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Sample records for bacteriuria

  1. Asymptomatic bacteriuria.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2014-02-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria is a common finding. Inappropriate antimicrobial treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria has been identified as a major issue for antimicrobial stewardship programs. This review summarizes and evaluates recent studies which extend our knowledge of the occurrence, management, and outcomes of bacteriuria. The reported prevalence of bacteriuria is higher in some developing countries than generally reported for developed countries, but reasons for this remain unclear. Clinical studies of young women, renal transplant patients, and patients undergoing minor nontraumatic urologic procedures confirm that treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria for these populations is not beneficial, and may be harmful. There is also no benefit for treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria prior to orthopedic surgery to decrease postoperative surgical site infection. Studies continue to report substantial inappropriate antimicrobial use for treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria. Recent publications confirm that asymptomatic bacteriuria is benign in most patients. Management strategies for pregnant women with recurrent bacteriuria require further clarification. There is a continuing problem with inappropriate treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria, and sustainable strategies to optimize antimicrobial use for this problem are needed.

  2. Asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Smaill, Fiona

    2007-06-01

    Screening for asymptomatic bacteriuria is a standard of obstetrical care and is included in most antenatal guidelines. There is good evidence that treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria will decrease the incidence of pyelonephritis. All pregnant women should be screened for asymptomatic bacteriuria, and there are no new data that would indicate otherwise. Antibiotic treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria is associated with a decrease in the incidence of preterm delivery or low birth weight, but the methodological quality of the studies means any conclusion about the strength of this association needs to be drawn cautiously. A better understanding of the mechanism by which treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria could prevent preterm delivery is needed. While several rapid screening tests have been evaluated, none perform adequately to replace urine culture for detecting asymptomatic bacteriuria. Until there are data from well-designed trials that establish the optimal duration of therapy for asymptomatic bacteriuria, standard treatment courses are recommended.

  3. Asymptomatic bacteriuria during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sheiner, Eyal; Mazor-Drey, Efrat; Levy, Amalia

    2009-05-01

    The present study was aimed to test the association between asymptomatic bacteriuria during pregnancy, among patients in whom antibiotic treatment was recommended, and perinatal outcome. Our study was also designed to characterize common bacteria and risk factors associated with asymptomatic bacteriuria during pregnancy. A retrospective population-based study comparing all singleton pregnancies of women with and asymptomatic bacteriuria was conducted. Patients with urinary tract infection were excluded from the analysis. Multiple logistic regression model was used to control for confounders. Out of 199,093 deliveries, 2.5% (n = 4890) were in patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria. E. coli was the most common pathogen associated with asymptomatic bacteriuria, representing 78.6% of the cultures with specified growth. Patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria were more likely to deliver preterm (PTD, 13.3%vs. 7.6%, odd ratio (OR) = 1.9, 95% confidence interval CI 1.7-2.0; P < 0.001) and deliver low birth-weight neonates (<2500 g, 13.3%vs. 7.9%, OR = 1.8; 95% CI 1.6-2.0; P < 0.001). Asymptomatic bacteriuria was independently associated with PTD (adjusted OR = 1.6; 95% CI 1.5-1.7; P < 0.001), fertility treatments, hypertensive disorders, recurrent abortions, diabetes mellitus, intrauterine growth restriction, polyhydramnion and oligohydramnion, premature rupture of membranes and labour induction, in a multivariable analysis with backwards elimination. Perinatal mortality rates (1.5%vs. 1.4%; P = 0.707) as well as low 5 min Apgar scores (0.8%vs. 0.6%; P = 0.065) were comparable between the groups. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is an independent risk factor for preterm delivery.

  4. Urinary Tract Infection and Bacteriuria in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Alexander P; Schaeffer, Anthony J

    2015-11-01

    Bacteriuria during pregnancy may be classified as asymptomatic bacteriuria, infections of the lower urinary tract (cystitis), or infections of the upper urinary tract (pyelonephritis). Lower tract bacteriuria is associated with an increased risk of developing pyelonephritis in pregnancy, which is itself associated with adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Pregnant women should be screened for the presence of bacteriuria early in pregnancy. All bacteriuria in pregnancy should be treated, and antimicrobial choice in pregnancy should reflect safety for both the mother and the fetus. After treatment of bacteriuria, patients should be followed closely due to risk of recurrent bacteriuria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Asymptomatic Bacteriuria and Bacterial Interference.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2015-10-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria is very common. In healthy women, asymptomatic bacteriuria increases with age, from <1% in newborns to 10% to 20% of women age 80 years, but is uncommon in men until after age 50 years. Individuals with underlying genitourinary abnormalities, including indwelling devices, may also have a high frequency of asymptomatic bacteriuria, irrespective of age or gender. The prevalence is very high in residents of long-term-care facilities, from 25% to 50% of women and 15% to 40% of men. Escherichia coli is the most frequent organism isolated, but a wide variety of other organisms may occur. Bacteriuria may be transient or persist for a prolonged period. Pregnant women with asymptomatic bacteriuria identified in early pregnancy and who are untreated have a risk of pyelonephritis later in pregnancy of 20% to 30%. Bacteremia is frequent in bacteriuric subjects following mucosal trauma with bleeding, with 5% to 10% of patients developing severe sepsis or septic shock. These two groups with clear evidence of negative outcomes should be screened for bacteriuria and appropriately treated. Asymptomatic bacteriuria in other populations is benign and screening and treatment are not indicated. Antimicrobial treatment has no benefits but is associated with negative outcomes including reinfection with antimicrobial resistant organisms and a short-term increased frequency of symptomatic infection post-treatment. The observation of increased symptomatic infection post-treatment, however, has led to active investigation of bacterial interference as a strategy to prevent symptomatic episodes in selected high risk patients.

  6. Research progress of asymptomatic bacteriuria before arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingyu; Liu, Lihua; Sun, Wei; Gao, Fuqiang; Cheng, Liming; Li, Zirong

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background: A high prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria exists in patients prior to arthroplasty, and urinary tract infection is considered to be a source of postoperative superficial wound and prosthetic joint infections. There is no consensus whether to screen for and treat asymptomatic bacteriuria before arthroplasty. Objective: To summarize the association between asymptomatic bacteriuria and complications after arthroplasty and to evaluate the clinical benefits of treating asymptomatic bacteriuria prior to arthroplasty. Method: We systematically searched PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library to retrieve potentially eligible articles. By screening the titles and abstracts of retrieved records and then reading the full texts of the remaining papers, we finally included 8 English-language articles in this systematic review. Results: Asymptomatic bacteriuria prior to arthroplasty is significantly associated with an increased occurrence of postoperative prosthetic joint and superficial wound infections. However, there is little evidence for direct or hematogenous seeding of urinary infections, and treating asymptomatic bacteriuria before arthroplasty did not decrease the incidence of postoperative infectious complications. Conclusion: Asymptomatic bacteriuria is not a contraindication for arthroplasty, and the practice of routine preoperative screening for and treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria should not be continued. PMID:29443741

  7. Asymptomatic bacteriuria in adults.

    PubMed

    Colgan, Richard; Nicolle, Lindsay E; McGlone, Andrew; Hooton, Thomas M

    2006-09-15

    A common dilemma in clinical medicine is whether to treat asymptomatic patients who present with bacteria in their urine. There are few scenarios in which antibiotic treatment of asymptomatic bacteruria has been shown to improve patient outcomes. Because of increasing antimicrobial resistance, it is important not to treat patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria unless there is evidence of potential benefit. Women who are pregnant should be screened for asymptomatic bacteriuria in the first trimester and treated, if positive. Treating asymptomatic bacteriuria in patients with diabetes, older persons, patients with or without indwelling catheters, or patients with spinal cord injuries has not been found to improve outcomes.

  8. Should asymptomatic bacteriuria be screened in pregnancy?

    PubMed

    Uncu, Y; Uncu, G; Esmer, A; Bilgel, N

    2002-01-01

    The incidence of asymptomatic bacteriuria is reported as 2-14% during pregnancy. Fetal and maternal complications like acute pyelonephritis, hypertension, anemia, preterm labor, low-birth-weight infants and intrauterine growth retardation can be expected. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of asymptomatic bacteriuria during pregnancy and its relation to pregnancy complications. The study involved 270 pregnant women up to 32 gestational weeks during a 9-month period. At the initial visit, they were screened with urine culture in order to detect asymptomatic bacteriuria. A control group was formed in a retrospective manner from the first day of the study with 186 pregnant women who delivered in our clinic and who were not screened for asymptomatic bacteriuria. The incidence of asymptomatic bacteriuria was 9.31%. Escherichia coli accounted for 79%, which was the most frequent of the isolates. We observed recurrence and had to apply treatment again to 21.7% of the women. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive and negative predictive values of leucocyturia as a screening test for asymptomatic bacteriuria were 91.3%, 83.6%, 45.6% and 98.5%, respectively. We diagnosed preterm labor in six of 23 (26%) with asymptomatic bacteriuria and 16 in 163 (9.3%) women in the urine culture negative group. The ratio acute pyelonephritis in the group which was routinely screened and treated for asymtomatic bacteriuria was 0.5% while the prevalence was 2.1% in the nonscreened group. Considering the relatively high incidence of asymptomatic bacteriuria during pregnancy and the relevant complications, we propose to screen and treat asymptomatic bacteriuria routinely in all pregnant women.

  9. [Asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Caputo, S; Ciardo, A

    2001-01-01

    Pregnancy is a predisposing factor for urinary tract infection and pregnant women suffering from this pathology are exposed to dangerous risks which may condition maternal wellbeing and fetal prognosis. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is the common bacterial infection requiring medical treatment in pregnancy. Diagnosis and treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria is important as approximately 20-40% of these women, if untreated during pregnancy, will develop a symptomatic urinary tract infection.

  10. Asymptomatic bacteriuria among an obstetric population in Ibadan.

    PubMed

    Awonuga, D O; Dada-Adegbola, H O; Fawole, A O; Olala, F A; Onimisi-Smith, H O

    2011-01-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy is the major risk factor for symptomatic urinary tract infection during pregnancy. Screening and identification of bacteriuria during pregnancy have been recommended. To determine the prevalence and pattern of asymptomatic bacteriuria associated with pregnancy. The study was a descriptive, cross sectional survey of pattern of asymptomatic bacteriuria among consecutive patients presenting for the first antenatal visit at a University College Hospital, during a period of two months. Relevant information obtained from all the patients recruited for the study included age, parity, educational level, gestational age and occupation of participant. Haemoglobin electrophoresis patterns were also retrieved and recorded. Main outcome measures were prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria, bacterial isolates and their antibiotic sensitivities. There were 205 eligible participants with a mean age of 30.6 ± 4.3 years and a mean gestational age at booking of 20.9 ±7.0 weeks. The prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria was 22(10.7%). The isolated pathogens were predominantly coliforms (Klebsiella and E. coli) accounting for 45.5% and Staphylococcus saprophyticus (27.3%). Only gentamycin, nitrofurantoin and ofloxacin demonstrated high efficacy against these uropathogens with antibiotic sensitivity rates of 72.7%-81.8%. Prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria in this centre is relatively high. This underscores the need for routine screening of pregnant women for bacteriuria.

  11. Antibiotics for asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Smaill, F

    2000-01-01

    Up to 30% of mothers develop acute pyelonephritis if asymptomatic bacteriuria is untreated. Asymptomatic bacteriuria may have a role in preterm birth, or it may be a marker for low socioeconomic status and thus, low birth weight. The objective of this review was to assess the effect of antibiotic treatment for asymptomatic bacteriuria on persistent bacteriuria during pregnancy, the risk of preterm delivery and the development of pyelonephritis after delivery. I searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group trials register. Randomised trials comparing antibiotic treatment with placebo or no treatment in pregnant women with asymptomatic bacteriuria found on antenatal screening. Trial quality was assessed. Thirteen studies were included. Overall the study quality was not strong. Antibiotic treatment compared to placebo or no treatment was effective in clearing asymptomatic bacteriuria (odds ratio 0.07, 95% confidence interval 0.05 to 0.10). The incidence of pyelonephritis was reduced (odds ratio 0.25, 95% confidence interval 0.19 to 0.32). Antibiotic treatment was also associated with a reduction in the incidence of preterm delivery or low birth weight babies (odds ratio 0.60, 95% confidence interval 0.45 to 0.80). Antibiotic treatment appears to be effective in reducing the risk of pyelonephritis in pregnancy. An apparent reduction in preterm delivery is consistent with current theories about the role of infection in preterm birth, but this association should be interpreted with caution.

  12. The Paradigm Shift to Non-Treatment of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria

    PubMed Central

    Nicolle, Lindsay E.

    2016-01-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria, also called asymptomatic urinary infection, is a common finding in healthy women, and in women and men with abnormalities of the genitourinary tract. The characterization and introduction of the quantitative urine culture in the 1950s first allowed the reliable recognition of asymptomatic bacteriuria. The observations that a substantial proportion of patients with chronic pyelonephritis at autopsy had no history of symptomatic urinary infection, and the high frequency of pyelonephritis observed in pregnant women with untreated asymptomatic bacteriuria, supported a conclusion that asymptomatic bacteriuria was harmful. Subsequent screening and long term follow-up programs for asymptomatic bacteriuria in schoolgirls and women reported an increased frequency of symptomatic urinary tract infection for subjects with asymptomatic bacteriuria, but no increased morbidity from renal failure or hypertension, or increased mortality. Treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria did not decrease the frequency of symptomatic infection. Prospective, randomized, comparative trials enrolling premenopausal women, children, elderly populations, patients with long term catheters, and diabetic patients consistently report no benefits with antimicrobial treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria, and some evidence of harm. Several studies have also reported that antimicrobial treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria increases the short term risk of pyelonephritis. Current investigations are exploring the potential therapeutic intervention of establishing asymptomatic bacteriuria with an avirulent Escherichia coli strain to prevent symptomatic urinary tract infection for selected patients. PMID:27104571

  13. The Paradigm Shift to Non-Treatment of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2016-04-19

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria, also called asymptomatic urinary infection, is a common finding in healthy women, and in women and men with abnormalities of the genitourinary tract. The characterization and introduction of the quantitative urine culture in the 1950s first allowed the reliable recognition of asymptomatic bacteriuria. The observations that a substantial proportion of patients with chronic pyelonephritis at autopsy had no history of symptomatic urinary infection, and the high frequency of pyelonephritis observed in pregnant women with untreated asymptomatic bacteriuria, supported a conclusion that asymptomatic bacteriuria was harmful. Subsequent screening and long term follow-up programs for asymptomatic bacteriuria in schoolgirls and women reported an increased frequency of symptomatic urinary tract infection for subjects with asymptomatic bacteriuria, but no increased morbidity from renal failure or hypertension, or increased mortality. Treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria did not decrease the frequency of symptomatic infection. Prospective, randomized, comparative trials enrolling premenopausal women, children, elderly populations, patients with long term catheters, and diabetic patients consistently report no benefits with antimicrobial treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria, and some evidence of harm. Several studies have also reported that antimicrobial treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria increases the short term risk of pyelonephritis. Current investigations are exploring the potential therapeutic intervention of establishing asymptomatic bacteriuria with an avirulent Escherichia coli strain to prevent symptomatic urinary tract infection for selected patients.

  14. Antibiotics for asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Smaill, F

    2001-01-01

    Up to 30% of mothers develop acute pyelonephritis if asymptomatic bacteriuria is untreated. Asymptomatic bacteriuria may have a role in preterm birth or it may be a marker for low socioeconomic status which is associated with low birth weight. The objective of this review was to assess the effect of antibiotic treatment for asymptomatic bacteriuria on persistent bacteriuria during pregnancy, the risk of preterm delivery, and the development of pyelonephritis. I searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group trials register. Date of last search: December 2000. Randomised trials comparing antibiotic treatment with placebo or no treatment in pregnant women with asymptomatic bacteriuria found on antenatal screening. Trial quality was assessed. Fourteen studies were included. Overall the study quality was not strong. Antibiotic treatment compared to placebo or no treatment was effective in clearing asymptomatic bacteriuria (odds ratio 0.07, 95% confidence interval 0.05 to 0.10). The incidence of pyelonephritis was reduced (odds ratio 0.24, 95% confidence interval 0.19 to 0.32). Antibiotic treatment was also associated with a reduction in the incidence of preterm delivery or low birth weight babies (odds ratio 0.60, 95% confidence interval 0.45 to 0.80). Antibiotic treatment is effective in reducing the risk of pyelonephritis in pregnancy. An apparent reduction in preterm delivery is consistent with current theories about the role of infection in preterm birth, but this association should be interpreted with caution.

  15. Antibiotics for asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Smaill, F; Vazquez, J C

    2007-04-18

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria occurs in 2% to 10% of pregnancies and, if not treated, up to 30% of mothers will develop acute pyelonephritis. Asymptomatic bacteriuria has been associated with low birthweight and preterm delivery. To assess the effect of antibiotic treatment for asymptomatic bacteriuria on persistent bacteriuria during pregnancy, the development of pyelonephritis and the risk of low birthweight and preterm delivery. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (January 2007). Randomized trials comparing antibiotic treatment with placebo or no treatment in pregnant women with asymptomatic bacteriuria found on antenatal screening. We assessed trial quality. Fourteen studies were included. Overall the study quality was poor. Antibiotic treatment compared to placebo or no treatment was effective in clearing asymptomatic bacteriuria (risk ratio (RR) 0.25, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.14 to 0.48). The incidence of pyelonephritis was reduced (RR 0.23, 95% CI 0.13 to 0.41). Antibiotic treatment was also associated with a reduction in the incidence of low birthweight babies (RR 0.66, 95% CI 0.49 to 0.89) but a difference in preterm delivery was not seen. Antibiotic treatment is effective in reducing the risk of pyelonephritis in pregnancy. A reduction in low birthweight is consistent with current theories about the role of infection in adverse pregnancy outcomes, but this association should be interpreted with caution given the poor quality of the included studies.

  16. Asymptomatic bacteriuria

    MedlinePlus

    Dull RB, Friedman SK, Risoldi ZM, Rice EC, Starlin RC, Destache CJ. Antimicrobial treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria in noncatheterized adults: a systematic review. Pharmacotherapy . 2014;34(9):941-960. PMID: 24807583 ...

  17. Asymptomatic bacteriuria: when to screen and when to treat.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2003-06-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria is common. Populations with structural or functional abnormalities of the genitourinary tract may have an exceedingly high prevalence of bacteriuria, but even healthy individuals frequently have positive urine cultures. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is seldom associated with adverse outcomes. Pregnant women and individuals who are to undergo traumatic genitourinary interventions are at risk for complications of bacteriuria and benefit from screening and treatment programs. Although screening is recommended for renal transplant recipients, the benefits for these patients are less clear. For other populations, including most bacteriuric individuals, negative outcomes attributable to asymptomatic bacteriuria have not been described. Treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria in these patients is not beneficial and, in fact, may be associated with harmful outcomes, such as increased short-term frequency of symptomatic infection, adverse drug effects, and reinfection with organisms of increased antimicrobial resistance. Screening for asymptomatic bacteriuria and treatment is recommended for only selected groups where benefit has been shown. Many research questions still need to be addressed. Different populations have unique risk factors, and the benefits and risks of different management approaches for asymptomatic bacteriuria must continue to be addressed systematically in appropriate clinical trials.

  18. Antimicrobial Treatment of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria in Healthy Ambulatory Subjects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhanel, George G.

    1990-01-01

    The treatment of urinary tract infections is discussed. Specific issues considered include the definition of asymptomatic bacteriuria, the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria, the controversies of who should be treated, and antimicrobial treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria. (MLW)

  19. Management of bacteriuria in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Pedler, S J; Bint, A J

    1987-04-01

    Bacteriuria of pregnancy is a common condition which, although usually asymptomatic, may give rise to potentially serious sequelae. All pregnant women should therefore be screened for the presence of bacteriuria, which if detected should be treated with an antimicrobial agent believed to be safe for use in pregnancy. Appropriate antimicrobial drugs include penicillins, cephalosporins and nitrofurantoin. Nalidixic acid, aminoglycosides and sulphonamides may be used under certain circumstances and with some precautions. Tetracyclines, trimethoprim and co-trimoxazole (trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole) should be avoided. There is some evidence that short-course therapy in pregnant women is less effective than longer courses, and we continue to recommend a 7-day course. Follow-up after completing a treatment course is an essential part of managing bacteriuria of pregnancy.

  20. Asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic urinary tract infections during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Macejko, Amanda M; Schaeffer, Anthony J

    2007-02-01

    Urinary tract infections are common complications of pregnancy; upper tract infections in particular may lead to significant morbidity for both the mother and fetus. Bacteriuria is a significant risk factor for developing pyelonephritis in pregnant women. Therefore, proper screening and treatment of bacteriuria during pregnancy is necessary to prevent complications. All women should be screened for bacteriuria in the first trimester, and women with a history of recurrent urinary tract infections or anomalies should have repeat bacteriuria screening throughout pregnancy. Treatment of bacteriuria should include 3-day therapy with appropriate antimicrobials, and women should be followed closely after treatment because recurrence may occur in up to one third of patients.

  1. Postpartum surveillance of bacteriuria in term vaginal deliveries.

    PubMed Central

    Orrett, F. A.; Premanand, N.

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of bacteriuria in early postpartum period after term vaginal delivery in Trinidad, West Indies. Asymptomatic bacteriuria occurred in 58 (34.5%) of 168 patients tested. The prevalence of bacteriuria was significantly higher in non-catheterized patients than in catheterized patients and occurred more commonly in patients who were 20 to 29 years old and who were primigravida rather than multigravida. Forty-four patients had a history of urinary tract infection; 18 (40.9%) of these patients had positive urine cultures. Although 10 patients had a vaginal discharge in the late third trimester, none presented with postpartum bacteriuria. Because of the high prevalence of postpartum bacteriuria and the potential to progress to pyelonephritis and chronic renal disease, quantitative urine cultures for all postnatal patients and curative treatment for all positive cultures are recommend. PMID:9549982

  2. Asymptomatic bacteriuria: review and discussion of the IDSA guidelines.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2006-08-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria is a common finding, but is usually benign. Screening and treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria is only recommended for pregnant women, or for patients prior to selected invasive genitourinary procedures. Healthy women identified with asymptomatic bacteriuria on population screening subsequently experience more frequent episodes of symptomatic infection, but antimicrobial treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria does not decrease the occurrence of these episodes. Clinical trials in spinal-cord injury patients, diabetic women, patients with indwelling urethral catheters, and elderly nursing home residents have consistently found no benefits with treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria. Negative outcomes with antimicrobial treatment do occur, including adverse drug effects and re-infection with organisms of increasing resistance. Optimal management of asymptomatic bacteriuria requires appropriate implementation of screening strategies to promote timely identification of the selected patients for whom treatment is beneficial, and avoidance of antimicrobial therapy where no benefit has been shown.

  3. Predictors of asymptomatic bacteriuria among obstetric population in Ibadan.

    PubMed

    Awonuga, D O; Awonuga, D A; Fawole, A O; Dada-Adegbola, H O; Dada-Adegbola, H A; Olola, F A; Awonuga, O M

    2010-01-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy is the major risk factor for symptomatic urinary tract infection during pregnancy. Screening and identification of bacteriuria during pregnancy have been recommended. The general objective of the study was to determine the pattern as well as possible predictors of asymptomatic bacteriuria at the University College Hospital, Ibadan. The study was a descriptive, cross sectional, exploratory survey of the pattern of asymptomatic bacteriuria among all consecutive patients presenting for the first antenatal visit at the University College Hospital, Ibadan during the study period. The prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria was 10.7%. Although no statistically significant association was found, the prevalence was higher among women aged between 26 - 35 years (11.5%) and those with only secondary education (14.6%). Other demographic parameters characterized by high rates of bacteriuria were Christian women (12.7% compared to 4.3% among Muslims) and genotypes AS and AC (16.4% and 16.7% respectively). Low parity (para 1-2), 2nd and 3rd trimesters of pregnancy were the identified possible obstetric predictors of bacteriuria in pregnancy. Staphylococcus species constitute the predominant isolates in 3rd trimester and among Muslim pregnant women. Since no statistically significant predictors for bacteriuria in pregnancy were found, routine screening of all our pregnant women for this condition in 2nd trimester is recommended.

  4. Research progress of asymptomatic bacteriuria before arthroplasty: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingyu; Liu, Lihua; Sun, Wei; Gao, Fuqiang; Cheng, Liming; Li, Zirong

    2018-02-01

    A high prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria exists in patients prior to arthroplasty, and urinary tract infection is considered to be a source of postoperative superficial wound and prosthetic joint infections. There is no consensus whether to screen for and treat asymptomatic bacteriuria before arthroplasty. To summarize the association between asymptomatic bacteriuria and complications after arthroplasty and to evaluate the clinical benefits of treating asymptomatic bacteriuria prior to arthroplasty. We systematically searched PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library to retrieve potentially eligible articles. By screening the titles and abstracts of retrieved records and then reading the full texts of the remaining papers, we finally included 8 English-language articles in this systematic review. Asymptomatic bacteriuria prior to arthroplasty is significantly associated with an increased occurrence of postoperative prosthetic joint and superficial wound infections. However, there is little evidence for direct or hematogenous seeding of urinary infections, and treating asymptomatic bacteriuria before arthroplasty did not decrease the incidence of postoperative infectious complications. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is not a contraindication for arthroplasty, and the practice of routine preoperative screening for and treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria should not be continued.

  5. Accuracy of diagnostic tests to detect asymptomatic bacteriuria during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mignini, Luciano; Carroli, Guillermo; Abalos, Edgardo; Widmer, Mariana; Amigot, Susana; Nardin, Juan Manuel; Giordano, Daniel; Merialdi, Mario; Arciero, Graciela; Del Carmen Hourquescos, Maria

    2009-02-01

    A dipslide is a plastic paddle coated with agar that is attached to a plastic cap that screws onto a sterile plastic vial. Our objective was to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of the dipslide culture technique to detect asymptomatic bacteriuria during pregnancy and to evaluate the accuracy of nitrate and leucocyte esterase dipslides for screening. This was an ancillary study within a trial comparing single-day with 7-day therapy in treating asymptomatic bacteriuria. Clean-catch midstream samples were collected from pregnant women seeking routine care. Positive and negative likelihood ratios and sensitivity and specificity for the culture-based dipslide to detect and chemical dipsticks (nitrites, leukocyte esterase, or both) to screen were estimated using traditional urine culture as the "gold standard." : A total of 3,048 eligible pregnant women were screened. The prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria was 15%, with Escherichia coli the most prevalent organism. The likelihood ratio for detecting asymptomatic bacteriuria with a positive dipslide test was 225 (95% confidence interval [CI] 113-449), increasing the probability of asymptomatic bacteriuria to 98%; the likelihood ratio for a negative dipslide test was 0.02 (95% CI 0.01-0.05), reducing the probability of bacteriuria to less than 1%. The positive likelihood ratio of leukocyte esterase and nitrite dipsticks (when both or either one was positive) was 6.95 (95% CI 5.80-8.33), increasing the probability of bacteriuria to only 54%; the negative likelihood ratio was 0.50 (95% CI 0.45-0.57), reducing the probability to 8%. A pregnant woman with a positive dipslide test is very likely to have a definitive diagnosis of asymptomatic bacteriuria, whereas a negative result effectively rules out the presence of bacteriuria. Dipsticks that measure nitrites and leukocyte esterase have low sensitivity for use in screening for asymptomatic bacteriuria during gestation. ISRCTN, isrctn.org, 1196608 II.

  6. Asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic urinary tract infections in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Schnarr, J; Smaill, F

    2008-10-01

    Symptomatic and asymptomatic bacteriuria is common in pregnant women. A history of previous urinary tract infections and low socioeconomic status are risk factors for bacteriuria in pregnancy. Escherichia coli is the most common aetiologic agent in both symptomatic and asymptomatic infection and quantitative culture is the gold standard for diagnosis. Treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria has been shown to reduce the rate of pyelonephritis in pregnancy and therefore screening for and treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria has become a standard of obstetrical care. Antibiotic treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria is associated with a decrease in the incidence of low birth weight, but the methodological quality of the studies limits the strength of the conclusions that can be drawn. Debate exists in the literature as to whether treated pyelonephritis is associated with adverse fetal outcomes. There is no clear consensus in the literature on antibiotic choice or duration of therapy for infection. With increasing antibiotic resistance, consideration of local resistance rates is necessary when choosing therapy.

  7. Asymptomatic group B streptococcal bacteriuria among pregnant women in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, S

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to determine the asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy due to GBS and its antimicrobial sensitivity pattern for planning strategy for the management of these cases and also to determine the relationship between asymptomatic bacteriuria and pyuria. A total of 3863 consecutive urine specimens were collected from 3863 pregnant women with asymptomatic bacteriuria attending the obstetrics and gynaecology department of our hospital over a period of two years. Specimens were processed using standard microbiological procedures. All the subjects were evaluated for bacteriuria. The prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria due to group B streptococci (GBS) was 82/3863 (2.1%) among pregnant women in Saudi Arabia. Among these, 69/82 patients (84.2%) had clinical and microbiological features consistent with cystitis, versus 13/82 (15.8%) for pyelonephritis. About 51.2% (42/82) of the patients who had urine analysis performed had positive results based on positive urinary leucocyte esterase and pyuria. Disc-diffusion analysis of all 82 GBS isolates showed that they were highly susceptible to Augmentin and linezolid. Screening for bacteriuria in pregnancy and proper treatment must be considered as an essential part of antenatal care in this community. To prevent asymptomatic bacteriuria complications, all pregnant women should be screened at the first antenatal visit. A negative test for pyuria is not a reliable indicator of the absence of asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women. Further, ongoing surveillance and evaluation of outcomes in pregnancies complicated by GBS bacteriuria is required to optimise maternal and newborn care.

  8. Asymptomatic Bacteriuria Caused by Chromobacterium violaceum in an Immunocompetent Adult.

    PubMed

    Pant, Narayan Dutt; Sharma, Manisha; Khatiwada, Saroj

    2015-01-01

    Because of increasing antimicrobial resistance, the treatment of the asymptomatic bacteriuria is not considered except in specific circumstances like during pregnancy or before invasive urologic procedures. We are reporting a first case of asymptomatic bacteriuria caused by Chromobacterium violaceum in a 16-year-old male. With the reporting of the C. violaceum which is notorious for its high propensity for hematogenous dissemination causing fatal sepsis (with reported mortality rate up to 65-80%) if prompt proper treatment is not given, as causative agent of asymptomatic bacteriuria, it is recommended to treat the asymptomatic bacteriuria caused by this organism.

  9. Screening and treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy prevent pyelonephritis.

    PubMed

    Gratacós, E; Torres, P J; Vila, J; Alonso, P L; Cararach, V

    1994-06-01

    Although asymptomatic bacteriuria during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of developing pyelonephritis, the effectiveness of screening programs to reduce this risk is controversial. A sharp reduction in the annual incidence of pyelonephritis (1.8% to 0.6%, P < .001) occurred after the introduction of a program to screen and treat asymptomatic bacteriuria among pregnant women followed at a large teaching hospital. The data provide retrospective and prospective evidence that screening and treatment programs for asymptomatic bacteriuria during pregnancy reduce the risk of pyelonephritis in a population with a moderate to high prevalence of bacteriuria.

  10. Asymptomatic bacteriuria of pregnancy in Ibadan, Nigeria: a re-assessment.

    PubMed

    Akinloye, O; Ogbolu, D O; Akinloye, O M; Terry Alli, O A

    2006-01-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy is the major risk factor for developing symptomatic urinary tract infection during pregnancy. In the present study, 300 pregnant women are screened for significant asymptomatic bacteriuria in order to provide an insight into the prevalence in developing countries, reassessment of some predisposing factors and aetiological agents and their susceptibility tests. The mean age of the patients in the study is 26.8 years (SD: 5.8 years, range: 16-40 years). Using 10(3) organisms/mL as a significant level of bacteriuria, the prevalence was found to be 21.0%. One hundred and fifty-eight samples had no pus cells, with 25 showing significant bacteriuria, 116 samples contained 1-4 pus cells/high power field (hpf) with 25 showing significant bacteriuria, while 26 samples had > or = 5 pus cells/hpf with 13 showing significant bacteriuria. There was no particular trend associated with age and rate of infection. However, there was a decline in the rate of infection in the 26-30 age group, with a sharp increase as age increased. There was high incidence of bacteriuria during the third trimester of pregnancy (21.9%) compared with that in the first trimester (7.7%), while the level in the second trimester was 22.5%. Multiparity is associated with increased bacteriuria in pregnancy. Thirty-one (49.2%) isolates grew Gram-negative bacilli; 27 (42.9%) grew Gram-positive cocci and the remainder (7.9%) grew yeast-like cells. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent pathogen (41.3%), followed by Klebsiella species (33.3%) and Escherichia coli (11.1%). Bacterial isolates from this study were most sensitive to ceftazidime, followed by ceftriazone, and least susceptible to co-trimoxazole.

  11. Evaluation and importance of asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Tugrul, S; Oral, O; Kumru, P; Köse, D; Alkan, A; Yildirim, G

    2005-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the incidence of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) during pregnancy and its prevalance in the three trimesters. One hundred and ten pregnant women in their first trimester attending the antenatal outpatient clinic with no urinary tract complaints were included in the study. After perineal cleaning, urine samples were obtained from all patients for culture and microscopic evaluation. Approximately 1 ml urine was sampled using the mid-stream catch technique. Patients with bacterial counts over 100,000 with the mid-stream catch technique were considered to have asymptomatic bacteriuria. Patients fulfilling the criteria for bacteriuria were treated with either penicillin or cephalosporine for one week, depending on the in-vitro sensitivity test results. ASB rate in the study group was 8.1%. E. coli was isolated as the pathogenic organism in 77.77% of the cases with ASB. ASB was found to be more frequent in patients over age 25 and the average age of pregnant women with ASB was 29.89 +/- 5.80 (p < 0.05). Average duration of gestation in the group with ASB was 28.11 +/- 2.26 weeks. ASB rate in the group age 35 and over was 22.22% (p < 0.05). ASB was diagnosed in nine patients; one of these patients was in the first trimester, two were in the second trimester, and six in the third trimester. Clustering in the third trimester was found to be statistically significant (p < 0.05). ASB distribution in the first, second, and third trimesters was 0.9%, 1.83%, and 5.6%, respectively. There was a significant relationship between advanced maternal age and incidence of ASB. Women with no bacteriuria in their initial examination in the first trimester developed bacteriuria in the later trimesters. We, therefore, suggest that it would be prudent to screen pregnant women for bacteriuria in the second and third trimesters.

  12. Duration of treatment for asymptomatic bacteriuria during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Widmer, Mariana; Gülmezoglu, A Metin; Mignini, Luciano; Roganti, Ariel

    2011-12-07

    A Cochrane systematic review has shown that drug treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women substantially decreases the risk of pyelonephritis and reduces the risk of preterm delivery. However, it is not clear whether single-dose therapy is as effective as longer conventional antibiotic treatment. To assess the effects of different durations of treatment for asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (31 August 2011) and reference lists of identified articles. Randomized and quasi-randomized trials comparing antimicrobial therapeutic regimens that differed in duration (particularly comparing single dose with longer duration regimens) in pregnant women diagnosed with asymptomatic bacteriuria. We assessed trial quality and extracted data independently. We included 13 studies, involving 1622 women. All were comparisons of single-dose treatment with four- to seven-day treatments. The trials were generally of limited quality. The 'no cure rate' for asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women was slightly higher for the single-dose than for the short-course treatment; however, these results were not statistically significant and showed heterogeneity. When comparing the trials that used the same antibiotic in both treatment and control groups with the trials that used different antibiotics in both groups, the 'no cure rate' risk ratio was similar. There was no statistically significant difference in the recurrence of asymptomatic bacteriuria rate between treatment and control groups. Slight differences were detected for preterm births and pyelonephritis although, apart from one trial, the sample size of the trials was inadequate. Single-dose treatment was associated with a decrease in reports of 'any side-effects' . Single-dose regimen of antibiotics may be less effective than the seven-day regimen. Women with asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy should be treated by the standard regimen of

  13. Duration of treatment for asymptomatic bacteriuria during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Villar, J; Lydon-Rochelle, M T; Gülmezoglu, A M; Roganti, A

    2000-01-01

    A Cochrane systematic review has shown that drug treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women substantially decreases the risk of pyelonephritis and reduces the risk of preterm delivery. However, it is not clear whether single dose therapy is as effective as longer conventional antibiotic treatment. The objective of this review was to assess the effects of different durations of treatment for asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group trials register, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register and the reference lists of articles. Randomised and quasi-randomised trials comparing antimicrobial therapeutic regimens that differed in duration (particularly comparing single dose with longer duration regimens) in pregnant women diagnosed with asymptomatic bacteriuria. Trial quality was assessed and data were extracted independently by the reviewers. Eight studies involving over 400 women were included. All were comparisons of single dose treatment with four to seven day treatments. The trials were generally of poor quality. No difference in 'no-cure' rate was detected between single dose and short course (4-7 day) treatment for asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women (relative risk 1.13, 95% confidence interval 0.82 to 1.54) as well as in the recurrent asymptomtic bacteriuria (relative risk 1.08, 95% confidence interval 0.70 to 1.66). However these results showed significant heterogeneity. No differences were detected for preterm births and pyelonephritis although sample size of trials was small. Longer duration treatment was associated with an increase in reports of adverse effects (relative risk 0.53, 95% confidence interval 0.31 to 0.91). There is not enough evidence to evaluate whether single dose or longer duration doses are more effective in treating asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women. Because single dose has lower cost and increases compliance, this comparison should be explored in a properly

  14. Prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria and its consequences in pregnancy in a rural community of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Ullah, M Anayet; Barman, A; Siddique, M A; Haque, A K M E

    2007-08-01

    This was a cross-sectional followed by cohort type of study conducted among the pregnant mothers of second trimester in the rural areas of Rajshahi district. Initially 1800 pregnant mothers ofsecond trimester were selected from 18 unions applying 2-stage random sampling. A total of 216 pregnant mothers with asymptomatic bacteriuria were paired among the rest of the healthy pregnant mothers (without bacteriuria) on the basis of age, gravida and economic status for cohort study to relate asymptomatic bacteriuria with the incidence of symptomatic bacteriuria, hypertensive disorders in pregnancy (HDP) and pre-term delivery. The matched paired pregnant mothers werefollowed monthly interval up to delivery. The prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria was 12% among the pregnant mothers in rural Rajshahi. E. Coli was the commonest causative agent of both asymptomatic and symptomatic bacteriuria. The results of this study suggest that asymptomatic bacteriuria were more prone to develop symptomatic bacteriuria, hypertensive disorders in pregnancy and pre-term delivery than that of the healthy mothers (without bacteriuria). Screening of bacteriuria in pregnancy and proper treatment must be considered as an essential part of antenatal care in this rural community.

  15. Urinary symptoms, sexual intercourse and significant bacteriuria in male patients attending STD clinics.

    PubMed Central

    David, L M; Natin, D; Walzman, M; Stocker, D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the relationship between sexual behaviour, urinary symptoms, urinalysis and bacteriuria in men attending STD clinics. DESIGN: A prospective study recording sexual behaviour, urinary symptoms and collecting mid-stream urine specimens. SETTING: Two West Midlands STD clinics, UK. SUBJECTS: 1086 new male patients. RESULTS: 704 patients had had sexual intercourse (SI) within 14 days of testing, 424 had urinary symptoms and 122 had pyuria. All 13 patients with positive culture had SI < 14 days before testing, urinary symptoms and pyuria. No association was found between sexual orientation, type of SI, number of sexual partners, condom usage and bacteriuria. CONCLUSION: Bacteriuria does not behave as an STD but SI may be a factor in acquiring bacteriuria. Dysuria with or without urethral discharge is the most predictive symptom of bacteriuria. Pyuria has a high sensitivity for predicting bacteriuria among males. PMID:8976831

  16. Detection, significance, and therapy of bacteriuria in pregnancy. Update in the managed health care era.

    PubMed

    Patterson, T F; Andriole, V T

    1997-09-01

    Profound physiologic and anatomic changes of the urinary tract during pregnancy contribute to the increased risk for symptomatic urinary tract infection in women with bacteriuria. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is the major risk factor for developing symptomatic UTIs during pregnancy and may be associated with adverse effects on maternal and fetal health. Because most symptomatic UTIs develop in women with bacteriuria earlier in pregnancy, treatment of bacteriuria is undertaken to prevent symptomatic infections. All pregnant women should be screened at the first antenatal visit, which is reliably and inexpensively done with a dipstick culture. Short-course therapy should be given to women with bacteriuria and clearance of bacteriuria should be documented after therapy is complete. Failure to eliminate bacteriuria with repeated therapy or recurrence with the same organism is indicative of renal parenchymal infection or a structural abnormality. All women with persistent bacteriuria or recurrent infection should have follow-up cultures and a urologic evaluation after delivery.

  17. Bladder versus renal bacteriuria during pregnancy: recurrence after treatment.

    PubMed

    Leveno, K J; Harris, R E; Gilstrap, L C; Whalley, P J; Cunningham, F G

    1981-02-15

    Localization of bacteriuria has been shown to correlate with the pattern of recurrence after treatment. The immunofluorescent technique was used to localize infection in 233 pregnant women with asymptomatic bacteriuria to determine whether this would identify those who were at greater risk for recurrence. In both an indigent and a military population, the incidence of renal bacteriuria was 42%. Regardless of the site of infection, after one course of short-term (10-day) or long-term (21-day) antimicrobial therapy, almost two thirds of these women were abacteriuric for the remainder of gestation. Women given short-term treatment were more likely to have a recurrence within 2 weeks of completion of therapy than were women given long-term therapy (P less than 0.001). Moreover, these early recurrences were more frequent in women given short-term treatment for renal bacteriuria (P less than 0.05). Conversely, recurrences 6 or more weeks after completion of therapy, and regardless of site of infection, were more common in women given long-term treatment (P less than 0.01). Although the timing of recurrence varied significantly in relation to duration of treatment and site of infection, the ultimate risk of recurrence was not related to either. The conclusion is that localization of asymptomatic bacteriuria does not contribute to the management of pregnant women, since overall recurrence rates are independent of the site of infection.

  18. Antibiotics for asymptomatic bacteriuria in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Coussement, Julien; Scemla, Anne; Abramowicz, Daniel; Nagler, Evi V; Webster, Angela C

    2018-02-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria, defined as bacteriuria without signs or symptoms of urinary tract infection (UTI), occurs in 17% to 51% of kidney transplant recipients and is thought to increase the risk for a subsequent UTI. No consensus exists on the role of antibiotics for asymptomatic bacteriuria in kidney transplantation. To assess the benefits and harms of treating asymptomatic bacteriuria in kidney transplant recipients with antimicrobial agents to prevent symptomatic UTI, all-cause mortality and the indirect effects of UTI (acute rejection, graft loss, worsening of graft function). We searched the Cochrane Kidney and Transplant Register of Studies up to 1 September 2017 through contact with the Information Specialist using search terms relevant to this review. Studies in the Register are identified through searches of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE, conference proceedings, the International Clinical Trials Register (ICTRP) Search Portal, and ClinicalTrials.gov. All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs in any language assessing treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria in kidney transplant recipients at any time-point after transplantation. Two authors independently determined study eligibility, assessed quality and extracted data. Primary outcomes were incidence of symptomatic UTI and incidence of antimicrobial resistance. Other outcomes included incidences of all-cause mortality, graft loss, graft rejection, graft function, hospitalisation for UTI, adverse reactions to antimicrobial agents and relapse or persistence of asymptomatic bacteriuria. We expressed dichotomous outcomes as absolute risk difference (RD) or risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) and continuous data as mean differences (MD) with 95% CI. Data were pooled using the random effects model. We included two studies (212 participants) comparing antibiotics versus no treatment, and identified three on-going studies. Overall, incidence of symptomatic UTI varied between 19% and 31

  19. Untreated asymptomatic group B streptococcal bacteriuria early in pregnancy and chorioamnionitis at delivery.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brenna L; Simhan, Hyagriv N; Simons, Kathryn M; Wiesenfeld, Harold C

    2007-06-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the frequency of adverse pregnancy outcomes in women with untreated asymptomatic group B beta-hemolytic streptococcal (GBS) bacteriuria during pregnancy. In this retrospective cohort, all women with antepartum GBS bacteriuria in a research registry were included. Controls were women with negative urine cultures. The frequency of chorioamnionitis was compared between groups. Chorioamnionitis was defined as intrapartum fever, fetal tachycardia, and histologic inflammation of the membranes. One hundred twenty-two women with bacteriuria (study group) and 183 women with negative antepartum cultures (controls) were included. There were no differences in demographic characteristics between the groups. Thirty-one women (10.2%) had chorioamnionitis. Untreated GBS bacteriuria was associated with chorioamnionitis after controlling for confounding variables, adjusted odds ratio 7.2 (95% confidence interval 2.4 to 21.2). There was also a significant positive rank correlation between increasing colony count of GBS bacteriuria and increasing grade of chorioamnionitis (P = .02). Untreated antepartum GBS bacteriuria is associated with chorioamnionitis.

  20. Significant Bacteriuria Among Asymptomatic Antenatal Clinic Attendees In Ibadan, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Kehinde, Aderemi O.; Adedapo, Kayode S.; Aimaikhu, Christopher O.; Odukogbe, Akin-tunde A.; Olayemi, Oladapo; Salako, Babatunde

    2011-01-01

    Untreated asymptomatic bacteriuria can lead to urinary tract infection (UTI) in pregnancy with devastating maternal and neonatal effects such as prematurity and low birth weight, higher fetal mortality rates and significant maternal morbidity. We carried out a two year (April 2007 to March 2009) cross-sectional epidemiological study to determine the prevalence of significant bacteriuria among asymptomatic antenatal clinic attendees at two antenatal clinics (ANCs) in University College Hospital and Adeoyo Maternity Hospital, both in Ibadan, Nigeria. All consenting ANC attendees without UTI were enrolled in the study. Urine specimens of 5 to 10 ml collected from each subject were examined microscopically for white blood cells, red blood cells and bacteria. The specimens were further cultured on MacConkey agar using a sterile bacteriological loop that delivered 0.002 ml of urine. Colony counts yielding bacterial growth of more than 105/ml of pure isolates were considered significant. Of the 473 subjects studied, 136 had significant bacteriuria, giving a prevalence rate of 28.8%. The highest age specific prevalence (47.8%) was found in the 25–29 year olds while only one (0.7%) was found in the teenage group. A large percentage (64.0%) of subjects with significant bacteriuria had tertiary education, compared with 4.4% who had no formal education but the association was not statistically significant (X2 = 0.47, p = 0.79). The majority (75.8%) of subjects with significant bacteriuria had no previous history of abortion, while 20 (14.7%) had one previous abortion and only three (2.1%) admitted to three previous abortions (X2 = 5.16, p = 0.16). The majority (69.8%) of those with significant bacteriuria presented at second trimester while 38 (28.0%) presented at third trimester (X2 = 6.5, p = 37). Only 22 (4.6%) of the studied subjects presented at first trimester, and 3 (13.7%) of these had significant bacteriuria. The prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria is high among

  1. Prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria among pregnant women in Benin City, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Akerele, J; Abhulimen, P; Okonofua, F

    2001-03-01

    A semi-quantitative screening for asymptomatic bacteriuria was carried out in the first trimester of 500 consecutive pregnant women in Benin City. The purpose was to provide baseline data and rational therapy for asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women. Of the 500 women screened, 433 clinical specimens showed significant bacteriuria, representing an incidence of 86.6%. Of this number, 38 (7.4%) were of mixed bacterial colonies while 395 (91%) were of single bacterial colonies. Staphylococcus aureus (29.8%), Escherichia coli (29.1%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (21.5%) were the most frequently isolated pathogens. The high incidence of asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy correlated significantly (P < 0.05) with the observed high proportion of pyuria. On average, sensitivity of the pathogens was ciprofloxacin 99.7%; ceftazidime 81.6%; co-trimoxazole 79.4%; augmentin 71.4%; nalidixic acid 61.7%; nitrofurantoin 61.%; gentamycin 56.9% and ampicillin 25.4%. S. aureus was most sensitive, while Proteus mirabilis was least sensitive among the pathogens. Rational therapy of asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women may prevent associated risks such as pyelonephritis and pre-eclampsia.

  2. Asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy: maternal and fetal complications.

    PubMed

    Grio, R; Porpiglia, M; Vetro, E; Uligini, R; Piacentino, R; Minì, D; Marchino, G L

    1994-12-01

    From an analysis of the data reported in the literature it is clear that pregnancy is a predisposing factor for urinary tract infection and that pregnant women with this pathology are exposed to dangerous risks which may influence maternal wellbeing and fetal prognosis. Authors do not concur on the specific risks to the mother and fetus, one reason being that the statistics reported to date reveal discrepancies relating to the presence of disorders prior to pregnancy and the environmental, working and socio-hygienic conditions of the populations studied. The apparently paradoxical finding of a higher incidence of perinatal problems in pregnant women with asymptomatic bacteriuria compared to manifest forms can be attributed to the fact that the latter are treated with adequate therapies whereas asymptomatic bacteriuria, which is difficult to diagnose, may persist throughout pregnancy. This underlines the importance of early diagnosis using a protocol which entails the execution of serial urine tests and urine cultures and adequate treatment of all cases of asymptomatic bacteriuria in order to reduce the incidence of urinary tract infections and materno-fetal complications. Non-treated asymptomatic bacteriuria in fact represents a considerable risk factor since it may lead to the onset of acute pyelonephritis in approximately 5% of pregnant women and may increase the risk of fetal mortality.

  3. Management of group B streptococcal bacteriuria in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Allen, Victoria M; Yudin, Mark H

    2012-05-01

    To provide information regarding the management of group B streptococcal (GBS) bacteriuria to midwives, nurses, and physicians who are providing obstetrical care. The outcomes considered were neonatal GBS disease, preterm birth, pyelonephritis, chorioamnionitis, and recurrence of GBS colonization. Medline, PubMed, and the Cochrane database were searched for articles published in English to December 2010 on the topic of GBS bacteriuria in pregnancy. Bacteriuria is defined in this clinical practice guideline as the presence of bacteria in urine, regardless of the number of colony-forming units per mL (CFU/mL). Low colony counts refer to < 100 000 CFU/mL, and high (significant) colony counts refer to ≥ 100 000 CFU/mL. Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, and relevant observational studies. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to February 2011. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology assessment-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. Recommendations were quantified using the evaluation of evidence guidelines developed by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table). The recommendations in this guideline are designed to help clinicians identify pregnancies in which it is appropriate to treat GBS bacteriuria to optimize maternal and perinatal outcomes, to reduce the occurrences of antibiotic anaphylaxis, and to prevent increases in antibiotic resistance to GBS and non-GBS pathogens. No cost-benefit analysis is provided. 1. Treatment of any bacteriuria with colony counts ≥ 100 000 CFU/mL in pregnancy is an accepted and recommended strategy and includes treatment with appropriate antibiotics. (II-2A) 2. Women with documented group B streptococcal bacteriuria (regardless of level of

  4. A preliminary assessment of asymptomatic bacteriuria of pregnancy in brunei darussalam.

    PubMed

    Muharram, Siti Hanna; Ghazali, Siti Nur Bazilah; Yaakub, Hajah Roselina; Abiola, Oduola

    2014-03-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria describes a condition in which urine culture reveals a significant growth of pathogenic bacteria, specifically greater than 10(5) of colony-forming units per millilitre of urine. It has a direct bearing on the health of a pregnant woman, her pregnancy and consequently the foetus. Thus, this study investigated the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria of pregnancy in Raja Isteri Pengiran Anak Saleha (RIPAS) Hospital, the premiere tertiary hospital in Brunei Darussalam. A total of 170 pregnant women who were visiting the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at RIPAS Hospital for routine antenatal care between February and March 2011 volunteered for this cross-sectional study. They did not present with any clinical symptoms of bacteriuria or indeed any other illness. They were investigated for bacteriuria by urine microscopy, culture, and sensitivity. Urine samples from seven of the women produced significant bacterial growth, showing a prevalence of 4.1%. The organisms isolated were Klebsiella species (2.94%) and Escherichia coli (1.18%); these bacteria were both sensitive to amoxicillin, vancomycin, tetracycline, and erythromycin. Brunei has a similar prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria to other South-East Asian countries.

  5. A Preliminary Assessment of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria of Pregnancy in Brunei Darussalam

    PubMed Central

    MUHARRAM, Siti Hanna; GHAZALI, Siti Nur Bazilah; YAAKUB, Hajah Roselina; ABIOLA, Oduola

    2014-01-01

    Background: Asymptomatic bacteriuria describes a condition in which urine culture reveals a significant growth of pathogenic bacteria, specifically greater than 105 of colony-forming units per millilitre of urine. It has a direct bearing on the health of a pregnant woman, her pregnancy and consequently the foetus. Thus, this study investigated the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria of pregnancy in Raja Isteri Pengiran Anak Saleha (RIPAS) Hospital, the premiere tertiary hospital in Brunei Darussalam. Methods: A total of 170 pregnant women who were visiting the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at RIPAS Hospital for routine antenatal care between February and March 2011 volunteered for this cross-sectional study. They did not present with any clinical symptoms of bacteriuria or indeed any other illness. They were investigated for bacteriuria by urine microscopy, culture, and sensitivity. Results: Urine samples from seven of the women produced significant bacterial growth, showing a prevalence of 4.1%. The organisms isolated were Klebsiella species (2.94%) and Escherichia coli (1.18%); these bacteria were both sensitive to amoxicillin, vancomycin, tetracycline, and erythromycin. Conclusion: Brunei has a similar prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria to other South-East Asian countries. PMID:24876805

  6. The uriscreen test to detect significant asymptomatic bacteriuria during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Teppa, Roberto J; Roberts, James M

    2005-01-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) occurs in 2-11% of pregnancies and it is a clear predisposition to the development of acute pyelonephritis, which, in turn, poses risk to mother and fetus. Treatment of bacteriuria during pregnancy reduces the incidence of pyelonephritis. Therefore, it is recommended to screen for ASB at the first prenatal visit. The gold standard for detection of bacteriuria during pregnancy is urine culture, but this test is expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive. To determine the reliability of an enzymatic urine screening test (Uriscreen; Savyon Diagnostics, Ashdod, Israel) for detecting ASB in pregnancy. Catheterized urine samples were collected from 150 women who had routine prenatal screening for ASB. Patients with urinary symptoms, active vaginal bleeding, or who were previously on antibiotics therapy were excluded from the study. Sensitivity, specificity, and the positive and negative predictive values for the Uriscreen were estimated using urine culture as the criterion standard. Urine cultures were considered positive if they grew >10(5) colony-forming units of a single uropathogen. Twenty-eight women (18.7%) had urine culture results indicating significant bacteriuria, and 17 of these 28 specimens had positive enzyme activity. Of 122 samples with no growth, 109 had negative enzyme activity. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for the Uriscreen test were 60.7% (+/-18.1), 89.3% (+/-5.6), 56.6%, and 90.8%, respectively. The Uriscreen test had inadequate sensitivity for rapid screening of bacteriuria in pregnancy.

  7. High prevalence of bacteriuria in pregnancy and its screening methods in north India.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Sutapa; Thakur, J S; Ray, Pallab; Kumar, Rajesh

    2005-05-01

    The study aims at finding out the prevalence of bacteruria in pregnancy in an urban setting and ascertaining methods to screen them in primary care clinics. A total of 1 61 pregnant ladies visiting a primary care clinic were screened for bacteriuria based on the symptomatology. Urine culture was done to know the prevalence of bacteriuria. Sensitivities and specificities were calculated for each symptom and risk assessment. A score card was developed based on combination of positive risk assessment and constellation of symptoms. Prevalence of symptomatic and asymptomatic bacteriuria was found to be 19.87% and 4.34% respectively. Prevalence of bacteriuria was significantly high among those who had intercourse more frequently and those with less water intake. Those with a score of more than or equal to 4, as per score card were 60% more likely to suffer from bacteriuria. When combined with microscopic examination for leucocytes on positively screened, the positive predictive value was found to be 89%. It is concluded that prevalence of symptomatic bacteriuria is common among pregnant women. Syndromic management of cases on the basis of score card is helpful in resource constraint areas. This may be combined with microscopic examination of urine to entail rational use of antibiotics.

  8. Antibiotics for asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Smaill, Fiona M; Vazquez, Juan C

    2015-08-07

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria occurs in 2% to 10% of pregnancies and, if not treated, up to 30% of mothers will develop acute pyelonephritis. Asymptomatic bacteriuria has been associated with low birthweight and preterm birth. To assess the effect of antibiotic treatment for asymptomatic bacteriuria on the development of pyelonephritis and the risk of low birthweight and preterm birth. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (19 March 2015) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Randomized trials comparing antibiotic treatment with placebo or no treatment in pregnant women with asymptomatic bacteriuria found on antenatal screening. Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data and checked them for accuracy. Fourteen studies, involving almost 2000 women, were included. Antibiotic treatment compared with placebo or no treatment reduced the incidence of pyelonephritis (average risk ratio (RR) 0.23, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.13 to 0.41; 11 studies, 1932 women; very low quality evidence). Antibiotic treatment was also associated with a reduction in the incidence of low birthweight babies (average RR 0.64, 95% CI 0.45 to 0.93; six studies, 1437 babies; low quality evidence) and preterm birth (RR 0.27, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.62; two studies, 242 women; low quality evidence). A reduction in persistent bacteriuria at the time of delivery was seen (average RR 0.30, 95% CI 0.18 to 0.53; four studies; 596 women). There were very limited data on which to estimate the effect of antibiotics on other infant outcomes and maternal adverse effects were rarely described.Overall, all 14 studies were assessed as being at high or unclear risk of bias. While many studies lacked an adequate description of methods and the risk of bias could only be assessed as unclear, in almost all studies there was at least one domain where the risk of bias was judged as high. The three primary outcomes were assessed with

  9. Screening for asymptomatic bacteriuria in adults: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force reaffirmation recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    2008-07-01

    Reaffirmation of the 2004 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement about screening for asymptomatic bacteriuria in adults. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force did a targeted literature search for evidence on the benefits and harms of screening for asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women, nonpregnant women, and men. Screen for asymptomatic bacteriuria with urine culture in pregnant women at 12 to 16 weeks' gestation or at the first prenatal visit, if later. (Grade A recommendation.) Do not screen for asymptomatic bacteriuria in men and nonpregnant women. (Grade D recommendation.).

  10. Bacteriuria in pregnant women with sickle cell trait.

    PubMed

    Thurman, Andrea Ries; Steed, Lisa L; Hulsey, Thomas; Soper, David E

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the following outcome variables in pregnant patients with sickle cell trait and matched pregnant control patients: asymptomatic bacteriuria, acute cystitis, urinary pathogens that were present, and pyelonephritis. This was a retrospective cohort study that was conducted at a university clinic. Pregnant patients with sickle cell trait (n = 455) were matched with control patients (n = 448) for race, age, gestational age at entry into prenatal care, and number of prenatal visits. Women with sickle cell trait received urine testing significantly more often. There was no difference in the incidence of positive urine cultures, urinary pathogens, or asymptomatic bacteriuria among the comparison groups. Sickle cell trait carriers had significantly higher rates of pyelonephritis, but many affected patients had risk factors, such as previous pyelonephritis or noncompliance with therapy. Sickle cell trait carriers were no more susceptible to acute cystitis and asymptomatic bacteriuria than were the control patients. On the basis of these data, we outline recommendations for urinary screening and pyelonephritis prevention in pregnant patients with sickle cell trait.

  11. Post-stroke bacteriuria among stroke patients attending a physiotherapy clinic in Ghana: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Donkor, Eric S; Akumwena, Amos; Amoo, Philip K; Owolabi, Mayowa O; Aspelund, Thor; Gudnason, Vilmundur

    2016-01-01

    Background Infections are known to be a major complication of stroke patients. In this study, we evaluated the risk of community-acquired bacteriuria among stroke patients, the associated factors, and the causative organisms. Methods This was a cross-sectional study involving 70 stroke patients and 83 age- and sex-matched, apparently healthy controls. Urine specimens were collected from all the study subjects and were analyzed by standard microbiological methods. Demographic and clinical information was also collected from the study subjects. For stroke patients, the information collected also included stroke parameters, such as stroke duration, frequency, and subtype. Results Bacteriuria was significantly higher among stroke patients (24.3%, n=17) than among the control group (7.2%, n=6), with a relative risk of 3.36 (confidence interval [CI], 1.40–8.01, P=0.006). Among the control group, all six bacteriuria cases were asymptomatic, whereas the 17 stroke bacteriuria cases comprised 15 cases of asymptomatic bacteriuria and two cases of symptomatic bacteriuria. Female sex (OR, 3.40; CI, 1.12–10.30; P=0.03) and presence of stroke (OR, 0.24; CI, 0.08–0.70; P=0.009) were significantly associated with bacteriuria. The etiology of bacteriuria was similar in both study groups, and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. were the most predominant organisms isolated from both stroke patients (12.9%) and the control group (2.4%). Conclusion Stroke patients in the study region have a significantly higher risk of community-acquired bacteriuria, which in most cases is asymptomatic. Community-acquired bacteriuria in stroke patients appears to have little or no relationship with clinical parameters of stroke such as stroke subtype, duration and frequency. PMID:27051289

  12. Low colony counts of asymptomatic group B streptococcus bacteriuria: a survey of practice patterns.

    PubMed

    Aungst, Matthew; King, Jeremy; Steele, Andrew; Gordon, Michael

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey expert opinion on the management of low colony counts (< 100,000 colony forming units/mL) of asymptomatic group B streptococcus (GBS) bacteriuria discovered in the first trimester. A survey was sent to the 241 senior obstetricians affiliated with each of the Obstetrics and Gynecology training programs in the United States on July 10, 2002. Surveys received by the deadline (September 1, 2002) were included in the dataset. Eighty-five completed surveys were returned for a response rate of 35%. Seventy-seven percent reported treating low colony counts of asymptomatic GBS bacteriuria in the first trimester at the time of diagnosis, whereas 23% stated they did not treat prior to labor (margin of error 7.5% with 95% confidence). Nine percent stated that their institution had a written protocol for the treatment of low colony counts of asymptomatic GBS bacteriuria. Two physicians indicated that they screened for asymptomatic GBS bacteriuria at 28 weeks. Currently, no generally accepted protocol for the management of low colony counts of asymptomatic GBS bacteriuria exists. This survey indicates that most of the responding senior obstetricians at United States training programs treat low colony counts of asymptomatic GBS bacteriuria in the first trimester.

  13. Bacteriuria amongst Pregnant Women in the Buea Health District, Cameroon: Prevalence, Predictors, Antibiotic Susceptibility Patterns and Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Mokube, Morike Ngoe; Atashili, Julius; Halle-Ekane, Gregory Edie; Ikomey, George M.; Ndumbe, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacteriuria is associated with significant maternal and foetal risks. However, its prevalence is not known in our community. Objectives This study was carried out to determine the prevalence and predictors of bacteriuria in pregnant women of the Buea Health District (BHD) as well as the antibiotic sensitivity patterns of bacterial isolates. It also sought to determine the diagnostic performance of the nitrite and leucocyte esterase tests in detecting bacteriuria in these women. Methods An observational analytic cross-sectional study was carried out amongst pregnant women attending selected antenatal care centres in Buea. We recruited 102 consenting pregnant women for the study. Demographic and clinical data were collected using structured questionnaires. Clean catch midstream urine was collected from each participant in sterile leak proof containers. Samples were examined biochemically, microscopically and by culture. Significant bacteriuria was defined as the presence of ≥108 bacteria/L of cultured urine. Identification and susceptibility of isolates was performed using API 20E and ATB UR EU (08) (BioMerieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France). Results Significant bacteriuria was found in the urine of 24 of the 102 women tested giving a bacteriuria prevalence of 23.5% in pregnant women of the BHD. Asymptomatic bacteriuria was detected in 8(7.8%) of the women. There was no statistically significant predictor of bacteriuria. Escherichia coli were the most isolated (33%) uropathogens and were 100% sensitive to cefixime, cefoxitin and cephalothin. The nitrite and leucocyte esterase tests for determining bacteriuria had sensitivities of 8%, 20.8% and specificities of 98.7% and 80.8% respectively. Conclusion Bacteriuria is frequent in pregnant women in the BHD suggesting the need for routine screening by urine culture. Empiric treatment with cefixime should be instituted until results of urine culture and sensitivity are available. Nitrite and leucocyte esterase tests

  14. Bacteriuria amongst pregnant women in the Buea Health District, Cameroon: prevalence, predictors, antibiotic susceptibility patterns and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Mokube, Morike Ngoe; Atashili, Julius; Halle-Ekane, Gregory Edie; Ikomey, George M; Ndumbe, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriuria is associated with significant maternal and foetal risks. However, its prevalence is not known in our community. This study was carried out to determine the prevalence and predictors of bacteriuria in pregnant women of the Buea Health District (BHD) as well as the antibiotic sensitivity patterns of bacterial isolates. It also sought to determine the diagnostic performance of the nitrite and leucocyte esterase tests in detecting bacteriuria in these women. An observational analytic cross-sectional study was carried out amongst pregnant women attending selected antenatal care centres in Buea. We recruited 102 consenting pregnant women for the study. Demographic and clinical data were collected using structured questionnaires. Clean catch midstream urine was collected from each participant in sterile leak proof containers. Samples were examined biochemically, microscopically and by culture. Significant bacteriuria was defined as the presence of ≥10⁸ bacteria/L of cultured urine. Identification and susceptibility of isolates was performed using API 20E and ATB UR EU (08) (BioMerieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France). Significant bacteriuria was found in the urine of 24 of the 102 women tested giving a bacteriuria prevalence of 23.5% in pregnant women of the BHD. Asymptomatic bacteriuria was detected in 8(7.8%) of the women. There was no statistically significant predictor of bacteriuria. Escherichia coli were the most isolated (33%) uropathogens and were 100% sensitive to cefixime, cefoxitin and cephalothin. The nitrite and leucocyte esterase tests for determining bacteriuria had sensitivities of 8%, 20.8% and specificities of 98.7% and 80.8% respectively. Bacteriuria is frequent in pregnant women in the BHD suggesting the need for routine screening by urine culture. Empiric treatment with cefixime should be instituted until results of urine culture and sensitivity are available. Nitrite and leucocyte esterase tests were not sensitive enough to replace urine

  15. Asymptomatic bacteriuria in puppies with canine parvovirus infection: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Koutinas, A F; Heliadis, N; Saridomichelakis, M N; Leontides, L; Terpsidis, K; Christodoulou, C

    1998-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the possible association between canine parvoviral enteritis and asymptomatic bacteriuria. Forty-three puppies that were admitted to the outpatient service of the Animal Medical Clinic with clinical signs compatible with parvoviral enteritis formed the exposed group. The clinical diagnosis was subsequently confirmed by a positive fecal ELISA test (CITE test: IDDEX Lab., Westbrook, ME). Twenty-three (53.5%) of these puppies were males and 20 (46.5%) were females. Their age ranged from 1.5 to 5.5 months. Forty-eight clinically normal and age-matched puppies, that had been admitted to the clinic for vaccinations and had a negative result in the aforementioned ELISA test, were randomly selected to form the unexposed group. Urine samples were collected by antebupic cystocentesis from all puppies and submitted for bacterial culture. In the parvovirus exposed group, 11 of 43 puppies had detectable bacteriuria. The isolates were Escherichia coli alone (8/11-72.7%) Staphylococcus aureus alone (1/11-9.1%) and mixed cultures of E. coli and S. epidermitis (2/11-18.2%). In the unexposed group there were three puppies with detectable bacteriuria, one isolate each of E. coli, Enterococcus durans and Corynebacterium spp. Puppies with parvoviral enteritis had five (95% CI: 1.3-19.8) times higher odds of developing asymptomatic bacteriuria than puppies without the disease. The observed increased risk of asymptomatic bacteriuria among puppies with parvoviral enteritis was probably due to the fecal contamination of the external genitalia and the neutropenia these puppies exhibited.

  16. The controversy of treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria in non-pregnant women--resolved.

    PubMed

    Gleckman, R

    1976-12-01

    Data derived from longitudinal studies demonstrate that asymptomatic bacteriuria in non-pregnant women without stones or obstructive uropathy is a benign pathological condition. Evidence has accumulated that untreated asymptomatic bacteriuria in otherwise healthy women does not result in hypertension and/or a decline in renal function, and that this condition required neither detection nor antimicrobial therapy.

  17. Asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women attending Boo-Ali Hospital Tehran Iran: Urine analysis vs. urine culture.

    PubMed

    Etminan-Bakhsh, Mina; Tadi, Sima; Darabi, Roksana

    2017-11-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria is one of the common problems in pregnancy. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is associated with pyelonephritis, preterm labor and low birth weight infants. The physiological and anatomical changes in pregnancy facilitate urinary tract infection (UTI) during pregnancy. Several tests are available for diagnosis of asymptomatic bacteriuria. The urine culture is a gold standard diagnostic test for asymptomatic bacteriuria but it is expensive and time-consuming. Screening methods may be useful in detecting high-risk pregnant women for asymptomatic bacteriuria. The aim of the present study was to compare urine analysis as a rapid screening test to urine culture in diagnosis of asymptomatic bacteriuria. A total of 123 pregnant women attending the obstetrics clinic of Boo-Ali hospital in Tehran, Iran from March 2013 to September 2014 were included in the present diagnostic cross-sectional study. One hundred twenty three mid-stream urine samples were inoculated into cultures and were processed by dipstick (nitrite test and leucocyte esterase test) and microscopic pus cell count. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of nitrite test, leucocyte esterase test and microscopic pus cell count were compared with urine culture in diagnosis of asymptomatic bacteriuria by using SPSS version 19. Of 123 urine samples, significant asymptomatic bacteriuria (≥10 4 cfu/Ml) was detected in 8 (6.5%) subjects. The sensitivity and specificity of nitrite test were 37% and 100% respectively. The sensitivity of pus cell count alone and leucocyte esterase test alone were 100% but the specificity of them were 64% and 65% respectively. We found high negative predictive value by Pus cell count and the leucocyte esterase test (100%) and low positive predictive value by them (16% and 17% respectively). Urine culture is the most useful test for diagnosis of asymptomatic bacteriuria. None of our screening tests had a sensitivity and

  18. Asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women attending Boo-Ali Hospital Tehran Iran: Urine analysis vs. urine culture

    PubMed Central

    Etminan-Bakhsh, Mina; Tadi, Sima; Darabi, Roksana

    2017-01-01

    Background Asymptomatic bacteriuria is one of the common problems in pregnancy. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is associated with pyelonephritis, preterm labor and low birth weight infants. The physiological and anatomical changes in pregnancy facilitate urinary tract infection (UTI) during pregnancy. Several tests are available for diagnosis of asymptomatic bacteriuria. The urine culture is a gold standard diagnostic test for asymptomatic bacteriuria but it is expensive and time-consuming. Screening methods may be useful in detecting high-risk pregnant women for asymptomatic bacteriuria. Objective The aim of the present study was to compare urine analysis as a rapid screening test to urine culture in diagnosis of asymptomatic bacteriuria. Methods A total of 123 pregnant women attending the obstetrics clinic of Boo-Ali hospital in Tehran, Iran from March 2013 to September 2014 were included in the present diagnostic cross-sectional study. One hundred twenty three mid-stream urine samples were inoculated into cultures and were processed by dipstick (nitrite test and leucocyte esterase test) and microscopic pus cell count. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of nitrite test, leucocyte esterase test and microscopic pus cell count were compared with urine culture in diagnosis of asymptomatic bacteriuria by using SPSS version 19. Results Of 123 urine samples, significant asymptomatic bacteriuria (≥104 cfu/Ml) was detected in 8 (6.5%) subjects. The sensitivity and specificity of nitrite test were 37% and 100% respectively. The sensitivity of pus cell count alone and leucocyte esterase test alone were 100% but the specificity of them were 64% and 65% respectively. We found high negative predictive value by Pus cell count and the leucocyte esterase test (100%) and low positive predictive value by them (16% and 17% respectively). Conclusion Urine culture is the most useful test for diagnosis of asymptomatic bacteriuria. None of

  19. Patient characteristics but not virulence factors discriminate between asymptomatic and symptomatic E. coli bacteriuria in the hospital

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli is a common cause of asymptomatic and symptomatic bacteriuria in hospitalized patients. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) is frequently treated with antibiotics without a clear indication. Our goal was to determine patient and pathogen factors suggestive of ASB. Methods We conducted a 12-month prospective cohort study of adult inpatients with E. coli bacteriuria seen at a tertiary care hospital in St. Louis, Missouri, USA. Urine cultures were taken at the discretion of treating physicians. Bacterial isolates were tested for 14 putative virulence genes using high-throughput dot-blot hybridization. Results The median age of the 287 study patients was 65 (19–101) years; 78% were female. Seventy percent had community-acquired bacteriuria. One-hundred ten (38.3%) patients had ASB and 177 (61.7%) had symptomatic urinary tract infection (sUTI). Asymptomatic patients were more likely than symptomatic patients to have congestive heart failure (p = 0.03), a history of myocardial infarction (p = 0.01), chronic pulmonary disease (p = 0.045), peripheral vascular disease (p = 0.04), and dementia (p = 0.03). Patients with sUTI were more likely to be neutropenic at the time of bacteriuria (p = 0.046). Chronic pulmonary disease [OR 2.1 (95% CI 1.04, 4.1)] and dementia [OR 2.4 (95% CI 1.02, 5.8)] were independent predictors for asymptomatic bacteriuria. Absence of pyuria was not predictive of ASB. None of the individual virulence genes tested were associated with ASB nor was the total number of genes. Conclusions Asymptomatic E. coli bacteriuria in hospitalized patients was frequent and more common in patients with dementia and chronic pulmonary disease. Bacterial virulence factors could not discriminate symptomatic from asymptomatic bacteriurias. Asymptomatic E. coli bacteriuria cannot be predicted by virulence screening. PMID:23663267

  20. Virulence properties of asymptomatic bacteriuria Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mabbett, Amanda N; Ulett, Glen C; Watts, Rebecca E; Tree, Jai J; Totsika, Makrina; Ong, Cheryl-lynn Y; Wood, Jacqueline M; Monaghan, Wayne; Looke, David F; Nimmo, Graeme R; Svanborg, Catharina; Schembri, Mark A

    2009-01-01

    In asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU), bacteria colonize the urinary tract without provoking symptoms. Here, we compared the virulence properties of a collection of ABU Escherichia coli strains to cystitis and pyelonephritis strains. Specific urinary tract infection (UTI)-associated virulence genes, hemagglutination characteristics, siderophore production, hemolysis, biofilm formation, and the ability of strains to adhere to and induce cytokine responses in epithelial cells were analyzed. ABU strains were phylogenetically related to strains that cause symptomatic UTI. However, the virulence properties of the ABU strains were variable and dependent on a combination of genotypic and phenotypic factors. Most ABU strains adhered poorly to epithelial cells; however, we also identified a subgroup of strongly adherent strains that were unable to stimulate an epithelial cell IL-6 cytokine response. Poor immune activation may represent one mechanism whereby ABU E. coli evade immune detection after the establishment of bacteriuria.

