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Sample records for bacterium staphylococcus carnosus

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Staphylococcus carnosus subsp. utilis LTH 7013, Isolated from South Tyrolean Ham.

    PubMed

    Müller, Anne; Huptas, Christopher; Wenning, Mareike; Schmidt, Herbert; Weiss, Agnes

    2015-05-14

    Staphylococcus carnosus is used as a starter culture in meat fermentation, where it contributes to color formation and produces aromatic compounds. Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of an S. carnosus subsp. utilis strain, LTH 7013, isolated from South Tyrolean ham, with potential application as a starter culture. Copyright © 2015 Müller et al.

  2. Genetic diversity and population structure of food-borne Staphylococcus carnosus strains.

    PubMed

    Bückle Née Müller, Anne; Kranz, Markus; Schmidt, Herbert; Weiss, Agnes

    2017-01-01

    The species Staphylococcus carnosus is a non-pathogenic representative of the coagulase negative staphylococci. Specific strains are applied as meat starter cultures. The species consists of two subspecies, S. carnosus ssp. carnosus and S. carnosus ssp. utilis. In order to place S. carnosus strains, characterized in former studies, in a genetic background that allows a typing of candidates for starter cultures, a Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) scheme was developed. Internal fragments of the genes tpiA, xprT, dat, gmk, glpK, narG, cstA, encoding triosephosphate isomerase, xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase, d-amino acid aminotransferase, guanylate kinase, glycerol kinase, the α-chain of the respiratory nitrate reductase, and a carbon starvation protein where chosen. Genes were selected based on their equal distribution in the genome, taxonomic value in subspecies differentiation and metabolic function. This MLST was applied to 44 S. carnosus strains, most of them previously analyzed for their suitability as starter cultures. The number of alleles varied between zero (tpiA) and five (cstA) and allowed the definition of nine sequence types (ST). ST1 was most abundant (18 strains), followed by ST2 (8) and ST4 (6). The nine STs confirmed a close relationship of all strains despite their isolation source and year, but lacked correlation with physiological activities relevant for starter cultures. The low amount of STs in the strain set lets us suggest that recombination between strains is rare. Thus, it is hypothesized that evolutionary events seem to be due to single point mutations rather than intrachromosomal recombination, and that the species possesses a clonal population structure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Nitrate reductase activity of Staphylococcus carnosus affecting the color formation in cured raw ham.

    PubMed

    Bosse Née Danz, Ramona; Gibis, Monika; Schmidt, Herbert; Weiss, Jochen

    2016-07-01

    The influence of the nitrate reductase activity of two Staphylococcus carnosus strains used as starter cultures on the formation of nitrate, nitrite and color pigments in cured raw ham was investigated. In this context, microbiological, chemical and multivariate image analyses were carried out on cured raw hams, which were injected with different brines containing either nitrite or nitrate, with or without the S. carnosus starter cultures. During processing and storage, the viable counts of staphylococci remained constant at 6.5logcfu/g in the hams inoculated with starter cultures, while the background microbiota of the hams processed without the starter cultures developed after 14days. Those cured hams inoculated with S. carnosus LTH 7036 (high nitrate reductase activity) showed the highest decrease in nitrate and high nitrite concentrations in the end product, but were still in the range of the legal European level. The hams cured with nitrate and without starter culture or with the other strain, S. carnosus LTH 3838 (low nitrate reductase activity) showed higher residual nitrate levels and a lower nitrite content in the end product. The multivariate image analysis identified spatial and temporal differences in the meat pigment profiles of the differently cured hams. The cured hams inoculated with S. carnosus LTH 3838 showed an uncured core due to a delay in pigment formation. Therefore, the selection of starter cultures based on their nitrate reductase activity is a key point in the formation of curing compounds and color pigments in cured raw ham manufacture. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Surface display of Salmonella epitopes in Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus carnosus.

    PubMed

    Nhan, Nguyen Thanh; Gonzalez de Valdivia, Ernesto; Gustavsson, Martin; Hai, Truong Nam; Larsson, Gen

    2011-04-11

    Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (SE) is considered to be one of the most potent pathogenic Salmonella serotypes causing food-borne disease in humans. Since a live bacterial vaccine based on surface display of antigens has many advantages over traditional vaccines, we have studied the surface display of the SE antigenic proteins, H:gm and SefA in Escherichia coli by the β-autotransporter system, AIDA. This procedure was compared to protein translocation in Staphylococcus carnosus, using a staphylococci hybrid vector earlier developed for surface display of other vaccine epitopes. Both SefA and H:gm were translocated to the outer membrane in Escherichia coli. SefA was expressed to full length but H:gm was shorter than expected, probably due to a proteolytic cleavage of the N-terminal during passage either through the periplasm or over the membrane. FACS analysis confirmed that SefA was facing the extracellular environment, but this could not be conclusively established for H:gm since the N-terminal detection tag (His6) was cleaved off. Polyclonal salmonella antibodies confirmed the sustained antibody-antigen binding towards both proteins. The surface expression data from Staphylococcus carnosus suggested that the H:gm and SefA proteins were transported to the cell wall since the detection marker was displayed by FACS analysis. Apart from the accumulated knowledge and the existence of a wealth of equipment and techniques, the results indicate the selection of E. coli for further studies for surface expression of salmonella antigens. Surface expression of the full length protein facing the cell environment was positively proven by standard analysis, and the FACS signal comparison to expression in Staphylococcus carnosus shows that the distribution of the surface protein on each cell was comparatively very narrow in E. coli, the E. coli outer membrane molecules can serve as an adjuvant for the surface antigenic proteins and multimeric forms of the SefA protein

  5. Species diversity and metabolic impact of the microbiota are low in spontaneously acidified Belgian sausages with an added starter culture of Staphylococcus carnosus.

    PubMed

    Janssens, M; Myter, N; De Vuyst, L; Leroy, F

    2012-04-01

    Quality of fermented sausages is affected by acidifying lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and colour- and flavour-promoting coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS), whether or not used as starter culture. Artisan fermented sausages are often perceived as superior to industrial variants, partially because of the specific microbiota due to spontaneous acidification, which may be considered as an artisan characteristic. Therefore, two kinds of spontaneously acidified Belgian sausages were prepared (Belgian-type salami and Boulogne sausage), but with addition of a Staphylococcus carnosus culture. The Belgian-type salami was made from pork and beef, whereas the Boulogne sausage contained pork and horse meat. In all cases, Lactobacillus sakei was the dominant LAB species present on the raw materials and during fermentation, whereas enterococci remained present in the background. Enterobacteriaceae vanished after fermentation. The CNS species diversity on the raw materials was large and differed between the pork, beef, and horse meat. Nevertheless, this species diversity was annihilated during fermentation by the added S. carnosus culture. The volatiles fraction was mainly composed of aldehydes that originated from lipid oxidation and spices-derived compounds. Aromatic compounds that are typically associated to CNS activity, such as end-products from the metabolism of branched-chain amino acids, were not present in the Belgian-type salami and only marginally present in the Boulogne sausage. In conclusion, spontaneous acidification of Belgian-type fermented sausages leads to dominance of L. sakei and is no guarantee for bacterial contribution to the aroma profile when S. carnosus is added as a starter culture. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Staphylococcal phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system: purification and characterization of the mannitol-specific enzyme III/sup mtl/ of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus carnosus and homology with the enzyme II/sup mtl/ of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Reiche, B.; Frank, R.; Deutscher, J.

    1988-08-23

    Enzyme III/sup mtl/ is part of the mannitol phosphotransferase system of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus carnosus and is phosphorylated by phosphoenolpyruvate in a reaction sequence requiring enzyme I (phosphoenolpyruvate-protein phosphotransferase) and the histidine-containing protein HPr. In this paper, the authors report the isolation of III/sup mtl/ from both S. aureus and S. carnosus and the characterization of the active center. After phosphorylation of III/sup mtl/ with (/sup 32/P)PEP, enzyme I, and HPr, the phosphorylated protein was cleaved with endoproteinase GLu(C). The amino acid sequence of the S. aureus peptide carrying the phosphoryl group was found to be Gln-Val-Val-Ser-Thr-Phe-Met-Gly-Asn-Gly-Leu-Ala-Ile-Pro-His-Gly-Thr-Asp-Asp. The correspondingmore » peptide from S. carnosus shows an equal sequence except that the first residue is Ala instead of Gln. These peptides both contain a single histidyl residue which they assume to carry the phosphoryl group. All proteins of the PTS so far investigated indeed carry the phosphoryl group attached to a histidyl residue. According to sodium dodecyl sulfate gels, the molecular weight of the III/sup mtl/ proteins was found to be 15,000. They have also determined the N-terminal sequence of both proteins. Comparison of the III/sup mtl/ peptide sequences and the C-terminal part of the enzyme II/sup mtl/ of Escherichia coli reveals considerable sequence homology, which supports the suggestion that II/sup mtl/ of E. coli is a fusion protein of a soluble III protein with a membrane-bound enzyme II.« less

  7. Comparative genomic analysis of the genus Staphylococcus including Staphylococcus aureus and its newly described sister species Staphylococcus simiae

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus belongs to the Gram-positive low G + C content group of the Firmicutes division of bacteria. Staphylococcus aureus is an important human and veterinary pathogen that causes a broad spectrum of diseases, and has developed important multidrug resistant forms such as methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Staphylococcus simiae was isolated from South American squirrel monkeys in 2000, and is a coagulase-negative bacterium, closely related, and possibly the sister group, to S. aureus. Comparative genomic analyses of closely related bacteria with different phenotypes can provide information relevant to understanding adaptation to host environment and mechanisms of pathogenicity. Results We determined a Roche/454 draft genome sequence for S. simiae and included it in comparative genomic analyses with 11 other Staphylococcus species including S. aureus. A genome based phylogeny of the genus confirms that S. simiae is the sister group to S. aureus and indicates that the most basal Staphylococcus lineage is Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, followed by Staphylococcus carnosus. Given the primary niche of these two latter taxa, compared to the other species in the genus, this phylogeny suggests that human adaptation evolved after the split of S. carnosus. The two coagulase-positive species (S. aureus and S. pseudintermedius) are not phylogenetically closest but share many virulence factors exclusively, suggesting that these genes were acquired by horizontal transfer. Enrichment in genes related to mobile elements such as prophage in S. aureus relative to S. simiae suggests that pathogenesis in the S. aureus group has developed by gene gain through horizontal transfer, after the split of S. aureus and S. simiae from their common ancestor. Conclusions Comparative genomic analyses across 12 Staphylococcus species provide hypotheses about lineages in which human adaptation has taken place and contributions of horizontal transfer in pathogenesis. PMID

  8. High-Quality Genome Sequence of the Highly Resistant Bacterium Staphylococcus haemolyticus, Isolated from a Neonatal Bloodstream Infection.

    PubMed

    Hosseinkhani, Farideh; Emaneini, Mohammad; van Leeuwen, Willem

    2017-07-20

    Using Illumina HiSeq and PacBio technologies, we sequenced the genome of the multidrug-resistant bacterium Staphylococcus haemolyticus , originating from a bloodstream infection in a neonate. The sequence data can be used as an accurate reference sequence. Copyright © 2017 Hosseinkhani et al.

  9. Accurate Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Mixtures by Use of Single-Bacterium Duplex Droplet Digital PCR.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jun; Li, Junhua; Yang, Hang; Yu, Junping; Wei, Hongping

    2017-10-01

    Accurate and rapid identification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is needed to screen MRSA carriers and improve treatment. The current widely used duplex PCR methods are not able to differentiate MRSA from coexisting methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) or other methicillin-resistant staphylococci. In this study, we aimed to develop a direct method for accurate and rapid detection of MRSA in clinical samples from open environments, such as nasal swabs. The new molecular assay is based on detecting the cooccurrence of nuc and mecA markers in a single bacterial cell by utilizing droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) with the chimeric lysin ClyH for cell lysis. The method consists of (i) dispersion of an intact single bacterium into nanoliter droplets, (ii) temperature-controlled release of genomic DNA (gDNA) by ClyH at 37°C, and (iii) amplification and detection of the markers ( nuc and mecA ) using standard TaqMan chemistries with ddPCR. Results were analyzed based on MRSA index ratios used for indicating the presence of the duplex-positive markers in droplets. The method was able to achieve an absolute limit of detection (LOD) of 2,900 CFU/ml for MRSA in nasal swabs spiked with excess amounts of Escherichia coli , MSSA, and other mecA -positive bacteria within 4 h. Initial testing of 104 nasal swabs showed that the method had 100% agreement with the standard culture method, while the normal duplex qPCR method had only about 87.5% agreement. The single-bacterium duplex ddPCR assay is rapid and powerful for more accurate detection of MRSA directly from clinical specimens. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  10. Accurate Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Mixtures by Use of Single-Bacterium Duplex Droplet Digital PCR

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jun; Li, Junhua; Yang, Hang; Yu, Junping

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Accurate and rapid identification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is needed to screen MRSA carriers and improve treatment. The current widely used duplex PCR methods are not able to differentiate MRSA from coexisting methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) or other methicillin-resistant staphylococci. In this study, we aimed to develop a direct method for accurate and rapid detection of MRSA in clinical samples from open environments, such as nasal swabs. The new molecular assay is based on detecting the cooccurrence of nuc and mecA markers in a single bacterial cell by utilizing droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) with the chimeric lysin ClyH for cell lysis. The method consists of (i) dispersion of an intact single bacterium into nanoliter droplets, (ii) temperature-controlled release of genomic DNA (gDNA) by ClyH at 37°C, and (iii) amplification and detection of the markers (nuc and mecA) using standard TaqMan chemistries with ddPCR. Results were analyzed based on MRSA index ratios used for indicating the presence of the duplex-positive markers in droplets. The method was able to achieve an absolute limit of detection (LOD) of 2,900 CFU/ml for MRSA in nasal swabs spiked with excess amounts of Escherichia coli, MSSA, and other mecA-positive bacteria within 4 h. Initial testing of 104 nasal swabs showed that the method had 100% agreement with the standard culture method, while the normal duplex qPCR method had only about 87.5% agreement. The single-bacterium duplex ddPCR assay is rapid and powerful for more accurate detection of MRSA directly from clinical specimens. PMID:28724560

  11. Multitargeted Flavonoid Inhibition of the Pathogenic Bacterium Staphylococcus aureus: A Proteomic Characterization.

    PubMed

    Elmasri, Wael A; Zhu, Rui; Peng, Wenjing; Al-Hariri, Moustafa; Kobeissy, Firas; Tran, Phat; Hamood, Abdul N; Hegazy, Mohamed F; Paré, Paul W; Mechref, Yehia

    2017-07-07

    Growth inhibition of the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus with currently available antibiotics is problematic in part due to bacterial biofilm protection. Although recently characterized natural products, including 3',4',5-trihydroxy-6,7-dimethoxy-flavone [1], 3',4',5,6,7-pentahydroxy-flavone [2], and 5-hydroxy-4',7-dimethoxy-flavone [3], exhibit both antibiotic and biofilm inhibitory activities, the mode of action of such hydroxylated flavonoids with respect to S. aureus inhibition is yet to be characterized. Enzymatic digestion and high-resolution MS analysis of differentially expressed proteins from S. aureus with and without exposure to antibiotic flavonoids (1-3) allowed for the characterization of global protein alterations induced by metabolite treatment. A total of 56, 92, and 110 proteins were differentially expressed with bacterial exposure to 1, 2, or 3, respectively. The connectivity of the identified proteins was characterized using a search tool for the retrieval of interacting genes/proteins (STRING) with multitargeted S. aureus inhibition of energy metabolism and biosynthesis by the assayed flavonoids. Identifying the mode of action of natural products as antibacterial agents is expected to provide insight into the potential use of flavonoids alone or in combination with known therapeutic agents to effectively control S. aureus infection.

  12. Fermentation of Propionibacterium acnes, a Commensal Bacterium in the Human Skin Microbiome, as Skin Probiotics against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jinghua; Kuo, Sherwin; Coda, Alvin; Jiang, Yong; Gallo, Richard L.; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial interference creates an ecological competition between commensal and pathogenic bacteria. Through fermentation of milk with gut-friendly bacteria, yogurt is an excellent aid to balance the bacteriological ecosystem in the human intestine. Here, we demonstrate that fermentation of glycerol with Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), a skin commensal bacterium, can function as a skin probiotic for in vitro and in vivo growth suppression of USA300, the most prevalent community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA). We also promote the notion that inappropriate use of antibiotics may eliminate the skin commensals, making it more difficult to fight pathogen infection. This study warrants further investigation to better understand the role of fermentation of skin commensals in infectious disease and the importance of the human skin microbiome in skin health. PMID:23405142

  13. Airborne Pathogens inside Automobiles for Domestic Use: Assessing In-Car Air Decontamination Devices Using Staphylococcus aureus as the Challenge Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Sattar, Syed A; Zargar, Bahram; Wright, Kathryn E; Rubino, Joseph R; Ijaz, M Khalid

    2017-05-15

    Family cars represent ∼74% of the yearly global output of motorized vehicles. With a life expectancy of ∼8 decades in many countries, the average person spends >100 min daily inside the confined and often shared space of the car, with exposure to a mix of potentially harmful microbes. Can commercial in-car microbial air decontamination devices mitigate the risk? Three such devices (designated devices 1 to 3) with HEPA filters were tested in the modified passenger cabin (3.25 m 3 ) of a four-door sedan housed within a biosafety level 3 containment facility. Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538) was suspended in a soil load to simulate the presence of body fluids and aerosolized into the car's cabin with a 6-jet Collison nebulizer. A muffin fan (80 mm by 80 mm, with an output of 0.17 m 3 /min) circulated the air inside. Plates (150 mm diameter) of Trypticase soy agar (TSA), placed inside a programmable slit-to-agar sampler, were held at 36 ± 1°C for 18 to 24 h and examined for CFU. The input dose of the test bacterium, its rate of biological decay, and the log 10 reductions by the test devices were analyzed. The arbitrarily set performance criterion was the time in hours a device took for a 3-log 10 reduction in the level of airborne challenge bacterium. On average, the level of S. aureus challenge in the air varied between 4.2 log 10 CFU/m 3 and 5.5 log 10 CFU/m 3 , and its rate of biological decay was -0.0213 ± 0.0021 log 10 CFU/m 3 /min. Devices 1 to 3 took 2.3, 1.5, and 9.7 h, respectively, to meet the performance criterion. While the experimental setup was tested using S. aureus as an archetypical airborne pathogen, it can be readily adapted to test other types of pathogens and technologies. IMPORTANCE This study was designed to test the survival of airborne pathogens in the confined and shared space of a family automobile as well as to assess claims of devices marketed for in-car air decontamination. The basic experimental setup and the test protocols

  14. Airborne Pathogens inside Automobiles for Domestic Use: Assessing In-Car Air Decontamination Devices Using Staphylococcus aureus as the Challenge Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Zargar, Bahram; Wright, Kathryn E.; Rubino, Joseph R.; Ijaz, M. Khalid

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Family cars represent ∼74% of the yearly global output of motorized vehicles. With a life expectancy of ∼8 decades in many countries, the average person spends >100 min daily inside the confined and often shared space of the car, with exposure to a mix of potentially harmful microbes. Can commercial in-car microbial air decontamination devices mitigate the risk? Three such devices (designated devices 1 to 3) with HEPA filters were tested in the modified passenger cabin (3.25 m3) of a four-door sedan housed within a biosafety level 3 containment facility. Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538) was suspended in a soil load to simulate the presence of body fluids and aerosolized into the car's cabin with a 6-jet Collison nebulizer. A muffin fan (80 mm by 80 mm, with an output of 0.17 m3/min) circulated the air inside. Plates (150 mm diameter) of Trypticase soy agar (TSA), placed inside a programmable slit-to-agar sampler, were held at 36 ± 1°C for 18 to 24 h and examined for CFU. The input dose of the test bacterium, its rate of biological decay, and the log10 reductions by the test devices were analyzed. The arbitrarily set performance criterion was the time in hours a device took for a 3-log10 reduction in the level of airborne challenge bacterium. On average, the level of S. aureus challenge in the air varied between 4.2 log10 CFU/m3 and 5.5 log10 CFU/m3, and its rate of biological decay was −0.0213 ± 0.0021 log10 CFU/m3/min. Devices 1 to 3 took 2.3, 1.5, and 9.7 h, respectively, to meet the performance criterion. While the experimental setup was tested using S. aureus as an archetypical airborne pathogen, it can be readily adapted to test other types of pathogens and technologies. IMPORTANCE This study was designed to test the survival of airborne pathogens in the confined and shared space of a family automobile as well as to assess claims of devices marketed for in-car air decontamination. The basic experimental setup and the test protocols reported

  15. First report of Amynthas carnosus (Goto & Hatai, 1899) (Oligochaeta: Megascolecidae) in the Western Hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Carrera-Martínez, Roberto; Snyder, Bruce A

    2016-05-16

    The earthworm fauna of North America is still greatly unknown, with undescribed native species and new records of invasive species continually being discovered. The most recent checklists are difficult to reconcile, since they vary in their geographic coverage and taxonomy. Reynolds & Wetzel (2012) state that North America (including all of Mexico, some of the Caribbean, and Hawaii) is home for 256 species of earthworms, from which 188 are considered native or endemic and 68 are peregrine, exotic, and invasive species. Blakemore (2008) listed North America north of Mexico as having 183 earthworm species, of which 59 species are exotic. One Megascolecidae genus, Amynthas, is mostly located in the warmer subtropical and tropical regions of the world, with a few species that are able to survive the winter in the temperate zones of North America (Edwards & Bohlen 1995; Görres et al. 2014). Here we report for the first time the occurrence of Amynthas carnosus (Goto & Hatai, 1899) in the United States. To our knowledge, this is not only the first report of A. carnosus in North America, but also its first report in the Western Hemisphere. The description below is intended to place our specimens in the correct taxon while avoiding future confusion with similar species, without making changes to the existing classification system.

  16. Anticancer potential of pyrrole (1, 2, a) pyrazine 1, 4, dione, hexahydro 3-(2-methyl propyl) (PPDHMP) extracted from a new marine bacterium, Staphylococcus sp. strain MB30.

    PubMed

    Lalitha, P; Veena, V; Vidhyapriya, P; Lakshmi, Pragna; Krishna, R; Sakthivel, N

    2016-05-01

    Marine bacterium, strain MB30 isolated from the deep sea sediment of Bay of Bengal, India, exhibited antimicrobial activity against human pathogenic bacteria. Based on the 16S rRNA sequence homology and subsequent phylogenetic tree analysis, the strain MB30 was identified as Staphylococcus sp. The bioactive metabolite produced by the strain MB30 was purified through silica gel column chromatography and preparative HPLC. Purified metabolite was further characterized by FT-IR, LC-MS and NMR analyses. On the basis of spectroscopic data, the metabolite was identified as pyrrole (1, 2, a) pyrazine 1, 4, dione, hexahydro 3-(2-methyl propyl) (PPDHMP). The PPDHMP exhibited in vitro anticancer potential against lung (A549) and cervical (HeLa) cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner with the IC50 concentration of 19.94 ± 1.23 and 16.73 ± 1.78 μg ml(-1) respectively. The acridine orange (AO)/ethidium bromide (EB) and 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride (DAPI) staining of the IC50 concentration of PPDHMP-treated cancer cells exhibited an array of morphological changes such as nuclear condensation, cell shrinkage and formation of apoptotic bodies. The PPDHMP-treated cancer cells induced the progressive accumulation of fragmented DNA in a time-dependent manner. Based on the flow cytometric analysis, it has become evident that the compound was also effective in arresting the cell cycle at G1 phase. Further, the Western blotting analysis confirmed the down-regulation of cyclin-D1, cyclin dependent kinase (CDK-2), anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins (Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL), activation of caspase-9 and 3 with the cleavage of PARP. The PPDHMP-treated cancer cells also showed the inhibition of migration and invasive capacity of cancer cells. In the present investigation, for the first time, we have reported the extraction, purification and characterization of an anticancer metabolite, PPDHMP from a new marine bacterium, Staphylococcus sp. strain MB30.

  17. Single Bacterium Detection Using Sers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonchukov, S. A.; Baikova, T. V.; Alushin, M. V.; Svistunova, T. S.; Minaeva, S. A.; Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Saraeva, I. N.; Zayarny, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    This work is devoted to the study of a single Staphylococcus aureus bacterium detection using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and resonant Raman spectroscopy (RS). It was shown that SERS allows increasing sensitivity of predominantly low frequency lines connected with the vibrations of Amide, Proteins and DNA. At the same time the lines of carotenoids inherent to this kind of bacterium are well-detected due to the resonance Raman scattering mechanism. The reproducibility and stability of Raman spectra strongly depend on the characteristics of nanostructured substrate, and molecular structure and size of the tested biological object.

  18. Collagen from the Marine Sponges Axinella cannabina and Suberites carnosus: Isolation and Morphological, Biochemical, and Biophysical Characterization.

    PubMed

    Tziveleka, Leto-Aikaterini; Ioannou, Efstathia; Tsiourvas, Dimitris; Berillis, Panagiotis; Foufa, Evangelia; Roussis, Vassilios

    2017-05-29

    In search of alternative and safer sources of collagen for biomedical applications, the marine demosponges Axinella cannabina and Suberites carnosus , collected from the Aegean and the Ionian Seas, respectively, were comparatively studied for their insoluble collagen, intercellular collagen, and spongin-like collagen content. The isolated collagenous materials were morphologically, physicochemically, and biophysically characterized. Using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy the fibrous morphology of the isolated collagens was confirmed, whereas the amino acid analysis, in conjunction with infrared spectroscopy studies, verified the characteristic for the collagen amino acid profile and its secondary structure. Furthermore, the isoelectric point and thermal behavior were determined by titration and differential scanning calorimetry, in combination with circular dichroism spectroscopic studies, respectively.

  19. Genomics of Staphylococcus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, Jodi A.

    The staphylococci are Gram-positive cocci that divide to form clusters that look like grapes. By 16S ribosomal sequencing, they are most closely related to the Gram-positive, low G+C content Bacillus-Lactobacillus-Staphylococcus genera (Woese, 1987). There are over 30 species of staphylococci identified, and they are typically found on the skin and mucous membranes of mammals. About a dozen species are frequently carried on humans, including Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus haemolyticus, Staphylococcus capitis, Staphylococcus hominis, Staphylococcus cohnii, Staphylococcus lugdunensis, Staphylococcus schleiferi, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Staphylococcus simulans, Staphylococcus warneri and Staphylococcus xylosus.

  20. Purification and substrate specificity of Staphylococcus hyicus lipase.

    PubMed

    van Oort, M G; Deveer, A M; Dijkman, R; Tjeenk, M L; Verheij, H M; de Haas, G H; Wenzig, E; Götz, F

    1989-11-28

    The Staphylococcus hyicus lipase gene has been cloned and expressed in Staphylococcus carnosus. From the latter organism the enzyme was secreted into the medium as a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 86 kDa. This protein was purified, and the amino-terminal sequence showed that the primary gene product was indeed cleaved at the proposed signal peptide cleavage site. The protein was purified from large-scale preparations after tryptic digestion. This limited proteolysis reduced the molecular mass to 46 kDa and increased the specific activity about 3-fold. Although the enzyme had a low specific activity in the absence of divalent cations, the activity increased about 40-fold in the presence of Sr2+ or Ca2+ ions. The purified lipase has a broad substrate specificity. The acyl chains were removed from the primary and secondary positions of natural neutral glycerides and from a variety of synthetic glyceride analogues. Thus triglycerides were fully hydrolyzed to free fatty acid and glycerol. The enzyme hydrolyzed naturally occurring phosphatidylcholines, their synthetic short-chain analogues, and lysophospholipids to free fatty acids and water-soluble products. The enzyme had a 2-fold higher activity on micelles of short-chain D-lecithins than on micelles composed of the L-isomers. Thus the enzyme from S. hyicus has lipase activity and also high phospholipase A and lysophospholipase activity.

  1. Clinical significance of the isolation of Staphylococcus epidermidis from bone biopsy in diabetic foot osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Aragón-Sánchez, Javier; Lázaro-Martínez, Jose Luis; Hernández-Herrero, María José; Quintana-Marrero, Yurena; Cabrera-Galván, Juan J

    2010-01-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci are considered as microorganisms with little virulence and usually as contaminants. In order to establish the role of Staphylococcus epidermidis as a pathogen in diabetic foot osteomyelitis, in addition to the isolation of the sole bacterium from the bone it will be necessary to demonstrate the histopathological changes caused by the infection. A consecutive series of 222 diabetic patients with foot osteomyelitis treated surgically in the Diabetic Foot Unit at La Paloma Hospital (Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, Spain) between 1 October 2002 and 31 October 2008. From the entire series including 213 bone cultures with 241 isolated organisms, we have analyzed only the 139 cases where Staphylococci were found. We analyzed several variables between the two groups: Staphylococcus aureus versus Staphylococcus epidermidis. Of the 134 patients included in this study, Staphlylococcus epidermidis was found as the sole bacterium isolated in 11 cases and accompanied by other bacteria in 12 cases. Staphlylococcus aureus was found as the sole bacterium isolated in 72 cases and accompanied by other bacteria in 39 cases. Histopathological changes were found in the cases of osteomyelitis where Staphylococcus epidermidis was the sole bacterium isolated. Acute osteomyelitis was found to a lesser extent when Staphylococcus epidermidis was the sole bacterium isolated but without significant differences with the cases where Staphylococcus aureus was the sole bacterium isolated. Staphylococcus epidermidis should be considered as a real pathogen, not only a contaminant, in diabetic patients with foot osteomyelitis when the bacterium is isolated from the bone. No differences in the outcomes of surgical treatment have been found with cases which Staphlylococcus aureus was isolated.

  2. Clinical significance of the isolation of Staphylococcus epidermidis from bone biopsy in diabetic foot osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Aragón-Sánchez, Javier; Lázaro-Martínez, Jose Luis; Hernández-Herrero, María José; Quintana-Marrero, Yurena; Cabrera-Galván, Juan J.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Coagulase-negative staphylococci are considered as microorganisms with little virulence and usually as contaminants. In order to establish the role of Staphylococcus epidermidis as a pathogen in diabetic foot osteomyelitis, in addition to the isolation of the sole bacterium from the bone it will be necessary to demonstrate the histopathological changes caused by the infection. Methods A consecutive series of 222 diabetic patients with foot osteomyelitis treated surgically in the Diabetic Foot Unit at La Paloma Hospital (Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, Spain) between 1 October 2002 and 31 October 2008. From the entire series including 213 bone cultures with 241 isolated organisms, we have analyzed only the 139 cases where Staphylococci were found. We analyzed several variables between the two groups: Staphylococcus aureus versus Staphylococcus epidermidis. Results Of the 134 patients included in this study, Staphlylococcus epidermidis was found as the sole bacterium isolated in 11 cases and accompanied by other bacteria in 12 cases. Staphlylococcus aureus was found as the sole bacterium isolated in 72 cases and accompanied by other bacteria in 39 cases. Histopathological changes were found in the cases of osteomyelitis where Staphylococcus epidermidis was the sole bacterium isolated. Acute osteomyelitis was found to a lesser extent when Staphylococcus epidermidis was the sole bacterium isolated but without significant differences with the cases where Staphylococcus aureus was the sole bacterium isolated. Conclusion Staphylococcus epidermidis should be considered as a real pathogen, not only a contaminant, in diabetic patients with foot osteomyelitis when the bacterium is isolated from the bone. No differences in the outcomes of surgical treatment have been found with cases which Staphlylococcus aureus was isolated. PMID:22396808

  3. A Pathway Closely Related to the d-Tagatose Pathway of Gram-Negative Enterobacteria Identified in the Gram-Positive Bacterium Bacillus licheniformis

    PubMed Central

    Van der Heiden, Edwige; Lebrun, Sarah; Freichels, Régine; Brans, Alain; Vastenavond, Christian M.; Galleni, Moreno; Joris, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    We report the first identification of a gene cluster involved in d-tagatose catabolism in Bacillus licheniformis. The pathway is closely related to the d-tagatose pathway of the Gram-negative bacterium Klebsiella oxytoca, in contrast to the d-tagatose 6-phosphate pathway described in the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:23524682

  4. A pathway closely related to the (D)-tagatose pathway of gram-negative enterobacteria identified in the gram-positive bacterium Bacillus licheniformis.

    PubMed

    Van der Heiden, Edwige; Delmarcelle, Michaël; Lebrun, Sarah; Freichels, Régine; Brans, Alain; Vastenavond, Christian M; Galleni, Moreno; Joris, Bernard

    2013-06-01

    We report the first identification of a gene cluster involved in d-tagatose catabolism in Bacillus licheniformis. The pathway is closely related to the d-tagatose pathway of the Gram-negative bacterium Klebsiella oxytoca, in contrast to the d-tagatose 6-phosphate pathway described in the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus.

  5. Staphylococcus aureus and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Staphylococcus aureus (Staph Infection) In every pregnancy, a woman starts out with a 3-5% chance of having ... risk. This sheet talks about whether exposure to staphylococcus aureus may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  6. Enzymatic Detachment of Staphylococcus epidermidis Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Jeffrey B.; Ragunath, Chandran; Velliyagounder, Kabilan; Fine, Daniel H.; Ramasubbu, Narayanan

    2004-01-01

    The gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus epidermidis is the most common cause of infections associated with catheters and other indwelling medical devices. S. epidermidis produces an extracellular slime that enables it to form adherent biofilms on plastic surfaces. We found that a biofilm-releasing enzyme produced by the gram-negative periodontal pathogen Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans rapidly and efficiently removed S. epidermidis biofilms from plastic surfaces. The enzyme worked by releasing extracellular slime from S. epidermidis cells. Precoating surfaces with the enzyme prevented S. epidermidis biofilm formation. Our findings demonstrate that biofilm-releasing enzymes can exhibit broad-spectrum activity and that these enzymes may be useful as antibiofilm agents. PMID:15215120

  7. Isolation and identification of Staphylococcus sp. in powdered infant milk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palilu, Prayolga Toban; Budiarso, Tri Yahya

    2017-05-01

    Staphylococcus sp. is one of the most dangerous bacteria that could cause food poisoning. It is a pathogenic bacterium which is able to produce enterotoxin in foods. Milk is an ideal growth medium for Staphylococcus sp., that may cause problem if it is to be consumed, especially by infant. It is the objective of this research to detect the presence of Staphylococcus sp. in powdered infant milk. As many as 14 samples obtained from market were used as samples for bacterial isolation. The isolation were done by employing enrichment step on BHI-broth, continued with Baird-Parker Agar which will produce a typical colony. It is then picked and grown on Mannitol Salt Agar, and gram staining, coagulase assay, and fermentation tests. The confirmation step was done by using API-Staph which gives the identification of Staphylococcus hemoliticus, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, with a percentage of identity ranging from 65.9-97.7%. Two isolates with the highest identification similarity values were then picked for molecular detection. A PCR primer pair targeting gene coding for enterotoxin A was used, and it gives positive result for the two isolates being tested. It is then concluded that the two isolates belong to Staphylococcus sp., and further research need to be done to correctly identify these isolates.

  8. Laboratory studies on biomachining of copper using Staphylococcus sp.

    PubMed

    Shikata, Shinji; Sreekumari, Kurissery R; Nandakumar, Kanavillil; Ozawa, Mazayoshi; Kikuchi, Yasushi

    2009-01-01

    The possibility of using bacteria to drill metallic surfaces has been demonstrated using Staphylococcus sp., a facultative anaerobic bacterium, isolated from corroded copper piping. The experiment involved exposure of copper coupons (25 mm x 15 mm x 3 mm) to a culture of Staphylococcus sp. for a maximum period of 7 days. Coupons exposed to sterile bacterial growth medium were used as controls. Exposed coupons were removed intermittently and observed microscopically for the extent of drilling. The total pit area and volume on these coupons were determined using image analysis. The results showed that both the biomachined area and volume increased with the duration of coupon exposure. In the drilling experiment, a copper thin film 2 microm thick was perforated by this bacterium within a period of 7 days. In conclusion, the results suggested that bacteria can be used as a tool for machining metallic surfaces.

  9. Staphylococcus aureus recovery from cotton towels.

    PubMed

    Oller, Anna R; Mitchell, Ashley

    2009-04-30

    Staphylococcus aureus is an emerging pathogen afflicting healthy individuals without known risk factors, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has been shown to colonize multiple family members sharing households. Because household items such as towels are often shared by family members, this study investigated whether cotton towel absorbency or washing conditions affect Staphylococcus aureus cell viability or cell retention, and whether the levels may be sufficient for person-to-person transmission. Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 was added to a 48 mm(2) template area on three cotton towel types (terry, pima, and Egyptian), and subjected to hand washing, without manual wringing, in three conditions (water only, bleach addition, or liquid detergent addition). Serial dilutions plated onto mannitol salt plates quantified bacteria for inoculations, pre- and post-wash water samples, towel surfaces, and hand transfer. Hand transfer of bacteria was determined on towels immediately, one, 24, and 48 hours post inoculation. Bleach (p < or = .05) was the most effective at reducing bacterial viability on all towel types compared to detergent and water. Although not statistically significant, more Staphylococcus colonies were recovered from higher absorbency towels and from inside directly inoculated template areas. A paired t-test showed a difference between immediate and one-hour CFUs versus 24- and 48-hour recoveries (0.0002) for hand transfers. Cell viability decreased for over 48 hours on towels, but sufficient quantities may remain for colonization. More absorbent towels may harbor more Staphylococci than less absorbent ones, and may serve as a transmission mechanism for the bacterium.

  10. Intraspecies Genomic Diversity and Natural Population Structure of the Meat-Borne Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactobacillus sakei▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Chaillou, Stéphane; Daty, Marie; Baraige, Fabienne; Dudez, Anne-Marie; Anglade, Patricia; Jones, Rhys; Alpert, Carl-Alfred; Champomier-Vergès, Marie-Christine; Zagorec, Monique

    2009-01-01

    Lactobacillus sakei is a food-borne bacterium naturally found in meat and fish products. A study was performed to examine the intraspecies diversity among 73 isolates sourced from laboratory collections in several different countries. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis demonstrated a 25% variation in genome size between isolates, ranging from 1,815 kb to 2,310 kb. The relatedness between isolates was then determined using a PCR-based method that detects the possession of 60 chromosomal genes belonging to the flexible gene pool. Ten different strain clusters were identified that had noticeable differences in their average genome size reflecting the natural population structure. The results show that many different genotypes may be isolated from similar types of meat products, suggesting a complex ecological habitat in which intraspecies diversity may be required for successful adaptation. Finally, proteomic analysis revealed a slight difference between the migration patterns of highly abundant GapA isoforms of the two prevailing L. sakei subspecies (sakei and carnosus). This analysis was used to affiliate the genotypic clusters with the corresponding subspecies. These findings reveal for the first time the extent of intraspecies genomic diversity in L. sakei. Consequently, identification of molecular subtypes may in the future prove valuable for a better understanding of microbial ecosystems in food products. PMID:19114527

  11. Intraspecies genomic diversity and natural population structure of the meat-borne lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus sakei.

    PubMed

    Chaillou, Stéphane; Daty, Marie; Baraige, Fabienne; Dudez, Anne-Marie; Anglade, Patricia; Jones, Rhys; Alpert, Carl-Alfred; Champomier-Vergès, Marie-Christine; Zagorec, Monique

    2009-02-01

    Lactobacillus sakei is a food-borne bacterium naturally found in meat and fish products. A study was performed to examine the intraspecies diversity among 73 isolates sourced from laboratory collections in several different countries. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis demonstrated a 25% variation in genome size between isolates, ranging from 1,815 kb to 2,310 kb. The relatedness between isolates was then determined using a PCR-based method that detects the possession of 60 chromosomal genes belonging to the flexible gene pool. Ten different strain clusters were identified that had noticeable differences in their average genome size reflecting the natural population structure. The results show that many different genotypes may be isolated from similar types of meat products, suggesting a complex ecological habitat in which intraspecies diversity may be required for successful adaptation. Finally, proteomic analysis revealed a slight difference between the migration patterns of highly abundant GapA isoforms of the two prevailing L. sakei subspecies (sakei and carnosus). This analysis was used to affiliate the genotypic clusters with the corresponding subspecies. These findings reveal for the first time the extent of intraspecies genomic diversity in L. sakei. Consequently, identification of molecular subtypes may in the future prove valuable for a better understanding of microbial ecosystems in food products.

  12. Preventing Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" among Student Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Many, Patricia S.

    2008-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (MRSA) was once thought to be a bacterium causing infections in only hospitalized patients. However, a new strain of MRSA has emerged among healthy individuals who have not had any recent exposure to a hospital or to medical procedures. This new strain is known as "community-associated…

  13. Biofilm Formation by a Metabolically Versatile Bacterium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-19

    ABSTRACT Rhodopseudomonas palustris is a photosynthetic bacterium that has good potential as a biocatalyst for the production ofhydrogen gas, a biofuel...Biofilm formation by a metabolically versatile bacterium: final report Report Title ABSTRACT Rhodopseudomonas palustris is a photosynthetic bacterium...agricultural waste. We characterized five new Rhodopseudomonas genome sequences and isolated and described R. palustris mutant strains that produce

  14. Establishment of an Arbitrary PCR for Rapid Identification of Tn917 Insertion Sites in Staphylococcus epidermidis: Characterization of Biofilm-Negative and Nonmucoid Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Knobloch, Johannes K.-M.; Nedelmann, Max; Kiel, Kathrin; Bartscht, Katrin; Horstkotte, Matthias A.; Dobinsky, Sabine; Rohde, Holger; Mack, Dietrich

    2003-01-01

    Transposon mutagenesis with the Enterococcus faecalis transposon Tn917 is a genetic approach frequently used to identify genes related with specific phenotypes in gram-positive bacteria. We established an arbitrary PCR for the rapid and easy identification of Tn917 insertion sites in Staphylococcus epidermidis with six independent, well-characterized biofilm-negative Tn917 transposon mutants, which were clustered in the icaADBC gene locus or harbor Tn917 in the regulatory gene rsbU. For all six of these mutants, short chromosomal DNA fragments flanking both transposon ends could be amplified. All fragments were sufficient to correctly identify the Tn917 insertion sites in the published S. epidermidis genomes. By using this technique, the Tn917 insertion sites of three not-yet-characterized biofilm-negative or nonmucoid mutants were identified. In the biofilm-negative and nonmucoid mutant M12, Tn917 is inserted into a gene homologous to the regulatory gene purR of Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. The Tn917 insertions of the nonmucoid but biofilm-positive mutants M16 and M20 are located in genes homologous to components of the phosphoenolpyruvate-sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) of B. subtilis, S. aureus, and Staphylococcus carnosus, indicating an influence of the PTS on the mucoid phenotype in S. epidermidis. PMID:14532029

  15. Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis in diverse host environments

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Divya; Harper, Lamia; Shopsin, Bo; Torres, Victor J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Staphylococcus aureus is an eminent human pathogen that can colonize the human host and cause severe life-threatening illnesses. This bacterium can reside in and infect a wide range of host tissues, ranging from superficial surfaces like the skin to deeper tissues such as in the gastrointestinal tract, heart and bones. Due to its multifaceted lifestyle, S. aureus uses complex regulatory networks to sense diverse signals that enable it to adapt to different environments and modulate virulence. In this minireview, we explore well-characterized environmental and host cues that S. aureus responds to and describe how this pathogen modulates virulence in response to these signals. Lastly, we highlight therapeutic approaches undertaken by several groups to inhibit both signaling and the cognate regulators that sense and transmit these signals downstream. PMID:28104617

  16. Pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Thomer, Lena; Schneewind, Olaf; Missiakas, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus , a Gram-positive bacterium colonizing nares, skin, and the gastrointestinal tract, frequently invades the skin, soft tissues, and bloodstreams of humans. Even with surgical and antibiotic therapy, bloodstream infections are associated with significant mortality. The secretion of coagulases, proteins that associate with and activate the host hemostatic factor prothrombin, and the bacterial surface display of agglutinins, proteins that bind polymerized fibrin, are key virulence strategies for the pathogenesis of S. aureus bloodstream infections, which culminate in the establishment of abscess lesions. Pathogen-controlled processes, involving a wide spectrum of secreted factors, are responsible for the recruitment and destruction of immune cells, transforming abscess lesions into purulent exudate, with which staphylococci disseminate to produce new infectious lesions or to infect new hosts. Research on S. aureus bloodstream infections is a frontier for the characterization of protective vaccine antigens and the development of immune therapeutics aiming to prevent disease or improve outcomes. PMID:26925499

  17. The T Cell Response to Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Bröker, Barbara M.; Mrochen, Daniel; Péton, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a dangerous pathogen and a leading cause of both nosocomial and community acquired bacterial infection worldwide. However, on the other hand, we are all exposed to this bacterium, often within the first hours of life, and usually manage to establish equilibrium and coexist with it. What does the adaptive immune system contribute toward lifelong control of S. aureus? Will it become possible to raise or enhance protective immune memory by vaccination? While in the past the S. aureus-specific antibody response has dominated this discussion, the research community is now coming to appreciate the role that the cellular arm of adaptive immunity, the T cells, plays. There are numerous T cell subsets, each with differing functions, which together have the ability to orchestrate the immune response to S. aureus and hence to tip the balance between protection and pathology. This review summarizes the state of the art in this dynamic field of research. PMID:26999219

  18. Selenium nanoparticles inhibit Staphylococcus aureus growth

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Phong A; Webster, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a key bacterium commonly found in numerous infections. S. aureus infections are difficult to treat due to their biofilm formation and documented antibiotic resistance. While selenium has been used for a wide range of applications including anticancer applications, the effects of selenium nanoparticles on microorganisms remain largely unknown to date. The objective of this in vitro study was thus to examine the growth of S. aureus in the presence of selenium nanoparticles. Results of this study provided the first evidence of strongly inhibited growth of S. aureus in the presence of selenium nanoparticles after 3, 4, and 5 hours at 7.8, 15.5, and 31 μg/mL. The percentage of live bacteria also decreased in the presence of selenium nanoparticles. Therefore, this study suggests that selenium nanoparticles may be used to effectively prevent and treat S. aureus infections and thus should be further studied for such applications. PMID:21845045

  19. Growth of Staphylococcus aureus in cooked potato and potato salad – A one-step kinetic analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive spherically-shaped bacterium capable of producing heat-stable enterotoxins that cause acute gastrointestinal diseases. The growth of this pathogen in food is a major threat to public health worldwide. Potato salad is a frequent vehicle for infection and foo...

  20. Direct measurement of interaction forces between a single bacterium and a flat plate.

    PubMed

    Klein, Jonah D; Clapp, Aaron R; Dickinson, Richard B

    2003-05-15

    A technique for precisely measuring the equilibrium and viscous interaction forces between a single bacterium and a flat surface as functions of separation distance is described. A single-beam gradient optical trap was used to micromanipulate the bacterium against a flat surface while evanescent wave light scattering was used to measure separation distances. Calibrating the optical trap far from the surface allowed the trapped bacterium to be used as a force probe. Equilibrium force-distance profiles were determined by measuring the deflection of the cell from the center of the optical trap at various trap positions. Simultaneously, viscous forces were determined by measuring the relaxation time for the fluctuating bacterium. Absolute distances were determined using a best-fit approximation to the theoretical prediction for the hindered mobility of a diffusing sphere near a wall. Using this approach, forces in the range from 0.01 to 4 pN were measured at near-nanometer resolution between Staphylococcus aureus and glass that was bare or coated with adsorbed protein.

  1. Development of a real-time PCR assay for the detection and identification of Staphylococcus capitis, Staphylococcus haemolyticus and Staphylococcus warneri.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Tadayuki; Seki, Keiko; Shinji, Hitomi; Mizunoe, Yoshimitsu; Masuda, Shogo

    2007-10-01

    Staphylococcus capitis, Staphylococcus haemolyticus and Staphylococcus warneri are coagulase-negative staphylococci. Each species has different characteristics, and a difference in pathology is also seen in compromised hosts. Therefore, the development of a species-specific simple detection method for the identification of these staphylococci is important. Here, a species-specific real-time PCR assay is reported that targets the superoxide dismutase A-encoding gene of these bacteria. Primers were designed with a base that was non-complementary with regard to the other bacteria. This base was at the 3' end of the primer (3' mismatch primer) and conferred high specificity. These primers were then evaluated using real-time PCR. They reacted only with the target bacterium. In addition, stable quantitative reactions were observed when experiments were performed using genomic DNA extracted from varying numbers of staphylococci cells (10(1)-10(7) cells). These results indicate that this method is useful for the identification and quantitative analysis of S. capitis, S. haemolyticus and S. warneri.

  2. Biotic Interactions Shape the Ecological Distributions of Staphylococcus Species.

    PubMed

    Kastman, Erik K; Kamelamela, Noelani; Norville, Josh W; Cosetta, Casey M; Dutton, Rachel J; Wolfe, Benjamin E

    2016-10-18

    Many metagenomic sequencing studies have observed the presence of closely related bacterial species or genotypes in the same microbiome. Previous attempts to explain these patterns of microdiversity have focused on the abiotic environment, but few have considered how biotic interactions could drive patterns of microbiome diversity. We dissected the patterns, processes, and mechanisms shaping the ecological distributions of three closely related Staphylococcus species in cheese rind biofilms. Paradoxically, the most abundant species (S. equorum) is the slowest colonizer and weakest competitor based on growth and competition assays in the laboratory. Through in vitro community reconstructions, we determined that biotic interactions with neighboring fungi help resolve this paradox. Species-specific stimulation of the poor competitor by fungi of the genus Scopulariopsis allows S. equorum to dominate communities in vitro as it does in situ Results of comparative genomic and transcriptomic experiments indicate that iron utilization pathways, including a homolog of the S. aureus staphyloferrin B siderophore operon pathway, are potential molecular mechanisms underlying Staphylococcus-Scopulariopsis interactions. Our integrated approach demonstrates that fungi can structure the ecological distributions of closely related bacterial species, and the data highlight the importance of bacterium-fungus interactions in attempts to design and manipulate microbiomes. Decades of culture-based studies and more recent metagenomic studies have demonstrated that bacterial species in agriculture, medicine, industry, and nature are unevenly distributed across time and space. The ecological processes and molecular mechanisms that shape these distributions are not well understood because it is challenging to connect in situ patterns of diversity with mechanistic in vitro studies in the laboratory. Using tractable cheese rind biofilms and a focus on coagulase-negative staphylococcus (CNS

  3. Single Upconversion Nanoparticle-Bacterium Cotrapping for Single-Bacterium Labeling and Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xin, Hongbao; Li, Yuchao; Xu, Dekang; Zhang, Yueli; Chen, Chia-Hung; Li, Baojun

    2017-04-01

    Detecting and analyzing pathogenic bacteria in an effective and reliable manner is crucial for the diagnosis of acute bacterial infection and initial antibiotic therapy. However, the precise labeling and analysis of bacteria at the single-bacterium level are a technical challenge but very important to reveal important details about the heterogeneity of cells and responds to environment. This study demonstrates an optical strategy for single-bacterium labeling and analysis by the cotrapping of single upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) and bacteria together. A single UCNP with an average size of ≈120 nm is first optically trapped. Both ends of a single bacterium are then trapped and labeled with single UCNPs emitting green light. The labeled bacterium can be flexibly moved to designated locations for further analysis. Signals from bacteria of different sizes are detected in real time for single-bacterium analysis. This cotrapping method provides a new approach for single-pathogenic-bacterium labeling, detection, and real-time analysis at the single-particle and single-bacterium level. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Overproduction of Hydrogen From an Anaerobic Bacterium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    fixation of nitrogen ( Haber - Bosch process), mostly to produce fertilizer. Nitrogenase provides a catalytic alternative to the commercial fixation of...the culture and suggests a uniquely simple hydrogen reactor design based on renewable feedstocks. 1. INTRODUCTION Hydrogen is an ideal... renewable feedstocks. Clostridium phytofermentans is a recently- discovered anaerobic bacterium, reported to possess cellulase enzymes that degrade

  5. A Comparative biochemical study on two marine endophytes, Bacterium SRCnm and Bacillus sp. JS, Isolated from red sea algae.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Eman Fadl; Hassan, Hossam Mokhtar; Rateb, Mostafa Ezzat; Abdel-Wahab, Noha; Sameer, Somayah; Aly Taie, Hanan Anwar; Abdel-Hameed, Mohammed Sayed; Hammouda, Ola

    2016-01-01

    Two marine endophytic bacteria were isolated from the Red Sea algae; a red alga; Acanthophora dendroides and the brown alga Sargassum sabrepandum. The isolates were identified based on their 16SrRNA sequences as Bacterium SRCnm and Bacillus sp. JS. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential anti-microbial and antioxidant activities of the extracts of the isolated bacteria grown in different nutrient conditions. Compared to amoxicillin (25μg/disk) and erythromycin (15μg/disk), the extracts of Bacterium SRCn min media II, III, IV and V were potent inhibitors of the gram-positive bacterium Sarcina maxima even at low concentrations. Also, the multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA) was more sensitive to the metabolites produced in medium (II) of the same endophyte than erythromycin (15μg/disk). A moderate activity of the Bacillus sp. JS extracts of media I and II was obtained against the same pathogen. The total compounds (500ug/ml) of both isolated endophytes showed moderate antioxidant activities (48.9% and 46.1%, respectively). LC/MS analysis of the bacterial extracts was carried out to investigate the likely natural products produced. Cyclo(D-cis-Hyp-L-Leu), dihydrosphingosine and 2-Amino-1,3-hexadecanediol were identified in the fermentation medium of Bacterium SRCnm, whereas cyclo (D-Pro-L-Tyr) and cyclo (L-Leu-L-Pro) were the suggested compounds of Bacillus sp. JS.

  6. Vitamin E improves the in vivo efficacy of tigecycline and daptomycin in an animal model of wounds infected with meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Provinciali, Mauro; Cirioni, Oscar; Orlando, Fiorenza; Pierpaoli, Elisa; Barucca, Alessandra; Silvestri, Carmela; Ghiselli, Roberto; Scalise, Alessandro; Brescini, Lucia; Guerrieri, Mario; Giacometti, Andrea

    2011-12-01

    A relevant bacterial load in cutaneous wounds significantly interferes with the normal process of healing. Vitamin E (VE) is a known immunomodulator and immune enhancer. Here, it was shown that administration of VE before infection was effective at increasing the antimicrobial activity of daptomycin (DAP) or tigecycline (TIG) in a mouse model of wound infection caused by meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). A wound was established through the panniculus carnosus of mice and inoculated with MRSA. Mice were assigned to six groups: a VE pre-treated group with no antibiotics given after MRSA challenge; two VE pre-treated groups with DAP or TIG given after MRSA challenge; two groups treated with DAP or TIG only after MRSA challenge; and a control group that did not receive any treatment. Mice receiving each antibiotic alone showed a 3 log decrease in the number of c.f.u. recovered compared with the control group, mice treated with VE plus TIG had a 4 log decrease, whilst mice treated with VE plus DAP had the largest decrease in c.f.u. recovered (5 logs). The increased antimicrobial effect seen from treatment with VE plus antibiotics was associated with increased levels of natural killer cell cytotoxicity, with a more pronounced increase in leukocyte populations in mice treated with VE plus DAP. These data suggest that treatment with VE prior to infection and subsequent antibiotic treatment act in synergy. © 2011 SGM

  7. Reductive evolution and the loss of PDC/PAS domains from the genus Staphylococcus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain represents a ubiquitous structural fold that is involved in bacterial sensing and adaptation systems, including several virulence related functions. Although PAS domains and the subclass of PhoQ-DcuS-CitA (PDC) domains have a common structure, there is limited amino acid sequence similarity. To gain greater insight into the evolution of PDC/PAS domains present in the bacterial kingdom and staphylococci in specific, the PDC/PAS domains from the genomic sequences of 48 bacteria, representing 5 phyla, were identified using the sensitive search method based on HMM-to-HMM comparisons (HHblits). Results A total of 1,007 PAS domains and 686 PDC domains distributed over 1,174 proteins were identified. For 28 Gram-positive bacteria, the distribution, organization, and molecular evolution of PDC/PAS domains were analyzed in greater detail, with a special emphasis on the genus Staphylococcus. Compared to other bacteria the staphylococci have relatively fewer proteins (6–9) containing PDC/PAS domains. As a general rule, the staphylococcal genomes examined in this study contain a core group of seven PDC/PAS domain-containing proteins consisting of WalK, SrrB, PhoR, ArlS, HssS, NreB, and GdpP. The exceptions to this rule are: 1) S. saprophyticus lacks the core NreB protein; 2) S. carnosus has two additional PAS domain containing proteins; 3) S. epidermidis, S. aureus, and S. pseudintermedius have an additional protein with two PDC domains that is predicted to code for a sensor histidine kinase; 4) S. lugdunensis has an additional PDC containing protein predicted to be a sensor histidine kinase. Conclusions This comprehensive analysis demonstrates that variation in PDC/PAS domains among bacteria has limited correlations to the genome size or pathogenicity; however, our analysis established that bacteria having a motile phase in their life cycle have significantly more PDC/PAS-containing proteins. In addition, our analysis revealed a

  8. Reductive evolution and the loss of PDC/PAS domains from the genus Staphylococcus.

    PubMed

    Shah, Neethu; Gaupp, Rosmarie; Moriyama, Hideaki; Eskridge, Kent M; Moriyama, Etsuko N; Somerville, Greg A

    2013-07-31

    The Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain represents a ubiquitous structural fold that is involved in bacterial sensing and adaptation systems, including several virulence related functions. Although PAS domains and the subclass of PhoQ-DcuS-CitA (PDC) domains have a common structure, there is limited amino acid sequence similarity. To gain greater insight into the evolution of PDC/PAS domains present in the bacterial kingdom and staphylococci in specific, the PDC/PAS domains from the genomic sequences of 48 bacteria, representing 5 phyla, were identified using the sensitive search method based on HMM-to-HMM comparisons (HHblits). A total of 1,007 PAS domains and 686 PDC domains distributed over 1,174 proteins were identified. For 28 Gram-positive bacteria, the distribution, organization, and molecular evolution of PDC/PAS domains were analyzed in greater detail, with a special emphasis on the genus Staphylococcus. Compared to other bacteria the staphylococci have relatively fewer proteins (6-9) containing PDC/PAS domains. As a general rule, the staphylococcal genomes examined in this study contain a core group of seven PDC/PAS domain-containing proteins consisting of WalK, SrrB, PhoR, ArlS, HssS, NreB, and GdpP. The exceptions to this rule are: 1) S. saprophyticus lacks the core NreB protein; 2) S. carnosus has two additional PAS domain containing proteins; 3) S. epidermidis, S. aureus, and S. pseudintermedius have an additional protein with two PDC domains that is predicted to code for a sensor histidine kinase; 4) S. lugdunensis has an additional PDC containing protein predicted to be a sensor histidine kinase. This comprehensive analysis demonstrates that variation in PDC/PAS domains among bacteria has limited correlations to the genome size or pathogenicity; however, our analysis established that bacteria having a motile phase in their life cycle have significantly more PDC/PAS-containing proteins. In addition, our analysis revealed a tremendous amount of variation in the

  9. SbnG, a Citrate Synthase in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Kobylarz, Marek J.; Grigg, Jason C.; Sheldon, Jessica R.; Heinrichs, David E.; Murphy, Michael E. P.

    2014-01-01

    In response to iron deprivation, Staphylococcus aureus produces staphyloferrin B, a citrate-containing siderophore that delivers iron back to the cell. This bacterium also possesses a second citrate synthase, SbnG, that is necessary for supplying citrate to the staphyloferrin B biosynthetic pathway. We present the structure of SbnG bound to the inhibitor calcium and an active site variant in complex with oxaloacetate. The overall fold of SbnG is structurally distinct from TCA cycle citrate synthases yet similar to metal-dependent class II aldolases. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that SbnG forms a separate clade with homologs from other siderophore biosynthetic gene clusters and is representative of a metal-independent subgroup in the phosphoenolpyruvate/pyruvate domain superfamily. A structural superposition of the SbnG active site to TCA cycle citrate synthases and site-directed mutagenesis suggests a case for convergent evolution toward a conserved catalytic mechanism for citrate production. PMID:25336653

  10. NREL Researchers Discover How a Bacterium, Clostridium thermocellum,

    Science.gov Websites

    containing the bacterium actually promotes the growth of C. thermocellum, yet its mechanistic details remained a puzzle. This enhanced growth implied the bacterium had the ability to use CO2 and prompted NREL researchers to investigate the phenomena enhancing the bacterium's growth. "It took us by surprise that

  11. Galectin-3 Is a Target for Proteases Involved in the Virulence of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Elmwall, Jonas; Kwiecinski, Jakub; Na, Manli; Ali, Abukar Ahmed; Osla, Veronica; Shaw, Lindsey N; Wang, Wanzhong; Sävman, Karin; Josefsson, Elisabet; Bylund, Johan; Jin, Tao; Welin, Amanda; Karlsson, Anna

    2017-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of skin and soft tissue infection. The bacterium expresses four major proteases that are emerging as virulence factors: aureolysin (Aur), V8 protease (SspA), staphopain A (ScpA), and staphopain B (SspB). We hypothesized that human galectin-3, a β-galactoside-binding lectin involved in immune regulation and antimicrobial defense, is a target for these proteases and that proteolysis of galectin-3 is a novel immune evasion mechanism. Indeed, supernatants from laboratory strains and clinical isolates of S. aureus caused galectin-3 degradation. Similar proteolytic capacities were found in Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates but not in Staphylococcus saprophyticus Galectin-3-induced activation of the neutrophil NADPH oxidase was abrogated by bacterium-derived proteolysis of galectin-3, and SspB was identified as the major protease responsible. The impact of galectin-3 and protease expression on S. aureus virulence was studied in a murine skin infection model. In galectin-3 +/+ mice, SspB-expressing S. aureus caused larger lesions and resulted in higher bacterial loads than protease-lacking bacteria. No such difference in bacterial load or lesion size was detected in galectin-3 -/- mice, which overall showed smaller lesion sizes than the galectin-3 +/+ animals. In conclusion, the staphylococcal protease SspB inactivates galectin-3, abrogating its stimulation of oxygen radical production in human neutrophils and increasing tissue damage during skin infection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Swimming efficiency of bacterium Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Suddhashil; Moldovan, Radu; Yeung, Chuck; Wu, X. L.

    2006-01-01

    We use measurements of swimming bacteria in an optical trap to determine fundamental properties of bacterial propulsion. In particular, we directly measure the force required to hold the bacterium in the optical trap and determine the propulsion matrix, which relates the translational and angular velocity of the flagellum to the torques and forces propelling the bacterium. From the propulsion matrix, dynamical properties such as torques, swimming speed, and power can be obtained by measuring the angular velocity of the motor. We find significant heterogeneities among different individuals even though all bacteria started from a single colony. The propulsive efficiency, defined as the ratio of the propulsive power output to the rotary power input provided by the motors, is found to be ≈2%, which is consistent with the efficiency predicted theoretically for a rigid helical coil. PMID:16954194

  13. Paradigms: examples from the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The history of advances in research on Xylella fastidiosa provides excellent examples of how paradigms both advance and limit our scientific understanding of plant pathogens and the plant diseases they cause. I describe this from a personal perspective, having been directly involved with many persons who made paradigm-changing discoveries, beginning with the discovery that a bacterium, not a virus, causes Pierce's disease of grape and other plant diseases in numerous plant species, including important crop and forest species.

  14. Characterization of a novel extremely alkalophilic bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Souza, K. A.; Deal, P. H.

    1977-01-01

    A new alkalophilic bacterium, isolated from a natural spring of high pH is characterized. It is a Gram-positive, non-sporulating, motile rod requiring aerobic and alkaline conditions for growth. The characteristics of this organism resemble those of the coryneform group of bacteria; however, there are no accepted genera within this group with which this organism can be closely matched. Therefore, a new genus may be warranted.

  15. Biofilm Formation by a Metabolically Versatile Bacterium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-02

    Rhodopseudomonas palustris is a photosynthetic bacterium that has good potential to be developed as a biocatalyst for the production of hydrogen, a...A for none) Samanta, S. K and C. S. Harwood. 2005. Use of the Rhodopseudomonas palustris genome to identify a single amino acid that contributes to...operon from Rhodopseudomonas palustris mediates dicarboxylic acid degradation and participates in anaerobic benzoate degradation. Microbiology 151

  16. Staphylococcus aureus infection dynamics.

    PubMed

    Pollitt, Eric J G; Szkuta, Piotr T; Burns, Nicola; Foster, Simon J

    2018-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a human commensal that can also cause systemic infections. This transition requires evasion of the immune response and the ability to exploit different niches within the host. However, the disease mechanisms and the dominant immune mediators against infection are poorly understood. Previously it has been shown that the infecting S. aureus population goes through a population bottleneck, from which very few bacteria escape to establish the abscesses that are characteristic of many infections. Here we examine the host factors underlying the population bottleneck and subsequent clonal expansion in S. aureus infection models, to identify underpinning principles of infection. The bottleneck is a common feature between models and is independent of S. aureus strain. Interestingly, the high doses of S. aureus required for the widely used "survival" model results in a reduced population bottleneck, suggesting that host defences have been simply overloaded. This brings into question the applicability of the survival model. Depletion of immune mediators revealed key breakpoints and the dynamics of systemic infection. Loss of macrophages, including the liver Kupffer cells, led to increased sensitivity to infection as expected but also loss of the population bottleneck and the spread to other organs still occurred. Conversely, neutrophil depletion led to greater susceptibility to disease but with a concomitant maintenance of the bottleneck and lack of systemic spread. We also used a novel microscopy approach to examine abscess architecture and distribution within organs. From these observations we developed a conceptual model for S. aureus disease from initial infection to mature abscess. This work highlights the need to understand the complexities of the infectious process to be able to assign functions for host and bacterial components, and why S. aureus disease requires a seemingly high infectious dose and how interventions such as a vaccine may be

  17. Biotic Interactions Shape the Ecological Distributions of Staphylococcus Species

    PubMed Central

    Kastman, Erik K.; Kamelamela, Noelani; Norville, Josh W.; Cosetta, Casey M.; Dutton, Rachel J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many metagenomic sequencing studies have observed the presence of closely related bacterial species or genotypes in the same microbiome. Previous attempts to explain these patterns of microdiversity have focused on the abiotic environment, but few have considered how biotic interactions could drive patterns of microbiome diversity. We dissected the patterns, processes, and mechanisms shaping the ecological distributions of three closely related Staphylococcus species in cheese rind biofilms. Paradoxically, the most abundant species (S. equorum) is the slowest colonizer and weakest competitor based on growth and competition assays in the laboratory. Through in vitro community reconstructions, we determined that biotic interactions with neighboring fungi help resolve this paradox. Species-specific stimulation of the poor competitor by fungi of the genus Scopulariopsis allows S. equorum to dominate communities in vitro as it does in situ. Results of comparative genomic and transcriptomic experiments indicate that iron utilization pathways, including a homolog of the S. aureus staphyloferrin B siderophore operon pathway, are potential molecular mechanisms underlying Staphylococcus-Scopulariopsis interactions. Our integrated approach demonstrates that fungi can structure the ecological distributions of closely related bacterial species, and the data highlight the importance of bacterium-fungus interactions in attempts to design and manipulate microbiomes. PMID:27795388

  18. Staphylococcus aureus, phagocyte NADPH oxidase and chronic granulomatous disease.

    PubMed

    Buvelot, Helene; Posfay-Barbe, Klara M; Linder, Patrick; Schrenzel, Jacques; Krause, Karl-Heinz

    2017-03-01

    Dysfunction of phagocytes is a relevant risk factor for staphylococcal infection. The most common hereditary phagocyte dysfunction is chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), characterized by impaired generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) due to loss of function mutations within the phagocyte NADPH oxidase NOX2. Phagocytes ROS generation is fundamental to eliminate pathogens and to regulate the inflammatory response to infection. CGD is characterized by recurrent and severe bacterial and fungal infections, with Staphylococcus aureus as the most frequent pathogen, and skin and lung abscesses as the most common clinical entities. Staphylococcus aureus infection may occur in virtually any human host, presumably because of the many virulence factors of the bacterium. However, in the presence of functional NOX2, staphylococcal infections remain rare and are mainly linked to breaches of the skin barrier. In contrast, in patients with CGD, S. aureus readily survives and frequently causes clinically apparent disease. Astonishingly, little is known why S. aureus, which possesses a wide range of antioxidant enzymes (e.g. catalase, SOD), is particularly sensitive to control through NOX2. In this review, we will evaluate the discovery of CGD and our present knowledge of the role of NOX2 in S. aureus infection. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Effects of Orange II and Sudan III azo dyes and their metabolites on Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Hongmiao; Feng, Jinhui; Cerniglia, Carl E.

    2018-01-01

    Azo dyes are widely used in the plastic, paper, cosmetics, food, and pharmaceutical industries. Some metabolites of these dyes are potentially genotoxic. The toxic effects of azo dyes and their potential reduction metabolites on Staphylococcus aureus ATCC BAA 1556 were studied. When the cultures were incubated with 6, 18, and 36 μg/ml of Orange II and Sudan III for 48 h, 76.3, 68.5, and 61.7% of Orange II and 97.8, 93.9, and 75.8% of Sudan III were reduced by the bacterium, respectively. In the presence of 36 μg/ml Sudan III, the cell viability of the bacterium decreased to 61.9% after 48 h of incubation, whereas the cell viability of the control culture without the dye was 71.5%. Moreover, the optical density of the bacterial cultures at 10 h decreased from 0.74 to 0.55, indicating that Sudan III is able to inhibit growth of the bacterium. However, Orange II had no significant effects on either cell growth or cell viability of the bacterium at the tested concentrations. 1-Amino-2-naphthol, a metabolite common to Orange II and Sudan III, was capable of inhibiting cell growth of the bacterium at 1 μg/ml and completely stopped bacterial cell growth at 24–48 μg/ml. On the other hand, the other metabolites of Orange II and Sudan III, namely sulfanilic acid, p-phenylenediamine, and aniline, showed no significant effects on cell growth. p-Phenylenediamine exhibited a synergistic effect with 1-amino-2-naphthol on cell growth inhibition. All of the dye metabolites had no significant effects on cell viability of the bacterium. PMID:21451978

  20. Screening Test for Shed Skin Cells by Measuring the Ratio of Human DNA to Staphylococcus epidermidis DNA.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Hiroaki; Ohmori, Takeshi; Hara, Masaaki; Takahashi, Shirushi; Kurosu, Akira; Takada, Aya; Saito, Kazuyuki

    2016-05-01

    A novel screening method for shed skin cells by detecting Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis), which is a resident bacterium on skin, was developed. Staphylococcus epidermidis was detected using real-time PCR. Staphylococcus epidermidis was detected in all 20 human skin surface samples. Although not present in blood and urine samples, S. epidermidis was detected in 6 of 20 saliva samples, and 5 of 18 semen samples. The ratio of human DNA to S. epidermidisDNA was significantly smaller in human skin surface samples than in saliva and semen samples in which S. epidermidis was detected. Therefore, although skin cells could not be identified by detecting only S. epidermidis, they could be distinguished by measuring the S. epidermidis to human DNA ratio. This method could be applied to casework touch samples, which suggests that it is useful for screening whether skin cells and human DNA are present on potential evidentiary touch samples. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  1. Neonatal Staphylococcus lugdunensis urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Itaru; Hataya, Hiroshi; Yamanouchi, Hanako; Sakakibara, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Toshiro

    2015-08-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a known pathogen of infective endocarditis, but not of urinary tract infection. We report a previously healthy neonate without congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract who developed urinary tract infection due to Staphylococcus lugdunensis, illustrating that Staphylococcus lugdunensis can cause urinary tract infection even in those with no urinary tract complications. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  2. Detection of Salmonella bacterium in drinking water using microring resonator.

