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Sample records for bacterium desulfovibrio vulgaris

  1. Regulation of Nitrite Stress Response in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, a Model Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Rajeev, Lara; Chen, Amy; Kazakov, Alexey E.; Luning, Eric G.; Zane, Grant M.; Novichkov, Pavel S.; Wall, Judy D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are sensitive to low concentrations of nitrite, and nitrite has been used to control SRB-related biofouling in oil fields. Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, a model SRB, carries a cytochrome c-type nitrite reductase (nrfHA) that confers resistance to low concentrations of nitrite. The regulation of this nitrite reductase has not been directly examined to date. In this study, we show that DVU0621 (NrfR), a sigma54-dependent two-component system response regulator, is the positive regulator for this operon. NrfR activates the expression of the nrfHA operon in response to nitrite stress. We also show that nrfR is needed for fitness at low cell densities in the presence of nitrite because inactivation of nrfR affects the rate of nitrite reduction. We also predict and validate the binding sites for NrfR upstream of the nrfHA operon using purified NrfR in gel shift assays. We discuss possible roles for NrfR in regulating nitrate reductase genes in nitrate-utilizing Desulfovibrio spp. IMPORTANCE The NrfA nitrite reductase is prevalent across several bacterial phyla and required for dissimilatory nitrite reduction. However, regulation of the nrfA gene has been studied in only a few nitrate-utilizing bacteria. Here, we show that in D. vulgaris, a bacterium that does not respire nitrate, the expression of nrfHA is induced by NrfR upon nitrite stress. This is the first report of regulation of nrfA by a sigma54-dependent two-component system. Our study increases our knowledge of nitrite stress responses and possibly of the regulation of nitrate reduction in SRB. PMID:26283774

  2. Function of Periplasmic Hydrogenases in the Sulfate-ReducingBacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    SciTech Connect

    Caffrey, Sean M.; Park, Hyung-Soo; Voordouw, Johanna K.; He,Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2007-09-24

    The sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgarisHildenborough possesses four periplasmic hydrogenases to facilitate theoxidation of molecular hydrogen. These include an [Fe]hydrogenase, an[NiFeSe]hydrogenase, and two [NiFe]hydrogenases encoded by the hyd,hys, hyn1, and hyn2 genes, respectively. In order to understand theircellular functions, we have compared the growth rates of existing (hydand hyn1) and newly constructed (hys and hyn-1 hyd) mutants to those ofthe wild type in defined media in which lactate or hydrogen at either 5or 50 percent (vol/vol) was used as the sole electron donor for sulfatereduction. Only strains missing the [Fe]hydrogenase were significantlyaffected during growth with lactate or with 50 percent (vol/vol) hydrogenas the sole electron donor. When the cells were grown at low (5 percent[vol/vol]) hydrogen concentrations, those missing the [NiFeSe]hydrogenase suffered the greatest impairment. The growth rate datacorrelated strongly with gene expression results obtained from microarrayhybridizations and real-time PCR using mRNA extracted from cells grownunder the three conditions. Expression of the hys genes followed theorder 5 percent hydrogen>50 percent hydrogen>lactate, whereasexpression of the hyd genes followed the reverse order. These resultssuggest that growth with lactate and 50 percent hydrogen is associatedwith high intracellular hydrogen concentrations, which are best capturedby the higher activity, lower affinity [Fe]hydrogenase. In contrast,growth with 5 percent hydrogen is associated with a low intracellularhydrogen concentration, requiring the lower activity, higher affinity[NiFeSe]hydrogenase.

  3. σ54-dependent regulome in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kazakov, Alexey E.; Rajeev, Lara; Chen, Amy; Luning, Eric G.; Dubchak, Inna; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Novichkov, Pavel S.

    2015-11-10

    The σ54 subunit controls a unique class of promoters in bacteria. Such promoters, without exception, require enhancer binding proteins (EBPs) for transcription initiation. Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, a model bacterium for sulfate reduction studies, has a high number of EBPs, more than most sequenced bacteria. Finally, the cellular processes regulated by many of these EBPs remain unknown.

  4. Recovery of temperate Desulfovibrio vulgaris bacteriophage on anovel host strain

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, C.B.; Stolyar, S.S.; Pinel, N.; Yen, H.C.; He, Z.; Zhou,J.; Wall, J.D.; Stahl, D.A.

    2007-04-02

    A novel sulfate-reducing bacterium (strain DePue) closelyrelated to Desulfovibrio vulgaris ssp. vulgaris strain Hildenborough wasisolated from the sediment of a heavy-metal impacted lake usingestablished techniques. Although few physiological differences betweenstrains DePue and Hildenborough were observed, pulsed-field gelelectrophoresis (PFGE) revealed a significant genome reduction in strainDePue. Comparative whole-genome microarray and PCR analyses demonstratedthat the absence of genes annotated in the Hildenborough genome as phageor phage-related contributed to the significant genome reduction instrain DePue. Two morphotypically distinct temperate bacteriophage fromstrain Hildenborough were recovered using strain DePue as a host forplaque isolation.

  5. Identification of Small RNAs in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Andrew; Joachimiak, Marcin; Deutschbauer, Adam; Arkin, Adam; Bender, Kelly

    2010-05-17

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris is an anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacterium capable of facilitating the removal of toxic metals such as uranium from contaminated sites via reduction. As such, it is essential to understand the intricate regulatory cascades involved in how D. vulgaris and its relatives respond to stressors in such sites. One approach is the identification and analysis of small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs); molecules ranging in size from 20-200 nucleotides that predominantly affect gene regulation by binding to complementary mRNA in an anti-sense fashion and therefore provide an immediate regulatory response. To identify sRNAs in D. vulgaris, a bacterium that does not possess an annotated hfq gene, RNA was pooled from stationary and exponential phases, nitrate exposure, and biofilm conditions. The subsequent RNA was size fractionated, modified, and converted to cDNA for high throughput transcriptomic deep sequencing. A computational approach to identify sRNAs via the alignment of seven separate Desulfovibrio genomes was also performed. From the deep sequencing analysis, 2,296 reads between 20 and 250 nt were identified with expression above genome background. Analysis of those reads limited the number of candidates to ~;;87 intergenic, while ~;;140 appeared to be antisense to annotated open reading frames (ORFs). Further BLAST analysis of the intergenic candidates and other Desulfovibrio genomes indicated that eight candidates were likely portions of ORFs not previously annotated in the D. vulgaris genome. Comparison of the intergenic and antisense data sets to the bioinformatical predicted candidates, resulted in ~;;54 common candidates. Current approaches using Northern analysis and qRT-PCR are being used toverify expression of the candidates and to further develop the role these sRNAs play in D. vulgaris regulation.

  6. Response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris to Alkaline Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Stolyar, S.; He, Q.; He, Z.; Yang, Z.; Borglin, S.E.; Joyner, D.; Huang, K.; Alm, E.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.; Wall, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.; Stahl, D.A.

    2007-11-30

    The response of exponentially growing Desulfovibrio vulgarisHildenborough to pH 10 stress was studied using oligonucleotidemicroarrays and a study set of mutants with genes suggested by microarraydata to be involved in the alkaline stress response deleted. The datashowed that the response of D. vulgaris to increased pH is generallysimilar to that of Escherichia coli but is apparently controlled byunique regulatory circuits since the alternative sigma factors (sigma Sand sigma E) contributing to this stress response in E. coli appear to beabsent in D. vulgaris. Genes previously reported to be up-regulated in E.coli were up-regulated in D. vulgaris; these genes included three ATPasegenes and a tryptophan synthase gene. Transcription of chaperone andprotease genes (encoding ATP-dependent Clp and La proteases and DnaK) wasalso elevated in D. vulgaris. As in E. coli, genes involved in flagellumsynthesis were down-regulated. The transcriptional data also identifiedregulators, distinct from sigma S and sigma E, that are likely part of aD. vulgaris Hildenborough-specific stress response system.Characterization of a study set of mutants with genes implicated inalkaline stress response deleted confirmed that there was protectiveinvolvement of the sodium/proton antiporter NhaC-2, tryptophanase A, andtwo putative regulators/histidine kinases (DVU0331 andDVU2580).

  7. Extracellular Electron Transfer Is a Bottleneck in the Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion of C1018 Carbon Steel by the Biofilm of Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Li, Huabing; Xu, Dake; Li, Yingchao; Feng, Hao; Liu, Zhiyong; Li, Xiaogang; Gu, Tingyue; Yang, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Carbon steels are widely used in the oil and gas industry from downhole tubing to transport trunk lines. Microbes form biofilms, some of which cause the so-called microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of carbon steels. MIC by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) is often a leading cause in MIC failures. Electrogenic SRB sessile cells harvest extracellular electrons from elemental iron oxidation for energy production in their metabolism. A previous study suggested that electron mediators riboflavin and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) both accelerated the MIC of 304 stainless steel by the Desulfovibrio vulgaris biofilm that is a corrosive SRB biofilm. Compared with stainless steels, carbon steels are usually far more prone to SRB attacks because SRB biofilms form much denser biofilms on carbon steel surfaces with a sessile cell density that is two orders of magnitude higher. In this work, C1018 carbon steel coupons were used in tests of MIC by D. vulgaris with and without an electron mediator. Experimental weight loss and pit depth data conclusively confirmed that both riboflavin and FAD were able to accelerate D. vulgaris attack against the carbon steel considerably. It has important implications in MIC failure analysis and MIC mitigation in the oil and gas industry. PMID:26308855

  8. Extracellular Electron Transfer Is a Bottleneck in the Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion of C1018 Carbon Steel by the Biofilm of Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingchao; Feng, Hao; Liu, Zhiyong; Li, Xiaogang; Gu, Tingyue; Yang, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Carbon steels are widely used in the oil and gas industry from downhole tubing to transport trunk lines. Microbes form biofilms, some of which cause the so-called microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of carbon steels. MIC by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) is often a leading cause in MIC failures. Electrogenic SRB sessile cells harvest extracellular electrons from elemental iron oxidation for energy production in their metabolism. A previous study suggested that electron mediators riboflavin and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) both accelerated the MIC of 304 stainless steel by the Desulfovibrio vulgaris biofilm that is a corrosive SRB biofilm. Compared with stainless steels, carbon steels are usually far more prone to SRB attacks because SRB biofilms form much denser biofilms on carbon steel surfaces with a sessile cell density that is two orders of magnitude higher. In this work, C1018 carbon steel coupons were used in tests of MIC by D. vulgaris with and without an electron mediator. Experimental weight loss and pit depth data conclusively confirmed that both riboflavin and FAD were able to accelerate D. vulgaris attack against the carbon steel considerably. It has important implications in MIC failure analysis and MIC mitigation in the oil and gas industry. PMID:26308855

  9. σ54-dependent regulome in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakov, Alexey E.; Rajeev, Lara; Chen, Amy; Luning, Eric G.; Dubchak, Inna; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Novichkov, Pavel S.

    2015-11-10

    The σ54 subunit controls a unique class of promoters in bacteria. Such promoters, without exception, require enhancer binding proteins (EBPs) for transcription initiation. Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, a model bacterium for sulfate reduction studies, has a high number of EBPs, more than most sequenced bacteria. Finally, the cellular processes regulated by many of these EBPs remain unknown.

  10. CO2 exposure at pressure impacts metabolism and stress responses in the model sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain Hildenborough

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Hoyt, David W.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Alderson, Paul A.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Tucker, Abigail E.; Walter, Eric D.; Linggi, Bryan E.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Taylor, Ronald C.

    2014-09-01

    Geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration drives physical and geochemical changes in deep subsurface environments that impact indigenous microbial activities. The combined effects of pressurized CO2 on a model sulfate-reducing microorganism, Desulfovibrio vulgaris, have been assessed using a suite of genomic and kinetic measurements. Novel high-pressure NMR time-series measurements using 13C-lactate were used to track D. vulgaris metabolism. We identified cessation of respiration at CO2 pressures of 10 bar, 25 bar, 50 bar, and 80 bar. Concurrent experiments using N2 as the pressurizing phase had no negative effect on microbial respiration, as inferred from reduction of sulfate to sulfide. Complementary pressurized batch incubations and fluorescence microscopy measurements supported NMR observations, and indicated that non-respiring cells were mostly viable at 50 bar CO2 for at least four hours, and at 80 bar CO2 for two hours. The fraction of dead cells increased rapidly after four hours at 80 bar CO2. Transcriptomic (RNA-Seq) measurements on mRNA transcripts from CO2-incubated biomass indicated that cells up-regulated the production of certain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine) following CO2 exposure at elevated pressures, likely as part of a general stress response. Evidence for other poorly understood stress responses were also identified within RNA-Seq data, suggesting that while pressurized CO2 severely limits the growth and respiration of D. vulgaris cells, biomass retains intact cell membranes at pressures up to 80 bar CO2. Together, these data show that geologic sequestration of CO2 may have significant impacts on rates of sulfate reduction in many deep subsurface environments where this metabolism is a key respiratory process.

  11. CO2 exposure at pressure impacts metabolism and stress responses in the model sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain Hildenborough

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Hoyt, David W.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Alderson, Paul A.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Markillie, L. Meng; Tucker, Abby E.; Walter, Eric D.; Linggi, Bryan E.; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Taylor, Ron C.

    2014-01-01

    Geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration drives physical and geochemical changes in deep subsurface environments that impact indigenous microbial activities. The combined effects of pressurized CO2 on a model sulfate-reducing microorganism, Desulfovibrio vulgaris, have been assessed using a suite of genomic and kinetic measurements. Novel high-pressure NMR time-series measurements using 13C-lactate were used to track D. vulgaris metabolism. We identified cessation of respiration at CO2 pressures of 10 bar, 25 bar, 50 bar, and 80 bar. Concurrent experiments using N2 as the pressurizing phase had no negative effect on microbial respiration, as inferred from reduction of sulfate to sulfide. Complementary pressurized batch incubations and fluorescence microscopy measurements supported NMR observations, and indicated that non-respiring cells were mostly viable at 50 bar CO2 for at least 4 h, and at 80 bar CO2 for 2 h. The fraction of dead cells increased rapidly after 4 h at 80 bar CO2. Transcriptomic (RNA-Seq) measurements on mRNA transcripts from CO2-incubated biomass indicated that cells up-regulated the production of certain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine) following CO2 exposure at elevated pressures, likely as part of a general stress response. Evidence for other poorly understood stress responses were also identified within RNA-Seq data, suggesting that while pressurized CO2 severely limits the growth and respiration of D. vulgaris cells, biomass retains intact cell membranes at pressures up to 80 bar CO2. Together, these data show that geologic sequestration of CO2 may have significant impacts on rates of sulfate reduction in many deep subsurface environments where this metabolism is a key respiratory process. PMID:25309528

  12. Oxidation of benzaldehydes to benzoic acid derivatives by three Desulfovibrio strains. [Desulfovibrio vulgaris; Desulfovibrio simplex; Desulfovibrio sp

    SciTech Connect

    Zellner, G.; Winter, J. ); Kneifel, H. )

    1990-07-01

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris Marburg, Desulfovibrio simplex XVI, and Desulfovibrio sp. strain MP47 used benzaldehydes such as vanillin, 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzaldehyde, protocatechualdehyde, syringaldehyde, p-anisaldehyde, p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, and 2-methoxybenzaldehyde as electron donors for sulfate reduction and carbon dioxide and/or components of yeast extract as carbon sources for cell synthesis. The aldehydes were oxidized to their corresponding benzoic acids. The three sulfate reducers oxidized up to 7 mM vanillin and up to 4 mM p-anisaldehyde. Higher concentrations of vanillin or p-anisaldehyde were toxic. In addition, pyridoxal hydrochloride and o-vanillin served as electron donors for sulfate reduction. Salicylaldehyde, pyridine-2-aldehyde, pyridine-4-aldehyde, and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylalcohol were not oxidized. No molecular hydrogen was detected in the gas phase. The oxidized aldehydes were not further degraded.

  13. The Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Hadj-Saïd, Jessica; Pandelia, Maria-Eirini; Léger, Christophe; Fourmond, Vincent; Dementin, Sébastien

    2015-12-01

    Ni-containing Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenases (CODHs) catalyze the reversible conversion between CO and CO₂and are involved in energy conservation and carbon fixation. These homodimeric enzymes house two NiFeS active sites (C-clusters) and three accessory [4Fe-4S] clusters. The Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Dv) genome contains a two-gene CODH operon coding for a CODH (cooS) and a maturation protein (cooC) involved in nickel insertion in the active site. According to the literature, the question of the precise function of CooC as a chaperone folding the C-cluster in a form which accommodates free nickel or as a mere nickel donor is not resolved. Here, we report the biochemical and spectroscopic characterization of two recombinant forms of the CODH, produced in the absence and in the presence of CooC, designated CooS and CooS(C), respectively. CooS contains no nickel and cannot be activated, supporting the idea that the role of CooC is to fold the C-cluster so that it can bind nickel. As expected, CooS(C) is Ni-loaded, reversibly converts CO and CO₂, displays the typical Cred1 and Cred2 EPR signatures of the C-cluster and activates in the presence of methyl viologen and CO in an autocatalytic process. However, Ni-loaded CooS(C) reaches maximum activity only upon reductive treatment in the presence of exogenous nickel, a phenomenon that had not been observed before. Surprisingly, the enzyme displays the Cred1 and Cred2 signatures whether it has been activated or not, showing that this activation process of the Ni-loaded Dv CODH is not associated with structural changes at the active site. PMID:26255854

  14. Contribution of mobile genetic elements to Desulfovibrio vulgaris genome plasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Christopher; Stolyar, Sergey; Chivian, Dylan; Pinel, Nicolas; Gabster, Jeffrey; Dehal, Paramvir; He, Zhili; Yang, Zamin Koo; Yen, Huei-Che; Zhou, Jizhong; Hazen, Terry; Arkin, Adam; Stahl, David

    2009-01-01

    The genome of Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain DePue, a sulfate-reducing Deltaproteobacterium isolated from heavy metal-impacted lake sediment, was completely sequenced and compared with the type strain D. vulgaris Hildenborough. The two genomes share a high degree of relatedness and synteny, but harbour distinct prophage and signatures of past phage encounters. In addition to a highly variable phage contribution, the genome of strain DePue contains a cluster of open-reading frames not found in strain Hildenborough coding for the production and export of a capsule exopolysaccharide, possibly of relevance to heavy metal resistance. Comparative whole-genome microarray analysis on four additional D. vulgaris strains established greater interstrain variation within regions associated with phage insertion and exopolysaccharide biosynthesis.

  15. Use of immunomagnetic separation for the detection of Desulfovibrio vulgaris from environmental samples

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, R.; Hazen, T.C.; Joyner, D.C.; Kusel, K.; Singer, M.E.; Sitte, J.; Torok, T.

    2011-04-15

    Immunomagnetic separation (IMS) has proved highly efficient for recovering microorganisms from heterogeneous samples. Current investigation targeted the separation of viable cells of the sulfate-reducing bacterium, Desulfovibrio vulgaris. Streptavidin-coupled paramagnetic beads and biotin labeled antibodies raised against surface antigens of this microorganism were used to capture D. vulgaris cells in both bioreactor grown laboratory samples and from extremely low-biomass environmental soil and subsurface drilling samples. Initial studies on detection, recovery efficiency and viability for IMS were performed with laboratory grown D. vulgaris cells using various cell densities. Efficiency of cell isolation and recovery (i.e., release of the microbial cells from the beads following separation) was followed by microscopic imaging and acridine orange direct counts (AODC). Excellent recovery efficiency encouraged the use of IMS to capture Desulfovibrio spp. cells from low-biomass environmental samples. The environmental samples were obtained from a radionuclide-contaminated site in Germany and the chromium (VI)-contaminated Hanford site, an ongoing bioremediation project of the U.S. Department of Energy. Field deployable IMS technology may greatly facilitate environmental sampling and bioremediation process monitoring and enable transcriptomics and proteomics/metabolomics-based studies directly on cells collected from the field.

  16. Post-Translational Modifications of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough Sulfate Reduction Pathway Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Gaucher, S.P.; Redding, A.M.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Keasling, J.D.; Singh, A.K.

    2008-03-01

    Recent developments in shotgun proteomics have enabled high-throughput studies of a variety of microorganisms at a proteome level and provide experimental validation for predicted open reading frames in the corresponding genome. More importantly, advances in mass spectrometric data analysis now allow mining of large proteomics data sets for the presence of post-translational modifications(PTMs). Although PTMs are a critical aspectof cellular activity, such information eludes cell-wide studies conducted at the transcript level. Here, we analyze several mass spectrometric data sets acquired using two-dimensional liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, 2D-LC/MS/MS, for the sulfate reducing bacterium, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. Our searches of the raw spectra led us to discover several post-translationally modified peptides in D. vulgaris. Of these, several peptides containing a lysine with a +42 Da modification were found reproducibly across all data sets. Both acetylation and trimethylation have the same nominal +42 Da mass, and are therefore candidates for this modification. Several spectra were identified having markers for trimethylation, while one is consistent with an acetylation. Surprisingly, these modified peptides predominantly mapped to proteins involved in sulfate respiration. Other highly expressed proteins in D. vulgaris, such as enzymes involved in electron transport and other central metabolic processes, did not contain this modification. Decoy database searches were used to control for random spectrum/sequence matches. Additional validation for these modifications was provided by alternate workflows, for example, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry analysis of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase gamma-subunit(DsrC) protein. MS data for DsrC in this alternate workflow also contained the +42 Da modification at the same loci. Furthermore, the DsrC homologue in another sulfate reducing bacterium

  17. Salt Stress in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough: An integratedgenomics approach

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; He, Zhili; Alm, Eric J.; Arkin, Adam P.; Baidoo, Edward E.; Borglin, Sharon C.; Chen, Wenqiong; Hazen, Terry C.; He, Qiang; Holman, Hoi-Ying; Huang, Katherine; Huang, Rick; Hoyner,Dominique C.; Katz, Natalie; Keller, Martin; Oeller, Paul; Redding,Alyssa; Sun, Jun; Wall, Judy; Wei, Jing; Yang, Zamin; Yen, Huei-Che; Zhou, Jizhong; Keasling Jay D.

    2005-12-08

    The ability of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to reduce, and therefore contain, toxic and radioactive metal waste has made all factors that affect the physiology of this organism of great interest. Increased salinity is an important and frequent fluctuation faced by D. vulgaris in its natural habitat. In liquid culture, exposure to excess salt resulted in striking elongation of D. vulgaris cells. Using data from transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolite assays, phospholipid fatty acid profiling, and electron microscopy, we used a systems approach to explore the effects of excess NaCl on D. vulgaris. In this study we demonstrated that import of osmoprotectants, such as glycine betaine and ectoine, is the primary mechanism used by D. vulgaris to counter hyperionic stress. Several efflux systems were also highly up-regulated, as was the ATP synthesis pathway. Increases in the levels of both RNA and DNA helicases suggested that salt stress affected the stability of nucleic acid base pairing. An overall increase in the level of branched fatty acids indicated that there were changes in cell wall fluidity. The immediate response to salt stress included up-regulation of chemotaxis genes, although flagellar biosynthesis was down-regulated. Other down-regulated systems included lactate uptake permeases and ABC transport systems. The results of an extensive NaCl stress analysis were compared with microarray data from a KCl stress analysis, and unlike many other bacteria, D. vulgaris responded similarly to the two stresses. Integration of data from multiple methods allowed us to develop a conceptual model for the salt stress response in D. vulgaris that can be compared to those in other microorganisms.

  18. Analysis of a Ferric Uptake Regulator (Fur) Mutant ofDesulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, Kelly S.; Yen, Huei-Che Bill; Hemme, Christopher L.; Yang, Zamin K.; He, Zhili; He, Qiang; Zhou, Jizhong; Huang, Katherine H.; Alm, Eric J.; Hazen, Terry C.; Arkin, Adam P.; Wall, Judy D.

    2007-09-21

    Previous experiments examining the transcriptional profileof the anaerobe Desulfovibrio vulgaris demonstrated up-regulation of theFur regulon in response to various environmental stressors. To test theinvolvement of Fur in the growth response and transcriptional regulationof D. vulgaris, a targeted mutagenesis procedure was used for deletingthe fur gene. Growth of the resulting ?fur mutant (JW707) was notaffected by iron availability, but the mutant did exhibit increasedsensitivity to nitrite and osmotic stresses compared to the wild type.Transcriptional profiling of JW707 indicated that iron-bound Fur acts asa traditional repressor for ferrous iron uptake genes (feoAB) and othergenes containing a predicted Fur binding site within their promoter.Despite the apparent lack of siderophore biosynthesis genes within the D.vulgaris genome, a large 12-gene operon encoding orthologs to TonB andTolQR also appeared to be repressed by iron-bound Fur. While other genespredicted to be involved in iron homeostasis were unaffected by thepresence or absence of Fur, alternative expression patterns that could beinterpreted as repression or activation by iron-free Fur were observed.Both the physiological and transcriptional data implicate a globalregulatory role for Fur in the sulfate-reducing bacterium D.vulgaris.

  19. Mapping the Two-component Regulatory Networks in Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Rajeev, Lara; Luning, Eric; Dehal, Paramvir; Joachimiak, Marcin; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2010-05-17

    D. vulgaris Hildenborough has 72 response regulators. The Desulfovibrio are sulfate reducing bacteria that are important in the sulfur and carbon cycles in anoxic habitats. Its large number of two componenent systems are probably critical to its ability to sense and respond to its environment. Our goal is to map these RRs to the genes they regulate using a DNA-affinity-purification-chip (DAP-chip) protocol. First target determined usuing EMSA. A positive target was determined for as many RRs as possible using EMSA. Targets were selected based on gene proximity, regulon predictions and/or predicted sigma54 dependent promoters. qPCR was used to ensure that the target was enriched from sheared genomic DNA before proceeding to the DAP-chip.

  20. The electron transfer system of syntrophically grown Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, C.B.; He, Z.; Yang, Z.K.; Ringbauer, Jr., J.A.; He, Q.; Zhou, J.; Voordouw, G.; Wall, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.; Hazen, T.C.; Stolyar, S.; Stahl, D.A.

    2009-05-01

    Interspecies hydrogen transfer between organisms producing and consuming hydrogen promotes the decomposition of organic matter in most anoxic environments. Although syntrophic couplings between hydrogen producers and consumers are a major feature of the carbon cycle, mechanisms for energy recovery at the extremely low free energies of reactions typical of these anaerobic communities have not been established. In this study, comparative transcriptional analysis of a model sulfate-reducing microbe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, suggested the use of alternative electron transfer systems dependent upon growth modality. During syntrophic growth on lactate with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, D. vulgaris up-regulated numerous genes involved in electron transfer and energy generation when compared with sulfate-limited monocultures. In particular, genes coding for the putative membrane-bound Coo hydrogenase, two periplasmic hydrogenases (Hyd and Hyn) and the well-characterized high-molecular weight cytochrome (Hmc) were among the most highly expressed and up-regulated. Additionally, a predicted operon coding for genes involved in lactate transport and oxidation exhibited up-regulation, further suggesting an alternative pathway for electrons derived from lactate oxidation during syntrophic growth. Mutations in a subset of genes coding for Coo, Hmc, Hyd and Hyn impaired or severely limited syntrophic growth but had little affect on growth via sulfate-respiration. These results demonstrate that syntrophic growth and sulfate-respiration use largely independent energy generation pathways and imply that understanding of microbial processes sustaining nutrient cycling must consider lifestyles not captured in pure culture.

  1. The electron transfer system of synthrophically grown desulfovibrio vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Christopher; He, Zhili; Yang, Zamin Koo; Ringbauer, Joseph; HE, Qiang; Zhou, Jizhong; Voordouw, Gerrit; Wall, Judy; Arkin, Adam; Hazen, Terry; Stolyar, Sergey; Stahl, David

    2009-01-01

    Interspecies hydrogen transfer between organisms producing and consuming hydrogen promotes the decomposition of organic matter in most anoxic environments. Although syntrophic coupling between hydrogen producers and consumers is a major feature of the carbon cycle, mechanisms for energy recovery at the extremely low free energies of reactions typical of these anaerobic communities have not been established. In this study, comparative transcriptional analysis of a model sulfate-reducing microbe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, suggested the use of alternative electron transfer systems dependent on growth modality. During syntrophic growth on lactate with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, numerous genes involved in electron transfer and energy generation were upregulated in D. vulgaris compared with their expression in sulfate-limited monocultures. In particular, genes coding for the putative membrane-bound Coo hydrogenase, two periplasmic hydrogenases (Hyd and Hyn), and the well-characterized high-molecular-weight cytochrome (Hmc) were among the most highly expressed and upregulated genes. Additionally, a predicted operon containing genes involved in lactate transport and oxidation exhibited upregulation, further suggesting an alternative pathway for electrons derived from lactate oxidation during syntrophic growth. Mutations in a subset of genes coding for Coo, Hmc, Hyd, and Hyn impaired or severely limited syntrophic growth but had little effect on growth via sulfate respiration. These results demonstrate that syntrophic growth and sulfate respiration use largely independent energy generation pathways and imply that to understand microbial processes that sustain nutrient cycling, lifestyles not captured in pure culture must be considered.

  2. The Electron Transfer System of Syntrophically Grown Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    PBD; ENIGMA; GTL; VIMSS; Walker, Christopher B.; He, Zhili; Yang, Zamin K.; Ringbauer Jr., Joseph A.; He, Qiang; Zhou, Jizhong; Voordouw, Gerrit; Wall, Judy D.; Arkin, Adam P.; Hazen, Terry C.; Stolyar, Sergey; Stahl, David A.

    2009-06-22

    Interspecies hydrogen transfer between organisms producing and consuming hydrogen promotes the decomposition of organic matter in most anoxic environments. Although syntrophic couplings between hydrogen producers and consumers are a major feature of the carbon cycle, mechanisms for energy recovery at the extremely low free energies of reactions typical of these anaerobic communities have not been established. In this study, comparative transcriptional analysis of a model sulfate-reducing microbe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, suggested the use of alternative electron transfer systems dependent upon growth modality. During syntrophic growth on lactate with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, D. vulgaris up-regulated numerous genes involved in electron transfer and energy generation when compared with sulfate-limited monocultures. In particular, genes coding for the putative membrane-bound Coo hydrogenase, two periplasmic hydrogenases (Hyd and Hyn) and the well-characterized high-molecular weight cytochrome (Hmc) were among the most highly expressed and up-regulated. Additionally, a predicted operon coding for genes involved in lactate transport and oxidation exhibited up-regulation, further suggesting an alternative pathway for electrons derived from lactate oxidation during syntrophic growth. Mutations in a subset of genes coding for Coo, Hmc, Hyd and Hyn impaired or severely limited syntrophic growth but had little affect on growth via sulfate-respiration. These results demonstrate that syntrophic growth and sulfate-respiration use largely independent energy generation pathways and imply that understanding of microbial processes sustaining nutrient cycling must consider lifestyles not captured in pure culture.

  3. Cell-Wide Responses to Low-Oxygen Exposure in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Redding, Alyssa; Joachimiak, Marcin; Arkin, Adam; Borglin, sharon; Dehal, Paramvir; Chakraborty, Romy; Geller, Jil; Hazen, Terry; HE, Qiang; Joyner, Dominique C.; Martin, Vincent; Wall, Judy; Yang, Zamin Koo; Zhou, Jizhong; Keasling, Jay

    2007-08-01

    The responses of the anaerobic, sulfate-reducing organism Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to low-oxygen exposure (0.1% O2) were monitored via transcriptomics and proteomics. Exposure to 0.1% O2 caused a decrease in the growth rate without affecting viability. Concerted upregulation of the predicted peroxide stress response regulon (PerR) genes was observed in response to the 0.1% O2 exposure. Several of the candidates also showed increases in protein abundance. Among the remaining small number of transcript changes was the upregulation of the predicted transmembrane tetraheme cytochrome c3 complex. Other known oxidative stress response candidates remained unchanged during the low-O2 exposure. To fully understand the results of the 0.1% O2 exposure, transcriptomics and proteomics data were collected for exposure to air using a similar experimental protocol. In contrast to the 0.1% O2 exposure, air exposure was detrimental to both the growth rate and viability and caused dramatic changes at both the transcriptome and proteome levels. Interestingly, the transcripts of the predicted PerR regulon genes were downregulated during air exposure. Our results highlight the differences in the cell-wide responses to low and high O2 levels in D. vulgaris and suggest that while exposure to air is highly detrimental to D. vulgaris, this bacterium can successfully cope with periodic exposure to low O2 levels in its environment.

  4. Desulfovibrio vulgaris Growth Coupled to Formate-Driven H2 Production.

    PubMed

    Martins, Mónica; Mourato, Cláudia; Pereira, Inês A C

    2015-12-15

    Formate is recognized as a superior substrate for biological H2 production by several bacteria. However, the growth of a single organism coupled to this energetic pathway has not been shown in mesophilic conditions. In the present study, a bioreactor with gas sparging was used, where we observed for the first time that H2 production from formate can be coupled with growth of the model sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris in the absence of sulfate or a syntrophic partner. In these conditions, D. vulgaris had a maximum growth rate of 0.078 h(-1) and a doubling time of 9 h, and the ΔG of the reaction ranged between -21 and -18 kJ mol(-1). This is the first report of a single mesophilic organism that can grow while catalyzing the oxidation of formate to H2 and bicarbonate. Furthermore, high volumetric and specific H2 production rates (125 mL L(-1) h(-1) and 2500 mL gdcw(-1) h(-1)) were achieved in a new bioreactor designed and optimized for H2 production. This high H2 production demonstrates that the nonconventional H2-producing organism D. vulgaris is a good biocatalyst for converting formate to H2. PMID:26579558

  5. Energy metabolism in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough: insights from transcriptome analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, Patricia M.; He, Qiang; Valente, Filipa M.A.; Xavier, Antonio V.; Zhou, Jizhong; Pereira, Ines A.C.; Louro, Ricardo O.

    2007-11-01

    Sulphate-reducing bacteria are important players in the global sulphur and carbon cycles, with considerable economical and ecological impact. However, the process of sulphate respiration is still incompletely understood. Several mechanisms of energy conservation have been proposed, but it is unclear how the different strategies contribute to the overall process. In order to obtain a deeper insight into the energy metabolism of sulphate-reducers whole-genome microarrays were used to compare the transcriptional response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough grown with hydrogen/sulphate, pyruvate/sulphate, pyruvate with limiting sulphate, and lactate/thiosulphate, relative to growth in lactate/sulphate. Growth with hydrogen/sulphate showed the largest number of differentially expressed genes and the largest changes in transcript levels. In this condition the most up-regulated energy metabolism genes were those coding for the periplasmic [NiFeSe]hydrogenase, followed by the Ech hydrogenase. The results also provide evidence for the involvement of formate cycling and the recently proposed ethanol pathway during growth in hydrogen. The pathway involving CO cycling is relevant during growth on lactate and pyruvate, but not during growth in hydrogen as the most down-regulated genes were those coding for the CO-induced hydrogenase. Growth on lactate/thiosulphate reveals a down-regulation of several energymetabolism genes similar to what was observed in the presence of nitrite. This study identifies the role of several proteins involved in the energy metabolism of D. vulgaris and highlights several novel genes related to this process, revealing a more complex bioenergetic metabolism than previously considered.

  6. Global Analysis of Heat Shock Response in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabra, S.R.; He, Q.; Huang, K.H.; Gaucher, S.P.; Alm, E.J.; He,Z.; Hadi, M.Z.; Hazen, T.C.; Wall, J.D.; Zhou, J.; Arkin, A.P.; Singh, A.K.

    2005-09-16

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough belongs to a class ofsulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and is found ubiquitously in nature.Given the importance of SRB-mediated reduction for bioremediation ofmetal ion contaminants, ongoing research on D. vulgaris has been in thedirection of elucidating regulatory mechanisms for this organism under avariety of stress conditions. This work presents a global view of thisorganism's response to elevated growth temperature using whole-celltranscriptomics and proteomics tools. Transcriptional response (1.7-foldchange or greater; Z>1.5) ranged from 1,135 genes at 15 min to 1,463genes at 120 min for a temperature up-shift of 13oC from a growthtemperature of 37oC for this organism and suggested both direct andindirect modes of heat sensing. Clusters of orthologous group categoriesthat were significantly affected included posttranslationalmodifications; protein turnover and chaperones (up-regulated); energyproduction and conversion (down-regulated), nucleotide transport,metabolism (down-regulated), and translation; ribosomal structure; andbiogenesis (down-regulated). Analysis of the genome sequence revealed thepresence of features of both negative and positive regulation whichincluded the CIRCE element and promoter sequences corresponding to thealternate sigma factors ?32 and ?54. While mechanisms of heat shockcontrol for some genes appeared to coincide with those established forEscherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, the presence of unique controlschemes for several other genes was also evident. Analysis of proteinexpression levels using differential in-gel electrophoresis suggestedgood agreement with transcriptional profiles of several heat shockproteins, including DnaK (DVU0811), HtpG (DVU2643), HtrA (DVU1468), andAhpC (DVU2247). The proteomics study also suggested the possibility ofposttranslational modifications in the chaperones DnaK, AhpC, GroES(DVU1977), and GroEL (DVU1976) and also several periplasmic ABCtransporters.

  7. Reduction of uranium by cytochrome c3 of Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Widman, P.K.; Woodward, J.C.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1993-01-01

    The mechanism for U(VI) reduction by Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough) was investigated. The H2-dependent U(VI) reductase activity in the soluble fraction of the cells was lost when the soluble fraction was passed over a cationic exchange column which extracted cytochrome c3. Addition of cytochrome c3 back to the soluble fraction that had been passed over the cationic exchange column restored the U(VI)-reducing capacity. Reduced cytochrome c3 was oxidized by U(VI), as was a c-type cytochrome(s) in whole-cell suspensions. When cytochrome c3 was combined with hydrogenase, its physiological electron donor, U(VI) was reduced in the presence of H2. Hydrogenase alone could not reduce U(VI). Rapid U(VI) reduction was followed by a subsequent slow precipitation of the U(IV) mineral uraninite. Cytochrome c3 reduced U(VI) in a uranium-contaminated surface water and groundwater. Cytochrome c3 provides the first enzyme model for the reduction and biomineralization of uranium in sedimentary environments. Furthermore, the finding that cytochrome c3 can catalyze the reductive precipitation of uranium may aid in the development of fixed-enzyme reactors and/or organisms with enhanced U(VI)-reducing capacity for the bioremediation of uranium- contaminated waters and waste streams.

  8. Functional expression of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough cytochrome c3 in Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G200 after conjugational gene transfer from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Voordouw, G; Pollock, W B; Bruschi, M; Guerlesquin, F; Rapp-Giles, B J; Wall, J D

    1990-01-01

    Plasmid pJRDC800-1, containing the cyc gene encoding cytochrome c3 from Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris Hildenborough, was transferred by conjugation from Escherichia coli DH5 alpha to Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G200. The G200 strain produced an acidic cytochrome c3 (pI = 5.8), which could be readily separated from the Hildenborough cytochrome c3 (pI = 10.5). The latter was indistinguishable from cytochrome c3 produced by D. vulgaris subsp. vulgaris Hildenborough with respect to a number of chemical and physical criteria. Images PMID:2170341

  9. Global transcriptomics analysis of the Desulfovibrio vulgaris change from syntrophic growth with Methanosarcina barkeri to sulfidogenic metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Plugge, Caroline M.; Scholten, Johannes C.; Culley, David E.; Nie, Lei; Brockman, Fred J.; Zhang, Weiwen

    2010-09-01

    Abstract Desulfovibrio vulgaris is a metabolically flexible microorganism. It can use sulfate as electron acceptor to catabolize a variety of substrates, or in the absence of sulfate can utilize organic acids and alcohols by forming a syntrophic association with hydrogen scavenging partner to relieve inhibition by hydrogen. These alternativemetabolic types increase the chance of survival for D. vulgaris in environments where one of the potential external electron acceptors becomes depleted. In this work, whole-genome D. vulgaris microarrays were used to determine relative transcript levels as D. vulgaris shifted its metabolism from syntroph in a lactate-oxidizing dual-culture with Methanosarcina barkeri to a sulfidogenic metabolism. Syntrophic dual-cultures were grown in two independent chemostats and perturbation was introduced after six volume changes with the addition of sulfate. The results showed that 132 genes were differentially expressed in D. vulgaris 2 hours after addition of sulfate. Functional analyses suggested that genes involved in cell envelope and energy metabolism were the most regulated when comparing syntrophic and sulfidogenic metabolism. Up-regulation was observed for genes encoding ATPase and the membrane-integrated energy conserving hydrogenase (Ech) when cells shifted to a sulfidogenic metabolism. A five-gene cluster encoding several lipo- and membrane-bound proteins was down-regulated when cells were shifted to a sulfidogenic metabolism. Interestingly, this gene cluster has orthologs found only in another syntrophic bacterium Syntrophobacter fumaroxidans and four recently sequenced Desulfovibrio strains. This study also identified several novel c-type cytochrome encoding genes which may be involved in the sulfidogenic metabolism.

  10. The hmc operon of Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris Hildenborough encodes a potential transmembrane redox protein complex.

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, M; Pollock, W B; Reij, M W; Keon, R G; Fu, R; Voordouw, G

    1993-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the hmc operon from Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris Hildenborough indicated the presence of eight open reading frames, encoding proteins Orf1 to Orf6, Rrf1, and Rrf2. Orf1 is the periplasmic, high-molecular-weight cytochrome (Hmc) containing 16 c-type hemes and described before (W. B. R. Pollock, M. Loutfi, M. Bruschi, B. J. Rapp-Giles, J. D. Wall, and G. Voordouw, J. Bacteriol. 173:220-228, 1991). Orf2 is a transmembrane redox protein with four iron-sulfur clusters, as indicated by its similarity to DmsB from Escherichia coli. Orf3, Orf4, and Orf5 are all highly hydrophobic, integral membrane proteins with similarities to subunits of NADH dehydrogenase or cytochrome c reductase. Orf6 is a cytoplasmic redox protein containing two iron-sulfur clusters, as indicated by its similarity to the ferredoxin domain of [Fe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio species. Rrf1 belongs to the family of response regulator proteins, while the function of Rrf2 cannot be derived from the gene sequence. The expression of individual genes in E. coli with the T7 system confirmed the open reading frames for Orf2, Orf6, and Rrf1. Deletion of 0.4 kb upstream from orf1 abolished the expression of Hmc in D. desulfuricans G200, indicating this region to contain the hmc operon promoter. The expression of two truncated hmc genes in D. desulfuricans G200 resulted in stable periplasmic c-type cytochromes, confirming the domain structure of Hmc. We propose that Hmc and Orf2 to Orf6 form a transmembrane protein complex that allows electron flow from the periplasmic hydrogenases to the cytoplasmic enzymes that catalyze the reduction of sulfate. The domain structure of Hmc may be required to allow interaction with multiple hydrogenases. Images PMID:8335628

  11. Expression profiling of hypothetical genes in Desulfovibrio vulgaris leads to improved functional annotation

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, Dwayne A.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Joachimiak, Marcine P.; Drury, Elliott C.; Redding, Alyssa M.; Yen, Huei-Che B.; Fields, Matthew; Hazen, Terry C.; Arkin, Adam P.; Keasling, Jay D.; Wall, Judy D.

    2009-03-17

    Hypothetical (HyP) and conserved HyP genes account for >30% of sequenced bacterial genomes. For the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, 347 of the 3634 genes were annotated as conserved HyP (9.5%) along with 887 HyP genes (24.4%). Given the large fraction of the genome, it is plausible that some of these genes serve critical cellular roles. The study goals were to determine which genes were expressed and provide a more functionally based annotation. To accomplish this, expression profiles of 1234 HyP and conserved genes were used from transcriptomic datasets of 11 environmental stresses, complemented with shotgun LC–MS/MS and AMT tag proteomic data. Genes were divided into putatively polycistronic operons and those predicted to be monocistronic, then classified by basal expression levels and grouped according to changes in expression for one or multiple stresses. One thousand two hundred and twelve of these genes were transcribed with 786 producing detectable proteins. There was no evidence for expression of 17 predicted genes.

  12. Expression profiling of hypothetical genes in Desulfovibrio vulgaris leads to improved functional annotation

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, Dwayne A.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Joachimiak, Marcin P.; Drury, Elliott C.; Redding, Alyssa M.; Yen, Huei-Che B.; Fields, Matthew W.; Hazen, Terry C.; Arkin, Adam P.; Keasling, Jay D.; Wall, Judy D.

    2008-10-27

    Hypothetical and conserved hypothetical genes account for>30percent of sequenced bacterial genomes. For the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, 347 of the 3634 genes were annotated as conserved hypothetical (9.5percent) along with 887 hypothetical genes (24.4percent). Given the large fraction of the genome, it is plausible that some of these genes serve critical cellular roles. The study goals were to determine which genes were expressed and provide a more functionally based annotation. To accomplish this, expression profiles of 1234 hypothetical and conserved genes were used from transcriptomic datasets of 11 environmental stresses, complemented with shotgun LC-MS/MS and AMT tag proteomic data. Genes were divided into putatively polycistronic operons and those predicted to be monocistronic, then classified by basal expression levels and grouped according to changes in expression for one or multiple stresses. 1212 of these genes were transcribed with 786 producing detectable proteins. There was no evidence for expression of 17 predicted genes. Except for the latter, monocistronic gene annotation was expanded using the above criteria along with matching Clusters of Orthologous Groups. Polycistronic genes were annotated in the same manner with inferences from their proximity to more confidently annotated genes. Two targeted deletion mutants were used as test cases to determine the relevance of the inferred functional annotations.

  13. Generalized Schemes for High Throughput Manipulation of the Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough Genome.

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabra, Swapnil; Butland, Gareth; Elias, Dwayne A; Chandonia, John-Marc; Fok, Olivia; Juba, tom; Gorur, A.; Allen, S.; Leung, C. M.; Keller, Kim; Reveco, S.; Zane, Mr. Grant M.; Semkiw, Elizabeth M.; Prathapam, R.; Gold, B.; Singer, Mary; Ouellet, M.; Sazakal, E. D.; Jorgens, Dominique; Price, Morgan N.; Witkowska, Ewa; Beller, Harry R.; Hazen, Terry; Biggin, Mark D.; Auer, Dr. Manfred; Wall, Judy D.; Keasling, Jay

    2011-01-01

    The ability to conduct advanced functional genomic studies of the thousands of 38 sequenced bacteria has been hampered by the lack of available tools for making high39 throughput chromosomal manipulations in a systematic manner that can be applied across 40 diverse species. In this work, we highlight the use of synthetic biological tools to 41 assemble custom suicide vectors with reusable and interchangeable DNA parts to 42 facilitate chromosomal modification at designated loci. These constructs enable an array 43 of downstream applications including gene replacement and creation of gene fusions with 44 affinity purification or localization tags. We employed this approach to engineer 45 chromosomal modifications in a bacterium that has previously proven difficult to 46 manipulate genetically, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, to generate a library of 47 662 strains. Furthermore, we demonstrate how these modifications can be used for 48 examining metabolic pathways, protein-protein interactions, and protein localization. The 49 ubiquity of suicide constructs in gene replacement throughout biology suggests that this 50 approach can be applied to engineer a broad range of species for a diverse array of 51 systems biological applications and is amenable to high-throughput implementation.

  14. Generalized schemes for high throughput manipulation of the Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough genome

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabra, S.R.; Butland, G.; Elias, D.; Chandonia, J.-M.; Fok, V.; Juba, T.; Gorur, A.; Allen, S.; Leung, C.-M.; Keller, K.; Reveco, S.; Zane, G.; Semkiw, E.; Prathapam, R.; Gold, B.; Singer, M.; Ouellet, M.; Sazakal, E.; Jorgens, D.; Price, M.; Witkowska, E.; Beller, H.; Hazen, T.C.; Biggin, M.; Auer, M.; Wall, J.; Keasling, J.

    2011-07-15

    The ability to conduct advanced functional genomic studies of the thousands of sequenced bacteria has been hampered by the lack of available tools for making high- throughput chromosomal manipulations in a systematic manner that can be applied across diverse species. In this work, we highlight the use of synthetic biological tools to assemble custom suicide vectors with reusable and interchangeable DNA “parts” to facilitate chromosomal modification at designated loci. These constructs enable an array of downstream applications including gene replacement and creation of gene fusions with affinity purification or localization tags. We employed this approach to engineer chromosomal modifications in a bacterium that has previously proven difficult to manipulate genetically, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, to generate a library of over 700 strains. Furthermore, we demonstrate how these modifications can be used for examining metabolic pathways, protein-protein interactions, and protein localization. The ubiquity of suicide constructs in gene replacement throughout biology suggests that this approach can be applied to engineer a broad range of species for a diverse array of systems biological applications and is amenable to high-throughput implementation.

  15. Study of Nitrate Stress in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough Using iTRAQ Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Redding, A.M.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Joyner, D.; Hazen, T.C.; Keasling, J.D.

    2006-10-12

    The response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH),a sulphate-reducing bacterium, to nitrate stress was examined usingquantitative proteomic analysis. DvH was stressed with 105 m M sodiumnitrate(NaNO3), a level that caused a 50 percent inhibition in growth.The protein profile of stressed cells was compared with that of cellsgrown in the absence of nitrate using the iTRAQ peptide labellingstrategy and tandem liquid chromatography separation coupled with massspectrometry (quadrupoletime-of-flight) detection. A total of 737 uniqueproteins were identified by two or more peptides, representing 22 percentof the total DvH proteome and spanning every functional category. Theresults indicate that this was a mild stress, as proteins involved incentral metabolism and the sulphate reduction pathway were unperturbed.Proteins involved in the nitrate reduction pathway increased. Increasesseen in transport systems for proline, glycine^ betaineandglutamateindicate that the NaNO3 exposure led to both salt stress and nitratestress.Up-regulation observed in oxidative stress response proteins (Rbr,RbO, etc.) and a large number of ABC transport systems as well as in iron^ sulphur -cluster-containing proteins, however, appear to be specific tonitrate exposure. Finally, a number of hypothetical proteins were amongthe most significant changers, indicating that there may be unknownmechanisms initiated upon nitrate stress in DvH.

  16. Impact of elevated nitrate on sulfate-reducing bacteria: A comparative study of Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    He, Q.; He, Z.; Joyner, D.C.; Joachimiak, M.; Price, M.N.; Yang, Z.K.; Yen, H.-C. B.; Hemme, C. L.; Chen, W.; Fields, M.; Stahl, D. A.; Keasling, J. D.; Keller, M.; Arkin, A. P.; Hazen, T. C.; Wall, J. D.; Zhou, J.

    2010-07-15

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria have been extensively studied for their potential in heavy-metal bioremediation. However, the occurrence of elevated nitrate in contaminated environments has been shown to inhibit sulfate reduction activity. Although the inhibition has been suggested to result from the competition with nitrate-reducing bacteria, the possibility of direct inhibition of sulfate reducers by elevated nitrate needs to be explored. Using Desulfovibrio vulgaris as a model sulfate-reducing bacterium, functional genomics analysis reveals that osmotic stress contributed to growth inhibition by nitrate as shown by the upregulation of the glycine/betaine transporter genes and the relief of nitrate inhibition by osmoprotectants. The observation that significant growth inhibition was effected by 70 mM NaNO{sub 3} but not by 70 mM NaCl suggests the presence of inhibitory mechanisms in addition to osmotic stress. The differential expression of genes characteristic of nitrite stress responses, such as the hybrid cluster protein gene, under nitrate stress condition further indicates that nitrate stress response by D. vulgaris was linked to components of both osmotic and nitrite stress responses. The involvement of the oxidative stress response pathway, however, might be the result of a more general stress response. Given the low similarities between the response profiles to nitrate and other stresses, less-defined stress response pathways could also be important in nitrate stress, which might involve the shift in energy metabolism. The involvement of nitrite stress response upon exposure to nitrate may provide detoxification mechanisms for nitrite, which is inhibitory to sulfate-reducing bacteria, produced by microbial nitrate reduction as a metabolic intermediate and may enhance the survival of sulfate-reducing bacteria in environments with elevated nitrate level.

  17. Hydrogen-peroxide-induced oxidative stress responses in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, A.; He, Z.; Redding-Johanson, A.M.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Hemme, C.L.; Joachimiak, M.P.; Bender, K.S.; Keasling, J.D.; Stahl, D.A.; Fields, M.W.; Hazen, T.C.; Arkin, A.P.; Wall, J.D.; Zhou, J.; Luo, F.; Deng, Y.; He, Q.

    2010-07-01

    To understand how sulphate-reducing bacteria respond to oxidative stresses, the responses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced stresses were investigated with transcriptomic, proteomic and genetic approaches. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and induced chemical species (e.g. polysulfide, ROS) and redox potential shift increased the expressions of the genes involved in detoxification, thioredoxin-dependent reduction system, protein and DNA repair, and decreased those involved in sulfate reduction, lactate oxidation and protein synthesis. A gene coexpression network analysis revealed complicated network interactions among differentially expressed genes, and suggested possible importance of several hypothetical genes in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stress. Also, most of the genes in PerR and Fur regulons were highly induced, and the abundance of a Fur regulon protein increased. Mutant analysis suggested that PerR and Fur are functionally overlapped in response to stresses induced by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and reaction products, and the upregulation of thioredoxin-dependent reduction genes was independent of PerR or Fur. It appears that induction of those stress response genes could contribute to the increased resistance of deletion mutants to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced stresses. In addition, a conceptual cellular model of D. vulgaris responses to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stress was constructed to illustrate that this bacterium may employ a complicated molecular mechanism to defend against the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced stresses.

  18. Correlation between mRNA and protein abundance in Desulfovibrio vulgaris: A multiple regression to identify sources of variations

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, Lei; Wu, G; Zhang, Weiwen

    2006-01-13

    Using whole-genome microarray and LC-MC/MS proteomic data collected from Desulfovibrio vulgaris grown under three different conditions, we systematically investigate the relationship between mRNA and protein abundunce by a multiple regression approach.

  19. Overexpression of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough cytochrome c553 in Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G200. Evidence of conformational heterogeneity in the oxidized protein by NMR.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, L; Marion, D; Pollock, B; Voordouw, G; Wall, J; Bruschi, M; Guerlesquin, F

    1993-12-01

    Plasmid pRC41, containing the cyf gene encoding cytochrome c533 from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, was transferred by conjugation from Escherichia coli to Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G200. The structural properties of the purified protein were studied by one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR. A heterogeneity in the folding of the cytochrome isolated from D. vulgaris Hildenborough and from D. desulfuricans G200 was observed for the oxidized from. Temperature, pH and salt-dependence studies indicated that the heterogeneity does not result from an intermediate in the protein unfolding process, but derives from two conformations which are not in dynamic equilibrium. PMID:8269917

  20. Hydrogenase activity in aged, nonviable Desulfovibrio vulgaris cultures and its significance in anaerobic biocorrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Chatelus, C.; Carrier, P.; Saignes, P.; Libert, M.F.; Berlier, Y.; Lespinat, P.A.; Fauque, G.; Legall, J.

    1987-07-01

    Batch cultures of Desulfovibrio vulgaris stored at 32 degrees C for 10 months have been found to retain 50% of the hydrogenase activity of a 1-day culture. The hydrogenase found in old cultures needs reducing conditions for its activation. Viable cell counts are negative after 6 months, showing that the hydrogenase activity does not depend on the presence of viable cells. These observations are of importance in the understanding of anaerobic biocorrosion of metals caused by depolarization phenomena. (Refs. 16).

  1. Metabolic dynamics of Desulfovibrio vulgaris biofilm grown on a steel surface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Pei, Guangsheng; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Weiwen

    2016-08-01

    In this study, a comparative metabolomics approach combining gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) was applied first between planktonic cells and biofilms and then between pure cultures and biofilms of Desulfovibrio vulgaris. The results revealed that the overall metabolic level of the biofilm cells was down-regulated, especially for metabolites related to the central carbon metabolism, compared to the planktonic cells and the pure culture of D. vulgaris. In addition, pathway enrichment analysis of the 58 metabolites identified by GC-MS showed that fatty acid biosynthesis in the biofilm cells was up-regulated, suggesting that fatty acids may be important for the formation, maintenance and function of D. vulgaris biofilm. This study offers a valuable perspective on the metabolic dynamics of the D. vulgaris biofilm. PMID:27299565

  2. Efficacy of natural biocide on control of microbial induced corrosion in oil pipelines mediated by Desulfovibrio vulgaris and Desulfovibrio gigas.

    PubMed

    Lavania, Meeta; Sarma, Priyangshu M; Mandal, Ajoy K; Cheema, Simrita; Lal, Banwari

    2011-01-01

    We compared the efficacy of a natural biocide with four chemical tetrakishydroxymethyl phosphonium sulfonate, benzyl trimethyl ammonium chloride, and formaldehyde, glutaraldehyde, to control microbial induced corrosion in oil pipelines. The efficacy of biocides were monitored against Desulfovibrio vulgaris and Desulfovibrio gigas in experimental pipes by measuring cell counts, H2S production, Fe(II) production, production of extracellular polymeric substances and structure of biofilm. The treatment with cow urine had minimum planktonic cell counts of 3 x 10(2) CFU/mL as well as biofilm cell counts of 9 x 10(1) CFU/mL as compared with tetrakishydroxyl methyl phosphonium sulfonate, benzyl trimethyl ammonium chloride, formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde. Sulfide production was the lowest with cow urine (0.08 mmol/L), followed by tetrakishydroxymethyl phosphonium sulfonate 0.72 mmol/L. On day 90 of treatment, Fe(II) production was also found to be the lowest with cow urine. The scanning electron microscopic studies indicated that the biofilm bacteria were killed by cow urine. These results demonstrate the cow urine mediated control of microbially induced corrosion, and this is indicative of its potential as a viable substitute of toxic biocides. To the best of our knowledge, this seems to be the first report which screens possible biocidal activity by cow urine as compared to the most common biocides which oil industry is currently using. PMID:22128548

  3. The Role of the Tetraheme Cytochrome c3 in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Semkiw, Elizabeth; Zane, Grant; Wall, Judy

    2010-05-17

    The role of tetraheme cytochrome c3 (CycA) in the metabolism of the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH) was investigated by deletion of the cycA gene using a marker-exchange deletion strategy. A highly abundant periplasmic cytochrome, CycA has the important function of transferring electrons from periplasmic hydrogenases (Hyd, Hyn, Hys) to transmembrane complexes which transport the electrons to the cytoplasm where sulfate is reduced. Previous studies have indicated that during its interaction with periplasmic hydrogenases, CycA is also involved in the reduction of toxic metals. Growth of the cycA mutant strain on lactate as the electron donor and sulfate as the terminal electron acceptor showed that, despite its abundance, CycA is not essential for DvH growth. However, the rate of growth of the mutant strain was significantly lower, and the extent of growth less, than rates and extents of growth of the wild type and complement strains on lactate/sulfate medium. This indicates that a portion of the electrons generated from cytoplasmic lactate oxidation are transported by CycA for energy production, possibly in a hydrogen cycling mechanism employed to generate ATP. Failure of the mutant strain to grow on either formate or H2, with sulfate or sulfite as electron acceptors, further indicated that CycA may be the only redox partner of periplasmic hydrogenases. The cycA mutant strain also did not grow as well as either the wild type or complement strains on medium supplemented with pyruvate/sulfate. Final growth on pyruvate/sulfate was comparable, but the mutant grew more slowly than the wild type and complement strains. Interestingly, the mutant grew better than the wild type or complement strains on pyruvate alone, possibly due to the release of H2 and/or CO2 in concentrations which may be somewhat inhibitory to wild type growth.

  4. Antimicrobial Effects of Free Nitrous Acid on Desulfovibrio vulgaris: Implications for Sulfide-Induced Corrosion of Concrete.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shu-Hong; Ho, Jun Yuan; Fan, Lu; Richardson, David J; Yuan, Zhiguo; Bond, Philip L

    2016-09-15

    antimicrobial mechanisms of FNA are largely unknown. In this study, we identified the key responses (decreased anaerobic respiration, reducing FNA, combating oxidative stress, and shutting down protein synthesis) of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, a model sewer corrosion bacterium, to FNA exposure by examining the growth, physiological, and gene expression changes. These findings provide new insight and underpinning knowledge for understanding the responses of D. vulgaris to FNA exposure, thereby benefiting the practical application of FNA for improved control of sewer corrosion and odor. PMID:27371588

  5. Identification of Molecular and Cellular Responses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Biofilms under Culture Conditions Relevant to Field Conditions for Bioreduction

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, Matthew W.

    2006-06-01

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris ATCC29579 is a sulfate- reducing bacterium (SRB) that is commonly used as a model for direct and indirect heavy metal reduction, and can also be a causitative agent of metal corrosion. During growth with lactate and sulfate, internal carbohydrate levels increased throughout exponential-phase, and peaked as the cells transitioned to stationary-phase. The carbohydrate to protein ratio (C:P) peaked at 0.05 ug/ug as the cells transitioned to stationary-phase, and then declined to 0.02 ug/ug during extended stationary-phase. In contrast, a strain of D. vulgaris that does not contain the megaplasmid, maintained higher internal carbohydrate levels and the C:P ratio peaked at 0.1 ug/ug (2-fold increase compared to wild-type). Under the tested growth conditions, we observed biofilm formation in wild-type cells, but the plasmid-less strain formed less biofilm (2-fold decrease). We hypothesized that carbohydrate was re-allocated to the external cell proper for biofilm formation. However, biofilm contained relatively little carbohydrate (0.6 to 1.0 ug/ml) and had a similar C:P ratio compared to wild-type early stationary-phase cells. Staining with calcafluor white also indicated the presence of little external carbohydrate in D. vulgaris biofilms. Less biofilm was formed in the presence of protinease K, trypsin, and chymotrypsin, however, the growth of planktonic cells was not affected. In addition, when D. vulgaris biofilm was treated with a protease, less biofilm was observed. Electron micrographs suggested the presence of filaments between the biofilm cells, and filaments appeared to be susceptible to protease treatment. Biofilm filtrates contained soluble protein, and SDS-PAGE analysis suggested different polypeptide profiles between a filtrate, a planktonic, and a biofilm sample.

  6. The primary pathway for lactate oxidation in Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Vita, Nicolas; Valette, Odile; Brasseur, Gaël; Lignon, Sabrina; Denis, Yann; Ansaldi, Mireille; Dolla, Alain; Pieulle, Laetitia

    2015-01-01

    The ability to respire sulfate linked to lactate oxidation is a key metabolic signature of the Desulfovibrio genus. Lactate oxidation by these incomplete oxidizers generates reductants through lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR), with the latter catalyzing pyruvate conversion into acetyl-CoA. Acetyl-CoA is the source of substrate-level phosphorylation through the production of ATP. Here, we show that these crucial steps are performed by enzymes encoded by a nonacistronic transcriptional unit named now as operon luo (for lactate utilization operon). Using a combination of genetic and biochemical techniques, we assigned a physiological role to the operon genes DVU3027-28 and DVU3032-33. The growth of mutant Δ26-28 was highly disrupted on D-lactate, whereas the growth of mutant Δ32-33 was slower on L-lactate, which could be related to a decrease in the activity of D-lactate or L-lactate oxidase in the corresponding mutants. The DVU3027-28 and DVU3032-33 genes thus encode functional D-LDH and L-LDH enzymes, respectively. Scanning of the genome for lactate utilization revealed several lactate permease and dehydrogenase homologs. However, transcriptional compensation was not observed in any of the mutants except for lactate permease. Although there is a high degree of redundancy for lactate oxidase, it is not functionally efficient in LDH mutants. This result could be related to the identification of several operon enzymes, including LDHs, in the PFOR activity bands, suggesting the occurrence of a lactate-oxidizing supermolecular structure that can optimize the performance of lactate utilization in Desulfovibrio species. PMID:26167158

  7. Toward a rigorous network of protein-protein interactions of the model sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabra, S.R.; Joachimiak, M.P.; Petzold, C.J.; Zane, G.M.; Price, M.N.; Gaucher, S.; Reveco, S.A.; Fok, V.; Johanson, A.R.; Batth, T.S.; Singer, M.; Chandonia, J.M.; Joyner, D.; Hazen, T.C.; Arkin, A.P.; Wall, J.D.; Singh, A.K.; Keasling, J.D.

    2011-05-01

    Protein–protein interactions offer an insight into cellular processes beyond what may be obtained by the quantitative functional genomics tools of proteomics and transcriptomics. The aforementioned tools have been extensively applied to study E. coli and other aerobes and more recently to study the stress response behavior of Desulfovibrio 5 vulgaris Hildenborough, a model anaerobe and sulfate reducer. In this paper we present the first attempt to identify protein-protein interactions in an obligate anaerobic bacterium. We used suicide vector-assisted chromosomal modification of 12 open reading frames encoded by this sulfate reducer to append an eight amino acid affinity tag to the carboxy-terminus of the chosen proteins. Three biological replicates of the 10 ‘pulled-down’ proteins were separated and analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Replicate agreement ranged between 35% and 69%. An interaction network among 12 bait and 90 prey proteins was reconstructed based on 134 bait-prey interactions computationally identified to be of high confidence. We discuss the biological significance of several unique metabolic features of D. vulgaris revealed by this protein-protein interaction data 15 and protein modifications that were observed. These include the distinct role of the putative carbon monoxide-induced hydrogenase, unique electron transfer routes associated with different oxidoreductases, and the possible role of methylation in regulating sulfate reduction.

  8. High-throughput Isolation and Characterization of Untagged Membrane Protein Complexes: Outer Membrane Complexes of Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Cell membranes represent the “front line” of cellular defense and the interface between a cell and its environment. To determine the range of proteins and protein complexes that are present in the cell membranes of a target organism, we have utilized a “tagless” process for the system-wide isolation and identification of native membrane protein complexes. As an initial subject for study, we have chosen the Gram-negative sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris. With this tagless methodology, we have identified about two-thirds of the outer membrane- associated proteins anticipated. Approximately three-fourths of these appear to form homomeric complexes. Statistical and machine-learning methods used to analyze data compiled over multiple experiments revealed networks of additional protein–protein interactions providing insight into heteromeric contacts made between proteins across this region of the cell. Taken together, these results establish a D. vulgaris outer membrane protein data set that will be essential for the detection and characterization of environment-driven changes in the outer membrane proteome and in the modeling of stress response pathways. The workflow utilized here should be effective for the global characterization of membrane protein complexes in a wide range of organisms. PMID:23098413

  9. Global transcriptional, physiological and metabolite analyses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough responses to salt adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    He, Z.; Zhou, A.; Baidoo, E.; He, Q.; Joachimiak, M. P.; Benke, P.; Phan, R.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Hemme, C.L.; Huang, K.; Alm, E.J.; Fields, M.W.; Wall, J.; Stahl, D.; Hazen, T.C.; Keasling, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.; Zhou, J.

    2009-12-01

    The response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to salt adaptation (long-term NaCl exposure) was examined by physiological, global transcriptional, and metabolite analyses. The growth of D. vulgaris was inhibited by high levels of NaCl, and the growth inhibition could be relieved by the addition of exogenous amino acids (e.g., glutamate, alanine, tryptophan) or yeast extract. Salt adaptation induced the expression of genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis and transport, electron transfer, hydrogen oxidation, and general stress responses (e.g., heat shock proteins, phage shock proteins, and oxidative stress response proteins). Genes involved in carbon metabolism, cell motility, and phage structures were repressed. Comparison of transcriptomic profiles of D. vulgaris responses to salt adaptation with those of salt shock (short-term NaCl exposure) showed some similarity as well as a significant difference. Metabolite assays showed that glutamate and alanine were accumulated under salt adaptation, suggesting that they may be used as osmoprotectants in D. vulgaris. A conceptual model is proposed to link the observed results to currently available knowledge for further understanding the mechanisms of D. vulgaris adaptation to elevated NaCl.

  10. Hexavalent chromium reduction in Desulfovibrio vulgarisHildenborough causes transitory inhibition of sulfate reduction and cellgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Klonowska, A.; Clark, M.E.; Thieman, S.B.; Giles, B.J.; Wall,J.D.; Fields, M.W.

    2008-01-07

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough is a well-studiedsulfate reducer that can reduce heavy metals and radionuclides [e.g.,Cr(VI) and U(VI)]. Cultures grown in a defined medium had a lag period ofapproximately 30 h when exposed to 0.05 mM Cr(VI). Substrate analysesrevealed that although Cr(VI) was reduced within the first 5 h, growthwas not observed for an additional 20 h. The growth lag could beexplained by a decline in cell viability; however, during this time smallamounts of lactate were still utilized without sulfate reduction oracetate formation. Approximately 40 h after Cr exposure (0.05 mM),sulfate reduction occurred concurrently with the accumulation of acetate.Similar amounts of hydrogen were produced by Cr-exposed cells compared tocontrol cells, and lactate was not converted to glycogen duringnon-growth conditions. D. vulgaris cells treated with a reducing agentand then exposed to Cr(VI) still experienced a growth lag, but theaddition of ascorbate at the time of Cr(VI) addition prevented the lagperiod. In addition, cells grown on pyruvate displayed more tolerance toCr(VI) compared to lactate-grown cells. These results indicated that D.vulgaris utilized lactate during Cr(VI) exposure without the reduction ofsulfate or production of acetate, and that ascorbate and pyruvate couldprotect D. vulgaris cells from Cr(VI)/Cr(III) toxicity.

  11. Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems of Desulfovibrio Vulgaris: Structural and Phylogenetic Analysis and Deduction of Putative Cognate Pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Weiwen; Culley, David E.; Wu, Gang; Brockman, Fred J.

    2006-01-20

    ABSTRACT-Two-component signal transduction systems (TCSTS) composed of sensory histidine kinases (HK) and response regulators (RR), constitute a key element of the mechanism by which bacteria sense and respond to changes in environments. A large number of TCSTSs including 59 putative HKs and 55 RRs were identified from the Desulfovibrio vulgaris genome, indicating their important roles in regulation of cellular metabolism. In this study, the structural and phylogenetic analysis of all putative TCSTSs in D. vulgaris was performed. The results showed D. vulgaris contained an unexpectedly large number of hybrid-type HKs, implying that multiple-step phosphorelay may be a common signal transduction mechanism in D. vulgaris. Most TCSTS components of D. vulgaris were found clustered into several subfamilies previously recognized in other bacteria and extensive co-evolution between D. vulgaris HKs and RRs was observed, suggesting that the concordance of HKs and RRs in cognate phylogenetic groups could be indicative of cognate TCSTSs...

  12. Expression of a tetraheme protein, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F cytochrome c(3), in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozawa, K.; Tsapin, A. I.; Nealson, K. H.; Cusanovich, M. A.; Akutsu, H.

    2000-01-01

    Cytochrome c(3) from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F was successfully expressed in the facultative aerobe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under anaerobic, microaerophilic, and aerobic conditions, with yields of 0.3 to 0.5 mg of cytochrome/g of cells. A derivative of the broad-host-range plasmid pRK415 containing the cytochrome c(3) gene from D. vulgaris Miyazaki F was used for transformation of S. oneidensis MR-1, resulting in the production of protein product that was indistinguishable from that produced by D. vulgaris Miyazaki F, except for the presence of one extra alanine residue at the N terminus.

  13. Oxidative Stress and Heat-Shock Responses in Desulfovibrio vulgaris by Genome-Wide Transcriptomic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Weiwen; Culley, David E.; Hogan, Mike; Vitiritti, Luigi; Brockman, Fred J.

    2006-05-30

    Abstract Sulfate-reducing bacteria, like Desulfovibrio vulgaris have developed a set of reactions allowing them to survive in environments. To obtain further knowledge of the protecting mechanisms employed in D. vulgaris against the oxidative stress and heat shock, we performed a genome-wide transcriptomic analysis to determine the cellular responses to both stimuli. The results showed that 130 genes were responsive to oxidative stress, while 427 genes responsive to heat-shock, respectively. Functional analyses suggested that the genes regulated were involved in a variety of cellular functions. Metabolic analysis showed that amino acid biosynthetic pathways were induced by both oxidative stress and heat shock treatments, while fatty acid metabolism, purine and cofactor biosynthesis were induced by heat shock only. Rubrerythrin gene (rbR) were upregulated by the oxidative stress, suggesting its important role in the oxidative resistance, whereas the expression of rubredoxin oxidoreductase (rbO), superoxide ismutase (sodB) and catalase (katA) genes were not subjected to regulation by oxidative stress in D. vulgaris. In addition, the results showed that thioredoxin reductase (trxB) was responsive to oxidative stress, suggesting the thiol-specific redox system might be involved in oxidative protection in D. vulgaris. Comparison of cellular responses to oxidative stress and heat-shock allowed the identification of 66 genes that showed a similar drastic response to both environmental stimuli, implying that they might be part of the general stress response (GSR) network in D. vulgaris, which was further supported by the finding of a conserved motif upstream these common-responsive genes.

  14. Effect of growth conditions on microbial activity and iron-sulfide production by Desulfovibrio vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chen; Vannela, Raveender; Hayes, Kim F; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2014-05-15

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) can produce iron sulfide (FeS) solids with mineralogical characteristics that may be beneficial for a variety of biogeochemical applications, such as long-term immobilization of uranium. In this study, the growth and metabolism of Desulfovibrio vulgaris, one of the best-studied SRB species, were comprehensively monitored in batch studies, and the biogenic FeS solids were characterized by X-ray diffraction. Controlling the pH by varying the initial pH, the iron-to-sulfate ratio, or the electron donor - affected the growth of D. vulgaris and strongly influenced the formation and growth of FeS solids. In particular, lower pH (from initial conditions or a decrease caused by less sulfate reduction, FeS precipitation, or using pyruvate as the electron donor) produced larger-sized mackinawite (Fe1+xS). Greater accumulation of free sulfide, from more sulfate reduction by D. vulgaris, also led to larger-sized mackinawite and particularly stimulated mackinawite transformation to greigite (Fe3S4) when the free sulfide concentration was 29.3mM. Furthermore, sufficient free Fe(2+) led to the additional formation of vivianite [Fe3(PO4)2·8(H2O)]. Thus, microbially relevant conditions (initial pH, choice of electron donor, and excess or deficiency of sulfide) are tools to generate biogenic FeS solids of different characteristics. PMID:24675611

  15. Transcriptional Response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to Oxidative Stress Mimicking Environmental Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, Patricia M.; He, Qiang; Xavier, Antonio V.; Zhou, Jizhong; Pereira, Ines A.C.; Louro, Ricardo O.

    2008-03-12

    Sulphate-reducing bacteria are anaerobes readily found in oxic-anoxic interfaces. Multiple defence pathways against oxidative conditions were identified in these organisms and proposed to be differentially expressed under different concentrations of oxygen, contributing to their ability to survive oxic conditions. In this study, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough cells were exposed to the highest concentration of oxygen that sulphate-reducing bacteria are likely to encounter in natural habitats, and the global transcriptomic response was determined. 307 genes were responsive, with cellular roles in energy metabolism, protein fate, cell envelope and regulatory functions, including multiple genes encoding heat shock proteins, peptidases and proteins with heat shock promoters. Of the oxygen reducing mechanisms of D. vulgaris only the periplasmic hydrogen-dependent mechanism is up-regulated, involving the [NiFeSe]hydrogenase, formate dehydrogenase(s) and the Hmc membrane complex. The oxidative defence response concentrates on damage repair by metal-free enzymes. These data, together with the down regulation of the Fur operon, which restricts the availability of iron, and the lack of response of the PerR operon, suggest that a major effect of this oxygen stress is the inactivation and/or degradation of multiple metalloproteins present in D. vulgaris as a consequence of oxidative damage to their metal clusters.

  16. Energetic Consequences of nitrite stress in Desulfovibrio vulgarisHildenborough, inferred from global transcriptional analysis

    SciTech Connect

    He, Qiang; Huang, Katherine H.; He, Zhili; Alm, Eric J.; Fields,Matthew W.; Hazen, Terry C.; Arkin, Adam P.; Wall, Judy D.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2005-11-03

    Many of the proteins that are candidates for bioenergetic pathways involved with sulfate respiration in Desulfovibrio spp. have been studied, but complete pathways and overall cell physiology remain to be resolved for many environmentally relevant conditions. In order to understand the metabolism of these microorganisms under adverse environmental conditions for improved bioremediation efforts, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough was used as a model organism to study stress response to nitrite, an important intermediate in the nitrogen cycle. Previous physiological studies demonstrated that growth was inhibited by nitrite and that nitrite reduction was observed to be the primary mechanism of detoxification. Global transcriptional profiling with whole-genome microarrays revealed coordinated cascades of responses to nitrite in pathways of energy metabolism, nitrogen metabolism, oxidative stress response, and iron homeostasis. In agreement with previous observations, nitrite-stressed cells showed a decrease in the expression of genes encoding sulfate reduction functions in addition to respiratory oxidative phosphorylation and ATP synthase activity. Consequently, the stressed cells had decreased expression of the genes encoding ATP-dependent amino acid transporters and proteins involved in translation. Other genes up-regulated in response to nitrite include the genes in the Fur regulon, which is suggested to be involved in iron homeostasis, and genes in the Per regulon, which is predicted to be responsible for oxidative stress response.

  17. Redox states of Desulfovibrio vulgaris DsrC, a key protein in dissimilatory sulfite reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Venceslau, Sofia S.; Cort, John R.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Chu, Rosalie K.; Robinson, Errol W.; Dahl, Christiane; Saraiva, Ligia M.; Pereira, Ines Ac

    2013-11-29

    Dissimilatory reduction of sulfite is carried out by the siroheme enzyme DsrAB, with the involvement of the protein DsrC having two conserved cysteine residues. Here, we report a study of the distribution of DsrC in cell extracts, a cysteine-labelling gel-shift assay to monitor its redox state and behaviour, and procedures to produce the different redox forms. We show that, in the model sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris, the majority of DsrC is not associated with DsrAB and is thus free to interact with other proteins. In addition, we successfully produced DsrC with an intramolecular disulfide bond (oxidized state) by treatment with arginine.