  1. Bacteriuria and urinary tract infection after female urodynamic studies: risk factors and microbiological analysis.

    PubMed

    Nóbrega, Mônica Martins; Auge, Antonio Pedro Flores; de Toledo, Luis Gustavo Morato; da Silva Carramão, Sílvia; Frade, Armando Brites; Salles, Mauro José Costa

    2015-10-01

    This study was conducted to determine risk factors for infectious complications after urodynamic study (UDS) in women, which can assist clinicians in identifying high-risk subjects who would benefit from antibiotic prophylaxis before UDS. In this prospective cohort study, we studied 232 women who underwent UDS at Santa Casa de São Paulo School of Medical Sciences between June 2013 and June 2014. Women ranging in age from 26 to 84 years who had urinary incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse, or voiding dysfunction were required to collect urine samples at 7 days before, on the day of, and 3-5 days after UDS. Urine cultures with >100,000 CFU/mL were considered positive. Risk factors associated with bacteriuria and urinary tract infection (UTI) after UDS were evaluated using multivariate analysis with multiple logistic regression. Two hundred thirty-two out of 257 women were subjected to further analysis. The incidence of bacteriuria, transient bacteriuria, and UTI after UDS was 11.6%, 7.3%, and 4.3%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, hypothyroidism (P = .04), body mass index (BMI) >30 (P = .025), and advanced pelvic organ prolapse (P = .021) were associated with a significantly increased risk of bacteriuria; however, only BMI >30 (P = .02) was associated with an increased risk for UTI. The rate of infectious complications after UDS was low, and advanced pelvic organ prolapse and hypothyroidism increased the risk for bacteriuria. However, only BMI >30 was associated with bacteriuria and UTI after UDS. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Postoperative bacteriuria, pyuria and urinary tract infection in patients with an orthotopic sigmoid colon neobladder replacement.

    PubMed

    Shigemura, Katsumi; Tanaka, Kazushi; Arakawa, Soichi; Miyake, Hideaki; Fujisawa, Masato

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the prevalence of postoperative bacteriuria, pyuria and urine culture in patients with an orthotopic sigmoid colon neobladder replacement. Urine samples for bacteriuria, pyuria and urine culture, if necessary, were collected at 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after surgery and the presence of blood culture and antibiotic-resistant strains, and their treatments on positive urine culture cases were investigated. Of 209 for bacteriuria and 207 for pyuria urine samples with evaluable data, 95 (45.5%) were positive for bacteriuria and 76 (36.7%) had pyuria (10 or more white blood cells per high-power field). Totally, 30 bacteria were isolated from urine culture of urinary tract infection (UTI) and Klebisiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcos aureus and Enterococcus spp. strains were representatively isolated. The incidence of pyuria significantly decreased over time (P=0.041) but that of bacteriuria did not (P=0.107). In them, there were six bacteria (20.7%) with antibiotic-resistant strains. The antibiotics used for their treatments representatively were levofloxacin in five cases, tazobactam/piperacillin in three cases and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim and cefepime, meropenem in two cases, respectively. In conclusion, these findings suggest that physicians taking care of sigmoid colon neobladder patients need to be aware of these high ratios of bacteriuria, pyuria and UTI, including bacteremia.

  3. Asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy: a diagnostic and therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Grio, R; Porpiglia, M; Vetro, E; Uligini, R; Piacentino, R; Minì, D; Marchino, G L

    1994-12-01

    Pregnancy is a predisposing factor for urinary tract infection and pregnant women suffering from this pathology are exposed to dangerous risks which may condition maternal wellbeing and fetal prognosis. The apparently paradoxal finding of a higher incidence of perinatal problems in pregnant women with asymptomatic bacteriuria compared to those with manifest infections may be explained by the fact that the latter are adequately treated, whereas asymptomatic bacteriuria, which is difficult to diagnose, may continue in a subtle form for the entire duration of pregnancy. This emphasises the importance of the early diagnosis of infection using a protocol based on urine tests and urine culture and the adequate treatment of all cases of asymptomatic bacteriuria in order to reduce the incidence of maternal and fetal complications (acute pyelonephritis, increased fetal morbidity and mortality). The choice of the antibiotic to be used must be made on the basis of the urine culture test, the stage of gestation, maternal clinical data and the characteristics of the antibiotic itself (pharmacokinetics, maternal and fetal toxicity). With regard to the treatment protocol, the "single-dose" protocol is currently preferred. After negative urine culture tests, all patients must carry out a complete urine test each month with hormonal and echographic monitoring of the fetoplacental unit.

  4. Asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregestational diabetic pregnancies and the role of group B streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Jesus R; Fechner, Adam J; Williams, Shauna F; Ganesh, Vijaya L; Apuzzio, Joseph J

    2010-03-01

    We sought to determine if gravidas with pregestational diabetes mellitus (DM) are at increased risk for asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) compared with nondiabetic gravidas. This is a retrospective case-control study of 150 pregnant patients with pregestational DM and 294 nondiabetic controls. Rates of ASB and any colony count of group B streptococcus (GBS) bacteriuria were reviewed. The incidence of ASB among pregestational diabetics was higher compared with nondiabetic gravidas (18% versus 8.2%, odds ratio [OR] 2.47, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.37 to 4.45). GBS was the most common organism in diabetic gravidas (26%). There was no difference in incidence of ASB recurrence (OR 1.26, 95% CI 0.37 to 4.36), but antibiotic resistance was higher in the control group (OR 0.28, 95% CI 0.09 to 0.91). Diabetic gravidas with ASB or any level of GBS bacteriuria had higher hemoglobin A (1c) values compared with diabetics without ASB (8.31 +/- 1.89 versus 7.31 +/- 1.84, P = 0.0035). Our results demonstrate that gravidas with DM are at increased risk of ASB including GBS bacteriuria compared with non-diabetic gravidas. Thieme Medical Publishers.

  5. Pasteurella aerogenes as an Asymptomatic Bacteriuria Agent.

    PubMed

    Alaygut, Demet; Engin, Aynur

    2018-02-01

    'Asymptomatic bacteriuria' (ASB) is isolation of a specified quantitative count of bacteria in an appropriately collected urine specimen obtained from a person without symptoms or signs referable to urinary infection. Catheterized specimens are less likely to be contaminated compared with voided specimens; therefore, positive cultures of catheterized specimens are more likely to reflect true bladder bacteriuria even with low colony counts. The common pathogens for ASB are Escherichia coli, Klebsiella and Streptococcus spp. Pasteurella spp. was not previously reported as an ASB agent. ASB is important for pregnant women, children, individuals with obstructive uropathy, chronic renal failure and neutropenia, before the urologic procedures and after renal transplantation. Treatment of ASB is required for above situations. We report an 11-year-old-girl with neurogenic bladder who made clean intermittent catheterization and had Pasteurella aerogenes as an ASB agent. © The Author [2017]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Enhanced urinalysis in the detection of asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Aigere, E O S; Okusanya, B O; Eigbefoh, J O; Okome, G B O

    2013-01-01

    Detection and treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) in pregnancy is important to avert the attendant maternal and fetal morbidity. Other than urine culture, no other screening test is unequivocal. The use of enhanced urinalysis test to detect ASB in pregnancy was investigated. This was a prospective observational study which compared enhanced urinalysis with dipstick tests and urine culture. Clean catch midstream urine specimen was collected from 150 consecutive asymptomatic pregnant women. Tests of validity were used for comparison. Enhanced urinalysis detected bacteriuria as much as urine culture (4% vs. 4.7%). Itwas 57.1% sensitive and 98.6% specific. It had a false negative rate of 42.9% and was 96.7% accurate when compared to urine culture. Enhanced urinalysis took 1-2 hours to be done and required skills to use the microscope and was more expensive than dipstick urinalysis. The accuracy of enhanced urinalysis and its ability to detect ASB as much as urine culture connotes that it can be used to detect asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy albeit only in secondary and tertiary health centres because of the cost and technicality involved.

  7. Laboratory aspects of asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Marlyn; Mahdy, Zaleha A; Omar, Jamil; Maan, Noorashikin; Jamil, M A

    2002-09-01

    A total of 1,661 pregnant women aged between 13 and 45 years were screened for bacteriuria by urine culture. Of the 1,661 culture results, 615 (37%) yielded no growth; 728 (43.8%) yielded no significant growth (presence of <10(5) organisms/ml urine of one or more types of bacteria); 286 (17.2%) yielded mixed growth (presence of >10(5) organisms/ml urine of more than one type of bacteria) and only 32 (1.9%) showed significant growth (presence of >10(5) organisms/ml urine of a single bacterium). Urine microscopy was also conducted. Two hundred and twenty-four (13.5%) specimens had >10 white blood cells/ml urine, of which 66 had >100 white blood cells; 13 were from the significant growth group. Three hundred and seventy-four (22.5%) specimens showed the presence of bacteria, 42 (2.5%) had red blood cells, 370 (22.3%) had epithelial cells, 58 (3.5%) had crystals, and 14 (0.8%) had yeasts. The most common bacterium isolated was Escherichia coli (12; 40%); the others included group B Streptococcus (5; 15%), Klebsiella spp (5; 15%), Diphtheroids (2), and Candida albicans (2). Fifty-two percent of tested strains were sensitive to ampicillin; 24 of 28 strains (85.7%) were sensitive to ciprofloxacin; all 7 strains tested were sensitive to nitrofurantoin and all 20 strains tested were sensitive to cotrimoxazole; 14/20 (70%) and 16/17 (94.1%) were sensitive to cephalexin and cefuroxime respectively. This study shows that asymptomatic bacteriuria does occur in pregnant women, albeit at a very low rate in an urban setting like Cheras. Urine microscopy is not specific and only serves as a guide to bacteriuria. The commonest causative organisms are those from the gastrointestinal tract and vagina. The antibiogram showed that cefuroxime and cephalexin are likely to be effective in treating bacteriuria: ampicillin must be reserved for Gram-negative organisms. For Gram-positive organisms, of which Group B Streptococcus is important, ampicillin is still effective in vitro

  8. Duration of treatment for asymptomatic bacteriuria during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Widmer, Mariana; Lopez, Ivana; Gülmezoglu, A Metin; Mignini, Luciano; Roganti, Ariel

    2015-11-11

    A previous Cochrane systematic review has shown that antibiotic drug treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women substantially decreases the risk of pyelonephritis and reduces the risk of preterm delivery. However, it is not clear whether single-dose therapy is as effective as longer conventional antibiotic treatment. To assess the effects of different durations of treatment for asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (31 August 2015) and reference lists of identified articles. Randomized and quasi-randomized trials comparing antimicrobial therapeutic regimens that differed in duration (particularly comparing single dose with longer duration regimens) in pregnant women diagnosed with asymptomatic bacteriuria. Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data and checked them for accuracy. We assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. We included 13 studies, involving 1622 women. All were comparisons of single-dose treatment with short-course (four- to seven-day) treatments. The risk of bias of trials included in this review was largely unclear, and most trials were at high risk of performance bias. The quality of the evidence was assessed using the GRADE approach. When the any antibiotic agent was used, the 'no cure' rate for asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women was slightly lower for the short-course treatment over the single-dose treatment, although there was evidence of statistical heterogeneity (average risk ratio (RR) 1.28, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.87 to 1.88; women = 1502, studies = 13; I² = 56%; very low quality evidence). Data from only good quality trials also showed better cure rates with short (four- to seven-day) regimens of the same microbial agent (average RR 1.72, 95% CI 1.27 to 2.33; women = 803, studies = two; I² = 0%; high quality evidence). There was no clear difference in the

  9. [Pathogenic characteristics of Escherichia coli strains in cases of asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Misiewicz, I A; Galiński, J

    1989-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine if E. coli isolated from asymptomatic bacteriuria differed in pathogenic features from strains isolated from symptomatic infections of urinary tract. In this study 130 strains of E. coli isolated from women having asymptomatic bacteriuria and 112 strains isolated from patients with symptoms of urinary tract infection were examined. It was shown that E. coli isolated from patients with symptomatic urinary tract infection showed the more frequently ability to cause mannose-resistant haemagglutination of human erythrocytes, resistance to bactericidal activity of serum and haemolytic properties than those isolated from asymptomatic bacteriuria. These strains showed also the higher ability to adhere to Vero cells in tissue culture. Among E. coli strains isolated from persons with asymptomatic bacteriuria the pathogenic features were most frequently found in strains from healthy women and the most rarely in isolated from diabetic women.

  10. Performance of a New Rapid Immunoassay Test Kit for Point-of-Care Diagnosis of Significant Bacteriuria

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Marsha E.; DiNello, Robert K.; Geisberg, Mark; Abbott, April; Roberts, Pacita L.; Hooton, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are frequently encountered in clinical practice and most commonly caused by Escherichia coli and other Gram-negative uropathogens. We tested RapidBac, a rapid immunoassay for bacteriuria developed by Silver Lake Research Corporation (SLRC), compared with standard bacterial culture using 966 clean-catch urine specimens submitted to a clinical microbiology laboratory in an urban academic medical center. RapidBac was performed in accordance with instructions, providing a positive or negative result in 20 min. RapidBac identified as positive 245/285 (sensitivity 86%) samples with significant bacteriuria, defined as the presence of a Gram-negative uropathogen or Staphylococcus saprophyticus at ≥103 CFU/ml. The sensitivities for Gram-negative bacteriuria at ≥104 CFU/ml and ≥105 CFU/ml were 96% and 99%, respectively. The specificity of the test, detecting the absence of significant bacteriuria, was 94%. The sensitivity and specificity of RapidBac were similar on samples from inpatient and outpatient settings, from male and female patients, and across age groups from 18 to 89 years old, although specificity was higher in men (100%) compared with that in women (92%). The RapidBac test for bacteriuria may be effective as an aid in the point-of-care diagnosis of UTIs especially in emergency and primary care settings. PMID:26063858

  11. Different antibiotic regimens for treating asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Guinto, Valerie T; De Guia, Blanca; Festin, Mario R; Dowswell, Therese

    2014-01-01

    Background Asymptomatic bacteriuria occurs in 5% to 10% of pregnancies and, if left untreated, can lead to serious complications. Objectives To assess which antibiotic is most effective and least harmful as initial treatment for asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (March 2010) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials comparing two antibiotic regimens for treating asymptomatic bacteriuria. Data collection and analysis Review authors independently screened the studies for inclusion and extracted data. Main results We included five studies involving 1140 women with asymptomatic bacteriuria. We did not perform meta-analysis; each trial examined different antibiotic regimens and so we were not able to pool results. In a study comparing a single dose of fosfomycin trometamol 3 g with a five-day course of cefuroxime, there was no significant difference in persistent infection (risk ratio (RR) 1.36, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.24 to 7.75), shift to other antibiotics (RR 0.08, 95% CI 0.00 to 1.45), or in allergy or pruritus (RR 2.73, 95% CI 0.11 to 65.24). A comparison of seven-day courses of 400 mg pivmecillinam versus 500 mg ampicillin, both given four times daily, showed no significant difference in persistent infection at two weeks or recurrent infection, but there was an increase in vomiting (RR 4.57, 95% CI 1.40 to 14.90) and women were more likely to stop treatment early with pivmecillinam (RR 8.82, 95% CI 1.16 to 66.95). When cephalexin 1 g versus Miraxid® (pivmecillinam 200 mg and pivampicillin 250 mg) were given twice-daily for three days, there was no significant difference in persistent or recurrent infection. A one- versus seven-day course of nitrofurantoin resulted in more persistent infection with the shorter course (RR 1.76, 95% CI 1.29 to 2.40), but no significant difference in symptomatic infection at two weeks

  12. Different antibiotic regimens for treating asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Guinto, Valerie T; De Guia, Blanca; Festin, Mario R; Dowswell, Therese

    2010-09-08

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria occurs in 5% to 10% of pregnancies and, if left untreated, can lead to serious complications. To assess which antibiotic is most effective and least harmful as initial treatment for asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (March 2010) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Randomized controlled trials comparing two antibiotic regimens for treating asymptomatic bacteriuria. Review authors independently screened the studies for inclusion and extracted data. We included five studies involving 1140 women with asymptomatic bacteriuria. We did not perform meta-analysis; each trial examined different antibiotic regimens and so we were not able to pool results. In a study comparing a single dose of fosfomycin trometamol 3 g with a five-day course of cefuroxime, there was no significant difference in persistent infection (risk ratio (RR) 1.36, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.24 to 7.75), shift to other antibiotics (RR 0.08, 95% CI 0.00 to 1.45), or in allergy or pruritus (RR 2.73, 95% CI 0.11 to 65.24). A comparison of seven-day courses of 400 mg pivmecillinam versus 500 mg ampicillin, both given four times daily, showed no significant difference in persistent infection at two weeks or recurrent infection, but there was an increase in vomiting (RR 4.57, 95% CI 1.40 to 14.90) and women were more likely to stop treatment early with pivmecillinam (RR 8.82, 95% CI 1.16 to 66.95). When cephalexin 1 g versus Miraxid(R) (pivmecillinam 200 mg and pivampicillin 250 mg) were given twice-daily for three days, there was no significant difference in persistent or recurrent infection. A one- versus seven-day course of nitrofurantoin resulted in more persistent infection with the shorter course (RR 1.76, 95% CI 1.29 to 2.40), but no significant difference in symptomatic infection at two weeks, nausea, or preterm birth. Comparing cycloserine with sulphadimidine, no significant differences in

  13. Urinary Tract Infections and Asymptomatic Bacteriuria in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Yacoub, Rabi; Akl, Nader Kassis

    2011-01-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria and urinary tract infection are common complications after kidney transplantation. In this population, if urinary tract infection occurred in the first six months post procedure, it carries a grave impact on both graft and patient survival. Renal transplant recipients with urinary tract infection are often clinically asymptomatic as a consequence of immunosuppression. Urinary tract infection, however, may progress to acute pyelonephritis, bacteremia and the full blown picture of urosepsis. PubMed and Cochrane databases were searched. The purpose of this review is to discuss the screening and treatment of urinary tract infection and asymptomatic bacteriuria in renal transplant recipients and to evaluate the guidelines on the basis of a review of published evidence. PMID:22224004

  14. Characterization of subclinical bacteriuria, bacterial cystitis, and pyelonephritis in dogs with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Foster, Jonathan D; Krishnan, Harathi; Cole, Stephen

    2018-05-15

    OBJECTIVE To determine the prevalence of bacteriuria (ie, a positive microbial culture result for ≥ 1 urine sample) in dogs with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and characterize findings of subclinical bacteriuria (SBU), bacterial cystitis, or pyelonephritis in these patients. DESIGN Retrospective, observational study. ANIMALS 182 dogs. PROCEDURES Medical records from January 2010 through July 2015 were reviewed to identify dogs with CKD that underwent urinalysis and urine microbial culture. Signalment, clinicopathologic data, stage of CKD according to previously published guidelines, results of urinalysis and urine culture, and abdominal ultrasonographic findings were recorded. Dogs with positive urine culture results were categorized as having SBU, bacterial cystitis, or pyelonephritis on the basis of these data. Prevalence of bacteriuria was calculated. Associations between CKD stage, presence of bacteriuria, and diagnosis category were analyzed statistically. RESULTS 33 of 182 (18.1%) dogs (40/235 [17.0%] urine samples) had positive culture results. All dogs received antimicrobials on the basis of culture and susceptibility test findings. Most positive culture results (18/40 [45%] samples) were found for dogs with SBU, followed by dogs with pyelonephritis (16/40 [40%]) and cystitis (6/40 [15%]). Escherichia coli was the most frequently observed isolate (29/40 [73%] cultures from 25/33 dogs). The CKD stage was not associated with presence of bacteriuria or diagnosis category. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The prevalence of positive urine culture results in dogs with CKD was lower than that reported for dogs with some systemic diseases that may predispose to infection. Prospective research is needed to assess the clinical importance of SBU in dogs with CKD.

  15. Asymptomatic bacteriuria. Clinical significance and management.

    PubMed

    Raz, Raul

    2003-10-01

    The clinical significance and management of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) differs according to different groups of patients. ASB requires antibiotic treatment in pregnant women, children aged 5-6 years and prior to invasive genitourinary procedures. However, there is a consensus that ASB in the elderly, healthy school girls and young women, diabetic women and patients with indwelling catheters or intermittent catheterization has no clinical significance and antibiotic prescription is not indicated.

  16. Screening for asymptomatic bacteriuria in adults: evidence for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force reaffirmation recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kenneth; Fajardo, Kevin

    2008-07-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria is common, and screening for this condition in pregnant women is a well-established, evidence-based standard of current medical practice. Screening other groups of adults has not been shown to improve outcomes. To review new and substantial evidence on screening for asymptomatic bacteriuria, to support the work of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. English-language studies of adults (age >18 years) indexed in PubMed and the Cochrane Library and published from 1 January 2002 through 30 April 2007. For benefits of screening or treatment for screened populations, systematic reviews; meta-analyses; and randomized, controlled trials were included. For harms of screening, systematic reviews; meta-analyses; randomized, controlled trials; cohort studies; case-control studies; and case series of large multisite databases were included. Two reviewers independently reviewed titles, abstracts, and full articles for inclusion. Two reviewers extracted data from studies on benefits of screening and treatment (including decreases in the incidence of adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, symptomatic urinary tract infections, hypertension, and renal function decline). An updated Cochrane systematic review of 14 randomized, controlled trials of treatment supports screening for asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women. A randomized, controlled trial and a prospective cohort study show that screening nonpregnant women with diabetes for asymptomatic bacteriuria is unlikely to produce benefits. No new evidence on screening men for asymptomatic bacteriuria or on harms of screening was found. The focused search strategy may have missed some smaller studies on the benefits and harms of screening for asymptomatic bacteriuria. The available evidence continues to support screening for asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women, but not in other groups of adults.

  17. Short-term versus continuous antimicrobial therapy for asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Whalley, P J; Cunningham, F G

    1977-03-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria was identified in 300 pregnant women prior to the 28th week of gestation. In one group of 200 women short-term treatment with either nitrofurantoin or sulfamethizole was given for 14 days, and in another group of 100 women continuous therapy with one of these drugs was given for the remainder of gestation. Weekly urine cultures were obtained from all the women. Of the women treated with short-term therapy, 65% were abacteriuric for the remainder of pregnancy following one course of therapy, 24% became abacteriuric but subsequently relapsed, 2% had reinfection after becoming abacteriuric, and 9% demonstrated no response. Following treatment with a second course of short-term therapy, another 19% of these women were cured for the remainder of their pregnancy, and 3.5% responded to a third course. In the continuous therapy group, 88% of the women became abacteriuric for the remainder of the gestation, 3% demonstrated relapse, 2% developed reinfection, and 7% had no response to the first drug given. These data demonstrate that short-term administration of antimicrobials, when combined with surveillance for recurrent bacteriuria, is effective for the management of the pregnant woman with asymptomatic bacteriuria.

  18. Maternal and neonatal consequences of treated and untreated asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy: a prospective cohort study with an embedded randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kazemier, Brenda M; Koningstein, Fiona N; Schneeberger, Caroline; Ott, Alewijn; Bossuyt, Patrick M; de Miranda, Esteriek; Vogelvang, Tatjana E; Verhoeven, Corine J M; Langenveld, Josje; Woiski, Mallory; Oudijk, Martijn A; van der Ven, Jeanine E M; Vlegels, Manita T W; Kuiper, Petra N; Feiertag, Nicolette; Pajkrt, Eva; de Groot, Christianne J M; Mol, Ben W J; Geerlings, Suzanne E

    2015-11-01

    Existing approaches for the screening and treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy are based on trials that were done more than 30 years ago. In this study, we reassessed the consequences of treated and untreated asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy. In this multicentre prospective cohort study with an embedded randomised controlled trial, we screened women (aged ≥18 years) at eight hospitals and five ultrasound centres in the Netherlands with a singleton pregnancy between 16 and 22 weeks' gestation for asymptomatic bacteriuria. Screening was done with a single dipslide and two culture media. Dipslides were judged positive when the colony concentration was at least 1×10(5) colony-forming units (CFU) per mL of a single microorganism or when two different colony types were present but one had a concentration of at least 1×10(5) CFU per mL. Asymptomatic bacteriuria-positive women were eligible to participate in the randomised controlled trial comparing nitrofurantoin with placebo treatment. In this trial, participants were randomly assigned 1:1 to receive either nitrofurantoin 100 mg or identical placebo tablets, and were instructed to self-administer these tablets twice daily for 5 consecutive days. Randomisation was done by a web-based application with a computer-generated list with random block sizes of two, four, or six participants rendered by an independent data manager. 1 week after the end of treatment, they provided us with a follow-up dipslide. Women, treating physicians, and researchers all remained unaware of the bacteriuria status and treatment allocation. Women who refused to participate in the randomised controlled trial did not receive any antibiotics, but their outcomes were collected for analysis in the cohort study. We compared untreated and placebo-treated asymptomatic bacteriuria-positive women with asymptomatic bacteriuria-negative women and nitrofurantoin-treated asymptomatic bacteriuria-positive women. The primary endpoint was a

  19. Maternal group B streptococcal (GBS) genital tract colonization at term in women who have asymptomatic GBS bacteriuria.

    PubMed

    McKenna, David S; Matson, Scott; Northern, Ike

    2003-01-01

    To determine the rate of positive group B streptococcus (GBS) cultures at 35-37 weeks gestation in women who have first trimester asymptomatic GBS bacteriuria. Pregnant women with asymptomatic first trimester GBS bacteriuria had genital cultures for GBS performed at 35-37 weeks gestational age. Serotyping was performed by the standard Lancefield capillary precipitin method. Fifty-three women with positive urine cultures had genital cultures performed at 35-37 weeks. Sixteen of the 53 (30.2%; 95% confidence interval: 18.4-44.3%) third trimester vaginal cultures were positive for GBS. Five of eight (63%) of the women with typable urine serotypes had the same typable serotype in the third trimester genital culture. Genital tract cultures at 35-37 weeks for GBS correlate poorly with first trimester asymptomatic GBS bacteriuria. Recommendations for GBS prophylaxis in labor in women who have first trimester asymptomatic GBS bacteriuria should be investigated further and reconsidered.

  20. Detection of bacteriuria and bacteremia in newborn calves by a catalase-based urine test.

    PubMed

    Raboisson, D; Clément, J; Queney, N; Lebreton, P; Schelcher, F

    2010-01-01

    Bacteremia occurs frequently in newborn calves. The predictive value of clinical signs is low, suggesting the use of calf-side diagnostic tests. To investigate testing of urine catalase activity (Uriscreen test) for bacteriuria and bacteremia detection. Five colostrum-free calves and 3 colostrum-fed control calves. Controlled experimental trial. Colostrum-free calves were inoculated PO with Escherichia coli O78+. A clinical score was established to define the onset of the illness. Blood and urine (cystocentesis) samplings and cultures, and Uriscreen tests, were performed 4-6 times from inoculation to death. Three control calves received the same management as 3 inoculated calves, but with colostrum and without inoculation. Bacteremia was demonstrated in all of the inoculated colostrum-free calves and in none of the control calves. The E. coli O78+ strain, E. coli, and Klebsiella spp. were recovered from 4/5, 5/5, and 2/5 inoculated colostrum-free calves, respectively. Urine cultures were negative for the 2 groups at the start of the experiment; 5/5 colostrum-deprived inoculated calves were positive for E. coli thereafter whereas 3/3 controls remained negative. Concordance of Uriscreen tests with bacteremia and bacteriuria was 0.86 and 0.88, respectively. Kappa value of agreement between Uriscreen and bacteremia and bacteriuria was 0.73 and 0.76, respectively. Sensitivity of Uriscreen for bacteremia and bacteriuria was 80.0 and 86.6%, respectively, and specificity was 92.8 and 88.8%, respectively. The results suggest that Uriscreen can be used for detection of bacteremia in neonatal calves in connection with a constant bacteriuria. Copyright © 2010 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  1. Maternofetal outcome of asymptomatic bacteriuria among pregnant women in a Nigerian Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    Izuchukwu, Kenneth Ebele; Oranu, Emmanuel Okwudili; Bassey, Goddy; Orazulike, Ngozi Clare

    2017-01-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria has been reported to be associated with adverse pregnancy outcome. This study sought to determine the prevalence and complications of asymptomatic bacteriuria amongst parturient in the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital (UPTH). The study was a prospective cohort study involving 220 eligible antenatal attendees. Urine culture and sensitivity was conducted for each participant and the fetomaternal outcome between affected and unaffected women were compared and p value <0.05 was considered significant. Sixty-five of the participants had asymptomatic bacteriuria giving a prevalence of 29.5%. Twenty-three (35.4%) cultures yielded Klebsiella spp while Fifty-eight (89%) of the cultured organisms were sensitive to Nitrofurantoin. There was no statistical difference in the rate of prelabour rupture of membranes, preeclampsia, preterm delivery, birth asphyxia and low birth weight between affected and unaffected women. Contrary to widely held view, there was no significant increase in adverse pregnancy outcome amongst affected women.

  2. Maternofetal outcome of asymptomatic bacteriuria among pregnant women in a Nigerian Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Izuchukwu, Kenneth Ebele; Oranu, Emmanuel Okwudili; Bassey, Goddy; Orazulike, Ngozi Clare

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Asymptomatic bacteriuria has been reported to be associated with adverse pregnancy outcome. This study sought to determine the prevalence and complications of asymptomatic bacteriuria amongst parturient in the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital (UPTH). Methods The study was a prospective cohort study involving 220 eligible antenatal attendees. Urine culture and sensitivity was conducted for each participant and the fetomaternal outcome between affected and unaffected women were compared and p value <0.05 was considered significant. Results Sixty-five of the participants had asymptomatic bacteriuria giving a prevalence of 29.5%. Twenty-three (35.4%) cultures yielded Klebsiella spp while Fifty-eight (89%) of the cultured organisms were sensitive to Nitrofurantoin. There was no statistical difference in the rate of prelabour rupture of membranes, preeclampsia, preterm delivery, birth asphyxia and low birth weight between affected and unaffected women. Conclusion Contrary to widely held view, there was no significant increase in adverse pregnancy outcome amongst affected women. PMID:28819490

  3. Bacteriuria in Pregnancy and Infection in Amniotic Fluid and Infant

    PubMed Central

    Ives, J. A.; Abbott, G. D.; Bailey, R. R.

    1971-01-01

    Women with asymptomatic bacteriuria during pregnancy had sterile amniotic fluid at the time of delivery. There was no evidence that maternal urinary infection was associated with infection in the infant. PMID:5555492

  4. Asymptomatic bacteriuria and concomitant presence of other micro-organisms in urine of pregnant women in Dar es Salaam -- Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Mtimavalye, L A; Runyoro, D E; Massawe, F N; Mhalu, F S; Kanyawana, J Z

    1983-09-01

    This study was designed to determine the prevalence of significant bacteriuria in pregnancy in Dar es Salaam as well as attempt to find out whether bacteriuria has any effects on the mother and baby. Of 1007 pregnant women studied for asymptomatic bacteriuria, a significant bacteriuria rate of 6.3% was revealed. Escherichia coli was the predominant organism, making up 47.6% of the total organisms isolated. Schistosoma hematobium was present in 8.7%, T. vaginalis in 14%, yeast cells were found in the urine of 9.1% and the microfilariae of Wuchereria bancrofti were found in 1 specimen. 66.2% had no abnormality in their urine. It is recommended on the basis of this study that all women found to have significant bacteriuria in 1 cultured urine sample should be treated. There was a significant relationship noted between significant bacteriuria and the passing of S. hematobium in the urine. There was also a significant correlation between the presence of T. vaginalis and yeast cells in the urine. On the basis of laboratory sensitivity studies it was also found that the antimicrobial agents of choice for treating urinary tract infections in Dar es Salaam where E. coli and Klebsiella erogenes are the predominant organisms are nitrofurantoin, nalidixic acid and co-trimoxazole. The socioeconomic status of the bacteriuric and control group was divided into 4 groups according to take home pay; results show no significant increase of bacteriuria in any of the groups. It was not possible to follow up the effects of the presence of micro-organisms in urine during pregnancy because once a woman was found to have a positive culture she was treated.

  5. Analysis of Escherichia coli Strains Causing Bacteriuria during Pregnancy: Selection for Strains That Do Not Express Type 1 Fimbriae

    PubMed Central

    Graham, J. C.; Leathart, J. B. S.; Keegan, S. J.; Pearson, J.; Bint, A.; Gally, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    Escherichia coli isolates from patients with bacteriuria of pregnancy were compared by PCR with isolates from patients with community-acquired cystitis for the presence of established virulence determinants. The strains from patients with bacteriuria of pregnancy were less likely to carry genes for P-family, S-family, and F1C adhesins, cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1, and aerobactin, but virtually all of the strains carried the genes for type 1 fimbriae. Standard mannose-sensitive agglutination of yeast cells showed that only 15 of 42 bacteriuria strains (36%) expressed type 1 fimbriae compared with 32 of 42 strains from community-acquired symptomatic infections (76%) (P < 0.01). This difference was confirmed by analysis of all isolates for an allele of the type 1 fimbrial regulatory region (fim switch), which negates type 1 fimbrial expression by preventing the fim switch from being inverted to the on phase. This allele, fimS49, was found in 8 of 47 bacteriuria strains from pregnant women (17.0%) compared with 2 of 60 strains isolated from patients with cystitis (3.3%) (P < 0.05). Determination of the phase switch orientation in vivo by analysis of freshly collected infected urine from patients with bacteriuria showed that the fim switch was detectable in the off orientation in 17 of 23 urine samples analyzed (74%). These data indicate that type 1 fimbriae are not necessary to maintain the majority of E. coli bacteriurias in pregnant women since there appears to be selection against their expression in this particular group. This is in contrast to the considered role of this adhesin in community-acquired symptomatic infections. The lack of type 1 fimbria expression is likely to contribute to the asymptomatic nature of bacteriuria in pregnant women, although approximately one-third of the bacteriuria isolates do possess key virulence determinants. If left untreated, this subset of isolates pose the greatest threat to the health of the mother and unborn child. PMID

  6. Comparison of routine urinalysis and urine Gram stain for detection of bacteriuria in dogs.

    PubMed

    Way, Leilani Ireland; Sullivan, Lauren A; Johnson, Valerie; Morley, Paul S

    2013-01-01

    To determine the utility of performing urine Gram stain for detection of bacteriuria compared to routine urine sediment examination and bacterial aerobic urine culture. Prospective, observational study. University teaching hospital. Urine samples acquired via cystocentesis through convenience sampling from 103 dogs presenting to a tertiary referral institution. All samples underwent routine urinalysis, including sediment examination, as well as urine Gram stain and quantitative bacterial aerobic urine culture. The urine Gram stain demonstrated improved sensitivity (96% versus 76%), specificity (100% versus 77%), positive predictive value (100% versus 83%), and negative predictive value (93% versus 69%) when identifying bacteriuria, compared to routine urine sediment examination. The urine Gram stain is highly sensitive and specific when detecting the presence of bacteria in canine urine samples. Gram staining should be considered when bacteriuria is highly suspected and requires rapid identification while bacterial culture is pending. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2013.

  7. Why are antibiotics prescribed for asymptomatic bacteriuria in institutionalized elderly people? A qualitative study of physicians' and nurses' perceptions.

    PubMed

    Walker, S; McGeer, A; Simor, A E; Armstrong-Evans, M; Loeb, M

    2000-08-08

    Antibiotic therapy for asymptomatic bacteriuria in institutionalized elderly people has not been shown to be of benefit and may in fact be harmful; however, antibiotics are still frequently used to treat asymptomatic bacteriuria in this population. The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions, attitudes and opinions of physicians and nurses involved in the process of prescribing antibiotics for asymptomatic bacteriuria in institutionalized elderly people. Focus groups were conducted among physicians and nurses who provide care to residents of long-term care facilities in Hamilton, Ont. A total of 22 physicians and 16 nurses participated. The focus group discussions were tape-recorded, and the transcripts of each session were analysed for issues and themes emerging from the text. Content analysis using an open analytic approach was used to explore and understand the experience of the focus group participants. The data from the text were then coded according to the relevant and emergent themes and issues. We observed that the ordering of urine cultures and the prescribing of antibiotics for residents with asymptomatic bacteriuria were influenced by a wide range of nonspecific symptoms or signs in residents. The physicians felt that the presence of these signs justified a decision to order antibiotics. Nurses played a central role in both the ordering of urine cultures and the decision to prescribe antibiotics through their awareness of changes in residents' status and communication of this to physicians. Education about asymptomatic bacteriuria was viewed as an important priority for both physicians and nurses. The presence of non-urinary symptoms and signs is an important factor in the prescription of antibiotics for asymptomatic bacteriuria in institutionalized elderly people. However, no evidence exists to support this reason for antibiotic treatment. Health care providers at long-term care facilities need more education about antibiotic use and

  8. The Basics of Bacteriuria: Strategies of Microbes for Persistence in Urine

    PubMed Central

    Ipe, Deepak S.; Horton, Ella; Ulett, Glen C.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriuria, the presence of bacteria in urine, is associated with asymptomatic, as well as symptomatic, urinary tract infection (UTI). Bacteriuria underpins some of the dynamics of microbial colonization of the urinary tract, and probably impacts the progression and persistence of infection in some individuals. Recent molecular discoveries in vitro have elucidated how some key bacterial traits can enable organisms to survive and grow in human urine as a means of microbial fitness adaptation for UTI. Several microbial characteristics that confer bacteruric potential have been identified including de novo synthesis of guanine, relative resistance to D-serine, and catabolism of malic acid. Microbial characteristics such as these are increasingly being defined through the use of synthetic human urine (SHU) in vitro as a model to mimic the in vivo environment that bacteria encounter in the bladder. There is considerable variation in the SHU model systems that have been used to study bacteriuria to date, and this influences the utility of these models. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of bacteruric potential with a focus on the specific mechanisms underlying traits that promote the growth of bacteria in urine. We also review the application of SHU in research studies modeling UTI and discuss the chemical makeup, and benefits and limitations that are encountered in utilizing SHU to study bacterial growth in urine in vitro. PMID:26904513

  9. The Basics of Bacteriuria: Strategies of Microbes for Persistence in Urine.

    PubMed

    Ipe, Deepak S; Horton, Ella; Ulett, Glen C

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriuria, the presence of bacteria in urine, is associated with asymptomatic, as well as symptomatic, urinary tract infection (UTI). Bacteriuria underpins some of the dynamics of microbial colonization of the urinary tract, and probably impacts the progression and persistence of infection in some individuals. Recent molecular discoveries in vitro have elucidated how some key bacterial traits can enable organisms to survive and grow in human urine as a means of microbial fitness adaptation for UTI. Several microbial characteristics that confer bacteruric potential have been identified including de novo synthesis of guanine, relative resistance to D-serine, and catabolism of malic acid. Microbial characteristics such as these are increasingly being defined through the use of synthetic human urine (SHU) in vitro as a model to mimic the in vivo environment that bacteria encounter in the bladder. There is considerable variation in the SHU model systems that have been used to study bacteriuria to date, and this influences the utility of these models. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of bacteruric potential with a focus on the specific mechanisms underlying traits that promote the growth of bacteria in urine. We also review the application of SHU in research studies modeling UTI and discuss the chemical makeup, and benefits and limitations that are encountered in utilizing SHU to study bacterial growth in urine in vitro.

  10. Evaluation of open versus closed urine collection systems and development of nosocomial bacteriuria in dogs.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Lauren A; Campbell, Vicki L; Onuma, Serene C

    2010-07-15

    To determine whether use of a closed urine collection system would decrease the incidence of nosocomial bacteriuria in hospitalized dogs, compared with use of an open urine collection system (used, sterile IV bags). Randomized controlled trial. 51 hospitalized dogs requiring indwelling urinary catheterization for >or= 24 hours. Dogs were randomly assigned to an open or closed urine collection system group. A standardized protocol for catheter placement and maintenance was followed for all dogs. A baseline urine sample was collected via cystocentesis for aerobic bacterial culture, with additional urine samples obtained daily from the urine collection reservoir. 27 dogs were assigned to the open urine collection system group, and 24 were assigned to the closed urine collection system group. The incidence of nosocomial bacteriuria in dogs with open urine collection systems (3/27 [11.1%]) was not significantly different from incidence in dogs with closed urine collection systems (2/24 [8.3%]). Median duration of catheterization was 2 days for dogs in both groups; the range was 1 to 7 days for dogs in the open group and 1 to 5 days for dogs in the closed group. Results suggested that for dogs requiring short-term indwelling urinary catheterization, the type of urine collection system (open vs closed) was not associated with likelihood of developing nosocomial bacteriuria. Use of a strict protocol for urinary catheter placement and maintenance was likely key in the low incidence of nosocomial bacteriuria in the present study.

  11. Old habits die hard; does early urinary catheter removal affect kidney size, bacteriuria and UTI after renal transplantation?

    PubMed

    Akbari, Roghayeh; Rahmani Firouzi, Sedigheh; Akbarzadeh-Pasha, Abazar

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice in chronic renal failure patients. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of urinary catheter removal time on transplanted kidney size and incidence of asymptomatic bacteriuria and urinary tract infections (UTIs). Patients and Methods: This retrospective cohort study evaluated the clinical outcomes of 109 consecutive live donor renal transplant recipients from December 2011 to July 2014. Routine ultrasound examinations were performed on donor's kidney prior to operation and one month later. Kidney volume was calculated. UTI and bacteriuria were evaluated one month later. Patients were divided into two groups based on time of Foley catheter removal (before and after fifth day posttransplantation). Results: In this study 74 males (67.9%) and 35 females (32.1%) were evaluated. Sixty-six patients (57.92%) were in group 1. None of the patients with positive urine culture had UTI but bacteriuria occurred in all of them (21.1%). Bacteriuria time after transplantation and catheter removal was significantly later in group 1 and it was not different in female group but they were later in male group. The mean renal volume increase was positively correlated to renal transplant recipient and donor's age and donor's body mass index (BMI) ( P <0.05). Conclusion: This study showed that the time of catheter removal after kidney transplantation does not affect incidence of UTI but increases the probability of bacteria in men whose catheter was removed within 5 days after transplantation. We also found that the renal volume change is not associated with catheter removal time and bacteriuria.

  12. Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria in Ante-Natal Clients in a Large Teaching Hospital in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Labi, A-K; Yawson, A E; Ganyaglo, G Y; Newman, M J

    2015-09-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria, the presence of bacteria in urine without symptoms of acute urinary tract infection, predisposes pregnant women to the development of urinary tract infections and pyelonephritis, with an attendant pregnancy related complications. To measure the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria among ante-natal clients at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital in Ghana and its' associated risk factors. A cross-sectional study involving 274 antenatal clients was conducted over a period of 4 weeks. A face to face questionnaire was completed and midstream urine collected for culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. The prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria was 5.5%. It was associated with sexual activity during pregnancy (Fisher's Exact 5.871, p-value 0.0135), but not with sexual frequency. There were no significant associations with educational status, parity, gestational age, marital status and the number of foetuses carried. The commonest organism isolated was Enterococcus spp (26.7%) although the enterobacteriaceae formed the majority of isolated organisms (46.7%). Nitrofurantoin was the antibiotic with the highest sensitivity to all the isolated organisms. The prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria among ante-natal clients at this large teaching hospital in Ghana is 5.5%, which is lower than what has been found in other African settings. Enterococcus spp was the commonest causative organism. However, due to the complications associated with asymptomatic bacteriuria, a policy to screen and treat- all pregnant women attending the hospital, is worth considering.

  13. Effect of Cranberry Capsules on Bacteriuria Plus Pyuria Among Older Women in Nursing Homes: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Juthani-Mehta, Manisha; Van Ness, Peter H; Bianco, Luann; Rink, Andrea; Rubeck, Sabina; Ginter, Sandra; Argraves, Stephanie; Charpentier, Peter; Acampora, Denise; Trentalange, Mark; Quagliarello, Vincent; Peduzzi, Peter

    2016-11-08

    Bacteriuria plus pyuria is highly prevalent among older women living in nursing homes. Cranberry capsules are an understudied, nonantimicrobial prevention strategy used in this population. To test the effect of 2 oral cranberry capsules once a day on presence of bacteriuria plus pyuria among women residing in nursing homes. Double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled efficacy trial with stratification by nursing home and involving 185 English-speaking women aged 65 years or older, with or without bacteriuria plus pyuria at baseline, residing in 21 nursing homes located within 50 miles (80 km) of New Haven, Connecticut (August 24, 2012-October 26, 2015). Two oral cranberry capsules, each capsule containing 36 mg of the active ingredient proanthocyanidin (ie, 72 mg total, equivalent to 20 ounces of cranberry juice) vs placebo administered once a day in 92 treatment and 93 control group participants. Presence of bacteriuria (ie, at least 105 colony-forming units [CFUs] per milliliter of 1 or 2 microorganisms in urine culture) plus pyuria (ie, any number of white blood cells on urinalysis) assessed every 2 months over the 1-year study surveillance; any positive finding was considered to meet the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes were symptomatic urinary tract infection (UTI), all-cause death, all-cause hospitalization, all multidrug antibiotic-resistant organisms, antibiotics administered for suspected UTI, and total antimicrobial administration. Of the 185 randomized study participants (mean age, 86.4 years [SD, 8.2], 90.3% white, 31.4% with bacteriuria plus pyuria at baseline), 147 completed the study. Overall adherence was 80.1%. Unadjusted results showed the presence of bacteriuria plus pyuria in 25.5% (95% CI, 18.6%-33.9%) of the treatment group and in 29.5% (95% CI, 22.2%-37.9%) of the control group. The adjusted generalized estimating equations model that accounted for missing data and covariates showed no significant difference in the presence of bacteriuria

  14. Effect of Cranberry Capsules on Bacteriuria Plus Pyuria among Older Women in Nursing Homes: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Juthani-Mehta, Manisha; Van Ness, Peter H.; Bianco, Luann; Rink, Andrea; Rubeck, Sabina; Ginter, Sandra; Argraves, Stephanie; Charpentier, Peter; Acampora, Denise; Trentalange, Mark; Quagliarello, Vincent; Peduzzi, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Importance Bacteriuria plus pyuria is highly prevalent among older women living in nursing homes. Cranberry capsules are an understudied, non-antimicrobial, prevention strategy used in this population. Objective To test the effect of two oral cranberry capsules once per day on presence of bacteriuria plus pyuria among women residing in nursing homes Design, Setting, and Participants This study was a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled efficacy trial with stratification by nursing home and surveillance of one year. 21 nursing homes with at least 90 beds and within 50 miles of New Haven, CT participated. 185 English-speaking, female, nursing home residents, age 65 or older, with or without bacteriuria and pyuria at baseline, were randomized. The study was conducted from 8/24/12-10/26/15. Intervention Two oral cranberry capsules, each capsule containing 36mg of the active ingredient proanthocyanidin (i.e., 72mg total, equivalent to 20 ounces of cranberry juice), versus placebo administered once per day in 92 treatment and 93 control group participants. Main Outcomes and Measures The primary outcome was the presence of bacteriuria (i.e., at least 105 cfu/mL of one or two microorganisms on urine culture) plus pyuria (i.e., any number of white blood cells on urinalysis) assessed every two months for a total of six assessments over the one year of surveillance; any positive finding was considered to meet the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes were symptomatic urinary tract infection (UTI), all-cause death, all-cause hospitalization, all multi-drug antibiotic resistant organisms, antibiotics administered for suspected UTI, and total antimicrobial administration. Results Among 185 women who were randomized (mean age 86.4 years [± 8.2], 90.3% white, 31.4% with bacteriuria plus pyuria at baseline), 147 completed the study. Overall adherence to capsule administration was 80.1%. Unadjusted results showed the presence of bacteriuria plus pyuria in 25.5% (95% CI 18

  15. Asymptomatic Bacteriuria in Pregnant Women in Outpatient Facilities.

    PubMed

    Nogayeva, Maral G; Tuleutayeva, Svetlana A

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract morbidity has increased by 7% in Kazakhstan between 2007 to 2011. Pregnant women with extragenital pathologies or kidney diseases had the greatest prevalence of morbidity. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) is one of the most important risk factors of pyelonephritis development in pregnant women, and it can affect the course and outcome of pregnancy, delivery, and postnatal period. AB prevention requires prevention of pregnancy complications including early diagnostic of urinary tract infections, timely optimization of therapy at outpatient facilities, and dynamic follow-up.

  16. Detection of Bacteriuria by Canine Olfaction

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Maureen; McCulloch, Michael; Willey, Angel M.; Hirsch, Wendi; Dewey, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    Background. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a significant medical problem , particularly for patients with neurological conditions and the elderly. Detection is often difficult in these patients, resulting in delayed diagnoses and more serious infections such as pyelonephritis and life-threatening sepsis. Many patients have a higher risk of UTIs because of impaired bladder function, catheterization, and lack of symptoms. Urinary tract infections are the most common nosocomial infection; however, better strategies are needed to improve early detection of the disease. Methods. In this double-blinded, case-control, validation study, we obtained fresh urine samples daily in a consecutive case series over a period of 16 weeks. Dogs were trained to distinguish urine samples that were culture-positive for bacteriuria from those of culture-negative controls, using reward-based clicker and treat methods. Results. Samples were obtained from 687 individuals (from 3 months to 92 years of age; 86% female and 14% male; 34% culture-positive and 66% culture-negative controls). Dogs detected urine samples positive for 100 000 colony-forming units/mL Escherichia coli (N = 250 trials; sensitivity 99.6%, specificity 91.5%). Dilution of E coli urine with distilled water did not affect accuracy at 1% (sensitivity 100%, specificity 91.1%) or 0.1% (sensitivity 100%, specificity 93.6%) concentration. Diagnostic accuracy was similar to Enterococcus (n = 50; sensitivity 100%, specificity 93.9%), Klebsiella (n = 50; sensitivity 100%, specificity 95.1%), and Staphylococcus aureus (n = 50; sensitivity 100%, specificity 96.3%). All dogs performed with similarly high accuracy: overall sensitivity was at or near 100%, and specificity was above 90%. Conclusions. Canine scent detection is an accurate and feasible method for detection of bacteriuria. PMID:27186578

  17. Asymptomatic Bacteriuria in Pregnant Women in Outpatient Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Nogayeva, Maral G.; Tuleutayeva, Svetlana A.

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract morbidity has increased by 7% in Kazakhstan between 2007 to 2011. Pregnant women with extragenital pathologies or kidney diseases had the greatest prevalence of morbidity. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) is one of the most important risk factors of pyelonephritis development in pregnant women, and it can affect the course and outcome of pregnancy, delivery, and postnatal period. AB prevention requires prevention of pregnancy complications including early diagnostic of urinary tract infections, timely optimization of therapy at outpatient facilities, and dynamic follow-up. PMID:29138709

  18. Asymptomatic bacteriuria: when the treatment is worse than the disease.

    PubMed

    Trautner, Barbara W

    2011-12-06

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) is a condition in which bacteria are present in a noncontaminated urine sample collected from a patient without signs or symptoms related to the urinary tract. ABU must be distinguished from symptomatic UTI by the absence of signs and symptoms compatible with UTI or by clinical determination that a nonurinary etiology accounts for the patient's symptoms. Interactions between the organism, the host, and the bladder environment determine whether bacteriuria leads to ABU or to UTI. ABU is a very common condition that is often treated unnecessarily with antibiotics-it should be detected and treated in pregnant women and patients undergoing urologic surgery, but in most other patient groups, treatment does not confer benefit and can be harmful. A change in prescribing behavior for ABU has been achieved through several fairly high-intensity interventions, such as interactive educational sessions for physicians, but whether these improvements persist beyond the study period is not known. Further research is needed to determine whether screening for and treatment of ABU is beneficial in patients with renal transplants, patients with orthotopic neobladders, patients undergoing prosthetic joint implantation, and patients with neutropenia. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved

  19. Risk Factors Analysis for Occurrence of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria After Endourological Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Junuzovic, Dzelaludin; Hasanbegovic, Munira

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Endourological procedures are performed according to the principles of aseptic techniques, jet still in certain number of patients urinary tract infections may occur. Considering the risk of urinary tract infection, there is no unique opinion about the prophylactic use of antibiotics in endourological procedures. Goal: The objective of this study was to determine the connection between endourological procedures and occurrence of urinary infections and to analyze the risk factors of urinary infection for patients who were hospitalized at the Urology Clinic of the Clinical Center University of Sarajevo CCUS. Materials and Methods: The research was conducted as a prospective study on a sample of 208 patients of both genders, who were hospitalized at the Urology Clinic of the CCUS and to whom some endourological procedure was indicated for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. We analyzed data from patient’s histories of illness, laboratory tests taken at admission and after endourological procedures, also surgical programs for endoscopic procedures. All patients were clinically examined prior to endoscopic procedures while after the treatment attention was focused to the symptoms of urinary tract infections. Results: Statistical analysis of the tested patients indicates that there is no significant difference in the presence of postoperative, compared to preoperative bacteriuria, which implies that the endourological procedures are safe procedures in terms of urinary tract infections. Preoperatively, the most commonly isolated bacteria was Escherichia coli (30.9%) and postoperatively, Enterococcus faecalis (25%). Statistically significant effect on the occurrence of postoperative bacteriuria has preoperative bacteriuria, duration of postoperative catheterization, and duration of hospitalization. Conclusion: In everyday urological practice, it is very important to identify and control risk factors for the development of urinary infection after

  20. Asymptomatic Bacteriuria: To Treat or Not To Treat. Pro Treatment.

    PubMed

    Köves, Béla

    2018-06-14

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) should be treated only in pregnant women and before urological procedures that breach the mucosa. In all other clinical settings, treatment of ABU is not beneficial and only contributes to antibiotic-associated morbidity and the selection of antibiotic resistance; therefore, screening and treatment are not recommended. Copyright © 2018 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Key demographic characteristics of patients with bacteriuria due to extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae in a multiethnic community, in North West London.

    PubMed

    Gopal Rao, G; Batura, Deepak; Batura, Neha; Nielsen, Peder Bo

    2015-01-01

    Infections with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBLE) are encountered worldwide, particularly in certain regions of the world and in certain ethnic groups. Simple criteria for identification of patients likely to be infected with ESBLE may enable clinicians to select appropriate empirical antibiotics for treatment. The aim of this study was to explore the association between ESBLE bacteriuria and readily available key demographic characteristics (age, gender and ethnicity) in a multiethnic population. In this cross-sectional observational study, we explored the association between ESBLE bacteriuria and age, gender and ethnicity in 134 831 patients who submitted urine specimens for culture during 2007-2009 in two multiethnic boroughs in London, UK. In multivariate analysis, the risk of ESBLE bacteriuria was higher in males (odds ratio, OR = 1.3) and in patients older than 60 years (OR > 2). Patients from an Asian ethnic group were significantly more likely than White British subjects to have ESBLE bacteriuria (Indians, OR = 2.7; Asians of any other background, OR = 2.4; and Pakistanis, OR = 1.8). In contrast, patients who were of white ethnic background other than Irish were 0.66 times less likely to have ESBLE bacteriuria than White British patients (p = 0.025). Our study shows that in our local multiethnic population, older patients (> 60 years), males and those of South Asian ethnicity were significantly more likely to have ESBLE bacteriuria than others. Knowledge of these simple and readily available demographic data can help identify groups of patients at risk of urinary tract infection (UTI) with ESBLE and may aid in choice of empirical antibiotics.

  2. Effectiveness of a cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) preparation in reducing asymptomatic bacteriuria in patients with an ileal enterocystoplasty.

    PubMed

    Botto, Henry; Neuzillet, Yann

    2010-04-01

    Bacteriuria is a usual complication of enterocystoplasty following cystectomy. Cranberry products may decrease the number of urinary tract infections because of a non-dialysable compound, a condensed tannin, the proanthocyanidin (PAC) type A. This study determined the effectiveness of treatment with a cranberry preparation highly dosed in proanthocyanidin A in prevention of repeated bacteriuria in patients with an ileal enterocystoplasty. Between November 2004 and November 2009, a controlled study was open to patients seen in consultation for follow-up after a radical cystectomy and ileal cystoplasty. Patients had a history of repeated urinary infection and/or bacteriuria during the pretreatment phase. During the treatment phase, patients received a cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) preparation highly dosed in proanthocyanidin A (36 mg measured by the dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde method), one capsule a day. The primary endpoint was the absence of bacteria in urine culture. The secondary endpoints were the presence or absence of symptoms (pain, fever), continence status and upper excretory tract enlargement. Each patient was his or her own historical control. Fifteen patients were included. The median duration of the period without treatment with cranberry compound was 18.5 (1-93) months. The median duration of the period with treatment with cranberry compound was 32.8 (13-60) months. There was a significant decrease in the number of positive urine cultures during cranberry compound treatment. Treatment with a cranberry compound seems to be effective in reducing asymptomatic bacteriuria in patients with an ileal enterocystoplasty. These results need to be validated by further double-blind randomized studies.

  3. Virulence potential of Escherichia coli strains causing asymptomatic bacteriuria during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Boutet-Dubois, Adeline; Laouini, Dorsaf; Combescure, Christophe; Bouziges, Nicole; Marès, Pierre; Sotto, Albert

    2011-11-01

    We compared the virulence properties of a collection of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) Escherichia coli strains to urinary tract infection (UTI) strains isolated from pregnant women in a university hospital over 1 year. The in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that ABU strains presented a virulence behavior similar to that of strains isolated from cases of cystitis.

  4. The prevalence and bacteriology of asymptomatic bacteriuria among antenatal patients in Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital Nnewi; South Eastern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Oli, A N; Okafor, C I; Ibezim, E C; Akujiobi, C N; Onwunzo, M C

    2010-12-01

    Urinary tract infection in pregnancy leads to poor pregnancy outcome. Diagnosis and treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria markedly improves pregnancy outcome as well as reduce the incidence of acute pyelonephritis. To determine the prevalence and bacteriology of asymptomatic bacteriuria among Antenatal patients in our centre, and to know if routine screening will be justifiable. This was a prospective study carried out between April and August 2008. Sample size was statistically determined. Women who consented were interviewed and mid stream urine samples were collected and processed in the microbiology laboratory, using standard microbiological methods. Out of 357 women studied, 65(18.21%) had significant bacteriuria. Escherichia coli was the commonest isolate (25.6%), while proteus mirabilis was the least frequent isolate (3.66%). Women in third trimester had the highest prevalence (25.68%) while those in the first trimester had the least (15.79%). Women that had only primary education had the highest prevalence (27.50%) while those that had tertiary education had the least prevalence (21.10%). The prevalence of significant asymptomatic bacteriuria among the women studied was high. Screening of all the pregnant women and treatment will reduce the incidence and complications of overt urinary tract infection in pregnancy among these women.

  5. Asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy: epidemiological, clinical and microbiological approach.

    PubMed

    Gebre-Selassie, S

    1998-07-01

    Asymptomatic urinary tract infection is a risk factor for fetal and maternal morbidity including development of pyelonephritis, premature labor and impaired intra-uterine development. In this study, 326 pregnant and 100 non-pregnant control women were screened for significant asymptomatic bacteriuria from April 8 to July 25, 1997 to gain insight into the prevalence rate, clinical characteristics of the disease and microbiological assessments of the causative agents. All the subjects were clinically identified to have no signs and symptoms of urinary tract infection (UTI). The age ranges of the study and control groups were between 15-40 years for both groups with mean of 25.1 and 25.3 years, respectively. Bacteriological screening of mid-stream urine (MSU) revealed that 24/326 (7%) and 3/100 (3%) were positive for asymptomatic bacteriuria in the study group and controls, respectively (P < 0.05). Further biochemical species identification showed that Escherichia coli was found in 11/24 (46%) followed by coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) in 8/24 (33%) and Citrobacter freundii in 2/24 (8%). Others found in smaller number included Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter cloacae and Proteus rettgeri in 1/24 (4%) each. Antimicrobial susceptibility test revealed that 10/11 (91%) of the E. coli isolates were resistant to ampicillin and amoxicillin and 10/11 (91%) of them sensitive to nitrofurantoin.

  6. Urinary Concentrating Ability in Women with Asymptomatic Bacteriuria in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Williams, G. L.; Campbell, H.; Davies, K. J.

    1969-01-01

    The incidence of impaired renal concentrating ability in pregnant women with asymptomatic significant bacteriuria is significantly less than previously reported when osmolality readings are performed on every urine specimen obtained during the 24 hours' deprivation of fluids. The concentrating defect is more considerable as pregnancy progresses. The lower the maximum urinary osmolality the more difficult is the treatment of the patient, and the higher the incidence of acute pyelonephritis. PMID:5792611

  7. Asymptomatic significant bacteriuria in the non-pregnant woman. II. Response to treatment and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Asscher, A W; Sussman, M; Waters, W E; Evans, J A; Campbell, H; Evans, K T; Williams, J E

    1969-03-29

    Short courses of nitrofurantoin and ampicillin produced an immediate cure in 80% of adult non-pregnant bacteriuric women. Of the subjects so treated, 55% remained cured at the end of one year. Over the same follow-up period 36% of untreated bacteriuric women developed a spontaneous remission of bacteriuria. Treatment failed to prevent the development of symptomatic infection, and the reinfections which followed successful treatment were more commonly associated with the development of symptoms than the persistent or relapsing infections in untreated or unsuccessfully treated subjects.It is concluded that a search for bacteriuria in non-pregnant women is unlikely to be of value as a preventive measure, since in many instances it fails to detect urinary tract infection at an early stage and since treatment by methods suitable for large-scale use is ineffective.

  8. Daily cranberry juice for the prevention of asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy: a randomized, controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wing, Deborah A; Rumney, Pamela J; Preslicka, Christine W; Chung, Judith H

    2008-10-01

    We compared the effects of daily cranberry juice cocktail to those of placebo during pregnancy on asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic urinary tract infections. A total of 188 women were randomized to cranberry or placebo in 3 treatment arms of A-cranberry 3 times daily (58), B-cranberry at breakfast then placebo at lunch and dinner (67), and C-placebo 3 times daily (63). After 27.7% (52 of 188) of the subjects were enrolled in the study the dosing regimens were changed to twice daily dosing to improve compliance. There were 27 urinary tract infections in 18 subjects in this cohort, with 6 in 4 group A subjects, 10 in 7 group B subjects and 11 in 7 group C subjects (p = 0.71). There was a 57% and 41% reduction in the frequency of asymptomatic bacteriuria and all urinary tract infections, respectively, in the multiple daily dosing group. However, this study was not sufficiently powered at the alpha 0.05 level (CI 0.14-1.39 and 0.22-1.60, respectively, incidence rate ratios). Of 188 subjects 73 (38.8%) withdrew, most for gastrointestinal upset. These data suggest there may be a protective effect of cranberry ingestion against asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic urinary tract infections in pregnancy. Further studies are planned to evaluate this effect.

  9. [Application of Monural to treat pregnant women with asymptomatic bacteriuria and acute cystitis].

    PubMed

    Michova, M; Ivanov, St; Batashki, I

    2009-01-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) and cystitis affect 4-9% of pregnancies and are associated with pyelonephritis and preterm labor. Screening for AB and adequate antimicrobal therapy prevent most of these serious complications. Twenty- nine pregnant patients, suffering from AB and 9 cases with cystitis were treated with single dose Monura (Fosfomycin trometamol) in a prospective study.

  10. [Maternal group B streptococcal bacteriuria and neonatal infective endocarditis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Crouzet, K; Martinovici, D; Hadeed, K; Dulac, Y; Acar, P; Séguéla, P-E

    2011-06-01

    Bacterial endocarditis is rare in children. We report the case of streptococcal B endocarditis in a newborn whose mother had asymptomatic bacteriuria during pregnancy. This report emphasizes the importance of maternal intrapartum antibiotic therapy when there is a major risk of neonatal infection and underlines the diagnostic value of echocardiography in case of prolonged fever. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Urinary Tract Infection and Asymptomatic Bacteriuria in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Cortes-Penfield, Nicolas W; Trautner, Barbara W; Jump, Robin L P

    2017-12-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a significant cause of morbidity among older adults. However, antibiotic prescriptions for clinically suspected UTIs are often inappropriate. Health care providers frequently struggle to differentiate UTI from asymptomatic bacteriuria, particularly in patients presenting with nonspecific symptoms. Patients with baseline cognitive impairments that limit history-taking can be particularly challenging. This article reviews the epidemiology and pathogenesis of UTI in older adults. It discusses an approach to diagnosis and treatment focused on recognizing patients who would likely benefit from antibiotic treatment and on identifying patients for whom empiric antibiotic therapy should not be given. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Asymptomatic bacteriuria, bacteremia, and other infections due to NSU corynebacteria.

    PubMed

    Furness, G; Kaminski, Z

    1975-11-01

    By means of the new medium, nonspecific urethritis (NSU) chocolate agar, NSU corymebacteria were isolated from patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria, bacteremia, cervicitis, conjuctivitis, and pericarditis, and also with bone marrow, wound, and cul-de-sac infections. The NSU corynebacteria were considered the etiologic agents. On the basis of biochemical reactions, antibiotic sensitivity, and complement fixation tests some isolates were the same microorganisms. Both patients with conjunctivitis were infected with the same NSU corynebacteria. A second isolate was cultured from patients with osteomyelitis and cervicitis, while a third was recovered from an infected leg wound and from a patient with pericarditis. Seven of the isolates, when injected into rabbits hypersensitive to four NSU corynebacteria isolated from the inflamed epididymis of patients with epididymitis, elicited delayed hypersensitivity reactions, which indicated that they also were related antigenically. It is suggested that nonspecific urethritis and eididymitis may represent an infection with NSU corynebacteria, or may be an extension of bacteriuria due to these microorganisms, with a delayed hypersensitivity reaction as a possible additional complication. Colony counts on NSU chocolate agar of the bacteria in urines from male and female patients were higher than those obtained on conventional agar media. NSU chocolate agar is superior to other agar media for the isolation of pathogenic and saprophytic bacteria not only from the urogenital tract but also from other foci of infection. It is easily prepared from commercial blood agar plates and its use should be considered when a selective medium is not required.

  13. Asymptomatic bacteriuria among antenatal women in Lagos.

    PubMed

    Olamijulo, Joseph Ayodeji; Adewale, Chris Olu; Olaleye, Olalekan

    2016-08-01

    This cross-sectional study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB), the commonest bacterial isolates and the antibiotic sensitivity pattern among 556 pregnant women in Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH), Nigeria. Women with a bacterial count over 100,000 colony-forming units per millilitre of the same organisms in paired urine samples were considered to have ASB. The prevalence of ASB was 14.6%. Klebsiella was the commonest micro-organism (39.2%) isolated. ASB was significantly associated with marital status, body mass index and parity. There was a significant relationship between urinary nitrites and ASB. The isolated organisms showed remarkable resistance to commonly prescribed antibiotics such as amoxicillin, cloxacillin and trimethoprim but good sensitivity to ofloxacin, gentamycin and ceftazidime. These facts have implications for the management of ASB in pregnancy.

  14. Asymptomatic bacteriuria and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of the isolates among pregnant women attending Dessie referral hospital, Northeast Ethiopia: A hospital-based cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ismail Ebrie; Gebrecherkos, Teklay; Gizachew, Mucheye; Menberu, Martha Alemayehu

    2018-05-01

    The aim of the current study was to find out the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria, antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of the isolates and related risk factors among pregnant women. A hospital-based cross-sectional study was carried out from February 2017 to May 2017 among asymptomatic pregnant mothers attending Dessie Referral Hospital, Northeast Ethiopia. About 10-15 mL of freshly voided midstream urine samples were collected from each study participants, and analyzed at Dessie regional research microbiology laboratory with conventional antibiotic susceptibility, and biochemical tests. Isolates were tested against commonly used antimicrobials using Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 20 software and in all cases, p-values below 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Overall, 358 pregnant women were included in the study with a mean age of 26.5±4.6 years (range, 19-43 yrs). The overall prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria was 56% (15.6%). Isolated microorganisms were mainly Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus (for each, n=18; 31%). Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus were resistant to ampicillin (66.7%), and penicillin (94.44%). The prevalence of multidrug- resistant isolates was 72.4%. History of catheterization [AOR=2.28, 95% CI=(1.03-5.06)] and anemia [AOR=4.98, 95% CI=(2.395-10.34) were statistically significant regarding the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria. The overall prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria among pregnant women in the study area was high. The presence of asymptomatic bacteriuria and their antibiotic susceptibility test results should be taken into consideration during the management of pregnant women who are visiting antenatal care clinic.

  15. Asymptomatic bacteriuria and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of the isolates among pregnant women attending Dessie referral hospital, Northeast Ethiopia: A hospital-based cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Ismail Ebrie; Gebrecherkos, Teklay; Gizachew, Mucheye

    2018-01-01

    Objective The aim of the current study was to find out the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria, antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of the isolates and related risk factors among pregnant women. Material and methods A hospital-based cross-sectional study was carried out from February 2017 to May 2017 among asymptomatic pregnant mothers attending Dessie Referral Hospital, Northeast Ethiopia. About 10–15 mL of freshly voided midstream urine samples were collected from each study participants, and analyzed at Dessie regional research microbiology laboratory with conventional antibiotic susceptibility, and biochemical tests. Isolates were tested against commonly used antimicrobials using Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 20 software and in all cases, p-values below 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results Overall, 358 pregnant women were included in the study with a mean age of 26.5±4.6 years (range, 19–43 yrs). The overall prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria was 56% (15.6%). Isolated microorganisms were mainly Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus (for each, n=18; 31%). Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus were resistant to ampicillin (66.7%), and penicillin (94.44%). The prevalence of multidrug- resistant isolates was 72.4%. History of catheterization [AOR=2.28, 95% CI=(1.03–5.06)] and anemia [AOR=4.98, 95% CI=(2.395–10.34) were statistically significant regarding the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria. Conclusion The overall prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria among pregnant women in the study area was high. The presence of asymptomatic bacteriuria and their antibiotic susceptibility test results should be taken into consideration during the management of pregnant women who are visiting antenatal care clinic. PMID:29733799

  16. Microbial aetiology and sensitivity of asymptomatic bacteriuria among ante-natal mothers in Mulago hospital, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Andabati, G; Byamugisha, J

    2010-12-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy is associated with potential urinary and obstetric complications. However the prevalence aetiology and antimicrobial sensitivity patterns of asymptomatic bacteriurea among women attending ante-natal care in our Hospital is not known. To determine the prevalence and identify the aetiological agents associated with asymptomatic bacteriurea in antenatal mothers in Mulago Hospital. We also intended to determine the anti-microbial sensitivity patterns of the common uropathogen in this population We performed culture and anti-microbial sensitivity tests on urine samples from 218 consecutive ante-natal mothers in Mulago Hospital. All participants did not have any clinical symptoms attributable to urinary tract infection. Twenty nine (13.3%) of the samples had significant bacterial growth and E.coli was the commonest isolate (51.2%). There was a high level (20-62%) of anti-bacterial resistance to the commonly used antibiotics. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is common among ante-natal mothers in Mulago. E. Coli that is resistant to the most commonly used antibiotics is the commonest isolate."