    PubMed

    Bahadoran, Mahdi; Noorden, Ahmad Fakhrurrazi Ahmad; Mohajer, Faeze Sadat; Abd Mubin, Mohamad Helmi; Chaudhary, Kashif; Jalil, Muhammad Arif; Ali, Jalil; Yupapin, Preecha

    2016-01-01

    A new microring resonator system is proposed for the detection of the Salmonella bacterium in drinking water, which is made up of SiO2-TiO2 waveguide embedded inside thin film layer of the flagellin. The change in refractive index due to the binding of the Salmonella bacterium with flagellin layer causes a shift in the output signal wavelength and the variation in through and drop port's intensities, which leads to the detection of Salmonella bacterium in drinking water. The sensitivity of proposed sensor for detecting of Salmonella bacterium in water solution is 149 nm/RIU and the limit of detection is 7 × 10(-4)RIU.

  3. Staphylococcus lugdunensis, a serious pathogen in periprosthetic joint infections: comparison to Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Lourtet-Hascoët, J; Bicart-See, A; Félicé, M P; Giordano, G; Bonnet, E

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the characteristics of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) due to Staphylococcus lugdunensis and to compare these to the characteristics of PJI due to Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. A retrospective multicentre study including all consecutive cases of S. lugdunensis PJI (2000-2014) was performed. Eighty-eight cases of staphylococcal PJI were recorded: 28 due to S. lugdunensis, 30 to S. aureus, and 30 to S. epidermidis, as identified by Vitek 2 or API Staph (bioMérieux). Clinical symptoms were more often reported in the S. lugdunensis group, and the median delay between surgery and infection was shorter for the S. lugdunensis group than for the S. aureus and S. epidermidis groups. Regarding antibiotic susceptibility, the S. lugdunensis strains were susceptible to antibiotics and 61% of the patients could be treated with levofloxacin + rifampicin. The outcome of the PJI was favourable for 89% of patients with S. lugdunensis, 83% with S. aureus, and 97% with S. epidermidis. S. lugdunensis is an emerging pathogen with a pathogenicity quite similar to that of S. aureus. This coagulase-negative Staphylococcus must be identified precisely in PJI, in order to select the appropriate surgical treatment and antibiotics . Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Oxidation of Ethylene Glycol by a Salt-Requiring Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Caskey, William H.; Taber, Willard A.

    1981-01-01

    Bacterium T-52, cultured on ethylene glycol, readily oxidized glycolate and glyoxylate and exhibited elevated activities of ethylene glycol dehydrogenase and glycolate oxidase. Labeled glyoxylate was identified in reaction mixtures containing [14C]-ethylene glycol, but no glycolate was detected. The most likely pathway of ethylene glycol catabolism by bacterium T-52 is sequential oxidation to glycolate and glyoxylate. PMID:16345810

  5. Staphylococcus haemolyticus as a potential producer of biosurfactants with antimicrobial, anti-adhesive and synergistic properties.

    PubMed

    Rossi, C C; Santos-Gandelman, J F; Barros, E M; Alvarez, V M; Laport, M S; Giambiagi-deMarval, M

    2016-09-01

    Staphylococcus haemolyticus is an opportunistic human pathogen that usually gains entry into the host tissue in association with medical device contamination. Biofilm formation is a key factor for the establishment of this bacterium and its arrangement and dynamics can be influenced by the synthesis of biosurfactants. Biosurfactants are structurally diverse amphiphilic molecules with versatile biotechnological applications, but information on their production by staphylococci is still scarce. In this work, two Staph. haemolyticus strains, showing high potential for biosurfactant production - as observed by four complementary methods - were investigated. Biosurfactant extracts were produced and studied for their capacity to inhibit the growth and biofilm formation by other bacterial human pathogens. The biosurfactant produced by the one of the strains inhibited the growth of most bacteria tested and subinhibitory concentrations of the biosurfactant were able to decrease biofilm formation and showed synergistic effects with tetracycline. Because these results were also positive when the biosurfactants were tested against the producing strains, it is likely that biosurfactant production by Staph. haemolyticus may be an unexplored virulence factor, important for competition and biofilm formation by the bacterium, in addition to the biotechnological potential. This work is the first to show the production of biosurfactants by Staphylococcus haemolyticus strains. Extracts showed antimicrobial, anti-adhesive and synergistic properties against a variety of relevant human pathogens, including the producing strains. In addition to the biotechnological potential, biosurfactants produced by Staph. haemolyticus are potentially undescribed virulence determinants in their producing strains. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Bacteriophage Transduction in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Olson, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    The genetic manipulation of Staphylococcus aureus for molecular experimentation is a valuable tool for assessing gene function and virulence. Genetic variability between strains coupled with difficult laboratory techniques for strain construction is a frequent roadblock in S. aureus research. Bacteriophage transduction greatly increases the speed and ease of S. aureus studies by allowing movement of chromosomal markers and plasmids between strains. This technique enables the S. aureus research community to focus investigations on clinically relevant isolates.

  7. Bacterium-Induced CXCL10 Secretion by Osteoblasts Can Be Mediated in Part through Toll-Like Receptor 4

    PubMed Central

    Gasper, Nancy A.; Petty, Cynthia C.; Schrum, Laura W.; Marriott, Ian; Bost, Kenneth L.

    2002-01-01

    Two common pathogens known to cause bone infection, Salmonella and Staphylococcus aureus, were investigated to determine their abilities to induce chemokine expression in cultured mouse and human osteoblasts. While these cells are responsible for bone formation, we were surprised to find that they could respond to bacterial infection by upregulating expression of the chemokine CXCL10 (IP-10). However, there were significant differences in the abilities of the gram-negative bacterium Salmonella and the gram-positive bacterium S. aureus to induce expression of CXCL10. Reverse transcription-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analyses showed high levels of Salmonella-induced CXCL10 mRNA and protein expression, respectively, whereas the osteoblast response to S. aureus was significantly less. Consistent with these findings, Salmonella-derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS), but not S. aureus-derived peptidoglycan, could induce expression of CXCL10. An antibody against toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) could block the LPS-induced CXCL10 production, demonstrating the functional expression of TLR4 by osteoblasts. Despite the inducible nature of TLR2 mRNA expression by bacterium-infected osteoblasts, peptidoglycan failed to stimulate CXCL10 secretion. Immunofluorescent staining of bacterium-infected calvaria (i.e., skull bone) demonstrated the presence of CXCL10 in osteoblasts. The fact that osteoblasts did not express CXCR3 mRNA, whereas T lymphocytes can express high levels of this receptor, suggests that osteoblast-derived CXCL10 may recruit T lymphocytes to the sites of bone infections. PMID:12117914

  8. The chemical formula of a magnetotactic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Naresh, Mohit; Das, Sayoni; Mishra, Prashant; Mittal, Aditya

    2012-05-01

    Elucidation of the chemical logic of life is one of the grand challenges in biology, and essential to the progress of the upcoming field of synthetic biology. Treatment of microbial cells explicitly as a "chemical" species in controlled reaction (growth) environments has allowed fascinating discoveries of elemental formulae of a few species that have guided the modern views on compositions of a living cell. Application of mass and energy balances on living cells has proved to be useful in modeling of bioengineering systems, particularly in deriving optimized media compositions for growing microorganisms to maximize yields of desired bio-derived products by regulating intra-cellular metabolic networks. In this work, application of elemental mass balance during growth of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense in bioreactors has resulted in the discovery of the chemical formula of the magnetotactic bacterium. By developing a stoichiometric equation characterizing the formation of a magnetotactic bacterial cell, coupled with rigorous experimental measurements and robust calculations, we report the elemental formula of M. gryphiswaldense cell as CH(2.06)O(0.13)N(0.28)Fe(1.74×10(-3)). Remarkably, we find that iron metabolism during growth of this magnetotactic bacterium is much more correlated individually with carbon and nitrogen, compared to carbon and nitrogen with each other, indicating that iron serves more as a nutrient during bacterial growth rather than just a mineral. Magnetotactic bacteria have not only invoked some interest in the field of astrobiology for the last two decades, but are also prokaryotes having the unique ability of synthesizing membrane bound intracellular organelles. Our findings on these unique prokaryotes are a strong addition to the limited repertoire, of elemental compositions of living cells, aimed at exploring the chemical logic of life. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Clonal differences in Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia-associated mortality.

    PubMed

    Recker, Mario; Laabei, Maisem; Toleman, Michelle S; Reuter, Sandra; Saunderson, Rebecca B; Blane, Beth; Török, M Estee; Ouadi, Khadija; Stevens, Emily; Yokoyama, Maho; Steventon, Joseph; Thompson, Luke; Milne, Gregory; Bayliss, Sion; Bacon, Leann; Peacock, Sharon J; Massey, Ruth C

    2017-10-01

    The bacterium Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen for which the emergence of antibiotic resistance is a global public health concern. Infection severity, and in particular bacteraemia-associated mortality, has been attributed to several host-related factors, such as age and the presence of comorbidities. The role of the bacterium in infection severity is less well understood, as it is complicated by the multifaceted nature of bacterial virulence, which has so far prevented a robust mapping between genotype, phenotype and infection outcome. To investigate the role of bacterial factors in contributing to bacteraemia-associated mortality, we phenotyped a collection of sequenced clinical S. aureus isolates from patients with bloodstream infections, representing two globally important clonal types, CC22 and CC30. By adopting a genome-wide association study approach we identified and functionally verified several genetic loci that affect the expression of cytolytic toxicity and biofilm formation. By analysing the pooled data comprising bacterial genotype and phenotype together with clinical metadata within a machine-learning framework, we found significant clonal differences in the determinants most predictive of poor infection outcome. Whereas elevated cytolytic toxicity in combination with low levels of biofilm formation was predictive of an increased risk of mortality in infections by strains of a CC22 background, these virulence-specific factors had little influence on mortality rates associated with CC30 infections. Our results therefore suggest that different clones may have adopted different strategies to overcome host responses and cause severe pathology. Our study further demonstrates the use of a combined genomics and data analytic approach to enhance our understanding of bacterial pathogenesis at the individual level, which will be an important step towards personalized medicine and infectious disease management.

  10. Combining use of a panel of ssDNA aptamers in the detection of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xiaoxiao; Li, Shaohua; Chen, Liucun; Ding, Hongmei; Xu, Hua; Huang, Yanping; Li, Jie; Liu, Nongle; Cao, Weihong; Zhu, Yanjun; Shen, Beifen; Shao, Ningsheng

    2009-01-01

    In this article, a panel of ssDNA aptamers specific to Staphylococcus aureus was obtained by a whole bacterium-based SELEX procedure and applied to probing S. aureus. After several rounds of selection with S. aureus as the target and Streptococcus and S. epidermidis as counter targets, the highly enriched oligonucleic acid pool was sequenced and then grouped under different families on the basis of the homology of the primary sequence and the similarity of the secondary structure. Eleven sequences from different families were selected for further characterization by confocal imaging and flow cytometry analysis. Results showed that five aptamers demonstrated high specificity and affinity to S. aureus individually. The five aptamers recognize different molecular targets by competitive experiment. Combining these five aptamers had a much better effect than the individual aptamer in the recognition of different S. aureus strains. In addition, the combined aptamers can probe single S. aureus in pyogenic fluids. Our work demonstrates that a set of aptamers specific to one bacterium can be used in combination for the identification of the bacterium instead of a single aptamer. PMID:19498077

  11. Combining use of a panel of ssDNA aptamers in the detection of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaoxiao; Li, Shaohua; Chen, Liucun; Ding, Hongmei; Xu, Hua; Huang, Yanping; Li, Jie; Liu, Nongle; Cao, Weihong; Zhu, Yanjun; Shen, Beifen; Shao, Ningsheng

    2009-08-01

    In this article, a panel of ssDNA aptamers specific to Staphylococcus aureus was obtained by a whole bacterium-based SELEX procedure and applied to probing S. aureus. After several rounds of selection with S. aureus as the target and Streptococcus and S. epidermidis as counter targets, the highly enriched oligonucleic acid pool was sequenced and then grouped under different families on the basis of the homology of the primary sequence and the similarity of the secondary structure. Eleven sequences from different families were selected for further characterization by confocal imaging and flow cytometry analysis. Results showed that five aptamers demonstrated high specificity and affinity to S. aureus individually. The five aptamers recognize different molecular targets by competitive experiment. Combining these five aptamers had a much better effect than the individual aptamer in the recognition of different S. aureus strains. In addition, the combined aptamers can probe single S. aureus in pyogenic fluids. Our work demonstrates that a set of aptamers specific to one bacterium can be used in combination for the identification of the bacterium instead of a single aptamer.

  12. Presence of Staphylococcus aureus on university dance studio floors and barres: a preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Unsworth, Desiree A; Russell, Jeffrey A; Martiny, Adam C

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a bacterium associated with various infectious diseases. Not only has the bacterium been detected in sports environments, the reported incidences of S. aureus infections have steadily increased in athletic teams. However, in spite of similarities between sports and dance facilities, to our knowledge no previous study has examined the presence of this bacterium in the dance environment. We hypothesized that S. aureus would be present in a university's dance studios, and that it would be extant in higher concentrations inside versus outside the studios. Using common microbiological culturing methods, samples were gathered from floors and barres in three studios of a single university, as well as from outside floors and railings near the studios and a conference room used by dancers. Confirming our hypothesis, we detected S. aureus in every dance studio sample (0.03 to 0.38 cfu/cm 2 ). Supporting our second hypothesis, we found that average S. aureus concentrations from the three studios were significantly higher compared to both outside and conference room samples (P ≤ 0.001). The latter two locations did not yield any S. aureus concentrations. Control samples developed as expected. The results of this study suggest that S. aureus bacteria are common on the flooring and barres of university dance studios, with the bacterial concentrations possibly dependent on the hours of usage of these surfaces. Whether the presence of S. aureus in dance studios presents a health risk to dancers should be studied further.

  13. Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis infections on implants.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, W F; Silva, P M S; Silva, R C S; Silva, G M M; Machado, G; Coelho, L C B B; Correia, M T S

    2018-02-01

    Infections are one of the main reasons for removal of implants from patients, and usually need difficult and expensive treatments. Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis are the most frequently detected pathogens. We reviewed the epidemiology and pathogenesis of implant-related infections. Relevant studies were identified by electronic searching of the following databases: PubMed, ScienceDirect, Academic Google, and CAPES Journal Portal. This review reports epidemiological studies of implant infections caused by S. aureus and S. epidermidis. We discuss some methodologies used in the search for new compounds with antibiofilm activity and the main strategies for biomaterial surface modifications to avoid bacterial plaque formation and consequent infection. S. aureus and S. epidermidis are frequently involved in infections in catheters and orthopaedic/breast implants. Different methodologies have been used to test the potential antibiofilm properties of compounds; for example, crystal violet dye is widely used for in-vitro biofilm quantification due to its low cost and good reproducibility. Changes in the surface biomaterials are necessary to prevent biofilm formation. Some studies have investigated the immobilization of antibiotics on the surfaces of materials used in implants. Other approaches have been used as a way to avoid the spread of bacterial resistance to antimicrobials, such as the functionalization of these surfaces with silver and natural compounds, as well as the electrical treatment of these substrates. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus canis, and Arcanobacterium phocae of healthy Canadian farmed mink and mink with pododermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Chalmers, Gabhan; McLean, John; Hunter, D. Bruce; Brash, Marina; Slavic, Durda; Pearl, David L.; Boerlin, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Pododermatitis is a disease of concern for mink breeders in Canada and worldwide, as it causes discomfort and lowers the breeding rates on farms affected by the disease. Unfortunately, the etiology and pathogenesis of pododermatitis are still unknown. In this study, we compared Staphylococcus spp. and Streptococcus canis isolates from healthy mink with isolates from animals with pododermatitis on 2 farms in Ontario. Almost all hemolytic Staphylococcus spp. isolated were shown to be Staphylococcus delphini Group A by 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequence analysis and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) did not reveal any S. delphini or S. canis clonal lineages specifically associated with pododermatitis, which suggests that these bacteria do not act as primary pathogens, but does not dismiss their potential roles as opportunistic pathogens. While S. delphini and S. canis were the most prevalent bacterial pathogens in mink pododermatitis, they were also present in samples from healthy mink. Arcanobacterium phocae is occasionally isolated from pododermatitis cases, but is difficult to recover with conventional culture methods due to its slow growth. A quantitative real-time PCR was developed for the detection of A. phocae and was tested on 138 samples of footpad tissues from 14 farms. The bacterium was detected only in pododermatitis-endemic farms in Canada and was at higher concentrations in tissues from infected footpads than in healthy tissues. This finding suggests that A. phocae is involved in the pathogenesis of pododermatitis. PMID:25852228

  15. Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus canis, and Arcanobacterium phocae of healthy Canadian farmed mink and mink with pododermatitis.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Gabhan; McLean, John; Hunter, D Bruce; Brash, Marina; Slavic, Durda; Pearl, David L; Boerlin, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Pododermatitis is a disease of concern for mink breeders in Canada and worldwide, as it causes discomfort and lowers the breeding rates on farms affected by the disease. Unfortunately, the etiology and pathogenesis of pododermatitis are still unknown. In this study, we compared Staphylococcus spp. and Streptococcus canis isolates from healthy mink with isolates from animals with pododermatitis on 2 farms in Ontario. Almost all hemolytic Staphylococcus spp. isolated were shown to be Staphylococcus delphini Group A by 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequence analysis and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) did not reveal any S. delphini or S. canis clonal lineages specifically associated with pododermatitis, which suggests that these bacteria do not act as primary pathogens, but does not dismiss their potential roles as opportunistic pathogens. While S. delphini and S. canis were the most prevalent bacterial pathogens in mink pododermatitis, they were also present in samples from healthy mink. Arcanobacterium phocae is occasionally isolated from pododermatitis cases, but is difficult to recover with conventional culture methods due to its slow growth. A quantitative real-time PCR was developed for the detection of A. phocae and was tested on 138 samples of footpad tissues from 14 farms. The bacterium was detected only in pododermatitis-endemic farms in Canada and was at higher concentrations in tissues from infected footpads than in healthy tissues. This finding suggests that A. phocae is involved in the pathogenesis of pododermatitis.

  16. [Vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Carlos Andrés; Vesga, Omar

    2005-12-01

    The evolution and molecular mechanisms of vancomycin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus were reviewed. Case reports and research studies on biochemestry, electron microscopy and molecular biology of Staphylococcus aureus were selected from Medline database and summarized in the following review. After almost 40 years of successful treatment of S. aureus with vancomycin, several cases of clinical failures have been reported (since 1997). S. aureus strains have appeared with intermediate susceptibility (MIC 8-16 microg/ml), as well as strains with heterogeneous resistance (global MIC < or =4 microg/ml), but with subpopulations of intermediate susceptibility. In these cases, resistance is mediated by cell wall thickening with reduced cross linking. This traps the antibiotic before it reaches its major target, the murein monomers in the cell membrane. In 2002, a total vancomycin resistant strain (MIC > or =32 microg/ml) was reported with vanA genes from Enterococcus spp. These genes induce the change of D-Ala-D-Ala terminus for D-Ala-D-lactate in the cell wall precursors, leading to loss of affinity for glycopeptides. Vancomycin resistance in S. aureus has appeared; it is mediated by cell wall modifications that trap the antibiotic before it reaches its action site. In strains with total resistance, Enterococcus spp. genes have been acquired that lead to modification of the glycopeptide target.

  17. Genome Sequence of the Soil Bacterium Janthinobacterium sp. KBS0711

    PubMed Central

    Shoemaker, William R.; Muscarella, Mario E.

    2015-01-01

    We present a draft genome of Janthinobacterium sp. KBS0711 that was isolated from agricultural soil. The genome provides insight into the ecological strategies of this bacterium in free-living and host-associated environments. PMID:26089434

  18. Postoperative Endophthalmitis Caused by Staphylococcus haemolyticus following Femtosecond Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Margaret; Baumrind, Benjamin R.; Frank, James H.; Halpern, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    A 53-year-old Caucasian man underwent femtosecond cataract surgery and then presented with pain and hand motions vision 1 day following surgery. Anterior segment examination showed a 2-mm-layered hypopyon, a well-centered intraocular lens in the sulcus, and an obscured view to the fundus. B-scan ultrasonography showed significant vitritis and that the retina was attached. A tap and an injection of vancomycin 1 mg per 0.1 ml and of ceftazidime 2.25 mg per 0.1 ml were performed. The tap eventually yielded culture results positive for Staphylococcus haemolyticus, which was sensitive to vancomycin. We report a case of endophthalmitis that occurred on postoperative day 1 following complicated cataract surgery. This is an uncommon bacterium that is not widely reported in the literature as a cause of endophthalmitis in the postoperative period. We urge clinicians to consider S. haemolyticus as an offending agent, especially when the infection presents very early and aggressively in the postoperative period. PMID:26951642

  19. Postoperative Endophthalmitis Caused by Staphylococcus haemolyticus following Femtosecond Cataract Surgery.

    PubMed

    Wong, Margaret; Baumrind, Benjamin R; Frank, James H; Halpern, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    A 53-year-old Caucasian man underwent femtosecond cataract surgery and then presented with pain and hand motions vision 1 day following surgery. Anterior segment examination showed a 2-mm-layered hypopyon, a well-centered intraocular lens in the sulcus, and an obscured view to the fundus. B-scan ultrasonography showed significant vitritis and that the retina was attached. A tap and an injection of vancomycin 1 mg per 0.1 ml and of ceftazidime 2.25 mg per 0.1 ml were performed. The tap eventually yielded culture results positive for Staphylococcus haemolyticus, which was sensitive to vancomycin. We report a case of endophthalmitis that occurred on postoperative day 1 following complicated cataract surgery. This is an uncommon bacterium that is not widely reported in the literature as a cause of endophthalmitis in the postoperative period. We urge clinicians to consider S. haemolyticus as an offending agent, especially when the infection presents very early and aggressively in the postoperative period.

  20. Epic Immune Battles of History: Neutrophils vs. Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Fermin E; Borgogna, Timothy R; Patel, Delisha M; Sward, Eli W; Voyich, Jovanka M

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in human blood and the first line of defense after bacteria have breached the epithelial barriers. After migration to a site of infection, neutrophils engage and expose invading microorganisms to antimicrobial peptides and proteins, as well as reactive oxygen species, as part of their bactericidal arsenal. Ideally, neutrophils ingest bacteria to prevent damage to surrounding cells and tissues, kill invading microorganisms with antimicrobial mechanisms, undergo programmed cell death to minimize inflammation, and are cleared away by macrophages. Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus ) is a prevalent Gram-positive bacterium that is a common commensal and causes a wide range of diseases from skin infections to endocarditis. Since its discovery, S. aureus has been a formidable neutrophil foe that has challenged the efficacy of this professional assassin. Indeed, proper clearance of S. aureus by neutrophils is essential to positive infection outcome, and S. aureus has developed mechanisms to evade neutrophil killing. Herein, we will review mechanisms used by S. aureus to modulate and evade neutrophil bactericidal mechanisms including priming, activation, chemotaxis, production of reactive oxygen species, and resolution of infection. We will also highlight how S. aureus uses sensory/regulatory systems to tailor production of virulence factors specifically to the triggering signal, e.g., neutrophils and defensins. To conclude, we will provide an overview of therapeutic approaches that may potentially enhance neutrophil antimicrobial functions.

  1. Staphylococcus aureus Regulatory RNAs as Potential Biomarkers for Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Bordeau, Valérie; Cady, Anne; Revest, Matthieu; Rostan, Octavie; Sassi, Mohamed; Tattevin, Pierre; Donnio, Pierre-Yves

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a commensal bacterium and pathogen. Identifying biomarkers for the transition from colonization to disease caused by this organism would be useful. Several S. aureus small RNAs (sRNAs) regulate virulence. We investigated presence and expression of 8 sRNAs in 83 S. aureus strains from 42 patients with sepsis or septic shock and 41 asymptomatic colonized carriers. Small pathogenicity island sRNAs sprB and sprC were clade specific. Six sRNAs had variable expression not correlated with clinical status. Expression of RNAIII was lower in strains from septic shock patients than in strains from colonized patients. When RNAIII was associated with expression of sprD, colonizing strains could be discriminated from strains in patients with bloodstream infections, including patients with sepsis and septic shock. Isolates associated with colonization might have sRNAs with target expression different from those of disease isolates. Monitoring expression of RNAIII and sprD could help determine severity of bloodstream infections. PMID:27224202

  2. Staphylococcus aureus Regulatory RNAs as Potential Biomarkers for Bloodstream Infections.

    PubMed

    Bordeau, Valérie; Cady, Anne; Revest, Matthieu; Rostan, Octavie; Sassi, Mohamed; Tattevin, Pierre; Donnio, Pierre-Yves; Felden, Brice

    2016-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a commensal bacterium and pathogen. Identifying biomarkers for the transition from colonization to disease caused by this organism would be useful. Several S. aureus small RNAs (sRNAs) regulate virulence. We investigated presence and expression of 8 sRNAs in 83 S. aureus strains from 42 patients with sepsis or septic shock and 41 asymptomatic colonized carriers. Small pathogenicity island sRNAs sprB and sprC were clade specific. Six sRNAs had variable expression not correlated with clinical status. Expression of RNAIII was lower in strains from septic shock patients than in strains from colonized patients. When RNAIII was associated with expression of sprD, colonizing strains could be discriminated from strains in patients with bloodstream infections, including patients with sepsis and septic shock. Isolates associated with colonization might have sRNAs with target expression different from those of disease isolates. Monitoring expression of RNAIII and sprD could help determine severity of bloodstream infections.

  3. Epic Immune Battles of History: Neutrophils vs. Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Fermin E.; Borgogna, Timothy R.; Patel, Delisha M.; Sward, Eli W.; Voyich, Jovanka M.

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in human blood and the first line of defense after bacteria have breached the epithelial barriers. After migration to a site of infection, neutrophils engage and expose invading microorganisms to antimicrobial peptides and proteins, as well as reactive oxygen species, as part of their bactericidal arsenal. Ideally, neutrophils ingest bacteria to prevent damage to surrounding cells and tissues, kill invading microorganisms with antimicrobial mechanisms, undergo programmed cell death to minimize inflammation, and are cleared away by macrophages. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a prevalent Gram-positive bacterium that is a common commensal and causes a wide range of diseases from skin infections to endocarditis. Since its discovery, S. aureus has been a formidable neutrophil foe that has challenged the efficacy of this professional assassin. Indeed, proper clearance of S. aureus by neutrophils is essential to positive infection outcome, and S. aureus has developed mechanisms to evade neutrophil killing. Herein, we will review mechanisms used by S. aureus to modulate and evade neutrophil bactericidal mechanisms including priming, activation, chemotaxis, production of reactive oxygen species, and resolution of infection. We will also highlight how S. aureus uses sensory/regulatory systems to tailor production of virulence factors specifically to the triggering signal, e.g., neutrophils and defensins. To conclude, we will provide an overview of therapeutic approaches that may potentially enhance neutrophil antimicrobial functions. PMID:28713774

  4. Characterization of the cellulose-degrading bacterium NCIMB 10462

    SciTech Connect

    Dees, C.; Scott, T.C.; Phelps, T.J.

    The gram-negative cellulase-producing bacterium NCIMB 10462 has been previously named Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. or var. cellulose. Because of renewed interest in cellulose-degrading bacteria for use in the bioconversion of cellulose to chemical feed stocks and fuels, we re-examined the characteristics of this microorganism to determine its true metabolic potential. Metabolic and physical characterization of NCIMB 10462 revealed that this is an alkalophilic, non-fermentative, gram-negative, oxidase-positive, motile, cellulose-degrading bacterium. The aerobic substrate utilization profile of this bacterium has few characteristics consistent with a classification of P. fluorescens and a very low probability match with the genus Sphingomonas. However, total lipid analysismore » did not reveal that any sphingolipid bases are produced by this bacterium. NCIMB 10462 grows best aerobically, but also grows well in complex media under reducing conditions. NCIMB 10462 grows slowly under anaerobic conditions on complex media, but growth on cellulosic media occurred only under aerobic conditions. Total fatty acid analysis (MIDI) of NCIMB 10462 failed to group this bacterium with a known pseudomonas species. However, fatty acid analysis of the bacteria when grown at temperatures below 37{degrees}C suggest that the organism is a pseudomonad. Since a predominant characteristic of this bacterium is its ability to degrade cellulose, we suggest that it be called Pseudomonas cellulosa.« less

  5. Taxonomic characterization of the cellulose-degrading bacterium NCIB 10462

    SciTech Connect

    Dees, C.; Ringleberg, D.; Scott, T.C.

    The gram negative cellulase-producing bacterium NCIB 10462 has been previously named Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. or var. cellulosa. Since there is renewed interest in cellulose-degrading bacteria for use in bioconversion of cellulose to chemical feed stocks and fuels, we re-examined the characteristics of this microorganism to determine its proper taxonomic characterization and to further define it`s true metabolic potential. Metabolic and physical characterization of NCIB 10462 revealed that this was an alkalophilic, non-fermentative, gram negative, oxidase positive, motile, cellulose-degrading bacterium. The aerobic substrate utilization profile of this bacterium was found to have few characteristics consistent with a classification of P. fluorescensmore » with a very low probability match with the genus Sphingomonas. Total lipid analysis did not reveal that any sphingolipid bases are produced by this bacterium. NCIB 10462 was found to grow best aerobically but also grows well in complex media under reducing conditions. NCIB 10462 grew slowly under full anaerobic conditions on complex media but growth on cellulosic media was found only under aerobic conditions. Total fatty acid analysis (MIDI) of NCIB 10462 failed to group this bacterium with a known pseudomonas species. However, fatty acid analysis of the bacteria when grown at temperatures below 37{degrees}C suggest that the organism is a pseudomonad. Since a predominant characteristic of this bacterium is it`s ability to degrade cellulose, we suggest it be called Pseudomonas cellulosa.« less

  6. Growth promotion of the opportunistic human pathogen, Staphylococcus lugdunensis, by heme, hemoglobin, and coculture with Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Brozyna, Jeremy R; Sheldon, Jessica R; Heinrichs, David E

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is both a commensal of humans and an opportunistic pathogen. Little is currently known about the molecular mechanisms underpinning the virulence of this bacterium. Here, we demonstrate that in contrast to S. aureus,S. lugdunensis makes neither staphyloferrin A (SA) nor staphyloferrin B (SB) in response to iron deprivation, owing to the absence of the SB gene cluster, and a large deletion in the SA biosynthetic gene cluster. As a result, the species grows poorly in serum-containing media, and this defect was complemented by introduction of the S. aureusSA gene cluster into S. lugdunensis. S. lugdunensis expresses the HtsABC and SirABC transporters for SA and SB, respectively; the latter gene set is found within the isd (heme acquisition) gene cluster. An isd deletion strain was significantly debilitated for iron acquisition from both heme and hemoglobin, and was also incapable of utilizing ferric-SB as an iron source, while an hts mutant could not grow on ferric-SA as an iron source. In iron-restricted coculture experiments, S. aureus significantly enhanced the growth of S. lugdunensis, in a manner dependent on staphyloferrin production by S. aureus, and the expression of the cognate transporters by S. lugdunensis. PMID:24515974

  7. Transfer of mupirocin resistance from Staphylococcus haemolyticus clinical strains to Staphylococcus aureus through conjugative and mobilizable plasmids.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Ciro C; Ferreira, Natália C; Coelho, Marcus L V; Schuenck, Ricardo P; Bastos, Maria do Carmo de F; Giambiagi-deMarval, Marcia

    2016-07-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci are thought to act as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes that can be transferred to Staphylococcus aureus, thus hindering the combat of this bacterium. In this work, we analyzed the presence of plasmids conferring resistance to the antibiotic mupirocin-widely used to treat and prevent S. aureus infections in hospital environments-in nosocomial S. haemolyticus strains. About 12% of the 75 strains tested were resistant to mupirocin, and this phenotype was correlated with the presence of plasmids. These plasmids were shown to be diverse, being either conjugative or mobilizable, and capable of transferring mupirocin resistance to S. aureus Our findings reinforce that S. haemolyticus, historically and mistakenly considered as a less important pathogen, is a reservoir of resistance genes which can be transferred to other bacteria, such as S. aureus, emphasizing the necessity of more effective strategies to detect and combat this emergent opportunistic pathogen. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Physiological traits of the symbiotic bacterium Teredinibacter turnerae isolated from the mangrove shipworm Neoteredo reynei

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Nutrition in the Teredinidae family of wood-boring mollusks is sustained by cellulolytic/nitrogen fixing symbiotic bacteria of the Teredinibacter clade. The mangrove Teredinidae Neoteredo reynei is popularly used in the treatment of infectious diseases in the north of Brazil. In the present work, the symbionts of N. reynei, which are strictly confined to the host's gills, were conclusively identified as Teredinibacter turnerae. Symbiont variants obtained in vitro were able to grow using casein as the sole carbon/nitrogen source and under reduced concentrations of NaCl. Furthermore, cellulose consumption in T. turnerae was clearly reduced under low salt concentrations. As a point of interest, we hereby report first hand that T. turnerae in fact exerts antibiotic activity. Furthermore, this activity was also affected by NaCl concentration. Finally, T. turnerae was able to inhibit the growth of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, this including strains of Sphingomonas sp., Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus sciuri. Our findings introduce new points of view on the ecology of T. turnerae, and suggest new biotechnological applications for this marine bacterium. PMID:21637522

  9. Biosurfactant from a marine bacterium disrupts biofilms of pathogenic bacteria in a tropical aquaculture system.

    PubMed

    Hamza, Faseela; Satpute, Surekha; Banpurkar, Arun; Kumar, Ameeta Ravi; Zinjarde, Smita

    2017-11-01

    Bacterial infections are major constraints in aquaculture farming. These pathogens often adapt to the biofilm mode of growth and resist antibiotic treatments. We have used a non-toxic glycolipid biosurfactant (BS-SLSZ2) derived from a marine epizootic bacterium Staphylococcus lentus to treat aquaculture associated infections in an eco-friendly manner. We found that BS-SLSZ2 contained threose, a four-carbon sugar as the glycone component, and hexadecanoic and octadecanoic acids as the aglycone components. The critical micelle concentration of the purified glycolipid was 18 mg mL-1. This biosurfactant displayed anti-adhesive activity and inhibited biofilm formation by preventing initial attachment of cells onto surfaces. The biosurfactant (at a concentration of 20 μg) was able to inhibit Vibrio harveyi and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms by 80.33 ± 2.16 and 82 ± 2.03%, respectively. At this concentration, it was also able to disrupt mature biofilms of V. harveyi (78.7 ± 1.93%) and P. aeruginosa (81.7 ± 0.59%). The biosurfactant was non-toxic towards Artemia salina. In vivo challenge experiments showed that the glycolipid was effective in protecting A. salina nauplii against V. harveyi and P. aeruginosa infections. This study highlights the significance of marine natural products in providing alternative biofilm controlling agents and decreasing the usage of antibiotics in aquaculture settings. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Staphylococcus aureus golden pigment impairs neutrophil killing and promotes virulence through its antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, George Y; Essex, Anthony; Buchanan, John T; Datta, Vivekanand; Hoffman, Hal M; Bastian, John F; Fierer, Joshua; Nizet, Victor

    2005-07-18

    Golden color imparted by carotenoid pigments is the eponymous feature of the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Here we demonstrate a role of this hallmark phenotype in virulence. Compared with the wild-type (WT) bacterium, a S. aureus mutant with disrupted carotenoid biosynthesis is more susceptible to oxidant killing, has impaired neutrophil survival, and is less pathogenic in a mouse subcutaneous abscess model. The survival advantage of WT S. aureus over the carotenoid-deficient mutant is lost upon inhibition of neutrophil oxidative burst or in human or murine nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase-deficient hosts. Conversely, heterologous expression of the S. aureus carotenoid in the nonpigmented Streptococcus pyogenes confers enhanced oxidant and neutrophil resistance and increased animal virulence. Blocking S. aureus carotenogenesis increases oxidant sensitivity and decreases whole-blood survival, suggesting a novel target for antibiotic therapy.

  11. Outbreak of subclinical mastitis in a flock of dairy goats associated with atypical Staphylococcus haemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Leitner, Gabriel; Sela, Shlom; Hammer-Muntz, Orly; Zivotofsky, Doni; Weisblit, Limor; Chaffer, Marcelo; Zamir, Shmuel

    2009-02-01

    Staphylococcus haemolyticus is a pathogen frequently isolated from dairy cows and small ruminants. However, it always appears in only a few animals and not as a major pathogen. Recently, in a dairy goat herd of approximately 250 milking animals, 25.6% (46/180 goats) had milk cultures with atypical highly mucoid colonies accompanied by elevated somatic cell counts. The isolates were identified as Staph. haemolyticus. The present study describes the steps used in an attempt to identify the bacterium and to compare it with other coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) including Staph. haemolyticus. Species identification performed with the API STAPH-IDENT 32 kit showed >99.4% identity confirmed by 16S rDNA sequencing tests. Microscopically the atypical Staph. haemolyticus strains showed unique cuboidal tetrad clusters reminiscent of those of the genus Sarcina. The outbreak caused by an atypical CNS underlines the need for accurate biochemical and genetic methods for ultimate identification of CNS to the species level.

  12. Insight into the Genome of Staphylococcus xylosus, a Ubiquitous Species Well Adapted to Meat Products

    PubMed Central

    Leroy, Sabine; Vermassen, Aurore; Ras, Geoffrey; Talon, Régine

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus xylosus belongs to the vast group of coagulase-negative staphylococci. It is frequently isolated from meat products, either fermented or salted and dried, and is commonly used as starter cultures in sausage manufacturing. Analysis of the S. xylosus genome together with expression in situ in a meat model revealed that this bacterium is well adapted to meat substrates, being able to use diverse substrates as sources of carbon and energy and different sources of nitrogen. It is well-equipped with genes involved in osmotic, oxidative/nitrosative, and acidic stress responses. It is responsible for the development of the typical colour of cured meat products via its nitrate reductase activity. It contributes to sensorial properties, mainly by the the catabolism of pyruvate and amino acids resulting in odorous compounds and by the limiting of the oxidation of fatty acids, thereby avoiding rancidity. PMID:28850086

  13. On the challenges of detecting whole Staphylococcus aureus cells with biosensors.

    PubMed

    Templier, V; Roupioz, Y

    2017-11-01

    Due to the increasing number of nosocomial infections and multidrug-resistant bacterial strains, Staphylococcus aureus is now a major worldwide concern. Rapid detection and characterization of this bacterium has become an important issue for biomedical applications. Biosensors are increasingly appearing as low-cost, easy-to-operate and fast alternatives for rapid detection. In this review, we will introduce the main characteristics of S. aureus and will focus on the interest of biosensors for a faster detection of whole S. aureus cells. In particular, we will review the most promising strategies in the choice of ligand for the design of selective and efficient biosensors. Their specific characteristics as well as their advantages and/or disadvantages will also be commented. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Extreme Ionizing-Radiation-Resistant Bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Schwendner, Petra

    2012-01-01

    potential for transfer, and subsequent proliferation, on another solar body such as Mars and Europa. These organisms are more likely to escape planetary protection assays, which only take into account presence of spores. Hence, presences of extreme radiation-resistant Deinococcus in the cleanroom facility where spacecraft are assembled pose a serious risk for integrity of life-detection missions. The microorganism described herein was isolated from the surfaces of the cleanroom facility in which the Phoenix Lander was assembled. The isolated bacterial strain was subjected to a comprehensive polyphasic analysis to characterize its taxonomic position. This bacterium exhibits very low 16SrRNA similarity with any other environmental isolate reported to date. Both phenotypic and phylogenetic analyses clearly indicate that this isolate belongs to the genus Deinococcus and represents a novel species. The name Deinococcus phoenicis was proposed after the Phoenix spacecraft, which was undergoing assembly, testing, and launch operations in the spacecraft assembly facility at the time of isolation. D. phoenicis cells exhibited higher resistance to ionizing radiation (cobalt-60; 14 kGy) than the cells of the D. radiodurans (5 kGy). Thus, it is in the best interest of NASA to thoroughly characterize this organism, which will further assess in determining the potential for forward contamination. Upon the completion of genetic and physiological characteristics of D. phoenicis, it will be added to a planetary protection database to be able to further model and predict the probability of forward contamination.

  15. Extreme Ionizing-Radiation-Resistant Bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Schwendner, Petra

    2013-01-01

    potential for transfer, and subsequent proliferation, on another solar body such as Mars and Europa. These organisms are more likely to escape planetary protection assays, which only take into account presence of spores. Hence, presences of extreme radiation-resistant Deinococcus in the cleanroom facility where spacecraft are assembled pose a serious risk for integrity of life-detection missions. The microorganism described herein was isolated from the surfaces of the cleanroom facility in which the Phoenix Lander was assembled. The isolated bacterial strain was subjected to a comprehensive polyphasic analysis to characterize its taxonomic position. This bacterium exhibits very low 16SrRNA similarity with any other environmental isolate reported to date. Both phenotypic and phylogenetic analyses clearly indicate that this isolate belongs to the genus Deinococcus and represents a novel species. The name Deinococcus phoenicis was proposed after the Phoenix spacecraft, which was undergoing assembly, testing, and launch operations in the spacecraft assembly facility at the time of isolation. D. phoenicis cells exhibited higher resistance to ionizing radiation (cobalt-60; 14 kGy) than the cells of the D. radiodurans (5 kGy). Thus, it is in the best interest of NASA to thoroughly characterize this organism, which will further assess in determining the potential for forward contamination. Upon the completion of genetic and physiological characteristics of D. phoenicis, it will be added to a planetary protection database to be able to further model and predict the probability of forward contamination.

  16. Coiled to diffuse: Brownian motion of a helical bacterium.

    PubMed

    Butenko, Alexander V; Mogilko, Emma; Amitai, Lee; Pokroy, Boaz; Sloutskin, Eli

    2012-09-11

    We employ real-time three-dimensional confocal microscopy to follow the Brownian motion of a fixed helically shaped Leptospira interrogans (LI) bacterium. We extract from our measurements the translational and the rotational diffusion coefficients of this bacterium. A simple theoretical model is suggested, perfectly reproducing the experimental diffusion coefficients, with no tunable parameters. An older theoretical model, where edge effects are neglected, dramatically underestimates the observed rates of translation. Interestingly, the coiling of LI increases its rotational diffusion coefficient by a factor of 5, compared to a (hypothetical) rectified bacterium of the same contour length. Moreover, the translational diffusion coefficients would have decreased by a factor of ~1.5, if LI were rectified. This suggests that the spiral shape of the spirochaete bacteria, in addition to being employed for their active twisting motion, may also increase the ability of these bacteria to explore the surrounding fluid by passive Brownian diffusion.

  17. Streptococcus pneumoniae Eradicates Preformed Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms through a Mechanism Requiring Physical Contact.

    PubMed

    Khan, Faidad; Wu, Xueqing; Matzkin, Gideon L; Khan, Mohsin A; Sakai, Fuminori; Vidal, Jorge E

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (Sau) strains are a main cause of disease, including nosocomial infections which have been linked to the production of biofilms and the propagation of antibiotic resistance strains such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). A previous study found that Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn) strains kill planktonic cultures of Sau strains. In this work, we have further evaluated in detail the eradication of Sau biofilms and investigated ultrastructural interactions of the biofilmicidal effect. Spn strain D39, which produces the competence stimulating peptide 1 (CSP1), reduced Sau biofilms within 8 h of inoculation, while TIGR4, producing CSP2, eradicated Sau biofilms and planktonic cells within 4 h. Differences were not attributed to pherotypes as other Spn strains producing different pheromones eradicated Sau within 4 h. Experiments using Transwell devices, which physically separated both species growing in the same well, demonstrated that direct contact between Spn and Sau was required to efficiently eradicate Sau biofilms and biofilm-released planktonic cells. Physical contact-mediated killing of Sau was not related to production of hydrogen peroxide as an isogenic TIGR4Δ spx B mutant eradicated Sau bacteria within 4 h. Confocal micrographs confirmed eradication of Sau biofilms by TIGR4 and allowed us to visualize ultrastructural point of contacts between Sau and Spn. A time-course study further demonstrated spatial colocalization of Spn chains and Sau tetrads as early as 30 min post-inoculation (Pearson's coefficient >0.72). Finally, precolonized biofilms produced by Sau strain Newman, or MRSA strain USA300, were eradicated by mid-log phase cultures of washed TIGR4 bacteria within 2 h post-inoculation. In conclusion, Spn strains rapidly eradicate pre-colonized Sau aureus biofilms, including those formed by MRSA strains, by a mechanism(s) requiring bacterium-bacterium contact, but independent from the production of hydrogen peroxide.

  18. Staphylococcus chromogenes, a Coagulase-Negative Staphylococcus Species That Can Clot Plasma.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Danielle Cabral; Lange, Carla Christine; Avellar-Costa, Pedro; Dos Santos, Katia Regina Netto; Brito, Maria Aparecida Vasconcelos Paiva; Giambiagi-deMarval, Marcia

    2016-05-01

    Staphylococcus chromogenes is one of the main coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated from mastitis of dairy cows. We describe S. chromogenes isolates that can clot plasma. Since the main pathogen causing mastitis is coagulase-positive Staphylococcus aureus, the coagulase-positive phenotype of S. chromogenes described here can easily lead to misidentification. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Sensory deprivation in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Maite; García, Begoña; Valle, Jaione; Rapún, Beatriz; Ruiz de Los Mozos, Igor; Solano, Cristina; Martí, Miguel; Penadés, José R; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Lasa, Iñigo

    2018-02-06

    Bacteria use two-component systems (TCSs) to sense and respond to environmental changes. The core genome of the major human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus encodes 16 TCSs, one of which (WalRK) is essential. Here we show that S. aureus can be deprived of its complete sensorial TCS network and still survive under growth arrest conditions similarly to wild-type bacteria. Under replicating conditions, however, the WalRK system is necessary and sufficient to maintain bacterial growth, indicating that sensing through TCSs is mostly dispensable for living under constant environmental conditions. Characterization of S. aureus derivatives containing individual TCSs reveals that each TCS appears to be autonomous and self-sufficient to sense and respond to specific environmental cues, although some level of cross-regulation between non-cognate sensor-response regulator pairs occurs in vivo. This organization, if confirmed in other bacterial species, may provide a general evolutionarily mechanism for flexible bacterial adaptation to life in new niches.

  20. Staphylococcus muscae, a new species isolated from flies.

    PubMed

    Hájek, V; Ludwig, W; Schleifer, K H; Springer, N; Zitzelsberger, W; Kroppenstedt, R M; Kocur, M

    1992-01-01

    A new coagulase-negative species of the genus Staphylococcus, Staphylococcus muscae, is described on the basis of the results of a study of four strains that were isolated from flies. 16S rRNA sequences of the type strains of S. muscae, Staphylococcus schleiferi, and Staphylococcus sciuri were determined and used, together with the corresponding sequences of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, for a comparative analysis. The new species is characterized taxonomically; this species is differentiated from the other novobiocin-susceptible staphylococci by its physiological and biochemical activities, cell wall composition, and levels of genetic relatedness. The type strain of this species is strain MB4 (= CCM 4175).

  1. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Poultry and Poultry Meat: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Claudia M; Stefani, Lenita M; Lucheis, Simone B; Okano, Werner; Cruz, Juliano Cezar M; Souza, Guilherme V; Casagrande, Thais A C; Bastos, Paula Andrea S; Pinheiro, Rafael R; Arruda, Mauro M; Afreixo, Vera

    2018-07-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a bacterium that colonizes and infects various host species and has been found in the poultry production chain, raising concerns about possible transmission from farm to fork. The objective of this study was to use meta-analytical methods to estimate the pooled prevalence of MRSA in chickens, turkeys, chicken meat, and turkey meat. Three electronic databases (PubMed, LILACS, and SciELO) were searched to establish MRSA prevalence from 51 studies published from 2003 through May 2017. The heterogeneity was assessed, and the pooled MRSA prevalence was calculated by using the random effects model according to the method of DerSimonian and Laird. Pooled MRSA prevalence (95% confidence interval [CI]) in turkeys, turkey meat, broilers, and chicken meat was 36% (1 to 78%), 13% (1 to 28%), 5% (2 to 9%), and 5% (3 to 8%), respectively. South America had the highest MRSA prevalence (27%; 95% CI, 17 to 37%), and North America had the lowest (1%; 95% CI, 0 to 2%). Livestock-associated MRSA has been isolated from poultry and poultry meat, indicating that this variant can spread from farm to fork. The presence of MRSA in poultry and poultry meat poses risks to public health, and steps should be taken to mitigate the contamination and spread of this bacterium along the poultry production chain.

  2. Solonamide B Inhibits Quorum Sensing and Reduces Staphylococcus aureus Mediated Killing of Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Anita; Månsson, Maria; Bojer, Martin S.; Gram, Lone; Larsen, Thomas O.; Novick, Richard P.; Frees, Dorte; Frøkiær, Hanne; Ingmer, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) continues to be a serious human pathogen, and particularly the spread of community associated (CA)-MRSA strains such as USA300 is a concern, as these strains can cause severe infections in otherwise healthy adults. Recently, we reported that a cyclodepsipeptide termed Solonamide B isolated from the marine bacterium, Photobacterium halotolerans strongly reduces expression of RNAIII, the effector molecule of the agr quorum sensing system. Here we show that Solonamide B interferes with the binding of S. aureus autoinducing peptides (AIPs) to sensor histidine kinase, AgrC, of the agr two-component system. The hypervirulence of USA300 has been linked to increased expression of central virulence factors like α-hemolysin and the phenol soluble modulins (PSMs). Importantly, in strain USA300 Solonamide B dramatically reduced the activity of α-hemolysin and the transcription of psma encoding PSMs with an 80% reduction in toxicity of supernatants towards human neutrophils and rabbit erythrocytes. To our knowledge this is the first report of a compound produced naturally by a Gram-negative marine bacterium that interferes with agr and affects both RNAIII and AgrA controlled virulence gene expression in S. aureus. PMID:24416329

  3. Repurposing Salicylanilide Anthelmintic Drugs to Combat Drug Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Rajamuthiah, Rajmohan; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Conery, Annie L.; Kim, Wooseong; Jayamani, Elamparithi; Kwon, Bumsup; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterium that has become the leading cause of hospital acquired infections in the US. Repurposing Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs for antimicrobial therapy involves lower risks and costs compared to de novo development of novel antimicrobial agents. In this study, we examined the antimicrobial properties of two commercially available anthelmintic drugs. The FDA approved drug niclosamide and the veterinary drug oxyclozanide displayed strong in vivo and in vitro activity against methicillin resistant S. aureus (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC): 0.125 and 0.5 μg/ml respectively; minimum effective concentration: ≤ 0.78 μg/ml for both drugs). The two drugs were also effective against another Gram-positive bacteria Enterococcus faecium (MIC 0.25 and 2 μg/ml respectively), but not against the Gram-negative species Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter aerogenes. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of niclosamide and oxyclozanide were determined against methicillin, vancomycin, linezolid or daptomycin resistant S. aureus clinical isolates, with MICs at 0.0625-0.5 and 0.125-2 μg/ml for niclosamide and oxyclozanide respectively. A time-kill study demonstrated that niclosamide is bacteriostatic, whereas oxyclozanide is bactericidal. Interestingly, oxyclozanide permeabilized the bacterial membrane but neither of the anthelmintic drugs exhibited demonstrable toxicity to sheep erythrocytes. Oxyclozanide was non-toxic to HepG2 human liver carcinoma cells within the range of its in vitro MICs but niclosamide displayed toxicity even at low concentrations. These data show that the salicylanilide anthelmintic drugs niclosamide and oxyclozanide are suitable candidates for mechanism of action studies and further clinical evaluation for treatment of staphylococcal infections. PMID:25897961

  4. Ephedrine hydrochloride protects mice from staphylococcus aureus-induced peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    He, Weigang; Ma, Jinzhu; Chen, Yijian; Jiang, Xinru; Wang, Yuli; Shi, Ting; Zhang, Qingwen; Yang, Yang; Jiang, Xin; Yin, Shulei; Zheng, Aoxiang; Lu, Jie; Zheng, Yuejuan

    2018-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive (G+) bacterium that causes a wide range of diseases in humans and livestock. Therefore, the development of innovative and effective therapies is essential for the treatment of S. aureus-induced severe infections. Ephedrine hydrochloride (EH) is a compound derived from ephedrine and is widely used for the management of cardiovascular diseases and hypotension. The results of our previous studies demonstrated that EH has anti-inflammatory activity in macrophages and protects against endotoxic shock. However, whether EH regulates the function of dendritic cells (DCs) and the immune response in S. aureus-induced infection is unknown. In this study, the anti-inflammatory and regulatory activity of EH on DCs was evaluated. EH increased the production of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and decreased the production of proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-12 in DCs stimulated with peptidoglycan (PGN), the main cell wall component in G+ bacteria. The PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK signaling pathways controlled EH-induced IL-10 expression and EH-inhibited TNF-α expression, respectively. The PGN-induced expression of co-stimulatory molecules CD40, CD80, CD86, and MHC class II molecule Iab was down-regulated in DCs by EH. Furthermore, EH protected the liver and kidney and increased the survival rate of mice with S. aureus-induced peritonitis. In conclusion, EH helps to keep immune homeostasis and alleviate organ damage during S. aureus-induced peritonitis. Therefore, EH may be a promising drug candidate in the treatment of S. aureus-induced severe infections and other invasive G+ bacterial infections. PMID:29636858

  5. Gut bacterium of Dendrobaena veneta (Annelida: Oligochaeta) possesses antimycobacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Fiołka, Marta J; Zagaja, Mirosław P; Piersiak, Tomasz D; Wróbel, Marek; Pawelec, Jarosław

    2010-09-01

    The new bacterial strain with antimycobacterial activity has been isolated from the midgut of Dendrobaena veneta (Annelida). Biochemical and molecular characterization of isolates from 18 individuals identified all as Raoultella ornithinolytica genus with 99% similarity. The bacterium is a possible symbiont of the earthworm D. veneta. The isolated microorganism has shown the activity against four strains of fast-growing mycobacteria: Mycobacterium butiricum, Mycobacterium jucho, Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium phlei. The multiplication of the gut bacterium on plates with Sauton medium containing mycobacteria has caused a lytic effect. After the incubation of the cell free extract prepared from the gut bacterium with four strains of mycobacteria in liquid Sauton medium, the cells of all tested strains were deformed and divided to small oval forms and sometimes created long filaments. The effect was observed by the use of light, transmission and scanning microscopy. Viability of all examined species of mycobacteria was significantly decreased. The antimycobacterial effect was probably the result of the antibiotic action produced by the gut bacterium of the earthworm. The application of ultrafiltration procedure allowed to demonstrate that antimicrobial substance with strong antimycobacterial activity from bacterial culture supernatant, is a protein with the molecular mass above 100 kDa. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Partial biological characteristics and algicidal activity of an algicidal bacterium].

    PubMed

    Li, San-Hua; Zhang, Qi-Ya

    2013-02-01

    An algicidal bacterium was isolated from freshwater (Lake Donghu in Wuhan) and coded as A01. The morphology of the algicidal bacterium was observed using optical microscope and electron microscopes, the results showed that A01 was rod-shaped, approximately 1.5 microm in length and 0.45 microm in width and with no flagella structure. A01 was Gram-negative and belongs to the family Acinetobacter sp. though identification by Gram's staining and 16S rDNA gene analysis. A01 exhibited strong algicidal activity on the bloom-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena eucompacta under laboratory conditions. The removal rate of chlorophyll a after 7-day incubation with the culture supernatant of A01 and thalli were 77% and 61%, respectively. Microscopic observation showed that almost all cyanobacterial cells were destroyed within 3 d of co-incubation with the supernatant of algicidal bacterium, but a mass of the cyanobacterial cell lysis was observed only after 5 d of co-incubation with the thalli of algicidal bacterium. These results indicated that the main algicidal component of A01 was in its culture supernatant. In other words, the strain A01 could secrete algicidal component against Anabaena eucompacta.

  7. Genome sequence of the algicidal bacterium Kordia algicida OT-1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Sook; Kang, Sung Gyun; Kwon, Kae Kyoung; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Sang-Jin

    2011-08-01

    Kordia algicida OT-1 is an algicidal bacterium against the bloom-forming microalgae. The genome sequence of K. algicida revealed a number of interesting features, including the degradation of macromolecules, the biosynthesis of carotenoid pigment and secondary metabolites, and the capacity for gliding motility, which might facilitate the understanding of algicidal mechanisms.

  8. Complete genome of the cellulolytic ruminal bacterium Ruminococcus albus 7

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ruminococcus albus 7 is a highly cellulolytic rumen bacterium that is a member of the phylum Firmicutes. Here, we describe the complete genome for this microbe. This genome will be useful for rumen microbiology, cellulosome biology, and in biofuel production, as one of its major fermentation product...

  9. Biofilm formation by Staphylococcus haemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Fredheim, Elizabeth Gladys Aarag; Klingenberg, Claus; Rohde, Holger; Frankenberger, Stephanie; Gaustad, Peter; Flaegstad, Trond; Sollid, Johanna Ericson

    2009-04-01

    Infections due to coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) most frequently occur after the implantation of medical devices and are attributed to the biofilm-forming potential of CoNS. Staphylococcus haemolyticus is the second most frequently isolated CoNS from patients with hospital-acquired infections. There is only limited knowledge of the nature of S. haemolyticus biofilms. The aim of this study was to characterize S. haemolyticus biofilm formation. We analyzed the biofilm-forming capacities of 72 clinical S. haemolyticus isolates. A detachment assay with NaIO(4), proteinase K, or DNase was used to determine the main biofilm components. Biofilm-associated genes, including the ica operon, were analyzed by PCR, and the gene products were sequenced. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was used to elucidate the biofilm structure. Fifty-three isolates (74%) produced biofilms after growth in Trypticase soy broth (TSB) with glucose, but only 22 (31%) produced biofilms after growth in TSB with NaCl. It was necessary to dissolve the biofilm in ethanol-acetone to measure the optical density of the full biofilm mass. DNase, proteinase K, and NaIO(4) caused biofilm detachment for 100%, 98%, and 38% of the isolates, respectively. icaRADBC and polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA) production were found in only two isolates. CLSM indicated that the biofilm structure of S. haemolyticus clearly differs from that of S. epidermidis. We conclude that biofilm formation is a common phenotype in clinical S. haemolyticus isolates. In contrast to S. epidermidis, proteins and extracellular DNA are of functional relevance for biofilm accumulation, whereas PIA plays only a minor role. The induction of biofilm formation and determination of the biofilm mass also needed to be optimized for S. haemolyticus.

  10. Vancomycin Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus


    PubMed Central

    McGuinness, Will A.; Malachowa, Natalia; DeLeo, Frank R.

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of Staphylococcus aureus during the modern antibiotic era has been delineated by distinct strain emergence events, many of which include acquisition of antibiotic resistance. The relative high burden of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in healthcare and community settings is a major concern worldwide. Vancomycin, a glycopeptide antibiotic that inhibits cell wall biosynthesis, remains a drug of choice for treatment of severe MRSA infections. S. aureus strains exhibiting increased resistance to vancomycin, known as vancomycin intermediate-resistant S. aureus (VISA) (MIC = 4-8 µg/mL), were discovered in the 1990s. The molecular basis of resistance in VISA is polygenic and involves stepwise mutations in genes encoding molecules predominantly involved in cell envelope biosynthesis. S. aureus isolates with complete resistance to vancomycin (MIC ≥ 16 µg/mL) are termed vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA)—they were first reported in the U.S. in 2002. Resistance in VRSA is conferred by the vanA gene and operon, which is present on a plasmid. Although treatment of VRSA infections is challenging, the total number of human VRSA infections to date is limited (14 in the U.S.). By comparison, the burden of VISA is relatively high and the molecular mechanisms of resistance are less well-defined. VISA are associated with persistent infections, vancomycin treatment failure, and poor clinical outcomes. Here, we review in brief progress made toward understanding the acquisition of antibiotic resistance in S. aureus, with an emphasis on the molecular mechanisms underlying vancomycin resistance. PMID:28656013

  11. Vancomycin Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus
.

    PubMed

    McGuinness, Will A; Malachowa, Natalia; DeLeo, Frank R

    2017-06-01

    The evolution of Staphylococcus aureus during the modern antibiotic era has been delineated by distinct strain emergence events, many of which include acquisition of antibiotic resistance. The relative high burden of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in healthcare and community settings is a major concern worldwide. Vancomycin, a glycopeptide antibiotic that inhibits cell wall biosynthesis, remains a drug of choice for treatment of severe MRSA infections. S. aureus strains exhibiting increased resistance to vancomycin, known as vancomycin intermediate-resistant S. aureus (VISA) (MIC = 4-8 µg/mL), were discovered in the 1990s. The molecular basis of resistance in VISA is polygenic and involves stepwise mutations in genes encoding molecules predominantly involved in cell envelope biosynthesis. S. aureus isolates with complete resistance to vancomycin (MIC ≥ 16 µg/mL) are termed vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA)-they were first reported in the U.S. in 2002. Resistance in VRSA is conferred by the vanA gene and operon, which is present on a plasmid. Although treatment of VRSA infections is challenging, the total number of human VRSA infections to date is limited (14 in the U.S.). By comparison, the burden of VISA is relatively high and the molecular mechanisms of resistance are less well-defined. VISA are associated with persistent infections, vancomycin treatment failure, and poor clinical outcomes. Here, we review in brief progress made toward understanding the acquisition of antibiotic resistance in S. aureus , with an emphasis on the molecular mechanisms underlying vancomycin resistance.

  12. Propionibacterium-Produced Coproporphyrin III Induces Staphylococcus aureus Aggregation and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wollenberg, Michael S.; Claesen, Jan; Escapa, Isabel F.; Aldridge, Kelly L.; Fischbach, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The majority of bacteria detected in the nostril microbiota of most healthy adults belong to three genera: Propionibacterium, Corynebacterium, and Staphylococcus. Among these staphylococci is the medically important bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. Almost nothing is known about interspecies interactions among bacteria in the nostrils. We observed that crude extracts of cell-free conditioned medium from Propionibacterium spp. induce S. aureus aggregation in culture. Bioassay-guided fractionation implicated coproporphyrin III (CIII), the most abundant extracellular porphyrin produced by human-associated Propionibacterium spp., as a cause of S. aureus aggregation. This aggregation response depended on the CIII dose and occurred during early stationary-phase growth, and a low pH (~4 to 6) was necessary but was not sufficient for its induction. Additionally, CIII induced plasma-independent S. aureus biofilm development on an abiotic surface in multiple S. aureus strains. In strain UAMS-1, CIII stimulation of biofilm depended on sarA, a key biofilm regulator. This study is one of the first demonstrations of a small-molecule-mediated interaction among medically relevant members of the nostril microbiota and the first description of a role for CIII in bacterial interspecies interactions. Our results indicate that CIII may be an important mediator of S. aureus aggregation and/or biofilm formation in the nostril or other sites inhabited by Propionibacterium spp. and S. aureus. PMID:25053784

  13. Capture and detection of Staphylococcus aureus with dual labeled aptamers to cell surface components.

    PubMed

    Ramlal, Shylaja; Mondal, Bhairab; Lavu, Padma Sudharani; N, Bhavanashri; Kingston, Joseph

    2018-01-16

    In the present study, a high throughput whole cell SELEX method has been applied successfully in selecting specific aptamers against whole cells of Staphylococcus aureus, a potent food poisoning bacterium. A total ten rounds of SELEX and three rounds of intermittent counter SELEX, was performed to obtain specific aptamers. Obtained oligonucleotide pool were cloned, sequenced and then grouped into different families based on their primary sequence homology and secondary structure similarity. FITC labeled sequences from different families were selected for further characterization via flow cytometry analysis. The dissociation constant (K d ) values of specific and higher binders ranged from 34 to 128nM. Binding assays to assess the selectivity of aptamer RAB10, RAB 20, RAB 28 and RAB 35 demonstrated high affinity against S. aureus and low binding affinity for other bacteria. To demonstrate the potential use of the aptamer a sensitive dual labeled sandwich detection system was developed using aptamer RAB10 and RAB 35 with a detection limit of 10 2 CFU/mL. Furthermore detection from mixed cell population and spiked sample emphasized the robustness as well as applicability of the developed method. Altogether, the established assay could be a reliable detection tool for the routine investigation of Staphylococcus aureus in samples from food and clinical sources. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Fibrinogen Is at the Interface of Host Defense and Pathogen Virulence in Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Ya-Ping; Flick, Matthew J.

    2017-01-01

    Fibrinogen not only plays a pivotal role in hemostasis but also serves key roles in antimicrobial host defense. As a rapidly assembled provisional matrix protein, fibrin(ogen) can function as an early line of host protection by limiting bacterial growth, suppressing dissemination of microbes to distant sites, and mediating host bacterial killing. Fibrinogen-mediated host antimicrobial activity occurs predominantly through two general mechanisms, namely, fibrin matrices functioning as a protective barrier and fibrin(ogen) directly or indirectly driving host protective immune function. The potential of fibrin to limit bacterial infection and disease has been countered by numerous bacterial species evolving and maintaining virulence factors that engage hemostatic system components within vertebrate hosts. Bacterial factors have been isolated that simply bind fibrinogen or fibrin, promote fibrin polymer formation, or promote fibrin dissolution. Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic gram-positive bacterium, the causative agent of a wide range of human infectious diseases, and a prime example of a pathogen exquisitely sensitive to host fibrinogen. Indeed, current data suggest fibrinogen serves as a context-dependent determinant of host defense or pathogen virulence in Staphylococcus infection whose ultimate contribution is dictated by the expression of S. aureus virulence factors, the path of infection, and the tissue microenvironment. PMID:27056151

  15. Survey of Extreme Solvent Tolerance in Gram-Positive Cocci: Membrane Fatty Acid Changes in Staphylococcus haemolyticus Grown in Toluene

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Lindsey E.; Kadavy, Dana R.; Rajagopal, Soumitra; Drijber, Rhae; Nickerson, Kenneth W.

    2005-01-01

    We exploited the unique ecological niche of oil fly larval guts to isolate a strain of Staphylococcus haemolyticus which may be the most solvent-tolerant gram-positive bacterium yet described. This organism is able to tolerate 100% toluene, benzene, and p-xylene on plate overlays and saturating levels of these solvents in monophasic liquid cultures. A comparison of membrane fatty acids by gas chromatography after growth in liquid media with and without toluene showed that in cells continuously exposed to solvent the proportion of anteiso fatty acids increased from 25.8 to 33.7% while the proportion of 20:0 straight-chain fatty acids decreased from 19.3 to 10.1%. No changes in the membrane phospholipid composition were noted. Thus, S. haemolyticus alters its membrane fluidity via fatty acid composition to become more fluid when it is exposed to solvent. This response is opposite that commonly found in gram-negative bacteria, which change their fatty acids so that the cytoplasmic membrane is less fluid. Extreme solvent tolerance in S. haemolyticus is not accompanied by abnormal resistance to anionic or cationic detergents. Finally, six strains of Staphylococcus aureus and five strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis, which were not obtained by solvent selection, also exhibited exceptional solvent tolerance. PMID:16151101

  16. Survey of extreme solvent tolerance in gram-positive cocci: membrane fatty acid changes in Staphylococcus haemolyticus grown in toluene.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Lindsey E; Kadavy, Dana R; Rajagopal, Soumitra; Drijber, Rhae; Nickerson, Kenneth W

    2005-09-01

    We exploited the unique ecological niche of oil fly larval guts to isolate a strain of Staphylococcus haemolyticus which may be the most solvent-tolerant gram-positive bacterium yet described. This organism is able to tolerate 100% toluene, benzene, and p-xylene on plate overlays and saturating levels of these solvents in monophasic liquid cultures. A comparison of membrane fatty acids by gas chromatography after growth in liquid media with and without toluene showed that in cells continuously exposed to solvent the proportion of anteiso fatty acids increased from 25.8 to 33.7% while the proportion of 20:0 straight-chain fatty acids decreased from 19.3 to 10.1%. No changes in the membrane phospholipid composition were noted. Thus, S. haemolyticus alters its membrane fluidity via fatty acid composition to become more fluid when it is exposed to solvent. This response is opposite that commonly found in gram-negative bacteria, which change their fatty acids so that the cytoplasmic membrane is less fluid. Extreme solvent tolerance in S. haemolyticus is not accompanied by abnormal resistance to anionic or cationic detergents. Finally, six strains of Staphylococcus aureus and five strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis, which were not obtained by solvent selection, also exhibited exceptional solvent tolerance.

  17. Presence of Laminin Receptors in Staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, J. D.; Dos Reis, M.; Brentani, R. R.

    1985-07-01

    A characteristic feature of infection by Staphylococcus aureus is bloodstream invasion and widespread metastatic abscess formation. The ability to extravasate, which entails crossing the vascular basement membrane, appears to be critical for the organism's pathogenicity. Extravasation by normal and neoplastic mammalian cells has been correlated with the presence of specific cell surface receptors for the basement membrane glycoprotein laminin. Similar laminin receptors were found in Staphylococcus aureus but not in Staphylococcus epidermidis, a noninvasive pathogen. There were about 100 binding sites per cell, with an apparent binding affinity of 2.9 nanomolar. The molecular weight of the receptor was 50,000 and pI was 4.2. Eukaryotic laminin receptors were visualized by means of the binding of S. aureus in the presence of laminin. Prokaryotic and eukaryotic invasive cells might utilize similar, if not identical, mechanisms for invasion.

  18. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus argenteus misidentified as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus emerging in western Sweden.

    PubMed

    Tång Hallbäck, Erika; Karami, Nahid; Adlerberth, Ingegerd; Cardew, Sofia; Ohlén, Maria; Engström Jakobsson, Hedvig; Svensson Stadler, Liselott

    2018-05-17

    Two strains included in a whole-genome sequencing project for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) were identified as non-Staphylococcus aureus when the sequences were analysed using the bioinformatics software ALEX (www.1928diagnostics.com, Gothenburg, Sweden). Sequencing of the sodA gene of these strains identified them as Staphylococcus argenteus. The collection of MRSA in western Sweden was checked for additional strains of this species. A total of 18 strains of S. argenteus isolated between 2011 and December 2017 were identified.