  18. Construction and Evaluation of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Whole-Genome Oligonucleotide Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Z. He; Q. He; L. Wu; M.E. Clark; J.D. Wall; Jizhong Zhou; Matthew W. Fields

    2004-03-17

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough has been the focus of biochemical and physiological studies in the laboratory, and the metabolic versatility of this organism has been largely recognized, particularly the reduction of sulfate, fumarate, iron, uranium and chromium. In addition, a Desulfovibrio sp. has been shown to utilize uranium as the sole electron acceptor. D. vulgaris is a d-Proteobacterium with a genome size of 3.6 Mb and 3584 ORFs. The whole-genome microarrays of D. vulgaris have been constructed using 70mer oligonucleotides. All ORFs in the genome were represented with 3471 (97.1%) unique probes and 103 (2.9%) non-specific probes that may have cross-hybridization with other ORFs. In preparation for use of the experimental microarrays, artificial probes and targets were designed to assess specificity and sensitivity and identify optimal hybridization conditions for oligonucleotide microarrays. The results indicated that for 50mer and 70mer oligonucleotide arrays, hybridization at 45 C to 50 C, washing at 37 C and a wash time of 2.5 to 5 minutes obtained specific and strong hybridization signals. In order to evaluate the performance of the experimental microarrays, growth conditions were selected that were expected to give significant hybridization differences for different sets of genes. The initial evaluations were performed using D. vulgaris cells grown at logarithmic and stationary phases. Transcriptional analysis of D. vulgaris cells sampled during logarithmic phase growth indicated that 25% of annotated ORFs were up-regulated and 3% of annotated ORFs were downregulated compared to stationary phase cells. The up-regulated genes included ORFs predicted to be involved with acyl chain biosynthesis, amino acid ABC transporter, translational initiation factors, and ribosomal proteins. In the stationary phase growth cells, the two most up-regulated ORFs (70-fold) were annotated as a carboxynorspermidine decarboxylase and a 2C-methyl-D-erythritol-2

  19. Exploring the role of CheA3 in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough motility

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Jayashree; Keller, Kimberly L.; Catena, Michela; Juba, Thomas R.; Zemla, Marcin; Rajeev, Lara; Knierim, Bernhard; Zane, Grant M.; Robertson, Jarrod J.; Auer, Manfred; Wall, Judy D.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2014-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria such as Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough are often found in environments with limiting growth nutrients. Using lactate as the electron donor and carbon source, and sulfate as the electron acceptor, wild type D. vulgaris shows motility on soft agar plates. We evaluated this phenotype with mutants resulting from insertional inactivation of genes potentially related to motility. Our study revealed that the cheA3 (DVU2072) kinase mutant was impaired in the ability to form motility halos. Insertions in two other cheA loci did not exhibit a loss in this phenotype. The cheA3 mutant was also non-motile in capillary assays. Complementation with a plasmid-borne copy of cheA3 restores wild type phenotypes. The cheA3 mutant displayed a flagellum as observed by electron microscopy, grew normally in liquid medium, and was motile in wet mounts. In the growth conditions used, the D. vulgaris ΔfliA mutant (DVU3229) for FliA, predicted to regulate flagella-related genes including cheA3, was defective both in flagellum formation and in forming the motility halos. In contrast, a deletion of the flp gene (DVU2116) encoding a pilin-related protein was similar to wild type. We conclude that wild type D. vulgaris forms motility halos on solid media that are mediated by flagella-related mechanisms via the CheA3 kinase. The conditions under which the CheA1 (DVU1594) and CheA2 (DVU1960) kinase function remain to be explored. PMID:24639670

  20. Effects of Chromium(VI) and Chromium(III) on Desulfovibrio vulgaris Cells

    SciTech Connect

    M.E. Clark; A. Klonowska; S.B. Thieman; B. Giles; J.D. Wall; and M.W. Fields

    2007-04-19

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris ATCC 29579 is a well studied sulfate reducer that has known capabilities of reducing heavy metals and radionuclides, like chromium and uranium. Cultures grown in a defined medium (i.e. LS4D) had a lag period of approximately 40 h when exposed to 50 μMof Cr(VI). Substrate analysis revealed that although chromium is reduced within the first 5 h, growth does not resume for another 35 h. During this time, small amounts of lactate are still utilized but the reduction of sulfate does not occur. Sulfate reduction occurs concurrently with the accumulation of acetate approximately 40 h after inoculation, when growth resumes. Similar amounts of hydrogen are produced during this time compared to hydrogen production by cells not exposed to Cr(VI); therefore an accumulation of hydrogen cannot account for the utilization of lactate. There is a significant decrease in the carbohydrate to protein ratio at approximately 25 h, and this result indicated that lactate is not converted to glycogen. Most probable number analysis indicated that cell viability decreased steadily after inoculation and reached approximately 6 x 104 cells/ml 20 h post-chromium exposure. Regeneration of reducing conditions during chromium exposure does not induce growth and in fact may make the growth conditions even more unfavorable. This result suggested that an increase in Eh was not solely responsible for the decline in viability. Cell pellets collected 10 h after chromium-exposure were unable to resume growth when suspended into fresh medium. Supernatants from these pellets were able to support cell growth upon re- inoculation. D. vulgaris cells treated with a non-dose dependent addition of ascorbate at the same time of Cr(VI) addition did not enter a lag period. Ascorbate added 3 h post-Cr(VI) exposure did not prevent the growth lag. These results indicated that Desulfovibrio utilized lactate to reduce Cr(VI) without the reduction of sulfate, that the decline in cell viability and

  1. Identification of Molecular and Cellular Responses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Biofilms under Culture Conditions Relevant to Field Conditions for Bioreduction of

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Judy D.

    2006-06-01

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough forms biofilms under stress and nutrient limitation conditions. Analysis of the transcriptional responses to acid exposure suggested that genes encoding arginine and polyamine biosynthesis were increased in expression. A literature search showed that polyamines had been suggested to stimulate biofilm formation in some bacteria. Therefore, biofilm formation by D. vulgaris was then examined. Two different assay methods were used to estimate the biofilm formation. First, the classical crystal violet stainable material attached to glass test tubes was measured. Second protein attached to the test tube sides and especially precipitated at the bottom was measured.

  2. Global Transcriptomic Analysis of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Grown on Different Carbon Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Weiwen; Culley, David E.; Scholten, Johannes C.; Hogan, Mike; Vitiritti, Luigi; Brockman, Fred J.

    2006-02-01

    Abstract Whole-genome microarrays of Desulfovibrio vulgaris were used to determine relative transcript levels in cells grown to exponential or stationary phase on a minimal medium containing either lactate or formate as electron donor. The results showed that 158 and 477 genes were differentially expressed when comparing exponential to stationary phase in lactate- or formate-based media, respectively; and 505 and 355 genes were responsive to the electron donor used at exponential or stationary phase, respectively. Functional analyses suggested that genes differentially regulated were involved in almost every aspect of cellular metabolism, with the genes involved in protein synthesis, carbon, and energy metabolism being the most regulated. The results suggested that hynAB-1 might function as a primary periplasmic hydrogenase responsible for oxidation of H2 inked to the proton gradient in lactate-based medium, while several periplasmic hydrogenases including hynAB-1 and hyd might carry out this role in formate-based medium. The results also indicated the proton gradient pathway catalyzed by alcohol dehydrogenase and heterodisulfide reductase might be actively functioning for ATP synthesis in D. vulgaris. The possible pathways for ethanol generation from lactate and formate metabolism were also discussed. In addition, hierarchical clustering analysis using expression data across carbon sources and growth phases allowed the identification of the common change specifically associated with the exponential to stationary phase transition, and that specifically associated with the carbon source change from lactate to formate. The study provides the first global description and a functional interpretation of transcriptomic response to growth phase and carbon source in D. vulgaris.

  3. Characterization of NaCl tolerance in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough through experimental evolution

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Aifen; Baidoo, Edward; He, Zhili; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Baumohl, Jason K; Benke, Peter; Joachimiak, Marcin P; Xie, Ming; Song, Rong; Arkin, Adam P; Hazen, Terry C; Keasling, Jay D; Wall, Judy D; Stahl, David A; Zhou, Jizhong

    2013-01-01

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough strains with significantly increased tolerance to NaCl were obtained via experimental evolution. A NaCl-evolved strain, ES9-11, isolated from a population cultured for 1200 generations in medium amended with 100 mM NaCl, showed better tolerance to NaCl than a control strain, EC3-10, cultured for 1200 generations in parallel but without NaCl amendment in medium. To understand the NaCl adaptation mechanism in ES9-11, we analyzed the transcriptional, metabolite and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) profiles of strain ES9-11 with 0, 100- or 250 mM-added NaCl in medium compared with the ancestral strain and EC3-10 as controls. In all the culture conditions, increased expressions of genes involved in amino-acid synthesis and transport, energy production, cation efflux and decreased expression of flagellar assembly genes were detected in ES9-11. Consistently, increased abundances of organic solutes and decreased cell motility were observed in ES9-11. Glutamate appears to be the most important osmoprotectant in D. vulgaris under NaCl stress, whereas, other organic solutes such as glutamine, glycine and glycine betaine might contribute to NaCl tolerance under low NaCl concentration only. Unsaturation indices of PLFA significantly increased in ES9-11. Branched unsaturated PLFAs i17:1 ω9c, a17:1 ω9c and branched saturated i15:0 might have important roles in maintaining proper membrane fluidity under NaCl stress. Taken together, these data suggest that the accumulation of osmolytes, increased membrane fluidity, decreased cell motility and possibly an increased exclusion of Na+ contribute to increased NaCl tolerance in NaCl-evolved D. vulgaris. PMID:23575373

  4. Rapid selective sweep of pre-existing polymorphisms and slow fixation of new mutations in experimental evolution of Desulfovibrio vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Aifen; Hillesland, Kristina L; He, Zhili; Schackwitz, Wendy; Tu, Qichao; Zane, Grant M; Ma, Qiao; Qu, Yuanyuan; Stahl, David A; Wall, Judy D; Hazen, Terry C; Fields, Matthew W; Arkin, Adam P; Zhou, Jizhong

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the genetic basis of microbial evolutionary adaptation to salt (NaCl) stress, populations of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH), a sulfate-reducing bacterium important for the biogeochemical cycling of sulfur, carbon and nitrogen, and potentially the bioremediation of toxic heavy metals and radionuclides, were propagated under salt stress or non-stress conditions for 1200 generations. Whole-genome sequencing revealed 11 mutations in salt stress-evolved clone ES9-11 and 14 mutations in non-stress-evolved clone EC3-10. Whole-population sequencing data suggested the rapid selective sweep of the pre-existing polymorphisms under salt stress within the first 100 generations and the slow fixation of new mutations. Population genotyping data demonstrated that the rapid selective sweep of pre-existing polymorphisms was common in salt stress-evolved populations. In contrast, the selection of pre-existing polymorphisms was largely random in EC populations. Consistently, at 100 generations, stress-evolved population ES9 showed improved salt tolerance, namely increased growth rate (2.0-fold), higher biomass yield (1.8-fold) and shorter lag phase (0.7-fold) under higher salinity conditions. The beneficial nature of several mutations was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. All four tested mutations contributed to the shortened lag phases under higher salinity condition. In particular, compared with the salt tolerance improvement in ES9-11, a mutation in a histidine kinase protein gene lytS contributed 27% of the growth rate increase and 23% of the biomass yield increase while a mutation in hypothetical gene DVU2472 contributed 24% of the biomass yield increase. Our results suggested that a few beneficial mutations could lead to dramatic improvements in salt tolerance. PMID:25848870

  5. Genome Sequence of Desulfovibrio sp. A2, a Highly Copper Resistant, Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from Effluents of a Zinc Smelter at the Urals

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Stefano; Abicht, Helge K.; Karnachuk, Olga V.; Solioz, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Desulfovibrio sp. A2 is an anaerobic Gram-negative sulfate-reducing bacterium with remarkable tolerance to copper. It was isolated from wastewater effluents of a zinc smelter at the Urals. Here, we report the 4.2-Mb draft genome sequence of Desulfovibrio sp. A2 and identify potential copper resistance mechanisms. PMID:22072648

  6. DcrA, a c-type heme-containing methyl-accepting protein from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, senses the oxygen concentration or redox potential of the environment.

    PubMed Central

    Fu, R; Wall, J D; Voordouw, G

    1994-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of DcrA from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, a strictly anaerobic, sulfate-reducing bacterium, indicated homology with the methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins from enteric bacteria (A. Dolla, R. Fu, M. J. Brumlik, and G. Voordouw, J. Bacteriol. 174:1726-1733, 1992). The homology is restricted to the cytoplasmic C-terminal signaling domain. The periplasmic N-terminal sensor domain was found to contain a unique sequence, CHHCH, corresponding to a consensus c-type heme binding site. A pretreated, DcrA-specific polyclonal antiserum, generated against DcrA protein overproduced in Escherichia coli, was used for immunoprecipitation of 35S-labeled DcrA from D. vulgaris and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G200(pJRFR2), a transconjugant that overexpresses functional DcrA. Labeling of the latter with the heme precursor 5-amino-[4-14C]levulinic acid, followed by immunoprecipitation, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and fluorography, confirmed the presence of c-type heme, while labeling with L-[methyl-3H]methionine in the absence of protein synthesis confirmed that DcrA is a methyl-accepting protein. The base liability of the incorporated radioactivity indicated methyl ester formation like that occurring in the methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins of enteric bacteria. L-[methyl-3H]methionine labeling of D. desulfuricans G200(pJRFR2) under different conditions indicated that methyl labeling of DcrA decreased upon addition of oxygen and increased upon subsequent addition of the reducing agent dithionite. These results indicate that DcrA may serve as a sensor of oxygen concentration and/or redox potential. Images PMID:8288528

  7. Distinctive Oxidative Stress Responses to Hydrogen Peroxide in Sulfate Reducing Bacteria Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Aifen; He, Zhili; Redding, A.M.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Hemme, Christopher L.; Joachimiak, Marcin P.; Bender, Kelly S.; Keasling, Jay D.; Stahl, David A.; Fields, Matthew W.; Hazen, Terry C.; Arkin, Adam P.; Wall, Judy D.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2009-01-01

    Response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 1 mM) was investigated with transcriptomic, proteomic and genetic approaches. Microarray data demonstrated that gene expression was extensively affected by H2O2 with the response peaking at 120 min after H2O2 treatment. Genes affected include those involved with energy production, sulfate reduction, ribosomal structure and translation, H2O2 scavenging, posttranslational modification and DNA repair as evidenced by gene coexpression networks generated via a random matrix-theory based approach. Data from this study support the hypothesis that both PerR and Fur play important roles in H2O2-induced oxidative stress response. First, both PerR and Fur regulon genes were significantly up-regulated. Second, predicted PerR regulon genes ahpC and rbr2 were derepressedin Delta PerR and Delta Fur mutants and induction of neither gene was observed in both Delta PerR and Delta Fur when challenged with peroxide, suggesting possible overlap of these regulons. Third, both Delta PerR and Delta Fur appeared to be more tolerant of H2O2 as measured by optical density. Forth, proteomics data suggested de-repression of Fur during the oxidative stress response. In terms of the intracellular enzymatic H2O2 scavenging, gene expression data suggested that Rdl and Rbr2 may play major roles in the detoxification of H2O2. In addition, induction of thioredoxin reductase and thioredoxin appeared to be independent of PerR and Fur. Considering all data together, D. vulgaris employed a distinctive stress resistance mechanism to defend against increased cellular H2O2, and the temporal gene expression changes were consistent with the slowdown of cell growth at the onset of oxidative stress.

  8. Electron mediators accelerate the microbiologically influenced corrosion of 304 stainless steel by the Desulfovibrio vulgaris biofilm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peiyu; Xu, Dake; Li, Yingchao; Yang, Ke; Gu, Tingyue

    2015-02-01

    In the microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) caused by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB), iron oxidation happens outside sessile cells while the utilization of the electrons released by the oxidation process for sulfate reduction occurs in the SRB cytoplasm. Thus, cross-cell wall electron transfer is needed. It can only be achieved by electrogenic biofilms. This work hypothesized that the electron transfer is a bottleneck in MIC by SRB. To prove this, MIC tests were carried out using 304 stainless steel coupons covered with the Desulfovibrio vulgaris (ATCC 7757) biofilm in the ATCC 1249 medium. It was found that both riboflavin and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), two common electron mediators that enhance electron transfer, accelerated pitting corrosion and weight loss on the coupons when 10ppm (w/w) of either of them was added to the culture medium in 7-day anaerobic lab tests. This finding has important implications in MIC forensics and biofilm synergy in MIC that causes billions of dollars of damages to the US industry each year. PMID:25023048

  9. Redox states of Desulfovibrio vulgaris DsrC, a key protein in dissimilatory sulfite reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Venceslau, Sofia S.; Cort, John R.; Baker, Erin S.; Chu, Rosalie K.; Robinson, Errol W.; Dahl, Christiane; Saraiva, Lígia M.; Pereira, Inês A.C.

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •DsrC is known to interact with the dissimilatory sulfite reductase enzyme (DsrAB). •We show that, however, most cellular DsrC is not associated with DsrAB. •A gel-shift assay was developed that allows monitoring of the DsrC redox state. •The DsrC intramolecularly oxidized state could only be produced by arginine treatment. -- Abstract: Dissimilatory reduction of sulfite is carried out by the siroheme enzyme DsrAB, with the involvement of the protein DsrC, which has two conserved redox-active cysteines. DsrC was initially believed to be a third subunit of DsrAB. Here, we report a study of the distribution of DsrC in cell extracts to show that, in the model sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris, the majority of DsrC is not associated with DsrAB and is thus free to interact with other proteins. In addition, we developed a cysteine-labelling gel-shift assay to monitor the DsrC redox state and behaviour, and procedures to produce the different redox forms. The oxidized state of DsrC with an intramolecular disulfide bond, which is proposed to be a key metabolic intermediate, could be successfully produced for the first time by treatment with arginine.

  10. Single-Cell Analysis of Growth and Cell Division of the Anaerobe Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    PubMed

    Fievet, Anouchka; Ducret, Adrien; Mignot, Tâm; Valette, Odile; Robert, Lydia; Pardoux, Romain; Dolla, Alain R; Aubert, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen significant progress in understanding basic bacterial cell cycle properties such as cell growth and cell division. While characterization and regulation of bacterial cell cycle is quite well-documented in the case of fast growing aerobic model organisms, no data has been so far reported for anaerobic bacteria. This lack of information in anaerobic microorganisms can mainly be explained by the absence of molecular and cellular tools such as single cell microscopy and fluorescent probes usable for anaerobes and essential to study cellular events and/or subcellular localization of the actors involved in cell cycle. In this study, single-cell microscopy has been adapted to study for the first time, in real time, the cell cycle of a bacterial anaerobe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH). This single-cell analysis provides mechanistic insights into the cell division cycle of DvH, which seems to be governed by the recently discussed so-called incremental model that generates remarkably homogeneous cell sizes. Furthermore, cell division was reversibly blocked during oxygen exposure. This may constitute a strategy for anaerobic cells to cope with transient exposure to oxygen that they may encounter in their natural environment, thereby contributing to their aerotolerance. This study lays the foundation for the first molecular, single-cell assay that will address factors that cannot otherwise be resolved in bulk assays and that will allow visualization of a wide range of molecular mechanisms within living anaerobic cells. PMID:26696987

  11. Genetic Adaptation to Salt Stress in Experimental Evolution of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Aifen; Hillesland, Kristina; He, Zhili; Joachimiak, Marcin; Zane, Grant; Dehal, Paramvir; Arkin, Adam; Stahl, David; Wall, Judy; Hazen, Terry; Zhou, Jizhong; Baidoo, Edward; Benke, Peter; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2010-05-17

    High salinity is one of the most common environmental stressors. In order to understand how environmental organisms adapt to salty environment, an experiment evolution with sulfate reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio vugaris Hildenborough was conducted. Control lines and salt-stressed lines (6 lines each) grown in minimal medium LS4D or LS4D + 100 mM NaCl were transferred for 1200 generations. The salt tolerance was tested with LS4D supplemented with 250 mM NaCl. Statistical analysis of the growth data suggested that all lines adapted to their evolutionary environment. In addition, the control lines performed better than the ancestor with faster growth rate, higher biomass yield and shorter lag phase under salty environment they did not evolve in. However, the salt-adapted lines performed better than the control lines on measures of growth rate and yield under salty environment, suggesting that the salt?evolved lines acquired mutations specific to having extra salt in LS4D. Growth data and gene transcription data suggested that populations tended to improve till 1000 generations and active mutations tended to be fixed at the stage of 1000 generations. Point mutations and insertion/deletions were identified in isolated colonies from salt-adapted and control lines via whole genome sequencing. Glu, Gln and Ala appears to be the major osmoprotectant in evolved salt-stressed line. Ongoing studies are now characterizing the contribution of specific mutations identified in the salt-evolved D. vulgaris.

  12. Single-Cell Analysis of Growth and Cell Division of the Anaerobe Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    PubMed Central

    Fievet, Anouchka; Ducret, Adrien; Mignot, Tâm; Valette, Odile; Robert, Lydia; Pardoux, Romain; Dolla, Alain R.; Aubert, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen significant progress in understanding basic bacterial cell cycle properties such as cell growth and cell division. While characterization and regulation of bacterial cell cycle is quite well-documented in the case of fast growing aerobic model organisms, no data has been so far reported for anaerobic bacteria. This lack of information in anaerobic microorganisms can mainly be explained by the absence of molecular and cellular tools such as single cell microscopy and fluorescent probes usable for anaerobes and essential to study cellular events and/or subcellular localization of the actors involved in cell cycle. In this study, single-cell microscopy has been adapted to study for the first time, in real time, the cell cycle of a bacterial anaerobe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH). This single-cell analysis provides mechanistic insights into the cell division cycle of DvH, which seems to be governed by the recently discussed so-called incremental model that generates remarkably homogeneous cell sizes. Furthermore, cell division was reversibly blocked during oxygen exposure. This may constitute a strategy for anaerobic cells to cope with transient exposure to oxygen that they may encounter in their natural environment, thereby contributing to their aerotolerance. This study lays the foundation for the first molecular, single-cell assay that will address factors that cannot otherwise be resolved in bulk assays and that will allow visualization of a wide range of molecular mechanisms within living anaerobic cells. PMID:26696987

  13. Temporal transcriptomic analysis of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough transition into stationary phase growth during electrondonor depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, M.E.; He, Q.; He, Z.; Huang, K.H.; Alm, E.J.; Wan, X.-F.; Hazen, T.C.; Arkin, A.P.; Wall, J.D.; Zhou, J.-Z.; Fields, M.W.

    2006-08-01

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris was cultivated in a defined medium, and biomass was sampled for approximately 70 h to characterize the shifts in gene expression as cells transitioned from the exponential to the stationary phase during electron donor depletion. In addition to temporal transcriptomics, total protein, carbohydrate, lactate, acetate, and sulfate levels were measured. The microarray data were examined for statistically significant expression changes, hierarchical cluster analysis, and promoter element prediction and were validated by quantitative PCR. As the cells transitioned from the exponential phase to the stationary phase, a majority of the down-expressed genes were involved in translation and transcription, and this trend continued at the remaining times. There were general increases in relative expression for intracellular trafficking and secretion, ion transport, and coenzyme metabolism as the cells entered the stationary phase. As expected, the DNA replication machinery was down-expressed, and the expression of genes involved in DNA repair increased during the stationary phase. Genes involved in amino acid acquisition, carbohydrate metabolism, energy production, and cell envelope biogenesis did not exhibit uniform transcriptional responses. Interestingly, most phage-related genes were up-expressed at the onset of the stationary phase. This result suggested that nutrient depletion may affect community dynamics and DNA transfer mechanisms of sulfate-reducing bacteria via the phage cycle. The putative feoAB system (in addition to other presumptive iron metabolism genes) was significantly up-expressed, and this suggested the possible importance of Fe{sup 2+} acquisition under metal-reducing conditions. The expression of a large subset of carbohydrate-related genes was altered, and the total cellular carbohydrate levels declined during the growth phase transition. Interestingly, the D. vulgaris genome does not contain a putative rpoS gene, a common attribute

  14. Resonance assignment of DVU2108 that is part of the Orange Protein complex in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    PubMed

    Neca, António J; Soares, Rui; Carepo, Marta S P; Pauleta, Sofia R

    2016-04-01

    We report the 94 % assignment of DVU2108, a protein belonging to the Orange Protein family, that in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough forms a protein complex named the Orange Protein complex. This complex has been shown to be implicated in the cell division of this organism. DVU2108 is a conserved protein in anaerobic microorganisms and in Desulfovibrio gigas the homologous protein was isolated with a novel Mo-Cu cluster non-covalently attached to the polypeptide chain. However, the heterologously produced DVU2108 did not contain any bound metal. These assignments provide the means to characterize the interaction of DVU2108 with the proteins that form the Orange Protein complex using NMR methods. PMID:26373427

  15. Isolation of Assimilatory- and Dissimilatory-Type Sulfite Reductases from Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Po; LeGall, Jean; Peck, Harry D.

    1973-01-01

    Bisulfite reductase (desulfoviridin) and an assimilatory sulfite reductase have been purified from extracts of Desulfovibrio vulgaris. The bisulfite reductase has absorption maxima at 628, 580, 408, 390, and 279 nm, and a molecular weight of 226,000 by sedimentation equilibrium, and was judged to be free of other proteins by disk electrophoresis and ultracentrifugation. On gels, purified bisulfite reductase exhibited two green bands which coincided with activity and protein. The enzyme appears to be a tetramer but was shown to have two different types of subunits having molecular weights of 42,000 and 50,000. The chromophore did not form an alkaline ferrohemochromogen, was not reduced with dithionite or borohydride, and did not form a spectrally visible complex with CO. The assimilatory sulfite reductase has absorption maxima at 590, 545, 405 and 275 nm and a molecular weight of 26,800, and appears to consist of a single polypeptide chain as it is not dissociated into subunits by sodium dodecyl sulfate. By disk electrophoresis, purified sulfite reductase exhibited a single greenish-brown band which coincided with activity and protein. The sole product of the reduction was sulfide, and the chromophore was reduced by borohydride in the presence of sulfite. Carbon monoxide reacted with the reduced chromophore but it did not form a typical pyridine ferrohemochromogen. Thiosulfate, trithionate, and tetrathionate were not reduced by either enzyme preparation. In the presence of 8 M urea, the spectrum of bisulfite reductase resembles that of the sulfite reductase, thus suggesting a chemical relationship between the two chromophores. Images PMID:4725615

  16. Single-cell analysis reveals gene-expression heterogeneity in syntrophic dual-culture of Desulfovibrio vulgaris with Methanosarcina barkeri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhenhua; Pei, Guangsheng; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Weiwen

    2014-12-01

    Microbial syntrophic metabolism has been well accepted as the heart of how methanogenic and other anaerobic microbial communities function. In this work, we applied a single-cell RT-qPCR approach to reveal gene-expression heterogeneity in a model syntrophic system of Desulfovibrio vulgaris and Methanosarcina barkeri, as compared with the D. vulgaris monoculture. Using the optimized primers and single-cell analytical protocol, we quantitatively determine gene-expression levels of 6 selected target genes in each of the 120 single cells of D. vulgaris isolated from its monoculture and dual-culture with M. barkeri. The results demonstrated very significant cell-to-cell gene-expression heterogeneity for the selected D. vulgaris genes in both the monoculture and the syntrophic dual-culture. Interestingly, no obvious increase in gene-expression heterogeneity for the selected genes was observed for the syntrophic dual-culture when compared with its monoculture, although the community structure and cell-cell interactions have become more complicated in the syntrophic dual-culture. In addition, the single-cell RT-qPCR analysis also provided further evidence that the gene cluster (DVU0148-DVU0150) may be involved syntrophic metabolism between D. vulgaris and M. barkeri. Finally, the study validated that single-cell RT-qPCR analysis could be a valuable tool in deciphering gene functions and metabolism in mixed-cultured microbial communities.

  17. Development of a Markerless Genetic Exchange System in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Its Use in Generating a Strain with Increased Transformation Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Kimberly L.; Bender, Kelly S.; Wall, Judy D.

    2009-07-21

    In recent years, the genetic manipulation of the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough has seen enormous progress. In spite of this progress, the current marker exchange deletion method does not allow for easy selection of multiple sequential gene deletions in a single strain because of the limited number of selectable markers available in D. vulgaris. To broaden the repertoire of genetic tools for manipulation, an in-frame, markerless deletion system has been developed. The counterselectable marker that makes this deletion system possible is the pyrimidine salvage enzyme, uracil phosphoribosyltransferase, encoded by upp. In wild-type D. vulgaris, growth was shown to be inhibited by the toxic pyrimidine analog 5-fluorouracil (5-FU); whereas, a mutant bearing a deletion of the upp gene was resistant to 5-FU. When a plasmid containing the wild-type upp gene expressed constitutively from the aph(3')-II promoter (promoter for the kanamycin resistance gene in Tn5) was introduced into the upp deletion strain, sensitivity to 5-FU was restored. This observation allowed us to develop a two-step integration and excision strategy for the deletion of genes of interest. Since this inframe deletion strategy does not retain an antibiotic cassette, multiple deletions can be generated in a single strain without the accumulation of genes conferring antibiotic resistances. We used this strategy to generate a deletion strain lacking the endonuclease (hsdR, DVU1703) of a type I restriction-modification system, that we designated JW7035. The transformation efficiency of the JW7035 strain was found to be 100 to 1000 times greater than that of the wild-type strain when stable plasmids were introduced via electroporation.

  18. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris biofilms: Carbon and energy flow contribute to the distinct biofilm growth state

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough is a sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB) that is intensively studied in the context of metal corrosion and heavy-metal bioremediation, and SRB populations are commonly observed in pipe and subsurface environments as surface-associated populations. In order to elucidate physiological changes associated with biofilm growth at both the transcript and protein level, transcriptomic and proteomic analyses were done on mature biofilm cells and compared to both batch and reactor planktonic populations. The biofilms were cultivated with lactate and sulfate in a continuously fed biofilm reactor, and compared to both batch and reactor planktonic populations. Results The functional genomic analysis demonstrated that biofilm cells were different compared to planktonic cells, and the majority of altered abundances for genes and proteins were annotated as hypothetical (unknown function), energy conservation, amino acid metabolism, and signal transduction. Genes and proteins that showed similar trends in detected levels were particularly involved in energy conservation such as increases in an annotated ech hydrogenase, formate dehydrogenase, pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and rnf oxidoreductase, and the biofilm cells had elevated formate dehydrogenase activity. Several other hydrogenases and formate dehydrogenases also showed an increased protein level, while decreased transcript and protein levels were observed for putative coo hydrogenase as well as a lactate permease and hyp hydrogenases for biofilm cells. Genes annotated for amino acid synthesis and nitrogen utilization were also predominant changers within the biofilm state. Ribosomal transcripts and proteins were notably decreased within the biofilm cells compared to exponential-phase cells but were not as low as levels observed in planktonic, stationary-phase cells. Several putative, extracellular proteins (DVU1012, 1545) were also detected in the extracellular fraction from

  19. Influence of plaque-forming bacterium, Rhodobacteraceae sp. on the growth of Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhangran; Zhang, Jingyan; Lei, Xueqian; Zhang, Bangzhou; Cai, Guanjing; Zhang, Huajun; Li, Yi; Zheng, Wei; Tian, Yun; Xu, Hong; Zheng, Tianling

    2014-10-01

    Experiments were conducted to find out the molecular features, infection process of a special alga plaque-forming microorganism and its potential influence on the biomass of Chlorella vulgaris during the infection process. Direct contact between the algal cell and the bacterium may be the primary steps needed for the bacterium to lyse the alga. Addition of C. vulgaris cells into f/2 medium allowed us obtain the object bacterium. The 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons results showed that the plaque-forming bacterium kept the closest relationship with Labrenzia aggregata IAM 12614(T) at 98.90%. The existence of the bacterium could influence both the dry weight and lipid content of C. vulgaris. This study demonstrated that direct cell wall disruption of C. vulgaris by the bacterium would be a potentially effective method to utilize the biomass of microalgae. PMID:25086475

  20. Evolution of the syntrophic interaction between Desulfovibrio vulgaris and Methanosarcina barkeri: involvement of an ancient horizontal gene transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Scholten, Johannes C.; Culley, David E.; Brockman, Fred J.; Wu, Gang; Zhang, Weiwen

    2007-01-05

    The sulfate reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio vulgaris and the methanogenic archaea Methanosarcina barkeri can grow syntrophically on lactate. In this study, three functionally unknown genes of D. vulgaris, DVU2103, DVU2104 and DVU2108, were found to be up-regulated 2-4 fold following the lifestyle shift from syntroph to sulfatereducer; moreover, none of these genes were regulated when D. vulgaris was grown alone in various pure culture conditions. These results suggest that these genes may play roles related to the lifestyle change of D. vulgaris from syntroph to sulfate reducer. This hypothesis is further supported by phylogenomic analyses showing that homologies of these genes were only narrowly present in several groups of bacteria, most of which are restricted to a syntrophic life-style, such as Pelobacter carbinolicus, Syntrophobacter fumaroxidans, Syntrophomonas wolfei and Syntrophus aciditrophicus. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the genes tended to be clustered with archaeal genera, and they were rooted on archaeal species in the phylogenetic trees, suggesting that they originated from an archaeal methanogen and were horizontally transferred to a common ancestor of delta- Proteobacteria, Clostridia and Thermotogae. While lost in most species during evolution, these genes appear to have been retained in bacteria capable of syntrophic relationships, probably due to their providing a selective advantage. In addition, no significant bias in codon and amino acid usages was detected between these genes and the rest of the D. vulgaris genome, suggesting these gene transfers may have occurred early in the evolutionary history so that sufficient time has elapsed to allow an adaptation to the codon and amino acid usages of D. vulgaris. This report provides novel insights into the origin and evolution of bacterial genes involved in the syntrophic lifestyle.

  1. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Desulfovibrio Vulgaris Grown in Planktonic Culture and Mature Biofilm on a Steel Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Weiwen; Culley, David E.; Nie, Lei; Scholten, Johannes C.

    2007-08-01

    The build-up of biofilms of sulphate -reducing bacteria (SRB) on metals surfaces may lead to severe corrosion of iron. To understand the processes at molecular level, in this study, a whole-genome oligonucleotide microarray was used to examine differential expression patterns between planktonic populations and mature biofilm of model SRB species Desulfovibrio vulgaris. Statistical analysis revealed that 472 genes were differentially expressed (1.5 fold or more with a p value less than 0.025) when comparing biofilm to planktonic cells. Among the differentially expressed genes were several that corresponded to biofilm formation genes identified in many aerobic bacterial biofilms (i.e., Pseudomonas species and Escherichia coli), such as down-regulation of genes encoding flagellin, flagellar motor switch protein and chemotaxis proteins involved in cell motility and induction of genes encoding sugar transferase and glycogen synthase involved in exopolysaccharide biosynthesis. In addition, D. vulgaris biofilm-bound cells exhibited decreased transcription of genes involved in protein synthesis, energy metabolism and sulfate reduction, as well as genes involved in general stress responses. These findings were all consistent with early suggestion that the average physiology of biofilm cells were similar to planktonic cells of stationary phases. Most notably, up-regulation of large number of outer membrane proteins was observed in D. vulgaris biofilm. Although their function is still unknown, the higher expression of these genes in D. vulgaris biofilm could implicate important roles formation and maintenance of multi-cellular consortium on metal surface. The study provided insights into the metabolic networks associated with D. vulgaris biofilm formation and maintenance on an iron surface.

  2. Crystallization and preliminary structure determination of the membrane-bound complex cytochrome c nitrite reductase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, M. L.; Oliveira, T.; Matias, P. M.; Martins, I. C.; Valente, F. M. A.; Pereira, I. A. C.; Archer, M.

    2006-06-01

    The cytochrome c nitrite reductase complex from D. vulgaris Hildenborough has been crystallized. The preliminary crystallographic structure reveals a 2:1 NrfA:NrfH complex stoichiometry. The cytochrome c nitrite reductase (cNiR) isolated from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough is a membrane-bound complex formed of NrfA and NrfH subunits. The catalytic subunit NrfA is a soluble pentahaem cytochrome c that forms a physiological dimer of about 120 kDa. The electron-donor subunit NrfH is a membrane-anchored tetrahaem cytochrome c of about 18 kDa molecular weight and belongs to the NapC/NirT family of quinol dehydrogenases, for which no structures are known. Crystals of the native cNiR membrane complex, solubilized with dodecylmaltoside detergent (DDM), were obtained using PEG 4K as precipitant. Anomalous diffraction data were measured at the Swiss Light Source to 2.3 Å resolution. Crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 79.5, b = 256.7, c = 578.2 Å. Molecular-replacement and MAD methods were combined to solve the structure. The data presented reveal that D. vulgaris cNiR contains one NrfH subunit per NrfA dimer.

  3. Glyceryl trinitrate and caprylic acid for the mitigation of the Desulfovibrio vulgaris biofilm on C1018 carbon steel.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Zhang, P; Cai, W; Rosenblatt, J S; Raad, I I; Xu, D; Gu, T

    2016-02-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC), also known as biocorrosion, is caused by corrosive biofilms. MIC is a growing problem, especially in the oil and gas industry. Among various corrosive microbes, sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) are often the leading culprit. Biofilm mitigation is the key to MIC mitigation. Biocide applications against biofilms promote resistance over time. Thus, it is imperative to develop new biodegradable and cost-effective biocides for large-scale field applications. Using the corrosive Desulfovibrio vulgaris (an SRB) biofilm as a model biofilm, this work demonstrated that a cocktail of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) and caprylic acid (CA) was very effective for biofilm prevention and mitigation of established biofilms on C1018 carbon steel coupons. The most probable number sessile cell count data and confocal laser scanning microscope biofilm images proved that the biocide cocktail of 25 ppm (w/w) GTN + 0.1% (w/w) CA successfully prevented the D. vulgaris biofilm establishment on C1018 carbon steel coupons while 100 ppm GTN + 0.1% CA effectively mitigated pre-established D. vulgaris biofilms on C1018 carbon steel coupons. In both cases, the cocktails were able to reduce the sessile cell count from 10(6) cells/cm(2) to an undetectable level. PMID:26745983

  4. Desulfovibrio profundus sp. nov., a novel barophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium from deep sediment layers in the Japan Sea.

    PubMed

    Bale, S J; Goodman, K; Rochelle, P A; Marchesi, J R; Fry, J C; Weightman, A J; Parkes, R J

    1997-04-01

    Several strains of a strictly anaerobic, vibrio-shaped or sigmoid, sulfate-reducing bacterium were isolated from deep marine sediments (depth, 80 and 500 m) obtained from the Japan Sea (Ocean Drilling Program Leg 128, site 798B). This bacterium was identified as a member of the genus Desulfovibrio on the basis of the presence of desulfoviridin and characteristic phospholipid fatty acids (iso 17:1 omega 7 and iso 15:0), the small number of growth substrates utilized (lactate, pyruvate, and hydrogen), and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis data. Based on data for 16S rRNA sequences (1,369 bp), all of the Japan Sea strains were identical to each other and were most closely related to Desulfovibrio salexigens and less closely related to Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (levels of similarity, 91 and 89.6%, respectively). There were, however, considerable phenotypic differences (in temperatures, pressures, and salinities tolerated, growth substrates, and electron donors) between the Japan Sea isolates and the type strains of previously described desulfovibrios, as well as important differences among the Japan Sea isolates. The Japan Sea isolates were active (with sulfide production) over a wide temperature range (15 to 65 degrees C) and a wide sodium chloride concentration range (0.2 to 10%) (moderate halophile), and they were barophiles that were active at pressures up to about 40 MPa (400 atm). The optimum pressures for activity corresponded to the calculated pressures at the depths from which the organisms were isolated (for isolates obtained at depths of 80 and 500 m the optimum activities occurred at 10 and 15 MPa, respectively [100 and 150 atm, respectively]). This confirms that the organisms came from deep sediments and indicates that they are well-adapted for deep sediment conditions, which is consistent with other characteristics (utilization of hydrogen, fermentation, and utilization of ferric iron and organic sulfonates as electron acceptors). We propose that Japan

  5. The sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 as a model for understanding bacterial mercury methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmour, C C; Elias, Dwayne A; Kucken, A M; Brown, Steven D; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Wall, Judy D.

    2011-01-01

    We propose the use of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 as a model species for understanding the mechanism of microbial Hg methylation. Strain ND132 is an anaerobic dissimilatory sulfate-reducing bacterium (DSRB), isolated from estuarine mid-Chesapeake Bay sediments. It was chosen for study because of its exceptionally high rates of Hg methylation in culture and its metabolic similarity to the lost strain D. desulfuricans LS, the only organism for which methylation pathways have been partially defined. Strain ND132 is an incomplete oxidizer of short-chain fatty acids. It is capable of respiratory growth using fumarate as an electron acceptor, supporting growth without sulfide production. We used enriched stable Hg isotopes to show that ND132 simultaneously produces and degrades methylmercury (MeHg) during growth but does not produce elemental Hg. MeHg produced by cells is mainly excreted, and no MeHg is produced in spent medium. Mass balances for Hg and MeHg during the growth of cultures, including the distribution between filterable and particulate phases, illustrate how medium chemistry and growth phase dramatically affect Hg solubility and availability for methylation. The available information on Hg methylation among strains in the genus Desulfovibrio is summarized, and we present methylation rates for several previously untested species. About 50% of Desulfovibrio strains tested to date have the ability to produce MeHg. Importantly, the ability to produce MeHg is constitutive and does not confer Hg resistance. A 16S rRNA-based alignment of the genus Desulfovibrio allows the very preliminary assessment that there may be some evolutionary basis for the ability to produce MeHg within this genus.

  6. Electron microscopic characterization of the sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris: biofilms and clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, M.; Remis, J.; Jorgens, D.; Zemla, M.; Singer, M.; Schmitt, J.; Gorby, Y.; Hazen, T.; Wall, J.; Elias, D.; Torok, T.

    2008-12-01

    Numerous studies have helped characterize the stress response of the anaerobic sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH). Yet all of these techniques represent bulk analyses of cells grown mostly under liquid culture conditions in large reactors. Such results represent an average over a large variety of individual cellular responses, hence assuming a homogeneous distribution of physiological traits. Moreover, only recently are those techniques applied to the environmentally more relevant condition of microbial communities (biofilms). What is missing is a detailed ultrastructural analysis of such biofilms in order to determine biofilm organization and its extracellular metal deposition distribution. Using sophisticated sample cryo-preparation approaches such as high-pressure freezing, freeze-substitution or microwave- assisted processing, followed serial section TEM imaging, we have found a large heterogeneity with respect to metal precipitation with some cells being surrounded by metal precipitates whereas neighboring cells, being genetically identical and seeing virtually the exact same microenvironment, completely lack extracellular metal deposits. Interestingly, apart from metal deposits near cell surfaces, we also found string- and sheet- like metal deposits in between neighboring cells that in mature biofilms can extend for hundreds of micrometers. In mature DvH biofilms such deposits were predominantly associated with areas of intact cells in biofilms, with areas devoid of such metal deposits displayed predominantly cell debris, suggesting a role of such deposits for cell survival, which may be of high significance to biofilms at DOE sites. Upon tomographic imaging we found that extracellular metal deposits were often associated with thin filaments and vesicle-like features. To complement our serial section 2D analysis of resin-embedded samples and the resulting limitation of sampling 3D biofilm as thin sections of arbitrary orientation, we

  7. Effects of Sulfate and Sulfide on Dehalococcoides Strain 195 and Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough Ability to Biodegrade Trichloroethene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polasko, A. L.; Mao, X.; Alvarez-Cohen, L.

    2014-12-01

    Trichloroethene (TCE) is a prevalent groundwater contaminant across the USA. Dehalococcoides is the only known bacterium that can reductively dechlorinate TCE to the benign end product ethene. Sulfate is also a common ubiquitous compound in groundwater. Little research has been conducted on the toxicity of sulfate or sulfide on Dehalococcoides and its effect on dechlorination. This study evaluated the inhibitory effects of high sulfate/sulfide concentrations on pure cultures Dehalococcoides mccartyi 195 (strain 195), sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DVH) and the syntrophic co-culture of strain 195 with DVH. Strain 195 was maintained in defined medium with H2 as electron donor, acetate as carbon source, and 78 μmol TCE as the electron acceptor. 2.5 mM sulfate showed no inhibitory effect on strain 195 dechlorination rates (5.3 μmol d-1); whereas, 2mM sulfide completely inhibited ethene production and only 14 μmol of cis-DCE was produced. DVH was maintained using lactate as the energy and carbon source and sulfate as the electron acceptor. High sulfate concentrations (30 mM) did not show an inhibitory effect on DVH growth and 90% of the amended sulfate was reduced within 24 hours. The cell yield of DVH was 1.3±0.1x108 mL-1, which was comparable to the control (1.5±0.2x108 mL-1). Similarly, 5mM sulfide did not show an inhibitory effect on the cell growth of DVH (1.8±0.3x108 mL-1). In the syntrophic co-culture containing strain 195 and DVH, DVH fermented lactate to H2 and acetate, and strain 195 used H2 as the electron donor for dechlorination. When 1 mM sulfate was amended to the consortia, the TCE dechlorination rate (13 μmol d-1) was similar to the control (no sulfate addition); whereas, the cell number of DVH increased from 8.7±0.4x107 (control) to 2.6±0.7x108 (1 mM sulfate). TCE dechlorination was completely inhibited when 5mM sulfate was amended, and only 10% of the total TCE added was dechlorinated to cis-DCE (8μmol). Accordingly

  8. Fractionation of sulfur isotopes by Desulfovibrio vulgaris mutants lacking hydrogenases or type I tetraheme cytochrome c3

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Min Sub; Wang, David T.; Zane, Grant M.; Wall, Judy D.; Bosak, Tanja; Ono, Shuhei

    2013-01-01

    The sulfur isotope effect produced by sulfate reducing microbes is commonly used to trace biogeochemical cycles of sulfur and carbon in aquatic and sedimentary environments. To test the contribution of intracellular coupling between carbon and sulfur metabolisms to the overall magnitude of the sulfur isotope effect, this study compared sulfur isotope fractionations by mutants of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. We tested mutant strains lacking one or two periplasmic (Hyd, Hyn-1, Hyn-2, and Hys) or cytoplasmic hydrogenases (Ech and CooL), and a mutant lacking type I tetraheme cytochrome (TpI-c3). In batch culture, wild-type D. vulgaris and its hydrogenase mutants had comparable growth kinetics and produced the same sulfur isotope effects. This is consistent with the reported redundancy of hydrogenases in D. vulgaris. However, the TpI-c3 mutant (ΔcycA) exhibited slower growth and sulfate reduction rates in batch culture, and produced more H2 and an approximately 50% larger sulfur isotope effect, compared to the wild type. The magnitude of sulfur isotope fractionation in the CycA deletion strain, thus, increased due to the disrupted coupling of the carbon oxidation and sulfate reduction pathways. In continuous culture, wild-type D. vulgaris and the CycA mutant produced similar sulfur isotope effects, underscoring the influence of environmental conditions on the relative contribution of hydrogen cycling to the electron transport. The large sulfur isotope effects associated with the non-ideal stoichiometry of sulfate reduction in this study imply that simultaneous fermentation and sulfate reduction may be responsible for some of the large naturally-occurring sulfur isotope effects. Overall, mutant strains provide a powerful tool to test the effect of specific redox proteins and pathways on sulfur isotope fractionation. PMID:23805134

  9. A Proteomic View of Desulfovibrio Vulgaris Metabolim as Determined by Liquid Chromatography Coupled with Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Weiwen; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Culley, David E.; Nie, Lei; Petritis, Konstantinos; Strittmatter, Eric F.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Brockman, Fred J.

    2006-08-15

    Direct liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to examine the proteins from Desulfovibrio vulgaris grown at exponential or stationary phase on a minimal medium containing either lactate or formate as the primary carbon source, with the goal of an initial characterization of the diversity of proteins synthesized under these conditions. Across all four growth conditions, 976 gene products were identified with high confidence, which is equal to approximately 28% of all predicted proteins in the D. vulgaris genome. Among these, fifty-two out of 55 predicted ribosomal proteins (~95%) were identified with high confidence. Functional analysis showed that the proteins identified were distributed among almost all functional classes, with the energy metabolism category containing the greatest number of identified proteins. At least 154 open reading frames (ORFs) originally annotated as hypothetical proteins were found to encode expressed proteins, which provided verification for the authenticity of these hypothetical proteins. Proteomic analysis showed that members of the proton gradient pathway, catalyzed by alcohol dehydrogenases and heterodisulfide reductases, and [NiFe] hydrogenase (HynAB-1) of the hydrogen cycling pathway were highly expressed in all four growth conditions, suggesting they may be the primary pathways for ATP synthesis in D. vulgaris. Most of the enzymes involved in substrate-level phosphorylation were also detected in all tested conditions. However, no enzyme involved in CO cycling or formate cycling was detected, suggesting these are not the primary pathways for ATP biosynthesis under the tested conditions. This study provides the first proteomic overview of the cellular metabolism of D. vulgaris.

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Erythrobacter vulgaris Strain O1, a Glycosyl Hydrolase-Producing Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Yaakop, Amira Suriaty; Chan, Chia Sing; Kahar, Ummirul Mukminin; Ee, Robson

    2015-01-01

    Erythrobacter vulgaris strain O1, a moderate halophile, was isolated from a beach in Johor, Malaysia. Here, we present the draft genome and suggest potential applications of this bacterium. PMID:25977433

  11. Overcoming the anaerobic hurdle in phenotypic microarrays: Generation andvisualization of growth curve data for Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    SciTech Connect

    Borglin, Sharon E; Joyner, Dominique; Jacobsen, Janet; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Hazen, Terry C.

    2008-10-04

    Growing anaerobic microorganisms in phenotypic microarrays (PM) and 96-well microtiter plates is an emerging technology that allows high throughput survey of the growth and physiology and/or phenotype of cultivable microorganisms. For non-model bacteria, a method for phenotypic analysis is invaluable, not only to serve as a starting point for further evaluation, but also to provide a broad understanding of the physiology of an uncharacterized wild-type organism or the physiology/phenotype of a newly created mutant of that organism. Given recent advances in genetic characterization and targeted mutations to elucidate genetic networks and metabolic pathways, high-throughput methods for determining phenotypic differences are essential. Here we outline challenges presented in studying the physiology and phenotype of a sulfate reducing anaerobic delta proteobacterium, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. Modifications of the commercially available OmniLog(TM) system (Hayward, CA) for experimental setup, and configuration, as well as considerations in PM data analysis are presented. Also highlighted here is data viewing software that enables users to view and compare multiple PM data sets. The PM method promises to be a valuable strategy in our systems biology approach to D. vulgaris studies and is readily applicable to other anaerobic and aerobic bacteria.

  12. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Hideaki; Shomura, Yasuhito; Goenka Agrawal, Aruna; Kaur, Amrit Pal; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2010-11-01

    Dissimilatory sulfite reductase (Dsr) plays an important role in sulfate respiration in many sulfate-reducing bacteria. Dsr from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F has been purified and crystallized at 277 K using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method with PEG 3350 and potassium thiocyanate as precipitants. A data set was collected to 3.7 Å resolution from a single crystal at 100 K using synchrotron radiation. The Dsr crystal belonged to space group P4(1)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 163.26, c = 435.32 Å. The crystal structure of Dsr was determined by the molecular-replacement method based on the three-dimensional structure of Dsr from D. vulgaris Hildenborough. The crystal contained three α(2)β(2)γ(2) units per asymmetric unit, with a Matthews coefficient (V(M)) of 2.35 Å(3) Da(-1); the solvent content was estimated to be 47.7%. PMID:21045297

  13. Improving interpretation of geoelectrical signatures arising from biomineralization process in porous media: Low-frequency dielectric spectroscopy measurements on Desulfovibrio vulgaris cell suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Prodan, C.; Slater, L. D.; Bot, C.; Ntarlagiannis, D.

    2009-12-01

    Previous geophysical studies have demonstrated the sensitivity of complex conductivity measurements to microbial growth, biofilm formation, and microbial-mineral alternations, indicating that complex conductivity has the potential to serve as non-invasive tool for bioremediation monitoring. However, the inherent dielectric properties of microbes and how they might directly contribute to the geophysical responses observed during microbial-mineral transformations are not well understood. As a first step towards improving the understanding of electrical signals from microbial-mineral transformations in porous media, we studied the low frequency dielectric properties of sulfate-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio vulgaris) cell suspensions, a common soil borne microorganism involved in remediation of toxic metals in solution. We utilized a two-electrode dielectric spectroscopy measurement, common in biophysics applications,to acquire high quality dielectric dispersion curves of Desulfovibrio vulgaris cell suspensions over the frequency range 0.1 Hz to 1M Hz. Desulfovibrio vulgaris cell suspensions were placed between two parallel steel electrodes that are enclosed in a cylindrical glass tube, and the complex impedance of sample was measured relative to a known resistor. The measured impedance includes an electrode polarization impedance arising at the interface between electrodes and ionic solutions at low frequencies. This electrode impedance has traditionally precluded the reliable interpretation of two electrode techniques at low frequencies (< 1000 Hz). In order to obtain the true dielectric dispersion curve of sample, we adopt a simple and robust strategy to measure, analyze and remove the polarization impedance. The feasibility of this polarization removal technique was tested on water saturated glass beads. We show that the broadband dielectric response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris can be reliably determined with this approach. The measurements are modeled based on a

  14. Genome Sequence of the Piezophilic, Mesophilic Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfovibrio indicus J2T

    PubMed Central

    Maignien, Lois; Shao, Zongze; Alain, Karine

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of Desulfovibrio indicus J2T, a member of the family Desulfovibrionaceae, consists of 3,966,573-bp in one contig and encodes 3,461 predicted genes, 5 noncoding RNAs, 3 rRNAs operons, and 52 tRNA-encoding genes. The genome is consistent with a heterotrophic, anaerobic lifestyle including the sulfate reduction pathway. PMID:27056223

  15. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the gene encoding the high-molecular-weight cytochrome c from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, W B; Loutfi, M; Bruschi, M; Rapp-Giles, B J; Wall, J D; Voordouw, G

    1991-01-01

    By using a synthetic deoxyoligonucleotide probe designed to recognize the structural gene for cytochrome cc3 from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, a 3.7-kb XhoI genomic DNA fragment containing the cc3 gene was isolated. The gene encodes a precursor polypeptide of 58.9 kDa, with an NH2-terminal signal sequence of 31 residues. The mature polypeptide (55.7 kDa) has 16 heme binding sites of the form C-X-X-C-H. Covalent binding of heme to these 16 sites gives a holoprotein of 65.5 kDa with properties similar to those of the high-molecular-weight cytochrome c (Hmc) isolated from the same strain by Higuchi et al. (Y. Higuchi, K. Inaka, N. Yasuoka, and T. Yagi, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 911:341-348, 1987). Since the data indicate that cytochrome cc3 and Hmc are the same protein, the gene has been named hmc. The Hmc polypeptide contains 31 histidinyl residues, 16 of which are integral to heme binding sites. Thus, only 15 of the 16 hemes can have bis-histidinyl coordination. A comparison of the arrangement of heme binding sites and coordinated histidines in the amino acid sequences of cytochrome c3 and Hmc from D. vulgaris Hildenborough suggests that the latter contains three cytochrome c3-like domains. Cloning of the D. vulgaris Hildenborough hmc gene into the broad-host-range vector pJRD215 and subsequent conjugational transfer of the recombinant plasmid into D. desulfuricans G200 led to expression of a periplasmic Hmc gene product with covalently bound hemes. Images PMID:1846136

  16. Multiple Roles of Desulfovibrio vulgaris to U (VI) Reduction and Long-term Stability of Uraninte (UO2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannela, R.; Zhou, C.; Rittmann, B. E.

    2012-04-01

    Our current research is focused on assessing the Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain and its versatility in uranium (U) bioremediation. D.vulgaris reduces U(VI) to U(IV), which can be immobilized by precipitation to uraninite (UO2) solids. We first studied the complementary mechanisms of direct enzymatic and indirect chemical reduction of U (VI) with the help of series of batch experiments. We observed 90% removal of U (VI) by enzymatic activity within 10 hours and formation of biogenic UO2 solids. These experiments also revealed that D. vulgaris reduced U(VI) fastest under sulfate-reducing conditions in absence of aqueous Fe(II). When, Fe (II) is present, the rate of uraninite formation was significantly reduced; suggesting the retardation by aqueous Fe2+. However, X-ray diffractometry (XRD) data indicated that biogenic uraninite was far more crystallized in presence of Fe2+. This data showed that the presence of aqueous iron (II) could enhance crystallization of uraninite. These results clearly confirm the chemical reduction of U(VI) by biogenic H2S as well as direct enzymatic U(VI) reduction by D.vulgaris strain. We are also investigating the other important role of biogenic iron sulfide (FeS) solids generated by D.vulgaris to long-term U (VI) bioremediation. Iron sulfide precipitates protect UO2 against oxidative dissolution of U by serving as an effective oxidant scavenger. In this regard, we first systematically studied effects of varying experimental conditions that represent real-life scenarios. In several batch experiments, we demonstrated that, over ranges of pH (6.5 to 8.6) and concentration ratios of lactate-to-sulfate (0.5:1 to 1.9:1) and iron-to-sulfate (0.11:1 to 1:1), D. vulgaris primarily produced mackinawite form of FeS when either soluble Fe2+ or Fe3+ was used as the iron source. We observed that poorly crystalline mackinawite ((Fe1+xS) - which is a more desired type of FeS, was found when low lactate-to-sulfate ratio (0.5:1), low iron-to-sulfate ratio

  17. Genome Sequence of the Piezophilic, Mesophilic Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfovibrio indicus J2T.

    PubMed

    Cao, Junwei; Maignien, Lois; Shao, Zongze; Alain, Karine; Jebbar, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome sequence ofDesulfovibrio indicusJ2(T), a member of the familyDesulfovibrionaceae, consists of 3,966,573-bp in one contig and encodes 3,461 predicted genes, 5 noncoding RNAs, 3 rRNAs operons, and 52 tRNA-encoding genes. The genome is consistent with a heterotrophic, anaerobic lifestyle including the sulfate reduction pathway. PMID:27056223

  18. LC-MS/MS based proteomic analysis and functional inference of hypothetical proteins in Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Weiwen; Culley, David E.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Nie, Lei; Scholten, Johannes C.; Petritis, Konstantinos; Strittmatter, Eric F.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Brockman, Fred J.

    2006-11-03

    ABSTRACT In the previous study, the whole-genome gene expression profiles of D. vulgaris in response to oxidative stress and heat shock were determined. The results showed 24-28% of the responsive genes were hypothetical proteins that have not been experimentally characterized or whose function can not be deduced by simple sequence comparison. To further explore the protecting mechanisms employed in D. vulgaris against the oxidative stress and heat shock, attempt was made in this study to infer functions of these hypothetical proteins by phylogenomic profiling along with detailed sequence comparison against various publicly available databases. By this approach we were ableto assign possible functions to 25 responsive hypothetical proteins. The findings included that DVU0725, induced by oxidative stress, may be involved in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis, implying that the alternation of lipopolysaccharide on cell surface might service as a mechanism against oxidative stress in D. vulgaris. In addition, two responsive proteins, DVU0024 encoding a putative transcriptional regulator and DVU1670 encoding predicted redox protein, were sharing co-evolution atterns with rubrerythrin in Archaeoglobus fulgidus and Clostridium perfringens, respectively, implying that they might be part of the stress response and protective systems in D. vulgaris. The study demonstrated that phylogenomic profiling is a useful tool in interpretation of experimental genomics data, and also provided further insight on cellular response to oxidative stress and heat shock in D. vulgaris.

  19. Construction of Whole Genome Microarrays, and Expression Analysis of Desulfovibrio vulgaris cells in Metal-Reducing Conditions (Uranium and Chromium)

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, Matthew W.

    2005-06-01

    One of the major goals of the project is to construct whole-genome microarrays for Desulfovibrio vulgaris. Previous whole-genome microarrays constructed at ORNL have been PCR-amplimer based, and we wanted to re-evaluate the type of microarrays being built because oligonucleotide probes have several advantages. Microarrays have been generally constructed with two types of probes, PCR-generated probes that typically range in size between 200 and 2000 bp, and oligonucleotide probes with typical size of 20-70 nt. Producing PCR product-based DNA arrays can be a time-consuming procedure that includes PCR primer design, amplification, size verification, product purification, and product quantification. Also, some ORFs are difficult to amplify and thus the construction of comprehensive arrays can be a challenge. Recently, to alleviate some of the problems associated with PCR product-based microarrays, oligonucleotide microarrays that contain probes longer than 40 nt have been evaluated and used for whole genome expression studies. These microarrays should have higher specificity and are easy to construct, and can thus provide an important alternative approach to monitor gene expression. However, due to the smaller probe size, it is expected that the detection sensitivity of oligonucleotide arrays will be lower than PCR product-based probes.

  20. Can direct extracellular electron transfer occur in the absence of outer membrane cytochromes in Desulfovibrio vulgaris?

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, Dwayne A; Zane, Mr. Grant M.; Auer, Dr. Manfred; Fields, Dr. Matthew Wayne; Wall, Judy D.; Gorby, Dr. Yuri A.

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular electron transfer has been investigated over several decades via forms of soluble electron transfer proteins that are exported for extracellular reoxidation. More recently, several organisms have been shown to reduce extracellular metals via the direct transfer of electron through appendages; also known as nanowires. They have been reported most predominantly in Shewanella and Geobacter. While the relevancy and composition of these structures in each genus has been debated, both possess outer membrane cytochrome complexes that could theoretically come into direct contact with solid phase oxidized metals. Members of the genus Desulfovibrio apparently have no such cytochromes although similar appendages are present, are electrically conductive, and are different from flagella. Upon U(VI)-reduction, the structures in Desulfovibrio become coated with U(IV). Deletion of flagellar genes did not alter soluble or amorphous Fe(III) or U(VI) reduction, or appendage appearance. Removal of the chromosomal pilA gene hampered amorphous Fe(III)-reduction by ca. 25%, but cells lacking the native plasmid, pDV1, reduced soluble Fe(III) and U(VI) at ca. 50% of the wild type rate while amorphous Fe(III)-reduction slowed to ca. 20% of the wild type rate. Appendages were present in all deletions as well as pDV1, except pilA. Gene complementation restored all activities and morphologies to wild type levels. This suggests that pilA encodes the structural component, whereas genes within pDV1 may provide the reactive members. How such appendages function without outer membrane cytochromes is under investigation.

  1. The sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 as a model for understanding bacterial mercury methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmour, C C; Elias, Dwayne A; Kucken, A M; Brown, Steven D; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Wall, Judy D.

    2010-01-01

    We propose the use of Desulfovibrio sp. ND132 as a model species for understanding the genetics and biochemistry of microbial Hg methylation. ND132 is a dissimilatory sulfate-reducing bacterium (DSRB) that exhibits exceptionally high rates of Hg methylation in culture, but is otherwise a characteristically typical Desulfovibrio strain. The full genome sequence of ND132 will be available soon. ND132 is very similar to other DSRB that are sequenced but do not methylate Hg, allowing comparison for potential methylation genes. Here, we describe the physiological characteristics of the strain, examine its MeHg production capability, and place the strain within the phylogeny of the Desulfovibrionales using 16S rRNA. We also examine Hg toxicity and the inducibility of MeHg production amongst the DSRB by comparing ND132 to non-methylating DSRB. The optimal growth medium for Hg methylation is pyruvate/fumarate, which supports strong respiratory growth without sulfide production. At moderate Hg concentrations (10 ng/ml), and using TiNTA as a reductant, ND132 methylates about 30% of added HgCl2 during batch culture growth on 40 mM pyruvate/fumarate. Under constant culture conditions, MeHg production is an exponential function of Hg concentration, probably reflecting Hg partitioning between aqueous and solid phases. To help understand how Hg is taken up by this organism, we examined the influence of a variety of small thiol-bearing ligands, as well as select amino acids, on methylation by D. desulfuricans ND132. All thiol bearing ligands tested affected methylation in similar ways, suggesting that Hg uptake by ND132 is not associated with uptake of a specific amino acid. To identify enzymes for the methylation activity, a genetic approach is being pursued. Conjugation from E. coli donors works well that allows the generation of a transposon library of random ND132 mutants. These mutants will be screened for affects on mercury methylation.

  2. Periplasmic Cytochrome c3 of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Is Directly Involved in H2-Mediated Metal but Not Sulfate Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Dwayne A.; Suflita, Joseph M.; McInerney, Michael J.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2004-01-01

    Kinetic parameters and the role of cytochrome c3 in sulfate, Fe(III), and U(VI) reduction were investigated in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. While sulfate reduction followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics (Km = 220 μM), loss of Fe(III) and U(VI) was first-order at all concentrations tested. Initial reduction rates of all electron acceptors were similar for cells grown with H2 and sulfate, while cultures grown using lactate and sulfate had similar rates of metal loss but lower sulfate reduction activities. The similarities in metal, but not sulfate, reduction with H2 and lactate suggest divergent pathways. Respiration assays and reduced minus oxidized spectra were carried out to determine c-type cytochrome involvement in electron acceptor reduction. c-type cytochrome oxidation was immediate with Fe(III) and U(VI) in the presence of H2, lactate, or pyruvate. Sulfidogenesis occurred with all three electron donors and effectively oxidized the c-type cytochrome in lactate- or pyruvate-reduced, but not H2-reduced cells. Correspondingly, electron acceptor competition assays with lactate or pyruvate as electron donors showed that Fe(III) inhibited U(VI) reduction, and U(VI) inhibited sulfate loss. However, sulfate reduction was slowed but not halted when H2 was the electron donor in the presence of Fe(III) or U(VI). U(VI) loss was still impeded by Fe(III) when H2 was used. Hence, we propose a modified pathway for the reduction of sulfate, Fe(III), and U(VI) which helps explain why these bacteria cannot grow using these metals. We further propose that cytochrome c3 is an electron carrier involved in lactate and pyruvate oxidation and is the reductase for alternate electron acceptors with higher redox potentials than sulfate. PMID:14711670

  3. Photosensitivity of the Ni-A state of [NiFe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F with visible light

    SciTech Connect

    Osuka, Hisao; Shomura, Yasuhito; Komori, Hirofumi; Shibata, Naoki; Nagao, Satoshi; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Hirota, Shun

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ni-A state of [NiFe] hydrogenase showed light sensitivity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New FT-IR bands were observed with light irradiation of the Ni-A state. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPR g-values of the Ni-A state shifted upon light irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The light-induced state converted back to the Ni-A state under the dark condition. -- Abstract: [NiFe] hydrogenase catalyzes reversible oxidation of molecular hydrogen. Its active site is constructed of a hetero dinuclear Ni-Fe complex, and the oxidation state of the Ni ion changes according to the redox state of the enzyme. We found that the Ni-A state (an inactive unready, oxidized state) of [NiFe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F (DvMF) is light sensitive and forms a new state (Ni-AL) with irradiation of visible light. The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) bands at 1956, 2084 and 2094 cm{sup -1} of the Ni-A state shifted to 1971, 2086 and 2098 cm{sup -1} in the Ni-AL state. The g-values of g{sub x} = 2.30, g{sub y} = 2.23 and g{sub z} = 2.01 for the signals in the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum of the Ni-A state at room temperature varied for -0.009, +0.012 and +0.010, respectively, upon light irradiation. The light-induced Ni-AL state converted back immediately to the Ni-A state under dark condition at room temperature. These results show that the coordination structure of the Fe site of the Ni-A state of [NiFe] hydrogenase is perturbed significantly by light irradiation with relatively small coordination change at the Ni site.

  4. Sustainable syntrophic growth of Dehalococcoides ethenogenes strain 195 with Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Methanobacterium congolense: global transcriptomic and proteomic analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Men, Yujie; Feil, Helene; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Shah, Manesh B; Johnson, David R.; Lee, Patrick K. H.; West, Kimberlee A; Zinder, Stephen H.; Andersen, Gary L.; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Dehalococcoides ethenogenes strain 195 (DE195) was grown in a sustainable syntrophic association with Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DVH) as a co-culture, as well as with DVH and the hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanobacterium congolense (MC) as a tri-culture using lactate as the sole energy and carbon source. In the co- and tri-cultures, maximum dechlorination rates of DE195 were enhanced by approximately three times (11.0 0.01 lmol per day for the co-culture and 10.1 0.3 lmol per day for the tri-culture) compared with DE195 grown alone (3.8 0.1 lmol per day). Cell yield of DE195 was enhanced in the co-culture (9.0 0.5107 cells per lmol Cl released, compared with 6.8 0.9107 cells per lmol Cl released for the pure culture), whereas no further enhancement was observed in the tri-culture (7.3 1.8107 cells per lmol Cl released). The transcriptome of DE195 grown in the co-culture was analyzed using a wholegenome microarray targeting DE195, which detected 102 significantly up- or down-regulated genes compared with DE195 grown in isolation, whereas no significant transcriptomic difference was observed between co- and tri-cultures. Proteomic analysis showed that 120 proteins were differentially expressed in the co-culture compared with DE195 grown in isolation. Physiological, transcriptomic and proteomic results indicate that the robust growth of DE195 in co- and tri-cultures is because of the advantages associated with the capabilities of DVH to ferment lactate to provide H2 and acetate for growth, along with potential benefits from proton translocation, cobalamin-salvaging and amino acid biosynthesis, whereas MC in the tri-culture provided no significant additional benefits beyond those of DVH.

  5. Sustainable syntrophic growth of Dehalococcoides ethenogenes strain 195 with Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Methanobacterium congolense: global transcriptomic and proteomic analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Men, Yujie; Feil, Helene; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C.; Shah, Manesh B.; Johnson, David R.; Lee, Patrick K. H.; West, Kimberlee A.; Zinder, Stephen H.; Andersen, Gary L.; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2011-09-01

    Dehalococcoides ethenogenes strain 195 (DE195) was grown in a sustainable syntrophic association with Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DVH) as a co-culture, as well as with DVH and the hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanobacterium congolense (MC) as a tri-culture using lactate as the sole energy and carbon source. In the co- and tri-cultures, maximum dechlorination rates of DE195 were enhanced by approximately three times (11.0 0.01 lmol per day for the co-culture and 10.1 0.3 lmol per day for the tri-culture) compared with DE195 grown alone (3.8 0.1 lmol per day). Cell yield of DE195 was enhanced in the co-culture (9.0 0.5107 cells per lmol Cl released, compared with 6.8 0.9107 cells per lmol Cl released for the pure culture), whereas no further enhancement was observed in the tri-culture (7.3 1.8107 cells per lmol Cl released). The transcriptome of DE195 grown in the co-culture was analyzed using a wholegenome microarray targeting DE195, which detected 102 significantly up- or down-regulated genes compared with DE195 grown in isolation, whereas no significant transcriptomic difference was observed between co- and tri-cultures. Proteomic analysis showed that 120 proteins were differentially expressed in the co-culture compared with DE195 grown in isolation. Physiological, transcriptomic and proteomic results indicate that the robust growth of DE195 in co- and tri-cultures is because of the advantages associated with the capabilities of DVH to ferment lactate to provide H2 and acetate for growth, along with potential benefits from proton translocation, cobalamin-salvaging and amino acid biosynthesis, whereas MC in the tri-culture provided no significant additional benefits beyond those of DVH.

  6. Periplasmic Cytochrome c(3) of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Is Directly Involved in H2-Mediated Metal but Not Sulfate Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, Dwayne A.; Suflita, Joseph M.; McInerney, Michael J.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2004-01-01

    Kinetic parameters and the role of cytochrome c3 in sulfate, Fe(III), and U(VI) reduction were investigated in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. While sulfate reduction followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics (Km 220 uM), loss of Fe(III) and U(VI) was first-order at all concentrations tested. Initial reduction rates of all electron acceptors were similar for cells grown with H2 and sulfate, while cultures grown using lactate and sulfate had similar rates of metal loss but lower sulfate reduction activities. The similarities in metal, but not sulfate, reduction with H2 and lactate suggest divergent pathways. Respiration assays and reduced minus oxidized spectra were carried out to determine c-type cytochrome involvement in electron acceptor reduction. c-type cytochrome oxidation was immediate with Fe(III) and U(VI) in the presence of H2, lactate, or pyruvate. Sulfidogenesis occurred with all three electron donors and effectively oxidized the c-type cytochrome in lactate or pyruvate-reduced, but not H2-reduced cells. Correspondingly, electron acceptor competition assays with lactate or pyruvate as electron donors showed that Fe(III) inhibited U(VI) reduction, and U(VI) inhibited sulfate loss. However, sulfate reduction was slowed but not halted when H2 was the electron donor in the presence of Fe(III) or U(VI). U(VI) loss was still impeded by Fe(III) when H2 was used. Hence, we propose a modified pathway for the reduction of sulfate, Fe(III), and U(VI) which helps explain why these bacteria cannot grow using these metals. We further propose that cytochrome c3 is an electron carrier involved in lactate and pyruvate oxidation and is the reductase for alternate electron acceptors with higher redox potentials than sulfate.

  7. Methanogenesis from sucrose by defined immobilized consortia. [Escherichia coli; Acetobacterium woodii; Desulfovibrio vulgaris; Methanosarcina barkeri; Methanobacterium formicicum

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, W.J.; Guyot, J.P.; Wolfe, R.S.

    1984-01-01

    A bacterial consortium capable of sucrose degradation primarily to CH/sub 4/ and CO/sub 2/ was constructed, with acetate as the key methanogenic precursor. In addition, the effect of agar immobilization on the activity of the consortium was determined. The primary fermentative organism, Escherichia coli, produced acetate, formate, H/sub 2/, and CO/sub 2/ (known substrates for methanogens), as well as ethanol and lactate, compounds that are not substrates for methanogens. Oxidation of the nonmethanogenic substrates, lactate and ethanol, to acetate was mediated by the addition of Acetobacterium woodii and Desulfovibrio vulgaris. The methanogenic stage was accomplished by the addition of the acetophilic methanogen Methanosarcina barkeri and the hydrogenophilic methanogen Methanobacterium formicicum. Results of studies with low substrate concentrations (0.05 to 0.2% (wt/vol)), a growth-limiting medium, and the five-component consortium indicated efficient conversion (40%) of sucrose carbon to CH/sub 4/. Significant decreases in yields of CH/sub 4/ and rates of CH/sub 4/ production were observed if any component of the consortium was omitted. Approximately 70% of the CH/sub 4/ generated occurred via acetate. Agar-immobilized cells of the consortium exhibited yields of CH/sub 4/ and rates of CH/sub 4/ production from sucrose similar to those of nonimmobilized cells. The rate of CH/sub 4/ production decreased by 25% when cysteine was omitted from reaction conditions and by 40% when the immobilized consortium was stored for 1 week at 4/sup 0/C.

  8. Growth of the Obligate Anaerobe Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough under Continuous Low Oxygen Concentration Sparging: Impact of the Membrane-Bound Oxygen Reductases

    PubMed Central

    Ramel, Fanny; Brasseur, Gael; Pieulle, Laetitia; Valette, Odile; Hirschler-Réa, Agnès; Fardeau, Marie Laure; Dolla, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Although obligate anaerobe, the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH) exhibits high aerotolerance that involves several enzymatic systems, including two membrane-bound oxygen reductases, a bd-quinol oxidase and a cc(b/o)o3 cytochrome oxidase. Effect of constant low oxygen concentration on growth and morphology of the wild-type, single (Δbd, Δcox) and double deletion (Δcoxbd) mutant strains of the genes encoding these oxygen reductases was studied. When both wild-type and deletion mutant strains were cultured in lactate/sulfate medium under constant 0.02% O2 sparging, they were able to grow but the final biomasses and the growth yield were lower than that obtained under anaerobic conditions. At the end of the growth, lactate was not completely consumed and when conditions were then switched to anaerobic, growth resumed. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that a large majority of the cells were then able to divide (over 97%) but the time to recover a complete division event was longer for single deletion mutant Δbd than for the three other strains. Determination of the molar growth yields on lactate suggested that a part of the energy gained from lactate oxidation was derived toward cells protection/repairing against oxidative conditions rather than biosynthesis, and that this part was higher in the single deletion mutant Δbd and, to a lesser extent, Δcox strains. Our data show that when DvH encounters oxidative conditions, it is able to stop growing and to rapidly resume growing when conditions are switched to anaerobic, suggesting that it enters active dormancy sate under oxidative conditions. We propose that the pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) plays a central role in this phenomenon by reversibly switching from an oxidative-sensitive fully active state to an oxidative-insensitive inactive state. The oxygen reductases, and especially the bd-quinol oxidase, would have a crucial function by maintaining reducing conditions

  9. The genetic basis of energy conservation in the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Price, Morgan N.; Ray, Jayashree; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Bauer, Stefan; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2014-10-31

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria play major roles in the global carbon and sulfur cycles, but it remains unclear how reducing sulfate yields energy. To determine the genetic basis of energy conservation, we measured the fitness of thousands of pooled mutants of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 during growth in 12 different combinations of electron donors and acceptors. We show that ion pumping by the ferredoxin:NADH oxidoreductase Rnf is required whenever substrate-level phosphorylation is not possible. The uncharacterized complex Hdr/flox-1 (Dde_1207:13) is sometimes important alongside Rnf and may perform an electron bifurcation to generate more reduced ferredoxin from NADH to allow further ion pumping. Similarly,more » during the oxidation of malate or fumarate, the electron-bifurcating transhydrogenase NfnAB-2 (Dde_1250:1) is important and may generate reduced ferredoxin to allow additional ion pumping by Rnf. During formate oxidation, the periplasmic [NiFeSe] hydrogenase HysAB is required, which suggests that hydrogen forms in the periplasm, diffuses to the cytoplasm, and is used to reduce ferredoxin, thus providing a substrate for Rnf. We found that during hydrogen utilization, the transmembrane electron transport complex Tmc is important and may move electrons from the periplasm into the cytoplasmic sulfite reduction pathway. Finally, mutants of many other putative electron carriers have no clear phenotype, which suggests that they are not important under our growth conditions, although we cannot rule out genetic redundancy.« less

  10. The genetic basis of energy conservation in the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Morgan N.; Ray, Jayashree; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Bauer, Stefan; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2014-10-31

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria play major roles in the global carbon and sulfur cycles, but it remains unclear how reducing sulfate yields energy. To determine the genetic basis of energy conservation, we measured the fitness of thousands of pooled mutants of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 during growth in 12 different combinations of electron donors and acceptors. We show that ion pumping by the ferredoxin:NADH oxidoreductase Rnf is required whenever substrate-level phosphorylation is not possible. The uncharacterized complex Hdr/flox-1 (Dde_1207:13) is sometimes important alongside Rnf and may perform an electron bifurcation to generate more reduced ferredoxin from NADH to allow further ion pumping. Similarly, during the oxidation of malate or fumarate, the electron-bifurcating transhydrogenase NfnAB-2 (Dde_1250:1) is important and may generate reduced ferredoxin to allow additional ion pumping by Rnf. During formate oxidation, the periplasmic [NiFeSe] hydrogenase HysAB is required, which suggests that hydrogen forms in the periplasm, diffuses to the cytoplasm, and is used to reduce ferredoxin, thus providing a substrate for Rnf. We found that during hydrogen utilization, the transmembrane electron transport complex Tmc is important and may move electrons from the periplasm into the cytoplasmic sulfite reduction pathway. Finally, mutants of many other putative electron carriers have no clear phenotype, which suggests that they are not important under our growth conditions, although we cannot rule out genetic redundancy.