  17. Reagent strip testing is not sensitive for the screening of asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Lumbiganon, Pisake; Chongsomchai, Chompilas; Chumworathayee, Bundit; Thinkhamrop, Jadsada

    2002-08-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the diagnostic performance of the reagent strip in screening for asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women using urine culture as a gold standard. This study comprised 204 asymptomatic pregnant women who attended their first antenatal care at Srinagarind Hospital, Khon Kaen University from April 1, 1999 to June 30, 1999. Women with symptoms of urinary tract infection, antibiotic treatment within the previous 7 days, pregnancy-induced hypertension, bleeding per vagina and history of urinary tract diseases were excluded. Urine specimens were collected by clean catched midstream urine technique for urinalysis, reagent strip test and urine culture. Diagnostic performance of reagent strip in terms of sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value was analyzed. Urine reagent strip test had a sensitivity of 13.9 per cent, a specificity of 95.6 per cent, a positive predictive value of 46.1 per cent, a negative predictive value of 80.6 per cent in detecting asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women.

  18. Prevalence of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria and its Antibacterial Susceptibility Pattern Among Pregnant Women Attending the Antenatal Clinic at Kanpur, India

    PubMed Central

    Nawani, Manju

    2014-01-01

    Background: Symptomatic and asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) is common in pregnant women. Pregnancy enhances the progression from ASB to symptomatic bacteriuria, which if left untreated, could lead to acute pyelonephritis and other adverse outcomes such as prematurity, postpartum, hypertensive disease, anaemia, UTIs and higher foetal mortality rates. Aim: To identify the prevalence of ASB, the most common causative microorganisms and the antibacterial susceptibilities of the isolated microorganisms at a tertiary care centre at Kanpur, India. Materials and Methods: A total number of 300 asymptomatic pregnant women were screened for ASB by urine culture by using a semi quantitative culture method. Results: In this study, significant bacteriuria was found in only 22 cases (7.3%). Growth of contaminants was seen in 40 cases (13.3%). Among cases which showed positive cultures, 48.9% were primigravidae and 51.1% were multigravidae. Highest incidence was reported in age group of 21-30 years. The predominant organisms which were isolated were Escherichia coli, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus and Proteus mirabilis. Escherichia coli, the most common isolate, was found to be only 61% and 70% sensitive to ampicillin and amoxicillin + clavulanate, respectively. Sensitivity to ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin was 95%, and sensitivity to amikacin was 99%. Hundred percent sensitivity was found for the broad spectrum pencillins, imipenem, and meropenem. Klebsiella pneumoniae, the second most frequent organism which was grown on culture, was only 11% sensitive to ampicillin, while sensitivity to amoxicillin + clavulanate and cefuroxime was 86%. 100% sensitivity was found for cefepime, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, imipenem and meropenem. Conclusion: Routine urine culture test should be carried out for all antenatal women, to detect asymptomatic bacteriuria, and every positive case should be treated with appropriate antibiotic therapy, to

  19. Prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria and its antibacterial susceptibility pattern among pregnant women attending the antenatal clinic at kanpur, India.

    PubMed

    Sujatha, R; Nawani, Manju

    2014-04-01

    Symptomatic and asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) is common in pregnant women. Pregnancy enhances the progression from ASB to symptomatic bacteriuria, which if left untreated, could lead to acute pyelonephritis and other adverse outcomes such as prematurity, postpartum, hypertensive disease, anaemia, UTIs and higher foetal mortality rates. To identify the prevalence of ASB, the most common causative microorganisms and the antibacterial susceptibilities of the isolated microorganisms at a tertiary care centre at Kanpur, India. A total number of 300 asymptomatic pregnant women were screened for ASB by urine culture by using a semi quantitative culture method. In this study, significant bacteriuria was found in only 22 cases (7.3%). Growth of contaminants was seen in 40 cases (13.3%). Among cases which showed positive cultures, 48.9% were primigravidae and 51.1% were multigravidae. Highest incidence was reported in age group of 21-30 years. The predominant organisms which were isolated were Escherichia coli, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus and Proteus mirabilis. Escherichia coli, the most common isolate, was found to be only 61% and 70% sensitive to ampicillin and amoxicillin + clavulanate, respectively. Sensitivity to ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin was 95%, and sensitivity to amikacin was 99%. Hundred percent sensitivity was found for the broad spectrum pencillins, imipenem, and meropenem. Klebsiella pneumoniae, the second most frequent organism which was grown on culture, was only 11% sensitive to ampicillin, while sensitivity to amoxicillin + clavulanate and cefuroxime was 86%. 100% sensitivity was found for cefepime, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, imipenem and meropenem. Routine urine culture test should be carried out for all antenatal women, to detect asymptomatic bacteriuria, and every positive case should be treated with appropriate antibiotic therapy, to prevent any obstetric complication which is associated with

  20. Urinary Tract Infection and Asymptomatic Bacteriuria in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Cortes-Penfield, Nicolas W.; Trautner, Barbara W.; Jump, Robin

    2018-01-01

    Synopsis Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a significant cause of morbidity among older adults; however, antibiotic prescriptions for clinically suspected UTIs are often inappropriate. Healthcare providers frequently struggle to differentiate UTI from asymptomatic bacteriuria, particularly in patients presenting with nonspecific symptoms. Patients with baseline cognitive impairments that limit history-taking can be particularly challenging. Here, we review the epidemiology and pathogenesis of UTI in older adults. We also discuss an approach to the diagnosis and treatment of UTIs, focusing on recognizing patients who would likely benefit from antibiotic treatment and on identifying patients for whom empiric antibiotic therapy should not be given. PMID:29079155

  1. Pre-procedural antibiotics for endoscopic urological procedures: Initial experience in individuals with spinal cord injury and asymptomatic bacteriuria.

    PubMed

    Chong, Julio T; Klausner, Adam P; Petrossian, Albert; Byrne, Michael D; Moore, Jewel R; Goetz, Lance L; Gater, David R; Grob, B Mayer

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the safety, efficacy, quality-of-life impact, and costs of a single dose or a longer course of pre-procedural antibiotics prior to elective endoscopic urological procedures in individuals with spinal cord injury and disorders (SCI/D) and asymptomatic bacteriuria. A prospective observational study. Hunter Holmes McGuire Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Richmond, Virginia, USA. Sixty persons with SCI/D and asymptomatic bacteriuria scheduled to undergo elective endoscopic urological procedures. A single pre-procedural dose of antibiotics vs. a 3-5-day course of pre-procedural antibiotics. Objective and subjective measures of health, costs, and quality of life. There were no significant differences in vital signs, leukocytosis, adverse events, and overall satisfaction in individuals who received short-course vs. long-course antibiotics. There was a significant decrease in antibiotic cost (33.1 ± 47.6 vs. 3.6 ± 6.1 US$, P = 0.01) for individuals in the short-course group. In addition, there was greater pre-procedural anxiety (18 vs. 0%, P < 0.05) for individuals who received long-course antibiotics. SCI/D individuals with asymptomatic bacteriuria may be able to safely undergo most endoscopic urological procedures with a single dose of pre-procedural antibiotics. However, further research is required and even appropriate pre-procedural antibiotics may not prevent severe infections.

  2. Asymtomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy: assesment of prevlence, microbial agents and ther antimicrobial sensitivty pattern in Gondar Teaching Hospital, north west Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Tadesse, Abilo; Negash, Mekonnen; Ketema, Late Shimeles

    2007-04-01

    To estimate the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women, identify the frequently isolated uropathogenic bacteria and its antimicrobial sensitivity pattern. This cross-sectional case series study was conducted in antenatal care clinic of Gondar Teaching Hospital from June-Oct., 2001. One hundred and seventy three pregnant women, who met the inclusion criteria, were included in the study after informed consent was obtained Clinical information pertaining to socio demographic data and obstetric history was filled in the questionnaire, pertinent physical examination was done and urine specimen from each candidate was collected and processed following the standard microbiological technique. Majority (70-90%) of the pregnant women were literate, housewives, married and residents of Gondar town. Of all pregnant women included in the study, 96/173 (56%) were multigravida, and 21/173 (12%) had 5 or more pregnancies. The identification rate of significant bacteriuria in the study group was 9.8% (17/173) with higher rate (20.5%) in multiparous mothers. The frequently isolated urinary pathogenic bacteria was E. coli, 47% (8/17), followed by S. aureus 3/17 (18%) and C. freundi 2/17 (12%). The majority of E. coli isolates (50-75%) were resistant to gentamicin, Ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole, tetracycline, and chloramphenicol; while 75% and 100% of E. coli isolates were sensitive to cefoxitin, and ciprofloxacin respectively. Asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women was prevalent in the study locality. E. coli was the common isolated urinary pathogen among urine samples of study subjects, and was found to be resistant to multiple antimicrobial agents. We suggest cefoxitin should be the drug used to treat significant bacteriuria in pregnant women in the study locality.

  3. Is single-dose fosfomycin trometamol a good alternative for asymptomatic bacteriuria in the second trimesterof pregnancy?

    PubMed

    Bayrak, Omer; Cimentepe, Ersin; Inegöl, Ilknur; Atmaca, Ali Fuat; Duvan, Candan Iltemir; Koç, Akif; Turhan, Nilgün Oztürk

    2007-05-01

    Untreated asymptomatic bacteriuria has been associated with acute pyelonephritis, which may have a role in many maternal and fetal complications. Acute pyelonephritis in pregnancy is related to anemia, septicemia, transient renal dysfunction, and pulmonary insufficiency. A randomized study was conducted to assess the clinical and microbiological efficacy of a single dose of fosfomycin trometamol for the treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria in the second trimester of pregnancy compared with a 5-day regimen of cefuroxime axetyl. Forty-four women received fosfomycin trometamol and 40 women received cefuroxime axetyl. There were no statistically significant differences between both groups regarding the mean age and mean duration of pregnancy. Therapeutic success was achieved in 93.2% of the patients treated with fosfomycin trometamol vs 95% of those treated with cefuroxime axetyl. A single dose of fosfomycin trometamol is a safe and effective alternative in the treatment of asymptomatic urinary tract infections in the second trimester of pregnancy.

  4. [The management of asymptomatic bacteriuria in different patient population].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, M-L; Malinverni, R

    2008-11-12

    Who should be screened for asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) and who should be treated? This review updates some aspects of the management of AB in different patient populations. A systematic screening for AB is recommended for pregnant women because of a significant risk of complications. In these cases as well as before any uro-gynecologic surgical procedure treatment of AB is strongly recommended. The management of AB in immunosuppressed or transplanted patients is more controversial. In other populations treating AB is not recommended and the outcome seems to be worse in case of treatment due to possible side effects and selection of resistant organisms. Recent studies have shown a considerable gap between clinical practice and recommendations.

  5. One-day compared with 7-day nitrofurantoin for asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lumbiganon, Pisake; Villar, Jose; Laopaiboon, Malinee; Widmer, Mariana; Thinkhamrop, Jadsada; Carroli, Guillermo; Duc Vy, Nguyen; Mignini, Luciano; Festin, Mario; Prasertcharoensuk, Witoon; Limpongsanurak, Sompop; Liabsuetrakul, Tippawan; Sirivatanapa, Pannee

    2009-02-01

    To evaluate whether a 1-day nitrofurantoin regimen is as effective as a 7-day regimen in eradicating asymptomatic bacteriuria during pregnancy. A multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo controlled noninferiority trial was conducted in antenatal clinics in Thailand, the Philippines, Vietnam, and Argentina. Pregnant women seeking antenatal care between March 2004 and March 2007 who met the inclusion and exclusion criteria were invited to participate in the study. Those who consented were randomly allocated to receive either a 1-day or a 7-day course of 100 mg capsules of nitrofurantoin, which was taken twice daily. The primary outcome was bacteriologic cure on day 14 of treatment. : A total of 1,248 of 24,430 eligible women had asymptomatic bacteriuria, making the overall prevalence of 5.1%. Of these 1,248 women, 778 women were successfully recruited, and 386 and 392 women were randomly allocated to 1-day and 7-day regimens, respectively. Escherichia coli was the most common potentially pathogenic bacteria detected, its prevalence approaching 50%. Bacteriologic cure rates at treatment day 14 were 75.7% and 86.2% for 1-day and 7-day regimens, respectively. The cure rate difference was -10.5% (95% confidence interval -16.1% to -4.9%). Mean birth weight and mean gestational age at delivery were significantly lower in the 1-day regimen group. There were fewer adverse effects in the 1-day regimen group, but the differences were not statistically significant. A 1-day regimen of nitrofurantoin is significantly less effective than a 7-day regimen. Women with asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy should receive the standard 7-day regimen. ISRCTN, isrctn.org, ISRCTN11966080 I.

  6. Asymptomatic bacteriuria of pregnancy: do obstetricians bother?

    PubMed

    Lelekis, M; Economou, E; Adamis, G; Gargalianos, P; Kosmidis, J

    1994-02-01

    In view of the potentially serious consequences of asymptomatic bacteriuria of pregnancy (ASB), we surveyed the attitudes of Greek obstetricians towards this entity. A total of 108 obstetricians practicing in the area of Athens completed a questionnaire concerning ASB. Only 73 of the 108 stated that they screen their clients for ASB (51 of them when pyuria is present and only 22 in all pregnant women). Of special interest is the finding that a larger percentage of younger obstetricians (practicing for up to 9 years) habitually screen their patients, compared to older ones (83% vs 60%). Concerning treatment of ASB, only 45 out of 73 doctors screening for ASB give any treatment when ASB is present. Most obstetricians (87%) prefer a beta-lactam antibiotic. In almost all cases 7-10 days are considered the appropriate duration of treatment. Better education of obstetricians, especially the older ones, concerning detection and management of ASB is needed.

  7. Office diagnosis of asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Van Dorsten, J P; Bannister, E R

    1986-10-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant patients can virtually eliminate pyelonephritis, the most common medical cause for antepartum hospitalization. However, the ever-increasing cost of the urine culture has led most clinicians away from routine urine screening. Uricult dip-slide paddles provide an inexpensive, efficient way to screen urine. Clean-catch urine specimens were obtained from 544 consecutive asymptomatic pregnant patients seen in the outpatient obstetric clinic at the Medical University of South Carolina. Specimens were analyzed by both traditional culture techniques and the Uricult dip-slide paddles. By comparison, the Uricult test detected 55 of the 56 significant gram-negative urinary pathogens found by culture. Detection of potential gram-positive pathogens is more difficult. A scheme is proposed that allows reliable, inexpensive surveillance in all pregnant patients. Hopefully, this algorithm will rekindle the obstetrician's interest in urine screening.

  8. [The efficacy and safety of cefixime and amoxicillin/clavulanate in the treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women: a randomized, prospective, multicenter study].

    PubMed

    Rafal'skiĭ, V V; Dovgan', E V; Kozyrev, Iu V; Gustovarova, T A; Khlybova, S V; Novoselova, A V; Filippenko, N G; Likhikh, D G

    2013-01-01

    The study was aimed to the evaluation of efficacy and safety of cefixime and amoxicillin/clavulanate in the treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women. A prospective, multicenter, randomized study that included 112 pregnant women with asymptomatic bacteriuria was performed. 58 women were randomized in group 1 (cefixime [suprax solutab] 400 mg 1 time a day, 7 days), 54 women were included in group 2 (amoxicillin/clavulanate [amoksiklav] 625 mg 3 times a day, 7 days). The average age of the patients in group 1 was 25.2 +/- 6.6; in group 2--26.6 +/- 5.8 years. Physical examination, evaluation of complaints, collection of data on adverse reactions, and bacteriological analysis of urine were performed after enrollment in the study at visit 2 (day 10 +/- 1) and 3 (day 35 +/- 2). Comparable effectiveness of cefixime and amoxicillin/clavulanate in the treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women was found. Eradication of the pathogen and sustained bacteriological response were observed in 94.8 and 92.7% of women treated with cefixime, and in 98.2 and 92.5% of women treated with amoxicillin/clavulanate, respectively (P > 0.05). At the same time, the use of amoxicillin/clavulanate compared with cefixime significantly higher was followed by the development of adverse reactions (13% and 1.7; respectively; P = 0.02). Seven-day courses of cefixime at a dose 400 mg 1 time a day and amoxicillin/clavulanate at a dose of 625 mg 3 times a day are high-effective treatment regimens for asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women in Russia. The use of amoxicillin/clavulanate is significantly more often accompanied by the development of adverse reactions compared with cefixime.

  9. Asymptomatic Bacteriuria in Clinical Urological Practice: Preoperative Control of Bacteriuria and Management of Recurrent UTI.

    PubMed

    Cai, Tommaso; Mazzoli, Sandra; Lanzafame, Paolo; Caciagli, Patrizio; Malossini, Gianni; Nesi, Gabriella; Wagenlehner, Florian M E; Köves, Bela; Pickard, Robert; Grabe, Magnus; Bjerklund Johansen, Truls E; Bartoletti, Riccardo

    2016-01-05

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) is a common clinical condition that often leads to unnecessary antimicrobial use. The reduction of antibiotic overuse for ABU is consequently an important issue for antimicrobial stewardship and to reduce the emergence of multidrug resistant strains. There are two issues in everyday urological practice that require special attention: the role of ABU in pre-operative prophylaxis and in women affected by recurrent urinary tract infections (rUTIs). Nowadays, this is the time to think over our practice and change our way of thinking. Here, we aimed to summarize the current literature knowledge in terms of ABU management in patients undergoing urological surgery and in patients with rUTIs. In the last years, the approach to patient with ABU has changed totally. Prior to all surgical procedures that do not enter the urinary tract, ABU is generally not considered as a risk factor, and screening and treatment are not considered necessary. On the other hand, in the case of all procedures entering the urinary tract, ABU should be treated in line with the results of a urine culture obtained before the procedure. In patients affected by rUTIs, ABU can even have a protective role in preventing symptomatic recurrence, particularly when Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) has been isolated.

  10. The Prevalence of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria in Iranian Pregnant Women: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ghafari, Mahin; Baigi, Vali; Cheraghi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) is defined as the presence of bacteria in urine without having signs and symptoms. The aim of this meta-analysis was to estimate the overall prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria among Iranian pregnant women. Methods Major national and international databases were searched up to November 2015, including Scientific Information Database, MagIran, Web of Science, Medline, Scopus, Science Direct and Ovid. The checklist of the STROBE statement was used for evaluating the quality of reporting. The extracted data were analyzed and the results were reported using a random-effects model with 95% confidence interval (CI). Results From 3709 obtained studies, 20 included in the meta-analysis, which involved 15108 pregnant women. The overall prevalence of ASB was 0.13 (95% CI: 0.09, 0.17). The prevalence of ASB in the northern and southern regions of Iran was 0.13 (95% CI: 0.09, 0.18) and 0.11 (95% CI: 0.05, 0.16), respectively. Conclusion Prevalence of ASB among Iranian pregnant women is considerable. Due to the complications of ASB for pregnant women and their children, preventative planning and control of ASB among pregnant women in Iran is necessary. PMID:27336476

  11. [Asymptomatic bacteriuria; management choices in different patient groups].

    PubMed

    Meiland, R; Geerlings, S E; Hoes, A W; Hoepelman, I M

    2002-04-06

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria is a common medical condition, especially in women and elderly people. It is generally considered to be a benign condition, which does not require screening or antibiotic treatment. However, there are a few exceptions for which screening is possibly worthwhile. For children it is unclear whether the early detection of ASB can result in better clinical outcomes. Screening is therefore not advised, except for young children during the first few months after a symptomatic urinary tract infection. For pregnant women the use of screening for ASB is also unclear and in general not indicated. Research is necessary into the possible transition from ASB to pyelonephritis and the possible connection with low birth weight and premature births. There are indications that ASB in women with type I diabetes mellitus can lead to a deterioration in the renal function, yet these are insufficient to recommend screening as a routine procedure.

  12. Increased serum procalcitonin levels in pregnant patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria.

    PubMed

    Bilir, Filiz; Akdemir, Nermin; Ozden, Selcuk; Cevrioglu, A Serhan; Bilir, Cemil

    2013-09-05

    Among the pregnancy urinary tract infections, asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) is the most common one. Untreated ASB can progress to pyelonephritis in 30-50% of the patients and can also result in prematurity in 27% of the pregnancy so it needs immediate diagnosis and treatment. In this study, we wanted to evaluate procalcitonin levels, compared to other inflammatory in pregnant women with ASB. The study was designed between the period of January 2012 and February 2013 at Sakarya University School of Medicine, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics. The study population included 30 pregnant patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria and 39 healthy pregnant controls. Mean age was 28 (SD, 5.5) of the study population; mean maternal weight was 70 (SD, 8) kilogram. There were no statically significant differences between the groups according to the routine biochemical parameters, but gestational age was significantly lower in the ASB group compared to the controls (20.4 vs 28.6, respectively; p < 0.001). Serum procalcitonin levels were negative in all of the controls. In ASB group, 9 (30%) patients had procalcitonin levels greater than >0.05 ng/ml and 21(70%) patients had negative procalcitonin levels (Chi-squrae, p < 0.001). The sensitivity and specificity of procalcitonin assay for ASB was calculated as 30% and 100%, respectively. The positive predictive value was 100% and the negative predictive value was 65%. The most frequent microorganisms in the urine culture were Escherichia coli (26 patients, 87%), Proteus mirabilis (3 patients, 10%) and Klebsiella (1 patient, 3%) in the ASB group. We experienced four (44%) recurrences among nine positive procalcitonin in ASB patients after completion of treatment of the first ASB diagnosis. Procalcitonin levels were significantly higher in ASB group than the control group and serum procalcitonin levels were higher in pregnant women with recurrent ASB. This finding is an important result revealed that high procalcitonin level can

  13. Screening and treating asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lumbiganon, Pisake; Laopaiboon, Malinee; Thinkhamrop, Jadsada

    2010-04-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) in pregnancy, if left undiagnosed and appropriately treated can lead to acute pyelonephritis in mothers and low birth weight in infants. Urine culture is the gold standard for diagnosing ASB. Unfortunately, urine culture is limitedly available. The present review aims at evaluating performance of various screening tests and effectiveness of antibiotic regimens for ASB. Positive dipslide test is very likely to have a definitive diagnosis of ASB, whereas a negative result effectively rules out ASB. Available evidences regarding the performance of urine dipstick are still conflicting, it is currently not appropriate to recommend urine dipstick for screening ASB in pregnancy. Choice of antibiotics should be guided by antimicrobial susceptibility testing whenever possible. Nitrofurantoin seems to be antibiotic of choice for ASB in pregnancy. Seven-day regimen of antibiotics gives a better microbiological cure rate but no difference in important clinical outcomes compared with 1-day regimen. Dipslide culture is a promising screening test for ASB. Pregnant women with ASB should be treated with 7-day regimen of antibiotics, although 1-day regimen might be appropriate in some settings. More research is needed for identifying appropriate screening tests for ASB.

  14. Management of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria, Urinary Catheters and Symptomatic Urinary Tract Infections in Patients Undergoing Surgery for Joint Replacement: A Position Paper of the Expert Group 'Infection' of swissorthopaedics

    PubMed Central

    Sendi, Parham; Borens, Olivier; Wahl, Peter; Clauss, Martin; Uçkay, Ilker

    2017-01-01

    In this position paper, we review definitions related to this subject and the corresponding literature. Our recommendations include the following statements. Asymptomatic bacteriuria, asymptomatic leukocyturia, urine discolouration, odd smell or positive nitrite sediments are not an indication for antimicrobial treatment. Antimicrobial treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria does not prevent periprosthetic joint infection, but is associated with adverse events, costs and antibiotic resistance development. Urine analyses or urine cultures in asymptomatic patients undergoing orthopaedic implants should be avoided. Indwelling urinary catheters are the most frequent reason for healthcare-associated urinary tract infections and should be avoided or removed as soon as possible. PMID:28894690

  15. Urinary Squamous Epithelial Cells Do Not Accurately Predict Urine Culture Contamination, but May Predict Urinalysis Performance in Predicting Bacteriuria.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Nicholas M; Harland, Karisa K; Crabb, Victoria; Mutnick, Rachel; Baumgartner, David; Spinosi, Stephanie; Haarstad, Michael; Ahmed, Azeemuddin; Schweizer, Marin; Faine, Brett

    2016-03-01

    The presence of squamous epithelial cells (SECs) has been advocated to identify urinary contamination despite a paucity of evidence supporting this practice. We sought to determine the value of using quantitative SECs as a predictor of urinalysis contamination. Retrospective cross-sectional study of adults (≥18 years old) presenting to a tertiary academic medical center who had urinalysis with microscopy and urine culture performed. Patients with missing or implausible demographic data were excluded (2.5% of total sample). The primary analysis aimed to determine an SEC threshold that predicted urine culture contamination using receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis. The a priori secondary analysis explored how demographic variables (age, sex, body mass index) may modify the SEC test performance and whether SECs impacted traditional urinalysis indicators of bacteriuria. A total of 19,328 records were included. ROC curve analysis demonstrated that SEC count was a poor predictor of urine culture contamination (area under the ROC curve = 0.680, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.671 to 0.689). In secondary analysis, the positive likelihood ratio (LR+) of predicting bacteriuria via urinalysis among noncontaminated specimens was 4.98 (95% CI = 4.59 to 5.40) in the absence of SECs, but the LR+ fell to 2.35 (95% CI = 2.17 to 2.54) for samples with more than 8 SECs/low-powered field (lpf). In an independent validation cohort, urinalysis samples with fewer than 8 SECs/lpf predicted bacteriuria better (sensitivity = 75%, specificity = 84%) than samples with more than 8 SECs/lpf (sensitivity = 86%, specificity = 70%; diagnostic odds ratio = 17.5 [14.9 to 20.7] vs. 8.7 [7.3 to 10.5]). Squamous epithelial cells are a poor predictor of urine culture contamination, but may predict poor predictive performance of traditional urinalysis measures. © 2016 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  16. Practice variation in treatment of suspected asymptomatic bacteriuria prior to cardiac surgery: are there differences in postoperative outcome? A retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    de Lange, Marije P.; Sonker, Uday; Kelder, Johannes C.; de Vos, Rien

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES It is unclear whether postoperative infections can be prevented by treating asymptomatic bacteriuria, or whether, on the other hand, such treatment will increase the risk of more serious infection by pathogenic bacteria different from the ones causing bacteriuria. This study aimed to support future treatment decisions for preoperative cardiothoracic surgery patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria, by examining current preoperative practice, in relation to postoperative outcome. METHODS A retrospective cohort study was conducted. All patients who underwent cardiothoracic surgery in 2011–2013 using extracorporeal circulation in St. Antonius Hospital Nieuwegein, and who preoperatively had nitrituria and/or leucocyturia were included. Exclusion criteria were C-reactive protein level higher than 10 mg/l, emergency surgery, critical preoperative state and/or antibiotic treatment because of other infections. Outcomes were postoperative infections and length of stay. Furthermore, we compared culture results of preoperative urine with postoperative infection sites in order to study the hypothesis of haematogenous spread. RESULTS One thousand and two patients with leucocyturia or nitrituria were eligible, of whom 3.9% had been treated with antibiotics preoperatively (AB+). Of the 96.1% of patients who had not been treated (AB−), 8.3% had an infection postoperatively, compared with 5.1% in the treatment (AB+) group. This was not statistically significant {odds ratio, corrected for EuroSCORE, 0.53 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.12–2.24, P = 0.39]}. Length of stay, corrected for EuroSCORE, between the treated (AB+) and the non-treated (AB−) group did not differ, with a hazard ratio of 1.05 (95% CI 0.63–1.75, P = 0.85). As regards bacterial culture results, none of patients not treated with antibiotics preoperatively (AB−) seemed to have a postoperative infection due to haematogenous spread of bacteria from the urinary tract present preoperatively

  17. Increased Age, but Not Parity Predisposes to Higher Bacteriuria Burdens Due to Streptococcus Urinary Tract Infection and Influences Bladder Cytokine Responses, Which Develop Independent of Tissue Bacterial Loads.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Matthew J; Carey, Alison J; Leclercq, Sophie Y; Tan, Chee K; Ulett, Glen C

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae causes urinary tract infection (UTI) in pregnant adults, non-pregnant adults, immune-compromised individuals and the elderly. The pathogenesis of S. agalactiae UTI in distinct patient populations is poorly understood. In this study, we used murine models of UTI incorporating young mice, aged and dam mice to show that uropathogenic S. agalactiae causes bacteriuria at significantly higher levels in aged mice compared to young mice and this occurs coincident with equivalent levels of bladder tissue colonisation at 24 h post-infection (p.i.). In addition, aged mice exhibited significantly higher bacteriuria burdens at 48 h compared to young mice, confirming a divergent pattern of bacterial colonization in the urinary tract of aged and young mice. Multiparous mice, in contrast, exhibited significantly lower urinary titres of S. agalactiae compared to age-matched nulliparous mice suggesting that parity enhances the ability of the host to control S. agalactiae bacteriuria. Additionally, we show that both age and parity alter the expression levels of several key regulatory and pro-inflammatory cytokines, which are known to be important the immune response to UTI, including Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-12(p40), and Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1). Finally, we demonstrate that other cytokines, including IL-17 are induced significantly in the S. agalactiae-infected bladder regardless of age and parity status. Collectively, these findings show that the host environment plays an important role in influencing the severity of S. agalactiae UTI; infection dynamics, particularly in the context of bacteriuria, depend on age and parity, which also affect the nature of innate immune responses to infection.

  18. Increased Age, but Not Parity Predisposes to Higher Bacteriuria Burdens Due to Streptococcus Urinary Tract Infection and Influences Bladder Cytokine Responses, Which Develop Independent of Tissue Bacterial Loads

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Matthew J.; Carey, Alison J.; Leclercq, Sophie Y.; Tan, Chee K.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae causes urinary tract infection (UTI) in pregnant adults, non-pregnant adults, immune-compromised individuals and the elderly. The pathogenesis of S. agalactiae UTI in distinct patient populations is poorly understood. In this study, we used murine models of UTI incorporating young mice, aged and dam mice to show that uropathogenic S. agalactiae causes bacteriuria at significantly higher levels in aged mice compared to young mice and this occurs coincident with equivalent levels of bladder tissue colonisation at 24 h post-infection (p.i.). In addition, aged mice exhibited significantly higher bacteriuria burdens at 48 h compared to young mice, confirming a divergent pattern of bacterial colonization in the urinary tract of aged and young mice. Multiparous mice, in contrast, exhibited significantly lower urinary titres of S. agalactiae compared to age-matched nulliparous mice suggesting that parity enhances the ability of the host to control S. agalactiae bacteriuria. Additionally, we show that both age and parity alter the expression levels of several key regulatory and pro-inflammatory cytokines, which are known to be important the immune response to UTI, including Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-12(p40), and Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1). Finally, we demonstrate that other cytokines, including IL-17 are induced significantly in the S. agalactiae-infected bladder regardless of age and parity status. Collectively, these findings show that the host environment plays an important role in influencing the severity of S. agalactiae UTI; infection dynamics, particularly in the context of bacteriuria, depend on age and parity, which also affect the nature of innate immune responses to infection. PMID:27936166

  19. Asymptomatic bacteriuria and urinary tract infections in special patient groups: women with diabetes mellitus and pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, Caroline; Kazemier, Brenda M; Geerlings, Suzanne E

    2014-02-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) and urinary tract infections (UTIs) in women with diabetes mellitus and during pregnancy are common and can have far-reaching consequences for the woman and neonate. This review describes epidemiology, risk factors, complications and treatment of UTI and ASB according to recent developments in these two groups. Most articles addressing the epidemiology and risk factors of ASB and UTI in diabetic and pregnant women confirmed existing knowledge. New insights were obtained in the association between sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors, as medication for diabetes mellitus type 2, and a small increased risk for UTI due to glucosuria and the possible negative effects of UTI, including urosepsis,on bladder and kidney function in diabetic women. Predominantly, potential long-term effects of antibiotic treatment of ASB or UTI during pregnancy on the neonate have received attention, including antibiotic resistance and epilepsy. SGLT2 inhibitors were associated with a small increased risk for UTI, UTI in diabetic women may lead to bladder and kidney dysfunction, and antibiotic treatment of ASB and UTI during pregnancy was associated with long-term effects on the neonate. Up-to-date research on the effectiveness and long-term effects of ASB screening and treatment policies, including group B Streptococcus bacteriuria in pregnancy, is warranted to inform clinical practice.

  20. Increased serum procalcitonin levels in pregnant patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Among the pregnancy urinary tract infections, asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) is the most common one. Untreated ASB can progress to pyelonephritis in 30-50% of the patients and can also result in prematurity in 27% of the pregnancy so it needs immediate diagnosis and treatment. In this study, we wanted to evaluate procalcitonin levels, compared to other inflammatory in pregnant women with ASB. Methods The study was designed between the period of January 2012 and February 2013 at Sakarya University School of Medicine, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics. The study population included 30 pregnant patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria and 39 healthy pregnant controls. Results Mean age was 28 (SD, 5.5) of the study population; mean maternal weight was 70 (SD, 8) kilogram. There were no statically significant differences between the groups according to the routine biochemical parameters, but gestational age was significantly lower in the ASB group compared to the controls (20.4 vs 28.6, respectively; p < 0.001). Serum procalcitonin levels were negative in all of the controls. In ASB group, 9 (30%) patients had procalcitonin levels greater than >0.05 ng/ml and 21(70%) patients had negative procalcitonin levels (Chi-squrae, p < 0.001). The sensitivity and specificity of procalcitonin assay for ASB was calculated as 30% and 100%, respectively. The positive predictive value was 100% and the negative predictive value was 65%. The most frequent microorganisms in the urine culture were Escherichia coli (26 patients, 87%), Proteus mirabilis (3 patients, 10%) and Klebsiella (1 patient, 3%) in the ASB group. We experienced four (44%) recurrences among nine positive procalcitonin in ASB patients after completion of treatment of the first ASB diagnosis. Discussion Procalcitonin levels were significantly higher in ASB group than the control group and serum procalcitonin levels were higher in pregnant women with recurrent ASB. This finding is an important

  1. Asymptomatic bacteriuria in sickle cell disease: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Cumming, Vanessa; Ali, Susanna; Forrester, Terrence; Roye-Green, Karen; Reid, Marvin

    2006-01-01

    Background It is known that there is significant morbidity associated with urinary tract infection and with renal dysfunction in sickle cell disease (SCD). However, it is not known if there are potential adverse outcomes associated with asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) infections in sickle cell disease if left untreated. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of ASB, in a cohort of patients with SCD. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of patients in the Jamaican Sickle Cell Cohort. Aseptically collected mid-stream urine (MSU) samples were obtained from 266 patients for urinalysis, culture and sensitivity analysis. Proteinuria was measured by urine dipsticks. Individuals with abnormal urine culture results had repeat urine culture. Serum creatinine was measured and steady state haematology and uric acid concentrations were obtained from clinical records. This was completed at a primary care health clinic dedicated to sickle cell diseases in Kingston, Jamaica. There were 133 males and 133 females in the sample studied. The mean age (mean ± sd) of participants was 26.6 ± 2.5 years. The main outcome measures were the culture of ≥ 105 colony forming units of a urinary tract pathogen per milliliter of urine from a MSU specimen on a single occasion (probable ASB) or on consecutive occasions (confirmed ASB). Results Of the 266 urines collected, 234 were sterile and 29 had significant bacteriuria yielding a prevalence of probable ASB of 10.9% (29/266). Fourteen patients had confirmed ASB (prevalence 5.3%) of which 13 had pyuria. Controlling for genotype, females were 14.7 times more likely to have confirmed ASB compared to males (95%CI 1.8 to 121.0). The number of recorded visits for symptomatic UTI was increased by a factor of 2.5 (95% CI 1.4 to 4.5, p < 0.005) but serum creatinine, uric acid and haematology values were not different in patients with confirmed ASB compared with those with sterile urine. There was no association with history of gram

  2. [Bacteriuria and Symptomatic Urinary Tract Infections during Antimicrobial Prophylaxis in Patients with Short-Term Urinary Catheters - Prospective Randomised Study in Patients after Joint Replacement Surgery].

    PubMed

    Dejmek, M; Kučera, T; Ryšková, L; Čermáková, E; Šponer, P

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY A very serious complication following joint replacement surgery is periprosthetic joint infection that can be caused by a urinary tract infection. Insertion of an indwelling urinary catheter constitutes a risk factor that may result in urinary tract infections. The aim of this prospective randomised study was to compare the occurrence of significant bacteriuria and symptomatic urinary tract infections during antibiotic prophylaxis at the time of removal of an indwelling urinary catheter by cotrimoxazole in two doses and with no administration of antibiotics. We also monitored the incidence of potential periprosthetic infection following the endoprosthesis implantation. The findings of preoperative urine tests were compared with the declared negative preoperative examination. MATERIAL AND METHODS The study included patients indicated for a total hip or knee replacement with a negative urine culture as a part of the preoperative testing. Where leukocyteria was detected, urine culture by mid-stream clean catch urine was obtained. The second part included patients, in whom an indwelling urinary catheter had to be inserted postoperatively for urine retention and/or monitoring of fluid balance and who were divided into two groups on a rota basis. No antibiotics were administered to the first group, whereas Cotrimoxazol 960 mg tablets p.o. was administered to the second group, 14 and 2 hours before the removal of the catheter. The urine culture test was performed 4 hours after the removal of the indwelling urinary catheter, in both the groups. The test was repeated after 14 days and a questionnaire was filled in to report urinary tract complications. Considered as significant bacteriuria by urinalysis was the laboratory finding of > 10x4 CFU/ml in case of a single pathogen or > 10x5 in case of multiple pathogens. The results were statistically processed by Fischer's exact test with the level of significance = 0.05. RESULTS In the first part of the

  3. [Asymptomatic bacteriuria among pregnant women. An underestimated threat].

    PubMed

    Quiroga-Feuchter, Germán; Robles-Torres, Rosa Evangelina; Ruelas-Morán, Andrés; Gómez-Alcalá, Alejandro V

    2007-01-01

    Urinary tract infection is a common pregnancy complication. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) can trigger the development of serious complications affecting both the mother and the fetus. Determine the frequency of AB among pregnant women attending to antenatal care at the family medicine clinic number 1 of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, located in Ciudad Obregón, Sonora. A longitudinal study was carried out from September to December 2004. Seventy-two 72 pregnant women with gestational age of 24 weeks or less were followed up during four months. All pregnant women were selected by a non-probabilistic method. Every patient had a monthly urine culture during the follow up period. Among the 72 pregnant women, 16.7% developed symptomatic urinary infections during the follow-up and 25% had at least one positive urine culture without urinary symptoms, being classified as AB, thus receiving treatment. Frequency of positive urine cultures was common at first and fourth months of follow-up. Urine culture is an important component of prenatal care, and helps in identifying a significant number of urinary tract infections that would go otherwise undetected.

  4. Diagnosis of asymptomatic bacteriuria and associated risk factors among pregnant women in mangalore, karnataka, India.

    PubMed

    Rajaratnam, Annie; Baby, Neha Maria; Kuruvilla, Thomas S; Machado, Santhosh

    2014-09-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) is common inwomen and increases in prevalence with age or sexual activity. Prompt detection and treatment of this condition and associated factors decreases complications like acute pyleonephritis, intrauterine growth retardation and preterm labour. Chromogenic media is a versatile tool in rapid primary screening of the causative organisms considerably reducing daily routine workload. To determine the prevalence of AB among pregnant women in a tertiary care set-up and analyse the contributory risk factors, its effects on pregnancy and the role of chromogenic media in the laboratory diagnosis of these cases. Urine samples of all pregnant women attending pre-natal check-ups with no genitourinary complaints, history of fever or antibiotic intake were collected for Gram stain, culture and antibiotic sensitivity tests. A second urine specimen for culture and sensitivity testing was obtained from those with significant bacteriuria. The results were compared with patients showing negative urine cultures. The overall prevalence of this clinical condition in our study was 13.2%. The significant isolates were Klebsiella pneumonia and E.coli and the most common risk factor was a previous history of urinary tract infection. The isolates were easily identified by using chromogenic agar ( HiCrome ) but colonies of uncommon pathogens like Acinetobacter and Streptococcus species appeared white and needed further identification. Screening of pregnant women for AB at first prenatal checkup helps analyse the associated factors and prevents its effects on pregnancy. The use of a chromogenic media can enhance reporting accuracy and will be an effective tool to monitor these cases routinely.

  5. Prevalence, aetiology and antibiotic sensitivity profile of asymptomatic bacteriuria isolates from pregnant women in selected antenatal clinic from Nairobi, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Ayoyi, Adelaide Ogutu; Kikuvi, Gideon; Bii, Christine; Kariuki, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) is the presence of bacteria in urine without apparent symptoms of urinary tract infections. The importance of asymptomatic bacteriuria lies in the insight it provides into symptomatic infections. To determine prevalence, bacterial isolates and Antibiotic Sensitivity Profile of asymptomatic bacterial urinary tract infection in pregnant women in selected clinics in Nairobi. This was a cross-sectional study involving women attending antenatal clinic at selected clinics of Nairobi County. The women who met the inclusion criteria were included in the study. The midstream urine samples of these women were subjected to microscopy, culture and sensitivity. A total of 1020 of women on their first antenatal clinic visit participated in the study; 219 of them had ASB, giving a prevalence of 21.5 % at 95% confidence level. Escherichia coli were the common organism isolated at 38.8%. The majority of the organisms were sensitive to imipenem and gentamycin. There is a high prevalence of ASB among pregnant women included in the study from the Nairobi county clinics. Therefore, routine ASB screening of pregnant women is recommended among the women attending antennal clinics in Nairobi county clinics.

  6. Prevalence, aetiology and antibiotic sensitivity profile of asymptomatic bacteriuria isolates from pregnant women in selected antenatal clinic from Nairobi, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Ayoyi, Adelaide Ogutu; Kikuvi, Gideon; Bii, Christine; Kariuki, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) is the presence of bacteria in urine without apparent symptoms of urinary tract infections. The importance of asymptomatic bacteriuria lies in the insight it provides into symptomatic infections. To determine prevalence, bacterial isolates and Antibiotic Sensitivity Profile of asymptomatic bacterial urinary tract infection in pregnant women in selected clinics in Nairobi. Methods This was a cross-sectional study involving women attending antenatal clinic at selected clinics of Nairobi County. The women who met the inclusion criteria were included in the study. The midstream urine samples of these women were subjected to microscopy, culture and sensitivity. Results A total of 1020 of women on their first antenatal clinic visit participated in the study; 219 of them had ASB, giving a prevalence of 21.5 % at 95% confidence level. Escherichia coli were the common organism isolated at 38.8%. The majority of the organisms were sensitive to imipenem and gentamycin. Conclusion There is a high prevalence of ASB among pregnant women included in the study from the Nairobi county clinics. Therefore, routine ASB screening of pregnant women is recommended among the women attending antennal clinics in Nairobi county clinics. PMID:28451019

  7. Similar Neutrophil-Driven Inflammatory and Antibacterial Responses in Elderly Patients with Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Bacteriuria

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yanbao; Zielinski, Martin D.; Rolfe, Melanie A.; Kuntz, Melissa M.; Nelson, Heidi; Nelson, Karen E.

    2015-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) and urinary tract infection (UTI) is based on the presence of diverse symptoms, including fever (≥38.5°C), rigors, malaise, lethargy, flank pain, hematuria, suprapubic discomfort, dysuria, and urgent or frequent urination. There is consensus in the medical community that ASB warrants antibiotic treatment only for patients undergoing urological procedures that lead to mucosal bleeding, catheterized individuals whose ASB persists for more than 48 h after catheter removal, and pregnant women. Pyuria is associated with UTI and implicates host immune responses via release of antibacterial effectors and phagocytosis of pathogens by neutrophils. Such responses are not sufficiently described for ASB. Metaproteomic methods were used here to identify the pathogens and evaluate molecular evidence of distinct immune responses in cases of ASB compared to UTI in elderly patients who were hospitalized upon injury. Neutrophil-driven inflammatory responses to invading bacteria were not discernible in most patients diagnosed with ASB compared to those with UTI. In contrast, proteomic urine analysis for trauma patients with no evidence of bacteriuria, including those who suffered mucosal injuries via urethral catheterization, rarely showed evidence of neutrophil infiltration. The same enzymes contributing to the synthesis of leukotrienes LTB4 and LTC4, mediators of inflammation and pain, were found in the UTI and ASB cohorts. These data support the notion that the pathways mediating inflammation and pain in most elderly patients with ASB are not quantitatively different from those seen in most elderly patients with UTI and warrant larger clinical studies to assess whether a common antibiotic treatment strategy for elderly ASB and UTI patients is justified. PMID:26238715

  8. Similar Neutrophil-Driven Inflammatory and Antibacterial Responses in Elderly Patients with Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Bacteriuria.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yanbao; Zielinski, Martin D; Rolfe, Melanie A; Kuntz, Melissa M; Nelson, Heidi; Nelson, Karen E; Pieper, Rembert

    2015-10-01

    Differential diagnosis of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) and urinary tract infection (UTI) is based on the presence of diverse symptoms, including fever (≥38.5°C), rigors, malaise, lethargy, flank pain, hematuria, suprapubic discomfort, dysuria, and urgent or frequent urination. There is consensus in the medical community that ASB warrants antibiotic treatment only for patients undergoing urological procedures that lead to mucosal bleeding, catheterized individuals whose ASB persists for more than 48 h after catheter removal, and pregnant women. Pyuria is associated with UTI and implicates host immune responses via release of antibacterial effectors and phagocytosis of pathogens by neutrophils. Such responses are not sufficiently described for ASB. Metaproteomic methods were used here to identify the pathogens and evaluate molecular evidence of distinct immune responses in cases of ASB compared to UTI in elderly patients who were hospitalized upon injury. Neutrophil-driven inflammatory responses to invading bacteria were not discernible in most patients diagnosed with ASB compared to those with UTI. In contrast, proteomic urine analysis for trauma patients with no evidence of bacteriuria, including those who suffered mucosal injuries via urethral catheterization, rarely showed evidence of neutrophil infiltration. The same enzymes contributing to the synthesis of leukotrienes LTB4 and LTC4, mediators of inflammation and pain, were found in the UTI and ASB cohorts. These data support the notion that the pathways mediating inflammation and pain in most elderly patients with ASB are not quantitatively different from those seen in most elderly patients with UTI and warrant larger clinical studies to assess whether a common antibiotic treatment strategy for elderly ASB and UTI patients is justified. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Diagnosis of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria and Associated Risk Factors Among Pregnant Women in Mangalore, Karnataka, India

    PubMed Central

    Baby, Neha Maria; Kuruvilla, Thomas .S.; Machado, Santhosh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) is common inwomen and increases in prevalence with age or sexual activity. Prompt detection and treatment of this condition and associated factors decreases complications like acute pyleonephritis, intrauterine growth retardation and preterm labour. Chromogenic media is a versatile tool in rapid primary screening of the causative organisms considerably reducing daily routine workload. Aim: To determine the prevalence of AB among pregnant women in a tertiary care set-up and analyse the contributory risk factors, its effects on pregnancy and the role of chromogenic media in the laboratory diagnosis of these cases. Materials and Methods: Urine samples of all pregnant women attending pre-natal check-ups with no genitourinary complaints, history of fever or antibiotic intake were collected for Gram stain, culture and antibiotic sensitivity tests. A second urine specimen for culture and sensitivity testing was obtained from those with significant bacteriuria. The results were compared with patients showing negative urine cultures. Results: The overall prevalence of this clinical condition in our study was 13.2%. The significant isolates were Klebsiella pneumonia and E.coli and the most common risk factor was a previous history of urinary tract infection. The isolates were easily identified by using chromogenic agar ( HiCrome ) but colonies of uncommon pathogens like Acinetobacter and Streptococcus species appeared white and needed further identification. Conclusion: Screening of pregnant women for AB at first prenatal checkup helps analyse the associated factors and prevents its effects on pregnancy. The use of a chromogenic media can enhance reporting accuracy and will be an effective tool to monitor these cases routinely. PMID:25386490

  10. Asymptomatic bacteriuria Escherichia coli are live biotherapeutics for UTI.

    PubMed

    Rudick, Charles N; Taylor, Aisha K; Yaggie, Ryan E; Schaeffer, Anthony J; Klumpp, David J

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) account for approximately 8 million clinic visits annually with symptoms that include acute pelvic pain, dysuria, and irritative voiding. Empiric UTI management with antimicrobials is complicated by increasing antimicrobial resistance among uropathogens, but live biotherapeutics products (LBPs), such as asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) strains of E. coli, offer the potential to circumvent antimicrobial resistance. Here we evaluated ASB E. coli as LBPs, relative to ciprofloxacin, for efficacy against infection and visceral pain in a murine UTI model. Visceral pain was quantified as tactile allodynia of the pelvic region in response to mechanical stimulation with von Frey filaments. Whereas ciprofloxacin promoted clearance of uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC), it did not reduce pelvic tactile allodynia, a measure of visceral pain. In contrast, ASB E. coli administered intravesically or intravaginally provided comparable reduction of allodynia similar to intravesical lidocaine. Moreover, ASB E. coli were similarly effective against UTI allodynia induced by Proteus mirabilis, Enterococccus faecalis and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Therefore, ASB E. coli have anti-infective activity comparable to the current standard of care yet also provide superior analgesia. These studies suggest that ASB E. coli represent novel LBPs for UTI symptoms.

  11. Risk factors related to asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Kovavisarach, Ekachai; Vichaipruck, Maytina; Kanjarahareutai, Suwattana

    2009-05-01

    To determine the risk factors related to asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) in pregnant women. Three hundred and sixty asymptomatic pregnant women who attended their first antenatal appointment at Rajavithi Hospital from August 1 and October 31 2005 were enrolled. Those with symptoms of urinary tract infection within one month, those who had been prescribed antibiotics during the previous seven days, and those with medical or obstetric complications, vaginal bleeding, and history of urinary tract disease were excluded. Urine specimens were collected by clean-catched midstream urine technique for culture. Several risk factors related to ABU and obstetric and demographic characteristics were recorded. The prevalence of ABU in pregnant women was 10.0%. The significant risk factors related to ABU in pregnancy was lower education level < or = grade 6 (p < 0.05) with 2.17-time risk of ABU compared with higher education level > grade 6. Maternal and gestational age, occupation, monthly income, gravidity, previous history of urinary tract infection and anemia were not statistically associated with ABU. Lower education level (< or = grade 6) should be the only significant risk factor related to ABU in Thai pregnant women under limited sample size.

  12. Outbreaks of Serratia marcescens bacteriuria in a neurosurgical intensive care unit of a tertiary care teaching hospital: a clinical, epidemiologic, and laboratory perspective.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hee Jung; Choi, Jun Yong; Park, Yoon Soo; Kim, Chang Oh; Kim, June Myung; Yong, Dong Eun; Lee, Kyung Won; Song, Young Goo

    2005-12-01

    Serratia marcescens is an aerobic gram-negative bacillus belonging to the family Enterobacteriacea. Infections caused by S marcescens may be difficult to treat because of their resistance to a variety of antibiotics, including beta-lactams and aminoglycosides. This study aimed to (1) identify the risk factors associated with the development of Serratia marcescens bacteriuria in neurosurgical intensive care units (NSICU); (2) genotype the pathogens to determine the source of infection; (3) compare these results with antibiograms; and (4) determine and implement appropriate control measures. A retrospective case-control study of the epidemiologic data, the surveillance of environmental cultures, and the genotyping of strains using arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR) were performed at a 750-bed, tertiary care teaching hospital. Seventy-four bacteriuria patients were compared with 74 age/sex-matched control patients in the NSICU between March 2002 and March 2004. The factors assessed were patient demographics; duration of hospital stay; duration of indwelling catheter use before and during stay in the NSICU; chronic underlying illnesses (diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, malignancy); other sites of infection; history of trauma; exposure to a nasogastric tube; mechanical ventilation; urinary catheterization; central venous catheterization; surgical drainage; tracheostomy; brain or spine surgery; and receipt of total parenteral nutrition (TPN), antimicrobials (beta-lactams, aminoglycosides, quinolones, carbapenems, vancomycins), or steroids. Patients with S marcescens bacteriuria were more likely to have a longer NSICU stay and other sites of infection. Environmental surveillance showed the handling of urine jugs to be the point source of contamination. Genotyping and antibiograms of 14 patients were the same except for those of 2 patients. The patient-related risk factors were identified, and a rapid identification of the organism was made

  13. Enterobacteria secrete an inhibitor of Pseudomonas virulence during clinical bacteriuria

    PubMed Central

    Ohlemacher, Shannon I.; Giblin, Daryl E.; d’Avignon, D. André; Stapleton, Ann E.; Trautner, Barbara W.; Henderson, Jeffrey P.

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli and other Enterobacteriaceae are among the most common pathogens of the human urinary tract. Among the genetic gains of function associated with urinary E. coli isolates is the Yersinia high pathogenicity island (HPI), which directs the biosynthesis of yersiniabactin (Ybt), a virulence-associated metallophore. Using a metabolomics approach, we found that E. coli and other Enterobacteriaceae expressing the Yersinia HPI also secrete escherichelin, a second metallophore whose chemical structure matches a known synthetic inhibitor of the virulence-associated pyochelin siderophore system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We detected escherichelin during clinical E. coli urinary tract infection (UTI) and experimental human colonization with a commensal, potentially probiotic E. coli bacteriuria strain. Escherichelin production by colonizing enterobacteria may help human hosts resist opportunistic infections by Pseudomonas and other pyochelin-expressing bacteria. This siderophore-based mechanism of microbial antagonism may be one of many elements contributing to the protective effects of the human microbiome. Future UTI-preventive probiotic strains may benefit by retaining the escherichelin biosynthetic capacity of the Yersinia HPI while eliminating the Ybt biosynthetic capacity. PMID:28945201

  14. Asymptomatic bacteriuria & obstetric outcome following treatment in early versus late pregnancy in north Indian women.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vaishali; Das, Vinita; Agarwal, Anjoo; Pandey, Amita

    2013-04-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria during pregnancy if left untreated, may lead to acute pyelonephritis, preterm labour, low birth weight foetus, etc. Adequate and early treatment reduces the incidence of these obstetric complications. The present study was done to determine presence of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) and obstetric outcome following treatment in early versus late pregnancy. A prospective cohort study was conducted at a tertiary care teaching hospital of north India. Pregnant women till 20 wk (n=371) and between 32 to 34 wk gestation (n=274) having no urinary complaints were included. Their mid stream urine sample was sent for culture and sensitivity. Women having > 10 [5] colony forming units/ml of single organism were diagnosed positive for ASB and treated. They were followed till delivery for obstetric outcome. Relative risk with 95% confidence interval was used to describe association between ASB and outcome of interest. ASB was found in 17 per cent pregnant women till 20 wk and in 16 per cent between 32 to 34 wk gestation. Increased incidence of preeclamptic toxaemia (PET) [RR 3.79, 95% CI 1.80-7.97], preterm premature rupture of membrane (PPROM)[RR 3.63, 45% CI 1.63-8.07], preterm labour (PTL) [RR 3.27, 95% CI 1.38-7.72], intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR)[RR 3.79, 95% CI 1.80-79], low birth weight (LBW) [RR1.37, 95% CI 0.71-2.61] was seen in late detected women (32-34 wk) as compared to ASB negative women, whereas no significant difference was seen in early detected women (till 20 wk) as compared to ASB negative women. Early detection and treatment of ASB during pregnancy prevents complications like PET, IUGR, PTL, PPROM and LBW. Therefore, screening and treatment of ASB may be incorporated as routine antenatal care for safe motherhood and healthy newborn.

  15. Asymptomatic bacteriuria & obstetric outcome following treatment in early versus late pregnancy in north Indian women

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Vaishali; Das, Vinita; Agarwal, Anjoo; Pandey, Amita

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Asymptomatic bacteriuria during pregnancy if left untreated, may lead to acute pyelonephritis, preterm labour, low birth weight foetus, etc. Adequate and early treatment reduces the incidence of these obstetric complications. The present study was done to determine presence of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) and obstetric outcome following treatment in early versus late pregnancy. Methods: A prospective cohort study was conducted at a tertiary care teaching hospital of north India. Pregnant women till 20 wk (n=371) and between 32 to 34 wk gestation (n=274) having no urinary complaints were included. Their mid stream urine sample was sent for culture and sensitivity. Women having > 105 colony forming units/ml of single organism were diagnosed positive for ASB and treated. They were followed till delivery for obstetric outcome. Relative risk with 95% confidence interval was used to describe association between ASB and outcome of interest. Results: ASB was found in 17 per cent pregnant women till 20 wk and in 16 per cent between 32 to 34 wk gestation. Increased incidence of preeclamptic toxaemia (PET) [RR 3.79, 95% CI 1.80-7.97], preterm premature rupture of membrane (PPROM)[RR 3.63, 45% CI 1.63-8.07], preterm labour (PTL) [RR 3.27, 95% CI 1.38-7.72], intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR)[RR 3.79, 95% CI 1.80-79], low birth weight (LBW) [RR1.37, 95% CI 0.71-2.61] was seen in late detected women (32-34 wk) as compared to ASB negative women, whereas no significant difference was seen in early detected women (till 20 wk) as compared to ASB negative women. Interpretation & conclusions: Early detection and treatment of ASB during pregnancy prevents complications like PET, IUGR, PTL, PPROM and LBW. Therefore, screening and treatment of ASB may be incorporated as routine antenatal care for safe motherhood and healthy newborn. PMID:23703344

  16. Costs and effects of screening and treating low risk women with a singleton pregnancy for asymptomatic bacteriuria, the ASB study.

    PubMed

    Kazemier, Brenda M; Schneeberger, Caroline; De Miranda, Esteriek; Van Wassenaer, Aleid; Bossuyt, Patrick M; Vogelvang, Tatjana E; Reijnders, Frans J L; Delemarre, Friso M C; Verhoeven, Corine J M; Oudijk, Martijn A; Van Der Ven, Jeanine A; Kuiper, Petra N; Feiertag, Nicolette; Ott, Alewijn; De Groot, Christianne J M; Mol, Ben Willem J; Geerlings, Suzanne E

    2012-06-21

    The prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) in pregnancy is 2-10% and is associated with both maternal and neonatal adverse outcomes as pyelonephritis and preterm delivery. Antibiotic treatment is reported to decrease these adverse outcomes although the existing evidence is of poor quality. We plan a combined screen and treat study in women with a singleton pregnancy. We will screen women between 16 and 22 weeks of gestation for ASB using the urine dipslide technique. The dipslide is considered positive when colony concentration ≥105 colony forming units (CFU)/mL of a single microorganism or two different colonies but one ≥105 CFU/mL is found, or when Group B Streptococcus bacteriuria is found in any colony concentration. Women with a positive dipslide will be randomly allocated to receive nitrofurantoin or placebo 100 mg twice a day for 5 consecutive days (double blind). Primary outcomes of this trial are maternal pyelonephritis and/or preterm delivery before 34 weeks. Secondary outcomes are neonatal and maternal morbidity, neonatal weight, time to delivery, preterm delivery rate before 32 and 37 weeks, days of admission in neonatal intensive care unit, maternal admission days and costs. This trial will provide evidence for the benefit and cost-effectiveness of dipslide screening for ASB among low risk women at 16-22 weeks of pregnancy and subsequent nitrofurantoin treatment. Dutch trial registry: NTR-3068.

  17. Deliberate Establishment of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria-A Novel Strategy to Prevent Recurrent UTI.

    PubMed

    Wullt, Björn; Svanborg, Catharina

    2016-07-29

    We have established a novel strategy to reduce the risk for recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI), where rapidly increasing antibiotic resistance poses a major threat. Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated that asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) protects the host against symptomatic infections with more virulent strains. To mimic this protective effect, we deliberately establish ABU in UTI-prone patients, who are refractory to conventional therapy. The patients are inoculated with Escherichia coli (E. coli) 83972, now widely used as a prototype ABU strain. Therapeutic efficacy has been demonstrated in a placebo-controlled trial, supporting the feasibility of using E. coli 83972 as a tool to prevent recurrent UTI and, potentially, to outcompete antibiotic-resistant strains from the human urinary tract. In addition, the human inoculation protocol offers unique opportunities to study host-parasite interaction in vivo in the human urinary tract. Here, we review the clinical evidence for protection using this approach as well as some molecular insights into the pathogenesis of UTI that have been gained during these studies.

  18. Virulence characteristics of Escherichia coli strains causing asymptomatic bacteriuria.

    PubMed

    Vranes, J; Kruzić, V; Sterk-Kuzmanović, N; Schönwald, S

    2003-08-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the expression of Escherichia coli virulence-associated factors among the strains isolated from a group of women with a history of recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs), in whom asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) was detected at follow-up, and from a group of children without a history of previous UTI, in whom ABU was detected during the screening. Possible differences between the virulence potential of these strains were investigated. Hemolysin production, the ability to adhere to Buffalo green monkey cell line and hemagglutination (HA) ability of the ABU-associated E. coli strains were tested. E. coli strains isolated from patients with acute recurrent UTIs served as a comparison. The well-known low virulence of strains isolated from patients with ABU was demonstrated. In contrast to strains isolated from recurrent uncomplicated UTIs, the ABU-associated strains were mostly nonhemolytic (75%), nonadherent (70%) and lacked HA ability (61%). HA ability was significantly more common among the strains isolated from children without a history of UTI than among the strains isolated from women with recurrent UTIs (chi2 = 9.97, p < 0.01), whereas the adherence and hemolytic abilities did not differ between the two ABU groups. A further prospective study is needed to determine whether the HA ability is the predictor of subsequent symptomatic UTI.

  19. Costs and effects of screening and treating low risk women with a singleton pregnancy for asymptomatic bacteriuria, the ASB study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) in pregnancy is 2-10% and is associated with both maternal and neonatal adverse outcomes as pyelonephritis and preterm delivery. Antibiotic treatment is reported to decrease these adverse outcomes although the existing evidence is of poor quality. Methods/Design We plan a combined screen and treat study in women with a singleton pregnancy. We will screen women between 16 and 22 weeks of gestation for ASB using the urine dipslide technique. The dipslide is considered positive when colony concentration ≥105 colony forming units (CFU)/mL of a single microorganism or two different colonies but one ≥105 CFU/mL is found, or when Group B Streptococcus bacteriuria is found in any colony concentration. Women with a positive dipslide will be randomly allocated to receive nitrofurantoin or placebo 100 mg twice a day for 5 consecutive days (double blind). Primary outcomes of this trial are maternal pyelonephritis and/or preterm delivery before 34 weeks. Secondary outcomes are neonatal and maternal morbidity, neonatal weight, time to delivery, preterm delivery rate before 32 and 37 weeks, days of admission in neonatal intensive care unit, maternal admission days and costs. Discussion This trial will provide evidence for the benefit and cost-effectiveness of dipslide screening for ASB among low risk women at 16–22 weeks of pregnancy and subsequent nitrofurantoin treatment. Trial registration Dutch trial registry: NTR-3068 PMID:22892110

  20. Predictors of asymptomatic bacteriuria among pregnant women in a low-resource setting.

    PubMed

    Awoleke, J O; Adanikin, A I; Ajayi, D D; Ayosanmi, O S

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at identifying predictors of asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) among pregnant women in a low-resource setting, with the intent of recommending a guideline for screening during antenatal care. A total of 266 healthy pregnant women were antenatally recruited after informed consent. They had routine antenatal investigations, a 1 h 50-g oral glucose tolerance test and quantitative urine culture and sensitivity. The data collected were analysed using statistical software package SPSS v. 17. Prevalence of AB was 23 (8.6%). Escherichia coli was the commonest isolate (6, 26.1%), closely followed by Staphylococcus aureus (5, 21.7%). AB was commoner among patients aged 25-34 years, of low parity and higher education. Blood group B- rhesus-positive significantly predicts the likelihood of developing AB in pregnancy (adjusted OR: 0.36; 95% CI: 0.14-0.96). We conclude that blood group B-rhesus-positive in association with other patients' characteristics, such as age 25-34 years, low parity and higher education could form guidelines for a screening algorithm in our environment.

  1. Modified Reporting of Positive Urine Cultures to Reduce Inappropriate Treatment of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria Among Nonpregnant, Noncatheterized Inpatients: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Daley, Peter; Garcia, David; Inayatullah, Raheel; Penney, Carla; Boyd, Sarah

    2018-05-28

    DESIGNWe conducted a randomized, parallel, unblinded, superiority trial of a laboratory reporting intervention designed to reduce antibiotic treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB).METHODSResults of positive urine cultures from 110 consecutive inpatients at 2 urban acute-care hospitals were randomized to standard report (control) or modified report (intervention). The standard report included bacterial count, bacterial identification, and antibiotic susceptibility information including drug dosage and cost. The modified report stated: "This POSITIVE urine culture may represent asymptomatic bacteriuria or urinary tract infection. If urinary tract infection is suspected clinically, please call the microbiology laboratory … for identification and susceptibility results." We used the following exclusion criteria: age <18 years, pregnancy, presence of an indwelling urinary catheter, samples from patients already on antibiotics, neutropenia, or admission to an intensive care unit. The primary efficacy outcome was the proportion of appropriate antibiotic therapy prescribed.RESULTSAccording to our intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis, the proportion of appropriate treatment (urinary tract infection treated plus ASB not treated) was higher in the modified arm than in the standard arm: 44 of 55 (80.0%) versus 29 of 55 (52.7%), respectively (absolute difference, -27.3%; RR, 0.42; P = .002; number needed to report for benefit, 3.7).CONCLUSIONSModified reporting resulted in a significant reduction in inappropriate antibiotic treatment without an increase in adverse events. Safety should be further assessed in a large effectiveness trial before implementationTRIAL REGISTRATION. clinicaltrials.gov#NCT02797613Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2018;1-6.

  2. Fosfomycin in a single dose versus a 7-day course of amoxicillin-clavulanate for the treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Estebanez, A; Pascual, R; Gil, V; Ortiz, F; Santibáñez, M; Pérez Barba, C

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this paper was to compare the efficacy of a single dose of 3 g of fosfomycin to that of a 7-day regimen of amoxicillin-clavulanate in the treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria during pregnancy. A randomised, prospective, interventional, analytical, longitudinal study was undertaken, in which the efficacy of two antibiotic regimens (one short and the other long) in the treatment of pregnant women with asymptomatic bacteriuria is compared. One hundred and nine patients were randomly assigned to two groups: 56 were treated with amoxicillin-clavulanate and 53 with fosfomycin. The two groups were similar in terms of co-morbidity, treatments received during pregnancy, obstetric, gynaecological and surgical history and laboratory data. The efficacy of the two regimens was similar and the eradication rate was over 80% in both groups (P = 0.720) (relative risk [RR] 1.195, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.451-3.165). The number of reinfections was greater in the amoxicillin-clavulanate group (P = 0.045). The secondary effects were lower in the fosfomycin group (P = 0.008). There were no significant differences in the number of persistences (P = 0.39), development of symptomatic urinary infections (P = 0.319) or recurrences (P = 0.96). Treatment with a single dose of fosfomycin is as effective as the standard course of treatment with amoxicillin-clavulanate and may be preferable due to its simpler administration and the smaller number of reinfections.

  3. The frequency of urinary tract infection and subclinical bacteriuria in dogs with allergic dermatitis treated with oclacitinib: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Andrew C; Schissler, Jennifer R; Rosychuk, Rod A W; Moore, A Russell

    2017-10-01

    Oclacitinib is a selective Janus kinase inhibitor for the treatment of canine allergic pruritus and atopic dermatitis in dogs. Glucocorticoids and ciclosporin increase urinary tract infection (UTI) frequency in dogs with inflammatory skin disease. Prospective study to evaluate the frequency of UTI and subclinical bacteriuria in dogs with allergic dermatitis receiving oclacitinib. Client-owned dogs ≥2 years of age with a history of allergic dermatitis without apparent history of urinary tract disease or predisposition to UTI were included. Prior to enrolment, urinalysis and quantitative urine culture were performed after a washout period of at least 14 days from systemic antimicrobial drugs and 28 days for ciclosporin and systemic glucocorticoids. Dogs received oclacitinib at labelled dosing for an intended period of 180-230 days with a follow-up urinalysis and urine culture performed regardless of urinary tract signs. Systemic antimicrobial and immune-modulating drugs were not administered during the study. None of the 55 dogs in this study developed UTI while receiving oclacitinib based on follow-up urinalysis and urine culture performed during a range of 58-280 days (mean 195 days). Two dogs developed self-limiting abnormal urinary tract signs without urine culture or urinalysis findings consistent with UTI. These findings indicate that bacteriuria is not an expected adverse effect in dogs treated with oclacitinib without a prior history of UTI or predisposing condition during this treatment period. Therefore, routine urine culture is not indicated for such dogs in the absence of abnormal urinalysis or clinical signs of urinary tract disease. © 2017 ESVD and ACVD.

  4. Asymptomatic bacteriuria, to screen or not to screen - and when to treat?

    PubMed

    Cai, Tommaso; Koves, Bela; Johansen, Truls E Bjerklund

    2017-03-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) is a common clinical condition that often leads to unnecessary treatment. The purpose of this review is to outline and evaluate the most recent literature on the management of ABU. The role of ABU management has been evaluated in several patient subgroups: healthy patients without identified risk factors, pregnant women, postmenopausal women, women with recurrent UTI, patients with diabetes, elderly institutionalized patients, patients with renal transplants, patients with indwelling catheters and prior to surgery. Available evidence only supports the need for screening and treatment of ABU in pregnant women and prior to urological procedures breaching the mucosa. In all the other conditions the treatment of ABU is not only useless but also harmful. A short course treatment in pregnant women is recommended; in patients with ABU prior to urological procedures breaching the mucosa the treatment should be given in line with antibiogram and in line with the recommendations of European Association of Urology guidelines. The approach to patients with ABU has changed completely during recent years. Today, screening and treatment of ABU is recommended only in pregnant women and in all patients who are candidates for urological procedures breaching the mucosa.

  5. A Controlled Quasi-Experimental Study of an Educational Intervention to Reduce the Unnecessary Use of Antimicrobials For Asymptomatic Bacteriuria

    PubMed Central

    Irfan, Neal; Brooks, Annie; Mithoowani, Siraj; Celetti, Steve J.; Main, Cheryl; Mertz, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Background Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) should only be treated in cases of pregnancy or in-patients undergoing urologic procedures; however, unnecessary treatment of ABU is common in clinical practice. Objective To identify risk factors for unnecessary treatment and to assess the impact of an educational intervention focused on these risk factors on treatment of ABU. Design Quasi-experimental study with a control group. Setting Two tertiary teaching adult care hospitals. Participants Consecutive patients with positive urine cultures between January 30th and April 17th, 2012 (baseline) and January 30th and April 30th, 2013 (intervention). Intervention In January 2013, a multifaceted educational intervention based on risk factors identified during the baseline period was provided to medical residents (monthly) on one clinical teaching unit (CTU) at one hospital site, with the CTU of the other hospital serving as the control. Results During the baseline period, 160/341 (46.9%) positive urine cultures were obtained from asymptomatic patients at the two hospitals, and 94/160 (58.8%) were inappropriately treated with antibiotics. Risk factors for inappropriate use included: female gender (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1-4.3), absence of a catheter (OR 2.5, 1.2-5), bacteriuria versus candiduria (OR 10.6, 3.8-29.4), pyuria (OR 2.0, 1.1-3.8), and positive nitrites (OR 2.2, 1.1-4.5). In 2013, only 2/24 (8%) of ABU patients were inappropriately treated on the intervention CTU as compared to 14/29 (52%) on the control CTU (OR 0.10; 95% CI 0.02-0.49). A reduction was also observed as compared to baseline on the intervention CTU (OR 0.1, 0.02-0.7) with no significant change noted on the control CTU (OR 0.47, 0.13-1.7). Conclusions A multifaceted educational intervention geared towards medical residents with a focus on identified risk factors for inappropriate management of ABU was effective in reducing unnecessary antibiotic use. PMID:26182348

  6. A Controlled Quasi-Experimental Study of an Educational Intervention to Reduce the Unnecessary Use of Antimicrobials For Asymptomatic Bacteriuria.