  19. Antibiofilm Activity of an Exopolysaccharide from Marine Bacterium Vibrio sp. QY101

    PubMed Central

    Han, Feng; Duan, Gaofei; Lu, Xinzhi; Gu, Yuchao; Yu, Wengong

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial exopolysaccharides have always been suggested to play crucial roles in the bacterial initial adhesion and the development of complex architecture in the later stages of bacterial biofilm formation. However, Escherichia coli group II capsular polysaccharide was characterized to exert broad-spectrum biofilm inhibition activity. In this study, we firstly reported that a bacterial exopolysaccharide (A101) not only inhibits biofilm formation of many bacteria but also disrupts established biofilm of some strains. A101 with an average molecular weight of up to 546 KDa, was isolated and purified from the culture supernatant of the marine bacterium Vibrio sp. QY101 by ethanol precipitation, iron-exchange chromatography and gel filtration chromatography. High performance liquid chromatography traces of the hydrolyzed polysaccharides showed that A101 is primarily consisted of galacturonic acid, glucuronic acid, rhamnose and glucosamine. A101 was demonstrated to inhibit biofilm formation by a wide range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria without antibacterial activity. Furthermore, A101 displayed a significant disruption on the established biofilm produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but not by Staphylococcus aureus. Importantly, A101 increased the aminoglycosides antibiotics' capability of killing P. aeruginosa biofilm. Cell primary attachment to surfaces and intercellular aggregates assays suggested that A101 inhibited cell aggregates of both P. aeruginosa and S. aureus, while the cell-surface interactions inhibition only occurred in S. aureus, and the pre-formed cell aggregates dispersion induced by A101 only occurred in P. aeruginosa. Taken together, these data identify the antibiofilm activity of A101, which may make it potential in the design of new therapeutic strategies for bacterial biofilm-associated infections and limiting biofilm formation on medical indwelling devices. The found of A101 antibiofilm activity may also promote a new recognition

  20. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles by the extreme bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans and an evaluation of their antibacterial properties.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiulong; Li, Qinghao; Ma, Xiaoqiong; Tian, Bing; Li, Tao; Yu, Jiangliu; Dai, Shang; Weng, Yulan; Hua, Yuejin

    Deinococcus radiodurans is an extreme bacterium known for its high resistance to stresses including radiation and oxidants. The ability of D. radiodurans to reduce Au(III) and biosynthesize gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was investigated in aqueous solution by ultraviolet and visible (UV/Vis) absorption spectroscopy, electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), dynamic light scattering (DLS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). D. radiodurans efficiently synthesized AuNPs from 1 mM Au(III) solution in 8 h. The AuNPs were of spherical, triangular and irregular shapes with an average size of 43.75 nm and a polydispersity index of 0.23 as measured by DLS. AuNPs were distributed in the cell envelope, across the cytosol and in the extracellular space. XRD analysis confirmed the crystallite nature of the AuNPs from the cell supernatant. Data from the FTIR and XPS showed that upon binding to proteins or compounds through interactions with carboxyl, amine, phospho and hydroxyl groups, Au(III) may be reduced to Au(I), and further reduced to Au(0) with the capping groups to stabilize the AuNPs. Biosynthesis of AuNPs was optimized with respect to the initial concentration of gold salt, bacterial growth period, solution pH and temperature. The purified AuNPs exhibited significant antibacterial activity against both Gram-negative ( Escherichia coli ) and Gram-positive ( Staphylococcus aureus ) bacteria by damaging their cytoplasmic membrane. Therefore, the extreme bacterium D. radiodurans can be used as a novel bacterial candidate for efficient biosynthesis of AuNPs, which exhibited potential in biomedical application as an antibacterial agent.

  1. Comparison of magnetic field effects on the growth of Staphylococcus Aureus and Staphylococcus Epidermidis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Kevin; Masood, Samina

    The effects of magnetic fields were investigated on two species of bacteria: Staphylococcus Aureus and Staphylococcus Epidermidis. Both cultures were grown independently in agar plates and nutrient broth with exposure to various conditions of static and oscillating magnetic fields. The effects were characterized by growth rate measurements via changes in optical density (OD) over incubation periods of 24-28 hours. Significant effects on the growth rates of both species were observed in the case of the time-varying magnetic field.

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Staphylococcus epidermidis 1457.

    PubMed

    Galac, Madeline R; Stam, Jason; Maybank, Rosslyn; Hinkle, Mary; Mack, Dietrich; Rohde, Holger; Roth, Amanda L; Fey, Paul D

    2017-06-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis 1457 is a frequently utilized strain that is amenable to genetic manipulation and has been widely used for biofilm-related research. We report here the whole-genome sequence of this strain, which encodes 2,277 protein-coding genes and 81 RNAs within its 2.4-Mb genome and plasmid. Copyright © 2017 Galac et al.

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of Staphylococcus epidermidis 1457

    PubMed Central

    Galac, Madeline R.; Stam, Jason; Maybank, Rosslyn; Hinkle, Mary; Mack, Dietrich; Rohde, Holger; Roth, Amanda L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus epidermidis 1457 is a frequently utilized strain that is amenable to genetic manipulation and has been widely used for biofilm-related research. We report here the whole-genome sequence of this strain, which encodes 2,277 protein-coding genes and 81 RNAs within its 2.4-Mb genome and plasmid. PMID:28572323

  4. Staphylococcus pseudintermedius necrotizing fasciitis in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Weese, J. Scott; Poma, Roberta; James, Fiona; Buenviaje, Gilbert; Foster, Robert; Slavic, Durda

    2009-01-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius was implicated as the cause of rapidly progressive and fatal necrotizing fasciitis in a dog. The isolate was methicillin-susceptible and did not contain genes encoding the Panton-Valentine leukocidin. While Streptococcus canis is typically considered to be the main cause of necrotizing fasciitis in dogs, staphylococci should also be considered. PMID:19721787

  5. Staphylococcus pseudintermedius necrotizing fasciitis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Weese, J Scott; Poma, Roberta; James, Fiona; Buenviaje, Gilbert; Foster, Robert; Slavic, Durda

    2009-06-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius was implicated as the cause of rapidly progressive and fatal necrotizing fasciitis in a dog. The isolate was methicillin-susceptible and did not contain genes encoding the Panton-Valentine leukocidin. While Streptococcus canis is typically considered to be the main cause of necrotizing fasciitis in dogs, staphylococci should also be considered.

  6. Trichloroethylene Biodegradation by a Methane-Oxidizing Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Little, C. Deane; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Herbes, Stephen E.; Lidstrom, Mary E.; Tyndall, Richard L.; Gilmer, Penny J.

    1988-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE), a common groundwater contaminant, is a suspected carcinogen that is highly resistant to aerobic biodegradation. An aerobic, methane-oxidizing bacterium was isolated that degrades TCE in pure culture at concentrations commonly observed in contaminated groundwater. Strain 46-1, a type I methanotrophic bacterium, degraded TCE if grown on methane or methanol, producing CO2 and water-soluble products. Gas chromatography and 14C radiotracer techniques were used to determine the rate, methane dependence, and mechanism of TCE biodegradation. TCE biodegradation by strain 46-1 appears to be a cometabolic process that occurs when the organism is actively metabolizing a suitable growth substrate such as methane or methanol. It is proposed that TCE biodegradation by methanotrophs occurs by formation of TCE epoxide, which breaks down spontaneously in water to form dichloroacetic and glyoxylic acids and one-carbon products. Images PMID:16347616

  7. [Carriage of Staphylococcus aureus among food service workers].

    PubMed

    Alarcón-Lavín, María Paula; Oyarzo, Carolina; Escudero, Carlos; Cerda-Leal, Fabiola; Valenzuela, Francisco J

    2017-12-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus produces 11 serotypes of endotoxins that may cause food poisoning. Aim To determine the prevalence of type A enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus carriage among food service workers in Chillan, Chile. Material and Methods Pharyngeal swabs were obtained from 100 food service workers and were cultured in Agar plates. After identifying the presence of Staphylococcus aureus, DNA was extracted to identify type A toxin by conventional PCR. Results Thirty eight percent of samples were colonized with Staphylococcus aureus. Among these, 26% were toxin A producers. Conclusions Half of the sampled workers carried Staphylococcus aureus and a quarter of these produced type A enterotoxin.

  8. Thermostable purified endoglucanase from thermophilic bacterium acidothermus cellulolyticus

    DOEpatents

    Tucker, Melvin P.; Grohmann, Karel; Himmel, Michael E.; Mohagheghi, Ali

    1992-01-01

    A substantially purified high molecular weight cellulase enzyme having a molecular weight of between about 156,000 to about 203,400 daltons isolated from the bacterium Acidothermus cellulolyticus (ATCC 43068) and a method of producing it are disclosed. The enzyme is water soluble, possesses both C.sub.1 and C.sub.x types of enzymatic activity, has a high degree of stability toward heat and exhibits both a high optimum temperature activity and high inactivation characteristics.

  9. Antibacterial efficacy of silver nanoparticles and ethyl acetate's metabolites of the potent halophilic (marine) bacterium, Bacillus cereus A30 on multidrug resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Arul, Dhayalan; Balasubramani, Govindasamy; Balasubramanian, Velramar; Natarajan, Thillainathan; Perumal, Pachiappan

    2017-10-01

    Bacteria are generally responsible for the prevalence of several diseases and pathogenic bacteria are showing increasing resistance to different antibacterials. During the present study an extremophilic bacterium-A30 isolated from the marine waters was characterized and evaluated against four multi-drug resistant (MDR) pathogens, viz; Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The sensitivity pattern of the selected pathogens was tested with 31 antibiotics. Among the 47 marine microbial extracts tested on 4-MDR pathogens viz: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), E. coli, K. pneumoniae and P. aeruginosa, only our strain A30 strain exhibited highest efficacy. This strain was subsequently subjected to 16S rDNA sequencing which confirmed its allocation as Bacillus cereus. Silver nanoparticle (AgNPs) synthesis and ethyl acetate extraction were performed using the supernatant of B. cereus. The synthesized AgNPs were characterized by UV-Visible, Fourier-transform infra-red (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and Zeta potential analyses. The presence of functional groups and 13 bioactive components in the ethyl acetate extract were analyzed using FT-IR and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The synthesized of AgNPs and the ethyl acetate extract showed preponderant activity against P. aeruginosa and MRSA, respectively. The effects of AgNPs were significant when compared to ethyl acetate extract. Therefore, the halophilic bacterium, B. cereus mediated AgNPs could provide antibacterial applications in the biomedical industries.

  10. [A rarely isolated bacterium in microbiology laboratories: Streptococcus uberis].

    PubMed

    Eryıldız, Canan; Bukavaz, Şebnem; Gürcan, Şaban; Hatipoğlu, Osman

    2017-04-01

    Streptococcus uberis is a gram-positive bacterium that is mostly responsible for mastitis in cattle. The bacterium rarely has been associated with human infections. Conventional phenotyphic methods can be inadequate for the identification of S.uberis; and in microbiology laboratories S.uberis is confused with the other streptococci and enterococci isolates. Recently, molecular methods are recommended for the accurate identification of S.uberis isolates. The aim of this report is to present a lower respiratory tract infection case caused by S.uberis and the microbiological methods for identification of this bacterium. A 66-year-old male patient with squamous cell lung cancer who received radiotherapy was admitted in our hospital for the control. According to the chest X-Ray, patient was hospitalized with the prediagnosis of ''cavitary tumor, pulmonary abscess''. In the first day of the hospitalization, blood and sputum cultures were drawn. Blood culture was negative, however, Candida albicans was isolated in the sputum culture and it was estimated to be due to oral lesions. After two weeks from the hospitalization, sputum sample was taken from the patient since he had abnormal respiratory sounds and cough complaint. In the Gram stained smear of the sputum there were abundant leucocytes and gram-positive cocci, and S.uberis was isolated in both 5% sheep blood and chocolate agar media. Bacterial identification and antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed by VITEK 2 (Biomerieux, France) and also, the bacterium was identified by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) based VITEK MS system as S.uberis. The isolate was determined susceptible to ampicillin, erythromycin, clindamycin, levofloxacin, linezolid, penicillin, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, tetracycline and vancomycin. 16S, 23S ribosomal RNA and 16S-23S intergenic spacer gene regions were amplified with specific primers and partial DNA sequence analysis of 16S

  11. Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus: methicillin-resistant isolates are detected directly in blood cultures by multiplex PCR.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Eliezer M; Schuenck, Ricardo P; Malvar, Karoline L; Iorio, Natalia L P; Matos, Pricilla D M; Olendzki, André N; Oelemann, Walter M R; dos Santos, Kátia R N

    2010-03-31

    In this study, we standardized and evaluated a multiplex-PCR methodology using specific primers to identify Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus and their methicillin-resistance directly from blood cultures. Staphylococci clinical isolates (149) and control strains (16) previously identified by conventional methods were used to establish the multiplex PCR protocol. Subsequently, this methodology was evaluated using a fast and cheap DNA extraction protocol from 25 staphylococci positive blood cultures. A wash step of the pellet with 0.1% bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution was performed to reduce PCR inhibitors. Amplicons of 154bp (mecA gene), 271bp (S. haemolyticus mvaA gene) and 108 and 124bp (S. aureus and S. epidermidis species-specific fragments, respectively) were observed. Reliable results were obtained for 100% of the evaluated strains, suggesting that this new multiplex-PCR combined with an appropriate DNA-extraction method could be useful in the laboratory for fast and accurate identification of three staphylococci species and simultaneously their methicillin resistance directly in blood cultures.

  12. Whole-bacterium SELEX of DNA aptamers for rapid detection of E.coli O157:H7 using a QCM sensor.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaofan; Chen, Fang; Wang, Ronghui; Li, Yanbin

    2018-01-20

    The rapid detection of foodborne pathogens is critical to ensure food safety. The objective of this study is to select aptamers specifically bound to Escherichia coli O157:H7 using the whole-bacterium SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment) and apply the selected aptamer to a QCM (quartz crystal microbalance) sensor for rapid and sensitive detection of target bacteria. A total of 19 rounds of selection against live E. coli O157:H7 and 6 rounds of counter selection against a mixture of Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella Typhimurium, were performed. The aptamer pool from the last round was cloned and sequenced. One sequence S1 that appeared 16 times was characterized and a dissociation constant (K d ) of 10.30nM was obtained. Subsequently, a QCM aptasensor was developed for the rapid detection of E. coli O157:H7. The limit of detection (LOD) and the detection time of the aptasensor was determined to be 1.46×10 3 CFU/ml and 50min, respectively. This study demonstrated that the ssDNA aptamer selected by the whole-bacterium SELEX possessed higher sensitivity than previous work and the potential use of the constructed QCM aptasensor in rapid screening of foodborne pathogens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Modeling the effect of Rose Bengal on growth and decay patterns of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Akhras, M.-Ali H.; Shorman, Mohammad Al; Masadeh, Majed M.; Aljarrah, Khaled; Ababneh, Zaid

    2018-02-01

    Most infections caused by (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus) are hospital and community acquired infections in patients. Bacterial growths incorporated with photosensitizing material (Rose Bengal) with and without light were investigated. The results demonstrated that the viable counts are increasing in absence of light (in dark) for all samples incorporated with Rose Bengal. Variation in growth phases were noticed as expected, but there is no significant change in decay phases. Convenient and adequate mathematical modeling is in very good agreement with the experimental results and showed to be a very good approach of characterization the growth behaviors of the bacteria. Bandwidths are independent of bacteria group (gram-positive or gram-negative) but it seems totally dependent on the oxygen requirements; an anaerobic bacterium takes broader bandwidths than aerobic bacteria. This concludes that the growth and lethal rates of anaerobic are much greater than aerobic.

  14. Rational protein engineering in action: The first crystal structure of a phenylalanine tRNA synthetase from Staphylococcus haemolyticus

    SciTech Connect

    Evdokimov, Artem G.; Mekel, Marlene; Hutchings, Kim

    2008-07-08

    In this article, we describe for the first time the high-resolution crystal structure of a phenylalanine tRNA synthetase from the pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus haemolyticus. We demonstrate the subtle yet important structural differences between this enzyme and the previously described Thermus thermophilus ortholog. We also explain the structure-activity relationship of several recently reported inhibitors. The native enzyme crystals were of poor quality -- they only diffracted X-rays to 3--5 {angstrom} resolution. Therefore, we have executed a rational surface mutagenesis strategy that has yielded crystals of this 2300-amino acid multidomain protein, diffracting to 2 {angstrom} or better. This methodology is discussed andmore » contrasted with the more traditional domain truncation approach.« less

  15. Drug-resistant human Staphylococcus aureus in sanctuary apes pose a threat to endangered wild ape populations.

    PubMed

    Schaumburg, Frieder; Mugisha, Lawrence; Peck, Bruce; Becker, Karsten; Gillespie, Thomas R; Peters, Georg; Leendertz, Fabian H

    2012-12-01

    Reintroduction of sanctuary apes to natural habitat is considered an important tool for conservation; however, reintroduction has the potential to endanger resident wild apes through the introduction of human pathogens. We found a high prevalence of drug-resistant, human-associated lineages of Staphylococcus aureus in sanctuary chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) from Zambia and Uganda. This pathogen is associated with skin and soft tissue diseases and severe invasive infections (i.e. pneumonia and septicemia). Colonization by this bacterium is difficult to clear due to frequent recolonization. In addition to its pathogenic potential, human-related S. aureus can serve as an indicator organism for the transmission of other potential pathogens like pneumococci or mycobacteria. Plans to reintroduce sanctuary apes should be reevaluated in light of the high risk of introducing human-adapted S. aureus into wild ape populations where treatment is impossible. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Pseudovibrio denitrificans strain Z143-1, a heptylprodigiosin-producing bacterium isolated from a Philippine tunicate.

    PubMed

    Sertan-de Guzman, Alice A; Predicala, Rey Z; Bernardo, Evelyn B; Neilan, Brett A; Elardo, Sheila P; Mangalindan, Gina C; Tasdemir, Deniz; Ireland, Chris M; Barraquio, Wilfredo L; Concepcion, Gisela P

    2007-12-01

    Microbial isolate Z143-1 found to be associated with an unidentified tunicate was characterized due to its significant antimicrobial activity. Z143-1 is similar to Pseudovibrio ascidiaceicola and Pseudovibrio denitrificans in morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics, except for its ability to ferment glucose and produce a characteristic red pigment. Fatty acid methyl ester analysis revealed a predominance of the fatty acid 18:1 omega7c at 80.55%, at levels slightly lower than the Pseudovibrio denitrificans type strain DN34(T) (87.7%). The mol% G+C of Z143-1 is 54.02, relatively higher than the Pseudovibrio denitrificans type strain DN34(T) and Pseudovibrio ascidiaceicola with mol% G+C of 51.7 and 51.4, respectively. However, phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of Z143-1 showed 100% similarity with the Pseudovibrio denitrificans type strain DN34(T). In this study, the bacterium Z143-1 is reported as a new strain of Pseudovibrio denitrificans. While there is no report of a secondary metabolite for Pseudovibrio denitrificans, Z143-1 produces the red pigment heptylprodigiosin, also known as 16-methyl-15-heptyl-prodiginine, which shows anti-Staphylococcus aureus activity.

  17. Identification and characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus haemolyticus and Staphylococcus pettenkoferi from a small animal clinic.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Sonja; Kadlec, Kristina; Fessler, Andrea T; Schwarz, Stefan

    2013-12-27

    The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS) in a small animal clinic and to investigate their distribution and possible transmission. Swabs (n=72) were taken from hospitalized pets, the environment and employees of a small animal clinic and screened for the presence of MRS. The staphylococcal species was confirmed biochemically or by 16S rDNA sequencing. Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents was tested by broth dilution. The presence of mecA and other resistance genes was confirmed by PCR. Molecular typing of the isolates followed standard procedures. In total, 34 MRS belonging to the four species Staphylococcus aureus (n=5), Staphylococcus epidermidis (n=21), Staphylococcus haemolyticus (n=6) or Staphylococcus pettenkoferi (n=2) were isolated. All isolates were multidrug-resistant with resistance to at least three classes of antimicrobial agents. Among the five methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates, four belonged to the clonal complex CC398; two of them were isolated from cats, the remaining two from pet cages. Overall, the MRS isolates differed in their characteristics, except for one S. epidermidis clone (n=9) isolated from hospitalized cats without clinical staphylococcal infections, pet cages, the clinic environment as well as from a healthy employee. This MRSE clone was resistant to 10 classes of antimicrobial agents, including aminocyclitols, β-lactams, fluoroquinolones, lincosamides, macrolides, phenicols, pleuromutilins, sulfonamides, tetracyclines and trimethoprim. These findings suggest a possible transmission of specific MRS isolates between animal patients, employees and the clinic environment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. [Change in drug resistance of Staphylococcus aureus].

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan; Liu, Yan; Luo, Yan-Ping; Liu, Chang-Ting

    2013-11-01

    To analyze the change in drug resistance of Staphylococcus aureus (SAU) in the PLA general hospital from January 2008 to December 2012, and to provide solid evidence to support the rational use of antibiotics for clinical applications. The SAU strains isolated from clinical samples in the hospital were collected and subjected to the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion test. The results were assessed based on the 2002 American National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) guidelines. SAU strains were mainly isolated from sputum, urine, blood and wound excreta and distributed in penology, neurology wards, orthopedics and surgery ICU wards. Except for glycopeptide drugs, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) had a higher drug resistance rate than those of the other drugs and had significantly more resistance than methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) (P < 0.05). In the dynamic observation of drug resistance, we discovered a gradual increase in drug resistance to fourteen test drugs during the last five years. Drug resistance rate of SAU stayed at a higher level over the last five years; moreover, the detection ratio of MRSA keeps rising year by year. It is crucial for physicians to use antibiotics rationally and monitor the change in drug resistance in a dynamic way.

  19. Chitin utilization by the insect-transmitted bacterium Xylella fastidiosa.

    PubMed

    Killiny, Nabil; Prado, Simone S; Almeida, Rodrigo P P

    2010-09-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is an insect-borne bacterium that colonizes xylem vessels of a large number of host plants, including several crops of economic importance. Chitin is a polysaccharide present in the cuticle of leafhopper vectors of X. fastidiosa and may serve as a carbon source for this bacterium. Biological assays showed that X. fastidiosa reached larger populations in the presence of chitin. Additionally, chitin induced phenotypic changes in this bacterium, notably increasing adhesiveness. Quantitative PCR assays indicated transcriptional changes in the presence of chitin, and an enzymatic assay demonstrated chitinolytic activity by X. fastidiosa. An ortholog of the chitinase A gene (chiA) was identified in the X. fastidiosa genome. The in silico analysis revealed that the open reading frame of chiA encodes a protein of 351 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 40 kDa. chiA is in a locus that consists of genes implicated in polysaccharide degradation. Moreover, this locus was also found in the genomes of closely related bacteria in the genus Xanthomonas, which are plant but not insect associated. X. fastidiosa degraded chitin when grown on a solid chitin-yeast extract-agar medium and grew in liquid medium with chitin as the sole carbon source; ChiA was also determined to be secreted. The gene encoding ChiA was cloned into Escherichia coli, and endochitinase activity was detected in the transformant, showing that the gene is functional and involved in chitin degradation. The results suggest that X. fastidiosa may use its vectors' foregut surface as a carbon source. In addition, chitin may trigger X. fastidiosa's gene regulation and biofilm formation within vectors. Further work is necessary to characterize the role of chitin and its utilization in X. fastidiosa.

  20. Triazine herbicide resistance in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Alfred E.; Gilbert, Carl W.; Guy, Rachel; Arntzen, Charles J.

    1984-01-01

    The photoaffinity herbicide azidoatrazine (2-azido-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) selectively labels the L subunit of the reaction center of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides. Herbicide-resistant mutants retain the L subunit and have altered binding properties for methylthio- and chloro-substituted triazines as well as altered equilibrium constants for electron transfer between primary and secondary electron acceptors. We suggest that a subtle alteration in the L subunit is responsible for herbicide resistance and that the L subunit is the functional analog of the 32-kDa QB protein of chloroplast membranes. Images PMID:16593520

  1. Tyrosine sulfation in a Gram-negative bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sang-Wook; Lee, Sang-Won; Bahar, Ofir; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Robinson, Michelle R.; Shaw, Jared B.; Madsen, James A.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine sulfation, a well-characterized post-translation modification in eukaryotes, has not previously been reported in prokaryotes. Here we demonstrate that the RaxST protein from the Gram-negative bacterium, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, is a tyrosine sulfotransferase. We used a newly developed sulfotransferase assay and ultraviolet photodissociation mass spectrometry (UVPD) to demonstrate that RaxST catalyzes sulfation of tyrosine 22 of the Xoo Ax21 (activator of XA21-mediated immunity). These results demonstrate a previously undescribed post-translational modification in a prokaryotic species with implications extending to host immune response and bacterial cell-cell communication system. PMID:23093190

  2. Factors Affecting Zebra Mussel Kill by the Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2004-02-24

    The specific purpose of this research project was to identify factors that affect zebra mussel kill by the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens. Test results obtained during this three-year project identified the following key variables as affecting mussel kill: treatment concentration, treatment duration, mussel siphoning activity, dissolved oxygen concentration, water temperature, and naturally suspended particle load. Using this latter information, the project culminated in a series of pipe tests which achieved high mussel kill inside power plants under once-through conditions using service water in artificial pipes.

  3. Magnetic guidance of the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense.

    PubMed

    Loehr, Johannes; Pfeiffer, Daniel; Schüler, Dirk; Fischer, Thomas M

    2016-04-21

    Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense is a magnetotactic bacterium with a permanent magnetic moment capable of swimming using two bipolarly located flagella. In their natural environment these bacteria swim along the field lines of the homogeneous geomagnetic field in a typical run and reversal pattern and thereby create non-differentiable trajectories with sharp edges. In the current work we nevertheless achieve stable guidance along curved lines of mechanical instability by using a heterogeneous magnetic field of a garnet film. The successful guidance of the bacteria depends on the right balance between motility and the magnetic moment of the magnetosome chain.

  4. Structural and functional characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus's class IIb fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase.

    PubMed

    Capodagli, Glenn C; Lee, Stephen A; Boehm, Kyle J; Brady, Kristin M; Pegan, Scott D

    2014-12-09

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common nosocomial sources of soft-tissue and skin infections and has more recently become prevalent in the community setting as well. Since the use of penicillins to combat S. aureus infections in the 1940s, the bacterium has been notorious for developing resistances to antibiotics, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). With the persistence of MRSA as well as many other drug resistant bacteria and parasites, there is a growing need to focus on new pharmacological targets. Recently, class II fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolases (FBAs) have garnered attention to fill this role. Regrettably, scarce biochemical data and no structural data are currently available for the class II FBA found in MRSA (SaFBA). With the recent finding of a flexible active site zinc-binding loop (Z-Loop) in class IIa FBAs and its potential for broad spectrum class II FBA inhibition, the lack of information regarding this feature of class IIb FBAs, such as SaFBA, has been limiting for further Z-loop inhibitor development. Therefore, we elucidated the crystal structure of SaFBA to 2.1 Å allowing for a more direct structural analysis of SaFBA. Furthermore, we determined the KM for one of SaFBA's substrates, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, as well as performed mode of inhibition studies for an inhibitor that takes advantage of the Z-loop's flexibility. Together the data offers insight into a class IIb FBA from a pervasively drug resistant bacterium and a comparison of Z-loops and other features between the different subtypes of class II FBAs.

  5. Structural and functional characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus’s class IIb fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase

    DOE PAGES

    Capodagli, Glenn C.; Lee, Stephen A.; Boehm, Kyle J.; ...

    2014-11-12

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common nosocomial sources of soft-tissue and skin infections and has more recently become prevalent in the community setting as well. Since the use of penicillins to combat S. aureus infections in the 1940s, the bacterium has been notorious for developing resistances to antibiotics, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). With the persistence of MRSA as well as many other drug resistant bacteria and parasites, there is a growing need to focus on new pharmacological targets. Recently, class II fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolases (FBAs) have garnered attention to fill this role. Regrettably, scarce biochemical datamore » and no structural data are currently available for the class II FBA found in MRSA (SaFBA). With the recent finding of a flexible active site zinc-binding loop (Z-Loop) in class IIa FBAs and its potential for broad spectrum class II FBA inhibition, the lack of information regarding this feature of class IIb FBAs, such as SaFBA, has been limiting for further Z-loop inhibitor development. Therefore, we elucidated the crystal structure of SaFBA to 2.1 Å allowing for a more direct structural analysis of SaFBA. Furthermore, we determined the KM for one of SaFBA’s substrates, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, as well as performed mode of inhibition studies for an inhibitor that takes advantage of the Z-loop’s flexibility. Altogether the data offers insight into a class IIb FBA from a pervasively drug resistant bacterium and a comparison of Z-loops and other features between the different subtypes of class II FBAs.« less

  6. Structural and functional characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus’s class IIb fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase

    SciTech Connect

    Capodagli, Glenn C.; Lee, Stephen A.; Boehm, Kyle J.

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common nosocomial sources of soft-tissue and skin infections and has more recently become prevalent in the community setting as well. Since the use of penicillins to combat S. aureus infections in the 1940s, the bacterium has been notorious for developing resistances to antibiotics, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). With the persistence of MRSA as well as many other drug resistant bacteria and parasites, there is a growing need to focus on new pharmacological targets. Recently, class II fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolases (FBAs) have garnered attention to fill this role. Regrettably, scarce biochemical datamore » and no structural data are currently available for the class II FBA found in MRSA (SaFBA). With the recent finding of a flexible active site zinc-binding loop (Z-Loop) in class IIa FBAs and its potential for broad spectrum class II FBA inhibition, the lack of information regarding this feature of class IIb FBAs, such as SaFBA, has been limiting for further Z-loop inhibitor development. Therefore, we elucidated the crystal structure of SaFBA to 2.1 Å allowing for a more direct structural analysis of SaFBA. Furthermore, we determined the KM for one of SaFBA’s substrates, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, as well as performed mode of inhibition studies for an inhibitor that takes advantage of the Z-loop’s flexibility. Altogether the data offers insight into a class IIb FBA from a pervasively drug resistant bacterium and a comparison of Z-loops and other features between the different subtypes of class II FBAs.« less

  7. Antagonistic trait of Staphylococcus succinus strain AAS2 against uropathogens and assessment of its in vitro probiotic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Khusro, Ameer; Aarti, Chirom; Salem, Abdelfattah Z M; Buendía Rodríguez, German; Rivas-Cáceres, Raymundo Rene

    2018-03-14

    The desideratum aim of the present context was to isolate a promising antagonist probiotic bacterium from fermented food item as biocontrol agent against uropathogens. Among diversified isolates evaluated for antagonistic trait, Staphylococcus succinus strain AAS2 was found to be an auspicious candidate against urinary tract infection (UTI) causing bacterial pathogens, being the most active against Staphylococcus aureus with substantial activity of 352.5 ± 5.4 AU/mL. Further, the in vitro probiotic attributes of strain AAS2 were assessed using systematic methodology. The isolate exhibited tolerance to acidic condition (up to pH 3.0) and simulated gastric juice (at pH 3.0) with fairly high survival logarithmic cell counts of 5.3 ± 0.15 and 5.23 ± 0.02 log cfu/mL, respectively. Additionally, strain AAS2 showed capability to resist 0.5% w/v bile salt too. It also revealed significant values of auto-aggregation (32.5 ± 1.3-56.5 ± 1.4%) and cell surface hydrophobicity (38.35 ± 1.4%) properties. The isolate showed resistivity towards phenol (6.8 ± 0.08 log cfu/mL) and lysozyme (58.6 ± 1.6%). Further, the susceptibility trait of strain AAS2 to conventional antibiotics made this isolate a promising probiotic bacterium. Most importantly, the isolate depicted DPPH (2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) and hydroxyl radical scavenging activities in a concentration dependent manner, thereby exhibiting its propitious antioxidative properties. In a nutshell, the outcomes of this investigation divulge the plausible use of S. succinus strain AAS2 as biocontrol agent against uropathogens, and recommended further applications in pharmaceutics due to its pronounced probiotic traits. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Commensal Protection of Staphylococcus aureus against Antimicrobials by Candida albicans Biofilm Matrix.

    PubMed

    Kong, Eric F; Tsui, Christina; Kucharíková, Sona; Andes, David; Van Dijck, Patrick; Jabra-Rizk, Mary Ann

    2016-10-11

    Biofilm-associated polymicrobial infections, particularly those involving fungi and bacteria, are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality and tend to be challenging to treat. Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus specifically are considered leading opportunistic fungal and bacterial pathogens, respectively, mainly due to their ability to form biofilms on catheters and indwelling medical devices. However, the impact of mixed-species biofilm growth on therapy remains largely understudied. In this study, we investigated the influence of C. albicans secreted cell wall polysaccharides on the response of S. aureus to antibacterial agents in biofilm. Results demonstrated significantly enhanced tolerance for S. aureus to drugs in the presence of C. albicans or its secreted cell wall polysaccharide material. Fluorescence confocal time-lapse microscopy revealed impairment of drug diffusion through the mixed biofilm matrix. Using C. albicans mutant strains with modulated cell wall polysaccharide expression, exogenous supplementation, and enzymatic degradation, the C. albicans-secreted β-1,3-glucan cell wall component was identified as the key matrix constituent providing the bacteria with enhanced drug tolerance. Further, antibody labeling demonstrated rapid coating of the bacteria by the C. albicans matrix material. Importantly, via its effect on the fungal biofilm matrix, the antifungal caspofungin sensitized the bacteria to the drugs. Understanding such symbiotic interactions with clinical relevance between microbial species in biofilms will greatly aid in overcoming the limitations of current therapies and in defining potential new targets for treating polymicrobial infections. The fungus Candida albicans and the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus are important microbial pathogens responsible for the majority of infections in hospitalized patients and are often coisolated from a host. In this study, we demonstrated that when grown together, the

  9. Differentiation between Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis strains using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rebrošová, Katarína; Šiler, Martin; Samek, Ota; Růžička, Filip; Bernatová, Silvie; Ježek, Jan; Zemánek, Pavel; Holá, Veronika

    2017-08-01

    Raman spectroscopy is an analytical method with a broad range of applications across multiple scientific fields. We report on a possibility to differentiate between two important Gram-positive species commonly found in clinical material - Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis - using this rapid noninvasive technique. For this, we tested 87 strains, 41 of S. aureus and 46 of S. epidermidis, directly from colonies grown on a Mueller-Hinton agar plate using Raman spectroscopy. The method paves a way for separation of these two species even on high number of samples and therefore, it can be potentially used in clinical diagnostics.

  10. Identification of Staphylococcus and Micrococcus species with the STAPHYtest system.

    PubMed

    Sedlácek, I; Kocur, M

    1991-01-01

    A collection of 216 well-characterized strains of Staphylococcus, Micrococcus and Stomatococcus was examined by a commercially available STAPHYtest system (Lachema, Brno, Czechoslovakia). The results of STAPHYtest agreed with those of conventional tests. The STAPHYtest permitted a clear-cut separation of Staphylococcus from Micrococcus and Stomatococcus strains and correctly identified 104 of 145 (72%) Staphylococcus strains after 24 h of incubation. However, it allowed the identification only of 19 of 29 validly published Staphylococcus species. The STAPHYtest proved to be a simple and rapid system for the separation of staphylococci from micrococci and for the identification of most frequent clinically significant staphylococci.

  11. Identification of Staphylococcus spp. using (GTG)₅-PCR fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Svec, Pavel; Pantůček, Roman; Petráš, Petr; Sedláček, Ivo; Nováková, Dana

    2010-12-01

    A group of 212 type and reference strains deposited in the Czech Collection of Microorganisms (Brno, Czech Republic) and covering 41 Staphylococcus species comprising 21 subspecies was characterised using rep-PCR fingerprinting with the (GTG)₅ primer in order to evaluate this method for identification of staphylococci. All strains were typeable using the (GTG)₅ primer and generated PCR products ranging from 200 to 4500 bp. Numerical analysis of the obtained fingerprints revealed (sub)species-specific clustering corresponding with the taxonomic position of analysed strains. Taxonomic position of selected strains representing the (sub)species that were distributed over multiple rep-PCR clusters was verified and confirmed by the partial rpoB gene sequencing. Staphylococcus caprae, Staphylococcus equorum, Staphylococcus sciuri, Staphylococcus piscifermentans, Staphylococcus xylosus, and Staphylococcus saprophyticus revealed heterogeneous fingerprints and each (sub)species was distributed over several clusters. However, representatives of the remaining Staphylococcus spp. were clearly separated in single (sub)species-specific clusters. These results showed rep-PCR with the (GTG)₅ primer as a fast and reliable method applicable for differentiation and straightforward identification of majority of Staphylococcus spp. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Vector potential of houseflies for the bacterium Aeromonas caviae.

    PubMed

    Nayduch, D; Noblet, G Pittman; Stutzenberger, F J

    2002-06-01

    Houseflies, Musca domestica Linnaeus (Diptera: Muscidae), have been implicated as vectors or transporters of numerous gastrointestinal pathogens encountered during feeding and ovipositing on faeces. The putative enteropathogen Aeromonas caviae (Proteobacteria: Aeromonadaceae) may be present in faeces of humans and livestock. Recently A. caviae was detected in houseflies by PCR and isolated by culture methods. In this study, we assessed the vector potential of houseflies for A. caviae relative to multiplication and persistence of the bacterium in the fly and to contamination of other flies and food materials. In experimentally fed houseflies, the number of bacteria increased up to 2 days post-ingestion (d PI) and then decreased significantly 3 d PI. A large number of bacteria was detected in the vomitus and faeces of infected flies at 2-3 d PI. The bacteria persisted in flies for up to 8 d PI, but numbers were low. Experimentally infected flies transmitted A. caviae to chicken meat, and transmissibility was directly correlated with exposure time. Flies contaminated the meat for up to 7 d PI; however, a significant decrease in contamination was observed 2-3 d PI. In the fly-to-fly transmission experiments, the transmission of A. caviae was observed and was apparently mediated by flies sharing food. These results support houseflies as potential vectors for A. caviae because the bacterium multiplied, persisted in flies for up to 8 d PI, and could be transmitted to human food items.

  13. Polysaccharide degradation systems of the saprophytic bacterium Cellvibrio japonicus

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, Jeffrey G.

    Study of recalcitrant polysaccharide degradation by bacterial systems is critical for understanding biological processes such as global carbon cycling, nutritional contributions of the human gut microbiome, and the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. One bacterium that has a robust ability to degrade polysaccharides is the Gram-negative saprophyte Cellvibrio japonicus. A bacterium with a circuitous history, C. japonicus underwent several taxonomy changes from an initially described Pseudomonas sp. Most of the enzymes described in the pre-genomics era have also been renamed. Furthermore, this review aims to consolidate the biochemical, structural, and genetic data published on C. japonicus and its remarkablemore » ability to degrade cellulose, xylan, and pectin substrates. Initially, C. japonicus carbohydrate-active enzymes were studied biochemically and structurally for their novel polysaccharide binding and degradation characteristics, while more recent systems biology approaches have begun to unravel the complex regulation required for lignocellulose degradation in an environmental context. Also included is a discussion for the future of C. japonicus as a model system, with emphasis on current areas unexplored in terms of polysaccharide degradation and emerging directions for C. japonicus in both environmental and biotechnological applications.« less

  14. Polysaccharide degradation systems of the saprophytic bacterium Cellvibrio japonicus

    DOE PAGES

    Gardner, Jeffrey G.

    2016-06-04

    Study of recalcitrant polysaccharide degradation by bacterial systems is critical for understanding biological processes such as global carbon cycling, nutritional contributions of the human gut microbiome, and the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. One bacterium that has a robust ability to degrade polysaccharides is the Gram-negative saprophyte Cellvibrio japonicus. A bacterium with a circuitous history, C. japonicus underwent several taxonomy changes from an initially described Pseudomonas sp. Most of the enzymes described in the pre-genomics era have also been renamed. Furthermore, this review aims to consolidate the biochemical, structural, and genetic data published on C. japonicus and its remarkablemore » ability to degrade cellulose, xylan, and pectin substrates. Initially, C. japonicus carbohydrate-active enzymes were studied biochemically and structurally for their novel polysaccharide binding and degradation characteristics, while more recent systems biology approaches have begun to unravel the complex regulation required for lignocellulose degradation in an environmental context. Also included is a discussion for the future of C. japonicus as a model system, with emphasis on current areas unexplored in terms of polysaccharide degradation and emerging directions for C. japonicus in both environmental and biotechnological applications.« less

  15. Biodegradation of polyethylene by the thermophilic bacterium Brevibacillus borstelensis.

    PubMed

    Hadad, D; Geresh, S; Sivan, A

    2005-01-01

    To select a polyethylene-degrading micro-organism and to study the factors affecting its biodegrading activity. A thermophilic bacterium Brevibaccillus borstelensis strain 707 (isolated from soil) utilized branched low-density polyethylene as the sole carbon source and degraded it. Incubation of polyethylene with B. borstelensis (30 days, 50 degrees C) reduced its gravimetric and molecular weights by 11 and 30% respectively. Brevibaccillus borstelensis also degraded polyethylene in the presence of mannitol. Biodegradation of u.v. photo-oxidized polyethylene increased with increasing irradiation time. Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) analysis of photo-oxidized polyethylene revealed a reduction in carbonyl groups after incubation with the bacteria. This study demonstrates that polyethylene--considered to be inert--can be biodegraded if the right microbial strain is isolated. Enrichment culture methods were effective for isolating a thermophilic bacterium capable of utilizing polyethylene as the sole carbon and energy source. Maximal biodegradation was obtained in combination with photo-oxidation, which showed that carbonyl residues formed by photo-oxidation play a role in biodegradation. Brevibaccillus borstelensis also degraded the CH2 backbone of nonirradiated polyethylene. Biodegradation of polyethylene by a single bacterial strain contributes to our understanding of the process and the factors affecting polyethylene biodegradation.

  16. Chromatin organization and radio resistance in the bacterium Gemmata obscuriglobus.

    PubMed

    Lieber, Arnon; Leis, Andrew; Kushmaro, Ariel; Minsky, Abraham; Medalia, Ohad

    2009-03-01

    The organization of chromatin has a major impact on cellular activities, such as gene expression. For bacteria, it was suggested that the spatial organization of the genetic material correlates with transcriptional levels, implying a specific architecture of the chromosome within the cytoplasm. Accordingly, recent technological advances have emphasized the organization of the genetic material within nucleoid structures. Gemmata obscuriglobus, a member of the phylum Planctomycetes, exhibits a distinctive nucleoid structure in which chromatin is encapsulated within a discrete membrane-bound compartment. Here, we show that this soil and freshwater bacterium tolerates high doses of UV and ionizing radiation. Cryoelectron tomography of frozen hydrated sections and electron microscopy of freeze-substituted cells have indicated a more highly ordered condensed-chromatin organization in actively dividing and stationary-phase G. obscuriglobus cells. These three-dimensional analyses revealed a complex network of double membranes that engulf the condensed DNA. Bioinformatics analysis has revealed the existence of a putative component involved in nonhomologous DNA end joining that presumably plays a role in maintaining chromatin integrity within the bacterium. Thus, our observations further support the notion that packed chromatin organization enhances radiation tolerance.

  17. Human infections due to Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, an emerging zoonosis of canine origin: report of 24 cases.

    PubMed

    Somayaji, R; Priyantha, M A R; Rubin, J E; Church, D

    2016-08-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius has been recently identified as a novel species within the genus Staphylococcus, and is commonly associated with infections in dogs. Currently, there are few reports of human infections due to this bacterium. To use a population-based approach to describe the characteristics of human S. pseudintermedius infections in a large Canadian healthcare region. All adult cases aged ≥18 years identified at a large regional laboratory from April 1, 2013 to April 1, 2015 who had at least one positive culture for S. pseudintermedius were retrospectively reviewed. A combination of phenotypic methods, mass spectrometry (i.e., MALDI-TOF), and cpn60 sequencing were used to identify S. pseudintermedius. Chart review was conducted, and cases were analysed descriptively. Twenty-seven isolates of S. pseudintermedius from 24 human cases were included for analysis. 58.3% were male with median age of 61 years (IQR 55-70.5). Most patients [22 (92.1%)] had confirmed contact with dogs at time of infection. S. pseudintermedius was isolated in 18 cases (75.0%) of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI), and 2 invasive cases (8.3%) including a prosthetic joint and bloodstream infection. The other 4 patients were considered to be colonized (skin - 3; lung - 1). Methicillin resistance was identified in 3 cases with 6 total isolates (22.2%); multi-drug resistance was also demonstrated commonly. S. pseudintermedius is most commonly associated with SSTIs in humans. Transmission probably occurs from a pet dog. Species-level identification of S. pseudintermedius is important due to the high prevalence of antibiotic resistance, particularly to methicillin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Tomatidine Is a Lead Antibiotic Molecule That Targets Staphylococcus aureus ATP Synthase Subunit C.

    PubMed

    Lamontagne Boulet, Maxime; Isabelle, Charles; Guay, Isabelle; Brouillette, Eric; Langlois, Jean-Philippe; Jacques, Pierre-Étienne; Rodrigue, Sébastien; Brzezinski, Ryszard; Beauregard, Pascale B; Bouarab, Kamal; Boyapelly, Kumaraswamy; Boudreault, Pierre-Luc; Marsault, Éric; Malouin, François

    2018-06-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a leading cause of deadly hospital-acquired infections. The discovery of anti- Staphylococcus antibiotics and new classes of drugs not susceptible to the mechanisms of resistance shared among bacteria is imperative. We recently showed that tomatidine (TO), a steroidal alkaloid from solanaceous plants, possesses potent antibacterial activity against S. aureus small-colony variants (SCVs), the notoriously persistent form of this bacterium that has been associated with recurrence of infections. Here, using genomic analysis of in vitro -generated TO-resistant S. aureus strains to identify mutations in genes involved in resistance, we identified the bacterial ATP synthase as the cellular target. Sequence alignments were performed to highlight the modified sequences, and the structural consequences of the mutations were evaluated in structural models. Overexpression of the atpE gene in S. aureus SCVs or introducing the mutation found in the atpE gene of one of the high-level TO-resistant S. aureus mutants into the Bacillus subtilis atpE gene provided resistance to TO and further validated the identity of the cellular target. FC04-100, a TO derivative which also possesses activity against non-SCV strains, prevents high-level resistance development in prototypic strains and limits the level of resistance observed in SCVs. An ATP synthesis assay allowed the observation of a correlation between antibiotic potency and ATP synthase inhibition. The selectivity index (inhibition of ATP production by mitochondria versus that of bacterial ATP synthase) is estimated to be >10 5 -fold for FC04-100. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from retail chicken carcasses and pet workers in Northwest Arkansas.

    PubMed

    Hanning, Irene; Gilmore, David; Pendleton, Sean; Fleck, Scott; Clement, Ashley; Park, Si Hong; Scott, Erin; Ricke, Steven C

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can be carried on the skin and nasal passages of humans and animals as a commensal. A case of human methicillin-resistant S. aureus infection resulting from contact with pork has been reported. Poultry carcasses are sold at retail with the skin intact, but pork and beef typically are not. Thus, the risk of methicillin-resistant S. aureus human infection from whole raw poultry carcasses may be greater than that of exposure from pork or beef. The objective of this study was to isolate and characterize S. aureus from whole retail poultry carcasses and compare the isolates to S. aureus isolates from humans. A total of 25 S. aureus isolates were collected from 222 whole poultry carcasses. The isolates were characterized phenotypically with antibiotic resistance disc diffusion assays and genotypically using multilocus sequence typing. A total of 17 S. aureus isolates obtained from healthy humans were included and characterized in the same way as the poultry isolates. Staphylococcus spp. were recovered from all poultry carcasses. Only 25 poultry carcasses (11.2%) were contaminated with S. aureus. Of these 25 isolates, 36% were resistant to at least one of the antibiotics tested and 20% were resistant to two or more antibiotics tested. However, 100% of the human isolates were resistant to at least one of the antibiotics and 94% were resistant to two or more antibiotics. The results of the multilocus sequence typing indicate that most of the isolates grouped according to source. These results indicate a low prevalence of S. aureus present in poultry, and the isolates were not phenotypically similar to human isolates. The low number of S. aureus isolates from this study indicates that chicken carcasses would appear to not be a significant source of this bacterium.

  20. Staphylococcus lugdunensis, a Common Cause of Skin and Soft Tissue Infections in the Community▿

    PubMed Central

    Böcher, Sidsel; Tønning, Birgitte; Skov, Robert L.; Prag, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis, a rare cause of severe infections such as native valve endocarditis, often causes superficial skin infections similar to Staphylococcus aureus infections. We initiated a study to optimize the identification methods in the routine laboratory, followed by a population-based epidemiologic analysis of patients infected with S. lugdunensis in Viborg County, Denmark. Recognition of a characteristic Eikenella corrodens-like odor on Columbia sheep blood agar combined with colony pleomorphism and prominent β-hemolysis after 2 days of incubation, confirmed by API-ID-32 Staph, led to an 11-fold increase in the detection of S. lugdunensis. By these methods we found 491 S. lugdunensis infections in 4 years, corresponding to an incidence of 53 per 100,000 per year, an increase from 5 infections per 100,000 inhabitants in the preceding years. Seventy-five percent of the cases were found in general practice; these were dominated by skin abscesses (36%), wound infections (25%), and paronychias (13%). Fifty-six percent of the infections occurred below the waist, and toes were the most frequently infected site (21%). Only 3% of the patients suffered from severe invasive infections. The median age was 52 years, and the male/female ratio was 0.69. Our study shows that S. lugdunensis is a common cause of skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTI) and is probably underrated by many laboratories. S. lugdunensis should be accepted as a significant pathogen in SSTI and should be looked for in all routine bacteriological examinations, and clinicians should be acquainted with the name and the pathology of the bacterium. PMID:19244465

  1. Evaluation of the tannic acid inhibitory effect against the NorA efflux pump of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Tintino, Saulo R; Oliveira-Tintino, Cícera D M; Campina, Fábia F; Silva, Raimundo L P; Costa, Maria do S; Menezes, Irwin R A; Calixto-Júnior, João T; Siqueira-Junior, José P; Coutinho, Henrique D M; Leal-Balbino, Tereza C; Balbino, Valdir Q

    2016-08-01

    During the early periods of antibiotic usage, bacterial infections were considered tamed. However, widespread antibiotic use has promoted the emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens, including multidrug resistant strains. Active efflux is a mechanism for bacterial resistance to inhibitory substances, known simply as drug efflux pumps. The bacterium Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogenic bacterium responsible for an array of infections. The NorA efflux pump has been shown to be responsible for moderate fluoroquinolone resistance of S. aureus. The inhibition of the efflux pump was assayed using a sub-inhibitory concentration of standard efflux pump inhibitors and tannic acid (MIC/8), where its capacity to decrease the MIC of Ethidium bromide (EtBr) and antibiotics due to the possible inhibitory effect of these substances was observed. The MICs of EtBr and antibiotics were significantly reduced in the presence of tannic acid, indicating the inhibitory effect of this agent against the efflux pumps of both strains causing a three-fold reduction of the MIC when compared with the control. These results indicate the possible usage of tannic acid as an adjuvant in antibiotic therapy against multidrug resistant bacteria (MDR). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Lavandula angustifolia Mill. Essential Oil Exerts Antibacterial and Anti-Inflammatory Effect in Macrophage Mediated Immune Response to Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Giovannini, D; Gismondi, A; Basso, A; Canuti, L; Braglia, R; Canini, A; Mariani, F; Cappelli, G

    2016-01-01

    Different studies described the antibacterial properties of Lavandula angustifolia (Mill.) essential oil and its anti-inflammatory effects. Besides, no data exist on its ability to activate human macrophages during the innate response against Staphylococcus aureus. The discovery of promising regulators of macrophage-mediated inflammatory response, without side effects, could be useful for the prevention of, or as therapeutic remedy for, various inflammation-mediated diseases. This study investigated, by transcriptional analysis, how a L. angustifolia essential oil treatment influences the macrophage response to Staphylococcus aureus infection. The results showed that the treatment increases the phagocytic rate and stimulates the containment of intracellular bacterial replication by macrophages. Our data showed that this stimulation is coupled with expression of genes involved in reactive oxygen species production (i.e., CYBB and NCF4). Moreover, the essential oil treatment balanced the inflammatory signaling induced by S. aureus by repressing the principal pro-inflammatory cytokines and their receptors and inducing the heme oxygenase-1 gene transcription. These data showed that the L. angustifolia essential oil can stimulate the human innate macrophage response to a bacterium which is responsible for one of the most important nosocomial infection and might suggest the potential development of this plant extract as an anti-inflammatory and immune regulatory coadjutant drug.

  3. Rational design of methicillin resistance staphylococcus aureus inhibitors through 3D-QSAR, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Ballu, Srilata; Itteboina, Ramesh; Sivan, Sree Kanth; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2018-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a gram positive bacterium. It is the leading cause of skin and respiratory infections, osteomyelitis, Ritter's disease, endocarditis, and bacteraemia in the developed world. We employed combined studies of 3D QSAR, molecular docking which are validated by molecular dynamics simulations and in silico ADME prediction have been performed on Isothiazoloquinolones inhibitors against methicillin resistance Staphylococcus aureus. Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) study was applied using comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) with Q 2 of 0.578, R 2 of 0.988, and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) with Q 2 of 0.554, R 2 of 0.975. The predictive ability of these model was determined using a test set of molecules that gave acceptable predictive correlation (r 2 Pred) values 0.55 and 0.57 of CoMFA and CoMSIA respectively. Docking, simulations were employed to position the inhibitors into protein active site to find out the most probable binding mode and most reliable conformations. Developed models and Docking methods provide guidance to design molecules with enhanced activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Structure and morphology of magnetite anaerobically-produced by a marine magnetotactic bacterium and a dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparks, N.H.C.; Mann, S.; Bazylinski, D.A.; Lovley, D.R.; Jannasch, H.W.; Frankel, R.B.

    1990-01-01

    Intracellular crystals of magnetite synthesized by cells of the magnetotactic vibroid organism, MV-1, and extracellular crystals of magnetite produced by the non-magnetotactic dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium strain GS-15, were examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction and 57Fe Mo??ssbauer spectroscopy. The magnetotactic bacterium contained a single chain of approximately 10 crystals aligned along the long axis of the cell. The crystals were essentially pure stoichiometric magnetite. When viewed along the crystal long axis the particles had a hexagonal cross-section whereas side-on they appeared as rectangules or truncated rectangles of average dimension, 53 ?? 35 nm. These findings are explained in terms of a three-dimensional morphology comprising a hexagonal prism of {110} faces which are capped and truncated by {111} end faces. Electron diffraction and lattice imaging studies indicated that the particles were structurally well-defined single crystals. In contrast, magnetite particles produced by the strain, GS-15 were irregular in shape and had smaller mean dimensions (14 nm). Single crystals were imaged but these were not of high structural perfection. These results highlight the influence of intracellular control on the crystallochemical specificity of bacterial magnetites. The characterization of these crystals is important in aiding the identification of biogenic magnetic materials in paleomagnetism and in studies of sediment magnetization. ?? 1990.

  5. Carnobacterium divergens - a dominating bacterium of pork meat juice.

    PubMed

    Rieder, Gabriele; Krisch, Linda; Fischer, Harald; Kaufmann, Maria; Maringer, Adolf; Wessler, Silja

    2012-07-01

    Nonspoiled food that nevertheless contains bacterial pathogens constitutes a much more serious health problem than spoiled food, as the consumer is not warned beforehand. However, data on the diversity of bacterial species in meat juice are rare. To study the bacterial load of fresh pork from ten different distributors, we applied a combination of the conventional culture-based and molecular methods for detecting and quantifying the microbial spectrum of fresh pork meat juice samples. Altogether, we identified 23 bacterial species of ten different families analyzed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The majority of isolates were belonging to the typical spoilage bacterial population of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), Enterococcaceae, and Pseudomonadaceae. Several additional isolates were identified as Staphylococcus spp. and Bacillus spp. originating from human and animal skin and other environmental niches including plants, soil, and water. Carnobacterium divergens, a LAB contributing to the spoilage of raw meat even at refrigeration temperature, was the most frequently isolated species in our study (5/10) with a bacterial load of 10(3) - 10(7) CFU mL(-1). In several of the analyzed pork meat juice samples, two bacterial faecal indicators, Serratia grimesii and Serratia proteamaculans, were identified together with another opportunistic food-borne pathogen, Staphylococcus equorum. Our data reveal a high bacterial load of fresh pork meat supporting the potential health risk of meat juice for the end consumer even under refrigerated conditions. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Monitoring of staphylococcal starters in two French processing plants manufacturing dry fermented sausages.

    PubMed

    Corbiere Morot-Bizot, S; Leroy, S; Talon, R

    2007-01-01

    The growth and survival of Staphylococcus xylosus and Staphylococcus carnosus were monitored during sausage manufacture in two processing plants. The gram-positive, catalase-positive cocci isolated from the processing plants F10 and F11 were identified by Staphylococcus-specific PCR and species-specific oligonucleotide array. In the inoculated products with starter cultures, 90% of staphylococcal strains isolated in F10 were identified as S. xylosus and 10% as S. carnosus. In F11, 77% were identified as S. xylosus and 20% as S. carnosus. Staphylococcus xylosus dominated the staphylococcal microbiota while S. carnosus survived during the process. The pulse-field gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that all S. xylosus and S. carnosus strains isolated corresponded to the starter strains inoculated. The two starter strains of S. xylosus co-dominated in the isolates from sausages of F11, whereas the strain with pattern A1 was dominant in the isolates from sausages of F10. In the environments, no S. carnosus and S. xylosus were found, whereas Staphylococcus equorum and Staphylococcus saprophyticus were the main species isolated. This work highlighted the domination of S. xylosus starter strains, which showed a strong capacity to grow during sausage process, while S. carnosus survived during the process. Successful implantation of starter cultures is obviously a prerequisite for their contribution to sensorial qualities. Thus, the monitoring of the growth and the survival of S. xylosus and S. carnosus are required to guarantee a well-adapted starter culture. This study revealed that the two Staphylococcus species are suitable for manufacturing sausages in processing plants with very different capacities of production.

  7. In-vitro antioxidant and antibacterial activities of Xanthium strumarium L. extracts on methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Rad, Javad Sharifi; Alfatemi, Seyedeh Mahsan Hoseini; Rad, Majid Sharifi; Iriti, Marcello

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims: The excessive and repeated use of antibiotics in medicine has led to the development of antibiotic-resistant microbial strains, including Staphylococcus aureus whose emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains has reduced the number of antibiotics available to treat clinical infections caused by this bacterium. In this study, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of methanolic extract of Xanthium strumarium L. leaves were evaluated on methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) spp. Materials and Methods: Antiradical and antioxidant activities X. strumarium L. leaf extract were evaluated based on its ability to scavenge the synthetic 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical and by the paired diene method, respectively, whereas the antimicrobial activity was assayed by the disc diffusion method. Statistical Analysis: Data were subjected to analysis of variance following an entirely random design to determine the least significant difference at P < 0.05 using SPSS v. 11.5. Results and Conclusions: The IC50 values of the extract were 0.02 mg/mL and 0.09 mg/mL for the antioxidant and DPPH-scavenging capacity, respectively. X. strumarium extract affected both methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus and MRSA, though antibacterial activity was more effective on methicillin-susceptible S. aureus spp. The antibacterial and antioxidant activities exhibited by the methanol extract may justify the traditional use of this plant as a folk remedy worldwide. PMID:25284944

  8. In-vitro antioxidant and antibacterial activities of Xanthium strumarium L. extracts on methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Rad, Javad Sharifi; Alfatemi, Seyedeh Mahsan Hoseini; Rad, Majid Sharifi; Iriti, Marcello

    2013-10-01

    The excessive and repeated use of antibiotics in medicine has led to the development of antibiotic-resistant microbial strains, including Staphylococcus aureus whose emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains has reduced the number of antibiotics available to treat clinical infections caused by this bacterium. In this study, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of methanolic extract of Xanthium strumarium L. leaves were evaluated on methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) spp. Antiradical and antioxidant activities X. strumarium L. leaf extract were evaluated based on its ability to scavenge the synthetic 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical and by the paired diene method, respectively, whereas the antimicrobial activity was assayed by the disc diffusion method. Data were subjected to analysis of variance following an entirely random design to determine the least significant difference at P < 0.05 using SPSS v. 11.5. The IC50 values of the extract were 0.02 mg/mL and 0.09 mg/mL for the antioxidant and DPPH-scavenging capacity, respectively. X. strumarium extract affected both methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus and MRSA, though antibacterial activity was more effective on methicillin-susceptible S. aureus spp. The antibacterial and antioxidant activities exhibited by the methanol extract may justify the traditional use of this plant as a folk remedy worldwide.

  9. Epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, D. L.; Chidambaram, M.; Heath, J. D.; Mallary, L.; Mishra, S. K.; Sharma, B.; Weinstock, G. M.

    1996-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus was isolated over 2 years from Space Shuttle mission crewmembers to determine dissemination and retention of bacteria. Samples before and after each mission were from nasal, throat, urine, and feces and from air and surface sampling of the Space Shuttle. DNA fingerprinting of samples by digestion of DNA with SmaI restriction endonuclease followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed S. aureus from each crewmember had a unique fingerprint and usually only one strain was carried by an individual. There was only one instance of transfer between crewmembers. Strains from interior surfaces after flight matched those of crewmembers, suggesting microbial fingerprinting may have forensic application.

  10. Metastatic Complications from Staphylococcus intermedius, a Zoonotic Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Sree, Aruna; Tirrell, Sandra; Torres, Brenda; Rothman, Alan L.

    2012-01-01

    Metastatic infection is an infrequent complication of non-Staphylococcus aureus staphylococcal infection. Here we report a case of bloodstream infection due to Staphylococcus intermedius. To our knowledge, ours is the only known case of metastatic infection with S. intermedius. PMID:22170938

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of the Cellulolytic Bacterium Clostridium papyrosolvens C7 (ATCC 700395).

    PubMed

    Zepeda, Veronica; Dassa, Bareket; Borovok, Ilya; Lamed, Raphael; Bayer, Edward A; Cate, Jamie H D

    2013-09-12

    We report the draft genome sequence of the cellulose-degrading bacterium Clostridium papyrosolvens C7, originally isolated from mud collected below a freshwater pond in Massachusetts. This Gram-positive bacterium grows in a mesophilic anaerobic environment with filter paper as the only carbon source, and it has a simple cellulosome system with multiple carbohydrate-degrading enzymes.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of the Cellulolytic Bacterium Clostridium papyrosolvens C7 (ATCC 700395)

    PubMed Central

    Zepeda, Veronica; Dassa, Bareket; Borovok, Ilya; Lamed, Raphael; Bayer, Edward A.

    2013-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of the cellulose-degrading bacterium Clostridium papyrosolvens C7, originally isolated from mud collected below a freshwater pond in Massachusetts. This Gram-positive bacterium grows in a mesophilic anaerobic environment with filter paper as the only carbon source, and it has a simple cellulosome system with multiple carbohydrate-degrading enzymes. PMID:24029755

  13. Near-complete genome sequence of the cellulolytic Bacterium Bacteroides ( Pseudobacteroides) cellulosolvens ATCC 35603

    DOE PAGES

    Dassa, Bareket; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Hurt, Richard A.; ...

    2015-09-24

    We report the single-contig genome sequence of the anaerobic, mesophilic, cellulolytic bacterium, Bacteroides cellulosolvens. The bacterium produces a particularly elaborate cellulosome system, whereas the types of cohesin-dockerin interactions are opposite of other known cellulosome systems: cell-surface attachment is thus mediated via type-I interactions whereas enzymes are integrated via type-II interactions.

  14. The O-antigen structure of bacterium Comamonas aquatica CJG.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiqian; Kondakova, Anna N; Zhu, Yutong; Knirel, Yuriy A; Han, Aidong

    2017-11-01

    Genus Comamonas is a group of bacteria that are able to degrade a variety of environmental waste. Comamonas aquatica CJG (C. aquatica) in this genus is able to absorb low-density lipoprotein but not high-density lipoprotein of human serum. Using 1 H and 13 C NMR spectroscopy, we found that the O-polysaccharide (O-antigen) of this bacterium is comprised of a disaccharide repeat (O-unit) of d-glucose and 2-O-acetyl-l-rhamnose, which is shared by Serratia marcescens O6. The O-antigen gene cluster of C. aquatica, which is located between coaX and tnp4 genes, contains rhamnose synthesis genes, glycosyl and acetyl transferase genes, and ATP-binding cassette transporter genes, and therefore is consistent with the O-antigen structure determined here.

  15. Growth of a Strictly Anaerobic Bacterium on Furfural (2-Furaldehyde)

    PubMed Central

    Brune, Gerhard; Schoberth, Siegfried M.; Sahm, Hermann

    1983-01-01

    A strictly anaerobic bacterium was isolated from a continuous fermentor culture which converted the organic constituents of sulfite evaporator condensate to methane and carbon dioxide. Furfural is one of the major components of this condensate. This furfural isolate could degrade furfural as the sole source of carbon and energy in a defined mineral-vitamin-sulfate medium. Acetic acid was the major fermentation product. This organism could also use ethanol, lactate, pyruvate, or fumarate and contained cytochrome c3 and desulfoviridin. Except for furfural degradation, the characteristics of the furfural isolate were remarkably similar to those of the sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio gigas. The furfural isolate has been tentatively identified as Desulfovibrio sp. strain F-1. Images PMID:16346423

  16. The domestication of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus

    PubMed Central

    Bull, Matthew J.; Jolley, Keith A.; Bray, James E.; Aerts, Maarten; Vandamme, Peter; Maiden, Martin C. J.; Marchesi, Julian R.; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus is a Gram-positive lactic acid bacterium that has had widespread historical use in the dairy industry and more recently as a probiotic. Although L. acidophilus has been designated as safe for human consumption, increasing commercial regulation and clinical demands for probiotic validation has resulted in a need to understand its genetic diversity. By drawing on large, well-characterised collections of lactic acid bacteria, we examined L. acidophilus isolates spanning 92 years and including multiple strains in current commercial use. Analysis of the whole genome sequence data set (34 isolate genomes) demonstrated L. acidophilus was a low diversity, monophyletic species with commercial isolates essentially identical at the sequence level. Our results indicate that commercial use has domesticated L. acidophilus with genetically stable, invariant strains being consumed globally by the human population. PMID:25425319

  17. The domestication of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus.

    PubMed

    Bull, Matthew J; Jolley, Keith A; Bray, James E; Aerts, Maarten; Vandamme, Peter; Maiden, Martin C J; Marchesi, Julian R; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar

    2014-11-26

    Lactobacillus acidophilus is a Gram-positive lactic acid bacterium that has had widespread historical use in the dairy industry and more recently as a probiotic. Although L. acidophilus has been designated as safe for human consumption, increasing commercial regulation and clinical demands for probiotic validation has resulted in a need to understand its genetic diversity. By drawing on large, well-characterised collections of lactic acid bacteria, we examined L. acidophilus isolates spanning 92 years and including multiple strains in current commercial use. Analysis of the whole genome sequence data set (34 isolate genomes) demonstrated L. acidophilus was a low diversity, monophyletic species with commercial isolates essentially identical at the sequence level. Our results indicate that commercial use has domesticated L. acidophilus with genetically stable, invariant strains being consumed globally by the human population.

  18. Production of a Pyrrole Antibiotic by a Marine Bacterium1

    PubMed Central

    Burkholder, Paul R.; Pfister, Robert M.; Leitz, Frederick H.

    1966-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the isolation and identification of bacteria able to synthesize an unusual antibiotic containing five bromine atoms per molecule. The identification and taxonomic position of these bacteria was made by use of a computer in conjunction with traditional methods. These microorganisms and closely related strains have been isolated on various occasions from tropical water in the vicinity of Puerto Rico. One bacterium, a pseudomonad, has been given the name Pseudomonas bromoutilis because of its distinctive capability. The antibiotic has been extracted, purified, and obtained in crystal form, and its structure has been determined. Although clinical tests of its properties were not encouraging, it may be of significant value and interest from an ecological standpoint. Images Fig. 1 PMID:4380876

  19. A bacterium that degrades and assimilates poly(ethylene terephthalate).

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shosuke; Hiraga, Kazumi; Takehana, Toshihiko; Taniguchi, Ikuo; Yamaji, Hironao; Maeda, Yasuhito; Toyohara, Kiyotsuna; Miyamoto, Kenji; Kimura, Yoshiharu; Oda, Kohei

    2016-03-11

    Poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) is used extensively worldwide in plastic products, and its accumulation in the environment has become a global concern. Because the ability to enzymatically degrade PET has been thought to be limited to a few fungal species, biodegradation is not yet a viable remediation or recycling strategy. By screening natural microbial communities exposed to PET in the environment, we isolated a novel bacterium, Ideonella sakaiensis 201-F6, that is able to use PET as its major energy and carbon source. When grown on PET, this strain produces two enzymes capable of hydrolyzing PET and the reaction intermediate, mono(2-hydroxyethyl) terephthalic acid. Both enzymes are required to enzymatically convert PET efficiently into its two environmentally benign monomers, terephthalic acid and ethylene glycol. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. [Sepsis with Staphylococcus aureus in immunocompromised patients].

    PubMed

    Petrache, Simona Magdalena; Miftode, Egidia; Vâţă, A; Petrovici, Cristina Mirela; Dorneanu, Olivia; Luca, V

    2009-01-01

    The aim of our study was to analyze clinical and biological characteristics of immunocompromised patients with staphylococcal sepsis and to compare with the same data in non-immunocompromised patients. The diagnosis of sepsis was made based on Bone criteria. MiniAPI system ID 32 STAPH was used for identification and antibiotic susceptibility was assessed by ATB STAPH method and by E-test for oxacillin and vancomycin. Among the 147 patients with Staphylococcus aureus sepsis--66.67% had concomitant immunosuppressive conditions (diabetes mellitus, liver diseases, renal failure, corticotherapy, etc). We have found a significant correlation between the immunosuppressed status and MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) involvement (p = 0.0018) and also, between this group of patients and treatment failure (p = 0.0012). Because of the high rate of MRSA involvement in systemic infections in the Eastern region of Romania first intention treatment of patients with staphylococcal infections and conditions of immunosuppression must include antibiotics effective against methicillin-resistant strains.

  1. TOLERANCE OF STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS TO SODIUM CHLORIDE

    PubMed Central

    Parfentjev, I. A.; Catelli, Anna R.