  11. Bacterial Growth Phase Influences Methylmercury Production by the Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Abir; Brooks, Scott C; Miller, Carrie L; Mosher, Jennifer J; Yin, Xiangping Lisa; Drake, Meghan M

    2011-01-01

    The effect of bacterial growth phase is an aspect of mercury (Hg) methylation that previous studies have not investigated in detail. Here we consider the effect of growth phase (mid-log, late-log and late stationary phase) on Hg methylation by the known methylator Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132. We tested the addition of Hg alone (chloride-complex), Hg with Suwannee River natural organic matter (SRNOM) (unequilibrated), and Hg equilibrated with SRNOM on monomethylmercury (MMHg) production by ND132 over a growth curve in pyruvate-fumarate media. This NOM did not affect MMHg production even under very low Hg:SRNOM ratios, where Hg binding is predicted to be dominated by high energy sites. Adding Hg or Hg-NOM to growing cultures 24h before sampling (late addition) resulted in {approx}2x greater net fraction of Hg methylated than for comparably aged cultures exposed to Hg from the initial culture inoculation (early addition). Mid- and late-log phase cultures produced similar amounts of MMHg, but late stationary phase cultures (both under early and late Hg addition conditions) produced up to {approx}3x more MMHg, indicating the potential importance of growth phase in studies of MMHg production.

  12. The genetic basis of energy conservation in the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    PubMed Central

    Price, Morgan N.; Ray, Jayashree; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Bauer, Stefan; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2014-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria play major roles in the global carbon and sulfur cycles, but it remains unclear how reducing sulfate yields energy. To determine the genetic basis of energy conservation, we measured the fitness of thousands of pooled mutants of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 during growth in 12 different combinations of electron donors and acceptors. We show that ion pumping by the ferredoxin:NADH oxidoreductase Rnf is required whenever substrate-level phosphorylation is not possible. The uncharacterized complex Hdr/flox-1 (Dde_1207:13) is sometimes important alongside Rnf and may perform an electron bifurcation to generate more reduced ferredoxin from NADH to allow further ion pumping. Similarly, during the oxidation of malate or fumarate, the electron-bifurcating transhydrogenase NfnAB-2 (Dde_1250:1) is important and may generate reduced ferredoxin to allow additional ion pumping by Rnf. During formate oxidation, the periplasmic [NiFeSe] hydrogenase HysAB is required, which suggests that hydrogen forms in the periplasm, diffuses to the cytoplasm, and is used to reduce ferredoxin, thus providing a substrate for Rnf. During hydrogen utilization, the transmembrane electron transport complex Tmc is important and may move electrons from the periplasm into the cytoplasmic sulfite reduction pathway. Finally, mutants of many other putative electron carriers have no clear phenotype, which suggests that they are not important under our growth conditions, although we cannot rule out genetic redundancy. PMID:25400629

  13. Bacterial Growth Phase Influences Methylmercury Production by the Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Abir; Brooks, Scott C; Miller, Carrie L; Mosher, Jennifer J; Yin, Xiangping Lisa; Drake, Meghan M

    2011-01-01

    The effect of bacterial growth phase is an aspect of mercury (Hg) methylation that previous studies have not investigated in detail. Here we consider the effect of growth phase (mid-log, late-log and late stationary phase) on Hg methylation by the known methylator Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132. We tested the addition of Hg alone (chloride-complex), Hg with Suwannee River natural organic matter (SRNOM) (unequilibrated), and Hg equilibrated with SRNOM on monomethylmercury (MMHg) production by ND132 over a growth curve in pyruvate fumarate media. This NOM did not affect MMHg production even under very low Hg: SRNOM ratios, where Hg binding is predicted to be dominated by high energy sites. Adding Hg or Hg NOM to growing cultures 24 h before sampling (late addition) resulted in ~2 greater net fraction of Hg methylated than for comparably aged cultures exposed to Hg from the initial culture inoculation (early addition). Mid-and late-log phase cultures produced similar amounts of MMHg, but late stationary phase cultures (both under early and late Hg addition conditions) produced up to ~3 more MMHg, indicating the potential importance of growth phase in studies of MMHg production.

  14. Study of the Thiol/Disulfide Redox Systems of the Anaerobe Desulfovibrio vulgaris Points Out Pyruvate:Ferredoxin Oxidoreductase as a New Target for Thioredoxin 1

    PubMed Central

    Pieulle, Laetitia; Stocker, Pierre; Vinay, Manon; Nouailler, Matthieu; Vita, Nicolas; Brasseur, Gaël; Garcin, Edwige; Sebban-Kreuzer, Corinne; Dolla, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Sulfate reducers have developed a multifaceted adaptative strategy to survive against oxidative stresses. Along with this oxidative stress response, we recently characterized an elegant reversible disulfide bond-dependent protective mechanism in the pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) of various Desulfovibrio species. Here, we searched for thiol redox systems involved in this mechanism. Using thiol fluorescent labeling, we show that glutathione is not the major thiol/disulfide balance-controlling compound in four different Desulfovibrio species and that no other plentiful low molecular weight thiol can be detected. Enzymatic analyses of two thioredoxins (Trxs) and three thioredoxin reductases allow us to propose the existence of two independent Trx systems in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH). The TR1/Trx1 system corresponds to the typical bacterial Trx system. We measured a TR1 apparent Km value for Trx1 of 8.9 μm. Moreover, our results showed that activity of TR1 was NADPH-dependent. The second system named TR3/Trx3 corresponds to an unconventional Trx system as TR3 used preferentially NADH (Km for NADPH, 743 μm; Km for NADH, 5.6 μm), and Trx3 was unable to reduce insulin. The Km value of TR3 for Trx3 was 1.12 μm. In vitro experiments demonstrated that the TR1/Trx1 system was the only one able to reactivate the oxygen-protected form of Desulfovibrio africanus PFOR. Moreover, ex vivo pulldown assays using the mutant Trx1C33S as bait allowed us to capture PFOR from the DvH extract. Altogether, these data demonstrate that PFOR is a new target for Trx1, which is probably involved in the protective switch mechanism of the enzyme. PMID:21199874

  15. Comparison of Transcriptional Heterogeneity of Eight Genes between Batch Desulfovibrio vulgaris Biofilm and Planktonic Culture at a Single-Cell Level.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhenhua; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Weiwen

    2016-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) biofilm formed on metal surfaces can change the physicochemical properties of metals and cause metal corrosion. To enhance understanding of differential gene expression in Desulfovibrio vulgaris under planktonic and biofilm growth modes, a single-cell based RT-qPCR approach was applied to determine gene expression levels of 8 selected target genes in four sets of the 31 individual cells isolated from each growth condition (i.e., biofilm formed on a mild steel (SS) and planktonic cultures, exponential and stationary phases). The results showed obvious gene-expression heterogeneity for the target genes among D. vulgaris single cells of both biofilm and planktonic cultures. In addition, an increased gene-expression heterogeneity in the D. vulgaris biofilm when compared with the planktonic culture was also observed for seven out of eight selected genes at exponential phase, and six out of eight selected genes at stationary phase, respectively, which may be contributing to the increased complexity in terms of structures and morphology in the biofilm. Moreover, the results showed up-regulation of DVU0281 gene encoding exopolysaccharide biosynthesis protein, and down-regulation of genes involved in energy metabolism (i.e., DVU0434 and DVU0588), stress responses (i.e., DVU2410) and response regulator (i.e., DVU3062) in the D. vulgaris biofilm cells. Finally, the gene (DVU2571) involved in iron transportation was found down-regulated, and two genes (DVU1340 and DVU1397) involved in ferric uptake repressor and iron storage were up-regulated in D. vulgaris biofilm, suggesting their possible roles in maintaining normal metabolism of the D. vulgaris biofilm under environments of high concentration of iron. This study showed that the single-cell based analysis could be a useful approach in deciphering metabolism of microbial biofilms. PMID:27199927

  16. Comparison of Transcriptional Heterogeneity of Eight Genes between Batch Desulfovibrio vulgaris Biofilm and Planktonic Culture at a Single-Cell Level

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Zhenhua; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Weiwen

    2016-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) biofilm formed on metal surfaces can change the physicochemical properties of metals and cause metal corrosion. To enhance understanding of differential gene expression in Desulfovibrio vulgaris under planktonic and biofilm growth modes, a single-cell based RT-qPCR approach was applied to determine gene expression levels of 8 selected target genes in four sets of the 31 individual cells isolated from each growth condition (i.e., biofilm formed on a mild steel (SS) and planktonic cultures, exponential and stationary phases). The results showed obvious gene-expression heterogeneity for the target genes among D. vulgaris single cells of both biofilm and planktonic cultures. In addition, an increased gene-expression heterogeneity in the D. vulgaris biofilm when compared with the planktonic culture was also observed for seven out of eight selected genes at exponential phase, and six out of eight selected genes at stationary phase, respectively, which may be contributing to the increased complexity in terms of structures and morphology in the biofilm. Moreover, the results showed up-regulation of DVU0281 gene encoding exopolysaccharide biosynthesis protein, and down-regulation of genes involved in energy metabolism (i.e., DVU0434 and DVU0588), stress responses (i.e., DVU2410) and response regulator (i.e., DVU3062) in the D. vulgaris biofilm cells. Finally, the gene (DVU2571) involved in iron transportation was found down-regulated, and two genes (DVU1340 and DVU1397) involved in ferric uptake repressor and iron storage were up-regulated in D. vulgaris biofilm, suggesting their possible roles in maintaining normal metabolism of the D. vulgaris biofilm under environments of high concentration of iron. This study showed that the single-cell based analysis could be a useful approach in deciphering metabolism of microbial biofilms. PMID:27199927

  17. Sustainable syntrophic growth of Dehalococcoides ethenogenes strain 195 with Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Methanobacterium congolense: Global transcriptomic and proteomic analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Men, Y.; Feil, H.; VerBerkmoes, N.C.; Shah, M.B.; Johnson, D.R.; Lee, P.K.H; West, K.A.; Zinder, S.H.; Andersen, G.L.; Alvarez-Cohen, L.

    2011-03-01

    Dehalococcoides ethenogenes strain 195 (DE195) was grown in a sustainable syntrophic association with Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DVH) as a co-culture, as well as with DVH and the hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanobacterium congolense (MC) as a tri-culture using lactate as the sole energy and carbon source. In the co- and tri-cultures, maximum dechlorination rates of DE195 were enhanced by approximately three times (11.0±0.01 lmol per day for the co-culture and 10.1±0.3 lmol per day for the tri-culture) compared with DE195 grown alone (3.8±0.1 lmol per day). Cell yield of DE195 was enhanced in the co-culture (9.0±0.5 x 107 cells per lmol Cl{sup -} released, compared with 6.8±0.9x 107 cells per lmol Cl{sup -} released for the pure culture), whereas no further enhancement was observed in the tri-culture (7.3±1.8x 107 cells per lmol Cl{sup -} released). The transcriptome of DE195 grown in the co-culture was analyzed using a whole-genome microarray targeting DE195, which detected 102 significantly up- or down-regulated genes compared with DE195 grown in isolation, whereas no significant transcriptomic difference was observed between co- and tri-cultures. Proteomic analysis showed that 120 proteins were differentially expressed in the co-culture compared with DE195 grown in isolation. Physiological, transcriptomic and proteomic results indicate that the robust growth of DE195 in co- and tri-cultures is because of the advantages associated with the capabilities of DVH to ferment lactate to provide H2 and acetate for growth, along with potential benefits from proton translocation, cobalamin-salvaging and amino acid biosynthesis, whereas MC in the tri-culture provided no significant additional benefits beyond those of DVH.

  18. Genome sequence of the model sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio gigas: a comparative analysis within the Desulfovibrio genus*

    PubMed Central

    Morais-Silva, Fabio O; Rezende, Antonio Mauro; Pimentel, Catarina; Santos, Catia I; Clemente, Carla; Varela–Raposo, Ana; Resende, Daniela M; da Silva, Sofia M; de Oliveira, Luciana Márcia; Matos, Marcia; Costa, Daniela A; Flores, Orfeu; Ruiz, Jerónimo C; Rodrigues-Pousada, Claudina

    2014-01-01

    Desulfovibrio gigas is a model organism of sulfate-reducing bacteria of which energy metabolism and stress response have been extensively studied. The complete genomic context of this organism was however, not yet available. The sequencing of the D. gigas genome provides insights into the integrated network of energy conserving complexes and structures present in this bacterium. Comparison with genomes of other Desulfovibrio spp. reveals the presence of two different CRISPR/Cas systems in D. gigas. Phylogenetic analysis using conserved protein sequences (encoded by rpoB and gyrB) indicates two main groups of Desulfovibrio spp, being D. gigas more closely related to D. vulgaris and D. desulfuricans strains. Gene duplications were found such as those encoding fumarate reductase, formate dehydrogenase, and superoxide dismutase. Complexes not yet described within Desulfovibrio genus were identified: Mnh complex, a v-type ATP-synthase as well as genes encoding the MinCDE system that could be responsible for the larger size of D. gigas when compared to other members of the genus. A low number of hydrogenases and the absence of the codh/acs and pfl genes, both present in D. vulgaris strains, indicate that intermediate cycling mechanisms may contribute substantially less to the energy gain in D. gigas compared to other Desulfovibrio spp. This might be compensated by the presence of other unique genomic arrangements of complexes such as the Rnf and the Hdr/Flox, or by the presence of NAD(P)H related complexes, like the Nuo, NfnAB or Mnh. PMID:25055974

  19. Final Report Construction of Whole Genome Microarrays, and Expression Analysis of Desulfovibrio vulgaris cells in Metal-Reducing Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    M.W. Fields; J.D. Wall; J. Keasling; J. Zhou

    2008-05-15

    We continue to utilize the oligonucleotide microarrays that were constructed through funding with this project to characterize growth responses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris relevant to metal-reducing conditions. To effectively immobilize heavy metals and radionuclides via sulfate-reduction, it is important to understand the cellular responses to adverse factors observed at contaminated subsurface environments (e.g., nutrients, pH, contaminants, growth requirements and products). One of the major goals of the project is to construct whole-genome microarrays for Desulfovibrio vulgaris. First, in order to experimentally establish the criteria for designing gene-specific oligonucleotide probes, an oligonucleotide array was constructed that contained perfect match (PM) and mismatch (MM) probes (50mers and 70mers) based upon 4 genes. The effects of probe-target identity, continuous stretch, mismatch position, and hybridization free energy on specificity were examined. Little hybridization was observed at a probe-target identity of <85% for both 50mer and 70mer probes. 33 to 48% of the PM signal intensities were detected at a probe-target identity of 94% for 50mer oligonucleotides, and 43 to 55% for 70mer probes at a probe-target identity of 96%. When the effects of sequence identity and continuous stretch were considered independently, a stretch probe (>15 bases) contributed an additional 9% of the PM signal intensity compared to a non-stretch probe (< 15 bases) at the same identity level. Cross-hybridization increased as the length of continuous stretch increased. A 35-base stretch for 50mer probes or a 50-base stretch for 70mer probes had approximately 55% of the PM signal. Mismatches should be as close to the middle position of an oligonucleotide probe as possible to minimize cross-hybridization. Little cross-hybridization was observed for probes with a minimal binding free energy greater than -30 kcal/mol for 50mer probes or -40 kcal/mol for 70mer probes. Based on the

  20. Fractionation of Sulfur Isotopes by Desulfovibrio vulgaris Mutants Lacking Periplasmic Hydrogenases or the Type I Tetraheme Cytochrome c3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, M.; Ono, S.; Bosak, T.

    2012-12-01

    A large fraction of anaerobic mineralization of organic compounds relies on microbial sulfate reduction. Sulfur isotope fractionation by these microbes has been widely used to trace the biogeochemical cycling of sulfur and carbon, but intracellular mechanisms behind the wide range of fractionations observed in nature and cultures are not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the influence of electron transport chain components on the fractionation of sulfur isotopes by culturing Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough mutants lacking hydrogenases or type I tetraheme cytochrome c3 (Tp1-c3). The mutants were grown both in batch and continuous cultures. All tested mutants grew on lactate or pyruvate as the sole carbon and energy sources, generating sulfide. Mutants lacking cytoplasmic and periplasmic hydrogenases exhibited similar growth physiologies and sulfur isotope fractionations to their parent strains. On the other hand, a mutant lacking Tp1-c3 (ΔcycA) fractionated the 34S/32S ratio more than the wild type, evolving H2 in the headspace and exhibiting a lower specific respiration rate. In the presence of high concentrations of pyruvate, the growth of ΔcycA relied largely on fermentation rather than sulfate reduction, even when sulfate was abundant, producing the largest sulfur isotope effect observed in this study. Differences between sulfur isotope fractionation by ΔcycA and the wild type highlight the effect of electron transfer chains on the magnitude of sulfur isotope fractionation. Because Tp1-c3 is known to exclusively shuttle electrons from periplasmic hydrogenases to transmembrane complexes, electron transfers in the absence of Tp1-c3 should bypass the periplasmic hydrogen cycling, and the loss of reducing equivalents in the form of H2 can impair the flow of electrons from organic acids to sulfur, increasing isotope fractionation. Larger fractionation by ΔcycA can inform interpretations of sulfur isotope data at an environmental scale as well

  1. Subcellular localization of proteins in the anaerobic sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris via SNAP-tag labeling and photoconversion

    SciTech Connect

    Gorur, A.; Leung, C. M.; Jorgens, D.; Tauscher, A.; Remis, J. P.; Ball, D. A.; Chhabra, S.; Fok, V.; Geller, J. T.; Singer, M.; Hazen, T. C.; Juba, T.; Elias, D.; Wall, J.; Biggin, M.; Downing, K. H.; Auer, M.

    2010-06-01

    Systems Biology studies the temporal and spatial 3D distribution of macromolecular complexes with the aim that such knowledge will allow more accurate modeling of biological function and will allow mathematical prediction of cellular behavior. However, in order to accomplish accurate modeling precise knowledge of spatial 3D organization and distribution inside cells is necessary. And while a number of macromolecular complexes may be identified by its 3D structure and molecular characteristics alone, the overwhelming number of proteins will need to be localized using a reporter tag. GFP and its derivatives (XFPs) have been traditionally employed for subcelllar localization using photoconversion approaches, but this approach cannot be taken for obligate anaerobic bacteria, where the intolerance towards oxygen prevents XFP approaches. As part of the GTL-funded PCAP project (now ENIGMA) genetic tools have been developed for the anaerobe sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris that allow the high-throughput generation of tagged-protein mutant strains, with a focus on the commercially available SNAP-tag cell system (New England Biolabs, Ipswich, MA), which is based on a modified O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) tag, that has a dead-end reaction with a modified O6-benzylguanine (BG) derivative and has been shown to function under anaerobic conditions. After initial challenges with respect to variability, robustness and specificity of the labeling signal we have optimized the labeling. Over the last year, as a result of the optimized labeling protocol, we now obtain robust labeling of 20 out of 31 SNAP strains. Labeling for 13 strains were confirmed at least five times. We have also successfully performed photoconversion on 5 of these 13 strains, with distinct labeling patterns for different strains. For example, DsrC robustly localizes to the periplasmic portion of the inner membrane, where as a DNA-binding protein localizes to the center of the cell, where the

  2. Development of a Model, Metal-reducing Microbial Community for a System Biology Level Assessment of Desulfovibrio vulgaris as part of a Community

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, Dwayne; Schadt, Christopher; Miller, Lance; Phelps, Tommy; Brown, S. D.; Arkin, Adam; Hazen, Terry; Drake, Megin; Yang, Z.K.; Podar, Mircea

    2010-05-17

    One of the largest experimental gaps is between the simplicity of pure cultures and the complexity of open environmental systems, particularly in metal-contaminated areas. These microbial communities form ecosystem foundations, drive biogeochemical processes, and are relevant for biotechnology and bioremediation. A model, metal-reducing microbial community was constructed as either syntrophic or competitive to study microbial cell to cell interactions, cell signaling and competition for resources. The microbial community was comprised of the metal-reducing Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. Additionally, Methanococcus maripaludis S2 was added to study complete carbon reduction and maintain a low hydrogen partial pressure for syntrophism to occur. Further, considerable work has been published on D. vulgaris and the D. vulgaris/ Mc. maripaludis co-culture both with and without stress. We are extending this work by conducting the same stress conditions on the model community. Additionally, this comprehensive investigation includes physiological and metabolic analyses as well as specially designed mRNA microarrays with the genes for all three organisms on one slide so as to follow gene expression changes in the various cultivation conditions as well as being comparable to the co- and individual cultures. Further, state-of -the-art comprehensive AMT tag proteomics allows for these comparisons at the protein level for a systems biology assessment of a model, metal-reducing microbial community. Preliminary data revealed that lactate oxidation by D. vulgaris was sufficient to support both G. sulfurreducens and M. maripaludis via the excretion of H2 and acetate. Fumarate was utilized by G. sulfurreducens and reduced to succinate since neither of the other two organisms can reduce fumarate. Methane was quantified, suggesting acetate and H2 concentrations were sufficient for M. maripaludis. Steady state community cultivation will allow for

  3. Rex (encoded by DVU_0916) in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough is a repressor of sulfate adenylyl transferase and is regulated by NADH.

    PubMed

    Christensen, G A; Zane, G M; Kazakov, A E; Li, X; Rodionov, D A; Novichkov, P S; Dubchak, I; Arkin, A P; Wall, J D

    2015-01-01

    Although the enzymes for dissimilatory sulfate reduction by microbes have been studied, the mechanisms for transcriptional regulation of the encoding genes remain unknown. In a number of bacteria the transcriptional regulator Rex has been shown to play a key role as a repressor of genes producing proteins involved in energy conversion. In the model sulfate-reducing microbe Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, the gene DVU_0916 was observed to resemble other known Rex proteins. Therefore, the DVU_0916 protein has been predicted to be a transcriptional repressor of genes encoding proteins that function in the process of sulfate reduction in D. vulgaris Hildenborough. Examination of the deduced DVU_0916 protein identified two domains, one a winged helix DNA-binding domain common for transcription factors, and the other a Rossman fold that could potentially interact with pyridine nucleotides. A deletion of the putative rex gene was made in D. vulgaris Hildenborough, and transcript expression studies of sat, encoding sulfate adenylyl transferase, showed increased levels in the D. vulgaris Hildenborough Rex (RexDvH) mutant relative to the parental strain. The RexDvH-binding site upstream of sat was identified, confirming RexDvH to be a repressor of sat. We established in vitro that the presence of elevated NADH disrupted the interaction between RexDvH and DNA. Examination of the 5' transcriptional start site for the sat mRNA revealed two unique start sites, one for respiring cells that correlated with the RexDvH-binding site and a second for fermenting cells. Collectively, these data support the role of RexDvH as a transcription repressor for sat that senses the redox status of the cell. PMID:25313388

  4. Pathway confirmation and flux analysis of central metabolicpathways in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough using GasChromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Fourier Transform-Ion CyclotronResonance Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yinjie; Pingitore, Francesco; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Phan,Richard; Hazen, Terry C.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2007-03-15

    Flux distribution in central metabolic pathways ofDesulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough was examined using 13C tracerexperiments. Consistent with the current genome annotation andindependent evidence from enzyme activity assays, the isotopomer resultsfrom both GC-MS and Fourier Transform-Ion Cyclotron Resonance massspectrometry (FT-ICR MS) indicate the lack of oxidatively functional TCAcycle and an incomplete pentose phosphate pathway. Results from thisstudy suggest that fluxes through both pathways are limited tobiosynthesis. The data also indicate that>80 percent of the lactatewas converted to acetate and the reactions involved are the primary routeof energy production (NAD(P)H and ATP production). Independent of the TCAcycle, direct cleavage of acetyl-CoA to CO and 5,10-methyl-THF also leadsto production of NADH and ATP. Although the genome annotation implicatesa ferredoxin-dependentoxoglutarate synthase, isotopic evidence does notsupport flux through this reaction in either the oxidative or reductivemode; therefore, the TCA cycle is incomplete. FT-ICR MS was used tolocate the labeled carbon distribution in aspartate and glutamate andconfirmed the presence of an atypical enzyme for citrate formationsuggested in previous reports (the citrate synthesized by this enzyme isthe isotopic antipode of the citrate synthesized by the (S)-citratesynthase). These findings enable a better understanding of the relationbetween genome annotation and actual metabolic pathways in D. vulgaris,and also demonstrate FT-ICR MS as a powerful tool for isotopomeranalysis, overcoming problems in both GC-MS and NMRspectroscopy.

  5. Integrated analysis of transcriptomic and proteomic data of Desulfovibrio vulgaris: Zero-Inflated Poisson regression models to predict abundance of undetected proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, Lei; Wu, Gang; Brockman, Fred J.; Zhang, Weiwen

    2006-05-04

    Abstract Advances in DNA microarray and proteomics technologies have enabled high-throughput measurement of mRNA expression and protein abundance. Parallel profiling of mRNA and protein on a global scale and integrative analysis of these two data types could provide additional insight into the metabolic mechanisms underlying complex biological systems. However, because protein abundance and mRNA expression are affected by many cellular and physical processes, there have been conflicting results on the correlation of these two measurements. In addition, as current proteomic methods can detect only a small fraction of proteins present in cells, no correlation study of these two data types has been done thus far at the whole-genome level. In this study, we describe a novel data-driven statistical model to integrate whole-genome microarray and proteomic data collected from Desulfovibrio vulgaris grown under three different conditions. Based on the Poisson distribution pattern of proteomic data and the fact that a large number of proteins were undetected (excess zeros), Zero-inflated Poisson models were used to define the correlation pattern of mRNA and protein abundance. The models assumed that there is a probability mass at zero representing some of the undetected proteins because of technical limitations. The models thus use abundance measurements of transcripts and proteins experimentally detected as input to generate predictions of protein abundances as output for all genes in the genome. We demonstrated the statistical models by comparatively analyzing D. vulgaris grown on lactate-based versus formate-based media. The increased expressions of Ech hydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh)-periplasmic Fe-only hydrogenase (Hyd) pathway for ATP synthesis were predicted for D. vulgaris grown on formate.

  6. Isolation and characterization of a bacteriophage lytic for Desulfovibrio salexigens, a salt-requiring, sulfate-reducing bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Kamimura, Kazuo; Araki, Michio )

    1989-03-01

    A bacteriophage that lysed Desulfovibrio salexigens cells was isolated from marine sediments and preliminarily characterized by electron microscopy and electrophoretic analysis of structural proteins and genomic nucleic acid. The bacteriophage had an icosahedral head and a long flexible tail, and the buoyant density of the bacteriophage particles was 1.468 g/ml in cesium chloride. The particles consisted of a double-stranded DNA molecule about 33 kilobase pairs long and at least 11 structural proteins.

  7. Correlation of mRNA expression and protein abundance affected by multiple sequence features related to translational efficiency in Desulfovibrio vulgaris: A quantitative analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, Lei; Wu, Gang; Zhang, Weiwen

    2006-12-01

    The modest correlation between mRNA expression and protein abundance in large scale datasets is explained in part by experimental challenges, such as technological limitations, and in part by fundamental biological factors in the transcription and translation processes. Among various factors affecting the mRNA-protein correlation, the roles of biological factors related to translation are poorly understood. In this study, using experimental mRNA expression and protein abundance data collected from Desulfovibrio vulgaris by DNA microarray and LC-MS/MS proteomic analysis, we quantitatively examined the effects of several translational-efficiency-related sequence features on mRNA-protein correlation. Three classes of sequence features were investigated according to different translational stages: (1) initiation: Shine-Dalgarno sequences, start codon identity and start codon context; (2) elongation: codon usage and amino acid usage; and (3) termination: stop codon identity and stop codon context. Surprisingly, although it is widely accepted that translation initiation is a rate-limiting step for translation, our results showed that the mRNA-protein correlation was affected the most by the features at elongation stages, codon usage and amino acid composition (7.4-12.6% and 5.3-9.3% of the total variation of mRNA-protein correlation, respectively), followed by stop codon context and the Shine-Dalgarno sequence (2.5-4.2% and 2.3%, respectively). Taken together, all sequence features contributed to 18.4-21.8% of the total variation of mRNA-protein correlation. As the first comprehensive quantitative analysis of the mRNA-protein correlation in bacterial D. vulgaris, our results suggest that the traditional view of the relative importance of various sequence features in prokaryotic protein translation might be questionable.

  8. [Desulfovibrio hontreensis sp. nov., a Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from Marine Biofoulings at the South Vietnam Coastal Area].

    PubMed

    Tarasov, A L; Osipov, G A; Borzenkov, I A

    2015-01-01

    A Desulfovibrio strain physiologically similar to and phylogeneticall related to "D. caledoniensis" SEBR 7250, D. portus MSL79, and D. dechloracetivorans ATCC 700912 (96.9, 95.9, and 95.8% similarity of the 16S rRNA gen sequences, respectively) was isolated from marine biofouling in the coastal zone of the South China Sae (Nha Trang, South Vietnam). The cells of strain ME were gram-negative motile vibrios (0.4-0.6 x 1.3-2 μm) with a single flagellum. The strain grew at 20 to 39 degrees C (growth optimum at 34-37 degrees C), pH 5.8 to 8.5 (pH optimum at 6.8-7.5), and salinity from 0.08 to 1.1 M Na+ (optimum at 0.2-0.3 M Na+). In the presence of sulfate, the strain grew autotrophically with hydrogen or on lactate, formate, pyruvate, fumarate, and malate. Weak growth occurred on succinate, glycerol, and fructose. In the absence of sulfate, the strain was able to ferment pyruvate, malate (weakly), but not lactate. Sulfate, sulfite, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, and dimethyl sulfoxide were used as electron acceptors. Vitamins and yeast extract were not required for growth. The G+C content was 52.4 mol %. Predominant fatty acids were C18:0 (13.9%), C16:0 (9.6%), iso-C16:0 (9.5%), C18: 1w7 (8.8%), anteiso-C15:0 (8.1%), and iso-C 17:1 (7.2%). The fatty acid composition was close to that of D. dechloracetivorans BO and has some similarity to that of D. portus. Based on its genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, strain ME maybe considered as a new species, for which the name Desulfovibrio hontrensis sp. nov. is proposed. PMID:27169246

  9. The Desulfuromonas acetoxidans Triheme Cytochrome c7 Produced in Desulfovibrio desulfuricans Retains Its Metal Reductase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Aubert, Corinne; Lojou, Elisabeth; Bianco, Pierre; Rousset, Marc; Durand, Marie-Claire; Bruschi, Mireille; Dolla, Alain

    1998-01-01

    Multiheme cytochrome c proteins that belong to class III have been recently shown to exhibit a metal reductase activity, which could be of great environmental interest, especially in metal bioremediation. To get a better understanding of these activities, the gene encoding cytochrome c7 from the sulfur-reducing bacterium Desulfuromonas acetoxidans was cloned from genomic DNA by PCR and expressed in Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G201. The expression system was based on the cyc transcription unit from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and led to the synthesis of holocytochrome c7 when transferred by electrotransformation into the sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G201. The produced cytochrome was indistinguishable from the protein purified from Desulfuromonas acetoxidans cells with respect to several biochemical and biophysical criteria and exhibited the same metal reductase activities as determined from electrochemical experiments. This suggests that the molecule was correctly folded in the host organism. Desulfovibrio desulfuricans produces functional multiheme c-type cytochromes from bacteria belonging to a different genus and may be considered a suitable host for the heterologous biogenesis of multiheme c-type cytochromes for either structural or engineering studies. This report, which presents the first example of the transformation of a Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strain by electrotransformation, describes work that is the first necessary step of a protein engineering program that aims to specify the structural features that are responsible for the metal reductase activities of multiheme cytochrome c7. PMID:9546165

  10. Effect of the deletion of qmoABC and the promoter distal gene encoding a hypothetical protein on sulfate-reduction in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    SciTech Connect

    Zane, Grant M.; Yen, Huei-chi Bill; Wall, Judy D.

    2010-03-18

    The pathway of electrons required for the reduction of sulfate in sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is not yet fully characterized. In order to determine the role of a transmembrane protein complex suggested to be involved in this process, a deletion of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough was created by marker exchange mutagenesis that eliminated four genes putatively encoding the QmoABC complex and a hypothetical protein (DVU0851). The Qmo complex (quinone-interacting membrane-bound oxidoreductase) is proposed to be responsible for transporting electrons to the dissimilatory adenosine-5?phosphosulfate (APS) reductase in SRB. In support of the predicted role of this complex, the deletion mutant was unable to grow using sulfate as its sole electron acceptor with a range of electron donors. To explore a possible role for the hypothetical protein in sulfate reduction, a second mutant was constructed that had lost only the gene that codes for DVU0851. The second constructed mutant grew with sulfate as the sole electron acceptor; however, there was a lag that was not present with the wild-type or complemented strain. Neither deletion strain was significantly impaired for growth with sulfite or thiosulfate as terminal electron acceptor. Complementation of the D(qmoABC-DVU0851) mutant with all four genes or only the qmoABC genes restored its ability to grow by sulfate respiration. These results confirmed the prediction that the Qmo complex is in the electron pathway for sulfate-reduction and revealed that no other transmembrane complex could compensate when Qmo was lacking.

  11. Structural studies of the carbon monoxide complex of [NiFe]hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F: suggestion for the initial activation site for dihydrogen.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Hideaki; Mizoguchi, Yasutaka; Mizuno, Nobuhiro; Miki, Kunio; Adachi, Shin-ichi; Yasuoka, Noritake; Yagi, Tatsuhiko; Yamauchi, Osamu; Hirota, Shun; Higuchi, Yoshiki

    2002-10-01

    The carbon monoxide complex of [NiFe]hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F has been characterized by X-ray crystallography and absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopy. Nine crystal structures of the [NiFe]hydrogenase in the CO-bound and CO-liberated forms were determined at 1.2-1.4 A resolution. The exogenously added CO was assigned to be bound to the Ni atom at the Ni-Fe active site. The CO was not replaced with H(2) in the dark at 100 K, but was liberated by illumination with a strong white light. The Ni-C distances and Ni-C-O angles were about 1.77 A and 160 degrees, respectively, except for one case (1.72 A and 135 degrees ), in which an additional electron density peak between the CO and Sgamma(Cys546) was recognized. Distinct changes were observed in the electron density distribution of the Ni and Sgamma(Cys546) atoms between the CO-bound and CO-liberated structures for all the crystals tested. The novel structural features found near the Ni and Sgamma(Cys546) atoms suggest that these two atoms at the Ni-Fe active site play a role during the initial H(2)-binding process. Anaerobic addition of CO to dithionite-reduced [NiFe]hydrogenase led to a new absorption band at about 470 nm ( approximately 3000 M(-1)cm(-1)). Resonance Raman spectra (excitation at 476.5 nm) of the CO complex revealed CO-isotope-sensitive bands at 375/393 and 430 cm(-1) (368 and 413 cm(-1) for (13)C(18)O). The frequencies and relative intensities of the CO-related Raman bands indicated that the exogenous CO is bound to the Ni atom with a bent Ni-C-O structure in solution, in agreement with the refined structure determined by X-ray crystallography. PMID:12296727

  12. Diverse Oxidative Stress Resistance Mechanisms in Sulfate-reducing Bacteria as Revealed by Global Analysis of the Impact of H2O2 Exposure on Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, A.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; He, Z.; Hemme, C. L.; Keasling, J. D.; Arkin, A. P.; Hazen, T. C.; Wall, J. D.; Zhou, J.

    2008-12-01

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH) plays important roles in the bioremediation of toxic metals. It has been shown aero-tolerant. In order to understand the molecular mechanism of DvH oxidative stress response, mid-log DvH cells were subjected to 1 mM of H2O2 and the transcriptomic changes were examined at 30, 60, 120, 240 and 480 min. The microarray data demonstrated that the gene expression was extensively affected with 29% of genes in the genome significantly up- or down-regulated after 120-min H2O2 treatment. In response to elevated cellular H2O2, expression of thiol-peroxidase genes ahpC and bcp were increased in addition to the significant induction of many thioredoxin reductase and thioredoxin genes, which represent the thiol switch in the oxidative stress response. Increased gene expression PerR regulon genes including PerR itself provided evidence for the regulatory role of PerR in oxidative stress response. The role of Fur was suggested by the significant up-regulation of Fur regulon genes. In terms of the H2O2 scavenging enzymes, different from the stress response to air where both rbr and rbr2 were induced, only rbr2 was up-regulated in response to H2O2; together with up-regulated rdl, they might be the additional players for the detoxification of H2O2. Superoxide scavenging enzyme katA was significantly down-regulated, which is in contrast to its role in facultative microbes such as E.coli and B. subtilis. The links between the up- regulated genes involved in H2O2 scavenging, protein fate, DNA metabolism and lipid metabolism and the down-regulated genes involved in sulfate reduction, energy production and translation were demonstrated by the gene co-expression network. The proteomics data provided further evidence in translation level and complemented the transcriptomics data. Taken together, the cellular response of D. vulgaris Hildenborough to H2O2 was the up-regulation of detoxification, protein and DNA repair systems and the down

  13. Two Component Signal Transduction in Desulfovibrio Species

    SciTech Connect

    Luning, Eric; Rajeev, Lara; Ray, Jayashree; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2010-05-17

    The environmentally relevant Desulfovibrio species are sulfate-reducing bacteria that are of interest in the bioremediation of heavy metal contaminated water. Among these, the genome of D. vulgaris Hildenborough encodes a large number of two component systems consisting of 72 putative response regulators (RR) and 64 putative histidinekinases (HK), the majority of which are uncharacterized. We classified the D. vulgaris Hildenborough RRs based on their output domains and compared the distribution of RRs in other sequenced Desulfovibrio species. We have successfully purified most RRs and several HKs as His-tagged proteins. We performed phospho-transfer experiments to verify relationships between cognate pairs of HK and RR, and we have also mapped a few non-cognate HK-RR pairs. Presented here are our discoveries from the Desulfovibrio RR categorization and results from the in vitro studies using purified His tagged D. vulgaris HKs and RRs.

  14. Relation between mRNA expression and sequence information in Desulfovibrio vulgaris: Combinatorial contributions of upstream regulatory motifs and coding sequence features to variations in mRNA abundance

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Gang; Nie, Lei; Zhang, Weiwen

    2006-05-26

    ABSTRACT-The context-dependent expression of genes is the core for biological activities, and significant attention has been given to identification of various factors contributing to gene expression at genomic scale. However, so far this type of analysis has been focused whether on relation between mRNA expression and non-coding sequence features such as upstream regulatory motifs or on correlation between mRN abundance and non-random features in coding sequences (e.g. codon usage and amino acid usage). In this study multiple regression analyses of the mRNA abundance and all sequence information in Desulfovibrio vulgaris were performed, with the goal to investigate how much coding and non-coding sequence features contribute to the variations in mRNA expression, and in what manner they act together...

  15. Functional genomic study of the environmentally important Desulfovibrio /Methanococcus syntrophic co-culture.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, A.

    2008-12-01

    The use of microbe-oriented bioremediation for ameliorating extensive environmental pollution has fostered fundamental and applied studies of environmentally relevant microorganisms such as Desulfovibrio vulgaris, Shewanella oneidensis and Geobacter metallireducens.. Concurrently, there has been an increasing appreciation that the physiology of these organisms in pure culture is not necessarily representative of its activities in the environment. To enable a better understanding of microbial physiology under more environmentally relevant conditions, the syntrophic growth between the sulfate reducing bacterium, D. vulgaris and the hydrogenotrophic methanogen, Methanococcus maripaludis serves as an ideal system for laboratory studies. Cell wide analyses using transcript, proteomics and metabolite analysis have been widely used to understand cellular activity at a molecular level. Using D. vulgaris and M. maripaludis arrays, and the iTRAQ proteomics method, we studied the physiology of the D. vulgaris / M. maripaludis syntrophic co- cultures. The results from this study allowed us to identify differences in cellular response in mono-culture vs. co-culture growth for both D. vulgaris and M. maripaludis.

  16. Characterization of the cytochrome system of a nitrogen-fixing strain of a sulfate-reducing bacterium: Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strain Berre-Eau.

    PubMed

    Moura, I; Fauque, G; LeGall, J; Xavier, A V; Moura, J J

    1987-02-01

    Two c-type cytochromes were purified and characterized by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic techniques, from the sulfate-reducer nitrogen-fixing organism, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strain Berre-Eau (NCIB 8387). The purification procedures included several chromatographic steps on alumina, carboxymethylcellulose and gel filtration. A tetrahaem and a monohaem cytochrome were identified. The multihaem cytochrome has visible, EPR and NMR spectra with general properties similar to other low-potential bis-histidinyl axially bound haem proteins, belonging to the class of tetrahaem cytochrome c3 isolated from other Desulfovibrio species. The monohaem cytochrome c553 is ascorbate-reducible and its EPR and NMR data are characteristic of a cytochrome with methionine-histidine ligation. Their properties are compared with other homologous proteins isolated from sulfate-reducing bacteria. PMID:3030740

  17. Enzymatic redox chemistry: A proposed reaction pathway for the six-electron reduction of SO sub 3 sup 2 minus to S sup 2 minus by the assimilatory-type sulfite reductase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough)

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Jian; Cowan, J.A. )

    1991-09-10

    A detailed reaction pathway for the six-electron reduction of SO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}} to S{sup 2{minus}} by the assimilatory-type sulfite reductase (SiR) from Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough) has been deduced from experiments with {sup 35}S-labeled enzyme and the relative reaction rates of nitrogenous substrates. The ligand bridging the prosthetic (Fe{sub 4}S{sub 4})-siroheme center is apparently exchanged by {sup 35}S{sup 2{minus}} in both oxidized and reduced enzyme. This {sup 35}S{sup 2{minus}} label was retained in the course of SO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}} reduction, implicating substrate binding to the nonbridging axial site of the siroheme. A reaction mechanism is proposed in which SO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}} binds to Fe{sup 2+} through the sulfur atom, followed by a series of two-electron reductive cleavages of S-O bonds. Protonation of oxygen facilitates bond cleavage, giving hydroxide as leaving group. The bridge remains intact throughout the course of the reaction, providing an efficient coupling pathway for electron transfer between the cluster and siroheme.

  18. TEM investigation of U{sup 6+} and Re{sup 7+} reduction by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, a sulfate-reducing bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    XU,HUIFANG; BARTON,LARRY L.; CHOUDHURY,KEKA; ZHANG,PENGCHU; WANG,YIFENG

    2000-03-14

    Uranium and its fission product Tc in aerobic environment will be in the forms of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}. Reduced forms of tetravalent U and Tc are sparingly soluble. As determined by transmission electron microscopy, the reduction of uranyl acetate by immobilized cells of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans results in the production of black uraninite nanocrystals precipitated outside the cell. Some nanocrystals are associated with outer membranes of the cell as revealed from cross sections of these metabolic active sulfate-reducing bacteria. The nanocrystals have an average diameter of 5 nm and have anhedral shape. The reduction of Re{sup 7+} by cells of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans is fast in media containing H{sub 2} an electron donor, and slow in media containing lactic acid. It is proposed that the cytochrome in these cells has an important role in the reduction of uranyl and Re{sup 7+} is (a chemical analogue for Tc{sup 7+}) through transferring an electron from molecular hydrogen or lactic acid to the oxyions of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}.

  19. Identification of Molecular and Cellular Responses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Biofilms under Culture Conditions Relevant to Field Conditions for Bioreduction of Toxic Metals and Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Judy D. Wall

    2011-06-09

    Our findings demonstrated that D. vulgaris surface-adhered populations produce extracellular structures, and that that the cells have altered carbon and energy flux compared to planktonic cells. Biofilms did not have greatly increased carbohydrate accumulation. Interestingly genes present on the native plasmid found in D. vulgaris Hildenborough were necessary for wild type biofilm formation. In addition, extracellular appendages dependent on functions or proteins encoded by flaG or fliA also contributed to biofilm formation. Studies with SRB biofilms have indicated that the reduction and precipitation of metals can occur within the biofilm matrix; however, little work has been done to elucidate the physiological state of surface-adhered cells during metal reduction (Cr6+, U6+) and how this process is affected by nutrient feed levels (i.e., the stimulant).

  20. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of adenosine triphosphate sulfurylase (ATPS) from the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, Olga Yu.; Kladova, Anna V.; Bursakov, Sergey A.; Dias, João M.; Texeira, Susana; Shnyrov, Valery L.; Moura, José J. G.; Moura, Isabel; Romão, Maria J.; Trincão, José

    2008-07-01

    Native zinc-containing ATP sulfurylase from D. desulfuricans ATCC 27774 was purified to homogeneity and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution. Native zinc/cobalt-containing ATP sulfurylase (ATPS; EC 2.7.7.4; MgATP:sulfate adenylyltransferase) from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774 was purified to homogeneity and crystallized. The orthorhombic crystals diffracted to beyond 2.5 Å resolution and the X-ray data collected should allow the determination of the structure of the zinc-bound form of this ATPS. Although previous biochemical studies of this protein indicated the presence of a homotrimer in solution, a dimer was found in the asymmetric unit. Elucidation of this structure will permit a better understanding of the role of the metal in the activity and stability of this family of enzymes.

  1. Diversity and origin of Desulfovibrio species: phylogenetic definition of a family.

    PubMed Central

    Devereux, R; He, S H; Doyle, C L; Orkland, S; Stahl, D A; LeGall, J; Whitman, W B

    1990-01-01

    The different nutritional properties of several Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strains suggest that either the strains are misclassified or there is a high degree of phenotypic diversity within the genus Desulfovibrio. The results of partial 16S rRNA and 23S rRNA sequence determinations demonstrated that Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774 and "Desulfovibrio multispirans" are closely related to the type strain (strain Essex 6) and that strains ATCC 7757, Norway 4, and El Agheila Z are not. Therefore, these latter three strains of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans are apparently misclassified. A comparative analysis of nearly complete 16S rRNA sequences in which we used a least-squares analysis method for evolutionary distances, an unweighted pair group method, a signature analysis method, and maximum parsimony was undertaken to further investigate the phylogeny of Desulfovibrio species. The species analyzed were resolved into two branches with origins deep within the delta subdivision of the purple photosynthetic bacteria. One branch contained five deep lineages, which were represented by (i) Desulfovibrio salexigens and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans El Agheila Z; (ii) Desulfovibrio africanus; (iii) Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774, Desulfomonas pigra, and Desulfovibrio vulgaris; (iv) Desulfovibrio gigas; and (v) Desulfomicrobium baculatus (Desulfovibrio baculatus) and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans Norway 4. A correlation between 16S rRNA sequence similarity and percentage of DNA relatedness showed that these five deep lineages are related at levels below the minimum genus level suggested by Johnson (in Bergey's Manual of Systematic Bacteriology, vol. 1, 1984). We propose that this branch should be grouped into a single family, the Desulfovibrionaceae. The other branch includes other genera of sulfate-reducing bacteria (e.g., Desulfobacter and Desulfococcus) and contains Desulfovibrio sapovorans and Desulfovibrio baarsii as separate, distantly related lineages. PMID

  2. Increased Growth of the Microalga Chlorella vulgaris when Coimmobilized and Cocultured in Alginate Beads with the Plant-Growth-Promoting Bacterium Azospirillum brasilense†

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Luz E.; Bashan, Yoav

    2000-01-01

    Coimmobilization of the freshwater microalga Chlorella vulgaris and the plant-growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense in small alginate beads resulted in a significantly increased growth of the microalga. Dry and fresh weight, total number of cells, size of the microalgal clusters (colonies) within the bead, number of microalgal cells per cluster, and the levels of microalgal pigments significantly increased. Light microscopy revealed that both microorganisms colonized the same cavities inside the beads, though the microalgae tended to concentrate in the more aerated periphery while the bacteria colonized the entire bead. The effect of indole-3-acetic acid addition to microalgal culture prior to immobilization of microorganisms in alginate beads partially imitated the effect of A. brasilense. We propose that coimmobilization of microalgae and plant-growth-promoting bacteria is an effective means of increasing microalgal populations within confined environments. PMID:10742237

  3. Bacteremia caused by Desulfovibrio fairfieldensis.

    PubMed

    Urata, Teruo; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Hino, Taro; Yoda, Yusuke; Tamai, Kiyoko; Kodaira, Yoshiya; Hitomi, Shigemi

    2008-10-01

    Desulfovibrio species are anaerobic gram-negative, pleomorphic bacilli rarely causing infection in humans. In the present report, we describe a case of bacteremia caused by Desulfovibrio fairfieldensis. The patient, for whom biapenem was administered, rapidly improved without any sequelae. As far as we know, this is the first case report of infection by Desulfovibrio species in Japan. PMID:18936890

  4. Electron transfer pathways of formate-driven H2 production in Desulfovibrio.

    PubMed

    Martins, Mónica; Mourato, Cláudia; Morais-Silva, Fabio O; Rodrigues-Pousada, Claudina; Voordouw, Gerrit; Wall, Judy D; Pereira, Inês A C

    2016-09-01

    The potential of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) as biocatalysts for H2 production from formate was recently demonstrated, but the electron transfer pathways involved were not described. In the present work, we analyzed the H2 production capacity of five Desulfovibrio strains: Desulfovibrio vulgaris, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, Desulfovibrio alaskensis, Desulfovibrio fructosivorans, and Desulfovibrio gigas. D. vulgaris showed the highest H2 productivity (865 mL Lmedium (-1)), and D. gigas the lowest one (374 mL Lmedium (-1) of H2). The electron transfer pathways involved in formate-driven H2 production by these two organisms were further investigated through the study of deletion mutants of hydrogenases (Hases) and formate dehydrogenases (Fdhs). In D. vulgaris, the periplasmic FdhAB is the key enzyme for formate oxidation and two pathways are apparently involved in the production of H2 from formate: a direct one only involving periplasmic enzymes and a second one that involves transmembrane electron transfer and may allow energy conservation. In the presence of selenium, the Hys [NiFeSe] Hase is the main periplasmic enzyme responsible for H2 production, and the cytoplasmic Coo Hase is apparently involved in the ability of D. vulgaris to grow by converting formate to H2, in sparging conditions. Contrary to D. vulgaris, H2 production in D. gigas occurs exclusively by the direct periplasmic route and does not involve the single cytoplasmic Hase, Ech. This is the first report of the metabolic pathways involved in formate metabolism in the absence of sulfate in SRB, revealing that the electron transfer pathways are species-specific. PMID:27270746

  5. High-Quality Draft Genome Sequence of Desulfovibrio carbinoliphilus FW-101-2B, an Organic Acid-Oxidizing Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from Uranium(VI)-Contaminated Groundwater

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Bradley D.; Hwang, Chiachi; Carroll, Sue L.; Lucas, Susan; Han, James; Lapidus, Alla L.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Samuel; Peters, Lin; Chertkov, Olga; Held, Brittany; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff S.; Tapia, Roxanne; Land, Miriam L.; Hauser, Loren J.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pagani, Ioanna; Woyke, Tanja; Arkin, Adam P.; Dehal, Paramvir; Chivian, Dylan; Criddle, Craig S.; Wu, Weimin; Chakraborty, Romy

    2015-01-01

    Desulfovibrio carbinoliphilus subsp. oakridgensis FW-101-2B is an anaerobic, organic acid/alcohol-oxidizing, sulfate-reducing δ-proteobacterium. FW-101-2B was isolated from contaminated groundwater at The Field Research Center at Oak Ridge National Lab after in situ stimulation for heavy metal-reducing conditions. The genome will help elucidate the metabolic potential of sulfate-reducing bacteria during uranium reduction. PMID:25767232

  6. High-Quality Draft Genome Sequence of Desulfovibrio carbinoliphilus FW-101-2B, an Organic Acid-Oxidizing Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from Uranium(VI)-Contaminated Groundwater

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ramsay, Bradley D.; Hwang, Chiachi; Woo, Hannah L.; Carroll, Sue L.; Lucas, Susan; Han, James; Lapidus, Alla L.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Samuel; et al

    2015-03-12

    Desulfovibrio carbinoliphilus subsp. oakridgensis FW-101-2B is an anaerobic, organic acid/alcohol-oxidizing, sulfate-reducing δ-proteobacterium. FW-101-2B was isolated from contaminated groundwater at The Field Research Center at Oak Ridge National Lab after in situ stimulation for heavy metal-reducing conditions. The genome will help elucidate the metabolic potential of sulfate-reducing bacteria during uranium reduction.

  7. Investigating the role of CheA-3 in Dusulfovibrio Vulgaris Hildenborough

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Jayashee; Keller, Kimberley; Krierim, Bernhard; Auer, Manfred; Keasling, Jay; Wall, Judy; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2010-05-22

    Multiple sets of chemotaxis genes including three cheA homologs were identified in the genome sequence of the anaerobic bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. Each CheA is a histidine kinase (HK) and part of a two component signal transduction system. Knock out mutants in the three cheA genes were created using single cross-over homologous recombination insertion. We studied the phenotypes of the cheA mutants in detail and discovered that ?cheA-3 has a non swarming/swimming phenotype both in the soft agar plates and Palleroni chamber assays. CheA-3 shows similarity to the Shewanella oneidensis CheA-3 and the Vibrio cholerae CheA-2 that are responsible for chemotaxis in the respective organisms. We did not find any morphological or structural differences between the three Delta cheA mutants and the wild type cells in electron microscopy. Our results from these studies are presented.

  8. Genetic basis for nitrate resistance in Desulfovibrio strains

    PubMed Central

    Korte, Hannah L.; Fels, Samuel R.; Christensen, Geoff A.; Price, Morgan N.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Zane, Grant M.; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Arkin, Adam P.; Wall, Judy D.

    2014-01-01

    Nitrate is an inhibitor of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). In petroleum production sites, amendments of nitrate and nitrite are used to prevent SRB production of sulfide that causes souring of oil wells. A better understanding of nitrate stress responses in the model SRB, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20, will strengthen predictions of environmental outcomes of nitrate application. Nitrate inhibition of SRB has historically been considered to result from the generation of small amounts of nitrite, to which SRB are quite sensitive. Here we explored the possibility that nitrate might inhibit SRB by a mechanism other than through nitrite inhibition. We found that nitrate-stressed D. vulgaris cultures grown in lactate-sulfate conditions eventually grew in the presence of high concentrations of nitrate, and their resistance continued through several subcultures. Nitrate consumption was not detected over the course of the experiment, suggesting adaptation to nitrate. With high-throughput genetic approaches employing TnLE-seq for D. vulgaris and a pooled mutant library of D. alaskensis, we determined the fitness of many transposon mutants of both organisms in nitrate stress conditions. We found that several mutants, including homologs present in both strains, had a greatly increased ability to grow in the presence of nitrate but not nitrite. The mutated genes conferring nitrate resistance included the gene encoding the putative Rex transcriptional regulator (DVU0916/Dde_2702), as well as a cluster of genes (DVU0251-DVU0245/Dde_0597-Dde_0605) that is poorly annotated. Follow-up studies with individual D. vulgaris transposon and deletion mutants confirmed high-throughput results. We conclude that, in D. vulgaris and D. alaskensis, nitrate resistance in wild-type cultures is likely conferred by spontaneous mutations. Furthermore, the mechanisms that confer nitrate resistance may be different from those that confer nitrite resistance

  9. The Complete Genome Sequence and Updated Annotation of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    SciTech Connect

    Hauser, Loren John; Wall, Judy D.; Brown, Steven D; Land, Miriam L; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Frank, Larimer; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, Cliff; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Pitluck, Samual; Keller, Kimberly L; Rapp-Giles, Barbara J; Price, Morgan N.; Lin, Monica; Tapia, Roxanne; Copeland, A; Cheng, Jan-Fang

    2011-01-01

    Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 (formerly desulfuricans G20) is a Gram-negative mesophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB), known to corrode ferrous metals and to reduce toxic radionuclides and metals such as uranium and chromium to sparingly soluble and less toxic forms. We present the 3.7 Mb genome sequence to provide insights into its physiology.

  10. Genome Sequence of Mercury-Methylating and Pleomorphic Desulfovibrio africanus strain Walvis Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven D; Wall, Judy D.; Kucken, A M; Gilmour, C C; Podar, Mircea; Brandt, Craig C; Teshima, Hazuki; Detter, J C; Han, Cliff; Land, Miriam L; Lucas, Susan; Han, James; Pennacchio, Len; Nolan, Matt; Pitluck, Samual; Woyke, Tanja; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Elias, Dwayne A

    2011-01-01

    Desulfovibrio africanus strain Walvis Bay is an anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacterium capable of producing methylmercury (MeHg), a potent human neurotoxin. The mechanism of methylation by this and other organisms is unknown. We present the 4.2-Mb genome sequence to provide further insight into microbial mercury methylation and sulfate-reducing bacteria.

  11. Complete Genome Sequence and Updated Annotation of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hauser, Loren J.; Land, Miriam L.; Brown, Steven D.; Larimer, Frank L; Keller, Kimberly L.; Rapp-Giles, Barbara J.; Price, Morgan N.; Lin, Monica A.; Bruce, David C.; Detter, John C.; et al

    2011-06-17

    Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 (formerly desulfuricans G20) is a Gram-negative mesophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB), known to corrode ferrous metals and to reduce toxic radionuclides and metals such as uranium and chromium to sparingly soluble and less toxic forms. We present the 3.7 Mb genome sequence to provide insights into its physiology.

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Mercury-Methylating Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven D; Gilmour, C C; Kucken, A M; Wall, Judy D.; Brandt, Craig C; Elias, Dwayne A; Podar, Mircea; Chertkov, Olga; Held, Brittany; Bruce, David; Detter, J C; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Palumbo, Anthony Vito

    2011-01-01

    Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strain ND132 is an anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB) capable of producing methylmercury (MeHg), a potent human neurotoxin. The mechanism of methylation by this and other organisms is unknown. We present the 3.8-Mb genome sequence to provide further insight into microbial mercury methylation.

  13. Properties of aromatic residues in ferricytochrome c3 of desulforvibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F studied by 1H NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jang-Su; Enoki, Minoru; Ohbu, Ayako; Fan, Kejung; Niki, Katsumi; Akutsu, Hideo; Kyogoku, Yoshimasa

    1991-01-01

    Conditions for the specific labelling of the tetrahaeme protein cytochrome c3 of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F during culture of this sulphate-reducing bacterium in a minimal medium were established. Phenylalanine and tyrosine residues were specifically deuterated at more than 85% efficiency. Cytochrome c3 has nine histidine, three tyrosine and two phenylalamine residues. Eight histidine imidazoles are ligated to four haeme groups. Using the deuterated cytochrome c3, aromatic proton signals of phenylalanine and tyrosine residues in the fully oxidized state were identified. However, the signals of one phenylalanine residue were missing and this was tentatively assigned to Phe20. The aromatic proton signals of His67 were also assigned p2H titration. Its pk1 was much higher than that for the free histidine residue. No tyrosine residue was ionized up to p2H 12.

  14. INORGANIC PYROPHOSPHATASE OF DESULFOVIBRIO DESULFURICANS.

    PubMed

    AKAGI, J M; CAMPBELL, L L

    1963-09-01

    Akagi, J. M. (University of Illinois, Urbana) and L. Leon Campbell. Inorganic pyrophosphatase of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. J. Bacteriol. 86:563-568. 1963.-The inorganic pyrophosphatase of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans was purified 136-fold by (NH(4))(2)SO(4) and ethanol fractionation and diethylaminoethyl cellulose chromatography. Mg(++) or Mn(++) was required for optimal activity; Co(++) was only 65% as effective as Mg(++). The optimal ratio of Mg(++) to pyrophosphate was 1.0 at pH 8.0. The K(s) for the pyrophosphatase was found to be in the region of 1.9 x 10(-3)m. Sulfhydryl inhibitors and sodium fluoride had no effect on enzyme activity at a concentration of 10(-3)m. The purified enzyme did not hydrolyze adenosine triphosphate, glycerol phosphate, diphenyl phosphate, or p-nitrophenyl phosphate. Thermal stability studies showed that the enzyme is rapidly inactivated at temperatures above 40 C. PMID:14066437

  15. Methods for Engineering Sulfate Reducing Bacteria of the Genus Desulfovibrio

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabra, Swapnil R; Keller, Kimberly L.; Wall, Judy D.

    2011-03-15

    Sulfate reducing bacteria are physiologically important given their nearly ubiquitous presence and have important applications in the areas of bioremediation and bioenergy. This chapter provides details on the steps used for homologous-recombination mediated chromosomal manipulation of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, a well-studied sulfate reducer. More specifically, we focus on the implementation of a 'parts' based approach for suicide vector assembly, important aspects of anaerobic culturing, choices for antibiotic selection, electroporation-based DNA transformation, as well as tools for screening and verifying genetically modified constructs. These methods, which in principle may be extended to other sulfate-reducing bacteria, are applicable for functional genomics investigations, as well as metabolic engineering manipulations.

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a class II release factor RF3 from a sulfate-reducing bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Kihira, Kiyohito; Numata, Shuko; Kitamura, Masaya; Kondo, Jun; Terawaki, Shinichi; Shomura, Yasuhito; Komori, Hirofumi; Shibata, Naoki; Higuchi, Yoshiki

    2008-07-01

    Class II release factor 3 (RF3) from the sulfate-reducing bacterium D. vulgaris Miyazaki F has been overexpressed, purified and crystallized in complex with GDP. Class II release factor 3 (RF3) from the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F, which promotes rapid dissociation of a class I release factor, has been overexpressed, purified and crystallized in complex with GDP at 293 K using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. A data set was collected to 1.8 Å resolution from a single crystal at 100 K using synchrotron radiation. The crystal belongs to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 47.39, b = 82.80, c = 148.29 Å, α = 104.21, β = 89.78, γ = 89.63°. The asymmetric unit contains four molecules of the RF3–GDP complex. The Matthews coefficient was calculated to be 2.3 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and the solvent content was estimated to be 46.6%.

  17. Draft genome sequence of the first acid-tolerant sulfate-reducing deltaproteobacterium Desulfovibrio sp. TomC having potential for minewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Karnachuk, Olga V; Mardanov, Andrey V; Avakyan, Marat R; Kadnikov, Vitaly V; Vlasova, Maria; Beletsky, Alexey V; Gerasimchuk, Anna L; Ravin, Nikolai V

    2015-02-01

    The sulfidogenic bacterium Desulfovibrio sp. TomC was isolated from acidic waste at the abandoned gold ore mining site in the Martaiga gold ore belt, Western Siberia. This bacterium, being the first reported acid-tolerant gram-negative sulfate-reducer of the order Deltaproteobacteria, is able to grow at pH as low as 2.5 and is resistant to high concentrations of metals. The draft 5.3 Mb genome sequence of Desulfovibrio sp. TomC has been established and provides the genetic basis for application of this microorganism in bioreactors and other bioremediation schemes for the treatment of metal-containing wastewater. PMID:25724779

  18. Variation among Desulfovibrio species in electron transfer systems used for syntrophic growth.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Birte; Kuehl, Jennifer; Deutschbauer, Adam M; Price, Morgan N; Arkin, Adam P; Stahl, David A

    2013-03-01

    Mineralization of organic matter in anoxic environments relies on the cooperative activities of hydrogen producers and consumers linked by interspecies electron transfer in syntrophic consortia that may include sulfate-reducing species (e.g., Desulfovibrio). Physiological differences and various gene repertoires implicated in syntrophic metabolism among Desulfovibrio species suggest considerable variation in the biochemical basis of syntrophy. In this study, comparative transcriptional and mutant analyses of Desulfovibrio alaskensis strain G20 and Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain Hildenborough growing syntrophically with Methanococcus maripaludis on lactate were used to develop new and revised models for their alternative electron transfer and energy conservation systems. Lactate oxidation by strain G20 generates a reduced thiol-disulfide redox pair(s) and ferredoxin that are energetically coupled to H(+)/CO(2) reduction by periplasmic formate dehydrogenase and hydrogenase via a flavin-based reverse electron bifurcation process (electron confurcation) and a menaquinone (MQ) redox loop-mediated reverse electron flow involving the membrane-bound Qmo and Qrc complexes. In contrast, strain Hildenborough uses a larger number of cytoplasmic and periplasmic proteins linked in three intertwining pathways to couple H(+) reduction to lactate oxidation. The faster growth of strain G20 in coculture is associated with a kinetic advantage conferred by the Qmo-MQ-Qrc loop as an electron transfer system that permits higher lactate oxidation rates under elevated hydrogen levels (thereby enhancing methanogenic growth) and use of formate as the main electron-exchange mediator (>70% electron flux), as opposed to the primarily hydrogen-based exchange by strain Hildenborough. This study further demonstrates the absence of a conserved gene core in Desulfovibrio that would determine the ability for a syntrophic lifestyle. PMID:23264581

  19. Variation among Desulfovibrio Species in Electron Transfer Systems Used for Syntrophic Growth

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Birte; Kuehl, Jennifer; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Price, Morgan N.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2013-01-01

    Mineralization of organic matter in anoxic environments relies on the cooperative activities of hydrogen producers and consumers linked by interspecies electron transfer in syntrophic consortia that may include sulfate-reducing species (e.g., Desulfovibrio). Physiological differences and various gene repertoires implicated in syntrophic metabolism among Desulfovibrio species suggest considerable variation in the biochemical basis of syntrophy. In this study, comparative transcriptional and mutant analyses of Desulfovibrio alaskensis strain G20 and Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain Hildenborough growing syntrophically with Methanococcus maripaludis on lactate were used to develop new and revised models for their alternative electron transfer and energy conservation systems. Lactate oxidation by strain G20 generates a reduced thiol-disulfide redox pair(s) and ferredoxin that are energetically coupled to H+/CO2 reduction by periplasmic formate dehydrogenase and hydrogenase via a flavin-based reverse electron bifurcation process (electron confurcation) and a menaquinone (MQ) redox loop-mediated reverse electron flow involving the membrane-bound Qmo and Qrc complexes. In contrast, strain Hildenborough uses a larger number of cytoplasmic and periplasmic proteins linked in three intertwining pathways to couple H+ reduction to lactate oxidation. The faster growth of strain G20 in coculture is associated with a kinetic advantage conferred by the Qmo-MQ-Qrc loop as an electron transfer system that permits higher lactate oxidation rates under elevated hydrogen levels (thereby enhancing methanogenic growth) and use of formate as the main electron-exchange mediator (>70% electron flux), as opposed to the primarily hydrogen-based exchange by strain Hildenborough. This study further demonstrates the absence of a conserved gene core in Desulfovibrio that would determine the ability for a syntrophic lifestyle. PMID:23264581

  20. Orange protein from Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20: insights into the Mo-Cu cluster protein-assisted synthesis.

    PubMed

    Carepo, Marta S P; Carreira, Cíntia; Grazina, Raquel; Zakrzewska, Małgorzata E; Dolla, Alain; Aubert, Corinne; Pauleta, Sofia R; Moura, José J G; Moura, Isabel

    2016-03-01

    A novel metalloprotein containing a unique [S2MoS2CuS2MoS2](3-) cluster, designated as Orange Protein (ORP), was isolated for the first time from Desulfovibrio gigas, a sulphate reducer. The orp operon is conserved in almost all sequenced Desulfovibrio genomes and in other anaerobic bacteria, however, so far D. gigas ORP had been the only ORP characterized in the literature. In this work, the purification of another ORP isolated form Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 is reported. The native protein is monomeric (12443.8 ± 0.1 Da by ESI-MS) and contains also a MoCu cluster with characteristic absorption bands at 337 and 480 nm, assigned to S-Mo charge transfer bands. Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 recombinant protein was obtained in the apo-form from E. coli. Cluster reconstitution studies and UV-visible titrations with tetrathiomolybdate of the apo-ORP incubated with Cu ions indicate that the cluster is incorporated in a protein metal-assisted synthetic mode and the protein favors the 2Mo:1Cu stoichiometry. In Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20, the orp genes are encoded by a polycistronic unit composed of six genes whereas in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough the same genes are organized into two divergent operons, although the composition in genes is similar. The gene expression of ORP (Dde_3198) increased 6.6 ± 0.5 times when molybdate was added to the growth medium but was not affected by Cu(II) addition, suggesting an involvement in molybdenum metabolism directly or indirectly in these anaerobic bacteria. PMID:26748795

  1. Modification of Lignins by Growing Cells of the Sulfate-Reducing Anaerobe Desulfovibrio desulfuricans†

    PubMed Central

    Ziomek, E.; Williams, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    The anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans was grown on medium supplemented with either Kraft lignin or lignosulfonate. Only lignosulfonate contributed to the growth of D. desulfuricans cells, by replacing sulfate, a natural electron acceptor for this microorganism. Kraft lignin added to the culture medium could not substitute for lactate or sulfate, both necessary culture medium components. However, it was found to enhance the viability of D. desulfuricans cells. When changes occurring in lignin during growth of Desulfovibrio cultures were monitored, it was found that both lignin preparations could be partially depolymerized. Spectrophotometric and elemental analysis of biologically treated lignins suggested that both the polyphenolic backbone and lignin functional groups were affected by D. desulfuricans. After treatment, a twofold increase in the sulfur content of Kraft lignin and a minor decrease (14%) in the sulfur content of lignosulfonate were observed. After biological treatment, Kraft lignin and lignosulfonate both bound larger quantities of heavy metals. PMID:16348007

  2. Desulfovibrio legallii Prosthetic Shoulder Joint Infection and Review of Antimicrobial Susceptibility and Clinical Characteristics of Desulfovibrio Infections

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Erin L.; Gustafson, Daniel R.; Cunningham, Scott A.; Cole, Nicolynn C.; Vetter, Emily A.; Steinmann, Scott P.; Wilson, Walter R.; Patel, Robin; Berbari, Elie F.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of shoulder hemiarthroplasty infection with Desulfovibrio legallii. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of 36 Desulfovibrio isolates are presented. Metronidazole and carbapenems exhibited reliable activity, although piperacillin-tazobactam did not. Eleven previous cases of Desulfovibrio infection are reviewed; most arose from a gastrointestinal tract-related source. PMID:24850351

  3. Genetics and Molecular Biology of the Electron Flow for Sulfate Respiration in Desulfovibrio

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Kimberly L.; Wall, Judy D.

    2011-01-01

    Progress in the genetic manipulation of the Desulfovibrio strains has provided an opportunity to explore electron flow pathways during sulfate respiration. Most bacteria in this genus couple the oxidation of organic acids or ethanol with the reduction of sulfate, sulfite, or thiosulfate. Both fermentation of pyruvate in the absence of an alternative terminal electron acceptor, disproportionation of fumarate and growth on H2 with CO2 during sulfate reduction are exhibited by some strains. The ability to produce or consume H2 provides Desulfovibrio strains the capacity to participate as either partner in interspecies H2 transfer. Interestingly the mechanisms of energy conversion, pathways of electron flow and the parameters determining the pathways used remain to be elucidated. Recent application of molecular genetic tools for the exploration of the metabolism of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough has provided several new datasets that might provide insights and constraints to the electron flow pathways. These datasets include (1) gene expression changes measured in microarrays for cells cultured with different electron donors and acceptors, (2) relative mRNA abundances for cells growing exponentially in defined medium with lactate as carbon source and electron donor plus sulfate as terminal electron acceptor, and (3) a random transposon mutant library selected on medium containing lactate plus sulfate supplemented with yeast extract. Studies of directed mutations eliminating apparent key components, the quinone-interacting membrane-bound oxidoreductase (Qmo) complex, the Type 1 tetraheme cytochrome c3 (Tp1-c3), or the Type 1 cytochrome c3:menaquinone oxidoreductase (Qrc) complex, suggest a greater flexibility in electron flow than previously considered. The new datasets revealed the absence of random transposons in the genes encoding an enzyme with homology to Coo membrane-bound hydrogenase. From this result, we infer that Coo hydrogenase plays an important role

  4. A Case of Liver Abscess with Desulfovibrio desulfuricans Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Koyano, Saho; Tatsuno, Keita; Okazaki, Mitsuhiro; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Sasaki, Takashi; Saito, Ryoichi; Okugawa, Shu; Moriya, Kyoji

    2015-01-01

    Desulfovibrio spp. are gram-negative, sulfate-reducing, and anaerobic bacteria found in the digestive tract of humans. Because Desulfovibrio spp. are infrequent causative agents of infectious diseases and are difficult to isolate and to identify from clinical specimens, the appropriate antibiotic therapy to infection with Desulfovibrio spp. has not been determined. We report the first case of liver abscess with bacteremia due to Desulfovibrio desulfuricans to show the clinical presentation and treatment. The patient was successfully treated with intravenous piperacillin-tazobactam and oral amoxicillin-clavulanic acid. PMID:25632357

  5. Crystal structure of cytochrome c3 from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans Norway at 1.7 A resolution.

    PubMed

    Czjzek, M; Payan, F; Guerlesquin, F; Bruschi, M; Haser, R

    1994-11-01

    The crystal structure of cytochrome c3 (M(r) 13,000) from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (118 residues, four heme groups) has been crystallographically refined to 1.7 A resolution using a simulated annealing method, based on the structure-model at 2.5 A resolution, already published. The final R-factor for 10,549 reflections was 0.198 covering the range from 5.5 to 1.7 A resolution. The individual temperature factors were refined for a total of 1059 protein atoms, together with 126 bound solvent molecules. The structure has been analyzed with respect to its detailed conformational properties, secondary structure features, temperature factor behaviour, bound solvent sites and heme geometry and ligation. The characteristic secondary structures of the polypeptide chain of this molecule are one extended alpha-helix, a short beta-strand and 13 reverse turns. The four heme groups are located in different structural environments, all highly exposed to solvent. The particular structural features of the heme environments are compared to the four hemes of the cytochrome c3 from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki. PMID:7966289

  6. Microcalorimetric studies of the growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria: comparison of the growth parameters of some Desulfovibrio species.

    PubMed

    Traore, A S; Hatchikian, C E; Le Gall, J; Belaich, J P

    1982-02-01

    We performed a comparative study of the growth energetics of some species of Desulfovibrio by measuring microcalorimetric and molar growth yield values. Lactate and pyruvate were used as energy sources for sulfate reduction. On lactate-sulfate media Desulfovibrio desulfuricans Norway, Desulfovibrio gigas, and Desulfovibrio africanus exhibited molar growth yields of 4.1 +/- 0.6, 3.7 +/- 1.7, and 1.8 +/- 0.1 g/mol, respectively, whereas on pyruvate-sulfate media the molar growth yields were higher (8.5 +/- 0.8, 7.7 +/- 1.6, and 3.5 +/- 0.5 g/mol, respectively). Thus, we found that D. africanus was the least efficient species in converting energy into cell material. The uncoupling of energy in this strain was obvious since its catabolic activities were high compared with those of the two other strains. The enthalpy changes associated with lactate and pyruvate metabolism were -49 +/- 0.7 and -70.2 +/- 6.0 jK/mol, respectively, for D. desulfuricans, -76.6 +/- 1.8 and -91.2 +/- 1.1 kJ/mol, respectively, for D. gigas, and -78.8 +/- 7.2 and -88.0 +/- 6.2 kJ/mol, respectively, for D. africanus. D. gigas and D. africanus produced only acetate, CO2 and hydrogen sulfide as metabolic end products. In addition to these normal end products, D. desulfuricans Norway produced a small amount of butanol. This butanol production was interpreted as reflecting a regulatory system of electron flow during the catabolism of both substrates. Such metabolism was comparable to that reported for D. vulgaris, which lost part of the reducing power of its energy sources through hydrogen evolution. PMID:7056697

  7. Bioreduction and biocrystallization of palladium by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans NCIMB 8307.

    PubMed

    Yong, Ping; Rowson, Neil A; Farr, J Peter G; Harris, I Rex; Macaskie, Lynne E

    2002-11-20

    The reduction of Pd(II) to Pd(0) was accelerated by using the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans NCIMB 8307 at the expense of formate or H(2) as electron donors at pH 2-7. With formate no reduction occurred at pH 2, but with H(2) 50% of the activity was retained at pH 2, with the maximum rate (1.3-1.4 micromol min(-1) mg dry cells(-1)) seen at pH 3-7, which was similar to the rate with formate at neutral pH. Excess nitrate was inhibitory to Pd(II) reduction using formate, but not H(2). Chloride ion was inhibitory as low as 100 mM using formate but with H(2) only ca. 25% inhibition was observed at 500 mM Cl(-) and H(2) was concluded to be the electron donor of choice for the potential remediation of industrial wastes. Deposited Pd was visible on the cells using transmission and scanning electron microscopy and analysis by energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDAX) identified the deposit as Pd, confirmed as Pd(0) by X-ray powder diffraction analysis (XRD). The crystal size of the biodeposited Pd(0) was determined to be only 50% of the size of Pd(0) crystals manufactured chemically from Pd(II) at the expense of H(2) and, unlike the chemically manufactured material, the biocrystal size was independent of the pH. The "biological" Pd(0) functioned as a superior chemical catalyst in a test reaction which liberated hydrogen from hypophosphite. Pd, and also Pt and Rh, could be recovered by resting cell suspensions under H(2) from an industrial processing wastewater, suggesting a possible future application of bioprocessing technology for precious metals. PMID:12325145

  8. Deciphering the adaptation strategies of Desulfovibrio piezophilus to hydrostatic pressure through metabolic and transcriptional analyses.