    PubMed

    Irfan, Neal; Brooks, Annie; Mithoowani, Siraj; Celetti, Steve J; Main, Cheryl; Mertz, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) should only be treated in cases of pregnancy or in-patients undergoing urologic procedures; however, unnecessary treatment of ABU is common in clinical practice. To identify risk factors for unnecessary treatment and to assess the impact of an educational intervention focused on these risk factors on treatment of ABU. Quasi-experimental study with a control group. Two tertiary teaching adult care hospitals. Consecutive patients with positive urine cultures between January 30th and April 17th, 2012 (baseline) and January 30th and April 30th, 2013 (intervention). In January 2013, a multifaceted educational intervention based on risk factors identified during the baseline period was provided to medical residents (monthly) on one clinical teaching unit (CTU) at one hospital site, with the CTU of the other hospital serving as the control. During the baseline period, 160/341 (46.9%) positive urine cultures were obtained from asymptomatic patients at the two hospitals, and 94/160 (58.8%) were inappropriately treated with antibiotics. Risk factors for inappropriate use included: female gender (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1-4.3), absence of a catheter (OR 2.5, 1.2-5), bacteriuria versus candiduria (OR 10.6, 3.8-29.4), pyuria (OR 2.0, 1.1-3.8), and positive nitrites (OR 2.2, 1.1-4.5). In 2013, only 2/24 (8%) of ABU patients were inappropriately treated on the intervention CTU as compared to 14/29 (52%) on the control CTU (OR 0.10; 95% CI 0.02-0.49). A reduction was also observed as compared to baseline on the intervention CTU (OR 0.1, 0.02-0.7) with no significant change noted on the control CTU (OR 0.47, 0.13-1.7). A multifaceted educational intervention geared towards medical residents with a focus on identified risk factors for inappropriate management of ABU was effective in reducing unnecessary antibiotic use.

  7. The Use of Clinical Decision Support in Reducing Diagnosis of and Treatment of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria.

    PubMed

    Keller, Sara C; Feldman, Leonard; Smith, Janessa; Pahwa, Amit; Cosgrove, Sara E; Chida, Natasha

    2018-06-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) embedded within the electronic health record (EHR) is a potential antibiotic stewardship strategy for hospitalized patients. Reduction in urine testing and treating asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) is an important strategy to promote antibiotic stewardship. We created an intervention focused on reducing urine testing for asymptomatic patients at a large tertiary care center. The objective of this study was to design an intervention to reduce unnecessary urinalysis and urine culture (UC) orders as well as the treatment of ASB. We performed a quasiexperimental study among adult inpatients at a single academic institution. We implemented a bundled intervention, including information broadcast in newsletters, hospitalwide screensavers, and passive CDS messages in the EHR. We investigated the impact of this strategy on urinalysis, UC orders, and on the treatment of ASB by using an interrupted time series analysis. Our intervention led to reduced UC order as well as reduced antibiotic orders in response to urinalysis orders and UC results. This easily implementable bundle may play an important role as an antibiotic stewardship strategy. © 2018 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  8. Is Asymptomatic Bacteriuria a Risk Factor for Prosthetic Joint Infection?

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Ricardo; Muñoz-Mahamud, Ernesto; Quayle, Jonathan; Dias da Costa, Luis; Casals, Cristina; Scott, Phylip; Leite, Pedro; Vilanova, Paz; Garcia, Sebastian; Ramos, Maria Helena; Dias, Joana; Soriano, Alex; Guyot, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Background. Infection is a major complication after total joint arthroplasty. The urinary tract is a possible source of surgical site contamination, but the role of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) before elective surgery and the subsequent risk of infection is poorly understood. Methods. Candidates for total hip or total knee arthroplasty were reviewed in a multicenter cohort study. A urine sample was cultured in all patients, and those with ASB were identified. Preoperative antibiotic treatment was decided on an individual basis, and it was not mandatory or randomized. The primary outcome was prosthetic joint infection (PJI) in the first postoperative year. Results. A total of 2497 patients were enrolled. The prevalence of ASB was 12.1% (303 of 2497), 16.3% in women and 5.0% in men (odds ratio, 3.67; 95% confidence interval, 2.65–5.09; P < .001). The overall PJI rate was 1.7%. The infection rate was significantly higher in the ASB group than in the non-ASB group (4.3% vs 1.4%; odds ratio, 3.23; 95% confidence interval, 1.67–6.27; P = .001). In the ASB group, there was no significant difference in PJI rate between treated (3.9%) and untreated (4.7%) patients. The ASB group had a significantly higher proportion of PJI due to gram-negative microorganisms than the non-ASB group, but these did not correlate to isolates from urine cultures. Conclusions. ASB was an independent risk factor for PJI, particularly that due to gram-negative microorganisms. Preoperative antibiotic treatment did not show any benefit and cannot be recommended. PMID:24723280

  9. Pre-operative Asymptomatic Bacteriuria: A Risk Factor For Prosthetic Joint Infection?

    PubMed

    Weale, R; El-Bakri, F; Saeed, Kordo

    2018-04-13

    Infection is a rare complication following implantation of prosthetic material into a joint. The impact of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) before elective operations and the subsequent risk of prosthetic joint infection (PJI) are not well understood. • Assess the prevalence of ASB amongst patients undergoing total arthroplasty of the hip and knee. • Determine the rates of PJI diagnosed within two years of the arthroplasty and if ASB is an independent risk factor for developing PJI. Patients who had total/unicondylar knee or total hip arthroplasty were retrospectively reviewed over a five-year period. Pre-operative urine samples within one year of surgery were analysed and those with ASB identified. Primary outcome was prosthetic joint infection (PJI) within the first postoperative year. 5542 patients were included. 4368 had a pre-operative urine culture recorded. The prevalence of ASB was 140 of 4368 (3.2%). The overall PJI rate was 56 of 5542 (1.01%). Of those with a PJI, 33 had a pre-operative urine sample recorded. The infection rate in the ASB group was 5% (7 of 140), in the no-ASB group it was 0.61% (26 of 4228) and in the group without a urine sample it was 1.96% (23 of 1174) (p value <0.001). The ASB isolate was the same microorganism as the PJI isolate in only one of the seven cases. The association between ASB and PJI is statistically significant, but the urine isolates did not relate to the isolates in the prosthetic joint, suggestive the relationship is unlikely causal. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Prevalence, detection and treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria in a Turkish obstetric population.

    PubMed

    Kutlay, Sim; Kutlay, Baran; Karaahmetoglu, Ozgur; Ak, Cetin; Erkaya, Salim

    2003-08-01

    To prospectively determine the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) and urinary tract infection (UTI) and presenting symptoms of UTI as well as the most appropriate diagnostic test and success of single/combination drug treatment in a Turkish obstetric population. Between September and December 2000, 406 of 412 pregnant women admitted for an initial obstetric examination during the first trimester were evaluated. Results of clean-catch urine culture, microscopic urinalysis and dipstick urine tests were analyzed. The prevalence of ASB (n = 43) and symptomatic UTI (n = 19) were 10.6% and 4.7%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of microscopic urinalysis were 71.0% and 73.6%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of dipstick testing were 38.7% and 35.8%, respectively. Eighty-three percent of ASB/UTI cases were effectively treated with a course of a single antimicrobial (amoxicillin or a first-generation cephalosporin). If untreated, ASB can lead to acute, symptomatic UTI, including acute pyelonephritis, which in turn is associated with preterm labor and low birth weight. Therefore, screening for ASB early in pregnancy by methods with high sensitivity and treatment with appropriate antimicrobial regimens can decrease the risk of symptomatic UTI. In a Turkish clinical unit where culture is not available, the use of microscopic urinalysis was a clinically effective alternative method of detecting ASB. In this study, the sensitivity and specificity of dipstick testing were not high enough to recommend them as means of detecting ASB/UTI.

  11. Profile and microbiological isolates of asymptomatic bacteriuria among pregnant women in Abakaliki, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Onu, Fidelis Agwu; Ajah, Leonard Ogbonna; Ezeonu, Paul Olisaemeka; Umeora, Odidika Ugochukwu Joannes; Ibekwe, Perpetus Chudi; Ajah, Monique Iheoma

    2015-01-01

    Background Detecting and treating asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) prevents urinary tract infection and its consequences. The cost-effectiveness of routine screening for ASB in pregnancy is controversial. In populations with high prevalence, however, it is worthwhile and justifiable. Aim To determine the profile, prevalence, microbiological isolates, and risk factors of ASB among booking antenatal clinic attendees in Abakaliki, Nigeria. Materials and methods This was a cross-sectional study involving booking antenatal clinic attendees at the Federal Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, who met the inclusion criteria. This study occurred between January and December, 2012. The midstream urine samples of these women were subjected to microscopy, culture, and sensitivity. Results A total of 300 randomly selected booking antenatal clinic attendees participated in the study; 74 of them had ASB, giving a prevalence of 24.7%. With the exception of rural residence, sociodemographic and obstetric characteristics did not influence the risk of ASB among the participants in this study. Staphylococcus aureus was the commonest organism isolated. The majority of the organisms were sensitive to ofloxacin and ceftriaxone. Conclusion There is a high prevalence of ASB among pregnant women in Abakaliki. With the exception of rural dwelling, sociodemographic and obstetric characteristics did not significantly influence the risk of ASB among these pregnant women. Therefore, routine ASB screening of pregnant women is recommended in our environment. PMID:26244027

  12. Detection of bacteriuria and pyuria by URISCREEN a rapid enzymatic screening test.

    PubMed Central

    Pezzlo, M T; Amsterdam, D; Anhalt, J P; Lawrence, T; Stratton, N J; Vetter, E A; Peterson, E M; de la Maza, L M

    1992-01-01

    A multicenter study was performed to evaluate the ability of the URISCREEN (Analytab Products, Plainview, N.Y.), a 2-min catalase tube test, to detect bacteriuria and pyuria. This test was compared with the Chemstrip LN (BioDynamics, Division of Boehringer Mannheim Diagnostics, Indianapolis, Ind.), a 2-min enzyme dipstick test; a semiquantitative plate culture method was used as the reference test for bacteriuria, and the Gram stain or a quantitative chamber count method was used as the reference test for pyuria. Each test was evaluated for its ability to detect probable pathogens at greater than or equal to 10(2) CFU/ml and/or greater than or equal to 1 leukocyte per oil immersion field, as determined by the Gram stain method, or greater than 10 leukocytes per microliter, as determined by the quantitative count method. A total of 1,500 urine specimens were included in this evaluation. There were 298 specimens with greater than or equal 10(2) CFU/ml and 451 specimens with pyuria. Of the 298 specimens with probable pathogens isolated at various colony counts, 219 specimens had colony counts of greater than or equal to 10(5) CFU/ml, 51 specimens had between 10(4) and 10(5) CFU/ml, and 28 specimens had between 10(2) and less than 10(4) CFU/ml. Both the URISCREEN and the Chemstrip LN detected 93% (204 of 219) of the specimens with probable pathogens at greater than or equal to 10(5) CFU/ml. For the specimens with probable pathogens at greater than or equal to 10(2) CFU/ml, the sensitivities of the URISCREEN and the Chemstrip LN were 86% (256 of 298) and 81% (241 of 298), respectively. Of the 451 specimens with pyuria, the URISCREEN detected 88% (398 of 451) and Chemstrip LN detected 78% (350 if 451). There were 204 specimens with both greater than or equal to 10(2) CFU/ml and pyuria; the sensitivities of both methods were 95% (193 of 204) for these specimens. Overall, there were 545 specimens with probable pathogens at greater than or equal to 10(2) CFU/ml and

  13. Discovery and Characterization of Human-Urine Utilization by Asymptomatic-Bacteriuria-Causing Streptococcus agalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Ipe, Deepak S.; Ben Zakour, Nouri L.; Sullivan, Matthew J.; Beatson, Scott A.; Ulett, Kimberly B.; Benjamin, William H.; Davies, Mark R.; Dando, Samantha J.; King, Nathan P.; Cripps, Allan W.; Dougan, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae causes both symptomatic cystitis and asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU); however, growth characteristics of S. agalactiae in human urine have not previously been reported. Here, we describe a phenotype of robust growth in human urine observed in ABU-causing S. agalactiae (ABSA) that was not seen among uropathogenic S. agalactiae (UPSA) strains isolated from patients with acute cystitis. In direct competition assays using pooled human urine inoculated with equal numbers of a prototype ABSA strain, designated ABSA 1014, and any one of several UPSA strains, measurement of the percentage of each strain recovered over time showed a markedly superior fitness of ABSA 1014 for urine growth. Comparative phenotype profiling of ABSA 1014 and UPSA strain 807, isolated from a patient with acute cystitis, using metabolic arrays of >2,500 substrates and conditions revealed unique and specific l-malic acid catabolism in ABSA 1014 that was absent in UPSA 807. Whole-genome sequencing also revealed divergence in malic enzyme-encoding genes between the strains predicted to impact the activity of the malate metabolic pathway. Comparative growth assays in urine comparing wild-type ABSA and gene-deficient mutants that were functionally inactivated for the malic enzyme metabolic pathway by targeted disruption of the maeE or maeK gene in ABSA demonstrated attenuated growth of the mutants in normal human urine as well as synthetic human urine containing malic acid. We conclude that some S. agalactiae strains can grow in human urine, and this relates in part to malic acid metabolism, which may affect the persistence or progression of S. agalactiae ABU. PMID:26553467

  14. Daily cranberry juice for the prevention of asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy: A randomized, controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Wing, Deborah A.; Rumney, Pamela J.; Preslicka, Christine; Chung, Judith H.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To compare daily cranberry juice cocktail to placebo during pregnancy on asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) and symptomatic urinary tract infections (UTIs). Study Design 188 women were randomized to cranberry or placebo in three treatment arms: A: Cranberry three times daily (n=58), B: Cranberry at breakfast, then placebo at lunch and dinner (n=67), C. Placebo three times daily (n=63). After 27.7% (52/188) of the subjects were enrolled, the dosing regimens were changed to twice daily dosing to improve compliance. Results There were 27 UTIs in 18 subjects in this cohort: 6 in 4 subjects in Group A, 10 in 7 subjects in Group B, and 11 in 7 subjects in Group C, p=0.71. There were 57% and 41% reductions in the frequency of ASB and all UTIs in the multiple daily dosing group, however, this study was not sufficiently powered at the alpha 0.05 level (CI 0.14–1.39 and 0.22–1.60, respectively, incidence rate ratios). 73/188 (38.8%) subjects withdrew, most for gastrointestinal upset. Conclusion These data suggest there may be a protective effect of cranberry ingestion against ASB and symptomatic UTIs in pregnancy. Further studies are planned to evaluate this effect. PMID:18707726

  15. Asymptomatic bacteriuria screened by catheterized samples at pregnancy term in women undergoing cesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Atacag, T; Yayci, E; Guler, T; Suer, K; Yayci, F; Deren, S; Cetin, A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the frequency of urinary tract infection (UTI) with urine samples obtained via catheterization among women undergoing cesarean delivery at term pregnancy. A cross-sectional study involving 159 women in whom cesarean delivery was conducted at term pregnancy after a regular follow-up from first to third trimester. For screening and diagnosis of UTI during antenatal period, the authors used dipstick test and microscopic urinalysis, and urine culture was used in the presence of symptomatic UTI unresponsive to initial antibiotic therapy. A urine sample was obtained immediately after insertion of Foley catheter for urine dipstick test, microscopic urinalysis, and culture during cesarean delivery. Obstetric and UTI data were recorded. Of 159 pregnant women, 95 (59.8%) did not develop UTI during antenatal care. There was no patient with symptomatic UTI at the admission for cesarean delivery. The authors found UTI with urine dipstick and microscopic urinalysis in 12 patients and of them, four patients had no history of UTI, and all the remaining eight patients had asymptomatic UTI during antenatal follow-up. UTI according to urine culture was encountered in three patients, two of them had one episode of UTI, and one had two episodes of UTI during antenatal follow-up. After regular antenatal follow-up screening with urine dipstick, microscopic urinalysis, and counseling of pregnant women regarding UTIs, the frequency of bacteriuria decreases considerably during cesarean delivery.

  16. Escherichia coli isolates causing asymptomatic bacteriuria in catheterized and noncatheterized individuals possess similar virulence properties.

    PubMed

    Watts, Rebecca E; Hancock, Viktoria; Ong, Cheryl-Lynn Y; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Mabbett, Amanda N; Totsika, Makrina; Looke, David F; Nimmo, Graeme R; Klemm, Per; Schembri, Mark A

    2010-07-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common infectious diseases of humans, with Escherichia coli being responsible for >80% of all cases. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) occurs when bacteria colonize the urinary tract without causing clinical symptoms and can affect both catheterized patients (catheter-associated ABU [CA-ABU]) and noncatheterized patients. Here, we compared the virulence properties of a collection of ABU and CA-ABU nosocomial E. coli isolates in terms of antibiotic resistance, phylogenetic grouping, specific UTI-associated virulence genes, hemagglutination characteristics, and biofilm formation. CA-ABU isolates were similar to ABU isolates with regard to the majority of these characteristics; exceptions were that CA-ABU isolates had a higher prevalence of the polysaccharide capsule marker genes kpsMT II and kpsMT K1, while more ABU strains were capable of mannose-resistant hemagglutination. To examine biofilm growth in detail, we performed a global gene expression analysis with two CA-ABU strains that formed a strong biofilm and that possessed a limited adhesin repertoire. The gene expression profile of the CA-ABU strains during biofilm growth showed considerable overlap with that previously described for the prototype ABU E. coli strain, 83972. This is the first global gene expression analysis of E. coli CA-ABU strains. Overall, our data suggest that nosocomial ABU and CA-ABU E. coli isolates possess similar virulence profiles.

  17. Influence of regularity of checkups during pregnancy on prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria and maternal behaviors regarding urinary infection prevention.

    PubMed

    Babic, U; Opric, D; Perovic, M; Dmitrovic, A; MihailoviC, S; Kocijancic, D; Radakovic, J; Dugalic, M Gojnic

    2015-01-01

    T0 investigate how the regularity of checkups in pregnancy influences maternal behavior regarding habits in prevention of urinary tract infection (UTI), the level of information, and finally the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB). This study included 223 women with regular and 220 women with irregular checkups in pregnancy were given the questionnaire on the following issues: frequency of sexual intercourses during pregnancy, the regularity of bathing and changing of underwear, the direction of washing the genital region after urinating, the regularity of antenatal visits to gynecologist, and the subjective experience concerning the quality of the information received by the healthcare provider. AB was present significantly more frequent in group of participants with irregular controls during pregnancy compared to group with regular checkups in pregnancy. The prevalence of AB was higher in those women who had irregular prenatal checkups. Maternal behaviors related with the risk of urinary infections are more frequent among women with irregular prenatal care. Results of the present study emphasize the importance of regular prenatal care in AB prevention.

  18. Discovery and Characterization of Human-Urine Utilization by Asymptomatic-Bacteriuria-Causing Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Ipe, Deepak S; Ben Zakour, Nouri L; Sullivan, Matthew J; Beatson, Scott A; Ulett, Kimberly B; Benjamin, William H; Davies, Mark R; Dando, Samantha J; King, Nathan P; Cripps, Allan W; Schembri, Mark A; Dougan, Gordon; Ulett, Glen C

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae causes both symptomatic cystitis and asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU); however, growth characteristics of S. agalactiae in human urine have not previously been reported. Here, we describe a phenotype of robust growth in human urine observed in ABU-causing S. agalactiae (ABSA) that was not seen among uropathogenic S. agalactiae (UPSA) strains isolated from patients with acute cystitis. In direct competition assays using pooled human urine inoculated with equal numbers of a prototype ABSA strain, designated ABSA 1014, and any one of several UPSA strains, measurement of the percentage of each strain recovered over time showed a markedly superior fitness of ABSA 1014 for urine growth. Comparative phenotype profiling of ABSA 1014 and UPSA strain 807, isolated from a patient with acute cystitis, using metabolic arrays of >2,500 substrates and conditions revealed unique and specific l-malic acid catabolism in ABSA 1014 that was absent in UPSA 807. Whole-genome sequencing also revealed divergence in malic enzyme-encoding genes between the strains predicted to impact the activity of the malate metabolic pathway. Comparative growth assays in urine comparing wild-type ABSA and gene-deficient mutants that were functionally inactivated for the malic enzyme metabolic pathway by targeted disruption of the maeE or maeK gene in ABSA demonstrated attenuated growth of the mutants in normal human urine as well as synthetic human urine containing malic acid. We conclude that some S. agalactiae strains can grow in human urine, and this relates in part to malic acid metabolism, which may affect the persistence or progression of S. agalactiae ABU. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Global Gene Expression Profiling of the Asymptomatic Bacteriuria Escherichia coli Strain 83972 in the Human Urinary Tract†

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Viktoria; Klemm, Per

    2006-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are an important health problem worldwide, with many million cases each year. Escherichia coli is the most common organism causing UTIs in humans. The asymptomatic bacteriuria E. coli strain 83972 is an excellent colonizer of the human urinary tract, where it causes long-term bladder colonization. The strain has been used for prophylactic purposes in patients prone to more severe and recurrent UTIs. For this study, we used DNA microarrays to monitor the expression profile of strain 83972 in the human urinary tract. Significant differences in expression levels were seen between the in vivo expression profiles of strain 83972 in three patients and the corresponding in vitro expression profiles in lab medium and human urine. The data revealed an in vivo lifestyle of microaerobic growth with respiration of nitrate coupled to degradation of sugar acids and amino acids, with no signs of attachment to host tissues. Interestingly, genes involved in NO protection and metabolism showed significant up-regulation in the patients. This is one of the first studies to address bacterial whole-genome expression in humans and the first study to investigate global gene expression of an E. coli strain in the human urinary tract. PMID:16714589

  20. Diabetes Mellitus has no Significant Influence on the Prevalence of Antenatal Asymptomatic Bacteriuria

    PubMed Central

    Gundela, Swarnalatha; Avula, Renuka Devi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Diabetes is a known risk factor for asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB). However, the influence of diabetes on antenatal ASB was previously not addressed. Aim The prevalence of ASB, effect of risk factors and type of isolates and susceptibility patterns were studied in diabetic pregnancy. Materials and Methods A total of 311 pregnant women were recruited for this study of which 103 were diabetic and 208 non-diabetic. A clean catch midstream urine samples were collected and cultured. The isolates were identified and antibiotic sensitivity was studied. The data was analysed by Chi-square test. Results The prevalence of ASB in diabetic pregnancy was 38.83% (40/103; 95% CI: 23.73 - 53.94) and in non-diabetic pregnancy was 37.98% (79/208; CI: 27.28- 48.68). The odds ratio was not significant 1.0225 (95% CU: 0.65 – 1.599; p=0.922) and associated factors such as age and gestational period had no effect. The major isolates were Escherichia coli (25.0%), Staphylococcus aureus (22.5%), Coagulase negative staphylococci (CONS) (20.00%), and Klebsiella pneumonia (20.00%) in diabetic pregnancy and CONS (31.7%), E.coli (24.0%) and K.pneumonia (16.5%) in non-diabetic pregnancy. The isolates of diabetic pregnancy showed highest susceptibility to nitrofurantoin (56.4%), gentamicin (38.5%) and cotrimoxazole (38.5%) whereas that of non-diabetic pregnancy to gentamicin (43.0%), azithromycin (32.9%) and norfloxacin (30.4). There was no significant (p<0.05) difference in the type and susceptibly of the isolates between diabetic and non-diabetic pregnancy. Conclusion Diabetes has no significant influence on the prevalence of ASB in diabetic pregnancy both in terms of isolates and antibiotic susceptibility pattern. PMID:27190802

  1. The use of a differential fluorescent staining method to detect bacteriuria.

    PubMed

    Ciancaglini, Ettore; Fazii, Paolo; Sforza, Giuseppe Riario

    2004-01-01

    This report describes a differential staining method which distinguishes gram-positive from gram-negative bacteria in fluorescence. Gram-positive bacteria appear yellow and gram-negative bacteria appear green. The method is based on two fluorochromes, one acting in the wavelength of red, i.e. the acridine orange, and another acting in the wavelength of green, i.e. the fluorescein, which together form a red/ green system. In this report we compared the accuracy of the differential fluorescent staining method and the Gram stain in screening for bacteriuria, as detected by conventional cultures. A total of 1487 urine samples were tested. 289 cultures were positive. 237 specimens grew a single organism at 10(5) and 10(4) CFU/ml. 224 smears were detected by the differential fluorescent staining method and 162 were detected by Gram stain. 1198 samples failed to grow organisms at 10(5) and 10(4) CFU/ml. 107 smears were falsely positive by the fluorescent staining procedure and 289 were falsely positive by the Gram stain. On the basis of the culture results, the sensitivity of the differential fluorescent staining method was 94.5% and that of the Gram stain 68.3%. The specificity of the fluorescent staining procedure was 91.6% and that of the Gram stain 75.8%. The positive predictive value and the negative predictive value of the fluorescent staining method were 67.6% and 98.8%, respectively. Those of the Gram stain were 35.9% and 92.3%, respectively. A wide range of microbiological and chemical techniques are available to identify bacteria in urine. This fluorescent staining method represents a simple, rapid, reliable method with low-running costs. The main advantage of this technique is that it enables the microbiologist to exclude the presence of bacteria in the urine within a short time after specimen receipt and to eliminate a large number of specimens for culture with significant cost saving. Another advantage of the method is that it allows to distinguish gram

  2. Epidemiology, natural history, and management of urinary tract infections in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Andriole, V T; Patterson, T F

    1991-03-01

    The urinary tract undergoes profound physiologic and anatomic changes during pregnancy that facilitate the development of symptomatic UTIs in women with bacteriuria. Although the adverse effects of asymptomatic bacteriuria on maternal and fetal health continue to be debated, it is clear that asymptomatic bacteriuria is the major risk factor for developing symptomatic UTI and that symptomatic infections are associated with significant maternal and fetal risks. Because the majority of symptomatic UTIs develop in women with bacteriuria earlier in pregnancy, treatment of bacteriuria is undertaken to prevent symptomatic infections. All women should be screened at the first antenatal visit, which is reliably and inexpensively done with a dipstick culture. Short-course therapy is as effective as prolonged therapy and should be followed with a repeat culture to document clearing of the bacteriuria. Failure to eliminate bacteriuria with repeated therapy or recurrence with the same organism is indicative of renal parenchymal infection or a structural abnormality. All women with persistent bacteriuria or recurrent infection should have follow-up cultures and a complete urologic evaluation after delivery.

  3. Evaluating a Hospitalist-Based Intervention to Decrease Unnecessary Antimicrobial Use in Patients With Asymptomatic Bacteriuria.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Sarah E; Kuhn, Latoya; Valley, Staci; Washer, Laraine L; Gandhi, Tejal; Meddings, Jennifer; Robida, Michelle; Sabnis, Salas; Chenoweth, Carol; Malani, Anurag N; Saint, Sanjay; Flanders, Scott A

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Inappropriate treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) in the hospital setting is common. We sought to evaluate the treatment rate of ASB at the 3 hospitals and assess the impact of a hospitalist-focused improvement intervention. DESIGN Prospective, interventional trial. SETTING Two community hospitals and a tertiary-care academic center. PATIENTS Adult patients with a positive urine culture admitted to hospitalist services were included in this study. Exclusions included pregnancy, intensive care unit admission, history of a major urinary procedure, and actively being treated for a urinary tract infection (UTI) at the time of admission or >48 hours prior to urine collection. INTERVENTIONS An educational intervention using a pocket card was implemented at all sites followed by a pharmacist-based intervention at the academic center. Medical records of the first 50 eligible patients at each site were reviewed at baseline and after each intervention for signs and symptoms of UTI, microbiological results, antimicrobials used, and duration of treatment for positive urine cultures. Diagnosis of ASB was determined through adjudication by 2 hospitalists and 2 infectious diseases physicians. RESULTS Treatment rates of ASB decreased (23.5%; P=.001) after the educational intervention. Reductions in treatment rates for ASB differed by site and were greatest in patients without classic signs and symptoms of UTI (34.1%; P<.001) or urinary catheters (31.2%; P<.001). The pharmacist-based intervention was most effective at reducing ASB treatment rates in catheterized patients. CONCLUSIONS A hospitalist-focused educational intervention significantly reduced ASB treatment rates. The impact varied across sites and by patient characteristics, suggesting that a tailored approach may be useful. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:1044-1051.

  4. The asymptomatic bacteriuria Escherichia coli strain 83972 outcompetes uropathogenic E. coli strains in human urine.

    PubMed

    Roos, Viktoria; Ulett, Glen C; Schembri, Mark A; Klemm, Per

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the most common organism associated with asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU). In contrast to uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC), which causes symptomatic urinary tract infections (UTI), very little is known about the mechanisms by which these strains colonize the human urinary tract. The prototype ABU E. coli strain 83972 was originally isolated from a girl who had carried it asymptomatically for 3 years. Deliberate colonization of UTI-susceptible individuals with E. coli 83972 has been used successfully as an alternative approach for the treatment of patients who are refractory to conventional therapy. Colonization with strain 83972 appears to prevent infection with UPEC strains in such patients despite the fact that this strain is unable to express the primary adhesins involved in UTI, viz. P and type 1 fimbriae. Here we investigated the growth characteristics of E. coli 83972 in human urine and show that it can outcompete a representative spectrum of UPEC strains for growth in urine. The unique ability of ABU E. coli 83972 to outcompete UPEC in urine was also demonstrated in a murine model of human UTI, confirming the selective advantage over UPEC in vivo. Comparison of global gene expression profiles of E. coli 83972 grown in lab medium and human urine revealed significant differences in expression levels in the two media; significant down-regulation of genes encoding virulence factors such as hemolysin, lipid A, and capsular polysaccharides was observed in cells grown in urine. Clearly, divergent abilities of ABU E. coli and UPEC to exploit human urine as a niche for persistence and survival suggest that these key differences may be exploited for preventative and/or therapeutic approaches.

  5. Asymptomatic bacteriuria and urinary tract infection in pregnant women with and without diabetes: Cohort study.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, Caroline; Erwich, Jan Jaap H M; van den Heuvel, Edwin R; Mol, Ben W J; Ott, Alewijn; Geerlings, Suzanne E

    2018-03-01

    To compare the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) and the incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in pregnant women with and without diabetes mellitus (DM) or gestational DM (GDM). We performed a cohort study in five hospitals and two midwifery clinics in the Netherlands. Pregnant women with and without DM or GDM were screened for the presence of ASB around 12 and 32 weeks' gestation. Characteristics of participants as well as outcome data were collected from questionnaires and medical records. ASB was defined as the growth of at least 10e5 cfu/ml isolated from the urine of a woman without UTI complaints. UTI was considered to be present when a treating physician had diagnosed UTI and prescribed antibiotics. We studied 202 women with and 272 women without DM or GDM. Of all women 31.7% with and 94.9% without DM or GDM provided a week 12 sample. The prevalence of ASB was comparable in women with and without DM or GDM (12 weeks' n = 322; 4.7% and 2.3%; relative risk (RR) 2.02; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.52-7.84; 32 weeks' n = 422; 3.2% and 3.0%; RR 1.06; 95% CI 0.36-3.09), as was the incidence of UTI (16.8% and 12.9%; RR 1.31; 95% CI 0.85-2.02). Neither ASB nor UTI were associated with preterm birth or babies being small for gestational age. In pregnant women with and women without DM or GDM, the overall prevalence of ASB was low. Neither ASB nor UTI did differ significantly between the groups. Our data discourage a routine ASB screen and treat policy in pregnant women with DM or GDM. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Asymptomatic bacteriuria in women with autoimmune rheumatic disease: prevalence, risk factors, and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Georgiadou, Sarah P; Gamaletsou, Maria N; Mpanaka, Ioanna; Vlachou, Aggeliki; Goules, Andreas V; Ziogas, Dimitrios C; Syriou, Vassiliki; Tektonidou, Maria G; Kaltsas, Gregory; Manoussakis, Menelaos N; Sipsas, Nikolaos V

    2015-03-15

    Data regarding the prevalence and clinical significance of asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) in women with autoimmune rheumatic disease (ARD) are scarce. In this prospective, case-control study, consecutive female outpatients with ARD were screened for AB. For each patient, demographics, type, duration, and treatment of underlying ARD, and risk factors for urinary tract infection (UTI), were recorded. Age-matched women with endocrine disease, without any autoimmune disease, not receiving immunosuppressive agents were used as controls. Subjects were followed up for 1 year for the development of symptomatic UTI. Two hundred sixty patients with ARD (mean age, 52.4 [standard deviation {SD}, 14.6] years) and 238 controls (mean age, 51.2 [SD, 16.5] years) were enrolled. The majority of patients with ARD (93.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 89.7%-95.9%) were receiving immunosuppressive agents. AB was detected in 24 patients with ARD (9.2%; 95% CI, 6.2%-13.4%) and in 22 controls (9.2%; 95% CI, 5.5%-12.9%) (P = 1.000). The most prevalent pathogen was Escherichia coli (16/24 [66%]). Independent predictors for AB among patients were diabetes (odds ratio [OR], 6.6; P = .008) and a longer ARD duration (>84 months; OR, 4.3; P = .018). During the 1-year follow-up, 9 patients with baseline AB remained persistently bacteriuric, whereas 11 were intermittently bacteriuric. Symptomatic UTI developed in 4 of 24 patients (16.7%; 95% CI, 6.1%-36.5%) with baseline AB vs 29 of 236 (12.3%; 95% CI, 8.6%-17.1%) without AB (P = .522). In our study, the prevalence of AB among women with ARD was not higher than that of controls, and AB was not associated with higher risk for symptomatic UTI. Risk factors for AB were longer duration of ARD and diabetes. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Study on the efficacy of cefaclor for the treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria and lower urinary tract infections in pregnant women with a history of hypersensitivity to penicillin.

    PubMed

    Stamatiou, K; Alevizos, A; Petrakos, G; Lentzas, I; Papathanasiou, M; Mariolis, A; Panagopoulos, P; Sofras, F

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety profile of twice daily versus the conventional three daily intake of cefaclor administrated orally for five to seven days in the treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria or acute cystitis in pregnant women with a history of hypersensitivity to penicillin. Between August 2003 and August 2004, 63 pregnant women with a positive urine culture and a history of suspicion of hypersensitivity to penicillin were randomly divided into two groups. The women in the first group received 500 mg of cefaclor while those in the second group received 750 mg of cefaclor for five to seven days. Laboratory and clinical results were assessed a week and a month after complettion of the therapy. Final therapy (bacteriologic eradication) succeeded in 93.7% (30/32) of the first group and in 90.3% (28/31) of the second group. Dosage of cefaclor at 750 mg is as effective as conventional cefaclor at 500 mg and better tolerated.

  8. Outcomes of UTI and bacteriuria caused by ESBL vs. non-ESBL Enterobacteriaceae isolates in pregnancy: a matched case-control study.

    PubMed

    Yagel, Y; Nativ, H; Riesenberg, K; Nesher, L; Saidel-Odes, L; Smolyakov, R

    2018-04-01

    Infections caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) have become increasingly prevalent, posing a serious public threat worldwide. It is commonly believed that untreated urinary tract infections (UTI) and asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) during pregnancy are associated with poor obstetric outcomes. Currently, there is a paucity of data regarding the outcomes or risk factors of such ESBL-E infections in pregnant women. We conducted a retrospective 1:2 matched case-control study of hospitalised pregnant women with ESBL-E- vs. non-ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae-positive urine cultures obtained between 2004 and 2015, and compared risk factors for the development of resistant bacteria, clinical course and outcomes. In total, 87 pregnant women with ESBL-E-positive urine cultures were matched to 174 controls by decade of age, ethnicity and pregnancy trimester. Significant risk factors for acquisition of ESBL-E included prior UTI/ABU episodes (50.6% vs. 26.3%, P < 0.001), previous isolation of ESBL-E in urine cultures (12.6% vs. 0.6%, P < 0.001) and prior antibiotic exposure (71.3% vs. 54%, P = 0.002). Previous hospitalisation, however, was not found to be a risk factor. No significant difference was found in adverse obstetric outcomes. We conclude that prior urinary infections and antibiotic exposure were significant risk factors for the isolation of ESBL-E pathogens from the urine of pregnant women; however, this was not associated with worse obstetric outcomes compared with non-ESBL-E pathogens.

  9. Pilot Study to Evaluate Compliance and Tolerability of Cranberry Capsules in Pregnancy for the Prevention of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria.

    PubMed

    Wing, Deborah A; Rumney, Pamela J; Hindra, Sasha; Guzman, Lizette; Le, Jennifer; Nageotte, Michael

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the compliance with and tolerability of daily cranberry capsule ingestion for asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) prevention in pregnancy. A total of 49 pregnant women from two sites were randomly assigned to cranberry or matching placebo, two doses daily, at gestational ages less than 16 weeks. Patients were followed monthly for urinary tract infection until delivery. Up to seven monthly visits were scheduled for each patient. Delivery data were evaluated. Of 38 evaluable patients, the mean compliance rate over the study period was 82% (range, 20%-100%). This compliance rate and the 74% of patients achieving good (≥75%) compliance were similar between those who received cranberry capsules and placebo. Compliance evaluation revealed that most patients stopped capsule consumption after 34-38 weeks of participation. Multivariate logistic regression and longitudinal analysis showed a significant interaction time effect with cranberry treatment. However, cranberry consumption was not a significant predictor of gastrointestinal intolerance or study withdrawal. Although 30% of patients withdrew for various reasons, only 1 withdrew because of intolerance to the cranberry capsules. Loss to follow-up was mostly due to provider change (9 of 49 [18%]) and therapy disinterest (4 of 49 [8%]). Seven cases of ASB occurred in 5 patients: 2 of 24 (8%) in the cranberry group and 3 of 25 (12%) in the placebo group. No cases of cystitis or pyelonephritis were observed. One third of pregnant women could not complete the study protocol for various reasons. Compliance with and tolerability of cranberry capsule ingestion appear good; these capsules provide a potentially effective means to prevent ASB in pregnancy. Further studies with large samples are necessary to confirm the findings.

  10. [Urinary tract infections in pregnancy: when to treat, how to treat, and what to treat with].

    PubMed

    Kladenský, J

    2012-04-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) in pregnant women are a relatively frequent occurrence and the spectrum of these infections ranges from lower urinary tract disease (asymptomatic bacteriuria, acute cystitis) to upper urinary tract disease (acute pyelonephritis). Anatomical and functional changes in the urinary tract in pregnancy result in significantly higher susceptibility to progression of the infection from asymptomatic bacteriuria to the stage of acute pyelonephritis. Untreated asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy leads, in as much as 40%, to the development of acute pyelonephritis with all the subsequent negative effects not only for the woman herself, but particularly for the fetus. Bacteriuria in pregnancy accounts for a significantly higher number of newborns with a low birth weight, low gestational age and higher neonatal mortality rate. Therefore, it is necessary to perform screening for bacteriuria in pregnant women and, when the finding is positive, to treat this bacteriuria. The selection of an appropriate antimicrobial agent to treat urinary tract infection in pregnancy is limited by the safety of a given drug not only for the woman, but particularly for the fetus. The article provides an overview of medications that can be safely used throughout the pregnancy or only in certain stages of pregnancy. The selection of an appropriate antibiotic should always be preceded by the result of urine culture. The article presents the principles and rules for treating asymptomatic bacteriuria, acute cystitis and acute pyelonephritis in pregnant women.

  11. Characterization of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria Escherichia coli Isolates in Search of Alternative Strains for Efficient Bacterial Interference against Uropathogens

    PubMed Central

    Stork, Christoph; Kovács, Beáta; Rózsai, Barnabás; Putze, Johannes; Kiel, Matthias; Dorn, Ágnes; Kovács, Judit; Melegh, Szilvia; Leimbach, Andreas; Kovács, Tamás; Schneider, György; Kerényi, Monika; Emödy, Levente; Dobrindt, Ulrich

    2018-01-01

    Asymptomatic bacterial colonization of the urinary bladder (asymptomatic bacteriuria, ABU) can prevent bladder colonization by uropathogens and thus symptomatic urinary tract infection (UTI). Deliberate bladder colonization with Escherichia coli ABU isolate 83972 has been shown to outcompete uropathogens and prevent symptomatic UTI by bacterial interference. Many ABU isolates evolved from uropathogenic ancestors and, although attenuated, may still be able to express virulence-associated factors. Our aim was to screen for efficient and safe candidate strains that could be used as alternatives to E. coli 83972 for preventive and therapeutic bladder colonization. To identify ABU E. coli strains with minimal virulence potential but maximal interference efficiency, we compared nine ABU isolates from diabetic patients regarding their virulence- and fitness-associated phenotypes in vitro, their virulence in a murine model of sepsis and their genome content. We identified strains in competitive growth experiments, which successfully interfere with colonization of ABU isolate 83972 or uropathogenic E. coli strain 536. Six isolates were able to outcompete E. coli 83972 and two of them also outcompeted UPEC 536 during growth in urine. Superior competitiveness was not simply a result of better growth abilities in urine, but seems also to involve expression of antagonistic factors. Competitiveness in urine did not correlate with the prevalence of determinants coding for adhesins, iron uptake, toxins, and antagonistic factors. Three ABU strains (isolates 61, 106, and 123) with superior competitiveness relative to ABU model strain 83972 display low in vivo virulence in a murine sepsis model, and susceptibility to antibiotics. They belong to different phylogroups and differ in the presence of ExPEC virulence- and fitness-associated genes. Importantly, they all lack marked cytotoxic activity and exhibit a high LD50 value in the sepsis model. These strains represent promising

  12. Pilot Study to Evaluate Compliance and Tolerability of Cranberry Capsules in Pregnancy for the Prevention of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria

    PubMed Central

    Rumney, Pamela J.; Hindra, Sasha; Guzman, Lizette; Le, Jennifer; Nageotte, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: To evaluate the compliance with and tolerability of daily cranberry capsule ingestion for asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) prevention in pregnancy. Design: A total of 49 pregnant women from two sites were randomly assigned to cranberry or matching placebo, two doses daily, at gestational ages less than 16 weeks. Patients were followed monthly for urinary tract infection until delivery. Up to seven monthly visits were scheduled for each patient. Delivery data were evaluated. Results: Of 38 evaluable patients, the mean compliance rate over the study period was 82% (range, 20%–100%). This compliance rate and the 74% of patients achieving good (≥75%) compliance were similar between those who received cranberry capsules and placebo. Compliance evaluation revealed that most patients stopped capsule consumption after 34–38 weeks of participation. Multivariate logistic regression and longitudinal analysis showed a significant interaction time effect with cranberry treatment. However, cranberry consumption was not a significant predictor of gastrointestinal intolerance or study withdrawal. Although 30% of patients withdrew for various reasons, only 1 withdrew because of intolerance to the cranberry capsules. Loss to follow-up was mostly due to provider change (9 of 49 [18%]) and therapy disinterest (4 of 49 [8%]). Seven cases of ASB occurred in 5 patients: 2 of 24 (8%) in the cranberry group and 3 of 25 (12%) in the placebo group. No cases of cystitis or pyelonephritis were observed. Conclusion: One third of pregnant women could not complete the study protocol for various reasons. Compliance with and tolerability of cranberry capsule ingestion appear good; these capsules provide a potentially effective means to prevent ASB in pregnancy. Further studies with large samples are necessary to confirm the findings. PMID:26535612

  13. Molecular Analysis of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria Escherichia coli Strain VR50 Reveals Adaptation to the Urinary Tract by Gene Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Ben Zakour, Nouri L.; Totsika, Makrina; Forde, Brian M.; Watts, Rebecca E.; Mabbett, Amanda N.; Szubert, Jan M.; Sarkar, Sohinee; Phan, Minh-Duy; Peters, Kate M.; Petty, Nicola K.; Alikhan, Nabil-Fareed; Sullivan, Mitchell J.; Gawthorne, Jayde A.; Stanton-Cook, Mitchell; Nhu, Nguyen Thi Khanh; Chong, Teik Min; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan; Hancock, Viktoria; Ussery, David W.; Ulett, Glen C.

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common infectious diseases of humans, with Escherichia coli responsible for >80% of all cases. One extreme of UTI is asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU), which occurs as an asymptomatic carrier state that resembles commensalism. To understand the evolution and molecular mechanisms that underpin ABU, the genome of the ABU E. coli strain VR50 was sequenced. Analysis of the complete genome indicated that it most resembles E. coli K-12, with the addition of a 94-kb genomic island (GI-VR50-pheV), eight prophages, and multiple plasmids. GI-VR50-pheV has a mosaic structure and contains genes encoding a number of UTI-associated virulence factors, namely, Afa (afimbrial adhesin), two autotransporter proteins (Ag43 and Sat), and aerobactin. We demonstrated that the presence of this island in VR50 confers its ability to colonize the murine bladder, as a VR50 mutant with GI-VR50-pheV deleted was attenuated in a mouse model of UTI in vivo. We established that Afa is the island-encoded factor responsible for this phenotype using two independent deletion (Afa operon and AfaE adhesin) mutants. E. coli VR50afa and VR50afaE displayed significantly decreased ability to adhere to human bladder epithelial cells. In the mouse model of UTI, VR50afa and VR50afaE displayed reduced bladder colonization compared to wild-type VR50, similar to the colonization level of the GI-VR50-pheV mutant. Our study suggests that E. coli VR50 is a commensal-like strain that has acquired fitness factors that facilitate colonization of the human bladder. PMID:25667270

  14. Molecular Analysis of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria Escherichia coli Strain VR50 Reveals Adaptation to the Urinary Tract by Gene Acquisition

    DOE PAGES

    Beatson, Scott A.; Ben Zakour, Nouri L.; Totsika, Makrina; ...

    2015-05-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common infectious diseases of humans, with Escherichia coli for >80% of all cases. One extreme of UTI is asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU), which occurs as an asymptomatic carrier state that resembles commensalism. Here, to understand the evolution and molecular mechanisms that underpin ABU, the genome of the ABU E. coli strain VR50 was sequenced. Analysis of the complete genome indicated that it most resembles E. coli K-12, with the addition of a 94-kb genomic island (GI-VR50-pheV), eight prophages, and multiple plasmids. GI-VR50- pheV has a mosaic structure and contains genes encoding a numbermore » of UTI-associated virulence factors, namely, Afa (afimbrial adhesin), two autotransporter proteins (Ag43 and Sat), and aerobactin. We demonstrated that the presence of this island in VR50 confers its ability to colonize the murine bladder, as a VR50 mutant with GI-VR50- pheV deleted was attenuated in a mouse model of UTI in vivo. We established that Afa is the island-encoded factor responsible for this phenotype using two independent deletion (Afa operon and AfaE adhesin) mutants. E. coli VR50 afa and VR50 afaE displayed significantly decreased ability to adhere to human bladder epithelial cells. In the mouse model of UTI, VR50 afa and VR50 afaE displayed reduced bladder colonization compared to wild-type VR50, similar to the colonization level of the GI-VR50- pheV mutant. In conlusion, our study suggests that E. coli VR50 is a commensal-like strain that has acquired fitness factors that facilitate colonization of the human bladder.« less

  15. Molecular Analysis of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria Escherichia coli Strain VR50 Reveals Adaptation to the Urinary Tract by Gene Acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Beatson, Scott A.; Ben Zakour, Nouri L.; Totsika, Makrina

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common infectious diseases of humans, with Escherichia coli for >80% of all cases. One extreme of UTI is asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU), which occurs as an asymptomatic carrier state that resembles commensalism. Here, to understand the evolution and molecular mechanisms that underpin ABU, the genome of the ABU E. coli strain VR50 was sequenced. Analysis of the complete genome indicated that it most resembles E. coli K-12, with the addition of a 94-kb genomic island (GI-VR50-pheV), eight prophages, and multiple plasmids. GI-VR50- pheV has a mosaic structure and contains genes encoding a numbermore » of UTI-associated virulence factors, namely, Afa (afimbrial adhesin), two autotransporter proteins (Ag43 and Sat), and aerobactin. We demonstrated that the presence of this island in VR50 confers its ability to colonize the murine bladder, as a VR50 mutant with GI-VR50- pheV deleted was attenuated in a mouse model of UTI in vivo. We established that Afa is the island-encoded factor responsible for this phenotype using two independent deletion (Afa operon and AfaE adhesin) mutants. E. coli VR50 afa and VR50 afaE displayed significantly decreased ability to adhere to human bladder epithelial cells. In the mouse model of UTI, VR50 afa and VR50 afaE displayed reduced bladder colonization compared to wild-type VR50, similar to the colonization level of the GI-VR50- pheV mutant. In conlusion, our study suggests that E. coli VR50 is a commensal-like strain that has acquired fitness factors that facilitate colonization of the human bladder.« less

  16. Molecular analysis of asymptomatic bacteriuria Escherichia coli strain VR50 reveals adaptation to the urinary tract by gene acquisition.

    PubMed

    Beatson, Scott A; Ben Zakour, Nouri L; Totsika, Makrina; Forde, Brian M; Watts, Rebecca E; Mabbett, Amanda N; Szubert, Jan M; Sarkar, Sohinee; Phan, Minh-Duy; Peters, Kate M; Petty, Nicola K; Alikhan, Nabil-Fareed; Sullivan, Mitchell J; Gawthorne, Jayde A; Stanton-Cook, Mitchell; Nhu, Nguyen Thi Khanh; Chong, Teik Min; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan; Hancock, Viktoria; Ussery, David W; Ulett, Glen C; Schembri, Mark A

    2015-05-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common infectious diseases of humans, with Escherichia coli responsible for >80% of all cases. One extreme of UTI is asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU), which occurs as an asymptomatic carrier state that resembles commensalism. To understand the evolution and molecular mechanisms that underpin ABU, the genome of the ABU E. coli strain VR50 was sequenced. Analysis of the complete genome indicated that it most resembles E. coli K-12, with the addition of a 94-kb genomic island (GI-VR50-pheV), eight prophages, and multiple plasmids. GI-VR50-pheV has a mosaic structure and contains genes encoding a number of UTI-associated virulence factors, namely, Afa (afimbrial adhesin), two autotransporter proteins (Ag43 and Sat), and aerobactin. We demonstrated that the presence of this island in VR50 confers its ability to colonize the murine bladder, as a VR50 mutant with GI-VR50-pheV deleted was attenuated in a mouse model of UTI in vivo. We established that Afa is the island-encoded factor responsible for this phenotype using two independent deletion (Afa operon and AfaE adhesin) mutants. E. coli VR50afa and VR50afaE displayed significantly decreased ability to adhere to human bladder epithelial cells. In the mouse model of UTI, VR50afa and VR50afaE displayed reduced bladder colonization compared to wild-type VR50, similar to the colonization level of the GI-VR50-pheV mutant. Our study suggests that E. coli VR50 is a commensal-like strain that has acquired fitness factors that facilitate colonization of the human bladder. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. "Urinary Tract Infection"-Requiem for a Heavyweight.

    PubMed

    Finucane, Thomas E

    2017-08-01

    "Urinary tract infection" ("UTI") is an ambiguous, expansive, overused diagnosis that can lead to marked, harmful antibiotic overtreatment. "Significant bacteriuria," central to most definitions of "UTI," has little significance in identifying individuals who will benefit from treatment. "Urinary symptoms" are similarly uninformative. Neither criterion is well defined. Bacteriuria and symptoms remit and recur spontaneously. Treatment is standard for acute uncomplicated cystitis and common for asymptomatic bacteriuria, but definite benefits are few. Treatment for "UTI" in older adults with delirium and bacteriuria is widespread but no evidence supports the practice, and expert opinion opposes it. Sensitive diagnostic tests now demonstrate that healthy urinary tracts host a ubiquitous, complex microbial community. Recognition of this microbiome, largely undetectable using standard agar-based cultures, offers a new perspective on "UTI." Everyone is bacteriuric. From this perspective, most people who are treated for a "UTI" would probably be better off without treatment. Elderly adults, little studied in this regard, face particular risk. Invasive bacterial diseases such as pyelonephritis and bacteremic bacteriuria are also "UTIs." Mindful decisions about antibiotic use will require a far better understanding of how pathogenicity arises within microbial communities. It is likely that public education and meaningful informed-consent discussions about antibiotic treatment of bacteriuria, emphasizing potential harms and uncertain benefits, would reduce overtreatment. Emphasizing the microbiome's significance and using the term "urinary tract dysbiosis" instead of "UTI" might also help and might encourage mindful study of the relationships among host, aging, microbiome, disease, and antibiotic treatment. © 2017, Copyright the Author Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  18. Urinary tract infections in women with urogynaecological symptoms.

    PubMed

    Lakeman, Marielle M E; Roovers, Jan-Paul W R

    2016-02-01

    Urinary tract infections are common in the field of urogynaecology. Women with persistent urinary symptoms seem more likely to have bacteriuria despite negative cultures. In this review, we will give an overview of the recent insights on the relationship between urinary tract infection and persistent urinary symptoms and possible new therapeutic options. Recently published articles evaluated the prevalence of low-count bacteriuria (≥10 CFU/ml) or intracellular bacterial communities in women with overactive bladder symptoms (OAB). Differences in urinary microbioma observed in women with and without OAB symptoms were evaluated. In the light of these findings, current screening strategies were discussed and alternative screening methods for bacteriuria developed. Low-count bacteriuria (≥10 CFU/ml) seems to be more prevalent in women with OAB. Also intracellular bacterial communities are more commonly detected in these women. The microbioma found in women with urinary symptoms appeared to differ from healthy controls. The current screening methods might be insufficient as they are targeted at detecting uropathogenic Escherichia coli, mostly using a detection threshold of at least 10 CFU/ml and failing to detect intracellular bacterial communities. Studies evaluating the efficacy of treating women with low-count bacteriuria are limited but promising.

  19. Comparison of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria Escherichia coli Isolates from Healthy Individuals versus Those from Hospital Patients Shows that Long-Term Bladder Colonization Selects for Attenuated Virulence Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Salvador, Ellaine; Wagenlehner, Florian; Köhler, Christian-Daniel; Mellmann, Alexander; Hacker, Jörg; Svanborg, Catharina

    2012-01-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) is a condition where bacteria stably colonize the urinary tract, in a manner closely resembling commensalism at other mucosal sites. The patients carry >105 CFU/ml for extended periods of time and rarely develop symptoms. Contrasting the properties of ABU strains to those of uropathogenic isolates causing symptomatic infection is therefore highly relevant to understand mechanisms of bacterial adaptation. The prototype ABU strain Escherichia coli 83972 has a smaller genome than uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) strains with deletions or point mutations in several virulence genes, suggesting that ABU strains undergo a programmed reductive evolution within human hosts. This study addressed if these observations can be generalized. Strains causing ABU in outpatients or hospitalized patients after catheterization or other invasive procedures were compared to commensal E. coli isolates from the intestinal flora of healthy individuals. Notably, clonal complex 73 (CC73) was a prominent phylogenetic lineage dominated by ABU isolates. ABU isolates from outpatients and hospitalized patients had a similar overall virulence gene repertoire, which distinguished them from many commensals, but typical UPEC virulence genes were less frequently attenuated in hospital strains than in outpatient strains or commensals. The decreased virulence potential of outpatient ABU isolates relative to that of ABU strains from hospitalized patients supports the hypothesis that loss of expression or decay of virulence genes facilitates long-term carriage and adaptation to host environments. PMID:22104113

  20. Triggered Urine Interleukin-6 Correlates to Severity of Symptoms in Nonfebrile Lower Urinary Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Sundén, Fredrik; Butler, Daniel; Wullt, Björn

    2017-07-01

    Objective diagnosis of symptomatic urinary tract infections in patients prone to asymptomatic bacteriuria is compromised by local host responses that are already present and the positive urine culture. We investigated interleukin-6 as a biomarker for nonfebrile urinary tract infection severity and diagnostic thresholds for interleukin-6 and 8, and neutrophils to differentiate between asymptomatic bacteriuria and urinary tract infection. Patients with residual urine and neurogenic bladders due to spinal lesions included in a long-term Escherichia coli 83972 asymptomatic bacteriuria inoculation trial were monitored for 2 years. Symptom scoring and urine sampling to estimate interleukin-6 and 8, and neutrophils were performed regularly monthly and at urinary tract infection episodes. Patients were followed in the complete study for a mean of 19 months (range 10 to 27) and those with asymptomatic bacteriuria with E. coli 83972 were followed a mean of 11 months (range 4 to 19). A total of 37 nonfebrile urinary tract infection episodes with complete data on interleukin-6 and 8, neutrophils and symptom scoring were documented. Interleukin-6 was the only marker that persistently increased during urinary tract infection compared to asymptomatic bacteriuria in pooled and paired intra-individual comparisons (p <0.05). Interleukin-6 above the threshold (greater than 25 ng/l) correlated to more severe urinary tract infection symptoms (p <0.05). The sensitivity and specificity of all biomarkers were poor/moderate when differentiating asymptomatic bacteriuria vs all urinary tract infection episodes. However, in urinary tract infections with worse symptoms interleukin-6 and neutrophils demonstrated equal good/excellent outcomes. Triggered interleukin-6 correlated to urinary tract infection symptom severity and demonstrated a promising differential diagnostic capacity to discriminate urinary tract infection from asymptomatic bacteriuria. Future studies should explore interleukin-6

  1. Urinary tract infections in older women: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Mody, Lona; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha

    2014-02-26

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic urinary tract infections (UTIs) in older women are commonly encountered in outpatient practice. To review management of asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic UTI and review prevention of recurrent UTIs in older community-dwelling women. A search of Ovid (Medline, PsycINFO, Embase) for English-language human studies conducted among adults aged 65 years and older and published in peer-reviewed journals from 1946 to November 20, 2013. The clinical spectrum of UTIs ranges from asymptomatic bacteriuria, to symptomatic and recurrent UTIs, to sepsis associated with UTI requiring hospitalization. Recent evidence helps differentiate asymptomatic bacteriuria from symptomatic UTI. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is transient in older women, often resolves without any treatment, and is not associated with morbidity or mortality. The diagnosis of symptomatic UTI is made when a patient has both clinical features and laboratory evidence of a urinary infection. Absent other causes, patients presenting with any 2 of the following meet the clinical diagnostic criteria for symptomatic UTI: fever, worsened urinary urgency or frequency, acute dysuria, suprapubic tenderness, or costovertebral angle pain or tenderness. A positive urine culture (≥105 CFU/mL) with no more than 2 uropathogens and pyuria confirms the diagnosis of UTI. Risk factors for recurrent symptomatic UTI include diabetes, functional disability, recent sexual intercourse, prior history of urogynecologic surgery, urinary retention, and urinary incontinence. Testing for UTI is easily performed in the clinic using dipstick tests. When there is a low pretest probability of UTI, a negative dipstick result for leukocyte esterase and nitrites excludes infection. Antibiotics are selected by identifying the uropathogen, knowing local resistance rates, and considering adverse effect profiles. Chronic suppressive antibiotics for 6 to 12 months and vaginal estrogen therapy effectively reduce

  2. Clinical and bacteriological outcome of different doses and duration of pivmecillinam compared with placebo therapy of uncomplicated lower urinary tract infection in women: The LUTIW project

    PubMed Central

    Ferry, Sven A.; Holm, Stig E.; Stenlund, Hans; Lundholm, Rolf; Monsen, Tor J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective To analyse associations between symptoms and bacteriuria in uncomplicated lower urinary tract infection in women (LUTIW) and to evaluate outcome of therapy with three different regimens of pivmecillinam or placebo. Design Prospective, multicentre, randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled therapy study. Symptoms registered at inclusion, during therapy and at follow-up visits after 8–10 and 35–49 days. Significant bacteriuria defined according to current European guidelines. Setting A total of 18 primary healthcare centres in northern Sweden. Subjects Women aged 18 years and above with symptoms of urgency, dysuria, supra pubic or loin pain. Main outcome measures Symptoms and bacteriuria at inclusion and course of symptoms, bacteriuria, and their combinations during and post-therapy. Results At inclusion, no associations or significant differences were found between symptom scores and bacteriuria, bacterial counts, or species. The 884 patients (77%) with significant bacteriuria were followed up. All pivmecillinam therapies were superior to placebo (p < 0.001). From day six until first follow-up, the mean values of all symptoms were higher and the bacteriological cure was lower at first follow-up in the three days (84%) compared with the seven days regimens (93–94%, p < 0.001). At final follow-up clinical cure was similar in all pivmecillinam regimens (65–72%) as was bacteriological cure (83–89%). Pivmecillinam had few low to mild adverse reactions, comparable to placebo. Conclusions Symptoms are not conclusive for diagnosis of LUTIW. Pivmecillinam therapies are superior to placebo and seven days regimens are more efficient than three days. Pivmecillinam 200 mg×2×7 days is recommended as a first-line therapy for LUTIW. PMID:17354160

  3. Evaluation of the Live Biotherapeutic Product, Asymptomatic Bacteriuria Escherichia coli 2-12, in Healthy Dogs and Dogs with Clinical Recurrent UTI.

    PubMed

    Segev, G; Sykes, J E; Klumpp, D J; Schaeffer, A J; Antaki, E M; Byrne, B A; Yaggie, R E; Westropp, J L

    2018-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is an emerging problem. To investigate the safety and efficacy of a live biotherapeutic product, ASB E. coli 2-12 for UTI treatment. Six healthy research dogs; nine client-owned dogs with recurrent UTI. Prospective noncontrolled clinical trial. For safety data, research dogs were sedated, a urinary catheter was inserted into the bladder; 10 10 CFU/mL of ASB E. coli 2-12 was instilled. Urine was cultured on days 1, 3, and 8 post-instillation and dogs were observed for lower urinary tract signs (LUTS). For client-owned dogs, ASB E. coli 2-12 was instilled similarly and urine cultures analyzed on days 1, 7, and 14 days postinstillation. No LUTS were noted in any of the 6 research dogs after ASB E. coli 2-12 infusion. Pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) studies confirmed the bacterial strains isolated matched that ASB E. coli 2-12 strain. Four of the nine client-owned dogs had complete or nearly complete clinical cures by day 14. Of these four dogs, 3 also had microbiologic cures at day 14; one of these dogs had subclinical bacteriuria (in addition to ASB E. coli 2-12). Three of these four dogs had ASB E. coli 2-12 isolated from their urine at day 14. With the exception of mild, temporary, self-limiting, hyporexia in two dogs on the day of biotherapeutic administration, there were no major adverse effects. These results suggest ASB E. coli 2-12 is safe and should be investigated in a larger controlled study evaluating clinical UTI in dogs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  4. Fosfomycin trometamol: a review of its use as a single-dose oral treatment for patients with acute lower urinary tract infections and pregnant women with asymptomatic bacteriuria.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2013-11-01

    Fosfomycin trometamol (fosfomycin tromethamine) [Monuril(®), Monurol(®), Monural(®)] is approved in numerous countries worldwide, mainly for the treatment of uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTIs). Fosfomycin has good in vitro activity against common uropathogens, such as Escherichia coli (including extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing E. coli), Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Staphylococcus saprophyticus, and the susceptibility of uropathogens to fosfomycin has remained relatively stable over time. A single oral dose of fosfomycin trometamol 3 g (the approved dosage) achieves high concentrations in urine. Results of recent randomized trials indicate that single-dose fosfomycin trometamol had similar clinical and/or bacteriological efficacy to 3- to 7-day regimens of ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, cotrimoxazole or nitrofurantoin in women with uncomplicated lower UTIs. In addition, single-dose fosfomycin trometamol had similar bacteriological efficacy to a 5-day course of cefuroxime axetil or a 7-day course of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid in pregnant women with asymptomatic bacteriuria, and similar clinical and/or bacteriological efficacy to a 5-day course of cefuroxime axetil or amoxicillin/clavulanic acid or a 3-day course of ceftibuten in pregnant women with a lower UTI. Single-dose fosfomycin trometamol was generally well tolerated, with gastrointestinal adverse events (e.g. diarrhoea, nausea) reported most commonly. In conclusion, single-dose fosfomycin trometamol is an important option for the first-line empirical treatment of uncomplicated lower UTIs.

  5. Prevalence of undiagnosed asymptomatic bacteriuria and associated risk factors during pregnancy: a cross-sectional study at two tertiary centres in Cairo, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Aziz Elzayat, Mohamed; Barnett-Vanes, Ashton; Dabour, Mohamed Farag Elmorsy; Cheng, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Background The prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) during pregnancy is poorly understood in Egypt—a country with a high birth rate. Objectives To determine the prevalence of ASB among pregnant women booking at El Hussein and Sayed Galal Hospitals in Al-Azhar University in Egypt; and to observe the relationship between ASB prevalence and risk factors such as socioeconomic level and personal hygiene. Setting Obstetrics and gynaecology clinics of 2 university hospitals in the capital of Egypt. Both hospitals are teaching and referral hospitals receiving referrals from across over the country. They operate specialist antenatal clinics 6 days per week. Participants A cross-sectional study combining the use of questionnaires and laboratory analysis was conducted in 171 pregnant women with no signs or symptoms of urinary tract infection (1 case was excluded). Samples of clean catch midstream urine were collected and cultured using quantitative urine culture and antibiotic sensitivity tests were performed. Results Of 171 pregnant women, 1 case was excluded; 17 cases (10%, 95% CI 5.93% to 15.53%) were positive for ASB. There was a statistically significant relation between the direction of washing genitals and sexual activity per week—and ASB. Escherichia coli was the most commonly isolated bacteria followed by Klebsiella. Nitrofurantoin showed 100% sensitivity, while 88% of the isolates were resistant to cephalexin. Conclusions The prevalence of ASB seen in pregnant women in 2 tertiary hospitals in Egypt was 10%. E. coli and Klebsiella are the common organisms isolated. The direction of washing genitals and sexual activity significantly influences the risk of ASB. Pregnant women should be screened early for ASB during pregnancy; appropriate treatment should be given for positive cases according to antibiotic sensitivity screening. Cephalexin is likely to be of limited use in this management. PMID:28325856

  6. A hospital-site controlled intervention using audit and feedback to implement guidelines concerning inappropriate treatment of catheter-associated asymptomatic bacteriuria.

    PubMed

    Trautner, Barbara W; Kelly, P Adam; Petersen, Nancy; Hysong, Sylvia; Kell, Harrison; Liao, Kershena S; Patterson, Jan E; Naik, Aanand D

    2011-04-22

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) is one of the most common hospital-acquired infections. However, many cases treated as hospital-acquired CAUTI are actually asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU). Evidence-based guidelines recommend that providers neither screen for nor treat ABU in most catheterized patients, but there is a significant gap between these guidelines and clinical practice. Our objectives are (1) to evaluate the effectiveness of an audit and feedback intervention for increasing guideline-concordant care concerning catheter-associated ABU and (2) to measure improvements in healthcare providers' knowledge of and attitudes toward the practice guidelines associated with the intervention. The study uses a controlled pre/post design to test an intervention using audit and feedback of healthcare providers to improve their compliance with ABU guidelines. The intervention and the control sites are two VA hospitals. For objective 1 we will review medical records to measure the clinical outcomes of inappropriate screening for and treatment of catheter-associated ABU. For objective 2 we will survey providers' knowledge and attitudes. Three phases of our protocol are proposed: the first 12-month phase will involve observation of the baseline incidence of inappropriate screening for and treatment of ABU at both sites. This surveillance for clinical outcomes will continue at both sites throughout the study. Phase 2 consists of 12 months of individualized audit and feedback at the intervention site and guidelines distribution at both sites. The third phase, also over 12 months, will provide unit-level feedback at the intervention site to assess sustainability. Healthcare providers at the intervention site during phase 2 and at both sites during phase 3 will complete pre/post surveys of awareness and familiarity (knowledge), as well as of acceptance and outcome expectancy (attitudes) regarding the relevant practice guidelines. Our proposal to bring clinical

  7. Urinary Tract Infections in Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Mody, Lona; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic urinary tract infections (UTIs) in older women are commonly encountered in outpatient practice. OBJECTIVE To review management of asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic UTI and review prevention of recurrent UTIs in older community-dwelling women. EVIDENCE REVIEW A search of Ovid (Medline, PsycINFO, Embase) for English-language human studies conducted among adults aged 65 years and older and published in peer-reviewed journals from 1946 to November 20, 2013. RESULTS The clinical spectrum of UTIs ranges from asymptomatic bacteriuria, to symptomatic and recurrent UTIs, to sepsis associated with UTI requiring hospitalization. Recent evidence helps differentiate asymptomatic bacteriuria from symptomatic UTI. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is transient in older women, often resolves without any treatment, and is not associated with morbidity or mortality. The diagnosis of symptomatic UTI is made when a patient has both clinical features and laboratory evidence of a urinary infection. Absent other causes, patients presenting with any 2 of the following meet the clinical diagnostic criteria for symptomatic UTI: fever, worsened urinary urgency or frequency, acute dysuria, suprapubic tenderness, or costovertebral angle pain or tenderness. A positive urine culture (≥105 CFU/mL) with no more than 2 uropathogens and pyuria confirms the diagnosis of UTI. Risk factors for recurrent symptomatic UTI include diabetes, functional disability, recent sexual intercourse, prior history of urogynecologic surgery, urinary retention, and urinary incontinence. Testing for UTI is easily performed in the clinic using dipstick tests. When there is a low pretest probability of UTI, a negative dipstick result for leukocyte esterase and nitrites excludes infection. Antibiotics are selected by identifying the uropathogen, knowing local resistance rates, and considering adverse effect profiles. Chronic suppressive antibiotics for 6 to 12 months and

  8. Asymptomatic urinary tract infection among pregnant women attending the antenatal clinic of Hawassa Referral Hospital, Southern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Untreated asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) during pregnancy may cause serious complications including pyelonephritis and delivery of premature or low-birth-weight infants. However, little is known about asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy in Ethiopia. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria, bacterial agents, and their antibiotic susceptibility pattern in pregnant women attending antenatal clinic of the Hawassa Teaching and Referral Hospital. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in a total of 244 pregnant women with no sign and symptom of urinary tract infection from March 2012 to September 2012. Clean catch mid-stream urine samples were collected from all study participants using sterile containers. Urine samples were cultured using standard bacteriological methods. Identification of suspected colonies and antibiotic sensitivity testing were done. Result Out of 244 pregnant women, 46(18.8%) were positive for asymptomatic bacteriuria (Colony Forming Unit ≥ 105/mL). There was no difference in prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria with respect to age (p = 0.07) and trimester (p = 0.27).The most frequently isolated bacteria were coagulase negative Staphylococcus (32.6%), followed by Escherichia coli (26.1%), and Staphylococcus auerus (13%). The susceptibility rate of bacterial isolate was highest for norfloxacin (64.7%) and lowest for ampicillin (17.6%). Conclusion The high prevalence of ASB in pregnant women warrant the need to screen all pregnant women and treat those infected with appropriate antimicrobial regimens in order to reduce its complications. PMID:24636218

  9. Asymptomatic urinary tract infection among pregnant women attending the antenatal clinic of Hawassa Referral Hospital, Southern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Tadesse, Endale; Teshome, Million; Merid, Yared; Kibret, Belayhun; Shimelis, Techalew

    2014-03-17

    Untreated asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) during pregnancy may cause serious complications including pyelonephritis and delivery of premature or low-birth-weight infants. However, little is known about asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy in Ethiopia. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria, bacterial agents, and their antibiotic susceptibility pattern in pregnant women attending antenatal clinic of the Hawassa Teaching and Referral Hospital. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a total of 244 pregnant women with no sign and symptom of urinary tract infection from March 2012 to September 2012. Clean catch mid-stream urine samples were collected from all study participants using sterile containers. Urine samples were cultured using standard bacteriological methods. Identification of suspected colonies and antibiotic sensitivity testing were done. Out of 244 pregnant women, 46(18.8%) were positive for asymptomatic bacteriuria (Colony Forming Unit ≥ 105/mL). There was no difference in prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria with respect to age (p = 0.07) and trimester (p = 0.27).The most frequently isolated bacteria were coagulase negative Staphylococcus (32.6%), followed by Escherichia coli (26.1%), and Staphylococcus auerus (13%). The susceptibility rate of bacterial isolate was highest for norfloxacin (64.7%) and lowest for ampicillin (17.6%). The high prevalence of ASB in pregnant women warrant the need to screen all pregnant women and treat those infected with appropriate antimicrobial regimens in order to reduce its complications.

  10. Identification of the Regions of Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor Type 1 Responsible for Receptor Binding and Enzymatic Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-05

    kidneys (Warren, 1996). There are generally three clinical manifestations of UTI. These are asymptomatic bacteriuria , cystitis, and acute...pyelonephritis (Warren, 1996; Zhang and Foxman, 2003). Asymptomatic bacteriuria is defined as such in an individual who has two consecutive urine cultures...tract (Marrs et al., 2005). UPEC strains that express this virulence factor are associated with pyelonephritis in pregnant women (30%) as well as

  11. Urinary tract infection during pregnancy: current concepts on a common multifaceted problem.

    PubMed

    Kalinderi, Kallirhoe; Delkos, Dimitrios; Kalinderis, Michail; Athanasiadis, Apostolos; Kalogiannidis, Ioannis

    2018-02-06

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most common bacterial infection in pregnancy, increasing the risk of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Urinary tract infections may present as asymptomatic bacteriuria, acute cystitis or pyelonephritis. Escherichia coli is the most common pathogen associated with both symptomatic and asymptomatic bacteriuria. If asymptomatic bacteriuria is untreated, up to 30% of mothers develop acute pyelonephritis, with an increased risk of multiple maternal and neonatal complications, such as preeclampsia, preterm birth, intrauterine growth restriction and low birth weight. Urinary tract infection is a common, but preventable cause of pregnancy complications, thus urinary tests, such as urine culture or new technologies such as high-throughput DNA sequence-based analyses, should be used in order to improve antenatal screening of pregnant women.