    1964-01-01

    Parfentjev, I. A. (Institute of Applied Biology, New York, N.Y.), and Anna R. Catelli. Tolerance of Staphylococcus aureus to sodium chloride. J. Bacteriol. 88:1–3. 1964.—The tolerance of Staphylococcus aureus to high concentrations of sodium chloride in liquid medium has been reported. We found that S. aureus grows at 37 C in Tryptose Phosphate Broth saturated with sodium chloride. No difference was noticed between possibly pathogenic and nonpathogenic strains. Under the conditions of our tests, no changes in the original properties of S. aureus strains occurred. In contrast, solutions of sodium chloride in distilled water were injurious to staphylococci and killed most of these organisms in 1 hr. Staphylococci were killed faster at 37 C than at room temperature in a solution of 0.85% sodium chloride in water. Addition of traces of Tryptose Phosphate Broth had a protective effect and prolonged the life of these organisms in physiological saline. All tests were performed at pH 7.2. PMID:14197887

  2. Anti-infective properties of Lactobacillus fermentum against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Varma, Parvathi; Nisha, N; Dinesh, Kavitha R; Kumar, Anil V; Biswas, Raja

    2011-01-01

    Surgical wounds and implant-associated Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections are often difficult to treat because of limited susceptibility of several of these strains to conventional antibiotics. As a result, there is a constant need for new alternative drugs. The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial properties of Lactobacillus fermentum, a probiotic bacterium, which we have isolated from colonic biopsies. The inhibition of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa growth was evaluated by coincubating with L. fermentum strains. Growth inhibition was tested for several of their clinical isolates using agar well diffusion assays. For biofilm assay S. aureus and P. aeruginosa were grown on the glass slides and in 96-well plates in presence of 2.5 μg/ml culture filtrate of L. fermentum. Biofilms were photographed using confocal microscope or stained with 0.1% crystal violet. Reduction in the cytotoxicity of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa was observed in presence of 2.5 μg/ml L. fermentum-spent media. Using in vitroexperiments, we showed that L. fermentum-secreted compound(s) inhibits the growth, cytotoxicity and biofilm formation of several S. aureus and P. aeruginosa strains. Compound(s) present in the culture supernatant of L. fermentum may have promising applications in treating hospital-acquired infections. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Reconstruction of mreB Expression in Staphylococcus aureus via a Collection of New Integrative Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Yepes, Ana; Koch, Gudrun; Waldvogel, Andrea; Garcia-Betancur, Juan-Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Protein localization has been traditionally explored in unicellular organisms, whose ease of genetic manipulation facilitates molecular characterization. The two rod-shaped bacterial models Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis have been prominently used for this purpose and have displaced other bacteria whose challenges for genetic manipulation have complicated any study of cell biology. Among these bacteria is the spherical pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. In this report, we present a new molecular toolbox that facilitates gene deletion in staphylococci in a 1-step recombination process and additional vectors that facilitate the insertion of diverse reporter fusions into newly identified neutral loci of the S. aureus chromosome. Insertion of the reporters does not add any antibiotic resistance genes to the chromosomes of the resultant strains, thereby making them amenable for further genetic manipulations. We used this toolbox to reconstitute the expression of mreB in S. aureus, a gene that encodes an actin-like cytoskeletal protein which is absent in coccal cells and is presumably lost during the course of speciation. We observed that in S. aureus, MreB is organized in discrete structures in association with the membrane, leading to an unusual redistribution of the cell wall material. The production of MreB also caused cell enlargement, but it did not revert staphylococcal shape. We present interactions of MreB with key staphylococcal cell wall-related proteins. This work facilitates the use S. aureus as a model system in exploring diverse aspects of cellular microbiology. PMID:24747904

  4. Virtual screening for development of new effective compounds against Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Roseane Costa; Soares, Lucas Weba; da Silva, Luis Claudio Nascimento

    2018-03-26

    Staphylococcus aureus is a notorious pathogenic bacterium causing a wide range of diseases from soft-tissue contamination, to more serious and deep-seated infections. This species is highlighted by its ability to express several kinds of virulence factors and to acquire genes related to drug resistance. Target this number of factors to design any drug is not an easy task. In this review we discuss the importance of computational methods to impulse the development of new drugs against S. aureus. The application of docking methods to screen large library of natural or synthetic compounds and to provide insights into action mechanisms is demonstrated. Particularly, highlighted the studies that validated in silico results with biochemical and microbiological assays. We also comment the computer-aided design of new molecules using some known inhibitors. The confirmation of in silico results with biochemical and microbiological assays allowed the identification of lead molecules that could be used for drug design such as rhodomyrtone, quinuclidine, berberine (and their derivative compounds). The fast development in the computational methods is essential to improve our ability to discovery new drugs, as well as to expand understanding about drug-target interactions. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Status of vaccine research and development of vaccines for Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Giersing, Birgitte K; Dastgheyb, Sana S; Modjarrad, Kayvon; Moorthy, Vasee

    2016-06-03

    Staphylococcus aureus is a highly versatile gram positive bacterium that is resident as an asymptomatic colonizer on the skin and in the nasopharynx of approximately 30% of individuals. Nasopharyngeal colonization is a risk for acquiring S. aureus infections, which can cause a range of clinical symptoms that are commonly associated with skin and soft-tissue infections. The emergence of S. aureus strains that are highly resistant to antimicrobials has recently become a major public health concern. In low-income countries the incidence of S. aureus disease is highest in neonates and children up to one year of age and mortality rates are estimated to be up to 50%. In the United States, S. aureus infection accounts for approximately 300,000 hospitalizations per year. A vaccine against multi-drug resistant S. aureus, therefore, is urgently needed. Two vaccine candidates have previously been evaluated in late-stage clinical trials but have not demonstrated efficacy. At present, one vaccine candidate and two monoclonal antibody are undergoing clinical evaluation in target groups at high risk for S. aureus infection. This review provides an overview of current vaccine development efforts and presents the major technical and regulatory challenges to developing a licensed S. aureus vaccine. Copyright © 2016 World Health Organization. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Sak and Sak4 recombinases are required for bacteriophage replication in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Neamah, Maan M.; Mir-Sanchis, Ignacio; López-Sanz, María; Acosta, Sonia; Baquedano, Ignacio; Haag, Andreas F.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract DNA-single strand annealing proteins (SSAPs) are recombinases frequently encoded in the genome of many bacteriophages. As SSAPs can promote homologous recombination among DNA substrates with an important degree of divergence, these enzymes are involved both in DNA repair and in the generation of phage mosaicisms. Here, analysing Sak and Sak4 as representatives of two different families of SSAPs present in phages infecting the clinically relevant bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, we demonstrate for the first time that these enzymes are absolutely required for phage reproduction. Deletion of the genes encoding these enzymes significantly reduced phage replication and the generation of infectious particles. Complementation studies revealed that these enzymes are required both in the donor (after prophage induction) and in the recipient strain (for infection). Moreover, our results indicated that to perform their function SSAPs require the activity of their cognate single strand binding (Ssb) proteins. Mutational studies demonstrated that the Ssb proteins are also required for phage replication, both in the donor and recipient strain. In summary, our results expand the functions attributed to the Sak and Sak4 proteins, and demonstrate that both SSAPs and Ssb proteins are essential for the life cycle of temperate staphylococcal phages. PMID:28475766

  7. Sak and Sak4 recombinases are required for bacteriophage replication in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Neamah, Maan M; Mir-Sanchis, Ignacio; López-Sanz, María; Acosta, Sonia; Baquedano, Ignacio; Haag, Andreas F; Marina, Alberto; Ayora, Silvia; Penadés, José R

    2017-06-20

    DNA-single strand annealing proteins (SSAPs) are recombinases frequently encoded in the genome of many bacteriophages. As SSAPs can promote homologous recombination among DNA substrates with an important degree of divergence, these enzymes are involved both in DNA repair and in the generation of phage mosaicisms. Here, analysing Sak and Sak4 as representatives of two different families of SSAPs present in phages infecting the clinically relevant bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, we demonstrate for the first time that these enzymes are absolutely required for phage reproduction. Deletion of the genes encoding these enzymes significantly reduced phage replication and the generation of infectious particles. Complementation studies revealed that these enzymes are required both in the donor (after prophage induction) and in the recipient strain (for infection). Moreover, our results indicated that to perform their function SSAPs require the activity of their cognate single strand binding (Ssb) proteins. Mutational studies demonstrated that the Ssb proteins are also required for phage replication, both in the donor and recipient strain. In summary, our results expand the functions attributed to the Sak and Sak4 proteins, and demonstrate that both SSAPs and Ssb proteins are essential for the life cycle of temperate staphylococcal phages. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Dehydrosqualene Desaturase as a Novel Target for Anti-Virulence Therapy against Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Davies, Julian; Kao, Richard Yi Tsun

    2017-09-05

    Staphylococcus aureus , especially methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), is a life-threatening pathogen in hospital- and community-acquired infections. The golden-colored carotenoid pigment of S. aureus , staphyloxanthin, contributes to the resistance to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and host neutrophil-based killing. Here, we describe a novel inhibitor (NP16) of S. aureus pigment production that reduces the survival of S. aureus under oxidative stress conditions. Carotenoid components analysis, enzyme inhibition, and crtN mutational studies indicated that the molecular target of NP16 is dehydrosqualene desaturase (CrtN). S. aureus treated with NP16 showed increased susceptibility to human neutrophil killing and to innate immune clearance in a mouse infection model. Our study validates CrtN as a novel druggable target in S. aureus and presents a potent and effective lead compound for the development of virulence factor-based therapy against S. aureus IMPORTANCE S. aureus staphyloxanthin contributes substantially to pathogenesis by interfering with host immune clearance mechanisms, but it has little impact on ex vivo survival of the bacterium. Agents blocking staphyloxanthin production may discourage the establishment and maintenance of bacterial infection without exerting selective pressure for antimicrobial resistance. Our newly discovered CrtN inhibitor, NP16, may offer an effective strategy for combating S. aureus infections. Copyright © 2017 Gao et al.

  9. Constitutive production of catalytic antibodies to a Staphylococcus aureus virulence factor and effect of infection.

    PubMed

    Brown, Eric L; Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Dunkle, Jesse W; Aggarwal, Shreya; Planque, Stephanie; Watanabe, Kenji; Csencsits-Smith, Keri; Bowden, M Gabriela; Kaplan, Sheldon L; Paul, Sudhir

    2012-03-23

    Antibodies that recognize microbial B lymphocyte superantigenic epitopes are produced constitutively with no requirement for adaptive immune maturation. We report cleavage of the Staphylococcus aureus virulence factor extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein (Efb) by catalytic antibodies produced with no exposure to the bacterium and reduction of the catalytic antibody activity following infection. IgG catalytic antibodies that specifically hydrolyzed Efb via a nucleophilic catalytic mechanism were found in the blood of healthy humans and aseptic mice free of S. aureus infection. IgG hydrolyzed peptide bonds on the C-terminal side of basic amino acids, including a bond located within the C3b-binding domain of Efb. Efb digested with the IgG lost its ability to bind C3b and inhibit complement-dependent antibody-mediated red blood cell lysis. In addition to catalysis, the IgG expressed saturable Efb binding activity. IgG from S. aureus-infected mice displayed reduced Efb cleaving activity and increased Efb binding activity compared with uninfected controls, suggesting differing effects of the infection on the antibody subsets responsible for the two activities. IgG from children hospitalized for S. aureus infection also displayed reduced Efb cleavage compared with healthy children. These data suggest a potential defense function for constitutively produced catalytic antibodies to a putative superantigenic site of Efb, but an adaptive catalytic response appears to be proscribed.

  10. Decoupling Activation of Heme Biosynthesis from Anaerobic Toxicity in a Molecule Active in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Dutter, Brendan F; Mike, Laura A; Reid, Paul R; Chong, Katherine M; Ramos-Hunter, Susan J; Skaar, Eric P; Sulikowski, Gary A

    2016-05-20

    Small molecules active in the pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus are valuable tools for the study of its basic biology and pathogenesis, and many molecules may provide leads for novel therapeutics. We have previously reported a small molecule, 1, which activates endogenous heme biosynthesis in S. aureus, leading to an accumulation of intracellular heme. In addition to this novel activity, 1 also exhibits toxicity towards S. aureus growing under fermentative conditions. To determine if these activities are linked and establish what features of the molecule are required for activity, we synthesized a library of analogs around the structure of 1 and screened them for activation of heme biosynthesis and anaerobic toxicity to investigate structure-activity relationships. The results of this analysis suggest that these activities are not linked. Furthermore, we have identified the structural features that promote each activity and have established two classes of molecules: activators of heme biosynthesis and inhibitors of anaerobic growth. These molecules will serve as useful probes for their respective activities without concern for the off target effects of the parent compound.

  11. A Precision Microbiome Approach Using Sucrose for Selective Augmentation of Staphylococcus epidermidis Fermentation against Propionibacterium acnes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanhan; Kao, Ming-Shan; Yu, Jinghua; Huang, Stephen; Marito, Shinta; Gallo, Richard L.; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Acne dysbiosis happens when there is a microbial imbalance of the over-growth of Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) in the acne microbiome. In our previous study, we demonstrated that Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis, a probiotic skin bacterium) can exploit glycerol fermentation to produce short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) which have antimicrobial activities to suppress the growth of P. acnes. Unlike glycerol, sucrose is chosen here as a selective fermentation initiator (SFI) that can specifically intensify the fermentation activity of S. epidermidis, but not P. acnes. A co-culture of P. acnes and fermenting S. epidermidis in the presence of sucrose significantly led to a reduction in the growth of P. acnes. The reduction was abolished when P. acnes was co-cultured with non-fermenting S. epidermidis. Results from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis revealed four SCFAs (acetic acid, butyric acid, lactic acid, and succinic acid) were detectable in the media of S. epidermidis sucrose fermentation. To validate the interference of S. epidermidis sucrose fermentation with P. acnes, mouse ears were injected with both P. acnes and S. epidermidis plus sucrose or phosphate buffered saline (PBS). The level of macrophage-inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) and the number of P. acnes in ears injected with two bacteria plus sucrose were considerably lower than those in ears injected with two bacteria plus PBS. Our results demonstrate a precision microbiome approach by using sucrose as a SFI for S. epidermidis, holding future potential as a novel modality to equilibrate dysbiotic acne. PMID:27834859

  12. A Precision Microbiome Approach Using Sucrose for Selective Augmentation of Staphylococcus epidermidis Fermentation against Propionibacterium acnes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanhan; Kao, Ming-Shan; Yu, Jinghua; Huang, Stephen; Marito, Shinta; Gallo, Richard L; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2016-11-09

    Acne dysbiosis happens when there is a microbial imbalance of the over-growth of Propionibacterium acne s ( P. acnes ) in the acne microbiome. In our previous study, we demonstrated that Staphylococcus epidermidis ( S. epidermidis , a probiotic skin bacterium) can exploit glycerol fermentation to produce short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) which have antimicrobial activities to suppress the growth of P. acnes . Unlike glycerol, sucrose is chosen here as a selective fermentation initiator (SFI) that can specifically intensify the fermentation activity of S. epidermidis , but not P. acnes . A co-culture of P. acnes and fermenting S. epidermidis in the presence of sucrose significantly led to a reduction in the growth of P. acnes . The reduction was abolished when P. acnes was co-cultured with non-fermenting S. epidermidis . Results from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis revealed four SCFAs (acetic acid, butyric acid, lactic acid, and succinic acid) were detectable in the media of S. epidermidis sucrose fermentation. To validate the interference of S. epidermidis sucrose fermentation with P. acnes , mouse ears were injected with both P. acnes and S. epidermidis plus sucrose or phosphate buffered saline (PBS). The level of macrophage-inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) and the number of P. acnes in ears injected with two bacteria plus sucrose were considerably lower than those in ears injected with two bacteria plus PBS. Our results demonstrate a precision microbiome approach by using sucrose as a SFI for S. epidermidis , holding future potential as a novel modality to equilibrate dysbiotic acne.

  13. Identification of two proline transport systems in Staphylococcus aureus and their possible roles in osmoregulation.

    PubMed

    Bae, J H; Miller, K J

    1992-02-01

    The food-borne pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is distinguished from other food-borne pathogens by its ability to grow at water activity values below 0.90. Previous studies have indicated that proline accumulation mediated by transport represents a primary osmoregulatory strategy utilized by this bacterium (C. B. Anderson and L. D. Witter, Appl. Environ, Microbiol. 43:1501-1503, 1982; I. Koujima, H. Hayashi, K. Tomochika, A. Okabe, and Y. Kanemasa, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 35:467-470, 1978; K. J. Miller, S. C. Zelt, and J.-H. Bae, Curr. Microbiol. 23:131-137, 1991). In this study, we demonstrate the presence of two proline transport systems within whole cells of S. aureus, a high-affinity transport system (Km, 7 microM) and a low-affinity transport system (Km, 420 microM). Our results indicate that the low-affinity proline transport system is osmotically activated and is the primary system responsible for the accumulation of proline by this pathogen during growth at low water activity.

  14. Bacteriophage immobilized graphene electrodes for impedimetric sensing of bacteria (Staphylococcus arlettae).

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Neha; Bhardwaj, Sanjeev K; Mehta, Jyotsana; Mohanta, Girish C; Deep, Akash

    2016-07-15

    Bacteriophages are a class of viruses that specifically infect and replicate within a bacterium. They possess inherent affinity and specificity to the particular bacterial cells. This property of bacteriophages makes them an attractive biorecognition element in the field of biosensor development. In this work, we report the use of an immobilized bacteriophage for the development of a highly sensitive electrochemical sensor for Staphylococcus arlettae, bacteria from the pathogenic family of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS). The specific bacteriophages were covalently immobilized on the screen-printed graphene electrodes. Thus, the fabricated bacteriophage biosensor displayed quantitative response for the target bacteria (S. arlettae) for a broad detection range (2.0-2.0 × 10(6) cfu). A fast response time (2 min), low limit of detection (2 cfu), specificity, and stability over a prolonged period (3 months) are some of the important highlights of the proposed sensor. The practical utility of the developed sensor has been demonstrated by the analysis of S. arlettae in spiked water and apple juice samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Killing of Staphylococcus aureus via Magnetic Hyperthermia Mediated by Magnetotactic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Changyou; Chen, Linjie; Yi, Yong; Chen, Chuanfang

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common hospital and household pathogen. Given the emergence of antibiotic-resistant derivatives of this pathogen resulting from the use of antibiotics as general treatment, development of alternative therapeutic strategies is urgently needed. Here, we assess the feasibility of killing S. aureus cells in vitro and in vivo through magnetic hyperthermia mediated by magnetotactic bacteria that possess magnetic nanocrystals and demonstrate magnetically steered swimming. The S. aureus suspension was added to magnetotactic MO-1 bacteria either directly or after coating with anti-MO-1 polyclonal antibodies. The suspensions were then subjected to an alternating magnetic field (AMF) for 1 h. S. aureus viability was subsequently assessed through conventional plate counting and flow cytometry. We found that approximately 30% of the S. aureus cells mixed with uncoated MO-1 cells were killed after AMF treatment. Moreover, attachment between the magnetotactic bacteria and S. aureus increased the killing efficiency of hyperthermia to more than 50%. Using mouse models, we demonstrated that magnetic hyperthermia mediated by antibody-coated magnetotactic MO-1 bacteria significantly improved wound healing. These results collectively demonstrated the effective eradication of S. aureus both in vitro and in vivo, indicating the potential of magnetotactic bacterium-mediated magnetic hyperthermia as a treatment for S. aureus-induced skin or wound infections. PMID:26873320

  16. Biochemical and molecular characterization of an azoreductase from Staphylococcus aureus, a tetrameric NADPH-dependent flavoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huizhong; Hopper, Sherryll L.; Cerniglia, Carl E.

    2018-01-01

    Azo dyes are a predominant class of colourants used in tattooing, cosmetics, foods and consumer products. A gene encoding NADPH-flavin azoreductase (Azo1) from the skin bacterium Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 was identified and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. RT-PCR results demonstrated that the azo1 gene was constitutively expressed at the mRNA level in S. aureus. Azo1 was found to be a tetramer with a native molecular mass of 85 kDa containing four non-covalently bound FMN. Azo1 requires NADPH, but not NADH, as an electron donor for its activity. The enzyme was resolved to dimeric apoprotein by removing the flavin prosthetic groups using hydrophobic-interaction chromatography. The dimeric apoprotein was reconstituted on-column and in free stage with FMN, resulting in the formation of a fully functional native-like tetrameric enzyme. The enzyme cleaved the model azo dye 2-[4-(dimethylamino)phenylazo]benzoic acid (Methyl Red) into N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine and 2-aminobenzoic acid. The apparent Km values for NADPH and Methyl Red substrates were 0·;074 and 0·057 mM, respectively. The apparent Vmax was 0·4 µM min−1 (mg protein)−1. Azo1 was also able to metabolize Orange II, Amaranth, Ponceau BS and Ponceau S azo dyes. Azo1 represents the first azoreductase to be identified and characterized from human skin microflora. PMID:15870453

  17. Optical mapping reveals a large genetic inversion between two methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Sanjay K; Kislow, Jennifer; Briska, Adam; Henkhaus, John; Dykes, Colin

    2009-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a highly versatile and evolving bacterium of great clinical importance. S. aureus can evolve by acquiring single nucleotide polymorphisms and mobile genetic elements and by recombination events. Identification and location of novel genomic elements in a bacterial genome are not straightforward, unless the whole genome is sequenced. Optical mapping is a new tool that creates a high-resolution, in situ ordered restriction map of a bacterial genome. These maps can be used to determine genomic organization and perform comparative genomics to identify genomic rearrangements, such as insertions, deletions, duplications, and inversions, compared to an in silico (virtual) restriction map of a known genome sequence. Using this technology, we report here the identification, approximate location, and characterization of a genetic inversion of approximately 500 kb of a DNA element between the NRS387 (USA800) and FPR3757 (USA300) strains. The presence of the inversion and location of its junction sites were confirmed by site-specific PCR and sequencing. At both the left and right junction sites in NRS387, an IS1181 element and a 73-bp sequence were identified as inverted repeats, which could explain the possible mechanism of the inversion event.

  18. Lab on a chip sensor for rapid detection and antibiotic resistance determination of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Abeyrathne, Chathurika D; Huynh, Duc H; Mcintire, Thomas W; Nguyen, Thanh C; Nasr, Babak; Zantomio, Daniela; Chana, Gursharan; Abbott, Iain; Choong, Peter; Catton, Mike; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-03-21

    The Gram-positive bacterium, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), is a major pathogen responsible for a variety of infectious diseases ranging from cellulitis to more serious conditions such as septic arthritis and septicaemia. Timely treatment with appropriate antibiotic therapy is essential to ensure clinical defervescence and to prevent further complications such as infective endocarditis or organ impairment due to septic shock. To date, initial antibiotic choice is empirical, using a "best guess" of likely organism and sensitivity- an approach adopted due to the lack of rapid identification methods for bacteria. Current culture based methods take up to 5 days to identify the causative bacterial pathogen and its antibiotic sensitivity. This paper provides proof of concept for a biosensor, based on interdigitated electrodes, to detect the presence of S. aureus and ascertain its sensitivity to flucloxacillin rapidly (within 2 hours) in a cost effective manner. The proposed method is label-free and uses non-faradic measurements. This is the first study to successfully employ interdigitated electrodes for the rapid detection of antibiotic resistance. The method described has important potential outcomes of faster definitive antibiotic treatment and more rapid clinical response to treatment.

  19. Inhibition of Virulence Gene Expression in Staphylococcus aureus by Novel Depsipeptides from a Marine Photobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Mansson, Maria; Nielsen, Anita; Kjærulff, Louise; Gotfredsen, Charlotte H.; Wietz, Matthias; Ingmer, Hanne; Gram, Lone; Larsen, Thomas O.

    2011-01-01

    During a global research expedition, more than five hundred marine bacterial strains capable of inhibiting the growth of pathogenic bacteria were collected. The purpose of the present study was to determine if these marine bacteria are also a source of compounds that interfere with the agr quorum sensing system that controls virulence gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus. Using a gene reporter fusion bioassay, we recorded agr interference as enhanced expression of spa, encoding Protein A, concomitantly with reduced expression of hla, encoding α-hemolysin, and rnaIII encoding RNAIII, the effector molecule of agr. A marine Photobacterium produced compounds interfering with agr in S. aureus strain 8325-4, and bioassay-guided fractionation of crude extracts led to the isolation of two novel cyclodepsipeptides, designated solonamide A and B. Northern blot analysis confirmed the agr interfering activity of pure solonamides in both S. aureus strain 8325-4 and the highly virulent, community-acquired strain USA300 (CA-MRSA). To our knowledge, this is the first report of inhibitors of the agr system by a marine bacterium. PMID:22363239

  20. Quantification of Staphylococcus aureus adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merghni, Abderrahmen; Kammoun, Dorra; Hentati, Hajer; Janel, Sébastien; Popoff, Michka; Lafont, Frank; Aouni, Mahjoub; Mastouri, Maha

    2016-08-01

    In the oral cavity dental restorative biomaterials can act as a reservoir for infection with opportunistic Staphylococcus aureus pathogen, which can lead to the occurrence of secondary caries and treatment failures. Our aim was to evaluate the adhesion forces by S. aureus on four dental restorative biomaterials and to correlate this finding to differences in specific surface characteristics. Additionally, the influence of salivary conditioning films in exerted adhesion forces was investigated. The substrate hydrophobicity was measured by goniometer and the surface free energy was calculated using the equilibrium advancing contact angle values of water, formamide, and diiodomethane on the tested surfaces. The surface roughness was determined using atomic force microscope (AFM). Additionally, cell force spectroscopy was achieved to quantify the forces that drive cell-substrate interactions. S. aureus bacterium exerted a considerable adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials, which decreased in the presence of saliva conditioning film. The influence of the surface roughness and free energy in initial adhesion appears to be more important than the effect of hydrophobicity, either in presence or absence of saliva coating. Hence, control of surface properties of dental restorative biomaterials is of crucial importance in preventing the attachment and subsequent the biofilm formation.

  1. Electrostatic immobilization of antimicrobial peptides on polyethylenimine and their antibacterial effect against Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Montelongo, J; Corrales Ureña, Y R; Machado, D; Lancelloti, M; Pinheiro, M P; Rischka, K; Lisboa-Filho, P N; Cotta, M A

    2018-04-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is a gram-positive bacterium, and one of the most prevalent causes of nosocomial infections due to its strong ability to form biofilms on catheters and surgical implants. Here we explore the antimicrobial properties of Tet-124 peptides, which are part of the innate defense against different multicellular organisms in nature. Two different Tet-124 peptides were immobilized on a polyethylenimine (PEI) film to determine their impact on the antimicrobial properties: KLWWMIRRW (Tet-124), which contains only natural amino acids, and KLWWMIRRWG-(F-Br)-G (F-Br = 4-Bromophenylalanine), a modified Tet-124 sequence with the addition of an unnatural amino acid. The immobilization was obtained as a result of the electrostatic interaction between PEI amino groups and the C-terminal carboxylic groups of tryptophan and glycine amino acids of Tet-124 and Tet-124-Br peptides, respectively. The process was monitored and studied by water contact angle, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D) measurements. The antibacterial effect of our samples against S. epidermis was evaluated by the spread plate counting method, and cytotoxicity was tested using fibroblast cultures. Our results indicate the feasibility to immobilize electrostatically both Tet-124 peptides for biomedical applications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Structural Insights into SraP-Mediated Staphylococcus aureus Adhesion to Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Juan; Wang, Lei; Bai, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Shi-Jie; Ren, Yan-Min; Li, Na; Zhang, Yong-Hui; Zhang, Zhiyong; Gong, Qingguo; Mei, Yide; Xue, Ting; Zhang, Jing-Ren; Chen, Yuxing; Zhou, Cong-Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterium causes a number of devastating human diseases, such as infective endocarditis, osteomyelitis, septic arthritis and sepsis. S. aureus SraP, a surface-exposed serine-rich repeat glycoprotein (SRRP), is required for the pathogenesis of human infective endocarditis via its ligand-binding region (BR) adhering to human platelets. It remains unclear how SraP interacts with human host. Here we report the 2.05 Å crystal structure of the BR of SraP, revealing an extended rod-like architecture of four discrete modules. The N-terminal legume lectin-like module specifically binds to N-acetylneuraminic acid. The second module adopts a β-grasp fold similar to Ig-binding proteins, whereas the last two tandem repetitive modules resemble eukaryotic cadherins but differ in calcium coordination pattern. Under the conditions tested, small-angle X-ray scattering and molecular dynamic simulation indicated that the three C-terminal modules function as a relatively rigid stem to extend the N-terminal lectin module outwards. Structure-guided mutagenesis analyses, in addition to a recently identified trisaccharide ligand of SraP, enabled us to elucidate that SraP binding to sialylated receptors promotes S. aureus adhesion to and invasion into host epithelial cells. Our findings have thus provided novel structural and functional insights into the SraP-mediated host-pathogen interaction of S. aureus. PMID:24901708

  3. SbnG, a citrate synthase in Staphylococcus aureus: A new fold on an old enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Kobylarz, Marek J.; Grigg, Jason C.; Sheldon, Jessica R.

    In response to iron deprivation, Staphylococcus aureus produces staphyloferrin B, a citrate-containing siderophore that delivers iron back to the cell. This bacterium also possesses a second citrate synthase, SbnG, that is necessary for supplying citrate to the staphyloferrin B biosynthetic pathway. In this paper, we present the structure of SbnG bound to the inhibitor calcium and an active site variant in complex with oxaloacetate. The overall fold of SbnG is structurally distinct from TCA cycle citrate synthases yet similar to metal-dependent class II aldolases. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that SbnG forms a separate clade with homologs from other siderophore biosynthetic genemore » clusters and is representative of a metal-independent subgroup in the phosphoenolpyruvate/pyruvate domain superfamily. Finally, a structural superposition of the SbnG active site to TCA cycle citrate synthases and site-directed mutagenesis suggests a case for convergent evolution toward a conserved catalytic mechanism for citrate production.« less

  4. Polymorphisms in Fibronectin Binding Protein A of Staphylococcus Aureus are Associated with Infection of Cardiovascular Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Lower, Steven; Lamlertthon, Supaporn; Casillas-Ituarte, Nadia

    Medical implants, like cardiovascular devices, improve the quality of life for countless individuals but may become infected with bacteria like Staphylococcus aureus. Such infections take the form of a bio-film, a structured community of bacterial cells adherent to the surface of a solid substrate. Every bio-film begins with an attractive force or bond between bacterium and substratum. We used atomic force microscopy to probe experimentally forces between a fibronectin-coated surface (i.e., proxy for an implanted cardiac device) and fibronectin-binding receptors on the surface of individual living bacteria from each of 80 clinical isolates of S. aureus. These isolates originated frommore » humans with infected cardiac devices (CDI; n = 26), uninfected cardiac devices (n = 20), and the anterior nares of asymptomatic subjects (n = 34). CDI isolates exhibited a distinct bindingforce signature and had speci!c single amino acid polymorphisms in fibronectin-binding protein A corresponding to E652D, H782Q, and K786N. In silico molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that residues D652, Q782, and N786 in fibronectin-binding protein A form extra hydrogen bonds with fibronectin, complementing the higher binding force and energy measured by atomic force microscopy for the CDI isolates. This study is significant, because it links pathogenic bacteria biofilms from the length scale of bonds acting across a nanometer-scale space to the clinical presentation of disease at the human dimension.« less

  5. Structural basis of Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation: mechanisms and molecular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Büttner, Henning; Mack, Dietrich; Rohde, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is a usually harmless commensal bacterium highly abundant on the human skin. Under defined predisposing conditions, most importantly implantation of a medical device, S. epidermidis, however, can switch from a colonizing to an invasive life style. The emergence of S. epidermidis as an opportunistic pathogen is closely linked to the biofilm forming capability of the species. During the past decades, tremendous advance regarding our understanding of molecular mechanisms contributing to surface colonization has been made, and detailed information is available for several factors active during the primary attachment, accumulative or dispersal phase of biofilm formation. A picture evolved in which distinct factors, though appearing to be redundantly organized, take over specific and exclusive functions during biofilm development. In this review, these mechanisms are described in molecular detail, with a highlight on recent insights into multi-functional S. epidermidis cell surface proteins contributing to surface adherence and intercellular adhesion. The integration of distinct biofilm-promoting factors into regulatory networks is summarized, with an emphasis on mechanism that could allow S. epidermidis to flexibly adapt to changing environmental conditions present during colonizing or invasive life-styles. PMID:25741476

  6. A peptide resource for the analysis of Staphylococcus aureus in host pathogen interaction studies

    PubMed Central

    Depke, Maren; Michalik, Stephan; Rabe, Alexander; Surmann, Kristin; Brinkmann, Lars; Jehmlich, Nico; Bernhardt, Jörg; Hecker, Michael; Wollscheid, Bernd; Sun, Zhi; Moritz, Robert L.; Völker, Uwe; Schmidt, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic human pathogen, which can cause life-threatening disease. Proteome analyses of the bacterium can provide new insights into its pathophysiology and important facets of metabolic adaptation and, thus, aid the recognition of targets for intervention. However, the value of such proteome studies increases with their comprehensiveness. We present an MS–driven, proteome-wide characterization of the strain S. aureus HG001. Combining 144 high precision proteomic data sets, we identified 19 109 peptides from 2088 distinct S. aureus HG001 proteins, which account for 72% of the predicted ORFs. Peptides were further characterized concerning pI, GRAVY, and detectability scores in order to understand the low peptide coverage of 8.7% (19 109 out of 220 245 theoretical peptides). The high quality peptide-centric spectra have been organized into a comprehensive peptide fragmentation library (SpectraST) and used for identification of S. aureus-typic peptides in highly complex host–pathogen interaction experiments, which significantly improved the number of identified S. aureus proteins compared to a MASCOT search. This effort now allows the elucidation of crucial pathophysiological questions in S. aureus-specific host–pathogen interaction studies through comprehensive proteome analysis. The S. aureus-specific spectra resource developed here also represents an important spectral repository for SRM or for data-independent acquisition MS approaches. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000702 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000702). PMID:26224020

  7. A peptide factor secreted by Staphylococcus pseudintermedius exhibits properties of both bacteriocins and virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Wladyka, Benedykt; Piejko, Marcin; Bzowska, Monika; Pieta, Piotr; Krzysik, Monika; Mazurek, Łukasz; Guevara-Lora, Ibeth; Bukowski, Michał; Sabat, Artur J; Friedrich, Alexander W; Bonar, Emilia; Międzobrodzki, Jacek; Dubin, Adam; Mak, Paweł

    2015-09-28

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a common commensal bacterium colonizing the skin and mucosal surfaces of household animals. However, it has recently emerged as a dangerous opportunistic pathogen, comparable to S. aureus for humans. The epidemiological situation is further complicated by the increasing number of methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius infections and evidence of gene transmission driving antibiotic resistance between staphylococci colonizing human and zoonotic hosts. In the present study, we describe a unique peptide, BacSp222, that possesses features characteristic of both bacteriocins and virulence factors. BacSp222 is secreted in high quantities by S. pseudintermedius strain 222 isolated from dog skin lesions. This linear, fifty-amino-acid highly cationic peptide is plasmid-encoded and does not exhibit significant sequence similarities to any other known peptides or proteins. BacSp222 kills gram-positive bacteria (at doses ranging from 0.1 to several micromol/l) but also demonstrates significant cytotoxic activities towards eukaryotic cells at slightly higher concentrations. Moreover, at nanomolar concentrations, the peptide also possesses modulatory properties, efficiently enhancing interferon gamma-induced nitric oxide release in murine macrophage-like cell lines. BacSp222 appears to be one of the first examples of multifunctional peptides that breaks the convention of splitting bacteriocins and virulence factors into two unrelated groups.

  8. Adherence of staphylococcus aureus to catheter tubing inhibition by quaternary ammonium compounds

    PubMed Central

    Iyamba, Jean-Marie Liesse; Okombe, Daniel Tassa; Zakanda, Francis Nsimba; Malongo, Trésor Kimbeni; Unya, Joseph Welo; Lukukula, Cyprien Mbundu; Kikuni, Ntondo za Balega Takaisi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction S. aureus is a Gram positive bacterium which is responsible for a wide range of infections. This pathogen has also the ability to adhere to biotic or abiotic surface such as central venous catheter (CVC) and to produce a biofilm. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (HTAB) and Hexadecylbetainate chloride (HBC) on Staphylococcus aureus adherence to the catheter tubing and on bacteria growth. Methods Broth microdilution method was used to determine the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC). The detection of slime production was done by Congo Red Agar method, and the adherence of bacteria to the catheter tubing was evaluated by the enumeration of bacteria on plate counts. Results The results of this study showed that the MICs of HTAB were ranged from 0.125 to 0.5 µg/mL, and those of HBC fluctuated between 2 to 8 µg/mL. HTAB and HBC inhibited bacteria adhesion on the surface of the catheter tubing. Conclusion This study showed that HTAB and HBC can prevent the adherence of S. aureus strains to the surface of catheter tubing, suggesting that they could be used to prevent the risk of catheter related bloodstream infections. PMID:28250874

  9. Staphylococcus via an Interaction with the ELR+ CXC Chemokine ENA-78 is Associated with BOS

    PubMed Central

    Gregson, Aric L; Wang, Xiaoyan; Injean, Patil; Weigt, S Sam; Shino, Michael; Sayah, David; DerHovanessian, Ariss; Lynch, Joseph P; Ross, David J; Saggar, Rajan; Ardehali, Abbas; Li, Gang; Elashoff, Robert; Belperio, John A

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most commonly isolated gram-positive bacterium after lung transplantation and has been associated with poor post-transplant outcomes, but its effect on BOS and death in the context of the allograft inflammatory environment has not been studied. A three-state Cox semi-Markovian model was used to determine the influence of allograft S. aureus and the ELR+ CXC chemokines on the survival rates and cause-specific hazards for movement from lung transplant (State 1) to BOS (State 2), from transplant (State 1) to death (State 3), and from BOS (State 2) to death (State 3). Acute rejection, pseudomonas pneumonia, BALF CXCL5 and its interaction with S. aureus all increased the likelihood of transition from transplant to BOS. Transition to death from transplant was facilitated by pseudomonas infection and single lung transplant. Movement from BOS to death was affected by the interaction between aspergillus, pseudomonas and CXCL5, but not S. aureus. S. aureus isolation had state specific effects after lung transplantation and only in concert with elevated BALF CXCL5 concentrations did it augment the risk of BOS. Pseudomonas and elevated BALF concentrations of CXCL5 continued as significant risk factors for BOS and death after BOS in lung transplantation. PMID:25683785

  10. Competition between Anion Binding and Dimerization Modulates Staphylococcus aureus Phosphatidylinositol-specific Phospholipase C Enzymatic Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jiongjia; Goldstein, Rebecca; Stec, Boguslaw; Gershenson, Anne; Roberts, Mary F.

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) is a secreted virulence factor for this pathogenic bacterium. A novel crystal structure shows that this PI-PLC can form a dimer via helix B, a structural feature present in all secreted, bacterial PI-PLCs that is important for membrane binding. Despite the small size of this interface, it is critical for optimal enzyme activity. Kinetic evidence, increased enzyme specific activity with increasing enzyme concentration, supports a mechanism where the PI-PLC dimerization is enhanced in membranes containing phosphatidylcholine (PC). Mutagenesis of key residues confirm that the zwitterionic phospholipid acts not by specific binding to the protein, but rather by reducing anionic lipid interactions with a cationic pocket on the surface of the S. aureus enzyme that stabilizes monomeric protein. Despite its structural and sequence similarity to PI-PLCs from other Gram-positive pathogenic bacteria, S. aureus PI-PLC appears to have a unique mechanism where enzyme activity is modulated by competition between binding of soluble anions or anionic lipids to the cationic sensor and transient dimerization on the membrane. PMID:23038258

  11. Adherence of staphylococcus aureus to catheter tubing inhibition by quaternary ammonium compounds.

    PubMed

    Iyamba, Jean-Marie Liesse; Okombe, Daniel Tassa; Zakanda, Francis Nsimba; Malongo, Trésor Kimbeni; Unya, Joseph Welo; Lukukula, Cyprien Mbundu; Kikuni, Ntondo Za Balega Takaisi

    2016-01-01

    S. aureus is a Gram positive bacterium which is responsible for a wide range of infections. This pathogen has also the ability to adhere to biotic or abiotic surface such as central venous catheter (CVC) and to produce a biofilm. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (HTAB) and Hexadecylbetainate chloride (HBC) on Staphylococcus aureus adherence to the catheter tubing and on bacteria growth. Broth microdilution method was used to determine the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC). The detection of slime production was done by Congo Red Agar method, and the adherence of bacteria to the catheter tubing was evaluated by the enumeration of bacteria on plate counts. The results of this study showed that the MICs of HTAB were ranged from 0.125 to 0.5 µg/mL, and those of HBC fluctuated between 2 to 8 µg/mL. HTAB and HBC inhibited bacteria adhesion on the surface of the catheter tubing. This study showed that HTAB and HBC can prevent the adherence of S. aureus strains to the surface of catheter tubing, suggesting that they could be used to prevent the risk of catheter related bloodstream infections.

  12. A peptide factor secreted by Staphylococcus pseudintermedius exhibits properties of both bacteriocins and virulence factors

    PubMed Central

    Wladyka, Benedykt; Piejko, Marcin; Bzowska, Monika; Pieta, Piotr; Krzysik, Monika; Mazurek, Łukasz; Guevara-Lora, Ibeth; Bukowski, Michał; Sabat, Artur J.; Friedrich, Alexander W.; Bonar, Emilia; Międzobrodzki, Jacek; Dubin, Adam; Mak, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a common commensal bacterium colonizing the skin and mucosal surfaces of household animals. However, it has recently emerged as a dangerous opportunistic pathogen, comparable to S. aureus for humans. The epidemiological situation is further complicated by the increasing number of methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius infections and evidence of gene transmission driving antibiotic resistance between staphylococci colonizing human and zoonotic hosts. In the present study, we describe a unique peptide, BacSp222, that possesses features characteristic of both bacteriocins and virulence factors. BacSp222 is secreted in high quantities by S. pseudintermedius strain 222 isolated from dog skin lesions. This linear, fifty-amino-acid highly cationic peptide is plasmid-encoded and does not exhibit significant sequence similarities to any other known peptides or proteins. BacSp222 kills gram-positive bacteria (at doses ranging from 0.1 to several micromol/l) but also demonstrates significant cytotoxic activities towards eukaryotic cells at slightly higher concentrations. Moreover, at nanomolar concentrations, the peptide also possesses modulatory properties, efficiently enhancing interferon gamma-induced nitric oxide release in murine macrophage-like cell lines. BacSp222 appears to be one of the first examples of multifunctional peptides that breaks the convention of splitting bacteriocins and virulence factors into two unrelated groups. PMID:26411997

  13. Ciprofloxacin and Trimethoprim Cause Phage Induction and Virulence Modulation in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Goerke, Christiane; Köller, Johanna; Wolz, Christiane

    2006-01-01

    In Staphylococcus aureus strains of human origin, phages which integrate into the chromosomal gene coding for β-hemolysin (hlb) are widely distributed. Most of them encode accessory virulence determinants such as staphylokinase (sak) or enterotoxins. Here, we analyzed the effects of ciprofloxacin and trimethoprim on phage induction and expression of phage-encoded virulence factors by using isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis for which the induction of hlb-converting phages was demonstrated in vivo (C. Goerke, S. Matias y Papenberg, S. Dasbach, K. Dietz, R. Ziebach, B. C. Kahl, and C. Wolz, J. Infect. Dis. 189:724-734, 2004) as well as a φ13 lysogen of phage-cured strain 8325-4. Treatment of lysogens with subinhibitory concentrations of either antibiotic resulted in (i) delysogenization of strains resembling the isolates picked up after chronic lung infection and (ii) replication of phages in the bacterial host in a dose-dependent manner. Ciprofloxacin treatment resulted in enhanced recA transcription, indicating involvement of the SOS response in phage mobilization. Induction of φ13 was linked to elevated expression of the phage-encoded virulence gene sak, chiefly due to the activation of latent phage promoters. In summary, we could show the induction of hlb-converting phages and a subsequent virulence modulation of the host bacterium by ciprofloxacin and trimethoprim. PMID:16377683

  14. SbnG, a citrate synthase in Staphylococcus aureus: A new fold on an old enzyme

    DOE PAGES

    Kobylarz, Marek J.; Grigg, Jason C.; Sheldon, Jessica R.; ...

    2014-10-21

    In response to iron deprivation, Staphylococcus aureus produces staphyloferrin B, a citrate-containing siderophore that delivers iron back to the cell. This bacterium also possesses a second citrate synthase, SbnG, that is necessary for supplying citrate to the staphyloferrin B biosynthetic pathway. In this paper, we present the structure of SbnG bound to the inhibitor calcium and an active site variant in complex with oxaloacetate. The overall fold of SbnG is structurally distinct from TCA cycle citrate synthases yet similar to metal-dependent class II aldolases. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that SbnG forms a separate clade with homologs from other siderophore biosynthetic genemore » clusters and is representative of a metal-independent subgroup in the phosphoenolpyruvate/pyruvate domain superfamily. Finally, a structural superposition of the SbnG active site to TCA cycle citrate synthases and site-directed mutagenesis suggests a case for convergent evolution toward a conserved catalytic mechanism for citrate production.« less

  15. SbnG, a citrate synthase in Staphylococcus aureus: a new fold on an old enzyme.

    PubMed

    Kobylarz, Marek J; Grigg, Jason C; Sheldon, Jessica R; Heinrichs, David E; Murphy, Michael E P

    2014-12-05

    In response to iron deprivation, Staphylococcus aureus produces staphyloferrin B, a citrate-containing siderophore that delivers iron back to the cell. This bacterium also possesses a second citrate synthase, SbnG, that is necessary for supplying citrate to the staphyloferrin B biosynthetic pathway. We present the structure of SbnG bound to the inhibitor calcium and an active site variant in complex with oxaloacetate. The overall fold of SbnG is structurally distinct from TCA cycle citrate synthases yet similar to metal-dependent class II aldolases. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that SbnG forms a separate clade with homologs from other siderophore biosynthetic gene clusters and is representative of a metal-independent subgroup in the phosphoenolpyruvate/pyruvate domain superfamily. A structural superposition of the SbnG active site to TCA cycle citrate synthases and site-directed mutagenesis suggests a case for convergent evolution toward a conserved catalytic mechanism for citrate production. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Staphylococcus aureus aggregation and coagulation mechanisms, and their function in host-pathogen interactions

    PubMed Central

    Crosby, Heidi A.; Kwiecinski, Jakub; Horswill, Alexander R.

    2017-01-01

    The human commensal bacterium Staphylococcus aureus can cause a wide range of infections ranging from skin and soft tissue infections to invasive diseases like septicemia, endocarditis, and pneumonia. Muticellular organization almost certainly contributes to S. aureus pathogenesis mechanisms. While there has been considerable focus on biofilm formation and its role in colonizing prosthetic joints and indwelling devices, less attention has been paid to non-surface attached group behavior like aggregation and clumping. S. aureus is unique in its ability to coagulate blood, and it also produces multiple fibrinogen-binding proteins that facilitate clumping. Formation of clumps, which are large, tightly-packed groups of cells held together by fibrin(ogen), has been demonstrated to be important for S. aureus virulence and immune evasion. Clumps of cells are able to avoid detection by the host’s immune system due to a fibrin(ogen) coat that acts as a shield, and the size of the clumps facilitates evasion of phagocytosis. In addition, clumping could be an important early step in establishing infections that involve tight clusters of cells embedded in host matrix proteins, such as soft tissue abscesses and endocarditis. In this review we discuss clumping mechanisms and regulation, as well as what is known about how clumping contributes to immune evasion. PMID:27565579

  17. Survey and properties of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from Japanese-style desserts.

    PubMed

    Shimamura, Yuko; Kidokoro, Shiho; Murata, Masatsune

    2006-07-01

    We surveyed the contamination of 315 Japanese- and western-style desserts and 247 human hands by Staphylococcus aureus and other staphylococcal bacteria. The most frequently isolated staphylococcal bacterium was S. warneri, followed by S. aureus. Only 1.9% of western-style desserts were contaminated by S. aureus strains, while 19.4% and 13.0% of Japanese-style desserts and human hands respectively were contaminated. Ninety-four isolates of S. aureus were characterized as to their biological properties and enterotoxigenicity. Although staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in the cultured broth of all S. aureus isolates, the reversed passive latex agglutination method and the polymerase chain reaction showed only 39 (41.5%) and 40 (42.6%) samples respectively as SE-positive. The predominant type of SE was SEB (67.5%), and eight strains produced SEA. None of the S. aureus strains had penicillin-binding protein 2', showing that methicillin-resistant S. aureus was not present in the samples.

  18. Effect of biosurfactants on Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus biofilms in a BioFlux channel.

    PubMed

    Diaz De Rienzo, M A; Stevenson, P S; Marchant, R; Banat, I M

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have indicated that biosurfactants play a role both in maintaining channels between multicellular structures in biofilms and in dispersal of cells from biofilms. A combination of caprylic acid (0.01 % v/v) together with rhamnolipids (0.04 % v/v) was applied to biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 15442, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 9144 and a mixed culture under BioFlux flowthrough conditions and caused disruption of the biofilms. The biofilms were also treated with a combination of rhamnolipids (0.04 % v/v) and sophorolipids (0.01 %). Control treatments with PBS 1× had no apparent effect on biofilm disruption. The Gram-positive bacterium (S. aureus ATCC 9144) was more sensitive than P. aeruginosa ATCC 15442 in terms of disruption and viability as shown by Live/Dead staining. Disruption of biofilms of P. aeruginosa ATCC 15442 was minimal. Oxygen consumption by biofilms, after different treatments with biosurfactants, confirms that sophorolipid on its own is unable to kill/inhibit cells of P. aeruginosa ATCC 15442, and even when used in combination with rhamnolipids, under static conditions, no decrease in the cell viability was observed. Cells in biofilms exposed to mono-rhamnolipids (0.04 % v/v) showed behaviour typical of exposure to bacteriostatic compounds, but when exposed to di-rhamnolipids (0.04 % v/v), they displayed a pattern characteristic of bactericidal compounds.

  19. An efficient thermotolerant and halophilic biosurfactant-producing bacterium isolated from Dagang oil field for MEOR application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Langping; Richnow, Hans; Yao, Jun; Jain, Anil

    2014-05-01

    Dagang Oil field (Petro China Company Limited) is one of the most productive oil fields in China. In this study, 34 biosurfactant-producing strains were isolated and cultured from petroleum reservoir of Dagang oil field, using haemolytic assay and the qualitative oil-displacement test. On the basis of 16S rDNA analysis, the isolates were closely related to the species in genus Pseudomonas, Staphylococcus and Bacillus. One of the isolates identified as Bacillus subtilis BS2 were selected for further study. This bacterium was able to produce a type of biosurfactant with excessive foam-forming properties at 37ºC as well as at higher temperature of 55ºC. The biosurfactant produced by the strain BS2 could reduce the surface tension of the culture broth from 70.87 mN/m to 28.97 mN/m after 8 days of incubation at 37ºC and to 36.15 mN/m after 20 days of incubation at 55ºC, respectively. The biosurfactant showed stability at high temperature (up to 120ºC), a wide range of pH (2 to 12) and salt concentrations (up to 12%) offering potential for biotechnology. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrum of extracted biosurfactant tentatively characterized the produced biosurfactant as glycolipid derivative. Elemental analysis of the biosurfactant by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) reveals that the biosurfactant was anionic in nature. 15 days of biodegradation of crude oil suggested a preferential usage of n-alkane upon microbial metabolism of BS2 as a carbon substrate and consequently also for the synthesis of biosurfactants. Core flood studies for oil release indicated 9.6% of additional oil recovery over water flooding at 37ºC and 7.2% of additional oil recovery at 55 ºC. Strain BS2 was characterized as an efficient biosurfactant-producing, thermotolerant and halophillic bacterium and has the potential for application for microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) through water flooding in China's oil fields even in situ as adapted to reservoir chemistry and

  20. Endophthalmitis caused by Staphylococcus hominis and two different colonies of Staphylococcus haemolyticus after cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Wong, Robert W; Rhodes, Kyle M

    2015-01-01

    To describe a case of endophthalmitis after cataract surgery caused by Staphylococcus hominis and two separate colony types of Staphylococcus haemolyticus. Retrospective chart review including ophthalmic examination, intraocular biopsy and cultures, and anterior segment photography. A patient presented with endophthalmitis 1 month after cataract surgery. The patient underwent pars plana vitrectomy with vitreous fluid, aqueous fluid, and lens capsule biopsy with injection of intravitreal antimicrobials with full resolution of the infection. Cultures isolated grew S. hominis and two different colonies of S. haemolyticus, all sensitive to vancomycin. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of endophthalmitis due to lens capsule seeding from three different types of bacteria, S. hominis and two different colony types of S. haemolyticus. Prompt diagnosis and treatment can be associated with good visual outcomes.

  1. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolated from various animals

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Joseph E.; Ball, Katherine R.; Chirino-Trejo, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    This study characterized the antimicrobial susceptibility of 221 Staphylococcus aureus isolated from various species, and 60 canine Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolated from 1986 through 2000 at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM). Resistance of S. aureus was most common to penicillin (31%) and tetracycline (14%); resistance of S. pseudintermedius to penicillin was present in 8% and to tetracycline in 34% of isolates. Resistance to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole was only seen among S. pseudintermedius, and there was no resistance to amoxicillin/clavulanate, ampicillin/sulbactam, cephalothin, amikacin, gentamicin, enrofloxacin, chloramphenicol, or rifampin among any isolate. Inducible clindamycin resistance was found in both S. aureus and S. pseudintermedius, highlighting the need for careful interpretation of culture and susceptibility test results. There were significant differences in the minimum inhibitory concentrations of penicillin, ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, clindamycin, erythromycin, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline between avian, bovine, equine, and porcine isolates. PMID:21532820

  2. Characterisation of nasal Staphylococcus delphini and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolates from healthy donkeys in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Gharsa, H; Slama, K Ben; Gómez-Sanz, E; Gómez, P; Klibi, N; Zarazaga, M; Boudabous, A; Torres, C

    2015-07-01

    Staphylococcus intermedius group (SIG) bacteria can colonise the nares of some animals but are also emerging pathogens in humans and animals. To analyse SIG nasal carriage in healthy donkeys destined for food consumption in Tunisia and to characterise recovered isolates. Nasal swabs from 100 healthy donkeys were tested for SIG recovery, and isolates were identified by biochemical and molecular methods. Antimicrobial susceptibility of isolates was tested and detection of antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes was performed. Isolates were typed at the clonal level by multilocus sequence typing and SmaI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Staphylococcus delphini and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (included in SIG) were obtained in 19% and 2% of the tested samples, respectively, and one isolate per sample was characterised. All isolates were meticillin susceptible and mecA negative. Most S. delphini and S. pseudintermedius isolates showed susceptibility to all antimicrobials tested, with the exception of 2 isolates resistant to tetracycline (tet(M) gene) or fusidic acid. The following toxin genes were identified (percentage of isolates): lukS-I (100%), lukF-I (9.5%), siet (100%), se-int (90%), seccanine (19%) and expA (9.5%). Thirteen different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles were identified among the 21 SIG isolates. Additionally, the following 9 different sequence types (STs) were detected by multilocus sequence typing, 6 of them new: ST219 (6 isolates), ST12 (5 isolates), ST220 (3 isolates), ST13, ST50, ST193, ST196, ST218 and ST221 (one isolate each). Staphylococcus delphini and S. pseudintermedius are common nasal colonisers of donkeys, generally susceptible to the antimicrobials tested; nevertheless, these SIG isolates contain virulence genes, including the recently described exfoliative gene (expA) and several enterotoxin genes, with potential implications for public health. This is the first description of S. delphini in Tunisia. The

  3. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus: Molecular Detection of Cytotoxin and Enterotoxin Genes

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Luiza; Ivo Brito, Carla; de Oliveira, Adilson; Yoshida Faccioli Martins, Patrícia; Cataneli Pereira, Valéria; Ribeiro de Souza da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    Although opportunistic pathogens, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), including Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus, have long been regarded as avirulent organisms. The role of toxins in the development of infections caused by CoNS is still controversial. The objective of this study was to characterize the presence of enterotoxin and cytotoxin genes in S. epidermidis and S. haemolyticus isolates obtained from blood cultures. Cytotoxin genes were detected by PCR using novel species-specific primers. Among the 85 S. epidermidis and 84 S. haemolyticus isolates, 95.3% and 79.8%, respectively, carried at least one enterotoxin gene. The most frequent enterotoxin genes were sea (53.3%), seg (64.5%) and sei (67.5%). The seg gene was positively associated with S. epidermidis (p = 0.02), and this species was more toxigenic than S. haemolyticus. The hla/yidD gene was detected in 92.9% of S. epidermidis and the hla gene in 91.7% of S. haemolyticus isolates; hlb was detected in 92.9% of the S. epidermidis isolates and hld in 95.3%. Nosocomial Staphylococcus epidermidis and S. haemolyticus isolates exhibited a high toxigenic potential, mainly containing the non-classical enterotoxin genes seg and sei. The previously unreported detection of hla/yidD and hlb in S. epidermidis and S. haemolyticus using species-specific primers showed that these hemolysin genes differ between CoNS species and that they are highly frequent in blood culture isolates. PMID:26389954

  4. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus: Molecular Detection of Cytotoxin and Enterotoxin Genes.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Luiza; Brito, Carla Ivo; de Oliveira, Adilson; Martins, Patrícia Yoshida Faccioli; Pereira, Valéria Cataneli; da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes Ribeiro de Souza

    2015-09-14

    Although opportunistic pathogens, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), including Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus, have long been regarded as avirulent organisms. The role of toxins in the development of infections caused by CoNS is still controversial. The objective of this study was to characterize the presence of enterotoxin and cytotoxin genes in S. epidermidis and S. haemolyticus isolates obtained from blood cultures. Cytotoxin genes were detected by PCR using novel species-specific primers. Among the 85 S. epidermidis and 84 S. haemolyticus isolates, 95.3% and 79.8%, respectively, carried at least one enterotoxin gene. The most frequent enterotoxin genes were sea (53.3%), seg (64.5%) and sei (67.5%). The seg gene was positively associated with S. epidermidis (p = 0.02), and this species was more toxigenic than S. haemolyticus. The hla/yidD gene was detected in 92.9% of S. epidermidis and the hla gene in 91.7% of S. haemolyticus isolates; hlb was detected in 92.9% of the S. epidermidis isolates and hld in 95.3%. Nosocomial Staphylococcus epidermidis and S. haemolyticus isolates exhibited a high toxigenic potential, mainly producing the non-classical enterotoxins seg and sei. The previously unreported detection of hla/yidD and hlb in S. epidermidis and S. haemolyticus using species-specific primers showed that these hemolysin genes differ between CoNS species and that they are highly frequent in blood culture isolates.

  5. Comparative study on nutrient depletion-induced lipidome adaptations in Staphylococcus haemolyticus and Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yu; Javed, Muhammad Afzal; Deneer, Harry

    2018-02-05

    Staphylococcus species are emerging opportunistic pathogens that cause outbreaks of hospital and community-acquired infections. Some of these bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are difficult to treat due to their resistance to multiple antibiotics. We carried out a comparative study on the lipidome adaptations in response to starvation in the two most common coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species: a S. epidermidis strain sensitive to ampicillin and erythromycin and a S. haemolyticus strain resistant to both. The predominant fatty acid composition in glycerolipids was (17:0-15:0) in both bacteria. During the exponential phase, the two bacterial lipidomes were similar. Both were dominated by diacylglycerol (DAG), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), lysyl-phosphatidylglycerol (Lysyl-PG) and Diglucosyl-diacylglycerol (DGDG). Alanyl-PG was detected in small amounts in both bacterial lipids. N-succinyl-lysyl-PG was detected only in S. haemolyticus, while lysyl-DAG only in S. epidermidis. As the two bacteria entered stationary phase, both lipidomes became essentially nitrogen-free. Both bacteria accumulated large amounts of free fatty acids. Strikingly, the lipidome of S. epidermidis became dominated by cardiolipin (CL), while that of S. haemolyticus was simplified to DGDG and PG. The S. epidermidis strain also produced acyl-phosphatidylglycerol (APG) in the stationary phase.

  6. Prevalence of Staphylococcus, including Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, in a Physical Therapy Education Facility.

    PubMed

    Dhagat, Priya V; Gibbs, Karen A; Rohde, Rodney E

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of Staphylococcus species, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), in a physical therapy (PT) education facility. The PT laboratory classrooms were routinely used by graduate PT students and faculty, undergraduate anatomy students, and licensed practitioners for continuing education purposes. A total of 88 swab samples were collected from plinths and other equipment and plated onto mannitol salt agar (MSA). Suspected S. aureus colonies were confirmed by Staphyloslide latex testing. S. aureus isolates were plated to HardyCHROM agar to identify MRSA. VITEK antibiotic susceptibility testing confirmed MRSA isolates. Forty-seven samples showed growth (47/88, 53%), and 7 tested positive for S. aureus (7/47, 15%). Of those 7, one demonstrated oxacillin resistance and was confirmed as MRSA (1/7, 2%). Remaining samples grew other species of Staphylococcus and gram-negative bacilli. Given high classroom utilization, staphylococci environmental prevalence would be expected. However, the presence of MRSA was unexpected. Results demonstrate the potential for easily transmissible and potentially harmful organisms to be present in multi-use classrooms utilized by health professions students where frequent skin-to-skin contact occurs. Strict, routine cleaning of plinths and other equipment is imperative in reducing exposure risk.

  7. Molecular coordination of Staphylococcus aureus cell division

    PubMed Central

    Cotterell, Bryony E; Walther, Christa G; Fenn, Samuel J; Grein, Fabian; Wollman, Adam JM; Leake, Mark C; Olivier, Nicolas; Cadby, Ashley; Mesnage, Stéphane; Jones, Simon

    2018-01-01

    The bacterial cell wall is essential for viability, but despite its ability to withstand internal turgor must remain dynamic to permit growth and division. Peptidoglycan is the major cell wall structural polymer, whose synthesis requires multiple interacting components. The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is a prolate spheroid that divides in three orthogonal planes. Here, we have integrated cellular morphology during division with molecular level resolution imaging of peptidoglycan synthesis and the components responsible. Synthesis occurs across the developing septal surface in a diffuse pattern, a necessity of the observed septal geometry, that is matched by variegated division component distribution. Synthesis continues after septal annulus completion, where the core division component FtsZ remains. The novel molecular level information requires re-evaluation of the growth and division processes leading to a new conceptual model, whereby the cell cycle is expedited by a set of functionally connected but not regularly distributed components. PMID:29465397

  8. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Western Australia

    PubMed Central

    Dailey, Lynne; Coombs, Geoffrey W.; O'Brien, Frances G.; Pearman, John W.; Christiansen, Keryn; Grubb, Warren B.

    2005-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) continues to be a notable cause of hospital-acquired infections. A statewide screening and control policy was implemented in Western Australia (WA) after an outbreak of epidemic MRSA in a Perth hospital in 1982. We report on statutory notifications from1998 to 2002 and review the 20-year period from 1983 to 2002. The rate of reporting of community-associated Western Australia MRSA (WAMRSA) escalated from 1998 to 2002 but may have peaked in 2001. Several outbreaks were halted, but they resulted in an increase in reports as a result of screening. A notable increase in ciprofloxacin resistance during the study period was observed as a result of more United Kingdom epidemic MRSA (EMRSA) -15 and -16. WA has seen a persistently low incidence of multidrug-resistant MRSA because of the screening and decolonization program. Non–multidrug-resistant, community-associated WAMRSA strains have not established in WA hospitals. PMID:16318700

  9. Emerging Functions for the Staphylococcus aureus RNome

    PubMed Central

    Felden, Brice

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading pathogen for animals and humans, not only being one of the most frequently isolated bacteria in hospital-associated infections but also causing diseases in the community. To coordinate the expression of its numerous virulence genes for growth and survival, S. aureus uses various signalling pathways that include two-component regulatory systems, transcription factors, and also around 250 regulatory RNAs. Biological roles have only been determined for a handful of these sRNAs, including cis, trans, and cis-trans acting RNAs, some internally encoding small, functional peptides and others possessing dual or multiple functions. Here we put forward an inventory of these fascinating sRNAs; the proteins involved in their activities; and those involved in stress response, metabolisms, and virulence. PMID:24348246

  10. Mobile genetic elements of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Malachowa, Natalia; DeLeo, Frank R

    2010-09-01

    Bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus are successful as commensal organisms or pathogens in part because they adapt rapidly to selective pressures imparted by the human host. Mobile genetic elements (MGEs) play a central role in this adaptation process and are a means to transfer genetic information (DNA) among and within bacterial species. Importantly, MGEs encode putative virulence factors and molecules that confer resistance to antibiotics, including the gene that confers resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Inasmuch as MRSA infections are a significant problem worldwide and continue to emerge in epidemic waves, there has been significant effort to improve diagnostic assays and to develop new antimicrobial agents for treatment of disease. Our understanding of S. aureus MGEs and the molecules they encode has played an important role toward these ends and has provided detailed insight into the evolution of antimicrobial resistance mechanisms and virulence.

  11. Hospital strain colonization by Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Blum-Menezes, D; Bratfich, O J; Padoveze, M C; Moretti, M L

    2009-03-01

    The skin and mucous membranes of healthy subjects are colonized by strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis showing a high diversity of genomic DNA polymorphisms. Prolonged hospitalization and the use of invasive procedures promote changes in the microbiota with subsequent colonization by hospital strains. We report here a patient with prolonged hospitalization due to chronic pancreatitis who was treated with multiple antibiotics, invasive procedures and abdominal surgery. We studied the dynamics of skin colonization by S. epidermidis leading to the development of catheter-related infections and compared the genotypic profile of clinical and microbiota strains by pulsed field gel electrophoresis. During hospitalization, the normal S. epidermidis skin microbiota exhibiting a polymorphic genomic DNA profile was replaced with a hospital-acquired biofilm-producer S. epidermidis strain that subsequently caused repetitive catheter-related infections.

  12. Isolation of a potent antibiotic producer bacterium, especially against MRSA, from northern region of the Persian Gulf

    PubMed Central

    Darabpour, Esmaeil; Ardakani, Mohammad Roayaei; Motamedi, Hossein; Ronagh, Mohammad Taghi

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, emergence and prevalence of MRSA (Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus) strain have become a great global concern in 21st century, so, it is necessary to discover new antibiotics against this pathogen. The aim of this study was isolation and evaluation marine bacteria from the Persian Gulf in order to finding antibiotic compounds against some pathogenic bacteria. For this purpose, water and sediment samples were collected from the Persian Gulf during March to October 2009. The antibacterial activity of the isolated bacteria was assessed using disc diffusion method. The Growth Curve Interference (GCI) parameter against MRSA was determined for the high potential antibiotic producing strain. The most important factors affecting fermentation conditions in antibiotic production were also optimized. Definite identification of intended isolate was confirmed by 16S rRNA sequencing. Altogether, 51 bacterial colony was isolated and among them only 3 bacterium showed antibacterial activity. Pseudoalteromonaspiscicida PG-01 isolated from a sediment sample was chosen as the best antibiotic producing strain. This strain was effective against all tested Gram-positive bacteria, had good anti-MRSA activity and also GCI value against MRSA was two times lower than MIC value. Among the optimized fermentation parameters, carbon and nitrogen sources play major role in efficacy of optimized antibiotic production. Ultrastructural study on the effect of intended antibiotic compounds on MRSA using TEM revealed that the target site for this compound is cell wall. Considering the antibacterial effect of PG-01 strain especially against MRSA, intended antibiotic compounds can gives hope for treatment of diseases caused by multi-drug resistant bacteria. PMID:22642595

  13. SAMMD: Staphylococcus aureus microarray meta-database.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Vijayaraj; Elasri, Mohamed O

    2007-10-02

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen, causing a wide variety of diseases ranging from superficial skin infections to severe life threatening infections. S. aureus is one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections. Its ability to resist multiple antibiotics poses a growing public health problem. In order to understand the mechanism of pathogenesis of S. aureus, several global expression profiles have been developed. These transcriptional profiles included regulatory mutants of S. aureus and growth of wild type under different growth conditions. The abundance of these profiles has generated a large amount of data without a uniform annotation system to comprehensively examine them. We report the development of the Staphylococcus aureus Microarray meta-database (SAMMD) which includes data from all the published transcriptional profiles. SAMMD is a web-accessible database that helps users to perform a variety of analysis against and within the existing transcriptional profiles. SAMMD is a relational database that uses MySQL as the back end and PHP/JavaScript/DHTML as the front end. The database is normalized and consists of five tables, which holds information about gene annotations, regulated gene lists, experimental details, references, and other details. SAMMD data is collected from the peer-reviewed published articles. Data extraction and conversion was done using perl scripts while data entry was done through phpMyAdmin tool. The database is accessible via a web interface that contains several features such as a simple search by ORF ID, gene name, gene product name, advanced search using gene lists, comparing among datasets, browsing, downloading, statistics, and help. The database is licensed under General Public License (GPL). SAMMD is hosted and available at http://www.bioinformatics.org/sammd/. Currently there are over 9500 entries for regulated genes, from 67 microarray experiments. SAMMD will help staphylococcal scientists to analyze their

  14. Staphylococcus capitis isolated from prosthetic joint infections.

    PubMed

    Tevell, S; Hellmark, B; Nilsdotter-Augustinsson, Å; Söderquist, B

    2017-01-01

    Further knowledge about the clinical and microbiological characteristics of prosthetic joint infections (PJIs) caused by different coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) may facilitate interpretation of microbiological findings and improve treatment algorithms. Staphylococcus capitis is a CoNS with documented potential for both human disease and nosocomial spread. As data on orthopaedic infections are scarce, our aim was to describe the clinical and microbiological characteristics of PJIs caused by S. capitis. This retrospective cohort study included three centres and 21 patients with significant growth of S. capitis during revision surgery for PJI between 2005 and 2014. Clinical data were extracted and further microbiological characterisation of the S. capitis isolates was performed. Multidrug-resistant (≥3 antibiotic groups) S. capitis was detected in 28.6 % of isolates, methicillin resistance in 38.1 % and fluoroquinolone resistance in 14.3 %; no isolates were rifampin-resistant. Heterogeneous glycopeptide-intermediate resistance was detected in 38.1 %. Biofilm-forming ability was common. All episodes were either early post-interventional or chronic, and there were no haematogenous infections. Ten patients experienced monomicrobial infections. Among patients available for evaluation, 86 % of chronic infections and 70 % of early post-interventional infections achieved clinical cure; 90 % of monomicrobial infections remained infection-free. Genetic fingerprinting with repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR; DiversiLab®) displayed clustering of isolates, suggesting that nosocomial spread might be present. Staphylococcus capitis has the potential to cause PJIs, with infection most likely being contracted during surgery or in the early postoperative period. As S. capitis might be an emerging nosocomial pathogen, surveillance of the prevalence of PJIs caused by S. capitis could be recommended.

  15. SAMMD: Staphylococcus aureus Microarray Meta-Database

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Vijayaraj; Elasri, Mohamed O

    2007-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen, causing a wide variety of diseases ranging from superficial skin infections to severe life threatening infections. S. aureus is one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections. Its ability to resist multiple antibiotics poses a growing public health problem. In order to understand the mechanism of pathogenesis of S. aureus, several global expression profiles have been developed. These transcriptional profiles included regulatory mutants of S. aureus and growth of wild type under different growth conditions. The abundance of these profiles has generated a large amount of data without a uniform annotation system to comprehensively examine them. We report the development of the Staphylococcus aureus Microarray meta-database (SAMMD) which includes data from all the published transcriptional profiles. SAMMD is a web-accessible database that helps users to perform a variety of analysis against and within the existing transcriptional profiles. Description SAMMD is a relational database that uses MySQL as the back end and PHP/JavaScript/DHTML as the front end. The database is normalized and consists of five tables, which holds information about gene annotations, regulated gene lists, experimental details, references, and other details. SAMMD data is collected from the peer-reviewed published articles. Data extraction and conversion was done using perl scripts while data entry was done through phpMyAdmin tool. The database is accessible via a web interface that contains several features such as a simple search by ORF ID, gene name, gene product name, advanced search using gene lists, comparing among datasets, browsing, downloading, statistics, and help. The database is licensed under General Public License (GPL). Conclusion SAMMD is hosted and available at . Currently there are over 9500 entries for regulated genes, from 67 microarray experiments. SAMMD will help staphylococcal scientists to analyze their

  16. Clinical Management of Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Thomas L.; Arnold, Christopher; Fowler, Vance G.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Several management strategies may improve outcomes in patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB). The strength of evidence supporting these management strategies, however, varies widely. Objective To perform a systematic review of the evidence for two unresolved questions involving management strategies for SAB: 1) is transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) necessary in all cases of SAB; and 2) what is the optimal antibiotic therapy for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia? Evidence acquisition A PubMed search from inception through May 2014 was performed to find studies that addressed the role of TEE in SAB. A second search of PubMed, EMBASE, and The Cochrane Library from 1/1/1990 to 5/28/2014 was performed to find studies that addressed antibiotic treatment of MRSA bacteremia. Studies that reported outcomes of systemic antibiotic therapy for MRSA bacteremia were included. All searches were augmented by review of bibliographic references from included studies. The quality of evidence was assessed using the GRADE system by consensus of independent evaluations by at least two authors. Results In 9 studies with a total of 3513 patients, use of TEE was associated with higher rates of diagnosis of endocarditis (14–25%) when compared with TTE (2–14%). Five studies proposed criteria to identify patients in whom TEE might safely be avoided. Only one high-quality trial of antibiotic therapy for MRSA bacteremia was identified from the 83 studies considered. Conclusions and relevance Most contemporary management strategies for SAB are based upon low quality evidence. TEE is indicated in most patients with SAB. It may be possible to identify a subset of SAB patients for whom TEE can be safely avoided. Vancomycin and daptomycin are the first-line antibiotic choices for MRSA bacteremia. Well-designed studies to address the management of SAB are desperately needed. PMID:25268440

  17. Response of the Oxygen Sensor NreB to Air In Vivo: Fe-S-Containing NreB and Apo-NreB in Aerobically and Anaerobically Growing Staphylococcus carnosus▿

    PubMed Central

    Reinhart, F.; Huber, A.; Thiele, R.; Unden, G.