    PubMed

    Amrani, Amira; van Helden, Jacques; Bergon, Aurélie; Aouane, Aicha; Ben Hania, Wajdi; Tamburini, Christian; Loriod, Béatrice; Imbert, Jean; Ollivier, Bernard; Pradel, Nathalie; Dolla, Alain

    2016-08-01

    Desulfovibrio piezophilus strain C1TLV30(T) is a mesophilic piezophilic sulfate-reducer isolated from Wood Falls at 1700 m depth in the Mediterranean Sea. In this study, we analysed the effect of the hydrostatic pressure on this deep-sea living bacterium at the physiologic and transcriptomic levels. Our results showed that lactate oxidation and energy metabolism were affected by the hydrostatic pressure. Especially, acetyl-CoA oxidation pathway and energy conservation through hydrogen and formate recycling would be more important when the hydrostatic pressure is above (26 MPa) than below (0.1 MPa) the optimal one (10 MPa). This work underlines also the role of the amino acid glutamate as a piezolyte for the Desulfovibrio genus. The transcriptomic analysis revealed 146 differentially expressed genes emphasizing energy production and conversion, amino acid transport and metabolism and cell motility and signal transduction mechanisms as hydrostatic pressure responding processes. This dataset allowed us to identify a sequence motif upstream of a subset of differentially expressed genes as putative pressure-dependent regulatory element. PMID:27264199

  9. Isolation of Desulfovibrio intestinalis sp. nov. from the hindgut' of the lower termite Mastotermes darwiniensis.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, J; Sass, H; Babenzien, H D; Kuhnigk, T; Varma, A; Saxena, S; Nalepa, C; Pfeiffer, P; König, H

    1999-02-01

    A Gram-negative, anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacterium was isolated from hindgut contents of the lower termite Mastotermes darwiniensis Froggatt (strain KMS2). Strain KMS2 is motile by a single polar flagellum. The isolate possesses desulfoviridin and catalase activity. The G+C content of its DNA is in the range of 54.5-55.5 mol% (strain KMS2). It respires hydrogen and different low molecular weight organic compounds in the presence of sulfate, thiosulfate, and sulfite, and also oxygen. The isolated strain ferments pyruvate. Fastest growth with a doubling time of 12.5 h was obtained at 37 degrees C and not at 28 degrees C, the temperature at which the termites were grown. The isolate showed a 16S rDNA sequence homology of 95.9% to Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774 and a DNA-DNA homology of 44.6% to D. desulfuricans Essex 6 (type strain). Based on its biochemical properties and 16S rDNA sequence, the isolate was assigned to a new species named Desulfovibrio intestinalis. PMID:10380647

  10. Acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Moradi Tuchayi, Sara; Makrantonaki, Evgenia; Ganceviciene, Ruta; Dessinioti, Clio; Feldman, Steven R; Zouboulis, Christos C

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a chronic inflammatory disease - rather than a natural part of the life cycle as colloquially viewed - of the pilosebaceous unit (comprising the hair follicle, hair shaft and sebaceous gland) and is among the most common dermatological conditions worldwide. Some of the key mechanisms involved in the development of acne include disturbed sebaceous gland activity associated with hyperseborrhoea (that is, increased sebum production) and alterations in sebum fatty acid composition, dysregulation of the hormone microenvironment, interaction with neuropeptides, follicular hyperkeratinization, induction of inflammation and dysfunction of the innate and adaptive immunity. Grading of acne involves lesion counting and photographic methods. However, there is a lack of consensus on the exact grading criteria, which hampers the conduction and comparison of randomized controlled clinical trials evaluating treatments. Prevention of acne relies on the successful management of modifiable risk factors, such as underlying systemic diseases and lifestyle factors. Several treatments are available, but guidelines suffer from a lack of data to make evidence-based recommendations. In addition, the complex combination treatment regimens required to target different aspects of acne pathophysiology lead to poor adherence, which undermines treatment success. Acne commonly causes scarring and reduces the quality of life of patients. New treatment options with a shift towards targeting the early processes involved in acne development instead of suppressing the effects of end products will enhance our ability to improve the outcomes for patients with acne. PMID:27189872

  11. Acne vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Aydemir, Ertuğrul H.

    2014-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a chronic inflammatory disease of the pilosebaceous unit and it is observed equally in both sexes and nearly all races. It generally begins at puberty, but the healing period is variable. There is no known etiological factor, except genetic tendency. Androgens play a very limited role in some female patients. The effects of cosmetics, foods and drinks are also discussible and too limited. There are four factors in acne pathogenesis: Increase of the sebum excretionKeratinization of infrainfundibulumBacterial colonization of the follicleInflammation It is mainly observed on the face and back, shoulders and chest. Initial lesions are comedons. Papules, pustules and cysts of severe types follow it. The most important factor in treatment is a very good patient-physician communication. Topical or systemic treatment or both can be used depending on the severity of acne. Benzoyl peroxyde, azelaic acid, AHA’s antibiotics, retinoic acid and derivatives are the topical choices. For systemic treatment antibiotics are the most commonly used medicines, but isotretinoine has a very spesific place with the possibility of permanent healing. All kind of treatments need approximately six months for a good result. PMID:26078626

  12. Propionibacterium acnes in the pathogenesis and immunotherapy of acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei-Feng; Hsieh, Yao-Dung; Lin, Ya-Ching; Two, Aimee; Shu, Chih-Wen; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris, a multi-factorial disease, is one of the most common skin diseases, affecting an estimated 80% of Americans at some point during their lives. The gram-positive and anaerobic Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) bacterium has been implicated in acne inflammation and pathogenesis. Therapies for acne vulgaris using antibiotics generally lack bacterial specificity, promote the generation of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains, and cause adverse effects. Immunotherapy against P. acnes or its antigens (sialidase and CAMP factor) has been demonstrated to be effective in mice, attenuating P. acnes-induced inflammation; thus, this method may be applied to develop a potential vaccine targeting P. acnes for acne vulgaris treatment. This review summarizes reports describing the role of P. acnes in the pathogenesis of acne and various immunotherapy-based approaches targeting P. acnes, suggesting the potential effectiveness of immunotherapy for acne vulgaris as well as P. acnes-associated diseases. PMID:26264195

  13. Characterization of an operon encoding an NADP-reducing hydrogenase in Desulfovibrio fructosovorans.

    PubMed Central

    Malki, S; Saimmaime, I; De Luca, G; Rousset, M; Dermoun, Z; Belaich, J P

    1995-01-01

    A genomic DNA fragment from Desulfovibrio fructosovorans, which strongly hybridized with the hydAB genes from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, was cloned and sequenced. This fragment was found to contain four genes, named hndA, hndB, hndC, and hndD. Analysis of the sequence homologies indicated that HndA shows 29, 21, and 26% identity with the 24-kDa subunit from Bos taurus complex I, the 25-kDa subunit from Paracoccus denitrificans NADH dehydrogenase type I, and the N-terminal domain of HoxF subunit of the NAD-reducing hydrogenase from Alcaligenes eutrophus, respectively. HndB does not show any significant homology with any known protein. HndC shows 37 and 33% identity with the C-terminal domain of HoxF and the 51-kDa subunit from B. taurus complex I, respectively, and has the requisite structural features to be able to bind one flavin mononucleotide, one NAD, and three [4Fe-4S] clusters. HndD has 40, 42, and 48% identity with hydrogenase I from Clostridium pasteurianum and HydC and HydA from D. vulgaris Hildenborough, respectively. The 4.5-kb length of the transcripts expressed in D. fructosovorans and in Escherichia coli (pSS13) indicated that all four genes were present on the same transcription unit. The sizes of the four polypeptides were measured by performing heterologous expression of hndABCD in E. coli, using the T7 promoter/polymerase system. The products of hndA, hndB, hndC, and hndD were 18.8, 13.8, 52, and 63.4 kDa, respectively. One hndC deletion mutant, called SM3, was constructed by performing marker exchange mutagenesis. Immunoblotting studies carried out on cell extracts from D. fructosovorans wild-type and SM3 strains, using antibodies directed against HndC, indicated that the 52-kDa protein was recognized in extracts from the wild-type strain only. In soluble extracts from D. fructosovorans wild type, a 10-fold induction of NADP reduction was observed when H(2) was present, but no H(2)-dependent NAD reduction ever occurred. This H(2

  14. The influence of desulfovibrio desulfuricans on neptunium chemistry.

    SciTech Connect

    Soderholm, L.; Williams, C.; Antonio, M. R.; Tischler, M. L.; Markos, M.

    1999-12-20

    The role of biotic Np(V) reduction is studied in light of its potential role in the environmental immobilization of this hazardous radionuclide. The speciation of Np in Desulfovibrio desulfuricans cultures is compared with Np speciation in the spent medium and in the uninoculated medium. Precipitates formed in all three samples. Optical spectroscopy and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) were used to determine that Np(V) is almost quantitatively reduced in all three samples and that the precipitate is an amorphous Np(IV) species. These results demonstrate that the reduction of Np is independent of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. The underlying chemistry associated with these results is discussed.

  15. Reduction of uranium by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1992-01-01

    The possibility that sulfate-reducing microorganisms contribute to U(VI) reduction in sedimentary environments was investigated. U(VI) was reduced to U(IV) when washed cells of sulfate-grown Desulfovibrio desulfuricans were suspended in a bicarbonate buffer with lactate or H2 as the electron donor. There was no U(VI) reduction in the absence of an electron donor or when the cells were killed by heat prior to the incubation. The rates of U(VI) reduction were comparable to those in respiratory Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms. Azide or prior exposure of the cells to air did not affect the ability of D. desulfuricans to reduce U(VI). Attempts to grow D. desulfuricans with U(VI) as the electron acceptor were unsuccessful. U(VI) reduction resulted in the extracellular precipitation of the U(IV) mineral uraninite. The presence of sulfate had no effect on the rate of U(VI) reduction. Sulfate and U(VI) were reduced simultaneously. Enzymatic reduction of U(VI) by D. desulfuricans was much faster than nonenzymatic reduction of U(VI) by sulfide, even when cells of D. desulfuricans were added to provide a potential catalytic surface for the nonenzymatic reaction. The results indicate that enzymatic U(VI) reduction by sulfate-reducing microorganisms may be responsible for the accumulation of U(IV) in sulfidogenic environments. Furthermore, since the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) precipitates uranium from solution, D. desulfuricans might be a useful organisms for recovering uranium from contaminated waters and waste streams.

  16. Laryngeal verruca vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Topdag, Murat; Erdogan, Selvet; Kara, Ahmet; Derin, Serhan

    2015-01-01

    Laryngeal verruca vulgaris is a rare disease of the larynx that is easily misdiagnosed as other laryngeal lesions. This article reports three patients with laryngeal verruca vulgaris and discusses the differential diagnosis of laryngeal verrucous lesions to avoid over treatment. PMID:25935911

  17. Large-Scale, Continuous-Flow Production of Stressed Biomass (Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough)

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, Jil T.; Borglin, Sharon E.; Fortney, Julian L.; Lam, Bonita R.; Hazen, Terry C.; Biggin, Mark D.

    2010-05-01

    The Protein Complex Analysis Project (PCAP, http://pcap.lbl.gov/), focuses on high-throughput analysis of microbial protein complexes in the anaerobic, sulfate-reducing organism, DesulfovibriovulgarisHildenborough(DvH).Interest in DvHas a model organism for bioremediation of contaminated groundwater sites arises from its ability to reduce heavy metals. D. vulgarishas been isolated from contaminated groundwater of sites in the DOE complex. To understand the effect of environmental changes on the organism, midlog-phase cultures are exposed to nitrate and salt stresses (at the minimum inhibitory concentration, which reduces growth rates by 50percent), and compared to controls of cultures at midlogand stationary phases. Large volumes of culture of consistent quality (up to 100 liters) are needed because of the relatively low cell density of DvHcultures (one order of magnitude lower than E. coli, for example) and PCAP's challenge to characterize low-abundance membrane proteins. Cultures are grown in continuous flow stirred tank reactors (CFSTRs) to produce consistent cell densities. Stressor is added to the outflow from the CFSTR, and the mixture is pumped through a plug flow reactor (PFR), to provide a stress exposure time of 2 hours. Effluent is chilled and held in large carboys until it is centrifuged. A variety of analyses -- including metabolites, total proteins, cell density and phospholipidfatty-acids -- track culture consistency within a production run, and differences due to stress exposure and growth phase for the different conditions used. With our system we are able to produce the requisite 100 L of culture for a given condition within a week.

  18. High Throughput Identification, Purification and Structural Characterization of Water Soluble Protein Complexes in Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Dong,, Ming; Han, Bong-Gyoon; Liu, Hui-Hai; Malik, J.; Geller, Jil; Yang, Li; Choi, M.; Chandonia, John-Marc; Arbelaez, Pablo; Sterling, H. J.; Typke, Dieter; Shatsky, Max; Brenner, Steve; Fisher, Susan; Williams, Evan; Szakal, Evelin; Allen, S.; Hall, S. C.; Hazen, Terry; Witkowska, H. E.; Jin, Jiming; Glaeser, Robert; Biggin, Mark

    2010-05-17

    Our scheme for the tagless purification of water soluble complexes. 10 g of protein from a crude bacterial extract is first fractionated by ammonium sulfate precipitation and then by a series of chromatographic steps: anion exchange (IEX), hydrophobic interaction (HIC), and finally size exclusion (Gel Filtration). Fractions from the last chromatography step are trypsin digested and peptides labeled with iTRAQ reagents to allow multiplexing and quantitation during mass spectrometric analysis. Elution profiles of identified proteins are then subjected to clustering analysis.

  19. Tetrachloroethene Dehalorespiration and Growth of Desulfitobacterium frappieri TCE1 in Strict Dependence on the Activity of Desulfovibrio fructosivorans

    PubMed Central

    Drzyzga, Oliver; Gottschal, Jan C.

    2002-01-01

    Tetrachloroethene (PCE) dehalorespiration was investigated in a continuous coculture of the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio fructosivorans and the dehalorespiring Desulfitobacterium frappieri TCE1 at different sulfate concentrations and in the absence of sulfate. Fructose (2.5 mM) was the single electron donor, which could be used only by the sulfate reducer. With 2.5 mM sulfate, the dehalogenating strain was outnumbered by the sulfate-reducing bacterium, sulfate reduction was the dominating process, and only trace amounts of PCE were dehalogenated by strain TCE1. With 1 mM sulfate in the medium, complete sulfate reduction and complete PCE dehalogenation to cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) occurred. In the absence of sulfate, PCE was also completely dehalogenated to cis-DCE, and the population size of strain TCE1 increased significantly. The results presented here describe for the first time dehalogenation of PCE by a dehalorespiring anaerobe in strict dependence on the activity of a sulfate-reducing bacterium with a substrate that is exclusively used by the sulfate reducer. This interaction was studied under strictly controlled and quantifiable conditions in continuous culture and shown to depend on interspecies hydrogen transfer under sulfate-depleted conditions. Interspecies hydrogen transfer was demonstrated by direct H2 measurements of the gas phase and by the production of methane after the addition of a third organism, Methanobacterium formicicum. PMID:11823202

  20. Metabolic Pathways Leading to Mercury Methylation in Desulfovibrio desulfuricans LS †

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sung-Chan; Chase, Theodore; Bartha, Richard

    1994-01-01

    The synthesis of methylmercury by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans LS was investigated on the basis of 14C incorporation from precursors and the measurement of relevant enzyme activities in cell extracts. The previously observed incorporation of C-3 from serine into methylmercury was confirmed by measurement of relatively high activities of serine hydroxymethyltransferase and other enzymes of this pathway. High rates of label incorporation into methylmercury from H14COO- and H14CO3- prompted the assay of enzymes of the acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) synthase pathway. These enzymes were found to be present but at activity levels much lower than those reported for acetogens. Propyl iodide inhibited methylmercury and acetyl-CoA syntheses to similar extents, and methylmercury synthesis was found to compete with acetyl-CoA synthesis for methyl groups. On the basis of these findings, we propose that in methylmercury synthesis by D. desulfuricans LS the methyl group is transferred from CH3-tetrahydrofolate via methylcobalamin. The methyl group may originate from C-3 of serine or from formate via the acetyl-CoA synthase pathway. These pathways are not unique to D. desulfuricans LS, and thus the ability of this bacterium to methylate mercury is most likely associated with the substrate specificity of its enzymes. PMID:16349435

  1. The isolation of a hexaheme cytochrome from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans and its identification as a new type of nitrite reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, M.-C.; Peck, H.D., Jr.

    1981-12-01

    Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (ATCC 27774), a strictly anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria, is able to perform anaerobic nitrate respiration in which nitrate is first reduced to nitrite by the action of nitrate reductase, and nitrite reductase then catalyzes the six-electron reduction of nitrite to ammonia. The nitrite reductase was found to be a membrane-bound enzyme and has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity. The purified enzyme has a minimal M/sub r/=66,000 as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis and contains 6 c-type heme groups/molecule. Pure nitrite reductase exhibits a typical c-type cytochrome absorption spectrum with reduced..cap alpha..-band at 552.5 nm. NADH and NADPH do not function as direct electron donors for the nitrite reductase. Desulfovibrio vulgaris hydrogenase,however, is able to transfer electrons from H/sub 2/ to the nitrite reductase using FAD as the electron transfer mediator. The dithionite-reduced nitrite reductase was demonstrated to be auto-oxidizable even in the presence of potassium cyanide. On addition of nitrite, the dithionite-reduced enzyme is re-oxidized immediately. Hydroxylamine, however, can only partially reoxidize the reduced enzyme. Ascorbate reduces the enzyme to a limited extent and the partially reduced enzyme is neither auto-oxidizable by nitrite or hydroxylamine. Purified nitrite reductase has a pH optimum in the range of 8.0-9.5 and optimal activity at 57/sup o/C. Purified nitrite reductase also has hydroxylamine reductase activity, and the K/sub m/ for nitrite was determined to be 1.14 mM.

  2. Analyzing the metabolic capabilities of Desulfovibrio speciesthrough genetic manipulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, K.; Yen, H.-C.; Wall, J.D.

    2005-12-31

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are an environmentallysignificant group belonging to the anaerobic delta-Proteobacteria thatrespire sulfate for growth. From an industrial stand point, SRB pose athreat through corrosion of ferrous metals and production of toxicsulfides. The more positive aspects of the metabolism of the SRB includea robust but poorly understood hydrogen metabolism that is of interest toalternative energy studies. SRB also immobilize a number of heavy metalsthrough sulfide precipitation or through changing the redox state of themetal and thus its solubility. When metals are made less soluble, as isthe case with chromium (Cr(VI) to Cr(III)) or uranium (U(VI) to U(IV)),toxicity is reduced by limiting biological availability. Despite theeconomic and environmental impacts associated with SRB activities, ourcurrent knowledge of their metabolism is inadequate. Among the SRB,members of the Desulfovibrio genus have received most attention becausethese strains are most readily grown in pure culture. Therefore,Desulfovibrio strains have been the focus of biochemical and biophysicalanalyses, however, genetic studies have been more difficult. Over thelast 15 years, progress has been made in developing techniques for DNAtransformation, gene mutagenesis and over expression, and proteintagging. Since the last genetics of SRB review by van Dongen, 10 yearshave passed (van Dongen, 1995) and the complete genome sequences of a fewstrains are now available (Heidelberg, et al., 2004). This reviewhighlights the current advances in the genetic manipulation ofDesulfovibrio species and the potential use of these tools inunderstanding the metabolism of sulfate reducers for biotechnologicalpurposes.

  3. DIVERSITY AND ORIGIN OF DESULFOVIBRIO SPECIES: PHYLOGENETIC DEFINITION OF A FAMILY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The different nutritional properties of several Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strains suggest that either the strains are misclassified or there is a high degree of phenotypic diversity within the genus Desulfovibrio. he results of partial 16S rRNA and 23S rRNA sequence determinati...

  4. Susceptibility to antibiotics and biochemical properties of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strains.

    PubMed

    Dzierzewicz, Z; Cwalina, B; Jaworska-Kik, M; Weglarz, L; Wilczok, T

    2001-01-01

    Susceptibility to several antibiotics and biochemical properties of intestinal and soil strains of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans bacteria were investigated using the tests: ATB ANA, Sceptor Anaerobic MIC/ID and API ZYM. It was demonstrated that the D. desulfuricans strains were resistant to penicillin, cefoxitin, clindamycin, metronidazole, erythromycin, rifampicin and teicoplanin. The strains initially susceptible to imipenem became resistant to this drug following 72 h incubation with it. Of 25 analyzed antibiotics there was none that after 72 h action on the bacteria was effective in relation to all of the investigated strains. The differences in susceptibility of D. desulfuricans strains to antibiotics were not associated with the strains' biochemical properties. PMID:12197616

  5. The Effect of Desulfovibrio sp. Biofilms on Corrosion Behavior of Copper in Sulfide-Containing Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güngör, Nihal Doğruöz; Çotuk, Ayşın; Dışpınar, Derya

    2015-03-01

    This study aims to detect the effect of Desulfovibrio sp. on copper in terms of biofilm formation and corrosion in 722 h. In that way, appropriate strategies to inhibit microbiological corrosion in copper systems with Desulfovibrio sp. can be evaluated. For this purpose, experiments were performed in 1 L glass model system containing 28 copper coupons and pure culture of the sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) strain Desulfovibrio sp. in Postgate's medium C. Also, a control system with copper coupons but without Desulfovibrio sp. containing sterile Postgate's medium was studied concurrently with the test system. The test coupons were collected from systems at certain time intervals, namely 24, 168, 360, and 720 h. The samples were then subjected to several characterization analyses such as measurement of Desulfovibrio sp. numbers, corrosion resistance, EPS extraction, carbohydrate analysis, SEM, and EDS. During the experiments, the maximum Desulfovibrio sp. count in biofilm samples was found at 360 h. Carbohydrate and copper concentrations in biofilm were increased over time. EDS analysis revealed Cu, S, C, O, and Cl peaks on the surface of the samples. For the control coupons, only Cu peaks were observed. The results obtained from this study showed that copper was corroded by Desulfovibrio sp. in the model system under laboratory conditions.

  6. Investigation of Mercury Methylation Pathways in Biofilm versus Planktonic Cultures of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tiffany Y.; Kampalath, Rita A.; Lin, Chu-Ching; Zhang, Ming; Chavarria, Karina; Lacson, Jessica; Jay, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms can methylate mercury (Hg) at higher rates than unattached bacteria and are increasingly recognized as important Hg methylation sites in the environment. Our previous study showed that methylation rates in biofilm cultures were up to 1 order of magnitude greater than those in planktonic cultures of a sulfate-reducing bacterium. To probe whether the differential Hg methylation rates resulted from metabolic differences between these two cultures, Hg methylation assays following molybdate or chloroform inhibition (a specific inhibitor of the acetyl-CoA pathway) were conducted on biofilm and planktonic cultures of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strains M8 and ND132. Molybdate was as effective in inhibiting Hg methylation as well as growth in both planktonic and biofilm cultures. The addition of chloroform only impacted Hg methylation in biofilm cultures, suggesting that different pathways are used for methylation in biofilm compared to planktonic cultures. To investigate this further, expression of the cooS gene, which encodes for carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, a key enzyme in the acetyl-CoA pathway, was compared in biofilm and planktonic cultures of ND132. Biofilm cultures showed up to 4 times higher expression of cooS than planktonic cultures. On the basis of these results, the acetyl-CoA pathway appears to play an important role in methylation in biofilm cultures of this organism, possibly by supplying the methyl group to Hg methylating enzymes; methylation in planktonic cultures appears to be independent of this pathway. This observation has important implications, particularly in developing reliable models to predict Hg methylation rates in different environments and perhaps eventually in being able to control this undesirable chemical transformation. PMID:23634937

  7. The toxicity of lead to Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 in the presence of goethite and quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Sani, Rajesh K.; Rastogi, Gurdeep; Moberly, J.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Ginn, Timothy R.; Spycher, Nicolas; Shende, Rajesh; Peyton, Brent

    2010-04-01

    An aqueous mixture of goethite, quartz, and lead chloride (PbCl2) was treated with the sulfatereducing bacterium, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 (D. desulfuricans G20), in a medium specifically designed to assess metal toxicity. In the presence of 26 μM of soluble Pb, together with the goethite and quartz, D. desulfuricans G20 grew after a lag time of 5 days compared to 2 days in Pb-, goethite-, and quartz-free treatments. In the absence of goethite and quartz, however, with 26 μM soluble Pb, no measurable growth was observed. Results showed that D. desulfuricans G20 first removed Pb from solutions then growth began resulting in black precipitates of Pb and iron sulfides. Transmission electron microscopic analyses of thin sections of D. desulfuricans G20 treated with 10 μM PbCl2 in goethite- and quartz-free treatment showed the presence of a dense deposit of lead sulfide precipitates both in the periplasm and cytoplasm. However, thin sections of D. desulfuricans G20 treated with goethite, quartz, and PbCl2 (26 μM soluble Pb) showed the presence of a dense deposit of iron sulfide precipitates both in the periplasm and cytoplasm. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, selected area electron diffraction patterns, or X-ray diffraction analyses confirmed the structure of precipitated Pb inside the cell as galena (PbS) in goethite- and quartz-free treatments, and iron sulfides in treatments with goethite, quartz, and PbCl2. Overall results suggest that even at the same soluble Pb concentration (26 μM), in the presence of goethite and quartz, apparent Pb toxicity to D. desulfuricans G20 decreased significantly. Further, accumulation of lead/iron sulfides inside D. desulfuricans G20 cells depended on the presence of goethite and quartz.

  8. Anaerobic oxidation of Hg(0) and methylmercury formation by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, Matthew J.; Ha, Juyoung; Reinfelder, John R.; Barkay, Tamar; Yee, Nathan

    2013-07-01

    The transformation of inorganic mercury (Hg) to methylmercury (MeHg) plays a key role in determining the amount of Hg that is bioaccumulated in aquatic food chains. An accurate knowledge of Hg methylation mechanisms is required to predict the conditions that promote MeHg production in aquatic environments. In this study, we conducted experiments to examine the oxidation and methylation of dissolved elemental mercury [Hg(0)] by the anaerobic bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132. Anoxic cultures of D. desulfuricans ND132 were exposed to Hg(0) in the dark, and samples were collected and analyzed for the loss of Hg(0), formation of non-purgeable Hg, and formation of MeHg over time. We found that D. desulfuricans ND132 rapidly transformed dissolved gaseous mercury into non-purgeable Hg, with bacterial cultures producing approximately 40 μg/L of non-purgeable Hg within 30 min, and as much as 800 μg/L of non-purgeable Hg after 36 h. Derivatization of the non-purgeable Hg in the cell suspensions to diethylmercury and analysis of Hg(0)-reacted D. desulfuricans ND132 cells using X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy demonstrated that cell-associated Hg was dominantly in the oxidized Hg(II) form. Spectral comparisons and linear combination fitting of the XANES spectra indicated that the oxidized Hg(II) was covalently bonded to cellular thiol functional groups. MeHg analyses revealed that D. desulfuricans ND132 produced up to 118 μg/L of methylmercury after 36 h of incubation. We found that a significant fraction of the methylated Hg was exported out of the cell and released into the culture medium. The results of this work demonstrate a previously unrecognized pathway in the mercury cycle, whereby anaerobic bacteria produce MeHg when provided with dissolved Hg(0) as their sole Hg source.

  9. Properties of intracellular magnetite crystals produced by Desulfovibrio magneticus strain RS-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pósfai, Mihály; Moskowitz, Bruce M.; Arató, Balázs; Schüler, Dirk; Flies, Christine; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Frankel, Richard B.

    2006-09-01

    Desulfovibrio magneticus strain RS-1 is an anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacterium. Cells form intracellular nanocrystals of magnetite but are only weakly magnetotactic. In order to understand the unusual magnetic response of this strain, we studied magnetite crystals within cells grown with fumarate and sulfate. Many cells grown under either condition did not form magnetic crystals while others contained only 1 to 18 small (˜ 40 nm) magnetite-containing magnetosomes. Bulk magnetic measurements of whole cells showed a superparamagnetic-like behavior, indicating that many of the magnetite crystals are too small to have a permanent magnetic moment at ambient temperature. The temperature of the Verwey transition is lower (˜ 86 K) than of magnetite from other magnetotactic strains, likely indicating partial oxidation of magnetite into maghemite. As a result of the small size and small number of magnetite magnetosomes, the magnetic moments of most cells grown anaerobically with fumarate or sulfate are insufficient for magnetotaxis. In addition to intracellular magnetite, in some cultures another iron oxide, hematite, formed on the surfaces of cells. The hematite grains are embedded in an extracellular polymeric material, indicating that the crystals likely resulted from a biologically-induced mineralization process. Although the hematite particles appear to consist of aggregations of many small (5 to 10 nm) grains, the grains have a consensus orientation and thus the whole particle diffracts as a single crystal. The aligned arrangement of nanoparticles within larger clusters may reflect either a templated nucleation of hematite crystallites in an extracellular organic matrix, or result from a self-assembling process during the crystallization of hematite from ferric gels or ferrihydrite.

  10. Effect of electron donors on the fractionation of sulfur isotopes by a marine Desulfovibrio sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Min Sub; Ono, Shuhei; Donovan, Katie; Templer, Stefanie P.; Bosak, Tanja

    2011-08-01

    Sulfur isotope effects produced by microbial dissimilatory sulfate reduction are used to reconstruct the coupled cycling of carbon and sulfur through geologic time, to constrain the evolution of sulfur-based metabolisms, and to track the oxygenation of Earth's surface. In this study, we investigate how the coupling of carbon and sulfur metabolisms in batch and continuous cultures of a recently isolated marine sulfate reducing bacterium DMSS-1, a Desulfovibrio sp ., influences the fractionation of sulfur isotopes. DMSS-1 grown in batch culture on seven different electron donors (ethanol, glycerol, fructose, glucose, lactate, malate and pyruvate) fractionates 34S/ 32S ratio from 6‰ to 44‰, demonstrating that the fractionations by an actively growing culture of a single incomplete oxidizing sulfate reducing microbe can span almost the entire range of previously reported values in defined cultures. The magnitude of isotope effect correlates well with cell specific sulfate reduction rates (from 0.7 to 26.1 fmol/cell/day). DMSS-1 grown on lactate in continuous culture produces a larger isotope effect (21-37‰) than the lactate-grown batch culture (6‰), indicating that the isotope effect also depends on the supply rate of the electron donor and microbial growth rate. The largest isotope effect in continuous culture is accompanied by measurable changes in cell length and cellular yield that suggest starvation. The use of multiple sulfur isotopes in the model of metabolic fluxes of sulfur shows that the loss of sulfate from the cell and the intracellular reoxidation of reduced sulfur species contribute to the increase in isotope effects in a correlated manner. Isotope fractionations produced during sulfate reduction in the pure culture of DMSS-1 expand the previously reported range of triple sulfur isotope effects ( 32S, 33S, and 34S) by marine sulfate reducing bacteria, implying that microbial sulfur disproportionation may have a smaller 33S isotopic fingerprint

  11. Crystal structure of rubredoxin from Desulfovibrio gigas to ultra-high 0.68 A resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.-J. . E-mail: cjchen@nsrrc.org.tw; Lin, Y.-H.; Huang, Y.-C.; Liu, M.-Y. . E-mail: mingliu@nsrrc.org.tw

    2006-10-13

    Rubredoxin (D.g. Rd) is a small non-heme iron-sulfur protein shown to function as a redox coupling protein from the sulfate reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio gigas. The protein is generally purified from anaerobic bacteria in which it is thought to be involved in electron transfer or exchange processes. Rd transfers an electron to oxygen to form water as part of a unique electron transfer chain, composed by NADH:rubredoxin oxidoreductase (NRO), rubredoxin and rubredoxin:oxygen oxidoreductase (ROO) in D.g. The crystal structure of D.g. Rd has been determined by means of both a Fe single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) signal and the direct method, and refined to an ultra-high 0.68 A resolution, using X-ray from a synchrotron. Rd contains one iron atom bound in a tetrahedral coordination by the sulfur atoms of four cysteinyl residues. Hydrophobic and {pi}-{pi} interactions maintain the internal Rd folding. Multiple conformations of the iron-sulfur cluster and amino acid residues are observed and indicate its unique mechanism of electron transfer. Several hydrogen bonds, including N-H..., SG of the iron-sulfur, are revealed clearly in maps of electron density. Abundant waters bound to C-O peptides of residues Val8, Cys9, Gly10, Ala38, and Gly43, which may be involved in electron transfer. This ultrahigh-resolution structure allows us to study in great detail the relationship between structure and function of rubredoxin, such as salt bridges, hydrogen bonds, water structures, cysteine ligands, iron-sulfur cluster, and distributions of electron density among activity sites. For First time, this information will provide a clear role for this protein in a strict anaerobic bacterium.

  12. Purification and properties of the membrane-bound by hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans.

    PubMed

    Lalla-Maharajh, W V; Hall, D O; Cammack, R; Rao, K K; Le Gall, J

    1983-02-01

    The membrane-bound hydrogenase from the anaerobic sulphate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (Norway strain) has been purified to homogeneity, with an overall 80-fold purification and a specific activity of 70 mumol of H2 evolved/min per mg of protein. The hydrogenase had a relative molecular mass of 58 000 as determined by gel filtration and was estimated to contain six iron atoms and six acid-labile sulphur groups per molecule. The absorption spectrum of the enzyme was characteristic of an iron-sulphur protein. The E400 and E280 were 28 500 and 109 000 M-1.cm-1 respectively. The e.s.r. of the oxidized protein indicated the presence of [4Fe-4S]3+ or [3Fe-3S]3+, and another paramagnetic centre, probably Ni(III). The hydrogenase was inhibited by heavy-metal salts, carbon monoxide and high ionic strength. However, it was resistant to inhibition by thiol-blocking and metal-complexing reagents. N-Bromosuccinimide totally inhibited the enzyme activity at low concentrations. The enzyme was stable to O2 over long periods and to high temperatures. It catalyses both H2-evolution and H2-uptake with a variety of artificial electron carriers. D. desulfuricans cytochrome C3, its natural electron carrier, had a high affinity for the enzyme (Km = 2 microns). Rate enhancement was observed when cytochrome C3 was added to Methyl Viologen in the H2-evolution assay. The pH optimum for H2-evolution was 6.5. PMID:6303306

  13. The toxicity of lead to Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 in the presence of goethite and quartz.

    PubMed

    Sani, Rajesh K; Rastogi, Gurdeep; Moberly, James G; Dohnalkova, Alice; Ginn, Timothy R; Spycher, Nicolas; Shende, Rajesh V; Peyton, Brent M

    2010-04-01

    An aqueous mixture of goethite, quartz, and lead chloride (PbCl(2)) was treated with the sulfate-reducing bacterium, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 (D. desulfuricans G20), in a medium specifically designed to assess metal toxicity. In the presence of 26 muM of soluble Pb, together with the goethite and quartz, D. desulfuricans G20 grew after a lag time of 5 days compared to 2 days in Pb-, goethite-, and quartz-free treatments. In the absence of goethite and quartz, however, with 26 microM soluble Pb, no measurable growth was observed. Results showed that D. desulfuricans G20 first removed Pb from solutions then growth began resulting in black precipitates of Pb and iron sulfides. Transmission electron microscopic analyses of thin sections of D. desulfuricans G20 treated with 10 microM PbCl(2) in goethite- and quartz-free treatment showed the presence of a dense deposit of lead sulfide precipitates both in the periplasm and cytoplasm. However, thin sections of D. desulfuricans G20 treated with goethite, quartz, and PbCl(2) (26 microM soluble Pb) showed the presence of a dense deposit of iron sulfide precipitates both in the periplasm and cytoplasm. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, selected area electron diffraction patterns, or X-ray diffraction analyses confirmed the structure of precipitated Pb inside the cell as galena (PbS) in goethite- and quartz-free treatments, and iron sulfides in treatments with goethite, quartz, and PbCl(2). Overall results suggest that even at the same soluble Pb concentration (26 microM), in the presence of goethite and quartz, apparent Pb toxicity to D. desulfuricans G20 decreased significantly. Further, accumulation of lead/iron sulfides inside D. desulfuricans G20 cells depended on the presence of goethite and quartz. PMID:20082378

  14. Pemphigus vulgaris in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Salzberg, Kelsey W; Gero, Melanie J; Ragsdale, Bruce D

    2014-10-01

    We report the case of a 34-year-old woman who was diagnosed with pemphigus vulgaris (PV) during pregnancy. The patient presented with widespread blistering dermatitis and associated burning and pruritus. At 6 weeks' gestation the patient was admitted to the hospital to expedite her diagnosis and initiate treatment. A skin biopsy revealed suprabasal acantholysis, and direct immunofluorescence demonstrated diffuse intercellular IgG in the epidermis and basal intercellular C3, which confirmed the diagnosis of PV. Treatment with corticosteroids was instituted after discussions with the patient about possible adverse effects to the fetus. Pemphigus vulgaris is rare in pregnancy and active PV presents potential threats of fetal spread and transient lesion production, which is associated with increased mortality and morbidity in the fetus. Our patient had active PV and required treatment throughout her pregnancy. The pregnancy progressed to premature delivery of the neonate without skin lesions or apparent complications. PMID:25372257

  15. The first genomic and proteomic characterization of a deep-sea sulfate reducer: insights into the piezophilic lifestyle of Desulfovibrio piezophilus.

    PubMed

    Pradel, Nathalie; Ji, Boyang; Gimenez, Grégory; Talla, Emmanuel; Lenoble, Patricia; Garel, Marc; Tamburini, Christian; Fourquet, Patrick; Lebrun, Régine; Bertin, Philippe; Denis, Yann; Pophillat, Matthieu; Barbe, Valérie; Ollivier, Bernard; Dolla, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Desulfovibrio piezophilus strain C1TLV30(T) is a piezophilic anaerobe that was isolated from wood falls in the Mediterranean deep-sea. D. piezophilus represents a unique model for studying the adaptation of sulfate-reducing bacteria to hydrostatic pressure. Here, we report the 3.6 Mbp genome sequence of this piezophilic bacterium. An analysis of the genome revealed the presence of seven genomic islands as well as gene clusters that are most likely linked to life at a high hydrostatic pressure. Comparative genomics and differential proteomics identified the transport of solutes and amino acids as well as amino acid metabolism as major cellular processes for the adaptation of this bacterium to hydrostatic pressure. In addition, the proteome profiles showed that the abundance of key enzymes that are involved in sulfate reduction was dependent on hydrostatic pressure. A comparative analysis of orthologs from the non-piezophilic marine bacterium D. salexigens and D. piezophilus identified aspartic acid, glutamic acid, lysine, asparagine, serine and tyrosine as the amino acids preferentially replaced by arginine, histidine, alanine and threonine in the piezophilic strain. This work reveals the adaptation strategies developed by a sulfate reducer to a deep-sea lifestyle. PMID:23383081

  16. Genes for Uranium Bioremediation in the Anaerobic Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria: Desulfovibrio mutants with altered sensitivity to oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Rayford B.; Ringbauer, Joseph A., Jr.; Wall, Judy D.

    2006-04-05

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria of the genus Desulfovibrio are ubiquitous in anaerobic environments such as groundwater, sediments, and the gastrointestinal tract of animals. Because of the ability of Desulfovibrio to reduce radionuclides and metals through both enzymatic and chemical means, they have been proposed as a means to bioremediate heavy metal contaminated sites. Although classically thought of as strict anaerobes, Desulfovibrio species are surprisingly aerotolerant. Our objective is to understand the response of Desulfovibrio to oxidative stress so that we may more effectively utilize them in bioremediation of heavy metals in mixed aerobic-anaerobic environments. The enzymes superoxide dismutase, superoxide reductase, catalase, and rubrerythrin have been shown by others to be involved in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species in Desulfovibrio. Some members of the genus Desulfovibrio can even reduce molecular oxygen to water via a membrane bound electron transport chain with the concomitant production of ATP, although their ability to grow with oxygen as the sole electron acceptor is still questioned.

  17. Versatility of a new bioinorganic catalyst: palladized cells of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans and application to dehalogenation of flame retardant materials.

    PubMed

    Deplanche, K; Snape, T J; Hazrati, S; Harrad, S; Macaskie, L E

    2009-06-01

    The versatility and reaction specificity of a novel bioinorganic catalyst is demonstrated in various reactions. Palladized cells (bioPd) of the sulphate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans showed an increased product selectivity and a catalytic activity comparable to a commercial Pd catalyst in several industrially relevant hydrogenations and hydrogenolyses (reductive dehalogenations). The ability of palladized cells to promote the reductive debromination of a polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE #47) is demonstrated, although chemically reduced Pd(II) and commercial Pd(0) were more effective debromination agents. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers are being supplanted as flame retardants by other compounds, e.g. tris(chloroisopropyl)phosphate (TCPP), the concentration of which was seen to increase approximately 10-fold in groundwater samples between 2000 and 2004. BioPd dechlorinated TCPP in groundwater samples with >90% recovery of free chloride ion, and was five times more effective than using commercial Pd(0) catalyst. Examination of the spent groundwater using 31P NMR showed a phosphorus species novel to the bioPd-treated solution, which was not evident in a commercial reference sample of TCPP. PMID:19705605

  18. [Acne vulgaris: endocrine aspects].

    PubMed

    Dekkers, O M; Thio, B H; Romijn, J A; Smit, J W A

    2006-06-10

    Androgens play an important part in the development of acne vulgaris. Androgen levels in patients with acne are higher than those in controls and people with the androgen insensitivity syndrome do not develop acne. Local factors other than androgen plasma levels, also play a part in the development of acne. The skin contains enzymes that convert precursor hormones to the more potent androgens such as testosterone and dihydrotestosterone. Androgen synthesis can therefore be regulated locally. The effects of androgens on the skin are the result of circulating androgens and enzyme activity in local tissues and androgen receptors. Acne is a clinical manifestation of some endocrine diseases. The polycystic ovary syndrome has the highest prevalence. In women with acne that persists after puberty, in 10-200% of cases polycystic ovary syndrome is later diagnosed. The mechanism of hormonal anti-acne therapy may work by blocking the androgen-production (oestrogens) or by blocking the androgen receptor (cyproterone, spironolactone). PMID:16821451

  19. Methanogenesis from choline by a coculture of Desulfovibrio sp. and Methanosarcina barkeri

    SciTech Connect

    Fiebig, K.; Gottschalk, G.

    1983-01-01

    A sulfate-reducing vibrio was isolated from a methanogenic enrichment with choline as the sole added organic substrate. This oganism was identified as a member of the genus Desulfovibrio and was designated Desulfovibrio strain G1. In a defined medium devoid of sulfate, a pure culture of Desulfovibrio strain G1 fermented choline to trimethylamine, acetate, and ethanol. In the presence of sulfate, more acetate and less ethanol were formed from choline than in the absence of sulfate. When grown in a medium containing sulfate, a coculture of Desulfovibrio strain G1 and Methanosarcina barkeri strain Fusaro degraded chloline almost completely to methane, ammonia, and hydrogen sulfide and presumably to carbon dioxide. Methanogenesis occurred in two distinct phases separated by a lag of about 6 days. During the first phase of methanogenesis choline was completely converted to trimethylamine, acetate, hydrogen sulfide, and traces of ethanol by the desulfovibrio.M. barkeri fermented trimethylamine to methane, ammonia, and presumably carbon dioxide via dimethyl- and methylamine as intermediates. Simultaneously, about 60% of the acetate expected was metabolized. In the second phase of methanogenesis, the residual acetate was almost completely catabolized.

  20. Extracellular iron-sulfur precipitates from growth of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans

    SciTech Connect

    Antonio, M. R.; Tischler, M. L.; Witzcak, D.

    1999-12-20

    The authors have examined extracellular iron-bearing precipitates resulting from the growth of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans in a basal medium with lactate as the carbon source and ferrous sulfate. Black precipitates were obtained when D. desulfuricans was grown with an excess of FeSO{sub 4}. When D. desulfuricans was grown under conditions with low amounts of FeSO{sub 4}, brown precipitates were obtained. The precipitates were characterized by iron K-edge XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structure), {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer-effect spectroscopy, and powder X-ray diffraction. Both were noncrystalline and nonmagnetic (at room temperature) solids containing high-spin Fe(III). The spectroscopic data for the black precipitates indicate the formation of an iron-sulfur phase with 6 nearest S neighbors about Fe at an average distance of 2.24(1) {angstrom}, whereas the brown precipitates are an iron-oxygen-sulfur phase with 6 nearest O neighbors about Fe at an average distance of 1.95(1) {angstrom}.

  1. Biomolecular and Isotopic Signatures Related to Cr(VI) Reduction by a Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from the Hanford 100H Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, R.; Qin, L.; Geller, J. T.; Chakraborty, R.; Christensen, J. N.; Beller, H. R.

    2011-12-01

    Chromium contamination of groundwater is widespread within the Dept. of Energy (DOE) complex. At DOE's Hanford 100H area, we have conducted Cr bioremediation (in situ reductive immobilization) studies involving injection of a lactate-containing polymer, and have observed sequential use of the dissolved electron acceptors present in groundwater (namely, oxygen, nitrate, and sulfate). Sulfate-reducing bacteria are of particular interest for chromate reduction because they can reduce Cr(VI) enzymatically (e.g., using cytochrome c3 or thioredoxin reductase) and abiotically with hydrogen sulfide, the end product of their respiration. In this poster, we use studies of a sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from the Hanford 100H aquifer, Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain RCH1, to explore (a) isotopic signatures that might allow us to distinguish between enzymatic and sulfide-mediated Cr(VI) reduction and (b) biomolecular signatures (gene or transcript copy number of diagnostic genes) that might be used as proxies of in situ metabolic rates. In order to differentiate between the mechanisms of Cr reduction by sulfate reducers, we analyzed the isotopic fractionation during Cr(VI) reduction by strain RCH1. Cell suspension studies of strain RCH1 demonstrated that Cr(VI) reduction could occur in the presence of lactate (electron donor) alone or with both lactate and sulfate. Cr(VI) reduction in the presence of lactate and sulfate was 25-30% more rapid than enzymatic Cr reduction when only lactate was added, suggesting that biogenic hydrogen sulfide increases the specific rate of Cr(VI) reduction beyond purely enzymatic activity. Cr isotopic measurements showed different fractionation behavior for the lactate-only and lactate+sulfate systems, with fractionation (epsilon) values of 2.3 and 1.66 per mil, respectively. In order to determine whether gene or transcript copy number for diagnostic sulfate and chromate reduction genes could serve as proxies to estimate in situ metabolic

  2. Competition for Sulfate and Ethanol Among Desulfobacter, Desulfobulbus, and Desulfovibrio Species Isolated from Intertidal Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.; Geerligs, Harm J.; Sijtsma, Lolke; Veldkamp, Hans

    1984-01-01

    Competition for sulfate and ethanol among Desulfobacter, Desulfobulbus, and Desulfovibrio species isolated from estuarine sediments was studied in energy-limited chemostats. Desulfovibrio baculatus was the most successful competitor for limiting amounts of sulfate and ethanol, followed by Desulfobulbus propionicus. The success of Desulfovibrio baculatus was dependent on the availability of sufficient iron. Of the three species studied, Desulfobacter postgatei was the least successful competitor for limiting amounts of sulfate. Although stimulating the growth of Desulfobacter postgatei, addition of Ca-saturated illite particles to culture media did not affect the outcome of competition for sulfate. Thus, under sulfate limitation acetate accumulated. This phenomenon was briefly discussed in relation to the flow of electrons during anaerobic mineralization in marine and estuarine sulfate-limited sediments. PMID:16346474

  3. Ultrafast fluorescence dynamics of FMN-binding protein from Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Miyazaki F) and its site-directed mutated proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chosrowjan, Haik; Taniguchi, Seiji; Mataga, Noboru; Tanaka, Fumio; Todoroki, Daisuke; Kitamura, Masaya

    2008-09-01

    Ultrafast fluorescence dynamics of FMN in FMN-binding protein (FMN-bp), and its mutated proteins, W32Y and W32A, were investigated by the fluorescence up-conversion method. Fluorescence lifetimes were 167 fs (96%) and 1.5 ps (4%) in wild-type FMN-bp (WT), and 3.4 ps (23%), 18.2 ps (74%), and 96 ps (3%) at 530 nm in W32Y, and 30.1 ps in W32A. The fluorescence lifetime of W32A, in which Trp-32 was absent, was about 140 times longer than that of WT. Tyr-32 in W32Y was not so effective quencher as Trp-32 in WT. This was explained in terms of different ionization potentials of quenchers and average donor-acceptor distances in the protein.

  4. Characterization of the structure and redox behaviour of cytochrome c3 from Desulfovibrio baculatus by 1H-nuclear-magnetic-resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, I B; Turner, D L; LeGall, J; Xavier, A V

    1993-01-01

    Complete assignment of the aromatic and haem proton resonances in the cytochromes c3 isolated from Desulfovibrio baculatus strains (Norway 4, DSM 1741) and (DSM 1743) was achieved using one- and two-dimensional 1H n.m.r. Nuclear Overhauser enhancements observed between haem and aromatic resonances and between resonances due to different haems, together with the ring-current contributions to the chemical shifts of haem resonances, support the argument that the haem core architecture is conserved in the various cytochromes c3, and that the X-ray structure of the D. baculatus cytochrome c3 is erroneous. The relative orientation of the haems for both cytochromes was determined directly from n.m.r. data. The n.m.r. structures have a resolution of approximately 0.25 nm and are found to be in close agreement with the X-ray structure from D. vulgaris cytochrome c3. The proton assignments were used to relate the highest potential to a specific haem in the three-dimensional structure by monitoring the chemical-shift variation of several haem resonances throughout redox titrations followed by 1H n.m.r. The haem with highest redox potential is not the same as that in other cytochromes c3. PMID:8397513

  5. Pemphigus Vulgaris with Tense Bullae

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Emilie T; Lin, Shinko K; Wu, Jashin J

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 51-year-old woman with a history of type II diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia presenting with pain, swelling, and crusting of the lips. One year after onset of mucosal lesions, she developed an abdominal eruption with several tense vesicles and bullae on an erythematous base. The hematoxylin and eosin stain sample was consistent with a diagnosis of pemphigus vulgaris. The tense bullae of our patient highlight a rare phenotype of pemphigus vulgaris, which fits the mucocutaneous type because of involvement of the oral mucosa, with the exception of the findings of tense bullae. PMID:25663209

  6. Accumulation of fatty acids in Chlorella vulgaris under heterotrophic conditions in relation to activity of acetyl-CoAcarboxylase, temperature, and co-immobilization with Azospirillum brasilense [corrected].

    PubMed

    Leyva, Luis A; Bashan, Yoav; Mendoza, Alberto; de-Bashan, Luz E

    2014-10-01

    The relation between fatty acid accumulation, activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), and consequently lipid accumulation was studied in the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris co-immobilized with the plant growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense under dark heterotrophic conditions with Na acetate as a carbon source. In C. vulgaris immobilized alone, cultivation experiments for 6 days showed that ACC activity is directly related to fatty acid accumulation, especially in the last 3 days. In co-immobilization experiments, A. brasilense exerted a significant positive effect over ACC activity, increased the quantity in all nine main fatty acids, increased total lipid accumulation in C. vulgaris, and mitigated negative effects of nonoptimal temperature for growth. No correlation between ACC activity and lipid accumulation in the cells was established for three different temperatures. This study demonstrated that the interaction between A. brasilense and C. vulgaris has a significant effect on fatty acid and lipid accumulation in the microalgae. PMID:25129521

  7. Accumulation fatty acids of in Chlorella vulgaris under heterotrophic conditions in relation to activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, temperature, and co-immobilization with Azospirillum brasilense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyva, Luis A.; Bashan, Yoav; Mendoza, Alberto; de-Bashan, Luz E.

    2014-10-01

    The relation between fatty acid accumulation, activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), and consequently lipid accumulation was studied in the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris co-immobilized with the plant growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense under dark heterotrophic conditions with Na acetate as a carbon source. In C. vulgaris immobilized alone, cultivation experiments for 6 days showed that ACC activity is directly related to fatty acid accumulation, especially in the last 3 days. In co-immobilization experiments, A. brasilense exerted a significant positive effect over ACC activity, increased the quantity in all nine main fatty acids, increased total lipid accumulation in C. vulgaris, and mitigated negative effects of nonoptimal temperature for growth. No correlation between ACC activity and lipid accumulation in the cells was established for three different temperatures. This study demonstrated that the interaction between A. brasilense and C. vulgaris has a significant effect on fatty acid and lipid accumulation in the microalgae.

  8. Reduction of U(VI) and Toxic Metals by Desulfovibrio Cytochrome C3

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Judy D

    2013-04-11

    The central objective of our proposed research was twofold: 1) to investigate the structure-function relationship of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (now Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20) cytochrome c3 with uranium and 2) to elucidate the mechanism for uranium reduction in vitro and in vivo. Physiological analysis of a mutant of D. desulfuricans with a mutation of the gene encoding the type 1 tetraheme cytochrome c3 had demonstrated that uranium reduction was negatively impacted while sulfate reduction was not if lactate were the electron donor. This was thought to be due to the presence of a branched pathway of electron flow from lactate leading to sulfate reduction. Our experimental plan was to elucidate the structural and mechanistic details of uranium reduction involving cytochrome c3.

  9. Microbial reduction of structural iron in interstratified illite-smectite minerals by a sulfate-reducing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Liu, D; Dong, H; Bishop, M E; Zhang, J; Wang, H; Xie, S; Wang, S; Huang, L; Eberl, D D

    2012-03-01

    Clay minerals are ubiquitous in soils, sediments, and sedimentary rocks and could coexist with sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in anoxic environments, however, the interactions of clay minerals and SRB are not well understood. The objective of this study was to understand the reduction rate and capacity of structural Fe(III) in dioctahedral clay minerals by a mesophilic SRB, Desulfovibrio vulgaris and the potential role in catalyzing smectite illitization. Bioreduction experiments were performed in batch systems, where four different clay minerals (nontronite NAu-2, mixed-layer illite-smectite RAr-1 and ISCz-1, and illite IMt-1) were exposed to D. vulgaris in a non-growth medium with and without anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) and sulfate. Our results demonstrated that D. vulgaris was able to reduce structural Fe(III) in these clay minerals, and AQDS enhanced the reduction rate and extent. In the presence of AQDS, sulfate had little effect on Fe(III) bioreduction. In the absence of AQDS, sulfate increased the reduction rate and capacity, suggesting that sulfide produced during sulfate reduction reacted with the phyllosilicate Fe(III). The extent of bioreduction of structural Fe(III) in the clay minerals was positively correlated with the percentage of smectite and mineral surface area of these minerals. X-ray diffraction, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy results confirmed formation of illite after bioreduction. These data collectively showed that D. vulgaris could promote smectite illitization through reduction of structural Fe(III) in clay minerals. PMID:22074236

  10. Microbial reduction of structural iron in interstratified illite-smectite minerals by a sulfate-reducing bacterium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, D.; Dong, H.; Bishop, M.E.; Zhang, Jiahua; Wang, Hongfang; Xie, S.; Wang, Shaoming; Huang, L.; Eberl, D.D.

    2012-01-01

    Clay minerals are ubiquitous in soils, sediments, and sedimentary rocks and could coexist with sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in anoxic environments, however, the interactions of clay minerals and SRB are not well understood. The objective of this study was to understand the reduction rate and capacity of structural Fe(III) in dioctahedral clay minerals by a mesophilic SRB, Desulfovibrio vulgaris and the potential role in catalyzing smectite illitization. Bioreduction experiments were performed in batch systems, where four different clay minerals (nontronite NAu-2, mixed-layer illite-smectite RAr-1 and ISCz-1, and illite IMt-1) were exposed to D. vulgaris in a non-growth medium with and without anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) and sulfate. Our results demonstrated that D. vulgaris was able to reduce structural Fe(III) in these clay minerals, and AQDS enhanced the reduction rate and extent. In the presence of AQDS, sulfate had little effect on Fe(III) bioreduction. In the absence of AQDS, sulfate increased the reduction rate and capacity, suggesting that sulfide produced during sulfate reduction reacted with the phyllosilicate Fe(III). The extent of bioreduction of structural Fe(III) in the clay minerals was positively correlated with the percentage of smectite and mineral surface area of these minerals. X-ray diffraction, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy results confirmed formation of illite after bioreduction. These data collectively showed that D. vulgaris could promote smectite illitization through reduction of structural Fe(III) in clay minerals. ?? 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Flexibility of syntrophic enzyme systems in Desulfovibrio species ensures their adaptation capability to environmental changes.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Birte; Kuehl, Jennifer V; Deutschbauer, Adam M; Arkin, Adam P; Stahl, David A

    2013-11-01

    The mineralization of organic matter in anoxic environments relies on the cooperative activities of hydrogen producers and consumers obligately linked by interspecies metabolite exchange in syntrophic consortia that may include sulfate reducing species such as Desulfovibrio. To evaluate the metabolic flexibility of syntrophic Desulfovibrio to adapt to naturally fluctuating methanogenic environments, we studied Desulfovibrio alaskensis strain G20 grown in chemostats under respiratory and syntrophic conditions with alternative methanogenic partners, Methanococcus maripaludis and Methanospirillum hungatei, at different growth rates. Comparative whole-genome transcriptional analyses, complemented by G20 mutant strain growth experiments and physiological data, revealed a significant influence of both energy source availability (as controlled by dilution rate) and methanogen on the electron transfer systems, ratios of interspecies electron carriers, energy generating systems, and interspecies physical associations. A total of 68 genes were commonly differentially expressed under syntrophic versus respiratory lifestyle. Under low-energy (low-growth-rate) conditions, strain G20 further had the capacity to adapt to the metabolism of its methanogenic partners, as shown by its differing gene expression of enzymes involved in the direct metabolic interactions (e.g., periplasmic hydrogenases) and the ratio shift in electron carriers used for interspecies metabolite exchange (hydrogen/formate). A putative monomeric [Fe-Fe] hydrogenase and Hmc (high-molecular-weight-cytochrome c3) complex-linked reverse menaquinone (MQ) redox loop become increasingly important for the reoxidation of the lactate-/pyruvate oxidation-derived redox pair, DsrC(red) and Fd(red), relative to the Qmo-MQ-Qrc (quinone-interacting membrane-bound oxidoreductase; quinone-reducing complex) loop. Together, these data underscore the high enzymatic and metabolic adaptive flexibility that likely sustains

  12. Flexibility of Syntrophic Enzyme Systems in Desulfovibrio Species Ensures Their Adaptation Capability to Environmental Changes

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Birte; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2013-01-01

    The mineralization of organic matter in anoxic environments relies on the cooperative activities of hydrogen producers and consumers obligately linked by interspecies metabolite exchange in syntrophic consortia that may include sulfate reducing species such as Desulfovibrio. To evaluate the metabolic flexibility of syntrophic Desulfovibrio to adapt to naturally fluctuating methanogenic environments, we studied Desulfovibrio alaskensis strain G20 grown in chemostats under respiratory and syntrophic conditions with alternative methanogenic partners, Methanococcus maripaludis and Methanospirillum hungatei, at different growth rates. Comparative whole-genome transcriptional analyses, complemented by G20 mutant strain growth experiments and physiological data, revealed a significant influence of both energy source availability (as controlled by dilution rate) and methanogen on the electron transfer systems, ratios of interspecies electron carriers, energy generating systems, and interspecies physical associations. A total of 68 genes were commonly differentially expressed under syntrophic versus respiratory lifestyle. Under low-energy (low-growth-rate) conditions, strain G20 further had the capacity to adapt to the metabolism of its methanogenic partners, as shown by its differing gene expression of enzymes involved in the direct metabolic interactions (e.g., periplasmic hydrogenases) and the ratio shift in electron carriers used for interspecies metabolite exchange (hydrogen/formate). A putative monomeric [Fe-Fe] hydrogenase and Hmc (high-molecular-weight-cytochrome c3) complex-linked reverse menaquinone (MQ) redox loop become increasingly important for the reoxidation of the lactate-/pyruvate oxidation-derived redox pair, DsrCred and Fdred, relative to the Qmo-MQ-Qrc (quinone-interacting membrane-bound oxidoreductase; quinone-reducing complex) loop. Together, these data underscore the high enzymatic and metabolic adaptive flexibility that likely sustains Desulfovibrio

  13. Enhanced activity of ADP glucose pyrophosphorylase and formation of starch induced by Azospirillum brasilense in Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Choix, Francisco J; Bashan, Yoav; Mendoza, Alberto; de-Bashan, Luz E

    2014-05-10

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) regulates starch biosynthesis in higher plants and microalgae. This study measured the effect of the bacterium Azospirillum brasilense on AGPase activity in the freshwater microalga Chlorella vulgaris and formation of starch. This was done by immobilizing both microorganisms in alginate beads, either replete with or deprived of nitrogen or phosphorus and all under heterotrophic conditions, using d-glucose or Na-acetate as the carbon source. AGPase activity during the first 72h of incubation was higher in C. vulgaris when immobilized with A. brasilense. This happened simultaneously with higher starch accumulation and higher carbon uptake by the microalgae. Either carbon source had similar effects on enzyme activity and starch accumulation. Starvation either by N or P had the same pattern on AGPase activity and starch accumulation. Under replete conditions, the population of C. vulgaris immobilized alone was higher than when immobilized together, but under starvation conditions A. brasilense induced a larger population of C. vulgaris. In summary, adding A. brasilense enhanced AGPase activity, starch formation, and mitigation of stress in C. vulgaris. PMID:24576433

  14. Pemphigus vulgaris with solitary toxic thyroid nodule.

    PubMed

    Alfishawy, Mostafa; Anwar, Karim; Elbendary, Amira; Daoud, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Background. Pemphigus vulgaris is an autoimmune vesiculobullous disease, affecting the skin and mucous membranes. It is reported to be associated with other autoimmune diseases including autoimmune thyroid diseases. However we report herein a case of pemphigus vulgaris associated with autonomous toxic nodule. Case Presentation. A 51-year-old woman was evaluated for blisters and erosions that develop on her trunk, face, and extremities, with a five-year history of progressively enlarging neck mass, and a past medical history of pemphigus vulgaris seven years ago. The condition was associated with palpitation, dyspnea, and heat intolerance. Thyroid function tests and thyroid scan were compatible with the diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis due to autonomous toxic nodule. Exacerbation of pemphigus vulgaris was proved by skin biopsy from the patient which revealed histologic picture of pemphigus vulgaris. Conclusion. Autoimmune thyroid diseases are reported to associate pemphigus vulgaris. To our knowledge, this case is the first in the English literature to report association between pemphigus vulgaris and autonomous toxic nodule and highlights the possibility of occurrence of pemphigus vulgaris with a nonautoimmune thyroid disease raising the question: is it just a coincidence or is there an explanation for the occurrence of both conditions together? PMID:25309761

  15. Macroglossia. An unusual presentation of pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Milgraum, S S; Kanzler, M H; Waldinger, T P; Wong, R C

    1985-10-01

    A 19-year-old woman presented with macroglossia of five months' duration and without bullae or erosions. A biopsy revealed a picture consistent with pemphigus vulgaris. The patient subsequently developed typical oral erosions. Her tongue enlargement and oral ulcerations improved dramatically with topical and systemic steroid therapy. Pemphigus vulgaris should be considered in the differential diagnosis of macroglossia. PMID:4037830

  16. Properties of Desulfovibrio carbinolicus sp. nov. and Other Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria Isolated from an Anaerobic-Purification Plant

    PubMed Central

    Nanninga, Henk J.; Gottschal, Jan C.

    1987-01-01

    Several sulfate-reducing microorganisms were isolated from an anaerobic-purification plant. Four strains were classified as Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, Desulfovibrio sapovorans, Desulfobulbus propionicus, and Desulfovibrio sp. The D. sapovorans strain contained poly-β-hydroxybutyrate granules and seemed to form extracellular vesicles. A fifth isolate, Desulfovibrio sp. strain EDK82, was a gram-negative, non-spore-forming, nonmotile, curved organism. It was able to oxidize several substrates, including methanol. Sulfate, sulfite, thiosulfate, and sulfur were utilized as electron acceptors. Pyruvate, fumarate, malate, and glycerol could be fermented. Because strain EDK82 could not be ascribed to any of the existing species, a new species, Desulfovibrio carbinolicus, is proposed. The doubling times of the isolates were determined on several substrates. Molecular hydrogen, lactate, propionate, and ethanol yielded the shortest doubling times (3.0 to 6.3 h). Due to the presence of support material in an anaerobic filter system, these species were able to convert sulfate to sulfide very effectively at a hydraulic retention time as short as 0.5 h. Images PMID:16347324

  17. Survey of large protein complexes D. vulgaris reveals great structural diversity

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B.-G.; Dong, M.; Liu, H.; Camp, L.; Geller, J.; Singer, M.; Hazen, T. C.; Choi, M.; Witkowska, H. E.; Ball, D. A.; Typke, D.; Downing, K. H.; Shatsky, M.; Brenner, S. E.; Chandonia, J.-M.; Biggin, M. D.; Glaeser, R. M.

    2009-08-15

    An unbiased survey has been made of the stable, most abundant multi-protein complexes in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH) that are larger than Mr {approx} 400 k. The quaternary structures for 8 of the 16 complexes purified during this work were determined by single-particle reconstruction of negatively stained specimens, a success rate {approx}10 times greater than that of previous 'proteomic' screens. In addition, the subunit compositions and stoichiometries of the remaining complexes were determined by biochemical methods. Our data show that the structures of only two of these large complexes, out of the 13 in this set that have recognizable functions, can be modeled with confidence based on the structures of known homologs. These results indicate that there is significantly greater variability in the way that homologous prokaryotic macromolecular complexes are assembled than has generally been appreciated. As a consequence, we suggest that relying solely on previously determined quaternary structures for homologous proteins may not be sufficient to properly understand their role in another cell of interest.

  18. An HcpR paralog of Desulfovibrio gigas provides protection against nitrosative stress

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Sofia M.; Amaral, Catarina; Neves, Susana S.; Santos, Cátia; Pimentel, Catarina; Rodrigues-Pousada, Claudina

    2015-01-01

    Desulfovibrio gigas belongs to the group of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). These ubiquitous and metabolically versatile microorganisms are often exposed to reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Nonetheless, the mechanisms and regulatory elements involved in nitrosative stress protection are still poorly understood. The transcription factor HcpR has emerged as a putative regulator of nitrosative stress response among anaerobic bacteria. HcpR is known to orchestrate the expression of the hybrid cluster protein gene, hcp, proposed to be involved in cellular defense against RNS. According to phylogenetic analyses, the occurrence of hcpR paralog genes is a common feature among several Desulfovibrio species. Within the D. gigas genome we have identified two HcpR-related sequences. One of these sequences, hcpR1, was found in the close vicinity of the hcp gene and this finding prompted us to proceed with its functional characterization. We observed that the growth of a D. gigas strain lacking hcpR1 is severely impaired under nitrosative stress. An in silico search revealed several putative targets of HcpR1 that were experimentally validated. The fact that HcpR1 regulates several genes encoding proteins involved in nitrite and nitrate metabolism, together with the sensitive growth phenotype to NO displayed by an hcpR1 mutant strain, strongly supports a relevant role of this factor under nitrosative stress. Moreover, the finding that several Desulfovibrio species possess HcpR paralogs, which have been transmitted vertically in the evolution and diversification of the genus, suggests that these sequences may confer adaptive or survival advantage to these organisms, possibly by increasing their tolerance to nitrosative stress. PMID:26273559

  19. Mercury methylation by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 in the presence of polysulfides.

    PubMed

    Jay, Jenny Ayla; Murray, Karen J; Gilmour, Cynthia C; Mason, Robert P; Morel, François M M; Roberts, A Lynn; Hemond, Harold F

    2002-11-01

    The extracellular speciation of mercury may control bacterial uptake and methylation. Mercury-polysulfide complexes have recently been shown to be prevalent in sulfidic waters containing zero-valent sulfur. Despite substantial increases in total dissolved mercury concentration, methylation rates in cultures of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 equilibrated with cinnabar did not increase in the presence of polysulfides, as expected due to the large size and charged nature of most of the complexes. In natural waters not at saturation with cinnabar, mercury-polysulfide complexes would be expected to shift the speciation of mercury from HgS(0)((aq)) toward charged complexes, thereby decreasing methylation rates. PMID:12406773

  20. Reduction of U(VI) and Toxic Metals by Desulfovibrio Cytochrome c3

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Judy D.

    2003-06-01

    The project, ''Reduction of U(VI) and toxic metals by Desulfovibrio cytochrome c3'', is designed to obtain spectroscopic information for or against a functional interaction of cytochrome c3 and uranium in the whole cells. That is, is the cytochrome c3 the uranium reductase? Our approach has been to start with purified cytochrome and determine any unique spectral disturbances during electron flow to U(VI). Then we will attempt to identify these signals emanating from cells actively reducing uranium. This project is being carried out in collaboration with Dr. William Woodruff at the Los Alamos National Laboratory where the spectral experiments are being carried out.

  1. Immobilizing U from solution by immobilized sulfate-reducing bacteria of desulfovibrio desulfuricans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hulfang; Barton, Larry L.

    2000-07-01

    As determined by transmission electron microscopy, the reduction of uranyl accetate by immobilized cells of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans results in the production of black uraninite nanocrystals precipitated outside the cell. Some nanocrystals are associated with outer membranes of the cell as revealed from cross sections of these metabolically active sulfate-reducing bacteria. The nanocrystals have an average diameter of 5 nm and have anhedral shape. It is proposed that cytochrome in these cells has an important role in the reduction of uranyl through transferring electron from molecular hydrogen or lactic acid to uranyl ions.

  2. Single Bacterium Detection Using Sers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonchukov, S. A.; Baikova, T. V.; Alushin, M. V.; Svistunova, T. S.; Minaeva, S. A.; Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Saraeva, I. N.; Zayarny, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    This work is devoted to the study of a single Staphylococcus aureus bacterium detection using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and resonant Raman spectroscopy (RS). It was shown that SERS allows increasing sensitivity of predominantly low frequency lines connected with the vibrations of Amide, Proteins and DNA. At the same time the lines of carotenoids inherent to this kind of bacterium are well-detected due to the resonance Raman scattering mechanism. The reproducibility and stability of Raman spectra strongly depend on the characteristics of nanostructured substrate, and molecular structure and size of the tested biological object.

  3. Phaseolus vulgaris endornavirus 1 and Phaseolus vulgaris endornavirus 2 infecting common bean Phaseolus vulgaris genotypes show differential infection patterns between gene pools

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the occurrence of two plant endornaviruses, Phaseolus vulgaris endornavirus 1 (PvEV-1) and Phaseolus vulgaris endornavirus 2 (PvEV-2), in breeding-lines, cultivars, landraces, and wild genotypes of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) as well as other Phaseolus species collected from two...

  4. Genetic diversity of Desulfovibrio spp. in environmental samples analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of [NiFe] hydrogenase gene fragments.

    PubMed Central

    Wawer, C; Muyzer, G

    1995-01-01

    The genetic diversity of Desulfovibrio species in environmental samples was determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR-amplified [NiFe] hydrogenase gene fragments. Five different PCR primers were designed after comparative analysis of [NiFe] hydrogenase gene sequences from three Desulfovibrio species. These primers were tested in different combinations on the genomic DNAs of a variety of hydrogenase-containing and hydrogenase-lacking bacteria. One primer pair was found to be specific for Desulfovibrio species only, while the others gave positive results with other bacteria also. By using this specific primer pair, we were able to amplify the [NiFe] hydrogenase genes of DNAs isolated from environmental samples and to detect the presence of Desulfovibrio species in these samples. However, only after DGGE analysis of these PCR products could the number of different Desulfovibrio species within the samples be determined. DGGE analysis of PCR products from different bioreactors demonstrated up to two bands, while at least five distinguishable bands were detected in a microbial mat sample. Because these bands most likely represent as many Desulfovibrio species present in these samples, we conclude that the genetic diversity of Desulfovibrio species in the natural microbial mat is far greater than that in the experimental bioreactors. PMID:7793940

  5. Sulfur Isotope Fractionation during the Evolutionary Adaptation of a Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Anderson-Trocmé, Luke; Whyte, Lyle G.; Zane, Grant M.; Wall, Judy D.; Wing, Boswell A.

    2015-01-01

    Dissimilatory sulfate reduction is a microbial catabolic pathway that preferentially processes less massive sulfur isotopes relative to their heavier counterparts. This sulfur isotope fractionation is recorded in ancient sedimentary rocks and generally is considered to reflect a phenotypic response to environmental variations rather than to evolutionary adaptation. Modern sulfate-reducing microorganisms isolated from similar environments can exhibit a wide range of sulfur isotope fractionations, suggesting that adaptive processes influence the sulfur isotope phenotype. To date, the relationship between evolutionary adaptation and isotopic phenotypes has not been explored. We addressed this by studying the covariation of fitness, sulfur isotope fractionation, and growth characteristics in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough in a microbial evolution experiment. After 560 generations, the mean fitness of the evolved lineages relative to the starting isogenic population had increased by ∼17%. After 927 generations, the mean fitness relative to the initial ancestral population had increased by ∼20%. Growth rate in exponential phase increased during the course of the experiment, suggesting that this was a primary influence behind the fitness increases. Consistent changes were observed within different selection intervals between fractionation and fitness. Fitness changes were associated with changes in exponential growth rate but changes in fractionation were not. Instead, they appeared to be a response to changes in the parameters that govern growth rate: yield and cell-specific sulfate respiration rate. We hypothesize that cell-specific sulfate respiration rate, in particular, provides a bridge that allows physiological controls on fractionation to cross over to the adaptive realm. PMID:25662968

  6. Sulfur isotope fractionation during the evolutionary adaptation of a sulfate-reducing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Pellerin, André; Anderson-Trocmé, Luke; Whyte, Lyle G; Zane, Grant M; Wall, Judy D; Wing, Boswell A

    2015-04-01

    Dissimilatory sulfate reduction is a microbial catabolic pathway that preferentially processes less massive sulfur isotopes relative to their heavier counterparts. This sulfur isotope fractionation is recorded in ancient sedimentary rocks and generally is considered to reflect a phenotypic response to environmental variations rather than to evolutionary adaptation. Modern sulfate-reducing microorganisms isolated from similar environments can exhibit a wide range of sulfur isotope fractionations, suggesting that adaptive processes influence the sulfur isotope phenotype. To date, the relationship between evolutionary adaptation and isotopic phenotypes has not been explored. We addressed this by studying the covariation of fitness, sulfur isotope fractionation, and growth characteristics in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough in a microbial evolution experiment. After 560 generations, the mean fitness of the evolved lineages relative to the starting isogenic population had increased by ∼ 17%. After 927 generations, the mean fitness relative to the initial ancestral population had increased by ∼ 20%. Growth rate in exponential phase increased during the course of the experiment, suggesting that this was a primary influence behind the fitness increases. Consistent changes were observed within different selection intervals between fractionation and fitness. Fitness changes were associated with changes in exponential growth rate but changes in fractionation were not. Instead, they appeared to be a response to changes in the parameters that govern growth rate: yield and cell-specific sulfate respiration rate. We hypothesize that cell-specific sulfate respiration rate, in particular, provides a bridge that allows physiological controls on fractionation to cross over to the adaptive realm. PMID:25662968

  7. Syntrophic Growth of Desulfovibrio alaskensis Requires Genes for H2 and Formate Metabolism as Well as Those for Flagellum and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Bradstock, Peter; Sheik, Cody S.; Diao, Yiwei; Gazioglu, Ozcan; Gorby, Yuri; McInerney, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    In anaerobic environments, mutually beneficial metabolic interactions between microorganisms (syntrophy) are essential for oxidation of organic matter to carbon dioxide and methane. Syntrophic interactions typically involve a microorganism degrading an organic compound to primary fermentation by-products and sources of electrons (i.e., formate, hydrogen, or nanowires) and a partner producing methane or respiring the electrons via alternative electron accepting processes. Using a transposon gene mutant library of the sulfate-reducing Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20, we screened for mutants incapable of serving as the electron-accepting partner of the butyrate-oxidizing bacterium, Syntrophomonas wolfei. A total of 17 gene mutants of D. alaskensis were identified as incapable of serving as the electron-accepting partner. The genes identified predominantly fell into three categories: membrane surface assembly, flagellum-pilus synthesis, and energy metabolism. Among these genes required to serve as the electron-accepting partner, the glycosyltransferase, pilus assembly protein (tadC), and flagellar biosynthesis protein showed reduced biofilm formation, suggesting that each of these components is involved in cell-to-cell interactions. Energy metabolism genes encoded proteins primarily involved in H2 uptake and electron cycling, including a rhodanese-containing complex that is phylogenetically conserved among sulfate-reducing Deltaproteobacteria. Utilizing an mRNA sequencing approach, analysis of transcript abundance in wild-type axenic and cocultures confirmed that genes identified as important for serving as the electron-accepting partner were more highly expressed under syntrophic conditions. The results imply that sulfate-reducing microorganisms require flagellar and outer membrane components to effectively couple to their syntrophic partners; furthermore, H2 metabolism is essential for syntrophic growth of D. alaskensis G20. PMID:25616787

  8. Isolation of sulfate-reducing bacteria from the terrestrial deep subsurface and description of Desulfovibrio cavernae sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Sass, Henrik; Cypionka, Heribert

    2004-09-01

    Deep subsurface sandstones in the area of Berlin (Germany) located 600 to 1060 m below the surface were examined for the presence of viable microorganisms. The in situ temperatures at the sampling sites ranged from 37 to 45 degrees C. Investigations focussed on sulfate-reducing bacteria able to grow on methanol and triethylene glycol, which are added as chemicals to facilitate the long-term underground storage of natural gas. Seven strains were isolated from porewater brines in the porous sandstone. Three of them were obtained with methanol (strains H1M, H3M, and B1M), three strains with triethylene glycol (strains H1T, B1T, and B2T) and one strain with a mixture of lactate, acetate and butyrate (strain H1-13). Due to phenotypic properties six isolates could be identified as members of the genus Desulfovibrio, and strain B2T as a Desulfotomaculum. The salt tolerance and temperature range for growth indicated that the isolates originated from the indigenous deep subsurface sandstones. They grew in mineral media reflecting the in situ ionic composition of the different brines, which contained 1.5 to 190 g NaCl x l(-1) and high calcium and magnesium concentrations. The Desulfovibrio strains grew at temperatures between 20 and 50 degrees C, while the Desulfotomaculum strain was thermophilic and grew between 30 and 65 degrees C. The strains utilized a broad spectrum of electron donors and acceptors. They grew with carbon compounds like lactate, pyruvate, formate, n-alcohols (C1-C5), glycerol, ethylene glycol, malate, succinate, and fumarate. Some strains even utilized glucose as electron donor and carbon source. All strains were able to use sulfate, sulfite and nitrate as electron acceptors. Additionally, three Desulfovibrio strains reduced manganese oxide, the Desulfotomaculum strain reduced manganese oxide, iron oxide, and elemental sulfur. The 16S rRNA analysis revealed that the isolates belong to three different species. The strains H1T, H3M and B1M could be

  9. Sunflower Seed and Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Mohebbipour, Alireza; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Mansouri, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Background: Regardless of the overall association between diet and acne which cannot be easily ignored, there might be an association between specific nutrients and acne development or improvement. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of dietary intake of sunflower seeds on acne severity and the pattern of acne lesions. Patients and Methods: In a randomized controlled trial, 50 patients aged 15 - 30 years old with acne vulgaris were enrolled through consecutive convenient sampling, in a dermatology clinic in Ardabil, Iran. They were randomly allocated into two trial arms. Those in the control group were asked to stop eating sunflower seeds if they did before. In the intervention group, they consumed 25 g sunflower-containing food daily for seven days. The primary outcome of interest was 10% increase/decrease in the baseline acne severity index (ASI), sustained to the end of the follow-up period on day 14. Results: The mean ASI did not change significantly through the study period in the control group, but it increased in the sunflower group from 62 at the baseline to 86.8 after two weeks (P < 0.001). The ASI mean change was 24.8 in the sunflower group compared to 4.9 in the control group (P < 0.001). The global acne grading score (GAGS) did not significantly change in any of the groups and the difference in the change of GAGS was not significant between the groups (2.4 in the sunflower group versus 1.6 in the control group). Twenty two subjects (88%) in the sunflower group versus 9 (36%) in the control group had at least 10% increment in ASI throughout the follow-up period (P < 0.001). The relative risk of developing the primary outcome in taking the sunflower seed intervention was 2.4 (95% CI: 1.4 - 4.2). The observed risk difference was 0.52 (95% CI: 0.29 - 0.75). Conclusions: Sunflower seed intake appears to aggravate acne vulgaris; however, further evidence is needed to ban sunflower seed intake in patients with acne. Considering the

  10. Determination of kinetic coefficients for the simultaneous reduction of sulfate and uranium by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, M.D.

