID:17071761

  20. Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, a halophilic bacterium producing acetone, butanol, and ethanol under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Hamid; Azarbaijani, Reza; Parsa Yeganeh, Laleh; Shahzadeh Fazeli, Abolhassan; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini; Karimi, Keikhosro

    2016-01-04

    The moderately halophilic bacterium Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, which was isolated from Aran-Bidgol Lake (Iran), has the ability to produce acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) as well as acetic and butyric acids under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This result is the first report of ABE production with a wild microorganism from a family other than Clostridia and also the first halophilic species shown to produce butanol under aerobic cultivation. The cultivation of Nesterenkonia sp. strain F under anaerobic conditions with 50 g/l of glucose for 72 h resulted in the production of 105 mg/l of butanol, 122 mg/l of acetone, 0.2 g/l of acetic acid, and 2.5 g/l of butyric acid. Furthermore, the strain was cultivated on media with different glucose concentrations (20, 50, and 80 g/l) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Through fermentation with a 50 g/l initial glucose concentration under aerobic conditions, 66 mg/l of butanol, 125 mg/l of acetone, 291 mg/l of ethanol, 5.9 g/l of acetic acid, and 1.2 g/l of butyric acid were produced. The enzymes pertaining to the fermentation pathway in the strain were compared with the enzymes of Clostridium spp., and the metabolic pathway of fermentation used by Nesterenkonia sp. strain F was investigated.