    2010-01-01

    The sensor kinase NreB from Staphylococcus carnosus contains an O2-sensitive [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster which is converted by O2 to a [2Fe-2S]2+ cluster, followed by complete degradation and formation of Fe-S-less apo-NreB. NreB·[2Fe-2S]2+ and apoNreB are devoid of kinase activity. NreB contains four Cys residues which ligate the Fe-S clusters. The accessibility of the Cys residues to alkylating agents was tested and used to differentiate Fe-S-containing and Fe-S-less NreB. In a two-step labeling procedure, accessible Cys residues in the native protein were first labeled by iodoacetate. In the second step, Cys residues not labeled in the first step were alkylated with the fluorescent monobromobimane (mBBr) after denaturing of the protein. In purified (aerobic) apoNreB, most (96%) of the Cys residues were alkylated in the first step, but in anaerobic (Fe-S-containing) NreB only a small portion (23%) were alkylated. In anaerobic bacteria, a very small portion of the Cys residues of NreB (9%) were accessible to alkylation in the native state, whereas most (89%) of the Cys residues from aerobic bacteria were accessible. The change in accessibility allowed determination of the half-time (6 min) for the conversion of NreB·[4Fe-4S]2+ to apoNreB after the addition of air in vitro. Overall, in anaerobic bacteria most of the NreB exists as NreB·[4Fe-4S]2+, whereas in aerobic bacteria the (Fe-S-less) apoNreB is predominant and represents the physiological form. The number of accessible Cys residues was also determined by iodoacetate alkylation followed by mass spectrometry of Cys-containing peptides. The pattern of mass increases confirmed the results from the two-step labeling experiments. PMID:19854899

  18. Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium with Unusual Morphology and Pigment Content

    PubMed Central

    Jones, H. E.

    1971-01-01

    A dissimilatory sulfate-reducing bacterium was isolated which differed in morphology and pigment content from previously described species. The organism was mesophilic, obligately anaerobic, gram-negative, nonsporulating, long, and slender with one polar flagellum. Whole cells fluoresced red at neutral pH when excited with light at 365 nm owing to the presence of a pink pigment. Desulfoviridin was present. Reduced minus oxidized spectra of whole cells showed peaks in the position of a c-type cytochrome characteristic of Desulfovibrio species and peaks at about 629 and 603 nm. CO difference spectra showed the presence of a CO-binding pigment with a peak at 593 nm. Lactate and pyruvate supported growth in the presence of sulfate but not in its absence. Sulfate, sulfite, and thiosulfate served as electron acceptors for growth. Hydrogenase was present. The deoxyribonucleic acid had a buoyant density of 1.722 g/cm3 and a guanosine plus cystosine molar percentage of total bases calculated by two different methods of 61.2 or 63.2. Images PMID:4929856

  19. Bioconversion of methane to lactate by an obligate methanotrophic bacterium

    DOE PAGES

    Henard, Calvin A.; Smith, Holly; Dowe, Nancy; ...

    2016-02-23

    Methane is the second most abundant greenhouse gas (GHG), with nearly 60% of emissions derived from anthropogenic sources. Microbial conversion of methane to fuels and value-added chemicals offers a means to reduce GHG emissions, while also valorizing this otherwise squandered high-volume, high-energy gas. However, to date, advances in methane biocatalysis have been constrained by the low-productivity and limited genetic tractability of natural methane-consuming microbes. Here, leveraging recent identification of a novel, tractable methanotrophic bacterium, Methylomicrobium buryatense, we demonstrate microbial biocatalysis of methane to lactate, an industrial platform chemical. Heterologous overexpression of a Lactobacillus helveticus L-lactate dehydrogenase in M. buryatense resultedmore » in an initial titer of 0.06 g lactate/L from methane. Cultivation in a 5 L continuously stirred tank bioreactor enabled production of 0.8 g lactate/L, representing a 13-fold improvement compared to the initial titer. The yields (0.05 g lactate/g methane) and productivity (0.008 g lactate/L/h) indicate the need and opportunity for future strain improvement. Additionally, real-time analysis of methane utilization implicated gas-to-liquid transfer and/or microbial methane consumption as process limitations. This work opens the door to develop an array of methanotrophic bacterial strain-engineering strategies currently employed for biocatalytic sugar upgrading to “green” chemicals and fuels.« less

  20. Bioconversion of methane to lactate by an obligate methanotrophic bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Henard, Calvin A.; Smith, Holly; Dowe, Nancy

    Methane is the second most abundant greenhouse gas (GHG), with nearly 60% of emissions derived from anthropogenic sources. Microbial conversion of methane to fuels and value-added chemicals offers a means to reduce GHG emissions, while also valorizing this otherwise squandered high-volume, high-energy gas. However, to date, advances in methane biocatalysis have been constrained by the low-productivity and limited genetic tractability of natural methane-consuming microbes. Here, leveraging recent identification of a novel, tractable methanotrophic bacterium, Methylomicrobium buryatense, we demonstrate microbial biocatalysis of methane to lactate, an industrial platform chemical. Heterologous overexpression of a Lactobacillus helveticus L-lactate dehydrogenase in M. buryatense resultedmore » in an initial titer of 0.06 g lactate/L from methane. Cultivation in a 5 L continuously stirred tank bioreactor enabled production of 0.8 g lactate/L, representing a 13-fold improvement compared to the initial titer. The yields (0.05 g lactate/g methane) and productivity (0.008 g lactate/L/h) indicate the need and opportunity for future strain improvement. Additionally, real-time analysis of methane utilization implicated gas-to-liquid transfer and/or microbial methane consumption as process limitations. This work opens the door to develop an array of methanotrophic bacterial strain-engineering strategies currently employed for biocatalytic sugar upgrading to “green” chemicals and fuels.« less

  1. Novel Rickettsiella Bacterium in the Leafhopper Orosius albicinctus (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae)

    PubMed Central

    Iasur-Kruh, Lilach; Weintraub, Phyllis G.; Mozes-Daube, Netta; Robinson, Wyatt E.; Perlman, Steve J.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria in the genus Rickettsiella (Coxiellaceae), which are mainly known as arthropod pathogens, are emerging as excellent models to study transitions between mutualism and pathogenicity. The current report characterizes a novel Rickettsiella found in the leafhopper Orosius albicinctus (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), a major vector of phytoplasma diseases in Europe and Asia. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and pyrosequencing were used to survey the main symbionts of O. albicinctus, revealing the obligate symbionts Sulcia and Nasuia, and the facultative symbionts Arsenophonus and Wolbachia, in addition to Rickettsiella. The leafhopper Rickettsiella is allied with bacteria found in ticks. Screening O. albicinctus from the field showed that Rickettsiella is highly prevalent, with over 60% of individuals infected. A stable Rickettsiella infection was maintained in a leafhopper laboratory colony for at least 10 generations, and fluorescence microscopy localized bacteria to accessory glands of the female reproductive tract, suggesting that the bacterium is vertically transmitted. Future studies will be needed to examine how Rickettsiella affects host fitess and its ability to vector phytopathogens. PMID:23645190

  2. Bioconversion of methane to lactate by an obligate methanotrophic bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Henard, Calvin A.; Smith, Holly; Dowe, Nancy; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G.; Pienkos, Philip T.; Guarnieri, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Methane is the second most abundant greenhouse gas (GHG), with nearly 60% of emissions derived from anthropogenic sources. Microbial conversion of methane to fuels and value-added chemicals offers a means to reduce GHG emissions, while also valorizing this otherwise squandered high-volume, high-energy gas. However, to date, advances in methane biocatalysis have been constrained by the low-productivity and limited genetic tractability of natural methane-consuming microbes. Here, leveraging recent identification of a novel, tractable methanotrophic bacterium, Methylomicrobium buryatense, we demonstrate microbial biocatalysis of methane to lactate, an industrial platform chemical. Heterologous overexpression of a Lactobacillus helveticus L-lactate dehydrogenase in M. buryatense resulted in an initial titer of 0.06 g lactate/L from methane. Cultivation in a 5 L continuously stirred tank bioreactor enabled production of 0.8 g lactate/L, representing a 13-fold improvement compared to the initial titer. The yields (0.05 g lactate/g methane) and productivity (0.008 g lactate/L/h) indicate the need and opportunity for future strain improvement. Additionally, real-time analysis of methane utilization implicated gas-to-liquid transfer and/or microbial methane consumption as process limitations. This work opens the door to develop an array of methanotrophic bacterial strain-engineering strategies currently employed for biocatalytic sugar upgrading to “green” chemicals and fuels. PMID:26902345

  3. Novel Trypanosomatid-Bacterium Association: Evolution of Endosymbiosis in Action

    PubMed Central

    Kostygov, Alexei Y.; Dobáková, Eva; Grybchuk-Ieremenko, Anastasiia; Váhala, Dalibor; Maslov, Dmitri A.; Votýpka, Jan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We describe a novel symbiotic association between a kinetoplastid protist, Novymonas esmeraldas gen. nov., sp. nov., and an intracytoplasmic bacterium, “Candidatus Pandoraea novymonadis” sp. nov., discovered as a result of a broad-scale survey of insect trypanosomatid biodiversity in Ecuador. We characterize this association by describing the morphology of both organisms, as well as their interactions, and by establishing their phylogenetic affinities. Importantly, neither partner is closely related to other known organisms previously implicated in eukaryote-bacterial symbiosis. This symbiotic association seems to be relatively recent, as the host does not exert a stringent control over the number of bacteria harbored in its cytoplasm. We argue that this unique relationship may represent a suitable model for studying the initial stages of establishment of endosymbiosis between a single-cellular eukaryote and a prokaryote. Based on phylogenetic analyses, Novymonas could be considered a proxy for the insect-only ancestor of the dixenous genus Leishmania and shed light on the origin of the two-host life cycle within the subfamily Leishmaniinae. PMID:26980834

  4. Yersinia ruckeri sp. nov., the redmouth (RM) bacterium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ewing, W.H.; Ross, A.J.; Brenner, Don J.; Fanning, G. R.

    1978-01-01

    Cultures of the redmouth (RM) bacterium, one of the etiological agents of redmouth disease in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) and certain other fishes, were characterized by means of their biochemical reactions, by deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) hybridization, and by determination of guanine-plus-cytosine (G+C) ratios in DNA. The DNA relatedness studies confirmed the fact that the RM bacteria are members of the family Enterobacteriaceae and that they comprise a single species that is not closely related to any other species of Enterobacteriaceae. They are about 30% related to species of both Serratia and Yersinia. A comparison of the biochemical reactions of RM bacteria and serratiae indicated that there are many differences between these organisms and that biochemically the RM bacteria are most closely related to yersiniae. The G+C ratios of RM bacteria were approximated to be between 47.5 and 48.5% These values are similar to those of yersiniae but markedly different from those of serratiae. On the basis of their biochemical reactions and their G+C ratios, the RM bacteria are considered to be a new species of Yersinia, for which the name Yersinia ruckeri is proposed. Strain 2396-61 (= ATCC 29473) is designated the type strain of the species.

  5. Discovery of a Novel Periodontal Disease-Associated Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Torres, Pedro J; Thompson, John; McLean, Jeffrey S; Kelley, Scott T; Edlund, Anna

    2018-06-02

    One of the world's most common infectious disease, periodontitis (PD), derives from largely uncharacterized communities of oral bacteria growing as biofilms (a.k.a. plaque) on teeth and gum surfaces in periodontal pockets. Bacteria associated with periodontal disease trigger inflammatory responses in immune cells, which in later stages of the disease cause loss of both soft and hard tissue structures supporting teeth. Thus far, only a handful of bacteria have been characterized as infectious agents of PD. Although deep sequencing technologies, such as whole community shotgun sequencing have the potential to capture a detailed picture of highly complex bacterial communities in any given environment, we still lack major reference genomes for the oral microbiome associated with PD and other diseases. In recent work, by using a combination of supervised machine learning and genome assembly, we identified a genome from a novel member of the Bacteroidetes phylum in periodontal samples. Here, by applying a comparative metagenomics read-classification approach, including 272 metagenomes from various human body sites, and our previously assembled draft genome of the uncultivated Candidatus Bacteroides periocalifornicus (CBP) bacterium, we show CBP's ubiquitous distribution in dental plaque, as well as its strong association with the well-known pathogenic "red complex" that resides in deep periodontal pockets.

  6. Diagnosis of cancer multidrug resistance by bacterium-mediated imaging.

    PubMed

    Elkadi, Omar Anwar; Abdelbasset, Muhammad

    2016-04-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a phenomenon expressed by many tumors affecting the chemotherapy efficacy, treatment decision, and the disease prognosis. Considering its great implication, non-invasive approaches are needed to identify this phenomenon in early stages of the disease. This article discusses the potential of the emerging non-invasive bacterium-mediated imaging of cancer in diagnosis of MDR. This potential is derived from the effect of cancer MDR on the pharmacokinetics of certain antibiotics, which are substrates of the MDR proteins. Since MDR proteins actively pump their substrates outside the resistant cancer cells, the elimination of the employed reporter bacteria, proliferating within MDR cancer cells, would require a larger dose of these antibiotics compared to those inside non-MDR cancer cells. These bacteria bear reporter genes that produce specific signals such as bioluminescent, fluorescent, magnetic, or radioactive signals that can be detected by non-invasive imaging modalities. Therefore, the presence, degree, and mechanism of MDR can be estimated by comparing the concentration of the employed antibiotic, required to cease these signals (reflecting the elimination of the bacteria), to a pre-determined reference. The real time imaging of MDR cancer and the early diagnosis of MDR, offered by this approach, would provide a better tool for preclinical studies of MDR, and allow a prompt choice of the most appropriate therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. THE EFFECT OF STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS TOXIN ON THE KIDNEY

    PubMed Central

    VonGlahn, William C.; Weld, Julia T.

    1935-01-01

    1. The hemolytic Staphylococcus aureus elaborates a toxin in vitro that when injected intravenously produces lesions in the kidneys of rabbits and cats. 2. The toxin injures primarily the blood vessels of the kidney. PMID:19870338

  8. Rapid lysostaphin test to differentiate Staphylococcus and Micrococcus species.

    PubMed Central

    Geary, C; Stevens, M

    1986-01-01

    A rapid, simple lysostaphin lysis susceptibility test to differentiate the genera Staphylococcus and Micrococcus was evaluated. Of 181 strains from culture collections, 95 of 95 Staphylococcus strains were lysed, and 79 of 79 Micrococcus strains were not lysed. The seven Planococcus strains were resistant. Clinical isolates (890) were tested with lysostaphin and for the ability to produce acid from glycerol in the presence of erythromycin. Overall agreement between the methods was 99.2%. All clinical Micrococcus strains (43) were resistant to lysostaphin, and all clinical Staphylococcus strains (847) were susceptible. Seven of the Staphylococcus strains did not produce acid from glycerol in the presence of erythromycin. This lysostaphin test provides results in 2 h. It is easier to perform than previously described lysostaphin lysis methods. It is also more rapid and accurate than the glycerol-erythromycin test. PMID:3519667

  9. Characterization of a Neochlamydia-like Bacterium Associated with Epitheliocystis in Cultured Artic Char Salvelinus alpinus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infections of branchial epithelium by intracellular gram-negative bacteria, termed epitheliocystis, have limited culture of Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus). To characterize a bacterium associated with epitheliocystis in cultured char, gills were sampled for histopathologic examination, conventional...

  10. Characterization of the promising poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) producing halophilic bacterium Halomonas halophila.

    PubMed

    Kucera, Dan; Pernicová, Iva; Kovalcik, Adriana; Koller, Martin; Mullerova, Lucie; Sedlacek, Petr; Mravec, Filip; Nebesarova, Jana; Kalina, Michal; Marova, Ivana; Krzyzanek, Vladislav; Obruca, Stanislav

    2018-05-01

    This work explores molecular, morphological as well as biotechnological features of the highly promising polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) producer Halomonas halophila. Unlike many other halophiles, this bacterium does not require expensive complex media components and it is capable to accumulate high intracellular poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) fractions up to 82% of cell dry mass. Most remarkably, regulating the concentration of NaCl apart from PHB yields influences also the polymer's molecular mass and polydispersity. The bacterium metabolizes various carbohydrates including sugars predominant in lignocelluloses and other inexpensive substrates. Therefore, the bacterium was employed for PHB production on hydrolysates of cheese whey, spent coffee grounds, sawdust and corn stover, which were hydrolyzed by HCl; required salinity of cultivation media was set up during neutralization by NaOH. The bacterium was capable to use all the tested hydrolysates as well as sugar beet molasses for PHB biosynthesis, indicating its potential for industrial PHB production. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Isolation of Bacteriophages of the Marine Bacterium Beneckea natriegens from Coastal Salt Marshes1

    PubMed Central

    Zachary, Arthur

    1974-01-01

    Bacteriophages of the marine bacterium Beneckea natriegens were isolated from coastal marshes where they were limited to brackish and marine waters. The phages were widely distributed and morphologically diverse in the marshes. Images PMID:4133830

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Sphingobium fuliginis OMI, a Bacterium That Degrades Alkylphenols and Bisphenols.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Masashi; Ogata, Yuka; Yahara, Tatsuya; Yokoyama, Takashi; Ishizawa, Hidehiro; Takada, Kazuki; Inoue, Daisuke; Sei, Kazunari; Ike, Michihiko

    2017-11-22

    Sphingobium fuliginis OMI is a bacterium that can degrade a variety of recalcitrant alkylphenols and bisphenols. This study reports the draft genome sequence of S. fuliginis OMI. Copyright © 2017 Kuroda et al.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Sphingobium fuliginis OMI, a Bacterium That Degrades Alkylphenols and Bisphenols

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Yuka; Yahara, Tatsuya; Yokoyama, Takashi; Ishizawa, Hidehiro; Takada, Kazuki; Inoue, Daisuke; Sei, Kazunari

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sphingobium fuliginis OMI is a bacterium that can degrade a variety of recalcitrant alkylphenols and bisphenols. This study reports the draft genome sequence of S. fuliginis OMI. PMID:29167253

  14. IN SITU RT-PCR WITH A SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIUM ISOLATED FROM SEAGRASS ROOTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacteria considered to be obligate anaerobes internally colonize roots of the submerged macrophyte Halodule wrightii. A sulfate reducing bacterium, Summer lac 1, was isolated on lactate from H. wrightii roots. The isolate has physiological characteristics typical of Desulfovibri...

  15. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Ethiopia: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Eshetie, Setegn; Tarekegn, Fentahun; Moges, Feleke; Amsalu, Anteneh; Birhan, Wubet; Huruy, Kahsay

    2016-11-21

    The burden of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a major public health concern worldwide; however the overall epidemiology of multidrug resistant strains is neither coordinated nor harmonized, particularly in developing countries including Ethiopia. Therefore, the aim of this meta-analysis was to assess the burden of methicillin resistant Staphylococcos aureus and its antibiotic resistance pattern in Ethiopia at large. PubMed, Google Scholar, and lancet databases were searched and a total of 20 studies have been selected for meta-analysis. Six authors have independently extracts data on the prevalence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus among clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus. Statistical analysis was achieved by using Open meta-analyst (version 3.13) and Comprehensive meta-analysis (version 3.3) softwares. The overall prevalence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and its antibiotic resistance pattern were pooled by using the forest plot, table and figure with 95% CI. The pooled prevalence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus was 32.5% (95% CI, 24.1 to 40.9%). Moreover, methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains were found to be highly resistant to penicillin, ampicillin, erythromycin, and amoxicillin, with a pooled resistance ratio of 99.1, 98.1, 97.2 and 97.1%, respectively. On the other hand, comparably low levels of resistance ratio were noted to vancomycin, 5.3%. The overall burden of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus is considerably high, besides these strains showed extreme resistance to penicillin, ampicillin, erythromycin and amoxicillin. In principle, appropriate use of antibiotics, applying safety precautions are the key to reduce the spread of multidrug resistant strains, methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in particular.

  16. Complete genome of Martelella sp. AD-3, a moderately halophilic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons-degrading bacterium.

    PubMed

    Cui, Changzheng; Li, Zhijie; Qian, Jiangchao; Shi, Jie; Huang, Ling; Tang, Hongzhi; Chen, Xin; Lin, Kuangfei; Xu, Ping; Liu, Yongdi

    2016-05-10

    Martelella sp. strain AD-3, a moderate halophilic bacterium, was isolated from a petroleum-contaminated soil with high salinity in China. Here, we report the complete genome of strain AD-3, which contains one circular chromosome and two circular plasmids. An array of genes related to metabolism of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and halophilic mechanism in this bacterium was identified by the whole genome analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of the p-Nitrophenol-Degrading Bacterium Pseudomonas putida DLL-E4

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaojun; Wang, Jue; Wang, Fei; Chen, Qiongzhen; Huang, Yan

    2014-01-01

    The first complete genome sequence of a p-nitrophenol (PNP)-degrading bacterium is reported here. Pseudomonas putida DLL-E4, a Gram-negative bacterium isolated from methyl-parathion-polluted soil, can utilize PNP as the sole carbon and nitrogen source. P. putida DLL-E4 has a 6,484,062 bp circular chromosome that contains 5,894 genes, with a G+C content of 62.46%. PMID:24948765

  18. Coagulase-Positive Staphylococcus: Prevalence and Antimicrobial Resistance.

    PubMed

    Beça, Nuno; Bessa, Lucinda Janete; Mendes, Ângelo; Santos, Joana; Leite-Martins, Liliana; Matos, Augusto J F; da Costa, Paulo Martins

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is the most prevalent coagulase-positive Staphylococcus inhabitant of the skin and mucosa of dogs and cats, causing skin and soft tissue infections in these animals. In this study, coagulase-positive Staphylococcus species were isolated from companion animals, veterinary professionals, and objects from a clinical veterinary environment by using two particular culture media, Baird-Parker RPF agar and CHROMagar Staph aureus. Different morphology features of colonies on the media allowed the identification of the species, which was confirmed by performing a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Among 23 animals, 15 (65.2%) harbored coagulase-positive Staphylococcus, being 12 Staphylococcus pseudintermedius carriers. Four out of 12 were methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius (MRSP). All veterinary professionals had coagulase-positive Staphylococcus (CoPS) species on their hands and two out of nine objects sampled harbored MRSP. The antimicrobial-resistance pattern was achieved for all isolates, revealing the presence of many multidrug-resistant CoPS, particularly S. pseudintermedius . The combined analysis of the antimicrobial-resistance patterns shown by the isolates led to the hypothesis that there is a possible crosscontamination and dissemination of S. aureus and S. pseudintermedius species between the three types of carriers sampled in this study that could facilitate the spread of the methicillin-resistance phenotype.

  19. Threat of drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus to health in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus is the most commonly isolated organism from the different clinical samples in hospital. The emergence and dissemination of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and growing resistance to non-beta-lactam antibiotics is making treatment of infections due to this organism increasingly difficult. Methods This study was conducted to determine the frequency of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from different clinical samples, rates of MRSA and full antibiotic susceptibility profiles. Clinical samples were cultured and Staphylococcus aureus was identified using standard microbiological methods recommended by the American Society for Microbiology (ASM). Methicillin resistance was confirmed using cefoxitin and oxacillin disks. Inducible clindamycin resistance was identified using D-zone test. Results From the processed samples, 306 isolates of Staphylococcus aureus were recovered. All the isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and teicoplanin. Methicillin resistance was observed in 43.1% of isolates while inducible clindamycin resistance in 12.4% of the isolates. Conclusions The results of our study reveals that rates of resistance to commonly prescribed antibiotics in Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates is high. In particular, rate of methicillin resistance is alarming, prompting concern on the rational use of antibiotics and vigilant laboratory-based surveillance of resistance rates in Nepal. PMID:24655316

  20. Endohyphal Bacterium Enhances Production of Indole-3-Acetic Acid by a Foliar Fungal Endophyte

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Michele T.; Gunatilaka, Malkanthi K.; Wijeratne, Kithsiri; Gunatilaka, Leslie; Arnold, A. Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Numerous plant pathogens, rhizosphere symbionts, and endophytic bacteria and yeasts produce the important phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), often with profound effects on host plants. However, to date IAA production has not been documented among foliar endophytes -- the diverse guild of primarily filamentous Ascomycota that live within healthy, above-ground tissues of all plant species studied thus far. Recently bacteria that live within hyphae of endophytes (endohyphal bacteria) have been detected, but their effects have not been studied previously. Here we show not only that IAA is produced in vitro by a foliar endophyte (here identified as Pestalotiopsis aff. neglecta, Xylariales), but that IAA production is enhanced significantly when the endophyte hosts an endohyphal bacterium (here identified as Luteibacter sp., Xanthomonadales). Both the endophyte and the endophyte/bacterium complex appear to rely on an L-tryptophan dependent pathway for IAA synthesis. The bacterium can be isolated from the fungus when the symbiotic complex is cultivated at 36°C. In pure culture the bacterium does not produce IAA. Culture filtrate from the endophyte-bacterium complex significantly enhances growth of tomato in vitro relative to controls and to filtrate from the endophyte alone. Together these results speak to a facultative symbiosis between an endophyte and endohyphal bacterium that strongly influences IAA production, providing a new framework in which to explore endophyte-plant interactions. PMID:24086270

  1. Metabolomics evaluation of the impact of smokeless tobacco exposure on the oral bacterium Capnocytophaga sputigena

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jinchun; Jin, Jinshan; Beger, Richard D.; Cerniglia, Carl E.; Yang, Maocheng; Chen, Huizhong

    2017-01-01

    The association between exposure to smokeless tobacco products (STP) and oral diseases is partially due to the physiological and pathological changes in the composition of the oral microbiome and its metabolic profile. However, it is not clear how STPs affect the physiology and ecology of oral microbiota. A UPLC/QTof-MS-based metabolomics study was employed to analyze metabolic alterations in oral bacterium, Capnocytophaga sputigena as a result of smokeless tobacco exposure and to assess the capability of the bacterium to metabolize nicotine. Pathway analysis of the metabolome profiles indicated that smokeless tobacco extracts caused oxidative stress in the bacterium. The metabolomics data also showed that the argininenitric oxide pathway was perturbed by the smokeless tobacco treatment. Results also showed that LC/MS was useful in identifying STP constituents and additives, including caffeine and many flavoring compounds. No significant changes in levels of nicotine and its major metabolites were found when C. sputigena was cultured in a nutrient rich medium, although hydroxylnicotine and cotinine N-oxide were detected in the bacterial metabolites suggesting that nicotine metabolism might be present as a minor degradation pathway in the bacterium. Study results provide new insights regarding the physiological and toxicological effects of smokeless tobacco on oral bacterium C. sputigena and associated oral health as well as measuring the ability of the oral bacterium to metabolize nicotine. PMID:27480511

  2. Capsule-Transmitted Gut Symbiotic Bacterium of the Japanese Common Plataspid Stinkbug, Megacopta punctatissima

    PubMed Central

    Fukatsu, Takema; Hosokawa, Takahiro

    2002-01-01

    The Japanese common plataspid stinkbug, Megacopta punctatissima, deposits small brown particles, or symbiont capsules, on the underside of the egg mass for the purpose of transmission of symbiotic bacteria to the offspring. We investigated the microbiological aspects of the bacteria contained in the capsule, such as microbial diversity, phylogenetic placement, localization in vivo, and fitness effects on the host insect. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA clones revealed that a single bacterial species dominates the microbiota in the capsule. The bacterium was not detected in the eggs but in the capsules, which unequivocally demonstrated that the bacterium is transmitted to the offspring of the insect orally rather than transovarially, through probing of the capsule content. Molecular phylogenetic analysis showed that the bacterium belongs to the γ-subdivision of the Proteobacteria. In adult insects the bacterium was localized in the posterior section of the midgut. Deprivation of the bacterium from the nymphs resulted in retarded development, arrested growth, abnormal body coloration, and other symptoms, suggesting that the bacterium is essential for normal development and growth of the host insect. PMID:11772649

  3. Metabolomics evaluation of the impact of smokeless tobacco exposure on the oral bacterium Capnocytophaga sputigena.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jinchun; Jin, Jinshan; Beger, Richard D; Cerniglia, Carl E; Yang, Maocheng; Chen, Huizhong

    2016-10-01

    The association between exposure to smokeless tobacco products (STP) and oral diseases is partially due to the physiological and pathological changes in the composition of the oral microbiome and its metabolic profile. However, it is not clear how STPs affect the physiology and ecology of oral microbiota. A UPLC/QTof-MS-based metabolomics study was employed to analyze metabolic alterations in oral bacterium, Capnocytophaga sputigena as a result of smokeless tobacco exposure and to assess the capability of the bacterium to metabolize nicotine. Pathway analysis of the metabolome profiles indicated that smokeless tobacco extracts caused oxidative stress in the bacterium. The metabolomics data also showed that the arginine-nitric oxide pathway was perturbed by the smokeless tobacco treatment. Results also showed that LC/MS was useful in identifying STP constituents and additives, including caffeine and many flavoring compounds. No significant changes in levels of nicotine and its major metabolites were found when C. sputigena was cultured in a nutrient rich medium, although hydroxylnicotine and cotinine N-oxide were detected in the bacterial metabolites suggesting that nicotine metabolism might be present as a minor degradation pathway in the bacterium. Study results provide new insights regarding the physiological and toxicological effects of smokeless tobacco on oral bacterium C. sputigena and associated oral health as well as measuring the ability of the oral bacterium to metabolize nicotine. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Staphylococcus argenteus from rabbits in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Indrawattana, Nitaya; Pumipuntu, Natapol; Suriyakhun, Nawarat; Jangsangthong, Arunee; Kulpeanprasit, Suphang; Chantratita, Narisara; Sookrung, Nitat; Chaicumpa, Wanpen; Buranasinsup, Shutipen

    2018-06-21

    Staphylococcus argenteus, a novel species of the genus Staphylococcus or a member of the S. aureus complex, is closely related to S. aureus and is usually misidentified. In this study, the presence of S. argenteus in isolated S. aureus was investigated in 67 rabbits with abscess lesions during 2014-2016. Among 19 S. aureus complex isolates, three were confirmed to be S. argenteus by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, nonribosomal peptide synthetase gene amplification, and multilocus sequence type. All S. aureus complex isolates, including the S. aureus isolates, were examined for their antimicrobial resistance phenotype by disk diffusion and for their resistance genotype by PCR assays. Among the S. argenteus isolates, one was susceptible to all antimicrobial drugs and the other two were resistant to penicillin and doxycycline. In contrast, most S. aureus isolates were resistant to penicillin (37.5%), and gentamicin (12.5%). Moreover, S. aureus isolates harbored the blaZ, mecA, aacA-aphD, and mrs(A) as well as mutations of gyrA and grlA, but S. argenteus isolates carried solely the blaZ. S. argenteus isolates were investigated for enterotoxin (sea-sed) and virulence genes by PCR. One isolate carried sea, sec, and sed, whereas the other two isolates carried only sea or sed. No isolate carried seb and see. All three S. argenteus isolates carried hla, hlb, and clfA, followed by pvl, whereas coa, spa (IgG-binding region), and spa (x region) were not detected in the three isolates. This paper presents the first identification of S. argenteus from rabbits in Thailand. S. argenteus might be pathogenic because the isolates carried virulence genes. Moreover, antimicrobial resistance was observed. Investigations of this new bacterial species should be conducted in other animal species as well as in humans. © 2018 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Quorum Sensing in a Methane-Oxidizing Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Puri, Aaron W; Schaefer, Amy L; Fu, Yanfen; Beck, David A C; Greenberg, E Peter; Lidstrom, Mary E

    2017-03-01

    Aerobic methanotrophic bacteria use methane as their sole source of carbon and energy and serve as a major sink for the potent greenhouse gas methane in freshwater ecosystems. Dissecting the molecular details of how these organisms interact in the environment may increase our understanding of how they perform this important ecological role. Many bacterial species use quorum sensing (QS) systems to regulate gene expression in a cell density-dependent manner. We have identified a QS system in the genome of Methylobacter tundripaludum , a dominant methane oxidizer in methane enrichments of sediment from Lake Washington (Seattle, WA). We determined that M. tundripaludum produces primarily N -3-hydroxydecanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (3-OH-C 10 -HSL) and that its production is governed by a positive feedback loop. We then further characterized this system by determining which genes are regulated by QS in this methane oxidizer using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) and discovered that this system regulates the expression of a putative nonribosomal peptide synthetase biosynthetic gene cluster. Finally, we detected an extracellular factor that is produced by M. tundripaludum in a QS-dependent manner. These results identify and characterize a mode of cellular communication in an aerobic methane-oxidizing bacterium. IMPORTANCE Aerobic methanotrophs are critical for sequestering carbon from the potent greenhouse gas methane in the environment, yet the mechanistic details of chemical interactions in methane-oxidizing bacterial communities are not well understood. Understanding these interactions is important in order to maintain, and potentially optimize, the functional potential of the bacteria that perform this vital ecosystem function. In this work, we identify a quorum sensing system in the aerobic methanotroph Methylobacter tundripaludum and use both chemical and genetic methods to characterize this system at the molecular level. Copyright © 2017 American Society for

  6. Phenotypic Variation in the Plant Pathogenic Bacterium Acidovorax citrulli

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Ram Kumar; Rosenberg, Tally; Makarovsky, Daria; Eckshtain-Levi, Noam; Zelinger, Einat; Kopelowitz, June; Sikorski, Johannes; Burdman, Saul

    2013-01-01

    Acidovorax citrulli causes bacterial fruit blotch (BFB) of cucurbits, a disease that threatens the cucurbit industry worldwide. Despite the economic importance of BFB, little is known about pathogenicity and fitness strategies of the bacterium. We have observed the phenomenon of phenotypic variation in A. citrulli. Here we report the characterization of phenotypic variants (PVs) of two strains, M6 and 7a1, isolated from melon and watermelon, respectively. Phenotypic variation was observed following growth in rich medium, as well as upon isolation of bacteria from inoculated plants or exposure to several stresses, including heat, salt and acidic conditions. When grown on nutrient agar, all PV colonies possessed a translucent appearance, in contrast to parental strain colonies that were opaque. After 72 h, PV colonies were bigger than parental colonies, and had a fuzzy appearance relative to parental strain colonies that are relatively smooth. A. citrulli colonies are generally surrounded by haloes detectable by the naked eye. These haloes are formed by type IV pilus (T4P)-mediated twitching motility that occurs at the edge of the colony. No twitching haloes could be detected around colonies of both M6 and 7a1 PVs, and microscopy observations confirmed that indeed the PVs did not perform twitching motility. In agreement with these results, transmission electron microscopy revealed that M6 and 7a1 PVs do not produce T4P under tested conditions. PVs also differed from their parental strain in swimming motility and biofilm formation, and interestingly, all assessed variants were less virulent than their corresponding parental strains in seed transmission assays. Slight alterations could be detected in some DNA fingerprinting profiles of 7a1 variants relative to the parental strain, while no differences at all could be seen among M6 variants and parental strain, suggesting that, at least in the latter, phenotypic variation is mediated by slight genetic and/or epigenetic

  7. [Chlorobaculum macestae sp. nov., a new green sulfur bacterium].

    PubMed

    Koppen, O I; Berg, I A; Lebedeva, N V; Taisova, A S; Kolganova, T V; Slobodova, N V; Bulygina, E S; Turova, T P; Ivanovskiĭ, R N

    2008-01-01

    The investigated green sulfur bacterium, strain M, was isolated from a sulfidic spring on the Black Sea Coast of the Caucasus. The cells of strain M are straight or curved rods 0.6-0.9 x 1.8-4.2 microm in size. According to the cell wall structure, the bacteria are gram-negative. Chlorosomes are located along the cell periphery. Strain M is an obligate anaerobe capable of photoautotrophic growth on sulfide, thiosulfate, and H2. It utilizes ammonium, urea, casein hydrolysate, and N2 as nitrogen sources and sulfide, thiosulfate, and elemental sulfur as sulfur sources. Bacteriochlorophyll c and the carotenoid chlorobactene are the main pigments. The optimal growth temperature is 25-28 degrees C; the optimal pH is 6.8. The strain does not require NaCl. Vitamin B12 stimulates growth. The content of the G+C base pairs in the DNA of strain M is 58.3 mol %. In the phylogenetic tree constructed on the basis of analysis of nucleotide sequences of 16S rRNA genes, strain M forms a separate branch, which occupies an intermediate position between the phylogenetic cluster containing representatives of the genus Chlorobaculum (94.9-96.8%) and the cluster containing species of the genus Chlorobium (94.1-96.5%). According to the results of analysis of the amino acid sequence corresponding to the fmo gene, strain M represents a branch which, unlike that in the "ribosomal" tree, falls into the cluster of the genus Chlorobaculum (95.8-97.2%). Phylogenetic analysis of the amino acid sequence corresponding to the nifH gene placed species of the genera Chlorobaculum and Chlorobium into a single cluster, whereas strain M formed a separate branch. The results obtained allow us to describe strain M as a new species of the genus Chlorobaculum. Chlorobaculum macestae sp. nov.

  8. Immunopathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus pulmonary infection

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Dane; Prince, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common human pathogen highly evolved as both a component of the commensal flora and as a major cause of invasive infection. Severe respiratory infection due to staphylococci has been increasing due to the prevalence of more virulent USA300 CA-MRSA strains in the general population. The ability of S. aureus to adapt to the milieu of the respiratory tract has facilitated its emergence as a respiratory pathogen. Its metabolic versatility, the ability to scavenge iron, coordinate gene expression, and the horizontal acquisition of useful genetic elements have all contributed to its success as a component of the respiratory flora, in hospitalized patients, as a complication of influenza and in normal hosts. The expression of surface adhesins facilitates its persistence in the airways. In addition, the highly sophisticated interactions of the multiple S. aureus virulence factors, particularly the α-hemolysin and protein A, with diverse immune effectors in the lung such as ADAM10, TNFR1, EGFR, immunoglobulin, and complement all contribute to the pathogenesis of staphylococcal pneumonia. PMID:22037948

  9. [Dispersal of Staphylococcus aureus from nasal carriers].

    PubMed

    Iskandar, Aline; Nguyen, Ngan; Kolmos, Hans Jørn

    2009-02-02

    Staphylococcus aureus (Sa) is an important cause of hospital-acquired infections, and nasal carriage of Sa is common among health care workers. This study was designed to measure the airborne dispersal of Sa and other bacteria from such carriers and to investigate whether the use of cap, gown, gloves, and mask could reduce this dispersal. A total of 13 nasal Sa carriers were identified among 63 persons screened for Sa nasal carriage. The volunteers were studied for airborne dispersal of Sa in four different situations: quiet breathing, movements of the arms, whispering and loud talking. These activities were performed with and without gown, gloves, mask and cap upon street clothes. The study showed that the highest number of Sa and bacteria in total was dispersed into the air when the volunteers were moving and wearing only their street clothes. The dispersal of Sa into the air was reduced into a minimum by wearing cap, gown and gloves, and no further significant decrease was achieved by wearing a mask. This applied for all volunteers except for one, who had to wear a mask in order to reduce his dispersal of Sa to a minimum. The total dispersal of bacteria was significantly reduced by wearing cap, gown and gloves; however, to reduce this dispersal to a minimum, volunteers also had to wear a mask. Our study supports the rational basis that gown, cap, gloves and mask should be used not only in the operating theatre, but also while e.g. inserting central venous catheters.

  10. Staphylococcus aureus infections in Australasian neonatal nurseries.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, D; Fraser, S; Hogg, G; Li, H Y

    2004-07-01

    To study the incidence and outcome of systemic infections with methicillin sensitive (MSSA) and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections in Australasian neonatal nurseries. Prospective longitudinal study of systemic infections (clinical sepsis plus positive cultures of blood and/or cerebrospinal fluid) in 17 Australasian neonatal nurseries. The incidence of early onset sepsis with S aureus, mainly MSSA, was 19 cases per 244 718 live births or 0.08 per 1000. From 1992 to 1994, MRSA infections caused only 8% of staphylococcal infections. From 1995 to 1998, there was an outbreak of MRSA infection, in two Melbourne hospitals. The outbreak resolved, after the use of topical mupirocin and improved handwashing. Babies with MRSA sepsis were significantly smaller than babies with MSSA sepsis (mean birth weight 1093 v 1617 g) and more preterm (mean gestation 27.5 v 30.3 weeks). The mortality of MRSA sepsis was 24.6% compared with 9.9% for MSSA infections. The mortality of early onset MSSA sepsis, however, was 39% (seven of 18) compared with 7.3% of late onset MSSA infection presenting more than two days after birth. S aureus is a rare but important cause of early onset sepsis. Late onset MRSA infections carried a higher mortality than late onset MSSA infections, but babies with early onset MSSA sepsis had a particularly high mortality.

  11. Triclosan Promotes Staphylococcus aureus Nasal Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Adnan K.; Ghosh, Sudeshna; Love, Nancy G.; Boles, Blaise R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The biocide triclosan is used in many personal care products, including toothpastes, soaps, clothing, and medical equipment. Consequently, it is present as a contaminant in the environment and has been detected in some human fluids, including serum, urine, and milk. Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that colonizes the noses and throats of approximately 30% of the population. Colonization with S. aureus is known to be a risk factor for several types of infection. Here we demonstrate that triclosan is commonly found in the nasal secretions of healthy adults and the presence of triclosan trends positively with nasal colonization by S. aureus. We demonstrate that triclosan can promote the binding of S. aureus to host proteins such as collagen, fibronectin, and keratin, as well as inanimate surfaces such as plastic and glass. Lastly, triclosan-exposed rats are more susceptible to nasal colonization with S. aureus. These data reveal a novel factor that influences the ability of S. aureus to bind surfaces and alters S. aureus nasal colonization. PMID:24713325

  12. The Pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus Eye Infections

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major pathogen of the eye able to infect the tear duct, eyelid, conjunctiva, cornea, anterior and posterior chambers, and the vitreous chamber. Of these infections, those involving the cornea (keratitis) or the inner chambers of the eye (endophthalmitis) are the most threatening because of their potential to cause a loss in visual acuity or even blindness. Each of these ocular sites is protected by the constitutive expression of a variety of antimicrobial factors and these defenses are augmented by a protective host response to the organism. Such infections often involve a predisposing factor that weakens the defenses, such as the use of contact lenses prior to the development of bacterial keratitis or, for endophthalmitis, the trauma caused by cataract surgery or intravitreal injection. The structural carbohydrates of the bacterial surface induce an inflammatory response able to reduce the bacterial load, but contribute to the tissue damage. A variety of bacterial secreted proteins including alpha-toxin, beta-toxin, gamma-toxin, Panton-Valentine leukocidin and other two-component leukocidins mediate tissue damage and contribute to the induction of the inflammatory response. Quantitative animal models of keratitis and endophthalmitis have provided insights into the S. aureus virulence and host factors active in limiting such infections. PMID:29320451

  13. Tryptophan biosynthetic enzymes of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Proctor, A R; Kloos, W E

    1973-04-01

    Tryptophan biosynthetic enzymes were assayed in various tryptophan mutants of Staphylococcus aureus strain 655 and the wild-type parent. All mutants, except trpB mutants, lacked only the activity corresponding to the particular biosynthetic block, as suggested previously by analysis of accumulated intermediates and auxonography. Tryptophan synthetase A was not detected in extracts of either trpA or trpB mutants but appeared normal in other mutants. Mutants in certain other classes exhibited partial loss of another particular tryptophan enzyme activity. Tryptophan synthetase B activity was not detected in cell extract preparations but was detected in whole cells. The original map order proposed for the S. aureus tryptophan gene cluster was clarified by the definition of trpD (phosphoribosyl transferase(-)) and trpF (phosphoribosyl anthranilate isomerase(-)) mutants. These mutants were previously unresolved and designated as trp(DF) mutants (anthranilate accumulators). Phosphoribosyl anthranilate isomerase and indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthetase enzymes were separable by molecular sieve chromatography, suggesting that these functions are coded by separate loci. Molecular sieve chromatography failed to reveal aggregates involving anthranilate synthetase, phosphoribosyl transferase, phosphoribosyl anthranilate isomerase, and indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthetase, and this procedure provided an estimate of the molecular weights of these enzymes. Tryptophan was shown to repress synthesis of all six tryptophan biosynthetic enzymes, and derepression of all six activities was incident upon tryptophan starvation. Tryptophan inhibited the activity of anthranilate synthetase, the first enzyme of the pathway.

  14. Pharmacotherapeutic options for treating Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Gudiol, Carlota; Cuervo, Guillermo; Shaw, Evelyn; Pujol, Miquel; Carratalà, Jordi

    2017-12-01

    Case-fatality rates for Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) remain unacceptably high and have improved only modestly in recent decades. Treatment of SAB is still a clinical challenge, especially if methicillin-resistant strains are involved. New drugs with anti-staphylococcal activity are currently available, and their role as alternatives to standard therapies is being investigated. Areas covered: In this review, we give an update of the current available antibiotics for the treatment of SAB. We provide information regarding the pharmacological characteristics, the accepted indications, and the most important adverse events of the old and new anti-staphylococcal agents, as well as the existing evidence on their use for the treatment of SAB. Expert opinion: The management of patients with SAB is very complex and needs a multidisciplinary approach. There are currently new available options for the treatment of methicillin-resistant SAB. However, more data from clinical trials are needed to assign specific roles to each antibiotic and to include them in the new antibacterial armamentarium. The role of combination therapy for the treatment of increasingly complex patients with SAB deserves thorough investigation.

  15. Predictors of Mortality in Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Slade O.; Vaska, Vikram L.; Espedido, Björn A.; Paterson, David L.; Gosbell, Iain B.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is an important infection with an incidence rate ranging from 20 to 50 cases/100,000 population per year. Between 10% and 30% of these patients will die from SAB. Comparatively, this accounts for a greater number of deaths than for AIDS, tuberculosis, and viral hepatitis combined. Multiple factors influence outcomes for SAB patients. The most consistent predictor of mortality is age, with older patients being twice as likely to die. Except for the presence of comorbidities, the impacts of other host factors, including gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and immune status, are unclear. Pathogen-host interactions, especially the presence of shock and the source of SAB, are strong predictors of outcomes. Although antibiotic resistance may be associated with increased mortality, questions remain as to whether this reflects pathogen-specific factors or poorer responses to antibiotic therapy, namely, vancomycin. Optimal management relies on starting appropriate antibiotics in a timely fashion, resulting in improved outcomes for certain patient subgroups. The roles of surgery and infectious disease consultations require further study. Although the rate of mortality from SAB is declining, it remains high. Future international collaborative studies are required to tease out the relative contributions of various factors to mortality, which would enable the optimization of SAB management and patient outcomes. PMID:22491776

  16. Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Pantosti, Annalisa; Sanchini, Andrea; Monaco, Monica

    2007-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can exemplify better than any other human pathogen the adaptive evolution of bacteria in the antibiotic era, as it has demonstrated a unique ability to quickly respond to each new antibiotic with the development of a resistance mechanism, starting with penicillin and methicillin, until the most recent, linezolid and daptomycin. Resistance mechanisms include enzymatic inactivation of the antibiotic (penicillinase and aminoglycoside-modification enzymes), alteration of the target with decreased affinity for the antibiotic (notable examples being penicillin-binding protein 2a of methicillin-resistant S. aureus and D-Ala-D-Lac of peptidoglycan precursors of vancomycin-resistant strains), trapping of the antibiotic (for vancomycin and possibly daptomycin) and efflux pumps (fluoroquinolones and tetracycline). Complex genetic arrays (staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec elements or the vanA operon) have been acquired by S. aureus through horizontal gene transfer, while resistance to other antibiotics, including some of the most recent ones (e.g., fluoroquinolones, linezolid and daptomycin) have developed through spontaneous mutations and positive selection. Detection of the resistance mechanisms and their genetic basis is an important support to antibiotic susceptibility surveillance in S. aureus.

  17. Primary lung abscess caused by Staphylococcus lugdunensis.

    PubMed

    Chou, Deng-Wei; Lee, Chao-Tai

    2017-11-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis, a strain of coagulase-negative staphylococci, is part of the normal flora of human skin but can cause multiple infections at various sites. This microorganism has emerged as a major human pathogen. However, no study has reported primary lung abscess caused by S. lugdunensis. A 54-year-old alcoholic man without relevant past medical history was admitted because of primary lung abscesses. Empirical amoxicillin/clavulanate therapy was initially administered; however, the patient had persistent pleuritic chest pain and fever. He subsequently underwent resection of the lung abscess and removal of exudative pleural effusion on the fourth hospital day. Histopathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of lung abscess, and colonies of gram-positive bacteria were identified. The culture specimen from the abscess was positive for S. lugdunensis, which was susceptible to amoxicillin/clavulanate, cefazolin, ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, erythromycin, oxacillin, teicoplanin, tetracycline, and vancomycin. Following resection and 3 weeks of amoxicillin/clavulanate therapy, the patient eventually recovered well without relapse. This case report is the first to describe S. lugdunensis as a cause of primary lung abscess; this microorganism should be considered a potential monomicrobial pathogen in primary lung abscess. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Antibacterial mechanism of fraxetin against Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    WANG, HAITING; ZOU, DAN; XIE, KUNPEING; XIE, MINGJIE

    2014-01-01

    Fraxetin is one of the main constituents of the traditional medicinal plant Fraxinus rhynchophylla. The inhibitory effect of fraxetin on various bacterial strains has been extensively reported, however, its mechanism of action on bacterial cells remains to be elucidated. In the present study, the antibacterial mechanism of fraxetin on Staphylococcus aureus was systematically investigated by examining its effect on cell membranes, protein synthesis, nucleic acid content and topoisomerase activity. The results indicated that fraxetin increased the permeability of the cell membrane but did not render it permeable to macromolecules, such as DNA and RNA. Additionally, the quantity of protein, DNA and RNA decreased to 55.74, 33.86 and 48.96%, respectively following treatment with fraxetin for 16 h. The activity of topoisomerase I and topoisomerase II were also markedly inhibited as fraxetin concentration increased. The result of the ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry demonstrated that the DNA characteristics exhibited a blue shift and hypochromic effect following treatment with fraxetin. These results indicated that fraxetin had a marked inhibitory effect on S.aureus proliferation. Further mechanistic studies showed that fraxetin could disrupt nucleic acid and protein synthesis by preventing topoisomerase from binding to DNA. PMID:25189268

  19. Staphylococcus aureus Strain Newman Photoinactivation and Cellular Response to Sunlight Exposure.

    PubMed

    McClary, Jill S; Sassoubre, Lauren M; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2017-09-01

    Sunlight influences microbial water quality of surface waters. Previous studies have investigated photoinactivation mechanisms and cellular photostress responses of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), including Escherichia coli and enterococci, but further work is needed to characterize photostress responses of bacterial pathogens. Here we investigate the photoinactivation of Staphylococcus aureus (strain Newman), a pigmented, waterborne pathogen of emerging concern. We measured photodecay using standard culture-based assays and cellular membrane integrity and investigated photostress response by measuring the relative number of mRNA transcripts of select oxidative stress, DNA repair, and metabolism genes. Photoinactivation experiments were performed in both oxic and anoxic systems to further investigate the role of oxygen-mediated and non-oxygen-mediated photoinactivation mechanisms. S. aureus lost culturability much faster in oxic systems than in anoxic systems, indicating an important role for oxygen in photodecay mechanisms. S. aureus cell membranes were damaged by sunlight exposure in anoxic systems but not in oxic systems, as measured by cell membrane permeability to propidium iodide. After sunlight exposure, S. aureus increased expression of a gene coding for methionine sulfoxide reductase after 12 h of sunlight exposure in the oxic system and after 6 h of sunlight exposure in the anoxic system, suggesting that methionine sulfoxide reductase is an important enzyme for defense against both oxygen-dependent and oxygen-independent photostresses. This research highlights the importance of oxygen in bacterial photoinactivation in environmentally relevant systems and the complexity of the bacterial photostress response with respect to cell structure and transcriptional regulation. IMPORTANCE Staphylococcus aureus is a pathogenic bacterium that causes gastrointestinal, respiratory, and skin infections. In severe cases, S. aureus infection can lead to life

  20. Comparison of the etiological relevance of Staphylococcus haemolyticus and Staphylococcus hominis.

    PubMed

    Frickmann, Hagen; Hahn, Andreas; Skusa, Romy; Mund, Nils; Viehweger, Vivian; Köller, Thomas; Köller, Kerstin; Schwarz, Norbert Georg; Becker, Karsten; Warnke, Philipp; Podbielski, Andreas

    2018-05-19

    The study was performed to assess potential differences in the etiological relevance of two coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), Staphylococcus haemolyticus and Staphylococcus hominis, in an observational single-center study. Over a 5-year interval, patients in whom there was detected S. haemolyticus or S. hominis of presumed etiological relevance were assessed for the primary endpoint death during hospital stay and the secondary endpoint transfer to an intensive care unit (ICU) after the detection of S. haemolyticus or S. hominis. Patients with S. haemolyticus or S. hominis died in 11.3% (50 out of 444) and 9.5% (60 out of 631) of cases, respectively, and were transferred to ICU after S. haemolyticus and S. hominis detection in 8.7% (19 out of 219) and 11.7% (44 out of 377) of cases, respectively. There was no significance for species-related influence on the primary outcome parameter (P > 0.1), while ICU transfers were more likely for patients with S. hominis detections (P = 0.016). Delayed diagnosis of both CoNS species was associated with an increased probability of death (P = 0.009). The study revealed comparable morbidity caused by S. haemolyticus and S. hominis identified in a clinically relevant context.

  1. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Koukos, Georgios; Sakellari, Dimitra; Arsenakis, Minas; Tsalikis, Lazaros; Slini, Theodora; Konstantinidis, Antonios

    2015-09-01

    To assess the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in plaque and tongue samples from systemically healthy subjects with periodontal health, gingivitis or chronic periodontitis. After screening 720 potentially eligible subjects, 154 systemically healthy participants were ultimately enrolled in the current study. Subgingival samples were taken from the first molars and the tongue and analyzed for the presence of S. aureus and MRSA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), using primers and conditions previously described in the literature. In addition, samples were taken from deep periodontal pockets of chronic periodontitis patients. Statistical analysis was performed by applying non-parametric tests (Kruskal-Wallis for clinical parameters, and z-test with Bonferroni corrections for distributions of assessed parameters). All comparisons were set at the 0.05 significance level. S. aureus was detected in 18% of all participants and in 10% of the samples tested. No significant differences were found in its distribution among the three investigated groups (z-test for proportions with Bonferroni corrections, p>0.05). The mecA gene was not present in any of the S. aureus found. S. aureus can be found in the oral environment regardless of the periodontal conditions and therefore should be considered as a member of the transient flora not participating in periodontal pathology. Subgingival sites and tongue surfaces seem to be an unusual habitat of MRSA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Disinfection of the Water Borne Pathogens Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus by Solar Photocatalysis Using Sonochemically Synthesized Reusable Ag@ZnO Core-Shell Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Das, Sourav; Ranjana, Neha; Misra, Ananyo Jyoti; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Mishra, Amrita; Tamhankar, Ashok J; Lundborg, Cecilia Stålsby; Tripathy, Suraj K

    2017-07-10

    Water borne pathogens present a threat to human health and their disinfection from water poses a challenge, prompting the search for newer methods and newer materials. Disinfection of the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli and the Gram-positive coccal bacterium Staphylococcus aureus in an aqueous matrix was achieved within 60 and 90 min, respectively, at 35 °C using solar-photocatalysis mediated by sonochemically synthesized Ag@ZnO core-shell nanoparticles. The efficiency of the process increased with the increase in temperature and at 55 °C the disinfection for the two bacteria could be achieved in 45 and 60 min, respectively. A new ultrasound-assisted chemical precipitation technique was used for the synthesis of Ag@ZnO core-shell nanoparticles. The characteristics of the synthesized material were established using physical techniques. The material remained stable even at 400 °C. Disinfection efficiency of the Ag@ZnO core-shell nanoparticles was confirmed in the case of real world samples of pond, river, municipal tap water and was found to be better than that of pure ZnO and TiO₂ (Degussa P25). When the nanoparticle- based catalyst was recycled and reused for subsequent disinfection experiments, its efficiency did not change remarkably, even after three cycles. The sonochemically synthesized Ag@ZnO core-shell nanoparticles thus have a good potential for application in solar photocatalytic disinfection of water borne pathogens.

  3. Disinfection of the Water Borne Pathogens Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus by Solar Photocatalysis Using Sonochemically Synthesized Reusable Ag@ZnO Core-Shell Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sourav; Ranjana, Neha; Misra, Ananyo Jyoti; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Mishra, Amrita; Tripathy, Suraj K.

    2017-01-01

    Water borne pathogens present a threat to human health and their disinfection from water poses a challenge, prompting the search for newer methods and newer materials. Disinfection of the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli and the Gram-positive coccal bacterium Staphylococcus aureus in an aqueous matrix was achieved within 60 and 90 min, respectively, at 35 °C using solar-photocatalysis mediated by sonochemically synthesized Ag@ZnO core-shell nanoparticles. The efficiency of the process increased with the increase in temperature and at 55 °C the disinfection for the two bacteria could be achieved in 45 and 60 min, respectively. A new ultrasound-assisted chemical precipitation technique was used for the synthesis of Ag@ZnO core-shell nanoparticles. The characteristics of the synthesized material were established using physical techniques. The material remained stable even at 400 °C. Disinfection efficiency of the Ag@ZnO core-shell nanoparticles was confirmed in the case of real world samples of pond, river, municipal tap water and was found to be better than that of pure ZnO and TiO2 (Degussa P25). When the nanoparticle- based catalyst was recycled and reused for subsequent disinfection experiments, its efficiency did not change remarkably, even after three cycles. The sonochemically synthesized Ag@ZnO core-shell nanoparticles thus have a good potential for application in solar photocatalytic disinfection of water borne pathogens. PMID:28698514

  4. A Genetic System for the Thermophilic Acetogenic Bacterium Thermoanaerobacter kivui.

    PubMed

    Basen, Mirko; Geiger, Irina; Henke, Laura; Müller, Volker

    2018-02-01

    Thermoanaerobacter kivui is one of the very few thermophilic acetogenic microorganisms. It grows optimally at 66°C on sugars but also lithotrophically with H 2 + CO 2 or with CO, producing acetate as the major product. While a genome-derived model of acetogenesis has been developed, only a few physiological or biochemical experiments regarding the function of important enzymes in carbon and energy metabolism have been carried out. To address this issue, we developed a method for targeted markerless gene deletions and for integration of genes into the genome of T. kivui The strain naturally took up plasmid DNA in the exponential growth phase, with a transformation frequency of up to 3.9 × 10 -6 A nonreplicating plasmid and selection with 5-fluoroorotate was used to delete the gene encoding the orotate phosphoribosyltransferase ( pyrE ), resulting in a Δ pyrE uracil-auxotrophic strain, TKV002. Reintroduction of pyrE on a plasmid or insertion of pyrE into different loci within the genome restored growth without uracil. We subsequently studied fructose metabolism in T. kivui The gene fruK (TKV_c23150) encoding 1-phosphofructosekinase (1-PFK) was deleted, using pyrE as a selective marker via two single homologous recombination events. The resulting Δ fruK strain, TKV003, did not grow on fructose; however, growth on glucose (or on mannose) was unaffected. The combination of pyrE as a selective marker and the natural competence of the strain for DNA uptake will be the basis for future studies on CO 2 reduction and energy conservation and their regulation in this thermophilic acetogenic bacterium. IMPORTANCE Acetogenic bacteria are currently the focus of research toward biotechnological applications due to their potential for de novo synthesis of carbon compounds such as acetate, butyrate, or ethanol from H 2 + CO 2 or from synthesis gas. Based on available genome sequences and on biochemical experiments, acetogens differ in their energy metabolism. Thus, there is an

  5. Regulation of Polyhydroxybutyrate Synthesis in the Soil Bacterium Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens

    PubMed Central

    Quelas, J. I.; Mesa, S.; Mongiardini, E. J.; Jendrossek, D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is a carbon and energy reserve polymer in various prokaryotic species. We determined that, when grown with mannitol as the sole carbon source, Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens produces a homopolymer composed only of 3-hydroxybutyrate units (PHB). Conditions of oxygen limitation (such as microoxia, oxic stationary phase, and bacteroids inside legume nodules) were permissive for the synthesis of PHB, which was observed as cytoplasmic granules. To study the regulation of PHB synthesis, we generated mutations in the regulator gene phaR and the phasin genes phaP1 and phaP4. Under permissive conditions, mutation of phaR impaired PHB accumulation, and a phaP1 phaP4 double mutant produced more PHB than the wild type, which was accumulated in a single, large cytoplasmic granule. Moreover, PhaR negatively regulated the expression of phaP1 and phaP4 as well as the expression of phaA1 and phaA2 (encoding a 3-ketoacyl coenzyme A [CoA] thiolases), phaC1 and phaC2 (encoding PHB synthases), and fixK2 (encoding a cyclic AMP receptor protein [CRP]/fumarate and nitrate reductase regulator [FNR]-type transcription factor of genes for microoxic lifestyle). In addition to the depressed PHB cycling, phaR mutants accumulated more extracellular polysaccharides and promoted higher plant shoot dry weight and competitiveness for nodulation than the wild type, in contrast to the phaC1 mutant strain, which is defective in PHB synthesis. These results suggest that phaR not only regulates PHB granule formation by controlling the expression of phasins and biosynthetic enzymes but also acts as a global regulator of excess carbon allocation and symbiosis by controlling fixK2. IMPORTANCE In this work, we investigated the regulation of polyhydroxybutyrate synthesis in the soybean-nodulating bacterium Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens and its influence in bacterial free-living and symbiotic lifestyles. We uncovered a new interplay between the synthesis of this carbon reserve

  6. Enterotoxigenicity and Antimicrobial Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Retail Food in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Baloch, Zulqarnain; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Cunshan; Peng, Zixin; Li, Fengqin; Fanning, Séamus; Ma, Aiguo; Xu, Jin

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common causes of zoonotic agent in the world, which are attributable to the contamination of food with enterotoxins. In this study, a total of 1,150 S. aureus isolates were cultured from 27,000 retail foods items from 203 cities of 24 provinces in China in 2015 and were test for antimicrobial susceptibility. Additionally, the role of the genes responsible for the staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEA to SEE), methicillin resistance (mecA) and the toxigenic capabilities were also assessed. The results showed that 4.3% retail foods were contaminated with S. aureus, and 7.9% retail foods isolates were mecA positive. Some 97.6% of S. aureus isolates were resistant to at least one antimicrobial compound, and 57.5% of these were multi drug resistant (MDR). Resistance to penicillin (83.7%, 963/1,150), was common, followed by linezolid (67.7%, 778/1,150) and erythromycin (52.1%, 599/1,150). The isolates cultured from raw meats showed high levels of resistant to tetracycline (42.8%), ciprofloxacin (17.4%), and chloramphenicol (12.0%) and expressed a MDR phenotype (62.4%). A total of 29.7% S. aureus isolates harbored the classical SEs genes (sea, seb, sec, and sed). The sea and seb genes were the most frequent SEs genes detected. Of note, 22% of the SEs genes positive S. aureus harbored two or three SEs genes, and 16 isolates were confirmed with the capacity to simultaneously produce two or three enterotoxin types. Moreover, nearly 50% of the MRSA isolates were positive for at least one SE gene in this study. Therefore, it is important to monitor the antimicrobial susceptibility and enterotoxigenicity of MDR S. aureus and MRSA in the food chain and to use these data to develop food safety measures, designed to reduce the contamination and transmission of this bacterium. PMID:29209290

  7. Reconstruction of mreB expression in Staphylococcus aureus via a collection of new integrative plasmids.

    PubMed

    Yepes, Ana; Koch, Gudrun; Waldvogel, Andrea; Garcia-Betancur, Juan-Carlos; Lopez, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    Protein localization has been traditionally explored in unicellular organisms, whose ease of genetic manipulation facilitates molecular characterization. The two rod-shaped bacterial models Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis have been prominently used for this purpose and have displaced other bacteria whose challenges for genetic manipulation have complicated any study of cell biology. Among these bacteria is the spherical pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. In this report, we present a new molecular toolbox that facilitates gene deletion in staphylococci in a 1-step recombination process and additional vectors that facilitate the insertion of diverse reporter fusions into newly identified neutral loci of the S. aureus chromosome. Insertion of the reporters does not add any antibiotic resistance genes to the chromosomes of the resultant strains, thereby making them amenable for further genetic manipulations. We used this toolbox to reconstitute the expression of mreB in S. aureus, a gene that encodes an actin-like cytoskeletal protein which is absent in coccal cells and is presumably lost during the course of speciation. We observed that in S. aureus, MreB is organized in discrete structures in association with the membrane, leading to an unusual redistribution of the cell wall material. The production of MreB also caused cell enlargement, but it did not revert staphylococcal shape. We present interactions of MreB with key staphylococcal cell wall-related proteins. This work facilitates the use S. aureus as a model system in exploring diverse aspects of cellular microbiology. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. A Single-Stranded DNA Aptamer That Selectively Binds to Staphylococcus aureus Enterotoxin B

    PubMed Central

    DeGrasse, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    The bacterium Staphylococcus aureus is a common foodborne pathogen capable of secreting a cocktail of small, stable, and strain-specific, staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs). Staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP) results when improperly handled food contaminated with SEs is consumed. Gastrointestinal symptoms of SFP include emesis, diarrhea and severe abdominal pain, which manifest within hours of ingesting contaminated food. Immuno-affinity based methods directly detect, identify, and quantify several SEs within a food or clinical sample. However, the success of these assays depends upon the availability of a monoclonal antibody, the development of which is non-trivial and costly. The current scope of the available immuno-affinity based methods is limited to the classical SEs and does not encompass all of the known or emergent SEs. In contrast to antibodies, aptamers are short nucleic acids that exhibit high affinity and specificity for their targets without the high-costs and ethical concerns of animal husbandry. Further, researchers may choose to freely distribute aptamers and develop assays without the proprietary issues that increase the per-sample cost of immuno-affinity assays. This study describes a novel aptamer, selected in vitro, with affinity to staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) that may be used in lieu of antibodies in SE detection assays. The aptamer, designated APTSEB1, successfully isolates SEB from a complex mixture of SEs with extremely high discrimination. This work sets the foundation for future aptamer and assay development towards the entire family of SEs. The rapid, robust, and low-cost identification and quantification of all of the SEs in S. aureus contaminated food is essential for food safety and epidemiological efforts. An in vitro generated library of SE aptamers could potentially allow for the comprehensive and cost-effective analysis of food samples that immuno-affinity assays currently cannot provide. PMID:22438927

  9. A single-stranded DNA aptamer that selectively binds to Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B.

    PubMed

    DeGrasse, Jeffrey A

    2012-01-01

    The bacterium Staphylococcus aureus is a common foodborne pathogen capable of secreting a cocktail of small, stable, and strain-specific, staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs). Staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP) results when improperly handled food contaminated with SEs is consumed. Gastrointestinal symptoms of SFP include emesis, diarrhea and severe abdominal pain, which manifest within hours of ingesting contaminated food. Immuno-affinity based methods directly detect, identify, and quantify several SEs within a food or clinical sample. However, the success of these assays depends upon the availability of a monoclonal antibody, the development of which is non-trivial and costly. The current scope of the available immuno-affinity based methods is limited to the classical SEs and does not encompass all of the known or emergent SEs. In contrast to antibodies, aptamers are short nucleic acids that exhibit high affinity and specificity for their targets without the high-costs and ethical concerns of animal husbandry. Further, researchers may choose to freely distribute aptamers and develop assays without the proprietary issues that increase the per-sample cost of immuno-affinity assays. This study describes a novel aptamer, selected in vitro, with affinity to staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) that may be used in lieu of antibodies in SE detection assays. The aptamer, designated APT(SEB1), successfully isolates SEB from a complex mixture of SEs with extremely high discrimination. This work sets the foundation for future aptamer and assay development towards the entire family of SEs. The rapid, robust, and low-cost identification and quantification of all of the SEs in S. aureus contaminated food is essential for food safety and epidemiological efforts. An in vitro generated library of SE aptamers could potentially allow for the comprehensive and cost-effective analysis of food samples that immuno-affinity assays currently cannot provide.

  10. Aptamer-conjugated silver nanoparticles for electrochemical dual-aptamer-based sandwich detection of staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Abbaspour, Abdolkarim; Norouz-Sarvestani, Fatemeh; Noori, Abolhassan; Soltani, Noushin

    2015-06-15

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is one of the most important human pathogens and causes numerous illnesses. In this study, we report a sensitive and highly selective dual-aptamer-based sandwich immunosensor for the detection of S. aureus. In this bioassay system, a biotinylated primary anti-S.aureus aptamer was immobilized on streptavidin coated magnetic beads (MB), which serves as a capture probe. A secondary anti-S.aureus aptamer was conjugated to silver nanoparticles (Apt-AgNP) that sensitively reports the detection of the target. In the presence of target bacterium, an Apt/S.aureus/apt-AgNP sandwich complex is formed on the MB surface and the electrochemical signal of AgNPs followed through anodic stripping voltammetry. The proposed sandwich assay benefits from advantageous of a sandwich assay for increased specificity, MB as carriers of affinity ligands for solution-phase recognition and fast magnetic separation, AgNPs for signal amplification, and an electrochemical stripping voltammetry read-out as a simple and sensitive detection. The electrochemical immunosensor shows an extended dynamic range from 10 to 1×10(6) cfu/mL with a low detection limit of 1.0 cfu/mL (S/N=3). Furthermore, the possible interference of other analog bacteria was studied. To assess the general applicability of this sensor, we investigated the quantification of S. aureus in real water samples. The results were compared to the experimental results obtained from a plate counting method, which demonstrated an acceptable consistency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. First report of sasX-positive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakaminami, Hidemasa; Ito, Teruyo; Han, Xiao; Ito, Ayumu; Matsuo, Miki; Uehara, Yuki; Baba, Tadashi; Hiramatsu, Keiichi; Noguchi, Norihisa

    2017-09-01

    SasX is a known virulence factor of Staphylococcus aureus involved in colonisation and immune evasion of the bacterium. The sasX gene, which is located on the ϕSPβ prophage, is frequently found in the sequence type (ST) 239 S. aureus lineage, which is the predominant healthcare-associated clone in Asian countries. In Japan, ST239 clones have rarely been identified, and sasX-positive strains have not been reported to date. Here, we report the first identification of 18 sasX-positive methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains in Japanese hospitals between 2009 and 2011. All sasX-positive isolates belonged to an ST239-staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type III (ST239-III) lineage. However, we were unable to identify additional sasX-positive MRSA strains from 2012 to 2016, indicating that the small epidemic of sasX-positive isolates observed in this study was temporary. The sequence surrounding sasX in the strain TOHH628 lacked 51 genes that encode phage packaging and structural proteins, and no bacteriophage was induced by mitomycin C. Additionally, in the TOHH628 strain, the region (64.6 kb) containing sasX showed high identity to the ϕSPβ-like element (71.3 kb) of the Taiwanese MRSA strain Z172. The data strongly suggest that the present sasX-positive isolates found in Japanese hospitals were transmitted incidentally from other countries. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Decrease of Staphylococcus aureus Virulence by Helcococcus kunzii in a Caenorhabditis elegans Model.