    1995-05-01

    Uranium contamination of groundwaters and surface waters near abandoned mill tailings piles is a serious concern in many areas of the western United States. Uranium usually exists in either the U(IV) or the U(VI) oxidation state. U(VI) is soluble in water and, as a result, is very mobile in the environment. U(IV), however, is generally insoluble in water and, therefore, is not subject to aqueous transport. In recent years, researchers have discovered that certain anaerobic microorganisms, such as the sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, can mediate the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). Although the ability of this microorganism to reduce U(VI) has been studied in some detail by previous researchers, the kinetics of the reactions have not been characterized. The purpose of this research was to perform kinetic studies on Desulfovibrio desulficans bacteria during simultaneous reduction of sulfate and uranium and to determine the phase in which uranium exists after it has been reduced and precipitated from solution. The studies were conducted in a laboratory-scale chemostat under substrate-limited growth conditions with pyruvate as the substrate. Kinetic coefficients for substrate utilization and cell growth were calculated using the Monod equation. The maximum rate of substrate utilization (k) was determined to be 4.70 days{sup {minus}1} while the half-velocity constant (K{sub s}) was 140 mg/l COD. The yield coefficient (Y) was determined to be 0.17 mg cells/mg COD while the endogenous decay coefficient (k{sub d}) was calculated as 0.072 days{sup {minus}1}. After reduction, U(IV) Precipitated from solution in the uraninite (UO{sub 2}) phase. Uranium removal efficiency as high as 90% was achieved in the chemostat.

  11. Photodynamic therapy of acne vulgaris.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ershova, Ekaterina Y.; Karimova, Lubov N.; Kharnas, Sergey S.; Kuzmin, Sergey G.; Loschenov, Victor B.

    2003-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with topical 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) was tested for the treatment of acne vulgaris. Patients with acne were treated with ALA plus red light. Ten percent water solution of ALA was applied with 1,5-2 h occlusion and then 18-45 J/cm2 630 nm light was given. Bacterial endogenous porphyrins fluorescence also was used for acne therapy. Treatment control and diagnostics was realized by fluorescence spectra and fluorescence image. Light sources and diagnostic systems were used: semiconductor laser (λ=630 nm, Pmax=1W), (LPhT-630-01-BIOSPEC); LED system for PDT and diagnostics with fluorescent imager (λ=635 nm, P=2W, p=50 mW/cm2), (UFPh-630-01-BIOSPEC); high sensitivity CCD video camera with narrow-band wavelength filter (central wavelength 630 nm); laser electronic spectrum analyzer for fluorescent diagnostics and photodynamic therapy monitoring (LESA-01-BIOSPEC). Protoporphyrin IX (PP IX) and endogenous porphyrins concentrations were measured by fluorescence at wavelength, correspondingly, 700 nm and 650 nm. It was shown that topical ALA is converted into PP IX in hair follicles, sebaceous glands and acne scars. The amount of resulting PP IX is sufficient for effective PDT. There was good clinical response and considerable clearance of acne lesion. ALA-PDT also had good cosmetic effect in treatment acne scars. PDT with ALA and red light assist in opening corked pores, destroying Propionibacterium acnes and decreasing sebum secretion. PDT treatment associated with several adverse effects: oedema and/or erytema for 3-5 days after PDT, epidermal exfoliation from 5th to 10th day and slight pigmentation during 1 month after PDT. ALA-PDT is effective for acne and can be used despite several side effects.

  12. Complementary therapies for acne vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Huijuan; Yang, Guoyan; Wang, Yuyi; Liu, Jian Ping; Smith, Caroline A; Luo, Hui; Liu, Yueming

    2015-01-01

    Background Acne is a chronic skin disease characterised by inflamed spots and blackheads on the face, neck, back, and chest. Cysts and scarring can also occur, especially in more severe disease. People with acne often turn to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), such as herbal medicine, acupuncture, and dietary modifications, because of their concerns about the adverse effects of conventional medicines. However, evidence for CAM therapies has not been systematically assessed. Objectives To assess the effects and safety of any complementary therapies in people with acne vulgaris. Search methods We searched the following databases from inception up to 22 January 2014: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 1), MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), PsycINFO (from 1806), AMED (from 1985), CINAHL (from 1981), Scopus (from 1966), and a number of other databases listed in the Methods section of the review. The Cochrane CAM Field Specialised Register was searched up to May 2014. We also searched five trials registers and checked the reference lists of articles for further references to relevant trials. Selection criteria We included parallel-group randomised controlled trials (or the first phase data of randomised cross-over trials) of any kind of CAM, compared with no treatment, placebo, or other active therapies, in people with a diagnosis of acne vulgaris. Data collection and analysis Three authors collected data from each included trial and evaluated the methodological quality independently. They resolved disagreements by discussion and, as needed, arbitration by another author. Main results We included 35 studies, with a total of 3227 participants. We evaluated the majority as having unclear risk of selection, attrition, reporting, detection, and other biases. Because of the clinical heterogeneity between trials and the incomplete data reporting, we could only include four

  13. Pathway confirmation and flux analysis of central metabolicpathways in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough using gaschromatography-mass spectrometry and fourier transform-ion cyclotronresonance mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yinjie; Pingitore, Francesco; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Phan,Richard; Hazen, Terry C.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2006-07-11

    It has been proposed that during growth under anaerobic oroxygen-limited conditions Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses theserine-isocitrate lyase pathway common to many methylotrophic anaerobes,in which formaldehyde produced from pyruvate is condensed with glycine toform serine. The serine is then transformed through hydroxypyruvate andglycerate to enter central metabolism at phosphoglycerate. To examine itsuse of the serine-isocitrate lyase pathway under anaerobic conditions, wegrew S. oneidensis MR-1 on [1-13C]lactate as the sole carbon source witheither trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) or fumarate as an electron acceptor.Analysis of cellular metabolites indicates that a large percentage(>75 percent) of lactate was partially oxidized to either acetate orpyruvate. The 13C isotope distributions in amino acids and other keymetabolites indicate that, under anaerobic conditions, a complete serinepathway is not present, and lactate is oxidized via a highly reversibleserine degradation pathway. The labeling data also suggest significantactivity in the anaplerotic (malic enzyme and phosphoenolpyruvatecarboxylase) and glyoxylate shunt (isocitrate lyase and malate synthase)reactions. Although the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is often observedto be incomplete in many other anaerobes (absence of 2-oxoglutaratedehydrogenase activity), isotopic labeling supports the existence of acomplete TCA cycle in S. oneidensis MR-1 under TMAO reductioncondition.

  14. Identification of a cyclic-di-GMP-modulating response regulator that impacts biofilm formation in a model sulfate reducing bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Rajeev, Lara; Luning, Eric G.; Altenburg, Sara; Zane, Grant M.; Baidoo, Edward E. K.; Catena, Michela; Keasling, Jay D.; Wall, Judy D.; Fields, Matthew W.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2014-01-01

    We surveyed the eight putative cyclic-di-GMP-modulating response regulators (RRs) in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough that are predicted to function via two-component signaling. Using purified proteins, we examined cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP) production or turnover in vitro of all eight proteins. The two RRs containing only GGDEF domains (DVU2067, DVU0636) demonstrated c-di-GMP production activity in vitro. Of the remaining proteins, three RRs with HD-GYP domains (DVU0722, DVUA0086, and DVU2933) were confirmed to be Mn2+-dependent phosphodiesterases (PDEs) in vitro and converted c-di-GMP to its linear form, pGpG. DVU0408, containing both c-di-GMP production (GGDEF) and degradation domains (EAL), showed c-di-GMP turnover activity in vitro also with production of pGpG. No c-di-GMP related activity could be assigned to the RR DVU0330, containing a metal-dependent phosphohydrolase HD-OD domain, or to the HD-GYP domain RR, DVU1181. Studies included examining the impact of overexpressed cyclic-di-GMP-modulating RRs in the heterologous host E. coli and led to the identification of one RR, DVU0636, with increased cellulose production. Evaluation of a transposon mutant in DVU0636 indicated that the strain was impaired in biofilm formation and demonstrated an altered carbohydrate:protein ratio relative to the D. vulgaris wild type biofilms. However, grown in liquid lactate/sulfate medium, the DVU0636 transposon mutant showed no growth impairment relative to the wild-type strain. Among the eight candidates, only the transposon disruption mutant in the DVU2067 RR presented a growth defect in liquid culture. Our results indicate that, of the two diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) that function as part of two-component signaling, DVU0636 plays an important role in biofilm formation while the function of DVU2067 has pertinence in planktonic growth. PMID:25120537

  15. Bioaccessibility of carotenoids from Chlorella vulgaris and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Gille, Andrea; Trautmann, Andreas; Posten, Clemens; Briviba, Karlis

    2015-08-01

    Microalgae can contribute to a balanced diet because of their composition. Beside numerous essential nutrients, carotenoids are in the focus for food applications. The bioavailability of carotenoids from photoautotrophic-cultivated Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris) and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (C. reinhardtii) was compared. An in vitro digestion model was used to investigate carotenoid bioaccessibility. Furthermore, the effect of sonication on bioaccessibility was assessed. Lutein was the main carotenoid in both species. C. reinhardtii showed higher amounts of lutein and β-carotene than C. vulgaris. In contrast to C. reinhardtii, no β-carotene and only 7% of lutein were bioaccessible in nonsonicated C. vulgaris. Sonication increased the bioaccessibility of carotenoids from C. vulgaris to a level comparable with C. reinhardtii (β-carotene: ≥ 10%; lutein: ≥ 15%). Thus, C. reinhardtii represents a good carotenoid source for potential use in foods without processing, while the application of processing methods, like sonication, is necessary for C. vulgaris. PMID:27146695

  16. Coagulation-membrane filtration of Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Lee, Duu-Jong; Liao, Guan-Yu; Chang, Yin-Ru; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2012-03-01

    Filtration-based separation of Chlorella vulgaris, a species with excellent potential for CO(2) capture and lipid production, was investigated using a surface-modified hydrophilic polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane. Coagulation using polyaluminum chloride (PACl) attained maximum turbidity removal at 200 mg L(-1) as Al(2)O(3). The membrane filtration flux at 1 bar increased as the PACl dose increased, regardless of overdosing in the coagulation stage. The filtered cake at the end of filtration tests peaked in solid content at 10 mg L(-1) as Al(2)O(3), reaching 34% w/w, roughly two times that of the original suspension. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) tests demonstrate that the cake with minimum water-solid binding strength produced the driest filter cake. Coagulation using 10 mg L(-1) PACl as Al(2)O(3), followed by PTFE membrane filtration at 1 bar, is an effective process for harvesting C. vulgaris from algal froth. PMID:22261659

  17. Management of pemphigus vulgaris: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Gregoriou, Stamatis; Efthymiou, Ourania; Stefanaki, Christina; Rigopoulos, Dimitris

    2015-01-01

    The main objective in the treatment of pemphigus vulgaris is to control the disease, prevent relapses, and avoid adverse events associated with the prolonged use of steroids and immunosuppressive agents. Systemic corticosteroids remain the gold standard treatment for pemphigus vulgaris. Azathioprine and mycophenolate mofetil are the first line of steroid-sparing treatment. Rituximab is extremely effective in recalcitrant pemphigus, when other treatments fail to control the disease. The European Dermatology Forum recommends tapering prednisolone by 25% every 2 weeks after the consolidation phase, and a 5 mg reduction every 4 weeks when the dose is reduced to <20 mg. If the patient relapses, options include increasing steroids back to the previous dose, adding an immunosuppressant if using steroid monotherapy, or replacing a first-line immunosuppressant by another if already on combination therapy. PMID:26543381

  18. The role of Rnf in ion gradient formation in Desulfovibrio alaskensis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Luyao; Bradstock, Peter; Li, Chuang; McInerney, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Rnf is a membrane protein complex that has been shown to be important in energy conservation. Here, Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 and Rnf mutants of G20 were grown with different electron donor and acceptor combinations to determine the importance of Rnf in energy conservation and the type of ion gradient generated. The addition of the protonophore TCS strongly inhibited lactate-sulfate dependent growth whereas the sodium ionophore ETH2120 had no effect, indicating a role for the proton gradient during growth. Mutants in rnfA and rnfD were more sensitive to the protonophore at 5 µM than the parental strain, suggesting the importance of Rnf in the generation of a proton gradient. The electrical potential (ΔΨ), ΔpH and proton motive force were lower in the rnfA mutant than in the parental strain of D.alaskensis G20. These results provide evidence that the Rnf complex in D. alaskensis functions as a primary proton pump whose activity is important for growth. PMID:27114876

  19. Bismuth(III) deferiprone effectively inhibits growth of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774.

    PubMed

    Barton, Larry L; Lyle, Daniel A; Ritz, Nathaniel L; Granat, Alex S; Khurshid, Ali N; Kherbik, Nada; Hider, Robert; Lin, Henry C

    2016-04-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria have been implicated in inflammatory bowel diseases and ulcerative colitis in humans and there is an interest in inhibiting the growth of these sulfide-producing bacteria. This research explores the use of several chelators of bismuth to determine the most effective chelator to inhibit the growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. For our studies, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774 was grown with nitrate as the electron acceptor and chelated bismuth compounds were added to test for inhibition of growth. Varying levels of inhibition were attributed to bismuth chelated with subsalicylate or citrate but the most effective inhibition of growth by D. desulfuricans was with bismuth chelated by deferiprone, 3-hydroxy-1,2-dimethyl-4(1H)-pyridone. Growth of D. desulfuricans was inhibited by 10 μM bismuth as deferiprone:bismuth with either nitrate or sulfate respiration. Our studies indicate deferiprone:bismuth has bacteriostatic activity on D. desulfuricans because the inhibition can be reversed following exposure to 1 mM bismuth for 1 h at 32 °C. We suggest that deferiprone is an appropriate chelator for bismuth to control growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria because deferiprone is relatively nontoxic to animals, including humans, and has been used for many years to bind Fe(III) in the treatment of β-thalassemia. PMID:26896170

  20. Role of Morphological Growth State and Gene Expression in Desulfovibrio africanus strain Walvis Bay Mercury Methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Moberly, James G; Miller, Carrie L; Brown, Steven D; Biswas, Abir; Brandt, Craig C; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Elias, Dwayne A

    2012-01-01

    The biogeochemical transformations of mercury are a complex process, with the production of methylmercury, a potent human neurotoxin, repeatedly demonstrated in sulfate- and Fe(III)- reducing as well as methanogenic bacteria. However, little is known regarding the morphology, genes or proteins involved in methylmercury generation. Desulfovibrio africanus strain Walvis Bay is a Hg-methylating -proteobacterium with a sequenced genome and has unusual pleomorphic forms. In this study, a relationship between the pleomorphism and Hg methylation was investigated. Proportional increases in the sigmoidal (regular) cell form corresponded with increased net MeHg production, but decreased when the pinched cocci (persister) form became the major morphotype. D. africanus microarrays indicated that the ferrous iron transport genes (feoAB), as well as ribosomal genes and several genes whose products are predicted to have metal binding domains (CxxC), were up-regulated during exposure to Hg in the exponential phase. While no specific methylation pathways were identified, the finding that Hg may interfere with iron transport and the correlation of growth-phase dependent morphology with MeHg production are notable. The identification of these relationships between differential gene expression, morphology, and the growth phase dependence of Hg transformations suggests that actively growing cells are primarily responsible for methylation, and so areas with ample carbon and electron-acceptor concentrations may also generate a higher proportion of methylmercury than more oligotrophic environments. The observation of increased iron transporter expression also suggests that Hg methylation may interfere with iron biogeochemical cycles.

  1. Comparison of Biocorrosion due to Desulfovibrio desulfuricans and Desulfotomaculum nigrificans Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lata, Suman; Sharma, Chhaya; Singh, Ajay K.

    2013-02-01

    One observes several species of sulfate-reducing bacteria in nature. Presence of these species in a media may cause microbial influenced corrosion (MIC) of materials differently. To investigate this aspect of MIC, corrosion tests were performed on three types of stainless steels. The tests were done in modified Baar's media inoculated separately by the two species of SRB namely Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (DD) and Desulfotomaculum nigrificans (DN). Electrochemical and immersion tests were performed to assess the extent of uniform and localized corrosion of these steels. Biofilms formed on the corroded samples were analyzed for estimating various components of its extracellular polymeric substances. Hydrogenase enzyme of these bacteria was tested to determine its nature and activity. Higher degree of corrosivity was observed in case of media inoculated with DD as compared to DN. More active nature of hydrogenase enzyme, its location in the periplasmic phase in DD and higher fraction of carbohydrate in biofilm formed due to DD have been suggested to be responsible for higher degree of corrosivity caused by them.

  2. The role of Rnf in ion gradient formation in Desulfovibrio alaskensis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Luyao; Bradstock, Peter; Li, Chuang; McInerney, Michael J; Krumholz, Lee R

    2016-01-01

    Rnf is a membrane protein complex that has been shown to be important in energy conservation. Here, Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 and Rnf mutants of G20 were grown with different electron donor and acceptor combinations to determine the importance of Rnf in energy conservation and the type of ion gradient generated. The addition of the protonophore TCS strongly inhibited lactate-sulfate dependent growth whereas the sodium ionophore ETH2120 had no effect, indicating a role for the proton gradient during growth. Mutants in rnfA and rnfD were more sensitive to the protonophore at 5 µM than the parental strain, suggesting the importance of Rnf in the generation of a proton gradient. The electrical potential (ΔΨ), ΔpH and proton motive force were lower in the rnfA mutant than in the parental strain of D.alaskensis G20. These results provide evidence that the Rnf complex in D. alaskensis functions as a primary proton pump whose activity is important for growth. PMID:27114876

  3. Can cofactor-binding sites in proteins be flexible? Desulfovibrio desulfuricans flavodoxin binds FMN dimer.

    PubMed

    Muralidhara, B K; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2003-11-11

    Flavodoxins catalyze redox reactions using the isoalloxazine moiety of the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor stacked between two aromatic residues located in two peptide loops. At high FMN concentrations that favor stacked FMN dimers in solution, isothermal titration calorimetric studies show that these dimers bind strongly to apo-flavodoxin from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (30 degrees C, 20 mM Hepes, pH 7, K(D) = 5.8 microM). Upon increasing the temperature so the FMN dimers dissociate (as shown by (1)H NMR), only one-to-one (FMN-to-protein) binding is observed. Calorimetric titrations result in one-to-one binding also in the presence of phosphate or sulfate (30 degrees C, 13 mM anion, pH 7, K(D) = 0.4 microM). FMN remains dimeric in the presence of phosphate and sulfate, suggesting that specific binding of a divalent anion to the phosphate-binding site triggers ordering of the peptide loops so only one isoalloxazine can fit. Although the physiological relevance of FMN and other nucleotides as dimers has not been explored, our study shows that high-affinity binding to proteins of such dimers can occur in vitro. This emphasizes that the cofactor-binding site in flavodoxin is more flexible than previously expected. PMID:14596623

  4. Thermal unfolding of Apo and Holo Desulfovibrio desulfuricans flavodoxin: cofactor stabilizes folded and intermediate states.

    PubMed

    Muralidhara, B K; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2004-10-12

    We here compare thermal unfolding of the apo and holo forms of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans flavodoxin, which noncovalently binds a flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor. In the case of the apo form, fluorescence and far-UV circular dichroism (CD) detected transitions are reversible but do not overlap (T(m) of 50 and 60 degrees C, respectively, pH 7). The thermal transitions for the holo form follow the same pattern but occur at higher temperatures (T(m) of 60 and 67 degrees C for fluorescence and CD transitions, respectively, pH 7). The holoprotein transitions are also reversible and exhibit no protein concentration dependence (above 10 microM), indicating that the FMN remains bound to the polypeptide throughout. Global analysis shows that the thermal reactions for both apo and holo forms proceed via an equilibrium intermediate that has approximately 90% nativelike secondary structure and significant enthalpic stabilization relative to the unfolded states. Incubation of unfolded holoflavodoxin at high temperatures results in FMN dissociation. Rebinding of FMN at these conditions is nominal, and therefore, cooling of holoprotein heated to 95 degrees C follows the refolding pathway of the apo form. However, FMN readily rebinds to the apoprotein at lower temperatures. We conclude that (1) a three-state thermal unfolding behavior appears to be conserved among long- and short-chain, as well as apo and holo forms of, flavodoxins and (2) flavodoxin's thermal stability (in both native and intermediate states) is augmented by the presence of the FMN cofactor. PMID:15461458

  5. Reduction of Cr, Mo, Se and U by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans immobilized in polyacrylamide gels.

    PubMed

    Tucker, M D; Barton, L L; Thomson, B M

    1998-01-01

    Intact cells of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, immobilized in polyacrylamide gel, removed Cr, Mo, Se and U from solution by enzymatic-mediated reduction reactions. Lactate or H2 served as the electron donor and the oxidized Cr(VI), Mo(VI), Se(VI) and U(VI) served as electron acceptors. Reduction of the oxidized metal species resulted in the precipitation of solid phases of the metals. Metal removal efficiencies of 86-96% were achieved for initial concentrations of 1 mM Mo, Se, and U and 0.5 mM Cr. Insoluble metal phases accumulated on both the surface and the interior of the polyacrylamide gel. In column tests conducted for U removal, effluent concentrations less than 20 micrograms L(-1) were achieved with initial concentrations of 5 mg L(-1) and 20 mg L(-1) U and residence times from 25-37 h. The enzymatic reduction of Cr, Mo, Se, and U by immobilized cells of D. desulfuricans may be a practical method for removing these metals from solution in a biological reactor. PMID:9565467

  6. Effects of temperature and phosphorous concentration on microbial sulfate reduction by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans.

    PubMed

    Okabe, S; Characklis, W G

    1992-04-25

    The effects of temperature and phosphorous concentration on the rate and the extent of microbial sulfate reduction with lactate as carbon and energy source were investigated for Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. The continuous culture experiments (chemostat) were conducted at pH 7.0 from 12 to 48 degrees C. The maximum specific growth rate (micro(max)) was relatively constant in the range 25 degrees C-43 degrees C and dramatically decreased outside this temperature range. The half-saturation coefficient was minimum at 25 degrees C. Cell yield was highest in the optimum temperature range (35 degrees C-43 degrees C) for growth. Maintenance energy requirements for D. desulfuricans were not significant. Two moles of lactate is consumed for every mole of sulfate reduced, and this stoichiometric ratio is not temperature dependent. Steady state rate and stoichiometric coefficients accurately predicted transient behavior during temperature shifts. The extent of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) is related to the concentration of phosphorous in the medium. EPS production rate increased with decreased phosphorous loading rate. Failure to discriminate between cell and EPS formation by D. desulfuricans leads to significant overestimates of the cell yield. The limiting C:P ratio for D. desulfuricans was in the range of 400:1 to 800:1. PMID:18600902

  7. Changes in metabolic pathways of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 cells induced by molybdate excess.

    PubMed

    Nair, Rashmi R; Silveira, Célia M; Diniz, Mário S; Almeida, Maria G; Moura, Jose J G; Rivas, Maria G

    2015-03-01

    The activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) intensifies the problems associated to corrosion of metals and the solution entails significant economic costs. Although molybdate can be used to control the negative effects of these organisms, the mechanisms triggered in the cells exposed to Mo-excess are poorly understood. In this work, the effects of molybdate ions on the growth and morphology of the SRB Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 (DaG20) were investigated. In addition, the cellular localization, ion uptake and regulation of protein expression were studied. We found that molybdate concentrations ranging between 50 and 150 µM produce a twofold increase in the doubling time with this effect being more significant at 200 µM molybdate (five times increase in the doubling time). It was also observed that 500 µM molybdate completely inhibits the cellular growth. On the context of protein regulation, we found that several enzymes involved in energy metabolism, cellular division and metal uptake processes were particularly influenced under the conditions tested. An overall description of some of the mechanisms involved in the DaG20 adaptation to molybdate-stress conditions is discussed. PMID:25488518

  8. The role of Rnf in ion gradient formation in Desulfovibrio alaskensis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Luyao; Bradstock, Peter; Li, Chuang; McInerney, Michael J.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2016-04-14

    Rnf is a membrane protein complex that has been shown to be important in energy conservation. Here, Desulfovibrio alaskensisG20 and Rnf mutants of G20 were grown with different electron donor and acceptor combinations to determine the importance of Rnf in energy conservation and the type of ion gradient generated. The addition of the protonophore TCS strongly inhibited lactate-sulfate dependent growth whereas the sodium ionophore ETH2120 had no effect, indicating a role for the proton gradient during growth. Mutants inrnfAandrnfDwere more sensitive to the protonophore at 5 µM than the parental strain, suggesting the importance of Rnf in the generation ofmore » a proton gradient. The electrical potential (ΔΨ), ΔpH and proton motive force were lower in thernfAmutant than in the parental strain of D.alaskensisG20. In conclusion, these results provide evidence that the Rnf complex inD. alaskensisfunctions as a primary proton pump whose activity is important for growth.« less

  9. Molecular dynamics study of Desulfovibrio africanus cytochrome c3 in oxidized and reduced forms.

    PubMed Central

    Bret, Céline; Roth, Michel; Nørager, Sofie; Hatchikian, E Claude; Field, Martin J

    2002-01-01

    A 5-ns molecular dynamics study of a tetraheme cytochrome in fully oxidized and reduced forms was performed using the CHARMM molecular modeling program, with explicit water molecules, Langevin dynamics thermalization, Particle Mesh Ewald long-range electrostatics, and quantum mechanical determination of heme partial charges. The simulations used, as starting points, crystallographic structures of the oxidized and reduced forms of the acidic cytochrome c(3) from Desulfovibrio africanus obtained at pH 5.6. In this paper we also report structures for the two forms obtained at pH 8. In contrast to previous cytochrome c(3) dynamics simulations, our model is stable. The simulation structures agree reasonably well with the crystallographic ones, but our models show higher flexibility and the water molecules are more labile. We have compared in detail the differences between the simulated and experimental structures of the two redox states and observe that the hydration structure is highly dependent on the redox state. We have also analyzed the interaction energy terms between the hemes, the protein residues, and water. The direct electrostatic interaction between hemes is weak and nearly insensitive to the redox state, but the remaining terms are large and contribute in a complex way to the overall potential energy differences that we see between the redox states. PMID:12496077

  10. Impact of Desulfovibrio alaskensis biofilms on corrosion behaviour of carbon steel in marine environment.

    PubMed

    Wikieł, Agata J; Datsenko, Iaryna; Vera, Mario; Sand, Wolfgang

    2014-06-01

    Sulfate reducing prokaryotes are associated with the steel deterioration. They build heterogeneous biofilms, capable of accelerating corrosion processes. In this study metabolic activity and the biofilm development of Desulfovibrio alaskensis were correlated to electrochemical response of carbon steel surface. In the exponential growth phase sulfide concentration reached its maximum of about 10mM. This phenomenon was responsible for the parallel increase in the corrosion potential (Ecorr) up to -720mV (vs. SCE). Subsequently, during the intensive biofilm formation and development another Ecorr peak (-710mV vs. SCE) occurred. Decrease in Ecorr was registered during the biofilm maturation and kept stable, being 20mV lower than in the control. While carbon steel was protected from the microbial attachment and exposed to metabolic products, only one potential maximum (-730mV vs. SCE) was recorded. Here Ecorr variations coincided with sulfide concentration changes and kept at 120mV lower vs. the control. Weight loss examinations revealed corrosion rates, which did not exceed 0.05mm/y. Confocal microscopy suggested the importance of extracellular proteins in the biofilm formation. Above 150 proteins were detected in the EPS matrix. Surface effects of biofilm and metabolic products were visualised, revealing the role of attached microorganisms in the localised corrosion. PMID:24238898

  11. Increased pigment and lipid content, lipid variety, and cell and population size of the microalgae Chlorella spp. when co-immobilized in alginate beads with the microalgae-growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense.

    PubMed

    de-Bashan, Luz E; Bashan, Yoav; Moreno, Manuel; Lebsky, Vladimir K; Bustillos, Jose J

    2002-06-01

    Three strains of the freshwater microalgae used for wastewater treatment, Chlorella vulgaris and Chlorella sorokiniana co-immobilized separately in alginate beads with the microalgae-growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense Cd, resulted in significant changes in microalgal-population size, cell size, cell cytology, pigment, lipid content, and the variety of fatty acids produced in comparison with microalgae immobilized in alginate without the bacterium. Cells of C. vulgaris UTEX 2714 did not change in size, but the population size within the beads significantly increased. On the other hand, C. vulgaris UTEX 395 cells grew 62% larger, but their numbers did not increase. The population of C. sorokiniana UTEX 1602 increased, but not their cell size. The content of pigments chlorophyll a and b, lutein, and violoaxanthin increased in all microalgal species. The lipid content also significantly increased in all three strains, and the number of different fatty acids in the microalgae increased from four to eight. This study indicates that the microalgae-growth-promoting bacterium induced significant changes in the metabolism of the microalgae. PMID:12166678

  12. A Preliminary Study Examining the Binding Capacity of Akkermansia muciniphila and Desulfovibrio spp., to Colonic Mucin in Health and Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Lokesh; Carrington, Stephen; Martin, Sean T.; Coffey, J. Calvin; Winter, Desmond C.; O’Connell, P. Ronan

    2015-01-01

    Background Akkermansia muciniphila and Desulfovibrio spp. are commensal microbes colonising the mucus gel layer of the colon. Both species have the capacity to utilise colonic mucin as a substrate. A. muciniphila degrades colonic mucin, while Desulfovibrio spp. metabolise the sulfate moiety of sulfated mucins. Altered abundances of these microorganisms have been reported in ulcerative colitis (UC). However their capacity to bind to human colonic mucin, and whether this binding capacity is affected by changes in mucin associated with UC, remain to be defined. Methods Mucin was isolated from resected colon from control patients undergoing resection for colonic cancer (n = 7) and patients undergoing resection for UC (n = 5). Isolated mucin was purified and printed onto mucin microarrays. Binding of reference strains and three clinical isolates of A. muciniphila and Desulfovibrio spp. to purified mucin was investigated. Results Both A. muciniphila and Desulfovibro spp. bound to mucin. The reference strain and all clinical isolates of A. muciniphila showed increased binding capacity for UC mucin (p < .005). The Desulfovibrio reference strain showed increased affinity for UC mucin. The mucin binding profiles of clinical isolates of Desulfovibrio spp. were specific to each isolate. Two isolates showed no difference in binding. One UC isolate bound with increased affinity to UC mucin (p < .005). Conclusion These preliminary data suggest that differences exist in the mucin binding capacity of isolates of A. muciniphila and Desulfovibrio spp. This study highlights the mucin microarray platform as a means of studying the ability of bacteria to interact with colonic mucin in health and disease. PMID:26491870

  13. Variation in the Breeding System of Prunella vulgaris L.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prunella vulgaris (Lamiaceae), commonly known as selfheal, is a perennial herb with a long history of use in traditional medicine. Recent studies have found that P. vulgaris possesses anti-inflammatory, antiviral and anti-bacterial properties, which may lead to increased commercial demand. To date...

  14. Inhibition of lentivirus replication by aqueous extracts of Prunella vulgaris

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prunella vulgaris has been used historically in Chinese and Native American medicine. Various members of the mint family, including Prunella, have been reported to have antiviral activity. To characterize the anti-lentiviral activities of P. vulgaris, we tested water and ethanol extracts for their...

  15. New Model for Electron Flow for Sulfate Reduction in Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Kimberly L.; Rapp-Giles, Barbara J.; Semkiw, Elizabeth S.; Porat, Iris; Brown, Steven D.; Wall, Judy D.

    2014-02-01

    To understand the energy conversion activities of the anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria, it is necessary to identify the components involved in electron flow. The importance of the abundant type I tetraheme cytochrome c3 (TpIc3) as an electron carrier during sulfate respiration was questioned by the previous isolation of a null mutation in the gene encoding TpIc3, cycA, in Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20. Whereas respiratory growth of the CycA mutant with lactate and sulfate was little affected, growth with pyruvate and sulfate was significantly impaired. We have explored the phenotype of the CycA mutant through physiological tests and transcriptomic and proteomic analyses. Data reported here show that electrons from pyruvate oxidation do not reach adenylyl sulfate reductase, the enzyme catalyzing the first redox reaction during sulfate reduction, in the absence of either CycA or the type I cytochrome c3:menaquinone oxidoreductase transmembrane complex, QrcABCD. In contrast to the wild type, the CycA and QrcA mutants did not grow with H2 or formate and sulfate as the electron acceptor. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of the CycA mutant showed that transcripts and enzymes for the pathway from pyruvate to succinate were strongly decreased in the CycA mutant regardless of the growth mode. Neither the CycA nor the QrcA mutant grew on fumarate alone, consistent with the omics results and a redox regulation of gene expression. We conclude that TpIc3 and the Qrc complex are D. alaskensis components essential for the transfer of electrons released in the periplasm to reach the cytoplasmic adenylyl sulfate reductase and present a model that may explain the CycA phenotype through confurcation of electrons.

  16. A New Model for Electron Flow for Sulfate Reduction in Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Kimberly L; Rapp-Giles, Barbara J; Semkiw, Elizabeth M.; Porat, Iris; Brown, Steven D; Wall, Judy D.

    2013-01-01

    To understand the energy conversion activities of the anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria, it is necessary to identify the components involved in electron flow. The importance of the abundant type I tetraheme cytochrome c3 (TpIc3) as an electron carrier during sulfate respiration was questioned by the previous isolation of a null mutation in the encoding gene, cycA, in Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20. Whereas respiratory growth of the CycA mutant with lactate and sulfate was little affected, growth with pyruvate and sulfate was significantly impaired. We have explored the phenotype of the CycA mutant through physiological tests and transcriptomic and proteomic analyses. Data reported here show that electrons from pyruvate oxidation do not reach adenylyl sulfate reductase, the enzyme catalyzing the first redox reaction during sulfate reduction, in the absence of either CycAor the type I cytochrome c3:menaquinone oxidoreductase, QrcABCD transmembrane complex. In contrast to the wild type, neither CycA and QrcA mutants do not grow with H2 or formate and sulfate as electron acceptor. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of the CycA mutant showed that transcripts and enzymes for the pathway from pyruvate to succinate were strongly decreased in the CycA mutant regardless of growth mode. Neither the CycA nor the QrcA mutant grew on fumarate alone, consistent with the omics results and a redox regulation of gene expression. We conclude that TpIc3 and the Qrc complex are essential D. alaskensis components for transfer of electrons released in the periplasm to reach the cytoplasmic adenylyl sulfate reductase and present a model that may explain the CycA phenotype through confurcation of electrons.

  17. New Model for Electron Flow for Sulfate Reduction in Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp-Giles, Barbara J; Keller, Kimberly L; Porat, Iris; Brown, Steven D; Semkiw, Elizabeth M.; Wall, Judy D.

    2014-01-01

    To understand the energy conversion activities of the anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria, it is necessary to identify the components involved in electron flow. The importance of the abundant type I tetraheme cytochrome c3 (TpIc3) as an electron carrier during sulfate respiration was questioned by the previous isolation of a null mutation in the gene encoding TpIc3, cycA, in Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20. Whereas respiratory growth of the CycA mutant with lactate and sulfate was little affected, growth with pyruvate and sulfate was significantly impaired. We have explored the phenotype of the CycA mutant through physiological tests and transcriptomic and proteomic analyses. Data reported here show that electrons from pyruvate oxidation do not reach adenylyl sulfate reductase, the enzyme catalyzing the first redox reaction during sulfate reduction, in the absence of either CycA or the type I cytochrome c3:menaquinone oxidoreductase transmembrane complex, QrcABCD. In contrast to the wild type, the CycA and QrcA mutants did not grow with H2 or formate and sulfate as the electron acceptor. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of the CycA mutant showed that transcripts and enzymes for the pathway from pyruvate to succinate were strongly decreased in the CycA mutant regardless of the growth mode. Neither the CycA nor the QrcA mutant grew on fumarate alone, consistent with the omics results and a redox regulation of gene expression. We conclude that TpIc3 and the Qrc complex are D. alaskensis components essential for the transfer of electrons released in the periplasm to reach the cytoplasmic adenylyl sulfate reductase and present a model that may explain the CycA phenotype through confurcation of electrons.

  18. Transhydrogenase and Growth Substrate Influence Lipid Hydrogen Isotope Ratios in Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20.

    PubMed

    Leavitt, William D; Flynn, Theodore M; Suess, Melanie K; Bradley, Alexander S

    2016-01-01

    Microbial fatty acids preserve metabolic and environmental information in their hydrogen isotope ratios ((2)H/(1)H). This ratio is influenced by parameters that include the (2)H/(1)H of water in the microbial growth environment, and biosynthetic fractionations between water and lipid. In some microbes, this biosynthetic fractionation has been shown to vary systematically with central energy metabolism, and controls on fatty acid (2)H/(1)H may be linked to the intracellular production of NADPH. We examined the apparent fractionation between media water and the fatty acids produced by Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20. Growth was in batch culture with malate as an electron donor for sulfate respiration, and with pyruvate and fumarate as substrates for fermentation and for sulfate respiration. A larger fractionation was observed as a consequence of respiratory or fermentative growth on pyruvate than growth on fumarate or malate. This difference correlates with opposite apparent flows of electrons through the electron bifurcating/confurcating transhydrogenase NfnAB. When grown on malate or fumarate, mutant strains of D. alaskensis G20 containing transposon disruptions in a copy of nfnAB show different fractionations than the wild type strain. This phenotype is muted during fermentative growth on pyruvate, and it is absent when pyruvate is a substrate for sulfate reduction. All strains and conditions produced similar fatty acid profiles, and the (2)H/(1)H of individual lipids changed in concert with the mass-weighted average. Unsaturated fatty acids were generally depleted in (2)H relative to their saturated homologs, and anteiso-branched fatty acids were generally depleted in (2)H relative to straight-chain fatty acids. Fractionation correlated with growth rate, a pattern that has also been observed in the fractionation of sulfur isotopes during dissimilatory sulfate reduction by sulfate-reducing bacteria. PMID:27445998

  19. Metabolic Interfaces of Mercury Methylation Proteins in Desulfovibrio sp. ND132

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, J. D.; Bridou, R.; Smith, S. D.; Mok, K.; Widner, F.; Johs, A.; Parks, J.; Pierce, E. M.; Elias, D. A.; Gilmour, C. C.; Taga, M.

    2015-12-01

    Two genes necessary for microbial production of the neurotoxin methylmercury have been identified; hgcA encoding a corrinoid methyltransferase and hgcB, a ferredoxin-like protein. To date, all microbes possessing orthologs of these genes that have been tested are capable of methylating mercury; whereas, organisms lacking hgcA and hgcB are not. Also of interest is the observation that confirmed mercury-methylating microbes are all considered anaerobes although not members of a specific phylogenetic group. They are found scattered in the genomes of methanogens, Firmicutes, and Deltaproteobacteria. Methylation has not been demonstrated to provide protection of the microbes to mercury exposure. To determine the source of evolutionary pressure for acquisition and maintenance of these genes, we are seeking to understand whether there is a second function of the proteins. We are seeking evidence for the metabolic source(s) of the methyl group and for competing reactions. We have found that deletion of the metH gene encoding a tetrahydrofolate methyltransferase in Desulfovibrio sp. ND132 decreases the mercury methylation capacity by ca. 95%, consistent with an interpretation that this enzyme is involved in the pathway for the methyl group for HgcA. In addition, the corrinoid present in HgcA and the MetH of ND132 is strictly dependent on nicotinate nucleotide:5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole phosphoribosyltransferase encoded by the cobT gene, linking methionine biosynthesis with mercury methylation at a second level. Additional methyl transferases have not been found to be necessary for this function. While earlier evidence was provided for an involvement of the CO dehydrogenase/acetylCoA synthase, this enzyme is not universally present in methylating strains unlike the pathway for methionine synthesis.

  20. The role of anaerobic bacteria in the neutralization of acid mine drainage. [Desulfovibrio

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, P.E.

    1988-01-01

    In contrast to the acidic water column, the sediments underlying Lake Anna, which receives acid mine drainage, are circumneutral and contain 1-4 meq alkalinity/L. Indirect fluorescent antibody counts of a methanogen (strain CA) and a sulfate reducer (Desulfovibrio strain SM) demonstrated that these organisms were present in the sediments at numbers of approximately 10{sup 6} bacteria/mL sediment. Anaerobic heterotrophs in the sediments underlying the acidified arm of the lake outnumbered anaerobic heterotrophs in a non-acidified arm of the lake. A major storm event resulted in the deposition of 11 cm of oxidized, acidic new sediment material over the older circumneutral sediments. The Eh in the new sediments decreased by 200 mV within one week after the storm event. The pH and alkalinity increased even in the 1-cm layer by two weeks after the storm and products of sulfate reduction (acid volatile sulfide) increased at three weeks after the storm. This suggests that biological processes other than sulfate reduction were responsible for the initial buffering of these sediments. Laboratory experiments using the sulfate reducer and two anaerobes (also isolated from the sediments) suggested that alkalinity production during sulfate reduction decreases with decreasing carbon concentration. Generation of alkalinity was found not to be a simple function of sulfate reduction or of iron reduction. The generation of alkalinity was found to be a function of the carbon source, and concentration, organisms present, and mineral phase formed. Iron reduction rates in the sediments of Contrary Creek ranged from 4.9-27.8 mM/m{sup 2}-sediment-day. Alkalinity was produced in the floc layer in the absence of sulfate reduction. Iron reduction could be responsible for the mineralization of 15-90% of the carbon input to this system.

  1. Transhydrogenase and Growth Substrate Influence Lipid Hydrogen Isotope Ratios in Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, William D.; Flynn, Theodore M.; Suess, Melanie K.; Bradley, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    Microbial fatty acids preserve metabolic and environmental information in their hydrogen isotope ratios (2H/1H). This ratio is influenced by parameters that include the 2H/1H of water in the microbial growth environment, and biosynthetic fractionations between water and lipid. In some microbes, this biosynthetic fractionation has been shown to vary systematically with central energy metabolism, and controls on fatty acid 2H/1H may be linked to the intracellular production of NADPH. We examined the apparent fractionation between media water and the fatty acids produced by Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20. Growth was in batch culture with malate as an electron donor for sulfate respiration, and with pyruvate and fumarate as substrates for fermentation and for sulfate respiration. A larger fractionation was observed as a consequence of respiratory or fermentative growth on pyruvate than growth on fumarate or malate. This difference correlates with opposite apparent flows of electrons through the electron bifurcating/confurcating transhydrogenase NfnAB. When grown on malate or fumarate, mutant strains of D. alaskensis G20 containing transposon disruptions in a copy of nfnAB show different fractionations than the wild type strain. This phenotype is muted during fermentative growth on pyruvate, and it is absent when pyruvate is a substrate for sulfate reduction. All strains and conditions produced similar fatty acid profiles, and the 2H/1H of individual lipids changed in concert with the mass-weighted average. Unsaturated fatty acids were generally depleted in 2H relative to their saturated homologs, and anteiso-branched fatty acids were generally depleted in 2H relative to straight-chain fatty acids. Fractionation correlated with growth rate, a pattern that has also been observed in the fractionation of sulfur isotopes during dissimilatory sulfate reduction by sulfate-reducing bacteria. PMID:27445998

  2. TupA: A Tungstate Binding Protein in the Periplasm of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    PubMed Central

    Otrelo-Cardoso, Ana Rita; Nair, Rashmi R.; Correia, Márcia A. S.; Rivas, Maria G.; Santos-Silva, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    The TupABC system is involved in the cellular uptake of tungsten and belongs to the ABC (ATP binding cassette)-type transporter systems. The TupA component is a periplasmic protein that binds tungstate anions, which are then transported through the membrane by the TupB component using ATP hydrolysis as the energy source (the reaction catalyzed by the ModC component). We report the heterologous expression, purification, determination of affinity binding constants and crystallization of the Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 TupA. The tupA gene (locus tag Dde_0234) was cloned in the pET46 Enterokinase/Ligation-Independent Cloning (LIC) expression vector, and the construct was used to transform BL21 (DE3) cells. TupA expression and purification were optimized to a final yield of 10 mg of soluble pure protein per liter of culture medium. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was carried out showing that TupA binds both tungstate and molybdate ions and has no significant interaction with sulfate, phosphate or perchlorate. Quantitative analysis of metal binding by isothermal titration calorimetry was in agreement with these results, but in addition, shows that TupA has higher affinity to tungstate than molybdate. The protein crystallizes in the presence of 30% (w/v) polyethylene glycol 3350 using the hanging-drop vapor diffusion method. The crystals diffract X-rays beyond 1.4 Å resolution and belong to the P21 space group, with cell parameters a = 52.25 Å, b = 42.50 Å, c = 54.71 Å, β = 95.43°. A molecular replacement solution was found, and the structure is currently under refinement. PMID:24992597

  3. Hydrogenase Activity of Mineral-Associated and Suspended Populations of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans Essex 6

    SciTech Connect

    C.L. Reardon; T.S. Magnuson; E.S. Boyd; W.D. Leavitt; D.W. Reed; G.G. Geesey

    2014-02-01

    The interactions between sulfate-reducing microorganisms and iron oxides influence a number of important redox-sensitive biogeochemical processes including the formation of iron sulfides. Enzymes, such as hydrogenase which catalyze the reversible oxidation of molecular hydrogen, are known to mediate electron transfer to metals and may contribute to the formation and speciation of ferrous sulfides formed at the cell–mineral interface. In the present study, we compared the whole cell hydrogenase activity of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strain Essex 6 growing as biofilms on hematite (hematite-associated) or as suspended populations using different metabolic pathways. Hematite-associated cells exhibited significantly greater hydrogenase activity than suspended populations during sulfate respiration but not during pyruvate fermentation. The enhanced activity of the hematite-associated, sulfate-grown cells appears to be dependent on iron availability rather than a general response to surface attachment since the activity of glass-associated cells did not differ from that of suspended populations. Hydrogenase activity of pyruvate-fermenting cells was stimulated by addition of iron as soluble Fe(II)Cl2 and, in the absence of added iron, both sulfate-reducing and pyruvate-fermenting cells displayed similar rates of hydrogenase activity. These data suggest that iron exerts a stronger influence on whole cell hydrogenase activity than either metabolic pathway or mode of growth. The location of hydrogenase to the cell envelope and the enhanced activity at the hematite surface in sulfate-reducing cells may influence the redox conditions that control the species of iron sulfides on the mineral surface.

  4. Dissolution of Barium from Barite in Sewage Sludges and Cultures of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans

    PubMed Central

    Baldi, F.; Pepi, M.; Burrini, D.; Kniewald, G.; Scali, D.; Lanciotti, E.

    1996-01-01

    High concentrations of total barium, ranging from 0.42 to 1.58 mg(middot)g(sup-1) (dry weight) were found in sludges of two sewage treatment plants near Florence, Italy. Barium concentrations in the suspended matter decreased as redox potential values changed from negative to positive. An anoxic sewage sludge sample was aerated, and 30% of the total barium was removed in 24 h. To demonstrate that barium was solubilized from barite by sulfate-reducing bacteria, a strain of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans was used to study the solubilization of barium from barite under laboratory conditions. During cell growth with different concentrations of barite from 0.01 to 0.3 g(middot)liter(sup-1) (the latter is the MIC) as the only source of sulfates in the cultures, the D. desulfuricans strain accumulated barium up to 0.58 (mu)g(middot)mg(sup-1) (dry weight). Three times the quantity of barium was dissolved by bacteria than in the uninoculated medium (control). The unexpectedly low concentration of soluble barium (1.2 mg of Ba(middot)liter(sup-1)) with respect to the quantity expected (109 mg of Ba(middot)liter(sup-1)), calculated on the basis of the free H(inf2)S evolved from the dissimilatory reduction of sulfate from barite, was probably due to the formation of other barium compounds, such as witherite (BaCO(inf3)) and the transient species barium sulfide (BaS). The D. desulfuricans strain, growing on barite, formed visible aggregates. Confocal microscopy analysis showed that aggregates consisted of bacteria and barite. After 3 days of incubation, several autofluorescent crystals surrounded by a dissolution halo were observed. The crystals were identified as BaS by comparison with the commercial compound. PMID:16535353

  5. Addressing Free Radical Oxidation in Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Criscito, Maressa C.; Schlesinger, Todd E.; Verdicchio, Robert; Szoke, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Comparatively little attention has been paid to the role of free radical oxidation in acne vulgaris. Here, using the traditional abnormalities cited for acne, the authors address the role of free radical oxidation throughout the pathogenesis by detailing the chemistry that may contribute to clinical changes. To probe the effects of free radical oxidation and test an antioxidant, they conducted a preliminary study of topically applied vitamin E. Methods: Seventeen patients with mild-to-moderate acne vulgaris were evaluated over an eight-week period in two private dermatology practices in this open-label study. All patients enrolled were on the same baseline regimen of salicylic acid and benzoyl peroxide. This regimen was then supplemented with topical vitamin E in sunflower seed oil. Results: At the end of the eight-week period, all patients demonstrated clinical improvement, as indicated by a reduction in the number of lesions and global mean difference. A statistically significant reduction was noted as early as Week 2. Enrolled patients also expressed a positive experience due to good tolerability and easy application. Conclusion: Although the exact pathogenesis of acne vulgaris remains unknown, the presence of excessive reactive oxygen species can be implicated in each of the major abnormalities involved. This presence, along with the positive results of the authors’ preliminary study, demonstrates the need for more exploration on the use of topical antioxidants in limiting free radical oxidation in the acne model. This paper is designed to stimulate academic discussion regarding a new way of thinking about the disease state of acne. PMID:26962389

  6. Insulin resistance in severe acne vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Fatma Pelin; Kemeriz, Funda

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acne vulgaris is a pilosebaceous gland disease that usually affects people from puberty to young adulthood. It is seen especially on the face, neck, trunk and arms. Its severity differs from patient to patient and its pathogenesis is multifactorial. The main pathogenic factors of acne are high sebaceous gland secretion, follicular hyperproliferation, high androgen effects, propionibacterium acnes colonization and inflammation. Diet is always thought a probable reason for acne and many studies are done about acne and diet. Aim To determine the effect of insulin resistance in severe acne vulgaris. Material and methods Two hundred and forty-three acne vulgaris patients and 156 healthy controls were enrolled into the study. The blood levels of insulin and glucose were measured. Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA) Index was calculated. The values were compared with the control group. Results All of the patients were in the severe acne group according to their scores on the global acne scoring scale. While fasting blood glucose levels were not different between the groups (p > 0.05, 82.91 ±9.76 vs. 80.26 ±8.33), the fasting insulin levels were significantly higher in the patient group than in the control group (p < 0.001, 14.01 ±11.94 vs. 9.12 ±3.53). Additionally, there was a highly significant difference between the patient and control groups in terms of HOMA values (p < 0.001, 2.87 ±2.56 vs. 1.63 ±0.65). Conclusions These results suggest that insulin resistance may have a role in the pathogenesis of acne. PMID:26366152

  7. Hormonal treatment of acne vulgaris: an update

    PubMed Central

    Elsaie, Mohamed L

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common skin condition associated with multiple factors. Although mostly presenting alone, it can likewise present with features of hyperandrogenism and hormonal discrepancies. Of note, hormonal therapies are indicated in severe, resistant-to-treatment cases and in those with monthly flare-ups and when standard therapeutic options are inappropriate. This article serves as an update to hormonal pathogenesis of acne, discusses the basics of endocrinal evaluation for patients with suspected hormonal acne, and provides an overview of the current hormonal treatment options in women. PMID:27621661

  8. Hormonal treatment of acne vulgaris: an update.

    PubMed

    Elsaie, Mohamed L

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common skin condition associated with multiple factors. Although mostly presenting alone, it can likewise present with features of hyperandrogenism and hormonal discrepancies. Of note, hormonal therapies are indicated in severe, resistant-to-treatment cases and in those with monthly flare-ups and when standard therapeutic options are inappropriate. This article serves as an update to hormonal pathogenesis of acne, discusses the basics of endocrinal evaluation for patients with suspected hormonal acne, and provides an overview of the current hormonal treatment options in women. PMID:27621661

  9. Nootropic effect of meadowsweet (Filipendula vulgaris) extracts.

    PubMed

    Shilova, I V; Suslov, N I

    2015-03-01

    The effects of the extracts of the aboveground parts of Filipendula vulgaris Moench on the behavior and memory of mice after hypoxic injury and their physical performance in the open-field test were studied using the models of hypoxia in a sealed volume, conditioned passive avoidance response (CPAR), and forced swimming with a load. The extracts improved animal resistance to hypoxia, normalized orientation and exploration activities, promoted CPAR retention after hypoxic injury, and increased physical performance. Aqueous extract of meadowsweet had the most pronounced effect that corresponded to the effect of the reference drug piracetam. These effects were probably caused by modulation of hippocampal activity. PMID:25778665

  10. Optimization of liquid media and biosafety assessment for algae-lysing bacterium NP23.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chunli; Liu, Xiaobo; Shan, Linna

    2014-09-01

    To control algal bloom caused by nutrient pollution, a wild-type algae-lysing bacterium was isolated from the Baiguishan reservoir in Henan province of China and identified as Enterobacter sp. strain NP23. Algal culture medium was optimized by applying a Placket-Burman design to obtain a high cell concentration of NP23. Three minerals (i.e., 0.6% KNO3, 0.001% MnSO4·H2O, and 0.3% K2HPO4) were found to be independent factors critical for obtaining the highest cell concentration of 10(13) CFU/mL, which was 10(4) times that of the control. In the algae-lysing experiment, the strain exhibited a high lysis rate for the 4 algae test species, namely, Chlorella vulgari, Scenedesmus, Microcystis wesenbergii, and Chlorella pyrenoidosa. Acute toxicity and mutagenicity tests showed that the bacterium NP23 had no toxic and mutagenic effects on fish, even in large doses such as 10(7) or 10(9) CFU/mL. Thus, Enterobacter sp. strain NP23 has strong potential application in the microbial algae-lysing project. PMID:25188453

  11. Oxidative Stress in Patients With Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Arican, Ozer; Belge Kurutas, Ergul; Sasmaz, Sezai

    2005-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is one of the common dermatological diseases and its pathogenesis is multifactorial. In this study, we aim to determine the effects of oxidative stress in acne vulgaris. Forty-three consecutive acne patients and 46 controls were enrolled. The parameters of oxidative stress such as catalase (CAT), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and malondialdehyde (MDA) in the venous blood of cases were measured spectrophotometrically. The values compared with control group, the relation between the severity and distribution of acne, and the correlation of each enzyme level were researched. CAT and G6PD levels in patients were found to be statistically decreased, and SOD and MDA levels were found to be statistically increased (P < .001). However, any statistical difference and correlation could not be found between the severity and distribution of lesions and the mean levels of enzymes. In addition, we found that each enzyme is correlated with one another. Our findings show that oxidative stress exists in the acne patients. It will be useful to apply at least one antioxidant featured drug along with the combined acne treatment. PMID:16489259

  12. Dissolved Organic Matter Enhances Hg Bioavailability to a Hg-Methylating Bacterium Under Mildly Sulfidic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, A. M.; Gilmour, C. C.

    2011-12-01

    Field studies have demonstrated a strong linkage between dissolved organic matter (DOM) quantity and quality and in-situ methylmercury (MeHg) production. The biogeochemical basis for these field observations is unknown however. Here, we investigate the roles of DOM and sulfide in controlling Hg bioavailability to the Hg-methylating bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 in short-term washed cell assays. At environmentally relevant Hg/DOM ratios (2-4300 ng Hg/mg DOM), MeHg production increased linearly with increasing Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA) concentration, even in the presence of sulfide concentrations (5-10 μM) sufficient to outcompete SRHA for inorganic Hg. The DOM-dependent enhancement in Hg-methylation cannot be attributed to an enhancement of ND132 metabolic activity or alteration of Hg sorption to cells or bottle walls. Equilibrium speciation calculations indicated that cell suspensions were supersaturated with respect to metacinnabar (β-HgS(s)) and that Hg-DOM thiol complexes were relatively minor species. Notably, SRHA addition had no effect on Hg methylation in solutions where Hg-cysteine species predominated and β-HgS(s) precipitation was not predicted. We hypothesize that DOM enhances Hg-methylation by stabilizing HgS(s) colloids or nanoparticles against aggregation and/or by reducing the crystallinty of HgS(s) particles, and that such HgS(s) colloids are bioavailable to Hg-methylating bacteria. Ongoing work in the laboratory is evaluating the role of DOM character (size, aromaticity, reduced S content, etc.) in controlling the extent of the enhancement in MeHg production. These findings highlight the limits of equilibrium speciation approaches to predicting Hg bioavailability to methylating bacteria given the demonstrated significance of Hg-DOM-sulfide interactions in the anoxic environments where methylation occurs. Our laboratory experiments provide additional insight into the role that DOM plays in determining spatial and temporal

  13. Temperature and its control of isotope fractionation by a sulfate-reducing bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canfield, Donald E.; Olesen, Claus A.; Cox, Raymond P.

    2006-02-01

    A synthesis of previous results, which we dub the "standard model," provides a prediction as to how isotope fractionation during sulfate reduction should respond to physiological variables such as specific rate of sulfate reduction and environmental variables such as substrate availability and temperature. The standard model suggests that isotope fractionation should decrease with increasing specific rates of sulfate reduction (rate per cell). Furthermore, the standard model predicts that low fractionations should be found at both high and low temperatures whereas the highest fractionations should be found in the intermediate temperature range. These fractionation trends are controlled, as a function of temperature, by the balance between the transfer rates of sulfate into and out of the cell and the exchange between the sulfur pools internal to the organism. We test this standard model by conducting experiments on the growth physiology and isotope fractionation, as a function of temperature, by the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (DSMZ 642). Our results contrast with the "standard model" by showing a positive correlation between specific rates of sulfate reduction and fractionation. Also by contrast with the standard model, we found the highest fractionations at low and high temperatures and the lowest fractionations in the intermediate temperature range. We develop a fractionation model which can be used to explain both our results as well as the results of the "standard model." Differences in fractionation with temperature relate to differences in the specific temperature response of internal enzyme kinetics as well as the exchange rates of sulfate in and out of the cell. It is expected that the kinetics of these processes will show strain-specific differences.

  14. Acetogenesis from dichloromethane by a two-component mixed culture comprising a novel bacterium.

    PubMed

    Magli, A; Rainey, F A; Leisinger, T

    1995-08-01

    A strictly anaerobic two-component culture able to grow exponentially with a doubling time of 20 h on a medium containing dichloromethane as the carbon and energy source was characterized. On a medium without sulfate, we observed (per mol of dichloromethane) a mass balance of 2 mol of chloride, 0.26 mol of acetate, 0.05 mol of formate, and 0.25 mol of carbon in biomass. One component of the culture, strain DMB, was identified by a 16S ribosomal DNA analysis as a Desulfovibrio sp. The other component, the gram-positive organism strain DMC, could not be isolated. It was possible, however, to associate strain DMC on a medium containing dichloromethane in a coculture with Acetobacterium woodii or Methanospirillum hungatei. Coculture of strain DMC with the Archaeon M. hungatei allowed us to specifically amplify by PCR the 16S rRNA gene of strain DMC. A phylogenetic analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA sequence revealed that this organism groups within the radiation of the Clostridium-Bacillus subphylum and exhibits the highest levels of sequence similarity (89%) with Desulfotomaculum orientis and Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans. Since the novel organism strain DMC was able to grow acetogenically with dichloromethane when it was associated with one of three metabolically different partners and since, in contrast to strain DMB, strain DMC contained carbon monoxide dehydrogenase activity, this bacterium is responsible for both the dehalogenation of dichloromethane and the acetogenesis observed in the original two-component culture. The obligatory dependence of strain DMC on a partner during growth with dichloromethane is thought to stem from the need for a growth factor produced by the associated organism. PMID:16535097

  15. Temperature effects on the fractionation of multiple sulfur isotopes by Thermodesulfobacterium and Desulfovibrio strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Sun, C.; Ono, S.; Lin, L.

    2012-12-01

    Microbial dissimilatory sulfate reduction is one of the major mechanisms driving anaerobic mineralization of organic matter in global ocean. While sulfate-reducing prokaryotes are well known to fractionate sulfur isotopes during dissimilatory sulfate reduction, unraveling the isotopic compositions of sulfur-bearing minerals preserved in sedimentary records could provide invaluable constraints on the evolution of seawater chemistry and metabolic pathways. Variations in the sulfur isotope fractionations are partly due to inherent differences among species and also affected by environmental conditions. The isotope fractionations caused by microbial sulfate reduction have been interpreted to be a sequence of enzyme-catalyzed isotope fractionation steps. Therefore, the fractionation factor depends on (1) the sulfate flux into and out of the cell, and (2) the flux of sulfur transformation between the internal pools. Whether the multiple sulfur isotope effect could be quantitatively predicted using such a metabolic flux model would provide insights into the cellular machinery catalyzing with sulfate reduction. This study examined the multiple sulfur isotope fractionation patterns associated with a thermophilic Thermodesulfobacterium-related strain and a mesophilic Desulfovibrio gigas over a wide temperature range. The Thermodesulfobacterium-related strain grew between 34 and 79°C with an optimal temperature at 72°C and the highest cell-specific sulfate reduction rate at 77°C. The 34ɛ values ranged between 8.2 and 31.6‰ with a maximum at 68°C. The D. gigas grew between 10 and 45 °C with an optimal temperature at 30°C and the highest cell-specific sulfate reduction rate at 41°C. The 34ɛ values ranged between 10.3 and 29.7‰ with higher magnitude at both lower and higher temperatures. The results of multiple sulfur isotope measurements expand the previously reported range and cannot be described by a solution field of the metabolic flux model, which calculates

  16. Adaptive evolution of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 for developing resistance to perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta-Kolte, M. G.; Youngblut, M.; Redford, S.; Gregoire, P.; Carlson, H. K.; Coates, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Due to its toxic, explosive, and corrosive nature, inadvertent biological H2S production by sulfate reducing microorganisms (SRM) poses significant health and industrial operational risks. Anthropogenic sources are dominated by the oil industry where H2S in reservoir gases and fluids has an associated annual cost estimated at $90 billion globally. Our previous studies have identified perchlorate (ClO4-) as a selective and potent inhibitor of SRM in pure culture and complex microbial ecosystems. However, constant addition of inhibitors like perchlorate to natural ecosystems may result in a new adaptive selective pressure on SRM populations. With this in mind we investigated the ability of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20, a model oil reservoir SRM, to adapt to perchlorate and develop a resistance. Serial transfers of three parallel cultures with increasing concentrations of perchlorate up to 100 mM were generated and compared to wild-type strains that were transferred for same number of generations in absence of perchlorate. Genome sequencing revealed that all three adapted strains had single non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the same gene, Dde_2265, the sulfate adenylytransferase (ATP sulfurylase (ATPS)) (EC 2.7.7.4). ATPS catalyzes the first committed step in sulfate reduction and is essential in all SRM. IC50s against growth for these evolved strains demonstrated a three-fold increased resistance to perchlorate compared to wild-type controls. These evolved strains also had 5x higher transcriptional abundance of Dde_2265 compared to the wild-type strain. Biochemical characterization of the purified ATPS enzyme from both wild-type and the evolved strain showed that the mutant ATPS from the evolved strain was resistant to perchlorate inhibition of ATP turnover with a KI for perchlorate that was 3x greater relative to the wild-type ATPS. These results demonstrate that a single-base pair mutation in ATPS can have a significant impact on developing

  17. Effects of trifluoromethyl ketones on the motility of Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Wolfart, Krisztina; Molnar, Annamaria; Kawase, Masami; Motohashi, Noboru; Molnar, Joseph

    2004-09-01

    In the present study, we showed the inhibition of motility by trifluoromethyl ketone (TF) derivatives (1-8) in Proteus vulgaris (P. vulgaris) cultures. Among them, 1-(2-benzoxazoyl)-3,3,3-trifluoro-2-propanone (1) showed a much stronger inhibitory effect on the motility of P. vulgaris than other TF compounds at 10% MIC. Our results suggest the possibility of an inhibitory action of TF compounds on the proton motive forces by affecting the action of biological motor and proton efflux in the membranes, resulting in a reduction of the ratio of running and the increased number of tumbling and non-motile cells. PMID:15340240

  18. Aqueous extract of dried fruit of Berberis vulgaris L. in acne vulgaris, a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Fouladi, Rohollah F

    2012-12-01

    Berberis vulgaris L. (barberry) is a very well-known herb in traditional medicine. Apart from its anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties, the antilipogenic effect of barberry on the sebaceous glands in animals may further suggest it could be employed as an anti-acne agent. This study examined the effect of oral aqueous extract of barberry on acne vulgaris. Adolescents aged 12-17 years with moderate to severe acne vulgaris were randomly given oral gelatin capsules containing either aqueous extract of dried barberry (600 mg daily for 4 weeks, n = 25) or placebo (n = 24). Counts of facial noninflamed, inflamed, and total acne lesions, as well as the Michaelson's acne severity score were documented at baseline and at weeks 2 and 4. Both groups were comparable in terms of the patients' characteristics and baseline variables. After 4 weeks, the mean number of noninflamed, inflamed, and total lesions as well as mean Michaelson's acne severity score declined significantly by 43.25 ± 10.88% (median: 42.11%), 44.53 ± 11.78% (median: 45.45%), 44.64 ± 8.46% (median: 46.15%), and 44.38 ± 8.25% (median: 44.07%), respectively, among the extract receivers (p <.001 for all the changes). Similar changes were not significant in the placebo group. No notable complication or side effect was reported in relation to barberry. In conclusion, oral aqueous extract of dried barberry is a safe, well-tolerated, and effective choice in teenagers with moderate to severe acne vulgaris. PMID:23038982

  19. Accumulation of intra-cellular polyphosphate in Chlorella vulgaris cells is related to indole-3-acetic acid produced by Azospirillum brasilense.

    PubMed

    Meza, Beatriz; de-Bashan, Luz E; Hernandez, Juan-Pablo; Bashan, Yoav

    2015-06-01

    Accumulation of intra-cellular phosphate, as polyphosphate, was measured when the microalga Chlorella vulgaris was immobilized in alginate with either of two wild-type strains of the microalgae growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense or their corresponding IAA-attenuated mutants. Wild type strains of A. brasilense induced higher amounts of intra-cellular phosphate in Chlorella than their respective mutants. Calculations comparing intra-cellular phosphate accumulation by culture or net accumulation by the cell and the amount of IAA that was produced by each of these strains revealed that higher IAA was linked to higher accumulations of intra-cellular phosphate. Application of four levels of exogenous IAA reported for A. brasilense and their IAA-attenuated mutants to cultures of C. vulgaris enhanced accumulation of intra-cellular phosphate; the higher the content of IAA per culture or per single cell, the higher was the amount of accumulated phosphate. When an IAA-attenuated mutant was complemented with exogenous IAA, accumulation of intra-cellular phosphate at the culture level was even higher than phosphate accumulation with the respective wild type strains. When calculating the net accumulation of intra-cellular phosphate in the complementation experiment, net intra-cellular phosphate induced by the IAA-attenuated mutant was completely restored and was similar to the wild strains. We propose that IAA produced by A. brasilense is linked to polyphosphate accumulation in C. vulgaris. PMID:25797155

  20. Proteomic profiling of Beta vulgaris leaves during rhizomania compatible interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizomania severely impacts sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris) production throughout the world, and is widely prevalent in most sugarbeet growing regions. Initial efforts to characterize proteome changes focused primarily on identifying putative host factors that elicit resistant interactions with Beet Necr...

  1. CULTURING AND ECOLOGY STUDIES OF THE ROTIFER, 'POLYARTHRA VULGARIS'

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents research conducted to identify variables which affect the survival and reproduction of the rotifer, Polyarthra vulgaris. The following variables were studied: handling stress, container size, frequency of changing the culture medium, light quantity and quality...

  2. Lupus vulgaris in a young girl.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Tarang; Varshney, Anupam; Bakshi, S K

    2013-01-01

    With the estimated global burden of TB being 8.8 million incident cases and 1.1 million deaths from TB in HIV-negative cases and additional 0.35 million deaths in HIV-associated cases,1 the total number of cutaneous TB cases ( < 1-2 % of total cases) becomes significant. With the WHO setting up public-private mix partnerships and a millenium development goal of a 50% reduction in the total number of incident cases, the case detection and reporting of unusual cutaneous TB cases becomes very important. We present a case of lupus vulgaris in a young girl with rapid progression of a large plaque with hypertrophic features in the periphery. The case is unusual due to its rapid progression, unusual site and extensive giant form which have never been reported previously. PMID:24060723

  3. Pemphigus vulgaris: a multidisciplinary approach to management.

    PubMed

    Vinall, Christopher; Stevens, Lucy; McArdle, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a rare but potentially life-threatening autoimmune disease affecting the mucosa and the skin. The disease is caused by circulating antibodies to desmosomes (important adhesion proteins linking cells together). Disruption of these intercellular connections results in a loss of cohesion between cells (acantholysis). The clinical result of this process is the development of multiple blisters that easily rupture, leaving behind painful sloughing eroded areas of mucosa and/or skin. We report a case of severe PV in a 56-year-old man presenting with widespread, painful, eroded mucocutaneous lesions. The severity of the disease demanded a range of medical and surgical specialties to successfully manage the problem. This paper highlights the importance of an early multidisciplinary team approach to improve the outcome of patients suffering with this disease. PMID:24343801

  4. Plastid transformation in sugar beet: Beta vulgaris.

    PubMed

    De Marchis, Francesca; Bellucci, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplast biotechnology has assumed great importance in the past 20 years and, thanks to the numerous advantages as compared to conventional transgenic technologies, has been applied in an increasing number of plant species but still very much limited. Hence, it is of utmost importance to extend the range of species in which plastid transformation can be applied. Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) is an important industrial crop of the temperate zone in which chloroplast DNA is not transmitted trough pollen. Transformation of the sugar beet genome is performed in several research laboratories; conversely sugar beet plastome genetic transformation is far away from being considered a routine technique. We describe here a method to obtain transplastomic sugar beet plants trough biolistic transformation. The availability of sugar beet transplastomic plants should avoid the risk of gene flow between these cultivated genetic modified sugar beet plants and the wild-type plants or relative wild species. PMID:24599867

  5. Role of olfaction in Octopus vulgaris reproduction.

    PubMed

    Polese, Gianluca; Bertapelle, Carla; Di Cosmo, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The olfactory system in any animal is the primary sensory system that responds to chemical stimuli emanating from a distant source. In aquatic animals "Odours" are molecules in solution that guide them to locate food, partners, nesting sites, and dangers to avoid. Fish, crustaceans and aquatic molluscs possess sensory systems that have anatomical similarities to the olfactory systems of land-based animals. Molluscs are a large group of aquatic and terrestrial animals that rely heavily on chemical communication with a generally dispersed sense of touch and chemical sensitivity. Cephalopods, the smallest class among extant marine molluscs, are predators with high visual capability and well developed vestibular, auditory, and tactile systems. Nevertheless they possess a well developed olfactory organ, but to date almost nothing is known about the mechanisms, functions and modulation of this chemosensory structure in octopods. Cephalopod brains are the largest of all invertebrate brains and across molluscs show the highest degree of centralization. The reproductive behaviour of Octopus vulgaris is under the control of a complex set of signal molecules such as neuropeptides, neurotransmitters and sex steroids that guide the behaviour from the level of individuals in evaluating mates, to stimulating or deterring copulation, to sperm-egg chemical signalling that promotes fertilization. These signals are intercepted by the olfactory organs and integrated in the olfactory lobes in the central nervous system. In this context we propose a model in which the olfactory organ and the olfactory lobe of O. vulgaris could represent the on-off switch between food intake and reproduction. PMID:25449183

  6. Use of tazarotene foam for the treatment of acne vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Gregoriou, Stamatis; Kritsotaki, Eleftheria; Katoulis, Alexandros; Rigopoulos, Dimitris

    2014-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common inflammatory chronic disease of the pilosebaceous unit. It often requires long-term treatment, resulting in increased demand for topical medications that are popular with patients in order to achieve long-term compliance. Tazarotene foam 0.1% is a novel formulation of tazarotene. We review efficacy and tolerability studies of the new formulation, and suggest a possible place for the product in the management of acne vulgaris. PMID:24920932

  7. Chlorella vulgaris: A Multifunctional Dietary Supplement with Diverse Medicinal Properties.

    PubMed

    Panahi, Yunes; Darvishi, Behrad; Jowzi, Narges; Beiraghdar, Fatemeh; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2016-01-01

    Chlorella vulgaris is a green unicellular microalgae with biological and pharmacological properties important for human health. C. vulgaris has a long history of use as a food source and contains a unique and diverse composition of functional macro- and micro-nutrients including proteinsChlorella vulgaris is a green unicellular microalgae with biological and pharmacological properties important for human health. C. vulgaris has a long history of use as a food source and contains a unique and diverse composition of functional macro- and micro-nutrients including proteins, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, polysaccharides, vitamins and minerals. Clinical trials have suggested that supplementation with C. vulgaris can ameliorate amelioration hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia, and protect against oxidative stress, cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In this review, we summarize the findings on the health benefits of Chlorella supplementation and the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects., omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, polysaccharides, vitamins and minerals. Clinical trials have suggested that supplementation with C. vulgaris can ameliorate amelioration hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia, and protect against oxidative stress, cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In this review, we summarize the findings on the health benefits of Chlorella supplementation and the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects. PMID:26561078

  8. Slow formation of [3Fe-4S](1+) clusters in mutant forms of Desulfovibrio africanus ferredoxin III.

    PubMed

    Hannan, J P; Busch, J L; James, R; Thomson, A J; Moore, G R; Davy, S L

    2000-02-25

    Desulfovibrio africanus ferredoxin III (Da FdIII) readily interconverts between a 7Fe and an 8Fe form with Asp-14 believed to provide a cluster ligand in the latter form. To investigate the factors important for cluster interconversion in Fe/S cluster-containing proteins we have studied two variants of Da FdIII produced by site-directed mutagenesis, Asp14Glu and Asp14His, with cluster incorporation performed in vitro. Characterisation of these proteins by UV/visible, EPR and (1)H NMR spectroscopies revealed that the formation of the stable 7Fe form of these proteins takes some time to occur. Evidence is presented which indicates the [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster is incorporated prior to the [3Fe-4S](1+) cluster. PMID:10692579

  9. Desulfovibrio desulfuricans PglB homolog possesses oligosaccharyltransferase activity with relaxed glycan specificity and distinct protein acceptor sequence requirements.

    PubMed

    Ielmini, Maria V; Feldman, Mario F

    2011-06-01

    Oligosaccharyltransferases (OTases) are responsible for the transfer of carbohydrates from lipid carriers to acceptor proteins and are present in all domains of life. In bacteria, the most studied member of this family is PglB from Campylobacter jejuni (PglB(Cj)). This enzyme is functional in Escherichia coli and, contrary to its eukaryotic counterparts, has the ability to transfer a variety of oligo- and polysaccharides to protein carriers in vivo. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that in the delta proteobacteria Desulfovibrio sp., the PglB homolog is more closely related to eukaryotic and archaeal OTases than to its Campylobacter counterparts. Genetic analysis revealed the presence of a putative operon that might encode all enzymes required for N-glycosylation in Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. D. desulfuricans PglB (PglB(Dd)) was cloned and successfully expressed in E. coli, and its activity was confirmed by transferring the C. jejuni heptasaccharide onto the model protein acceptor AcrA. In contrast to PglB(Cj), which adds two glycan chains to AcrA, a single oligosaccharide was attached to the protein by PglB(Dd). Site-directed mutagenesis of the five putative N-X-S/T glycosylation sites in AcrA and mass spectrometry analysis showed that PglB(Dd) does not recognize the "conventional bacterial glycosylation sequon" consisting of the sequence D/E-X(1)-N-X(2)-S/T (where X(1) and X(2) are any amino acid except proline), and instead used a different site for the attachment of the oligosaccharide than PglB(Cj.). Furthermore, PglB(Dd) exhibited relaxed glycan specificity, being able to transfer mono- and polysaccharides to AcrA. Our analysis constitutes the first characterization of an OTase from delta-proteobacteria involved in N-linked protein glycosylation. PMID:21098514

  10. Novel Waddlia Intracellular Bacterium in Artibeus intermedius Fruit Bats, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Pierlé, Sebastián Aguilar; Morales, Cirani Obregón; Martínez, Leonardo Perea; Ceballos, Nidia Aréchiga; Rivero, Juan José Pérez; Díaz, Osvaldo López; Brayton, Kelly A.