  12. Pattern of asymptomatic bacteriuria among pregnant women attending an antenatal clinic at a private health facility in Benin, South-South Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Alfred, Aiyebelehin O; Chiedozie, Ike; Martin, Duru U

    2013-01-01

    The objective was to establish the characteristics of antenatal attendees in Faith Medical Centre, a private health facility in Benin City who have asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) as well as to determine the relationship between ASB and socioeconomic status. It was a descriptive, cross-sectional study involving 240 pregnant women who presented in the course of antenatal care from January to April 2009. With the aid of a questionnaire patients who were recruited for the study had their socio-demographic data and relevant gynecological and drug history recorded. A physical examination was done to document temperature, height, weight and symphysiofundal height. A clean-catch midstream urine sample was collected for microscopy and culture. White blood cell count of≥5/hpf and/or bacteria count of≥1/hpf of urine was considered significant for urine microscopy and a single colony count of ≥105/ml from two consecutive urine samples was considered significant for urine culture. The prevalence of ASB was 13.8% by urine culture and 43.8% by urine microscopy among antenatal attendees in Faith Medical Centre, Benin City. There was no relationship between ASB and socio-economic factor (P value=0.1267). There was also no significant specific trend between ASB and age (P value=0.0578). Using urine culture as gold standard, the sensitivity of urine microscopy was 90.9%, the specificity was 49.3%, the positive predictive value was 22.2% and the negative predictive value was 97.1%. ASB in pregnancy is common in Faith Mediplex and has no statistically significant relationship with socioeconomic status. The current practice of diagnosing and treating ASB based on urine microscopy needs to be reviewed since the specificity of urine microscopy is very low. Also the practice of screening pregnant women only at the time of booking can lead to under-diagnosis of ASB. This is so because most women who develop this condition later in the course of antenatal care will be missed."

  13. Benefits and harms of screening for and treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Angelescu, Konstanze; Nussbaumer-Streit, Barbara; Sieben, Wiebke; Scheibler, Fülöp; Gartlehner, Gerald

    2016-11-02

    Most European and North American clinical practice guidelines recommend screening for asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) as a routine pregnancy test. Antibiotic treatment of ASB in pregnant women is supposed to reduce maternal upper urinary tract infections (upper UTIs) and preterm labour. However, most studies supporting the treatment of ASB were conducted in the 1950s to 1980s. Because of subsequent changes in treatment options for ASB and UTI, the applicability of findings from these studies has come into question. Our systematic review had three objectives: firstly, to assess the patient-relevant benefits and harms of screening for ASB versus no screening; secondly, to compare the benefits and harms of different screening strategies; and thirdly, in case no reliable evidence on the overarching screening question was identified, to determine the benefits and harms of treatment of ASB. We systematically searched several bibliographic databases, trial registries, and other sources (up to 02/2016) for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and prospective non-randomised trials. Two authors independently reviewed abstracts and full-text articles and assessed the risk of bias of the studies included. As meta-analyses were not possible, we summarised the results qualitatively. We did not identify any eligible studies that investigated the benefits and harms of screening for ASB versus no screening or that compared different screening strategies. We identified four RCTs comparing antibiotics with no treatment or placebo in 454 pregnant women with ASB. The results of 2 studies published in the 1960s showed a statistically significant reduction in rates of pyelonephritis (odds ratio [OR] = 0.21, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.07-0.59) and lower UTI (OR = 0.10, 95 % CI 0.03-0.35) in women treated with antibiotics. By contrast, event rates reported by a recent study were not statistically significantly different, neither regarding pyelonephritis (0 % vs. 2.2 %; OR

  14. Benefits and Harms of Treatment of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis by the European Association of Urology Urological Infection Guidelines Panel.

    PubMed

    Köves, Bela; Cai, Tommaso; Veeratterapillay, Rajan; Pickard, Robert; Seisen, Thomas; Lam, Thomas B; Yuan, Cathy Yuhong; Bruyere, Franck; Wagenlehner, Florian; Bartoletti, Riccardo; Geerlings, Suzanne E; Pilatz, Adrian; Pradere, Benjamin; Hofmann, Fabian; Bonkat, Gernot; Wullt, Björn

    2017-12-01

    People with asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) are often unnecessarily treated with antibiotics risking adverse effects and antimicrobial resistance. We performed a systematic review to determine any benefits and harms of treating ABU in particular patient groups. Relevant databases were searched and eligible trials were assessed for risk-of-bias and Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Education quality. Where possible, a meta-analysis of extracted data was performed or a narrative synthesis of the evidence was presented. After screening 3626 articles, 50 studies involving 7088 patients were included. Overall, quality of evidence ranged from very low to low. There was no evidence of benefit for patients with no risk factors, patients with diabetes mellitus, postmenopausal women, elderly institutionalised patients, patients with renal transplants, or patients prior to joint replacement, and treatment was harmful for patients with recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI). Treatment of ABU resulted in a lower risk of postoperative UTI after transurethral resection surgery. In pregnant women, we found evidence that treatment of ABU decreased risk of symptomatic UTI, low birthweight, and preterm delivery. ABU should be treated prior to transurethral resection surgery. In addition, current evidence also suggests that ABU treatment is required in pregnant women, although the results of a recent trial have challenged this view. We reviewed available scientific studies to see if people with bacteria in their urine but without symptoms of urinary tract infection should be treated with antibiotics to eliminate bacteria. For most people, treatment was not beneficial and may be harmful. Antibiotic treatment did appear to benefit women in pregnancy and those about to undergo urological surgery. Copyright © 2017 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A hospital-site controlled intervention using audit and feedback to implement guidelines concerning inappropriate treatment of catheter-associated asymptomatic bacteriuria

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) is one of the most common hospital-acquired infections. However, many cases treated as hospital-acquired CAUTI are actually asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU). Evidence-based guidelines recommend that providers neither screen for nor treat ABU in most catheterized patients, but there is a significant gap between these guidelines and clinical practice. Our objectives are (1) to evaluate the effectiveness of an audit and feedback intervention for increasing guideline-concordant care concerning catheter-associated ABU and (2) to measure improvements in healthcare providers' knowledge of and attitudes toward the practice guidelines associated with the intervention. Methods/Design The study uses a controlled pre/post design to test an intervention using audit and feedback of healthcare providers to improve their compliance with ABU guidelines. The intervention and the control sites are two VA hospitals. For objective 1 we will review medical records to measure the clinical outcomes of inappropriate screening for and treatment of catheter-associated ABU. For objective 2 we will survey providers' knowledge and attitudes. Three phases of our protocol are proposed: the first 12-month phase will involve observation of the baseline incidence of inappropriate screening for and treatment of ABU at both sites. This surveillance for clinical outcomes will continue at both sites throughout the study. Phase 2 consists of 12 months of individualized audit and feedback at the intervention site and guidelines distribution at both sites. The third phase, also over 12 months, will provide unit-level feedback at the intervention site to assess sustainability. Healthcare providers at the intervention site during phase 2 and at both sites during phase 3 will complete pre/post surveys of awareness and familiarity (knowledge), as well as of acceptance and outcome expectancy (attitudes) regarding the relevant practice guidelines

  16. Prevalence of undiagnosed asymptomatic bacteriuria and associated risk factors during pregnancy: a cross-sectional study at two tertiary centres in Cairo, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aziz Elzayat, Mohamed; Barnett-Vanes, Ashton; Dabour, Mohamed Farag Elmorsy; Cheng, Feng

    2017-03-21

    The prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) during pregnancy is poorly understood in Egypt-a country with a high birth rate. To determine the prevalence of ASB among pregnant women booking at El Hussein and Sayed Galal Hospitals in Al-Azhar University in Egypt; and to observe the relationship between ASB prevalence and risk factors such as socioeconomic level and personal hygiene. Obstetrics and gynaecology clinics of 2 university hospitals in the capital of Egypt. Both hospitals are teaching and referral hospitals receiving referrals from across over the country. They operate specialist antenatal clinics 6 days per week. A cross-sectional study combining the use of questionnaires and laboratory analysis was conducted in 171 pregnant women with no signs or symptoms of urinary tract infection (1 case was excluded). Samples of clean catch midstream urine were collected and cultured using quantitative urine culture and antibiotic sensitivity tests were performed. Of 171 pregnant women, 1 case was excluded; 17 cases (10%, 95% CI 5.93% to 15.53%) were positive for ASB. There was a statistically significant relation between the direction of washing genitals and sexual activity per week-and ASB. Escherichia coli was the most commonly isolated bacteria followed by Klebsiella . Nitrofurantoin showed 100% sensitivity, while 88% of the isolates were resistant to cephalexin. The prevalence of ASB seen in pregnant women in 2 tertiary hospitals in Egypt was 10%. E. coli and Klebsiella are the common organisms isolated. The direction of washing genitals and sexual activity significantly influences the risk of ASB. Pregnant women should be screened early for ASB during pregnancy; appropriate treatment should be given for positive cases according to antibiotic sensitivity screening. Cephalexin is likely to be of limited use in this management. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. Protocol to disseminate a hospital-site controlled intervention using audit and feedback to implement guidelines concerning inappropriate treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria.

    PubMed

    Trautner, Barbara W; Prasad, Pooja; Grigoryan, Larissa; Hysong, Sylvia J; Kramer, Jennifer R; Rajan, Suja; Petersen, Nancy J; Rosen, Tracey; Drekonja, Dimitri M; Graber, Christopher; Patel, Payal; Lichtenberger, Paola; Gauthier, Timothy P; Wiseman, Steve; Jones, Makoto; Sales, Anne; Krein, Sarah; Naik, Aanand Dinkar

    2018-01-19

    Antimicrobial stewardship to combat the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has become a national priority. This project focuses on reducing inappropriate use of antimicrobials for asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB), a very common condition that leads to antimicrobial overuse in acute and long-term care. We previously conducted a successful intervention, entitled "Kicking Catheter Associated Urinary Tract Infection (CAUTI): the No Knee-Jerk Antibiotics Campaign," to decrease guideline-discordant ordering of urine cultures and antibiotics for ASB. The current objective is to facilitate implementation of a scalable version of the Kicking CAUTI campaign across four geographically diverse Veterans Health Administration facilities while assessing what aspects of an antimicrobial stewardship intervention are essential to success and sustainability. This project uses an interrupted time series design with four control sites. The two main intervention tools are (1) an evidence-based algorithm that distills the guidelines into a streamlined clinical pathway and (2) case-based audit and feedback to train clinicians to use the algorithm. Our conceptual framework for the development and implementation of this intervention draws on May's General Theory of Implementation. The intervention is directed at providers in acute and long-term care, and the goal is to reduce inappropriate screening for and treatment of ASB in all patients and residents, not just those with urinary catheters. The start-up for each facility consists of centrally-led phone calls with local site champions and baseline surveys. Case-based audit and feedback will begin at a given site after the start-up period and continue for 12 months, followed by a sustainability assessment. In addition to the clinical outcomes, we will explore the relationship between the dose of the intervention and clinical outcomes. This project moves from a proof-of-concept effectiveness study to implementation involving

  18. Management of urinary tract infections in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hodgman, D E

    1994-06-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most frequent complications of pregnancy. When the lower UTIs of asymptomatic bacteriuria and cystitis are not eradicated, the subsequent risk of the development of pyelonephritis is increased. The associated decreased maternal morbidity and fetal prematurity are the goals of a screening and treatment program for pregnant women. This clinical article presents information on the etiology, incidence, diagnosis, and management of asymptomatic bacteriuria and cystitis. Nursing implications regarding teaching are included.

  19. Urine interleukin-6, interleukin-8 and transforming growth factor β1 in infants with urinary tract infection and asymptomatic bacteriuria

    PubMed Central

    Krzemień, Grażyna; Turczyn, Agnieszka; Pańczyk-Tomaszewska, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Urinary tract infection (UTI) occurs in 1.1% of girls and 1.4% of boys during the first year of life. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) is usually detected incidentally in 0.9% of girls and 2.5% of boys at this age. The aim of the study was to assess the usefulness of measurement of pro-inflammatory urine interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 concentrations and anti-inflammatory transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) level in infants with febrile UTI, non-febrile UTI and ABU. Material and methods A total of 35 children, mean age 6.14 ±3.47 months, were divided into three groups: group I – febrile UTI (n = 13), group II – non-febrile UTI (n = 13) and group III – ABU (n = 9). At the time of enrollment urine IL-6, IL-8, TGF-β1 and serum C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and white blood cell count (WBC) were measured. Renal ultrasound was performed in all children, 99mTc-dimercaptosuccinic acid scintigraphy (DMSA) and voiding cystourethrography in children with UTI. Results Urine concentrations of IL-6 and IL-8 were significantly higher in febrile UTI compared to those with non-febrile UTI and ABU (p < 0.5, p < 0.01) and positively correlated with CRP, ESR and WBC (p < 0.01). Urine levels of TGF-β1 were significantly higher in children with febrile UTI compared to those with ABU (p < 0.05) and positively correlated with WBC (p < 0.01). Inflammatory changes in the DMSA scan were detected in 66.6% of children with UTI. No significant difference in frequency of an abnormal DMSA scan compared to a normal scan was found in groups with febrile and non-febrile UTI. No relations between urine cytokines, systemic inflammatory markers and changes in DMSA scan were observed. The cutoff value for detection of inflammatory changes in the DMSA scan for IL-8 was 120 pg/mg creatinine (Cr) and 40 pg/mg Cr for TGF-β1. Based on this value, the sensitivity for IL-8 was 58.3%, specificity 100% and for TGF-β1 66.7% and 83.7%, respectively

  20. Urinary tract infection in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Theresa A; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha

    2013-01-01

    Urinary tract infection and asymptomatic bacteriuria are common in older adults. Unlike in younger adults, distinguishing symptomatic urinary tract infection from asymptomatic bacteriuria is problematic, as older adults, particularly those living in long-term care facilities, are less likely to present with localized genitourinary symptoms. Consensus guidelines have been published to assist clinicians with diagnosis and treatment of urinary tract infection; however, a single evidence-based approach to diagnosis of urinary tract infection does not exist. In the absence of a gold standard definition of urinary tract infection that clinicians agree upon, overtreatment with antibiotics for suspected urinary tract infection remains a significant problem, and leads to a variety of negative consequences including the development of multidrug-resistant organisms. Future studies improving the diagnostic accuracy of urinary tract infections are needed. This review will cover the prevalence, diagnosis and diagnostic challenges, management, and prevention of urinary tract infection and asymptomatic bacteriuria in older adults. PMID:24391677

  1. Vesicoureteral Reflux in Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Molenaar, Nina M; Minnee, Robert C; Bemelman, Frederike J; Idu, Mirza M

    2017-06-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is frequently found after transplantation, but its impact on graft function, urine tract infection, and graft loss remains uncertain. Therefore our objective was to evaluate the effects of VUR on the outcome of renal transplantation. We included 1008 adult renal transplant recipients of whom a 1-week posttransplant voiding cystourethrogram was available. Study end points included occurrence of bacteriuria, renal function, and graft survival. In total, 106 (10.5%) of 1008 graft recipients had a diagnosis of VUR on voiding cystography. The incidence of bacteriuria was comparable in the reflux and nonreflux group (17% vs 17.4%, P = .91). There was no significant difference in renal function at 3 months and 1 year in patients with and without VUR. One- and 5-year graft survival in patients with VUR was 85.8% and 82.1% compared to 87.3% and 83.0% in patients without VUR ( P = .68 and P = .80). Posttransplant VUR has no correlations with early bacteriuria, renal function, and graft survival.

  2. Urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Rubinoff, H

    1977-12-01

    Urinary tract infections can be found in either sex at any age. While the majority occur in adult females as acute cystitis, recurrent symptomatic bacteriuria, or asymptomatic bacteriuria, adult males with prostatitis or acute pyelonephritis and children with symptomatic urinary tract infections comprise a considerable portion of patients seen. Management in pregnant females or in males with indwelling catheters or before prostatic surgery presents special problems. The choice of drug and dosage schedule should vary according to the infecting agent and the clinical state of the patient.

  3. Risk factors for nursing- and healthcare-associated urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Sugishita, Keiji; Saito, Toshiaki; Iwamoto, Takashi

    2018-05-17

    In concordance with population aging, the number of patients living in long-term care facilities or who require nursing care has been increasing in Japan. However, little is known about the characteristics of urinary tract infection in these patients. The present study aimed to clarify the background or risk factors for multidrug-resistant urinary tract infection in this patient population. A retrospective study was carried out of patients aged ≥65 years who presented to Kesennuma City Municipal Motoyoshi Hospital from April 2014 to July 2017 with suspected urinary tract infection and a positive urine culture. Among a total of 76 patients, 20 (26%) had multidrug-resistant bacteriuria. The prevalence of multidrug-resistant bacteriuria was 40% among the long-term care facility residents, 34% among the patients who were certified as requiring care under the long-term care system in Japan and 47% among those with antibiotic prescription within 90 days. By multivariate analysis, long-term care facility residency was an independent risk factor for multidrug-resistant bacteriuria (odds ratio 4.1, 95% confidence interval 1.2-14.3). Long-term care facility residency was found to be a significant predictor of multidrug-resistant bacteriuria. Nursing- and healthcare-associated urinary tract infection, which has different characteristics from those of community- or hospital-acquired infections, should be considered when deciding treatment in this population. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2018; ••: ••-••. © 2018 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  4. Management of urinary tract infections in patients with neurogenic bladder: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Pannek, Jürgen; Wöllner, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common morbidities in persons with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD). They are associated with a significant morbidity and mortality, and they affect the quality of life of the affected patients. Diagnosis and treatment of UTI in this group of patients are challenging. In this review, the current strategies regarding diagnosis, treatment, and prevention are summarized. it is important to correctly diagnose a UTI, as treatment of bacteriuria should strictly be avoided. A UTI is defined as a combination of laboratory findings (leukocyturia and bacteriuria) and symptoms. Laboratory findings without symptoms are classified as asymptomatic bacteriuria. Routine urine screening is not advised. Only UTI should be treated; treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria is not indicated. Prior to treatment, urine for a urine culture should be obtained. Antibiotic treatment for ~7 days is advised. In recurrent UTI, bladder management should be optimized and morphologic causes for UTI should be excluded. If UTIs persist, medical prophylaxis should be considered. Currently, no prophylactic measure with evidence-based efficacy exists. Long-term antibiotic prophylaxis should be used merely as an ultimate measure. Among the various mentioned innovative approaches for UTI prevention, bacteriophages, intravesical instillations, complementary and alternative medicine techniques, and probiotics seem to be most promising. Recently, several promising innovative options for UTI prophylaxis have been developed which may help overcome the current therapeutic dilemma. However, further well designed studies are necessary to evaluate the safety and efficacy of these approaches.

  5. Effectiveness of Prophylactic Antibiotics against Post-Ureteroscopic Lithotripsy Infections: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lo, Chi-Wen; Yang, Stephen Shei-Dei; Hsieh, Cheng-Hsing; Chang, Shang-Jen

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of prophylactic antibiotic therapy in reducing the incidence of post-ureteroscopic lithotripsy (URL) infections. A systemic search of PubMED was performed to identify all randomized trials that compared the incidence of post-operative infections in patients without pre-operative urinary tract infections who underwent URL with and without a single dose of prophylactic antibiotics. The data were analyzed using Cochrane Collaboration Review Manager (RevMan, version 5.2). The endpoints of the analysis were pyuria (>10 white blood cells/high-power field), bacteriuria (urine culture with bacteria >10(5) colony-forming units/mL), and febrile urinary tract infections (fUTIs), defined as a body temperature of >38°C with pyuria or meaningful bacteriuria within 1 wk after the operation. In total, four trials enrolling 500 patients met the inclusion criteria and were subjected to meta-analysis. Prophylactic antibiotics significantly reduced post-URL pyuria (risk ratios [RR] 0.65; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.51-0.82) and bacteriuria (RR 0.26; 95% CI 0.12-0.60; p=0.001). Patients who received prophylactic antibiotics tended to have lower rates of fUTI, although the difference was not statistically significant. Prophylactic antibiotic therapy can reduce the incidence of pyuria and bacteriuria after URL. However, because of the low incidence of post-URL fUTIs, we failed to show that a single dose of prophylactic antibiotics can reduce the rate of such infections significantly.

  6. Recommended treatment for urinary tract infection in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Vercaigne, L M; Zhanel, G G

    1994-02-01

    To establish and recommend a therapeutic regimen for the treatment of urinary tract infection (UTI) in pregnancy based on the published studies. An English-language literature search employing MEDLINE, Index Medicus, and bibliographic reviews of the references obtained were searched (key terms: urinary tract infection, UTI, pregnancy, bacteriuria). All identified human studies dealing with bacteriuria or UTI in pregnancy were analyzed. Limited data are available regarding the appropriate antibiotic management of UTI in pregnancy. Single-dose cure rates with amoxicillin are approximately 80 percent. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole provides cure rates of greater than 80 percent. Cephalosporins and nitrofurantoin produce variable results. We recommend separating pregnant subjects with UTI into two groups. Those with asymptomatic bacteriuria can be treated with a single dose of an antimicrobial to which the organism is susceptible. For those with symptomatic UTI, we recommend amoxicillin 500 mg tid for three days. Urine cultures should be repeated seven days following therapy to assess cure or failure. Well-designed studies need to be performed, comparing single-dose and three-day therapy for UTI in pregnancy.

  7. [Asymptomatic bacteruiria frequency in pregnant women and uropathogen in vitro antimicrobial sensitivity].

    PubMed

    Hernández Blas, Fernanda; López Carmona, Juan Manuel; Rodríguez Moctezuma, José Raymundo; Peralta Pedrero, María Luisa; Rodríguez Gutiérrez, Román Salvador; Ortiz Aguirre, Alma Rosa

    2007-06-01

    To estimate the frequency of asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women attended in Family Medicine Units of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social and to determine the in vitro sensitivity rate of the microorganisms to ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, nitrofurantoin and amikacin. We carried out an observational, prospective and transversal study at Family Medicine Units 62 and 64 of the Mexico State Delegation, located in the urban area of Mexico City. Women with lesser than 32 weeks of pregnancy without urinary tract symptoms were included. Urine culture of a midstream urine specimen with > or = 10(5) colony forming units/mL urine of an only germen was used as the gold standard. The in vitro antimicrobial sensitivity was established according to the Bauer Kirby technique. 874 pregnant women were included and 73 had a positive urine culture, with a frequency of 8.4%, IC 95% = 6.6 - 10.2%, of asymptomatic bacteriuria. Escherichia coil was the most frequent isolated agent (77%). In vitro sensitivity to ampicillin of the microorganisms isolated was of 27%, IC 95% = 16 - 38%; to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole of 40%, IC95% = 29 - 51%; to amikacin of 68%, IC 95% = 57 - 79%, and to nitrofurantoin of 79%, IC 95% = 70 - 88%. The frequency of asymptomatic bacteriuria in the studied population is similar to the reported by the literature. The in vitro sensitivity rates of E. coil to ampicillin and to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole are very low. The best sensitivity corresponded to the nitrofurantoin. The treatment of the asymptomatic bacteriuria must be based on the local patterns of antimicrobial sensitivity and resistance.

  8. Detection of urinary tract infection (UTI) in long-term care setting: Is the multireagent strip an adequate diagnostic tool?

    PubMed

    Arinzon, Zeev; Peisakh, Alexander; Shuval, Ishay; Shabat, Shay; Berner, Yitshal N

    2009-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most commonly diagnosed and treated infection in elderly residents of long-term care (LTC) setting, and most of them are asymptomatic. Early diagnosis and treatment especially in this group of patients is very important because even a brief delay contributes to mortality as well as to reduce functional and cognitive decline. The purpose of the present study was to determine the validity of multireagent strips (Multistix 10 SG, Bayer, UK) compared with standard urinalysis for the early detection of UTI in LTC elderly patients. Urine specimens were examined for the presence of leukocyte esterase (LE) activity as an indicator of pyuria, nitrite production as an indicator of bacteriuria, erythrocytes (RBC), and protein. The sensitivity, specificity, predictive value, kappa agreement, and likelihood ration were determined for each of the four dipstick parameters measurement separately, and in four combinations were calculated against the urine culture for the diagnosis of UTI and asymptomatic bacteriuria. Ninety-six patients aged 65 years and older with symptomatic UTI were compared with similar number, age, sex and comorbidity status matched patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria. In both groups, urinary culture results were compared with the results of multireagent strips. The multireagent strips results were evaluated for the presence of LE activity as an indicator of pyuria, nitrite production as an indicator of bacteriuria, RBC, and protein. All positive sticks results were evaluated as single parameter and in combination of them. Positive urine cultures were found in 71% (68/96) of the patients with symptomatic and in 60% (58/96; p>0.05) of patients with asymptomatic UTI. In patients with UTI, using multireagent strips kappa agreement for LE was 0.53, for nitrite was 0.14, and in combination of them was 0.31. Similar results were reported in patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria, 0.35, 0.23, and 0.35m. The detection of

  9. Frequency of urinary tract infection in dogs with inflammatory skin disorders treated with ciclosporin alone or in combination with glucocorticoid therapy: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Andrea L; Torres, Sheila M F; Rendahl, Aaron; Koch, Sandra N

    2012-06-01

    Few studies have investigated the frequency of urinary tract infection (UTI) in dogs receiving long-term ciclosporin therapy. The goal of the study was to investigate the frequency of UTI in dogs receiving ciclosporin with or without glucocorticoids. A secondary goal was to determine whether bacteriuria, pyuria and urine specific gravity were good predictors of UTI, and if ciclosporin dose, concurrent ketoconazole therapy, sex or duration of therapy affected the frequency of UTI. Animals -  Eighty-seven dogs with various inflammatory skin disorders and 59 control dogs with inflammatory skin conditions that had not received glucocorticoids or ciclosporin for 6 months were enrolled. This study was retrospective. The first urine culture from dogs receiving ciclosporin was compared with control dogs using Fisher's exact test. A logistic mixed model was used to test for association between a positive bacterial culture and duration of treatment, dose of ciclosporin, concurrent ketoconazole therapy and sex. The sensitivities and specificities for bacteriuria, pyuria and urine specific gravity were determined. Twenty-six of 87 (30%) ciclosporin-treated dogs had at least one positive culture. Compared with 3% positive control samples, 15% were positive in treated dogs (P=0.027). The sensitivity and specificity were, respectively, 64.1 and 98.1% for bacteriuria, 74.4 and 70.9% for pyuria, and 56.4 and 65.3% for urine specific gravity. All other analysed parameters were not significantly different. The results suggest that routine urine cultures and assessment of bacteriuria by cystocentesis should be part of the monitoring for dogs on long-term ciclosporin with and without glucocorticoids. © 2012 The Authors. Veterinary Dermatology. © 2012 ESVD and ACVD.

  10. Diagnostic accuracy of rapid urine dipstick test to predict urinary tract infection among pregnant women in Felege Hiwot Referral Hospital, Bahir Dar, North West Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Demilie, Tazebew; Beyene, Getenet; Melaku, Selabat; Tsegaye, Wondewosen

    2014-07-29

    Untreated bacteriuria during pregnancy has been shown to be associated with low birth-weight and premature delivery. Therefore, routine screening for bacteriuria is advocated. The decision about how to screen pregnant women for bacteriuria has always been a balance between the cost of screening versus the sensitivity and specificity. This study was designed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the rapid dipstick test to predict urinary tract infection in pregnancy against the gold standard urine culture. A total of 367 mid stream urine samples were collected, inoculated on MacConkey, Manitol salt agar (MSA) and blood agar and incubated aerobically at 37°C for overnight. Specimens were classified as "positive" for urinary tract infection (UTI) if the growth of the pathogen(s) was at a count ≥ 10(5) colony-forming units per milliliter (cfu/mL) of urine and classified as "negative" with growth of <10(5) cfu/mL. Urine samples were tested for the presence of nitrite and leukocyte esterase using dipstick rapid test in accordance to the manufacturer's instructions. From the total study participants, 37 pregnant women were symptomatic and the remaining 330 pregnant women were asymptomatic. The sensitivity and specificity of dipstick tests of leukocyte esterase was 50% and 89.1% for pregnant women with asymptomatic UTI(ABU) and 71.4% and 86.7% for symptomatic UTI respectively and for nitrite 35.7% and 98.0% for ABU and 57.1% and 96.7% symptomatic UTI. This study revealed that the use of dipstick leukocyte esterase and nitrite for screening UTI particularly asymptomatic bacteriuria was associated with many false positive and negative results when it was compared against the gold standard culture method. The low sensitivity and positive predictive value of urine dipstick test proved that culture should be used for the diagnosis of UTI.

  11. [Is bacteriological testing of bladder urine informative in acute obstructive pyelo- nephritis?

    PubMed

    Kogan, M I; Naboka, Yu L; Bedzhanyan, S K; Mitusova, E V; Gudima, I A; Morgun, P P; Vasileva, L I

    2017-07-01

    The problem of the etiology and pathogenesis of acute obstructive pyelonephritis (OOP) remains one of the challenging issues of modern urology. Etiological agents of pyelonephritis can be both gram-negative and gram-positive opportunistic bacteria mostly belonging to the normal flora in humans. The generally accepted diagnostic work-up involves a bacteriological testing of not pelvic urine, but of bladder urine collected by a transurethral catheter or midstream specimens of urine collected from the patients. The aim of our study was to compare the microbiota of bladder and pelvic urine in patients with OOP. The study comprised 72 sequentially selected patients (12 men and 60 women) with OOP associated with ureteral stones. Mean age of patients was 53.7+/-0.5 years. All patients underwent bacteriological examination of the bladder urine collected by a transurethral catheter and pelvic urine obtained after relieving stone-related ureteral obstruction. Urinary diversion was performed using j-j stent and PCN in 64 and 8 patients, respectively. Preoperative prophylactic antibiotics were administered routinely. Bacteriological testing of urine was carried out using an extended set (9-10) of culture media. Empirical antibiotic therapy was initiated only after the restoration of urine outflow from the kidney and continued for 5-6 days until the availability of bacteriological testing results. Levels of bacteriuria with Enterobacteria, gram-positive pathogens and NAB in two urine samples did not differ significantly (p>0.05). There was a wide range of bacteriuria from 101 to 106 CFU/ml of most microorganisms except @Proteus spp., S. aureus. In bladder urine, the rates of bacteriuria of more or equal 104 CFU/ml for E. coli, Klebsiella spp. and Proteus spp. were 90.9%, 72.7% and 100.0%, respectively. For the remaining microorganisms, predominant bacteriuria was less or equal 103 CFU/ml. In pelvic urine, the rates of bacteriuria of more or equal 104 CFU/ml for E. coli

  12. Integrated next-generation sequencing of 16S rDNA and metaproteomics differentiate the healthy urine microbiome from asymptomatic bacteriuria in neuropathic bladder associated with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical dogma is that healthy urine is sterile and the presence of bacteria with an inflammatory response is indicative of urinary tract infection (UTI). Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) represents the state in which bacteria are present but the inflammatory response is negligible. Differentiating ABU from UTI is diagnostically challenging, but critical because overtreatment of ABU can perpetuate antimicrobial resistance while undertreatment of UTI can result in increased morbidity and mortality. In this study, we describe key characteristics of the healthy and ABU urine microbiomes utilizing 16S rRNA gene (16S rDNA) sequencing and metaproteomics, with the future goal of utilizing this information to personalize the treatment of UTI based on key individual characteristics. Methods A cross-sectional study of 26 healthy controls and 27 healthy subjects at risk for ABU due to spinal cord injury-related neuropathic bladder (NB) was conducted. Of the 27 subjects with NB, 8 voided normally, 8 utilized intermittent catheterization, and 11 utilized indwelling Foley urethral catheterization for bladder drainage. Urine was obtained by clean catch in voiders, or directly from the catheter in subjects utilizing catheters. Urinalysis, urine culture and 16S rDNA sequencing were performed on all samples, with metaproteomic analysis performed on a subsample. Results A total of 589454 quality-filtered 16S rDNA sequence reads were processed through a NextGen 16S rDNA analysis pipeline. Urine microbiomes differ by normal bladder function vs. NB, gender, type of bladder catheter utilized, and duration of NB. The top ten bacterial taxa showing the most relative abundance and change among samples were Lactobacillales, Enterobacteriales, Actinomycetales, Bacillales, Clostridiales, Bacteroidales, Burkholderiales, Pseudomonadales, Bifidobacteriales and Coriobacteriales. Metaproteomics confirmed the 16S rDNA results, and functional human protein-pathogen interactions were noted in

  13. Evaluation of urine culture screening by light-scatter photometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, D.C.; Thrupp, L.D.; Matsen, J.M.

    1981-08-01

    Urine screening for bacteriuria by light-scatter photometry (Autobac) was evaluated for accuracy and compared with a colony count by the calibrated loop method. Incubation time, inoculum size, precision, and interference of particulate matter were evaluated in an effort to standardize the screening procedure. Results showed that urines could be accurately screened for Enterobacteriaceae by inoculating a single Autobac cuvette chamber with 0.1 or 0.2 ml of urine and determining the voltage change after four hours. A change of greater than or equal to 0.2 units indicates significant bacteriuria. Decreased accuracy was noted for urines having greater than 10(5) cfu/ml ofmore » Pseudomonas species or gram-positive cocci, possibly because these organisms grow more slowly.« less

  14. Asymptomatic urinary tract infection in gynaecological outpatients.

    PubMed

    Williams, J D; Thomlinson, J L; Cole, J G; Cope, E

    1969-01-04

    In this study mid-stream specimens of urine were collected from all new patients attending a gynaecological outpatient department and tested for significant bacteriuria. Those having an asymptomatic infection were folloWed up, treated, and investigated adiologically.Of 1,506 women screened for bacteriuria 82 (5.4%) were found to have a persistent infection. The predominant organism was Escherichia coli, present in 83% of infections. Treatment with sulphonamides produced a good cure rate, which was improved by ampicillin given to failures. Some patients, however, had infections that persisted or recurred despite several antibiotics. The radiological investigations showed that a high proportion of women with asymptomatic urinary infection had severe renal disease which was quite symptomless. This was more pronounced in those with persistent or recurrent infections.

  15. Urinary tract infections in pregnancy: old and new unresolved diagnostic and therapeutic problems.

    PubMed

    Matuszkiewicz-Rowińska, Joanna; Małyszko, Jolanta; Wieliczko, Monika

    2015-03-16

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common in pregnant women and pose a great therapeutic challenge, since the risk of serious complications in both the mother and her child is high. Pregnancy is a state associated with physiological, structural and functional urinary tract changes which promote ascending infections from the urethra. Unlike the general population, all pregnant women should be screened for bacteriuria with urine culture, and asymptomatic bacteriuria must be treated in every case that is diagnosed, as it is an important risk factor for pyelonephritis in this population. The antibiotic chosen should have a good maternal and fetal safety profile. In this paper, current principles of diagnosis and management of UTI in pregnancy are reviewed, and the main problems and controversies are identified and discussed.

  16. Female urinary tract infection in primary health care: bacteriological and clinical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Osterberg, E; Hallander, H O; Kallner, A; Lundin, A; Svensson, S B; Aberg, H

    1990-01-01

    Female patients with symptoms of urinary tract infection (n = 1136) were studied in primary health care with respect to (a) clinical symptoms as predictors of bacteriuria; (b) relation between aetiological agent and clinical picture, especially for P-fimbriated Escherichia coli; and (c) clinical findings in cases with 10(2)- less than 10(5) CFU/ml of E. coli. Prevalence of bacteriuria (greater than or equal to 10(5) CFU/ml) was 61%. Concurrence of urgency/frequency and dysuria, short duration of symptoms and hematuria increased the probability of bacteriuria and were also significantly more frequent among cases with low counts of E. coli (10(2) less than 10(5) CFU/ml in pure culture or mixed flora) than among cases with sterile urine, indicating an aetiological role of E. coli in many of those cases. Infections with P-fimbriated E. coli were as benign as the P-fimbriae-negative. The rate of P-fimbriation was 29% in specimens containing greater than or equal to 10(5) CFU/ml of E. coli, 30% among specimens with less than 10(5) CFU/ml in pure culture and 10% in specimens containing less than 10(5) CFU/ml of E. coli in mixed culture. Patients infected with Klebsiella, Enterobacter or Proteus did not show a higher rate of previous urinary tract disease or anomalies.

  17. Evaluation of the in vitro growth of urinary tract infection-causing gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria in a proposed synthetic human urine (SHU) medium.

    PubMed

    Ipe, Deepak S; Ulett, Glen C

    2016-08-01

    Bacteriuria is a hallmark of urinary tract infection (UTI) and asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU), which are among the most frequent infections in humans. A variety of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria are associated with these infections but Escherichia coli contributes up to 80% of cases. Multiple bacterial species including E. coli can grow in human urine as a means to maintain colonization during infections. In vitro bacteriuria studies aimed at modeling microbial growth in urine have utilized various compositions of synthetic human urine (SHU) and a Composite SHU formulation was recently proposed. In this study, we sought to validate the recently proposed Composite SHU as a medium that supports the growth of several bacterial species that are known to grow in normal human urine and/or artificial urine. Comparative growth assays of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria E. coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, Streptococcus agalactiae, Staphylococcus saprophyticus and Enterococcus faecalis were undertaken using viable bacterial count and optical density measurements over a 48h culture period. Three different SHU formulations were tested in various culture vessels, shaking conditions and volumes and showed that Composite SHU can support the robust growth of gram-negative bacteria but requires supplementation with 0.2% yeast extract to support the growth of gram-positive bacteria. Experiments are also presented that show an unexpected but major influence of P. mirabilis towards the ability to measure bacterial growth in generally accepted multiwell assays using absorbance readings, predicted to have a basis in the release of volatile organic compound(s) from P. mirabilis during growth in Composite SHU medium. This study represents an essential methodological validation of a more chemically defined type of synthetic urine that can be applied to study mechanisms of bacteriuria and we conclude will offer a useful in vitro model to investigate the

  18. The Effectiveness of Prophylactic Antibiotics with Oral Levofloxacin against Post-Shock Wave Lithotripsy Infectious Complications: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Cheng-Hsing; Yang, Stephen Shei-Dei; Chang, Shang-Jen

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of prophylactic antibiotics in reduction of infections after shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) in patients undergoing shock wave lithotripsy (SWL). The study was a randomized control trial. Between 2012 and 2014, patients with pre-operative sterile urine undergoing SWL were randomly assigned by the randomization ratio of 1:1 to receive prophylactic antibiotics with single-dose oral levofloxacin (500 mg) or no treatment (control group), respectively. Urinalysis and urine cultures were obtained between post-operative day five and seven, respectively. Pyuria was defined as ≥10 white blood cells per high power field (WBC/hpf). Significant bacteriuria was defined as ≥10(5) colony forming units per milliliter (CFU/mL) uropathogens. Febrile urinary tract infection (fUTI) was defined as body temperature higher than 38.0°C with pyuria or significant bacteriuria within seven days after SWL treatment. Initially, 274 patents underwent randomization with 135 and 139 patients in the levofloxacin and control group, respectively. A total of 206 patients (106 with placebo and 100 with levofloxacin) with complete follow-up of urinalysis were eligible for analysis. The rates of post-operative pyuria were not significantly different in patients with and without prophylaxis (8% versus 4.7%, p = 0.33). Moreover, there was also no significant difference in rates of bacteriuria in patients with and without prophylaxis (1% versus 0%, p = 0.49). Patients without follow-up urinalysis and urine culture received telephone survey. Among them, there was only one patient reporting post-SWL fever in the levofloxacin group (0.7%) compared with none (0%) in the control group (p = 0.49). As the results of the interim analysis revealed no benefit of levofloxacin in preventing post-SWL pyuria, bacteriuria, and fUTI, we terminated the study early before the pre-planned sample size was achieved. The incidence of asymptomatic and fUTI is low in patients with pre

  19. Urinary tract infections in pregnancy: old and new unresolved diagnostic and therapeutic problems

    PubMed Central

    Małyszko, Jolanta; Wieliczko, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common in pregnant women and pose a great therapeutic challenge, since the risk of serious complications in both the mother and her child is high. Pregnancy is a state associated with physiological, structural and functional urinary tract changes which promote ascending infections from the urethra. Unlike the general population, all pregnant women should be screened for bacteriuria with urine culture, and asymptomatic bacteriuria must be treated in every case that is diagnosed, as it is an important risk factor for pyelonephritis in this population. The antibiotic chosen should have a good maternal and fetal safety profile. In this paper, current principles of diagnosis and management of UTI in pregnancy are reviewed, and the main problems and controversies are identified and discussed. PMID:25861291

  20. [Decrease in nosocomial infection based on continuous monitoring and control. 7 years' experience in a women's clinic].

    PubMed

    Hirsch, H A; Niehues, U; Decker, K

    1985-12-13

    During a seven-year programme of surveillance and control of infection data were collected by a specialist hygiene nurse on 47 551 gynaecological, obstetric and post-partum patients. The infection rate was highest (40.5%) after major surgical procedures. Infection rate after cesarian section was 16%, eight times the rate after vaginal delivery (2%). The most frequent type of infection was of the urinary tract (70%), usually asymptomatic bacteriuria. Next most frequent were pelvic infections, abdominal wound infections, and phlebitis via an intravenous entry in long-term parenteral nutrition. During the period of observation bacteriuria rate decreased by 75%, the other nosocomial infections by 64%, febrile standard morbidity by 81%. The decrease is largely due to the infection surveillance programme with the employment of a specialist hygiene nurse.

  1. Urinalysis: case presentations for the primary care physician.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Victoria J; Lee, Daniel K; Askeland, Eric J

    2014-10-15

    Urinalysis is useful in diagnosing systemic and genitourinary conditions. In patients with suspected microscopic hematuria, urine dipstick testing may suggest the presence of blood, but results should be confirmed with a microscopic examination. In the absence of obvious causes, the evaluation of microscopic hematuria should include renal function testing, urinary tract imaging, and cystoscopy. In a patient with a ureteral stent, urinalysis alone cannot establish the diagnosis of urinary tract infection. Plain radiography of the kidneys, ureters, and bladder can identify a stent and is preferred over computed tomography. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is the isolation of bacteria in an appropriately collected urine specimen obtained from a person without symptoms of a urinary tract infection. Treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria is not recommended in nonpregnant adults, including those with prolonged urinary catheter use.

  2. Catheter-associated UTI

    MedlinePlus

    ... UTI; Health care-associated UTI; Catheter-associated bacteriuria; Hospital acquired-UTI Images Bladder catheterization, female Bladder catheterization, male References Calfee DP. Prevention and control of health care-associated infections. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  3. ESBL-producing enterobacteriaceae-related urinary tract infections in kidney transplant recipients: incidence and risk factors for recurrence.

    PubMed

    Pilmis, Benoît; Scemla, Anne; Join-Lambert, Olivier; Mamzer, Marie-France; Lortholary, Oliver; Legendre, Christophe; Zahar, Jean-Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) represent the first cause of bacterial infections in renal transplant recipients. In a period of increasing resistance to antimicrobial agents, the factors leading to the development of UTI in previously urinary colonized renal transplant recipients as well as the factors associated with recurrence of UTIs have to be determined. The aims of this retrospective study were (1) to assess the incidence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-PE)-related UTI in kidney transplant recipients, (2) to identify factors associated with ESBL-PE infection and (3) to determine the risk factors for recurrence. We included all kidney transplant recipients admitted in our hospital between January 2009 and January 2012 who had a monobacterial ESBL-PE UTI or bacteriuria. During the study period, 659 patients underwent kidney transplantation; 72 patients had ESBL-PE bacteriuria, representing a 10.9% prevalence, and among the latter 34 (47.2%) presented an ESBL-PE-related UTI. Fourteen patients (41.2%) experienced a UTI relapse associated with two factors: advanced age (p = 0.032) and persistent bacteriuria 48 h after appropriate antibiotic therapy (p = 0.04). No other risk factor for recurrence was found, including the presence and management of a ureteral stent during the first UTI, causative microorganisms, or diabetes mellitus. In this specific population, regarding the risk of relapse there is an urgent need for prospective studies to test the best treatment strategy.

  4. Epidemiology of urinary tract infections and antibiotics sensitivity among pregnant women at Khartoum North Hospital.

    PubMed

    Hamdan, Hamdan Z; Ziad, Abdel Haliem M; Ali, Salah K; Adam, Ishag

    2011-01-18

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) can lead to poor maternal and perinatal outcomes. Investigating epidemiology of UTI and antibiotics sensitivity among pregnant women is fundamental for care-givers and health planners. A cross sectional study has been conducted at Khartoum north teaching hospital Antenatal Care Clinic between February-June 2010, to investigate epidemiology of UTI and antibiotics resistance among pregnant women. Structured questionnaires were used to gather data from pregnant women. UTI was diagnosed using mid stream urine culture on standard culture media Out of 235 pregnant women included, 66 (28.0%) were symptomatic and 169 (71.9%) asymptomatic. the prevalence of bacteriuria among symptomatic and asymptomatic pregnant women were (12.1%), and (14.7%) respectively, with no significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.596), and the overall prevalence of UTI was (14.0%). In multivariate analyses, age, gestational age, parity, and history of UTI in index pregnancy were not associated with bacteriuria. Escherichia coli (42.4%) and S. aureus (39.3%) were the commonest isolated bacteria. Four, 2, 2, 3, 4, 2 and 0 out of 14 E. coli isolates, showed resistance to amoxicillin, naladixic acid, nitrofurantoin, ciprofloxacin, co-trimoxazole, amoxicillin/clavulanate and norfloxacin, respectively. Escherichia coli were the most prevalent causative organisms and showing multi drug resistance pattern, asymptomatic bacteriuria is more prevalent than symptomatic among pregnant women. Urine culture for screening and diagnosis purpose for all pregnant is recommended.

  5. Bacteria on Urine Microscopy Is Not Associated with Systemic Infection in Patients with Obstructing Urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Felix; Loeb, Charles A; Croglio, Michael P; Waltzer, Wayne C; Weissbart, Steven J

    2017-09-01

    Determining whether bacterial presence in urine microscopy represents infection is important as ureteral stent placement is indicated in patients with obstructing urolithiasis and infection. We aim to investigate whether the presence of bacteria on urine microscopy is associated with other markers of infection in patients with obstructing urolithiasis presenting to the emergency room. We performed a cross-sectional study of 199 patients with obstructing urolithiasis and divided patients into two groups according to the presence of bacteria on urine microscopy. The primary outcome was serum white blood cell count and secondary outcomes were objective fever, subjective fever, tachycardia, pyuria, and final urine culture. Univariate and multivariate analysis were used to assess whether the presence of bacteria on microscopy was associated with other markers of infection. The study included 72 patients in the bacteriuria group and 127 without bacteriuria. On univariate analysis, the presence of bacteria was not associated with leukocytosis, objective fever, or subjective fever, but it was associated with gender (p < 0.001), pyuria (p < 0.001), positive nitrites (p = 0.001), positive leukocyte esterase (p < 0.001), and squamous epithelial cells (p = 0.002). In a multilinear regression model including the presence of squamous cells, age, and sex, the presence of bacteriuria was not related to serum white blood cell count (coefficient -0.47; 95% confidence interval [CI] -1.1, 0.2; p = 0.17), heart rate (coefficient 0.85; 95% CI -2.5, 4.2; p = 0.62), presence of subjective or objective fever (odds ratio [OR] 1.5; 95% CI 0.8, 3.1; p = 0.18), or the presence of squamous epithelial cells (coefficient -4.4; 95% CI -10, 1.2; p = 0.12). However, the presence of bacteriuria was related to only the degree of pyuria (coefficient 16.4; 95% CI 9.6, 23.3; p < 0.001). Bacteria on urine microscopy is not associated with other markers of systemic

  6. [Diagnosis and clinical management of urinary tract infection].

    PubMed

    Heilberg, Ita Pfeferman; Schor, Nestor

    2003-01-01

    A review about recent aspects on diagnosis and clinical management of urinary tract infection (UTI) is presented. There is a wide variation in clinical presentation of UTI which include different forms as cystitis, pyelonephritis, urethral syndrome and the clinical relevance of asymptomatic bacteriuria and low-count bacteriuria that must be distinguished from contamination. Pathogenetic aspects concerning bacterial virulence as well as host factors in susceptibility to UTI as urinary tract obstruction, vesicoureteral reflux, indwelling bladder catheters, pregnancy, diabetes mellitus, sexual activity, contraceptive methods, prostatism, menopause, advanced age and renal transplantation are discussed. Diagnostic criteria and the most common tests utilized for differentiation between lower and upper UTI have been reviewed. The authors conclude that a careful evaluation of the underlying factors is required for the correct diagnosis of UTI and to prevent recurrence and that appropriate strategies and specific therapeutic regimens may maximize the benefit while reducing costs and adverse reactions.

  7. Clinical spectrum of urine cultures positive for ESBL-producing Escherichia coli in hospitalized patients and impact on antibiotic use.

    PubMed

    Lepeule, R; Leflon-Guibout, V; Vanjak, D; Zahar, J-R; Lafaurie, M; Besson, C; Lefort, A

    2014-12-01

    We wanted to describe the clinical features associated with urinalysis positive for ESBL-producing Escherichia coli and their impact on antibiotic use. We performed a prospective observational study in 13 French hospitals of the Paris area for 3 consecutive months. We included all patients with urine cultures positive for ESBL-producing E. coli. One hundred and seventeen of the 218 patients (54%) presented with asymptomatic bacteriuria, 31 (14%) with cystitis, and 70 (32%) with a parenchymal infection. Nineteen patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria (16%) received antibiotics. Forty-one with parenchymal infections (59%) received a carbapenem. A carbapenem alternative could have been used in every patient treated with a carbapenem, according to antibiotic susceptibility testing results. Urinary tract infections accounted for 46% of E. coli ESBL positive urinalysis. Fifty percent of parenchymal infections were treated with a carbapenem. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Systematic Review of Interventions to Reduce Urinary Tract Infection in Nursing Home Residents

    PubMed Central

    Meddings, Jennifer; Saint, Sanjay; Krein, Sarah L.; Gaies, Elissa; Reichert, Heidi; Hickner, Andrew; McNamara, Sara; Mann, Jason D.; Mody, Lona

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Urinary tract infections (UTIs) in nursing homes are common, costly, and morbid. PURPOSE Systematic literature review of strategies to reduce UTIs in nursing home residents DATA SOURCES Ovid MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Web of Science and Embase through June 22, 2015. STUDY SELECTION Interventional studies with a comparison group reporting at least one outcome for: catheter-associated UTI (CAUTI), UTIs not identified as catheter-associated, bacteriuria, or urinary catheter use. DATA EXTRACTION Two authors abstracted study design, participant and intervention details, outcomes, and quality measures. DATA SYNTHESIS Of 5,794 records retrieved, 20 records describing 19 interventions were included: 8 randomized controlled trials, 10 pre-post non-randomized interventions, and 1 non-randomized intervention with concurrent controls. Quality (range 8-25, median 15) and outcome definitions varied greatly. Thirteen studies employed strategies to reduce catheter use or improve catheter care; nine studies employed general infection prevention strategies (e.g., improving hand hygiene, surveillance, contact precautions, reducing antibiotics). The nineteen studies reported 12 UTI outcomes, 9 CAUTI outcomes, 4 bacteriuria outcomes, and 5 catheter use outcomes. Five studies showed CAUTI reduction (1 significantly); nine studies showed UTI reduction (none significantly); 2 studies showed bacteriuria reduction (none significantly). Four studies showed reduced catheter use (1 significantly). LIMITATIONS Studies were often underpowered to assess statistical significance; none were pooled given variety of interventions and outcomes. CONCLUSIONS Several practices, often implemented in bundles, appear to reduce UTI or CAUTI in nursing home residents such as improving hand hygiene, reducing and improving catheter use, managing incontinence without catheters, and enhanced barrier precautions. PMID:28459908

  9. Systematic Review of Interventions to Reduce Urinary Tract Infection in Nursing Home Residents.

    PubMed

    Meddings, Jennifer; Saint, Sanjay; Krein, Sarah L; Gaies, Elissa; Reichert, Heidi; Hickner, Andrew; McNamara, Sara; Mann, Jason D; Mody, Lona

    2017-05-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) in nursing homes are common, costly, and morbid. Systematic literature review of strategies to reduce UTIs in nursing home residents. Ovid MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Web of Science and Embase through June 22, 2015. Interventional studies with a comparison group reporting at least 1 outcome for: catheter-associated UTI (CAUTI), UTIs not identified as catheter-associated, bacteriuria, or urinary catheter use. Two authors abstracted study design, participant and intervention details, outcomes, and quality measures. Of 5794 records retrieved, 20 records describing 19 interventions were included: 8 randomized controlled trials, 10 pre-post nonrandomized interventions, and 1 nonrandomized intervention with concurrent controls. Quality (range, 8-25; median, 15) and outcome definitions varied greatly. Thirteen studies employed strategies to reduce catheter use or improve catheter care; 9 studies employed general infection prevention strategies (eg, improving hand hygiene, surveillance, contact precautions, reducing antibiotics). The 19 studies reported 12 UTI outcomes, 9 CAUTI outcomes, 4 bacteriuria outcomes, and 5 catheter use outcomes. Five studies showed CAUTI reduction (1 significantly); 9 studies showed UTI reduction (none significantly); 2 studies showed bacteriuria reduction (none significantly). Four studies showed reduced catheter use (1 significantly). Studies were often underpowered to assess statistical significance; none were pooled given variety of interventions and outcomes. Several practices, often implemented in bundles, such as improving hand hygiene, reducing and improving catheter use, managing incontinence without catheters, and enhanced barrier precautions, appear to reduce UTI or CAUTI in nursing home residents. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2017;12:356-368. © 2017 Society of Hospital Medicine

  10. Multi-resistant gram negative enteric bacteria causing urinary tract infection among malnourished underfives admitted at a tertiary hospital, northwestern, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Maimuna; Moremi, Nyambura; Mirambo, Mariam M; Hokororo, Adolfine; Mushi, Martha F; Seni, Jeremiah; Kamugisha, Erasmus; Mshana, Stephen E

    2015-06-19

    Infections are common complications occurring in malnourished childrenas a result of impaired immunity. Urinary tract infections (UTI) have been found to be the commonest cause of fever in normal children in developing countries. However, data regarding UTI among malnourished children is limited because in most of time severe and moderately malnourished children are afebrile despite significant bacteriuria. A total of 402 malnourished underfives were enrolled. Demographic and other clinical characteristics were collected using standardized data collection tool. Urine specimens were cultured and interpreted according to standard operating procedures. Data were analyzed using STATA version 11. Out of 402 malnourished underfives, 229 (56.9 %) were male. The median age in months was 17 (IQR; 12-31). Of 402 malnourished underfives, 83 (20.3 %) had significant bacteriuria of gram negative enteric bacteria. Escherichia coli 35/84 and Klebsiella pneumonia 20/84 were predominant bacteria isolated. More than 37 % of isolates were resistant to third generation cephalosporins with all of them exhibiting extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL) phenotype. Rates of resistance to ampicillin, amoxillin/clavulanic acid, gentamicin and ciprofloxacin were 82/84 (98.7 %), 47/55 (85.4 %), 45/84 (57.8 %) and 9/84 (10.8 %) respectively. Decrease in age and increase in lymphocytes count were independent factors on multivariate logistic regression analysis found to predict UTI (p<0.05). Multi-resistant gram negative enteric bacteria are common cause of UTI among underfives. A significant number of severe and moderate malnourished children with bacteriuria had no fever. Therefore, routine testing for UTI is emphasized in all malnourished underfives so that appropriate treatment can be initiated.

  11. Rapid tests and urine sampling techniques for the diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI) in children under five years: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Whiting, Penny; Westwood, Marie; Watt, Ian; Cooper, Julie; Kleijnen, Jos

    2005-04-05

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common sources of infection in children under five. Prompt diagnosis and treatment is important to reduce the risk of renal scarring. Rapid, cost-effective, methods of UTI diagnosis are required as an alternative to culture. We conducted a systematic review to determine the diagnostic accuracy of rapid tests for detecting UTI in children under five years of age. The evidence supports the use of dipstick positive for both leukocyte esterase and nitrite (pooled LR+ = 28.2, 95% CI: 17.3, 46.0) or microscopy positive for both pyuria and bacteriuria (pooled LR+ = 37.0, 95% CI: 11.0, 125.9) to rule in UTI. Similarly dipstick negative for both LE and nitrite (Pooled LR- = 0.20, 95% CI: 0.16, 0.26) or microscopy negative for both pyuria and bacteriuria (Pooled LR- = 0.11, 95% CI: 0.05, 0.23) can be used to rule out UTI. A test for glucose showed promise in potty-trained children. However, all studies were over 30 years old. Further evaluation of this test may be useful. Dipstick negative for both LE and nitrite or microscopic analysis negative for both pyuria and bacteriuria of a clean voided urine, bag, or nappy/pad specimen may reasonably be used to rule out UTI. These patients can then reasonably be excluded from further investigation, without the need for confirmatory culture. Similarly, combinations of positive tests could be used to rule in UTI, and trigger further investigation.

  12. Urinary Tract Infections among HIV-Positive Pregnant Women in Mwanza City, Tanzania, Are High and Predicted by Low CD4+ Count

    PubMed Central

    Chaula, Tito; Ng'walida, Nhandi; Kajura, Alphaxaid; Mirambo, Mariam M.; DeVinney, Rebekah

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Urinary tract infection (UTI) among pregnant women can lead to adverse maternal and foetal outcomes. UTI has been widely studied in the general obstetric population in Tanzania; the present study evaluated the magnitude, antimicrobial resistance, and predictors of UTI among HIV-positive pregnant women. Methods. Between March and May 2016 midstream urine samples from 234 women attending prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) clinics were analyzed using standard methods. Data was analyzed by STATA version 11.0. Results. The prevalence of UTI was 21.4%, 50/234 [95% CI: 16.1–26.6]. The asymptomatically significant bacteriuria was higher than symptomatically significant bacteriuria (16.6% versus 4.7%, p < 0.001). On multivariable logistic regression analysis, single marital status (OR: 2.6, 95% CI: 1.1–6.1, and p = 0.026), low CD4+ counts of <200/μL (OR: 2.9, 95% CI: 1.1–7.7, and p = 0.031), and having UTI symptoms (OR: 2.5, 95% CI: 1.1–6.0, and p = 0.03) were independent predictors of UTI. Escherichia coli predominated (57.7%) and exhibited a low prevalence of resistance to nitrofurantoin (16.7%), gentamicin (10.0%), and ceftriaxone (13.3%). Four (13.3%) of these were extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producers. Conclusions. A considerable proportion of HIV-positive pregnant women in Mwanza have significant bacteriuria which calls for the need to introduce routine UTI screening at PMTCT clinics to guide specific treatment and prevent associated complications. PMID:28255302

  13. Rapid tests and urine sampling techniques for the diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI) in children under five years: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Whiting, Penny; Westwood, Marie; Watt, Ian; Cooper, Julie; Kleijnen, Jos

    2005-01-01

    Background Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common sources of infection in children under five. Prompt diagnosis and treatment is important to reduce the risk of renal scarring. Rapid, cost-effective, methods of UTI diagnosis are required as an alternative to culture. Methods We conducted a systematic review to determine the diagnostic accuracy of rapid tests for detecting UTI in children under five years of age. Results The evidence supports the use of dipstick positive for both leukocyte esterase and nitrite (pooled LR+ = 28.2, 95% CI: 17.3, 46.0) or microscopy positive for both pyuria and bacteriuria (pooled LR+ = 37.0, 95% CI: 11.0, 125.9) to rule in UTI. Similarly dipstick negative for both LE and nitrite (Pooled LR- = 0.20, 95% CI: 0.16, 0.26) or microscopy negative for both pyuria and bacteriuria (Pooled LR- = 0.11, 95% CI: 0.05, 0.23) can be used to rule out UTI. A test for glucose showed promise in potty-trained children. However, all studies were over 30 years old. Further evaluation of this test may be useful. Conclusion Dipstick negative for both LE and nitrite or microscopic analysis negative for both pyuria and bacteriuria of a clean voided urine, bag, or nappy/pad specimen may reasonably be used to rule out UTI. These patients can then reasonably be excluded from further investigation, without the need for confirmatory culture. Similarly, combinations of positive tests could be used to rule in UTI, and trigger further investigation. PMID:15811182

  14. Diagnostic accuracy of uriSed automated urine microscopic sediment analyzer and dipstick parameters in predicting urine culture test results.

    PubMed

    Huysal, Kağan; Budak, Yasemin U; Karaca, Ayse Ulusoy; Aydos, Murat; Kahvecioğlu, Serdar; Bulut, Mehtap; Polat, Murat

    2013-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common types of infection. Currently, diagnosis is primarily based on microbiologic culture, which is time- and labor-consuming. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of urinalysis results from UriSed (77 Electronica, Budapest, Hungary), an automated microscopic image-based sediment analyzer, in predicting positive urine cultures. We examined a total of 384 urine specimens from hospitalized patients and outpatients attending our hospital on the same day for urinalysis, dipstick tests and semi-quantitative urine culture. The urinalysis results were compared with those of conventional semiquantitative urine culture. Of 384 urinary specimens, 68 were positive for bacteriuria by culture, and were thus considered true positives. Comparison of these results with those obtained from the UriSed analyzer indicated that the analyzer had a specificity of 91.1%, a sensitivity of 47.0%, a positive predictive value (PPV) of 53.3% (95% confidence interval (CI) = 40.8-65.3), and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 88.8% (95% CI = 85.0-91.8%). The accuracy was 83.3% when the urine leukocyte parameter was used, 76.8% when bacteriuria analysis of urinary sediment was used, and 85.1% when the bacteriuria and leukocyturia parameters were combined. The presence of nitrite was the best indicator of culture positivity (99.3% specificity) but had a negative likelihood ratio of 0.7, indicating that it was not a reliable clinical test. Although the specificity of the UriSed analyzer was within acceptable limits, the sensitivity value was low. Thus, UriSed urinalysis resuIts do not accurately predict the outcome of culture.

  15. Recurrent urinary tract infections in children.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, H. W.; Lirenman, D. S.; Anderson, J. D.; Nielsen, W. R.

    1993-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are common in children and present in various ways. Diagnosis is based on findings of pyuria and bacteriuria. Management includes adequate and timely investigation, appropriate antibiotics, treatment of underlying contributing factors, and follow-up advice. Images p1625-a p1628-a p1629-a PMID:8348023

  16. An in-vitro urinary catheterization model that approximates clinical conditions for evaluation of innovations to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Chua, R Y R; Lim, K; Leong, S S J; Tambyah, P A; Ho, B

    2017-09-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) account for approximately 25% of nosocomial infections globally, and often result in increased morbidity and healthcare costs. An additional concern is the presence of microbial biofilms which are major reservoirs of bacteria, especially antibiotic-resistant bacteria, in catheters. Since introduction of the use of closed drainage systems, innovations to combat CAUTI have not led to significant improvements in clinical outcomes. The lack of a robust laboratory platform to test new CAUTI preventive strategies may impede development of novel technologies. To establish an in-vitro catheterization model (IVCM) for testing of technological innovations to prevent CAUTI. The IVCM consists of a continuous supply of urine medium flowing into a receptacle (bladder) where the urine is drained through a urinary catheter connected to an effluent collection vessel (drainage bag). Test organism(s) can be introduced conveniently into the bladder via a rubber septa port. Development of bacteriuria and microbial biofilm on the catheter can be determined subsequently. With an initial inoculum of Escherichia coli [∼5×10 5  colony-forming units (cfu)/mL] into the bladder, a 100% silicone catheter and a commercially available silver-hydrogel catheter showed heavy biofilm colonization (∼10 8  cfu/cm and ∼10 7  cfu/cm, respectively) with similar bacterial populations in the urine (bacteriuria) (∼10 8  cfu/mL and ∼10 7  cfu/mL, respectively) within three days. Interestingly, an antimicrobial peptide (CP11-6A)-coated catheter showed negligible biofilm colonization and no detectable bacteriuria. The IVCM is a useful preclinical approach to evaluate new strategies for the prevention of CAUTI. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Strong inflammatory cytokine response in male and strong anti-inflammatory response in female kidney transplant recipients with urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Mahmoud; Daniel, Volker; Naujokat, Cord; Wiesel, Manfred; Hergesell, Olaf; Opelz, Gerhard

    2005-02-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common post-transplant infection in renal transplant recipients. The relationship of plasma and urine cytokines with UTI after kidney transplantation has not yet been delineated and literature reports on cytokine and UTI are rare. In a retrospective study, we compared post-transplant plasma and urine cytokine levels of 132 outpatient renal transplant recipients with or without UTI. Soluble interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (sIL-1RA), IL-2, sIL-2R, IL-3, IL-4, IL-6, sIL-6R, IL-8, IL-10, transforming growth factor-beta2 (TGF-beta2), interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) levels were determined using commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. We found gender-related urine cytokine patterns. Anti-inflammatory sIL-1RA was significantly higher in females than in males and this gender-related difference was more pronounced in bacteriuric (P < 0.0001) than in nonbacteriuric (P = 0.001) patients. Urine proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 (P = 0.001) and IL-8 (P = 0.007) were significantly higher in male patients with bacteriuria than in males without bacteriuria and sIL-2R (P = 0.001) and sIL-6R (P = 0.03) were significantly higher in males with leukocyturia than in males without leukocyturia. Bacteriuria in males was associated with higher doses of immunosuppressive drugs (P = 0.02). Male renal transplant recipients with UTI have a strong inflammatory cytokine response with activation of IL-6, IL-8, sIL-2R and sIL-6R producing cells, whereas female patients with UTI block the inflammatory response to UTI by production of sIL-1RA.

  18. Repeated Treatments with Chitosan in Combination with Antibiotics Completely Eradicate Uropathogenic Escherichia coli From Infected Mouse Urinary Bladders.

    PubMed

    Erman, Andreja; Hergouth, Veronika Križan; Blango, Matthew G; Kos, Mojca Kerec; Mulvey, Matthew A; Veranic, Peter

    2017-08-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the primary causative agents of urinary tract infections, colonize and invade the epithelial cells of the bladder urothelium. Infection of immature urothelial cells can result in the formation of persistent intracellular reservoirs that are refractory to antibiotic treatments. Previously, we defined a novel therapeutic strategy that used the bladder cell exfoliant chitosan to deplete UPEC reservoirs. However, although a single treatment of chitosan followed by ciprofloxacin administration had a marked effect on reducing UPEC titers within the bladder, this treatment failed to prevent relapsing bacteriuria. We show here that repeated use of chitosan in conjunction with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin completely eradicates UPEC from the urinary tract and prevents the development of relapsing bouts of bacteriuria. In addition, microscopy revealed rapid restoration of bladder integrity following chitosan treatment, indicating that chitosan can be used to effectively combat recalcitrant bladder infections without causing lasting harm to the urothelium. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Approach to a Positive Urine Culture in a Patient Without Urinary Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Trautner, Barbara W.; Grigoryan, Larissa

    2013-01-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) is a condition in which bacteria are present in a noncontaminated urine sample collected from a patient without signs or symptoms related to the urinary tract. ASB must be distinguished from symptomatic UTI by the absence of signs and symptoms compatible with UTI or by clinical determination that a nonurinary etiology accounts for the patient's symptoms. ABU is a very common condition that is often treated unnecessarily with antibiotics. Pregnant women and persons undergoing urologic procedures expected to cause mucosal bleeding are the only two groups with convincing evidence that screening for and treating ASB is beneficial. Randomized, controlled trials of ASB screening and/or treatment have established the lack of efficacy in premenopausal adult women, diabetic women, patients with spinal cord injury, catheterized patients, older adults living in the community, and elderly institutionalized adults. The overall purpose of this review is to promote an awareness of ASB as a distinct condition from UTI and to empower clinicians to withhold antibiotics in situations in which antimicrobial treatment of bacteriuria is not indicated. PMID:24484572

  20. Catheter associated urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infection attributed to the use of an indwelling urinary catheter is one of the most common infections acquired by patients in health care facilities. As biofilm ultimately develops on all of these devices, the major determinant for development of bacteriuria is duration of catheterization. While the proportion of bacteriuric subjects who develop symptomatic infection is low, the high frequency of use of indwelling urinary catheters means there is a substantial burden attributable to these infections. Catheter-acquired urinary infection is the source for about 20% of episodes of health-care acquired bacteremia in acute care facilities, and over 50% in long term care facilities. The most important interventions to prevent bacteriuria and infection are to limit indwelling catheter use and, when catheter use is necessary, to discontinue the catheter as soon as clinically feasible. Infection control programs in health care facilities must implement and monitor strategies to limit catheter-acquired urinary infection, including surveillance of catheter use, appropriateness of catheter indications, and complications. Ultimately, prevention of these infections will require technical advances in catheter materials which prevent biofilm formation. PMID:25075308

  1. Urinalysis and Urinary Tract Infection: Update for Clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jennifer L.

    2001-01-01

    Dysuria is a common presenting complaint of women and urinalysis is a valuable tool in the initial evaluation of this presentation. Clinicians need to be aware that pyuria is the best determinate of bacteriuria requiring therapy and that values significant for infection differ depending on the method of analysis. A hemocytometer yields a value of ≥ 10 WBC/ mm3 significant for bacteriuria, while manual microscopy studies show ≥ 8 WBC/high-power field reliably predicts a positive urine culture. In cases of uncomplicated symptomatic urinary tract infection, a positive value for nitrites and leukocyte esterase by urine dipstick can be treated without the need for a urine culture. Automated urinalysis used widely in large volume laboratories provides more sensitive detection of leukocytes and bacteria in the urine.With automated microscopy, a value of > 2 WBC/hpf is significant pyuria indicative of inflammation of the urinary tract. In complicated cases such as pregnancy, recurrent infection or renal involvement, further evaluation is necessary including manual microscopy and urine culture with sensitivities. PMID:11916184

  2. Discontinuation of reflex testing of stool samples for vancomycin-resistant enterococci resulted in increased prevalence.

    PubMed

    Bodily, Mandy; McMullen, Kathleen M; Russo, Anthony J; Kittur, Nupur D; Hoppe-Bauer, Joan; Warren, David K

    2013-08-01

    Discontinuation of reflex testing of stool submitted for Clostridium difficile testing for vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) led to an increase in the number of patients with healthcare-associated VRE bacteremia and bacteriuria (0.21 vs 0.36 cases per 1,000 patient-days; P<.01). Cost-benefit analysis showed reflex screening and isolation of VRE reduced hospital costs.