    PubMed

    Ngba Essebe, Christelle; Visvikis, Orane; Fines-Guyon, Marguerite; Vergne, Anne; Cattoir, Vincent; Lecoustumier, Alain; Lemichez, Emmanuel; Sotto, Albert; Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Dunyach-Remy, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Social bacterial interactions are considered essential in numerous infectious diseases, particularly in wounds. Foot ulcers are a common complication in diabetic patients and these ulcers become frequently infected. This infection is usually polymicrobial promoting cell-to-cell communications. Staphylococcus aureus is the most prevalent pathogen isolated. Its association with Helcococcus kunzii , commensal Gram-positive cocci, is frequently described. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of co-infection on virulence of both H. kunzii and S. aureus strains in a Caenorhabditis elegans model. To study the host response, qRT-PCRs targeting host defense genes were performed. We observed that H. kunzii strains harbored a very low (LT50: 5.7 days ± 0.4) or an absence of virulence (LT50: 6.9 days ± 0.5). In contrast, S. aureus strains (LT50: 2.9 days ± 0.4) were significantly more virulent than all H. kunzii ( P < 0.001). When H. kunzii and S. aureus strains were associated, H. kunzii significantly reduced the virulence of the S. aureus strain in nematodes (LT50 between 4.4 and 5.2 days; P < 0.001). To evaluate the impact of these strains on host response, transcriptomic analysis showed that the ingestion of S. aureus led to a strong induction of defense genes ( lys-5, sodh-1 , and cyp-37B1 ) while H. kunzii did not. No statistical difference of host response genes expression was observed when C. elegans were infected with either S. aureus alone or with S. aureus + H. kunzii . Moreover, two well-characterized virulence factors ( hla and agr ) present in S. aureus were down-regulated when S. aureus were co-infected with H. kunzii . This study showed that H. kunzii decreased the virulence of S. aureus without modifying directly the host defense response. Factor(s) produced by this bacterium modulating the staphylococci virulence must be investigated.

  13. Staphylococcus aureus Transcriptome Architecture: From Laboratory to Infection-Mimicking Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Depke, Maren; Pané-Farré, Jan; Debarbouille, Michel; van der Kooi-Pol, Magdalena M.; Guérin, Cyprien; Dérozier, Sandra; Hiron, Aurelia; Jarmer, Hanne; Leduc, Aurélie; Michalik, Stephan; Reilman, Ewoud; Schaffer, Marc; Schmidt, Frank; Bessières, Philippe; Noirot, Philippe; Hecker, Michael; Msadek, Tarek; Völker, Uwe; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major pathogen that colonizes about 20% of the human population. Intriguingly, this Gram-positive bacterium can survive and thrive under a wide range of different conditions, both inside and outside the human body. Here, we investigated the transcriptional adaptation of S. aureus HG001, a derivative of strain NCTC 8325, across experimental conditions ranging from optimal growth in vitro to intracellular growth in host cells. These data establish an extensive repertoire of transcription units and non-coding RNAs, a classification of 1412 promoters according to their dependence on the RNA polymerase sigma factors SigA or SigB, and allow identification of new potential targets for several known transcription factors. In particular, this study revealed a relatively low abundance of antisense RNAs in S. aureus, where they overlap only 6% of the coding genes, and only 19 antisense RNAs not co-transcribed with other genes were found. Promoter analysis and comparison with Bacillus subtilis links the small number of antisense RNAs to a less profound impact of alternative sigma factors in S. aureus. Furthermore, we revealed that Rho-dependent transcription termination suppresses pervasive antisense transcription, presumably originating from abundant spurious transcription initiation in this A+T-rich genome, which would otherwise affect expression of the overlapped genes. In summary, our study provides genome-wide information on transcriptional regulation and non-coding RNAs in S. aureus as well as new insights into the biological function of Rho and the implications of spurious transcription in bacteria. PMID:27035918

  14. Identification and characterization of a cyclosporin binding cyclophilin from Staphylococcus aureus Newman

    PubMed Central

    Polley, Soumitra; Seal, Soham; Mahapa, Avisek; Jana, Biswanath; Biswas, Anindya; Mandal, Sukhendu; Sinha, Debabrata; Sau, Keya; Sau, Subrata

    2017-01-01

    Cyclophilins, a class of peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) enzymes, are inhibited by cyclosporin A (CsA), an immunosuppressive drug. Staphylococcus aureus Newman, a pathogenic bacterium, carries a gene for encoding a putative cyclophilin (SaCyp). SaCyp shows significant homology with other cyclophilins at the sequence level. A three-dimensional model structure of SaCyp harbors a binding site for CsA. To verify whether SaCyp possesses both the PPIase activity and the CsA binding ability, we have purified and investigated a recombinant SaCyp (rCyp) using various in vitro tools. Our RNase T1 refolding assay indicates that rCyp has a substantial extent of PPIase activity. rCyp that exists as a monomer in the aqueous solution is truly a cyclophilin as its catalytic activity specifically shows sensitivity to CsA. rCyp appears to bind CsA with a reasonably high affinity. Additional investigations reveal that binding of CsA to rCyp alters its structure and shape to some extent. Both rCyp and rCyp-CsA are unfolded via the formation of at least one intermediate in the presence of guanidine hydrochloride. Unfolding study also indicates that there is substantial extent of thermodynamic stabilization of rCyp in the presence of CsA as well. The data suggest that rCyp may be exploited to screen the new antimicrobial agents in the future. PMID:28584448

  15. Differential gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus exposed to Orange II and Sudan III azo dyes

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Hongmiao; Xu, Joshua; Kweon, Oh-Gew; Zou, Wen; Feng, Jinhui; He, Gui-Xin; Cerniglia, Carl E.

    2018-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the effects of azo dyes and their reduction metabolites on bacterial cell growth and cell viability. In this report, the effects of Orange II and Sudan III on gene expression profiling in Staphylococcus aureus ATCC BAA 1556 were analyzed using microarray and quantitative RT-PCR technology. Upon exposure to 6 μg/ml Orange II for 18 h, 21 genes were found to be differently expressed. Among them, 8 and 13 genes were up- and down-regulated, respectively. Most proteins encoded by these differentially expressed genes involve stress response caused by drug metabolism, oxidation, and alkaline shock indicating that S. aureus could adapt to Orange II exposure through a balance between up and down regulated gene expression. Whereas, after exposure to 6 μg/ml Sudan III for 18 h, 57 genes were differentially expressed. In which, 51 genes were up-regulated and 6 were down-regulated. Most proteins encoded by these differentially expressed genes involve in cell wall/membrane biogenesis and biosynthesis, nutrient uptake, transport and metabolite, and stress response, suggesting that Sudan III damages the bacterial cell wall or/and membrane due to binding of the dye. Further analysis indicated that all differentially expressed genes encoded membrane proteins were up-regulated and most of them serve as transporters. The result suggested that these genes might contribute to survival, persistence and growth in the presence of Sudan III. Only one gene msrA, which plays an important role in oxidative stress resistance, was found to be down-regulated after exposure to both Orange II and Sudan III. The present results suggested that both these two azo dyes can cause stress in S. aureus and the response of the bacterium to the stress is mainly related to characteristics of the azo dyes. PMID:25720844

  16. Enterotoxigenicity and Antimicrobial Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Retail Food in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Baloch, Zulqarnain; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Cunshan; Peng, Zixin; Li, Fengqin; Fanning, Séamus; Ma, Aiguo; Xu, Jin

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common causes of zoonotic agent in the world, which are attributable to the contamination of food with enterotoxins. In this study, a total of 1,150 S. aureus isolates were cultured from 27,000 retail foods items from 203 cities of 24 provinces in China in 2015 and were test for antimicrobial susceptibility. Additionally, the role of the genes responsible for the staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEA to SEE), methicillin resistance ( mecA ) and the toxigenic capabilities were also assessed. The results showed that 4.3% retail foods were contaminated with S. aureus , and 7.9% retail foods isolates were mecA positive. Some 97.6% of S. aureus isolates were resistant to at least one antimicrobial compound, and 57.5% of these were multi drug resistant (MDR). Resistance to penicillin (83.7%, 963/1,150), was common, followed by linezolid (67.7%, 778/1,150) and erythromycin (52.1%, 599/1,150). The isolates cultured from raw meats showed high levels of resistant to tetracycline (42.8%), ciprofloxacin (17.4%), and chloramphenicol (12.0%) and expressed a MDR phenotype (62.4%). A total of 29.7% S. aureus isolates harbored the classical SEs genes ( sea, seb, sec , and sed ). The sea and seb genes were the most frequent SEs genes detected. Of note, 22% of the SEs genes positive S. aureus harbored two or three SEs genes, and 16 isolates were confirmed with the capacity to simultaneously produce two or three enterotoxin types. Moreover, nearly 50% of the MRSA isolates were positive for at least one SE gene in this study. Therefore, it is important to monitor the antimicrobial susceptibility and enterotoxigenicity of MDR S. aureus and MRSA in the food chain and to use these data to develop food safety measures, designed to reduce the contamination and transmission of this bacterium.

  17. Anti-biofilm formation of a novel stainless steel against Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Nan, Li; Yang, Ke; Ren, Guogang

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a bacterium frequently found proliferating on metal surfaces such as stainless steels used in healthcare and food processing facilities. Past research has shown that a novel Cu-bearing 304 type stainless steel (304CuSS) exhibits excellent antibacterial ability (i.e. against S. aureus) in a short time period (24h.). This work was dedicated to investigate the 304CuSS's inhibition ability towards the S. aureus biofilm formation for an extended period of 7days after incubation. It was found that the antibacterial rate of the 304CuSS against sessile bacterial cells reached over 99.9% in comparison with the 304SS. The thickness and sizes of the biofilms on the 304SS surfaces increased markedly with period of contact, and thus expected higher risk of bio-contamination, indicated by the changes of surface free energy between biofilm and the steel surfaces. The results demonstrated that the 304CuSS exhibited strong inhibition on the growth and adherence of the biofilms. The surface free energy of the 304CuSS after contact with sessile bacterial cells was much lower than that of the 304SS towards the same culture times. The continuously dissolved Cu(2+) ions well demonstrated the dissolution ability of Cu-rich precipitates after exposure to S. aureus solution, from 3.1ppm (2days) to 4.5ppm (7days). For this to occur, a hypothesis mechanism might be established for 304CuSS in which the Cu(2+) ions were released from Cu-rich phases that bond with extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of the microorganisms. And these inhibited the activities of cell protein/enzymes and effectively prevented planktonic bacterial cells attaching to the 304CuSS metal surface. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Are Phage Lytic Proteins the Secret Weapon To Kill Staphylococcus aureus?

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Diana; Fernández, Lucía; Rodríguez, Ana; García, Pilar

    2018-01-23

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most threatening microorganisms for global human health. The current strategies to reduce the impact of S. aureus include a restrictive control of worldwide antibiotic use, prophylactic measures to hinder contamination, and the search for novel antimicrobials to treat human and animal infections caused by this bacterium. The last strategy is currently the focus of considerable research. In this regard, phage lytic proteins (endolysins and virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolases [VAPGHs]) have been proposed as suitable candidates. Indeed, these proteins display narrow-spectrum antimicrobial activity and a virtual lack of bacterial-resistance development. Additionally, the therapeutic use of phage lytic proteins in S. aureus animal infection models is yielding promising results, showing good efficacy without apparent side effects. Nonetheless, human clinical trials are still in progress, and data are not available yet. This minireview also analyzes the main obstacles for introducing phage lytic proteins as human therapeutics against S. aureus infections. Besides the common technological problems derived from large-scale production of therapeutic proteins, a major setback is the lack of a proper legal framework regulating their use. In that sense, the relevant health authorities should urgently have a timely discussion about these new antimicrobials. On the other hand, the research community should provide data to dispel any doubts regarding their efficacy and safety. Overall, the appropriate scientific data and regulatory framework will encourage pharmaceutical companies to invest in these promising antimicrobials. Copyright © 2018 Gutiérrez et al.

  19. A peptide resource for the analysis of Staphylococcus aureus in host-pathogen interaction studies.

    PubMed

    Depke, Maren; Michalik, Stephan; Rabe, Alexander; Surmann, Kristin; Brinkmann, Lars; Jehmlich, Nico; Bernhardt, Jörg; Hecker, Michael; Wollscheid, Bernd; Sun, Zhi; Moritz, Robert L; Völker, Uwe; Schmidt, Frank

    2015-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic human pathogen, which can cause life-threatening disease. Proteome analyses of the bacterium can provide new insights into its pathophysiology and important facets of metabolic adaptation and, thus, aid the recognition of targets for intervention. However, the value of such proteome studies increases with their comprehensiveness. We present an MS-driven, proteome-wide characterization of the strain S. aureus HG001. Combining 144 high precision proteomic data sets, we identified 19 109 peptides from 2088 distinct S. aureus HG001 proteins, which account for 72% of the predicted ORFs. Peptides were further characterized concerning pI, GRAVY, and detectability scores in order to understand the low peptide coverage of 8.7% (19 109 out of 220 245 theoretical peptides). The high quality peptide-centric spectra have been organized into a comprehensive peptide fragmentation library (SpectraST) and used for identification of S. aureus-typic peptides in highly complex host-pathogen interaction experiments, which significantly improved the number of identified S. aureus proteins compared to a MASCOT search. This effort now allows the elucidation of crucial pathophysiological questions in S. aureus-specific host-pathogen interaction studies through comprehensive proteome analysis. The S. aureus-specific spectra resource developed here also represents an important spectral repository for SRM or for data-independent acquisition MS approaches. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000702 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000702). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Structure-Function Analysis of Staphylococcus aureus Amidase Reveals the Determinants of Peptidoglycan Recognition and Cleavage*

    PubMed Central

    Büttner, Felix Michael; Zoll, Sebastian; Nega, Mulugeta; Götz, Friedrich; Stehle, Thilo

    2014-01-01

    The bifunctional major autolysin AtlA of Staphylococcus aureus cleaves the bacterium's peptidoglycan network (PGN) at two distinct sites during cell division. Deletion of the enzyme results in large cell clusters with disordered division patterns, indicating that AtlA could be a promising target for the development of new antibiotics. One of the two functions of AtlA is performed by the N-acetylmuramyl-l-alanine amidase AmiA, which cleaves the bond between the carbohydrate and the peptide moieties of PGN. To establish the structural requirements of PGN recognition and the enzymatic mechanism of cleavage, we solved the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of AmiA (AmiA-cat) in complex with a peptidoglycan-derived ligand at 1.55 Å resolution. The peptide stem is clearly visible in the structure, forming extensive contacts with protein residues by docking into an elongated groove. Less well defined electron density and the analysis of surface features indicate likely positions of the carbohydrate backbone and the pentaglycine bridge. Substrate specificity analysis supports the importance of the pentaglycine bridge for fitting into the binding cleft of AmiA-cat. PGN of S. aureus with l-lysine tethered with d-alanine via a pentaglycine bridge is completely hydrolyzed, whereas PGN of Bacillus subtilis with meso-diaminopimelic acid directly tethered with d-alanine is not hydrolyzed. An active site mutant, H370A, of AmiA-cat was completely inactive, providing further support for the proposed catalytic mechanism of AmiA. The structure reported here is not only the first of any bacterial amidase in which both the PGN component and the water molecule that carries out the nucleophilic attack on the carbonyl carbon of the scissile bond are present; it is also the first peptidoglycan amidase complex structure of an important human pathogen. PMID:24599952

  1. Decrease of Staphylococcus aureus Virulence by Helcococcus kunzii in a Caenorhabditis elegans Model

    PubMed Central

    Ngba Essebe, Christelle; Visvikis, Orane; Fines-Guyon, Marguerite; Vergne, Anne; Cattoir, Vincent; Lecoustumier, Alain; Lemichez, Emmanuel; Sotto, Albert; Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Dunyach-Remy, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Social bacterial interactions are considered essential in numerous infectious diseases, particularly in wounds. Foot ulcers are a common complication in diabetic patients and these ulcers become frequently infected. This infection is usually polymicrobial promoting cell-to-cell communications. Staphylococcus aureus is the most prevalent pathogen isolated. Its association with Helcococcus kunzii, commensal Gram-positive cocci, is frequently described. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of co-infection on virulence of both H. kunzii and S. aureus strains in a Caenorhabditis elegans model. To study the host response, qRT-PCRs targeting host defense genes were performed. We observed that H. kunzii strains harbored a very low (LT50: 5.7 days ± 0.4) or an absence of virulence (LT50: 6.9 days ± 0.5). In contrast, S. aureus strains (LT50: 2.9 days ± 0.4) were significantly more virulent than all H. kunzii (P < 0.001). When H. kunzii and S. aureus strains were associated, H. kunzii significantly reduced the virulence of the S. aureus strain in nematodes (LT50 between 4.4 and 5.2 days; P < 0.001). To evaluate the impact of these strains on host response, transcriptomic analysis showed that the ingestion of S. aureus led to a strong induction of defense genes (lys-5, sodh-1, and cyp-37B1) while H. kunzii did not. No statistical difference of host response genes expression was observed when C. elegans were infected with either S. aureus alone or with S. aureus + H. kunzii. Moreover, two well-characterized virulence factors (hla and agr) present in S. aureus were down-regulated when S. aureus were co-infected with H. kunzii. This study showed that H. kunzii decreased the virulence of S. aureus without modifying directly the host defense response. Factor(s) produced by this bacterium modulating the staphylococci virulence must be investigated. PMID:28361041

  2. Exploring the contribution of efflux on the resistance to fluoroquinolones in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Antimicrobial resistance mediated by efflux systems is still poorly characterized in Staphylococcus aureus, despite the description of several efflux pumps (EPs) for this bacterium. In this work we used several methodologies to characterize the efflux activity of 52 S. aureus isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin collected in a hospital in Lisbon, Portugal, in order to understand the role played by these systems in the resistance to fluoroquinolones. Results Augmented efflux activity was detected in 12 out of 52 isolates and correlated with increased resistance to fluoroquinolones. Addition of efflux inhibitors did not result in the full reversion of the fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype, yet it implied a significant decrease in the resistance levels, regardless of the type(s) of mutation(s) found in the quinolone-resistance determining region of grlA and gyrA genes, which accounted for the remaining resistance that was not efflux-mediated. Expression analysis of the genes coding for the main efflux pumps revealed increased expression only in the presence of inducing agents. Moreover, it showed that not only different substrates can trigger expression of different EP genes, but also that the same substrate can promote a variable response, according to its concentration. We also found isolates belonging to the same clonal type that showed different responses towards drug exposure, thus evidencing that highly related clinical isolates may diverge in the efflux-mediated response to noxious agents. The data gathered by real-time fluorometric and RT-qPCR assays suggest that S. aureus clinical isolates may be primed to efflux antimicrobial compounds. Conclusions The results obtained in this work do not exclude the importance of mutations in resistance to fluoroquinolones in S. aureus, yet they underline the contribution of efflux systems for the emergence of high-level resistance. All together, the results presented in this study show the potential role

  3. Structure-function analysis of Staphylococcus aureus amidase reveals the determinants of peptidoglycan recognition and cleavage.

    PubMed

    Büttner, Felix Michael; Zoll, Sebastian; Nega, Mulugeta; Götz, Friedrich; Stehle, Thilo

    2014-04-18

    The bifunctional major autolysin AtlA of Staphylococcus aureus cleaves the bacterium's peptidoglycan network (PGN) at two distinct sites during cell division. Deletion of the enzyme results in large cell clusters with disordered division patterns, indicating that AtlA could be a promising target for the development of new antibiotics. One of the two functions of AtlA is performed by the N-acetylmuramyl-l-alanine amidase AmiA, which cleaves the bond between the carbohydrate and the peptide moieties of PGN. To establish the structural requirements of PGN recognition and the enzymatic mechanism of cleavage, we solved the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of AmiA (AmiA-cat) in complex with a peptidoglycan-derived ligand at 1.55 Å resolution. The peptide stem is clearly visible in the structure, forming extensive contacts with protein residues by docking into an elongated groove. Less well defined electron density and the analysis of surface features indicate likely positions of the carbohydrate backbone and the pentaglycine bridge. Substrate specificity analysis supports the importance of the pentaglycine bridge for fitting into the binding cleft of AmiA-cat. PGN of S. aureus with l-lysine tethered with d-alanine via a pentaglycine bridge is completely hydrolyzed, whereas PGN of Bacillus subtilis with meso-diaminopimelic acid directly tethered with d-alanine is not hydrolyzed. An active site mutant, H370A, of AmiA-cat was completely inactive, providing further support for the proposed catalytic mechanism of AmiA. The structure reported here is not only the first of any bacterial amidase in which both the PGN component and the water molecule that carries out the nucleophilic attack on the carbonyl carbon of the scissile bond are present; it is also the first peptidoglycan amidase complex structure of an important human pathogen.

  4. Double triplex real-time PCR assay for simultaneous detection of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus hominis, and Staphylococcus haemolyticus and determination of their methicillin resistance directly from positive blood culture bottles.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Abdullah; Basustaoglu, A Celal

    2011-12-01

    We developed and validated here a double triplex real-time PCR assay to simultaneously detect and identify Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus hominis, Staphylococcus haemolyticus and their methicillin resistance in a single reaction directly from Gram-positive cocci-in-clusters (GPCs)-positive blood culture bottles. From August 15, 2009 through February 15, 2010, 238 GPC-positive samples were collected and identified by conventional methods as 11 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), 28 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), 176 MR coagulase-negative staphylococci (MRCoNS), 21 MSCoNS and two Enterococcus faecalis. The double triplex real-time PCR assay was targeted and detected tuf, nuc and mecA genes in the first tube and atlE, gap and mvaA genes in the second tube which could be run simultaneously. The detection limit of the assay was found at 10(3) CFU/ml for the atleE gene, 10(4) CFU/ml for the mva gene and 10(5) CFU/ml for gap, nuc, mecA and tuf genes based on seeding experiments. All Staphylococcus species except two S. epidermidis were correctly identified by the assay. The double triplex real-time PCR assay quickly and accurately detects S. aureus, S. epidermidis, S. hominis and S. haemolyticus and their methicillin resistance in a single reaction directly from positive blood culture bottles within 83 min. Copyright © 2011 Institut Pasteur. All rights reserved.

  5. SRD: a Staphylococcus regulatory RNA database.

    PubMed

    Sassi, Mohamed; Augagneur, Yoann; Mauro, Tony; Ivain, Lorraine; Chabelskaya, Svetlana; Hallier, Marc; Sallou, Olivier; Felden, Brice

    2015-05-01

    An overflow of regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) was identified in a wide range of bacteria. We designed and implemented a new resource for the hundreds of sRNAs identified in Staphylococci, with primary focus on the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. The "Staphylococcal Regulatory RNA Database" (SRD, http://srd.genouest.org/) compiled all published data in a single interface including genetic locations, sequences and other features. SRD proposes novel and simplified identifiers for Staphylococcal regulatory RNAs (srn) based on the sRNA's genetic location in S. aureus strain N315 which served as a reference. From a set of 894 sequences and after an in-depth cleaning, SRD provides a list of 575 srn exempt of redundant sequences. For each sRNA, their experimental support(s) is provided, allowing the user to individually assess their validity and significance. RNA-seq analysis performed on strains N315, NCTC8325, and Newman allowed us to provide further details, upgrade the initial annotation, and identified 159 RNA-seq independent transcribed sRNAs. The lists of 575 and 159 sRNAs sequences were used to predict the number and location of srns in 18 S. aureus strains and 10 other Staphylococci. A comparison of the srn contents within 32 Staphylococcal genomes revealed a poor conservation between species. In addition, sRNA structure predictions obtained with MFold are accessible. A BLAST server and the intaRNA program, which is dedicated to target prediction, were implemented. SRD is the first sRNA database centered on a genus; it is a user-friendly and scalable device with the possibility to submit new sequences that should spread in the literature. © 2015 Sassi et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  6. Evolving Epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Yoona; Aroutcheva, Alla; Hota, Bala; Weinstein, Robert A; Popovich, Kyle J

    2015-12-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections due to USA300 have become widespread in community and healthcare settings. It is unclear whether risk factors for bloodstream infections (BSIs) differ by strain type. To examine the epidemiology of S. aureus BSIs, including USA300 and non-USA300 MRSA strains. Retrospective observational study with molecular analysis. Large urban public hospital. Individuals with S. aureus BSIs from January 1, 2007 through December 31, 2013. We used electronic surveillance data to identify cases of S. aureus BSI. Available MRSA isolates were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Poisson regression was used to evaluate changes in BSI incidence over time. Risk factor data were collected by medical chart review and logistic regression was used for multivariate analysis of risk factors. A total of 1,015 cases of S. aureus BSIs were identified during the study period; 36% were due to MRSA. The incidence of hospital-onset (HO) MRSA BSIs decreased while that of community-onset (CO) MRSA BSIs remained stable. The rate of CO- and HO- methicillin-susceptible S. aureus infections both decreased over time. More than half of HO-MRSA BSIs were due to the USA300 strain type and for 4 years, the proportion of HO-MRSA BSIs due to USA300 exceeded 60%. On multivariate analysis, current or former drug use was the only epidemiologic risk factor for CO- or HO-MRSA BSIs due to USA300 strains. USA300 MRSA is endemic in communities and hospitals and certain populations (eg, those who use illicit drugs) may benefit from enhanced prevention efforts in the community.

  7. Cytoplasmic peptidoglycan intermediate levels in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Vemula, Harika; Ayon, Navid J; Gutheil, William G

    2016-02-01

    Intracellular cytoplasmic peptidoglycan (PG) intermediate levels were determined in Staphylococcus aureus during log-phase growth in enriched media. Levels of UDP-linked intermediates were quantitatively determined using ion pairing LC-MS/MS in negative mode, and amine intermediates were quantitatively determined stereospecifically as their Marfey's reagent derivatives in positive mode. Levels of UDP-linked intermediates in S. aureus varied from 1.4 μM for UDP-GlcNAc-Enolpyruvyate to 1200 μM for UDP-MurNAc. Levels of amine intermediates (L-Ala, D-Ala, D-Ala-D-Ala, L-Glu, D-Glu, and L-Lys) varied over a range of from 860 μM for D-Ala-D-Ala to 30-260 mM for the others. Total PG was determined from the D-Glu content of isolated PG, and used to estimate the rate of PG synthesis (in terms of cytoplasmic metabolite flux) as 690 μM/min. The total UDP-linked intermediates pool (2490 μM) is therefore sufficient to sustain growth for 3.6 min. Comparison of UDP-linked metabolite levels with published pathway enzyme characteristics demonstrates that enzymes on the UDP-branch range from >80% saturation for MurA, Z, and C, to <5% saturation for MurB. Metabolite levels were compared with literature values for Escherichia coli, with the major difference in UDP-intermediates being the level of UDP-MurNAc, which was high in S. aureus (1200 μM) and low in E. coli (45 μM). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  8. Staphopains Modulate Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Mootz, Joe M.; Malone, Cheryl L.; Shaw, Lindsey N.

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a known cause of chronic biofilm infections that can reside on medical implants or host tissue. Recent studies have demonstrated an important role for proteinaceous material in the biofilm structure. The S. aureus genome encodes many secreted proteases, and there is growing evidence that these enzymes have self-cleavage properties that alter biofilm integrity. However, the specific contribution of each protease and mechanism of biofilm modulation is not clear. To address this issue, we utilized a sigma factor B (ΔsigB) mutant where protease activity results in a biofilm-negative phenotype, thereby creating a condition where the protease(s) responsible for the phenotype could be identified. Using a plasma-coated microtiter assay, biofilm formation was restored to the ΔsigB mutant through the addition of the cysteine protease inhibitor E-64 or by using Staphostatin inhibitors that specifically target the extracellular cysteine proteases SspB and ScpA (called Staphopains). Through construction of gene deletion mutants, we determined that an sspB scpA double mutant restored ΔsigB biofilm formation, and this recovery could be replicated in plasma-coated flow cell biofilms. Staphopain levels were also found to be decreased under biofilm-forming conditions, possibly allowing biofilm establishment. The treatment of S. aureus biofilms with purified SspB or ScpA enzyme inhibited their formation, and ScpA was also able to disperse an established biofilm. The antibiofilm properties of ScpA were conserved across S. aureus strain lineages. These findings suggest an underappreciated role of the SspB and ScpA cysteine proteases in modulating S. aureus biofilm architecture. PMID:23798534

  9. Staphylococcus caprae native mitral valve infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Kwok, T'ng Choong; Poyner, Jennifer; Olson, Ewan; Henriksen, Peter; Koch, Oliver

    2016-10-01

    Staphylococcus caprae is a rare cause of infective endocarditis. Here, we report a case involving the native mitral valve in the absence of an implantable cardiac electronic device. A 76-year-old man presented with a 2 week history of confusion and pyrexia. His past medical history included an open reduction and internal fixation of a humeral fracture 17 years previously, which remained non-united despite further revision 4 years later. There was no history of immunocompromise or farm-animal contact. Two sets of blood culture bottles, more than 12 h apart, were positive for S. caprae . Trans-thoracic echocardiography revealed a 1×1.2 cm vegetation on the mitral valve, with moderate mitral regurgitation. Due to ongoing confusion, he had a magnetic resonance imaging brain scan, which showed a subacute small vessel infarct consistent with a thromboembolic source. A humeral SPECT-CT (single-photon emission computerized tomography-computerized tomography) scan showed no clear evidence of acute osteomyelitis. Surgical vegetectomy and mitral-valve repair were considered to reduce the risk of further systemic embolism and progressive valve infection. However, the potential risks of surgery to this patient led to a decision to pursue a cure with antibiotic therapy alone. He remained well 3 months after discharge, with repeat echocardiography demonstrating a reduction in the size of the vegetation (0.9 cm). Management of this infection was challenging due to its rarity and its unclear progression, complicated by the dilemma surrounding surgical intervention in a patient with a complex medical background.

  10. Comparative homology model building and docking evaluation for RNA III inhibiting peptide of Multi drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain MRSA252.

    PubMed

    Mevada, Vishal; Patel, Rajesh; Patel, Bhoomi; Chaudhari, Rajesh

    2018-04-01

    Since last several years, infection caused by Staphylococcus aureus is challenging to cure using conventional antibiotics. The organism is a Gram-positive bacterial pathogen that can cause serious diseases not only in humans but also in animals, such as various skin infections, pneumonia, endocarditis and toxin shock syndrome. This bacterium causes such diseases by producing macromolecules such as hemolysins, enterotoxins, proteases and toxic shock syndrome toxin (TSST-1). This organism had developed the multidrug resistance by acquiring MEC-A gene. This account for made organism to come into the category of Superbug. Several studies showed that, the toxin production is induced by AIP and RAP via the phosphorylation of TRAP. TRAP is a 21 kDa protein and was believed to be associated with the membrane via SvrA Phosphoamino acid analysis revealed that TRAP is histidine phosphorylated in a signal transduction pathway that is activated by RAP. The inhibition of TRAP could be done by RIP (RNAIII-inhibiting peptide). The structure for RIP is still undiscovered to be used as inhibitor. Present work has been carried out to get the structural insight with various online and offline homology modeling techniques such as SWISS-MODEL, MODBASE, GENO3D, CPHmodels and I-TASSER for getting unknown structural information target of RNAIII-activating protein from Staphylococcus aureus strain MRSA252 origin for their future exploration as a target in drug discovery process against MRSA. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from dairy cows and genetic diversity of resistant isolates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Staphylococcus aureus is a frequent and major contagious mastitis bacterial pathogen. The antibiotic treatment cure rates vary considerably from 4% to 92%. Staphylococcus aureus readily becomes resistant to antibiotics, resulting in persistent noncurable intramammary infection that usually results i...

  12. Identification of compounds inhibiting the C-S lyase activity of a cell extract from a Staphylococcus sp. isolated from human skin.

    PubMed

    Egert, M; Höhne, H-M; Weber, T; Simmering, R; Banowski, B; Breves, R

    2013-12-01

    The C-S lyase activity of bacteria in the human armpit releases highly malodorous, volatile sulfur compounds from nonvolatile precursor molecules. Such compounds significantly contribute to human body odour. Hence, C-S lyase represents an attractive target for anti-body-odour cosmetic products. Here, aiming at a final use in an ethanol-based deodorant formulation, 267 compounds and compound mixtures were screened for their ability to inhibit the C-S lyase activity of a Stapyhlococcus sp. crude extract. Staphylococcus sp. Isolate 128, closely related to Staphylococcus hominis, was chosen as the test bacterium, as it showed a reproducibly high specific C-S lyase activity on three different culturing media. Using a photometric assay and benzylcysteine as substrate, six rather complex, plant-derived compound mixtures and five well defined chemical compounds or compound mixtures were identified as inhibitors, leading to an inhibition of ≥70% at concentrations of ≤0·5% in the assay. The inhibition data have demonstrated that compounds with two vicinal hydroxyl groups or one hydroxyl and one keto group bound to an aryl residue are characteristic for the inhibition. The substances identified as C-S lyase inhibitors have the potential to improve the performance of anti-body-odour cosmetic products, for example, ethanol-based deodorants. Bacterial C-S lyase represents one of the key enzymes involved in human body odour formation. The aim of this study was to identify compounds inhibiting the C-S lyase activity of a Staphylococcus sp. isolate from the human skin. The compounds identified as the best inhibitors are characterized by the following features: two vicinal hydroxyl groups or one hydroxyl and one keto group bound to an aryl residue. They might be used to improve the performance of cosmetic products aiming to prevent the formation of microbially caused human body odour, for example, ethanol-based deodorants. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Molecular mechanisms of mucocutaneous immunity against Candida and Staphylococcus species.

    PubMed

    Maródi, László; Cypowyj, Sophie; Tóth, Beáta; Chernyshova, Liudmyla; Puel, Anne; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2012-11-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins are key components of the innate and adaptive immune responses to pathogenic microorganisms. Recent research on primary immunodeficiency disorders and the identification of patients carrying germline mutations in STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5B have highlighted the role of human STATs in host defense against various viruses, bacteria, and fungi. Mutations in STAT1 and STAT3 disrupt various cytokine pathways that control mucocutaneous immunity against Candida species, especially Candida albicans, and Staphylococcus species, especially Staphylococcus aureus. Here we consider inborn errors of immunity arising from mutations in either STAT1 or STAT3 that affect mucocutaneous immunity to Candida and Staphylococcus species. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Multiplex PCR assay to identify methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus haemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Schuenck, Ricardo P; Pereira, Eliezer M; Iorio, Natalia L P; Dos Santos, Kátia R N

    2008-04-01

    Staphylococcus haemolyticus is the most frequently coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species associated with antimicrobial resistance isolated from nosocomial infections. We developed an accurate and simple multiplex PCR assay to identify methicillin-resistant S. haemolyticus (MRSH) isolates. We designed species-specific primers of the mvaA gene that encodes a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A involved in the mevalonate pathway of the microorganism. Simultaneously, mecA gene primers of methicillin resistance were also used. The PCR assay was established using 16 strains of different reference Staphylococcus species and validated with a collection of 147 clinical staphylococcal isolates that were also phenotypically characterized. Reliable results for the detection of MRSH isolates were obtained for 100% of the strains evaluated, showing that this PCR assay can be used for the routine microbiology laboratories. This is the first report using species-specific multiplex PCR to detect a single segment of S. haemolyticus associated with a segment of mecA gene.

  15. Evaluation of Pyrrolidonyl Arylamidase Activity in Staphylococcus delphini.

    PubMed

    Compton, Samantha T; Kania, Stephen A; Robertson, Amy E; Lawhon, Sara D; Jenkins, Stephen G; Westblade, Lars F; Bemis, David A

    2017-03-01

    Clinical reference textbooks lack data for pyrrolidonyl arylamidase (PYR) activity in Staphylococcus delphini This study evaluated PYR activities of 21 S. delphini strains by reference broth, rapid disc, and rapid slide methods. Species and subgroup identifications were confirmed by nucleic acid-based methods and included nine group A and 12 group B strains. Testing by rapid PYR methods with products from four manufacturers was performed at two testing locations, and, with the exception of one strain tested at one location using reagents from one manufacturer, each S. delphini strain tested positive for PYR activity. Therefore, PYR may be a useful single-test adjunct for distinguishing Staphylococcus aureus from S. delphini and other members of the Staphylococcus intermedius group. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Phenazine antibiotic inspired discovery of potent bromophenazine antibacterial agents against Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Borrero, Nicholas V; Bai, Fang; Perez, Cristian; Duong, Benjamin Q; Rocca, James R; Jin, Shouguang; Huigens, Robert W

    2014-02-14

    Nearly all clinically used antibiotics have been (1) discovered from microorganisms (2) using phenotype screens to identify inhibitors of bacterial growth. The effectiveness of these antibiotics is attributed to their endogenous roles as bacterial warfare agents against competing microorganisms. Unfortunately, every class of clinically used antibiotic has been met with drug resistant bacteria. In fact, the emergence of resistant bacterial infections coupled to the dismal pipeline of new antibacterial agents has resulted in a global health care crisis. There is an urgent need for innovative antibacterial strategies and treatment options to effectively combat drug resistant bacterial pathogens. Here, we describe the implementation of a Pseudomonas competition strategy, using redox-active phenazines, to identify novel antibacterial leads against Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. In this report, we describe the chemical synthesis and evaluation of a diverse 27-membered phenazine library. Using this microbial warfare inspired approach, we have identified several bromophenazines with potent antibacterial activities against S. aureus and S. epidermidis. The most potent bromophenazine analogue from this focused library demonstrated a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 0.78-1.56 μM, or 0.31-0.62 μg mL(-1), against S. aureus and S. epidermidis and proved to be 32- to 64-fold more potent than the phenazine antibiotic pyocyanin in head-to-head MIC experiments. In addition to the discovery of potent antibacterial agents against S. aureus and S. epidermidis, we also report a detailed structure-activity relationship for this class of bromophenazine small molecules.

  17. Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis strain diversity underlying pediatric atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Byrd, Allyson L; Deming, Clay; Cassidy, Sara K B; Harrison, Oliver J; Ng, Weng-Ian; Conlan, Sean; Belkaid, Yasmine; Segre, Julia A; Kong, Heidi H

    2017-07-05

    The heterogeneous course, severity, and treatment responses among patients with atopic dermatitis (AD; eczema) highlight the complexity of this multifactorial disease. Prior studies have used traditional typing methods on cultivated isolates or sequenced a bacterial marker gene to study the skin microbial communities of AD patients. Shotgun metagenomic sequence analysis provides much greater resolution, elucidating multiple levels of microbial community assembly ranging from kingdom to species and strain-level diversification. We analyzed microbial temporal dynamics from a cohort of pediatric AD patients sampled throughout the disease course. Species-level investigation of AD flares showed greater Staphylococcus aureus predominance in patients with more severe disease and Staphylococcus epidermidis predominance in patients with less severe disease. At the strain level, metagenomic sequencing analyses demonstrated clonal S. aureus strains in more severe patients and heterogeneous S. epidermidis strain communities in all patients. To investigate strain-level biological effects of S. aureus , we topically colonized mice with human strains isolated from AD patients and controls. This cutaneous colonization model demonstrated S. aureus strain-specific differences in eliciting skin inflammation and immune signatures characteristic of AD patients. Specifically, S. aureus isolates from AD patients with more severe flares induced epidermal thickening and expansion of cutaneous T helper 2 (T H 2) and T H 17 cells. Integrating high-resolution sequencing, culturing, and animal models demonstrated how functional differences of staphylococcal strains may contribute to the complexity of AD disease. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, Mun Su; Moritz, Brelan E.; Xie, Gary

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 and fer- ments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this spo- rogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attrac- tive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemi- cellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome se- quence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strainmore » 36D1, is presented and discussed.« less

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Gary; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 and fer-ments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this sporogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attractive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemi-cellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome squence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed.

  20. Characterization of a bacterium of the genus Azospirillum from cellulolytic nitrogen-fixing mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Wong, P P; Stenberg, N E; Edgar, L

    1980-03-01

    A bacterium with the taxonomic characteristics of the genus Azospirillum was isolated from celluloytic N2-fixing mixed cultures. Its characteristics fit the descriptions of both Azopirillum lipoferum (Beijerinck) comb. nov. and Azospirillum brasilense sp. nov. It may be a variant strain of A. lipoferum. In mixed cultures with cellulolytic organisms, the bacterium grew and fixed N2 with cellelose as a sole source of energy and carbon. The mixed cultures used cellulose from leaves of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), corn (Zea mays L.), and big bluestem grass (Andropogon gerardii Vitm). Microaerophilic N2-fixing bacteria of the genus Azospirillum, such as the bacterium we isolated, may be important contributors of fixed N2 in soil with partial anaerobiosis and cellulose decomposition.

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Mun Su; Moritz, Brélan E.; Xie, Gary; Glavina del Rio, T.; Dalin, E.; Tice, H.; Bruce, D.; Goodwin, L.; Chertkov, O.; Brettin, T.; Han, C.; Detter, C.; Pitluck, S.; Land, Miriam L.; Patel, Milind; Ou, Mark; Harbrucker, Roberta; Ingram, Lonnie O.; Shanmugam, K. T.

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 °C and pH 5.0 and ferments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this sporogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 °C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attractive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemicellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome sequence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed. PMID:22675583

  2. Deinococcus mumbaiensis sp. nov., a radiation-resistant pleomorphic bacterium isolated from Mumbai, India.

    PubMed

    Shashidhar, Ravindranath; Bandekar, Jayant R

    2006-01-01

    A radiation-resistant, Gram-negative and pleomorphic bacterium (CON-1) was isolated from a contaminated tryptone glucose yeast extract agar plate in the laboratory. It was red pigmented, nonmotile, nonsporulating, and aerobic, and contained MK-8 as respiratory quinone. The cell wall of this bacterium contained ornithine. The major fatty acids were C16:0, C16:1, C17:0, C18:1 and iso C18:0. The DNA of CON-1 had a G+C content of 70 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that CON-1 exhibited a maximum similarity (94.72%) with Deinococcus grandis. Based on the genotypic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, the bacterium CON-1 was identified as a new species of the genus Deinococcus, for which the name Deinococcus mumbaiensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of D. mumbaiensis is CON-1 (MTCC 7297(T)=DSM 17424(T)).

  3. Halomonas maura is a physiologically versatile bacterium of both ecological and biotechnological interest.

    PubMed

    Llamas, Inmaculada; del Moral, Ana; Martínez-Checa, Fernando; Arco, Yolanda; Arias, Soledad; Quesada, Emilia

    2006-01-01

    Halomonas maura is a bacterium of great metabolic versatility. We summarise in this work some of the properties that make it a very interesting microorganism both from an ecological and biotechnological point of view. It plays an active role in the nitrogen cycle, is capable of anaerobic respiration in the presence of nitrate and has recently been identified as a diazotrophic bacterium. Of equal interest is mauran, the exopolysaccharide produced by H. maura, which contributes to the formation of biofilms and thus affords the bacterium advantages in the colonisation of its saline niches. Mauran is highly viscous, shows thixotropic and pseudoplastic behaviour, has the capacity to capture heavy metals and exerts a certain immunomodulator effect in medicine. All these attributes have prompted us to make further investigations into its molecular characteristics. To date we have described 15 open reading frames (ORF's) related to exopolysaccharide production, nitrogen fixation and nitrate reductase activity among others.

  4. [Study on anti-bacterium activity of ginkgolic acids and their momomers].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoming; Zhu, Wei; Chen, Jun; Qian, Zhiyu; Xie, Jimin

    2004-09-01

    Ginkgolic acids and their three monomers were separated from ginkgo sarcotestas. The anti-bacterium activity of ginkgolic acids were tested. The relation between the anti-bacterium activity and side chain of ginkgolic acid were studied. The MIC of ginkgolic acids and their three monomers and salicylic acid were tested. Ginkgolic acid has strong inhibitive effect on G+-bacterium. Salicylic acid has no side chain, so no anti-bacterial activity. When the length of gingkolic acid side chain is C13:0, it has the strongest anti-bacterial activity in three monomers. The side chain of ginkgolic acid is the key functional group that possessed anti-bacterial activity. The length of Ginkgolic acid was the main effective factor of anti-bacterial activity.

  5. [Investigation of biofilm formation properties of staphylococcus isolates].

    PubMed

    Öcal, Duygu Nilüfer; Dolapçı, İştar; Karahan, Zeynep Ceren; Tekeli, Alper

    2017-01-01

    Biofilm production is an important virulence factor which allows staphylococci to adhere to medical devices. The principal component of biofilm is a "polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA)" which is composed of a beta-1,6-N-acetylglucosamine polymer synthesized by an enzyme (N-acetylglucosamine transferase) encoded by the ica operon found on the bacterial chromosome. This operon is composed of four genes (A, B, C, and D), and a transposable element IS256. In this study, we aimed to determine the biofilm production characteristics of invasive/non-invasive staphylococcus isolates and different staphylococcus species. Biofilm production of 166 staphylococci was phenotypically investigated on Congo Red Agar (CRA); the presence of icaA, icaD and IS256 genes were investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). 74 of the isolates (44.6%) were identified as methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), 25 (15.1%) as methicillin sensitive S.aureus (MSSA), 25 (37.3%) as Staphylococcus hominis, 20 (12%) as S.epidermidis, ten (15%) as Staphylococcus haemolyticus, nine (13.4%) as Staphylococcus capitis, two (3%) Staphylococcus saprophyticus and one (1.5%) as Staphylococcus warnerii. Of the MRSA strains, 52 were isolated from blood and 22 from nose; all MSSA strains were isolated from nose cultures. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) strains were composed of invasive and non-invasive strains isolated from nose, catheter tip and blood cultures from patients with catheter. Production with CRA method was found to be statistically significant in invasive isolates (p< 0.001). It is concluded that; as the biofilm formation capacity of invasive isolates can cause refractory infections and the importance of carriage and hospital infections of these bacteria, it is important to prevent the spread of these isolates. A combination of phenotypic and genotypic tests is recommended for the investigation of biofilm formation in staphylococci. 40.3% of the CoNS isolates, and 85

  6. PHAGE FORMATION IN STAPHYLOCOCCUS MUSCAE CULTURES

    PubMed Central

    Price, Winston H.

    1950-01-01

    1. Four strains of Staphylococcus muscae have been isolated which differ in their growth rates and phage syntheses in Fildes' synthetic medium. 2. Two of the strains when singly infected cannot release phage in Fildes' synthetic medium unless a substance present in certain acid-hydrolyzed proteins is added to the medium. One of these strains also requires other substance(s) present in acid-hydrolyzed proteins in order to grow in Fildes' medium. 3. The two strains which do not require the addition of the phage-stimulating factor have been found either to synthesize this substance, or one similar to it. One of these strains will not grow in Fildes' medium unless substance(s) present in acid-hydrolyzed proteins is added to the medium. 4. The purified acid-hydrolyzed protein factor necessary for virus liberation does not affect the multiplication rate of uninfected S. muscae cells in Fildes' synthetic medium. 5. The substance is not needed for the adsorption or the invasion of the host cell by the virus. In the absence of the factor, the virus is adsorbed to the cell and "kills" it. 6. An analysis carried out by means of the one-step growth curve technique has indicated that the substance is not concerned simply with the mechanism of virus release, but is necessary for some initial stage in virus synthesis. 7. With one bacterial strain not requiring the AHPF, aspartic acid had to be present at least during the minimum latent period for the cell to form virus. 8. In the absence of aspartic acid, the virus was adsorbed to the cell and killed it, but no virus was released from singly infected bacteria. 9. If the cells were grown in a medium containing aspartic acid and then resuspended in the medium minus aspartic acid, no virus was released, although such cells contained at least two times the amount of aspartic acid necessary for the burst size in the complete medium. 10. Aspartic acid, a constituent of the virus particle, appears from an analysis of one-step growth

  7. Whole Genome Sequencing of Danish Staphylococcus argenteus Reveals a Genetically Diverse Collection with Clear Separation from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Thomas A; Bartels, Mette D; Høgh, Silje V; Dons, Lone E; Pedersen, Michael; Jensen, Thøger G; Kemp, Michael; Skov, Marianne N; Gumpert, Heidi; Worning, Peder; Westh, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus argenteus ( S. argenteus ) is a newly identified Staphylococcus species that has been misidentified as Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus ) and is clinically relevant. We identified 25 S. argenteus genomes in our collection of whole genome sequenced S. aureus . These genomes were compared to publicly available genomes and a phylogeny revealed seven clusters corresponding to seven clonal complexes. The genome of S. argenteus was found to be different from the genome of S. aureus and a core genome analysis showed that ~33% of the total gene pool was shared between the two species, at 90% homology level. An assessment of mobile elements shows flow of SCC mec cassettes, plasmids, phages, and pathogenicity islands, between S. argenteus and S. aureus . This dataset emphasizes that S. argenteus and S. aureus are two separate species that share genetic material.

  8. Genetic Variation among Staphylococcus aureus Strains from Bovine Milk and Their Relevance to Methicillin-Resistant Isolates from Humans ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hata, Eiji; Katsuda, Ken; Kobayashi, Hideki; Uchida, Ikuo; Tanaka, Kiyoshi; Eguchi, Masashi

    2010-01-01

    In genetic analysis of bovine Staphylococcus aureus isolates that are recognized as an important pathogenic bacterium in bovine mastitis, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) showed strong correlation to the results of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, coa PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), spa typing, and the coagulase serotyping method. According to MLST results, strains derived from sequence type 97 (ST97) and ST705 were suggested as not only dominant bovine S. aureus lineages in Japan but also pandemic bovine S. aureus lineages. Although both lineages seem to be distantly related to each other by phylogenetic analysis, both had common characteristics, i.e., lukM/lukF′-PV and coagulase serotype VI. These characteristics were very rare among minor bovine strains and human strains and may contribute to the host specificity of these lineages. Four methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates were first confirmed from bovine milk in Japan; these isolates showed geno- and serotypes that were identical or similar to those of human MRSA isolates in Japan (ST5, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type II [SCCmec II], Spa type t002 or t375, and coagulase serotype II, and ST89, SCCmec IIIa, Spa type t5266, and coagulase serotype I). ST5 and ST89 are uncommon among bovine isolates in the world, whereas these STs are common among human MRSA isolates in Japan. PMID:20392913

  9. Evaluation of Ultrasound-Induced Damage to Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus by Flow Cytometry and Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiao; Ahn, Juhee; Liu, Donghong; Chen, Shiguo; Ye, Xingqian

    2016-01-01

    As a nonthermal sterilization technique, ultrasound has attracted great interest in the field of food preservation. In this study, flow cytometry and transmission electron microscopy were employed to investigate ultrasound-induced damage to Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. For flow cytometry studies, single staining with propidium iodide (PI) or carboxyfluorescein diacetate (cFDA) revealed that ultrasound treatment caused cell death by compromising membrane integrity, inactivating intracellular esterases, and inhibiting metabolic performance. The results showed that ultrasound damage was independent of initial bacterial concentrations, while the mechanism of cellular damage differed according to the bacterial species. For the Gram-negative bacterium E. coli, ultrasound worked first on the outer membrane rather than the cytoplasmic membrane. Based on the double-staining results, we inferred that ultrasound treatment might be an all-or-nothing process: cells ruptured and disintegrated by ultrasound cannot be revived, which can be considered an advantage of ultrasound over other nonthermal techniques. Transmission electron microscopy studies revealed that the mechanism of ultrasound-induced damage was multitarget inactivation, involving the cell wall, cytoplasmic membrane, and inner structure. Understanding of the irreversible antibacterial action of ultrasound has great significance for its further utilization in the food industry. PMID:26746712

  10. Variability of antibiotic susceptibility and toxin production of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from skin, soft tissue, and bone related infections

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic commensal bacterium that mostly colonizes the skin and soft tissues. The pathogenicity of S. aureus is due to both its ability to resist antibiotics, and the production of toxins. Here, we characterize a group of genes responsible for toxin production and antibiotic resistance of S. aureus strains isolated from skin, soft tissue, and bone related infections. Results A total of 136 S. aureus strains were collected from five different types of infection: furuncles, pyomyositis, abscesses, Buruli ulcers, and osteomyelitis, from hospital admissions and out-patients in Benin. All strains were resistant to benzyl penicillin, while 25% were resistant to methicillin, and all showed sensitivity to vancomycin. Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) was the most commonly produced virulence factor (70%), followed by staphylococcal enterotoxin B (44%). Exfoliative toxin B was produced by 1.3% of the strains, and was only found in isolates from Buruli ulcers. The tsst-1, sec, and seh genes were rarely detected (≤1%). Conclusions This study provides new insight into the prevalence of toxin and antibiotic resistance genes in S. aureus strains responsible for skin, soft tissue, and bone infections. Our results showed that PVL was strongly associated with pyomyositis and osteomyelitis, and that there is a high prevalence of PVL-MRSA skin infections in Benin. PMID:23924370

  11. Variability of antibiotic susceptibility and toxin production of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from skin, soft tissue, and bone related infections.

    PubMed

    Sina, Haziz; Ahoyo, Théodora A; Moussaoui, Wardi; Keller, Daniel; Bankolé, Honoré S; Barogui, Yves; Stienstra, Ymkje; Kotchoni, Simeon O; Prévost, Gilles; Baba-Moussa, Lamine

    2013-08-08

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic commensal bacterium that mostly colonizes the skin and soft tissues. The pathogenicity of S. aureus is due to both its ability to resist antibiotics, and the production of toxins. Here, we characterize a group of genes responsible for toxin production and antibiotic resistance of S. aureus strains isolated from skin, soft tissue, and bone related infections. A total of 136 S. aureus strains were collected from five different types of infection: furuncles, pyomyositis, abscesses, Buruli ulcers, and osteomyelitis, from hospital admissions and out-patients in Benin. All strains were resistant to benzyl penicillin, while 25% were resistant to methicillin, and all showed sensitivity to vancomycin. Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) was the most commonly produced virulence factor (70%), followed by staphylococcal enterotoxin B (44%). Exfoliative toxin B was produced by 1.3% of the strains, and was only found in isolates from Buruli ulcers. The tsst-1, sec, and seh genes were rarely detected (≤1%). This study provides new insight into the prevalence of toxin and antibiotic resistance genes in S. aureus strains responsible for skin, soft tissue, and bone infections. Our results showed that PVL was strongly associated with pyomyositis and osteomyelitis, and that there is a high prevalence of PVL-MRSA skin infections in Benin.

  12. The mPEG-PCL Copolymer for Selective Fermentation of Staphylococcus lugdunensis Against Candida parapsilosis in the Human Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Ming-Shan; Wang, Yanhan; Marito, Shinta; Huang, Stephen; Lin, Wan-Zhen; Gangoiti, Jon A; Barshop, Bruce A; Hyun, Choi; Lee, Woan-Ruah; Sanford, James A; Gallo, Richard L; Ran, Yuping; Chen, Wan-Tzu; Huang, Chun-Jen; Hsieh, Ming-Fa; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Many human skin diseases, such as seborrheic dermatitis, potentially occur due to the over-growth of fungi. It remains a challenge to develop fungicides with a lower risk of generating resistant fungi and non-specifically killing commensal microbes. Our probiotic approaches using a selective fermentation initiator of skin commensal bacteria, fermentation metabolites or their derivatives provide novel therapeutics to rein in the over-growth of fungi. Staphylococcus lugdunensis (S. lugdunensis) bacteria and Candida parapsilosis (C. parapsilosis) fungi coexist in the scalp microbiome. S. lugdunensis interfered with the growth of C. parapsilosis via fermentation. A methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(ε-caprolactone) (mPEG-PCL) copolymer functioned as a selective fermentation initiator of S. lugdunensis, selectively triggering the S. lugdunensis fermentation to produce acetic and isovaleric acids. The acetic acid and its pro-drug diethyleneglycol diacetate (Ac-DEG-Ac) effectively suppressed the growth of C. parapsilosis in vitro and impeded the fungal expansion in the human dandruff. We demonstrate for the first time that S. lugdunensis is a skin probiotic bacterium that can exploit mPEG-PCL to yield fungicidal short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). The concept of bacterial fermentation as a part of skin immunity to re-balance the dysbiotic microbiome warrants a novel avenue for studying the probiotic function of the skin microbiome in promoting health. PMID:28111598

  13. Phloretin derived from apple can reduce alpha-hemolysin expression in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuan; Liu, Shui; Li, Wenhua; Zhang, Bing; Liu, Bowen; Liu, Yan; Deng, Xuming; Peng, Liping

    2015-08-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has become increasingly important because it is the most common cause of hospital-acquired infections, which have become globally epidemic. Our study specifically focused on the MRSA strain USA300, which was shown in 2014 to be responsible for the most current pandemic of highly virulent MRSA in the United States. We aimed to evaluate the in vitro effect of phloretin on USA300. Susceptibility testing, western blotting assays, hemolysis assays and real-time RT-PCR were employed to examine the in vitro effects of phloretin on alpha-hemolysin (Hla) production when the bacterium was co-cultured with phloretin. The protective effect of phloretin against the USA300-mediated injury of human alveolar epithelial cells (A549) was tested using the live/dead analysis and cytotoxicity assays. We showed that sub-inhibitory concentrations of phloretin have no effect on bacterial viability; however, they can markedly inhibit the production of Hla in culture supernatants and the transcriptional levels of hla (the gene encoding Hla) and agrA (the accessory gene regulator). Phloretin, at a final concentration of 16 µg/ml, could protect A549 cells from injury caused by USA300 in the co-culture system. Our study suggests that phloretin might have a potential application in the development of treatment for MRSA infections.

  14. Metabolic Footprint Analysis Uncovers Strain Specific Overflow Metabolism and D-Isoleucine Production of Staphylococcus Aureus COL and HG001

    PubMed Central

    Dörries, Kirsten; Lalk, Michael

    2013-01-01

    During infection processes, Staphylococcus aureus is able to survive within the host and to invade tissues and cells. For studying the interaction between the pathogenic bacterium and the host cell, the bacterial growth behaviour and its metabolic adaptation to the host cell environment provides first basic information. In the present study, we therefore cultivated S. aureus COL and HG001 in the eukaryotic cell culture medium RPMI 1640 and analyzed the extracellular metabolic uptake and secretion patterns of both commonly used laboratory strains. Extracellular accumulation of D-isoleucine was detected starting during exponential growth of COL and HG001 in RPMI medium. This non-canonical D-amino acid is known to play a regulatory role in adaptation processes. Moreover, individual uptake of glucose, accumulation of acetate, further overflow metabolites, and intermediates of the branched-chain amino acid metabolism constitute unique metabolic footprints. Altogether these time-resolved footprint analyses give first metabolic insights into staphylococcal growth behaviour in a culture medium used for infection related studies. PMID:24312553

  15. Antibiotic resistance and molecular characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from backyard-raised pigs and pig workers.

    PubMed

    Momoh, Asabe Halimat; Kwaga, Jacob K P; Bello, Mohammed; Sackey, Anthony K B; Larsen, Anders Rhod

    2018-04-19

    Staphylococcus aureus is a commensal and pathogenic bacterium with impact on public health and livestock industry. The study investigated nasal carriage, antibiotic resistance, and molecular characterization of S. aureus in pigs and pig workers. Nasal swabs from 300 backyard-raised pigs and 101 pig workers were used for the study. Resulting isolates were confirmed using MALDI-TOF MS, tested for antibiotic resistance, and three different multiplex PCRs were used to detect enterotoxin, mecA, spaA, scn, and pvl genes. spa typing was used to annotate the isolates into MLST clonal complexes (CC). Structured questionnaire was used to access possible risk factors for S. aureus carriage. The prevalence of S. aureus in pigs and pig workers were 5.3 and 12.9%, respectively. The isolates were resistant to beta-lactams (97%), tetracycline (62%), sulfonamide (52%), aminoglycoside (20.6%), fluoroquinolone (24%), and mupirocin (3.4%). Twenty seven (93%) of the isolates carried scn, 7(24%) pvl, and 12 (41%) enterotoxin genes, respectively. Questionnaire survey showed medical-related occupation of household members was associated (p < 0.5) with S. aureus carriage. This study suggests the presence of human multidrug resistant strains of S. aureus, high carriage of pvl, and enterotoxin genes, and CC5, CC15, and CC152 were the CC-groups shared among pigs and pig workers.

  16. Ammonificins C and D, Hydroxyethylamine Chromene Derivatives from a Cultured Marine Hydrothermal Vent Bacterium, Thermovibrio ammonificans

    PubMed Central

    Andrianasolo, Eric H.; Haramaty, Liti; Rosario-Passapera, Richard; Vetriani, Costantino; Falkowski, Paul; White, Eileen; Lutz, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Chemical and biological investigation of the cultured marine hydrothermal vent bacterium, Thermovibrio ammonifican led to the isolation of two hydroxyethylamine chromene derivatives, ammonificins C and D. Their structures were elucidated using combination of NMR and mass spectrometry. Absolute stereochemistry was ascertained by comparison of experimental and calculated CD spectra. Biological evaluation and assessment were determined using the patented ApopScreen cell-based screen for apoptosis-induction. Ammonificins C and D induce apoptosis in micromolar concentrations. To our knowledge, this finding is the first report of chemical compounds that induce apoptosis from the cultured deep-sea marine organism, hydrothermal vent bacterium, Thermovibrio ammonificans. PMID:23170085

  17. Investigations of Iron Minerals Formed by Dissimilatory Alkaliphilic Bacterium with 57Fe Mössbauer Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chistyakova, N. I.; Rusakov, V. S.; Shapkin, A. A.; Zhilina, T. N.; Zavarzina, D. G.; Lančok, A.; Kohout, J.

    2010-07-01

    Anaerobic alkaliphilic bacterium of Geoalkalibacter ferrihydriticus type (strain Z-0531), isolated from a bottom sediment sample from the weakly mineralized soda Lake Khadyn, have been analyzed. The strain uses the amorphous Fe(III)-hydroxide (AFH) as an electron acceptor and acetate CH3COO- as an electron donor. Mössbauer investigations of solid phase samples obtained during the process of the bacterium growth were carried out at room temperature, 77.8 K, 4.2 K without and with the presence of an external magnetic field (6 T) applied perpendicular to the γ-bebam.

  18. From Genome to Function: Systematic Analysis of the Soil Bacterium Bacillus Subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Crawshaw, Samuel G.; Wipat, Anil

    2001-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis is a sporulating Gram-positive bacterium that lives primarily in the soil and associated water sources. Whilst this bacterium has been studied extensively in the laboratory, relatively few studies have been undertaken to study its activity in natural environments. The publication of the B. subtilis genome sequence and subsequent systematic functional analysis programme have provided an opportunity to develop tools for analysing the role and expression of Bacillus genes in situ. In this paper we discuss analytical approaches that are being developed to relate genes to function in environments such as the rhizosphere. PMID:18628943

  19. Description of a bacterium associated with redmouth disease of rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, A.J.; Rucker, R.R.; Ewing, W.H.

    1966-01-01

    A description was given of a gram-negative, peritrichously flagellated, fermentative bacterium that was isolated on numerous occasions from kidney tissues of rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) afflicted with redmouth disease. Although the bacteria apparently were members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, it was impossible to determine their taxonomic position within the family with certainty. Hence it was recommended that their taxonomic position remain sub judice for the present. As a temporary designation RM bacterium was used. Redmouth disease was transmitted from infected to normal fish through the medium of water.

  20. Communications of Staphylococcus aureus and non-aureus Staphylococcus species from bovine intramammary infections and teat apex colonization.

    PubMed

    Mahmmod, Yasser S; Klaas, Ilka Christine; Svennesen, Line; Pedersen, Karl; Ingmer, Hanne

    2018-05-16

    The role of non-aureus staphylococci (NAS) in the risk of acquisition of intramammary infections with Staphylococcus aureus is vague and still under debate. The objectives of this study were to (1) investigate the distribution patterns of NAS species from milk and teat skin in dairy herds with automatic milking systems, and (2) examine if the isolated NAS influences the expression of S. aureus virulence factors controlled by the accessory gene regulator (agr) quorum sensing system. In 8 herds, 14 to 20 cows with elevated somatic cell count were randomly selected for teat skin swabbing and aseptic quarter foremilk samples from right hind and left front quarters. Teat skin swabs were collected using the modified wet-dry method and milk samples were taken aseptically for bacterial culture. Colonies from quarters with suspicion of having NAS in milk or teat skin samples (or both) were subjected to MALDI-TOF assay for species identification. To investigate the interaction between S. aureus and NAS, 81 isolates NAS were subjected to a qualitative β-galactosidase reporter plate assay. In total, 373 NAS isolates were identified representing 105 from milk and 268 from teat skin of 284 quarters (= 142 cows). Sixteen different NAS species were identified, 15 species from teat skin and 10 species from milk. The most prevalent NAS species identified from milk were Staphylococcus epidermidis (50%), Staphylococcus haemolyticus (15%), and Staphylococcus chromogenes (11%), accounting for 76%. Meanwhile, the most prevalent NAS species from teat skin were Staphylococcus equorum (43%), S. haemolyticus (16%), and Staphylococcus cohnii (14%), accounting for 73%. Using reporter gene fusions monitoring transcriptional activity of key virulence factors and regulators, we found that out of 81 supernatants of NAS isolates, 77% reduced expression of hla, encoding a-hemolysin, 70% reduced expression of RNAIII, the key effector molecule of agr, and 61% reduced expression of spa encoding

  1. Isolation and molecular characterization of multiresistant Staphylococcus sciuri and Staphylococcus haemolyticus associated with skin and soft-tissue infections.

    PubMed

    Shittu, Adebayo; Lin, Johnson; Morrison, Donald; Kolawole, Deboye

    2004-01-01

    The isolation, molecular identification and genotyping of multiresistant Staphylococcus sciuri and Staphylococcus haemolyticus from skin and soft-tissue infections are reported. Accurate and full identification of three coagulase-negative staphylococcal isolates was achieved using PCR, while the API STAPH method failed to identify an isolate of S. haemolyticus fully. The PCR assay, which detects polymorphism in the 16S-23S rRNA spacer region, is shown to be potentially useful for rapid and accurate identification of coagulase-negative staphylococci. Identical PFGE type and antibiotic-resistance profiles of two methicillin-resistant S. haemolyticus isolates in this study suggest the existence of a multiresistant community clone.

  2. Cadherin Domains in the Polysaccharide-Degrading Marine Bacterium Saccharophagus degradans 2-40 Are Carbohydrate-Binding Modules▿

    PubMed Central

    Fraiberg, Milana; Borovok, Ilya; Bayer, Edward A.; Weiner, Ronald M.; Lamed, Raphael

    2011-01-01

    The complex polysaccharide-degrading marine bacterium Saccharophagus degradans strain 2-40 produces putative proteins that contain numerous cadherin and cadherin-like domains involved in intercellular contact interactions. The current study reveals that both domain types exhibit reversible calcium-dependent binding to different complex polysaccharides which serve as growth substrates for the bacterium. PMID:21036994

  3. Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis CNRZ327, a Dairy Bacterium with Anti-Inflammatory Properties.

    PubMed

    El Kafsi, Hela; Binesse, Johan; Loux, Valentin; Buratti, Julien; Boudebbouze, Samira; Dervyn, Rozenn; Hammani, Amal; Maguin, Emmanuelle; van de Guchte, Maarten

    2014-07-17

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis CNRZ327 is a dairy bacterium with anti-inflammatory properties both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we report the genome sequence of this bacterium, which appears to contain no less than 215 insertion sequence (IS) elements, an exceptionally high number regarding the small genome size of the strain. Copyright © 2014 El Kafsi et al.

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of an Anaerobic and Extremophilic Bacterium, Caldanaerobacter yonseiensis, Isolated from a Geothermal Hot Stream

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Jae; Lee, Yong-Jik; Park, Gun-Seok; Kim, Byoung-Chan; Lee, Sang Jun; Shin, Jae-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Caldanaerobacter yonseiensis is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, spore-forming bacterium, which was isolated from a geothermal hot stream in Indonesia. This bacterium utilizes xylose and produces a variety of proteases. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of C. yonseiensis, which reveals insights into the pentose phosphate pathway and protein degradation metabolism in thermophilic microorganisms. PMID:24201201

  5. An Improved Medium for Growing Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-19

    implantitis, chronic wound infections , chronic rhinosinusitis, endocarditis , and ocular infections (Archer et al., 2011). In addition, emerging evidence...causes of human bacterial infections , Staphylococcus aureus, a gram positive organism, is a ubiquitous oppor tunistic pathogen that commonly colonizes...resistant to antibiotic therapy. It has been shown that S. aureus biofilms are involved in oste omyelitis; indwelling medical device infections ; and peri

  6. 21 CFR 866.3700 - Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents. 866.3700 Section 866.3700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3700...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3700 - Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents. 866.3700 Section 866.3700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3700...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3700 - Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents. 866.3700 Section 866.3700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3700...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3700 - Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents. 866.3700 Section 866.3700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3700...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3700 - Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents. 866.3700 Section 866.3700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3700...

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Staphylococcus haemolyticus Type Strain SGAir0252.

    PubMed

    Premkrishnan, Balakrishnan N V; Junqueira, Ana Carolina M; Uchida, Akira; Purbojati, Rikky W; Houghton, James N I; Chénard, Caroline; Wong, Anthony; Kolundžija, Sandra; Clare, Megan E; Kushwaha, Kavita K; Panicker, Deepa; Putra, Alexander; Gaultier, Nicolas E; Heinle, Cassie E; Vettath, Vineeth Kodengil; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I; Schuster, Stephan C

    2018-05-10

    Staphylococcus haemolyticus is a coagulase-negative staphylococcal species that is part of the skin microbiome and an opportunistic human pathogen. The strain SGAir0252 was isolated from tropical air samples collected in Singapore, and its complete genome comprises one chromosome of 2.63 Mb and one plasmid of 41.6 kb. Copyright © 2018 Premkrishnan et al.

  12. Microstructures as IR-sensors with Staphylococcus aureus bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baikova, T. V.; Danilov, P. A.; Gonchukov, S. A.; Yermachenko, V. M.; Ionin, A. A.; Khmelnitskii, R. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Nguyen, T. T. H.; Rudenko, A. A.; Saraeva, I. N.; Svistunova, T. S.; Zayarny, D. A.

    2017-09-01

    Using a micro-hole grating in a supported silver film as a laser-fabricated novel optical platform for surface-enhanced IR absoprtion/reflection spectroscopy, characteristic absorption bands of Staphylococcus aureus, especially - its buried carotenoid fragments - were detected in FT-IR spectra with 10-fold analytical enhancement, paving the way to spectral express-identification of the pathogenic microorganisms.

  13. Global Transcriptome Analysis of Staphylococcus aureus Response to Hydrogen Peroxide†

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wook; Small, David A.; Toghrol, Freshteh; Bentley, William E.

    2006-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus responds with protective strategies against phagocyte-derived reactive oxidants to infect humans. Herein, we report the transcriptome analysis of the cellular response of S. aureus to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress. The data indicate that the oxidative response includes the induction of genes involved in virulence, DNA repair, and notably, anaerobic metabolism. PMID:16452450

  14. An Interdisciplinary Experiment: Azo-Dye Metabolism by "Staphylococcus Aureus"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brocklesby, Kayleigh; Smith, Robert; Sharp, Duncan

    2012-01-01

    An interdisciplinary and engaging practical is detailed which offers great versatility in the study of a qualitative and quantitative metabolism of azo-dyes by "Staphylococcus aureus". This practical has broad scope for adaptation in the number and depth of variables to allow a focused practical experiment or small research project. Azo-dyes are…

  15. Novel pleuromutilin derivatives with excellent antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peng; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Sun, Yong-Xue; Liu, Jian-Hua; Yang, Bing; Wang, Yu-Zhong; Wang, Yu-Liang

    2009-06-01

    Ten novel pleuromutilin derivatives with thioether moiety and heterocyclic carboxamide or chloroformate group in the side chain were synthesized and confirmed by (1)H NMR, IR and HRMS. The results of the antibacterial activity showed that the title compounds had excellent antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, among which the MIC of 5f reached 0.03125 microg/mL.