    2015-01-01

    An intracellular bacterium was isolated from fruit bats (Artibeus intermedius) in Cocoyoc, Mexico. The bacterium caused severe lesions in the lungs and spleens of bats and intracytoplasmic vacuoles in cell cultures. Sequence analyses showed it is related to Waddlia spp. (order Chlamydiales). We propose to call this bacterium Waddlia cocoyoc. PMID:26583968

  11. Novel Waddlia Intracellular Bacterium in Artibeus intermedius Fruit Bats, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Pierlé, Sebastián Aguilar; Morales, Cirani Obregón; Martínez, Leonardo Perea; Ceballos, Nidia Aréchiga; Rivero, Juan José Pérez; Díaz, Osvaldo López; Brayton, Kelly A; Setién, Alvaro Aguilar

    2015-12-01

    An intracellular bacterium was isolated from fruit bats (Artibeus intermedius) in Cocoyoc, Mexico. The bacterium caused severe lesions in the lungs and spleens of bats and intracytoplasmic vacuoles in cell cultures. Sequence analyses showed it is related to Waddlia spp. (order Chlamydiales). We propose to call this bacterium Waddlia cocoyoc. PMID:26583968

  12. The epidemiology of acne vulgaris in late adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Lynn, Darren D; Umari, Tamara; Dunnick, Cory A; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    Importance Acne vulgaris is the most common skin condition affecting late adolescents across the globe. Although prior studies have evaluated epidemiologic patterns of acne vulgaris in various ethnicities and regions, adequate understanding of the worldwide burden of the disease associated with patients in their late adolescence (15–19-year olds) remains lacking. Objective To assess the global burden of the disease associated with acne vulgaris for late adolescents (15–19-year olds) and provide an overview of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and treatment options for acne in this population. Design Database summary study. Setting Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 database. Participants Global Burden of Disease regions comprised countries with prevalence of acne vulgaris between the ages of 15 and 19 years. Main outcomes and measures Geographic region-level disability-adjusted life year rates (per 100,000 persons) associated with acne vulgaris in years 1990 through 2010. Median percentage change in disability-adjusted life year rates was estimated for each region across the specified study period. Conclusion and relevance Acne vulgaris-associated disease burden exhibits global distribution and has continued to grow in prevalence over time within this population. This continued growth suggests an unmet dermatologic need worldwide for this disorder and potential opportunities for improved access and delivery of dermatologic care. Our analysis of the literature reveals numerous opportunities for enhanced patient care. To that end, we highlight some of the effective and promising treatments currently available and address important factors, such as sex, nationality, genetics, pathophysiology, and diet, as they relate to acne vulgaris in late adolescence. PMID:26955297

  13. Isolation and algicidal characterization of Bowmanella denitrificans S088 against Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiao; Ren, Chunhua; Hu, Chaoqun; Zhao, Zhe

    2014-02-01

    One strain of algicidal bacterium, named as S088, was isolated from the intestine of healthy sea cucumbers (Stichopus horrens) in the South China Sea. Based on the analysis of its biochemical characteristics and 16S rDNA gene sequence, S088 was identified as Bowmanella denitrificans. Importantly, the algicidal activity of S088 on Chlorella vulgaris was characterized in this study. The initial densities of bacterial and algal cell showed strong influence on the removal rates of chlorophyll a. When the strain S088 was cultured under a complete darkness condition at 30 °C, its algicidal activity reached the highest level. Furthermore, it was found that the filtered supernatant from bacterial cultures had full algicidal activity, suggesting that the secreted compounds from S088 are involved in the observed algicidal action of S088. Moreover, the algicidal compounds were heat tolerant and had no cytotoxicity against fish cells, indicating that S088 would have a promising application as a safe probiotics for S. horrens. Finally, this is the first report about the algicidal activities in B. denitrificans. PMID:24030170

  14. Improved Methodology for Bioremoval of Black Crusts on Historical Stone Artworks by Use of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Cappitelli, Francesca; Zanardini, Elisabetta; Ranalli, Giancarlo; Mello, Emilio; Daffonchio, Daniele; Sorlini, Claudia

    2006-01-01

    An improved methodology to remove black crusts from stone by using Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris ATCC 29579, a sulfate-reducing bacterium, is presented. The strain removed 98% of the sulfates of the crust in a 45-h treatment. Precipitation of black iron sulfide was avoided using filtration of a medium devoid of iron. Among three cell carriers, Carbogel proved to be superior to both sepiolite and Hydrobiogel-97, as it allowed an easy application of the bacteria, kept the system in a state where microbial activity was maintained, and allowed easy removal of the cells after the treatment. PMID:16672524

  15. Effects of Ag and Cu ions on the microbial corrosion of 316L stainless steel in the presence of Desulfovibrio sp.

    PubMed

    Unsal, Tuba; Ilhan-Sungur, Esra; Arkan, Simge; Cansever, Nurhan

    2016-08-01

    The utilization of Ag and Cu ions to prevent both microbial corrosion and biofilm formation has recently increased. The emphasis of this study lies on the effects of Ag and Cu ions on the microbial corrosion of 316L stainless steel (SS) induced by Desulfovibrio sp. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization were used to analyze the corrosion behavior. The biofilm formation, corrosion products and Ag and Cu ions on the surfaces were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) and elemental mapping. Through circuit modeling, EIS results were used to interpret the physicoelectric interactions between the electrode, biofilm and culture interfaces. EIS results indicated that the metabolic activity of Desulfovibrio sp. accelerated the corrosion rate of SS in both conditions with and without ions. However, due to the retardation in the growth of Desulfovibrio sp. in the presence of Ag and Cu ions, significant decrease in corrosion rate was observed in the culture with the ions. In addition, SEM and EIS analyses revealed that the presence of the ions leads to the formation on the SS of a biofilm with different structure and morphology. Elemental analysis with EDS detected mainly sulfide- and phosphorous-based corrosion products on the surfaces. PMID:27105168

  16. Pemphigus vulgaris: a case-based update.

    PubMed

    Ben Lagha, Nadia; Poulesquen, Vincent; Roujeau, Jean-Claude; Alantar, Alp; Maman, Louis

    2005-10-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an autoimmune disease accounting for 80% of all cases of pemphigus. Before the advent of corticosteroid therapy, pemphigus was fatal, with a mortality rate of up to 75% in the first year. It is still a serious disorder, but the 5% to 10% mortality rate is now primarily due to the side effects of therapy. In 75% to 80% of cases, PV lesions first appear in the oral cavity. Dentists are therefore in a unique position to recognize the oral manifestations of the disease, allowing early diagnosis and initiation of treatment. The diagnosis is based on pathological examination and immunofluorescence testing. Systemic corticosteriods and steroid-sparing agents are the mainstays of treatment; topical corticosteroids may also be used to accelerate healing of persistent oral lesions. This article describes a 71-year-old woman with multiple chronic ulcers in the oral cavity, in whom PV was diagnosed 4 months after the symptoms first appeared. The article also reviews the current literature on diagnosis and treatment of the condition. PMID:16271165

  17. Immunohistochemical study of desmosomes in acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Knaggs, H E; Hughes, B R; Morris, C; Wood, E J; Holland, D B; Cunliffe, W J

    1994-06-01

    Desmosomes contribute towards adhesion between adjacent keratinocytes. In acne vulgaris, increased intercellular adhesion is thought to contribute to the retention of keratinocytes within the follicular lumen during comedogenesis. Therefore, the distribution of different desmosomal components was investigated in normal and acne subjects. Biopsies were cryostat-sectioned (6 microns), and stained with antibodies to different desmosomal components: desmoplakin 1/2, desmoglein 1, desmocollin 3a/3b, and a late desmosomal antigen, G36-19. Desmoplakin 1/2, desmoglein 1 and desmocollin 3a/3b shared a similar distribution in follicles from control skin, from acne-affected skin, and in non-inflamed lesions. All three proteins were expressed around the periphery of keratinocytes of all the intrafollicular epidermis, except the basal lamina and the upper stratum corneum. In inflamed lesions, the expression of desmoglein 1 and desmocollin 3a/3b was diminished; in 12.5%, staining for these two proteins was completely abolished, and in 81.25% of the lesions investigated the staining was patchy. The antibody G36-19 bound to an antigen in the upper granular layer in the infundibular epidermis. No differences were noted in the staining pattern of the follicular epithelia of controls, non-inflamed, and inflamed lesions. This study, using monoclonal antibodies, did not identify any changes in the desmosomal components which might explain the increased adhesion between follicular keratinocytes during comedogenesis. PMID:8011498

  18. Topical and oral antibiotics for acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q

    2016-06-01

    Antibiotics, both oral and topical, have been an integral component of the management of acne vulgaris (AV) for approximately 6 decades. Originally thought to be effective for AV due to their ability to inhibit proliferation of Propionibacterium acnes, it is now believed that at least some antibiotics also exert anti-inflammatory effects that provide additional therapeutic benefit. To add, an increase in strains of P acnes and other exposed bacteria that are less sensitive to antibiotics used to treat AV have emerged, with resistance directly correlated geographically with the magnitude of antibiotic use. Although antibiotics still remain part of the therapeutic armamentarium for AV treatment, current recommendations support the following when used to treat AV: 1) monotherapy use should be avoided; 2) use benzoyl peroxide concomitantly to reduce emergence of resistant P acnes strains; 3) oral antibiotics should be used in combination with a topical regimen for moderate-to-severe inflammatory AV; and 4) use oral antibiotics over a limited duration to achieve control of inflammatory AV with an exit plan in place to discontinue their use as soon as possible. When selecting an oral antibiotic to treat AV, potential adverse effects are important to consider. PMID:27416309

  19. Acne vulgaris in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Schnopp, C; Mempel, M

    2011-08-01

    Acne vulgaris is a very common inflammatory skin disease originating from the pilosebaceous unit. Peak incidence is at puberty, but acne can affect all age groups. Prepubertal acne is rare, but important to recognize as diagnostic and therapeutic procedures differ from pubertal acne. Acne neonatorum is a mild, self-limiting disease, whereas acne infantum commonly presents with moderate to severe lesions and high risk of scarring thus requiring early intervention. Mid-childhood or prepubertal acne raises the suspicion of hyperandrogenemia, further investigations are indicated to rule out underlying disease. The same applies to any patient with very severe acne, acne not responding to therapy or unusual clinical presentation. Etiopathogenesis of acne is not yet fully understood. Familiy history is the most important risk factor to develop severe acne and scarring. The relevance of life style factors such as smoking or diet is controversial. Lately high carbohydrate diet and dairy products have been implicated as aggravating factors. Mild acne normally responds to topical monotherapy, in moderate disease combination of two synergistically acting substances (e.g. benzoyl peroxid plus antibiotic, benzoyl peroxid plus retinoid, retinoid plus antibiotic, benzoyl peroxid plus azelaic acid) will improve clinical response. Retinoids and/or benzoylperoxid have been shown to be effective in maintenance therapy. In patients with severe disease or high risk of scarring systemic therapy with antibiotics, oral contraceptives with antiandrogenic properties and in particularly isotretinoin as most effective acne treatment should be considered early to avoid physical and emotional scars. PMID:21909065

  20. Metabolism of urea by Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Hodson, R C; Thompson, J F

    1969-05-01

    Urea metabolism was studied with nitrogen-starved cells of Chlorella vulgaris Beijerinck var. viridis (Chodat), a green alga which apparently lacks urease. Incorporation of radioactivity from urea-(14)C into the alcohol-soluble fraction was virtually eliminated in cell suspensions flushed with 10% CO(2) in air. This same result was obtained when expected acceptors of urea carbon were replenished by adding ornithine and glucose with the urea. Several carbamyl compounds, which might be early products of urea metabolism and a source of the (14)CO(2), were not appreciably labeled. If cells were treated with cyanide at a concentration which inhibited ammonia uptake completely and urea uptake only slightly, more than half of the urea nitrogen taken up was found in the medium as ammonia. Cells under nitrogen gas in the dark were unable to take up urea or ammonia, but the normal rate of uptake was resumed in light. Since 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea did not selectively inhibit this uptake, an active respiration supported by light-dependent oxygen evolution in these cells was ruled out. A tentative scheme for urea metabolism is proposed to consist of an initial energy-dependent splitting of urea into carbon dioxide and ammonia. This reaction in Chlorella is thought to differ from a typical urease-catalyzed reaction by the apparent requirement of a high energy compound, possibly adenosine triphosphate. PMID:5783973

  1. Novel therapies for pemphigus vulgaris: an overview.

    PubMed

    Perez, Oliver A; Patton, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Pemphigus comprises a group of autoimmune, mucocutaneous blistering disorders. Its principal cause may be a group of antibodies directed against proteins present on the surface of keratinocytes that provide mechanical structure to the epidermis. In the case of pemphigus vulgaris, the characteristic blistering noted just above the basal layer may be triggered by autoantibodies directed against desmoglein 3 (Dsg3). The process by which the binding of these antibodies leads to acantholysis, apoptosis and eventual loss of epidermal function is not completely understood. Current therapies are primarily directed against the formation of these antibodies by suppression of the immune system, and are associated with significant adverse events. As our understanding of the pathophysiology of pemphigus increases, newer therapies have been proposed and evaluated. These novel therapies include intravenous immunoglobulin, plasmapheresis, immunoadsorption, extracorporeal photochemotherapy, biological agents, as well as experimental therapies such as cholinergic receptor agonists, Dsg3 peptides and a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor. Current limitations to the widespread use of these therapies include cost, a lack of consistent data regarding their benefit, limited availability, and the experimental nature of some of the treatments. This review highlights the latest case reports and studies that employ established as well as new therapeutics in a novel way to treat this rare, but serious, disorder. PMID:19761276

  2. Timely recognition of pemphigus vulgaris by dental professionals.

    PubMed

    Fatahzadeh, Mahnaz

    2013-07-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris is a potentially fatal mucocutaneous, vesiculobullous disorder of autoimmune etiology. Regrettably, affected patients frequently experience considerable discomfort and diagnostic delay for months in spite of multiple clinician contacts. The high likelihood of disease manifestations in the oral cavity and serious nature of potential oral and systemic complications mandates dental professionals to recognize early oral signs and symptoms of pemphigus vulgaris and contribute to timely diagnosis and medical intervention to prevent disease progression. This case report presents a young man with pemphigus vulgaris whose oral disease caused him significant suffering and spread to the skin before he was finally diagnosed 3 months after the onset. The signs and symptoms of the disease are reviewed and the potential role of dental providers in timely recognition and management is emphasized. PMID:23616980

  3. Removal and biodegradation of nonylphenol by immobilized Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Gao, Q T; Wong, Y S; Tam, N F Y

    2011-11-01

    The removal and biodegradation of nonylphenol (NP) by alginate-immobilized cells of Chlorella vulgaris were compared with their respective free cultures. The effects of four cell densities of 10(4) per algal bead were investigated, as were the four algal bead concentrations, with regard to the removal and biodegradation of NP. Although immobilization significantly decreased the growth rate and NP's biodegradation efficiency of C. vulgaris, NP removal over a short period was enhanced. The NP removal mechanism by immobilized cells was similar to that by free cells, including adsorption onto alginate matrix and algal cells, absorption within cells and cellular biodegradation. The optimal cell density and bead concentration for the removal and biodegradation of NP was 50-100×10(4) cells algal bead(-1) and 2-4 beads ml(-1) of wastewater, respectively. These results demonstrated that immobilized C. vulgaris cells under optimal biomass and photoautotrophic conditions are effective in removing NP from contaminated water. PMID:21944284

  4. Acne vulgaris: nutritional factors may be influencing psychological sequelae.

    PubMed

    Katzman, Martin; Logan, Alan C

    2007-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a distressing skin condition which can carry with it significant psychological disability. Patients with acne are more likely to experience anger and are at increased risk of depression, anxiety, suicidal ideation. Certain nutrients which have been implicated as influencing the pathophysiology of acne have also been identified as important mediators of human cognition, behavior and emotions. Zinc, folic acid, selenium, chromium and omega-3 fatty acids are all examples of nutrients which have been shown to influence depression, anger and/or anxiety. These same nutrients, along with systemic oxidative stress and an altered intestinal microflora have been implicated in acne vulgaris. It is our contention that certain nutritional factors, a weakened antioxidant defense system and altered intestinal microflora may interplay to increase the risk of psychological sequelae in acne vulgaris. PMID:17448607

  5. Radiation-induced pemphigus vulgaris of the breast.

    PubMed

    Vigna-Taglianti, R; Russi, E G; Denaro, N; Numico, G; Brizio, R

    2011-07-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris is a rare autoimmune mucocutaneous bullous disease. Patients with a history of pemphigus vulgaris - who need radiotherapy - may show a long lasting bullous cutaneous manifestation, typical of pemphigus, within radiation fields. The literature describes fewer than 20 radio-induced cases. While systematic corticosteroid therapy has proven to be useful, topical treatment used in association with corticosteroid therapy is rarely described. To our knowledge the use of modern dressing products has never been described. We report our experience in a case in which modern dressing products were usefully associated to systemic therapy. PMID:21511511

  6. Syntrophus aciditrophicus sp. nov., a new anaerobic bacterium that degrades fatty acids and benzoate in syntrophic association with hydrogen-using microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, B. E.; Bhupathiraju, V. K.; Tanner, R. S.; Woese, C. R.; McInerney, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    Strain SBT is a new, strictly anaerobic, gram-negative, nonmotile, non-sporeforming, rod-shaped bacterium that degrades benzoate and certain fatty acids in syntrophic association with hydrogen/formate-using microorganisms. Strain SBT produced approximately 3 mol of acetate and 0.6 mol of methane per mol of benzoate in coculture with Methanospirillum hungatei strain JF1. Saturated fatty acids, some unsaturated fatty acids, and methyl esters of butyrate and hexanoate also supported growth of strain SBT in coculture with Desulfovibrio strain G11. Strain SBT grew in pure culture with crotonate, producing acetate, butyrate, caproate, and hydrogen. The molar growth yield was 17 +/- 1 g cell dry mass per mol of crotonate. Strain SBT did not grow with fumarate, iron(III), polysulfide, or oxyanions of sulfur or nitrogen as electron acceptors with benzoate as the electron donor. The DNA base composition of strain SBT was 43.1 mol% G+C. Analysis of the 16 S rRNA gene sequence placed strain SBT in the delta-subdivision of the Proteobacteria, with sulfate-reducing bacteria. Strain SBT was most closely related to members of the genus Syntrophus. The clear phenotypic and genotypic differences between strain SBT and the two described species in the genus Syntrophus justify the formation of a new species, Syntrophus aciditrophicus.

  7. Desulfovibrio magneticus RS-1 contains an iron- and phosphorus-rich organelle distinct from its bullet-shaped magnetosomes

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Meghan E.; Ball, David A.; Guerquin-Kern, Jean-Luc; Rouiller, Isabelle; Wu, Ting-Di; Downing, Kenneth H.; Vali, Hojatollah; Komeili, Arash

    2010-01-01

    Intracellular magnetite crystal formation by magnetotactic bacteria has emerged as a powerful model for investigating the cellular and molecular mechanisms of biomineralization, a process common to all branches of life. Although magnetotactic bacteria are phylogenetically diverse and their crystals morphologically diverse, studies to date have focused on a few, closely related species with similar crystal habits. Here, we investigate the process of magnetite biomineralization in Desulfovibrio magneticus sp. RS-1, the only reported species of cultured magnetotactic bacteria that is outside of the α-Proteobacteria and that forms bullet-shaped crystals. Using a variety of high-resolution imaging and analytical tools, we show that RS-1 cells form amorphous, noncrystalline granules containing iron and phosphorus before forming magnetite crystals. Using NanoSIMS (dynamic secondary ion mass spectroscopy), we show that the iron-phosphorus granules and the magnetite crystals are likely formed through separate cellular processes. Analysis of the cellular ultrastructure of RS-1 using cryo-ultramicrotomy, cryo-electron tomography, and tomography of ultrathin sections reveals that the magnetite crystals are not surrounded by membranes but that the iron-phosphorus granules are surrounded by membranous compartments. The varied cellular paths for the formation of these two minerals lead us to suggest that the iron-phosphorus granules constitute a distinct bacterial organelle. PMID:20566879

  8. Anisotropy of Bullet-Shaped Magnetite Nanoparticles in the Magnetotactic Bacteria Desulfovibrio magneticus sp. Strain RS-1

    PubMed Central

    Chariaou, Michalis; Rahn-Lee, Lilah; Kind, Jessica; García-Rubio, Inés; Komeili, Arash; Gehring, Andreas U.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) build magnetic nanoparticles in chain configuration to generate a permanent dipole in their cells as a tool to sense the Earth’s magnetic field for navigation toward favorable habitats. The majority of known MTB align their nanoparticles along the magnetic easy axes so that the directions of the uniaxial symmetry and of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy coincide. Desulfovibrio magneticus sp. strain RS-1 forms bullet-shaped magnetite nanoparticles aligned along their (100) magnetocrystalline hard axis, a configuration energetically unfavorable for formation of strong dipoles. We used ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy to quantitatively determine the magnetocrystalline and uniaxial anisotropy fields of the magnetic assemblies as indicators for a cellular dipole with stable direction in strain RS-1. Experimental and simulated ferromagnetic resonance spectral data indicate that the negative effect of the configuration is balanced by the bullet-shaped morphology of the nanoparticles, which generates a pronounced uniaxial anisotropy field in each magnetosome. The quantitative comparison with anisotropy fields of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense, a model MTB with equidimensional magnetite particles aligned along their (111) magnetic easy axes in well-organized chain assemblies, shows that the effectiveness of the dipole is similar to that in RS-1. From a physical perspective, this could be a reason for the persistency of bullet-shaped magnetosomes during the evolutionary development of magnetotaxis in MTB. PMID:25762338

  9. Extrudability of four common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extrusion method has been used to cook different food materials by employing the combination of high temperature, pressure and shearing stresses. Effects of extrusion cooking on functional, physicochemical and nutritional properties of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) have been reported for years...

  10. Variation in Breeding Systems in Hypericum Perforatum and Prunella Vulgaris

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effective conservation of new crop germplasm and its efficient use in new-crop development both rely on a clear understanding of the crop's reproductive biology. Hypericum perforatum (St. John's wort) and Prunella vulgaris (Common selfheal) are two medicinal plant species with potential for crop...

  11. Gallium-67-citrate uptake in a case of acne vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Kipper, M.S.; Taylor, A.; Ashburn, W.L.

    1981-09-01

    A case of increased Ga-67 uptake in a patient with active acne vulgaris is reported. The scan was requested in a search for metastatic testicular carcinoma or bleomycin pulmonary toxicity. Careful clinical evaluation including physical examination was necessary in order to avoid an erroneous scan interpretation.

  12. POD DEVELOPMENT INCREASES THE OZONE SENSITIVITY OF PHASEOLUS VULGARIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to determine if the O3 sensitivity of Phaseolus vulgaris L. changed with plant development. Plants exposed to charcoal-filtered air or elevated O3 throughout the study were compared to those exposed only during the vegetative or reproductive s...

  13. A Phaseolus vulgaris diversity panel for Andean bean improvement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dry beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) of the Andean gene pool, including red mottled, kidney, cranberry, and yellow seed types are important in Africa and in the Americas. Andean dry bean breeding gains have lagged behind those of Mesoamerican beans. These differences may be due to a narrower genetic b...

  14. One case of pemphigus vulgaris observed in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Ishii, T; Furusawa, S; Iguti, Y; Kuno, T; Nishiyama, K; Yamamoto, K; Nitta, M; Hayashi, Y

    1996-01-01

    We report on a case of pemphigus vulgaris with lesions in the oral cavity as well as an outline of differential diagnosis and treatment. Changes in the pemphigus antibodies in blood assisted in judging the therapeutic effects along with the therapeutic course. PMID:8790766

  15. ICG laser therapy of acne vulgaris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuchin, Valery V.; Altshuler, Gregory B.; Genina, Elina A.; Bashkatov, Alexey N.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Odoevskaya, Olga D.; Yaroslavsky, Ilya V.

    2004-07-01

    The near-infrared (NIR) laser radiation due to its high penetration depth is widely used in phototherapy. In application to skin appendages a high selectivity of laser treatment is needed to prevent light action on surrounding tissues. Indocyanine Green (ICG) dye may provide a high selectivity of treatment due to effective ICG uploading by a target and its narrow band of considerable absorption just at the wavelength of the NIR diode laser. The goal of this study is to demonstrate the efficacy of the NIR diode laser phototherapy in combination with topical application of ICG suggested for soft and thermal treatment of acne vulgaris. 28 volunteers with facile or back-located acne were enrolled. Skin sites of subjects were stained by ICG and irradiated by NIR laser-diode light (803 or 809 nm). Untreated, only stained and only light irradiated skin areas served as controls. For soft acne treatment, the low-intensity (803 nm, 10 - 50 mW/cm2, 5-10 min) or the medium-intensity (809 nm, 150 - 190 mW/cm2, 15 min) protocols were used. The single and multiple (up to 8-9) treatments were provided. The individual acne lesions were photothermally treated at 18 W/cm2 (803 nm, 0.5 sec) without skin surface cooling or at 200 W/cm2 (809 nm, 0.5 sec) with cooling. The results of the observations during 1-2 months after the completion of the treatment have shown that only in the case of the multiple-wise treatment a combined action of ICG and NIR irradiation reduces inflammation and improves skin state during a month without any side effects. At high power densities (up to 200 W/cm2) ICG stained acne inflammatory elements were destructed for light exposures of 0.5 sec. Based on the concept that hair follicle, especially sebaceous gland, can be intensively and selectively stained by ICG due to dye diffusion through pilosebaceous canal and its fast uptake by living microorganisms, by vital keratinocytes of epithelium of the canal and sebaceous duct, and by rapidly proliferating

  16. Ratoon stunting disease of sugarcane: isolation of the causal bacterium.

    PubMed

    Davis, M J; Gillaspie, A G; Harris, R W; Lawson, R H

    1980-12-19

    A small coryneform bacterium was consistently isolated from sugarcane with ratoon stunting disease and shown to be the causal agent. A similar bacterium was isolated from Bermuda grass. Both strains multiplied in sugarcane and Bermuda grass, but the Bermuda grass strain did not incite the symptoms of ratoon stunting disease in sugarcane. Shoot growth in Bermuda grass was retarded by both strains. PMID:17817853

  17. Possible involvement of a L-delta 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) reductase in the synthesis of proline in Desulfovibrio desulfuricans Norway.

    PubMed

    Fons, M; Cami, B; Chippaux, M

    1991-09-16

    A L-delta 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase activity has been detected in crude extracts of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans Norway. This P5C reductase activity is also found when a 2.5 kb D. desulfuricans DNA fragment is introduced into an Escherichia coli proC mutant. Although it restores growth of the proC mutant, the ProDd enzyme might be detrimental to the E. coli host since the plasmid carrying the cognate proDd gene is segregated at high rate by the cells but is stabilized by small deletions which lead to a loss of the P5C reductase activity. PMID:1898390

  18. Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a diazotrophic bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Kanvinde, L.; Sastry, G.R.K. )

    1990-07-01

    This is the first report that Agrobacterium tumefaciens can fix nitrogen in a free-living condition as shown by its abilities to grown on nitrogen-free medium, reduce acetylene to ethylene, and incorporate {sup 15}N supplied as {sup 15}N{sub 2}. As with most other well-characterized diazotrophic bacteria, the presence of NH{sub 4}{sup +} in the medium and aerobic conditions repress nitrogen fixation by A. tumefaciens. The system requires molybdenum. No evidence for nodulation was found with pea, peanut, or soybean plants. Further understanding of the nitrogen-fixing ability of this bacterium, which has always been considered a pathogen, should cast new light on the evolution of a pathogenic versus symbiotic relationship.

  19. Comparative redox and pKa calculations on cytochrome c3 from several Desulfovibrio species using continuum electrostatic methods.

    PubMed

    Martel, P J; Soares, C M; Baptista, A M; Fuxreiter, M; Náray-Szabó, G; Louro, R O; Carrondo, M A

    1999-02-01

    A comparative study of the pH-dependent redox mechanisms of several members of the cytochrome c3 family has been carried out. In a previous work, the molecular determinants of this dependency (the so-called redox-Bohr effect) were investigated for one species using continuum electrostatic methods to find groups with a titrating range and strength of interaction compatible with a mediating role in the redox-Bohr effect. Here we clarify these aspects in the light of new and improved pKa calculations, our findings supporting the hypothesis of propionate D from heme I being the main effector in the pH-dependent modulation of the cytochrome c3 redox potentials in all the c3 molecules studied here. However, the weaker (but significant) role of other titrating groups cannot be excluded, their importance and identity changing with the particular molecule under study. We also calculate the relative redox potentials of the four heme centers among the selected members of the c3 family, using a continuum electrostatic method that takes into account both solvation and interaction effects. Comparison of the calculated values with available data for the microscopic redox potentials was undertaken, the quality of the agreement being dependent upon the choice of the dielectric constant for the protein interior. We find that high dielectric constants give best correlations, while low values result in better magnitudes for the calculated potentials. The possibility that the crystallographic calcium ion in c3 from Desulfovibrio gigas may be present in the solution structure was tested, and found to be likely. PMID:10499105

  20. The chemical formula of a magnetotactic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Naresh, Mohit; Das, Sayoni; Mishra, Prashant; Mittal, Aditya

    2012-05-01

    Elucidation of the chemical logic of life is one of the grand challenges in biology, and essential to the progress of the upcoming field of synthetic biology. Treatment of microbial cells explicitly as a "chemical" species in controlled reaction (growth) environments has allowed fascinating discoveries of elemental formulae of a few species that have guided the modern views on compositions of a living cell. Application of mass and energy balances on living cells has proved to be useful in modeling of bioengineering systems, particularly in deriving optimized media compositions for growing microorganisms to maximize yields of desired bio-derived products by regulating intra-cellular metabolic networks. In this work, application of elemental mass balance during growth of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense in bioreactors has resulted in the discovery of the chemical formula of the magnetotactic bacterium. By developing a stoichiometric equation characterizing the formation of a magnetotactic bacterial cell, coupled with rigorous experimental measurements and robust calculations, we report the elemental formula of M. gryphiswaldense cell as CH(2.06)O(0.13)N(0.28)Fe(1.74×10(-3)). Remarkably, we find that iron metabolism during growth of this magnetotactic bacterium is much more correlated individually with carbon and nitrogen, compared to carbon and nitrogen with each other, indicating that iron serves more as a nutrient during bacterial growth rather than just a mineral. Magnetotactic bacteria have not only invoked some interest in the field of astrobiology for the last two decades, but are also prokaryotes having the unique ability of synthesizing membrane bound intracellular organelles. Our findings on these unique prokaryotes are a strong addition to the limited repertoire, of elemental compositions of living cells, aimed at exploring the chemical logic of life. PMID:22170293

  1. The optimal hyperspectral quantitative models for chlorophyll-a of chlorella vulgaris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Qian; Wu, Xiuju

    2009-09-01

    Chlorophyll-a of Chlorella vulgaris had been related with spectrum. Based on hyperspectral measurement for Chlorella vulgaris, the hyperspectral characteristics of Chlorella vulgaris and their optimal hyperspectral quantitative models of chlorophyll-a (Chla) estimation were researched in situ experiment. The results showed that the optimal hyperspectral quantitative model of Chlorella vulgaris was Chla=180.5+1125787(R700)'+2.4 *109[(R700)']2 (P0<.01), and the suitability order of corresponding methods was spectral ratiovulgaris, two reflectance crests were around 540 nm and 700 nm and their locations moved right while Chl-a concentration increased. The reflectance of Chlorella vulgaris decreases with Cha concentration increase in 540 nm, but on the contrary in 700nm.

  2. Skin prick test results to artesunate in children sensitized to Artemisia vulgaris L.

    PubMed

    Mori, F; Pantano, S; Rossi, M E; Montagnani, C; Chiappini, E; Novembre, E; Galli, L; de Martino, M

    2015-09-01

    Artemisia vulgaris L and Artemisia annua L (Chinese: qinghao) are similar plants of the Asterbaceae family. Artesunate, a semi-synthetic derivate of artemisin which is the active principle extract of the plant qinghao, has antimalarial properties. Some cases of severe allergic reactions to artesunate have been described. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between positive skin tests to Artemisia vulgaris L allergen and a preparation of injectable artesunate. A total of 531 children were skin prick tested with inhalants (including Artemisia vulgaris L), foods, and artesunate. Among the 59 patients positive to Artemisia vulgaris L only one child was also positive to artesunate. No child was positive to artesunate in those negative to Artemisia vulgaris L. We conclude that Artemisia vulgaris L sensitization is not associated with sensitization to artesunate; consequently, skin test to artesunate should not be carried out before using the drug considering the rare allergic reactions. PMID:26157064

  3. Alexithymia and Acne Vulgaris: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Baykir, Murat; Ateş, Gülfem; Ekşioğlu, Meral

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess relationship between alexithymia and acne vulgaris in young people. Methods A hundred and eleven subjects between 15 and 25 years of age referred to out-patient clinic of dermatology with acne and 78 subjects applied to family physician for complaints other than acne were included in patient and control groups of the study, respectively. A questionnaire to determine demographic characteristics, an acne classification to determine severity of acne and Toronto Alexithymic Scale (TAS) to assess alexithymia were used. Results The mean scores of TAS were 52.7±10.8 and 51.7±10.7 in patient and control groups, respectively. Alexitymia was determined in 23.4% of the subjects in acne group and in 24.4% of control group. No significant differences were found between groups in terms of alexithymia, intermediate alexitymia and three-factors of TAS. Conclusion Alexithymia does not appear to be related to acne vulgaris. PMID:22216042

  4. Characterization of Iron Uptake from Ferrioxamine B by Chlorella vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Allnutt, F. C. Thomas; Bonner, Walter D.

    1987-01-01

    Iron uptake from two Fe3+-hydroxamate siderophores, ferrioxamine B and Fe3+-rhodotorulate, by iron-stressed Chlorella vulgaris (ATCC strain 11468) was evaluated with some comparison to iron uptake from synthetic and organic acid ferric chelates. Iron-stress induced iron uptake from ferrioxamine B. Dissipation of the electrochemical gradient, via uncouplers, inhibited iron uptake. Respiratory inhibitors gave variable results, an indication that a direct link to respiration was not apparent. Vanadate inhibition of iron uptake indicated that an ATPase or phosphate intermediate could be involved in the uptake mechanism. Divalent cations manifested variable effects dependent on the cation and chelator used. These data confirm that C. vulgaris has an inducible iron-uptake system for Fe3+-hydroxamic acid siderophores which may involve a different mechanism than that observed for other chelates. PMID:16665771

  5. Significance of diet in treated and untreated acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Kucharska, Alicja; Szmurło, Agnieszka; Sińska, Beata

    2016-04-01

    The relationship between diet and acne is highly controversial. Several studies during the last decade have led dermatologists to reflect on a potential link between diet and acne. This article presents the latest findings on a potential impact that diet can have on pathogenesis of acne vulgaris. The association between diet and acne can no longer be dismissed. Compelling evidence shows that high glycemic load diets may exacerbate acne. Dairy ingestion appears to be weakly associated with acne and the roles of omega-3 fatty acids, dietary fiber, antioxidants, vitamin A, zinc and iodine remain to be elucidated. The question of what the impact of diet is on the course of acne vulgaris still remains unclear. PMID:27279815

  6. Thymus vulgaris essential oil: chemical composition and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Borugă, O; Jianu, C; Mişcă, C; Goleţ, I; Gruia, A T; Horhat, F G

    2014-01-01

    The study was designed to determine the chemical composition and antimicrobial properties of the essential oil of Thymus vulgaris cultivated in Romania. The essential oil was isolated in a yield of 1.25% by steam distillation from the aerial part of the plant and subsequently analyzed by GC-MS. The major components were p-cymene (8.41%), γ-terpinene (30.90%) and thymol (47.59%). Its antimicrobial activity was evaluated on 7 common food-related bacteria and fungus by using the disk diffusion method. The results demonstrate that the Thymus vulgaris essential oil tested possesses strong antimicrobial properties, and may in the future represent a new source of natural antiseptics with applications in the pharmaceutical and food industry. PMID:25870697

  7. Significance of diet in treated and untreated acne vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Szmurło, Agnieszka; Sińska, Beata

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between diet and acne is highly controversial. Several studies during the last decade have led dermatologists to reflect on a potential link between diet and acne. This article presents the latest findings on a potential impact that diet can have on pathogenesis of acne vulgaris. The association between diet and acne can no longer be dismissed. Compelling evidence shows that high glycemic load diets may exacerbate acne. Dairy ingestion appears to be weakly associated with acne and the roles of omega-3 fatty acids, dietary fiber, antioxidants, vitamin A, zinc and iodine remain to be elucidated. The question of what the impact of diet is on the course of acne vulgaris still remains unclear. PMID:27279815

  8. Mucosal-dominant pemphigus vulgaris in a captopril-taking woman with angioedema.

    PubMed

    Gornowicz-Porowska, Justyna; Dmochowski, Marian; Pietkiewicz, Pawel; Bowszyc-Dmochowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    We describe a 39-year-old woman with an apparent captopril-induced, contact mucosal-dominant pemphigus vulgaris and angioedema, who took captopril during a bout of arterial hypertension. This exposure suggests that captopril and pathophysiology of angioedema stimulated the development of pemphigus vulgaris, which was diagnosed using the novel, indirect immunofluorescence BIOCHIP mosaic, with the modification to detect serum IgG4 autoantibodies. We discuss the patient, who experienced a chain of events leading to the active stage of pemphigus vulgaris, and review concepts of pemphigus vulgaris inducible by drugs and pathological immunity. PMID:26560224

  9. Mucosal-dominant pemphigus vulgaris in a captopril-taking woman with angioedema*

    PubMed Central

    Gornowicz-Porowska, Justyna; Dmochowski, Marian; Pietkiewicz, Pawel; Bowszyc-Dmochowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    We describe a 39-year-old woman with an apparent captopril-induced, contact mucosal-dominant pemphigus vulgaris and angioedema, who took captopril during a bout of arterial hypertension. This exposure suggests that captopril and pathophysiology of angioedema stimulated the development of pemphigus vulgaris, which was diagnosed using the novel, indirect immunofluorescence BIOCHIP mosaic, with the modification to detect serum IgG4 autoantibodies. We discuss the patient, who experienced a chain of events leading to the active stage of pemphigus vulgaris, and review concepts of pemphigus vulgaris inducible by drugs and pathological immunity. PMID:26560224

  10. Verruca vulgaris of the tongue: a case report with literature review

    PubMed Central

    Ural, Ahmet; Arslan, Selçuk; Ersöz, Şafak; Değer, Betül

    2014-01-01

    Verruca vulgaris (common warts) is a benign lesion of skin and mucous membranes caused by human papillomovirus (HPV). The lesions are typically self-limited but may vary in size and number. The occurrence on the tongue is extremely rare. To the best of our knowledge, only one verruca vulgaris existing in the tongue had been reported in the literature. Case presentation: A rare case of verruca vulgaris of the tongue occurring in a 36-year-old Caucasian male is presented with a discussion on ethiopathogenesis and the treatment methods. Verruca vulgaris must be remembered in the differential diagnosis of tongue lesions and surgical treatment may provide satisfactory outcomes. PMID:25172971

  11. The Morphology and Adhesion Mechanism of Octopus vulgaris Suckers

    PubMed Central

    Tramacere, Francesca; Beccai, Lucia; Kuba, Michael; Gozzi, Alessandro; Bifone, Angelo; Mazzolai, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The octopus sucker represents a fascinating natural system performing adhesion on different terrains and substrates. Octopuses use suckers to anchor the body to the substrate or to grasp, investigate and manipulate objects, just to mention a few of their functions. Our study focuses on the morphology and adhesion mechanism of suckers in Octopus vulgaris. We use three different techniques (MRI, ultrasonography, and histology) and a 3D reconstruction approach to contribute knowledge on both morphology and functionality of the sucker structure in O. vulgaris. The results of our investigation are two-fold. First, we observe some morphological differences with respect to the octopus species previously studied (i.e., Octopus joubini, Octopus maya, Octopus bimaculoides/bimaculatus and Eledone cirrosa). In particular, in O. vulgaris the acetabular chamber, that is a hollow spherical cavity in other octopuses, shows an ellipsoidal cavity which roof has an important protuberance with surface roughness. Second, based on our findings, we propose a hypothesis on the sucker adhesion mechanism in O. vulgaris. We hypothesize that the process of continuous adhesion is achieved by sealing the orifice between acetabulum and infundibulum portions via the acetabular protuberance. We suggest this to take place while the infundibular part achieves a completely flat shape; and, by sustaining adhesion through preservation of sucker configuration. In vivo ultrasonographic recordings support our proposed adhesion model by showing the sucker in action. Such an underlying physical mechanism offers innovative potential cues for developing bioinspired artificial adhesion systems. Furthermore, we think that it could possibly represent a useful approach in order to investigate any potential difference in the ecology and in the performance of adhesion by different species. PMID:23750233

  12. The morphology and adhesion mechanism of Octopus vulgaris suckers.

    PubMed

    Tramacere, Francesca; Beccai, Lucia; Kuba, Michael; Gozzi, Alessandro; Bifone, Angelo; Mazzolai, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The octopus sucker represents a fascinating natural system performing adhesion on different terrains and substrates. Octopuses use suckers to anchor the body to the substrate or to grasp, investigate and manipulate objects, just to mention a few of their functions. Our study focuses on the morphology and adhesion mechanism of suckers in Octopus vulgaris. We use three different techniques (MRI, ultrasonography, and histology) and a 3D reconstruction approach to contribute knowledge on both morphology and functionality of the sucker structure in O. vulgaris. The results of our investigation are two-fold. First, we observe some morphological differences with respect to the octopus species previously studied (i.e., Octopus joubini, Octopus maya, Octopus bimaculoides/bimaculatus and Eledone cirrosa). In particular, in O. vulgaris the acetabular chamber, that is a hollow spherical cavity in other octopuses, shows an ellipsoidal cavity which roof has an important protuberance with surface roughness. Second, based on our findings, we propose a hypothesis on the sucker adhesion mechanism in O. vulgaris. We hypothesize that the process of continuous adhesion is achieved by sealing the orifice between acetabulum and infundibulum portions via the acetabular protuberance. We suggest this to take place while the infundibular part achieves a completely flat shape; and, by sustaining adhesion through preservation of sucker configuration. In vivo ultrasonographic recordings support our proposed adhesion model by showing the sucker in action. Such an underlying physical mechanism offers innovative potential cues for developing bioinspired artificial adhesion systems. Furthermore, we think that it could possibly represent a useful approach in order to investigate any potential difference in the ecology and in the performance of adhesion by different species. PMID:23750233

  13. A Benzoyl Peroxide-Sulfur Cream for Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Pace, William E.

    1965-01-01

    Benzoyl peroxide, a powerful, non-toxic, oxidizing agent, combined with sulfur in an oil-in-water emulsion base, was used to treat 286 patients with acne vulgaris. This esthetically acceptable, easily compounded, inexpensive medication consistently induced prompt suppression of acne lesions of all types and eliminated the need for x-ray, ultraviolet light and routine systemic antibiotic therapy. Contact allergic sensitivity, which developed in 2.5% of patients, was the only adverse reaction encountered. PMID:14328040

  14. Ammonium reduces chromium toxicity in the freshwater alga Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingqing; Sun, Zhengqi; Lavoie, Michel; Fan, Xiaoji; Bai, Xiaocui; Qian, Haifeng

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of ammonium (NH4 (+)) on Cr toxicity to the freshwater alga Chlorella vulgaris. We followed an array of cellular functions and biomolecules in C. vulgaris cells exposed to 50 or 100 μM Cr at three different initial NH4 (+) concentrations (0.5, 3, and 10 mM). The results showed that Cr strongly inhibited cell yield of C. vulgaris, but 10 mM NH4 (+) could decrease by more than two-fold Cr toxicity on cell yield compared to exposure to 0.5 mM NH4 (+). Cr toxicity on gene transcripts and cellular substructure was also much lower at high than at low NH4 (+). Our results suggest that this protecting effect of NH4 (+) on intracellular Cr toxicity could be due to several factors, such as enhance uptake of phosphorus, increase in C and N assimilation efficiency, and increase transcription of photosynthesis-related genes. PMID:25421561

  15. Enhancement of hydrolysis of Chlorella vulgaris by hydrochloric acid.

    PubMed

    Park, Charnho; Lee, Ja Hyun; Yang, Xiaoguang; Yoo, Hah Young; Lee, Ju Hun; Lee, Soo Kweon; Kim, Seung Wook

    2016-06-01

    Chlorella vulgaris is considered as one of the potential sources of biomass for bio-based products because it consists of large amounts of carbohydrates. In this study, hydrothermal acid hydrolysis with five different acids (hydrochloric acid, nitric acid, peracetic acid, phosphoric acid, and sulfuric acid) was carried out to produce fermentable sugars (glucose, galactose). The hydrothermal acid hydrolysis by hydrochloric acid showed the highest sugar production. C. vulgaris was hydrolyzed with various concentrations of hydrochloric acid [0.5-10 % (w/w)] and microalgal biomass [20-140 g/L (w/v)] at 121 °C for 20 min. Among the concentrations examined, 2 % hydrochloric acid with 100 g/L biomass yielded the highest conversion of carbohydrates (92.5 %) into reducing sugars. The hydrolysate thus produced from C. vulgaris was fermented using the yeast Brettanomyces custersii H1-603 and obtained bioethanol yield of 0.37 g/g of algal sugars. PMID:26899601

  16. Growth of Chlorella vulgaris and associated bacteria in photobioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Lakaniemi, Aino‐Maija; Intihar, Veera M.; Tuovinen, Olli H.; Puhakka, Jaakko A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study was to test three flat plate photobioreactor configurations for growth of Chlorella vulgaris under non‐axenic conditions and to characterize and quantify associated bacterial communities. The photobioreactor cultivations were conducted using tap water‐based media to introduce background bacterial population. Growth of algae was monitored over time with three independent methods. Additionally, the quantity and quality of eukaryotes and bacteria were analysed using culture‐independent molecular tools based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR‐DGGE) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR). Static mixers used in the flat plate photobioreactors did not generally enhance the growth at the low light intensities used. The maximum biomass concentration and maximum specific growth rate were 1.0 g l−1 and 2.0 day−1 respectively. Bacterial growth as determined by QPCR was associated with the growth of C. vulgaris. Based on PCR‐DGGE, bacteria in the cultures mainly originated from the tap water. Bacterial community profiles were diverse but reproducible in all flat plate cultures. Most prominent bacteria in the C. vulgaris cultures belonged to the class Alphaproteobacteria and especially to the genus Sphingomonas. Analysis of the diversity of non‐photosynthetic microorganisms in algal mass cultures can provide useful information on the public health aspects and unravel community interactions. PMID:21936882

  17. Detection of apoptosis in pemphigus vulgaris by TUNEL technique*

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas-Gonzalez, Juan Carlos; Vega-Memíje, Maria Elisa; García-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Aguilar-Urbano, Marco António

    2016-01-01

    Background Pemphigus is part of a group of blistering diseases that affect the skin and mucous membranes. Based on its autoimmune origin, autoantibodies develop in pemphigus that are directed toward cell surface components of keratinocytes. However, some data cannot be explained, such as the lack of a relationship between autoantibody levels and the severity of clinical manifestations, treatment resistance, the presence of inflammatory infiltrates and the potential occurrence of apoptosis as determinants of vesicle formation. Objective To examine the presence of apoptosis in pemphigus vulgaris by TUNEL technique. Methods In this cross-sectional study, we selected 15 paraffin-embedded tissues from subjects who were diagnosed with pemphigus vulgaris by hematoxylin and eosin staining. The samples were subjected to TUNEL assay and examined under an Olympus BX61 fluorescence microscope. Positivity was categorized dichotomously, and the statistical analysis was performed using the X2 test. Results Positivity was observed in basal layer cells in 14 (93.3%) cases. In 13 (86.7%) of the positive cases, we noted espinosum and granular layers that formed the blister roof, and in 12 cases (80%), positive acantholytic cells were observed. Conclusions TUNEL positivity was observed in pemphigus vulgaris, implicating apoptosis in the pathophysiology of this condition, which can help guide the development of apoptotic blockers as therapeutics. PMID:27438195

  18. Photosynthetic and cellular toxicity of cadmium in Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Ou-Yang, Hui-Ling; Kong, Xiang-Zhen; Lavoie, Michel; He, Wei; Qin, Ning; He, Qi-Shuang; Yang, Bin; Wang, Rong; Xu, Fu-Liu

    2013-12-01

    The toxic effects of cadmium (Cd) on the green alga Chlorella vulgaris were investigated by following the response to Cd of various toxicity endpoints (cell growth, cell size, photochemical efficiency of PSII in the light or Φ(PSII), maximal photochemical efficiency or Fv/Fm, chlorophyll a fluorescence, esterase activity, and cell viability). These toxicity endpoints were studied in laboratory batch cultures of C. vulgaris over a long-term 96-h exposure to different Cd concentrations using flow cytometry and pulse amplitude modulated fluorometry. The sequence of sensitivity of these toxicity endpoints was: cell yield > Φ(PSII) ≈ esterase activity > Fv/Fm > chlorophyll a fluorescence ≈ cell viability. It is shown that cell apoptosis or cell death only accounted for a minor part of the reduction in cell yield even at very high algistatic free Cd²⁺ concentrations, and other mechanisms such as blocked cell divisions are major contributors to cell yield inhibition. Furthermore, cadmium may affect both the electron donors and acceptors of the electron transport chain at high free Cd²⁺ concentration. Finally, the resistance of cells to cell death was size-dependent; medium-sized cells had the highest toxicity threshold. The present study brings new insights into the toxicity mechanisms of Cd in C. vulgaris and provides a detailed comparison of the sensitivity of various Cd toxicity endpoints. PMID:23966280

  19. Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene ( vgb) improves lutein production in Chlorella vulgaris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ruijuan; Lin, Xiangzhi

    2014-03-01

    Vitreoscilla hemoglobin is an oxygen-binding protein that promotes oxygen delivery and reduces oxygen consumption under low oxygen conditions to increase the efficiency of cell respiration and metabolism. In this study, we introduced a Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene ( vgb) into Chlorella vulgaris by Agrobacterium tumefaciens -mediated transformation (ATMT). PCR analysis confirmed that the vgb gene was successfully integrated into the Chlorella vulgaris genome. Analysis of biomass obtained in shake flasks revealed transformant biomass concentrations as high as 3.28 g/L, which was 38.81% higher than that of the wild-type strain. Lutein content of transformants also increased slightly. Further experiments recovered a maximum lutein yield of 2.91 mg/L from the transformants, which was 36.77% higher than that of the wild-type strain. The above results suggest that integrated expression of the vgb gene may improve cell growth and lutein yield in Chlorella vulgaris, with applications to lutein production from Chlorella during fermentation.

  20. Photon up-conversion increases biomass yield in Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Menon, Kavya R; Jose, Steffi; Suraishkumar, Gadi K

    2014-12-01

    Photon up-conversion, a process whereby lower energy radiations are converted to higher energy levels via the use of appropriate phosphor systems, was employed as a novel strategy for improving microalgal growth and lipid productivity. Photon up-conversion enables the utilization of regions of the solar spectrum, beyond the typical photosynthetically active radiation, that are usually wasted or are damaging to the algae. The effects of up-conversion of red light by two distinct sets of up-conversion phosphors were studied in the model microalgae Chlorella vulgaris. Up-conversion by set 1 phosphors led to a 2.85 fold increase in biomass concentration and a 3.2 fold increase in specific growth rate of the microalgae. While up-conversion by set 2 phosphors resulted in a 30% increase in biomass and 12% increase in specific intracellular neutral lipid, while the specific growth rates were comparable to that of the control. Furthermore, up-conversion resulted in higher levels of specific intracellular reactive oxygen species in C. vulgaris. Up-conversion of red light (654 nm) was shown to improve biomass yields in C. vulgaris. In principle, up-conversion can be used to increase the utilization range of the electromagnetic spectrum for improved cultivation of photosynthetic systems such as plants, algae, and microalgae. PMID:25155721

  1. Characterizations of intracellular arsenic in a bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe-Simon, F.; Yannone, S. M.; Tainer, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    Life requires a key set of chemical elements to sustain growth. Yet, a growing body of literature suggests that microbes can alter their nutritional requirements based on the availability of these chemical elements. Under limiting conditions for one element microbes have been shown to utilize a variety of other elements to serve similar functions often (but not always) in similar molecular structures. Well-characterized elemental exchanges include manganese for iron, tungsten for molybdenum and sulfur for phosphorus or oxygen. These exchanges can be found in a wide variety of biomolecules ranging from protein to lipids and DNA. Recent evidence suggested that arsenic, as arsenate or As(V), was taken up and incorporated into the cellular material of the bacterium GFAJ-1. The evidence was interpreted to support As(V) acting in an analogous role to phosphate. We will therefore discuss our ongoing efforts to characterize intracellular arsenate and how it may partition among the cellular fractions of the microbial isolate GFAJ-1 when exposed to As(V) in the presence of various levels of phosphate. Under high As(V) conditions, cells express a dramatically different proteome than when grown given only phosphate. Ongoing studies on the diversity and potential role of proteins and metabolites produced in the presence of As(V) will be reported. These investigations promise to inform the role and additional metabolic potential for As in biology. Arsenic assimilation into biomolecules contributes to the expanding set of chemical elements utilized by microbes in unusual environmental niches.

  2. Genome Sequence of the Soil Bacterium Janthinobacterium sp. KBS0711.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, William R; Muscarella, Mario E; Lennon, Jay T

    2015-01-01

    We present a draft genome of Janthinobacterium sp. KBS0711 that was isolated from agricultural soil. The genome provides insight into the ecological strategies of this bacterium in free-living and host-associated environments. PMID:26089434

  3. Genome Sequence of the Soil Bacterium Janthinobacterium sp. KBS0711

    PubMed Central

    Shoemaker, William R.; Muscarella, Mario E.

    2015-01-01

    We present a draft genome of Janthinobacterium sp. KBS0711 that was isolated from agricultural soil. The genome provides insight into the ecological strategies of this bacterium in free-living and host-associated environments. PMID:26089434

  4. Detection of Salmonella bacterium in drinking water using microring resonator.

    PubMed

    Bahadoran, Mahdi; Noorden, Ahmad Fakhrurrazi Ahmad; Mohajer, Faeze Sadat; Abd Mubin, Mohamad Helmi; Chaudhary, Kashif; Jalil, Muhammad Arif; Ali, Jalil; Yupapin, Preecha

    2016-01-01

    A new microring resonator system is proposed for the detection of the Salmonella bacterium in drinking water, which is made up of SiO2-TiO2 waveguide embedded inside thin film layer of the flagellin. The change in refractive index due to the binding of the Salmonella bacterium with flagellin layer causes a shift in the output signal wavelength and the variation in through and drop port's intensities, which leads to the detection of Salmonella bacterium in drinking water. The sensitivity of proposed sensor for detecting of Salmonella bacterium in water solution is 149 nm/RIU and the limit of detection is 7 × 10(-4)RIU. PMID:25133457

  5. Taxonomic characterization of the cellulose-degrading bacterium NCIB 10462

    SciTech Connect

    Dees, C.; Ringleberg, D.; Scott, T.C.; Phelps, T.

    1994-06-01

    The gram negative cellulase-producing bacterium NCIB 10462 has been previously named Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. or var. cellulosa. Since there is renewed interest in cellulose-degrading bacteria for use in bioconversion of cellulose to chemical feed stocks and fuels, we re-examined the characteristics of this microorganism to determine its proper taxonomic characterization and to further define it`s true metabolic potential. Metabolic and physical characterization of NCIB 10462 revealed that this was an alkalophilic, non-fermentative, gram negative, oxidase positive, motile, cellulose-degrading bacterium. The aerobic substrate utilization profile of this bacterium was found to have few characteristics consistent with a classification of P. fluorescens with a very low probability match with the genus Sphingomonas. Total lipid analysis did not reveal that any sphingolipid bases are produced by this bacterium. NCIB 10462 was found to grow best aerobically but also grows well in complex media under reducing conditions. NCIB 10462 grew slowly under full anaerobic conditions on complex media but growth on cellulosic media was found only under aerobic conditions. Total fatty acid analysis (MIDI) of NCIB 10462 failed to group this bacterium with a known pseudomonas species. However, fatty acid analysis of the bacteria when grown at temperatures below 37{degrees}C suggest that the organism is a pseudomonad. Since a predominant characteristic of this bacterium is it`s ability to degrade cellulose, we suggest it be called Pseudomonas cellulosa.

  6. Insect resistance to sugar beet pests mediated by a Beta vulgaris proteinase inhibitor transgene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We transformed sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) hairy roots and Nicotiana benthamiana plants with a Beta vulgaris root gene (BvSTI) that codes for a serine proteinase inhibitor. BvSTI is a root gene cloned from the F1016 breeding line that has moderate levels of resistance to the sugar beet root maggot ...

  7. Burkholderia phymatum Strains Capable of Nodulating Phaseolus vulgaris Are Present in Moroccan Soils ▿

    PubMed Central

    Talbi, C.; Delgado, M. J.; Girard, L.; Ramírez-Trujillo, A.; Caballero-Mellado, J.; Bedmar, E. J.

    2010-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA, nodC, and nifH genes of four bacterial strains isolated from root nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris grown in Morocco soils were identified as Burkholderia phymatum. All four strains formed N2-fixing nodules on P. vulgaris and Mimosa, Acacia, and Prosopis species and reduced acetylene to ethylene when cultured ex planta. PMID:20472732

  8. Pangenome Evolution in the Marine Bacterium Alteromonas

    PubMed Central

    López-Pérez, Mario; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    We have examined a collection of the free-living marine bacterium Alteromonas genomes with cores diverging in average nucleotide identities ranging from 99.98% to 73.35%, i.e., from microbes that can be considered members of a natural clone (like in a clinical epidemiological outbreak) to borderline genus level. The genomes were largely syntenic allowing a precise delimitation of the core and flexible regions in each. The core was 1.4 Mb (ca. 30% of the typical strain genome size). Recombination rates along the core were high among strains belonging to the same species (37.7–83.7% of all nucleotide polymorphisms) but they decreased sharply between species (18.9–5.1%). Regarding the flexible genome, its main expansion occurred within the boundaries of the species, i.e., strains of the same species already have a large and diverse flexible genome. Flexible regions occupy mostly fixed genomic locations. Four large genomic islands are involved in the synthesis of strain-specific glycosydic receptors that we have called glycotypes. These genomic regions are exchanged by homologous recombination within and between species and there is evidence for their import from distant taxonomic units (other genera within the family). In addition, several hotspots for integration of gene cassettes by illegitimate recombination are distributed throughout the genome. They code for features that give each clone specific properties to interact with their ecological niche and must flow fast throughout the whole genus as they are found, with nearly identical sequences, in different species. Models for the generation of this genomic diversity involving phage predation are discussed. PMID:27189983

  9. Pangenome Evolution in the Marine Bacterium Alteromonas.

    PubMed

    López-Pérez, Mario; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    We have examined a collection of the free-living marine bacterium Alteromonas genomes with cores diverging in average nucleotide identities ranging from 99.98% to 73.35%, i.e., from microbes that can be considered members of a natural clone (like in a clinical epidemiological outbreak) to borderline genus level. The genomes were largely syntenic allowing a precise delimitation of the core and flexible regions in each. The core was 1.4 Mb (ca. 30% of the typical strain genome size). Recombination rates along the core were high among strains belonging to the same species (37.7-83.7% of all nucleotide polymorphisms) but they decreased sharply between species (18.9-5.1%). Regarding the flexible genome, its main expansion occurred within the boundaries of the species, i.e., strains of the same species already have a large and diverse flexible genome. Flexible regions occupy mostly fixed genomic locations. Four large genomic islands are involved in the synthesis of strain-specific glycosydic receptors that we have called glycotypes. These genomic regions are exchanged by homologous recombination within and between species and there is evidence for their import from distant taxonomic units (other genera within the family). In addition, several hotspots for integration of gene cassettes by illegitimate recombination are distributed throughout the genome. They code for features that give each clone specific properties to interact with their ecological niche and must flow fast throughout the whole genus as they are found, with nearly identical sequences, in different species. Models for the generation of this genomic diversity involving phage predation are discussed. PMID:27189983

  10. Neuroprotective potential of Beta vulgaris L. in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Nade, Vandana S.; Kawale, Laxman A.; Zambre, Shankar S.; Kapure, Amit B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to investigate the neuroprotective role of Beta vulgaris in Parkinson's disease (PD). Materials and Methods: PD was induced by administration of reserpine (5 mg/kg/day, i.p for 5 consecutive days), haloperidol (1 mg/kg, i.p.), and tacrine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) in experimental animals. The symptoms of PD such as tremors, akinesia, rigidity, catalepsy, and vacuous chewing movements (VCMs) were evaluated. Foot shock-induced aggression (FSIA) model was used to confirm anti-parkinsonian activity. The methanolic extract of Beta vulgaris (MEBV) was administered at doses of 100, 200, and 300 mg/kg, p.o. The combination of L-dopa and carbidopa was used as a standard drug. Behavioral studies such as locomotor activity and grip strength were determined, and oxidative stress was evaluated in FSIA model in rat brain. Results: Pretreatment with MEBV (200 and 300 mg/kg) significantly reduced the intensity of muscular rigidity, duration of catalepsy, akinesia, the number of tremors, VCMs, and increase fighting behavior. The locomotor activity and grip strength were significantly increased by MEBV. In FSIA, the biochemical analysis of brain revealed the increased level of lipid peroxidation (LPO) and decreased levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT). MEBV significantly reduced LPO level and restored the defensive antioxidant enzymes SOD and CAT in rat brain. Conclusions: The results indicated the protective role of B. vulgaris against PD. The mechanism of protection may be due to augmentation of cellular antioxidants. PMID:26288473

  11. Clinical complications of kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) consumption.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Verma, Alok Kumar; Das, Mukul; Jain, S K; Dwivedi, Premendra D

    2013-06-01

    Kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), are common legumes, consumed worldwide. The delicacy of kidney beans is highly appreciable but, at the same time, their toxicity has raised an alarming concern. Kidney bean toxicity may be divided into two subcategories: toxicity caused by its lectins, saponins, phytates, and protease inhibitors or allergenicity induced by its allergenic proteins. The purpose of this review is to unravel the facts behind the different aspects of toxicity and allergenicity induced by kidney beans and try to fill the gaps that exist currently. PMID:23410632

  12. Evidence-based treatments in pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus.

    PubMed

    Frew, John W; Martin, Linda K; Murrell, Dédée F

    2011-10-01

    Treatment modalities in pemphigus vulgaris (PV) and pemphigus foliaceus (PF) are many and varied, although level 1 evidence supporting their use is limited. To date, only 2 systematic reviews exist to support the use of different treatment modalities to control this group of conditions. Overall, within the literature, the quality of trials comparing treatment modalities is poor. Cohort sizes are small, methodologies are varied, and standardized outcome measurements are lacking. The authors aim to present a comprehensive view of the level 1 evidence that exists for common treatment modalities used in PV and PF. PMID:21925004

  13. The role of hormones in the pathogenesis of psoriasis vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    ROMAN, IULIA IOANA; CONSTANTIN, ANNE-MARIE; MARINA, MIHAELA ELENA; ORASAN, REMUS IOAN

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris is a chronic, common skin disease, which affects the patient’s quality of life to the highest degree. Several exogenous factors and endogenous hormonal changes may act as triggers for psoriasis. The skin possesses a true endocrine system, which is very important in multiple systemic diseases. A number of conditions are associated with psoriasis, and its severity can also be influenced by hormones. Even though the sex hormones and prolactin have a major role in psoriasis pathogenicity, there are a lot of other hormones which can influence the psoriasis clinical manifestations: glucocorticoids, epinephrine, thyroid hormones, and insulin. PMID:27004020

  14. The role of hormones in the pathogenesis of psoriasis vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Roman, Iulia Ioana; Constantin, Anne-Marie; Marina, Mihaela Elena; Orasan, Remus Ioan

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris is a chronic, common skin disease, which affects the patient's quality of life to the highest degree. Several exogenous factors and endogenous hormonal changes may act as triggers for psoriasis. The skin possesses a true endocrine system, which is very important in multiple systemic diseases. A number of conditions are associated with psoriasis, and its severity can also be influenced by hormones. Even though the sex hormones and prolactin have a major role in psoriasis pathogenicity, there are a lot of other hormones which can influence the psoriasis clinical manifestations: glucocorticoids, epinephrine, thyroid hormones, and insulin. PMID:27004020

  15. Single-crystal electron paramagnetic resonance study of cytochrome c3 from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans Norway Strain. Assignment of the heme midpoint redox potentials.

    PubMed

    Guigliarelli, B; Bertrand, P; More, C; Haser, R; Gayda, J P

    1990-11-01

    A single crystal of cytochrome c3 from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans Norway is studied by electron paramagnetic resonance at low temperature. The orientation of the principal axis corresponding to the largest g value is determined for the 12 heme groups in the crystal unit cell. The comparison of these directions to the normals to the heme planes, determined from the crystallographic data at 2.5 A resolution, gives strong evidence for the following assignment of the midpoint redox potentials to the heme groups H1 to H4, defined in the three-dimensional structure: -150 mV is assigned to H3, -300 mV to H4, -330 mV to H1 and -355 mV to H2. This assignment is in agreement with a partial correspondence previously established from an independent study performed on cytochrome c3 in solution. PMID:2172551

  16. Glycomacropeptide is a prebiotic that reduces Desulfovibrio bacteria, increases cecal short-chain fatty acids, and is anti-inflammatory in mice.

    PubMed

    Sawin, Emily A; De Wolfe, Travis J; Aktas, Busra; Stroup, Bridget M; Murali, Sangita G; Steele, James L; Ney, Denise M

    2015-10-01

    Glycomacropeptide (GMP) is a 64-amino acid (AA) glycophosphopeptide with application to the nutritional management of phenylketonuria (PKU), obesity, and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). GMP is a putative prebiotic based on extensive glycosylation with sialic acid, galactose, and galactosamine. Our objective was to determine the prebiotic properties of GMP by characterizing cecal and fecal microbiota populations, short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), and immune responses. Weanling PKU (Pah(enu2)) and wild-type (WT) C57Bl/6 mice were fed isoenergetic AA, GMP, or casein diets for 8 wk. The cecal content and feces were collected for microbial DNA extraction to perform 16S microbiota analysis by Ion Torrent PGM sequencing. SCFA were determined by gas chromatography, plasma cytokines via a Bio-Plex Pro assay, and splenocyte T cell populations by flow cytometry. Changes in cecal and fecal microbiota are primarily diet dependent. The GMP diet resulted in a reduction from 30-35 to 7% in Proteobacteria, genera Desulfovibrio, in both WT and PKU mice with genotype-dependent changes in Bacteroidetes or Firmicutes. Cecal concentrations of the SCFA acetate, propionate, and butyrate were increased with GMP. The percentage of stimulated spleen cells producing interferon-γ (IFN-γ) was significantly reduced in mice fed GMP compared with casein. In summary, plasma concentrations of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-2 were reduced in mice fed GMP. GMP is a prebiotic based on reduction in Desulfovibrio, increased SCFA, and lower indexes of inflammation compared with casein and AA diets in mice. Functional foods made with GMP may be beneficial in the management of PKU, obesity, and IBD. PMID:26251473

  17. Body Image Disturbance in Patients with Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Bowe, Whitney P.; Crerand, Canice E.; Margolis, David J.; Shalita, Alan R.

    2011-01-01

    Psychosocial outcome measures, which attempt to examine acne from the patient's perspective, have become increasingly important in dermatology research. One such measure is the Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire. The authors' primary aim was to determine the validity and internal consistency of the Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire in patients with acne vulgaris. The secondary aim was to investigate the relationship between body image disturbance and quality of life. This cross-sectional investigation included 52 consecutive acne patients presenting to an outpatient dermatology clinic. Subjects completed the Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire, Skindex-16, and other body image and psychosocial functioning measures. An objective assessment of acne was performed. The Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire was internally consistent and converged with other known body image indices. Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire scores also correlated with Skindex-16 scores, confirming that quality of life and body image are related psychosocial constructs. The Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire appears to be an accurate instrument that can assess appearance-related concern and impairment in patients with acne vulgaris. Limitations include a small sample size and the cross-sectional design. PMID:21779418

  18. Body image disturbance in patients with acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Bowe, Whitney P; Doyle, Amanda K; Crerand, Canice E; Margolis, David J; Shalita, Alan R

    2011-07-01

    Psychosocial outcome measures, which attempt to examine acne from the patient's perspective, have become increasingly important in dermatology research. One such measure is the Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire. The authors' primary aim was to determine the validity and internal consistency of the Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire in patients with acne vulgaris. The secondary aim was to investigate the relationship between body image disturbance and quality of life. This cross-sectional investigation included 52 consecutive acne patients presenting to an outpatient dermatology clinic. Subjects completed the Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire, Skindex-16, and other body image and psychosocial functioning measures. An objective assessment of acne was performed. The Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire was internally consistent and converged with other known body image indices. Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire scores also correlated with Skindex-16 scores, confirming that quality of life and body image are related psychosocial constructs. The Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire appears to be an accurate instrument that can assess appearance-related concern and impairment in patients with acne vulgaris. Limitations include a small sample size and the cross-sectional design. PMID:21779418

  19. Invading slugs (Arion vulgaris) can be vectors for Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Gismervik, K; Aspholm, M; Rørvik, LM; Bruheim, T; Andersen, A; Skaar, I

    2015-01-01

    Aims Listeriosis is a frequent silage-associated disease in ruminants. The slugs Arion vulgaris are invaders in gardens, vegetable crops and meadows for silage production. Field and laboratory studies were conducted to clarify whether slugs could host Listeria monocytogenes and thereby constitute a threat to animal feed safety. Methods and Results Selective culture of L. monocytogenes from 79 pooled slug samples (710 slugs) resulted in 43% positive, 16% with mean L. monocytogenes values of 405 CFU g−1 slug tissues. Of 62 individual slugs cultured, 11% also tested positive from surface/mucus. Multilocus sequence typing analysis of 36 isolates from different slug pools identified 20 sequence types belonging to L. monocytogenes lineages I and II. Slugs fed ≅4·0 × 105 CFUL. monocytogenes, excreted viable L. monocytogenes in faeces for up to 22 days. Excretion of L. monocytogenes decreased with time, although there were indications of a short enrichment period during the first 24 h. Conclusions Arion vulgaris may act as a vector for L. monocytogenes. Significance and Impact of the Study Highly slug-contaminated grass silage may pose a potential threat to animal feed safety. PMID:25580873

  20. TNFα gene polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Kornélia; Tax, Gábor; Teodorescu-Brinzeu, Dragos; Koreck, Andrea; Kemény, Lajos

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation plays an important role in acne pathogenesis, and pro-inflammatory cytokines are key factors in these events. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) is a central molecule coded by a gene that shows high level of genetic polymorphisms especially in its promoter region. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the TNFα gene have been shown to be associated with an increased risk to develop chronic inflammatory diseases. In order to find out if known TNFα regulatory SNPs (-1031T>C, -857C>T, -863C>A, -308G>A, -238G>A) have a role in the development of the inflammatory reactions in acne vulgaris, we analyzed our genomic collection in a retrospective case-control study using the PCR-RFLP method, and we compared the resulting genotype and allele frequencies. There were no significant differences in the observed genotype or allele frequencies between the control and acne group in case of the -1031, -863, -238 SNPs; however, the TNFα -857 minor T allele was found to act as a protective factor in our study population in acne, and a higher occurrence of the minor -308 A allele in female acne patients was also noted. Genetic variants of the TNFα gene may affect the risk of acne vulgaris. Our results can help to elucidate the molecular events leading to acne development. PMID:20386917

  1. Toxicological Responses of Chlorella vulgaris to Dichloromethane and Dichloroethane

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shijin; Zhang, Huaxing; Yu, Xiang; Qiu, Lequan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the acute toxicity effects of dichloromethane and dichloroethane on Chlorella vulgaris at the physiological and molecular level. Data showed that the cell number, chlorophyll a, and total protein content gradually decreased with increasing dichloromethane and dichloroethane concentrations over a 96-h exposure. Lower doses of two organic solvents had stimulatory effects on catalase and superoxide dismutase activity. Malondialdehyde showed a concentration-dependent increase in response to dichloromethane and dichloroethane exposure. Electron microscopy also showed that there were some chloroplast abnormalities in response to different concentrations of dichloromethane and dichloroethane exposure. Real-time polymerase chain reaction assay demonstrated that dichloromethane and dichloroethane reduced the transcript abundance of psaB, whereas that of psbC changed depending on the toxicant after 24 h of exposure. Dichloromethane and dichloroethane affected the activity of antioxidant enzymes, disrupted the chloroplast ultrastructure, and reduced transcription of photosynthesis-related genes in C. vulgaris, leading to metabolic disruption and cell death. PMID:24550665

  2. Verruca vulgaris of tympanic membrane treated with topical immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shangkuan, Wei-Chuan; Lin, Ming-Yee

    2014-01-01

    Verruca vulgaris is a common skin disease caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, but it rarely involves the tympanic membrane. The current treatments for verruca are usually destructive and irreversible, should not be performed universally; the most relevant therapy will be variable subject to disease location, severity, and the patient's immune status. In this report, we demonstrated a case with verruca vulgaris of tympanic membrane, who had topical immunomodulatory agent treatment successfully with well-preserved hearing, and who has no any recurrence up to now for 3 years. In clinical, to cure verruca on the vulnerable tympanic membrane without hearing sequela is a dilemma, and there is no any treatment guideline due to its rarity. Topical immunomodulatory agent with high selectivity, showed great competence on this occasion and verified its practicability in treating verruca on unapproachable area, or where bearing vital functions; the convenient out-patient-based application also ensures good compliance. However, it does need longer duration and higher costs than the other routine treatment modalities. PMID:24321751

  3. Stability and loading properties of curcumin encapsulated in Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Yaser; Sabahi, Hossein; Rahaie, Mahdi

    2016-11-15

    Curcumin (Cur), a polyphenols with pharmacological function, was successfully encapsulated in algae (Alg) cell (Chlorella vulgaris) as confirmed by fluorescence microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Fluorescence micrographs, TGA, DSC and FTIR spectra suggested the hypothesis inclusion Cur in Nano-empty spaces inside cell wall of Alg. The TGA analysis showed that the thermal stability of Alg and Cur at algae/curcumin complex was 3.8% and 33% higher than their free forms at 0-300°C and 300-600°C ranges, respectively. After encapsulation in Alg cells, the photostability of Cur was enhanced by about 2.5-fold. Adsorption isotherm of Cur into Alg was fitted with the Freundlich isotherm. The microcapsules were loaded with Cur up to about 55% w/w which is much higher than other reported bio-carriers. In conclusion, the data proved that Chlorella vulgaris cell can be used as a new stable carrier for Cur. PMID:27283686

  4. Treatment of acne vulgaris with fractional radiofrequency microneedling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Tae; Lee, Kang Hoon; Sim, Hyung Jun; Suh, Kee Suck; Jang, Min Soo

    2014-07-01

    Fractional radiofrequency microneedling is a novel radiofrequency technique that uses insulated microneedles to deliver energy to the deep dermis at the point of penetration without destruction of the epidermis. It has been used for the treatment of various dermatological conditions including wrinkles, atrophic scars and hypertrophic scars. There have been few studies evaluating the efficacy of fractional radiofrequency microneedling in the treatment of acne, and none measuring objective parameters like the number of inflammatory and non-inflammatory acne lesions or sebum excretion levels. The safety and efficacy of fractional radiofrequency microneedling in the treatment of acne vulgaris was investigated. In a prospective clinical trial, 25 patients with moderate to severe acne were treated with fractional radiofrequency microneedling. The procedure was carried out three times at 1-month intervals. Acne lesion count, subjective satisfaction score, sebum excretion level and adverse effects were assessed at baseline and at 4, 8 and 12 weeks after the first treatment as well as 4, 8 and 12 weeks after the last treatment. Number of acne lesions (inflammatory and non-inflammatory) decreased. Sebum excretion and subjective satisfaction were more favorable at every time point compared with the baseline values (P < 0.05). Inflammatory lesions responded better than non-inflammatory lesions (P < 0.05). Adverse effects such as pinpoint bleeding, pain and erythema were noted, but were transient and not severe enough to stop treatment. Fractional radiofrequency microneedling is a safe and effective treatment for acne vulgaris. PMID:24807263

  5. Effects of sodium pentaborate pentahydrate exposure on Chlorella vulgaris growth, chlorophyll content, and enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueqing; Pei, Yuansheng

    2016-10-01

    Sodium pentaborate pentahydrate (SPP) is a rare mineral. In this study, SPP was synthesized from boric acid and borax through low-temperature crystallization, and its effects on the growth of the alga, Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris) were assessed. The newly synthesized SPP was characterized by chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and differential thermal analysis. The changes in C. vulgaris growth, chlorophyll content, and enzyme activities upon exposure to SPP for 168h were evaluated. Results showed that SPP treatment was detrimental to C. vulgaris growth during the first 24-120h of exposure. The harmful effects, however, diminished over time (168h), even at an effective medium concentration of 226.37mg BL(-1) (the concentration of boron applied per liter of culture medium). A similar trend was observed for chlorophyll content (chlorophyll a and b) and indicated that the photosynthesis of C. vulgaris was not affected and that high levels of SPP may even promote chlorophyll synthesis. Superoxide dismutase and catalase activities of C. vulgaris increased during 24-120h exposure to SPP, but these activities gradually decreased as culture time progressed. In other words, the initial detrimental effects of synthetic SPP on C. vulgaris were temporary and reversible. This research provides a scientific basis for applications of SPP in the environment. PMID:27367150

  6. TNF -308 G/A Polymorphism and Risk of Acne Vulgaris: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian-Kang; Wu, Wen-Juan; Qi, Jue; He, Li; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Background The -308 G/A polymorphism in the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) gene has been implicated in the risk of acne vulgaris, but the results are inconclusive. The present meta-analysis aimed to investigate the overall association between the -308 G/A polymorphism and acne vulgaris risk. Methods We searched in Pubmed, Embase, Web of Science and CNKI for studies evaluating the association between the -308 G/A gene polymorphism and acne vulgaris risk. Data were extracted and statistical analysis was performed using STATA 12.0 software. Results A total of five publications involving 1553 subjects (728 acne vulgaris cases and 825 controls) were included in this meta-analysis. Combined analysis revealed a significant association between this polymorphism and acne vulgaris risk under recessive model (OR = 2.73, 95% CI: 1.37–5.44, p = 0.004 for AA vs. AG + GG). Subgroup analysis by ethnicity showed that the acne vulgaris risk associated with the -308 G/A gene polymorphism was significantly elevated among Caucasians under recessive model (OR = 2.34, 95% CI: 1.13–4.86, p = 0.023). Conclusion This meta-analysis suggests that the -308 G/A polymorphism in the TNF gene contributes to acne vulgaris risk, especially in Caucasian populations. Further studies among different ethnicity populations are needed to validate these findings. PMID:24498378

  7. Inhibitory Effects of Iranian Thymus vulgaris Extracts on in Vitro Growth of Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Behnia, Maryam; Komeylizadeh, Hossein; Tabaei, Seyyed-Javad Seyyed; Abadi, Alireza

    2008-01-01

    One of the most common drugs used against a wide variety of anaerobic protozoan parasites is metronidazole. However, this drug is mutagenic for bacteria and is a potent carcinogen for rodents. Thymus vulgaris is used for cough suppression and relief of dyspepsia. Also it has antibacterial and antifungal properties. The aim of this study was to investigate antiamebic effect of Thymus vulgaris against Entamoeba histolytica in comparison with metronidazole. One hundred gram air-dried T. vulgaris plant was obtained and macerated at 25℃ for 14 days using n-hexane and a mixture of ethanol and water. For essential oil isolation T. vulgaris was subjected to hydrodistillation using a clevenger-type apparatus for 3 hr. E. histolytica, HM-1: IMSS strain was used in all experiments. It was found that the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) for T. vulgaris hydroalcoholic, hexanic extracts, and the essential oil after 24 hr was 4 mg/mL, 4 mg/mL, and 0.7 mg/mL, respectively. After 48 hr the MIC for T. vulgaris hydroalcoholic and hexanic extracts was 3 and 3 mg/mL, respectively. Therefore, it can be concluded that the Iranian T. vulgaris is effective against the trophozoites of E. histolytica. PMID:18830054

  8. Chlorella vulgaris production enhancement with supplementation of synthetic medium in dairy manure wastewater.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jun; Pandey, Pramod K; Franz, Annaliese K; Deng, Huiping; Jeannotte, Richard

    2016-03-01

    To identify innovative ways for better utilizing flushed dairy manure wastewater, we have assessed the effect of dairy manure and supplementation with synthetic medium on the growth of Chlorella vulgaris. A series of experiments were carried out to study the impacts of pretreatment of dairy wastewater and the benefits of supplementing dairy manure wastewater with synthetic medium on C. vulgaris growth increment and the ultrastructure (chloroplast, starch, lipid, and cell wall) of C. vulgaris cells. Results showed that the biomass production of C. vulgaris in dairy wastewater can be enhanced by pretreatment and using supplementation with synthetic media. A recipe combining pretreated dairy wastewater (40 %) and synthetic medium (60 %) exhibited an improved growth of C. vulgaris. The effects of dairy wastewater on the ultrastructure of C. vulgaris cells were distinct compared to that of cells grown in synthetic medium. The C. vulgaris growth in both synthetic medium and manure wastewater without supplementing synthetic medium was lower than the growth in dairy manure supplemented with synthetic medium. We anticipate that the results of this study will help in deriving an enhanced method of coupling nutrient-rich dairy manure wastewater for biofuel production. PMID:26897534

  9. Hydrogen Production by the Thermophilic Bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Nirakar; Dipasquale, Laura; d'Ippolito, Giuliana; Panico, Antonio; Lens, Piet N L; Esposito, Giovanni; Fontana, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    As the only fuel that is not chemically bound to carbon, hydrogen has gained interest as an energy carrier to face the current environmental issues of greenhouse gas emissions and to substitute the depleting non-renewable reserves. In the last years, there has been a significant increase in the number of publications about the bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana that is responsible for production yields of H2 that are among the highest achievements reported in the literature. Here we present an extensive overview of the most recent studies on this hyperthermophilic bacterium together with a critical discussion of the potential of fermentative production by this bacterium. The review article is organized into sections focused on biochemical, microbiological and technical issues, including the effect of substrate, reactor type, gas sparging, temperature, pH, hydraulic retention time and organic loading parameters on rate and yield of gas production. PMID:26053393

  10. Hydrogen Production by the Thermophilic Bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Nirakar; Dipasquale, Laura; d’Ippolito, Giuliana; Panico, Antonio; Lens, Piet N. L.; Esposito, Giovanni; Fontana, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    As the only fuel that is not chemically bound to carbon, hydrogen has gained interest as an energy carrier to face the current environmental issues of greenhouse gas emissions and to substitute the depleting non-renewable reserves. In the last years, there has been a significant increase in the number of publications about the bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana that is responsible for production yields of H2 that are among the highest achievements reported in the literature. Here we present an extensive overview of the most recent studies on this hyperthermophilic bacterium together with a critical discussion of the potential of fermentative production by this bacterium. The review article is organized into sections focused on biochemical, microbiological and technical issues, including the effect of substrate, reactor type, gas sparging, temperature, pH, hydraulic retention time and organic loading parameters on rate and yield of gas production. PMID:26053393

  11. Quality of life, self-esteem and psychosocial factors in adolescents with acne vulgaris*

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Gustavo Nunes; dos Santos, Laís Araújo; Sobral Filho, Jader Freire

    2015-01-01

    Background Dermatological diseases, among which acne vulgaris, have psychological impact on the affected generating feelings of guilt, shame and social isolation. Objectives To compare quality of life, self-esteem and other psychosocial variables amongst adolescents with and without acne vulgaris, and between levels of severity. Methods Cross-sectional observational study in a sample of 355 high school students from the city of João Pessoa. Data collection was performed with questionnaires and clinical-dermatological evaluation. The primary variables were the incidence of AV; quality of life, set by the Children's Dermatology Quality of Life Index and Dermatology Quality of Life Index; and self-esteem, measured by the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. For calculation of statistical tests, we used the SPSS 20.0 software, considering p=0.05. Results The sample, with an average age of 16, showed 89.3% prevalence of acne vulgaris. The most prevalent psychosocial issue was "afraid that acne will never cease", present in 58% of affected youth. The median score of Quality of Life in Children's Dermatology Index was different amongst students with and without acne vulgaris (p=0.003), as well as the Quality of Life in Dermatology (p=0.038) scores, so that students with acne vulgaris have worse QoL. There was a correlation between the severity of acne vulgaris and worse quality of life. Self-esteem was not significantly associated with the occurrence or severity of acne vulgaris. Conclusions acne vulgaris assumes significance in view of its high prevalence and the effect on quality of life of adolescents, more severe at the more pronounced stages of disease (p<0.001). The psychosocial impact of acne vulgaris should be valued in the management of patients with this condition. PMID:26560206

  12. Extreme Ionizing-Radiation-Resistant Bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Schwendner, Petra

    2013-01-01

    potential for transfer, and subsequent proliferation, on another solar body such as Mars and Europa. These organisms are more likely to escape planetary protection assays, which only take into account presence of spores. Hence, presences of extreme radiation-resistant Deinococcus in the cleanroom facility where spacecraft are assembled pose a serious risk for integrity of life-detection missions. The microorganism described herein was isolated from the surfaces of the cleanroom facility in which the Phoenix Lander was assembled. The isolated bacterial strain was subjected to a comprehensive polyphasic analysis to characterize its taxonomic position. This bacterium exhibits very low 16SrRNA similarity with any other environmental isolate reported to date. Both phenotypic and phylogenetic analyses clearly indicate that this isolate belongs to the genus Deinococcus and represents a novel species. The name Deinococcus phoenicis was proposed after the Phoenix spacecraft, which was undergoing assembly, testing, and launch operations in the spacecraft assembly facility at the time of isolation. D. phoenicis cells exhibited higher resistance to ionizing radiation (cobalt-60; 14 kGy) than the cells of the D. radiodurans (5 kGy). Thus, it is in the best interest of NASA to thoroughly characterize this organism, which will further assess in determining the potential for forward contamination. Upon the completion of genetic and physiological characteristics of D. phoenicis, it will be added to a planetary protection database to be able to further model and predict the probability of forward contamination.