  3. Urinary tract infection in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Raz, Raul

    2011-12-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common bacterial infection in women in general and in postmenopausal women in particular. Two groups of elderly women with recurrent UTI should be differentiated regarding age and general status: healthy, young postmenopausal women aged 50 to 70 years who are neither institutionalized or catheterized and elderly institutionalized women with or without a catheter. Bacteriuria occurs more often in elderly functionally impaired women, but in general it is asymptomatic. However, the risk factors associated with recurrent UTI in elderly women are not widely described. In a multivariate analysis it was found that urinary incontinence, a history of UTI before menopause, and nonsecretor status were strongly associated with recurrent UTI in young postmenopausal women. Another study described the incidence and risk factors of acute cystitis among nondiabetic and diabetic postmenopausal women. Independent predictors of infection included insulin-treated patients and a lifetime history of urinary infection. Borderline associations included a history of vaginal estrogen cream use in the past month, kidney stones, and asymptomatic bacteriuria at baseline. Another important factor in postmenopausal women is the potential role that estrogen deficiency plays in the development of bacteriuria. There are at least two studies showing a beneficial effect of estrogen in the management of recurrent bacteriuria in elderly women. One of these studies showed that vaginal estrogen cream reduced vaginal pH from 5.5±0.7 to 3.6±1.0, restored lactobacillus, and decreased new episodes of UTI. Another study reported similar results using an estriol vaginal ring. However, contradictory results are found in the literature. For example, additional studies found that the use of estriol-containing vaginal pessaries was less effective than oral nitrofurantoin macrocrystals in preventing UTI in postmenopausal women. Two other studies also did not find any

  4. Efficacy and safety of fosfomycin-trometamol in the prophylaxis for transrectal prostate biopsy. Prospective randomized comparison with ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Lista, F; Redondo, C; Meilán, E; García-Tello, A; Ramón de Fata, F; Angulo, J C

    2014-01-01

    Prostate biopsy is the standardized diagnostic method for prostate cancer. However, although there is not a standardized protocol, there are recommendations in order to reduce the incidence of complications. The objective of the present work is to assess the efficacy and safety of antibiotic prophylaxis in the prostate biopsy by comparing two antibiotic regimes: two doses of fosfomycin-trometamol 3g (FMT) every 48 hours with 10 doses of oral ciprofloxacin 500 mg every 12 hours during 5 days. Randomized prospective study was performed with 671 patients who had undergone to walking transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy. Patients of group A (n=312) were treated with ciprofloxacin, and patients of group B (n=359) with FMT. Efficacy and tolerability of two prophylactic regimes were compared. Urine culture was carried out at 2 weeks after biopsy. Initially, patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria were not treated with antibiotics; urine culture was repeated after 1 month, persistent bacteriuria was treated according to antibiogram. No differences between groups were found in age (P=.78), cancer presence (P=.9) or number of biopsy cylinders (P=.93). The mean number of cores obtained was 11.3 ± 3.25 (range 6-20). Digestive intolerance was observed for 9 patients (2.9%) of group A and 10 patients (2.8%) in group B. One patient (.3%) of group A showed severe allergic reaction. In total, 167 patients (24.6%) had complications: 16 (2.4%) fever, 47 (6.9%) hemospermia, 81 (11.9%) hematuria, 7 (1%) rectal bleeding and 16 (2.4%) urinary retention. No statistically differences between groups were observed (27.6% vs. 22.6%; P=.17). However, hemospermia was more frequent in group A (9.9% vs. 4.5%; P=.006). Bacteriuria after biopsy was detected in 44 patients (6.6%), being more frequent in group B patients (4.2% vs. 8.6%; P=.02) although a higher number of second treatment cycles were not needed (53.9% vs. 29%; P=.17). The likelihood of resistance to ciprofloxacin in patients

  5. An update on new antibiotic prophylaxis and treatment for urinary tract infections in children.

    PubMed

    Delbet, Jean Daniel; Lorrot, Mathie; Ulinski, Tim

    2017-10-01

    This review focuses on the treatment of urinary tract infections (UTI) in children and in particular its recent changes. Areas covered: Acute pyelonephritis, acute cystitis and asymptomatic bacteriuria or asymptomatic infections have to be clearly distinguished. Prompt treatment is required in pyelonephritis and cystitis, but not in asymptomatic bacteriuria or infection, in order to avoid selection of more virulent strains. This concept should be considered even in immunocompromised or bedridden children. In case of pyelonephritis, there should be no delay in beginning the antibiotic treatment in order to decrease the risk of long term complication, such as renal scars. Predisposing conditions for UTI, such as voiding anomalies and urinary tract malformation should be carefully evaluated. Expert opinion: One major concern is the increasing resistance to 3 rd generation cephalosporins. Therefore overconsumption in low-risk settings should be absolutely avoided. The prevalence of infections with E. coli producing extended spectrum ß-lactamase (ESBL) is increasing and pediatricians should be aware about the specific treatment options. Any recommendation about (initial) antibiotic treatment should be regularly updated and adapted to local resistance profiles and to economic factors in different health systems.

  6. Impact of an Antimicrobial Stewardship Care Bundle to Improve the Management of Patients with Suspected or Confirmed Urinary Tract Infection.

    PubMed

    Collins, Curtis D; Kabara, Jared J; Michienzi, Sarah M; Malani, Anurag N

    2016-12-01

    Implementation of an antimicrobial stewardship program bundle for urinary tract infections among 92 patients led to a higher rate of discontinuation of therapy for asymptomatic bacteriuria (52.4% vs 12.5%; P =.004), more appropriate durations of therapy (88.7% vs 63.6%; P =.001), and significantly higher overall bundle compliance (75% vs 38.2%; P < .001). Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;1499-1501.

  7. Antibiotic Screening of Urine Culture for Internal Quality Audit at Amrita Hospital, Kochi.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Aswathy; Gopinathan, Anusha; Dinesh, Kavitha R; Kumar, Anil

    2017-07-01

    Urine antimicrobial activity is a seldom analysed laboratory test which greatly impacts the quantification of urine specimens. Presence of antimicrobial activity in the urine reduces the bacterial load in these specimens. Hence, the chances of erroneously reporting insignificant bacteriuria can be reduced on analysis of the antimicrobial activity in urine. The aim of the study was to measure the antimicrobial activity of urine samples obtained from patients in a tertiary care hospital. A total of 100 urine specimens were collected from the study group. Tests like wet mount, Gram staining and culture were performed. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was done on the bacteria isolated from each specimen. The urine specimens were reported as significant bacteriuria (>105 Colony Forming Unit (CFU)/ml) and insignificant bacteriuria (<105 CFU/ml - clean catch midstream urine; <102 CFU/ml - catheterized urine sample) according to the CFU/ml. Staphylococcus aureus ATCC ® 25923 ™ and Escherichia coli ATCC ® 25922 ™ were used to identify the presence of antimicrobial activity in the urine sample by Urine Anti-Bacterial substance Assay (UABA). McNemar test was used for statistical analysis using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 21.0. On analysis of the antimicrobial activity of urine sample with the prior antibiotic history of the patients, 17 were true positives and 43 were true negatives. Twenty six of samples with UABA positivity were culture negative and 28 samples with UABA positivity were culture positive. Sensitivity and specificity of the test was 85% and 53.8% respectively. Accuracy of the test was 60%. The p-value of UABA was <0.001. Enterobacteriaceae was the most common bacterial family isolated from the urine specimens. A total of 85% patients responded to treatment. Presence of antimicrobial activity in urine has a great impact on the interpretation of urine culture reports. Identification of urine antimicrobial activity helps

  8. Urinary Tract Infections Among Hospitalized Adults in the Early Post-Liver Transplant Period: Prevalence, Risk Factors, Causative Agents, and Microbial Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Pouladfar, Gholamreza; Jafarpour, Zahra; Firoozifar, Mohammad; Malek Hosseini, Seyed Ali; Rasekh, Razieh; Khosravifard, Leila; Janghorban, Parisa

    2017-02-01

    Urinary tract infections are among the most common infections after liver transplant, especially soon after surgery. This study analyzed urinary tract infections or bacteriuria, their causative agents, and related risk factors in the early period after liver transplant in hospitalized adult transplant recipients in the main liver transplant referral center in Iran. In this prospective study, 389 consecutive adult patients who underwent liver transplant at the Nemazee Teaching Hospital were enrolled between October 2014 and October 2015. Risk factors were compared for patients who developed urinary tract infections or bacteriuria ("infection group "; n = 63 [16.2% ]) and patients without evidence of infection ("control group "; n = 211 [54.2% ]). Patients with sites of infection other than the urinary tract were excluded. Antimicrobial sus ceptibility testing was performed using the Kirby-Bauer disk-diffusion method. Univariate and multivariate analyses compared variables between the 2 groups. Seventy-nine episodes of urinary tract infections or bacteriuria occurred in the infection group. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that female sex, hospitalization 2 to 7 days before transplant, and frequency of abdominal exploration were 11.0, 5.9, and 3.0 times more common in the infection group than in the control group. The chance of infection rises 1.1 times with each one unit increase of body mass index. The most common infection causes were gram-negative bacteria (n = 50; 63.3%), predominantly Escherichia coli (n = 24; 30.4%); followed by gram-positive bacteria (n = 20; 25.3%), predominantly Enterococcus species (n = 14; 17.8%) that had a high incidence of vancomycin resistance (n = 10; 71.4%); and non-Candida albicans species isolates (n = 9; 11.4%). Urinary tract infections are a common infection in hospitalized adult patients soon after liver transplant. Female sex, hospitalization shortly before transplant, more frequent abdominal exploration, and higher

  9. Bacterial profile and drug susceptibility pattern of urinary tract infection in pregnant women at University of Gondar Teaching Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Alemu, Agersew; Moges, Feleke; Shiferaw, Yitayal; Tafess, Ketema; Kassu, Afework; Anagaw, Belay; Agegn, Abebe

    2012-04-25

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common health problem among pregnant women. Proper investigation and prompt treatment are needed to prevent serious life threatening condition and morbidity due to urinary tract infection that can occur in pregnant women. Recent report in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia indicated the prevalence of UTI in pregnant women was 11.6% and Gram negative bacteria was the predominant isolates and showed multi drug resistance. This study aimed to assess bacterial profile that causes urinary tract infection and their antimicrobial susceptibility pattern among pregnant women visiting antenatal clinic at University of Gondar Teaching Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia. A cross-sectional study was conducted at University of Gondar Teaching Hospital from March 22 to April 30, 2011. Mid stream urine samples were collected and inoculated into Cystine Lactose Electrolyte Deficient medium (CLED). Colony counts yielding bacterial growth of 105/ml of urine or more of pure isolates were regarded as significant bacteriuria for infection. Colony from CLED was sub cultured onto MacConkey agar and blood agar plates. Identification was done using cultural characteristics and a series of biochemical tests. A standard method of agar disc diffusion susceptibility testing method was used to determine susceptibility patterns of the isolates. The overall prevalence of UTI in pregnant women was 10.4%. The predominant bacterial pathogens were Escherichia coli 47.5% followed by coagulase-negative staphylococci 22.5%, Staphylococcus aureus 10%, and Klebsiella pneumoniae 10%. Gram negative isolates were resulted low susceptibility to co-trimoxazole (51.9%) and tetracycline (40.7%) whereas Gram positive showed susceptibility to ceftriaxon (84.6%) and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (92.3%). Multiple drug resistance (resistance to two or more drugs) was observed in 95% of the isolates. Significant bacteriuria was observed in asymptomatic pregnant women. Periodic studies are recommended to

  10. Bacterial profile and drug susceptibility pattern of urinary tract infection in pregnant women at University of Gondar Teaching Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common health problem among pregnant women. Proper investigation and prompt treatment are needed to prevent serious life threatening condition and morbidity due to urinary tract infection that can occur in pregnant women. Recent report in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia indicated the prevalence of UTI in pregnant women was 11.6 % and Gram negative bacteria was the predominant isolates and showed multi drug resistance. This study aimed to assess bacterial profile that causes urinary tract infection and their antimicrobial susceptibility pattern among pregnant women visiting antenatal clinic at University of Gondar Teaching Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted at University of Gondar Teaching Hospital from March 22 to April 30, 2011. Mid stream urine samples were collected and inoculated into Cystine Lactose Electrolyte Deficient medium (CLED). Colony counts yielding bacterial growth of 105/ml of urine or more of pure isolates were regarded as significant bacteriuria for infection. Colony from CLED was sub cultured onto MacConkey agar and blood agar plates. Identification was done using cultural characteristics and a series of biochemical tests. A standard method of agar disc diffusion susceptibility testing method was used to determine susceptibility patterns of the isolates. Results The overall prevalence of UTI in pregnant women was 10.4 %. The predominant bacterial pathogens were Escherichia coli 47.5 % followed by coagulase-negative staphylococci 22.5 %, Staphylococcus aureus 10 %, and Klebsiella pneumoniae 10 %. Gram negative isolates were resulted low susceptibility to co-trimoxazole (51.9 %) and tetracycline (40.7 %) whereas Gram positive showed susceptibility to ceftriaxon (84.6 %) and amoxicillin–clavulanic acid (92.3 %). Multiple drug resistance (resistance to two or more drugs) was observed in 95 % of the isolates. Conclusion Significant bacteriuria was

  11. The effect of pregnancy on renal function: physiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Dafnis, E; Sabatini, S

    1992-03-01

    Marked changes in renal function occur with pregnancy. We present a summary of these changes in this review and give insight into possible mechanisms if they are known. Controversies exist regarding the therapy of pregnancy-induced hypertension and asymptomatic and recurrent bacteriuria. The current views on these topics are given. Specific renal diseases are summarized, including transplantation, and optimum management strategies and maternal and fetal prognosis during pregnancy are given.

  12. Self Test Kit: Rapid Diagnosis of Urogenital Infections in Military Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-01

    asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptoms from their cervical/vaginal infection. In many cases treatment of their cervical/vaginal infection would also...technology required for rapid diagnosis and treatment of these conditions may not always be readily available to deployed military women especially while...6 In another study of 476 asymptomatic active duty army women presenting for routine pap smears, 39(8.2%) tested positive for chlamydia. This is a

  13. Self-Test Kit: Rapid Diagnosis of Urogenital Infections in Military Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    tract infections or asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptoms from their cervical/vaginal infection. In many cases treatment of their cervical/vaginal...during the second year. We have thus far tested the kit in 234 women with genital complaints. The self-test kit results suggested appropriate treatment in...evaluation, diagnosis and treatment . All of these factors may significantly impact the ability and readiness of military women to perform their assigned

  14. Innate immunity and genetic determinants of urinary tract infection susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Godaly, Gabriela; Ambite, Ines; Svanborg, Catharina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common, dangerous and interesting. Susceptible individuals experience multiple, often clustered episodes, and in a subset of patients, infections progress to acute pyelonephritis (APN), sometimes accompanied by uro-sepsis. Others develop asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU). Here, we review the molecular basis for these differences, with the intention to distinguish exaggerated host responses that drive disease from attenuated responses that favour protection and to highlight the genetic basis for these extremes, based on knock-out mice and clinical studies. Recent findings The susceptibility to UTI is controlled by specific innate immune signalling and by promoter polymorphisms and transcription factors that modulate the expression of genes controlling these pathways. Gene deletions that disturb innate immune activation either favour asymptomatic bacteriuria or create acute morbidity and disease. Promoter polymorphisms and transcription factor variants affecting those genes are associated with susceptibility in UTI-prone patients. Summary It is time to start using genetics in UTI-prone patients, to improve diagnosis and to assess the risk for chronic sequels such as renal malfunction, hypertension, spontaneous abortions, dialysis and transplantation. Furthermore, the majority of UTI patients do not need follow-up, but for lack of molecular markers, they are unnecessarily investigated. PMID:25539411

  15. Common bacterial urinary tract infections in women.

    PubMed

    Cimino, J E

    1976-09-01

    Unfortunately, there is no general consensus as to how long patients with bacteriuria or urinary tract infections should be monitored and certainly there is no agreement on how long recurrent episodes should be treated beyond ten days to two weeks. The most important points to remember are: 1. Culture the urine both at the time of therapy and during follow-up. The patient should be examined periodically for the presence of bacteruria. If bacteria cannot be eradicated, at least the physician is aware of the organism most likely causing the patient's symptoms. 2. Do not subject the patient with frequent recurrent (chronic) and complicated infections to continual antibacterial therapy, but rather, manage the acute episodes. 3. Use prophylaxis, particularly single bed-time doses for dysuria and frequency symptoms. 4. Screen for bacteriuria during pregnancy. 5. Avoid the use of catheters except where absolutely necessary. 6. Avoid systemic prophylaxis of infection in patients with catheters; rather, use closed-system drainage with antibacteri-irrigation. It is to be hoped within the next few years, studies now underway will allow specific recommendations regarding the management of asymptomatic bacteruria, the duration of therapy for recurrent infections, the prevention and treatment of L-form bacterial infections, and indications for urologic procedures.

  16. Treatment of pyonephrosis with a subcutaneous ureteral bypass device in four cats.

    PubMed

    Cray, Megan; Berent, Allyson C; Weisse, Chick W; Bagley, Demetrius

    2018-03-15

    CASE DESCRIPTION 4 cats were examined because of ureteral obstruction. CLINICAL FINDINGS Clinical and clinicopathologic abnormalities were nonspecific and included anorexia, lethargy, weight loss, anemia, leukocytosis, neutrophilia, lymphopenia, and azotemia. A diagnosis of pyonephrosis was made in all cats. The presence of bacteriuria was confirmed by means of urinalysis in 2 cats, bacterial culture of a urine sample obtained by means of preoperative cystocentesis in 2 cats, and bacterial culture of samples obtained from the renal pelvis intraoperatively in 3 cats. Ureteral obstruction was caused by a urolith in 3 cats; ureteral stricture associated with a circumcaval ureter was identified in 1 cat. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME All 4 cats underwent renal pelvis lavage and placement of a subcutaneous ureteral bypass (SUB) device for treatment of obstructive pyonephrosis. Postoperatively, the cystostomy tube became occluded with purulent material in 1 cat, requiring exchange. The procedure was successful in relieving the obstruction and pyonephrosis in all cats. Three of 4 cats had documented resolution of urinary tract infection. One cat had persistent bacteriuria without clinical signs 1 month after SUB device placement. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results of this small series suggested that renal pelvis lavage with placement of an SUB device may be a treatment option for cats with obstructive pyonephrosis.

  17. Novel Approaches to Preventing Urinary Tract Infection in Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-01

    Gupta K, Samadpour M, Stamm WE. A prospective study of asymptomatic bacteriuria in sexually active young women [see comments]. N Engl Med 2000;343:992...women each year at an annual cost for diagnosis and treatment exceeding one billion dollars. Over half of all women have had a bacterial UTI by their...increased risk of UTI (45), and during pregnancy , colonization with E. col is associated with preterm birth and other perinatal complications (18, 34

  18. Self-Test Kit: Rapid Diagnosis of Urogenital Infections in Military Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-01

    in women with other infections and it was not clear whether they had symptomatic urinary tract infections or asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptoms from...CA), and bacterial vaginosis (BV) by PCR or standard methods. A asymptomatic pregnant women (n=1 57) were also screened for TV and bacterial...were less likely to respond to the survey.6 In another study of 476 asymptomatic active duty army women presenting for routine pap smears, 39(8.2

  19. Challenges in preventing pyelonephritis in pregnant women in Indigenous communities.

    PubMed

    Bookallil, M; Chalmers, E; Andrew, B

    2005-01-01

    To measure the quality of antenatal care in rural and remote regions of the Northern Territory, using asymptomatic bacteruria as an indicator. Indigenous Australian women and their babies have a greater frequency of adverse outcomes in pregnancy than their non-Indigenous counterparts. It is well established that asymptomatic bacteriuria may have serious outcomes in pregnancy, including an increased risk of pyelonephritis and a strong association with preterm and low birth weight delivery. Ensuring good quality antenatal care can reduce the individual risks of pregnancy for mothers and their babies. In the Northern Territory there are well established guidelines for antenatal care in rural and remote Indigenous communities. These are documented in the Women's Business Manual. Audit and feedback is one method that has been shown to have a small to moderate effect in changing clinician behaviour, in this case improving compliance with guidelines. A retrospective chart audit of antenatal clients was conducted at 10 rural and remote primary health care clinics in the Northern Territory, Australia. The audit reviewed all the available charts (n = 268) of pregnant women, from the participating communities, who gave birth in 2002 or 2003. The diagnosis and management of asymptomatic bacteriuria was chosen as the indicator of quality antenatal care, as it is one of five areas of antenatal care where there is evidence that appropriate management improves outcomes. The quality of care was measured against the local guidelines, the Women's Business Manual. Women frequently had urine tests with where the dipstick showed an abnormal result, with 75% (95% CI [0.70,0.80]) of women having at least one episode of abnormal urinalysis during pregnancy. Six hundred and twenty episodes of abnormal urinalysis in pregnancy were identified. The incidence of bacteriuria at first visit was 16%, (95%-confidence interval = 95% CI [0.10, 0.21]). Compliance with the guidelines was poor. Fifty

  20. Randomized, double-blind, comparative study of levofloxacin and ofloxacin in the treatment of complicated urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Peng, M Y

    1999-03-01

    Levofloxacin, the optical S-(-) isomer of ofloxacin, was compared with ofloxacin in the treatment of complicated urinary tract infections (UTIs). Patients eligible for the trial were randomly assigned to either a daily 300 mg of levofloxacin or 600 mg of ofloxacin for 10 consecutive days. The double blind design was achieved by a double-dummy technique utilizing placebo of both test drugs. Efficacy variables measured were: urine white blood cell counts for the effects on pyuria, urine cultures for effects on bacteriuria, subjective symptoms, and overall clinical efficacy which combined results from effects on bacteriuria, pyuria and subjective symptoms. Safety endpoints were the incidence of adverse events and laboratory test monitoring after a 10-day treatment. A total of 104 patients were enrolled into this trial and 46 patients were evaluable for efficacy endpoints. Most patients with culture-negative (48 cases), mixed flora (5 cases), and less than 10,000 colony forming units/mL of bacteria (3 cases) were excluded from analyses. None of the demographic and baseline characteristics were significantly different between treatments (p > 0.05). Therapeutic effects upon bacteriuria for both treatment groups were similar with a response rate of 90.0% for levofloacin and 88.5% for ofloxacin. Efficacy on the subjective symptoms revealed response rates of 90.0% in the levofloxacin group and 80.7% in the ofloxacin group, with the overall clinical efficacy of 90% in the levofloxacin and 84.6% in the ofloxacin groups. All the efficacy variables measured between treatments were not statistically different which indicated an equivalent efficacy in the treatment of complicated UTIs (p > 0.05). Of the 104 patients exposed to the test medications, only three having adverse effects. One developed epigastralgia in the levofloxacin group, and 2 developed a headache in the ofloxacin treatment. All events were moderate in severity and were resolved quickly after medication. Four

  1. Urinary tract infections in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ovalle, A; Levancini, M

    2001-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are very common during pregnancy. Escherichia coli is the most common pathogen isolated from pregnant women. Ampicillin should not be used because of its high resistance to Escherichia coli. Pyelonephritis can cause morbidity and can be life-threatening to both mother and fetus. Second and third-generation cephalosporins are recommended for treatment, administered initially intravenously during hospitalization. Cultures and the study of virulence factors of uropathogenic Escherichia coli are recommended for the adequate management of pyelonephritis. The lower genital tract infection associated with pyelonephritis is responsible for the failure of antibiotic treatment. Asymptomatic bacteriuria can evolve into cystitis or pyelonephritis. All pregnant women should be routinely screened for bacteriuria using urine culture, and should be treated with nitrofurantoin, sulfixosazole or first-generation cephalosporins. Recurrent urinary infection should be treated with prophylactic antibiotics. Pregnant women who develop urinary tract infections with group B streptococcal infection should be treated with prophylactic antibiotics during labour to prevent neonatal sepsis. Preterm delivery is frequent. Evidence suggests that infection plays a role in the pathogenesis of preterm labour. Experimental models in pregnant mice support the theory that Escherichia coli propagated by the transplacental route, involving bacterial adhesins, induces preterm delivery, but this has not been demonstrated in humans. Ascending lower genital tract infections are the most probable cause of preterm delivery, but this remains to be proved.

  2. [Management of threatening preterm labor with intact membranes: indications for antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Winer, N

    2002-11-01

    To analyse the benefits and disadvantages of systematic antibiotic therapy in patient presenting a preterm labor with intact membranes. We reviewed French and English reports on Medline using to the following key words: "antibiotic therapy and preterm labor, preterm labor, streptococcus B, vaginose, mycoplasma, antenatal infection". The systematic prescription of antibiotics is not recommended for patients presenting preterm labor who have intact membranes and no symptoms of infection. The benefit of antibiotics is small and shows a tendency to prolong the pregnancy and the reduction of maternal infection. No benefit has been shown for neonatal results. When early-onset neonatal sepsis develops in a case in which antepartum chemoprophylaxis was used, the isolated bacteria will present an increasing risk of bacterial drug resistance. Local treatment (cream or pessary) do not belong in the treatment of threatening preterm labor and are not recommended for the prevention of prematurity or materno fetal infection. Risk groups of patients who present a positive vaginal colonization are subject to discussion. Studies do not allow us to ascertain that antibiotics have a beneficial effect on prematurity in these groups. Antibiotics are recommended for the treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria. This treatment reduces prematurity and maternal infections. Despite poor consensus criteria, if threatening preterm labor is associated with a bacteriuria, experts usually recommend treatment.

  3. Can routine automated urinalysis reduce culture requests?

    PubMed

    Kayalp, Damla; Dogan, Kubra; Ceylan, Gozde; Senes, Mehmet; Yucel, Dogan

    2013-09-01

    There are a substantial number of unnecessary urine culture requests. We aimed to investigate whether urine dipstick and microscopy results could accurately rule out urinary tract infection (UTI) without urine culture. The study included a total of 32,998 patients (11,928 men and 21,070 women, mean age: 39 ± 32 years) with a preliminary diagnosis of UTI and both urinalysis and urinary culture were requested. All urine cultures were retrospectively reviewed; association of culture positivity with a positive urinalysis result for leukocyte esterase (LE) and nitrite in chemical analysis and pyuria (WBC) and bacteriuria in microscopy was determined. Diagnostic performance of urinalysis parameters for detection of UTI was evaluated. In total, 758 (2.3%) patients were positive by urine culture. Out of these culture positive samples, ratios of positive dipstick results for LE and nitrite were 71.0% (n=538) and 17.7% (n=134), respectively. The positive microscopy results for WBC and bacteria were 68.2% (n=517) and 78.8% (n=597), respectively. Negative predictive values for LE, nitrite, bacteriuria and WBC were very close to 100%. Most of the samples have no or insignificant bacterial growth. Urine dipstick and microscopy can accurately rule out UTI. Automated urinalysis is a practicable and faster screening test which may prevent unnecessary culture requests for majority of patients. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Isolation of Members of the Staphylococcus sciuri Group from Urine and Their Relationship to Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Stepanovic, Srdjan; Ježek, Petr; Vukovic, Dragana; Dakic, Ivana; Petráš, Petr

    2003-01-01

    During a 3-year study period, 32,741 urine samples were analyzed for the presence of members of the Staphylococcus sciuri group (S. sciuri, S. lentus, and S. vitulinus), and 13 isolates were identified. They presented 0.79% of the total number of coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated. One case of symptomatic urinary tract infection and five possible cases of asymptomatic bacteriuria caused by these bacteria were established. It is noteworthy, however, that over 50% of the isolates originated from hospitalized patients. PMID:14605178

  5. Evaluation of Granada agar plate for detection of Streptococcus agalactiae in urine specimens from pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Tamayo, Javier; Gómez-Garcés, José-Luis; Alós, Juan-Ignacio

    2004-08-01

    The Granada agar plate (GAP; Biomedics SL, Madrid, Spain) was evaluated for the detection of group B streptococci (GBS) in urine specimens from pregnant women submitted for testing for asymptomatic bacteriuria and was compared with blood agar (BA [Columbia agar with 5% sheep blood]; bioMérieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France). The GAP detected 103 out of 105 GBS, whereas BA detected only 50. Use of the GAP could be a good method for the detection of GBS in urine specimens from pregnant women.

  6. Diagnosis and treatment of urinary tract infections across age groups.

    PubMed

    Chu, Christine M; Lowder, Jerry L

    2018-01-02

    Urinary tract infections are the most common outpatient infections, but predicting the probability of urinary tract infections through symptoms and test results can be complex. The most diagnostic symptoms of urinary tract infections include change in frequency, dysuria, urgency, and presence or absence of vaginal discharge, but urinary tract infections may present differently in older women. Dipstick urinalysis is popular for its availability and usefulness, but results must be interpreted in context of the patient's pretest probability based on symptoms and characteristics. In patients with a high probability of urinary tract infection based on symptoms, negative dipstick urinalysis does not rule out urinary tract infection. Nitrites are likely more sensitive and specific than other dipstick components for urinary tract infection, particularly in the elderly. Positive dipstick testing is likely specific for asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy, but urine culture is still the test of choice. Microscopic urinalysis is likely comparable to dipstick urinalysis as a screening test. Bacteriuria is more specific and sensitive than pyuria for detecting urinary tract infection, even in older women and during pregnancy. Pyuria is commonly found in the absence of infection, particularly in older adults with lower urinary tract symptoms such as incontinence. Positive testing may increase the probability of urinary tract infection, but initiation of treatment should take into account risk of urinary tract infection based on symptoms as well. In cases in which the probability of urinary tract infection is moderate or unclear, urine culture should be performed. Urine culture is the gold standard for detection of urinary tract infection. However, asymptomatic bacteriuria is common, particularly in older women, and should not be treated with antibiotics. Conversely, in symptomatic women, even growth as low as 10 2 colony-forming unit/mL could reflect infection. Resistance is

  7. Enhanced versus automated urinalysis for screening of urinary tract infections in children in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ami P; Cobb, Benjamin T; Lower, Darla R; Shaikh, Nader; Rasmussen, Jayne; Hoberman, Alejandro; Wald, Ellen R; Rosendorff, Adam; Hickey, Robert W

    2014-03-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are the most common serious bacterial infection in febrile infants. Urinalysis (UA) is a screening test for preliminary diagnosis of UTI. UA can be performed manually or using automated techniques. We sought to compare manual versus automated UA for urine specimens obtained via catheterization in the pediatric emergency department. In this prospective study, we processed catheterized urine samples from infants with suspected UTI by both the manual method (enhanced UA) and the automated method. We defined a positive enhanced UA as ≥ 10 white blood cells per cubic millimeter and presence of any bacteria per 10 oil immersion fields on a Gram-stained smear. We defined a positive automated UA as ≥ 2 white blood cells per high-powered field and presence of any bacteria using the IRIS iQ200 ELITE. We defined a positive urine culture as growth of ≥ 50,000 colony-forming units per milliliter of a single uropathogen. We analyzed data using SPSS software. A total of 703 specimens were analyzed. Prevalence of UTI was 7%. For pyuria, the sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) of the enhanced UA in predicting positive urine culture were 83.6% and 52.5%, respectively; corresponding values for the automated UA were 79.5% and 37.5%, respectively. For bacteriuria, the sensitivity and PPV of a Gram-stained smear (enhanced UA) were 83.6% and 59.4%, respectively; corresponding values for the automated UA were 73.4%, and 26.2%, respectively. Using criteria of both pyuria and bacteriuria for the enhanced UA resulted in a sensitivity of 77.5% and a PPV of 84.4%; corresponding values for the automated UA were 63.2% and 51.6%, respectively. Combining automated pyuria (≥ 2 white blood cells/high-powered microscopic field) with a Gram-stained smear resulted in a sensitivity of 75.5% and a PPV of 84%. Automated UA is comparable with manual UA for detection of pyuria in young children with suspected UTI. Bacteriuria detected by automated UA is

  8. Infection, antibiotics, and preterm delivery.

    PubMed

    Locksmith, G; Duff, P

    2001-10-01

    The relationship between genital tract infection and preterm delivery has been established on the basis of biochemical, microbiological, and clinical evidence. In theory, pathogenic bacteria may ascend from the lower reproductive tract into the uterus, and the resulting inflammation leads to preterm labor, rupture of the membranes, and birth. A growing body of evidence suggests that preterm labor and/rupture of the membranes are triggered by micro-organisms in the genital tract and by the host response to these organisms, ie, elaboration of cytokines and proteolytic enzymes. Epidemiologic and in vitro studies do not prove a cause-and-effect relationship between infection and preterm birth. However, the preponderance of evidence indicates that treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic lower genital tract infections such as bacterial vaginosis (BV), trichomoniasis, gonorrhea, and chlamydia will lower the risk of preterm delivery. Based on current evidence, pregnant women who note an abnormal vaginal discharge should be tested for BV, trichomonas, gonorrhea, and chlamydia. Those who test positive should be treated appropriately. A 3- to 7-day course of antibiotic treatment for asymptomatic bacteriuria during pregnancy is clinically indicated to reduce the risk of pyelonephritis and preterm delivery. Routine screening for chlamydia and gonorrhea should be performed for women at high risk of acquiring sexually transmitted diseases. The practice of routine screening for BV in asymptomatic women who are at low risk for preterm delivery cannot be supported based on evidence from the literature. Routine screening for asymptomatic bacteriuria during pregnancy is cost-effective, particularly in high-prevalence populations. The results of antibiotic trials for the treatment of preterm labor have been inconsistent. In the absence of reasonable evidence that antimicrobial therapy leads to significant prolongation of pregnancy in the setting of preterm labor

  9. Lipocalin 2 Imparts Selective Pressure on Bacterial Growth in the Bladder and Is Elevated in Women with Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Steigedal, Magnus; Marstad, Anne; Haug, Markus; Damås, Jan K.; Strong, Roland K.; Roberts, Pacita L.; Himpsl, Stephanie D.; Stapleton, Ann; Hooton, Thomas M.; Mobley, Harry L. T.; Hawn, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    Competition for iron is a critical component of successful bacterial infections, but the underlying in vivo mechanisms are poorly understood. We have previously demonstrated that lipocalin 2 (LCN2) is an innate immunity protein that binds to bacterial siderophores and starves them for iron, thus representing a novel host defense mechanism to infection. In the present study we show that LCN2 is secreted by the urinary tract mucosa and protects against urinary tract infection (UTI). We found that LCN2 was expressed in the bladder, ureters, and kidneys of mice subject to UTI. LCN2 was protective with higher bacterial numbers retrieved from bladders of Lcn2-deficient mice than from wild-type mice infected with the LCN2-sensitive Escherichia coli strain H9049. Uropathogenic E. coli mutants in siderophore receptors for salmochelin, aerobactin, or yersiniabactin displayed reduced fitness in wild-type mice, but not in mice deficient of LCN2, demonstrating that LCN2 imparts a selective pressure on bacterial growth in the bladder. In a human cohort of women with recurrent E. coli UTIs, urine LCN2 levels were associated with UTI episodes and with levels of bacteriuria. The number of siderophore systems was associated with increasing bacteriuria during cystitis. Our data demonstrate that LCN2 is secreted by the urinary tract mucosa in response to uropathogenic E. coli challenge and acts in innate immune defenses as a colonization barrier that pathogens must overcome to establish infection. PMID:25398327

  10. Moderate-to-high normal levels of thyrotropin is a risk factor for urinary incontinence and an unsuitable quality of life in women over 65 years.

    PubMed

    Cuevas-Romero, Estela; Sánchez-Cardiel, Angélica; Zamora-Gallegos, Angélica M; Cruz-Lumbreras, Rosalía; Corona-Quintanilla, Dora L; Castelán, Francisco; Martínez-Gómez, Margarita

    2017-12-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between normal serum concentrations of thyrotropin (TSH) and urinary incontinence (IU), urinary infections, and quality of life in old women. Euthyroid post-menopausal women without sarcopenia, estrogen replacement, emotional illness, and/or cancer were enrolled as participants. Anthropometric indicators, serum glucose and estradiol, and thyroid profile were measured. Sociodemographic, clinical, physical activity, and quality of life (SF-36) surveys were applied. One-hour pad test and International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form (ICIQ-SF) were used to determine UI. Urinalysis was also done. In agreement with results from the pad test (cut-off point ≥1.4 g), the ICIQ-SF reveled approximately 50% of incontinent women. A high percentage of women had moderate-high bacteriuria and urinary infections. Logistic regression analysis showed that age is a risk factor for both UI and urinary infection. Diabetes, number of pregnancies or childbirths, urinary infections, and bacteriuria did not influence the presence of UI. To allocate women into four groups according to their age (<65 or ≥65 years old) and TSH concentrations (0.3-1.9 or 2-10 μUI/mL), we found that moderate-to-high normal levels of TSH is a risk factor for UI and a worse quality of life in the oldest women. Our results highlight the profit of measuring TSH concentrations in post-menopausal women. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Use of microbial cultures and antibiotics in the prevention of infection-associated preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Klein, Laura L; Gibbs, Ronald S

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to summarize recent evidence regarding infection-associated preterm birth and to make appropriate recommendations. Antepartum treatment of lower genital tract infection or bacterial colonization has been found to reduce the incidence of preterm birth in the case of asymptomatic bacteriuria and bacterial vaginosis in selected patients but has been proved to be ineffective for vaginal colonization with organisms such as Ureaplasma urealyticum and group B streptococcus. This is a clinical opinion based on a review of recent data related to 1) the association between lower genital tract infection and preterm birth and 2) antibiotic trials to prevent preterm birth. Antepartum treatment of lower genital tract infection or bacterial colonization has been found to reduce the incidence of preterm birth in the case of asymptomatic bacteriuria and bacterial vaginosis in selected patients, but has been proven to be ineffective for vaginal colonization with organisms such as Ureaplasma urealyticum and group B streptococcus. Large well-designed trials have shown that the routine administration of antibiotics to women with preterm labor and intact membranes is not beneficial; however, antibiotic regimens including macrolides are recommended for preterm premature rupture of the membranes. Large well-designed trials have shown that the routine administration of antibiotics to women with preterm labor and intact membranes is not beneficial; however, antibiotic regimens that include macrolides are recommended for preterm premature rupture of the membranes.

  12. Current concepts in urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Williams, D H; Schaeffer, A J

    2004-03-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common infectious diseases that can be associated with substantial morbidity and significant expenditures. This review highlights the current concepts and recent advances in our understanding and management of this condition. Specific topics include pathogenesis, host factors, antimicrobial resistance, recurrent UTIs in women, diagnosis, treatment of uncomplicated and complicated UTIs, prophylaxis, catheter associated bacteriuria, pregnancy, diabetes, UTIs in men, prostatitis, and the chronic pelvic pain syndrome. UTIs can be viewed as an interaction between specific bacterial virulence factors and the patient. A new model explaining the pathogenesis of recurrent UTIs has been presented. There is a need to reconsider traditional treatment recommendations in the face of local resistance patterns, as well as the need to make better use of drugs that are currently available. Prospects for prevention of recurrent UTI include natural compounds, bacterial interference and immunization. With regard to UTI risk in women, patients can be classified based on age, and functional and hormonal status. Appropriate treatment approaches must be based on this classification. In contrast to uncomplicated UTIs, management of most complicated infections depends on clinical experience and resources at individual institutions rather than on evidence based guidelines. Asymptomatic bacteriuria generally should not be treated except in high-risk catheterized patients and in pregnancy. UTIs in men generally require formal urologic evaluation. Our understanding of the etiologies, diagnostic strategies, and treatment options for prostatitis and the chronic pelvic pain syndrome in men continues to evolve.

  13. Diagnostic value and biological significance of antibody-coated bacteria in urine

    PubMed Central

    Mengoli, C; Arosio, E; Bonato, D; Spiazzi, G; Pancera, P; Montesi, G; Lechi, A; Scuro, LA

    1980-01-01

    The incidence of antibody-coated bacteria (ACB) in the urinary sediments as an indication of the site of urinary tract infections (UTI) was investigated in 103 adult subjects with persistent bacteriuria by means of a direct immunofluorescence technique. ACB were found in 49 of 58 (84·5%) subjects with long-standing upper urinary tract obstruction and in 5 of 45 (11·1%) with lower UTI; this difference was statistically significant (X2 = 51·79; P<0·001). The group with upper UTI was further subdivided according to renal function (patients with renal insufficiency had both bilateral obstruction and bilateral renal damage); 21 positive results were obtained in 27 (77·8%) patients with normal renal function, whereas 28 positive cases were observed among 31 (90·3%) patients with chronic renal insufficiency. Thus the degree of renal involvement also seemed to influence the outcome of the test. Within the group of lower UTI, a higher rate of `false-positive' results was obtained in 14 patients with symptomatic long-standing infection (21·4%) than in 31 subjects with asymptomatic bacteriuria (6·4%). The three major immunoglobulin classes and the secretory component were studied in 42 cases. Of these, 29 were found to be positive for ACB. The constant presence of IgA and secretory component on the surface of ACB suggests that the secretory immune system plays an important role in UTI. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:6988464

  14. In vitro susceptibility to mecillinam of Escherichia coli strains isolated from the urine of pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Duployez, C; Loiez, C; Cattoen, C; Descamps, D; Wallet, F; Vachée, A

    2016-12-01

    Pivmecillinam is a safe beta-lactam for use in pregnancy. It has been widely used for the treatment of lower urinary tract infections (UTIs) in the Nordic countries where its efficacy, minor impact on the microbiota, and low level of resistance among the Escherichia coli strains have been proven. However, susceptibility data related to E. coli involved in asymptomatic bacteriuria and lower UTIs in pregnant women is lacking. We aimed to support the 2015 recommendations issued by the French Infectious Diseases Society (SPILF) on gestational UTI, with a particular focus on pivmecillinam. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by 12 hospitals with a maternity department on 235 E. coli strains isolated from the urine of pregnant women. Susceptibility to mecillinam was tested by disk diffusion method using the 2015 recommendations of the antibiogram committee of the French microbiology society (CA-SFM). Global susceptibility to mecillinam was 86.4%. Susceptibility to mecillinam was 96.5% for strains susceptible to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and 38.7% for resistant strains. All six extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing E. coli strains were susceptible to mecillinam. Given the efficacy and safety of pivmecillinam during pregnancy, it may be used for the documented treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria and acute cystitis in pregnant women. It also represents an alternative for the treatment of multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Safety of gentamicin bladder irrigations in complex urological cases.

    PubMed

    Defoor, William; Ferguson, Denise; Mashni, Susan; Creelman, Lisa; Reeves, Deborah; Minevich, Eugene; Reddy, Pramod; Sheldon, Curtis

    2006-05-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infections are common in complex pediatric urological cases, particularly those requiring clean intermittent catheterization. At our institution gentamicin bladder irrigations have been used for antimicrobial prophylaxis and to treat symptomatic bacteriuria, particularly when the infection does not involve the upper urinary tract. The purpose of this study was to assess the safety of this therapy. A retrospective study was performed of all children treated with gentamicin bladder irrigations from 1999 to 2004. The dose was 14 mg gentamicin in 30 ml saline instilled via catheter once or twice daily. Serum creatinine and random gentamicin levels were obtained according to a protocol based on risk of gentamicin toxicity. Patient demographics, laboratory results and outcomes were abstracted from the medical records. A total of 80 patients (38 males and 42 females) were identified. Median patient age was 10 years and median duration of treatment was 90 days. No patient had detectable serum gentamicin levels greater than 0.4 mg/dl. Small increases in serum creatinine were seen in 3 patients, all of whom had chronic renal insufficiency. A total of 21 patients (26%) had breakthrough UTIs, of which 5 (24%) were gentamicin resistant. No adverse events were documented. Gentamicin bladder irrigations are a helpful adjunct in the management of complex pediatric urological cases involving recurrent symptomatic bacteriuria. We no longer require intensive laboratory monitoring of low risk patients at our institution.

  16. Rare emergence of symptoms during long-term asymptomatic Escherichia coli 83972 carriage without an altered virulence factor repertoire.

    PubMed

    Köves, Béla; Salvador, Ellaine; Grönberg-Hernández, Jenny; Zdziarski, Jaroslaw; Wullt, Björn; Svanborg, Catharina; Dobrindt, Ulrich

    2014-02-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria established by intravesical inoculation of Escherichia coli 83972 is protective in patients with recurrent urinary tract infections. In this randomized, controlled crossover study a total of 3 symptomatic urinary tract infection episodes developed in 2 patients while they carried E. coli 83972. We examined whether virulence reacquisition by symptom isolates may account for the switch from asymptomatic bacteriuria to symptomatic urinary tract infection. We used E. coli 83972 re-isolates from 2 patients in a prospective study and from another 2 in whom symptoms developed after study completion. We phylogenetically classified the re-isolates, and identified the genomic restriction patterns and gene expression profiles as well as virulence gene structure and phenotypes. In vivo virulence was examined in the murine urinary tract infection model. The fim, pap, foc, hlyA, fyuA, iuc, iroN, kpsMT K5 and malX genotypes of the symptomatic re-isolates remained unchanged. Bacterial gene expression profiles of flagellated symptomatic re-isolates were unique to each host, providing no evidence of common deregulation. Symptomatic isolates did not differ in virulence from the wild-type strain, as defined in the murine urinary tract infection model by persistence, symptoms or innate immune activation. The switch from asymptomatic E. coli 83972 carriage to symptomatic urinary tract infection was not explained by reversion to a functional virulence gene repertoire. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Prospective evaluation of antibiotic treatment for urological procedure in patients presenting with neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Weglinski, L; Rouzaud, C; Even, A; Bouchand, F; Davido, B; Duran, C; Salomon, J; Perronne, C; Denys, P; Chartier-Kastler, E; Dinh, A

    2016-09-01

    Patients presenting with neurogenic bladder often require urological procedures (urodynamic testing and botulinum toxin injections) and a preventive antibiotic therapy. We aimed to assess the efficacy of this little known strategy in a cohort of patients. All patients presenting with neurogenic bladder who underwent urological procedure were included in the study. They received an antibiotic therapy in accordance with the urine cytobacteriological examination results. The antibiotic therapy was initiated two days before the procedure and prolonged up until two days after the procedure if the culture was positive. Patients were treated with a single dose of fosfomycin-trometamol in case of a negative culture. The main study outcome was the occurrence of urinary tract infection (UTI), defined by a positive urine culture and symptoms, up until 14 days after the procedure. A total of 80 urological procedures were performed. Mean patient age was 47±13.1 years (sex ratio 1.22); 59 (73.8%) presented with asymptomatic bacteriuria before the procedure. Nine (11.1%) UTIs were recorded on Day 14, of which one (1.2%) was febrile. Two patients required an additional curative antibiotic therapy. No patient was hospitalized. Overall, 77.8% of UTIs were cured without antibiotic therapy. Screening and treating asymptomatic bacteriuria before urological procedures seems unnecessary and vainly exposes this population at high risk of infectious diseases to antibiotic therapies. This data should be confirmed by a randomized clinical trial. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Management of urinary tract infections in pregnancy: a review with comments on single dose therapy.

    PubMed

    Zinner, S H

    1992-01-01

    Most investigators agree that the adverse effects of urinary tract infections in pregnancy can be abrogated by effective early detection and treatment. However, the optimal methods for screening and treatment remain controversial. Although single-dose therapy has not been applied to pregnant women with acute pyelonephritis, most but not all studies which have compared single-dose with longer courses of beta-lactam or other antibiotics in pregnant asymptomatic bacteriuric women have shown no differences in outcome. This paper reviews recent trials of single-dose treatment of bacteriuria in pregnant women.

  19. Applications of luminescent systems to infectious disease methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picciolo, G. L.; Chappelle, E. W.; Deming, J. W.; Mcgarry, M. A.; Nibley, D. A.; Okrend, H.; Thomas, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    The characterization of a clinical sample by a simple, fast, accurate, automatable analytical measurement is important in the management of infectious disease. Luminescence assays offer methods rich with options for these measurements. The instrumentation is common to each assay, and the investment is reasonable. Three general procedures were developed to varying degrees of completeness which measure bacterial levels by measuring their ATP, FMN and iron porphyrins. Bacteriuria detection and antibiograms can be determined within half a day. The characterization of the sample for its soluble ATP, FMN or prophyrins was also performed.

  20. No need for a urine culture in elderly hospitalized patients with a negative dipstick test result.

    PubMed

    Shimoni, Zvi; Hermush, Vered; Glick, Joseph; Froom, Paul

    2018-05-18

    To determine the clinical utility/disutility of canceling urine cultures in elderly patients with a negative dipstick. The cohort included consecutive patients aged ≥ 65 years hospitalized in internal medicine departments with an admission urinalysis and urine culture (January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2016). We calculated the sensitivity of the dipstick (either a trace leukocyte esterase or a positive nitrite test result) to detect patients with bacteriuria, and the decrease in urine cultures resulting from cancelation in patients with a negative dipstick. We reviewed the charts of patients with a positive culture but negative dipstick to determine if they received appropriate antibiotic therapy and if the culture results had clinical utility, defined as changes in antibiotic therapy made according to culture results in a patient who did not respond to initial antibiotic therapy. The sensitivity of the dipstick for bacteriuria was 90.8% (95% CI, 89.6-92.0%). Of the 210 patients with a positive culture but negative dipstick, 132 (62.9%) had a diagnosis clearly outside the urinary tract. Thirty-five patients (16.7%) received inappropriate differential antibiotic therapy. Urine cultures did not have clinical utility and canceling urine cultures in those with a negative dipstick would result in a 41.5% (95% CI, 40.3-42.7%) decrease in urine cultures. We conclude that canceling orders for urine cultures in the elderly patient with a negative dipstick did not have clinical disutility and would decrease inappropriate antibiotic therapy. Extrapolation to other settings is dependent on urinalysis methodology, patient selection, and physician ordering and treatment behaviors.

  1. Urogenital tract infections in pregnancy at King Edward VIII Hospital, Durban, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, M; Hoosen, A A; Moodley, J; Moodley, S

    1992-02-01

    To evaluate the role of detecting asymptomatic bacteriuria and endocervical infections in the black prenatal patients attending King Edward VIII Hospital (KEH), Durban, with the view of justifying a screening programme. Screening for syphilis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection were also evaluated. 181 asymptomatic black prenatal patients attending the antenatal clinic for their first antenatal visit volunteered for the study and gave their written consent. Examination of each prenatal patient included obtaining of endocervical swabs to detect endocervical infections (C trachomatis, N gonorrhoeae), serum for syphilitic and HIV testing, and a midstream specimen of urine for microscopy and culture. Asymptomatic bacteriuria was found in 5.6% of patients in this study. Cervical infections were diagnosed microbiologically in 8.2% of women. These were N gonorrhoeae in 4.1% and C trachomatis in 4.7%. Serological tests for sexually transmitted diseases showed the presence of syphilis in 7.6% and antibody to the HIV in 1.9%. Overall, one or more sexually transmitted diseases were found in 16.5% of the women studied. This study suggests that all women presenting for routine antenatal care in a setting such as Durban should be screened for lower genital tract infections. Ideally this should include a midstream urine specimen for culture, serum for syphilitic and HIV antibody testing and endocervical swabs for sexually transmitted pathogens. In developing communities, however, more reliable and cheaper methods of endocervical screening need to be available before antenatal screening for cervico-vaginal infections can be justified.

  2. Lipocalin 2 imparts selective pressure on bacterial growth in the bladder and is elevated in women with urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Steigedal, Magnus; Marstad, Anne; Haug, Markus; Damås, Jan K; Strong, Roland K; Roberts, Pacita L; Himpsl, Stephanie D; Stapleton, Ann; Hooton, Thomas M; Mobley, Harry L T; Hawn, Thomas R; Flo, Trude H

    2014-12-15

    Competition for iron is a critical component of successful bacterial infections, but the underlying in vivo mechanisms are poorly understood. We have previously demonstrated that lipocalin 2 (LCN2) is an innate immunity protein that binds to bacterial siderophores and starves them for iron, thus representing a novel host defense mechanism to infection. In the present study we show that LCN2 is secreted by the urinary tract mucosa and protects against urinary tract infection (UTI). We found that LCN2 was expressed in the bladder, ureters, and kidneys of mice subject to UTI. LCN2 was protective with higher bacterial numbers retrieved from bladders of Lcn2-deficient mice than from wild-type mice infected with the LCN2-sensitive Escherichia coli strain H9049. Uropathogenic E. coli mutants in siderophore receptors for salmochelin, aerobactin, or yersiniabactin displayed reduced fitness in wild-type mice, but not in mice deficient of LCN2, demonstrating that LCN2 imparts a selective pressure on bacterial growth in the bladder. In a human cohort of women with recurrent E. coli UTIs, urine LCN2 levels were associated with UTI episodes and with levels of bacteriuria. The number of siderophore systems was associated with increasing bacteriuria during cystitis. Our data demonstrate that LCN2 is secreted by the urinary tract mucosa in response to uropathogenic E. coli challenge and acts in innate immune defenses as a colonization barrier that pathogens must overcome to establish infection. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  3. Characterization of the urinary microbiota of elderly women and the effects of type 2 diabetes and urinary tract infections on the microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fengping; Ling, Zongxin; Xiao, Yonghong; Yang, Qing; Zheng, Li; Jiang, Ping; Li, Lanjuan; Wang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Evidence shows that urine has complex bacterial profiles with considerable variation between individuals. Aging and age-related conditions can lead to the changes to the composition of urine, which means that the available nutrition for bacteria in the bladder changes with age. We explored the characteristics of the urinary microbiota of elderly women and whether these are associated with age-related conditions such as diabetes and urinary tract infections. An elderly and a non-elderly cohort of women were included. Magnetic beads were used to isolate bacterial genomic DNA, which was analyzed based on the V3-V4 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene. There were significant differences between the elderly and non-elderly regarding thirteen genera of bacteria. For example, the relative abundance of Lactobacillus was dramatically reduced in the elderly compared with the non-elderly; it also decreased with age in the elderly cohort and it was not correlated with urine pH. The relative abundance of Peptococcus increased with age in the elderly while the abundance of Bifidobacteria decreased with age. The abundance of Escherichia coli was the same in the two cohorts, and it increased with water intake and was not associated with urinary tract infection events. Higher levels of Lactobacillus (including Lactobacillus iners) in the elderly were associated with diabetes, and lower levels of Peptoniphilus and Dialister were correlated with asymptomatic bacteriuria. The urinary microbiota of women is affected by ageing, type 2 diabetes mellitus and asymtomatic bacteriuria. PMID:29246012

  4. Urinary Tract Infections in the Older Adult.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2016-08-01

    Urinary infection is the most common bacterial infection in elderly populations. The high prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria in both men and women is benign and should not be treated. A diagnosis of symptomatic infection for elderly residents of long-term care facilities without catheters requires localizing genitourinary findings. Symptomatic urinary infection is overdiagnosed in elderly bacteriuric persons with nonlocalizing clinical presentations, with substantial inappropriate antimicrobial use. Residents with chronic indwelling catheters experience increased morbidity from urinary tract infection. Antimicrobial therapy is selected based on clinical presentation, patient tolerance, and urine culture results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of Sisomicin and Gentamicin in Bacteriuric Patients with Underlying Diseases of the Urinary Tract

    PubMed Central

    Klastersky, Jean; Hensgens, Colette; Gerard, Michel; Daneau, Didier

    1975-01-01

    Sisomicin and gentamicin (2 mg/kg) were administered in a random fashion to patients with bacteriuria superimposed on abnormalities of the urinary tract. Cure was achieved in a similar number of patients in both groups, but superinfection and reinfection with resistant microorganisms was more frequent in patients receiving gentamicin. Untoward side effects were not frequent in this series, especially if the serious underlying urological disease of most patients is taken into consideration. The susceptibility of the causative pathogens to the antibiotic administered and the severity of the underlying disease were the most important factors in the outcome. PMID:1155918

  6. Types of urethral catheters for management of short-term voiding problems in hospitalized adults: a short version Cochrane review.

    PubMed

    Schumm, K; Lam, T B L

    2008-01-01

    bacteriuria in short-term catheterized hospitalized adults but the confidence intervals were wide (RR 0.89, 95% CI 0.68-1.15) and these catheters are no longer available. Silver alloy catheters were found to significantly reduce the incidence of asymptomatic bacteriuria (RR 0.54, 95% CI 0.43-0.67) in hospitalized adults catheterized for <1 week. At >1 week of catheterization the risk of asymptomatic bacteriuria was still reduced with the use of silver alloy catheters (RR 0.64, 95% CI 0.51-0.80). The randomized cross-over trial of silver alloy catheters versus standard catheters was excluded from the pooled results because data were not available prior to crossover. The results of this trial indicated benefit from the silver alloy catheters and included an economic analysis that indicated cost savings of between 3.3% and 35.5%. Antibiotic impregnated catheters were compared to standard catheters and found to lower the rate of asymptomatic bacteriuria in the antibiotic group at <1 week of catheterization for both minocycline and rifampicin combined (RR 0.36, 95% CI 0.18-0.73), and nitrofurazone (RR 0.52, 95% CI 0.34-0.78). However, at >1 week the results were not statistically significant. One of 56 men in the antibiotic impregnated group had a symptomatic UTI compared with 6 of 68 who had standard catheters (RR 0.20, 95% CI 0.03-1.63). Three trials compared two different types of standard catheters (defined as catheters that are not impregnated with antiseptics or antibiotics) to investigate infection. Individual trials were too small to show whether or not one type of standard catheter reduced the risk of catheter related urinary tract infection compared to another type of standard catheter. The results suggest that the use of silver alloy indwelling catheters for catheterizing hospitalized adults short-term reduces the risk of catheter acquired urinary tract infection. Further economic evaluation is required to confirm that the reduction of infection compensates for the

  7. Compliance with American Urological Association Guidelines for Post-Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy Antibiotics Does Not Appear to Increase Rates of Infection.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Sameer; Sternberg, Kevan; Hernandez, Natalia; Eisner, Brian H

    2015-10-01

    We compared infection rates after percutaneous nephrolithotomy in a group of patients without a history of infection or struvite calculi who received 24 hours or less of antibiotics postoperatively (ie compliance with AUA guidelines) vs a group that received 5 to 7 days of antibiotics postoperatively. We retrospectively reviewed the records of consecutive percutaneous nephrolithotomy procedures in patients without a history of urinary tract infection. Group 1 received 24 hours or less of antibiotics postoperatively and group 2 received a mean of 6 days of antibiotics postoperatively. A total of 52 patients in group 1 (24 hours or less of antibiotics) and 30 in group 2 (mean 6 days of antibiotics) met study inclusion criteria. In 5 group 1 patients (9.6%) fever developed within 72 hours of percutaneous nephrolithotomy but none demonstrated bacteriuria or bacteremia on cultures. No patient in group 1 was treated for urinary tract infection on postoperative days 3 to 14. In 4 group 2 patients (13.3%) fever developed within 72 hours of percutaneous nephrolithotomy. A single patient showed bacteriuria (less than 10,000 cfu mixed gram-positive bacteria) on culture while no patient demonstrated bacteremia. No patient in group 2 was treated for urinary tract infection on postoperative days 3 to 14. There was no difference in stone-free rates or the need for additional procedures between the 2 groups. In this pilot series compliance with AUA guidelines for antibiotic prophylaxis did not result in higher rates of infection than in a comparable group of 30 patients who received approximately 6 days of antibiotics postoperatively. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Using optical coherence tomography to detect bacterial biofilms on foley catheters (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidari, Andrew E.; Oh, Kyungjin; Chen, Zhongping

    2017-02-01

    Urinary tract infections(UTI) pose a serious problem for hospital patients accounting for 33% of all hospital acquired(nosocomial) infections with indwelling foley catheters. The presence of an indwelling foley catheter provides a scaffolding for circulating planktonic bacteria to adhere to and to form microbial biofilm communities that would typically be hindered by the body's innate immune system response. It is these biofilm communities that form on the inner lumen of foley catheters that provide a reservoir of pathogenic bacteria that could dislodge or disperse from the biofilm and infect urethra or bladder mucosal tissue in the urinary tract. Current diagnostic techniques of urine microbiological cultures are lacking in differentiating asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic catheter-associated urinary tract infection(CAUTI) since almost all patients with chronic indwelling catheters are almost universally bacteriuruic. There is an unmet need of a diagnostic tool to assess the difference between the pathogenesis of asymptomatic bacteriuria and CAUTI, specifically at the site of the native biofilm formation. Optical Coherence Tomography(OCT) is an emerging high resolution, minimally invasive tomographic imaging technique that has shown promise in imaging biofilm structures previously in an endoscopic setting of the airway in-vivo and in microfluidic chambers. OCT can be adapted to image various sized biological surfaces and orifices such as airway branches and blood vessels by using a variety of minature endoscopic probes. In this work OCT will be used to image biofilm structure in-vitro on the inner lumen of extravasated critical care patient's foley catheters. Scanning electron microscopy will be conducted post OCT to confirm the presence of bacterial biofilm in OCT images.

  9. Discontinuation of peri-operative gentamicin use for indwelling urinary catheter manipulation in orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Bond, Stuart E; Boutlis, Craig S; Jansen, Stuart G; Miyakis, Spiros

    2017-11-01

    Gentamicin has historically been used prior to insertion and removal of indwelling urinary catheters (IDCs) around elective joint replacement surgery to prevent infection; however, this indication is not recognized in the Australian Therapeutic Guidelines: Antibiotic and the paradigm for safe use of gentamicin has shifted. The antimicrobial stewardship team of a 500 bed tertiary regional hospital performed a retrospective clinical study of gentamicin IDC prophylaxis around total hip and knee arthroplasties. Results were presented to the orthopaedic surgeons. A literature review identified no guidelines to support gentamicin prophylaxis and only a very low risk of bacteraemia associated with IDC insertion/removal in patients with established bacteriuria. Consensus was reached with the surgeons to discontinue this practice. Subsequent prospective data collection was commenced to determine effectiveness, with weekly feedback to the Department Head of Orthopaedics. Data from 137 operations pre-intervention (6 months) were compared with 205 operations post-intervention (12 months). The median patient age was 72 years in both groups. Following the intervention, reductions in gentamicin use were demonstrated for IDC insertion (59/137 (42%) to 4/205 (2%), P < 0.01) and removal (39/137 (28%) to 6/205 (3%), P < 0.01). No gentamicin use was observed during the final 40 weeks of the post-intervention period. There were no significant differences between the groups for pre-operative bacteriuria, surgical site infections or acute kidney injury. A collaborative approach using quality improvement methodology can lead to an evidence-based reappraisal of established practice. Regular rolling audits and timely feedback were useful in sustaining change. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  10. Bacteriuria and antibiotic resistance in catheter urine specimens following radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Banks, Jessica A; McGuire, Barry B; Loeb, Stacy; Shrestha, Sanjina; Helfand, Brian T; Catalona, William J

    2013-10-01

    There are increasing reports of infectious complications following prostate biopsy due to fluoroquinolone resistance. To determine infectious complications at catheter removal following radical prostatectomy (RP), another setting in daily urological practice where fluoroquinolone prophylaxis is frequently used. We prospectively examined urine culture results collected from 334 RP patients immediately prior to catheter removal. Patients received prophylactic antibiotics 1 day before, the day of, and for 5 days after catheter removal. Culture results were reviewed for bacterial species and antimicrobial susceptibilities. Patients with positive urine cultures resistant to the prophylactic antibiotic were switched to culture-specific antibiotic therapy and underwent follow-up culture. The frequency of urinary tract infection (UTI), complications, additional antibiotic therapy, and repeat urine cultures was determined within 60 days. Of the 334 patients identified, 203 (61%) had cultures with no bacterial growth, and 48 (14%) had colony counts of <1,000 bacteria or Candida albicans and received no further antibiotics. The remaining 83 (25%) had positive culture results, of which 7% were resistant to ciprofloxacin. Twenty-four bacterial species were identified, with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5%) Escherichia coli (4%), and Staphylococcus epidermidis (3%) being the most frequent. Only two (0.6%) men developed clinical symptoms consistent with UTI (i.e., suprapubic pain, fever) prior to catheter removal, and no serious complications occurred. A substantial proportion of RP patients have positive urine cultures at the time of catheter removal, despite the administration of prophylactic fluoroquinolone antibiotics. Potentially virulent organisms are commonly cultured, and ciprofloxacin resistance is frequent. However, outcomes are favorable when culture-specific oral antibiotic therapy is initiated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Pharmacologic management of asymptomatic bacteriuria and urinary tract infections in women.

    PubMed

    O'Dell, Katharine K

    2011-01-01

    Many factors influence the decision to institute treatment for the common problems of urinary tract symptoms and/or the presence of microorganisms in the urine of women. This article summarizes current evidence related to treatment choice and compares selected treatment practice guidelines. Evidence related to prevention of recurrent infection without the use of antibiotics is included. © 2011 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  12. The Genetics of Urinary Tract Infections and the Innate Defense of the Kidney and Urinary tract

    PubMed Central

    Ambite, Ines; Rydstrom, Gustav; Schwaderer, Andrew L.; Hains, David S.

    2015-01-01

    The urinary tract is a sterile organ system. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common and often serious infections. Research has focused on uropathogen, environment, and host factors leading to UTI pathogenesis. A growing body of evidence exists implicating genetic factors that can contribute to UTI risks. In this review, we highlight genetic variations in aspects of the innate immune system critical to the host response to uropathogens. This overview includes genetic variations in pattern recognition receptor molecules, chemokines/cytokines, and neutrophil activation. We also comprehensively cover murine knockout models of UTI, genetic variations involved in renal scarring as a result of ascending UTIs, and asymptomatic bacteriuria. PMID:27617139

  13. Urinary tract infections in women.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M A

    1990-02-01

    The clinical conditions that cause dysuria in women can usually be differentiated by the history and selected physical and laboratory examinations. Cystitis can be treated with short-course therapy in uncomplicated cases; pretreatment cultures are usually not necessary, since most infections are caused by Escherichia coli. Outpatient treatment of pyelonephritis is appropriate in selected patients. Follow-up culture after treatment of either cystitis or pyelonephritis is indicated to identify those patients requiring longer treatment or urologic evaluation. Recurrent urinary tract infections can be managed with postcoital antibiotics, long-term prophylaxis or patient self-administration of short-course therapy. Bacteriuria and pyelonephritis in pregnancy must be aggressively diagnosed and treated.

  14. Executive summary. Management of urinary tract infection in solid organ transplant recipients: Consensus statement of the Group for the Study of Infection in Transplant Recipients (GESITRA) of the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC) and the Spanish Network for Research in Infectious Diseases (REIPI).

    PubMed

    Vidal, Elisa; Cervera, Carlos; Cordero, Elisa; Armiñanzas, Carlos; Carratalá, Jordi; Cisneros, José Miguel; Fariñas, M Carmen; López-Medrano, Francisco; Moreno, Asunción; Muñoz, Patricia; Origüen, Julia; Sabé, Núria; Valerio, Maricela; Torre-Cisneros, Julián

    2015-12-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are one of the most common infections in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. A systematic review was performed to assess the management of UTI in SOT recipients. Recommendations are provided on the management of asymptomatic bacteriuria, and prophylaxis and treatment of UTI in SOT recipients. The diagnostic-therapeutic management of recurrent UTI and the role of infection in kidney graft rejection or dysfunction are reviewed. Finally, recommendations on antimicrobials and immunosuppressant interactions are also included. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  15. Antibiotics for treating lower urinary tract infection in children.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Anita; Mori, Rintaro; Lakhanpaul, Monica; Tullus, Kjell

    2012-08-15

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common bacterial infections in infants and children. Lower UTI is the most commonly presenting and in the majority of cases can be easily treated with a course of antibiotic therapy with no further complications. A number of antimicrobials have been used to treat children with lower UTIs; however is it unclear what are the specific benefits and harms of such treatments. This review aims to summarise the benefits and harms of antibiotics for treating lower UTI in children. We searched the Renal Group's Specialised Register (April 2012), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 5), MEDLINE OVID SP (from 1966), and EMBASE OVID SP (from 1988) without language restriction. Date of last search: May 2012. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs in which antibiotic therapy was used to treat bacteriologically proven, symptomatic, lower UTI in children aged zero to 18 years in primary and community healthcare settings were included. Two authors independently assessed study quality and extracted data. Statistical analyses were performed using the random effects model and the results expressed as risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Sixteen RCTs, analysing 1,116 children were included. Conventional 10-day antibiotic treatment significantly increased the number of children free of persistent bacteriuria compared to single-dose therapy (6 studies, 228 children: RR 2.01, 95%CI 1.06 to 3.80). No heterogeneity was observed. Persistent bacteriuria at the end of treatment was reported in 24% of children receiving single-dose therapy compared to 10% of children who were randomised to 10-day therapy. There were no significant differences between groups for persistent symptoms, recurrence following treatment, or re-infection following treatment. There was insufficient data to analyse the effect of antibiotics on renal parenchymal damage, compliance, development of resistant organisms or adverse events. Despite

  16. GPs should evaluate all children following UTI.

    PubMed

    Hutchings, Frances; Jadresić, Lyda

    2010-01-01

    Ten per cent of girls and 3% of boys will have had a UTI by 16 years of age. The majority are acute, isolated illnesses that resolve quickly, with no long-term implications for the patient. However, UTIs may be associated with underlying congenital abnormalities, and recurrent infections can lead to renal scarring. UTI is defined as bacteriuria in the presence of symptoms. Asymptomatic bacteriuria does not require treatment or investigation. The presentation of UTI is extremely variable. The only way to differentiate a UTI from a viral infection is by testing the urine and this should be carried out within 24 hours in children with non-specific fever. UTIs can also present with vomiting, failure to thrive or persistent irritability. A urine infection in the presence of any of the above symptoms is a pyelonephritis (upper UTI). Children may also present with classical symptoms of cystitis (lower UTI) such as urinary frequency, dysuria and abdominal pain. Most children with UTI, even if febrile, can be managed in the community. If the initial assessment shows a high risk of serious illness, there should be an urgent referral to a paediatrician. The same applies to infants under three months with suspected UTI. It is better to obtain a urine sample by the clean catch method, rather than using urine pads or bags. Leucocyte esterase and nitrite dipsticks are not reliable in children under three, so a negative dipstick does not rule out UTI. Not every child needs to be referred after a first UTI. However, they should all be evaluated to help determine which require renal imaging as well as identifying triggers for recurrence. GPs are central to the identification of children at risk of renal pathology. All children who are diagnosed and treated for a UTI must be assessed for risk of renal abnormalities and/or recurrence.

  17. Another Setting for Stewardship: High Rate of Unnecessary Antimicrobial Use in a VA Long-Term Care Facility

    PubMed Central

    Peron, Emily P.; Hirsch, Amy A.; Jury, Lucy A.; Jump, Robin L.P.; Donskey, Curtis J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE Antimicrobials are frequently prescribed in long-term care facilities (LTCFs). In order to develop effective stewardship interventions, there is a need for data on current patterns of unnecessary antimicrobial prescribing among LTCF residents. The objective of this study was to examine the frequency of, reasons for, and adverse effects of unnecessary antimicrobial use in our Veterans Affairs (VA) LTCF. DESIGN Retrospective chart review. SETTING Cleveland VA Medical Center LTCF. PARTICIPANTS Randomly selected patients receiving antimicrobial therapy from October 1, 2008 to March 31, 2009. MEASUREMENTS Days of necessary and unnecessary antimicrobial therapy determined using Infectious Diseases Society of America guidelines, syndromes treated with unnecessary antimicrobials, and the frequency of development of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), colonization or infection with antimicrobial resistant pathogens, and other adverse effects. RESULTS Of 1351 days of therapy prescribed in 100 regimens, 575 days (42.5%) were deemed unnecessary. Of the 575 unnecessary days of therapy, 334 (58%) were for antimicrobial regimens that were entirely unnecessary (n=42). Asymptomatic bacteriuria was the most common reason for entirely unnecessary regimens (n=21), resulting in 173 days of unnecessary therapy. Regimens that were partially unnecessary resulted in 241 (42%) days of unnecessary therapy, with longer than recommended treatment duration accounting for 226 (94%) unnecessary days of therapy. Within 30 days of completing the antimicrobial regimens, 5 patients developed CDI, 5 had colonization or infection with antimicrobial-resistant pathogens, and 10 experienced other adverse drug events. CONCLUSIONS In our VA LTCF, 43% of all days of antimicrobial therapy were unnecessary. Our findings suggest that antimicrobial stewardship interventions in LTCFs should focus on improving adherence to recommended treatment durations and eliminating inappropriate

  18. Oral vaccine (OM-89) in the recurrent urinary tract infection prophylaxis: a realistic systematic review with meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Taha Neto, K A; Nogueira Castilho, L; Reis, L O

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of Escherichia Coli extract (OM-89) in the prophylaxis of recurrent uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI) through a contemporary systematic review and meta-analysis. Inclusion criteria were double-blind randomized trials using orally administrated OM-89, 6mg daily, during three months with a minimum of three months of monitoring. Outcomes were the frequency of bacteriuria in 3 and 6 months, dysuria in 6 months and UTI in 6 months. PubMed, MEDLINE, Cochrane Collaboration and their key references. After analysis by three independent reviewers, 15 double-blind randomized trials were identified, 10 papers excluded due to methods flaws and 5 used for data analysis due to double blinding and reporting drop-outs. Among 5 selected studies the date of publication ranged from 1985 to 2005, totalizing 396 patients in the OM-89 group and 392 in the control group. Overall, there were 61 dropouts in the control group and 76 in the OM-89 group. As a major limitation there was no appropriate description of their methodologies and none of the studies described conflict of interest or commitment to the pharmaceutical industry. All studies were multi-centric, except for two, which showed no clarity on allocation concealment. All studies show benefit in favor of vaccine. Current literature on prospective randomized controlled trials evaluating the use of oral OM-89 vaccine in the recurrent UTI prophylaxis is of low quality, limited to the first six months only and with variable definition of bacteriuria and UTI. Although all studies show benefit in favor of vaccine, no robust trial was identified, resulting in a high heterogeneity in the data analyzed. Also, publication bias could not be excluded and future higher quality studies are warranted adding intermediate (>12 months) and long-term follow-up. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Repair of Spontaneous Appendicovesical Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Kibar, Yusuf; Yalcin, Serdar; Kopru, Burak; Topuz, Bahadir; Ebiloglu, Turgay

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: To report the first case of the spontaneous appendicovesical fistulas' (AVF) repair with robot assisted laparoscopy. Case Presentation: A 29-year-old male patient with urgent persistant bacteriuria and dysuria was referred to our clinic. Physical examination and blood tests were normal. He had used various antibiotics due to recurrent UTI for about 20 years. Computed tomography revealed the fistula tract between the distal end of the appendix and right lateral wall of the bladder dome. He was successfully treated with robot-assisted laparoscopic repair. Following this surgery, the patient's complaints were resolved completely. Conclusion: AVF is the rare condition. Robot-assisted laparoscopy repair of AVF is safe and effective treatment option. PMID:27579435

  20. Prevention of renal scarring from pyelonephritis in nonhuman primates by vaccination with a synthetic Escherichia coli serotype O8 oligosaccharide-protein conjugate.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, J A; Kaack, M B; Baskin, G; Svenson, S B

    1993-01-01

    Rhesus monkeys were vaccinated with a synthetic Escherichia coli serotype O8 oligosaccharide-protein conjugate. Using our experimental pyelonephritis monkey model, we tested whether such immunization was protective against the renal damage from inflammation following experimental infection with a P-fimbriated O-antigenically homologous E. coli strain. The vaccination did not significantly alter the duration of bacteriuria or interfere with the infection. However, the vaccine was efficient in renal protection, as vaccinated animals showed significantly less intratubular infiltration of neutrophils (P < 0.02) and the degree of renal scarring was also significantly less in these animals (P > 0.005) than in the control animals. Total kidney involvement in the vaccinated animals was 16.9%, compared with 32.5% in the control animals (P = 0.07). PMID:8225595

  1. Urinary tract infections during pregnancy - an updated overview.

    PubMed

    Szweda, Hanna; Jóźwik, Marcin

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most common type of infection during pregnancy, affecting up to 10% of pregnant women. They are also recognized as the second most common ailment of pregnancy, after anemia. Three clinical types of pregnancy-related UTI are distinguished: asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB), cystitis, and pyelonephritis. A particular form of ASB is the presence of Group B streptococci in the urinary tract of the pregnant woman. All clinical types of UTI may lead to serious maternal and fetal complications. Therefore, unlike in the nonpregnant female patient, all UTIs during pregnancy, including the asymptomatic infection, require treatment. In some patients, antibiotic prophylaxis should also be introduced. In the present work, we collectively summarize current practical recommendations from a number of international bodies and organizations.