  16. Silver nanoparticles toxicity against airborne strains of Staphylococcus spp.

    PubMed

    Wolny-Koładka, Katarzyna A; Malina, Dagmara K

    2017-11-10

    The aim of this study was to explore the toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) synthesized by chemical reduction method assessment with regard to airborne strains of Staphylococcus spp. The first step of the experiment was the preparation of silver nanoparticle suspension. The suspension was obtained by a fast and simple chemical method involving the reduction of silver ions through a reducing factor in the presence of the suitable stabilizer required to prevent the aggregation. In the second stage, varied instrumental techniques were used for the analysis and characterization of the obtained nanostructures. Third, the bacteria of the Staphylococcus genus were isolated from the air under stable conditions with 47 sports and recreational horses, relatively. Next, isolated strains were identified using biochemical and spectrophotometric methods. The final step was the evaluation of the Staphylococcus genus sensitivity to nanosilver using the disk diffusion test. It has been proven that prepared silver nanoparticles exhibit strong antibacterial properties. The minimum inhibitory concentration for tested isolates was 30 μg/mL. It has been found that the sensitivity of Staphylococcus spp. isolated from six identified species differs considerably. The size distribution of bacterial growth inhibition zones indicates that resistance to various nanosilver concentrations is an individual strain feature, and has no connection with belonging to a specific species.

  17. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization of house officers.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Anna A; Chapin, Kim; Mermel, Leonard A

    2009-09-01

    We performed a prospective prevalence survey of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage in the nares of 50 medical and 50 surgical house officers. None of the 50 internal medicine house officers and 5 of the 50 general surgery house officers had MRSA nares colonization (P = .03). None of the MRSA isolates recovered from the surgical house officers were identical.

  18. Survival of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius in modified Romanowsky staining solutions.

    PubMed

    Misan, Angus; Chan, Wei Yee; Trott, Darren; Hill, Peter B

    2017-08-01

    Stains that are used regularly for patient-side diagnosis to rapidly identify bacterial and fungal infections could become contaminated by common pathogens, such as Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, during slide immersion. To determine whether the inoculation of S. pseudintermedius into modified Romanowsky type stains (Quick Dip ® ) results in viable bacterial contamination and whether this is influenced by the addition of organic debris (canine hair and skin). A clinical isolate of S. pseudintermedius was inoculated into clean and organically contaminated Quick Dip ® solutions (methanol fixative, eosin, methylene blue), and positive (broth) and negative (bleach) controls. Each solution was tested for the presence of viable bacteria by counting the number of colony forming units (CFU/mL) at various time points. Solutions also were examined under high power microscopy to count the number of visible bacteria at each time point. Staphylococcus pseudintermedius was able to survive in the clean and contaminated Quick Dip ® stains for at least one hour, but by 24 h no viable bacteria remained. Survival of the bacteria was not supported in the fixative at any time point. Staphylococcus pseudintermedius remained visible under high power microscopy for up to 2 weeks in all organically contaminated solutions of the Quick Dip ® set. Staphylococcus pseudintermedius only remains viable in eosin and methylene blue for short periods of time, but the prolonged visibility of dead organisms could theoretically lead to the misdiagnosis of cytology samples. © 2017 ESVD and ACVD.

  19. Spontaneous methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) meningitis.

    PubMed

    Longhurst, William D; Sheele, Johnathan M

    2018-05-01

    Spontaneous methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) meningitis is extremely rare and has a high mortality rate. We report a case of MRSA meningitis in an otherwise healthy young adult female with no recent trauma or neurosurgical interventions. Despite antibiotics she suffered a vasculitis-induced cerebral vascular ischemic event. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Pneumonia and New Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clone

    PubMed Central

    Tristan, Anne; François, Bruno; Etienne, Jerome; Delage-Corre, Manuella; Martin, Christian; Liassine, Nadia; Wannet, Wim; Denis, François; Ploy, Marie-Cécile

    2006-01-01

    Necrotizing pneumonia caused by Staphylococcus aureus strains carrying the Panton-Valentin leukocidin gene is a newly described disease entity. We report a new fatal case of necrotizing pneumonia. An S. aureus strain with an agr1 allele and of a new sequence type 377 was recovered, representing a new, emerging, community-acquired methicillin-resistant clone. PMID:16704793

  1. [Staphylococcus aureus infection in Apis mellifera L. (honeybees)].

    PubMed

    Keskin, N

    1989-07-01

    The causative agent of American foulbrood is Bacillus larvae, the causes of the European foulbrood diseases are Streptococcus pluton and Bacillus alvei and the causes of the septicemia are Pseudomonas apiseptica and Escherichia coli in honeybees (Apis mellifera). Apart from the above causative agents in this study, Staphylococcus aureus has been isolated and identified from honeybees (Apis mellifera).

  2. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing of Staphylococcus aureus isolates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) is the most applied and effective genetic typing method for epidemiological studies and investigation of foodborne outbreaks caused by different pathogens, including Staphylococcus aureus. The technique relies on analysis of large DNA fragments generated by th...

  3. Heterogeneous resistance to vancomycin in Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus haemolyticus and Staphylococcus warneri clinical strains: characterisation of glycopeptide susceptibility profiles and cell wall thickening.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Ana Paula Ferreira; Teixeira, Lúcia Martins; Iorio, Natália Lopes Pontes; Bastos, Carla Callegário Reis; de Sousa Fonseca, Leila; Souto-Padrón, Thaís; dos Santos, Kátia Regina Netto

    2006-04-01

    The population analysis profile (PAP) method as well as analysis of autolytic activity and cellular ultrastructure by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to characterise Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus haemolyticus and Staphylococcus warneri clinical strains with reduced susceptibility to glycopeptides. All strains showed heterogeneous profiles to vancomycin and teicoplanin by the PAP method. Subpopulations that grew in the presence of high concentrations of each drug were selected from the PAP as derivative strains. Their glycopeptide minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined and subsequently all parental and derivative strains were grown in one-half of the MIC of vancomycin or teicoplanin. An increase in cell wall thickness of all derivative strains was seen by TEM, with statistically significant values (P<0.01) compared with their respective parental strains. In general, variable rates of autolysis among the strains were observed. Cell wall thickness is an important factor involved in glycopeptide resistance and, in association with PAP results, confirmed the Brazilian coagulase-negative staphylococci clinical isolates as being heteroresistant to glycopeptides. Detection of these heteroresistant organisms is important in order to achieve more judicious use of vancomycin and teicoplanin in hospitals.

  4. Isolation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus spp. from ready-to-eat fish products.

    PubMed

    Sergelidis, D; Abrahim, A; Papadopoulos, T; Soultos, N; Martziou, E; Koulourida, V; Govaris, A; Pexara, A; Zdragas, A; Papa, A

    2014-11-01

    A hundred samples from ready-to-eat (RTE) fish products were examined for the presence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus spp. Staphylococci were isolated from 43% of these samples (n = 100). The identified species in the samples were Staphylococcus aureus (7%), Staphylococcus epidermidis (13%), Staphylococcus xylosus (12%), Staphylococcus sciuri (4%), Staphylococcus warneri (3%), Staphylococcus saprophyticus (2%), Staphylococcus schleiferi (1%) and Staphylococcus auricularis (1%). Two Staph. aureus (MRSA) isolates, three Staph. epidermidis (MRSE), five Staph. xylosus, four Staph. sciuri, one Staph. schleiferi and one Staph. saprophyticus isolates were resistant to oxacillin and all of them carried the mecA gene. The two MRSA isolates belonged to the spa types t316 (ST359) and t548 (ST5) and none of them was able to produce enterotoxins. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis for Staph. aureus and Staph. epidermidis isolates revealed 6 and 11 distinct PFGE types, respectively, reflecting diversity. The presence of methicillin-resistant staphylococci, especially MRSA and MRSE, in RTE fish products may constitute a potential health risk for consumers. This study provides the first data on the occurrence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci in salted and smoked fish products in Greece. These results are important and useful for Staphylococcus spp. risk assessment and management programmes for ready-to-eat fish products. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. In Vitro Studies of Pharmacodynamic Properties of Vancomycin against Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis

    PubMed Central

    Löwdin, E.; Odenholt, I.; Cars, O.

    1998-01-01

    The bactericidal activities of vancomycin against two reference strains and two clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis were studied with five different concentrations ranging from 2× to 64× the MIC. The decrease in the numbers of CFU at 24 h was at least 3 log10 CFU/ml for all strains. No concentration-dependent killing was observed. The postantibiotic effect (PAE) was determined by obtaining viable counts for two of the reference strains, and the viable counts varied markedly: 1.2 h for S. aureus and 6.0 h for S. epidermidis. The determinations of the PAE, the postantibiotic sub-MIC effect (PA SME), and the sub-MIC effect (SME) for all strains were done with BioScreen C, a computerized incubator for bacteria. The PA SMEs were longer than the SMEs for all strains tested. A newly developed in vitro kinetic model was used to expose the bacteria to continuously decreasing concentrations of vancomycin. A filter prevented the loss of bacteria during the experiments. One reference strain each of S. aureus and S. epidermidis and two clinical isolates of S. aureus were exposed to an initial concentration of 10× the MIC of vancomycin with two different half-lives (t1/2s): 1 or 5 h. The post-MIC effect (PME) was calculated as the difference in time for the bacteria to grow 1 log10 CFU/ml from the numbers of CFU obtained at the time when the MIC was reached and the corresponding time for an unexposed control culture. The difference in PME between the strains was not as pronounced as that for the PAE. Furthermore, the PME was shorter when a t1/2 of 5 h (approximate terminal t1/2 in humans) was used. The PMEs at t1/2s of 1 and 5 h were 6.5 and 3.6 h, respectively, for S. aureus. The corresponding figures for S. epidermidis were 10.3 and less than 6 h. The shorter PMEs achieved with a t1/2 of 5 h and the lack of concentration-dependent killing indicate that the time above the MIC is the parameter most important for the efficacy of vancomycin

  6. Response to comments on "A bacterium that can grow using arsenic instead of phosphorus"

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfe-Simon, Felisa; Blum, Jodi Switzer; Kulp, Thomas R.; Gordon, Gwyneth W.; Hoeft, Shelley E.; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Stolz, John F.; Webb, Samuel M.; Weber, Peter K.; Davies, Paul C.W.; Anbar, Ariel D.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2011-01-01

    Concerns have been raised about our recent study suggesting that arsenic (As) substitutes for phosphorus in major biomolecules of a bacterium that tolerates extreme As concentrations. We welcome the opportunity to better explain our methods and results and to consider alternative interpretations. We maintain that our interpretation of As substitution, based on multiple congruent lines of evidence, is viable.

  7. Colwellia agarivorans sp. nov., an agar-digesting marine bacterium isolated from coastal seawater

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A novel Gram-stain-negative, facultatively anaerobic, yellowish and agar-digesting marine bacterium, designated strain QM50**T, was isolated from coastal seawater in an aquaculture site near Qingdao, China. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequences revealed that the novel isolate represented...

  8. Draft genome sequence of ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma pruni’ strain CX, a plant pathogenic bacterium

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma pruni’ strain CX, belonging to subgroup 16SrIII-A, is a plant pathogenic bacterium causing economically important diseases in many fruit crops. Here we report the draft genome sequence that consists of 598,508 bases, with a G+C content of 27.21 mol%. ...

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus paracasei DmW181, a Bacterium Isolated from Wild Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Austin J; Walters, Amber; Carroll, Courtney; Newell, Peter D; Chaston, John M

    2017-07-06

    The draft genome sequence of Lactobacillus paracasei DmW181, an anaerobic bacterium isolate from wild Drosophila flies, is reported here. Strain DmW181 possesses genes for sialic acid and mannose metabolism. The assembled genome is 3,201,429 bp, with 3,454 predicted genes. Copyright © 2017 Hammer et al.

  10. Hydrogen Production by Co-cultures of Rhizopus oryzae and a Photosynthetic Bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asada, Yasuo; Ishimi, Katsuhiro; Nagata, Yoko; Wakayama, Tatsuki; Miyake, Jun; Kohno, Hideki

    Hydrogen production with glucose by using co-immobilized cultures of a fungus, Rhizopus oryzae NBRC5384, and a photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV, in agar gels was studied. The co-immobilized cultures converted glucose to hydrogen via lactate in a high molar yield of about 8moles of hydrogen per glucose at a maximum under illuminated conditions.

  11. Genome Sequence of Pedobacter arcticus sp. nov., a Sea Ice Bacterium Isolated from Tundra Soil

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Ye; Yue, Guidong; Gao, Qiang; Wang, Zhiyong; Peng, Fang; Fang, Chengxiang; Yang, Xu

    2012-01-01

    Pedobacter arcticus sp. nov. was originally isolated from tundra soil collected from Ny-Ålesund, in the Arctic region of Norway. It is a Gram-negative bacterium which shows bleb-shaped appendages on the cell surface. Here, we report the draft annotated genome sequence of Pedobacter arcticus sp. nov., which belongs to the genus Pedobacter. PMID:23144423

  12. Genome Sequence of Sphingobium indicum B90A, a Hexachlorocyclohexane-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Shailly; Sangwan, Naseer; Lata, Pushp; Kaur, Jasvinder; Dua, Ankita; Singh, Amit Kumar; Verma, Mansi; Kaur, Jaspreet; Khurana, Jitendra P.; Khurana, Paramjit; Mathur, Saloni

    2012-01-01

    Sphingobium indicum B90A, an efficient degrader of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) isomers, was isolated in 1990 from sugarcane rhizosphere soil in Cuttack, India. Here we report the draft genome sequence of this bacterium, which has now become a model system for understanding the genetics, biochemistry, and physiology of HCH degradation. PMID:22843598

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of the Deinococcus-Thermus Bacterium Meiothermus ruber Strain A

    DOE PAGES

    Thiel, Vera; Tomsho, Lynn P.; Burhans, Richard; ...

    2015-03-26

    The draft genome sequence of the Deinococcus-Thermus group bacterium Meiothermus ruber strain A, isolated from a cyanobacterial enrichment culture obtained from Octopus Spring (Yellowstone National Park, WY), comprises 2,968,099 bp in 170 contigs. It is predicted to contain 2,895 protein-coding genes, 44 tRNA-coding genes, and 2 rRNA operons.

  14. Complete genome sequence of the haloalkaliphilic, hydrogen-producing bacterium Halanaerobium hydrogeniformans.

    PubMed

    Brown, Steven D; Begemann, Matthew B; Mormile, Melanie R; Wall, Judy D; Han, Cliff S; Goodwin, Lynne A; Pitluck, Samuel; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren J; Elias, Dwayne A

    2011-07-01

    Halanaerobium hydrogenoformans is an alkaliphilic bacterium capable of biohydrogen production at pH 11 and 7% (wt/vol) salt. We present the 2.6-Mb genome sequence to provide insights into its physiology and potential for bioenergy applications.

  15. The Production, Purification and Properties of the Biopolymer Levan Produced by the Bacterium Erwinia Herbicola

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-01

    standard and an inulin standard provided by Dr. Elwin Reese of this laboratory and a sample of levan from a different bacterium provided by the USDA.23 A...polymyxa 24 Levan standard Continuous culture Tangential Flow purified levan (this study) >■• <-■-’•«■ i-I-» r Inulin standard tu 25 Figure 5. NMR

  16. Genome Sequence of Lysinibacillus sphaericus, a Lignin-Degrading Bacterium Isolated from Municipal Solid Waste Soil.

    PubMed

    Persinoti, Gabriela F; Paixão, Douglas A A; Bugg, Timothy D H; Squina, Fabio M

    2018-05-03

    We report here the draft genome sequence of Lysinibacillus sphaericus strain A1, a potential lignin-degrading bacterium isolated from municipal solid waste (MSW) soil and capable of enhancing gas release from lignocellulose-containing soil. Copyright © 2018 Persinoti et al.

  17. Isolation of a New Polysaccharide-Digesting Bacterium from a Salt Marsh

    PubMed Central

    Andrykovitch, George; Marx, Irene

    1988-01-01

    A new marine bacterium that digested a variety of storage and structural polysaccharides, including agar, was isolated. Strain 2-40 is a nonfermentative gram-negative, polarly flagellated rod that sometimes grew as a filamentous helix and secreted a melaninlike pigment. Its characteristics conform to those of no previously described species. PMID:16347602

  18. Five new amicoumacins isolated from a marine-derived bacterium Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongxin; Xu, Ying; Liu, Lingli; Han, Zhuang; Lai, Pok Yui; Guo, Xiangrong; Zhang, Xixiang; Lin, Wenhan; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2012-02-01

    Four novel amicoumacins, namely lipoamicoumacins A-D (1-4), and one new bacilosarcin analog (5) were isolated from culture broth of a marine-derived bacterium Bacillus subtilis, together with six known amicoumacins. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic (2D NNR, IR, CD and MS) analysis and in comparison with data in literature.

  19. Partial proteome of the corynetoxin-producing Gram-positive bacterium, Rathayibacter toxicus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rathayibacter toxicus is a Gram-positive bacterium that is the causative agent of annual ryegrass toxicity (ARGT), a disease that causes devastating losses in the Australian livestock industry. R. toxicus exhibits a complex life cycle, using the nematode Anguina funesta as a physical vector to carry...

  20. Transcriptome analysis of the rhizosphere bacterium Azospirillum brasilense reveals an extensive auxin response.

    PubMed

    Van Puyvelde, Sandra; Cloots, Lore; Engelen, Kristof; Das, Frederik; Marchal, Kathleen; Vanderleyden, Jos; Spaepen, Stijn

    2011-05-01

    The rhizosphere bacterium Azospirillum brasilense produces the auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) through the indole-3-pyruvate pathway. As we previously demonstrated that transcription of the indole-3-pyruvate decarboxylase (ipdC) gene is positively regulated by IAA, produced by A. brasilense itself or added exogenously, we performed a microarray analysis to study the overall effects of IAA on the transcriptome of A. brasilense. The transcriptomes of A. brasilense wild-type and the ipdC knockout mutant, both cultured in the absence and presence of exogenously added IAA, were compared.Interfering with the IAA biosynthesis/homeostasis in A. brasilense through inactivation of the ipdC gene or IAA addition results in much broader transcriptional changes than anticipated. Based on the multitude of changes observed by comparing the different transcriptomes, we can conclude that IAA is a signaling molecule in A. brasilense. It appears that the bacterium, when exposed to IAA, adapts itself to the plant rhizosphere, by changing its arsenal of transport proteins and cell surface proteins. A striking example of adaptation to IAA exposure, as happens in the rhizosphere, is the upregulation of a type VI secretion system (T6SS) in the presence of IAA. The T6SS is described as specifically involved in bacterium-eukaryotic host interactions. Additionally, many transcription factors show an altered regulation as well, indicating that the regulatory machinery of the bacterium is changing.

  1. Robinsoniella peoriensis: A model anaerobic commensal bacterium for acquisition of antibiotic resistance?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: R. peoriensis was characterized in our laboratories from swine manure and feces as a Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium. Since then strains of this species have been identified from a variety of mammalian and other gastrointestinal (GI) tracts, suggesting it is a member of the commensal ...

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of the Algicidal Bacterium Mangrovimonas yunxiaonensis Strain LY01.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Zhu, Hong; Li, Chongping; Zhang, Huajun; Chen, Zhangran; Zheng, Wei; Xu, Hong; Zheng, Tianling

    2014-11-26

    Mangrovimonas yunxiaonensis LY01, a novel bacterium isolated from mangrove sediment, showed high algicidal effects on harmful algal blooms of Alexandrium tamarense. Here, we present the first draft genome sequence of this strain to further understanding of the functional genes related to algicidal activity. Copyright © 2014 Li et al.

  3. Genome Sequence of the Algicidal Bacterium Kordia algicida OT-1 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Sook; Kang, Sung Gyun; Kwon, Kae Kyoung; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Sang-Jin

    2011-01-01

    Kordia algicida OT-1 is an algicidal bacterium against the bloom-forming microalgae. The genome sequence of K. algicida revealed a number of interesting features, including the degradation of macromolecules, the biosynthesis of carotenoid pigment and secondary metabolites, and the capacity for gliding motility, which might facilitate the understanding of algicidal mechanisms. PMID:21622754

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of the Algicidal Bacterium Mangrovimonas yunxiaonensis Strain LY01

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Zhu, Hong; Li, Chongping; Zhang, Huajun; Chen, Zhangran; Zheng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Mangrovimonas yunxiaonensis LY01, a novel bacterium isolated from mangrove sediment, showed high algicidal effects on harmful algal blooms of Alexandrium tamarense. Here, we present the first draft genome sequence of this strain to further understanding of the functional genes related to algicidal activity. PMID:25428978

  5. Aerobic mineralization of vinyl chloride by a bacterium of the order Actinomycetales.

    PubMed Central

    Phelps, T J; Malachowsky, K; Schram, R M; White, D C

    1991-01-01

    A gram-positive branched bacterium isolated from a trichloroethylene-degrading consortium mineralized vinyl chloride in growing cultures and cell suspensions. Greater than 67% of the [1,2-14C]vinyl chloride was mineralized to carbon dioxide, with approximately 10% of the radioactivity appearing in cell biomass and another 10% appearing in 14C-aqueous-phase products. PMID:1905522

  6. Aerobic mineralization of vinyl chlorides by a bacterium of the order Actinomycetales

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, T.J.; Malachowsky, K.; Schram, R.M.

    1991-04-01

    A gram-positive branched bacterium isolated from a trichloroethylene-degrading consortium mineralized vinyl chloride in growing cultures and cell suspensions. Greater than 67% of the (1,2-{sup 14}C)vinyl chloride was mineralized to carbon dioxide, with approximately 10% of the radioactivity appearing in {sup 14}C-aqueous-phase products.

  7. Expression of Heterogenous Arsenic Resistance Genes in the Obligately Autotrophic Biomining Bacterium Thiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Peng, J B; Yan, W M; Bao, X Z

    1994-07-01

    Two arsenic-resistant plasmids were constructed and introduced into Thiobacillus ferrooxidans strains by conjugation. The plasmids with the replicon of wide-host-range plasmid RSF1010 were stable in T. ferrooxidans. The arsenic resistance genes originating from the heterotroph were expressed in this obligately autotrophic bacterium, but the promoter derived from T. ferrooxidans showed no special function in its original host.

  8. Complete genome sequence of the bioleaching bacterium Leptospirillum sp. group II strain CF-1.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Alonso; Bunk, Boyke; Spröer, Cathrin; Biedendieck, Rebekka; Valdés, Natalia; Jahn, Martina; Jahn, Dieter; Orellana, Omar; Levicán, Gloria

    2016-03-20

    We describe the complete genome sequence of Leptospirillum sp. group II strain CF-1, an acidophilic bioleaching bacterium isolated from an acid mine drainage (AMD). This work provides data to gain insights about adaptive response of Leptospirillum spp. to the extreme conditions of bioleaching environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of a Bacillus Bacterium from the Atacama Desert Wetlands Metagenome

    PubMed Central

    Vilo, Claudia; Galetovic, Alexandra; Araya, Jorge E.; Dong, Qunfeng

    2015-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of a Bacillus bacterium isolated from the microflora of Nostoc colonies grown at the Andean wetlands in northern Chile. We consider this genome sequence to be a molecular tool for exploring microbial relationships and adaptation strategies to the prevailing extreme conditions at the Atacama Desert. PMID:26294639

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of the 2-Chloro-4-Nitrophenol-Degrading Bacterium Arthrobacter sp. Strain SJCon

    PubMed Central

    Vikram, Surendra; Kumar, Shailesh; Vaidya, Bhumika; Pinnaka, Anil Kumar

    2013-01-01

    We report the 4.39-Mb draft genome sequence of the 2-chloro-4-nitrophenol-degrading bacterium Arthrobacter sp. strain SJCon, isolated from a pesticide-contaminated site. The draft genome sequence of strain SJCon will be helpful in studying the genetic pathways involved in the degradation of several aromatic compounds. PMID:23516196

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of the Obligately Alkaliphilic Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfonatronum thiodismutans Strain MLF1

    PubMed Central

    Trubitsyn, Denis; Geurink, Corey; Pikuta, Elena; Lefèvre, Christopher T.; McShan, W. Michael; Gillaspy, Allison F.

    2014-01-01

    Desulfonatronum thiodismutans strain MLF1, an alkaliphilic bacterium capable of sulfate reduction, was isolated from Mono Lake, California. Here we report the 3.92-Mb draft genome sequence comprising 34 contigs and some results of its automated annotation. These data will improve our knowledge of mechanisms by which bacteria withstand extreme environments. PMID:25081260

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of the Obligately Alkaliphilic Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfonatronum thiodismutans Strain MLF1.

    PubMed

    Trubitsyn, Denis; Geurink, Corey; Pikuta, Elena; Lefèvre, Christopher T; McShan, W Michael; Gillaspy, Allison F; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2014-07-31

    Desulfonatronum thiodismutans strain MLF1, an alkaliphilic bacterium capable of sulfate reduction, was isolated from Mono Lake, California. Here we report the 3.92-Mb draft genome sequence comprising 34 contigs and some results of its automated annotation. These data will improve our knowledge of mechanisms by which bacteria withstand extreme environments. Copyright © 2014 Trubitsyn et al.

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of the Naphthalene-Degrading Bacterium Pseudomonas stutzeri AN10 (CCUG 29243)

    PubMed Central

    Brunet-Galmés, Isabel; Busquets, Antonio; Peña, Arantxa; Gomila, Margarita; Nogales, Balbina; García-Valdés, Elena; Lalucat, Jorge; Bennasar, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas stutzeri AN10 (CCUG 29243) can be considered a model strain for aerobic naphthalene degradation. We report the complete genome sequence of this bacterium. Its 4.71-Mb chromosome provides insights into other biodegradative capabilities of strain AN10 (i.e., benzoate catabolism) and suggests a high number of horizontal gene transfer events. PMID:23144395

  14. Complete genome sequence of the xylan-degrading subseafloor bacterium Microcella alkaliphila JAM-AC0309.

    PubMed

    Kurata, Atsushi; Hirose, Yuu; Misawa, Naomi; Wakazuki, Sachiko; Kishimoto, Noriaki; Kobayashi, Tohru

    2016-03-10

    Here we report the complete genome sequence of Microcella alkaliphila JAM-AC0309, which was newly isolated from the deep subseafloor core sediment from offshore of the Shimokita Peninsula of Japan. An array of genes related to utilization of xylan in this bacterium was identified by whole genome analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of the Thermophilic Bacterium Geobacillus thermoleovorans CCB_US3_UF5

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Rahman, Ahmad Yamin; Saito, Jennifer A.; Hou, Shaobin

    2012-01-01

    Geobacillus thermoleovorans CCB_US3_UF5 is a thermophilic bacterium isolated from a hot spring in Malaysia. Here, we report the complete genome of G. thermoleovorans CCB_US3_UF5, which shows high similarity to the genome of Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA 426 in terms of synteny and orthologous genes. PMID:22328744

  16. The construction of an engineered bacterium to remove cadmium from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Chang, S; Shu, H

    2014-01-01

    The removal of cadmium (Cd) from wastewater before it is released from factories is important for protecting human health. Although some researchers have developed engineered bacteria, the resistance of these engineered bacteria to Cd have not been improved. In this study, two key genes involved in glutathione synthesis (gshA and gshB), a serine acetyltransferase gene (cysE), a Thlaspi caerulescens phytochelatin synthase gene (TcPCS1), and a heavy metal ATPase gene (TcHMA3) were transformed into Escherichia coli BL21. The resistance of the engineered bacterium to Cd was significantly greater than that of the initial bacterium and the Cd accumulation in the engineered bacterium was much higher than in the initial bacterium. In addition, the Cd resistance of the bacteria harboring gshB, gshA, cysE, and TcPCS1 was higher than that of the bacteria harboring gshA, cysE, and TcPCS1. This finding demonstrated that gshB played an important role in glutathione synthesis and that the reaction catalyzed by glutathione synthase was the limiting step for producing phytochelatins. Furthermore, TcPCS1 had a greater specificity and a higher capacity for removing Cd than SpPCS1, and TcHMA3 not only played a role in T. caerulescens but also functioned in E. coli.

  17. Extracellular nucleic acids of the marine bacterium Rhodovulum sulfidophilum and recombinant RNA production technology using bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Yo; Umekage, So

    2018-02-01

    Extracellular nucleic acids of high molecular weight are detected ubiquitously in seawater. Recent studies have indicated that these nucleic acids are, at least in part, derived from active production by some bacteria. The marine bacterium Rhodovulum sulfidophilum is one of those bacteria. Rhodovulumsulfidophilum is a non-sulfur phototrophic marine bacterium that is known to form structured communities of cells called flocs, and to produce extracellular nucleic acids in culture media. Recently, it has been revealed that this bacterium produces gene transfer agent-like particles and that this particle production may be related to the extracellular nucleic acid production mechanism. This review provides a summary of recent physiological and genetic studies of these phenomena and also introduces a new method for extracellular production of artificial and biologically functional RNAs using this bacterium. In addition, artificial RNA production using Escherichia coli, which is related to this topic, will also be described. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa NA04 Bacterium Isolated from an Entomopathogenic Nematode.

    PubMed

    Salgado-Morales, Rosalba; Rivera-Gómez, Nancy; Lozano-Aguirre Beltrán, Luis Fernando; Hernández-Mendoza, Armando; Dantán-González, Edgar

    2017-09-07

    We report the draft genome sequence of Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa NA04, isolated from the entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis indica MOR03. The draft genome consists of 54 contigs, a length of 6.37 Mb, and a G+C content 66.49%. Copyright © 2017 Salgado-Morales et al.

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Pontibacter sp. nov. BAB1700, a Halotolerant, Industrially Important Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, M. N.; Sharma, A. C.; Pandya, R. V.; Patel, R. P.; Saiyed, Z. M.; Saxena, A. K.

    2012-01-01

    Pontibacter sp. nov. BAB1700 is a halotolerant, Gram-negative, rod-shaped, pink-pigmented, menaquinone-7-producing bacterium isolated from sediments of a drilling well. The draft genome sequence of the strain, consisting of one chromosome of 4.5 Mb, revealed vital gene clusters involved in vitamin biosynthesis and resistance against various metals and antibiotics. PMID:23105068

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of the Efficient Bioflocculant-Producing Bacterium Paenibacillus sp. Strain A9

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin-liang; Hu, Xiao-min

    2013-01-01

    Paenibacillus sp. strain A9 is an important bioflocculant-producing bacterium, isolated from a soil sample, and is pale pink-pigmented, aerobic, and Gram-positive. Here, we report the draft genome sequence and the initial findings from a preliminary analysis of strain A9, which is a novel species of Paenibacillus. PMID:23618713

  1. Food compounds inhibit Staphylococcus aureus bacteria and the toxicity of Staphylococcus Enterotoxin A (SEA) associated with atopic dermatitis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Atopic dermatitis or eczema is characterized by skin rashes and itching is an inflammatory disease that affects 10-20% of children and 1-3% of adults. Staphylococcus aureus bacteria are present on the skin of nearly all patients with atopic dermatitis. Antibiotics that suppress colonization of S. au...

  2. Studying the Symbiotic Bacterium Xenorhabdus nematophila in Individual, Living Steinernema carpocapsae Nematodes Using Microfluidic Systems.

    PubMed

    Stilwell, Matthew D; Cao, Mengyi; Goodrich-Blair, Heidi; Weibel, Douglas B

    2018-01-01

    Animal-microbe symbioses are ubiquitous in nature and scientifically important in diverse areas, including ecology, medicine, and agriculture. Steinernema nematodes and Xenorhabdus bacteria compose an established, successful model system for investigating microbial pathogenesis and mutualism. The bacterium Xenorhabdus nematophila is a species-specific mutualist of insect-infecting Steinernema carpocapsae nematodes. The bacterium colonizes a specialized intestinal pocket within the infective stage of the nematode, which transports the bacteria between insects that are killed and consumed by the pair for reproduction. Current understanding of the interaction between the infective-stage nematode and its bacterial colonizers is based largely on population-level, snapshot time point studies on these organisms. This limitation arises because investigating temporal dynamics of the bacterium within the nematode is impeded by the difficulty of isolating and maintaining individual living nematodes and tracking colonizing bacterial cells over time. To overcome this challenge, we developed a microfluidic system that enables us to spatially isolate and microscopically observe individual, living Steinernema nematodes and monitor the growth and development of the associated X. nematophila bacterial communities-starting from a single cell or a few cells-over weeks. Our data demonstrate, to our knowledge, the first direct, temporal, in vivo visual analysis of a symbiosis system and the application of this system to reveal continuous dynamics of the symbiont population in the living host animal. IMPORTANCE This paper describes an experimental system for directly investigating population dynamics of a symbiotic bacterium, Xenorhabdus nematophila , in its host-the infective stage of the entomopathogenic nematode Steinernema carpocapsae . Tracking individual and groups of bacteria in individual host nematodes over days and weeks yielded insight into dynamic growth and topology changes

  3. A natural human monoclonal antibody targeting Staphylococcus Protein A protects against Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Varshney, Avanish K.; Sunley, Kevin M.; Bowling, Rodney A.; Kwan, Tzu-Yu; Mays, Heather R.; Rambhadran, Anu; Zhang, Yanfeng; Martin, Rebecca L.; Cavalier, Michael C.; Simard, John

    2018-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can cause devastating and life-threatening infections. With the increase in multidrug resistant strains, novel therapies are needed. Limited success with active and passive immunization strategies have been attributed to S. aureus immune evasion. Here, we report on a monoclonal antibody, 514G3, that circumvents a key S. aureus evasion mechanism by targeting the cell wall moiety Protein A (SpA). SpA tightly binds most subclasses of immunoglobulins via their Fc region, neutralizing effector function. The organism can thus shield itself with a protective coat of serum antibodies and render humoral immunity ineffective. The present antibody reactivity was derived from an individual with natural anti-SpA antibody titers. The monoclonal antibody is of an IgG3 subclass, which differs critically from other immunoglobulin subclasses since its Fc is not bound by SpA. Moreover, it targets a unique epitope on SpA that allows it to bind in the presence of serum antibodies. Consequently, the antibody opsonizes S. aureus and maintains effector function to enable natural immune mediated clearance. The data presented here provide evidence that 514G3 antibody is able to successfully rescue mice from S. aureus mediated bacteremia. PMID:29364906

  4. Rapid detection and differentiation of Staphylococcus colonies using an optical scattering technology.

    PubMed

    Alsulami, Tawfiq S; Zhu, Xingyue; Abdelhaseib, Maha Usama; Singh, Atul K; Bhunia, Arun K

    2018-05-24

    Staphylococcus species are a major pathogen responsible for nosocomial infections and foodborne illnesses. We applied a laser-based BARDOT (bacterial rapid detection using optical scattering technology) for rapid colony screening and detection of Staphylococcus on an agar plate and differentiate these from non-Staphylococcus spp. Among the six growth media tested, phenol red mannitol agar (PRMA) was found most suitable for building the Staphylococcus species scatter image libraries. Scatter image library for Staphylococcus species gave a high positive predictive value (PPV 87.5-100%) when tested against known laboratory strains of Staphylococcus spp., while the PPV against non-Staphylococcus spp. was 0-38%. A total of nine naturally contaminated bovine raw milk and ready-to-eat chicken salad samples were tested, and BARDOT detected Staphylococcus including Staphylococcus aureus with 80-100% PPV. Forty-five BARDOT-identified bacterial isolates from naturally contaminated foods were further confirmed by tuf and nuc gene-specific PCR and 16S rRNA gene sequence. This label-free, non-invasive on-plate colony screening technology can be adopted by the food industries, biotechnology companies, and public health laboratories for Staphylococcus species detection including S. aureus from various samples for food safety and public health management. Graphical abstract.

  5. High prevalence of Staphylococcus haemolyticus and Staphylococcus saprophyticus in environmental samples of a Tunisian hospital.

    PubMed

    Dziri, Raoudha; Klibi, Naouel; Lozano, Carmen; Ben Said, Leila; Bellaaj, Ridha; Tenorio, Carmen; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Ben Slama, Karim; Torres, Carmen

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the rate of detection of coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS) in environmental samples of 17 services in a Tunisian hospital, determining the antimicrobial resistance phenotypes and genotypes of recovered isolates. To our knowledge, this is the first study that determines the prevalence of CoNS with correlation of antibiotic resistance in the hospital environment in Tunisia. CoNS were obtained from 83 of the 200 tested samples (41.5%). Staphylococcus haemolyticus was the most prevalent species (45.8%), followed by S. saprophyticus (36.1%). The remaining CoNS species detected were S. epidermidis, S. cohnii, S. warneri, S. sciuri, S. simulans, S. pasteuri, S. arlettae, and S. xilosus. Methicillin-resistant CoNS were detected in 20 of the 200 tested samples (10%), and the mecA gene was demonstrated in 18 S. haemolyticus, one S. epidermidis and one S. saprophyticus isolates. Methicillin susceptible isolates were detected in 63 samples (31.5%). Antimicrobial resistance genes detected were as follows (number of isolates): erythromycin [msr(A) (n = 32); erm(C) (n = 8)], tetracycline [tet(K) and/or tet(M) (n = 21)], gentamicin [aac(6')-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia (n = 16)], kanamycin [(aph(3')-IIIa (n = 19)], tobramycin [ant(4')-Ia (n = 14)], and streptomycin [ant(6')-Ia (n = 3)]. The high frequency of detection of multi-drug-resistant CoNS in the hospital environment, especially S. haemolyticus and S. saprophyticus, is of relevance and could be due to cross-transmission between patients, staff, and environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Selective biosensing of Staphylococcus aureus using chitosan quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelhamid, Hani Nasser; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2018-01-01

    Selective biosensing of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) using chitosan modified quantum dots (CTS@CdS QDs) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide is reported. The method is based on the intrinsic positive catalase activity of S. aureus. CTS@CdS quantum dots provide high dispersion in aqueous media with high fluorescence emission. Staphylococcus aureus causes a selective quenching of the fluorescence emission of CTS@CdS QDs in the presence of H2O2 compared to other pathogens such as Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The intrinsic enzymatic character of S. aureus (catalase positive) offers selective and fast biosensing. The present method is highly selective for positive catalase species and requires no expensive reagents such as antibodies, aptamers or microbeads. It could be extended for other species that are positive catalase.

  7. Clinical characteristics of Staphylococcus epidermidis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Namvar, Amirmorteza Ebrahimzadeh; Bastarahang, Sara; Abbasi, Niloufar; Ghehi, Ghazaleh Sheikhi; Farhadbakhtiarian, Sara; Arezi, Parastoo; Hosseini, Mahsa; Baravati, Sholeh Zaeemi; Jokar, Zahra; Chermahin, Sara Ganji

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococci are known as clustering Gram-positive cocci, nonmotile, non-spore forming facultatively anaerobic that classified in two main groups, coagulase-positive and coagulase-negative. Staphylococcus epidermidis with the highest percentage has the prominent role among coagulase-negative Staphylococci that is the most important reason of clinical infections. Due to various virulence factors and unique features, this microorganism is respected as a common cause of nosocomial infections. Because of potential ability in biofilm formation and colonization in different surfaces, also using of medical implant devices in immunocompromised and hospitalized patients the related infections have been increased. In recent decades the clinical importance and the emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis strains have created many challenges in the treatment process. PMID:25285267

  8. Neutrophil evasion strategies by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Megan L; Surewaard, Bas G J

    2018-03-01

    Humans are well equipped to defend themselves against bacteria. The innate immune system employs diverse mechanisms to recognize, control and initiate a response that can destroy millions of different microbes. Microbes that evade the sophisticated innate immune system are able to escape detection and could become pathogens. The pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus are particularly successful due to the development of a wide variety of virulence strategies for bacterial pathogenesis and they invest significant efforts towards mechanisms that allow for neutrophil evasion. Neutrophils are a primary cellular defense and can rapidly kill invading microbes, which is an indispensable function for maintaining host health. This review compares the key features of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus in epidemiology, with a specific focus on virulence mechanisms utilized to evade neutrophils in bacterial pathogenesis. It is important to understand the complex interactions between pathogenic bacteria and neutrophils so that we can disrupt the ability of pathogens to cause disease.

  9. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a neonatal alpaca

    PubMed Central

    Stull, Jason W.; Kenney, Daniel G.; Slavić, Durda; Weese, J. Scott

    2012-01-01

    A 6-hour-old alpaca was presented for evaluation of respiratory difficulty. As part of routine surveillance, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was identified from a nasal swab taken upon admission to the hospital. No signs of MRSA infection were noted. The MRSA strain recovered was a human epidemic clone that has been associated with horses. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus colonization can occur in camelids, and the potential animal and public health risks require consideration. PMID:23204589

  10. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus survival on hospital fomites.

    PubMed

    Huang, Robert; Mehta, Sanjay; Weed, Diane; Price, Connie Savor

    2006-11-01

    We examined the duration of survival of 2 strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) on 3 types of hospital fomites. MRSA survived for 11 days on a plastic patient chart, more than 12 days on a laminated tabletop, and 9 days on a cloth curtain. Irregular surfaces may help harbor organisms in the environment. In addition to contact precautions, MRSA containment during an outbreak should include concurrent environmental decontamination.

  11. High Rates of Staphylococcus aureus USA400 Infection, Northern Canada

    PubMed Central

    Golding, George R.; Levett, Paul N.; McDonald, Ryan R.; Irvine, James; Quinn, Brian; Nsungu, Mandiangu; Woods, Shirley; Khan, Mohammad; Ofner-Agostini, Marianna

    2011-01-01

    Surveillance of Staphylococcus aureus infections in 3 northern remote communities of Saskatchewan was undertaken. Rates of methicillin-resistant infections were extremely high (146–482/10,000 population), and most (98.2%) were caused by USA400 strains. Although USA400 prevalence has diminished in the United States, this strain is continuing to predominate throughout many northern communities in Canada. PMID:21470471

  12. New drugs for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: an update.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Krishan; Chopra, Sidharth

    2013-07-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) remains a leading cause of bacterial infections worldwide, with a dwindling repertoire of effective antimicrobials active against it. This review aims to provide an update on novel anti-MRSA molecules currently under pre-clinical and clinical development, with emphasis on their mechanism of action. This review is limited to molecules that target the pathogen directly and does not detail immunomodulatory anti-infectives.

  13. Extracellular Polymeric Matrix Production and Relaxation under Fluid Shear and Mechanical Pressure in Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jiapeng; Veeregowda, Deepak H; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C

    2017-10-20

    The viscoelasticity of a biofilm's EPS (extracellular-polymeric-substance) matrix conveys protection against mechanical challenges, but adaptive responses of biofilm inhabitants to produce EPS are not well known. Here, we compare the response of a biofilm of an EPS producing (ATCC 12600) and non-EPS producing (5298) Staphylococcus aureus strain to fluid shear and mechanical challenge. Confocal-Laser-Scanning-Microscopy confirmed absence of calcofluorwhite-stainable EPS in biofilms of S. aureus 5298. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy combined with tribometry indicated that the polysaccharide production per bacterium in the initial adhering layer was higher during growth at high shear than at low shear and this increased EPS production extended to entire biofilms, as indicated by tribometrically measured coefficients of friction (CoF). CoFs of biofilms grown under high fluid shear were higher than when grown under low shear, likely due to wash-off of polysaccharides. Measurement of a biofilm's CoF implies application of mechanical pressure that yielded an immediate increase in polysaccharide band area of S. aureus ATCC 12600 biofilms due to their compression that decreased after relieving pressure to the level observed prior to mechanical pressure. For biofilms grown under high shear, this coincided with a higher %whiteness in Optical-Coherence-Tomography-images indicative of water outflow, returning back into the biofilm during stress relaxation. Biofilms grown under low shear however, were stimulated during tribometry to produce EPS, also after stress relieve. Knowledge of factors that govern EPS production and water flow in biofilms will allow better control of biofilms under mechanical challenge and understanding of the barrier properties of biofilms toward antimicrobial penetration. IMPORTANCE Adaptive responses of biofilm inhabitants in nature to environmental challenges such as fluid shear and mechanical pressure, often involve EPS production with the aim of protecting

  14. Epidemiology and molecular characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage isolates from bovines

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus is a common bacterium usually found on skin and mucous membranes of warm blooded animals. Resistance in S. aureus has been increasingly reported though depending on the clonal lineage. Indeed, while hospital acquired (HA)-methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) are typically multi-resistant, community associated (CA)-MRSA are by large more susceptible to many antibiotics. Although S. aureus isolated from animals are often susceptible to most antibiotics, multi-resistant livestock associated (LA)-MRSA have been recovered from bovine mastitis. In this study, we investigated the prevalence and types of MRSA present in the nose of healthy bovines of different age groups and rearing practices. Since no validated methods for MRSA isolation from nasal swabs were available, we compared two isolation methods. Molecular characterization was performed by means of spa-typing, MLST, SCCmec typing and microarray analysis for the detection of antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes. Results MRSA between herd prevalence in bovines was estimated at 19.8%. There was a marked difference between rearing practices with 9.9%, 10.2% and 46.1% of the dairy, beef and veal calve farms respectively being MRSA positive. No significant difference was observed between both isolation methods tested. Most isolates were ST398 spa type t011 or closely related spa types. Few ST239 spa type t037 and t388 and ST8 spa type t121 were also found. SCCmec types carried by these strains were mainly type IV(2B), IV(2B&5) and type V. Type III and non-typeable SCCmec were recovered to a lesser extent. All isolates were multi-resistant to at least two antimicrobials in addition to the expected cefoxitin and penicillin resistance, with an average of resistance to 9.5 different antimicrobials. Isolates selected for microarray analysis carried a broad range of antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes. Conclusion MRSA were mainly present in veal farms, compared to the lower

  15. Staphylococcus aureus adherence to Candida albicans hyphae is mediated by the hyphal adhesin Als3p.

    PubMed

    Peters, Brian M; Ovchinnikova, Ekaterina S; Krom, Bastiaan P; Schlecht, Lisa Marie; Zhou, Han; Hoyer, Lois L; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C; Jabra-Rizk, Mary Ann; Shirtliff, Mark E

    2012-12-01

    The bacterium Staphylococcus (St.) aureus and the opportunistic fungus Candida albicans are currently among the leading nosocomial pathogens, often co-infecting critically ill patients, with high morbidity and mortality. Previous investigations have demonstrated preferential adherence of St. aureus to C. albicans hyphae during mixed biofilm growth. In this study, we aimed to characterize the mechanism behind this observed interaction. C. albicans adhesin-deficient mutant strains were screened by microscopy to identify the specific receptor on C. albicans hyphae recognized by St. aureus. Furthermore, an immunoassay was developed to validate and quantify staphylococcal binding to fungal biofilms. The findings from these experiments implicated the C. albicans adhesin agglutinin-like sequence 3 (Als3p) in playing a major role in the adherence process. This association was quantitatively established using atomic force microscopy, in which the adhesion force between single cells of the two species was significantly reduced for a C. albicans mutant strain lacking als3. Confocal microscopy further confirmed these observations, as St. aureus overlaid with a purified recombinant Als3 N-terminal domain fragment (rAls3p) exhibited robust binding. Importantly, a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae heterologously expressing Als3p was utilized to further confirm this adhesin as a receptor for St. aureus. Although the parental strain does not bind bacteria, expression of Als3p on the cell surface conferred upon the yeast the ability to strongly bind St. aureus. To elucidate the implications of these in vitro findings in a clinically relevant setting, an ex vivo murine model of co-infection was designed using murine tongue explants. Fluorescent microscopic images revealed extensive hyphal penetration of the epithelium typical of C. albicans mucosal infection. Interestingly, St. aureus bacterial cells were only seen within the epithelial tissue when associated with the invasive

  16. A Bioengineered Nisin Derivative to Control Biofilms of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius

    PubMed Central

    Field, Des; Gaudin, Noémie; Lyons, Francy; O'Connor, Paula M.; Cotter, Paul D.; Hill, Colin; Ross, R. Paul

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance and the shortage of novel antimicrobials are among the biggest challenges facing society. One of the major factors contributing to resistance is the use of frontline clinical antibiotics in veterinary practice. In order to properly manage dwindling antibiotic resources, we must identify antimicrobials that are specifically targeted to veterinary applications. Nisin is a member of the lantibiotic family of antimicrobial peptides that exhibit potent antibacterial activity against many gram-positive bacteria, including human and animal pathogens such as Staphylococcus, Bacillus, Listeria, and Clostridium. Although not currently used in human medicine, nisin is already employed commercially as an anti-mastitis product in the veterinary field. Recently we have used bioengineering strategies to enhance the activity of nisin against several high profile targets, including multi-drug resistant clinical pathogens such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and also against staphylococci and streptococci associated with bovine mastitis. However, newly emerging pathogens such as methicillin resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) pose a significant threat in terms of veterinary health and as a reservoir for antibiotic resistance determinants. In this study we created a nisin derivative with enhanced antimicrobial activity against S. pseudintermedius. In addition, the novel nisin derivative exhibits an enhanced ability to impair biofilm formation and to reduce the density of established biofilms. The activities of this peptide represent a significant improvement over that of the wild-type nisin peptide and merit further investigation with a view to their use to treat S. pseudintermedius infections. PMID:25789988

  17. Phenol-Soluble Modulin Toxins of Staphylococcus haemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Da, Fei; Joo, Hwang-Soo; Cheung, Gordon Y. C.; Villaruz, Amer E.; Rohde, Holger; Luo, Xiaoxing; Otto, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are important nosocomial pathogens and the leading cause of sepsis. The second most frequently implicated species, after Staphylococcus epidermidis, is Staphylococcus haemolyticus. However, we have a significant lack of knowledge about what causes virulence of S. haemolyticus, as virulence factors of this pathogen have remained virtually unexplored. In contrast to the aggressive pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, toxin production has traditionally not been associated with CoNS. Recent findings have suggested that phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs), amphipathic peptide toxins with broad cytolytic activity, are widespread in staphylococci, but there has been no systematic assessment of PSM production in CoNS other than S. epidermidis. Here, we identified, purified, and characterized PSMs of S. haemolyticus. We found three PSMs of the β-type, which correspond to peptides that before were described to have anti-gonococcal activity. We also detected an α-type PSM that has not previously been described. Furthermore, we confirmed that S. haemolyticus does not produce a δ-toxin, as results from genome sequencing had indicated. All four S. haemolyticus PSMs had strong pro-inflammatory activity, promoting neutrophil chemotaxis. Notably, we identified in particular the novel α-type PSM, S. haemolyticus PSMα, as a potent hemolysin and leukocidin. For the first time, our study describes toxins of this important staphylococcal pathogen with the potential to have a significant impact on virulence during blood infection and sepsis. PMID:28596942

  18. Phenol-Soluble Modulin Toxins of Staphylococcus haemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Da, Fei; Joo, Hwang-Soo; Cheung, Gordon Y C; Villaruz, Amer E; Rohde, Holger; Luo, Xiaoxing; Otto, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are important nosocomial pathogens and the leading cause of sepsis. The second most frequently implicated species, after Staphylococcus epidermidis , is Staphylococcus haemolyticus . However, we have a significant lack of knowledge about what causes virulence of S. haemolyticus , as virulence factors of this pathogen have remained virtually unexplored. In contrast to the aggressive pathogen Staphylococcus aureus , toxin production has traditionally not been associated with CoNS. Recent findings have suggested that phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs), amphipathic peptide toxins with broad cytolytic activity, are widespread in staphylococci, but there has been no systematic assessment of PSM production in CoNS other than S. epidermidis . Here, we identified, purified, and characterized PSMs of S. haemolyticus . We found three PSMs of the β-type, which correspond to peptides that before were described to have anti-gonococcal activity. We also detected an α-type PSM that has not previously been described. Furthermore, we confirmed that S. haemolyticus does not produce a δ-toxin, as results from genome sequencing had indicated. All four S. haemolyticus PSMs had strong pro-inflammatory activity, promoting neutrophil chemotaxis. Notably, we identified in particular the novel α-type PSM, S. haemolyticus PSMα, as a potent hemolysin and leukocidin. For the first time, our study describes toxins of this important staphylococcal pathogen with the potential to have a significant impact on virulence during blood infection and sepsis.

  19. Food poisoning outbreak in Tokyo, Japan caused by Staphylococcus argenteus.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yasunori; Kubota, Hiroaki; Ono, Hisaya K; Kobayashi, Makiko; Murauchi, Konomi; Kato, Rei; Hirai, Akihiko; Sadamasu, Kenji

    2017-12-04

    Staphylococcus argenteus is a novel species subdivided from Staphylococcus aureus. Whether this species can cause food poisoning outbreaks is unknown. This study aimed to investigate the enterotoxigenic activities of two food poisoning isolates suspected to be S. argenteus (Tokyo13064 and Tokyo13069). The results for phylogenic trees, constructed via whole genome sequencing, demonstrated that both isolates were more similar to a type strain of S. argenteus (MSHR1132) than any S. aureus strain. Moreover, the representative characteristics of S. argenteus were present in both strains, namely both isolates belong to the CC75 lineage and both lack a crtOPQMN operon. Thus, both were determined to be "S. argenteus." The compositions of the two isolates' accessory elements differed from those of MSHR1132. For example, the seb-related Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity island, SaPIishikawa11, was detected in Tokyo13064 and Tokyo13069 but not in MSHR1132. Both isolates were suggested to belong to distinct lineages that branched off from MSHR1132 lineages in terms of accessory elements. Tokyo13064 and Tokyo13069 expressed high levels of s(arg)eb and produced S(arg)EB protein, indicating that both have the ability to cause food poisoning. Our findings suggest that S. argenteus harboring particular accessory elements can cause staphylococcal diseases such as food poisoning, similarly to S. aureus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Survey of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage in healthy college students, Hawai'i.

    PubMed

    Morita, Jennifer E; Fujioka, Roger S; Tice, Alan D; Berestecky, John; Sato, Dayna; Seifried, Steven E; Katz, Alan R

    2007-08-01

    Currently, the carriage rate for Community-Acquired Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is unknown in Hawai'i. This survey focuses on a healthy population of 95 college students and 5 faculty who completed a survey related to possible risk factors for colonization of Staphylococcus aureus and were sampled for S. aureus from their anterior nares. Thirty-three (33%) subjects were carrying Staphylococcus aureus and of those, 3 (3%) carried MRSA. There was no significant association between Staphylococcus aureus carriage and ethnicity, gender exposure to seawater, prior Staphylococcus aureus infections, recent antibiotic use, or pets. Additional testing of a larger group of healthy individuals would be beneficial in assessing factors associated with CA-MRSA and Methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) carriage in Hawai'i.

  1. Frequency of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization among patients suffering from methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia

    PubMed Central

    Aslam, Nadia; Izhar, Mateen; Mehdi, Naima

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine rate of nasal colonization in Patients suffering from bacteraemia caused by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Methods: This descriptive cross sectional study was carried out in a tertiary ca re, University Teaching Hospital (Shaikh Zayed Hospital, Lahore) from October 2010 to August 2011. Nasal swabs were taken from patients suffering from MRSA bacteraemia and were plated on mannitol salt agar plates to isolate Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) which were then tested for oxacillin susceptibility. Results: Nasal colonization was present in 52.5% of patients suffering from MRSA bacteraemia. Conclusion: Nasal colonization rates with MRSA were high among patients suffering from MRSA bacteraemia especially in those undergoing dialysis or surgical procedures. Therefore, screening and nasal decolonization should be practiced in hospitals. PMID:24550968

  2. Frequency of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization among patients suffering from methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia.

    PubMed

    Aslam, Nadia; Izhar, Mateen; Mehdi, Naima

    2013-11-01

    To determine rate of nasal colonization in Patients suffering from bacteraemia caused by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. This descriptive cross sectional study was carried out in a tertiary ca re, University Teaching Hospital (Shaikh Zayed Hospital, Lahore) from October 2010 to August 2011. Nasal swabs were taken from patients suffering from MRSA bacteraemia and were plated on mannitol salt agar plates to isolate Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) which were then tested for oxacillin susceptibility. Nasal colonization was present in 52.5% of patients suffering from MRSA bacteraemia. Nasal colonization rates with MRSA were high among patients suffering from MRSA bacteraemia especially in those undergoing dialysis or surgical procedures. Therefore, screening and nasal decolonization should be practiced in hospitals.

  3. Isolation and biological characteristics of aerobic marine magnetotactic bacterium YSC-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jun; Pan, Hongmiao; Yue, Haidong; Song, Tao; Zhao, Yong; Chen, Guanjun; Wu, Longfei; Xiao, Tian

    2006-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria have become a hot spot of research in microbiology attracting intensive interest of researchers in multiple disciplinary fields. However, the studies were limited in few fastidious bacteria. The objective of this study aims at isolating new marine magnetic bacteria and better comprehension of magnetotactic bacteria. In this study, an aerobic magnetotactic bacterium YSC-1 was isolated from sediments in the Yellow Sea Cold Water Mass (YSCWM). In TEM, magnetic cells have one or several circular magnetosomes in diameter of 100nm, and consist of Fe and Co shown on energy dispersive X-ray spectrum. The biological and physiological characteristics of this bacterium were also described. The colour of YSC-1 colony is white in small rod. The gram stain is negative. Results showed that Strain YSC-1 differs from microaerophile magnetotactic bacteria MS-1 and WD-1 in biology.

  4. Economic Game Theory to Model the Attenuation of Virulence of an Obligate Intracellular Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Tago, Damian; Meyer, Damien F

    2016-01-01

    Diseases induced by obligate intracellular pathogens have a large burden on global human and animal health. Understanding the factors involved in the virulence and fitness of these pathogens contributes to the development of control strategies against these diseases. Based on biological observations, a theoretical model using game theory is proposed to explain how obligate intracellular bacteria interact with their host. The equilibrium in such a game shows that the virulence and fitness of the bacterium is host-triggered and by changing the host's defense system to which the bacterium is confronted, an evolutionary process leads to an attenuated strain. Although, the attenuation procedure has already been conducted in practice in order to develop an attenuated vaccine (e.g., with Ehrlichia ruminantium), there was a lack of understanding of the theoretical basis behind this process. Our work provides a model to better comprehend the existence of different phenotypes and some underlying evolutionary mechanisms for the virulence of obligate intracellular bacteria.

  5. Experimental study of the quasi 1d motion of a ``robot bacterium'' within a tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kai; Jiao, Yusheng; Li, Shutong; Ding, Yang; Xu, Xinliang; Complex Fluids Team

    2017-11-01

    Understanding how solid boundary influences the motion of a micro-swimmer can be quite important. Here we experimentally study the problem with a system of centi-meter size ``robot bacterium'' immersed in the solvent silicon oil. Equipped with build-in battery and motor, the robot mimics a free swimmer and the overall Reynolds number of the system is kept very small as we use silicon oil with very high viscosity. The motion of centi-meter size ``robot bacterium'' within cylindrical tube is experimentally studied in detail. Our results show that robot bacteria with different shapes respond very different to the solid boundary. For certain shapes the swimmers actually swim much faster within a tube, when compared to their motions without any confinement, in good agreement with our numerical evaluations of the hydrodynamics of the system.

  6. Gene function analysis in extremophiles: the "nif" regulon of the strict iron oxidizing bacterium "Leptospirillum ferrooxidans"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parro, Victor; Moreno-Paz, Mercedes

    2004-03-01

    In Centro de Astrobiologia it has been considered the Tinto river as a model ecosystem to study life based on iron. The final goal is to study the biological and metabolic diversity in microorganisms living there, following a genomic approach, to get insights to the mechanisms of adaptation to this environment. The Gram-negative bacterium Leptospirillum ferrooxidans is one of the most abundant microorganisms in the river, and it is one of the main responsible in maintenance of pH balance and, as a consequence, the physico-chemical properties of the exosystem. We have constructed a Shotgun DNA microarrays from this bacterium and we have used it to studied its genetic capacity for nitrogen fixation. With this approach we have identified most of the genes necessary for dinitrogen (N2) reduction, confirming the capacity of L. ferrooxidans as a free diazotrophic (nitrogen fixer) microorganism.

  7. Economic Game Theory to Model the Attenuation of Virulence of an Obligate Intracellular Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Tago, Damian; Meyer, Damien F.

    2016-01-01

    Diseases induced by obligate intracellular pathogens have a large burden on global human and animal health. Understanding the factors involved in the virulence and fitness of these pathogens contributes to the development of control strategies against these diseases. Based on biological observations, a theoretical model using game theory is proposed to explain how obligate intracellular bacteria interact with their host. The equilibrium in such a game shows that the virulence and fitness of the bacterium is host-triggered and by changing the host's defense system to which the bacterium is confronted, an evolutionary process leads to an attenuated strain. Although, the attenuation procedure has already been conducted in practice in order to develop an attenuated vaccine (e.g., with Ehrlichia ruminantium), there was a lack of understanding of the theoretical basis behind this process. Our work provides a model to better comprehend the existence of different phenotypes and some underlying evolutionary mechanisms for the virulence of obligate intracellular bacteria. PMID:27610355

  8. Evaluation of an Immunochromatographic Assay for Rapid Detection of Penicillin-Binding Protein 2a in Human and Animal Staphylococcus intermedius Group, Staphylococcus lugdunensis, and Staphylococcus schleiferi Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Arnold, A R; Burnham, C-A D; Ford, B A; Lawhon, S D; McAllister, S K; Lonsway, D; Albrecht, V; Jerris, R C; Rasheed, J K; Limbago, B; Burd, E M; Westblade, L F

    2016-03-01

    The performance of a rapid penicillin-binding protein 2a (PBP2a) detection assay, the Alere PBP2a culture colony test, was evaluated for identification of PBP2a-mediated beta-lactam resistance in human and animal clinical isolates of Staphylococcus intermedius group, Staphylococcus lugdunensis, and Staphylococcus schleiferi. The assay was sensitive and specific, with all PBP2a-negative and PBP2a-positive strains testing negative and positive, respectively. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Comment on "A bacterium that degrades and assimilates poly(ethylene terephthalate)".

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Yang, Jun; Jiang, Lei

    2016-08-19

    Yoshida et al (Report, 11 March 2016, p. 1196) reported that the bacterium Ideonella sakaiensis 201-F6 can degrade and assimilate poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET). However, the authors exaggerated degradation efficiency using a low-crystallinity PET and presented no straightforward experiments to verify depolymerization and assimilation of PET. Thus, the authors' conclusions are rather misleading. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Sphingobium ummariense Strain RL-3, a Hexachlorocyclohexane-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, Puneet; Dua, Ankita; Sangwan, Naseer; Oldach, Phoebe; Khurana, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH)-degrading bacterium Sphingobium ummariense strain RL-3, which was isolated from the HCH dumpsite located in Lucknow, India (27°00′N and 81°09′E). The annotated draft genome sequence (4.75 Mb) of strain RL-3 consisted of 139 contigs, 4,645 coding sequences, and 65% G+C content. PMID:24233594

  11. Halobacterium saccharovorum sp. nov., a carbohydrate-metabolizing, extremely halophilic bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomlinson, G. A.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1976-01-01

    The previously described extremely halophilic bacterium, strain M6, metabolizes a variety of carbohydrates with the production of acid. In addition, the organism produces nitrite (but no gas) from nitrate, is motile, and grows most rapidly at about 50 C. These characteristics distinguish it from all previously described halophilic bacteria in the genus Halobacterium. It is suggested that it be designated as a new species, Halobacterium saccharovorum.

  12. Whole-Genome Sequence of Cupriavidus sp. Strain BIS7, a Heavy-Metal-Resistant Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Kar Wai; Thinagaran, Dinaiz a/l; Gan, Han Ming; Yin, Wai-Fong

    2012-01-01

    Cupriavidus sp. strain BIS7 is a Malaysian tropical soil bacterium that exhibits broad heavy-metal resistance [Co(II), Zn(II), Ni(II), Se(IV), Cu(II), chromate, Co(III), Fe(II), and Fe(III)]. It is particularly resistant to Fe(II), Fe(III), and Zn(II). Here we present the assembly and annotation of its genome. PMID:23115161

  13. Whole-genome sequence of Cupriavidus sp. strain BIS7, a heavy-metal-resistant bacterium.

    PubMed

    Hong, Kar Wai; Thinagaran, Dinaiz al; Gan, Han Ming; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2012-11-01

    Cupriavidus sp. strain BIS7 is a Malaysian tropical soil bacterium that exhibits broad heavy-metal resistance [Co(II), Zn(II), Ni(II), Se(IV), Cu(II), chromate, Co(III), Fe(II), and Fe(III)]. It is particularly resistant to Fe(II), Fe(III), and Zn(II). Here we present the assembly and annotation of its genome.

  14. Sexual Transmission of a Plant Pathogenic Bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, between Conspecific Insect Vectors during Mating

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Rajinder S.; Pelz-Stelinski, Kirsten; Hermann, Sara L.; Tiwari, Siddharth; Stelinski, Lukasz L.

    2011-01-01

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus is a fastidious, phloem-inhabiting, gram-negative bacterium transmitted by Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae). The bacterium is the presumed causal agent of huanglongbing (HLB), one of the most destructive and economically important diseases of citrus. We investigated whether Las is transmitted between infected and uninfected D. citri adults during courtship. Our results indicate that Las was sexually transmitted from Las-infected male D. citri to uninfected females at a low rate (<4%) during mating. Sexual transmission was not observed following mating of infected females and uninfected males or among adult pairs of the same sex. Las was detected in genitalia of both sexes and also in eggs of infected females. A latent period of 7 days or more was required to detect the bacterium in recipient females. Rod shaped as well as spherical structures resembling Las were observed in ovaries of Las-infected females with transmission electron microscopy, but were absent in ovaries from uninfected D. citri females. The size of the rod shaped structures varied from 0.39 to 0.67 µm in length and 0.19 to 0.39 µm in width. The spherical structures measured from 0.61 to 0.80 µm in diameter. This investigation provides convincing evidence that a plant pathogenic bacterium is sexually transmitted from male to female insects during courtship and established evidence that bacteria persist in reproductive organs. Moreover, these findings provide an alternative sexually horizontal mechanism for the spread of Las within populations of D. citri, even in the absence of infected host trees. PMID:22216209

  15. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic study of intact cells of the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Azospirillum brasilense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamnev, A. A.; Ristić, M.; Antonyuk, L. P.; Chernyshev, A. V.; Ignatov, V. V.

    1997-06-01

    The data of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic measurements performed on intact cells of the soil nitrogen-fixing bacterium Azospirillum brasilense grown in a standard medium and under the conditions of an increased metal uptake are compared and discussed. The structural FTIR information obtained is considered together with atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) data on the content of metal cations in the bacterial cells. Some methodological aspects concerning preparation of bacterial cell samples for FTIR measurements are also discussed.

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of the Endophytic Bacterium Burkholderia sp. Strain KJ006

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Min-Jung; Song, Ju Yeon; Kim, Seon-Young; Jeong, Haeyoung; Kang, Sung Gyun; Kim, Byung Kwon; Kwon, Soon-Kyeong; Lee, Choong Hoon; Yu, Dong Su

    2012-01-01

    Endophytes live inside plant tissues without causing any harm and may even benefit plants. Here, we provide the high-quality genome sequence of Burkholderia sp. strain KJ006, an endophytic bacterium of rice with antifungal activity. The 6.6-Mb genome, consisting of three chromosomes and a single plasmid, contains genes related to plant growth promotion or degradation of aromatic compounds. PMID:22843575

  17. Stress of algicidal substances from a bacterium Exiguobacterium sp. h10 on Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Liu, L; Xu, Y; Li, P; Zhang, K; Jiang, X; Zheng, T; Wang, H

    2017-01-01

    Microcystis aeruginosa is a cyanobacterial bloom-causing species and is considered a serious threat to human health and biological safety. In this study, the algicidal bacterium h10 showed high algicidal effects on M. aeruginosa 7820, and strain h10 was confirmed to belong to the genus Exiguobacterium, for which the name Exiguobacterium sp. h10 is proposed. Algicidal activity and mode analysis revealed that the supernatant, rather than the bacterial cells, was responsible for the algicidal activity, indicating that the algicidal mode of strain h10 is by indirect attack through the production of algicidal substances. Analysis of the algicidal substance characteristics showed a molecular weight of <1000 Da and that algicidal substances exhibit high thermal stability and pH instability, and the characteristic functional groups of the algicidal substance mainly included carbonyl, amino and hydroxyl groups. Under the effects of the algicidal substance, the cellular pigment content was significantly decreased, and the algal cell structure and morphology were seriously damaged. The results indicate that the algicidal bacterium Exiguobacterium sp. h10 could be a potential bio-agent for controlling cyanobacterial blooms of M. aeruginosa. In this study, the effects of algicidal substances from an algicidal bacterium Exiguobacterium sp. h10 on the toxic cyanobacterium, Microcystis aeruginosa 7820, were first investigated. The algicidal mode of action was confirmed as an indirect attack through the production of algicidal substances. The characteristics of the algicidal substance were determined, especially the functional groups analysis that confirmed the algicidal substances were glycolipid mixtures. With the stress of algicidal substances, the algal chlorophyll a synthesis, cell structure and morphology were seriously damaged. This study proved that algicidal bacteria are promising sources of potential cyanobacterial bloom-control, and provided good procedures for the

  18. Expression of Heterogenous Arsenic Resistance Genes in the Obligately Autotrophic Biomining Bacterium Thiobacillus ferrooxidans

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ji-Bin; Yan, Wang-Ming; Bao, Xue-Zhen

    1994-01-01

    Two arsenic-resistant plasmids were constructed and introduced into Thiobacillus ferrooxidans strains by conjugation. The plasmids with the replicon of wide-host-range plasmid RSF1010 were stable in T. ferrooxidans. The arsenic resistance genes originating from the heterotroph were expressed in this obligately autotrophic bacterium, but the promoter derived from T. ferrooxidans showed no special function in its original host. PMID:16349341

  19. Catalytic Biomineralization of Fluorescent Calcite by the Thermophilic Bacterium Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius▿

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Naoto; Higashimura, Eiji; Saeki, Yuichi

    2010-01-01

    The thermophilic Geobacillus bacterium catalyzed the formation of 100-μm hexagonal crystals at 60°C in a hydrogel containing sodium acetate, calcium chloride, and magnesium sulfate. Under fluorescence microscopy, crystals fluoresced upon excitation at 365 ± 5, 480 ± 20, or 545 ± 15 nm. X-ray diffraction indicated that the crystals were magnesium-calcite in calcite-type calcium carbonate. PMID:20851984

  20. Outbreak of meningitis in weaner pigs caused by unidentified asaccharolytic gram-negative bacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, K; Holmes, B; Kock, N; Muvavarirwa, P

    1996-01-01

    Several organisms are known to cause outbreaks of meningitis in pigs, with Haemophilus species being the most frequently implicated. We report such an outbreak in which necropsied pigs manifested an unusual combination of meningitis, tracheitis, and bronchitis. The causative agent appeared to be an asaccharolytic gram-negative nonfermentative bacterium whose classification has yet to be determined. The organism was isolated from the brain and was extremely capnophilic, growing in air only after several serial subcultures. PMID:8815112

  1. Insights in Nanoparticle-Bacterium Interactions: New Frontiers to Bypass Bacterial Resistance to Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Diab, Roudayna; Khameneh, Bahman; Joubert, Olivier; Duval, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology has been revealed as a fundamental approach for antibiotics delivery. In this paper, recent findings demonstrating the superiority of nanocarried-antibiotics over "naked" ones and the ways by which nanoparticles can help to overwhelm bacterial drug resistance are reviewed. The second part of this paper sheds light on nanoparticle-bacterium interaction patterns. Finally, key factors affecting the effectiveness of nanoparticles interactions with bacteria are discussed.