  13. Extreme Ionizing-Radiation-Resistant Bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Schwendner, Petra

    2012-01-01

    potential for transfer, and subsequent proliferation, on another solar body such as Mars and Europa. These organisms are more likely to escape planetary protection assays, which only take into account presence of spores. Hence, presences of extreme radiation-resistant Deinococcus in the cleanroom facility where spacecraft are assembled pose a serious risk for integrity of life-detection missions. The microorganism described herein was isolated from the surfaces of the cleanroom facility in which the Phoenix Lander was assembled. The isolated bacterial strain was subjected to a comprehensive polyphasic analysis to characterize its taxonomic position. This bacterium exhibits very low 16SrRNA similarity with any other environmental isolate reported to date. Both phenotypic and phylogenetic analyses clearly indicate that this isolate belongs to the genus Deinococcus and represents a novel species. The name Deinococcus phoenicis was proposed after the Phoenix spacecraft, which was undergoing assembly, testing, and launch operations in the spacecraft assembly facility at the time of isolation. D. phoenicis cells exhibited higher resistance to ionizing radiation (cobalt-60; 14 kGy) than the cells of the D. radiodurans (5 kGy). Thus, it is in the best interest of NASA to thoroughly characterize this organism, which will further assess in determining the potential for forward contamination. Upon the completion of genetic and physiological characteristics of D. phoenicis, it will be added to a planetary protection database to be able to further model and predict the probability of forward contamination.

  14. SvSXP: a Strongylus vulgaris antigen with potential for prepatent diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Strongyle parasites are ubiquitous in grazing horses. Strongylus vulgaris, the most pathogenic of the large strongyles, is known for its extensive migration in the mesenteric arterial system. The lifecycle of S. vulgaris is characterised by a long prepatent period where the migrating larvae are virtually undetectable as there currently is no test available for diagnosing prepatent S. vulgaris infection. Presence of S. vulgaris larvae in the arterial system causes endarteritis and thrombosis with a risk of non-strangulating intestinal infarctions. Emergence of anthelmintic resistance among cyathostomins has led to recommendations of reduced treatment intensity by targeting horses that exceed a predetermined strongyle faecal egg count threshold. One study suggests an apparent increase in prevalence of S. vulgaris on farms where reduced anthelmintic treatment intensity has been implemented. These issues highlight the need for an accurate and reliable assay for diagnosing prepatent S. vulgaris infection. Methods Immunoscreening of a larval S. vulgaris cDNA library using hyperimmune serum raised against S. vulgaris excretory/secretory antigens was performed to identify potential diagnostic antigens. Immunoreactive clones were sequenced, one potential antigen was characterised, expressed as a recombinant protein, initially evaluated by western blot (WB) analysis, the diagnostic potential of the IgG subclasses was evaluated by ELISA, and the diagnostic accuracy evaluated using serum from 102 horses with known S. vulgaris infection status. Results The clone expressing the potential antigen encoded a S. vulgaris SXP/RAL2 homologue. The recombinant protein, rSvSXP, was shown to be a potential diagnostic antigen by WB analysis, and a target of serum IgGa, IgG(T) and total IgG in naturally infected horses, with IgG(T) antibodies being the most reliable indicator of S. vulgaris infection in horses. Evaluation of diagnostic accuracy of the ELISA resulted in a

  15. Oral Spironolactone in Post-teenage Female Patients with Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Grace K.

    2012-01-01

    Oral spironolactone has been used for over two decades in the dermatological setting. Although it is not generally considered a primary option in the management of female patients with acne vulgaris, the increase in office visits by post-teenage women with acne vulgaris has recently placed a spotlight on the use of this agent in this subgroup of patients. This article reviews the literature focusing on the use of oral spironolactone in this subset of women with acne vulgaris, including discussions of the recommended starting dose, expected response time, adjustments in therapy, potential adverse effects, and patient monitoring. PMID:22468178

  16. Two endornaviruses show differential infection patterns between gene pools of Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Khankhum, Surasak; Valverde, Rodrigo A; Pastor-Corrales, Marcial A; Osorno, Juan M; Sabanadzovic, Sead

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the occurrence of two plant endornaviruses, Phaseolus vulgaris endornavirus 1 and Phaseolus vulgaris endornavirus 2, in breeding lines, cultivars, landraces, and wild genotypes of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) collected from the two centers of common bean domestication: Mesoamerica and the Andes. The two endornaviruses were detected in many genotypes of Mesoamerican origin but rarely in genotypes of Andean origin. The results suggest that these two endornaviruses were introduced into the Mesoamerican modern genotypes during common bean domestication and provide more evidence for the existence of two divergent gene pools of common bean. PMID:25623050

  17. Microcalorimetric Measurements of Glucose Metabolism by Marine Bacterium Vibrio alginolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Andrew S.; Millero, Frank J.; Gerchakov, Sol M.

    1982-01-01

    Microcalorimetric measurements of heat production from glucose by Vibrio alginolyticus were made to assess the viability of calorimetry as a technique for studying the metabolism of marine bacteria at organic nutrient concentrations found in marine waters. The results show that the metabolism of glucose by this bacterium can be measured by calorimetry at submicromolar concentrations. A linear correlation between glucose concentration and total heat production was observed over a concentration range of 8 mM to 0.35 μM. It is suggested that these data indicate a constant efficiency of metabolism for this bacterium over the wide range of glucose concentrations studied. PMID:16346131

  18. Phytoremediation of cadmium-contaminated farmland soil by the hyperaccumulator Beta vulgaris L. var. cicla.

    PubMed

    Song, Xueying; Hu, Xiaojun; Ji, Puhui; Li, Yushuang; Chi, Guangyu; Song, Yufang

    2012-04-01

    A field study was conducted to evaluate the phytoremediation efficiency of cadmium (Cd) contaminated soil utilizing the Cd hyperaccumulator Beta vulgaris L. var. cicla during one growing season (about 2 months) on farmland in Zhangshi Irrigation Area, the representative wastewater irrigation area in China. Results showed that B. vulgaris L. var. cicla is a promising plant in the phytoremediation of Cd contaminated farmland soil. The maximum of Cd phytoremediation efficiency by B. vulgaris L. var. cicla reached 144.6 mg/ha during one growing season. Planting density had a significant effect on the plant biomass and the overall Cd phytoremediation efficiency (p < 0.05). The amendment of organic manure promoted the biomass increase of B. vulgaris L. var. cicla (p < 0.05) but inhibited the Cd phytoremediation efficiency. PMID:22286610

  19. Cefadroxil-induced ampicillin-exacerbated pemphigus vulgaris: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J P; Koren, J F; Daniel, R C; Chapman, S W

    1986-03-01

    A 77-year-old patient is described who developed pemphigus vulgaris temporally with the administration of cefadroxil. The disease improved when the drug was discontinued but was exacerbated with the administration of ampicillin. This may be the first case of possible cefadroxil-induced and only the second case of ampicillin-induced pemphigus vulgaris reported. The pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of pemphigus vulgaris is briefly described. Drug-induced pemphigus is reviewed. By far the most incriminated drug has been penicillamine. It is postulated that the sulfhydryl group of penicillamine alters the intercellular cement substance into an antigenic structure with subsequent antibody formation. The chemical similarity between penicillamine, the penicillins, and the cephalosporins is alluded to and the potential for cross-sensitivity between the penicillins and cephalosporins is emphasized. Although the pemphigus vulgaris could have occurred by chance, it seems probable that it was drug-induced. PMID:3956380

  20. Two new cycloartane glycosides from the underground parts of Aquilegia vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Yoshimitsu, Hitoshi; Nishida, Makiko; Nohara, Toshihiro

    2008-11-01

    Two new cycloartane glycosides, named aquilegiosides K and L, have been isolated from the dried underground parts of Aquilegia vulgaris. Their structures were determined by two dimensional (2D) NMR spectroscopic analysis and chemical evidence. PMID:18981620

  1. Narrow- and Broad-Host-Range Symbiotic Plasmids of Rhizobium spp. Strains That Nodulate Phaseolus vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Brom, Susana; Martinez, Esperanza; Dávila, Guillermo; Palacios, Rafael

    1988-01-01

    Agrobacterium transconjugants containing symbiotic plasmids from different Rhizobium spp. strains that nodulate Phaseolus vulgaris were obtained. All transconjugants conserved the parental nodulation host range. Symbiotic (Sym) plasmids of Rhizobium strains isolated originally from P. vulgaris nodules, which had a broad nodulation host range, and single-copy nitrogenase genes conferred a Fix+ phenotype to the Agrobacterium transconjugants. A Fix− phenotype was obtained with Sym plasmids of strains isolated from P. vulgaris nodules that had a narrow host range and reiterated nif genes, as well as with Sym plasmids of strains isolated from other legumes that presented single nif genes and a broad nodulation host range. This indicates that different types of Sym plasmids can confer the ability to establish an effective symbiosis with P. vulgaris. Images PMID:16347637

  2. Production of Triterpenoid Sapogenins in Hairy Root Cultures of Silene vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon Bok; Reed, Darwin W; Covello, Patrick S

    2015-11-01

    Silene vulgaris (Moench) Garcke (Caryophyllaceae) is widely distributed in North America and contains bioactive oleanane-type saponins. In order to investigate in vitro production of triterpenoid saponins, hairy root cultures of S. vulgaris were established by infecting leaf explants with five strains of Agrobacterium rhizogenes (LBA9402, R1000, A4, 13333, and 15834). The A. rhizogenes strain LBA9402 had an infection of 100% frequency and induced the most hairy roots per plant. Methyl jasmonate (MeJA)-induced changes in triterpenoid saponins in S. vulgaris hairy roots were analyzed. Accumulation of segetalic acid and gypsogenic acid after MeJA treatment was 5-and 2-fold higher, respectively, than that of control root. We suggest that hairy root cultures of S. vulgaris could be an important alternative approach to the production of saponins. PMID:26749827

  3. Complete Genome of the Cellulolytic Ruminal Bacterium Ruminococcus albus 7

    SciTech Connect

    Suen, Garret; Stevenson, David M; Bruce, David; Chertkov, Olga; Copeland, A; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Detter, J. Chris; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, Cliff; Hauser, Loren John; Ivanova, N; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Land, Miriam L; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pitluck, Sam; Tapia, Roxanne; Woyke, Tanja; Boyum, Julie; Mead, David; Weimer, Paul J

    2011-01-01

    Ruminococcus albus 7 is a highly cellulolytic ruminal bacterium that is a member of the phylum Firmicutes. Here, we describe the complete genome of this microbe. This genome will be useful for rumen microbiology and cellulosome biology and in biofuel production, as one of its major fermentation products is ethanol.

  4. Complete genome of the cellulolytic ruminal bacterium Ruminococcus albus 7

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ruminococcus albus 7 is a highly cellulolytic rumen bacterium that is a member of the phylum Firmicutes. Here, we describe the complete genome for this microbe. This genome will be useful for rumen microbiology, cellulosome biology, and in biofuel production, as one of its major fermentation product...

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Oral Bacterium Streptococcus mutans JH1140.

    PubMed

    Escano, Jerome; Deng, Peng; Lu, Shi-En; Smith, Lief

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans JH1140 is an oral bacterium known to produce the bacteriocin mutacin 1140, and the strain has been genetically engineered to combat dental caries. Here, we report the 2.0-Mb draft genome of S. mutans JH1140. This genome provides new insights into the strain's superior colonization properties and its utility in replacement therapy. PMID:27257196

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Oral Bacterium Streptococcus mutans JH1140

    PubMed Central

    Escano, Jerome; Deng, Peng; Lu, Shi-En

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans JH1140 is an oral bacterium known to produce the bacteriocin mutacin 1140, and the strain has been genetically engineered to combat dental caries. Here, we report the 2.0-Mb draft genome of S. mutans JH1140. This genome provides new insights into the strain’s superior colonization properties and its utility in replacement therapy. PMID:27257196

  7. Newer approaches to the treatment of acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Simonart, Thierry

    2012-12-01

    The multifactorial etiology of acne vulgaris makes it challenging to treat. Current treatments include topical retinoids, benzoyl peroxide, topical and systemic antibiotics, azelaic acid, and systemic isotretinoin. Adjunctive and/or emerging approaches include topical dapsone, taurine bromamine, resveratrol, chemical peels, optical treatments, as well as complementary and alternative medications. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the therapies available for acne and their latest developments, including new treatment strategies (i.e. re-evaluation of the use of oral antibiotics and avoidance of topical antibiotic monotherapy, use of subantimicrobial antibiotic dosing, use of low-dose isotretinoin, optical treatments), new formulations (microsponges, liposomes, nanoemulsions, aerosol foams), new combinations (fixed-combination products of topical retinoids and topical antibiotics [essentially clindamycin] or benzoyl peroxide), new agents (topical dapsone, taurine bromamine, resveratrol) and their rationale and likely place in treatment. Acne vaccines, topical natural antimicrobial peptides, and lauric acid represent other promising therapies. PMID:22920095

  8. Cannibalistic behavior of octopus (Octopus vulgaris) in the wild.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Urcera, Jorge; Garci, Manuel E; Roura, Alvaro; González, Angel F; Cabanellas-Reboredo, Miguel; Morales-Nin, Beatriz; Guerra, Angel

    2014-11-01

    The first description of cannibalism in wild adult Octopus vulgaris is presented from 3 observations made in the Ría de Vigo (NW Spain), which were filmed by scuba divers. These records document common traits in cannibalistic behavior: (a) it was intercohort cannibalism; (b) attacks were made by both males and females; (c) in 2 of the records, the prey were transported to the den, which was covered with stones of different sizes; (d) the predator started to eat the tip of the arms of its prey; (e) predation on conspecifics occurred even if there were other abundant prey available (i.e., mussels); and (f) the prey/predator weight ratio in the 3 cases ranged from 20% to 25% body weight. The relationships between this behavior and sex, defense of territory, energy balance, food shortage, competition and predation, as well as how the attacker kills its victim are discussed. PMID:25198542

  9. The Perception of Glass Patterns by Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris)

    PubMed Central

    Qadri, Muhammad A. J.; Cook, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Glass patterns are structured dot stimuli used to investigate the visual perception of global form. Studies have demonstrated that humans and pigeons differ in their processing of circular versus linearly organized Glass patterns. To test whether this comparative difference is characteristic of birds as a phylogenetic class, we investigated for the first time how a passerine (starlings, Sturnus vulgaris) discriminated multiple Glass patterns from random dot stimuli in a simultaneous discrimination. Examining acquisition, steady-state performance, and the effects of diminishing global coherence, it was found that the perception of Glass patterns by five starlings differed from human perception and corresponded to that established with pigeons. This suggests an important difference in how birds and primates are specialized in their processing of circular visual patterns, perhaps related to face perception, or in how these highly visual animals direct attention to the global and local components of spatially separated form stimuli. PMID:25117091

  10. Characterization of oral pemphigus vulgaris in Thai patients.

    PubMed

    Iamaroon, Anak; Boonyawong, Pattriyaporn; Klanrit, Poramaporn; Prasongtunskul, Suwan; Thongprasom, Kobkan

    2006-03-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a serious mucocutaneous disease that be fatal if left untreated. The oral mucosa is often the first site to be affected by the disease. It is thus important that the dentist is able to recognize oral manifestations of PV and refer appropriately. Although oral PV is a well-characterized condition, the disease characteristics of patients in Thailand have not been previously reported. Here, we describe patient and lesion characteristics of 18 cases of oral PV. For these 18 cases, the mean age was 38 years, and the male:female ratio was 1:2. The most commonly affected sites were the gingiva and buccal mucosa, and the duration of disease was approximately one year. Medications previously used included corticosteroids and interferon, and nine patients reported systemic disease. Histopathologic examination with/without direct immunofluorescence was the method of diagnosis in all cases. PMID:16617201

  11. Relapse of pemphigus vulgaris after topical application of ingenol mebutate.

    PubMed

    Russo, I; Ferrazzi, A; Alaibac, M

    2016-08-01

    Ingenol mebutate is a recently approved topical agent for the treatment of actinic keratosis. Its most common adverse effects are transient local skin reactions. We report a 63-year-old white man who presented with a red-brownish crusted plaque involving the dorsum of his nose and an eroded area on his lower lip, which appeared soon after topical application of ingenol mebutate gel. Clinical, histological and immunopathological features were consistent with a diagnosis of pemphigus vulgaris (PV). To our knowledge, this is the first report of relapse of PV after topical application of ingenol mebutate gel. The temporal relationship between the application of the drug and the outbreak of PV supports the involvement of this agent in triggering the disease. It is plausible that ingenol mebutate may have induced the disease by its action on the production of proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:27381839

  12. The importance of photoprotection and moisturization in treating acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Bowe, Whitney P; Kircik, Leon H

    2014-08-01

    Skin care products are recognized by dermatologists as critical adjunctive therapeutic modalities for patients suffering from acne vulgaris (AV). Prescribing an acne medication without reviewing a patient's skin care regimen can lead to poor compliance, intolerable side effects, and resulting patient and physician frustration. Striking that delicate balance between maintaining the skin barrier while controlling oil and shine has always been a challenge when treating this chronic inflammatory condition, and it necessitates a unique set of ingredients and formulation. Cetaphil® DermaControl™ Moisturizer SPF 30 (Galderma Laboratories, L.P., Fort Worth, Texas) is a new generation of skin care specifically designed for acne-prone skin and acne-affected skin. Both Cetaphil® DermaControl™ Foam Wash and Cetaphil DermaControl Moisturizer SPF 30 incorporate pharmacologically tested, state-of-the-art ingredients and technologies that studies have shown impart substantial benefits to AV patients. PMID:25116982

  13. Volatile compounds of dry beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Oomah, B Dave; Liang, Lisa S Y; Balasubramanian, Parthiba

    2007-12-01

    Volatile compounds of uncooked dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivars representing three market classes (black, dark red kidney and pinto) grown in 2005 were isolated with headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME), and analyzed with gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A total of 62 volatiles consisting of aromatic hydrocarbons, aldehydes, alkanes, alcohols and ketones represented on average 62, 38, 21, 12, and 9 x 10(6) total area counts, respectively. Bean cultivars differed in abundance and profile of volatiles. The combination of 18 compounds comprising a common profile explained 79% of the variance among cultivars based on principal component analysis (PCA). The SPME technique proved to be a rapid and effective method for routine evaluation of dry bean volatile profile. PMID:17926127

  14. Future therapies for pemphigus vulgaris: Rituximab and beyond.

    PubMed

    Huang, Amy; Madan, Raman K; Levitt, Jacob

    2016-04-01

    The conventional treatment for patients with pemphigus vulgaris (PV) centers on global immunosuppression, such as the use of steroids and other immunosuppressive drugs, to decrease titers of antidesmoglein autoantibodies responsible for the acantholytic blisters. Global immunosuppressants, however, cause serious side effects. The emergence of anti-CD20 biologic medications, such as rituximab, as an adjunct to conventional therapy has shifted the focus to targeted destruction of autoimmune B cells. Next-generation biologic medications with improved modes of delivery, pharmacology, and side effect profiles are constantly being developed, adding to the diversity of options for PV treatment. We review promising monoclonal antibodies, including veltuzumab, obinutuzumab (GA-101), ofatumumab, ocaratuzumab (AME-133v), PRO131921, and belimumab. PMID:26792592

  15. Enhancing methane production of Chlorella vulgaris via thermochemical pretreatments.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Lara; Mahdy, Ahmed; Timmers, Rudolphus A; Ballesteros, Mercedes; González-Fernández, Cristina

    2013-12-01

    To enhance the anaerobic digestion of Chlorella vulgaris, thermochemical pretreatments were conducted. All pretreatments markedly improved solubilisation of carbohydrates. Thermal treatments and thermal treatments combined with alkali resulted in 5-fold increase of soluble carbohydrates while thermal treatment with acid addition enhanced by 7-fold. On the other hand, proteins were only solubilized with thermo-alkaline conditions applied. Likewise, all the pretreatments tested improved methane production. Highest anaerobic digestion was accomplished by thermal treatment at 120°C for 40 min without any chemical addition. As a matter of fact, hydrolysis constant rate was doubled under this condition. According to the energetic analysis, energy input was higher than the extra energy gain at the solid concentration employed. Nevertheless, higher biomass organic load pretreatment may be an option to achieve positive energetic balances. PMID:24096280

  16. The complete mitochondrial genome of Hydra vulgaris (Hydroida: Hydridae).

    PubMed

    Pan, Hong-Chun; Fang, Hong-Yan; Li, Shi-Wei; Liu, Jun-Hong; Wang, Ying; Wang, An-Tai

    2014-12-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Hydra vulgaris (Hydroida: Hydridae) is composed of two linear DNA molecules. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) molecule 1 is 8010 bp long and contains six protein-coding genes, large subunit rRNA, methionine and tryptophan tRNAs, two pseudogenes consisting respectively of a partial copy of COI, and terminal sequences at two ends of the linear mtDNA, while the mtDNA molecule 2 is 7576 bp long and contains seven protein-coding genes, small subunit rRNA, methionine tRNA, a pseudogene consisting of a partial copy of COI and terminal sequences at two ends of the linear mtDNA. COI gene begins with GTG as start codon, whereas other 12 protein-coding genes start with a typical ATG initiation codon. In addition, all protein-coding genes are terminated with TAA as stop codon. PMID:23841615

  17. Attenuation of monochromatic and polychromatic lights in Chlorella vulgaris suspensions.

    PubMed

    Yun, Y S; Park, J M

    2001-06-01

    A quantitative description of light attenuation in microalgal suspensions is a prerequisite for kinetic modeling of microalgal photosynthesis and/or growth activity depending upon the light distribution inside photobioreactors. In this study, the light attenuation coefficients in Chlorella vulgaris suspensions were theoretically calculated from light absorption spectra and spectral irradiances of various light sources. By using this method, errors occurring in the direct measurement of the attenuation coefficients can be avoided. The obtained light attenuation coefficients were used for evaluating light attenuation models such as the Beer-Lambert, Cornet, and hyperbolic models. Furthermore, advantages and disadvantages of these models are discussed with respect to prediction of performance, mechanistic background, and usefulness for further application to calculation of the light distribution inside photobioreactors. PMID:11525626

  18. Nootropic Effects of Filipendula Vulgaris Moench Water Extract Fractions.

    PubMed

    Shilova, I V; Suslov, N I; Amelchenko, V P

    2015-07-01

    Nootropic activity of water extract fractions from aerial parts of Filipendula vulgaris Moench was demonstrated on the models of hermetic volume hypoxia, conditioned passive avoidance response, open field test, and forced swimming with a load. The fractions stimulated hypoxic resistance, normalized orientation and exploratory behavior, improved conditioned response reproduction during testing after hypoxic injury, and increased exercise tolerance. Fractionation of the extract led to dissociation of the effect components, which suggests that individual constituents have specific characteristics. Ethylacetate fraction exhibited most pronounced nootropic activity and was superior to plant extract by some characteristics. The detected effects seemed to be caused by modulation of the hippocampus activity the under the effects of phenol and triterpene compounds. PMID:26210209

  19. The perception of Glass patterns by starlings (Sturnus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Qadri, Muhammad A J; Cook, Robert G

    2015-06-01

    Glass patterns are structured dot stimuli used to investigate the visual perception of global form. Studies have demonstrated that humans and pigeons differ in their processing of circular versus linearly organized Glass patterns. To test whether this comparative difference is characteristic of birds as a phylogenetic class, we investigated for the first time how a passerine (starlings, Sturnus vulgaris) discriminated multiple Glass patterns from random-dot stimuli in a simultaneous discrimination. By examining acquisition, steady-state performance, and the effects of diminishing global coherence, it was found that the perception of Glass patterns by 5 starlings differed from human perception and corresponded to that established with pigeons. This suggests an important difference in how birds and primates are specialized in their processing of circular visual patterns, perhaps related to face perception, or in how these highly visual animals direct attention to the global and local components of spatially separated form stimuli. PMID:25117091

  20. A case of stasis papillomatosis associated with psoriasis vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Sato, T; Katagiri, K; Itami, S; Takayasu, S

    1996-05-01

    A markedly obese, 41-year-old Japanese man who had suffered from psoriasis vulgaris for several years visited us with elephantiasis-like swelling of his lower legs of three months' duration. His right lower leg showed marked papillomatosis with thick scales, and the left lower leg was eroded and papillomatous. Although direct lymphography of his lower extremities showed no abnormality, indirect lymphography revealed local lymphatic damage in the involved skin. Histological examination showed hyperkeratosis, marked papillomatosis, proliferation of capillaries in the upper dermis, and lymphectasia in the lower dermis. The lesions were much improved by washing and topical use of corticosteroids for two months. It was suspected that obesity and the preceding psoriatic lesions caused local lymphatic disturbances, followed by the development of stasis papillomatosis. PMID:8675828

  1. Thermogravimetric analysis of the gasification of microalgae Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Figueira, Camila Emilia; Moreira, Paulo Firmino; Giudici, Reinaldo

    2015-12-01

    The gasification of microalgae Chlorella vulgaris under an atmosphere of argon and water vapor was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis. The data were interpreted by using conventional isoconversional methods and also by the independent parallel reaction (IPR) model, in which the degradation is considered to happen individually to each pseudo-component of biomass (lipid, carbohydrate and protein). The IPR model allows obtaining the kinetic parameters of the degradation reaction of each component. Three main stages were observed during the gasification process and the differential thermogravimetric curve was satisfactorily fitted by the IPR model considering three pseudocomponents. The comparison of the activation energy values obtained by the methods and those found in the literature for other microalgae was satisfactory. Quantification of reaction products was performed using online gas chromatography. The major products detected were H2, CO and CH4, indicating the potential for producing fuel gas and syngas from microalgae. PMID:26447558

  2. ZnO nanoparticles and root colonization by a beneficial pseudomonad influence essential metal responses in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Dimkpa, Christian O; Hansen, Trevor; Stewart, Jacob; McLean, Joan E; Britt, David W; Anderson, Anne J

    2015-05-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) incorporated into commercial products are reactive on plants. Here, the influence of a root-associated bacterium, Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6 (PcO6) on the responses of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) to commercial ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) was examined. ZnO NPs (250-1000 mg Zn/kg) significantly (p = 0.05) impacted root elongation after 7 days; only at 1000 mg/kg was shoot growth significantly inhibited. Zn solubilized from ZnO NPs correlated with root growth inhibition (r(2 )= 0.8709); solubility of Fe (r(2 )= 0.916) and Mn (r(2 )= 0.997), and shoot accumulation of Zn (r(2 )= 0.9095), Fe (r(2 )= 0.9422) and Mn (r(2 )= 0.789). Root ferric reductase activity diminished 31% in NP-exposed plants. Amendments with Zn ions at 6 mg/kg, corresponding to Zn solubilized from the NPs, did not replicate the responses, suggesting a nano-specific contribution of the ZnO. Neither NPs (500 mg Zn/kg) nor Zn ions affected root colonization by PcO6. Siderophore production by PcO6 increased 17% by exposure to NPs and 11% with Zn ions (18 mg/kg). PcO6 restored plant ferric reduction under NP exposure, but decreased uptake of Zn and Fe, 58 and 18%, respectively, suggesting soil bacteria could reduce plant accumulation of metals under toxic exposure levels, while negatively affecting uptake of essential elements. Collectively, these findings demonstrated that growth and balance of essential metals in bean exposed to ZnO NPs were influenced by the NPs and bacterial colonization of NP-exposed roots, indicating subtle effects of NPs in plant nutrition. PMID:24713073

  3. Damaged-self recognition in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) shows taxonomic specificity and triggers signaling via reactive oxygen species (ROS)

    PubMed Central

    Duran-Flores, Dalia; Heil, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Plants require reliable mechanisms to detect injury. Danger signals or “damage-associated molecular patterns” (DAMPs) are released from stressed host cells and allow injury detection independently of enemy-derived molecules. We studied the response of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) to the application of leaf homogenate as a source of DAMPs and measured the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as an early response and the secretion of extrafloral nectar (EFN) as a jasmonic acid (JA)-dependent late response. We observed a strong taxonomic signal in the response to different leaf homogenates. ROS formation and EFN secretion were highly correlated and responded most strongly to leaf homogenates produced using the same cultivar or closely related accessions, less to a distantly related cultivar of common bean or each of the two congeneric species, P. lunatus and P. coccineus, and not at all to homogenates prepared from species in different genera, not even when using other Fabaceae. Interestingly, leaf homogenates also reduced the infection by the bacterial pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae, when they were applied directly before challenging, although the same homogenates exhibited no direct in vitro inhibitory effect in the bacterium. We conclude that ROS signaling is associated to the induction of EFN secretion and that the specific blend of DAMPs that are released from damaged cells allows the plant to distinguish the “damaged-self” from the damaged “non-self.” The very early responses of plants to DAMPs can trigger resistance to both, herbivores and pathogens, which should be adaptive because injury facilitates infection, independently of its causal reason. PMID:25400650

  4. URIC ACID: A NEW ANTIOXIDANT IN PATIENTS WITH PEMPHIGUS VULGARIS

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi, Maryam; Rahimi, Hoda; Barikbin, Behrooz; Toossi, Parviz; Lotfi, Sara; Hedayati, Mehdi; Younespour, Shima

    2011-01-01

    Background: Increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation are seen in many dermatologic disorders, for example, atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, vitiligo, acne vulgaris, pemphigus vulgaris (PV), lichen planus, and alopecia areata. ROS has an important role in the inflammation process. In PV, increased production of ROS leads to decline of antioxidants in plasma and red blood cells which results in oxidative stress. We aimed to evaluate the level of these antioxidants in PV patients and compare it to the controls. Materials and Methods: Among patients attending the dermatology clinics, 30 patients with PV, who had never been on treatment, were enrolled to the study. The control group consisted of 30 age- and sex-matched healthy non-smoker individuals. Venous blood was collected from the subjects for the evaluation of plasma levels of glutathione peroxidase, vitamin C, selenium, bilirubin, and uric acid. Results: Age mean and standard deviation of the patients (40.83, 12.74) was comparable to the controls (41.96, 13.08). Mean level of uric acid was significantly lower in PV patients compared to the controls (P = 0.006). Other antioxidants were not different between the two groups. Uric acid of the patients with mucosal involvement was significantly lower than patients with mucocutaneous involvement (P = 0.049). Limitations: The blood level of other antioxidants (e.g. malondialdehyde) was not evaluated. Conclusions: Uric acid as an antioxidant in our study had similar changes to previous studies in the field of other diseases but selenium, bilirubin, and glutathione peroxidase did not differ between patients and controls. PMID:21772587

  5. Study of the effect of extract of Thymus vulgaris on anxiety in male rats.

    PubMed

    Komaki, Alireza; Hoseini, Faeghe; Shahidi, Siamak; Baharlouei, Negar

    2016-07-01

    There is some evidence in traditional medicine for the effectiveness of Thymus vulgaris ( bǎi lǐ xiāng) in the treatment of anxiety in humans. The elevated plus-maze (EPM) has broadly been used to investigate anxiolytic and anxiogenic compounds. The present study investigated the effects of extract of T. vulgaris on rat behavior in the EPM. In the present study, the data were obtained from male Wistar rats. Animals were divided into four groups: saline group and T. vulgaris groups (50 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg, and 200 mg/kg infusion for 7 days by feeding). During the test period, the total distance covered by animals, the number of open- and closed-arm entries, and the time spent in open and closed arms of the EPM were recorded. T. vulgaris increased open-arm exploration and open-arm entry in the EPM, whereas extract of this plant has no effects on the total distance covered by animals and the number of closed-arm entries. The results of the present experiment indicate that T. vulgaris may have an anxiolytic profile in rat behavior in the EPM test, which is not influenced by the locomotor activity. Further research is required to determine the mechanisms by which T. vulgaris extract exerts an anxiolytic effect in rats. PMID:27419090

  6. A clinico-histopathological study of lupus vulgaris: A 3 year experience at a tertiary care centre

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Varadraj Vasant; Naveen, Kikkeri Narayanshetty; Athanikar, S. B.; Dinesh, U. S.; Divyashree, A.; Gupta, Gaurang

    2014-01-01

    Background: Lupus vulgaris is the most common form of cutaneous tuberculosis in adults. Lupus vulgaris is caused by hematogenous, lymphatic, or contiguous spread from elsewhere in the body. histologically it is charecterised by typical tubercles with or without caseation, surrounded by epitheloid histiocytes and multinucleate giant cells in the superficial epidermis with prominent peripheral lymphocytes. Materials and Method: All cases of clinically and histopathologicaly diagnosed lupus vulgaris over the previous five years were included in the study. Results: Fourteen cases of lupus vulgaris cases reported during the study period with eaqual incidence among males and females. Discussion: Plaque type of lupus vulgaris was the most common type. Histopathologically tubercular granulomas were seen in all cases as compared to other studies. Conclusion: Different patterns of lupus vulgaris are reported PMID:25396129

  7. Uranium and cesium accumulation in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. vulgaris) and its potential for uranium rhizofiltration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Minjune; Jawitz, James W; Lee, Minhee

    2015-02-01

    Laboratory scale rhizofiltration experiments were performed to investigate uranium and cesium accumulation in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. vulgaris) and its potential for treatment of uranium contaminated groundwater. During 72 h of rhizofiltration, the roots of the bean accumulated uranium and cesium to concentrations 317-1019 times above the initial concentrations, which ranged from 100 to 700 μg l(-1) in artificially contaminated solutions. When the pH of the solution was adjusted to 3, the ability to accumulate uranium was 1.6 times higher than it was for solutions of pH 7 and pH 9. With an initial uranium concentration of 240 μg l(-1) in genuine groundwater at pH 5, the bean reduced the uranium concentration by 90.2% (to 23.6 μg l(-1)) within 12 h and by 98.9% (to 2.8 μg l(-1)) within 72 h. A laboratory scale continuous clean-up system reduced uranium concentrations from 240 μg l(-1) to below 10 μg l(-1) in 56 h; the whole uranium concentration in the bean roots during system operation was more than 2600 μg g(-1) on a dry weight basis. Using SEM and EDS analyses, the uranium removal in solution at pH 7 was determined based on adsorption and precipitation on the root surface in the form of insoluble uranium compounds. The present results demonstrate that the rhizofiltration technique using beans efficiently removes uranium and cesium from groundwater as an eco-friendly and cost-effective method. PMID:25461514

  8. In vitro antioxidant and anticancer effects of solvent fractions from prunella vulgaris var. lilacina

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recently, considerable attention has been focused on exploring the potential antioxidant properties of plant extracts or isolated products of plant origin. Prunella vulgaris var. lilacina is widely distributed in Korea, Japan, China, and Europe, and it continues to be used to treat inflammation, eye pain, headache, and dizziness. However, reports on the antioxidant activities of P. vulgaris var. lilacina are limited, particularly concerning the relationship between its phenolic content and antioxidant capacity. In this study, we investigated the antioxidant and anticancer activities of an ethanol extract from P. vulgaris var. lilacina and its fractions. Methods Dried powder of P. vulgaris var. lilacina was extracted with ethanol, and the extract was fractionated to produce the hexane fraction, butanol fraction, chloroform fraction and residual water fraction. The phenolic content was assayed using the Folin-Ciocalteu colorimetric method. Subsequently, the antioxidant activities of the ethanol extract and its fractions were analyzed employing various antioxidant assay methods including DPPH, FRAP, ABTS, SOD activity and production of reactive oxygen species. Additionally, the extract and fractions were assayed for their ability to exert cytotoxic activities on various cancer cells using the MTT assay. We also investigated the expression of genes associated with apoptotic cell death by RT-PCR. Results The total phenolic contents of the ethanol extract and water fraction of P. vulgaris var. lilacina were 303.66 and 322.80 mg GAE/g dry weight (or fractions), respectively. The results showed that the ethanol extract and the water fraction of P. vulgaris var. lilacina had higher antioxidant content than other solvent fractions, similar to their total phenolic content. Anticancer activity was also tested using the HepG2, HT29, A549, MKN45 and HeLa cancer cell lines. The results clearly demonstrated that the P. vulgaris var. lilacina ethanol extract induced

  9. In-vivo fluorescence detection and imaging of porphyrin-producing bacteria in the human skin and in the oral cavity for diagnosis of acne vulgaris, caries, and squamous cell carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Schneckenburger, Herbert; Hemmer, Joerg; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Steiner, Rudolf W.

    1994-05-01

    Certain bacteria are able to synthesize metal-free fluorescent porphyrins and can therefore be detected by sensitive autofluorescence measurements in the red spectral region. The porphyrin-producing bacterium Propionibacterium acnes, which is involved in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris, was localized in human skin. Spectrally resolved fluorescence images of bacteria distribution in the face were obtained by a slow-scan CCD camera combined with a tunable liquid crystal filter. The structured autofluorescence of dental caries and dental plaque in the red is caused by oral bacteria, like Bacteroides or Actinomyces odontolyticus. `Caries images' were created by time-gated imaging in the ns-region after ultrashort laser excitation. Time-gated measurements allow the suppression of backscattered light and non-porphyrin autofluorescence. Biopsies of oral squamous cell carcinoma exhibited red autofluorescence in necrotic regions and high concentrations of the porphyrin-producing bacterium Pseudomonas aerigunosa. These studies suggest that the temporal and spectral characteristics of bacterial autofluorescence can be used in the diagnosis and treatment of a variety of diseases.

  10. Three-dimensional structure of the nonaheme cytochrome c from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans Essex in the Fe(III) state at 1.89 A resolution.

    PubMed

    Umhau, S; Fritz, G; Diederichs, K; Breed, J; Welte, W; Kroneck, P M

    2001-02-01

    A nine heme group containing cytochrome c isolated from the soluble and membrane fractions of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans Essex, termed nonaheme cytochrome c, was crystallized, and the structure was solved using the multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) phasing method. Refinement was carried out to a resolution of 1.89 A, and anisotropic temperature factors were addressed to the iron and sulfur atoms in the model. The structure revealed two cytochrome c(3) like domains with the typical arrangement of four heme centers. Both domains flanked an extra heme buried under the protein surface. This heme is held in position by loop extensions in each of the two domains. Although both the N- and C-terminal tetraheme domains exhibit a fold and heme arrangement very similar to that of cytochrome c(3), they differ considerably in their loop extensions and electrostatic surface. Analysis of the structure provides evidence for a different function of both domains, namely, anchoring the protein in a transmembranous complex with the N-terminal domain and formation of an electron-transfer complex with hydrogenase by the C-terminal domain. PMID:11170457

  11. Multiscale simulations give insight into the hydrogen in and out pathways of [NiFe]-hydrogenases from Aquifex aeolicus and Desulfovibrio fructosovorans.

    PubMed

    Oteri, Francesco; Baaden, Marc; Lojou, Elisabeth; Sacquin-Mora, Sophie

    2014-12-01

    [NiFe]-hydrogenases catalyze the cleavage of molecular hydrogen into protons and electrons and represent promising tools for H2-based technologies such as biofuel cells. However, many aspects of these enzymes remain to be understood, in particular how the catalytic center can be protected from irreversible inactivation by O2. In this work, we combined homology modeling, all-atom molecular dynamics, and coarse-grain Brownian dynamics simulations to investigate and compare the dynamic and mechanical properties of two [NiFe]-hydrogenases: the soluble O2-sensitive enzyme from Desulfovibrio fructosovorans, and the O2-tolerant membrane-bound hydrogenase from Aquifex aeolicus. We investigated the diffusion pathways of H2 from the enzyme surface to the central [NiFe] active site, and the possible proton pathways that are used to evacuate hydrogen after the oxidation reaction. Our results highlight common features of the two enzymes, such as a Val/Leu/Arg triad of key residues that controls ligand migration and substrate access in the vicinity of the active site, or the key role played by a Glu residue for proton transfer after hydrogen oxidation. We show specificities of each hydrogenase regarding the enzymes internal tunnel network or the proton transport pathways. PMID:25399809

  12. Isolation of a bacterium capable of degrading peanut hull lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, T.A.; Kerr, R.D.; Benner, R.

    1983-11-01

    Thirty-seven bacterial strains capable of degrading peanut hull lignin were isolated by using four types of lignin preparations and hot-water-extracted peanut hulls. One of the isolates, tentatively identified as Arthrobacter species, was capable of utilizing all four lignin preparations as well as extracted peanut hulls as a sole source of carbon. The bacterium was also capable of degrading specifically labeled (/sup 14/C) lignin-labeled lignocellulose and (/sup 14/C)cellulose-labeled lignocellulose from the cordgrass Spartina alterniflora and could also degrade (/sup 14/C) Kraft lignin from slash pine. After 10 days of incubation with (/sup 14/C) cellulose-labeled lignocellulose or (/sup 14/C) lignin-labeled lignocellulose from S. alterniflora, the bacterium mineralized 6.5% of the polysaccharide component and 2.9% of the lignin component. (Refs. 24).

  13. A Streamlined Strategy for Biohydrogen Production with an Alkaliphilic Bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, Dwayne A; Wall, Judy D.; Mormile, Dr. Melanie R.; Begemann, Matthew B

    2012-01-01

    Biofuels are anticipated to enable a shift from fossil fuels for renewable transportation and manufacturing fuels, with biohydrogen considered attractive since it could offer the largest reduction of global carbon budgets. Currently, biohydrogen production remains inefficient and heavily fossil fuel-dependent. However, bacteria using alkali-treated biomass could streamline biofuel production while reducing costs and fossil fuel needs. An alkaliphilic bacterium, Halanaerobium strain sapolanicus, is described that is capable of biohydrogen production at levels rivaling neutrophilic strains, but at pH 11 and hypersaline conditions. H. sapolanicus ferments a variety of 5- and 6- carbon sugars derived from hemicellulose and cellulose including cellobiose, and forms the end products hydrogen and acetate. Further, it can also produce biohydrogen from switchgrass and straw pretreated at temperatures far lower than any previously reported and in solutions compatible with growth. Hence, this bacterium can potentially increase the efficiency and efficacy of biohydrogen production from renewable biomass resources.

  14. Carum copticum and Thymus vulgaris oils inhibit virulence in Trichophyton rubrum and Aspergillus spp

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mohd Sajjad Ahmad; Ahmad, Iqbal; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

    2014-01-01

    Emergence of drug-resistant strains has demanded for alternative means of combating fungal infections. Oils of Carum copticum and Thymus vulgaris have long been used in ethnomedicine for ailments of various fungal infections. Since their activity has not been reported in particular against drug-resistant fungi, this study was aimed to evaluate the effects of oils of C. copticum and T. vulgaris on the growth and virulence of drug-resistant strains of Aspergillus spp. and Trichophyton rubrum. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis revealed thymol constituting 44.71% and 22.82% of T. vulgaris and C. copticum, respectively. Inhibition of mycelial growth by essential oils was recorded in the order of thymol > T. vulgaris > C. copticum against the tested strains. RBC lysis assay showed no tested oils to be toxic even up to concentration two folds higher than their respective MFCs. Thymol exhibited highest synergy in combination with fluconazole against Aspergillus fumigatus MTCC2550 (FICI value 0.187) and T. rubrum IOA9 (0.156) as determined by checkerboard method. Thymol and T. vulgaris essential oil were equally effective against both the macro and arthroconidia growth (MIC 72 μg/mL). A > 80% reduction in elastase activity was recorded for A. fumigatus MTCC2550 by C. copticum, T. vulgaris oils and thymol. The effectiveness of these oils against arthroconidia and synergistic interaction of thymol and T. vulgaris with fluconazole can be exploited to potentiate the antifungal effects of fluconazole against drug-resistant strains of T. rubrum and Aspergillus spp. PMID:25242937

  15. Carum copticum and Thymus vulgaris oils inhibit virulence in Trichophyton rubrum and Aspergillus spp.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohd Sajjad Ahmad; Ahmad, Iqbal; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

    2014-01-01

    Emergence of drug-resistant strains has demanded for alternative means of combating fungal infections. Oils of Carum copticum and Thymus vulgaris have long been used in ethnomedicine for ailments of various fungal infections. Since their activity has not been reported in particular against drug-resistant fungi, this study was aimed to evaluate the effects of oils of C. copticum and T. vulgaris on the growth and virulence of drug-resistant strains of Aspergillus spp. and Trichophyton rubrum. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis revealed thymol constituting 44.71% and 22.82% of T. vulgaris and C. copticum, respectively. Inhibition of mycelial growth by essential oils was recorded in the order of thymol > T. vulgaris > C. copticum against the tested strains. RBC lysis assay showed no tested oils to be toxic even up to concentration two folds higher than their respective MFCs. Thymol exhibited highest synergy in combination with fluconazole against Aspergillus fumigatus MTCC2550 (FICI value 0.187) and T. rubrum IOA9 (0.156) as determined by checkerboard method. Thymol and T. vulgaris essential oil were equally effective against both the macro and arthroconidia growth (MIC 72 μg/mL). A > 80% reduction in elastase activity was recorded for A. fumigatus MTCC2550 by C. copticum, T. vulgaris oils and thymol. The effectiveness of these oils against arthroconidia and synergistic interaction of thymol and T. vulgaris with fluconazole can be exploited to potentiate the antifungal effects of fluconazole against drug-resistant strains of T. rubrum and Aspergillus spp. PMID:25242937

  16. The culture of Chlorella vulgaris with human urine in multibiological life support system experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Liu, Hong; Tong, Ling; Fu, Yuming; He, Wenting; Hu, Enzhu; Hu, Dawei

    The Integrative Experimental System (IES) was established as a tool to evaluate the rela-tionship of the subsystems in Bioregenerative Life Support System, and Multibiological Life Support System Experiments (MLSSE) have been conducted in the IES. The IES consists of a higher plant chamber, an animal chamber and a plate photo bioreactor (PPB) which cultivated lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), silkworm (Bombyx Mori L.) and microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris), respectively. In MLSSE, four volunteers took turns breathing the system air through a tube connected with the animal chamber periodically. According to the CO2 concentration in the IES, the automotive control system of the PPB changed the light intensity regulating the photosynthesis of Chlorella vulgaris to make CO2 /O2 in the system maintain at stable levels. Chlorella vulgaris grew with human urine by carrying certain amount of alga liquid out of the bioreactor every day with synthetic urine replenished into the system, and O2 was regenerated, at the same time human urine was purified. Results showed that this IES worked stably and Chlorella vulgaris grew well; The culture of Chlorella vulgaris could be used to keep the balance of CO2 and O2 , and the change of light intensity could control the gas composition in the IES; Microalgae culture could be used in emergency in the system, the culture of Chlorella vulgaris could recover to original state in 5 days; 15.6 ml of condensation water was obtained every day by the culture of Chlorella vulgaris; The removal efficiencies of N, P in human urine could reach to 98.2% and 99.5%.

  17. Thermostable purified endoglucanase from thermophilic bacterium acidothermus cellulolyticus

    DOEpatents

    Tucker, Melvin P.; Grohmann, Karel; Himmel, Michael E.; Mohagheghi, Ali

    1992-01-01

    A substantially purified high molecular weight cellulase enzyme having a molecular weight of between about 156,000 to about 203,400 daltons isolated from the bacterium Acidothermus cellulolyticus (ATCC 43068) and a method of producing it are disclosed. The enzyme is water soluble, possesses both C.sub.1 and C.sub.x types of enzymatic activity, has a high degree of stability toward heat and exhibits both a high optimum temperature activity and high inactivation characteristics.

  18. Delta8(14)-steroids in the bacterium Methylococcus capsulatus.

    PubMed Central

    Bouvier, P; Rohmer, M; Benveniste, P; Ourisson, G

    1976-01-01

    The 4,4-dimethyl and 4alpha-methyl sterols of the bacterium Methylococcus capsulatus were identified as 4,4-dimethyl- and 4alpha-methyl-5alpha-cholest-8(14)-en-3beta-ol and 4,4-dimethyl- and 4alpha-methyl-5alpha-cholesta-8(14),24-dien-3beta-ol. Sterol biosynthesis is blocked at the level of 4alpha-methyl delta8(14)-sterols. PMID:999649

  19. Isolation and Characterization of a Chlorinated-Pyridinol-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Y.; Racke, K. D.; Bollag, J.

    1997-01-01

    The isolation of a pure culture of bacteria able to use 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) as a sole source of carbon and energy under aerobic conditions was achieved for the first time. The bacterium was identified as a Pseudomonas sp. and designated ATCC 700113. [2,6-(sup14)C]TCP degradation yielded (sup14)CO(inf2), chloride, and unidentified polar metabolites. PMID:16535719

  20. An on-bacterium flow cytometric immunoassay for protein quantification.

    PubMed

    Lan, Wen-Jun; Lan, Wei; Wang, Hai-Yan; Yan, Lei; Wang, Zhe-Li

    2013-09-01

    The polystyrene bead-based flow cytometric immunoassay has been widely reported. However, the preparation of functional polystyrene bead is still inconvenient. This study describes a simple and easy on-bacterium flow cytometric immunoassay for protein quantification, in which Staphylococcus aureus (SAC) is used as an antibody-antigen carrier to replace the polystyrene bead. The SAC beads were prepared by carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) labeling, paraformaldehyde fixation and antibody binding. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and cytokeratin-19 fragment (CYFRA 21-1) proteins were used as models in the test system. Using prepared SAC beads, biotinylated proteins, and streptavidin-phycoerythrin (SA-PE), the on-bacterium flow cytometric immunoassay was validated by quantifying CEA and CYFRA 21-1 in sample. Obtained data demonstrated a concordant result between the logarithm of the protein concentration and the logarithm of the PE mean fluorescence intensity (MFI). The limit of detection (LOD) in this immunoassay was at least 0.25 ng/ml. Precision and accuracy assessments appeared that either the relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) or the relative error (R.E.) was <10%. The comparison between this immunoassay and a polystyrene bead-based flow cytometric immunoassay showed a correlation coefficient of 0.998 for serum CEA or 0.996 for serum CYFRA 21-1. In conclusion, the on-bacterium flow cytometric immunoassay may be of use in the quantification of serum protein. PMID:23739299

  1. Orally administered extract from Prunella vulgaris attenuates spontaneous colitis in mdr1a-/- mice

    PubMed Central

    Haarberg, Kelley MK; Wymore Brand, Meghan J; Overstreet, Anne-Marie C; Hauck, Catherine C; Murphy, Patricia A; Hostetter, Jesse M; Ramer-Tait, Amanda E; Wannemuehler, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the ability of a Prunella vulgaris (P. vulgaris) ethanolic extract to attenuate spontaneous typhlocolitis in mdr1a-/- mice. METHODS: Vehicle (5% ethanol) or P. vulgaris ethanolic extract (2.4 mg/d) were administered daily by oral gavage to mdr1a-/- or wild type FVBWT mice from 6 wk of age up to 20 wk of age. Clinical signs of disease were noted by monitoring weight loss. Mice experiencing weight loss in excess of 15% were removed from the study. At the time mice were removed from the study, blood and colon tissue were collected for analyses that included histological evaluation of lesions, inflammatory cytokine levels, and myeloperoxidase activity. RESULTS: Administration of P. vulgaris extracts to mdr1a-/- mice delayed onset of colitis and reduced severity of mucosal inflammation when compared to vehicle-treated mdr1a-/- mice. Oral administration of the P. vulgaris extract resulted in reduced (P < 0.05) serum levels of IL-10 (4.6 ± 2 vs 19.4 ± 4), CXCL9 (1319.0 ± 277 vs 3901.0 ± 858), and TNFα (9.9 ± 3 vs 14.8 ± 1) as well as reduced gene expression by more than two-fold for Ccl2, Ccl20, Cxcl1, Cxcl9, IL-1α, Mmp10, VCAM-1, ICAM, IL-2, and TNFα in the colonic mucosa of mdr1a-/- mice compared to vehicle-treated mdr1a-/- mice. Histologically, several microscopic parameters were reduced (P < 0.05) in P. vulgaris-treated mdr1a-/- mice, as was myeloperoxidase activity in the colon (2.49 ± 0.16 vs 3.36 ± 0.06, P < 0.05). The numbers of CD4+ T cells (2031.9 ± 412.1 vs 5054.5 ± 809.5) and germinal center B cells (2749.6 ± 473.7 vs 4934.0 ± 645.9) observed in the cecal tonsils of P. vulgaris-treated mdr1a-/- were significantly reduced (P < 0.05) from vehicle-treated mdr1a-/- mice. Vehicle-treated mdr1a-/- mice were found to produce serum antibodies to antigens derived from members of the intestinal microbiota, indicative of severe colitis and a loss of adaptive tolerance to the members of the microbiota. These serum antibodies were greatly

  2. Molecular Characterization of a Catalase from Hydra vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Bhagirathi; Phillips, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    Catalase, an antioxidant and hydroperoxidase enzyme protects the cellular environment from harmful effects of hydrogen peroxide by facilitating its degradation to oxygen and water. Molecular information on a cnidarian catalase and/or peroxidase is, however, limited. In this work an apparent full length cDNA sequence coding for a catalase (HvCatalase) was isolated from Hydra vulgaris using 3’- and 5’- (RLM) RACE approaches. The 1859 bp HvCatalase cDNA included an open reading frame of 1518 bp encoding a putative protein of 505 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 57.44 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence of HvCatalase contained several highly conserved motifs including the heme-ligand signature sequence RLFSYGDTH and the active site signature FXRERIPERVVHAKGXGA. A comparative analysis showed the presence of conserved catalytic amino acids [His(71), Asn(145), and Tyr(354)] in HvCatalase as well. Homology modeling indicated the presence of the conserved features of mammalian catalase fold. Hydrae exposed to thermal, starvation, metal and oxidative stress responded by regulating its catalase mRNA transcription. These results indicated that the HvCatalase gene is involved in the cellular stress response and (anti)oxidative processes triggered by stressor and contaminant exposure. PMID:22521743

  3. Structure and mechanical properties of Octopus vulgaris suckers.

    PubMed

    Tramacere, Francesca; Kovalev, Alexander; Kleinteich, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N; Mazzolai, Barbara

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we investigate the morphology and mechanical features of Octopus vulgaris suckers, which may serve as a model for the creation of a new generation of attachment devices. Octopus suckers attach to a wide range of substrates in wet conditions, including rough surfaces. This amazing feature is made possible by the sucker's tissues, which are pliable to the substrate profile. Previous studies have described a peculiar internal structure that plays a fundamental role in the attachment and detachment processes of the sucker. In this work, we present a mechanical characterization of the tissues involved in the attachment process, which was performed using microindentation tests. We evaluated the elasticity modulus and viscoelastic parameters of the natural tissues (E ∼ 10 kPa) and measured the mechanical properties of some artificial materials that have previously been used in soft robotics. Such a comparison of biological prototypes and artificial material that mimics octopus-sucker tissue is crucial for the design of innovative artificial suction cups for use in wet environments. We conclude that the properties of the common elastomers that are generally used in soft robotics are quite dissimilar to the properties of biological suckers. PMID:24284894

  4. SNP marker diversity in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Cortés, Andrés J; Chavarro, Martha C; Blair, Matthew W

    2011-09-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers have become a genetic technology of choice because of their automation and high precision of allele calls. In this study, our goal was to develop 94 SNPs and test them across well-chosen common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) germplasm. We validated and accessed SNP diversity at 84 gene-based and 10 non-genic loci using KASPar technology in a panel of 70 genotypes that have been used as parents of mapping populations and have been previously evaluated for SSRs. SNPs exhibited high levels of genetic diversity, an excess of middle frequency polymorphism, and a within-genepool mismatch distribution as expected for populations affected by sudden demographic expansions after domestication bottlenecks. This set of markers was useful for distinguishing Andean and Mesoamerican genotypes but less useful for distinguishing within each gene pool. In summary, slightly greater polymorphism and race structure was found within the Andean gene pool than within the Mesoamerican gene pool but polymorphism rate between genotypes was consistent with genepool and race identity. Our survey results represent a baseline for the choice of SNP markers for future applications because gene-associated SNPs could themselves be causative SNPs for traits. Finally, we discuss that the ideal genetic marker combination with which to carry out diversity, mapping and association studies in common bean should consider a mix of both SNP and SSR markers. PMID:21785951

  5. The Effect of Radiation on Phaseolus vulgaris and Aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durham, Stephanie; Boylan, Derek

    2013-10-01

    Radiation affects human life in disparately subtle and dramatic ways. For instance, nuclear reactions in the Sun produce light and heat that are essential for human existence, while recent research implies that the flux of cosmic ray particles may also have an impact on humans' daily lives. According to the EPA the average American receives 310 mrems of radiation per year, well under a total dose of 50,000 mrems and higher doses that cause symptoms ranging from nausea to death. However, scientists hypothesize that exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation (< 1000 mrems) may produce beneficial effects in organisms. Thus the effect of low doses of alpha, beta, and gamma radiation (12 doses ranging from 0.04 mrems of alpha radiation to 17 mrems of gamma radiation) on Phaseolus vulgaris was tested. The same radiation was also tested on the performance of aerogel, a material used in particle detectors. Aerogel will be used in experiments at the 12 GeV Jefferson Laboratory and has been previously observed to change its optical characteristics after being used in experiments. To determine the level of cosmic ray flux and possible contribution to our experiments a detector was created using scintillator material and 2-inch phototubes. Results from our experiments will be presented. Supported in part by NSF grant 1019521 and 1039446.

  6. The Effect of Radiation on Phaseolus vulgaris growth and Aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boylan, Derek; Durham, Stephanie

    2013-10-01

    Radiation affects human life in disparately subtle and dramatic ways. For instance, nuclear reactions in the Sun produce light and heat that are essential for human existence, while recent research implies that the flux of cosmic ray particles may also have an impact on humans' daily lives. According to the EPA the average American receives 310 mrems of radiation per year, well under a total dose of 50,000 mrems and higher doses that cause symptoms ranging from nausea to death. However, scientists hypothesize that exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation (< 1000 mrems) may produce beneficial effects in organisms. Thus the effect of low doses of alpha, beta, and gamma radiation (12 doses ranging from 0.04 mrems of alpha radiation to 17 mrems of gamma radiation) on Phaseolus vulgaris was tested. The same radiation was also tested on the performance of aerogel, a material used in particle detectors. Aerogel will be used in experiments at the 12 GeV Jefferson Laboratory and has been previously observed to change its optical characteristics after being used in experiments. To determine the level of cosmic ray flux and possible contribution to our experiments a detector was created using scintillator material and 2-inch phototubes. Results from our experiments will be presented. Supported in part by NSF grant 1019521 and 1039446.

  7. Purification and Characterization of Asparaginase from Phaseolus vulgaris Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Saleh A.; Elshal, Mohamed F.; Kumosani, Taha A.; Aldahlawi, Alia M.

    2015-01-01

    L-asparaginase from bacteria has been used in treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The aim of this study was to purify and characterize L-asparaginase from Phaseolus vulgaris seeds instead of microbial sources. L-asparaginase was purified to apparent homogeneity. The enzyme has molecular mass of 79 kDa. The purified asparaginase had very low activity toward a number of asparagine and glutamine analogues. L-asparaginase was free from glutaminase activity. Kinetic parameters, Km and Vmax of purified enzyme, were found to be 6.72 mM and 0.16 μM, respectively. The enzyme had optimum pH at 8.0. The enzyme showed high stability at alkaline pH (pH 7.5–9.0) when incubated for up to 24 h. L-asparaginase had the same temperature optimum and thermal stability at 37°C. K+ was able to greatly enhance the activity of asparaginase by 150% compared with other metals tested. In conclusion, L-asparaginase showed no glutaminase activity and good stability over a wide range of physiological conditions, and thus it could be used as a potential candidate for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:26413120

  8. Molecular characterization of two superoxide dismutases from Hydra vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Bhagirathi; Metz, Richard; Huebner, Henry J.; Porter, Weston; Phillips, Timothy D.

    2007-01-01

    Apparent full-length cDNA sequences coding for manganese superoxide dismutase (HvMnSOD) and extracellular superoxide dismutase (HvEC-SOD) were isolated from Hydra vulgaris in order to understand their expression and 3D structures; and explore their possibility of being used as for biomarkers for environmental stress and toxicity. The deduced HvMnSOD protein consists of 219 amino acids of which first 21 amino acids constitute a presumed mitochondria-targeting signal peptide whereas HvEC-SOD protein consists of 189 amino acids of which first 19 amino acids constitute a presumed signal peptide. Molecular model generated for HvMnSOD displayed the N-terminal long alpha antiparallel hairpin and the C-terminal mixed alpha/beta fold characteristic of MnSODs and that for HvEC-SOD displayed the characteristic CuZnSOD beta-barrel fold. Hydrae subjected to thermal, starvation, metal and oxidative stress responded by regulating MnSOD and EC-SOD mRNA transcription. These results indicated that these genes are involved in the cellular stress response and (anti)oxidative processes triggered by stressor and contaminant exposure. Hence the expression of these SODs in hydra may have potential as molecular biomarkers for assessing stress, toxicity and pro-oxidant quality of chemicals and aquatic environmental quality. PMID:17150313

  9. Use of diluted urine for cultivation of Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Jaatinen, Sanna; Lakaniemi, Aino-Maija; Rintala, Jukka

    2016-05-01

    Our aim was to study the biomass growth of microalga Chlorella vulgaris using diluted human urine as a sole nutrient source. Batch cultivations (21 days) were conducted in five different urine dilutions (1:25-1:300), in 1:100-diluted urine as such and with added trace elements, and as a reference, in artificial growth medium. The highest biomass density was obtained in 1:100-diluted urine with and without additional trace elements (0.73 and 0.60 g L(-1), respectively). Similar biomass growth trends and densities were obtained with 1:25- and 1:300-diluted urine (0.52 vs. 0.48 gVSS L(-1)) indicating that urine at dilution 1:25 can be used to cultivate microalgal based biomass. Interestingly, even 1:300-diluted urine contained sufficiently nutrients and trace elements to support biomass growth. Biomass production was similar despite pH-variation from < 5 to 9 in different incubations indicating robustness of the biomass growth. Ammonium formation did not inhibit overall biomass growth. At the beginning of cultivation, the majority of the biomass consisted of living algal cells, while towards the end, their share decreased and the estimated share of bacteria and cell debris increased. PMID:26508358

  10. Nest odor dynamics in the social wasp Vespula vulgaris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinmetz, Inge; Schmolz, Erik

    2005-09-01

    We investigated nest odor dynamics in the common yellow jacket, Vespula vulgaris. In six isolated colonies, we tested the aggression rates toward dead nestmates that had been stored for 10 min, 10 and 19 days outside their colonies at 76 °C. The aggression rate increased from about 12% toward recently killed nestmates up to 30% toward nestmates killed 19 days before the experiment. Obviously, the conserved nest odor profile of the nestmates frozen for several days did not match with that of their colony anymore. This indicates a change of the nest odor within the colony. In a second experiment, we kept two colonies each in one nest box with a complete separation of both neighbor nests by a solid wall inside the box for 28 days. In confrontation experiments, the colony members treated dead foragers from the neighbor nest as aggressively as dead foreign, non-neighbor workers (about 39% each) whereas only about 14% reacted aggressively toward dead nestmates. Seventeen days after the replacement of the solid wall by a metallic grid, which allowed no physical contact but air exchange between the two neighbor colonies, the aggression rates toward foreign workers and nestmates remained relatively unaffected whereas it decreased significantly toward dead neighbors to about 11%. These results suggest a nest odor dynamic caused by volatiles transferred between two adjacent colonies, resulting in an equalization of the former colony specific nest odors. A change of nest odor dynamics influenced by volatiles was so far described only for one ant species at all.

  11. Quality of life issues for South Africans with acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Mosam, A; Vawda, N B; Gordhan, A H; Nkwanyana, N; Aboobaker, J

    2005-01-01

    The adverse effects of acne on the psyche have been established in patients from 'first world' countries. There has been no in depth study in predominantly black patients from Africa addressing this issue. This was a prospective cross-sectional study of acne patients attending a dermatology unit in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. A questionnaire was completed and acne graded by the Global Acne Grading scale. Psychological morbidity and quality of life (QOL) were assessed by the General Health Questionnaire and Dermatology Specific Quality of Life Questionnaires, respectively. We found that clinical severity was not associated with patient perception or psychological distress. The QOL measures such as feelings, social activities, performance at work or school, activities of daily living and overall mental health were found to be associated with distress with associated P-values of 0.0002, 0.0168, 0.0032, 0.033 and < 0.0001, respectively. The severity of acne was not associated with psychological distress. Painful and bleeding lesions were associated with distress levels; P = 0.042 and P = 0.019, respectively. In conclusion, South African patients with acne vulgaris suffer significant psychological distress, which affects the quality of their lives. PMID:15663491

  12. Family study of monozygotic twins affected by pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Salathiel, Adriana Martinelli; Brochado, Maria José Franco; Kim, Olivia; Deghaide, Neifi Hassan Saloum; Donadi, Eduardo Antonio; Roselino, Ana Maria

    2016-07-01

    Rare are the family studies that include siblings affected by pemphigus vulgaris (PV) and in whom HLA class II alleles are related. HLA-DR and -DQ genotyping and profiling of antibodies against desmogleins (Dsg) 1 and Dsg3 were performed in ten members of a family including monozygotic twins affected by PV. The twin sisters were heterozygotes; they presented the haplotypes most commonly associated with increased susceptibility to PV (DRB1∗04:02-DQA1∗03:01-DQB1∗03:02 and DRB1∗14:04-DQA1∗01:01-DQB1∗05:03). Their parents and five siblings had only one or none of these two haplotypes in combination with the alleles or haplotypes associated with resistance to PV (DRB1∗07:01-DQA1∗02:01-DQB1∗02:02 and DRB1∗13:01-DQA1∗01:03-DQB1∗06:03). Only the monozygotic twins presented IgG antibodies against both Dsg1 and Dsg3. According to our knowledge based on a review of published literature on the topic, this is the first report of PV affecting monozygotic twins. PMID:27177496

  13. Extraocular spectral photosensitivity in the tentacles of Hydra vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Guertin, S; Kass-Simon, G

    2015-06-01

    Previous electrophysiological studies on the cnidarian Hydra vulgaris have shown that hydra have a highly developed and specific photoresponse despite their lack of any structure recognizable as a traditional photoreceptor. In an effort to identify the site of hydra's photoreceptors, we recorded extracellularly from single excised tentacles and from ablated hypostomes lacking tentacles in absolute darkness and during exposure to light of various wavelengths. During recording, after an initial period of absolute darkness, tentacles or hypostomes were exposed to light from 450nm to 600nm, red, and white light. Exposure to light caused a change in the pattern and frequency of impulses in the tentacles that varied with color. The number of large tentacle pulses (TPs) increased at 550 and 600nm relative to darkness, whereas the number of small tentacle pulses (STPs) tended to decrease in 500nm light. Impulse frequency was significantly different among the different wavelengths. In addition to bursts of tentacle contraction pulses, long trains of pulses were observed. A change in lighting caused a switch from bursting to trains or vice versa. In contrast to excised tentacles, no change in electrical activity was seen in ablated hypostomes at any of the wavelengths relative to each other or relative to darkness. These results indicate that isolated tentacles can distinguish among and respond to various colors across the visible spectrum and suggest that electromagnetic information is transmitted from the tentacles to the hypostome where it may be integrated by the hypostomal nervous system, ultimately contributing to hydra's photoreceptive behavior. PMID:25724097

  14. Indocyanine green-laser thermolysis of acne vulgaris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genina, Elina A.; Bashkatov, Alexey N.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Yaroslavsky, Ilya V.; Altshuler, Gregory B.

    2005-08-01

    The near-infrared (NIR) laser radiation due to its high penetration depth is widely used in phototherapy and photothermolysis. In application to skin appendages a high selectivity of laser treatment is needed to prevent light action on surrounding tissues. Indocyanine Green (ICG) dye may provide a high selectivity of treatment due to effective ICG uploading by a target and its narrow band of considerable absorption just at the wavelength of the NIR diode laser. The goal of this study is to demonstrate the efficacy of the NIR diode laser photothermolysis in combination with topical application of ICG suggested for treatment of acne vulgaris. Two volunteers with back-located acne were enrolled. Skin sites of subjects were stained by ICG and irradiated by NIR laser-diode light (803 or 809 nm). The individual acne lesions were photothermally treated at 18 W/cm2 (803 nm, 0.5 sec) without skin surface cooling or at 200 W/cm2 (809 nm, 0.5 sec) with cooling. The results of the observations during a month after the treatment have shown that ICG stained acne inflammatory elements were destructed for light exposures of 0.5 sec.

  15. Carbon assimilation and export in sugar beet leaves. [Beta vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Tucci, M.A.; Geiger, D.K.; Servaites, J.C.

    1987-04-01

    Net carbon exchange rates (NCE), starch accumulation rates, gas exchange, and the maximum amount of carbon available for export were studied in Beta vulgaris L. following a 25% increase or a 25% decrease in ambient CO/sub 2/ (340 ..mu..l/L). Changing CO/sub 2/ by 25% above or below ambient had no effect on the ratio of internal CO/sub 2/ to ambient CO/sub 2/. Stomatal aperature adjusted in both cases to maintain the same relative stomatal limitation to NCE. Increasing CO/sub 2/ 25% increased NCE and water use efficiency, but slightly decreased stomatal conductance by 9% below leaves maintained at ambient. In contrast, a 25% reduction in CO/sub 2/ decreased NCE and water use efficiency. Decreasing CO/sub 2/ caused an increase in conductance also by 9%. Increasing CO/sub 2/ increased starch storage by 36%, but caused no change in the ratio of starch accumulation to NCE. A reduction in CO/sub 2/ caused a 60% decrease in the rate of starch storage and decreased the ratio of starch accumulation to NCE by one-half. The maximum amount of carbon available for export was increased 25% by increasing CO/sub 2/, but decreased by 5% following a reduction in CO2 level. These data are evidence that export rates are maintained at the expense of starch synthesis during periods of low NCE.

  16. A small peptide with therapeutic potential for inflammatory acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiye; Mu, Lixian; Tang, Jing; Duan, Zilei; Wang, Fengyu; Wei, Lin; Rong, Mingqiang; Lai, Ren

    2013-01-01

    A designed peptide named LZ1 with 15 amino acid residues containing strong antimicrobial activity against bacteria pathogens of acne vulgaris including Propionibacterium acnes, Staphylococcus epidermidis and S. aureus. Especially, it exerted strong anti-P. acnes ability. The minimal inhibitory concentration against three strains of P. acnes was only 0.6 µg/ml, which is 4 times lower than that of clindamycin. In experimental mice skin colonization model, LZ1 significantly reduced the number of P. acnes colonized on the ear, P. acnes-induced ear swelling, and inflammatory cell infiltration. It ameliorated inflammation induced by P. acnes by inhibiting the secretion of inflammatory factors including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-1β. LZ1 showed little cytotoxicity on human keratinocyte and hemolytic activity on human blood red cells. Furthermore, LZ1 was very stable in human plasma. Combined with its potential bactericidal and anti-inflammatory properties, simple structure and high stability, LZ1 might be an ideal candidate for the treatment of acne. PMID:24013774

  17. [Preliminary analysis of bitter substances in spica of Prunella vulgaris].