  2. Vesico-ureteric reflux: occurrence and long-term risks.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, S H; Hansson, S; Jakobsson, B

    1999-11-01

    The prevalence of vesico-ureteric reflux in the general population is unknown, but it is increased in risk groups, such as children with symptomatic urinary tract infection, schoolgirls with asymptomatic bacteriuria, first-degree relatives of patients with reflux and children with prenatal dilatation of their upper urinary tract. Children and adults with pyelonephritic renal scarring are at risk of serious long-term complications, e.g. hypertension and renal failure. Modern paediatric care, with early detection and treatment of urinary tract infections and reflux during childhood and adolescence, may improve long-term prognosis. In the adult patient with established pyelonephritic renal scarring, careful control of hypertension may retard the rate of progression, and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors may have renal protective properties.

  3. What we don't know may hurt us: urinary drainage system tubing coils and CA-UTIs-A prospective quality study.

    PubMed

    Kubilay, Zeynep; Archibald, Lennox K; Kirchner, H Lester; Layon, A Joseph

    2013-12-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections account for >30% of infections in acute care hospitals. We hypothesized that coiling of/kinks in the indwelling urinary bladder catheter (IUBC) drainage bag tubing would increase the occurrence of infection/bacteriuria. Ninety-one patient events were evaluated over 60 days. All outcome variables trended with greater frequency among those with a coil in the IUBC tubing; only fever (temperature > 38.1°C) correlated significantly between groups (P = .003). If IUBC is unavoidable, strategies such as keeping collection bag below the level of bladder and avoiding any coiling in the drainage system should be employed. Further study of these phenomena is needed. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Antibiotic Treatment of Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Ha, U-Syn; Lee, Seung-Ju; Yeo, Jeong Kyun; Min, Seung Ki; Lee, Heeyoung

    2018-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are infectious diseases that commonly occur in communities. Although several international guidelines for the management of UTIs have been available, clinical characteristics, etiology and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns may differ from country to country. This work represents an update of the 2011 Korean guideline for UTIs. The current guideline was developed by the update and adaptation method. This clinical practice guideline provides recommendations for the diagnosis and management of UTIs, including asymptomatic bacteriuria, acute uncomplicated cystitis, acute uncomplicated pyelonephritis, complicated pyelonephritis related to urinary tract obstruction, and acute bacterial prostatitis. This guideline targets community-acquired UTIs occurring among adult patients. Healthcare-associated UTIs, catheter-associated UTIs, and infections in immunocompromised patients were not included in this guideline. PMID:29637759

  5. Is early removal of prophylactic ureteric stents beneficial in live donor renal transplantation?

    PubMed Central

    Indu, K. N.; Lakshminarayana, G.; Anil, M.; Rajesh, R.; George, K.; Ginil, K.; Georgy, M.; Nair, B.; Sudhindran, S.; Appu, T.; Unni, V. N.; Sanjeevan, K. V.

    2012-01-01

    Prophylactic ureteric stenting has been shown to reduce ureteric leaks and collecting system obstruction following renal transplantation and is in widespread use. However, the optimal time for removal of ureteric stents after renal transplantation remains unclear. Aim of this study was to compare the result of early versus late removal of ureteric stents after kidney transplantation of the laparoscopically retrieved live related donor grafts. Eligible patients were live donor kidney transplant recipients with normal urinary tracts. All recipients underwent extravesical Lich–Gregoire ureteroneocystostomy over 4F/160 cm polyurethane double J stents by a uniform technique. They were randomized on seventh postoperative day for early removal of stents on postoperative day 7 (Group I), or for late removal on postoperative day 28 (Group II). The incidence of urinary tract infections, asymptomatic bacteriuria, and urological complications were compared. Between 2007 and 2009, 130 kidney transplants were performed at one centre of which 100 were enrolled for the study, and 50 each were randomized into the two groups. Donor and recipient age, sex, native renal disease, immunosupression, number of rejection episodes, and antirejection therapy were similar in the two groups. The occurrence of symptomatic urinary tract infection during the follow-up period of 6 months was significantly less in the early stent removal group [5 out of 50 (10%) in Group I, vs 50 out of 15 (30%) in Group II, P=0.02]. Asymptomatic bacteriuria was documented in 2 out of 50 (4%) in Group I and 4 out of 50 (8%) in Group II (P=0.3). There was no statistically significant difference in the rate of ureteric leak, ureteric obstruction, or hematuria in the two groups (P=1.0). We conclude that, in kidney transplant recipients of laparoscopically retrieved live donor grafts, early stent removal at the end of first week reduces the incidence of urinary tract infection without increasing the rate of urine

  6. Voided Midstream Urine Culture and Acute Cystitis in Premenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Hooton, Thomas M; Roberts, Pacita L.; Cox, Marsha E.; Stapleton, Ann E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The cause of acute uncomplicated cystitis is determined on the basis of cultures of voided midstream urine, but few data guide the interpretation of such results, especially when gram-positive bacteria grow. METHODS Women from 18 to 49 years of age with symptoms of cystitis provided specimens of midstream urine, after which we collected urine by means of a urethral catheter for culture (catheter urine). We compared microbial species and colony counts in the paired specimens. The primary outcome was a comparison of positive predictive values and negative predictive values of organisms grown in midstream urine, with the presence or absence of the organism in catheter urine used as the reference. RESULTS The analysis of 236 episodes of cystitis in 226 women yielded 202 paired specimens of midstream urine and catheter urine that could be evaluated. Cultures were positive for uropathogens in 142 catheter specimens (70%), 4 of which had more than one uropathogen, and in 157 midstream specimens (78%). The presence of Escherichia coli in midstream urine was highly predictive of bladder bacteriuria even at very low counts, with a positive predictive value of 102 colony-forming units (CFU) per milliliter of 93% (Spearman’s r = 0.944). In contrast, in midstream urine, enterococci (in 10% of cultures) and group B streptococci (in 12% of cultures) were not predictive of bladder bacteriuria at any colony count (Spearman’s r = 0.322 for enterococci and 0.272 for group B streptococci). Among 41 episodes in which enterococcus, group B streptococci, or both were found in midstream urine, E. coli grew from catheter urine cultures in 61%. CONCLUSIONS Cultures of voided midstream urine in healthy premenopausal women with acute uncomplicated cystitis accurately showed evidence of bladder E. coli but not of enterococci or group B streptococci, which are often isolated with E. coli but appear to rarely cause cystitis by themselves. (Funded by the National Institute of

  7. Bacterial profile and drug susceptibility pattern of urinary tract infection in pregnant women at Tikur Anbessa Specialized Hospital Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Assefa, Addisu; Asrat, Daniel; Woldeamanuel, Yimtubezinash; G/Hiwot, Yirgu; Abdella, Ahmed; Melesse, Tadele

    2008-07-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common complication of pregnancy. It may be symptomatic or asymptomatic. The aim of this cross sectional study was to identify bacterial agents and their antibiotic susceptibility pattern isolated from pregnant women with UTI attending antenatal clinic of Tikur Anbessa Specialized Hospital (TASH). Four hundred and fourteen pregnant women with asymptomatic UTI (n = 369) and symptomatic UTI (n = 45) were investigated for urinary tract infection from January to March 2005. The age range of both groups was 18 to 44 years. Bacteriological screening of mid-stream urine specimens revealed that 39/369 (10.6%) and 9/45 (20%) had significant bacteriuria in asymptomatic and symptomatic group, respectively (p = 0.10). The overall prevalence of urinary tract infection was 48/414 (11.6%). The bacterial pathogens isolated were predominantly E. coil (44%), followed by S. aureus (20%), coagulase-negative staphylococci (16%), and K. pneumoniae (8%). Others found in small in number included P. mirabilis, P. aeruginosa, Enterococcus spp. and non-Group A-beta hemolytic Streptococcus, this accounted 2% for each. The gram positive and negative bacteria accounted 40% and 60% respectively. The susceptibility pattern for gram-negative bacteria showed that most of the isolates (> 65% of the strains) were sensitive to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (70%), chloramphenicol (83.3%), gentamicin (93.3%), kanamycin (93.3%), nitrofurantoin (87.7%) and trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole (73.3%). Among the gram-positives, more than 60% of the isolates were sensitive to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (100%), cephalothin (95%), chloramphenicol (70%), erythromycin (80%), gentamicin (85%), methicillin (83.3%), nitrofurantoin (100%) and trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole (65%). Generally, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, chloramphenicol, gentamicin, nitrofurantoin and trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole were effective at least in 70% of the isolates. Multiple drug resistance (resistance two or

  8. Urinary tract infection among obstetric fistula patients at Gondar University Hospital, northwest Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Wondimeneh, Yitayih; Muluye, Dagnachew; Alemu, Abebe; Atinafu, Asmamaw; Yitayew, Gashaw; Gebrecherkos, Teklay; Alemu, Agersew; Damtie, Demekech; Ferede, Getachew

    2014-01-17

    Many women die from complications related to pregnancy and childbirth. In developing countries particularly in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia, where access to emergency obstetrical care is often limited, obstetric fistula usually occurs as a result of prolonged obstructed labour. Obstetric fistula patients have many social and health related problems like urinary tract infections (UTIs). Despite this reality there was limited data on prevalence UTIs on those patients in Ethiopia. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the prevalence, drug susceptibility pattern and associated risk factors of UTI among obstetric fistula patients at Gondar University Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia. A cross sectional study was conducted from January to May, 2013 at Gondar University Hospital. From each post repair obstetric fistula patients, socio-demographic and UTIs associated risk factors were collected by using a structured questionnaire. After the removal of their catheters, the mid-stream urine was collected and cultured on CLED. After overnight incubation, significant bacteriuria was sub-cultured on Blood Agar Plate (BAP) and MacConkey (MAC). The bacterial species were identified by series of biochemical tests. Antibiotic susceptibility test was done by disc diffusion method. Data was entered and analyzed by using SPSS version 20. A total of 53 post repair obstetric fistula patients were included for the determination of bacterial isolate and 28 (52.8%) of them had significant bacteriuria. Majority of the bacterial isolates, 26 (92.9%), were gram negative bacteria and the predominant ones were Citrobacter 13 (24.5%) and E. coli 6 (11.3%). Enterobacter, E.coli and Proteus mirabilis were 100% resistant to tetracycline. Enterobacter, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsella pneumonia, Klebsella ozenae and Staphylococcus aureus were also 100% resistant to ceftriaxone. The prevalence of bacterial isolates in obstetric fistula patients was high and majority of the isolates were gram

  9. [Prostate histopathology of NIH category IV prostatitis detected by sextant prostate needle biopsy from the patients with high prostatic specific antigen].

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Tatsuya; Kiyota, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Madarame, Jun; Kimura, Takahiro; Onodera, Shouichi

    2003-08-01

    Asymptomatic prostatitis is classified as category IV in NIH classification of prostatitis syndrome (1999). No report concerning this category has been present. We investigated this category histopathologically and clinically, in order to clarify the histopathological distribution and its correlation to the clinical features, in this study. Among 785 patients who were suspected prostate cancer because of their high prostatic specific antigen (PSA) values and to have a sextant prostate needle biopsy was performed between January, 1996 and December, 2000, 88 patients (11.2%) were diagnosed as NIH category IV prostatitis (asymptomatic prostatitis). We observed all pathological specimens stained with Hematoxylin-Eosine, and classified them into subtypes according to the classification criteria for prostatitis defined by True et al. (1999). We also investigated the relationship between histopathological distribution and clinical features such as PSA values, PSA density, the incidence of pyuria or bacteriuria. In the histopathological study, grade distributions were 12.5% (11/88) in mild, 71.6% (63/88) in moderate, and 15.9% (14/88) in severe. Location distributions were 2.3% (2/88) in glandular, 68.2% (60/88) in periglandular, and 29.5% (26/88) in stromal. No relationship between these subtypes and clinical features was recognized statistically. However, 7 patients (7.95%) were diagnosed as prostate cancers, later. Pyuria was found in 29.1% (23/79). Bacteriuria was present in 14.3% (11/77). Isolated bacteria were 4 strains of Enterococcus faccalis, 2 strains of each of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, and one strain of each of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella oxytoca, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Staphylococcus haemolyticus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Gram positive rod, and Candida sp. No relationship between these subtypes and bacterial species was recognized. These results indicated that the incidence of NIII category IV prostatits

  10. Recurrent urinary tract infection and urinary Escherichia coli in women ingesting cranberry juice daily: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Ann E; Dziura, James; Hooton, Thomas M; Cox, Marsha E; Yarova-Yarovaya, Yuliya; Chen, Shu; Gupta, Kalpana

    2012-02-01

    To compare the time to urinary tract infection (UTI) and the rates of asymptomatic bacteriuria and urinary P-fimbriated Escherichia coli during a 6-month period in women ingesting cranberry vs placebo juice daily. Premenopausal women with a history of recent UTI were enrolled from November 16, 2005, through December 31, 2008, at 2 centers and randomized to 1 of 3 arms: 4 oz of cranberry juice daily, 8 oz of cranberry juice daily, or placebo juice. Time to UTI (symptoms plus pyuria) was the main outcome. Asymptomatic bacteriuria, adherence, and adverse effects were assessed at monthly visits. A total of 176 participants were randomized (120 to cranberry juice and 56 to placebo) and followed up for a median of 168 days. The cumulative rate of UTI was 0.29 in the cranberry juice group and 0.37 in the placebo group (P=.82). The adjusted hazard ratio for UTI in the cranberry juice group vs the placebo group was 0.68 (95% confidence interval, 0.33-1.39; P=.29). The proportion of women with P-fimbriated urinary E coli isolates during the intervention phase was 10 of 23 (43.5%) in the cranberry juice group and 8 of 10 (80.0%) in the placebo group (P=.07). The mean dose adherence was 91.8% and 90.3% in the cranberry juice group vs the placebo group. Minor adverse effects were reported by 24.2% of those in the cranberry juice group and 12.5% in the placebo group (P=.07). Cranberry juice did not significantly reduce UTI risk compared with placebo. The potential protective effect we observed is consistent with previous studies and warrants confirmation in larger, well-powered studies of women with recurrent UTI. The concurrent reduction in urinary P-fimbriated E coli strains supports the biological plausibility of cranberry activity. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00128128. Copyright © 2012 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Urinary tract infections in patients with spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    D'Hondt, Frederiek; Everaert, Karel

    2011-12-01

    Spinal cord injuries (SCI) result in different lower urinary tract dysfunctions. Because of both the disease and the bladder drainage method, urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most frequent conditions seen in SCI patients. Diagnosis is not always easy due to lack of symptoms. Asymptomatic bacteriuria needs no treatment. If symptoms occur, antibiotherapy is indicated. Duration depends mainly on severity of illness and upper urinary tract or prostatic involvement. Choice of antibiotherapy should be based on local resistance profiles, but fluoroquinolones seems to be an adequate empirical treatment. Prevention of UTI is important, as lots of complications can be foreseen. Catheter care, permanent low bladder pressure and clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) with hydrophilic catheters are interventions that can prevent UTI. Probiotics might be useful, but data are limited.

  12. Reducing recurrent preterm births: best evidence for transitioning to predictive and preventative strategies.

    PubMed

    Cypher, Rebecca L

    2012-01-01

    Women who have delivered an infant between 16 and 36 weeks' gestation have an increased risk of preterm birth (PTB) in a subsequent pregnancy. The high incidence of recurrent PTB remains relatively unchanged despite intensive research efforts and advances in perinatal care. Attempts to decrease the incidence of recurrent PTB have not always been successful, with research efforts being focused on clinical, pharmacotherapy and biochemical, and ultrasound strategies. Fortunately, there is adequate evidence in the literature to justify clinical management guidelines that may impact the PTB rate: smoking cessation, treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria, transvaginal ultrasonography of the cervix, administration of vaginal progesterone or 17α-hydroxyprogesterone caproate, cerclage, and fetal fibronectin. This article is intended to give brief highlights of these strategies and the current science that supports their conclusions.

  13. Care for women with prior preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Iams, Jay D; Berghella, Vincenzo

    2010-08-01

    Women who have delivered an infant between 16 and 36 weeks' gestation have an increased risk of preterm birth in subsequent pregnancies. The risk increases with more than 1 preterm birth and is inversely proportional to the gestational age of the previous preterm birth. African American women have rates of recurrent preterm birth that are nearly twice that of women of other backgrounds. An approximate risk of recurrent preterm birth can be estimated by a comprehensive reproductive history, with emphasis on maternal race, the number and gestational age of prior births, and the sequence of events preceding the index preterm birth. Interventions including smoking cessation, eradication of asymptomatic bacteriuria, progestational agents, and cervical cerclage can reduce the risk of recurrent preterm birth when employed appropriately. Copyright (c) 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Prevalence of antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli from patients with suspected urinary tract infection in primary care, Denmark.

    PubMed

    Córdoba, Gloria; Holm, Anne; Hansen, Frank; Hammerum, Anette M; Bjerrum, Lars

    2017-10-10

    Escherichia coli is the most common pathogen causing Urinary Tract Infections (UTI). Data from the current National Surveillance program in Denmark (DANMAP) may not accurately represent the prevalence of resistant E. coli in primary care, because only urine samples from complicated cases may be forwarded to the microbiological departments at hospitals for diagnostic examination. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of resistant E. coli to the most commonly used antimicrobial agents in primary care in a consecutive sample of patients from general practice. Observational study carried out from December 2014 to December 2015. Thirty-nine general practices from The Capital Region of Denmark included adult patients with urinary tract symptoms and suspected UTI. All urine samples were sent to the central laboratory Statens Serum Institut (SSI). Significant bacteriuria was interpreted according to the European Urinalysis Standards. Susceptibility testing was performed and interpreted according to the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) standards. From the 39 general practices 505 patients were recruited. Completed data were obtained from 485 (96%) patients. According to the European Urinalysis Standards, 261 (54%) patients had positive bacteriuria. The most common uropathogen in patients with uncomplicated (uUTI) and complicated (cUTI) urinary tract infection was E. coli 105 (69%) and 76 (70%), respectively. Eighty-two (45%) of 181 E. coli isolates were resistant to at least one of the tested antibiotics and 50 out of 82 isolates were resistant to two or more antimicrobial agents. The highest resistance-rate was found against ampicillin 34% (95% CI 24;42) in uUTI and 36% (24;46) in cUTI. There were no differences in the distribution of resistance between uncomplicated and complicated cases. The prevalence of resistance was similar to the one reported in DANMAP 2014. In E. coli from uUTI there is high resistance rates to

  15. The prevention of early-onset neonatal group B streptococcal disease.

    PubMed

    Money, Deborah M; Dobson, Simon

    2004-09-01

    To review the evidence in the literature and to provide recommendations on the management of pregnant women in labour for the prevention of early-onset neonatal group B streptococcal (GBS) disease. Maternal outcomes evaluated included exposure to antibiotics in pregnancy and labour and complications related to antibiotic use. Neonatal outcomes of rates of early-onset group B streptococcal infections are evaluated. A review of the literature through MEDLINE from January 1980 to December 2003, relating to neonatal group B streptococcal infection and a review of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations. The evidence obtained was reviewed and evaluated by the Infectious Diseases Committee of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC) under the leadership of the principal authors, and recommendations were made according to guidelines developed by the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Exam. 1. Offer all women screening for group B streptococcal disease at 35 to 37 weeks' gestation with culture done from one swab first to the vagina then to the rectal area. (II-1)2. Treat the following women intrapartum at time of labour or rupture of membranes with IV antibiotics: -all women positive by GBS culture screening done at 35 to 37 weeks (II-2) - any women with an infant previously infected with GBS (II-3) - any women with documented GBS bacteriuria (regardless of level of colony-forming units per mL) in this pregnancy (II-2) 3. Treat women at less than 37 weeks' gestation with IV antibiotics unless there has been a negative GBS vaginal/rectal swab culture within 5 weeks. (II-3) 4. Treat women with intrapartum fever with IV antibiotics (i.e., chorioamnionitis must be treated, but broader spectrum antibiotics would be advised). (II-2) 5. If a woman is GBS-positive by culture screening or by history of bacteriuria, with prelabour rupture of membranes at term, treat with GBS antibiotic prophylaxis and initiate induction of

  16. Vigilance on use of drugs, herbal products, and food supplements during pregnancy: focus on fosfomycin.

    PubMed

    Mannucci, C; Dante, G; Miroddi, M; Facchinetti, F; D'Anna, R; Santamaria, A; Lenti, M C; Vannacci, A; Calapai, F; Perone, M; Migliardi, G; Alibrandi, A; Navarra, M; Calapai, G

    2017-09-17

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is defined as a common bacterial infection that can lead to significant morbidity such as stricture, fistula, abscess formation, bacteremia, sepsis, pyelonephritis, and kidney dysfunction with a mortality rates reported of 1% in men and 3% in women because of development of pyelonephritis. UTIs are more common in women and the 33% of them require antimicrobials treatment for at least one episode by the age of 24 years. UTIs are the most common infections observed during pregnancy and up to 30% of mothers with not treated asymptomatic bacteriuria may develop acute pyelonephritis which consequently can be associated to adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. All bacteriuria in pregnancy should be treated with antimicrobial treatments being safe for both the mother and the fetus. Approximately one every four women receives prescription of antibiotic treatment during pregnancy, nearly 80% of all the prescription medications during gestation. The use of fosfomycin to treat cystitis in pregnancy generally considered safe and effective. Even though use on antibiotics for urinary tract infections is considered generally safe for the fetus and mothers, this opinion is not based on specific studies monitoring the relationship of among urinary infections, consumption of antibiotics, and pregnancy outcomes. On this basis we decided to analyze data from the database of our multicenter study PHYTOVIGGEST, reporting data from 5362 pregnancies, focusing on use of fosfomycin. Principal outcomes of pregnancy in women treated with fosfomycin were taken into consideration. Women who have been treated with urinary antibiotics during the pregnancy were 183. With respect to the total number of pregnancies of our sample, these women represented the percentage of 3.49% (187/5362). Analysis of different outcomes of pregnancy such as gestational age, neonatal weight, and neonatal Apgar index did not show any significant difference. At the same time, analysis of

  17. Reducing catheter-associated urinary tract infections in hospitals: study protocol for a multi-site randomised controlled study.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Brett G; Fasugba, Oyebola; Gardner, Anne; Koerner, Jane; Collignon, Peter; Cheng, Allen C; Graves, Nicholas; Morey, Peter; Gregory, Victoria

    2017-11-28

    Despite advances in infection prevention and control, catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are common and remain problematic. A number of measures can be taken to reduce the risk of CAUTI in hospitals. Appropriate urinary catheter insertion procedures are one such method. Reducing bacterial colonisation around the meatal or urethral area has the potential to reduce CAUTI risk. However, evidence about the best antiseptic solutions for meatal cleaning is mixed, resulting in conflicting recommendations in guidelines internationally. This paper presents the protocol for a study to evaluate the effectiveness (objective 1) and cost-effectiveness (objective 2) of using chlorhexidine in meatal cleaning prior to catheter insertion, in reducing catheter-associated asymptomatic bacteriuria and CAUTI. A stepped wedge randomised controlled trial will be undertaken in three large Australian hospitals over a 32-week period. The intervention in this study is the use of chlorhexidine (0.1%) solution for meatal cleaning prior to catheter insertion. During the first 8 weeks of the study, no hospital will receive the intervention. After 8 weeks, one hospital will cross over to the intervention with the other two participating hospitals crossing over to the intervention at 8-week intervals respectively based on randomisation. All sites complete the trial at the same time in 2018. The primary outcomes for objective 1 (effectiveness) are the number of cases of CAUTI and catheter-associated asymptomatic bacteriuria per 100 catheter days will be analysed separately using Poisson regression. The primary outcome for objective 2 (cost-effectiveness) is the changes in costs relative to health benefits (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio) from adoption of the intervention. Results will be disseminated via peer-reviewed journals and presentations at relevant conferences.A dissemination plan it being developed. Results will be published in the peer review literature

  18. The urine dipstick test useful to rule out infections. A meta-analysis of the accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Devillé, Walter LJM; Yzermans, Joris C; van Duijn, Nico P; Bezemer, P Dick; van der Windt, Daniëlle AWM; Bouter, Lex M

    2004-01-01

    Background Many studies have evaluated the accuracy of dipstick tests as rapid detectors of bacteriuria and urinary tract infections (UTI). The lack of an adequate explanation for the heterogeneity of the dipstick accuracy stimulates an ongoing debate. The objective of the present meta-analysis was to summarise the available evidence on the diagnostic accuracy of the urine dipstick test, taking into account various pre-defined potential sources of heterogeneity. Methods Literature from 1990 through 1999 was searched in Medline and Embase, and by reference tracking. Selected publications should be concerned with the diagnosis of bacteriuria or urinary tract infections, investigate the use of dipstick tests for nitrites and/or leukocyte esterase, and present empirical data. A checklist was used to assess methodological quality. Results 70 publications were included. Accuracy of nitrites was high in pregnant women (Diagnostic Odds Ratio = 165) and elderly people (DOR = 108). Positive predictive values were ≥80% in elderly and in family medicine. Accuracy of leukocyte-esterase was high in studies in urology patients (DOR = 276). Sensitivities were highest in family medicine (86%). Negative predictive values were high in both tests in all patient groups and settings, except for in family medicine. The combination of both test results showed an important increase in sensitivity. Accuracy was high in studies in urology patients (DOR = 52), in children (DOR = 46), and if clinical information was present (DOR = 28). Sensitivity was highest in studies carried out in family medicine (90%). Predictive values of combinations of positive test results were low in all other situations. Conclusions Overall, this review demonstrates that the urine dipstick test alone seems to be useful in all populations to exclude the presence of infection if the results of both nitrites and leukocyte-esterase are negative. Sensitivities of the combination of both tests vary between 68 and 88% in

  19. Optimization and evaluation of Flexicult® Vet for detection, identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of bacterial uropathogens in small animal veterinary practice.

    PubMed

    Guardabassi, Luca; Hedberg, Sandra; Jessen, Lisbeth Rem; Damborg, Peter

    2015-10-26

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common reason for antimicrobial prescription in dogs and cats. The objective of this study was to optimize and evaluate a culture-based point-of-care test for detection, identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of bacterial uro-pathogens in veterinary practice. Seventy-two urine samples from dogs and cats with suspected UTI presenting to seven veterinary facilities were used by clinical staff and an investigator to estimate sensitivity and specificity of Flexicult Vet A compared to laboratory reference standards for culture and susceptibility testing. Subsequently, the test was modified by inclusion of an oxacillin-containing compartment for detection of methicillin-resistant staphylococci. The performance of the modified product (Flexicult Vet B) for susceptibility testing was evaluated in vitro using a collection of 110 clinical isolates. Bacteriuria was reported by the laboratory in 25 (35 %) samples from the field study. The sensitivity and specificity of Flexicult Vet A for detection of bacteriuria were 83 and 100 %, respectively. Bacterial species were correctly identified in 53 and 100 % of the positive samples by clinical staff and the investigator, respectively. The susceptibility results were interpreted correctly by clinical staff for 70 % of the 94 drug-strain combinations. Higher percentages of correct interpretation were observed when the results were interpreted by the investigator in both the field (76 %) and the in vitro study (94 %). The most frequent errors were false resistance to β-lactams (ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate and cephalotin) in Escherichia coli for Flexicult Vet A, and false amoxicillin-clavulanate resistance in E. coli and false ampicillin susceptibility in Staphylococcus pseudintermedius for Flexicult Vet B. The latter error can be prevented by categorizing staphylococcal strains growing in the oxacillin compartment as resistant to all β-lactams. Despite the

  20. Cranberries for Preventing Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections in Uncircumcised Boys.

    PubMed

    Wan, Kong-Sang; Liu, Chih-Kuang; Lee, Wen-Kai; Ko, Ming-Chung; Huang, Che-Sheng

    2016-11-01

    Background • Highly concentrated cranberry juice has long been considered to have protective properties against urinary tract infections (UTIs), on the basis of its content of cranberry proanthocyanidins, with A-type interflavan bonds. Objective • This study intended to evaluate the benefits of a highly concentrated cranberry juice for the prevention of repeated episodes of UTI in uncircumcised boys. Design • The study was a randomized, controlled trial. Setting • The study took place at Taipei City Hospital, Renai and Zhongxing Branches (Taipei City, Taiwan). Participants • Participants were 55 uncircumcised boys and 12 circumcised boys, aged 6 to 18 y, with histories of uncomplicated UTI, who were patients at the hospital. Intervention • The uncircumcised boys were randomly divided into 2 groups: (1) group 1 (n = 28) took 4 oz (120 mL) daily of cranberry juice for 6 mo; and (2) group 2 (n = 27), the negative control group, drank a placebo juice for 6 months. The circumcised boys in group 3, a positive control group, also drank a placebo juice for 6 mo. Outcome Measures • The time to UTI (ie, to the appearance of symptoms plus pyuria) was the main outcome. Asymptomatic bacteriuria, adherence to the treatment, and adverse effects were assessed at monthly visits. Results • After 6 mo of a prophylactic treatment with cranberry juice, the incidence of bacteriuria, mainly Escherichia coli, as shown in urine cultures at ≥1 × 105, were 25% (7/28), 37% (10/27), and 33.3% (4/12) in groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The comparisons of the rate of prevention of a recurrence of UTI between group 1 and group 2 and between group 1 and group 3 showed that group 1 had fewer recurrent episodes of UTI. No children withdrew from the study. No adverse events or side effects were recorded. Conclusions • Cranberry juice may reduce the number of repeated episodes of UTI in uncircumcised boys and may have beneficial effects against the growth of Gram

  1. Vulvovaginitis: causes and management.

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, A M; Hart, C A

    1992-01-01

    Over a period of 33 months in a paediatric accident and emergency department, the clinical pattern and possible causes of vulvovaginitis were studied prospectively in 200 girls presenting with genital discharge, irritation, pain, or redness. The major causes were poor hygiene and threadworms. The suspicion of sexual abuse arose in a few girls but no organisms of sexually transmitted disease were found. Urinary symptoms were common but only 20 patients had a significant bacteriuria and 40 had sterile pyuria. Specific skin problems occurred in 28 cases. Simple measures to improve hygiene and treatment of threadworms gave effective relief. Genital irritation caused urinary symptoms with no clinical evidence of infection, and it is advised that antibiotic treatment should await urine culture. Specific skin problems require help from a dermatologist. The possibility of sexual abuse must be considered especially if the vulvovaginitis is persistent or recurrent after adequate treatment. PMID:1580682

  2. Comparative analysis of antibiotic resistance and phylogenetic group patterns in human and porcine urinary tract infectious Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Viktoria; Nielsen, Eva Møller; Krag, Louise; Engberg, Jørgen; Klemm, Per

    2009-11-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common infectious diseases in humans and domestic animals such as pigs. The most frequent infectious agent in such infections is Escherichia coli. Virulence characteristics of E. coli UTI strains range from highly virulent pyelonephritis strains to relatively benign asymptomatic bacteriuria strains. Here we analyse a spectrum of porcine and human UTI E. coli strains with respect to their antibiotic resistance patterns and their phylogenetic groups, determined by multiplex PCR. The clonal profiles of the strains differed profoundly; whereas human strains predominantly belonged to clonal types B2 and D, these were not seen among the porcine strains, which all belonged to the E. coli clonal groups A and B1. Contrary to the human strains, the majority of the porcine strains were multidrug resistant. The distinct profiles of the porcine strains suggest selective pressure due to extensive antibiotic use.

  3. The dangers of long-term catheter drainage.

    PubMed

    Lowthian, P

    There are many dangers associated with long-term urinary bladder drainage by catheter. For various reasons, the choice of catheter is important, and its initial insertion can be particularly hazardous. All catheterizations should, however, be safer when there is some urine (or other fluid) in the bladder. The appropriate choice of drainage system attached to the catheter can delay bacterial invasion of the bladder. Great care is needed to prevent blockage of the system, particularly when bacteriuria is present. Recent evidence indicates that some bacteria encourage the development of encrustations, so that, in some circumstances, catheters may become blocked within 24 hours. This, together with other considerations, strongly suggests that indwelling catheters should be changed at intervals of not more than 5 days. The practical implications of this are considered, as are the benefits that may accrue. Accidental catheter traction is another danger, and some possible methods of avoiding this are discussed. Finally, the need for a new kind of drainage-bag support is highlighted.

  4. Prevention of urinary tract infection in six spinal cord-injured pregnant women who gave birth to seven children under a weekly oral cyclic antibiotic program.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Jérôme; Schnitzler, Alexis; Ville, Yves; Laffont, Isabelle; Perronne, Christian; Denys, Pierre; Bernard, Louis

    2009-05-01

    Pregnancies in spinal cord-injured (SCI) patients present unique clinical challenges. Because of the neurogenic bladder and the use of intermittent catheterization, chronic bacteriuria and recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI) is common. During pregnancy the prevalence of UTI increases dramatically. Recurrent UTI requires multiple courses of antibiotics and increases the risks of abortion, prematurity, and low birth weight. A weekly oral cyclic antibiotic (WOCA) program was recently described for the prevention of UTI in SCI patients. To test the impact of WOCA in six SCI pregnant women (four paraplegic, two tetraplegic). This was a prospective observational study. WOCA consists of the alternate administration of one of two antibiotics once per week. We observed a significant reduction of UTI (6 UTI/patient/year before pregnancy to 0.4 during pregnancy and under WOCA; p<0.001) and no obstetric complications. Infant outcomes were good. The WOCA regimen could be useful for UTI prophylaxis in SCI pregnant women.

  5. Percutaneous management of urolithiasis during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kavoussi, L R; Albala, D M; Basler, J W; Apte, S; Clayman, R V

    1992-09-01

    A total of 6 pregnant women with obstructing urinary calculi was managed by percutaneous nephrostomy drainage placed under ultrasound guidance with the patient under local anesthesia. All patients initially had relief of acute obstruction. However, occlusion of the percutaneous nephrostomy tubes with debris necessitated tube changes in 5 of 6 patients. In 2 patients recurrent nephrostomy tube obstruction, fever and pain led to percutaneous stone removal during pregnancy. In the remaining 4 patients the nephrostomy tubes were left indwelling through delivery. During the postpartum period 3 patients successfully underwent ureteroscopic stone extraction and 1 passed the stone spontaneously. Bacteriuria developed in each patient despite the use of preventive antibiotics. All 6 women had uncomplicated vaginal deliveries of healthy newborns and are currently asymptomatic with no evidence of obstruction. Percutaneous drainage of an acutely obstructed kidney in a pregnant woman is an effective temporizing alternative to ureteral stent placement until definitive treatment can be performed.

  6. [Urinary tract infections in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Becher, Klaus Friedrich; Klempien, Ingo; Wiedemann, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Acute infection of the urinary tract is one of the most commonly encountered bacterial infections in the frail elderly population and is responsible for substantial morbidity and recurrent infections with antibiotic resistance. Although generally considered to be self-limiting without treatment or easily treated with a short antibiotic regime, urinary tract infections (UTIs) often have a dramatic history, associated with incomplete resolution and frequent recurrence. The biological complexity of the infections combined with a dramatic rise in antibiotic-resistant pathogens highlight the need for an anticipating strategy for therapy necessary for a rapid recovery. The first crucial step is the classification in asymptomatic bacteriuria or complicated pyelonephritis, on which the decision for the intensity of treatment and diagnostic effort is based. For the selection of empiric antibiotic therapy, knowledge about the predominant uropathogens as well as local resistance patterns is important. In this manner, most urinary tract infections in the elderly can be treated without greater expense.

  7. [Urinary tract infection in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Herráiz, Miguel Angel; Hernández, Antonio; Asenjo, Eloy; Herráiz, Ignacio

    2005-12-01

    Urinary tract infections, asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB), acute cystitis (AC) and acute pyelonephritis (AP), are favored by the morphological and functional changes involved in pregnancy. AB increases the risk of preterm labor, low birth weight and AP. AB should be detected by uroculture (other methods are not sufficiently effective) and treated early. Approximately 80% of cases are caused by Escherichia coli. The risks and effectiveness of the distinct antibiotic regimens should be evaluated: fosfomycin trometamol in monotherapy or as short course therapy is safe and effective for the treatment of AB and AC. AP is the most frequent cause of hospital admission for medical reasons in pregnant women and can lead to complications in 10% of cases, putting the lives of the mother and fetus at risk. Currently outpatient treatment of AP is recommended in selected cases. Adequate follow-up of pregnant women with urinary tract infections is required due to frequent recurrence.

  8. Bacteriology of urinary tract infection associated with indwelling J ureteral stents.

    PubMed

    Kehinde, Elijah O; Rotimi, Vincent O; Al-Hunayan, Adel; Abdul-Halim, Hamdy; Boland, Fareeda; Al-Awadi, Khaleel A

    2004-11-01

    To investigate the microorganisms responsible for urinary tract infection (UTI) and stent colonization in patients with indwelling J ureteral stents and to compare the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of the isolates from urine and J stents in order to establish the etiologic agents of bacteriuria and colonized stents in such patients and provide baseline data on an antibiotic policy for the urology unit. Midstream urine from 250 patients requiring J stent insertion was investigated microbiologically prior to stent insertion and on the day of stent removal. After stent removal, 3 to 5 cm of the tip located in the bladder was also sent for culture. Patients' bio-data and underlying diseases were documented. Those with no known systemic diseases ("normal patients") were also studied as controls. Of the 250 patients studied, 152 (61%) were normal, while 27 (11%), 53 (21%), and 18 (7%) had diabetes mellitus (DM), chronic renal failure (CRF), and diabetic nephropathy (DN), respectively. The mean duration of stent retention was 27 days. All microbial isolates were tested for their susceptibility to a panel of 10 antibiotics. Twelve patients (5%) before stent insertion and 42 patients (17%; P < 0.001) on the day of stent removal had positive urine cultures. One hundred four stents (42%) were culture positive. Of the 104 patients with positive stent cultures, in 62 patients (60%), urine culture was sterile. The commonest isolates were Escherichia coli, Enterococcus spp., Staphylococcus spp., Pseudomonas, and Candida spp. On the day of stent removal, urine culture was positive in 28% of the normal patients compared with 57% (P = 0.11), 78% (P < 0.001), and 62% (P < 0.001) of patients with CRF, DM, and DN, respectively. Stent isolates were more resistant to antibiotics than the organism isolated before stent insertion. An indwelling J ureteral stent carries a significant risk of bacteriuria and stent colonization. The sensitivity of urine culture to stent colonization is

  9. Bacteriology and Antibiogram of Urinary Tract Infection Among Female Patients in a Tertiary Health Facility in South Eastern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Oli, Angus N; Akabueze, Vivian B; Ezeudu, Chijioke E; Eleje, George U; Ejiofor, Obiora S; Ezebialu, Ifeanyichukwu U; Oguejiofor, Charlotte B; Ekejindu, Ifeoma M; Emechebe, George O; Okeke, Kenneth N

    2017-01-01

    Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) is a common contagion among men and women with the incidence relatively higher among women due to their differing anatomy. An understanding of the kind of pathogens implicated in urinary tract infections as well as antibiotic susceptibility profiling may help the clinician make rationally correct empirical choice in their treatment. This study is aimed at determining the type and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of bacterial uropathogens isolated from female patients attending Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University Teaching Hospital (COOUTH), Awka, Nigeria. Two hundred and forty patients with clinically diagnosed UTI and who were on at least 5 days' antibiotic holiday were recruited into the study. Their demographic characteristics were captured using pre-tested questionnaire. Their clean catch mid-stream urine samples were collected using sterile universal container and sent to the Microbiology Department for processing. Within 30 minutes of samples collection, the specimens were cultured and the isolates were identified, after 24 h of incubation, using standard microbiological techniques. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were done with standard antibiotic discs using the Kirby-bauer disc diffusion method. Out of the 240 urine samples, 89.17% yielded significant bacteriuria. The pathogens implicated were Escherichia coli (28.5%), Staphylococcus aureus (28.0%), Salmonella spp (22.8%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (20.5%). HIV status, patients age, pregnancy status and marital status all significantly affected bacteriuria rate (p value < 0.05), while patients' location (sub-urban/rural dwelling), and level of education did not (p value > 0.05). The pattern of microbial resistance to antibiotics suggests that ceftazidime, fosfomycin and cefoxitin may not be used as first-line agents in the empirical treatment of UTIs rather; levofloxacin, meropenem or aztreonam should be considered. Levofloxacin was significantly effective against all the

  10. [Comparative study of cefpirome and ceftazidime in complicated urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Naide, Y; Aso, Y; Oshi, M; Kumamoto, Y; Hirose, T; Machida, T; Tsuchida, S; Suzuki, K; Orikasa, S; Kawada, Y

    1991-04-01

    We carried out a randomized multi-center study comparing cefpirome (CPR) 0.5 g b.i.d. (1 g group), 1.0 g b.i.d. (2 g group) and ceftazidime (CAZ) 1.0 g b.i.d. (CAZ group) in the treatment of complicated urinary tract infections. Patients who were over 16 years old and had underlying urinary tract disease, with bacteriuria of more than 10(4) cells ml or more and pyuria of more than 5 WBCs/hpf (x 400) or more were randomly allocated to receive either 0.5 g of CPR, 1.0 g of CPR or 1.0 g of CAZ twice a day for 5 days by intravenous drip infusion. The overall clinical efficacy of the treatment was evaluated by the criteria of the Japanese UTI Committee as excellent, moderate or poor, on the basis of the changes in pyuria and bacteriuria. A total of 530 patients were treated. Of these, 141 patients in the 1 g group, 136 in the 2 g group, and 140 in the CAZ group were evaluable for clinical efficacy. No significant differences in background characteristics were observed among the treatment groups. The overall clinical efficacy rate of the 1 g group, the 2 g group and the CAZ group was 80.1%, 76.5% and 71.4%, respectively. The differences were not statistically significant. The overall bacteriological eradication rate of the 1 g group, the 2 g group and the CAZ group was 81.0%, 88.1% and 83.8%. The differences were not statistically significant either. Against the enterococcus group, however, eradication rates were higher significantly in the 1 g and 2 g groups than in the CAZ group. The incidence of adverse reactions was 2.2% in the 1 g group, 0.6% in the 2 g group and 2.9% in the CAZ group. Abnormal laboratory data after medication were observed in 10.8% of the 1 g group, 12.1% of the 2 g group and 10.2% of the CAZ group, the difference not being statistically significant. There were no serious untoward reactions to medication. From the results obtained in this study, we consider that CPR is at least as useful as CAZ in the treatment of complicated urinary tract

  11. Bacterial migration along solid surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Harkes, G; Dankert, J; Feijen, J

    1992-01-01

    An in vitro system was developed to study the migration of uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains. In this system an aqueous agar gel is placed against a solid surface, allowing the bacteria to migrate along the gel/solid surface interface. Bacterial strains as well as solid surfaces were characterized by means of water contact angle and zeta potential measurements. When glass was used as the solid surface, significantly different migration times for the strains investigated were observed. Relationships among the observed migration times of six strains, their contact angles, and their zeta potentials were found. Relatively hydrophobic strains exhibited migration times shorter than those of hydrophilic strains. For highly negatively charged strains shorter migration times were found than were found for less negatively charged strains. When the fastest-migrating strain with respect to glass was allowed to migrate along solid surfaces differing in hydrophobicity and charge, no differences in migration times were found. Our findings indicate that strategies to prevent catheter-associated bacteriuria should be based on inhibition of bacterial growth rather than on modifying the physicochemical character of the catheter surface. PMID:1622217

  12. Urinary tract infections in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: review of prevalence, diagnosis, and management

    PubMed Central

    Nitzan, Orna; Elias, Mazen; Chazan, Bibiana; Saliba, Walid

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are more common, more severe, and carry worse outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. They are also more often caused by resistant pathogens. Various impairments in the immune system, poor metabolic control, and incomplete bladder emptying due to autonomic neuropathy may all contribute to the enhanced risk of urinary tract infections in these patients. The new anti-diabetic sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors have not been found to significantly increase the risk of symptomatic urinary tract infections. Symptoms of urinary tract infection are similar to patients without diabetes, though some patients with diabetic neuropathy may have altered clinical signs. Treatment depends on several factors, including: presence of symptoms, severity of systemic symptoms, if infection is localized in the bladder or also involves the kidney, presence of urologic abnormalities, accompanying metabolic alterations, and renal function. There is no indication to treat diabetic patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria. Further studies are needed to improve the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes and urinary tract infections. PMID:25759592

  13. Increased incidence of resistance to antimicrobials by urinary pathogens isolated at Tikur Anbessa Hospital.

    PubMed

    Wolday, D; Erge, W

    1997-04-01

    A retrospective analysis of 2209 urine samples submitted for culture to the Microbiology Laboratory of the Tikur Anbessa Hospital (TAH), Addis Ababa, between January 1992 and December 1994 was made. Significant bacteriuria (colony count > 10(5) colony forming units/ml urine) was detected in 672 (30%). Pure culture was obtained in 510 (23%) of all samples and polymicrobial growth was detected in the remaining 162 (7%). Gram-negative bacteria comprised 95% of all isolates. The commonest organisms being Escherichia coli (39%) and Klebsiella species (26%). Among the gram-positives, Staphylococcus aureus (57%) was the most common pathogen isolated. Most of the organisms were resistant to multiple drugs. Ampicillin, carbenicillin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline and trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole were effective in less than 30% of all cases. There was also a significant resistance to cephalothin, gentamicin and kanamycin. Only nalidixic acid and nitrofurantoin were effective for most of the organisms. Compared to previous studies, there is an indication of reduced effectiveness of the commonly prescribed antibiotics. The rational use of drugs should be practiced in order to prevent the emergence of multi-drug resistant microorganisms.

  14. Congenital aneurysm of both left ventricle and left atrium.

    PubMed

    Halas, Ryan F; Schmehil, Christopher J; Ten Eyck, Gary R; Loker, James L

    2018-01-01

    This is a case of both congenital left ventricular (LV) free wall submitral aneurysm and left atrial appendage aneurysm with 6 years of clinical follow-up. Each lesion is a rare entity, and to the best of our knowledge, this is the first case in medical literature of both lesions occurring in the same patient, raising the likelihood of a common etiology. The workup was initiated in the third trimester of fetal life with irregular heart rate and abnormal fetal ultrasound and echocardiogram at that time. The patient required emergent atrial appendage plication due to blood clot formation and suffered from multiple other complications including ventricular ectopy and surgically induced pseudoaneurysm. Follow-up interval echocardiograms have revealed continued good LV function with persistent LV aneurysm. In review of the case, there were several potential in utero causes including maternal viral upper respiratory infection and bacteriuria with exposure to amoxicillin. These as well as other considerations are discussed along with a brief review of these rare lesions, usual presentation, and known associations.

  15. Interactions among Urogenital, Intestinal, Skin, and Oral Infections in Pregnant and Lactating Panamanian Ngäbe Women: A Neglected Public Health Challenge

    PubMed Central

    González-Fernández, Doris; Koski, Kristine G.; Sinisterra, Odalis Teresa; del Carmen Pons, Emérita; Murillo, Enrique; Scott, Marilyn E.

    2015-01-01

    Interrelationships among bacteria, protozoa, helminths, and ectoparasites were explored in a cross-sectional survey of 213 pregnant and 99 lactating indigenous women. Prevalences in pregnancy and lactation, respectively, were: vaginitis (89.2%; 46.8%), vaginal trichomoniasis (75.3%; 91.1%), bacterial vaginosis (BV; 60.6%; 63.3%), hookworm (56.6%; 47.8%), asymptomatic bacteriuria/urinary tract infection (AB/UTI; 56.2%; 36.2%), cervicitis (33.3%; 6.3%), vaginal yeast (24.9%; 11.4%), Ascaris (32.5%; 17.4%), vaginal diplococci (20.4%; 31.6%), caries (19.7%; 18.2%), scabies (17.4%; 8.1%), and Trichuris (12.5%; 8.7%). Multiple regressions revealed positive associations during pregnancy (trichomoniasis and AB/UTI; diplococci and Ascaris) and lactation (yeast and scabies). Negative associations were detected in pregnancy (BV and trichomoniasis; hookworm and diplococci) and lactation (BV and yeast). Vaginal Lactobacillus reduced odds of diplococci in pregnancy and lactation, but increased Ascaris eggs per gram (epg) and odds of trichomoniasis in pregnancy and yeast in lactation. These associations raised a concern that treatment of one condition may increase the risk of another. PMID:25825387

  16. Influence of various factors on the accuracy of gallium-67 imaging for occult infection

    SciTech Connect

    Maderazo, E.G.; Hickingbotham, N.B.; Woronick, C.L.

    1988-05-01

    To examine whether the results and interpretation of gallium-67 citrate imaging may be adversely influenced by factors present in compromised patients, we reviewed our 1-year experience in 69 patients in intensive care units, renal transplants, and those on hemodialysis. Our results indicate that it is an inappropriate diagnostic procedure for acute pancreatitis since seven of nine had false-negative results. Using loglinear modeling and chi-square analysis we found that treatment with antiinflammatory steroids, severe liver disease, end-stage renal disease, and renal transplantation with immunosuppressive therapy did not interfere with gallium-67 uptake. Increased rate of true-negative results in patients with end-stage renalmore » disease was due to a greater and earlier use of the test in the febrile transplant patient and in hemodialysis patients with infections not amenable to diagnosis with gallium-67 scan (transient bacteremia and bacteriuria). We conclude that gallium-67 imaging is a useful diagnostic tool that, with the exception of acute pancreatitis, has very few false-negative results.« less

  17. Management of urinary tract infection in solid organ transplant recipients: Consensus statement of the Group for the Study of Infection in Transplant Recipients (GESITRA) of the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC) and the Spanish Network for Research in Infectious Diseases (REIPI).

    PubMed

    Vidal, Elisa; Cervera, Carlos; Cordero, Elisa; Armiñanzas, Carlos; Carratalá, Jordi; Cisneros, José Miguel; Fariñas, M Carmen; López-Medrano, Francisco; Moreno, Asunción; Muñoz, Patricia; Origüen, Julia; Sabé, Núria; Valerio, Maricela; Torre-Cisneros, Julián

    2015-12-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common infections in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. Experienced SOT researchers and clinicians have developed and implemented this consensus document in support of the optimal management of these patients. A systematic review was conducted, and evidence levels based on the available literature are given for each recommendation. This article was written in accordance with international recommendations on consensus statements and the recommendations of the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II). Recommendations are provided on the management of asymptomatic bacteriuria, and prophylaxis and treatment of UTI in SOT recipients. The diagnostic-therapeutic management of recurrent UTI and the role of infection in kidney graft rejection or dysfunction are reviewed. Finally, recommendations on antimicrobials and immunosuppressant interactions are also included. The latest scientific information on UTI in SOT is incorporated in this consensus document. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  18. [The role of E. coli adhesiveness in the pathogenesis and clinical course of urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Krzeska, I; Ostojska, J; Dzierzanowska, D

    An infection with E. coli is the most frequent cause of the urinary infections in childhood. Virulence depends on several factors out of which a principal role is played by the adhesion of bacteria to the urinary tract epithelium. Such a property have E. coli strains with adherence mannose-positive fimbriae of type P with antigens recognizing and binding glycolipid receptors on epithelial cells in the urinary tract. Children with such infections owe their "sensitivity+" (10% of the population) to genetically determined large number o receptors binding E. coli strains. Incidence and clinical course of the urinary tract infections have been analysed in the group of 184 children. Moreover, sequelae of the urinary tract infections with E. coli have been analysed in dependence on E. coli strain characteristics, i.e. presence or absence of adherent fimbriae from cases of cystitis and significant asymptomatic bacteriuria. Considering pathogenesis of the urinary tract infections as the result of interactions between bacteria and host, antigenic properties of adherent fimbriae might be used for preparation of a vaccine preventing such infections.

  19. A clinical hepatologist's predictions about non-absorbed carbohydrates for the early twenty-first century.

    PubMed

    Conn, H O

    1997-01-01

    To put these predictions into perspective, the primary indication for lactulose therapy in the treatment of HE and SHE is presented and discussed. Six secondary indications for lactulose therapy are also listed and briefly commented upon. A dozen predictions about the status of lactulose are presented and briefly discussed. A. Lactulose will be the treatment of choice for HE.B. TIPS will be the most common cause of HE.C. Lactulose will not be approved in Mexico. D. Lactulose plus anti-diarrheal drugs will be agents for treatment of HE. E. Lactulose will not be the treatment of choice for constipation. F. Lactulose will not be used for Salmonella or Shigella carrier states. G. Lactulose will be routinely administered prophylactically after TIPS. H. Lactulose will be administered prophylactically to cirrhotic patients with portal hypertension. I. Lactulose plus anti-diarrheal drugs will be used for a variety of diverse purposes: (i) Suppression of bacterial growth; (ii) prevention of bacteriuria; (iii) diminution of cholesterol saturation of bile; (iv) adjunct treatment of gallstones with ursodeoxycholic acid; (v) Prevention of colon carcinoma.

  20. Long-term results with renal autotransplantation for ureteral replacement.

    PubMed

    Bodie, B; Novick, A C; Rose, M; Straffon, R A

    1986-12-01

    From 1970 to 1984 renal autotransplantation was performed on 23 patients to replace all or a major portion of the ureter. The conditions necessitating ureteral replacement were postoperative ureteral injury in 16 cases, recurrent renal colic in 4, urinary undiversion in 2 and an atonic ureter in 1. Six patients presented with a solitary kidney and 1 underwent staged bilateral autotransplantation. After autotransplantation urinary continuity was restored by ureteroneocystostomy in 11 patients, pyelovesicostomy in 7, ureteroureterostomy in 2, pyeloureterostomy in 2 and ureterosigmoidostomy in 1. Postoperatively, there was no mortality and all but 1 of the autotransplanted kidneys functioned immediately. Two kidneys required removal postoperatively owing to bleeding. Currently, 20 patients are alive with functioning renal autotransplants at intervals of 1.5 to 14 years. The current serum creatinine level in these patients ranges from 1.1 to 2.2 mg. per dl., which in each case is improved or stable compared to the preoperative determination. Only 1 patient has experienced chronic bacteriuria. We conclude that renal autotransplantation provides excellent long-term treatment for patients who require ureteral replacement.

  1. The diagnostic accuracy of the rapid dipstick test to predict asymptomatic urinary tract infection of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Eigbefoh, J O; Isabu, P; Okpere, E; Abebe, J

    2008-07-01

    Untreated urinary tract infection can have devastating maternal and neonatal effects. Thus, routine screening for bacteriuria is advocated. This study was designed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the rapid dipstick test to predict urinary tract infection in pregnancy with the gold standard of urine microscopy, culture and sensitivity acting as the control. The urine dipstick test uses the leucocyte esterase, nitrite and test for protein singly and in combination. The result of the dipstick was compared with the gold standard, urine microscopy, culture and sensitivity using confidence interval for proportions. The reliability and validity of the urine dipstick was also evaluated. Overall, the urine dipstick test has a poor correlation with urine culture (p = 0.125, CI 95%). The same holds true for individual components of the dipstick test. The overall sensitivity of the urine dipstick test was poor at 2.3%. Individual sensitivity of the various components varied between 9.1% for leucocyte esterase and the nitrite test to 56.8% for leucocyte esterase alone. The other components of the dipstick test, the test of nitrite, test for protein and combination of the test (leucocyte esterase, nitrite and proteinuria) appear to decrease the sensitivity of the leucocyte esterase test alone. The ability of the urine dipstick test to correctly rule out urinary tract infection (specificity) was high. The positive predictive value for the dipstick test was high, with the leucocyte esterase test having the highest positive predictive value compared with the other components of the dipstick test. The negative predictive value (NPV) was expectedly highest for the leucocyte esterase test alone with values higher than the other components of the urine dipstick test singly and in various combinations. Compared with the other parameters of the urine dipstick test, singly and in combination, leucocyte esterase appears to be the most accurate (90.25%). The dipstick test has a

  2. Impressive Performance: New Disposable Digital Ureteroscope Allows for Extreme Lower Pole Access and Use of 365 μm Holmium Laser Fiber.

    PubMed

    Leveillee, Raymond J; Kelly, Emily Fell

    2016-01-01

    Since the development of the first flexible ureteroscope, in 1964, technological advances in image quality, flexibility, and deflection have led to the development of the first single-use digital flexible ureteroscope, LithoVue™ (Boston Scientific, Marlborough, MA). With respect to reusable fiber-optic and now digital ureteroscopes, there is an initial capital cost of several thousand dollars (USD) as well as, controversy regarding durability, the cost of repairs and the burdensome reprocessing steps of ureteroscopy. The single-use LithoVue eliminates the need for costly repairs, the occurrence of unpredictable performance, and procedural delays. Renal stones located in the lower pole of the kidney can be extremely challenging as extreme deflections of greater than 160° are difficult to maintain and are often further compromised when using stone treatment tools, such as laser fibers and baskets. This case describes an initial use of the LithoVue digital disposable ureteroscope in the effective treatment of lower pole calculi using a 365 μm holmium laser fiber. A 35-year-old female, with a medical history significant for chronic bacteriuria, and recurrent symptomatic culture proven urinary tract infections, underwent localization studies. Retrograde ureteropyelography demonstrated two calcifications adjoining, measuring a total of 1.4 cm, overlying the left renal shadow. Urine aspirated yielded clinically significant, >100,000, Escherichia coli and Streptococcus anginosus bacteriuria, which was felt to be originating from the left lower calix. This case used the newly FDA-approved LithoVue flexible disposable ureteroscope. The two stones were seen using the ureteroscope passed through an ureteral access sheath in the lower pole calix. A 365 μm holmium laser fiber was inserted into the ureteroscope and advanced toward the stones. There was no loss of deflection as the ureteroscope performed reproducibly. The laser was used for more than 4000 pulses at 15

  3. Urinary tract infection (UTI) in newborns: risk factors, identification and prevention of consequences.

    PubMed

    Milas, Vesna; Puseljić, Silvija; Stimac, Maja; Dobrić, Hana; Lukić, Gordana

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the study is identification of urinary tract infections (UTI) and urinary tract anomalies (UTA) already in the perinatal period. The authors attempted to prevent serious consequences of the above conditions in the examined children. Family history data, certain conditions in pregnancy and appertaining symptoms in children were elaborated to specify selective distinctive criteria for children at risk. Newborns (1200) were selected for potential existence of a UTI. All the examined newborns underwent a urinalysis. Those with significant bacteriuria were taken urine specimens, C-reactive protein (RVP), Complete Blood Count (CBC) and bilirubin. The newborns with a UTI and a suspected UTA were sent to ultrasound examination, direct radio nuclide cystography and Tc99m MAG3 dynamic scanning. The frequency of a UTI in the perinatal period amounted to 4.5%. A UTA was found in 29.6% of the examinees. The infection was more likely to appear among newborns with a UTA in their families, a UTI, pre-eclampsia and a febrile infection in mother, intrauterine growth retardation, premature rupture of membranes (RVP), umbilical cord strangulation, jaundice, cyanosis, breathing difficulties, seizures and asphyxia.

  4. [Nephrology-part 3: Urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Fünfstück, Reinhard; Stein, Günter; Naber, Kurt G; Hacker, Jörg; Marget, Walter

    2003-07-15

    Urinary tract infections are one of the most common bacterial infectious diseases in humans. Depending on the localization and the effectiveness of pathogenetic factors, various clinical pictures (lower urinary tract infection, pyelonephritis, asymptomatic bacteriuria) have to be differentiated. There are virulence factors of microorganisms on the one hand and defense mechanisms on the other, which influence the manifestation and the course of disease. The process of bacterial attachment to the epithelial cells of the boundary layer, the internalization and invasion of bacteria could be important for acute and chronic disease. Disturbances of local defense mechanisms, such as increased urinary glucose concentration in diabetes or variations of Tamm-Horsfall protein and defensin levels, may influence the course of infection. On the basis of microbiological and laboratory findings as well as the results of clinical and ultrasound procedures, the decision on the therapeutic strategy should be made. There are different treatment recommendations for acute uncomplicated and complicated cases as well as for chronic diseases. Future investigations should focus on effective therapeutic options for special immunocompromised patients in relation to the microbiological aspects and defense mechanisms of the host.

  5. Complicated urinary tract infections: practical solutions for the treatment of multiresistant Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Pallett, Ann; Hand, Kieran

    2010-11-01

    Resistance in Gram-negative bacteria has been increasing, particularly over the last 6 years. This is mainly due to the spread of strains producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) such as CTX-M enzymes or AmpC β-lactamases. Many of the isolates producing these enzymes are also resistant to trimethoprim, quinolones and aminoglycosides, often due to plasmid co-expression of other resistance mechanisms. CTX-M-producing Escherichia coli often occurs in the community and as E. coli is one of the commonest organisms causing urinary tract infections (UTIs) the choice of agents to treat these infections is diminishing. Novel combinations of antibiotics are being used in the community and broad-spectrum agents such as carbapenems are being used increasingly as empirical treatment for severe infections. Of particular concern therefore are reports in the UK of organisms that produce carbapenemases. As resistance is becoming more widespread, prudent use of antimicrobials is imperative and, as asymptomatic bacteriuria is typically benign in the elderly, antibiotics should not be prescribed without clinical signs of UTI. The use of antibiotics as suppressive therapy or long-term prophylaxis may no longer be defensible.

  6. Intermittent catheterisation with hydrophilic-coated catheters (SpeediCath) reduces the risk of clinical urinary tract infection in spinal cord injured patients: a prospective randomised parallel comparative trial.

    PubMed

    De Ridder, D J M K; Everaert, K; Fernández, L García; Valero, J V Forner; Durán, A Borau; Abrisqueta, M L Jauregui; Ventura, M G; Sotillo, A Rodriguez

    2005-12-01

    To compare the performance of SpeediCath hydrophilic-coated catheters versus uncoated polyvinyl chloride (PVC) catheters, in traumatic spinal cord injured patients presenting with functional neurogenic bladder-sphincter disorders. A 1-year, prospective, open, parallel, comparative, randomised, multi centre study included 123 male patients, > or =16 y and injured within the last 6 months. Primary endpoints were occurrence of symptomatic urinary tract infection (UTI) and hematuria. Secondary endpoints were development of urethral strictures and convenience of use. The main hypothesis was that coated catheters cause fewer complications in terms of symptomatic UTIs and hematuria. 57 out of 123 patients completed the 12-month study. Fewer patients using the SpeediCath hydrophilic-coated catheter (64%) experienced 1 or more UTIs compared to the uncoated PVC catheter group (82%) (p = 0.02). Thus, twice as many patients in the SpeediCath group were free of UTI. There was no significant difference in the number of patients experiencing bleeding episodes (38/55 SpeediCath; 32/59 PVC) and no overall difference in the occurrence of hematuria, leukocyturia and bacteriuria. The results indicate that there is a beneficial effect regarding UTI when using hydrophilic-coated catheters.

  7. Interactions among urogenital, intestinal, skin, and oral infections in pregnant and lactating Panamanian Ngäbe women: a neglected public health challenge.

    PubMed

    González-Fernández, Doris; Koski, Kristine G; Sinisterra, Odalis Teresa; Del Carmen Pons, Emérita; Murillo, Enrique; Scott, Marilyn E

    2015-06-01

    Interrelationships among bacteria, protozoa, helminths, and ectoparasites were explored in a cross-sectional survey of 213 pregnant and 99 lactating indigenous women. Prevalences in pregnancy and lactation, respectively, were: vaginitis (89.2%; 46.8%), vaginal trichomoniasis (75.3%; 91.1%), bacterial vaginosis (BV; 60.6%; 63.3%), hookworm (56.6%; 47.8%), asymptomatic bacteriuria/urinary tract infection (AB/UTI; 56.2%; 36.2%), cervicitis (33.3%; 6.3%), vaginal yeast (24.9%; 11.4%), Ascaris (32.5%; 17.4%), vaginal diplococci (20.4%; 31.6%), caries (19.7%; 18.2%), scabies (17.4%; 8.1%), and Trichuris (12.5%; 8.7%). Multiple regressions revealed positive associations during pregnancy (trichomoniasis and AB/UTI; diplococci and Ascaris) and lactation (yeast and scabies). Negative associations were detected in pregnancy (BV and trichomoniasis; hookworm and diplococci) and lactation (BV and yeast). Vaginal Lactobacillus reduced odds of diplococci in pregnancy and lactation, but increased Ascaris eggs per gram (epg) and odds of trichomoniasis in pregnancy and yeast in lactation. These associations raised a concern that treatment of one condition may increase the risk of another. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  8. Risk assessment and management to prevent preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Koullali, B; Oudijk, M A; Nijman, T A J; Mol, B W J; Pajkrt, E

    2016-04-01

    Preterm birth is the most important cause of neonatal mortality and morbidity worldwide. In this review, we review potential risk factors associated with preterm birth and the subsequent management to prevent preterm birth in low and high risk women with a singleton or multiple pregnancy. A history of preterm birth is considered the most important risk factor for preterm birth in subsequent pregnancy. General risk factors with a much lower impact include ethnicity, low socio-economic status, maternal weight, smoking, and periodontal status. Pregnancy-related characteristics, including bacterial vaginosis and asymptomatic bacteriuria, appear to be of limited value in the prediction of preterm birth. By contrast, a mid-pregnancy cervical length measurement is independently associated with preterm birth and could be used to identify women at risk of a premature delivery. A fetal fibronectin test may be of additional value in the prediction of preterm birth. The most effective methods to prevent preterm birth depend on the obstetric history, which makes the identification of women at risk of preterm birth an important task for clinical care providers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Executive summary of the diagnosis and treatment of urinary tract infection: Guidelines of the Spanish Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (SEIMC).

    PubMed

    de Cueto, Marina; Aliaga, Luis; Alós, Juan-Ignacio; Canut, Andres; Los-Arcos, Ibai; Martínez, Jose Antonio; Mensa, Jose; Pintado, Vicente; Rodriguez-Pardo, Dolors; Yuste, Jose Ramon; Pigrau, Carles

    2017-05-01

    Most urinary tract infections (UTI) are uncomplicated infections occurring in young women. An extensive evaluation is not required in the majority of cases, and they can be safely managed as outpatients with oral antibiotics. Escherichia coli is by far the most common uropathogen, accounting for >80% of all cases. Other major clinical problems associated with UTI include asymptomatic bacteriuria, and patients with complicated UTI. Complicated UTIs are a heterogeneous group associated with conditions that increase the risk of acquiring infection or treatment failure. Distinguishing between complicated and uncomplicated UTI is important, as it influences the initial evaluation, choice, and duration of antimicrobial therapy. Diagnosis is especially challenging in the elderly and in patients with in-dwelling catheters. The increasing prevalence of resistant uropathogens, including extended-spectrum β-lactamases and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, and other multidrug-resistant Gram-negative organisms further compromises treatment of both complicated and uncomplicated UTIs. The aim of these Clinical Guidelines is to provide a set of recommendations for improving the diagnosis and treatment of UTI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical features and risk factors for development of urinary tract infections in cats.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Ruzafa, Ivan; Kruger, John M; Miller, RoseAnn; Swenson, Cheryl L; Bolin, Carole A; Kaneene, John B

    2012-10-01

    The clinical and diagnostic features of 155 cats with urinary tract infection (UTI) and 186 controls with negative urine culture/s were characterized retrospectively (signalment, clinical signs, urinalysis, urine culture, concurrent diseases, lower urinary tract diagnostic/therapeutic procedures). Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify risk factors associated with UTI. Cats of all ages were affected by UTI with no sex/breed predisposition. Lower urinary tract signs were absent in 35.5% of cats with UTI. Pyuria and bacteriuria had sensitivities of 52.9% and 72.9%, and specificities of 85.5% and 67.7% for detection of UTI, respectively. Risk factors significantly associated with increased odds of UTI were urinary incontinence [odds ratio (OR)=10.78, P=0.0331], transurethral procedures (OR=8.37, P<0.0001), urogenital surgery (OR=6.03, P=0.0385), gastrointestinal disease (OR=2.62, P=0.0331), decreased body weight (OR=0.81, P=0.0259) and decreased urine specific gravity (OR=0.78, P=0.0055). Whilst not independently significant, renal disease and lower urinary tract anatomic abnormalities improved statistical model performance and contributed to UTI.

  11. Bacterial adherence in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection: a review.

    PubMed

    Reid, G; Sobel, J D

    1987-01-01

    Bacterial adherence to the uroepithelium is recognized as an important mechanism in the initiation and pathogenesis of urinary tract infections (UTI). The uropathogens originate predominantly in the intestinal tract and initially colonize the periurethral region and ascend into the bladder, resulting in symptomatic or asymptomatic bacteriuria. Thereafter, depending on host factors and bacterial virulence factors, the organisms may further ascend and give rise to pyelonephritis. Uropathogens are selected by the presence of virulence characteristics that enable them to resist the normally efficient host defense mechanisms. Considerable progress has been made in identifying bacterial adhesins and in demonstrating bacterial receptor sites on uroepithelial surfaces. Recent studies have identified natural anti-adherence mechanisms in humans as well as possible increased susceptibility to UTI when these mechanisms are defective and when receptor density on uroepithelial cells is altered. Knowledge of bacterial adherence mechanisms may permit alternative methods of prevention and management of urinary infection, including the use of subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics, vaccine development, nonimmune inhibition of bacterial adhesins and receptor sites, and the use of autochthonous flora, such as lactobacilli, to exclude uropathogens from colonizing the urinary tract.

  12. Distinct Signature of Oxylipid Mediators of Inflammation during Infection and Asymptomatic Colonization by E. coli in the Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Packiriswamy, Nandakumar; Gandy, Jeff; Smith, Sara N.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2017-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is an extremely common infectious disease. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the predominant etiological agent of UTI. Asymptomatic bacteriuric E. coli (ABEC) strains successfully colonize the urinary tract resulting in asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) and do not induce symptoms associated with UTI. Oxylipids are key signaling molecules involved in inflammation. Based on the distinct clinical outcomes of E. coli colonization, we hypothesized that UPEC triggers the production of predominantly proinflammatory oxylipids and ABEC leads to production of primarily anti-inflammatory or proresolving oxylipids in the urinary tract. We performed quantitative detection of 39 oxylipid mediators with proinflammatory, anti-inflammatory, and proresolving properties, during UTI and ABU caused by genetically distinct E. coli strains in the murine urinary bladder. Our results reveal that infection with UPEC causes an increased accumulation of proinflammatory oxylipids as early as 6 h postinoculation, compared to controls. To the contrary, ABEC colonization leads to decreased accumulation of proinflammatory oxylipids at the early time point compared to UPEC infection but does not affect the level of proresolving oxylipids. This report represents the first comprehensive investigation on the oxylipidome during benign ABEC colonization observed in ABU and acute inflammation triggered by UPEC leading to UTI. PMID:29445256

  13. Can absence of pyuria exclude urinary tract infection in febrile infants? About 2011 AAP guidelines on UTI.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong Heon; Lyu, Soo Young; Kim, Hye Young; Park, Su Eun; Kim, Su Young

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to describe clinical and laboratory characteristics of urinary tract infection (UTI) without significant pyuria in young children aged 2-24 months. The subjects consisted of infants and young children with febrile UTI treated at Pusan National University Children's Hospital, Korea. Group A included 283 patients with definite UTI who fulfilled the revised American Academy of Pediatrics diagnostic criteria, and group B included 19 patients with presumed UTI who had significant culture of uropathogens without pyuria, bacteriuria or other focus of infection. Duration of fever before hospital visit in group B was significantly shorter than in group A (17.7 ± 14.0 vs 34.5 ± 30.7 h). Most patients in group B (17/19, 89.5%) came to the hospital within 24 h of onset of fever. Acute scintigraphic lesions were found in 47.8% of patients in group A and 50% in group B. Underlying urological abnormalities such as vesicoureteral reflux and obstructive uropathy were found in 24.5% of patients in group A and in 33.3% of patients in group B (P = 0.74). Clinicians cannot exclude UTI on the absence of pyuria in young children aged 2-24 months. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  14. Update on biofilm infections in the urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Tenke, Peter; Köves, Béla; Nagy, Károly; Hultgren, Scott J; Mendling, Werner; Wullt, Björn; Grabe, Magnus; Wagenlehner, Florian M E; Cek, Mete; Pickard, Robert; Botto, Henry; Naber, Kurt G; Bjerklund Johansen, Truls E

    2012-02-01

    Biofilm infections have a major role in implants or devices placed in the human body. As part of the endourological development, a great variety of foreign bodies have been designed, and with the increasing number of biomaterial devices used in urology, biofilm formation and device infection is an issue of growing importance. A literature search was performed in the Medline database regarding biofilm formation and the role of biofilms in urogenital infections using the following items in different combinations: "biofilm," "urinary tract infection," "bacteriuria," "catheter," "stent," and "encrustation." The studies were graded using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine classification. The authors present an update on the mechanism of biofilm formation in the urinary tract with special emphasis on the role of biofilms in lower and upper urinary tract infections, as well as on biofilm formation on foreign bodies, such as catheters, ureteral stents, stones, implants, and artificial urinary sphincters. The authors also summarize the different methods developed to prevent biofilm formation on urinary foreign bodies. Several different approaches are being investigated for preventing biofilm formation, and some promising results have been obtained. However, an ideal method has not been developed. Future researches have to aim at identifying effective mechanisms for controlling biofilm formation and to develop antimicrobial agents effective against bacteria in biofilms.