  2. Draft genome sequence of a strictly anaerobic dichloromethane-degrading bacterium

    DOE PAGES

    Kleindienst, Sara; Higgins, Steven A.; Tsementzi, Despina; ...

    2016-03-03

    Here, an anaerobic, dichloromethane-degrading bacterium affiliated with novel Peptococcaceae was maintained in a microbial consortium. The organism originated from pristine freshwater sediment collected from Rio Mameyes in Luquillo, Puerto Rico, in October 2009 (latitude 18°21'43.9", longitude –65°46'8.4"). The draft genome sequence is 2.1 Mb and has a G+C content of 43.5%.

  3. Permanent draft genome of the malachite-green-tolerant bacterium Rhizobium sp. MGL06.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Runping; Zeng, Runying

    2014-12-01

    Rhizobium sp. MGL06, the first Rhizobium isolate from a marine environment, is a malachite-green-tolerant bacterium with a broader salinity tolerance (range: 0.5% to 9%) than other rhizobia. This study sequences and annotates the draft genome sequence of this strain. Genome sequence information provides a basis for analyzing the malachite green tolerance, broad salinity adaptation, nitrogen fixation properties, and taxonomic classification of the isolate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of Tannic Acid on the Transcriptome of the Soil Bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chee Kent; Penesyan, Anahit; Hassan, Karl A.

    2013-01-01

    Tannins are a diverse group of plant-produced, polyphenolic compounds with metal-chelating and antimicrobial properties that are prevalent in many soils. Using transcriptomics, we determined that tannic acid, a form of hydrolysable tannin, broadly affects the expression of genes involved in iron and zinc homeostases, sulfur metabolism, biofilm formation, motility, and secondary metabolite biosynthesis in the soil- and rhizosphere-inhabiting bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5. PMID:23435890

  5. Massilia sp. BS-1, a novel violacein-producing bacterium isolated from soil.

    PubMed

    Agematu, Hitosi; Suzuki, Kazuya; Tsuya, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    A novel bacterium, Massilia sp. BS-1, producing violacein and deoxyviolacein was isolated from a soil sample collected from Akita Prefecture, Japan. The 16S ribosomal DNA of strain BS-1 displayed 93% homology with its nearest violacein-producing neighbor, Janthinobacterium lividum. Strain BS-1 grew well in a synthetic medium, but required both L-tryptophan and a small amount of L-histidine to produce violacein.

  6. Bacterium induces cryptic meroterpenoid pathway in the pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    König, Claudia C; Scherlach, Kirstin; Schroeckh, Volker; Horn, Fabian; Nietzsche, Sandor; Brakhage, Axel A; Hertweck, Christian

    2013-05-27

    Stimulating encounter: The intimate, physical interaction between the soil-derived bacterium Streptomyces rapamycinicus and the human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus led to the activation of an otherwise silent polyketide synthase (PKS) gene cluster coding for an unusual prenylated polyphenol (fumicycline A). The meroterpenoid pathway is regulated by a pathway-specific activator gene as well as by epigenetic factors. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of a New Ruminococcaceae Bacterium Isolated from Anaerobic Biomass Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Hahnke, Sarah; Abendroth, Christian; Langer, Thomas; Codoñer, Francisco M; Ramm, Patrice; Porcar, Manuel; Luschnig, Olaf; Klocke, Michael

    2018-04-05

    A new Ruminococcaceae bacterium, strain HV4-5-B5C, participating in the anaerobic digestion of grass, was isolated from a mesophilic two-stage laboratory-scale leach bed biogas system. The draft annotated genome sequence presented in this study and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated the affiliation of HV4-5-B5C with the family Ruminococcaceae outside recently described genera. Copyright © 2018 Hahnke et al.

  8. Low occurrence of the new species Staphylococcus argenteus in a Staphylococcus aureus collection of human isolates from Belgium.

    PubMed

    Argudín, M A; Dodémont, M; Vandendriessche, S; Rottiers, S; Tribes, C; Roisin, S; de Mendonça, R; Nonhoff, C; Deplano, A; Denis, O

    2016-06-01

    Staphylococcus argenteus is a novel Staphylococcus species closely related to Staphylococcus aureus that has been recently described. In this study, we investigated the proportion and the characteristics of S. argenteus recovered from humans in Belgium. S. aureus. human isolates collected in Belgium from 2006 to 2015 (n = 1,903) were retrospectively characterised via the presence of non-pigmented colonies on chocolate agar, spa typing and rpoB sequencing to determine if some of them were in fact S. argenteus. Out of 73 strains non-pigmented on chocolate plates, 3 isolates (0.16 %) showed rpoB sequences, in addition to spa and sequence types (ST2250/t5787, ST2250/t6675, ST3240/t6675), related to S. argenteus. Two of them were methicillin-resistant, harbouring a SCCmec type IV. The three S. argenteus isolates carried genes (sak, scn) of the immune evasion cluster. This first Belgian nationwide analysis showed a low occurrence of S. argenteus. Further studies should be conducted to identify the distribution range and the clinical impact of this new species.

  9. Characterization of a potentially novel 'blown pack' spoilage bacterium isolated from bovine hide.

    PubMed

    Moschonas, G; Bolton, D J

    2013-03-01

    To characterize a psychrotrophic bacterium, designated TC1, previously isolated from a cattle hide in Ireland, and to investigate the ability of this strain to cause 'blown pack' spoilage (BPS) of vacuum-packaged beef primals. TC1 was characterized using a combination of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and genotypic analyses and was assessed for its ability to spoil vacuum-packaged beef at refrigerated temperatures. TC1 was Gram-positive and formed elliptical subterminal endospores. The strain was able to grow between 0 and 33 °C, with optimal growth between 23 and 24 °C. TC1 could be differentiated from its phylogenetically closest neighbour (Clostridium lituseburense DSM 797(T)) by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and cellular fatty acid composition. TC1 spoiled (BPS) beef within 42 days when inoculated in cold-stored (1 °C) vacuum-packed beef. The phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and genotypic characterization indicated that TC1 may represent a potentially novel, cold-tolerant, gas-producing bacterium of considerable economic significance to the beef industry. This study reports and characterizes an emerging BPS bacterium, which should be considered in future activities designed to minimize the psychrophilic and psychrotrophic spoilage of vacuum-packaged beef. © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Phosphate enhances levan production in the endophytic bacterium Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus Pal5

    PubMed Central

    Idogawa, Nao; Amamoto, Ryuta; Murata, Kousaku; Kawai, Shigeyuki

    2014-01-01

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a gram-negative and endophytic nitrogen-fixing bacterium that has several beneficial effects in host plants; thus, utilization of this bacterium as a biofertilizer in agriculture may be possible. G. diazotrophicus synthesizes levan, a D-fructofuranosyl polymer with β-(2→6) linkages, as an exopolysaccharide and the synthesized levan improves the stress tolerance of the bacterium. In this study, we found that phosphate enhances levan production by G. diazotrophicus Pal5, a wild type strain that showed a stronger mucous phenotype on solid medium containing 28 mM phosphate than on solid medium containing 7 mM phosphate. A G. diazotrophicus Pal5 levansucrase disruptant showed only a weak mucous phenotype regardless of the phosphate concentration, indicating that the mucous phenotype observed on 28 mM phosphate medium was caused by levan. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the effect of a high concentration of phosphate on exopolysaccharide production. PMID:24717418

  11. The gene transfer agent-like particle of the marine phototrophic bacterium Rhodovulum sulfidophilum.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Nobuyoshi; Yamamoto, Junya; Komatsu, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Hirose, Yuu; Umekage, So; Ohyama, Takashi; Kikuchi, Yo

    2015-12-01

    Gene transfer agents (GTAs) are shaped like bacteriophage particles but have many properties that distinguish them from bacteriophages. GTAs play a role in horizontal gene transfer in nature and thus affect the evolution of prokaryotic genomes. In the course of studies on the extracellular production of designed RNAs using the marine bacterium Rhodovulum sulfidophilum , we found that this bacterium produces a GTA-like particle. The particle contains DNA fragments of 4.5 kb, which consist of randomly fragmented genomic DNA from the bacterium. This 4.5-kb DNA production was prevented while quorum sensing was inhibited. Direct observation of the particle by transmission electron microscopy revealed that the particle resembles a tailed phage and has a head diameter of about 40 nm and a tail length of about 60 nm. We also identified the structural genes for the GTA in the genome. Translated amino acid sequences and gene positions are closely related to those of the genes that encode the Rhodobacter capsulatus GTA. This is the first report of a GTA-like particle from the genus Rhodovulum . However, gene transfer activity of this particle has not yet been confirmed. The differences between this particle and other GTAs are discussed.

  12. Purification and Characterization of Haloalkaline, Organic Solvent Stable Xylanase from Newly Isolated Halophilic Bacterium-OKH

    PubMed Central

    Sanghvi, Gaurav; Jivrajani, Mehul; Patel, Nirav; Jivrajani, Heta; Bhaskara, Govinal Badiger; Patel, Shivani

    2014-01-01

    A novel, alkali-tolerant halophilic bacterium-OKH with an ability to produce extracellular halophilic, alkali-tolerant, organic solvent stable, and moderately thermostable xylanase was isolated from salt salterns of Mithapur region, Gujarat, India. Identification of the bacterium was done based upon biochemical tests and 16S rRNA sequence. Maximum xylanase production was achieved at pH 9.0 and 37°C temperature in the medium containing 15% NaCl and 1% (w/v) corn cobs. Sugarcane bagasse and wheat straw also induce xylanase production when used as carbon source. The enzyme was active over a range of 0–25% sodium chloride examined in culture broth. The optimum xylanase activity was observed at 5% sodium chloride. Xylanase was purified with 25.81%-fold purification and 17.1% yield. Kinetic properties such as Km and Vmax were 4.2 mg/mL and 0.31 μmol/min/mL, respectively. The enzyme was stable at pH 6.0 and 50°C with 60% activity after 8 hours of incubation. Enzyme activity was enhanced by Ca2+, Mn2+, and Mg2+ but strongly inhibited by heavy metals such as Hg2+, Fe3+, Ni2+, and Zn2+. Xylanase was found to be stable in organic solvents like glutaraldehyde and isopropanol. The purified enzyme hydrolysed lignocellulosic substrates. Xylanase, purified from the halophilic bacterium-OKH, has potential biotechnological applications. PMID:27350996

  13. Multiple cellobiohydrolases and cellobiose phosphorylases cooperate in the ruminal bacterium Ruminococcus albus 8 to degrade cellooligosaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devendran, Saravanan; Abdel-Hamid, Ahmed M.; Evans, Anton F.; Iakiviak, Michael; Kwon, In Hyuk; Mackie, Roderick I.; Cann, Isaac

    2016-10-01

    Digestion of plant cell wall polysaccharides is important in energy capture in the gastrointestinal tract of many herbivorous and omnivorous mammals, including humans and ruminants. The members of the genus Ruminococcus are found in both the ruminant and human gastrointestinal tract, where they show versatility in degrading both hemicellulose and cellulose. The available genome sequence of Ruminococcus albus 8, a common inhabitant of the cow rumen, alludes to a bacterium well-endowed with genes that target degradation of various plant cell wall components. The mechanisms by which R. albus 8 employs to degrade these recalcitrant materials are, however, not clearly understood. In this report, we demonstrate that R. albus 8 elaborates multiple cellobiohydrolases with multi-modular architectures that overall enhance the catalytic activity and versatility of the enzymes. Furthermore, our analyses show that two cellobiose phosphorylases encoded by R. albus 8 can function synergistically with a cognate cellobiohydrolase and endoglucanase to completely release, from a cellulosic substrate, glucose which can then be fermented by the bacterium for production of energy and cellular building blocks. We further use transcriptomic analysis to confirm the over-expression of the biochemically characterized enzymes during growth of the bacterium on cellulosic substrates compared to cellobiose.

  14. Enhancement of survival and electricity production in an engineered bacterium by light-driven proton pumping.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ethan T; Baron, Daniel B; Naranjo, Belén; Bond, Daniel R; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia; Gralnick, Jeffrey A

    2010-07-01

    Microorganisms can use complex photosystems or light-dependent proton pumps to generate membrane potential and/or reduce electron carriers to support growth. The discovery that proteorhodopsin is a light-dependent proton pump that can be expressed readily in recombinant bacteria enables development of new strategies to probe microbial physiology and to engineer microbes with new light-driven properties. Here, we describe functional expression of proteorhodopsin and light-induced changes in membrane potential in the bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. We report that there were significant increases in electrical current generation during illumination of electrochemical chambers containing S. oneidensis expressing proteorhodopsin. We present evidence that an engineered strain is able to consume lactate at an increased rate when it is illuminated, which is consistent with the hypothesis that proteorhodopsin activity enhances lactate uptake by increasing the proton motive force. Our results demonstrate that there is coupling of a light-driven process to electricity generation in a nonphotosynthetic engineered bacterium. Expression of proteorhodopsin also preserved the viability of the bacterium under nutrient-limited conditions, providing evidence that fulfillment of basic energy needs of organisms may explain the widespread distribution of proteorhodopsin in marine environments.

  15. Fine Structure and Host-Virus Relationship of a Marine Bacterium and Its Bacteriophage

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, Artrice F.; Chapman, George B.

    1966-01-01

    Valentine, Artrice F. (Georgetown University, Washington, D.C.), and George B. Chapman. Fine structure and host-virus relationship of a marine bacterium and its bacteriophage. J. Bacteriol. 92:1535–1554. 1966.—The fine structure of a gram-negative marine bacterium, Cytophaga marinoflava sp. n., has been revealed by ultrathin sectioning and electron microscopy. Stages in the morphogenesis of the bacterial virus NCMB 385, which has been shown to be highly specific for this organism, were also demonstrated in bacterial cells fixed according to the Kellenberger technique. The bacterium possessed a cell wall, cytoplasmic membrane, and nuclear and cytoplasmic regions typical of bacterial cells. Both the cell wall and the cytoplasmic membrane showed a tripartite structure, i.e., each was composed of two dense layers separated by a low-density zone. Intracytoplasmic membrane systems were also observed, especially in dividing cells and in cells in which new viruses were being formed. As many as 18 hexagonally shaped, empty phage heads (membranes only) were observed in untreated, infected bacterial cells. Phage heads, intermediate in density to empty heads and fully condensed ones, possibly representing stages in the morphological development of the virus, were also seen. Images PMID:5924277

  16. AzaSite® inhibits Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus biofilm formation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wu, Eric C; Kowalski, Regis P; Romanowski, Eric G; Mah, Francis S; Gordon, Y Jerold; Shanks, Robert M Q

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of azithromycin (AZM) 1% ophthalmic solution in DuraSite® (AzaSite®) on biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci in vitro. Susceptible and resistant clinical strains (n = 8) of S. aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci were challenged with serial dilutions of AzaSite® and its components: AZM, benzalkonium chloride (BAK), and the DuraSite drug delivery vehicle. After 20 h of incubation, bacterial growth was quantified using a spectrophotometer (A = 600 nm). Plates were stained with crystal violet and biofilm formation was quantified spectrophotometrically at A = 590 nm. AzaSite® and AZM inhibited bacterial growth (P < 0.05) and biofilm formation (P < 0.05) in AZM-susceptible strains at all studied dilutions. AZM-resistant strains treated with AzaSite® exhibited a significant reduction in biofilm formation (P < 0.05) at subinhibitory concentrations (1.25%-5%). AZM had no effect on bacterial growth in resistant strains but conferred a small reduction in biofilm formation at concentrations from 1.25 to 10 mg/mL in most strains. DuraSite® inhibited biofilm formation at concentrations between 10% and 2.5% in all studied strains (P < 0.05), without affecting bacterial growth. BAK inhibited bacterial growth and biofilm formation in all strains between concentrations of 0.042 and 0.375 mg/mL (P < 0.05). AzaSite®, AZM, or BAK prevented biofilm formation by inhibiting growth of AZM-susceptible strains. AzaSite®, AZM, and DuraSite® also reduced biofilm formation at subinhibitory concentrations for growth. Our data indicate that AZM has a moderate inhibitory effect on biofilm formation, whereas DuraSite® appears to play a greater role in the inhibition of staphylococcal biofilm formation by AzaSite®.

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Arthrobacter sp. Strain SPG23, a Hydrocarbon-Degrading and Plant Growth-Promoting Soil Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Gkorezis, Panagiotis; Bottos, Eric M; Van Hamme, Jonathan D; Thijs, Sofie; Rineau, Francois; Franzetti, Andrea; Balseiro-Romero, Maria; Weyens, Nele; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2015-12-23

    We report here the 4.7-Mb draft genome of Arthrobacter sp. SPG23, a hydrocarbonoclastic Gram-positive bacterium belonging to the Actinobacteria, isolated from diesel-contaminated soil at the Ford Motor Company site in Genk, Belgium. Strain SPG23 is a potent plant growth promoter useful for diesel fuel remediation applications based on plant-bacterium associations. Copyright © 2015 Gkorezis et al.

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus licheniformis Strain GB2, a Hydrocarbon-Degrading and Plant Growth-Promoting Soil Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Gkorezis, Panagiotis; Van Hamme, Jonathan; Bottos, Eric; Thijs, Sofie; Balseiro-Romero, Maria; Monterroso, Carmela; Kidd, Petra Suzan; Rineau, Francois; Weyens, Nele; Sillen, Wouter; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2016-06-23

    We report the 4.39 Mb draft genome of Bacillus licheniformis GB2, a hydrocarbonoclastic Gram-positive bacterium of the family Bacillaceae, isolated from diesel-contaminated soil at the Ford Motor Company site in Genk, Belgium. Strain GB2 is an effective plant-growth promoter useful for diesel fuel remediation applications based on plant-bacterium associations. Copyright © 2016 Gkorezis et al.

  19. [Diversity analysis of desulfuration bacterium from the oxidation ditch of city sewage treatment plant with SO2 gas].

    PubMed

    Huang, Bing; Zhang, Shi-Ling; Zhang, Jiang-Hong; Ao, Yong; Shi, Zhe

    2011-07-01

    A group of removing SO2 bacterium was obtained from the oxidation ditch of city sewage treatment plant by inductive domestication over 6 d with low concentration SO2 gas, and they have an ability with biodegradation rate of 888 mg x (L x h)(-1) and a degradation efficiency of 85% during 1.5 h for SO2 dissolved in water with their synergy. The clone library and two phylogenetic trees of the removing SO2 bacterium communities were obtained based on 16S rRNA DNA comparison by DNA extraction of the sample and in situ polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The phylogenetic analysis showed that 8 dominant desulfuration bacterium occupy about 69% of all removing SO2 bacterium, and some of them have a kindred with discovered desulfuration bacterium but not homogeneity, and there are four belong to alpha-Proteobacteria, another four belong to beta-Proteobacteria in them. The gene information about 16S rRNA sequence of the dominant desulfuration bacteria and domestication method provide a basic of looking for or domesticating removing SO2 bacterium for development microbial desulfurization technology of contained SO2 tail gas.

  20. Understanding the interaction between an obligate hyperparasitic bacterium, Pasteuria penetrans and its obligate plant-parasitic nematode host, Meloidogyne spp.

    PubMed

    Davies, Keith G

    2009-01-01

    Pasteuria penetrans is an endospore-forming bacterium, which is a hyperparasite of root-knot nematodes Meloidogyne spp. that are economically important pests of a wide range of crops. The life cycle of the bacterium and nematode are described with emphasis on the bacterium's potential as a biocontrol agent. Two aspects that currently prohibit the commercial development of the bacterium as a biocontrol agent are the inability to culture it outside its host and its host specificity. Vegetative growth of the bacterium is possible in vitro; however, getting the vegetative stages of the bacterium to enter sporogenesis has been problematic. Insights from genomic survey sequences regarding the role of cation concentration and the phosphorylation of Spo0F have proved useful in inducing vegetative bacteria to sporulate. Similarly, genomic data have also proved useful in understanding the attachment of endospores to the cuticle of infective nematode juveniles, and a Velcro-like model of spore attachment is proposed that involves collagen-like fibres on the surface of the endospore interacting with mucins on the nematode cuticle. Ecological studies of the interactions between Daphnia and Pasteuria ramosa are examined and similarities are drawn between the co-evolution of virulence in the Daphnia system and that of plant-parasitic nematodes.

  1. Pathogenicity of Moraxella osloensis, a Bacterium Associated with the Nematode Phasmarhabditis hermaphrodita, to the Slug Deroceras reticulatum

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Li; Grewal, Parwinder S.

    2001-01-01

    Moraxella osloensis, a gram-negative bacterium, is associated with Phasmarhabditis hermaphrodita, a nematode parasite of slugs. This bacterium-feeding nematode has potential for the biological control of slugs, especially the grey garden slug, Deroceras reticulatum. Infective juveniles of P. hermaphrodita invade the shell cavity of the slug, develop into self-fertilizing hermaphrodites, and produce progeny, resulting in host death. However, the role of the associated bacterium in the pathogenicity of the nematode to the slug is unknown. We discovered that M. osloensis alone is pathogenic to D. reticulatum after injection into the shell cavity or hemocoel of the slug. The bacteria from 60-h cultures were more pathogenic than the bacteria from 40-h cultures, as indicated by the higher and more rapid mortality of the slugs injected with the former. Coinjection of penicillin and streptomycin with the 60-h bacterial culture reduced its pathogenicity to the slug. Further work suggested that the reduction and loss of pathogenicity of the aged infective juveniles of P. hermaphrodita to D. reticulatum result from the loss of M. osloensis from the aged nematodes. Also, axenic J1/J2 nematodes were nonpathogenic after injection into the shell cavity. Therefore, we conclude that the bacterium is the sole killing agent of D. reticulatum in the nematode-bacterium complex and that P. hermaphrodita acts only as a vector to transport the bacterium into the shell cavity of the slug. The identification of the toxic metabolites produced by M. osloensis is being pursued. PMID:11679319

  2. Pathogenicity of Moraxella osloensis, a bacterium associated with the nematode Phasmarhabditis hermaphrodita, to the slug Deroceras reticulatum.

    PubMed

    Tan, L; Grewal, P S

    2001-11-01

    Moraxella osloensis, a gram-negative bacterium, is associated with Phasmarhabditis hermaphrodita, a nematode parasite of slugs. This bacterium-feeding nematode has potential for the biological control of slugs, especially the grey garden slug, Deroceras reticulatum. Infective juveniles of P. hermaphrodita invade the shell cavity of the slug, develop into self-fertilizing hermaphrodites, and produce progeny, resulting in host death. However, the role of the associated bacterium in the pathogenicity of the nematode to the slug is unknown. We discovered that M. osloensis alone is pathogenic to D. reticulatum after injection into the shell cavity or hemocoel of the slug. The bacteria from 60-h cultures were more pathogenic than the bacteria from 40-h cultures, as indicated by the higher and more rapid mortality of the slugs injected with the former. Coinjection of penicillin and streptomycin with the 60-h bacterial culture reduced its pathogenicity to the slug. Further work suggested that the reduction and loss of pathogenicity of the aged infective juveniles of P. hermaphrodita to D. reticulatum result from the loss of M. osloensis from the aged nematodes. Also, axenic J1/J2 nematodes were nonpathogenic after injection into the shell cavity. Therefore, we conclude that the bacterium is the sole killing agent of D. reticulatum in the nematode-bacterium complex and that P. hermaphrodita acts only as a vector to transport the bacterium into the shell cavity of the slug. The identification of the toxic metabolites produced by M. osloensis is being pursued.

  3. Determination of phenanthrene bioavailability by using a self-dying reporter bacterium: test with model solids and soil.

    PubMed

    Shin, Doyun; Nam, Kyoungphile

    2012-02-20

    The present study was conducted to investigate the performance and feasibility of a self-dying reporter bacterium to visualize and quantify phenanthrene bioavailability in soil. The self-dying reporter bacterium was designed to die on the initiation of phenanthrene biodegradation. The viability of the reporter bacterium was determined by a fluorescence live/dead cell staining method and visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopic observation. Phenanthrene was spiked into four types of model solids and a sandy loam. The bioavailability of phenanthrene to the reporter bacterium was remarkably declined with the hydrophobicity of the model solids: essentially no phenanthrene was biodegraded in the presence of 9-nm pores and about 35.8% of initial phenanthrene was biodegraded without pores. Decrease in bioavailability was not evident in the nonporous hydrophilic bead, but a small decrease was observed in the porous hydrophilic bead at 1000 mg/kg of phenanthrene. The fluorescence intensity was commensurate with the extent of phenanthrene biodegradation by the reporter bacterium at the concentration range from 50 to 500 mg/kg. Such a quantitative relationship was also confirmed with a sandy loam spiked up to 1000 mg/kg of phenanthrene. This reporter bacterium may be a useful means to determine phenanthrene bioavailability in soil. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of arsenite-oxidizing bacterium B. laterosporus on arsenite toxicity and arsenic translocation in rice seedlings.

    PubMed

    Yang, Gui-Di; Xie, Wan-Ying; Zhu, Xi; Huang, Yi; Yang, Xiao-Jun; Qiu, Zong-Qing; Lv, Zhen-Mao; Wang, Wen-Na; Lin, Wen-Xiong

    2015-10-01

    Arsenite [As (III)] oxidation can be accelerated by bacterial catalysis, but the effects of the accelerated oxidation on arsenic toxicity and translocation in rice plants are poorly understood. Herein we investigated how an arsenite-oxidizing bacterium, namely Brevibacillus laterosporus, influences As (III) toxicity and translocation in rice plants. Rice seedlings of four cultivars, namely Guangyou Ming 118 (GM), Teyou Hang II (TH), Shanyou 63 (SY) and Minghui 63 (MH), inoculated with or without the bacterium were grown hydroponically with As (III) to investigate its effects on arsenic toxicity and translocation in the plants. Percentages of As (III) oxidation in the solutions with the bacterium (100%) were all significantly higher than those without (30-72%). The addition of the bacterium significantly decreased As (III) concentrations in SY root, GM root and shoot, while increased the As (III) concentrations in the shoot of SY, MH and TH and in the root of MH. Furthermore, the As (III) concentrations in the root and shoot of SY were both the lowest among the treatments with the bacterium. On the other hand, its addition significantly alleviated the As (III) toxicity on four rice cultivars. Among the treatments amended with B. laterosporus, the bacterium showed the best remediation on SY seedlings, with respect to the subdued As (III) toxicity and decreased As (III) concentration in its roots. These results indicated that As (III) oxidation accelerated by B. laterosporus could be an effective method to alleviate As (III) toxicity on rice seedlings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Activity of virgin coconut oil, lauric acid or monolaurin in combination with lactic acid against Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Tangwatcharin, Pussadee; Khopaibool, Prapaporn

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the in vitro activities of virgin coconut oil, lauric acid and monolaurin in combination with lactic acid against two strains of Staphylococcus aureus, ATCC 25923 and an isolate from a pig carcass, by determination of Fractional Bactericidal Concentration Index (FBCI), time-kill method, as well as scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) of lauric acid, monolaurin and lactic acid were 3.2 mg/ml, 0.1 mg/ml and 0.4% (v/v), respectively. The effects of lauric acid + lactic acid and monolaurin + lactic acid combinations were synergistic against both strains, exhibiting FBCIs of 0.25 and 0.63, respectively. In time-kill studies, lauric acid and monolaurin + lactic acid combinations added at their minimum inhibitory concentrations produced a bactericidal effect. The induction of stress in non-stressed cells was dependent on the type and concentration of antimicrobial. This resulted in a loss and change of the cytoplasm and membrane in cells of the bacterium. In contrast, virgin coconut oil (10%) was not active against S. aureus. The bacterial counts found in pork loin treated with lauric acid and monolaurin alone were significantly higher (p <0.05) than those treated with both lipids in combination with lactic acid at sub-inhibitory concentrations. The color, odor and overall acceptability of the pork loins were adversely affected by treatment with the three lipids and lactic acid alone but when combinations of the agents were used the sensory quality was acceptable.

  6. Temporins A and B Stimulate Migration of HaCaT Keratinocytes and Kill Intracellular Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Di Grazia, Antonio; Luca, Vincenzo; Segev-Zarko, Li-av T.; Shai, Yechiel

    2014-01-01

    The growing number of microbial pathogens resistant to available antibiotics is a serious threat to human life. Among them is the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, which colonizes keratinocytes, the most abundant cell type in the epidermis. Its intracellular accumulation complicates treatments against resulting infections, mainly due to the limited diffusion of conventional drugs into the cells. Temporins A (Ta) and B (Tb) are short frog skin antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Despite extensive studies regarding their antimicrobial activity, very little is known about their activity on infected cells or involvement in various immunomodulatory functions. Here we show that Tb kills both ATCC-derived and multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of S. aureus within infected HaCaT keratinocytes (80% and 40% bacterial mortality, respectively) at a nontoxic concentration, i.e., 16 μM, whereas a weaker effect is displayed by Ta. Furthermore, the peptides prevent killing of keratinocytes by the invading bacteria. Further studies revealed that both temporins promote wound healing in a monolayer of HaCaT cells, with front speed migrations of 19 μm/h and 12 μm/h for Ta and Tb, respectively. Migration is inhibited by mitomycin C and involves the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway. Finally, confocal fluorescence microscopy indicated that the peptides diffuse into the cells. By combining antibacterial and wound-healing activities, Ta and Tb may act as multifunctional mediators of innate immunity in humans. Particularly, their nonendogenous origin may reduce microbial resistance to them as well as the risk of autoimmune diseases in mammals. PMID:24514087

  7. Molecular docking studies to map the binding site of squalene synthase inhibitors on dehydrosqualene synthase of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Kahlon, Amandeep Kaur; Roy, Sudeep; Sharma, Ashok

    2010-10-01

    Dehydrosqualene synthase of Staphylococcus aureus is involved in the synthesis of golden carotenoid pigment staphyloxanthin. This pigment of S. aureus provides the antioxidant property to this bacterium to survive inside the host cell. Dehydrosqualene synthase (CrtM) is having structural similarity with the human squalene synthase enzyme which is involved in the cholesterol synthesis pathway in humans (Liu et al., 2008). Cholesterol lowering drugs were found to have inhibitory effect on dehydrosqualene synthase enzyme of S. aureus. The present study attempts to focus on squalene synthase inhibitors, lapaquistat acetate and squalestatins reported as cholesterol lowering agents in vitro and in vivo but not studied in context to dehydrosqualene synthase of S. aureus. Mode of binding of lapaquistat acetate and squalestatin analogs on dehydrosqualene synthase (CrtM) enzyme of S. aureus was identified by performing docking analysis with Scigress Explorer Ultra 7.7 docking software. Based on the molecular docking analysis, it was found that the His18, Arg45, Asp48, Asp52, Tyr129, Gln165, Asn168 and Asp172 residues interacted with comparatively high frequency with the inhibitors studied. Comparative docking study with Discovery studio 2.0 also confirmed the involvement of these residues of dehydrosqualene synthase enzyme with the inhibitors studied. This further confirms the importance of these residues in the enzyme function. In silico ADMET analysis was done to predict the ADMET properties of the standard drugs and test compounds. This might provide insights to develop new drugs to target the virulence factor, dehydrosqualene synthase of S. aureus.

  8. Detection of Staphylococcus aureus by functional gold nanoparticle-based affinity surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lai, Hong-Zheng; Wang, Sin-Ge; Wu, Ching-Yi; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2015-02-17

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the common pathogenic bacteria responsible for bacterial infectious diseases and food poisoning. This study presents an analytical method based on the affinity nanoprobe-based mass spectrometry that enables detection of S. aureus in aqueous samples. A peptide aptamer DVFLGDVFLGDEC (DD) that can recognize S. aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was used as the reducing agent and protective group to generate DD-immobilized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs@DD) from one-pot reactions. The thiol group from cysteine in the peptide aptamer, i.e., DD, can interact with gold ions to generate DD-immobilized AuNPs in an alkaline solution. The generated AuNPs@DD has an absorption maximum at ∼518 nm. The average particle size is 7.6 ± 1.2 nm. Furthermore, the generated AuNPs@DD can selectively bind with S. aureus and MRSA. The conjugates of the target bacteria with AuNPs were directly analyzed by surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS). The gold ions generated from the AuNPs@DD anchored on the target bacteria were monitored. Gold ions (m/z 197 and 394) were only generated from the conjugates of the target bacterium-AuNP@DD in the SALDI process. Thus, the gold ions could be used as the indicators for the presence of the target bacteria. The detection limit of S. aureus using this method is in the order of a few tens of cells. The low detection limit is due to the ease of generation of gold cluster ion derived from AuNPs under irradiation with a 355 nm laser beam. Apple juice mixed with S. aureus was used as the sample to demonstrate the suitability of the method for real-world application. Because of its low detection limit, this approach can potentially be used to screen the presence of S. aureus in complex samples.

  9. Stability of the heme environment of the nitric oxide synthase from Staphylococcus aureus in the absence of pterin cofactor.

    PubMed

    Chartier, François J M; Couture, Manon

    2004-09-01

    We have used resonance Raman spectroscopy to probe the heme environment of a recently discovered NOS from the pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, named SANOS. We detect two forms of the CO complex in the absence of L-arginine, with nu(Fe-CO) at 482 and 497 cm(-1) and nu(C-O) at 1949 and 1930 cm(-1), respectively. Similarly to mammalian NOS, the binding of L-arginine to SANOS caused the formation of a single CO complex with nu(Fe-CO) and nu(C-O) frequencies at 504 and 1,917 cm(-1), respectively, indicating that L-arginine induced an electrostatic/steric effect on the CO molecule. The addition of pterins to CO-bound SANOS modified the resonance Raman spectra only when they were added in combination with L-arginine. We found that (6R) 5,6,7,8 tetra-hydro-L-biopterin and tetrahydrofolate were not required for the stability of the reduced protein, which is 5-coordinate, and of the CO complex, which does not change with time to a form with a Soret band at 420 nm that is indicative of a change of the heme proximal coordination. Since SANOS is stable in the absence of added pterin, it suggests that the role of the pterin cofactor in the bacterial NOS may be limited to electron/proton transfer required for catalysis and may not involve maintaining the structural integrity of the protein as is the case for mammalian NOS.

  10. AFM probing in aqueous environment of Staphylococcus epidermidis cells naturally immobilised on glass: physico-chemistry behind the successful immobilisation.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Vilas, A; Gallardo-Moreno, A M; Calzado-Montero, R; González-Martín, M L

    2008-05-01

    AFM probing of microbial cells in liquid environments usually requires them to be physically or chemically attached to a solid surface. The fixation mechanisms may influence the nanomechanical characterization done by force curve mapping using an AFM. To study the response of a microbial cell surface to this kind of local measurement this study attempts to overcome the problem associated to the uncertainties introduced by the different fixation treatments by analysing the surface of Staphylococcus epidermidis cells naturally (non-artificially mediated) immobilised on a glass support surface. The particularities of this natural bacterial fixation process for AFM surface analysis are discussed in terms of theoretical predictions of the XDLVO model applied to the systems bacteria/support substratum and bacteria/AFM tip immersed in water. In this sense, in the first part of this study the conditions for adequate natural fixation of three S. epidermidis strains have been analyzed by taking into account the geometries of the bacterium, substrate and tip. In the second part, bacteria are probed without the risk of any possible artefacts due to the mechanical or chemical fixation procedures. Forces measured over the successfully adhered cells have (directly) shown that the untreated bacterial surface suffers from a combination of both reversible and non-reversible deformations during acquisition of force curves all taken under the same operational conditions. This is revealed directly through high-resolution tapping-mode imaging of the bacterial surface immediately following force curve mapping. The results agree with the two different types of force curves that were repeatedly obtained. Interestingly, one type of these force curves suggests that the AFM tip is breaking (rather than pushing) the cell surface during acquisition of the force curve. In this case, adhesive peaks were always observed, suggesting a mechanical origin of the measured pull-off forces. The other

  11. Altered Competitive Fitness, Antimicrobial Susceptibility, and Cellular Morphology in a Triclosan-Induced Small-Colony Variant of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Sarah; Latimer, Joe; Bazaid, Abdulrahman

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can produce small-colony variants (SCVs) that express various phenotypes. While their significance is unclear, SCV propagation may be influenced by relative fitness, antimicrobial susceptibility, and the underlying mechanism. We have investigated triclosan-induced generation of SCVs in six S. aureus strains, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Parent strains (P0) were repeatedly passaged on concentration gradients of triclosan using a solid-state exposure system to generate P10. P10 was subsequently passaged without triclosan to generate X10. Susceptibility to triclosan and 7 antibiotics was assessed at all stages. For S. aureus ATCC 6538, SCVs were further characterized by determining microbicide susceptibility and competitive fitness. Cellular morphology was examined using electron microscopy, and protein expression was evaluated through proteomics. Triclosan susceptibility in all SCVs (which could be generated from 4/6 strains) was markedly decreased, while antibiotic susceptibility was significantly increased in the majority of cases. An SCV of S. aureus ATCC 6538 exhibited significantly increased susceptibility to all tested microbicides. Cross-wall formation was impaired in this bacterium, while expression of FabI, a target of triclosan, and IsaA, a lytic transglycosylase involved in cell division, was increased. The P10 SCV was 49% less fit than P0. In summary, triclosan exposure of S. aureus produced SCVs in 4/6 test bacteria, with decreased triclosan susceptibility but with generally increased antibiotic susceptibility. An SCV derived from S. aureus ATCC 6538 showed reduced competitive fitness, potentially due to impaired cell division. In this SCV, increased FabI expression could account for reduced triclosan susceptibility, while IsaA may be upregulated in response to cell division defects. PMID:26033734

  12. Low Fluid Shear Culture of Staphylococcus Aureus Represses hfq Expression and Induces an Attachment-Independent Biofilm Phenotype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, C. Mark; Castro, S. L.; Nickerson, C. A.; Nelman-Gonzalez, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The opportunistic pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, experiences fluctuations in fluid shear during infection and colonization of a human host. Colonization frequently occurs at mucus membrane sites such as in the gastrointestinal tract where the bacterium may experience low levels of fluid shear. The response of S. aureus to low fluid shear remains unclear. Methods: S. aureus was cultured to stationary phase using Rotating-Wall Vessel (RWV) bioreactors which produce a physiologically relevant low fluid shear environment. The bacterial aggregates that developed in the RWV were evaluated by electron microscopy as well as for antibiotic resistance and other virulence-associated stressors. Genetic expression profiles for the low-shear cultured S. aureus were determined by microarray analysis and quantitative real-time PCR. Results: Planktonic S. aureus cultures in the low-shear environment formed aggregates completely encased in high amounts of extracellular polymeric substances. In addition, these aggregates demonstrated increased antibiotic resistance indicating attachment-independent biofilm formation. Carotenoid production in the low-shear cultured S. aureus was significantly decreased, and these cultures displayed an increased susceptibility to oxidative stress and killing by whole blood. The hfq gene, associated with low-shear growth in Gram negative organisms, was also found to be down-regulated in S. aureus. Conclusions: Collectively, this data suggests that S. aureus decreases virulence characteristics in favor of a biofilm-dwelling colonization phenotype in response to a low fluid shear environment. Furthermore, the identification of an Hfq response to low-shear culture in S. aureus, in addition to the previously reported responses in Gram negative organisms, strongly suggests an evolutionarily conserved response to mechanical stimuli among structurally diverse prokaryotes.

  13. Diversity of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates in European Wildlife

    PubMed Central

    Monecke, Stefan; Gavier-Widén, Dolores; Hotzel, Helmut; Peters, Martin; Guenther, Sebastian; Lazaris, Alexandros; Loncaric, Igor; Müller, Elke; Reissig, Annett; Ruppelt-Lorz, Antje; Shore, Anna C.; Walter, Birgit; Coleman, David C.; Ehricht, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a well-known colonizer and cause of infection among animals and it has been described from numerous domestic and wild animal species. The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular epidemiology of S. aureus in a convenience sample of European wildlife and to review what previously has been observed in the subject field. 124 S. aureus isolates were collected from wildlife in Germany, Austria and Sweden; they were characterized by DNA microarray hybridization and, for isolates with novel hybridization patterns, by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The isolates were assigned to 29 clonal complexes and singleton sequence types (CC1, CC5, CC6, CC7, CC8, CC9, CC12, CC15, CC22, CC25, CC30, CC49, CC59, CC88, CC97, CC130, CC133, CC398, ST425, CC599, CC692, CC707, ST890, CC1956, ST2425, CC2671, ST2691, CC2767 and ST2963), some of which (ST2425, ST2691, ST2963) were not described previously. Resistance rates in wildlife strains were rather low and mecA-MRSA isolates were rare (n = 6). mecC-MRSA (n = 8) were identified from a fox, a fallow deer, hares and hedgehogs. The common cattle-associated lineages CC479 and CC705 were not detected in wildlife in the present study while, in contrast, a third common cattle lineage, CC97, was found to be common among cervids. No Staphylococcus argenteus or Staphylococcus schweitzeri-like isolates were found. Systematic studies are required to monitor the possible transmission of human- and livestock-associated S. aureus/MRSA to wildlife and vice versa as well as the possible transmission, by unprotected contact to animals. The prevalence of S. aureus/MRSA in wildlife as well as its population structures in different wildlife host species warrants further investigation. PMID:27992523

  14. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: an overview for manual therapists().

    PubMed

    Green, Bart N; Johnson, Claire D; Egan, Jonathon Todd; Rosenthal, Michael; Griffith, Erin A; Evans, Marion Willard

    2012-03-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is associated with difficult-to-treat infections and high levels of morbidity. Manual practitioners work in environments where MRSA is a common acquired infection. The purpose of this review is to provide a practical overview of MRSA as it applies to the manual therapy professions (eg, physical and occupational therapy, athletic training, chiropractic, osteopathy, massage, sports medicine) and to discuss how to identify and prevent MRSA infections in manual therapy work environments. PubMed and CINAHL were searched from the beginning of their respective indexing years through June 2011 using the search terms MRSA, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus aureus. Texts and authoritative Web sites were also reviewed. Pertinent articles from the authors' libraries were included if they were not already identified in the literature search. Articles were included if they were applicable to ambulatory health care environments in which manual therapists work or if the content of the article related to the clinical management of MRSA. Following information extraction, 95 citations were included in this review, to include 76 peer-reviewed journal articles, 16 government Web sites, and 3 textbooks. Information was organized into 10 clinically relevant categories for presentation. Information was organized into the following clinically relevant categories: microbiology, development of MRSA, risk factors for infection, clinical presentation, diagnostic tests, screening tests, reporting, treatment, prevention for patients and athletes, and prevention for health care workers. Methicillin-resistant S aureus is a health risk in the community and to patients and athletes treated by manual therapists. Manual practitioners can play an essential role in recognizing MRSA infections and helping to control its transmission in the health care environment and the community. Essential methods for protecting patients

  15. Trends in incidence and resistance patterns of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Jokinen, Elina; Laine, Janne; Huttunen, Reetta; Lyytikäinen, Outi; Vuento, Risto; Vuopio, Jaana; Syrjänen, Jaana

    2018-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) causes a significant burden on the population. Several infection control measures have been implemented in Pirkanmaa county to combat a local epidemic with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). We aimed to study the epidemiology of SAB and antibiotic resistance of S. aureus and the possible influence of improved infection control. Register data from 2005 to 2015 were retrospectively analysed to study the antimicrobial susceptibility, the incidence and mortality in SAB in a population-based setting. The incidence of SAB increased during the study period from 21.6 to 35.8/100,000 population. The number of both health care-associated (HA) and community-associated (CA) cases has increased. The incidence of MSSA bacteremia increased from 19.9 to 35.2/100,000 population in Pirkanmaa in parallel to other parts of Finland. The incidence of MRSA bacteremia was 10-fold (4.5/100,000 population) higher in 2011 than in other parts of the country, but sank to the national level (0.59/100,000 population) in 2015. The fatality rate decreased from 22% to 17%. The proportion of penicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (PSSA) increased from 23.9% in 2008 to 43.1% in 2015. The incidence of both HA and CA SAB has increased since 2005. Conversely, the proportion of MRSA and PRSA bacteremia has decreased. Promotion of infection control measures may have reduced the incidence of MRSA bacteremia but not the overall incidence of SAB. The rising proportion of PSSA enables the use of targeted, narrow spectrum antimicrobials.

  16. spa typing for epidemiological surveillance of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Hallin, Marie; Friedrich, Alexander W; Struelens, Marc J

    2009-01-01

    The spa typing method is based on sequencing of the polymorphic X region of the protein A gene (spa), present in all strains of Staphylococcus aureus. The X region is constituted of a variable number of 24-bp repeats flanked by well-conserved regions. This single-locus sequence-based typing method combines a number of technical advantages, such as rapidity, reproducibility, and portability. Moreover, due to its repeat structure, the spa locus simultaneously indexes micro- and macrovariations, enabling the use of spa typing in both local and global epidemiological studies. These studies are facilitated by the establishment of standardized spa type nomenclature and Internet shared databases.

  17. Molecular mechanisms of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, M A; Liñares, J; Martín, R

    1997-09-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains are among the most common nosocomial pathogens. The most significant mechanism of resistance to methicillin in this-species is the acquisition of a genetic determinant (mecA gene). However, resistance seems to have a more complex molecular basis, since additional chromosomal material is involved in such resistance. Besides, overproduction of penicillinase and/or alterations in the PBPs can contribute to the formation of resistance phenotypes. Genetic and environmental factors leading to MRSA are reviewed.

  18. In Vitro Pharmacodynamics of AZD5206 against Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kai-Tai; Yang, Zhen; Newman, Joseph; Hu, Ming

    2013-01-01

    AZD5206 is a novel antimicrobial agent with potent in vitro activity against Staphylococcus aureus. We evaluated the in vitro pharmacodynamics of AZD5206 against a standard wild-type methicillin-susceptible strain (ATCC 29213) and a clinical strain of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (SA62). Overall, bacterial killing against a low baseline inoculum was more remarkable. Low dosing exposures and/or high baseline inoculum resulted in early reduction in bacterial burden, followed by regrowth and selective amplification of the resistant population. PMID:23229481

  19. Linezolid resistant Staphylococcus haemolyticus: first case report from India.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Varsha; Garg, Shivani; Jain, Ruby; Garg, Sudhir; Chander, Jagdish

    2012-10-01

    Linezolid is being increasingly used in the treatment of infections with gram-positive organisms especially methicillin resistant Staphylococcal isolates. Though resistance to this antimicrobial is emerging but it is extremely rare. Here we document first case of linezolid resistant Staphylococcus haemolyticus (S.haemolyticus) from India. This organism was isolated from pus oozing from a postsurgical site in 61 year old male hailing from an adjoining state of Haryana. Copyright © 2012 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of biofilm formation in Staphylococcus haemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Barros, Elaine M; Lemos, Moara; Souto-Padrón, Thais; Giambiagi-deMarval, Marcia

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcus haemolyticus is one of the most frequently isolated coagulase-negative staphylococci. The ability to produce biofilm has contributed to its emergence as a nosocomial pathogen. In this study, some growth conditions were tested to determine their influence on biofilm formation. Brain-heart infusion (BHI) broth containing glucose was used to screen 64 clinical strains. A strong biofilm producer strain showed cells surrounded by a thick layer of extracellular matrix. The presence of atlE, fbp, bap, and icaA genes was analyzed. We concluded that S. haemolyticus biofilm production can be increased with cells grown in BHI, and highlighted that it could be an ica-independent process.

  1. The Staphylococcus aureus RNome and Its Commitment to Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Felden, Brice; Vandenesch, François; Bouloc, Philippe; Romby, Pascale

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen causing a wide spectrum of nosocomial and community-associated infections with high morbidity and mortality. S. aureus generates a large number of virulence factors whose timing and expression levels are precisely tuned by regulatory proteins and RNAs. The aptitude of bacteria to use RNAs to rapidly modify gene expression, including virulence factors in response to stress or environmental changes, and to survive in a host is an evolving concept. Here, we focus on the recently inventoried S. aureus regulatory RNAs, with emphasis on those with identified functions, two of which are directly involved in pathogenicity. PMID:21423670

  2. Antibacterial activity of alimentary plants against Staphylococcus aureus growth.

    PubMed

    Pérez, C; Anesini, C

    1994-01-01

    Alimentary plants were screened for antibacterial activity against a penicillin G resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus. Twenty-five samples of plant material corresponding to 21 species from 13 families were used. Both aqueous and ethanol extracts were obtained from them. Antibacterial activity was determined by the agar-well diffusion method, using cephazolin as a standard antibiotic. Seventeen ethanol extracts were found active. Eugenia caryophyllata (clavo de olor*) flowers, Myristica fragans (nuez moscada*) seeds, Theobroma cacao (cacao*) seed bark, Triticum sp (trigo*) fruit, Zea mays (maíz*) fruit and Piper nigrum (pimienta*) ripe fruit produced some of the more active extracts (* = Argentine vulgar names).

  3. Inhibition of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus by a plasma needle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miletić, Maja; Vuković, Dragana; Živanović, Irena; Dakić, Ivana; Soldatović, Ivan; Maletić, Dejan; Lazović, Saša; Malović, Gordana; Petrović, Zoran Lj.; Puač, Nevena

    2014-03-01

    In numerous recent papers plasma chemistry of non equilibrium plasma sources operating at atmospheric pressure has been linked to plasma medical effects including sterilization. In this paper we present a study of the effectiveness of an atmospheric pressure plasma source, known as plasma needle, in inhibition of the growth of biofilm produced by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Even at the lowest powers the biofilms formed by inoculi of MRSA of 104 and 105 CFU have been strongly affected by plasma and growth in biofilms was inhibited. The eradication of the already formed biofilm was not achieved and it is required to go to more effective sources.

  4. Concurrent infectious mononucleosis and community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li Jun; Du, Xiao Qin; Nyirimigabo, Eric; Shou, Song Tao

    2014-04-01

    It is rare to see a concurrent infection with infectious mononucleosis and community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Tianjin, China. Until now, there is still no any single recorded case of concurrent infectious mononucleosis and community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia.

  5. [Study of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization among intermediate-care facility patients].

    PubMed

    Giret, P; Roblot, F; Poupet, J Y; Thomas, P; Lussier-Bonneau, M D; Pradère, C; Becq-Giraudon, B; Fauchère, J L; Castel, O

    2001-08-01

    Prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is high in the Poitiers teaching hospital, particularly in the intermediate care facilities. We performed a survey of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization in the intermediate care facilities and 265 patients were included. Nasal, cutaneous and wound swab cultures were done at the time of admission and at the time of the patients' departure. A decolonization procedure of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriers was performed using nasal application of fusidic acid and different soaps for the skin. At entry, 17.7% of patients were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriers (of at least one location). At departure, 30.4% were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriers. Among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus non-carriers at entry, 24.3% became methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriers. The principal risk factor of carriage was the initial presence of a wound (RR = 3.6). The incidence rate of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection among the 265 patients included was 3%. The systematic screening of patients at the time of admission is expensive and isolation technically hard to manage in the intermediate care facilities. The risk factor we found in this study allow us to propose a 'light' screening limited to patients with wounds.

  6. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: an emerging cause of acute bacterial parotitis.

    PubMed

    Nicolasora, Nelson P; Zacharek, Mark A; Malani, Anurag N

    2009-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus has long been recognized as a cause of acute bacterial parotitis. A case of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) parotitis is presented, highlighting the emergence of this increasingly important pathogen to cause a wide variety of infections. Also reviewed are the salient clinical and microbiologic features of this novel infection.

  7. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant "Staphylococcus aureus": Considerations for School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alex, Aniltta; Letizia, MariJo

    2007-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (MRSA) is a disease-causing organism that has been present in hospital settings since the 1960s. However, a genetically distinct strain of MRSA, called community-acquired methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (CA-MRSA), has emerged in recent years in community settings among healthy…

  8. Staphylococcus aureus and Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) in and Around Therapeutic Whirlpools in College Athletic Training Rooms

    PubMed Central

    Kahanov, Leamor; Kim, Young Kyun; Eberman, Lindsey; Dannelly, Kathleen; Kaur, Haninder; Ramalinga, A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has become a leading cause of skin and soft tissue infection in the nonhospitalized community. Care of the athletes in athletic training rooms is specifically designed with equipment tailored to the health care needs of the athletes, yet recent studies indicate that CA-MRSA is still prevalent in athletic facilities and that cleaning methods may not be optimal. Objective: To investigate the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and CA-MRSA in and around whirlpools in the athletic training room. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I university. Patients or Other Participants: Student-athletes (n = 109) consisting of 46 men (42%) and 63 women (58%) representing 6 sports. Main Outcome Measure(s): Presence of MRSA and Staphylococcus aureus in and around the whirlpool structures relative to sport and number of athletes using the whirlpools. Results: We identified Staphylococcus aureus in 22% (n = 52/240) of the samples and MRSA in 0.8% (n = 2/240). A statistically significant difference existed between the number of athletes using the whirlpool and the presence of Staphylococcus aureus in and around the whirlpools (F2,238 = 2.445, P = .007). However, Staphylococcus aureus was identified regardless of whether multiple athletes used a whirlpool or no athletes used a whirlpool. We did not identify a relationship between the number of athletes who used a whirlpool and Staphylococcus aureus or MRSA density (P = .134). Conclusions: Staphylococcus aureus and MRSA were identified in and around the whirlpools. Transmission of the bacteria can be reduced by following the cleaning and disinfecting protocols recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Athletic trainers should use disinfectants registered by the Environmental Protection Agency to sanitize all whirlpools between uses. PMID:25710853

  9. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in palliative care: A prospective study of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus prevalence in a hospital-based palliative care unit.

    PubMed

    Schmalz, Oliver; Strapatsas, Tobias; Alefelder, Christof; Grebe, Scott Oliver

    2016-07-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a common organism in hospitals worldwide and is associated with morbidity and mortality. However, little is known about the prevalence in palliative care patients. Furthermore, there is no standardized screening protocol or treatment for patients for whom therapy concentrates on symptom control. Examining the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in palliative care patients as well as the level of morbidity and mortality. We performed a prospective study where methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus screening was undertaken in 296 consecutive patients within 48 h after admission to our palliative care unit. Medical history was taken, clinical examination was performed, and the Karnofsky Performance Scale and Palliative Prognostic Score were determined. Prevalence of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was compared to data of general hospital patients. In total, 281 patients were included in the study having a mean age of 69.7 years (standard deviation = 12.9 years) and an average Karnofsky Performance Scale between 30% and 40%. The mean length of stay was 9.7 days (standard deviation = 7.6 days). A total of 24 patients were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus positive on the first swab. Median number of swabs was 2. All patients with a negative methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus swab upon admission remained Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus negative in all subsequent swabs. Our study suggests that the prevalence of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among patients in an in-hospital palliative care unit is much higher than in other patient populations. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. Staphylococcus aureus and community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) in and around therapeutic whirlpools in college athletic training rooms.

    PubMed

    Kahanov, Leamor; Kim, Young Kyun; Eberman, Lindsey; Dannelly, Kathleen; Kaur, Haninder; Ramalinga, A

    2015-04-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has become a leading cause of skin and soft tissue infection in the nonhospitalized community. Care of the athletes in athletic training rooms is specifically designed with equipment tailored to the health care needs of the athletes, yet recent studies indicate that CA-MRSA is still prevalent in athletic facilities and that cleaning methods may not be optimal. To investigate the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and CA-MRSA in and around whirlpools in the athletic training room. Cross-sectional study. National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I university. Student-athletes (n = 109) consisting of 46 men (42%) and 63 women (58%) representing 6 sports. Presence of MRSA and Staphylococcus aureus in and around the whirlpool structures relative to sport and number of athletes using the whirlpools. We identified Staphylococcus aureus in 22% (n = 52/240) of the samples and MRSA in 0.8% (n = 2/240). A statistically significant difference existed between the number of athletes using the whirlpool and the presence of Staphylococcus aureus in and around the whirlpools (F(2,238) = 2.445, P = .007). However, Staphylococcus aureus was identified regardless of whether multiple athletes used a whirlpool or no athletes used a whirlpool. We did not identify a relationship between the number of athletes who used a whirlpool and Staphylococcus aureus or MRSA density (P = .134). Staphylococcus aureus and MRSA were identified in and around the whirlpools. Transmission of the bacteria can be reduced by following the cleaning and disinfecting protocols recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Athletic trainers should use disinfectants registered by the Environmental Protection Agency to sanitize all whirlpools between uses.

  11. [Tracing to the source of staphylococcus aureus isolates from ice cream].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Jun; Xu, Dan-Ge; Fang, Ye-Zhen; Gong, Pu; Zhu, Min; Bao, Fang-Zhen

    2008-07-01

    To investigate the contamination of Staphylococcus aureus isolates in ice cream by phenotypic typing and molecular typing. The Staphylococcus aureus isolates were separated from ice cream, filler, cutter, salves and material. The separated isolates were characterized by drug-resistance, staphylococcal enterotoxin (SEA-E), SE (A-E, G-J) genes and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) types. Two Staphylococcus aureus isolates were separated, one from ice cream, another from cutter. Their characteristics of drug-resistance, staphylococcal enterotoxin (SEA-E), SE (A-E,G-J) genes and PFGE type were the same. The two Staphylococcus aureus isolates were the same clone. The contaminated Staphylococcus aureus isolates could be traced to the contaminated cutters.

  12. Studies of the Extracellular Glycocalyx of the Anaerobic Cellulolytic Bacterium Ruminococcus albus 7▿

    PubMed Central

    Weimer, Paul J.; Price, Neil P. J.; Kroukamp, Otini; Joubert, Lydia-Marie; Wolfaardt, Gideon M.; Van Zyl, Willem H.

    2006-01-01

    Anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria are thought to adhere to cellulose via several mechanisms, including production of a glycocalyx containing extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). As the compositions and structures of these glycocalyces have not been elucidated, variable-pressure scanning electron microscopy (VP-SEM) and chemical analysis were used to characterize the glycocalyx of the ruminal bacterium Ruminococcus albus strain 7. VP-SEM revealed that growth of this strain was accompanied by the formation of thin cellular extensions that allowed the bacterium to adhere to cellulose, followed by formation of a ramifying network that interconnected individual cells to one another and to the unraveling cellulose microfibrils. Extraction of 48-h-old whole-culture pellets (bacterial cells plus glycocalyx [G] plus residual cellulose [C]) with 0.1 N NaOH released carbohydrate and protein in a ratio of 1:5. Boiling of the cellulose fermentation residue in a neutral detergent solution removed almost all of the adherent cells and protein while retaining a residual network of adhering noncellular material. Trifluoroacetic acid hydrolysis of this residue (G plus C) released primarily glucose, along with substantial amounts of xylose and mannose, but only traces of galactose, the most abundant sugar in most characterized bacterial exopolysaccharides. Linkage analysis and characterization by nuclear magnetic resonance suggested that most of the glucosyl units were not present as partially degraded cellulose. Calculations suggested that the energy demand for synthesis of the nonprotein fraction of EPS by this organism represents only a small fraction (<4%) of the anabolic ATP expenditure of the bacterium. PMID:17028224

  13. Diversity in bacterium-host interactions within the species Helicobacter heilmannii sensu stricto

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter (H.) heilmannii sensu stricto (s.s.) is a zoonotic bacterium that naturally colonizes the stomach of dogs and cats. In humans, this microorganism has been associated with gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. Little information is available about the pathogenesis of H. heilmannii s.s. infections in humans and it is unknown whether differences in virulence exist within this species. Therefore, a Mongolian gerbil model was used to study bacterium-host interactions of 9 H. heilmannii s.s. strains. The colonization ability of the strains, the intensity of gastritis and gene expression of various inflammatory cytokines in the stomach were determined at 9 weeks after experimental infection. The induction of an antrum-dominant chronic active gastritis with formation of lymphocytic aggregates was shown for 7 strains. High-level antral colonization was seen for 4 strains, while colonization of 4 other strains was more restricted and one strain was not detected in the stomach at 9 weeks post infection. All strains inducing a chronic active gastritis caused an up-regulation of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β in the antrum. A reduced antral expression of H+/K+ ATPase was seen in the stomach after infection with 3 highly colonizing strains and 2 highly colonizing strains caused an increased gastrin expression in the fundus. In none of the H. heilmannii s.s.-infected groups, IFN-γ expression was up-regulated. This study demonstrates diversity in bacterium-host interactions within the species H. heilmannii s.s. and that the pathogenesis of gastric infections with this microorganism is not identical to that of an H. pylori infection. PMID:23895283

  14. NH4+ transport system of a psychrophilic marine bacterium, Vibrio sp. strain ABE-1.

    PubMed

    Chou, M; Matsunaga, T; Takada, Y; Fukunaga, N

    1999-05-01

    NH4(+) transport system of a psychrophilic marine bacterium Vibrio sp. strain ABE-1 (Vibrio ABE-1) was examined by measuring the uptake of [14C]methylammonium ion (14CH3NH3+) into the intact cells. 14CH3NH3+ uptake was detected in cells grown in medium containing glutamate as the sole nitrogen source, but not in those grown in medium containing NH4Cl instead of glutamate. Vibrio ABE-1 did not utilize CH3NH3+ as a carbon or nitrogen source. NH4Cl and nonradiolabeled CH3NH3+ completely inhibited 14CH3NH3+ uptake. These results indicate that 14CH3NH3+ uptake in this bacterium is mediated via an NH4+ transport system and not by a specific carrier for CH3NH3+. The respiratory substrate succinate was required to drive 14CH3NH3+ uptake and the uptake was completely inhibited by KCN, indicating that the uptake was energy dependent. The electrochemical potentials of H+ and/or Na+ across membranes were suggested to be the driving forces for the transport system because the ionophores carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone and monensin strongly inhibited uptake activities at pH 6.5 and 8.5, respectively. Furthermore, KCl activated 14CH3NH3+ uptake. The 14CH3NH3+ uptake activity of Vibrio ABE-1 was markedly high at temperatures between 0 degrees and 15 degrees C, and the apparent Km value for CH3NH3+ of the uptake did not change significantly over the temperature range from 0 degrees to 25 degrees C. Thus, the NH4+ transport system of this bacterium was highly active at low temperatures.

  15. Antimicrobial polyketide furanoterpenoids from seaweed-associated heterotrophic bacterium Bacillus subtilis MTCC 10403.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Kajal; Thilakan, Bini; Raola, Vamshi Krishna

    2017-10-01

    Brown seaweed Anthophycus longifolius (Turner) Kützing (family Sargassaceae) associated heterotrophic bacterium Bacillus subtilis MTCC 10403 was found to be a potent isolate with broad range of antibacterial activity against important perceptive food pathogens Vibrio parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus, and Aeromonas hydrophila. This bacterium was positive for polyketide synthetase gene (KC589397), and therefore, was selected to bioprospect specialized metabolites bearing polyketide backbone. Bioactivity-guided chromatographic fractionation of the ethyl acetate extract of the seaweed-associated bacterium segregated four homologous polyketide furanoterpenoids with potential antibacterial activities against clinically important pathogens. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay showed that the referral antibiotics tetracycline and ampicillin were active at 25 μg/mL against the test pathogens, whereas the previously undescribed (4E)-methyl 13-((16-(furan-2-yl) ethyl)-octahydro-7-hydroxy-4-((E)-23-methylbut-21-enyl)-2H-chromen-6-yl)-4-methylpent-4-enoate (compound 1) and methyl 3-(hexahydro-9-((E)-3-methylpent-1-enyl)-4H-furo[3,2-g]isochromen-6-yl) propanoate (compound 3) displayed antibacterial activities against the test pathogens at a lesser concentration (MIC < 7 μg/mL). The title compounds were characterized by comprehensive nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopic experiments. Polyketide synthase catalyzed putative biosynthetic mechanism additionally corroborated the structural ascriptions of the hitherto undescribed furanoterpenoids from seaweed-associated bacterial symbiont. The electronic and hydrophobic parameters appeared to hold a conspicuous part in directing the antibacterial properties of the compounds. Seaweed-associated B. subtilis MTCC 10403 demonstrated to represent a potential source of antimicrobial polyketides for pharmaceutical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Chitin Utilization by the Insect-Transmitted Bacterium Xylella fastidiosa▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Killiny, Nabil; Prado, Simone S.; Almeida, Rodrigo P. P.

    2010-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is an insect-borne bacterium that colonizes xylem vessels of a large number of host plants, including several crops of economic importance. Chitin is a polysaccharide present in the cuticle of leafhopper vectors of X. fastidiosa and may serve as a carbon source for this bacterium. Biological assays showed that X. fastidiosa reached larger populations in the presence of chitin. Additionally, chitin induced phenotypic changes in this bacterium, notably increasing adhesiveness. Quantitative PCR assays indicated transcriptional changes in the presence of chitin, and an enzymatic assay demonstrated chitinolytic activity by X. fastidiosa. An ortholog of the chitinase A gene (chiA) was identified in the X. fastidiosa genome. The in silico analysis revealed that the open reading frame of chiA encodes a protein of 351 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 40 kDa. chiA is in a locus that consists of genes implicated in polysaccharide degradation. Moreover, this locus was also found in the genomes of closely related bacteria in the genus Xanthomonas, which are plant but not insect associated. X. fastidiosa degraded chitin when grown on a solid chitin-yeast extract-agar medium and grew in liquid medium with chitin as the sole carbon source; ChiA was also determined to be secreted. The gene encoding ChiA was cloned into Escherichia coli, and endochitinase activity was detected in the transformant, showing that the gene is functional and involved in chitin degradation. The results suggest that X. fastidiosa may use its vectors' foregut surface as a carbon source. In addition, chitin may trigger X. fastidiosa's gene regulation and biofilm formation within vectors. Further work is necessary to characterize the role of chitin and its utilization in X. fastidiosa. PMID:20656858

  17. Treatment of Alkaline Cr(VI)-Contaminated Leachate with an Alkaliphilic Metal-Reducing Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Watts, Mathew P; Khijniak, Tatiana V; Boothman, Christopher; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2015-08-15

    Chromium in its toxic Cr(VI) valence state is a common contaminant particularly associated with alkaline environments. A well-publicized case of this occurred in Glasgow, United Kingdom, where poorly controlled disposal of a cementitious industrial by-product, chromite ore processing residue (COPR), has resulted in extensive contamination by Cr(VI)-contaminated alkaline leachates. In the search for viable bioremediation treatments for Cr(VI), a variety of bacteria that are capable of reduction of the toxic and highly soluble Cr(VI) to the relatively nontoxic and less mobile Cr(III) oxidation state, predominantly under circumneutral pH conditions, have been isolated. Recently, however, alkaliphilic bacteria that have the potential to reduce Cr(VI) under alkaline conditions have been identified. This study focuses on the application of a metal-reducing bacterium to the remediation of alkaline Cr(VI)-contaminated leachates from COPR. This bacterium, belonging to the Halomonas genus, was found to exhibit growth concomitant to Cr(VI) reduction under alkaline conditions (pH 10). Bacterial cells were able to rapidly remove high concentrations of aqueous Cr(VI) (2.5 mM) under anaerobic conditions, up to a starting pH of 11. Cr(VI) reduction rates were controlled by pH, with slower removal observed at pH 11, compared to pH 10, while no removal was observed at pH 12. The reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) resulted in the precipitation of Cr(III) biominerals, which were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (TEM-EDX) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The effectiveness of this haloalkaliphilic bacterium for Cr(VI) reduction at high pH suggests potential for its use as an in situ treatment of COPR and other alkaline Cr(VI)-contaminated environments. Copyright © 2015, Watts et al.

  18. Novel insights into the algicidal bacterium DH77-1 killing the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoru; Li, Xinyi; Zhou, Yanyan; Zheng, Wei; Yu, Changping; Zheng, Tianling

    2014-06-01

    Algicidal bacteria may play a major role in controlling harmful algal blooms (HABs) dynamics. Bacterium DH77-1 was isolated with high algicidal activity against the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense and identified as Joostella sp. DH77-1. The results showed that DH77-1 exhibited algicidal activity through indirect attack, which excreted active substance into the filtrate. It had a relatively wide host range and the active substance of DH77-1 was relatively stable since temperature, pH and storage condition had no obvious effect on the algicidal activity. The algicidal compound from bacterium DH77-1 was isolated based on activity-guided bioassay and the molecular weight was determined to be 125.88 by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometer, however further identification via nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra is ongoing. The physiological responses of algal cells after exposure to the DH77-1 algicidal substances were as follows: the antioxidant system of A. tamarense responded positively in self-defense; total protein content decreased significantly as did the photosynthetic pigment content; superoxide dismutase, peroxidase enzyme and malondialdehyde content increased extraordinarily and algal cell nucleic acid leaked seriously ultimately inducing cell death. Furthermore, DH77-1 is the first record of a Joostella sp. bacterium being algicidal to the harmful dinoflagellate A. tamarense, and the bacterial culture and the active compounds might be potentially used as a bio-agent for controlling harmful algal blooms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Haloanaerobium salsugo sp. nov., a moderately halophilic, anaerobic bacterium from a subterranean brine

    SciTech Connect

    Bhupathiraju, V.K.; Sharma, P.K.; Tanner, R.S.

    A strictly anaerobic, moderately halophilic, gram-negative bacterium was isolated from a highly saline oil field brine. The bacterium was a non-spore-forming, nonmotile rod, appearing singly, in pairs, or occasionally as long chains, and measured 0.3 to 0.4 by 2.6 to 4 {micro}m. The bacterium had a specific requirement for NaCl and grew at NaCl concentrations of between 6 and 24%, with optimal growth at 9% NaCl. The isolate grew at temperatures of between 22 and 51 C and pH values of between 5.6 and 8.0. The doubling time in a complex medium containing 10% NaCl was 9 h. Growth wasmore » inhibited by chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and penicillin but not by cycloheximide or azide. Fermentable substrates were predominantly carbohydrates. The end products of glucose fermentation were acetate, ethanol, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}. The major components of the cellular fatty acids were C{sub 14:0}, C{sub 16:0}, C{sub 16:1}, and C{sub 17:0 cyc} acids. The DNA base composition of the isolate was 34 mol% G+C. Oligonucleotide catalog and sequence analyses of the 16S rRNA showed that strain VS-752{sup T} was most closely related to Haloanaerobium praevalens GSL{sup T} (ATCC 33744), the sole member of the genus Haloanaerobium. The authors propose that strain VS-752 (ATCC 51327) by established as the type strain of a new species, Haloanaerobium salsugo, in the genus Haloanaerobium. 40 refs., 3 figs, 5 tabs.« less

  20. Milling the Mistletoe: Nanotechnological Conversion of African Mistletoe (Loranthus micranthus) Intoantimicrobial Materials.

    PubMed

    Sarfraz, Muhammad; Griffin, Sharoon; Gabour Sad, Tamara; Alhasan, Rama; Nasim, Muhammad Jawad; Irfan Masood, Muhammad; Schäfer, Karl Herbert; Ejike, Chukwunonso E C C; Keck, Cornelia M; Jacob, Claus; Ebokaiwe, Azubuike P

    2018-04-20

    Nanosizing represents a straight forward technique to unlock the biological activity of complex plant materials. The aim of this study was to develop herbal nanoparticles with medicinal value from dried leaves and stems of Loranthus micranthus with the aid of ball-milling, high speed stirring, and high-pressure homogenization techniques. The milled nanoparticles were characterized using laser diffraction analysis, photon correlation spectroscopy analysis, and light microscopy. The average size of leaf nanoparticles was around 245 nm and that of stem nanoparticles was around 180 nm. The nanoparticles were tested for their antimicrobial and nematicidal properties against a Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli , a Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus carnosus , fungi Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae , and a nematode Steinernemafeltiae . The results show significant activities for both leaf and (particularly) stem nanoparticles of Loranthus micranthus on all organisms tested, even at a particle concentration as low as 0.01% ( w / w ). The results observed indicate that nanoparticles (especially of the stem) of Loranthus micranthus could serve as novel antimicrobial agents with wide-ranging biomedical applications.