    PubMed

    Zhai, Xin; Xi, Meng-Qian; Guo, Qiao-Sheng; Han, Huan-Huan; Zhang, Xiang; Yang, Wei; Zheng, Rong-bo; Huang, Xiao-Dan; Zhu, Huan-Rong

    2014-02-01

    Volatile oil components and the contents and types of amino acid in spica of Prunella vulgaris were analysed by GC-MS and amino acid analyzer. Esters, fatty acids, aromatic hydrocarbon, ketone and several alcohol compounds were identified by mass spectrum comparison. In these ingredients, beta-ionone smelled aroma of cedar, raspberry, nerolidol showed weak sweet soft orange blossom flavor, neroli tasted sweet and fresh, nerolidol tasted sweet with light aroma of wood, hexadecanal showed a weak aroma of flowers and wax, alpha-sinensal had rich and fresh sweet orange flavor. To some extent, these types of aromatic substances can affect the taste of herbal tea or decoction made of Spica Prunellae. Among amino acids detected, natural amino acids accounted for a larger proportion, and those natural amino acids showed bitterness, slight bitterness, sourness (freshness), sweetness, slight sweetness, sourness (slight freshness). The results indicated that bitter and slightly bitter amino acids have the greatest impacts on the sense of Spica Prunellae. PMID:24946541

  18. Structure and mechanical properties of Octopus vulgaris suckers

    PubMed Central

    Tramacere, Francesca; Kovalev, Alexander; Kleinteich, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N.; Mazzolai, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the morphology and mechanical features of Octopus vulgaris suckers, which may serve as a model for the creation of a new generation of attachment devices. Octopus suckers attach to a wide range of substrates in wet conditions, including rough surfaces. This amazing feature is made possible by the sucker's tissues, which are pliable to the substrate profile. Previous studies have described a peculiar internal structure that plays a fundamental role in the attachment and detachment processes of the sucker. In this work, we present a mechanical characterization of the tissues involved in the attachment process, which was performed using microindentation tests. We evaluated the elasticity modulus and viscoelastic parameters of the natural tissues (E ∼ 10 kPa) and measured the mechanical properties of some artificial materials that have previously been used in soft robotics. Such a comparison of biological prototypes and artificial material that mimics octopus-sucker tissue is crucial for the design of innovative artificial suction cups for use in wet environments. We conclude that the properties of the common elastomers that are generally used in soft robotics are quite dissimilar to the properties of biological suckers. PMID:24284894

  19. Activity of Thymus vulgaris essential oil against Anisakis larvae.

    PubMed

    Giarratana, F; Muscolino, D; Beninati, C; Giuffrida, A; Panebianco, A

    2014-07-01

    Anisakiasis is an important food-borne disease especially in countries with high fish consumption. The increase of cases of human disease and the virtual absence of effective treatments have prompted the research on new active compounds against Anisakis larvae. As well known, the disease is related to the consumption of raw or almost raw seafood products, but also marinated and/or salted fishery products, if the processing is insufficient to destroy nematode larvae can represent a risks for the consumers. In the light of the biocidal efficacy against different pathogens demonstrated for various essential oils, the aim of this work is to evaluate the effect of Thymus vulgaris essential oil (TEO) against anisakidae larvae. The TEO at 10% and 5% concentration in oil sunflower seeds, caused in vitro the death of all larvae within 14 h, with cuticle and intestinal wall damages. The results obtained showing a significant activity against Anisakis larvae, suggest further investigation on TEO as a larvicidal agent and on its potential use in the industrial marinating process. PMID:24721259

  20. Physiological and biochemical responses of Chlorella vulgaris to Congo red.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Zamora, Miriam; Perales-Vela, Hugo Virgilio; Flores-Ortíz, César Mateo; Cañizares-Villanueva, Rosa Olivia

    2014-10-01

    Extensive use of synthetic dyes in many industrial applications releases large volumes of wastewater. Wastewaters from dying industries are considered hazardous and require careful treatment prior to discharge into receiving water bodies. Dyes can affect photosynthetic activities of aquatic flora and decrease dissolved oxygen in water. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Congo red on growth and metabolic activity of Chlorella vulgaris after 96h exposure. Exposure of the microalga to Congo red reduced growth rate, photosynthesis and respiration. Analysis of chlorophyll a fluorescence emission showed that the donor side of photosystem II was affected at high concentrations of Congo red. The quantum yield for electron transport (φEo), the electron transport rate (ETR) and the performance index (PI) also decreased. The reduction in the ability to absorb and use the quantum energy increased non-photochemical (NPQ) mechanisms for thermal dissipation. Overall, Congo red affects growth and metabolic activity in photosynthetic organisms in aquatic environments. PMID:25042247

  1. Fontibacillus phaseoli sp. nov. isolated from Phaseolus vulgaris nodules.

    PubMed

    Flores-Félix, José David; Mulas, Rebeca; Ramírez-Bahena, Martha-Helena; Cuesta, María José; Rivas, Raúl; Brañas, Javier; Mulas, Daniel; González-Andrés, Fernando; Peix, Alvaro; Velázquez, Encarna

    2014-01-01

    A bacterial strain, designated BAPVE7BT, was isolated from root nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris in Spain. Phylogenetic analysis based on its 16S rRNA gene sequence placed the isolate into the genus Fontibacillus with Fontibacillus panacisegetis KCTC 13564T its closest relative with 97.1 % identity. The isolate was observed to be a Gram-positive, motile and sporulating rod. The catalase test was negative and oxidase was weak. The strain was found to reduce nitrate to nitrite and to produce β-galactosidase but the production of gelatinase, caseinase, urease, arginine dehydrolase, ornithine or lysine decarboxylase was negative. Acetoin production and aesculin hydrolysis were found to be positive. Growth was observed to be supported by many carbohydrates and organic acids as carbon source. MK-7 was identified as the predominant menaquinone and the major fatty acid (43.7 %) as anteiso-C15:0, as occurs in the other species of the genus Fontibacillus. Strain BAPVE7BT displayed a complex lipid profile consisting of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, four glycolipids, four phospholipids, two lipids, two aminolipids and an aminophospholipid. Mesodiaminopimelic acid was detected in the peptidoglycan. The G+C content was determined to be 45.6 mol% (Tm). Phylogenetic, chemotaxonomic and phenotypic analyses showed that strain BAPVE7BT should be considered a new species of genus Fontibacillus, for which the name Fontibacillus phaseoli sp. nov. is proposed (type strain, LMG 27589T, CECT 8333T). PMID:24122118

  2. Magnesium Uptake by the Green Microalga Chlorella vulgaris in Batch Cultures.

    PubMed

    Ben Amor-Ben Ayed, Hela; Taidi, Behnam; Ayadi, Habib; Pareau, Dominique; Stambouli, Moncef

    2016-03-01

    The accumulation (internal and superficial distribution) of magnesium ions (Mg(2+)) by the green freshwater microalga Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris) was investigated under autotrophic culture in a stirred photobioreactor. The concentrations of the three forms of Mg(2+) (dissolved, extracellular, and intracellular) were determined with atomic absorption spectroscopy during the course of C. vulgaris growth. The proportions of adsorbed (extracellular) and absorbed (intracellular) Mg(2+) were quantified. The concentration of the most important pigment in algal cells, chlorophyll a, increased over time in proportion to the increase in the biomass concentration, indicating a constant chlorophyll/biomass ratio during the linear growth phase. The mean-average rate of Mg(2+) uptake by C. vulgaris grown in a culture medium starting with 16 mg/l of Mg(2+) concentration was measured. A clear relationship between the biomass concentration and the proportion of the Mg(2+) removal from the medium was observed. Of the total Mg(2+) present in the culture medium, 18% was adsorbed on the cell wall and 51% was absorbed by the biomass by the end of the experiment (765 h). Overall, 69% of the initial Mg(2+) were found to be removed from the medium. This study supported the kinetic model based on a reversible first-order reaction for Mg(2+) bioaccumulation in C. vulgaris, which was consistent with the experimental data. PMID:26628253

  3. Antigenic analyses of tissues and excretory and secretory products from Strongylus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Wynne, E; Slocombe, J O; Wilkie, B N

    1981-07-01

    Rabbit antisera were prepared against veronal buffered saline extracts of L4 and L5 Strongylus vulgaris, adult S. vulgaris and adult Strongylus equinus retrieved from naturally infected horses. In agar gel diffusion with these antisera, adult S vulgaris and S. equinus each appeared to have at least one unique antigen; larval S. vulgaris appeared to have two species-specific and two stage-specific antigens. There were several common antigens. Excretory and secretory products were collected also from L4 and L5 an maintained over several days in tissue culture fluid. In agar gel diffusion against the above rabbit antisera, a stage-specific antigen was found also in excretory and secretory products. In addition, excretory and secretory products had three antigens in common with adult and larval S. vulgaris, but only one of these was common to adult S. equinus. The excretory and secretory products appear, therefore, to have two species-specific and one stage-specific antigens. PMID:6804070

  4. Antigenic analyses of tissues and excretory and secretory products from Strongylus vulgaris.

    PubMed Central

    Wynne, E; Slocombe, J O; Wilkie, B N

    1981-01-01

    Rabbit antisera were prepared against veronal buffered saline extracts of L4 and L5 Strongylus vulgaris, adult S. vulgaris and adult Strongylus equinus retrieved from naturally infected horses. In agar gel diffusion with these antisera, adult S vulgaris and S. equinus each appeared to have at least one unique antigen; larval S. vulgaris appeared to have two species-specific and two stage-specific antigens. There were several common antigens. Excretory and secretory products were collected also from L4 and L5 an maintained over several days in tissue culture fluid. In agar gel diffusion against the above rabbit antisera, a stage-specific antigen was found also in excretory and secretory products. In addition, excretory and secretory products had three antigens in common with adult and larval S. vulgaris, but only one of these was common to adult S. equinus. The excretory and secretory products appear, therefore, to have two species-specific and one stage-specific antigens. Images Fig. 1 a and b. Fig. 2 a and b. Fig. 3 a and b. Fig. 4 a and b. Fig. 5 a and b. Fig. 6 a and b. Fig. 7 a and b. Fig. 8 a and b. PMID:6804070

  5. In vitro activity of heather [Calluna vulgaris (L.) Hull] extracts on selected urinary tract pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Vučić, Dragana M.; Petković, Miroslav R.; Rodić-Grabovac, Branka B.; Stefanović, Olgica D.; Vasić, Sava M.; Čomić, Ljiljana R.

    2014-01-01

    Calluna vulgaris L. Hull (Ericaceae) has been used for treatment of urinary tract infections in traditional medicine. In this study we analyzed in vitro antibacterial activity of the plant extracts on different strains of Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis and Proteus vulgaris, as well as the concentrations of total phenols and flavonoids in the extracts. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) were determined. The concentrations of total phenols were examined by using Folin-Ciocalteu reagent and ranged between 67.55 to 142.46 mg GAE/g. The concentrations of flavonoids in extracts were determined using spectrophotometric method with aluminum chloride and the values ranged from 42.11 to 63.68 mg RUE/g. The aqueous extract of C. vulgaris showed a significant antibacterial activity. The values of MIC were in the range from 2.5 mg/ml to 20 mg/ml for this extract. Proteus vulgaris strains were found to be the most sensitive. The results obtained suggest that all tested extracts of C. vulgaris inhibit the growth of human pathogens, especially the aqueous extract. PMID:25428676

  6. Efficacy of Essential Oils of Thymus vulgaris and Origanum vulgare on Echinococcus granulosus

    PubMed Central

    Pensel, P. E.; Maggiore, M. A.; Gende, L. B.; Eguaras, M. J.; Denegri, M. G.; Elissondo, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to determine the in vitro effect of T. vulgaris and O. vulgare essential oils against E. granulosus protoscoleces and cysts. Essential oils were added to the medium resulting in thymol final concentrations of 10 μg/mL. The essential oils had a time-dependent effect provoking the complete loss of protoscolex viability after 72 days of postincubation. The results were confirmed at the ultrastructure level. Loss of infectivity in protoscoleces incubated with O. vulgare after 60 days was observed. On the other hand, the weight of cysts recorded in mice inoculated with T. vulgaris treated protoscoleces was significantly lower than that obtained in control group. Gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase activity was readily detected in the culture supernatant of protoscoleces treated either with the essential oils or thymol. T. vulgaris and O. vulgare essential oils and thymol can induce cell apoptosis of protoscoleces after short incubation times. The efficacy of T. vulgaris and O. vulgare essential oils was also demonstrated in vitro on E. granulosus murine cysts. Our data suggest that essential oils of T. vulgaris and O. vulgare have anthelmintic effect against protoscoleces and cysts of E. granulosus. PMID:25180033

  7. Mechanisms of Eu(III) and Cm(III) Association With Chlorella Vulgaris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, T.; Kimura, T.; Ohnuki, T.; Francis, A. J.

    2002-12-01

    Association of Eu(III) and Cm(III) with Chlorella vulgaris and cellulose was studied by a batch method, time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). The kinetics study performed by a batch method showed that the maximum adsorption of Eu(III) and Cm(III) on C. vulgaris was attained within three minutes of contact time, and afterwards the percentage adsorption decreased with time due to exudates released from C. vulgaris with affinity for Eu(III) and Cm(III). TRLFS showed that the short-term adsorption of Eu(III) on C. vulgaris was attributed to their coordination with the cell wall components comprised of cellulose. TRLFS also demonstrated that Eu(III) coordinated with the functional groups of cellulose very weakly in spite of the large distribution coefficients observed. EXAFS analysis showed the local structure around the Eu(III) adsorbed on cellulose and with C. vulgaris was similar. These results indicate that the reactions both at cell surfaces through the adsorption as well as in solution phases through chelation with the exudates are important in estimating the environmental behavior of Eu(III) and Cm(III) in aqueous environments.

  8. Phylogenetic diversity of rhizobial species and symbiovars nodulating Phaseolus vulgaris in Iran.

    PubMed

    Rouhrazi, Kiomars; Khodakaramian, Gholam; Velázquez, Encarna

    2016-03-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of 29 rhizobial strains nodulating Phaseolus vulgaris in Iran was analysed on the basis of their core and symbiotic genes. These strains displayed five 16S rRNA-RFLP patterns and belong to eight ERIC-PCR clusters. The phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA, recA and atpD core genes allowed the identification of several strains as Rhizobium sophoriradicis, R. leguminosarum, R. tropici and Pararhizobium giardinii, whereas other strains represented a new phylogenetic lineage related to R. vallis. These strains and those identified as R. sophoriradicis and R. leguminosarum belong to the symbiovar phaseoli carrying the γ nodC allele distributed in P. vulgaris endosymbionts in America, Europe, Africa and Asia. The strain identified as R. tropici belongs to the symbiovar tropici carried by strains of R. tropici, R. leucaenae, R. lusitanum and R. freirei nodulating P. vulgaris in America, Africa and Asia. The strain identified as P. giardinii belongs to the symbiovar giardinii together with the type strain of this species nodulating P. vulgaris in France. It is remarkable that the recently described species R. sophoriradicis is worldwide distributed in P. vulgaris nodules carrying the γ nodC allele of symbiovar phaseoli harboured by rhizobia isolated in the American distribution centers of this legume. PMID:26832644

  9. In vitro activity of heather [Calluna vulgaris (L.) Hull] extracts on selected urinary tract pathogens.

    PubMed

    Vučić, Dragana M; Petković, Miroslav R; Rodić-Grabovac, Branka B; Stefanović, Olgica D; Vasić, Sava M; Comić, Ljiljana R

    2014-01-01

    Calluna vulgaris L. Hull (Ericaceae) has been used for treatment of urinary tract infections in traditional medicine. In this study we analyzed in vitro antibacterial activity of the plant extracts on different strains of Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis and Proteus vulgaris, as well as the concentrations of total phenols and flavonoids in the extracts. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) were determined. The concentrations of total phenols were examined by using Folin-Ciocalteu reagent and ranged between 67.55 to 142.46 mg GAE/g. The concentrations of flavonoids in extracts were determined using spectrophotometric method with aluminum chloride and the values ranged from 42.11 to 63.68 mg RUE/g. The aqueous extract of C. vulgaris showed a significant antibacterial activity. The values of MIC were in the range from 2.5 mg/ml to 20 mg/ml for this extract. Proteus vulgaris strains were found to be the most sensitive. The results obtained suggest that all tested extracts of C. vulgaris inhibit the growth of human pathogens, especially the aqueous extract. PMID:25428676

  10. The Effect of Temperature and Hydrogen Limited Growth on the Fractionation of Sulfur Isotopes by Thermodesulfatator indicus, a Deep-sea Hydrothermal Vent Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoek, J.; Reysenbach, A.; Habicht, K.; Canfield, D. E.

    2004-12-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria fractionate sulfur isotopes during dissimilatory sulfate reduction, producing sulfide depleted in 34S. Although isotope fractionation during sulfate reduction of pure cultures has been extensively studied, most of the research to date has focused on mesophilic sulfate reducers, particularly for the species Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. Results from these studies show that: 1) fractionations range from 3-46‰ with an average around 18‰ , 2) when organic electron donors are utilized, the extent of fractionation is dependent on the rate of sulfate reduction, with decreasing fractionations observed with higher specific rates, 3) fractionations are suppressed with low sulfate concentrations, and when hydrogen is used as the electron donor. High specific sulfate-reduction rates are encountered when sulfate-reducing bacteria metabolize at their optimal temperature and under non-limiting substrate conditions. Changes in both temperature and substrate availability could shift fractionations from those expressed under optimal growth conditions. Sulfate reducers may frequently experience substrate limitation and sub-optimal growth temperatures in the environment. Therefore it is important to understand how sulfate-reducing bacteria fractionate sulfur isotopes under conditions that more closely resemble the restrictions imposed by the environment. In this study the fractionation of sulfur isotopes by Thermodesulfatator indicus was explored during sulfate reduction under a wide range of temperatures and with both hydrogen-saturating and hydrogen-limited conditions. T. indicus is a thermophilic (temperature optimum = 70° C) chemolithotrophic sulfate-reducing bacterium, which was recently isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent on the Central Indian Ridge. This bacterium represents the type species of a new genus and to date is the most deeply branching sulfate-reducing bacterium known. T. indicus was grown in carbonate-buffered salt-water medium

  11. A study on aromatic profiles of Thymus hyemalis and Spanish T. vulgaris essential oils at five physiological stages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shrubs of clonal selections of Thymus hyemalis L. and Spanish T. vulgaris subsp. vulgaris were harvested at five phenological stages during the plant growing cycle: vegetative (VEG), floral (FL), floral-fructification (FL-FR), fructification (FR), and passed fructification (FR-pas). The volatile pro...

  12. Reducing effect of a combination of Phaseolus vulgaris and Cynara scolymus extracts on food intake and glycemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Loi, Barbara; Fantini, Noemi; Colombo, Giancarlo; Gessa, Gian Luigi; Riva, Antonella; Bombardelli, Ezio; Morazzoni, Paolo; Carai, Mauro A M

    2013-02-01

    Extracts from Phaseolus vulgaris and Cynara scolymus may reduce food intake and/or postprandial glycemia. This study investigated the effect of standardized extracts of P. vulgaris and C. scolymus and their combination on food intake and glycemia in rats. P. vulgaris and C. scolymus extracts, and their 1:2 combination, were administered acutely to rats (a) given access to regular food and water, (b) given access to regular food, water, and a chocolate-flavored beverage, or (c) infused with a starch bolus. P. vulgaris extract and the combination produced comparable reductions in intake of regular food and chocolate-flavored beverage; conversely, C. scolymus extract was ineffective on both parameters. P. vulgaris and C. scolymus extracts additively contributed to the reducing effect of the combination on glycemic rise. These results suggest that a mixture of P. vulgaris and C. scolymus extracts is preferable over each single extract, as it combines the anorectic effect of the P. vulgaris extract with the hypoglycemic effect of both extracts. These data support the recent clinical use of the combination of P. vulgaris and C. scolymus extracts in the control of appetite, food intake, and postprandial glycemia and represent a successful example of translational research in the nutraceutical field. PMID:22565861

  13. The inhibitory effect of Thymus vulgaris extracts on the planktonic form and biofilm structures of six human pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Mohsenipour, Zeinab; Hassanshahian, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Microorganisms are responsible for many problems in industry and medicine because of biofilm formation. Therefore, this study was aimed to examine the effect of Thymus vulgaris (T. vulgaris) extracts on the planktonic form and biofilm structures of six pathogenic bacteria. Materials and methods: Antimicrobial activities of the plant extracts against the planktonic form of the bacteria were determined using the disc diffusion method. MIC and MBC values were evaluated using macrobroth dilution technique. Anti-biofilm effects were assessed by microtiter plate method. Results: According to disc diffusion test (MIC and MBC), the ability of Thymus vulgaris (T. vulgaris ) extracts for inhibition of bacteria in planktonic form was confirmed. In dealing with biofilm structures, the inhibitory effect of the extracts was directly correlated to their concentration. Except for the inhibition of biofilm formation, efficacy of each extract was independent from type of solvent. Conclusion: According to the potential of Thymus vulgaris (T. vulgaris) extracts to inhibit the test bacteria in planktonic and biofilm form, it can be suggested that Thymus vulgaris (T. vulgaris) extracts can be applied as antimicrobial agents against the pathogenic bacteria particularly in biofilm forms. PMID:26442753

  14. Transcriptome characterization of developing bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) pods from two genotypes with contrasting seed zinc concentrations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seeds are a rich source of dietary zinc, especially for people consuming plant-based diets. Within P. vulgaris there is at least two-fold variation in seed Zn concentration. Genetic studies have revealed seed Zn differences to be controlled by a single gene in two c...

  15. Comparative genomics approaches within Beta vulgaris to reveal loci relevant to root development and secondary metabolite storage traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development and patterning of Beta vulgaris root tissues is key to obtaining a good crop. This study aims to undertake a comparative systems biology approach for the study of root development, physiology, and storage characteristics within two B. vulgaris crop types, sugar beet and red beet. Generat...

  16. Topical, Biological and Clinical Challenges in the Management of Patients with Acne Vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Al-Hammadi, Anwar; Al-Ismaily, Abla; Al-Ali, Sameer; Ramadurai, Rajesh; Jain, Rishi; McKinley-Grant, Lynn; Mughal, Tariq I

    2016-05-01

    Acne vulgaris is one of the most common chronic inflammatory skin disorders among adolescents and young adults. It is associated with substantial morbidity and, rarely, with mortality. The exact worldwide incidence and prevalence are currently unknown. Current challenges involve improving understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of acne vulgaris and developing a practical treatment consensus. Expert panel discussions were held in 2013 and 2014 among a group of scientists and clinicians from the Omani and United Arab Emirate Dermatology Societies to ascertain the current optimal management of acne vulgaris, identify clinically relevant end-points and construct suitable methodology for future clinical trial designs. This article reviews the discussions of these sessions and recent literature on this topic. PMID:27226905

  17. Antifungal activity of extracts of Rosmarinus officinalis and Thymus vulgaris against Aspergillus flavus and A. ochraceus.

    PubMed

    Centeno, S; Calvo, M A; Adelantado, C; Figueroa, S

    2010-05-01

    The antifungal activity of ethanolic extracts of Rosmarinus officinalis and Thymus vulgaris were tested against strains of Aspergillus flavus and A. ochraceus, since these two species are common contaminants of cereals and grains and are able to produce and accumulate mycotoxins. The methodology used is based on measuring the inhibition halos produced by discs impregnated with the extracts and establishing their Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) as well as the Minimum Fungicide Concentration (MFC). The results obtained suggest that the assayed extracts affect the proper development of A. flavus and A. ochraceus; leading to a lower MIC (1200 ppm) and MFC (2400 ppm) for T. vulgaris extract against A. ochraceus than against A. flavus. The results show, that the extracts of Rosmarinus officinalis and Thymus vulgaris used at low concentrations could have significant potential for the biological control of fungi in foodstuffs. PMID:20973400

  18. A comparative study of phytohaemagglutinin and extract of Phaseolus vulgaris seeds by characterization and cytogenetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badari Nath, A. R. S.; Sivaramakrishna, A.; Marimuthu, K. M.; Saraswathy, Radha

    2015-01-01

    Phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) is a lectin obtained from Phaseolus vulgaris (red kidney beans), that acts as a mitogen in human leucocyte culture and is commercially available from Gibco®. This PHA (Gibco®) was found to be very expensive, hence other inexpensive sources that can be used in all kinds of cytogenetics labs (rich and poor), were attempted. One such successful attempt was PHA extract from seeds of P.vulgaris. This paper details the methodology of extraction and application of PHA from seeds of P.vulgaris. Attempts has been made to identify the chemical and physical properties of the products in the extract, analyzed by various spectroscopic and analytical techniques. The analysis clearly indicates that the product from Phaseolus seeds extract was found to be similar to the commercially available PHA (Gibco®) in the cytogenetic study of human leucocyte cultures. The present study enforces the possible utility of the plant extract directly for human leucocyte cultures.

  19. A comparative study of phytohaemagglutinin and extract of Phaseolus vulgaris seeds by characterization and cytogenetics.

    PubMed

    Badari Nath, A R S; Sivaramakrishna, A; Marimuthu, K M; Saraswathy, Radha

    2015-01-01

    Phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) is a lectin obtained from Phaseolus vulgaris (red kidney beans), that acts as a mitogen in human leucocyte culture and is commercially available from Gibco. This PHA (Gibco) was found to be very expensive, hence other inexpensive sources that can be used in all kinds of cytogenetics labs (rich and poor), were attempted. One such successful attempt was PHA extract from seeds of P.vulgaris. This paper details the methodology of extraction and application of PHA from seeds of P.vulgaris. Attempts has been made to identify the chemical and physical properties of the products in the extract, analyzed by various spectroscopic and analytical techniques. The analysis clearly indicates that the product from Phaseolus seeds extract was found to be similar to the commercially available PHA (Gibco) in the cytogenetic study of human leucocyte cultures. The present study enforces the possible utility of the plant extract directly for human leucocyte cultures. PMID:25004904

  20. Topical, Biological and Clinical Challenges in the Management of Patients with Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hammadi, Anwar; Al-Ismaily, Abla; Al-Ali, Sameer; Ramadurai, Rajesh; Jain, Rishi; McKinley-Grant, Lynn; Mughal, Tariq I.

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is one of the most common chronic inflammatory skin disorders among adolescents and young adults. It is associated with substantial morbidity and, rarely, with mortality. The exact worldwide incidence and prevalence are currently unknown. Current challenges involve improving understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of acne vulgaris and developing a practical treatment consensus. Expert panel discussions were held in 2013 and 2014 among a group of scientists and clinicians from the Omani and United Arab Emirate Dermatology Societies to ascertain the current optimal management of acne vulgaris, identify clinically relevant end-points and construct suitable methodology for future clinical trial designs. This article reviews the discussions of these sessions and recent literature on this topic. PMID:27226905

  1. Host Suitability of Diverse Lines of Phaseolus vulgaris to Multiple Populations of Heterodera glycines

    PubMed Central

    Smith, James R.; Young, Lawrence D.

    2003-01-01

    The host suitability of diverse races and gene pools of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) for multiple isolates of Heterodera glycines was studied. Twenty P. vulgaris genotypes, representing three of the six races within the two major germplasm pools, were tested in greenhouse experiments to determine their host suitability to five H. glycines isolates. Phaseolus vulgaris genotypes differed in their host suitability to different H. glycines isolates. While some common bean lines were excellent hosts for some H. glycines isolates, no common bean line was a good host for all isolates. Some bean lines from races Durango and Mesoamerica, representing the Middle America gene pool, were resistant to all five nematode isolates. Other lines, from both the Andean and Middle America gene pools, had differential responses for host suitability to the different isolates of H. glycines. PMID:19265970

  2. Lipid accumulation from pinewood pyrolysates by Rhodosporidium diobovatum and Chlorella vulgaris for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Luque, Luis; Orr, Valerie C A; Chen, Sean; Westerhof, Roel; Oudenhoven, Stijn; Rossum, Guus van; Kersten, Sascha; Berruti, Franco; Rehmann, Lars

    2016-08-01

    This study evaluated the suitability of pinewood pyrolysates as a carbon source for lipid production and cultivation of the oleaginous yeast Rhodosporidium diobovatum and the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris. Thermal decomposition of pinewood and fractional condensation were used to obtain an oil rich in levoglucosan which was upgraded to glucose by acid hydrolysis. Blending of pyrolytic sugars with pure glucose in both nitrogen rich and nitrogen limited conditions was studied for R. diobovatum, and under nitrogen limited conditions for C. vulgaris. Glucose consumption rate decreased with increasing proportions of pyrolytic sugars increasing cultivation time. While R. diobovatum was capable of growth in 100% (v/v) pyrolytic sugars, C. vulgaris growth declined rapidly in blends greater than 20% (v/v) until no growth was detected in blends >40%. Finally, the effects of pyrolysis sugars on lipid composition was evaluated and biodiesel fuel properties were estimated based on the lipid profiles. PMID:27208736

  3. Association between Psoriasis Vulgaris and Coronary Heart Disease in a Hospital-Based Population in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Shiba, Masayuki; Kato, Takao; Funasako, Moritoshi; Nakane, Eisaku; Miyamoto, Shoichi; Izumi, Toshiaki; Haruna, Tetsuya; Inoko, Moriaki

    2016-01-01

    Background Psoriasis vulgaris is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with an immune-genetic background. It has been reported as an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD) in the United States and Europe. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between psoriasis and CHD in a hospital-based population in Japan. Methods For 113,065 in-hospital and clinic patients at our institution between January 1, 2011 and January 1, 2013, the diagnostic International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-10 codes for CHD, hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, and psoriasis vulgaris were extracted using the medical accounting system and electronic medical record, and were analyzed. Results The prevalence of CHD (n = 5,167, 4.5%), hypertension (n = 16,476, 14.5%), dyslipidemia (n = 9,236, 8.1%), diabetes mellitus (n = 11,555, 10.2%), and psoriasis vulgaris (n = 1,197, 1.1%) were identified. The prevalence of CHD in patients with hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, and psoriasis vulgaris were 21.3%, 22.2%, 21.1%, and 9.0%, respectively. In 1,197 psoriasis patients, those with CHD were older, more likely to be male, and had more number of the diseases surveyed by ICD-10 codes. Multivariate analysis showed that psoriasis vulgaris was an independent associated factor for CHD (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 1.27; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01–1.58; p = 0.0404) along with hypertension (adjusted OR: 7.78; 95% CI: 7.25–8.36; p < 0.0001), dyslipidemia (adjusted OR: 2.35; 95% CI: 2.19–2.52; p < 0.0001), and diabetes (adjusted OR: 2.86; 95% CI: 2.67–3.06; p < 0.0001). Conclusion Psoriasis vulgaris was independently associated with CHD in a hospital-based population in Japan. PMID:26910469

  4. The influence of aluminium availability on phosphate uptake in Phaseolus vulgaris L. and Phaseolus lunatus L.

    PubMed

    Mimmo, Tanja; Sciortino, Marco; Ghizzi, Massimiliano; Gianquinto, Giorgio; Gessa, Carlo E

    2009-01-01

    Aluminium toxicity is one of the major limiting factors of crop productivity on acid soils. High levels of available aluminium in soil may induce phosphorus deficiency in plants. This study investigates the influence of Aluminium (Al) on the phosphate (P(i)) uptake of two Phaseolus species, Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. Red Kidney and Phaseolus lunatus L. The two bean species were treated first with solutions of Al at different concentrations (0, 25, 50 and 100microM, pH 4.50) and second with solutions of P(i) (150microM) at pH 4.50. The higher the Al concentration the higher the Al concentration sorbed but P. vulgaris L var. Red Kidney adsorbed significantly more Al than P. lunatus L. Both species released organic acids: P. vulgaris L var. Red Kidney released fumaric acid and P. lunatus L. fumaric and oxalic acids which could have hindered further Al uptake. The two bean species showed a sigmoid P(i) uptake trend but with two different mechanisms. P. vulgaris L var. Red Kidney showed a starting point of 3h whereas P. lunatus L. adsorbed P(i) immediately within the first minutes. In addition, P. vulgaris L var. Red Kidney presented significantly higher P(i) uptake (higher uptake rate 'k' and higher maximum adsorption 'a' of the kinetic uptake model). The Al treatments did not significantly influence P(i) uptake. Results suggest that P. lunatus L. might adopt an external Al detoxification mechanism by the release of oxalic acid. P. vulgaris L var. Red Kidney on the other hand seemed to adopt an internal detoxification mechanism even if the Al sorbed is poorly translocated into the shoots. More detailed studies will be necessary to better define Al tolerance and/or resistance of Phaseolus spp. PMID:18996705

  5. Tryptophan inhibits Proteus vulgaris TnaC leader peptide elongation, activating tna operon expression.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Vera, Luis R; Yang, Rui; Yanofsky, Charles

    2009-11-01

    Expression of the tna operon of Escherichia coli and of Proteus vulgaris is induced by L-tryptophan. In E. coli, tryptophan action is dependent on the presence of several critical residues (underlined) in the newly synthesized TnaC leader peptide, WFNIDXXL/IXXXXP. These residues are conserved in TnaC of P. vulgaris and of other bacterial species. TnaC of P. vulgaris has one additional feature, distinguishing it from TnaC of E. coli; it contains two C-terminal lysine residues following the conserved proline residue. In the present study, we investigated L-tryptophan induction of the P. vulgaris tna operon, transferred on a plasmid into E. coli. Induction was shown to be L-tryptophan dependent; however, the range of induction was less than that observed for the E. coli tna operon. We compared the genetic organization of both operons and predicted similar folding patterns for their respective leader mRNA segments. However, additional analyses revealed that L-tryptophan action in the P. vulgaris tna operon involves inhibition of TnaC elongation, following addition of proline, rather than inhibition of leader peptide termination. Our findings also establish that the conserved residues in TnaC of P. vulgaris are essential for L-tryptophan induction, and for inhibition of peptide elongation. TnaC synthesis is thus an excellent model system for studies of regulation of both peptide termination and peptide elongation, and for studies of ribosome recognition of the features of a nascent peptide. PMID:19767424

  6. Acetate kinase Activity and Kinetic Properties of the Enzyme in Desulfovibrio piger Vib-7 and Desulfomicrobium sp. Rod-9 Intestinal Bacterial Strains

    PubMed Central

    Kushkevych, Ivan V

    2014-01-01

    Activity of acetate kinase in cell-free extracts and individual fractions and the kinetic properties of the enzyme obtained from the Desulfovibrio piger Vib-7 and Desulfomicrobium sp. Rod-9 intestinal bacterial strains were presented at the first time. The highest activity of the enzyme was measured in the cell-free extracts (1.52 ± 0.163 and 0.46 ± 0.044 U × mg-1 protein for D. piger Vib-7 and Desulfomicrobium sp. Rod-9, respectively) compared to other fractions. The specific activity of acetate kinase in the extracts of both bacterial strains was determined at different temperature and pH. Analysis of the kinetic properties of the purified acetate kinase was carried out. The acetate kinase activity, initial (instantaneous) reaction rate (V0) and maximum rate of the acetate kinase reaction (Vmax) in D. piger Vib-7 and Desulfomicrobium sp. Rod-9 intestinal bacterial strains were defined. Michaelis constants (KmAcetyl phosphate and KmADP) of the enzyme reaction (2.54 ± 0.26 and 2.39 ± 0.24 mM for D. piger Vib-7 as well as 2.68 ± 0.25 and 2.47 ± 0.27 mM for Desulfomicrobium sp. Rod-9, respectively) were calculated. The described results of acetate kinase, an important enzyme in the process of organic compounds oxidation and dissimilatory sulfate reduction would be perspective and useful for clarification of the etiological role of these bacteria in the development of inflammatory bowel diseases in humans and animals. PMID:25598851

  7. Model-based Characterization of the Parameters of Dissimilatory Sulfate Reduction Under the Effect of Different Initial Density of Desulfovibrio piger Vib-7 Bacterial Cells.

    PubMed

    Kushkevych, Ivan; Bolis, Marco; Bartos, Milan

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to design a model of dissimilatory sulfate reduction process using the Verhulst function, with a particular focus on the kinetics of bacterial growth, sulfate and lactate consumption, and accumulation of hydrogen sulfide and acetate. The effect of the initial density (0.12±0.011, 0.25±0.024, 0.5±0.048 and 1.0±0.096 mg cells/ml of medium) of the sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio piger Vib-7 on the growth and dissimilatory sulfate reduction was studied. The exponential growth phase of the D. piger Vib-7 was observed for 72 hours of cultivation at the (0.12 and 0.25 mg/ml) initial concentration of bacterial cells. Sulfate and lactate were consumed incompletely during this time. The increase in the initial concentration of cells to 0.5 and 1 mg/ml led to a shortening of the exponential bacterial growth phase and a shift to the stationary phase of the growth. In the case of 0.5 mg/ml seeding, the stationary growth phase was observed in the 36(th) hour of cultivation. The increase in the initial concentration of cells to 1 mg/ml led to the beginning of the stationary growth phase in 24th hours of cultivation. Under these conditions, sulfate and lactate were consumed completely in the 48th hour of cultivation. The kinetic analysis of the curves of bacterial growth and the process of dissimilatory sulfate reduction by D. piger Vib-7 was carried out. PMID:26668663

  8. Kinetic Properties of Pyruvate Ferredoxin Oxidoreductase of Intestinal Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria Desulfovibrio piger Vib-7 and Desulfomicrobium sp. Rod-9.

    PubMed

    Kushkevych, Ivan V

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal sulfate-reducing bacteria reduce sulfate ions to hydrogen sulfide causing inflammatory bowel diseases of humans and animals. The bacteria consume lactate as electron donor which is oxidized to acetate via pyruvate in process of the dissimilatory sulfate reduction. Pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase activity and the kinetic properties of the enzyme from intestinal sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio piger and Desulfomicrobium sp. have never been well-characterized and have not been yet studied. In this paper we present for the first time the specific activity of pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase and the kinetic properties of the enzyme in cell-free extracts of both D. piger Vib-7 and Desulfomicrobium sp. Rod-9 intestinal bacterial strains. Microbiological, biochemical, biophysical and statistical methods were used in this work. The optimal temperature (+35°C) and pH 8.5 for enzyme reaction were determined. The spectral analysis of the puri- fied pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase from the cell-free extracts was demonstrated. Analysis of the kinetic properties of the studied enzyme was carried out. Initial (instantaneous) reaction velocity (V0), maximum amount of the product of reaction (Pmax), the reaction time (half saturation period) and maximum velocity of the pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase reaction (V ) were defined. Michaelis constants (Km) of the enzyme reaction were calculated for both intestinal bacterial strains. The studies of the kinetic enzyme properties in the intestinal sulfate-reducing bacteria strains in detail can be prospects for clarifying the etiological role of these bacteria in the development of inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:26373169

  9. Multiple sulfur isotope signatures of sulfite and thiosulfate reduction by the model dissimilatory sulfate-reducer, Desulfovibrio alaskensis str. G20

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, William D.; Cummins, Renata; Schmidt, Marian L.; Sim, Min S.; Ono, Shuhei; Bradley, Alexander S.; Johnston, David T.

    2014-01-01

    Dissimilatory sulfate reduction serves as a key metabolic carbon remineralization process in anoxic marine environments. Sulfate reducing microorganisms can impart a wide range in mass-dependent sulfur isotopic fractionation. As such, the presence and relative activity of these organisms is identifiable from geological materials. By extension, sulfur isotope records are used to infer the redox balance of marine sedimentary environments, and the oxidation state of Earth's oceans and atmosphere. However, recent work suggests that our understanding of microbial sulfate reduction (MSRs) may be missing complexity associated with the presence and role of key chemical intermediates in the reductive process. This study provides a test of proposed metabolic models of sulfate reduction by growing an axenic culture of the well-studied MSRs, Desulfovibrio alaskensis strain G20, under electron donor limited conditions on the terminal electron acceptors sulfate, sulfite or thiosulfate, and tracking the multiple S isotopic consequences of each condition set. The dissimilatory reduction of thiosulfate and sulfite produce unique minor isotope effects, as compared to the reduction of sulfate. Further, these experiments reveal a complex biochemistry associated with sulfite reduction. That is, under high sulfite concentrations, sulfur is shuttled to an intermediate pool of thiosulfate. Site-specific isotope fractionation (within thiosulfate) is very large (34ε ~ 30‰) while terminal product sulfide carries only a small fractionation from the initial sulfite (34ε < 10‰): a signature similar in magnitude to sulfate and thiosulfate reduction. Together these findings show that microbial sulfate reduction (MSR) is highly sensitive to the concentration of environmentally important sulfur-cycle intermediates (sulfite and thiosulfate), especially when thiosulfate and the large site-specific isotope effects are involved. PMID:25505449

  10. Effect of Phosphate on the Corrosion of Carbon Steel and on the Composition of Corrosion Products in Two-Stage Continuous Cultures of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans†

    PubMed Central

    Weimer, Paul J.; Van Kavelaar, Margaret J.; Michel, Charles B.; Ng, Thomas K.

    1988-01-01

    A field isolate of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans was grown in defined medium in a two-stage continuous culture apparatus with different concentrations of phosphate in the feed medium. The first state (V1) was operated as a conventional chemostat (D = 0.045 h−1) that was limited in energy source (lactate) or phosphate. The second stage (V2) received effluent from V1 but no additional nutrients, and contained a healthy population of transiently starved or resting cells. An increase in the concentration of phosphate in the medium fed to V1 resulted in increased corrosion rates of carbon steel in both V1 and V2. Despite the more rapid corrosion observed in growing cultures relative to that in resting cultures, corrosion products that were isolated under strictly anaerobic conditions from the two culture modes had similar bulk compositions which varied with the phosphate content of the medium. Crystalline mackinawite (Fe9S8), vivianite [Fe3(PO4)2 · 8H2O], and goethite [FeO(OH)] were detected in amounts which varied with the culture conditions. Chemical analyses indicated that the S in the corrosion product was almost exclusively in the form of sulfides, while the P was present both as phosphate and as unidentified components, possibly reduced P species. Some differential localization of S and P was observed in intact corrosion products. Cells from lactate-limited, but not from phosphate-limited, cultures contained intracellular granules that were enriched in P and Fe. The results are discussed in terms of several proposed mechanisms of microbiologically influenced corrosion. Images PMID:16347552

  11. Fast Neutron Irradiation of the Highly Radioresistant Bacterium Deinococcus Radiodurans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, Diane Louise

    Fast neutron dose survival curves were generated for the bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, which is renowned for its unusually high resistance to gamma, x-ray, and ultraviolet radiation, but for which fast neutron response was unknown. The fast neutrons were produced by the University of Massachusetts Lowell 5.5-MV, type CN Van de Graaff accelerator through the ^7Li(p,n)^7 Be reaction by bombarding a thick metallic lithium target with a 4-MeV proton beam. The bacteria were uniformly distributed on 150-mm agar plates and were exposed to the fast neutron beam under conditions of charged particle equilibrium. The plates were subdivided into concentric rings of increasing diameter from the center to the periphery of the plate, within which the average neutron dose was calculated as the product of the precisely known neutron fluence at the average radius of the ring and the neutron energy dependent kerma factor. The neutron fluence and dose ranged from approximately 3 times 1013 n cm^ {-2} to 1 times 1012 n cm^ {-2}, and 200 kilorad to 5 kilorad, respectively, from the center to the periphery of the plate. Percent survival for Deinococcus radiodurans as a function of fast neutron dose was derived from the ability of the irradiated cells to produce visible colonies within each ring compared to that of a nonirradiated control population. The bacterium Escherichia coli B/r (CSH) was irradiated under identical conditions for comparative purposes. The survival response of Deinococcus radiodurans as a result of cumulative fast neutron exposures was also investigated. The quantification of the ability of Deinococcus radiodurans to survive cellular insult from secondary charged particles, which are produced by fast neutron interactions in biological materials, will provide valuable information about damage and repair mechanisms under extreme cellular stress, and may provide new insight into the origin of this bacterium's unprecedented radiation resistance.

  12. Concomitant pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigoid gestationis: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Vin, Harina; Seyfer, Sarah J; McClain, Colt M; Hsu, Sylvia

    2016-01-01

    Pemphigus and pemphigoid are two unique acquired immunobullous diseases with distinct clinical presentations, histological findings, and characteristic serology; they are rarely reported to coexist in the same patient. Herein we present a 29-year-old woman with a history of pemphigus vulgaris, diagnosed by histology and positive desmoglein-3 antibodies on ELISA. She presented to our clinic shortly after the delivery of her first child with tense vesicles and bullae on an erythematous base on her abdomen. Biopsy was consistent with pemphigoid gestationis and direct immunofluorescence confirmed the diagnosis. To our knowledge, there are no other reported cases of pemphigoid gestationis occurring in a patient with pemphigus vulgaris. PMID:26990471

  13. Mechanisms of Mitochondrial Damage in Keratinocytes by Pemphigus Vulgaris Antibodies*

    PubMed Central

    Kalantari-Dehaghi, Mina; Chen, Yumay; Deng, Wu; Chernyavsky, Alex; Marchenko, Steve; Wang, Ping H.; Grando, Sergei A.

    2013-01-01

    The development of nonhormonal treatment of pemphigus vulgaris (PV) has been hampered by a lack of clear understanding of the mechanisms leading to keratinocyte (KC) detachment and death in pemphigus. In this study, we sought to identify changes in the vital mitochondrial functions in KCs treated with the sera from PV patients and healthy donors. PV sera significantly increased proton leakage from KCs, suggesting that PV IgGs increase production of reactive oxygen species. Indeed, measurement of intracellular reactive oxygen species production showed a drastic increase of cell staining in response to treatment by PV sera, which was confirmed by FACS analysis. Exposure of KCs to PV sera also caused dramatic changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential detected with the JC-1 dye. These changes can trigger the mitochondria-mediated intrinsic apoptosis. Although sera from different PV patients elicited unique patterns of mitochondrial damage, the mitochondria-protecting drugs nicotinamide (also called niacinamide), minocycline, and cyclosporine A exhibited a uniform protective effect. Their therapeutic activity was validated in the passive transfer model of PV in neonatal BALB/c mice. The highest efficacy of mitochondrial protection of the combination of these drugs found in mitochondrial assay was consistent with the ability of the same drug combination to abolish acantholysis in mouse skin. These findings provide a theoretical background for clinical reports of the efficacy of mitochondria-protecting drugs in PV patients. Pharmacological protection of mitochondria and/or compensation of an altered mitochondrial function may therefore become a novel approach to development of personalized nonhormonal therapies of patients with this potentially lethal autoimmune blistering disease. PMID:23599429

  14. The efficacy of acyclovir in treatment of the pemphigus vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Iraji, Fariba; Faghihi, Gita; Siadat, Amir Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Background: Pemphigus is a group of autoimmune blistering diseases of the skin and mucous membranes caused by the presence of antibodies against adhesion molecules on the cell surface of keratinocytes. The possible role of herpes simplex virus infection in the pathogenesis of pemphigus vulgaris (PV) has been suggested. In this study, we evaluated the impact of a course of acyclovir in improvement of the pemphigus patients and reduction of the hospitalization duration. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 patients with definitive diagnosis of PV were recruited in study. They were randomized in two groups. One group received routine treatment and another received the routine plus 2 week course of oral acyclovir (1200 mg/day). The improvement was defined as a more than 50% change in baseline severity score of the disease. All data was registered at the checklists and after follow-up period, the statistical analyses were performed by aid of t-test and Fisher's exact test. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in mean severity score and improvement rates between two groups at the end of study (P > 0.05). Meanwhile, there was no statistical difference in duration of hospitalization in two groups (P > 0.05) though the severity score and hospitalization duration were apparently less in acyclovir-group than control group. Neither of the patients (in acyclovir group) showed any side effect. Conclusion: We did not observe any difference between response to treatment and hospitalization period in the group that was treated with acyclovir as compared with control group. However, the partial and complete remissions were higher in patients on acyclovir therapy compared to controls. In those pemphigus patients who do not respond to sufficient immunosuppressive regimen or show a sudden relapse after reaching partial or complete clinical remission, a trial of oral acyclovir therapy may have promising result. PMID:24523784

  15. Diversification and Population Structure in Common Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Matthew W.; Soler, Alvaro; Cortés, Andrés J.

    2012-01-01

    Wild accessions of crops and landraces are valuable genetic resources for plant breeding and for conserving alleles and gene combinations in planta. The primary genepool of cultivated common beans includes wild accessions of Phaseolus vulgaris. These are of the same species as the domesticates and therefore are easily crossable with cultivated accessions. Molecular marker assessment of wild beans and landraces is important for the proper utilization and conservation of these important genetic resources. The goal of this research was to evaluate a collection of wild beans with fluorescent microsatellite or simple sequence repeat markers and to determine the population structure in combination with cultivated beans of all known races. Marker diversity in terms of average number of alleles per marker was high (13) for the combination of 36 markers and 104 wild genotypes that was similar to the average of 14 alleles per marker found for the 606 cultivated genotypes. Diversity in wild beans appears to be somewhat higher than in cultivated beans on a per genotype basis. Five populations or genepools were identified in structure analysis of the wild beans corresponding to segments of the geographical range, including Mesoamerican (Mexican), Guatemalan, Colombian, Ecuadorian-northern Peruvian and Andean (Argentina, Bolivia and Southern Peru). The combined analysis of wild and cultivated accessions showed that the first and last of these genepools were related to the cultivated genepools of the same names and the penultimate was found to be distinct but not ancestral to the others. The Guatemalan genepool was very novel and perhaps related to cultivars of race Guatemala, while the Colombian population was also distinct. Results suggest geographic isolation, founder effects or natural selection could have created the different semi-discrete populations of wild beans and that multiple domestications and introgression were involved in creating the diversity of cultivated beans

  16. Anthocyanin profile of Korean cultivated kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Choung, Myoung-Gun; Choi, Byoung-Rourl; An, Young-Nam; Chu, Yong-Ha; Cho, Young-Son

    2003-11-19

    This investigation was conducted to determine the structures and amounts of anthocyanins obtained from seed coats of kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivated in Korea. Anthocyanins in the seed coat of kidney bean were extracted with 1% HCl/20% CH(3)OH, and the crude anthocyanin extracts were purified by semipreparative HPLC. Five major anthocyanins were isolated, and their chemical structures were identified by spectroscopic methods (UV-vis, LC/ES-MS, and 1H and 13C NMR). The structures of these five anthocyanins were elucidated as cyanidin 3,5-diglucoside, delphinidin 3-glucoside, cyanidin 3-glucoside, petunidin 3-glucoside, and pelargonidin 3-glucoside. Using RP-HPLC with photodiode array detection, each of the five anthocyanins was separated within 12 min by using a gradient elution. It was proved that the application of RP-HPLC could be an excellent method for determining the composition and contents of anthocyanins in kidney bean. The preponderance of pelargonidin 3-glucoside and delphinidin 3-glucoside are observed in red and black kidney beans, respectively. However, in this study, it is reported for the first time that the contents and composition of anthocyanins in speckled seed depend on the classes of speckle color. The contents of cyanidin 3,5-diglucoside, delphinidin 3-glucoside, cyanidin 3-glucoside, petunidin 3-glucoside, pelargonidin 3-glucoside, and total anthocyanins in seed coats of 16 kidney beans cultivated in Korea were in the ranges of 0-0.04, 0-2.61, 0-0.12, 0-0.17, 0-0.59 and 0-2.78 mg/g of dried seed coats, respectively. PMID:14611168

  17. Effect of the Glycemic Index of Carbohydrates on Acne vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Rebecca C.; Lee, Stephen; Choi, James Y. J.; Atkinson, Fiona S.; Stockmann, Karola S.; Petocz, Peter; Brand-Miller, Jennie C.

    2010-01-01

    Acne vulgaris may be improved by dietary factors that increase insulin sensitivity. We hypothesized that a low-glycemic index diet would improve facial acne severity and insulin sensitivity. Fifty-eight adolescent males (mean age ± standard deviation 16.5 ± 1.0 y and body mass index 23.1 ± 3.5 kg/m2) were alternately allocated to high or low glycemic index diets. Severity of inflammatory lesions on the face, insulin sensitivity (homeostasis modeling assessment of insulin resistance), androgens and insulin-like growth factor-1 and its binding proteins were assessed at baseline and at eight weeks, a period corresponding to the school term. Forty-three subjects (n = 23 low glycemic index and n = 20 high glycemic index) completed the study. Diets differed significantly in glycemic index (mean ± standard error of the mean, low glycemic index 51 ± 1 vs. high glycemic index 61 ± 2, p = 0.0002), but not in macronutrient distribution or fiber content. Facial acne improved on both diets (low glycemic index −26 ± 6%, p = 0.0004 and high glycemic index −16 ± 7%, p = 0.01), but differences between diets did not reach significance. Change in insulin sensitivity was not different between diets (low glycemic index 0.2 ± 0.1 and high glycemic index 0.1 ± 0.1, p = 0.60) and did not correlate with change in acne severity (Pearson correlation r = −0.196, p = 0.244). Longer time frames, greater reductions in glycemic load or/and weight loss may be necessary to detect improvements in acne among adolescent boys. PMID:22253996

  18. Geometry applied to breeding common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Lima, J G; Ramalho, M A P

    2016-01-01

    The primary components of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) grain yield (W) are the number of pods (X), the number of grains per pod (Y), and the weight of the grains (Z). In 1964, Grafius suggested using geometry in plant breeding; W corresponds to the volume of a parallelepiped with three axes, X, Y, and Z. Because the cube is the largest parallelepiped by volume, maximum yield is obtained when the relative contributions of X, Y, and Z are the same. We evaluated individual plants of a 'Talismã' x 'L.59583' cross in two sowing periods. The sum of squares of deviations from the ideal plant (GI), i.e., the plant in which the X, Y, and Z contributions were the same, was estimated. Mean and variance genetic components, and genetic and phenotypic correlations between the characteristics were also estimated. Good concordance was observed in the magnitude and direction of the genetic and phenotypic correlation estimates of the paired characteristics. However, a low GI heritability (h(2)r = 6.7%) indicated that success due to selection should be small. Ninety-four progenies of 'Pérola' x 'ESAL 686' crosses were also evaluated, where X, Y, Z, and W were obtained and GI was estimated. The h(2) estimate was higher, but still low (h(2) = 39.0%). Therefore, the selection of individuals to obtain plants in which the X, Y, and Z products tend to the cube is unfeasible, because the sums of X, Y, and Z vary between individuals. In addition, the GI h2 value was low. PMID:27173247

  19. Advantage of soybean isoflavone as antiandrogen on acne vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Riyanto, Puguh; Subchan, Prasetyowati; Lelyana, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acne vulgaris (AV) is the commonest skin disorder, whereas soybean isoflavone had been proved as antiandrogen that is it can inhibit the enzyme 3ß-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase,17ß-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and 5α-reductase. The purpose of this study is to prove the advantage of soybean isoflavone as antiandrogen on AV. Methods: this study is a clinical study using randomized pretest-posttest control group design. This study is a study with 40 samples randomized into 2 groups, i.e. placebo group and 160 mgs of isoflavone group, the duration is 12 weeks, conducted a double-blind manner. The dependent variabel is total of AV lesion, whereas the intermediate variable is DHT that will be examined using ELISA. Defferential test and multivariate analysis were performed on dependent, independent and intermediate variables. Results: This study found that the difference in mean of total AV lesion before treatment was not significant (p: 0.099), whereas after treatment it differed significantly (p: 0.000), with significant delta difference (p: 0.000). Difference of mean DHT level before treatment was not significant (p: 0.574), whereas after treatment it differed significantly (p: 0.000), with significant delta difference (p: 0.000). Delta of DHT (p: 0.003) (r: 0.736) had significant influence on delta of total AV lesion (P < 0.05). Conclusion: This study concludes that supplementation with 160 mgs/day of soybean isoflavone can reduce total AV lesion as a result of decreased DHT level. PMID:26413190

  20. Thermoregulation of water foraging wasps (Vespula vulgaris and Polistes dominulus)

    PubMed Central

    Kovac, Helmut; Stabentheiner, Anton; Schmaranzer, Sigurd

    2011-01-01

    A comparison of the thermoregulation of water foraging wasps (Vespula vulgaris, Polistes dominulus) under special consideration of ambient temperature and solar radiation was conducted. The body surface temperature of living and dead wasps was measured by infrared thermography under natural conditions in their environment without disturbing the insects’ behaviour. The body temperature of both of them was positively correlated with Ta and solar radiation. At moderate Ta (22–28 °C) the regression lines revealed mean thorax temperatures (Tth) of 35.5–37.5 °C in Vespula, and of 28.6–33.7 °C in Polistes. At high Ta (30–39 °C) Tth was 37.2–40.6 °C in Vespula and 37.0–40.8 °C in Polistes. The thorax temperature excess (Tth–Ta) increased at moderate Ta by 1.9 °C (Vespula) and 4.4 °C (Polistes) per kW−1 m−2. At high Ta it increased by 4.0 °C per kW−1 m−2 in both wasps. A comparison of the living water foraging Vespula and Polistes with dead wasps revealed a great difference in their thermoregulatory behaviour. At moderate Ta (22–28 °C) Vespula exhibited distinct endothermy in contrast to Polistes, which showed only a weak endothermic activity. At high Ta (30–39 °C) Vespula reduced their active heat production, and Polistes were always ectothermic. Both species exhibited an increasing cooling effort with increasing insolation and ambient temperature. PMID:19589341

  1. Characterization of iron uptake from hydroxamate siderophores by Chlorella vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Allnutt, F.C.T.

    1985-01-01

    Iron uptake by Chlorella vulgaris from ferric-hydroxamate siderophores and the possible production of siderophores by these algae was investigated. No production of siderophores or organic acids was observed. Iron from the two hydroxamate siderophores tested, ferrioximine B (Fe/sup 3 +/-DFOB) and ferric-rhodotorulate (Fe/sup 3 +/-RA), was taken up at the same rate as iron chelated by citrate or caffeate. Two synthetic chelates, Fe/sup 3 +/-EDTA and Fe/sup 3 +/-EDDHA, provided iron at a slower rate. Iron uptake was inhibited by 50 ..mu..M CCCP or 1 mM vanadate. Cyanide (100 ..mu..M KCN) or 25 ..mu..M antimycin A failed to demonstrate a link between uptake and respiration. Labeled iron (/sup 55/Fe) was taken up while labeled ligands ((/sup 14/C) citrate or RA) were not accumulated. Cation competition from Ni/sup 2 +/ and Co/sup 2 +/ observed using Fe/sup 3 +/-DFOB and Fe/sup 3 +/-RA while iron uptake from Fe/sup 3 +/-citrate was stimulated. Iron-stress induced iron uptake from the hydroxamate siderophores. Ferric reduction from the ferric-siderophores was investigated with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and bathophenathroline disulfonate (BPDS). Ferric reduction was induced by iron-stress and inhibited by CCCP. A close correlation between iron uptake and ferric reduction was measured by the EPR method. Ferric reduction measured by the BPDS method was greater than that measure by EPR. BPDS reduction was interpreted to indicate a potential for reduction while EPR measures the physiological rate of reduction. BPDS inhibition of iron uptake and ferricyanide interference with reduction indicate that reduction and uptake occur exposed to the external medium. Presumptive evidence using a binding dose response curve for Fe/sup 3 +/-DFOB indicated that a receptor may be involved in this mechanism.

  2. I Know My Neighbour: Individual Recognition in Octopus vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Tricarico, Elena; Borrelli, Luciana; Gherardi, Francesca; Fiorito, Graziano

    2011-01-01

    Background Little is known about individual recognition (IR) in octopuses, although they have been abundantly studied for their sophisticated behaviour and learning capacities. Indeed, the ability of octopuses to recognise conspecifics is suggested by a number of clues emerging from both laboratory studies (where they appear to form and maintain dominance hierarchies) and field observations (octopuses of neighbouring dens display little agonism between each other). To fill this gap in knowledge, we investigated the behaviour of 24 size-matched pairs of Octopus vulgaris in laboratory conditions. Methodology/Principal Findings The experimental design was composed of 3 phases: Phase 1 (acclimatization): 12 “sight-allowed” (and 12 “isolated”) pairs were maintained for 3 days in contiguous tanks separated by a transparent (and opaque) partition to allow (and block) the vision of the conspecific; Phase 2 (cohabitation): members of each pair (both sight-allowed and isolated) were transferred into an experimental tank and were allowed to interact for 15 min every day for 3 consecutive days; Phase 3 (test): each pair (both sight-allowed and isolated) was subject to a switch of an octopus to form pairs composed of either familiar (“sham switches”) or unfamiliar conspecifics (“real switches”). Longer latencies (i.e. the time elapsed from the first interaction) and fewer physical contacts in the familiar pairs as opposed to the unfamiliar pairs were used as proxies for recognition. Conclusions Octopuses appear able to recognise conspecifics and to remember the individual previously met for at least one day. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first experimental study showing the occurrence of a form of IR in cephalopods. Future studies should clarify whether this is a “true” IR. PMID:21533257

  3. Factors Affecting Zebra Mussel Kill by the Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2004-02-24

    The specific purpose of this research project was to identify factors that affect zebra mussel kill by the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens. Test results obtained during this three-year project identified the following key variables as affecting mussel kill: treatment concentration, treatment duration, mussel siphoning activity, dissolved oxygen concentration, water temperature, and naturally suspended particle load. Using this latter information, the project culminated in a series of pipe tests which achieved high mussel kill inside power plants under once-through conditions using service water in artificial pipes.

  4. Intracellular iron minerals in a dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Glasauer, Susan; Langley, Sean; Beveridge, Terry J

    2002-01-01

    Among prokaryotes, there are few examples of controlled mineral formation; the formation of crystalline iron oxides and sulfides [magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4)] by magnetotactic bacteria is an exception. Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, a Gram-negative, facultative anaerobic bacterium that is capable of dissimilatory iron reduction, produced microscopic intracellular grains of iron oxide minerals during growth on two-line ferrihydrite in a hydrogen-argon atmosphere. The minerals, formed at iron concentrations found in the soil and sedimentary environments where these bacteria are active, could represent an unexplored pathway for the cycling of iron by bacteria. PMID:11778045

  5. The terminal oxidase in the marine bacterium Pseudomonas nautica 617.

    PubMed

    Simpson, H; Denis, M; Malatesta, F

    1997-06-01

    The molecular properties of a novel membrane quinol oxidase from the marine bacterium Pseudomonas nautica 617 are presented. The protein contains 2b hemes/mole which may be distinguished by EPR spectroscopy but not by optical spectroscopy and electrochemistry. Respiration, though being cyanide insensitive, is not inhibited by carbon monoxide and oxygen reduction is carried out only half-way with production of hydrogen peroxide. The terminal oxidase represents, therefore, a unique example in the large family of terminal oxidases known up to date. PMID:9337488

  6. Triazine herbicide resistance in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, A.E.; Gilbert, C.W.; Guy, R.; Arntzen, C.J.

    1984-10-01

    The photoaffinity herbicide azidoatrazine (2-azido-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) selectively labels the L subunit of the reaction center of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides. Herbicide-resistant mutants retain the L subunit and have altered binding properties for methylthio- and chloro-substituted triazines as well as altered equilibrium constants for electron transfer between primary and secondary electron acceptors. We suggest that a subtle alteration in the L subunit is responsible for herbicide resistance and that the L subunit is the functional analog of the 32-kDa Q/sub B/ protein of chloroplast membranes. 42 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  7. Magnetic guidance of the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense.

    PubMed

    Loehr, Johannes; Pfeiffer, Daniel; Schüler, Dirk; Fischer, Thomas M

    2016-04-21

    Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense is a magnetotactic bacterium with a permanent magnetic moment capable of swimming using two bipolarly located flagella. In their natural environment these bacteria swim along the field lines of the homogeneous geomagnetic field in a typical run and reversal pattern and thereby create non-differentiable trajectories with sharp edges. In the current work we nevertheless achieve stable guidance along curved lines of mechanical instability by using a heterogeneous magnetic field of a garnet film. The successful guidance of the bacteria depends on the right balance between motility and the magnetic moment of the magnetosome chain. PMID:26972517

  8. Noncatalytic transformation of the crude lipid of ChlorellaI vulgaris into fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) with charcoal via a thermo-chemical process.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Eilhann E; Jeon, Young Jae; Yi, Haakrho

    2013-02-01

    The noncatalytic transformation of the crude lipid of Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris) into fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) via a thermo-chemical process was mainly investigated in this work. The crude lipid of C. vulgaris was recovered by means of solvent extraction from C. vulgaris cultivated in a raceway pond. The conventional catalyzed transesterification of crude lipid of C. vulgaris is notably inhibited by the impurities contained in the crude lipid of C. vulgaris. These impurities are inevitably derived from the solvent extraction process for C. vulgaris. However, this work presents the noncatalytic transesterification of microalgal lipid into FAME, which could be an alternative option. For example, the noncatalytic transformation of microalgal lipid into FAME provides evidence that the esterification of free fatty acids (FFAs) and the transesterification of triglycerides can be combined into a single step less susceptible to the impurities and with a high conversion efficiency (∼97%). PMID:23294646

  9. Molybdate Reduction to Molybdenum Blue by an Antarctic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, S. A.; Shukor, M. Y.; Shamaan, N. A.; Mac Cormack, W. P.; Syed, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    A molybdenum-reducing bacterium from Antarctica has been isolated. The bacterium converts sodium molybdate or Mo6+ to molybdenum blue (Mo-blue). Electron donors such as glucose, sucrose, fructose, and lactose supported molybdate reduction. Ammonium sulphate was the best nitrogen source for molybdate reduction. Optimal conditions for molybdate reduction were between 30 and 50 mM molybdate, between 15 and 20°C, and initial pH between 6.5 and 7.5. The Mo-blue produced had a unique absorption spectrum with a peak maximum at 865 nm and a shoulder at 710 nm. Respiratory inhibitors such as antimycin A, sodium azide, potassium cyanide, and rotenone failed to inhibit the reducing activity. The Mo-reducing enzyme was partially purified using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. The partially purified enzyme showed optimal pH and temperature for activity at 6.0 and 20°C, respectively. Metal ions such as cadmium, chromium, copper, silver, lead, and mercury caused more than 95% inhibition of the molybdenum-reducing activity at 0.1 mM. The isolate was tentatively identified as Pseudomonas sp. strain DRY1 based on partial 16s rDNA molecular phylogenetic assessment and the Biolog microbial identification system. The characteristics of this strain would make it very useful in bioremediation works in the polar and temperate countries. PMID:24381945

  10. Molybdate reduction to molybdenum blue by an Antarctic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, S A; Shukor, M Y; Shamaan, N A; Mac Cormack, W P; Syed, M A

    2013-01-01

    A molybdenum-reducing bacterium from Antarctica has been isolated. The bacterium converts sodium molybdate or Mo⁶⁺ to molybdenum blue (Mo-blue). Electron donors such as glucose, sucrose, fructose, and lactose supported molybdate reduction. Ammonium sulphate was the best nitrogen source for molybdate reduction. Optimal conditions for molybdate reduction were between 30 and 50 mM molybdate, between 15 and 20°C, and initial pH between 6.5 and 7.5. The Mo-blue produced had a unique absorption spectrum with a peak maximum at 865 nm and a shoulder at 710 nm. Respiratory inhibitors such as antimycin A, sodium azide, potassium cyanide, and rotenone failed to inhibit the reducing activity. The Mo-reducing enzyme was partially purified using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. The partially purified enzyme showed optimal pH and temperature for activity at 6.0 and 20°C, respectively. Metal ions such as cadmium, chromium, copper, silver, lead, and mercury caused more than 95% inhibition of the molybdenum-reducing activity at 0.1 mM. The isolate was tentatively identified as Pseudomonas sp. strain DRY1 based on partial 16s rDNA molecular phylogenetic assessment and the Biolog microbial identification system. The characteristics of this strain would make it very useful in bioremediation works in the polar and temperate countries. PMID:24381945

  11. Biological Control of Meloidogyne hapla Using an Antagonistic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jiyeong; Seo, Yunhee; Kim, Young Ho

    2014-01-01

    We examined the efficacy of a bacterium for biocontrol of the root-knot nematode (RKN) Meloidogyne hapla in carrot (Daucus carota subsp. sativus) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Among 542 bacterial isolates from various soils and plants, the highest nematode mortality was observed for treatments with isolate C1-7, which was identified as Bacillus cereus based on cultural and morphological characteristics, the Biolog program, and 16S rRNA sequencing analyses. The population density and the nematicidal activity of B. cereus C1-7 remained high until the end of culture in brain heart infusion broth, suggesting that it may have sustainable biocontrol potential. In pot experiments, the biocontrol efficacy of B. cereus C1-7 was high, showing complete inhibition of root gall or egg mass formation by RKN in carrot and tomato plants, and subsequently reducing RKN damage and suppressing nematode population growth, respectively. Light microscopy of RKN-infected carrot root tissues treated with C1-7 showed reduced formation of gall cells and fully developed giant cells, while extensive gall cells and fully mature giant cells with prominent cell wall ingrowths formed in the untreated control plants infected with RKNs. These histopathological characteristics may be the result of residual or systemic biocontrol activity of the bacterium, which may coincide with the biocontrol efficacies of nematodes in pots. These results suggest that B. cereus C1-7 can be used as a biocontrol agent for M. hapla. PMID:25289015

  12. Radiation response mechanisms of the extremely radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Narumi, Issay; Satoh, Katsuya; Funayama, Tomoo; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Kitayama, Shigeru; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2004-11-01

    Effect of microgravity on recovery of bacterial cells from radiation damage was examined in IML-2, S/MM-4 and S/MM-9 experiments using the extremely radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. The cells were irradiated with gamma rays before the space flight and incubated on board the Space Shuttle. The survival of the wild type cells incubated in space increased compared with the ground controls, suggesting that the recovery of this bacterium from radiation damage was enhanced under the space environment. No difference was observed between the survivals of radiosensitive mutant rec30 cells incubated in space and on the ground. The amount of DNA-repair related RecA protein induced under microgravity was similar to those of ground controls, however, induction of PprA protein, product of a unique radiation-inducible gene (designated pprA) responsible for loss of radiation resistance in repair-deficient mutant, KH311, was enhanced under microgravity compared with ground controls. Recent investigation in vitro showed that PprA preferentially bound to double-stranded DNA carrying strand breaks, inhibited Escherichia coli exonuclease III activity, and stimulated the DNA end-joining reaction catalyzed by DNA ligases. These results suggest that D. radiodurans has a radiation-induced non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair mechanism in which PprA plays a critical role. PMID:15858357

  13. Polysaccharide degradation systems of the saprophytic bacterium Cellvibrio japonicus.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Jeffrey G

    2016-07-01

    Study of recalcitrant polysaccharide degradation by bacterial systems is critical for understanding biological processes such as global carbon cycling, nutritional contributions of the human gut microbiome, and the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. One bacterium that has a robust ability to degrade polysaccharides is the Gram-negative saprophyte Cellvibrio japonicus. A bacterium with a circuitous history, C. japonicus underwent several taxonomy changes from an initially described Pseudomonas sp. Most of the enzymes described in the pre-genomics era have also been renamed. This review aims to consolidate the biochemical, structural, and genetic data published on C. japonicus and its remarkable ability to degrade cellulose, xylan, and pectin substrates. Initially, C. japonicus carbohydrate-active enzymes were studied biochemically and structurally for their novel polysaccharide binding and degradation characteristics, while more recent systems biology approaches have begun to unravel the complex regulation required for lignocellulose degradation in an environmental context. Also included is a discussion for the future of C. japonicus as a model system, with emphasis on current areas unexplored in terms of polysaccharide degradation and emerging directions for C. japonicus in both environmental and biotechnological applications. PMID:27263016

  14. Metabolism of threo-beta-methylmalate by a soil bacterium.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, S; Takeuchi, Y; Sasaki, K; Katsuki, H

    1976-10-01

    Studies on threo-beta-methylmalate metabolism in a soil bacterium of the genus Bacillus which can utilize threo-beta-methylmalate as a sole carbon source were carried out. When DL-threo-beta-methylmalate was incubated with a cell-free extract of the bacterium, citramalate was found to be formed. Similarly, formation of threo-beta-methylmalate from DL-citramalate was confirmed. These dicarbosylic acids were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Examination of inducibility, substrate specificity, and cofactor requirement of the enzymes involved in the reactions showed the existence of two interconversion reactions between the threo-beta-methylmalate and citramalate. One was an interconversion reaction between L-threo-beta-methylmalate and L-citramalate via mesaconate and the other was an interconversion reaction between D-threo-beta-methylmalate and D-citramalate via citraconate. These reactions were both reversible and were catalyzed by distinct and inducible enzymes. It is suggested that the two reactions participate in the catabolism of threo-beta-methylmalate. PMID:1010849

  15. Isolation and characterization of luminescent bacterium for sludge biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Zahaba, Maryam; Halmi, Mohd Izuan Effendi; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima; Shukor, Mohd Yunus; Syed, Mohd Arif

    2015-11-01

    Microtox is based on the inhibition of luminescence of the bacterium Vibrio fischeri by the toxicants. This technique has been accepted by the USEPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency) as a biomonitoring tool for remediation of toxicants such as hydrocarbon sludge. In the present study, a luminescent bacterium was isolated from yellow striped scad (Selaroides leptolepis) and was tentatively identified as Vibrio sp. isolate MZ. This aerobic isolate showed high luminescence activity in a broad range of temperature from 25 to 35 °C. In addition, optimal conditions for high bioluminescence activity in range of pH 7.5 to 8.5 and 10 gl(-1) of sodium chloride, 10 gl(-1) of peptone and 10 gl(-1) of sucrose as carbon source. Bench scale biodegradation 1% sludge (w/v) was set up and degradation was determined using gas chromatography with flame ionised detector (GC-FID). In this study, Rhodococcus sp. strain AQ5NOL2 was used to degrade the sludge. Based on the preliminary results obtained, Vibrio sp. isolate MZwas able to monitor the biodegradation of sludge. Therefore, Vibrio sp. isolate MZ has the potential to be used as a biomonitoring agent for biomonitoring of sludge biodegradation particularly in the tropical ranged environment. PMID:26688958

  16. Hydrogenomics of the Extremely Thermophilic Bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus▿ †

    PubMed Central

    van de Werken, Harmen J. G.; Verhaart, Marcel R. A.; VanFossen, Amy L.; Willquist, Karin; Lewis, Derrick L.; Nichols, Jason D.; Goorissen, Heleen P.; Mongodin, Emmanuel F.; Nelson, Karen E.; van Niel, Ed W. J.; Stams, Alfons J. M.; Ward, Donald E.; de Vos, Willem M.; van der Oost, John; Kelly, Robert M.; Kengen, Servé W. M.

    2008-01-01

    Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus is an extremely thermophilic, gram-positive anaerobe which ferments cellulose-, hemicellulose- and pectin-containing biomass to acetate, CO2, and hydrogen. Its broad substrate range, high hydrogen-producing capacity, and ability to coutilize glucose and xylose make this bacterium an attractive candidate for microbial bioenergy production. Here, the complete genome sequence of C. saccharolyticus, consisting of a 2,970,275-bp circular chromosome encoding 2,679 predicted proteins, is described. Analysis of the genome revealed that C. saccharolyticus has an extensive polysaccharide-hydrolyzing capacity for cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin, and starch, coupled to a large number of ABC transporters for monomeric and oligomeric sugar uptake. The components of the Embden-Meyerhof and nonoxidative pentose phosphate pathways are all present; however, there is no evidence that an Entner-Doudoroff pathway is present. Catabolic pathways for a range of sugars, including rhamnose, fucose, arabinose, glucuronate, fructose, and galactose, were identified. These pathways lead to the production of NADH and reduced ferredoxin. NADH and reduced ferredoxin are subsequently used by two distinct hydrogenases to generate hydrogen. Whole-genome transcriptome analysis revealed that there is significant upregulation of the glycolytic pathway and an ABC-type sugar transporter during growth on glucose and xylose, indicating that C. saccharolyticus coferments these sugars unimpeded by glucose-based catabolite repression. The capacity to simultaneously process and utilize a range of carbohydrates associated with biomass feedstocks is a highly desirable feature of this lignocellulose-utilizing, biofuel-producing bacterium. PMID:18776029

  17. Polysaccharide degradation systems of the saprophytic bacterium Cellvibrio japonicus

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gardner, Jeffrey G.

    2016-06-04

    Study of recalcitrant polysaccharide degradation by bacterial systems is critical for understanding biological processes such as global carbon cycling, nutritional contributions of the human gut microbiome, and the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. One bacterium that has a robust ability to degrade polysaccharides is the Gram-negative saprophyte Cellvibrio japonicus. A bacterium with a circuitous history, C. japonicus underwent several taxonomy changes from an initially described Pseudomonas sp. Most of the enzymes described in the pre-genomics era have also been renamed. Furthermore, this review aims to consolidate the biochemical, structural, and genetic data published on C. japonicus and its remarkablemore » ability to degrade cellulose, xylan, and pectin substrates. Initially, C. japonicus carbohydrate-active enzymes were studied biochemically and structurally for their novel polysaccharide binding and degradation characteristics, while more recent systems biology approaches have begun to unravel the complex regulation required for lignocellulose degradation in an environmental context. Also included is a discussion for the future of C. japonicus as a model system, with emphasis on current areas unexplored in terms of polysaccharide degradation and emerging directions for C. japonicus in both environmental and biotechnological applications.« less

  18. Effects of vegetative propagule pressure on the establishment of an introduced clonal plant, Hydrocotyle vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruihua; Chen, Qiuwen; Dong, Bicheng; Yu, Feihai

    2014-01-01

    Some introduced clonal plants spread mainly by vegetative (clonal) propagules due to the absence of sexual reproduction in the introduced range. Propagule pressure (i.e. total number of propagules) may affect the establishment and thus invasion success of introduced clonal plants, and such effects may also depend on habitat conditions. A greenhouse experiment with an introduced plant, Hydrocotyle vulgaris was conducted to investigate the role of propagule pressure on its invasion process. High (five ramets) or low (one ramet) propagule pressure was established either in bare soil or in an experimental plant community consisting of four grassland species. H. vulgaris produced more total biomass under high than under low propagule pressure in both habitat conditions. Interestingly, the size of the H. vulgaris individuals was smaller under high than under low propagule pressure in bare soil, whereas it did not differ between the two propagule pressure treatments in the grassland community. The results indicated that high propagule pressure can ensure the successful invasion in either the grass community or bare soil, and the shift in the intraspecific interaction of H. vulgaris from competition in the bare soil to facilitation in the grassland community may be a potential mechanism. PMID:24981102

  19. Inhibition of HIV-1 infection by aqueous extracts of Prunella vulgaris L

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mint family produces many metabolites with medicinal properties. Several species are reported to have antiviral activity, including lemon balm, peppermint, hyssop, basil, sage and self-heal. To further characterize the anti-lentiviral activity of self-heal (Prunella vulgaris), we tested water an...

  20. Novel bioconversions of municipal effluent and CO₂ into protein riched Chlorella vulgaris biomass.

    PubMed

    Li, Changling; Yang, Hailin; Li, Yuji; Cheng, Luping; Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Wu

    2013-03-01

    Batch, modified semi-continuous and continuous cultivations of Chlorella vulgaris C9-JN 2010 cells in municipal effluent were performed and analyzed. The experiments were carried out in 7.5-L photo-bioreactors, to which 2% of CO2 was supplied. Biomass and specific growth rate of C. vulgaris were 0.528-0.760gl(-1) and 0.200-0.374d(-1), respectively. Meanwhile, it could efficiently remove ammonia-N, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, CODCr and BOD5 by around 98.0%, 90.9-93.6%, 89.9-91.8%, 60.7-90.0% and 83.4-88.4%, respectively. Algal protein content was 550±30.0mgg(-1) of the harvested biomass of C. vulgaris which was rich in eight kinds of essential amino acids (around 44.5% of the total). The processes of cultivation of C. vulgaris in municipal effluent could be proposed as dual-beneficial approaches, which could produce profitable byproducts and simultaneously reduce the contaminations to environment. PMID:23399495