  15. Antimicrobial stewardship in long term care facilities: what is effective?

    PubMed

    Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2014-02-12

    Intense antimicrobial use in long term care facilities promotes the emergence and persistence of antimicrobial resistant organisms and leads to adverse effects such as C. difficile colitis. Guidelines recommend development of antimicrobial stewardship programs for these facilities to promote optimal antimicrobial use. However, the effectiveness of these programs or the contribution of any specific program component is not known. For this review, publications describing evaluation of antimicrobial stewardship programs for long term care facilities were identified through a systematic literature search. Interventions included education, guidelines development, feedback to practitioners, and infectious disease consultation. The studies reviewed varied in types of facilities, interventions used, implementation, and evaluation. Comprehensive programs addressing all infections were reported to have improved antimicrobial use for at least some outcomes. Targeted programs for treatment of pneumonia were minimally effective, and only for indicators of uncertain relevance for stewardship. Programs focusing on specific aspects of treatment of urinary infection - limiting treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria or prophylaxis of urinary infection - were reported to be effective. There were no reports of cost-effectiveness, and the sustainability of most of the programs is unclear. There is a need for further evaluation to characterize effective antimicrobial stewardship for long term care facilities.

  16. Host-pathogen interactions mediating pain of urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Rudick, Charles N; Billips, Benjamin K; Pavlov, Vladimir I; Yaggie, Ryan E; Schaeffer, Anthony J; Klumpp, David J

    2010-04-15

    Pelvic pain is a major component of the morbidity associated with urinary tract infection (UTI), yet the molecular mechanisms underlying UTI-induced pain remain unknown. UTI pain mechanisms probably contrast with the clinical condition of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB), characterized by significant bacterial loads without lack symptoms. A murine UTI model was used to compare pelvic pain behavior elicited by infection with uropathogenic Escherichia coli strain NU14 and ASB strain 83972. NU14-infected mice exhibited pelvic pain, whereas mice infected with 83972 did not exhibit pain, similar to patients infected with 83972. NU14-induced pain was not dependent on mast cells, not correlated with bacterial colonization or urinary neutrophils. UTI pain was not influenced by expression of type 1 pili, the bacterial adhesive appendages that induce urothelial apoptosis. However, purified NU14 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-dependent pain, whereas 83972 LPS induced no pain. Indeed, 83972 LPS attenuated the pain of NU14 infection, suggesting therapeutic potential. These data suggest a novel mechanism of infection-associated pain that is dependent on TLR4 yet independent of inflammation. Clinically, these findings also provide the rational for probiotic therapies that would minimize the symptoms of infection without reliance on empirical therapies that contribute to antimicrobial resistance.

  17. Multicenter trial of prophylaxis with clindamycin plus aztreonam or cefotaxime in gynecologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Mangioni, C; Bianchi, L; Bolis, P F; Lomeo, A M; Mazzeo, F; Ventriglia, L; Scalambrino, S

    1991-01-01

    A prospective, randomized, multicenter study was conducted on the efficacy and safety of two prophylactic antibiotic regimens in both abdominal and vaginal hysterectomy. Patients received three intravenous doses of clindamycin (900 mg) plus either aztreonam (1 g) or cefotaxime (1 g); the doses were given at the induction of anesthesia and 8 and 16 hours later. A total of 170 patients undergoing abdominal hysterectomy and 142 patients undergoing vaginal hysterectomy completed the trial and were evaluated. Following abdominal hysterectomy infections occurred at the operative site in 1.2% of patients given a regimen including aztreonam and in 4.7% of those given a regimen including cefotaxime; the difference between the two groups was not significant. Neither were significant differences observed in the incidence of fever, the incidence of bacteriuria, the need for postoperative antibiotics, or the duration of postoperative hospitalization, although results were slightly better for patients receiving clindamycin plus aztreonam. Following vaginal hysterectomy, slightly but not significantly better results for the same parameters were obtained in the group given clindamycin plus cefotaxime. Diarrhea was the only adverse reaction attributable to antibiotic treatment and occurred more frequently in patients given cefotaxime. It was concluded that the two regimens were similarly effective and safe in preventing infections following hysterectomy.

  18. Host-Pathogen Checkpoints and Population Bottlenecks in Persistent and Intracellular Uropathogenic E. coli Bladder Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, Thomas J.; Totsika, Makrina; Mansfield, Kylie J.; Moore, Kate H.; Schembri, Mark A.; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2013-01-01

    Bladder infections affect millions of people yearly, and recurrent symptomatic infections (cystitis) are very common. The rapid increase in infections caused by multi-drug resistant uropathogens threatens to make recurrent cystitis an increasingly troubling public health concern. Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) cause the vast majority of bladder infections. Upon entry into the lower urinary tract, UPEC face obstacles to colonization that constitute population bottlenecks, reducing diversity and selecting for fit clones. A critical mucosal barrier to bladder infection is the epithelium (urothelium). UPEC bypass this barrier when they invade urothelial cells and form intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs), a process which requires type 1 pili. IBCs are transient in nature, occurring primarily during acute infection. Chronic bladder infection is common and can be either latent, in the form of the Quiescent Intracellular Reservoir (QIR), or active, in the form of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB/ABU) or chronic cystitis. In mice, the fate of bladder infection: QIR, ASB, or chronic cystitis, is determined within the first 24 hours of infection and constitutes a putative host-pathogen mucosal checkpoint that contributes to susceptibility to recurrent cystitis. Knowledge of these checkpoints and bottlenecks is critical for our understanding of bladder infection and efforts to devise novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:22404313

  19. Novel Biomarkers for the Diagnosis of Urinary Tract Infection—A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, Neha; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha

    2009-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are associated with significant morbidity. We rely on clinical presentation, urinalysis, and urine culture to diagnose UTI. To differentiate between lower UTI and pyelonephritis, we depend on the clinical presentation. In the extremes of age and in immunocompromised individuals, clinical presentation is often atypical posing a challenge to diagnosis. In the elderly, the high prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria is another confounder. We conducted a search of publications to find novel biomarkers to diagnose UTI and to ascertain its severity. We searched PUBMED, MEDLINE and SCOPUS databases for studies pertaining to novel biomarkers and UTI. Two reviewers independently evaluated the methodology of the studies using the STARD (Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy) criteria. We have identified procalcitonin as a biomarker to differentiate lower UTI from pyelonephritis in the pediatric age group. Elevated serum procalcitonin levels can result in early and aggressive treatment at the time of presentation. Interleukin 6 has also shown some promise in differentiating between lower UTI and pyelonephritis but needs further validation. Lastly, given the paucity of data in certain subgroups like diabetics, kidney transplant recipients, and individuals with spinal cord injury, further studies should be conducted in these populations to improve diagnostic criteria that will inform clinical management decisions. PMID:19707519

  20. Specialty Care Delivery: Bringing Infectious Disease Expertise to the Residents of a Veterans Affairs Long-Term Care Facility

    PubMed Central

    Jump, Robin L. P.; Olds, Danielle M.; Jury, Lucy A.; Sitzlar, Brett; Saade, Elie; Watts, Brook; Bonomo, Robert A.; Donskey, Curtis J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Residents of long-term care facilities (LTCFs) are a population vulnerable to infections and to the adverse effects of inappropriate antimicrobial prescribing. To improve the care of residents with possible infections, we initiated a LTCF Infectious Disease (LID) service that provides on-site consultations to LTCF residents. Design Clinical demonstration project Setting A 160-bed LTCF affiliated with a tertiary care Veterans Affairs (VA) hospital. Participants Residents referred to the LID Team. Measurements The reason for and source of LTCF residents’ referral to the LID team as well as their demographics, infectious disease diagnoses, interventions and hospitalizations were determined. Results Between July 2009 and December 2010, the LID consult service provided 291 consults for 250 LTCF residents. Referrals came from either the LTCF staff (75%) or the VA hospital’s ID consult service (25%). The most common diagnoses were Clostridium difficile infection (14%), asymptomatic bacteriuria (10%), and urinary tract infection (10%). More than half of referred patients were on antibiotic therapy when first seen by the LID team; 46% of patients required an intervention. The most common interventions, stopping (32%) or starting (26%) antibiotics, were made in accordance with principles of antibiotic stewardship. Conclusion The LID team represents a novel and effective means to bring subspecialty care to LTCF residents. PMID:23590125

  1. [Characteristic Features of Urinary Incontinence--Diagnostic Investigation in Geriatric Patients].

    PubMed

    Kirschner-Hermanns, R; Anding, R

    2016-02-01

    Urinary incontinence is a common medical and social problem in elderly people. It leads to a massive reduction in the quality of life of affected persons and their dependants and causes an enormous socio-economic burden, which will increase significantly within the next years and decades as the age structure of the German population changes. Successful treatment of urinary incontinence in the elderly requires a good pathophysiological understanding of the underlying problem as well as individually tailored diagnostic procedures, which must be oriented at the patient's wishes, the social environment and the resulting therapeutic consequences. This especially applies to persons with symptoms of dementia. Comorbidities such as diabetes mellitus, reduced mobility and a medication-induced decrease in cognitive function play a major role in the severity of urgency and urinary incontinence in the elderly. Also the frequently described concomitant diagnosis of urinary tract infection must be exactly evaluated. Before antibiotic treatment is given, it should be clarified if the patient suffers from "harmless" bacteriuria or a urinary tract infection requiring treatment. Patients with an age-associated decrease in brain power must be diagnosed quite carefully, because these patients may potentially be harmed by pharmacological treatment for overactive bladder syndrome. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Urinary tract infections during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Le, Jennifer; Briggs, Gerald G; McKeown, Anna; Bustillo, Gerardo

    2004-10-01

    To provide a comprehensive review of urinary tract infections (UTIs) during pregnancy. All aspects of UTIs, including epidemiology, pathogenesis, resistance, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, were reviewed. MEDLINE (1966-August 2003) and Cochrane Library searches were performed using the key search terms urinary tract infection, pyelonephritis, cystitis, asymptomatic bacteriuria, and resistance. All article abstracts were evaluated for relevance. Only articles pertaining to pregnancy were included. The majority of published literature were review articles; the number of original clinical studies was limited. UTIs are the most common bacterial infections during pregnancy. They are characterized by the presence of significant bacteria anywhere along the urinary tract. Pyelonephritis is the most common severe bacterial infection that can lead to perinatal and maternal complications including premature delivery, infants with low birth weight, fetal mortality, preeclampsia, pregnancy-induced hypertension, anemia, thrombocytopenia, and transient renal insufficiency. Enterobacteriaceae account for 90% of UTIs. The common antibiotics used are nitrofurantoin, cefazolin, cephalexin, ceftriaxone, and gentamicin. Therapeutic management of UTIs in pregnancy requires proper diagnostic workup and thorough understanding of antimicrobial agents to optimize maternal outcome, ensure safety to the fetus, and prevent complications that lead to significant morbidity and mortality in both the fetus and the mother.

  3. Is presence of bacteria in preoperative microscopic urinalysis of the patients scheduled for cardiac surgery a reason for cancellation of elective operation?

    PubMed

    Soltanzadeh, Mansoor; Ebadi, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    In some hospitals, urinalysis is done routinely for all patients scheduled for cardiac surgery. Occasionally pyuria or bacteria is reported in the microscopic urinalysis of these patients that are clinically asymptomatic for urinary tract infections. WE WERE SEEKING ANSWER TO THIS QUESTION: is the presence of a different number of bacteria in preoperative microscopic urinalysis of asymptomatic patients scheduled for cardiac surgery indicative of potential postoperative complications and as a result, a good reason to postpone the operation? We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study based on the review of the medical records of 1165 patients who underwent open-heart surgery. One hundered and fifty one patients were eligible in our established criteria. There were no significant difference between their demographic characteristics and the same number of randomly selected patients with normal urinalysis who had underwent open-heart surgery. In the bacteriuria group, two patients, and in the control group, three patients had an infection at the operation sites in the post-operative period, which was not a significant finding between two groups (P = 0.503). We recommend that in the absence of symptoms of urinary tract infection, urinalysis is not necessary and not cost beneficial in the preoperative evaluation of patients scheduled for open-heart surgery.

  4. A Capacitive Touch Screen Sensor for Detection of Urinary Tract Infections in Portable Biomedical Devices

    PubMed Central

    Honrado, Carlos; Dong, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Incidence of urinary tract infections (UTIs) is the second highest among all infections; thus, there is a high demand for bacteriuria detection. Escherichia coli are the main cause of UTIs, with microscopy methods and urine culture being the detection standard of these bacteria. However, the urine sampling and analysis required for these methods can be both time-consuming and complex. This work proposes a capacitive touch screen sensor (CTSS) concept as feasible alternative for a portable UTI detection device. Finite element method (FEM) simulations were conducted with a CTSS model. An exponential response of the model to increasing amounts of E. coli and liquid samples was observed. A measurable capacitance change due to E. coli presence and a tangible difference in the response given to urine and water samples were also detected. Preliminary experimental studies were also conducted on a commercial CTSS using liquid solutions with increasing amounts of dissolved ions. The CTSS was capable of distinguishing different volumes of liquids, also giving an exponential response. Furthermore, the CTSS gave higher responses to solutions with a superior amount of ions. Urine samples gave the top response among tested liquids. Thus, the CTSS showed the capability to differentiate solutions by their ionic content. PMID:25196109

  5. Role of interspecies interactions in dual-species biofilms developed in vitro by uropathogens isolated from polymicrobial urinary catheter-associated bacteriuria.

    PubMed

    Galván, E M; Mateyca, C; Ielpi, L

    2016-10-01

    Most catheter-associated urinary tract infections are polymicrobial. Here, uropathogen interactions in dual-species biofilms were studied. The dual-species associations selected based on their prevalence in clinical settings were Klebsiella pneumoniae-Escherichia coli, E. coli-Enterococcus faecalis, K. pneumoniae-E. faecalis, and K. pneumoniae-Proteus mirabilis. All species developed single-species biofilms in artificial urine. The ability of K. pneumoniae to form biofilms was not affected by E. coli or E. faecalis co-inoculation, but was impaired by P. mirabilis. Conversely, P. mirabilis established a biofilm when co-inoculated with K. pneumoniae. Additionally, E. coli persistence in biofilms was hampered by K. pneumoniae but not by E. faecalis. Interestingly, E. coli, but not K. pneumoniae, partially inhibited E. faecalis attachment to the surface and retarded biofilm development. The findings reveal bacterial interactions between uropathogens in dual-species biofilms ranged from affecting initial adhesion to outcompeting one bacterial species, depending on the identity of the partners involved.

  6. Hospitalization for urinary tract infections and the quality of preventive health care received by people with spina bifida.

    PubMed

    Armour, Brian S; Ouyang, Lijing; Thibadeau, Judy; Grosse, Scott D; Campbell, Vincent A; Joseph, David

    2009-07-01

    The preventive health care needs of people with disabilities often go unmet, resulting in medical complications that may require hospitalization. Such complications could be due, in part, to difficulty accessing care or the quality of ambulatory care services received. To use hospitalizations for urinary tract infections (UTIs) as a marker of the potential quality of ambulatory care services received by people affected by spina bifida. MarketScan inpatient and outpatient medical claims data for 2000 through 2003 were used to identify hospitalizations for UTI, which is an ambulatory care sensitive condition, for people affected by spina bifida and to calculate inpatient discharge rates, average lengths of stay, and average medical care expenditures for such hospitalizations. People affected by spina bifida averaged 0.5 hospitalizations per year, and there were 22.8 inpatient admissions with UTI per 1000 persons with spina bifida during the period 2000-2003, in comparison to an average of 0.44 admission with UTI per 1000 persons for those without spina bifida. If the number of UTI hospitalizations among people affected by spina bifida were reduced by 50%, expenditures could be reduced by $4.4 million per 1000 patients. Consensus on the evaluation and management of bacteriuria could enhance clinical care and reduce the disparity in UTI discharge rates among people affected by spina bifida compared to those without spina bifida. National evidence-based guidelines are needed.

  7. [Primary and secondary prevention of urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Wagenlehner, F M E; Vahlensieck, W; Bauer, H W; Weidner, W; Naber, K G; Piechota, H J

    2011-10-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most frequent bacterial infections in the community and health care setting. Mostly young and, to some extent, postmenopausal women are affected by recurrent UTI (rUTI) defined as ≥3 UTI/year. On the other hand rUTI are frequently found in patients with complicating urological factors, e.g. urinary catheters. Modifiable predisposing factors in uncomplicated rUTI in women are rare. Continuous antibiotic prophylaxis or postcoital prophylaxis, if there is close correlation with sexual intercourse, are most effective to prevent rUTI. Nitrofurantoin, trimethoprim (or cotrimoxazole), and fosfomycin trometamol are available as first-line drugs. Oral cephalosporins and quinolones should be restricted to specific indications. Antibiotic prophylaxis reduces the number of uropathogens in the gut and/or vaginal flora and reduces bacterial"fitness". Given the correct indication, the recurrence rate of rUTI can be reduced by about 90%. In postmenopausal patients vaginal substitution of oestriol should be started first. Oral or parenteral immunoprophylaxis is another option in patients with rUTI. Other possibilities with varying scientific evidence are prophylaxis with cranberries or probiotics. The prophylaxis of catheter-associated UTI or asymptomatic bacteriuria should employ strategies which result in a reduction of frequency and duration of catheter drainage of the urinary tract. The currently available catheter materials have only little influence on reducing catheter-associated rUTI.

  8. Association between Asymptomatic Urinary Tract Infection and Postoperative Spine Infection in Elderly Women : A Retrospective Analysis Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Eun; Park, Yong-Sook; Kim, Young-Baeg

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to identify the relationship between asymptomatic urinary tract infection (aUTI) and postoperative spine infection. Methods A retrospective review was done in 355 women more than 65 years old who had undergone laminectomy and/or discectomy, and spinal fusion, between January 2004 and December 2008. Previously postulated risk factors (i.e., instrumentation, diabetes, prior corticosteroid therapy, previous spinal surgery, and smoking) were investigated. Furthermore, we added aUTI that was not previously considered. Results Among 355 patients, 42 met the criteria for aUTI (Bacteriuria ≥ 105 CFU/mL and no associated symptoms). A postoperative spine infection was evident in 15 of 355 patients. Of the previously described risk factors, multi-levels (p < 0.05), instrumentation (p < 0.05) and diabetes (p < 0.05) were proven risk factors, whereas aUTI (p > 0.05) was not statistically significant. However, aUTI with Foley catheterization was statistically significant when Foley catheterization was added as a variable to the all existing risk factors. Conclusion aUTI is not rare in elderly women admitted to the hospital for lumbar spine surgery. The results of this study suggest that aUTI with Foley catheterization may be considered a risk factor for postoperative spine infection in elderly women. Therefore, we would consider treating aUTI before operating on elderly women who will need Foley catheterization. PMID:20461166

  9. The Development of Extremely Preterm Infants Born to Women Who Had Genitourinary Infections During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Leviton, Alan; Allred, Elizabeth N.; Kuban, Karl C. K.; O'Shea, T. Michael; Paneth, Nigel; Onderdonk, Andrew B.; Fichorova, Raina N.; Dammann, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Gestational genitourinary infections, which have been associated with neurodevelopmental impairments among infants born near term, have not been studied among very preterm infants. The mothers of 989 infants born before 28 weeks of gestation were interviewed about urine, bladder, or kidney infections (UTIs) and cervical or vaginal infections (CVIs) during pregnancy, as well as other exposures and characteristics, and their charts were reviewed for the Extremely Low Gestational Age Newborns (ELGAN) Study (2002–2004). At 2 years of age, these infants underwent a neurodevelopmental assessment. Generalized estimating equation logistic regression models of developmental adversities were used to adjust for potential confounders. Infants born to women who reported a UTI were less likely than were others to have a very low Mental Development Index (adjusted odds ratio = 0.5; 95% confidence interval: 0.3, 0.8), whereas infants born to women who reported a CVI were more likely than others to have a low Psychomotor Development Index (adjusted odds ratio = 1.7; 95% confidence interval: 1.04, 2.7). In this high-risk sample, maternal gestational CVI, but not UTI, was associated with a higher risk of impaired motor development at 2 years of age. The apparent protective effect of UTI might be spurious, reflect confounding due to untreated asymptomatic bacteriuria among women who were not given a diagnosis of UTI, or reflect preconditioning. PMID:26667255

  10. Urologic evaluation of urinary tract infection in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Diokno, A C; Compton, A; Seski, J; Vinson, R

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-three antepartum patients with urinary tract infections underwent urologic evaluation as soon as the infection had been successfully treated. The evaluation included history of voiding habits, cystometry, urethral calibration and cystourethroscopy. A second phase of the urologic evaluation included an excretory urogram and repeat cystometry 10-12 weeks postpartum. Sixty percent had a history of infrequent voiding, and 90% of them had a bladder capacity greater than 450 mL. Forty-one percent of the patients had a normal bladder capacity (less than 450 mL), and 85% of this group did not have any history of infrequent voiding. The radiographic evaluation postpartum in 18 of 33 patients revealed major abnormalities in 50%. These abnormalities were seen as often and were as significant in women with asymptomatic bacteriuria as in those who presented with acute pyelonephritis. The results suggest that the large bladder seen in pregnant women may be secondary to the chronic, unphysiologic habit of infrequent voiding. Furthermore, this study reinforced the fact that most pregnant women with urinary tract infection have preexisting chronic bladder or renal abnormalities that predispose them to infection. Those at risk should be identified early through a careful history and urinalysis to determine which ones need urinary prophylaxis during pregnancy. Postpartum urologic investigation should be carried out to identify any structural or functional problems; understanding them is helpful in present and future management.

  11. Perspectives in the prevention of premature birth.

    PubMed

    Ancel, Pierre-Yves

    2004-11-15

    Obstetric and neonatal interventions have improved the survival of preterm infants, but there has not been an equivalent reduction in long-term neurological disability. Thus, some effort must be invested in finding ways of preventing preterm birth. Numerous programmes have been promoted to address the matter of how the frequency of preterm birth could be prevented. Most interventions intended to prevent preterm labour do not have the desired effect, except for antibiotic treatment in cases of asymptomatic bacteriuria or bacterial vaginosis and progesterone administered prophylactically in high-risk women. Tocolytic drugs appear to delay delivery long enough for successful administration of corticosteroids in women in preterm labour, but without decreasing the risk of preterm birth. Some authors promote public health approaches that address all risk factors and affect the entire population of pregnant women, given that prevention programmes directed only at high-risk women have had little effect in preventing preterm births. However, the lack of progress in reducing the frequency of preterm births is also due to our limited understanding of the aetiology of preterm delivery. Although there is growing evidence that infection and neuroendocrine processes are involved, progress has remained slow. Recently, the hypothesis of a genetic predisposition to preterm delivery has been set up. Additional research exploring the pathophysiology of preterm labour is obviously needed, which will hopefully lead to the development of new therapeutic approaches.

  12. Risk-based screening combined with a PCR-based test for group B streptococci diminishes the use of antibiotics in laboring women.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Mohammed R; Uldbjerg, Niels; Thorsen, Poul B; Henriksen, Birgitte; Møller, Jens K

    2017-08-01

    To assess the performance of a polymerase chain reaction - group B streptococci test (PCR-GBS test) - in deciding antibiotic prophylaxis in term laboring women. In this observational study, we enrolled 902 unselected Danish term pregnant women. During labor, midwives obtained vaginal swabs that were used for both GBS cultures (reference standard) and for the PCR-GBS test. Furthermore, we recorded the presence of risk factors for EOGBS (Early Onset Group B Streptococcal disease): (1) Bacteriuria during current pregnancy, (2) Prior infant with EOGBS (3) Temperature above 38.0°C during labor, and (4) Rupture of membranes ≥18h. The prevalence of GBS carriers was 12% (104 of 902), the sensitivity of the PCR-GBS test 83% (86 of 104), and the specificity 97% (774 of 798). Among the 108 with one or more EOGBS-risk factors, GBS was present in 23% (25 of 108), the sensitivity 92% (23 of 25), and the specificity 89% (74 of 83). In programs that aim to treat all laboring women with vaginal GBS-colonization (12% in the present study) with penicillin, the PCR-GBS will perform well (sensitivity 83% and specificity 97%). In programs aiming to treat only GBS-carriers among those with risk factors of EOGBS, a reduction of penicillin usage by two-thirds from 12% to 4% may be possible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Urinalysis requests on the elderly residing in the Auckland community: tick box requesting?

    PubMed

    Upton, Arlo; McEwan, M; Williamson, Deborah

    2016-01-29

    Urinalysis for microscopy and culture is one of the most frequently requested tests for microbiology laboratories, particularly from elderly patients. This study sought to describe the clinical appropriateness of urinalysis from community-dwelling elderly patients and subsequent antibiotic prescription. Demographic, laboratory, and antibiotic prescription data were collected on all samples submitted from patients ≥ 70 years during August 2014 to Labtests Auckland. In addition, clinical data were collected by questionnaire from a subgroup of 200 patients. During August 2014, approximately 7% of the Auckland population aged ≥ 70 years had urinalysis submitted. Urine dipstick was not routinely performed before specimen submission, particularly from patients living at home rather than a long-term care facility, and nearly 50% of samples were not cultured due to absence of pyuria. Escherichia coli was isolated from 23% of female and 7% of male specimens. E. coli isolates from our cohort were less susceptible to all antibiotics tested against compared with all E. coli isolated from all urines in 2014. Clinical indications were absent in 40% of the subgroup of patients. Antibiotic prescription within 7 days of urinalysis was common (36%). This study highlights the frequency of urinalysis testing among the elderly residing in the community. Clinical indications are often absent, and treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria is likely to be contributing to excessive antibiotic prescription in this group of patients.

  14. Is whole gland salvage cryotherapy effective as palliative treatment of haematuria in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer? Results of a preliminary case series

    PubMed Central

    Mucciardi, Giuseppe; Galì, Alessandro; Pappalardo, Rosa; Lembo, Francesco; Anastasi, Giuseppina; Butticè, Salvatore; Ascenti, Giorgio; Lugnani, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Locally advanced prostate cancer may cause several complications such as haematuria, bladder outlet obstruction, and renal failure due to the ureteral obstruction. Various treatments have been suggested, including radiotherapy, antifibrinolytics, bladder irrigation with alum solution, transurethral surgery and angioembolization, none of which have proven effectiveness. In the last years cryoablation has become a valid therapeutic option for prostate cancer. In our experience we used this ‘new’ technique as haemostatic therapy. Methods: We selected four patients with gross haematuria affected by locally advanced hormone refractory prostate cancer, who had already been treated with primary radiotherapy. We used third-generation cryotherapy: under ultrasonographic guidance, we inserted six cryoprobes, two in each of the vascular pedicles reaching at least −60°C, and three thermometers. We then induced two freeze–thaw cycles. Results: After the operation the haematuria stopped in all patients and at 9-month follow up we observed a mean of four red cells (range three to five) in the urinary sediment with no evidence of bacteriuria. Prostate volume, prostate-specific antigen and postmicturition residue were significantly reduced. Qmax improved significantly too. Conclusion: Our experience has given us good results with minimal intra- and postoperative complications. We think that haemostatic cryotherapy as a palliative approach for locally advanced prostate cancer could represent a valid treatment option and more consideration could be given to its use. PMID:26425138

  15. Update on biofilm infections in the urinary tract

    PubMed Central

    Köves, Béla; Nagy, Károly; Hultgren, Scott J.; Mendling, Werner; Wullt, Björn; Grabe, Magnus; Wagenlehner, Florian M. E.; Cek, Mete; Pickard, Robert; Botto, Henry; Naber, Kurt G.; Bjerklund Johansen, Truls E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Biofilm infections have a major role in implants or devices placed in the human body. As part of the endourological development, a great variety of foreign bodies have been designed, and with the increasing number of biomaterial devices used in urology, biofilm formation and device infection is an issue of growing importance. Methods A literature search was performed in the Medline database regarding biofilm formation and the role of biofilms in urogenital infections using the following items in different combinations: “biofilm,” “urinary tract infection,” “bacteriuria,” “catheter,” “stent,” and “encrustation.” The studies were graded using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine classification. Results The authors present an update on the mechanism of biofilm formation in the urinary tract with special emphasis on the role of biofilms in lower and upper urinary tract infections, as well as on biofilm formation on foreign bodies, such as catheters, ureteral stents, stones, implants, and artificial urinary sphincters. The authors also summarize the different methods developed to prevent biofilm formation on urinary foreign bodies. Conclusions Several different approaches are being investigated for preventing biofilm formation, and some promising results have been obtained. However, an ideal method has not been developed. Future researches have to aim at identifying effective mechanisms for controlling biofilm formation and to develop antimicrobial agents effective against bacteria in biofilms. PMID:21590469

  16. Promoting appropriate urine culture management to improve health care outcomes and the accuracy of catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Robert; Spitzer, Eric D

    2017-10-01

    Published literature indicates that the unjustified ordering or improper collection of urine for urinalysis or culture from either catheterized patients or those without indwelling devices, or misinterpretation of positive results, often leads to adverse health care events, including increased financial burdens, overreporting of mandated catheter-associated urinary tract infection events, overtreatment of patients with antimicrobial agents, selection of multidrug-resistant organisms, and Clostridium difficile infection. Moreover, national guidelines that provide evidence-based direction on core processes that form the basis for subsequent clinical therapy decisions or surveillance interpretations; that is, the appropriate ordering and collection of urine for laboratory testing and the treatment of patients with symptomatic urinary tract infection, are not widely known or lack adherence. This article provides published evidence on the influence of inappropriate ordering of urine specimens and subsequent treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria and associated adverse effects; reviews research on bacterial contamination and preservation; and delineates best practices in the collection, handling, and testing of urine specimens for culture or for biochemical analysis in both catheterized and noncatheterized patients. The goal is to provide infection preventionists (IPs) with a cohesive evidence-based framework that will assist them in facilitating the implementation of a urine culture management program that reduces patient harms, enhances the accuracy of catheter-associated urinary tract infection surveillance, improves antibiotic stewardship, and reduces costs. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Clinical Presentations and Epidemiology of Urinary Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Geerlings, Suzanne E

    2016-10-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common bacterial infections, and the incidence in women is much higher than in men. The diagnosis of a UTI can be made based on a combination of symptoms and a positive urine analysis or culture. Most UTIs are uncomplicated UTIs, defined as cystitis in a woman who is not pregnant, is not immunocompromised, has no anatomical and functional abnormalities of the urogenital tract, and does not exhibit signs of tissue invasion and systemic infection. All UTIs that are not uncomplicated are considered to be complicated UTIs. Differentiation between uncomplicated and complicated UTIs has implications for therapy because the risks of complications or treatment failure are increased for patients with a complicated UTI. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) is defined as the presence of a positive urine culture collected from a patient without symptoms of a UTI. Concerning the complicated UTI, it is possible to make a differentiation between UTI with systemic symptoms (febrile UTI) and UTI in a host, which carries an increased risk to develop complications of this UTI. Febrile UTIs are urosepsis, pyelonephritis, and prostatitis. A complicated host is defined as one that has an increased risk for complications, to which the following groups belong: men, pregnant women, immunocompromised patients, or those who have an anatomical or functional abnormality of the urogenital tract (e.g., spinal cord-injury patients, renal stones, urinary catheter).

  18. Antibiotics Dispensed to Privately Insured Pregnant Women with Urinary Tract Infections - United States, 2014.

    PubMed

    Ailes, Elizabeth C; Summers, April D; Tran, Emmy L; Gilboa, Suzanne M; Arnold, Kathryn E; Meaney-Delman, Dana; Reefhuis, Jennita

    2018-01-12

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) occur in about 8% of pregnant women, and untreated UTIs can have serious consequences, including pyelonephritis, preterm labor, low birth weight, and sepsis (1). Pregnant women are typically screened for UTIs during early pregnancy, and those with bacteriuria are treated with antibiotics (1,2). Antibiotic stewardship is critical to improving patient safety and to combating antibiotic resistance. Because of the potential risk for birth defects, including anencephaly, heart defects, and orofacial clefts, associated with use of sulfonamides and nitrofurantoin during pregnancy (3), a 2011 committee opinion from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) recommended that sulfonamides and nitrofurantoin may be prescribed in the first trimester of pregnancy only when other antimicrobial therapies are deemed clinically inappropriate (4). To assess the effects of these recommendations, CDC analyzed the Truven Health MarketScan Commercial Database* to examine antibiotic prescriptions filled by pregnant women with UTIs. Among 482,917 pregnancies in 2014, 7.2% of women had an outpatient UTI diagnosis during the 90 days before the date of last menstrual period (LMP) or during pregnancy. Among pregnant women with UTIs, the most frequently prescribed antibiotics during the first trimester were nitrofurantoin, ciprofloxacin, cephalexin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Given the potential risks associated with use of some of these antibiotics in early pregnancy and the potential for unrecognized pregnancy, women's health care providers should be familiar with the ACOG recommendations and consider the possibility of early pregnancy when treating women of reproductive age.

  19. Hip fracture mortality. A prospective, multifactorial study to predict and minimize death risk.

    PubMed

    Mullen, J O; Mullen, N L

    1992-07-01

    Four hundred consecutive hip fractures were studied prospectively. Two hundred forty-seven patients were classified as unhealthy (poor cardiac status, pneumonia, cancer history, bowel obstruction history, malnutrition, dehydration, stroke history, renal failure history, cirrhosis). Twenty-two percent of this unhealthy group died, while only 6% of the remaining healthy group died. Death rates varied with admission activity level and mental status but not when patient health status was factored out. After factoring out health status, age was associated with higher death rates only in patients older than age 85. Confusion, a change of mental status in the hospital, occurred in 25% of patients. Confusion was associated with a medical complication in 94% of cases, was the presenting symptom of a medical complication in 79% of cases, and was associated with a 39% death rate. Major medical complications occurred in 9% of the healthy group (29% of them died) and 21% of the unhealthy group (64% of them died). Major medical complications in unhealthy, shut-in patients were associated with an 80% death rate. Vigorous urinary tract monitoring and early treatment of bacteriuria decreased death rate. Postfracture malnutrition was associated with higher complication rates. Hip surgery performed within 72 hours on patients with acute medical illnesses in addition to their fracture was associated with a higher death rate. Whether a patient walked postfracture seemed not to be correlated with the death rate. Patients who were not walking prefracture but treated by internal fixation had a 34% failure rate.

  20. Indicators of quality of antenatal care: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Vause, S; Maresh, M

    1999-03-01

    To pilot a list of indicators of quality of antenatal care across a range of maternity care settings. For each indicator to determine what is achieved in current clinical practice, to facilitate the setting of audit standards and calculation of appropriate sample sizes for audit. A multicentre retrospective observational study. Nine maternity units in the United Kingdom. 20,771 women with a singleton pregnancy, who were delivered between 1 August 1994 and 31 July 1995. Nine of the eleven suggested indicators were successfully piloted. Two indicators require further development. In seven of the nine hospitals external cephalic version was not commonly performed. There were wide variations in the proportions of women screened for asymptomatic bacteriuria. Screening of women from ethnic minorities for haemoglobinopathy was more likely in hospitals with a large proportion of non-caucasian women. A large number of Rhesus negative women did not have a Rhesus antibody check performed after 28 weeks of gestation and did not receive anti-D immunoglobulin after a potentially sensitising event during pregnancy. As a result of the study appropriate sample sizes for future audit could be calculated. Measuring the extent to which evidence-based interventions are used in routine clinical practice provides a more detailed picture of the strengths and weaknesses in an antenatal service than traditional outcomes such as perinatal mortality rates. Awareness of an appropriate sample size should prevent waste of time and resources on inconclusive audits.

  1. Improving maternal care with a continuous quality improvement strategy: a report from the Interventions to Minimize Preterm and Low Birth Weight Infants through Continuous Improvement Techniques (IMPLICIT) Network.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Ian M; Coco, Andrew; Anderson, Janice; Horst, Michael; Gambler, Angela S; Barr, Wendy Brooks; Ratcliffe, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Maternal medical care (prenatal and postpartum) involves a set of clinical interventions addressing risk factors associated with important maternal and infant outcomes. Programs to increase the rate of delivery of these interventions in clinical practice have not been widely implemented. A practice-based research network focused on developing continuous quality improvement (CQI) processes for maternal care among 10 family medicine residency training sites in the northeastern United States (the IMPLICIT Network) from January 2003 through September 2007. Documented delivery of 5 standard maternal care interventions was assessed before and after initiating a program to increase their frequency. Proportion chart analyses were conducted comparing the period before and after implementation of the CQI interventions. Data were available for 3936 pregnancies during the course of the study period. Results varied across the clinical interventions. Significant improvement in care processes was seen for 3 screening activities: (1) prenatal depression symptomatology (by 15 weeks' gestation); (2) screening for smoking at 30 weeks' gestation; (3) and postpartum contraception planning. Screening for smoking by 15 weeks' gestation and testing for asymptomatic bacteriuria were already conducted >90% of the time during the baseline period and did not increase significantly after initiating the CQI program. Screening for postpartum depression symptomatology was recorded in 50% to 60% of women before the CQI program and did not increase significantly. A practice-based research network of family medicine residency practices focused on CQI outcomes was successful in increasing the delivery of some maternal care interventions.

  2. [Troyakov. Experience in using hytolysin in the integrated management of urinary tract infections and methapylactics of nephrolithiasis].

    PubMed

    Saenko, V S; Kapsargin, F P; Pesegov, S V; M, V

    2017-07-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) are a risk factor for diseases leading to impairment of renal function and kidney stone disease (KSD). Growing resistance of uropathogens to antibacterial agents is a challenging issue in most countries of the world. Urolithiasis is the second most prevalent urologic condition following urinary tract infections and has a pronounced tendency to recur. Rational stone metaphylaxis leads to a significant reduction in the incidence of recurrent stones. In recent decades, there has been a markedly increasing interest in plant-based therapies in managing urologic diseases. To evaluate the effectiveness of phytotherapeutic medication Phytolysin in the integrated management of UTI and metaphylaxis of urolithiasis. Comprehensive evaluation of the effectiveness of Phytolysin was conducted at the Department of Urology, I.M. Sechenov First MSMU and Department of Urology, Andrology and Sexology, Voino-Yasenetsky Krasnoyarsk SMU in 40 women with episodes of exacerbation of chronic cystitis and 30 patients of both sexes during the postoperative metaphylaxis of the KSD. The age of the patients ranged from 20 to 68 years (mean age 40+/-2,8 years). Adding Phytolysin to the integrated management results in the improvement in general clinical signs and laboratory parameters of blood and urine, leads to a decrease in the level of leukocyturia, bacteriuria and an increase in diuresis and urinary alkalinization, reduces the number relapses of UTI and stone formation. Phytolysin is an effective and safe medication.

  3. Immunoassays distinguishing between HNL/NGAL released in urine from kidney epithelial cells and neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Mårtensson, Johan; Xu, Shengyuan; Bell, Max; Martling, Claes-Roland; Venge, Per

    2012-10-09

    The distinction between monomeric human neutrophil lipocalin/neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (HNL/NGAL), secreted by injured kidney tubular cells, and dimeric HNL/NGAL, released by activated neutrophils, is important to accurately diagnose acute kidney injury (AKI). 132 urine samples from 44 intensive care unit (ICU) patients and five urine samples from non-ICU patients with urinary tract infections (UTIs) were analyzed by two monoclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA-1 and ELISA-2). The presence of monomeric and/or dimeric HNL/NGAL in each sample was visualized by Western blotting. The ELISA-1 detected both monomeric and dimeric HNL/NGAL whereas the ELISA-2 almost exclusively detected dimeric HNL/NGAL with an area under the receiver-operating characteristics curve (AuROC) of 0.90. The ELISA-1/ELISA-2 ratio detected the monomeric form with an AuROC of 0.92. In 32 AKI patients, dimer-specific ELISA-2 levels decreased pre-AKI whereas the monomer-specific ELISA-1/ELISA-2 ratio gradually increased beyond AKI diagnosis. High ELISA-2 levels and/or low ELISA-1/ELISA-2 ratios detected a predominance of dimeric HNL/NGAL in urine from the patients with UTIs. In combination, our two ELISAs distinguish monomeric HNL/NGAL, produced by the kidney epithelium, from dimeric HNL/NGAL, released by neutrophils during AKI development, as well as reduce the confounding effect of neutrophil involvement when bacteriuria is present. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of criteria for urinary tract infection in a cohort of nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Juthani-Mehta, Manisha; Tinetti, Mary; Perrelli, Eleanor; Towle, Virginia; Van Ness, Peter H; Quagliarello, Vincent

    2007-07-01

    To prospectively evaluate nursing home residents with suspected urinary tract infection (UTI) to determine whether they met the McGeer, Loeb, or revised Loeb consensus-based criteria and whether any set of criteria was associated with laboratory evidence of UTI, namely bacteriuria (>100,000 colony forming units) plus pyuria (>10 white blood cells). Prospective cohort study. Three New Haven-area nursing homes. Of 611 residents screened, 457 were eligible, 362 consented, and 340 enrolled. Participants underwent prospective surveillance from May 2005 to April 2006 for the development of suspected UTI (defined as a participant's physician or nurse clinically suspecting UTI). One hundred participants with suspected UTI and a urinalysis and urine culture performed were included in the analyses. Participants were identified who met the criteria of McGeer, Loeb, revised Loeb, and laboratory evidence of UTI. Using laboratory evidence of UTI as the outcome, the McGeer criteria demonstrated 30% sensitivity, 82% specificity, 57% positive predictive value (PPV), and 61% negative predictive value (NPV); the Loeb criteria showed 19% sensitivity, 89% specificity, 57% PPV, and 59% NPV; and the revised Loeb criteria demonstrated 30% sensitivity, 79% specificity, 52% PPV, and 60% NPV. All of the consensus-based criteria have similar test characteristics. The diagnostic accuracy of UTI criteria in nursing home residents could be improved, and the data suggest that evidence-based clinical criteria associated with laboratory evidence of UTI need to be identified and validated.

  5. [Spectrum and drug sensitivity of pathogenic bacteria in children with nephrotic syndrome complicated by urinary tract infection: an analysis of 97 cases].

    PubMed

    Song, Shao-Na; Zhang, Bi-Li; Wang, Wen-Hong; Zhang, Xuan

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the spectrum and drug sensitivity of pathogenic bacteria in children with nephrotic syndrome (NS) complicated by urinary tract infection (UTI). A retrospective analysis was performed on the spectrum and drug sensitivity of pathogenic bacteria in 97 children with NS complicated by UTI, who hospitalized from January to December, 2011. The incidence of UTI in children with NS was 36.5%. It was significantly more common in children with recurrent NS than in those with primary NS (44.0% vs 31.9%; P<0.05). These cases mainly presented with asymptomatic bacteriuria. Enterococcus was the most common pathogenic bacteria (50.5%), including Enterococcus faecium (29.4%) and Enterococcus faecalis (21.1%), followed by Gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli (15.6%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (14.7%). Enterococcus was highly sensitive to nitrofurantoin, vacomycin and linezolid, but was highly resistant to tetracycline and moxifloxacin. More multi-resistant strains were detected in Enterococcus faecium than in Enterococcus faecalis (72% vs 17%; P<0.05). Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae were highly sensitive to amikacin, imipenem and piperacillin/tazobactam. Of the Gram-negative bacteria, 25% produced extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs). ESBLs-producing bacteria had 100% sensitivity to imipenem, amikacin and piperacillin/tazobactam but were highly resistant to ampicillin, cefazolin and ceftriaxone. Children with recurrent NS are more susceptible to UTI than those with primary NS. Enterococcus is becoming major pathogenic bacteria for UTI in children with NS and has relatively high drug resistance, and most strains of Enterococcus faecium are multi-resistant.

  6. Urine Stasis Predisposes to Urinary Tract Infection by an Opportunistic Uropathogen in the Megabladder (Mgb) Mouse.

    PubMed

    Becknell, Brian; Mohamed, Ahmad Z; Li, Birong; Wilhide, Michael E; Ingraham, Susan E

    2015-01-01

    Urinary stasis is a risk factor for recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI). Homozygous mutant Megabladder (Mgb-/-) mice exhibit incomplete bladder emptying as a consequence of congenital detrusor aplasia. We hypothesize that this predisposes Mgb-/- mice to spontaneous and experimental UTI. Mgb-/-, Mgb+/-, and wild-type female mice underwent serial ultrasound and urine cultures at 4, 6, and 8 weeks to detect spontaneous UTI. Urine bacterial isolates were analyzed by Gram stain and speciated. Bladder stones were analyzed by x-ray diffractometry. Bladders and kidneys were subject to histologic analysis. The pathogenicity of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CONS) isolated from Mgb-/- urine was tested by transurethral administration to culture-negative Mgb-/- or wild-type animals. The contribution of urinary stasis to CONS susceptibility was evaluated by cutaneous vesicostomy in Mgb-/- mice. Mgb-/- mice develop spontaneous bacteriuria (42%) and struvite bladder stones (31%) by 8 weeks, findings absent in Mgb+/- and wild-type controls. CONS was cultured as a solitary isolate from Mgb-/- bladder stones. Bladders and kidneys from mice with struvite stones exhibit mucosal injury, inflammation, and fibrosis. These pathologic features of cystitis and pyelonephritis are replicated by transurethral inoculation of CONS in culture-negative Mgb-/- females, whereas wild-type animals are less susceptible to CONS colonization and organ injury. Cutaneous vesicostomy prior to CONS inoculation significantly reduces the quantity of CONS recovered from Mgb-/- urine, bladders, and kidneys. CONS is an opportunistic uropathogen in the setting of urinary stasis, leading to enhanced UTI incidence and severity in Mgb-/- mice.

  7. Androgens Enhance Male Urinary Tract Infection Severity in a New Model

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Patrick D.; Hruska, Keith A.

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) occur predominantly in females but also affect substantial male patient populations; indeed, morbidity in complicated UTI is higher in males. Because of technical obstacles, preclinical modeling of UTI in male mice has been limited. We devised a minimally invasive surgical bladder inoculation technique that yields reproducible upper and lower UTI in both male and female mice, enabling studies of sex differences in these infections. Acute uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) cystitis in C57BL/6 and C3H/HeN males recapitulated the intracellular bacterial community pathway previously shown in females. However, surgically infected females of these strains exhibited more robust bladder cytokine responses and more efficient UPEC control than males. Compared with females, C3H/HeN males displayed a striking predilection for chronic cystitis, manifesting as persistent bacteriuria, high-titer bladder bacterial burdens, and chronic inflammation. Furthermore, males developed more severe pyelonephritis and 100% penetrant renal abscess (a complication that is rare in female mice). These phenotypes were sharply abrogated after castration but restored with exogenous testosterone, suggesting that male susceptibility to UTI is strongly influenced by androgen exposure. These data substantiate the long-standing presumption that anatomic differences in urogenital anatomy confer protection from UTI in males; however, as clinically observed, male sex associated with more severe UTI once these traditional anatomic barriers were bypassed. This study introduces a highly tractable preclinical model for interrogating sex differences in UTI susceptibility and pathogenesis, and illuminates an interplay between host sex and UTI that is more complex than previously appreciated. PMID:26449605

  8. Urine Stasis Predisposes to Urinary Tract Infection by an Opportunistic Uropathogen in the Megabladder (Mgb) Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Becknell, Brian; Mohamed, Ahmad Z.; Li, Birong; Wilhide, Michael E.; Ingraham, Susan E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Urinary stasis is a risk factor for recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI). Homozygous mutant Megabladder (Mgb-/-) mice exhibit incomplete bladder emptying as a consequence of congenital detrusor aplasia. We hypothesize that this predisposes Mgb-/- mice to spontaneous and experimental UTI. Methods Mgb-/-, Mgb+/-, and wild-type female mice underwent serial ultrasound and urine cultures at 4, 6, and 8 weeks to detect spontaneous UTI. Urine bacterial isolates were analyzed by Gram stain and speciated. Bladder stones were analyzed by x-ray diffractometry. Bladders and kidneys were subject to histologic analysis. The pathogenicity of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CONS) isolated from Mgb-/- urine was tested by transurethral administration to culture-negative Mgb-/- or wild-type animals. The contribution of urinary stasis to CONS susceptibility was evaluated by cutaneous vesicostomy in Mgb-/- mice. Results Mgb-/- mice develop spontaneous bacteriuria (42%) and struvite bladder stones (31%) by 8 weeks, findings absent in Mgb+/- and wild-type controls. CONS was cultured as a solitary isolate from Mgb-/- bladder stones. Bladders and kidneys from mice with struvite stones exhibit mucosal injury, inflammation, and fibrosis. These pathologic features of cystitis and pyelonephritis are replicated by transurethral inoculation of CONS in culture-negative Mgb-/- females, whereas wild-type animals are less susceptible to CONS colonization and organ injury. Cutaneous vesicostomy prior to CONS inoculation significantly reduces the quantity of CONS recovered from Mgb-/- urine, bladders, and kidneys. Conclusions CONS is an opportunistic uropathogen in the setting of urinary stasis, leading to enhanced UTI incidence and severity in Mgb-/- mice. PMID:26401845

  9. Retrospective study for risk factors for febrile UTI in spinal cord injury patients with routine concomitant intermittent catheterization in outpatient settings.

    PubMed

    Mukai, S; Shigemura, K; Nomi, M; Sengoku, A; Yamamichi, F; Fujisawa, M; Arakawa, S

    2016-01-01

    Retrospective study. The objective of this study was to investigate the clinical risk factors for febrile urinary tract infection (UTI) in spinal cord injury-associated neurogenic bladder (NB) patients who perform routine clean intermittent catheterization (CIC). Rehabilitation Hospital, Kobe, Japan. Over a 3-year period, we retrospectively assessed the clinical risk factors for febrile UTI in 259 spinal cord injury patients diagnosed as NB and performing routine CIC with regard to the factors such as gender, the presence of pyuria and bacteriuria, and the categories of the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) impairment scale. A total of 67 patients had febrile UTI in the follow-up period, with 57 cases of pyelonephritis, 11 cases of epididymitis and 2 cases of prostatitis, including the patients with plural infectious diseases. The causative bacteria were ranked as follows: Escherichia coli (74 cases), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (17 cases), Enterococcus faecalis (14 cases) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (12 cases). Antibiotic-resistant E. coli were seen, with 10.5% instances of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) production and 23.8% of fluoroquinolone resistance. Multivariate analyses of clinical risk factors for febrile UTI showed that gender (male, P=0.0431), and ASIA impairment scale C or more severe (P=0.0266) were significantly associated with febrile UTI occurrence in NB patients with routine CIC. Our data demonstrated gender (male) and ASIA impairment scale C or more severe were significantly associated with febrile UTI occurrence in NB patients using routine CIC. Further prospective studies are necessary to define the full spectrum of possible risk factors for febrile UTI in these patients.

  10. A Single Dose of Intraoperative Antibiotics Is Sufficient to Prevent Urinary Tract Infection During Ureteroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chew, Ben H; Flannigan, Ryan; Kurtz, Michael; Gershman, Boris; Arsovska, Olga; Paterson, Ryan F; Eisner, Brian H; Lange, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    American Urology Association (AUA) Best Practice Guidelines for ureteroscopic stone treatment recommend antibiotic coverage for <24 hours following the procedure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if the addition of postoperative antibiotics reduces urinary tract infections (UTIs) following ureteroscopic stone treatment beyond the recommended preoperative dose. A retrospective review was performed of consecutive patients at two institutions, University of British Columbia and Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard. All patients received a single dose of antibiotics before ureteroscopic stone treatment. A subset of patients was also given postoperative antibiotics. The rate of UTI was compared in patients receiving only preoperative antibiotics (group 1) vs those who received pre- and postoperative antibiotics (group 2). Eighty-one patients underwent ureteroscopy for renal calculi. Mean time to follow up was 42 ± 88 days. Eight (9.9%) patients in total (two from group 1 and six from group 2, p = 0.1457) developed UTIs postoperatively. In group 1, both patients presented with pyelonephritis (n = 2); those patients with infections in group 2 presented with urosepsis (n = 2) and cystitis (n = 2) and two patients had asymptomatic bacteriuria. Risk factors such as preoperative stenting, nephrostomy tubes, and foley catheters neither differed between groups nor did they predispose patients to postoperative infections. The postoperative UTI rate in this study (9.9%) is consistent with previous reports. Our data suggest that a single preoperative dose of antibiotics is sufficient, and additional postoperative antibiotics do not decrease infection rates after ureteroscopic stone treatment. Risk for selection bias is a potential limitation.

  11. The human urinary microbiome and how it relates to urogynecology.

    PubMed

    Schneeweiss, Jenifer; Koch, Marianne; Umek, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies applying molecular techniques have demonstrated the presence of a urinary microbiota not detected by standard microbiological techniques. These have been found in the urine of healthy individuals and in those suffering from clinical symptoms. The present article reviews the findings of these studies to date, describing the molecular techniques, and specifically outlining any differences in microbiomes in relation to urogynecological disease. Further, the role of commensal bacteria in the lower urinary tract is considered. An extensive literature search was conducted to identify articles on the microbiome of the female urinary tract in health and disease. We searched the electronic meta-databases Ovid MEDLINE® 1946-2015 and Embase 1974-2015. The keywords "microbiome, microbiota, bacterial colonization, microbiology, commensal bacteria, and bacteriuria" were searched in combination with "lower urinary tract symptoms, urogenital symptoms, urinary tract infection, overactive bladder and urinary incontinence." A total of 426 papers were retrieved; 33 were included in this paper. The microbiome of the female lower urinary tract shows variance between individuals and between age groups. There are significant differences between the microbiota in the lower urinary tract of individuals with urological symptoms and those without, relating to type and proportion of commensal Lactobacillus spp. There is only weak evidence to suggest that Lactobacillus might be applied as a therapeutic measure. It is still unclear what role microbiota plays in female urinary tract health. The discovery of bacteria in the urine of healthy individuals may have implications for future therapies for lower urinary tract symptoms.

  12. Particle motion in unsteady two-dimensional peristaltic flow with application to the ureter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Lozano, Joel; Sen, Mihir; Dunn, Patrick F.

    2009-04-01

    Particle motion in an unsteady peristaltic fluid flow is analyzed. The fluid is incompressible and Newtonian in a two-dimensional planar geometry. A perturbation method based on a small ratio of wave height to wavelength is used to obtain a closed-form solution for the fluid velocity field. This analytical solution is used in conjunction with an equation of motion for a small rigid sphere in nonuniform flow taking Stokes drag, virtual mass, Faxén, Basset, and gravity forces into account. Fluid streamlines and velocity profiles are calculated. Theoretical values for pumping rates are compared with available experimental data. An application to ureteral peristaltic flow is considered since fluid flow in the ureter is sometimes accompanied by particles such as stones or bacteriuria. Particle trajectories for parameters that correspond to calcium oxalates for calculosis and Escherichia coli type for bacteria are analyzed. The findings show that retrograde or reflux motion of the particles is possible and bacterial transport can occur in the upper urinary tract when there is a partial occlusion of the wave. Dilute particle mixing is also investigated, and it is found that some of the particles participate in the formation of a recirculating bolus, and some of them are delayed in transit and eventually reach the walls. This can explain the failure of clearing residuals from the upper urinary tract calculi after successful extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. The results may also be relevant to the transport of other physiological fluids and industrial applications in which peristaltic pumping is used.

  13. The resident microflora of voided midstream urine of healthy controls: standard versus expanded urine culture protocols.

    PubMed

    Coorevits, L; Heytens, S; Boelens, J; Claeys, G

    2017-04-01

    The workup and interpretation of urine cultures is not always clear-cut, especially for midstream samples contaminated with commensals. Standard urine culture (SUC) protocols are designed in favor of growth of uropathogens at the expense of commensals. In selected clinical situations, however, it is essential to trace fastidious or new uropathogens by expanding the urine culture conditions (EUC). The aim of our study was to map the microflora in midstream urine specimens from healthy controls by means of EUC, in view of the interpretation of bacterial culture results in symptomatic patients. Midstream urine specimens from 101 healthy controls (86 females and 15 males) were examined using both SUC and EUC. Whilst 73 % of samples examined by SUC showed no growth at 10 3  colony-forming units (CFU)/mL, 91 % of samples examined by EUC grew bacterial species in large numbers (≥10 4  CFU/mL). Asymptomatic bacteriuria, as defined by the European guidelines for urinalysis, was detected in six samples with both protocols. EUC revealed 98 different species, mostly Lactobacillus, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Corynebacterium. None of the samples grew Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Corynebacterium urealyticum, or Aerococcus urinae. Samples from females contained higher bacterial loads and showed higher bacterial diversity compared to males. Midstream urine of healthy controls contains large communities of living bacteria that comprise a resident microflora, only revealed by EUC. Hence, the use of EUC instead of SUC in a routine setting would result in more sensitive but less specific results, requiring critical interpretation. In our view, EUC should be reserved for limited indications.

  14. The Development of Extremely Preterm Infants Born to Women Who Had Genitourinary Infections During Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Leviton, Alan; Allred, Elizabeth N; Kuban, Karl C K; O'Shea, T Michael; Paneth, Nigel; Onderdonk, Andrew B; Fichorova, Raina N; Dammann, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Gestational genitourinary infections, which have been associated with neurodevelopmental impairments among infants born near term, have not been studied among very preterm infants. The mothers of 989 infants born before 28 weeks of gestation were interviewed about urine, bladder, or kidney infections (UTIs) and cervical or vaginal infections (CVIs) during pregnancy, as well as other exposures and characteristics, and their charts were reviewed for the Extremely Low Gestational Age Newborns (ELGAN) Study (2002-2004). At 2 years of age, these infants underwent a neurodevelopmental assessment. Generalized estimating equation logistic regression models of developmental adversities were used to adjust for potential confounders. Infants born to women who reported a UTI were less likely than were others to have a very low Mental Development Index (adjusted odds ratio = 0.5; 95% confidence interval: 0.3, 0.8), whereas infants born to women who reported a CVI were more likely than others to have a low Psychomotor Development Index (adjusted odds ratio = 1.7; 95% confidence interval: 1.04, 2.7). In this high-risk sample, maternal gestational CVI, but not UTI, was associated with a higher risk of impaired motor development at 2 years of age. The apparent protective effect of UTI might be spurious, reflect confounding due to untreated asymptomatic bacteriuria among women who were not given a diagnosis of UTI, or reflect preconditioning. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Do screening-preventative interventions in asymptomatic pregnancies reduce the risk of preterm delivery--a critical appraisal of the literature.

    PubMed

    Varma, Rajesh; Gupta, Janesh K; James, David K; Kilby, Mark D

    2006-08-01

    Recent research has suggested that women who experience preterm delivery (PTD) may be identified earlier in pregnancy and before onset of symptoms. Interventions commenced at this earlier asymptomatic stage may offer an opportunity to prevent PTD or lengthen gestation sufficiently to reduce adverse perinatal outcome. Our objective was to examine the evidence that supports or refutes this approach to preventing PTD. We therefore conducted a systematic search and critical appraisal of the identified literature. We found evidence that introducing screening-preventative strategies for asymptomatic pregnancies may reduce the rate of PTD. Evidence for screening and selective treatment exists for: asymptomatic bacteriuria; bacterial vaginosis in low-risk population groups; elective cervical cerclage in high-risk pregnancies; indicated cervical cerclage in women with short cervical length on ultrasound; prophylactic progesterone supplementation in high-risk pregnancies, and smoking cessation. However, for most other strategies, such as increased antenatal attendance, or routine administration of prophylactic micronutrients, the evidence is inconsistent and conflicting. Information on neonatal outcomes apart from PTD (such as serious neonatal morbidity and mortality) was found to be lacking in most studies. It was therefore not possible to establish whether preventing PTD or prolonging gestation would correlate to improved perinatal outcome, and this lessened the potential clinical usefulness of any proposed preventative strategy. No studies were found that evaluated the effectiveness of combining screening-preventative strategies. The review concludes with a suggested an antenatal management plan designed to prevent PTD based on current practice and the evidence presented in this article.

  16. [Preventive activities in primary health care: identifying the agreement among evidence-based guidelines].

    PubMed

    Gosalbes Soler, V; Márquez Calderón, S; Maiques Galán, A; Latour Pérez, J; Bernal Delgado, E; Puig Barberá, J; Arranz Lázaro, M

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to identify the agreement among evidence-based guidelines about recommendations on preventive activities in low risk adults. For which we identified, from the 1996 US Task Force on Preventive Services Guide those preventives activities classified like A or B (recommendation in favour of provision) and like D or E (recommendation against provision), excepting those D and E recommendations based on descriptives studies or expert opinions. Both preventive activities aimed at pregnant women and children and those which are not applicable to our context were excluded. Selected preventive services were compared with the range of age, sex and periodicity in which agreement with the recommendations of American College of Physicians and Canadian Task Force on Preventive Services existed. We found the following agreements. Screening activities. In favour: screening for hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, breast cancer, colorectal cancer, uterine cervix cancer, rubella, visual and hearing impairment and problem drinking. Against: cancer of prostate, lung, bladder and thyroid, and asymptomatic bacteriuria. Counseling activities. In favour: smoking, motor-vehicles injuries, alcohol consumption, unintended pregnancy. Immunizations and quimioprophylaxis. In favour: Vaccines for influenza, tetanus-diphtheria, hepatitis B and measles-mumps-rubella. Postexposure prophylaxis to hepatitis A, hepatitis B, meningococcal, rabies and tetanus. We see then, that a high degree in agreement among the main guidelines exists; about the preventive activities to perform in Primary Health Services, nevertheless we observed low fulfillment of certain preventive activities in Primary Health Services, different barriers for the accomplishment from these activities were described.

  17. Virulence factors in Escherichia coli urinary tract infection.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, J R

    1991-01-01

    Uropathogenic strains of Escherichia coli are characterized by the expression of distinctive bacterial properties, products, or structures referred to as virulence factors because they help the organism overcome host defenses and colonize or invade the urinary tract. Virulence factors of recognized importance in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection (UTI) include adhesins (P fimbriae, certain other mannose-resistant adhesins, and type 1 fimbriae), the aerobactin system, hemolysin, K capsule, and resistance to serum killing. This review summarizes the virtual explosion of information regarding the epidemiology, biochemistry, mechanisms of action, and genetic basis of these urovirulence factors that has occurred in the past decade and identifies areas in need of further study. Virulence factor expression is more common among certain genetically related groups of E. coli which constitute virulent clones within the larger E. coli population. In general, the more virulence factors a strain expresses, the more severe an infection it is able to cause. Certain virulence factors specifically favor the development of pyelonephritis, others favor cystitis, and others favor asymptomatic bacteriuria. The currently defined virulence factors clearly contribute to the virulence of wild-type strains but are usually insufficient in themselves to transform an avirulent organism into a pathogen, demonstrating that other as-yet-undefined virulence properties await discovery. Virulence factor testing is a useful epidemiological and research tool but as yet has no defined clinical role. Immunological and biochemical anti-virulence factor interventions are effective in animal models of UTI and hold promise for the prevention of UTI in humans. Images PMID:1672263

  18. Prevention and treatment strategy in pregnant women with group B streptococcal infection.

    PubMed

    Tevdorashvili, G; Tevdorashvili, D; Andghuladze, M; Tevdorashvili, M

    2015-04-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS; Streptococcus agalactiae) are encapsulated gram-positive cocci belonging to Lancefield group B, that frequently colonizes the human genital and gastrointestinal tracts. It is an important cause of illness in three categories of population: infants, pregnant women, and adults with underlying medical conditions. In pregnant women and postpartum women, GBS is a frequent cause of asymptomatic bacteriuria, urinary tract infection, upper genital tract infection (i.e. intraamniotic infection or chorioamnionitis), postpartum endometritis (8%), pneumonia (2%), puerperal sepsis (2%), and bacteremia without a focal site (31%). It also can cause focal infections such as pneumonia, meningitis, and endocarditis, albeit rarely. Invasive maternal infection with GBS is associated with pregnancy loss and preterm delivery. Prior to the widespread use of maternal intrapartum chemoprophylaxis, maternal colonization with GBS conferred an increased risk of chorioamnionitis, and early postpartum infection. The serotype distribution of invasive GBS infection in pregnant women is similar to that of early-onset neonatal disease. The most common GBS serotypes causing invasive disease in adults and neonates are Ia, Ib, III, and V. Vaccination of adolescent women is considered an ideal solution. However, recent reports (April 2015) have shown that serotype IV GBS is emerging in pregnant carriers and causing infections in neonates and adults. This emergence is of concern because GBS conjugate vaccines that are being developed to prevent invasive disease may protect only against serotypes Ia, Ib, II, III, and V, or combinations thereof. Though research for the development of such a vaccine is underway, a good candidate vaccine has yet to surface.

  19. Intermittent catheterisation for long-term bladder management (abridged cochrane review).

    PubMed

    Prieto, Jacqui A; Murphy, Catherine; Moore, Katherine N; Fader, Mandy J

    2015-09-01

    To review the evidence on strategies to reduce UTI, other complications or improve satisfaction in intermittent catheter (IC) users by comparing: (1) one catheter design, material or technique versus another; (2) sterile technique versus clean; or (3) single-use (sterile) or multiple-use (clean) catheters. We searched Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Trials Register, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, ERIC, reference lists, and conference proceedings to November 2013. We contacted other investigators for unpublished data or clarification. Trial screening, assessment and data abstraction were all in accordance with the Cochrane handbook. Thirty one trials (13 RCTs and 18 randomized crossover trials), addressed the inclusion criteria comparing method or design and UTI/bacteriuria, other complications or participant assessed outcomes. Studies varied widely in follow-up, UTI definition and attrition; in some, data could not be combined. Where there were data, confidence intervals were wide and hence clinically important differences could neither be reliably identified nor ruled out. Current research evidence is weak and design issues are significant. It has not yet been established whether incidence of UTI, other complications such as haematuria, or user satisfaction are affected by sterile or clean technique, coated or uncoated catheters, single or multiple-use catheters or by any other strategy. For people using IC, choice of catheter will depend on personal preference, cost, portability, and ease of use. Individuals should discuss the catheter options with their healthcare practitioner. Cost-effectiveness analysis and use of the standard definition of UTI are essential in any proposed clinical trial. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Recolonization of group B Streptococcus (GBS) in women with prior GBS genital colonization in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Tam, Teresa; Bilinski, Ewa; Lombard, Emily

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the incidence of women with prior GBS genital colonization who have recolonization in subsequent pregnancies. This is a retrospective, cohort study of patients with a prior GBS genital colonization in pregnancy and a subsequent pregnancy with a recorded GBS culture result, from January 2000 through June 2007. Documentation of GBS status was through GBS culture performed between 35 to 37 weeks gestation. Exclusion criteria included pregnancies with unknown GBS status, patients with GBS bacteriuria, women with a previous neonate with GBS disease and GBS finding prior to 35 weeks. Data was analyzed using SPSS 15.0. The sample proportion of subjects with GBS genital colonization and its confidence interval were computed to estimate the incidence rate. Logistic regression was performed to assess potential determinants of GBS colonization. Regression coefficients, odds ratios and associated confidence intervals, and p-values were reported, with significant results reported. There were 371 pregnancies that met the test criteria. There were 151 subsequent pregnancies with GBS genital colonization and 220 without GBS recolonization. The incidence of GBS recolonization on patients with prior GBS genital colonization was 40.7% (95% confidence interval 35.7-45.69%). The incidence rate for the sample was significantly larger than 30% (p < .001), which is the estimated incidence rate for all pregnant women who are GBS carriers regardless of prior history. These results suggest that patients with a history of GBS are at a significantly higher risk of GBS recolonization in subsequent pregnancies.

  1. Epigenetic Mechanisms Regulate Innate Immunity against Uropathogenic and Commensal-Like Escherichia coli in the Surrogate Insect Model Galleria mellonella.

    PubMed

    Heitmueller, Miriam; Billion, André; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Mukherjee, Krishnendu

    2017-10-01

    Innate-immunity-related genes in humans are activated during urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli but are suppressed by commensals. Epigenetic mechanisms play a pivotal role in the regulation of gene expression in response to environmental stimuli. To determine whether epigenetic mechanisms can explain the different behaviors of pathogenic and commensal bacteria, we infected larvae of the greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella , a widely used model insect host, with a uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) strain that causes symptomatic UTIs in humans or a commensal-like strain that causes asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU). Infection with the UPEC strain (CFT073) was more lethal to larvae than infection with the attenuated ABU strain (83972) due to the recognition of each strain by different Toll-like receptors, ultimately leading to differential DNA/RNA methylation and histone acetylation. We used next-generation sequencing and reverse transcription (RT)-PCR to correlate epigenetic changes with the induction of innate-immunity-related genes. Transcriptomic analysis of G. mellonella larvae infected with E. coli strains CFT073 and 83972 revealed strain-specific variations in the class and expression levels of genes encoding antimicrobial peptides, cytokines, and enzymes controlling DNA methylation and histone acetylation. Our results provide evidence for the differential epigenetic regulation of transcriptional reprogramming by UPEC and ABU strains of E. coli in G. mellonella larvae, which may be relevant to understanding the different behaviors of these bacterial strains in the human urinary tract. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. The urinary microbiome and its contribution to lower urinary tract symptoms; ICI-RS 2015.

    PubMed

    Drake, Marcus J; Morris, Nicola; Apostolidis, Apostolos; Rahnama'i, Mohammad S; Marchesi, Julian R

    2017-04-01

    The microbiome is the term used for the symbiotic microbial colonisation of healthy organs. Studies have found bacterial identifiers within voided urine which is apparently sterile on conventional laboratory culture, and accordingly there may be health and disease implications. The International Consultation on Incontinence Research Society (ICI-RS) established a literature review and expert consensus discussion focussed on the increasing awareness of the urinary microbiome, and potential research priorities. The consensus considered the discrepancy between findings of conventional clinical microbiology methods, which generally rely on culture parameters predisposed towards certain "expected" organisms. Discrepancy between selective culture and RNA sequencing to study species-specific 16S ribosomal RNA is increasingly clear, and highlights the possibility that protective or harmful bacteria may be overlooked where microbiological methods are selective. There are now strong signals of the existence of a "core" urinary microbiome for the human urinary tract, particularly emerging with ageing. The consensus reviewed the potential relationship between a patient's microbiome and lower urinary tract dysfunction, whether low-count bacteriuria may be clinically significant and mechanisms which could associate micro-organisms with lower urinary tract symptoms. Key research priorities identified include the need to establish the scope of microbiome across the range of normality and clinical presentations, and gain consensus on testing protocols. Proteomics to study enzymatic and other functions may be necessary, since different bacteria may have overlapping phenotype. Longitudinal studies into risk factors for exposure, cumulative risk, and emergence of disease need to undertaken. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:850-853, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Validity, accuracy, and predictive value of urinary tract infection signs and symptoms in individuals with spinal cord injury on intermittent catheterization.

    PubMed

    Massa, Luiz M; Hoffman, Jeanne M; Cardenas, Diana D

    2009-01-01

    To determine the validity, accuracy, and predictive value of the signs and symptoms of urinary tract infection (UTI) for individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) using intermittent catheterization (IC) and the accuracy of individuals with SCI on IC at predicting their own UTI. Prospective cohort based on data from the first 3 months of a 1-year randomized controlled trial to evaluate UTI prevention effectiveness of hydrophilic and standard catheters. Fifty-six community-based individuals on IC. Presence of UTI as defined as bacteriuria with a colony count of at least 10(5) colony-forming units/mL and at least 1 sign or symptom of UTI. Analysis of monthly urine culture and urinalysis data combined with analysis of monthly data collected using a questionnaire that asked subjects to self-report on UTI signs and symptoms and whether or not they felt they had a UTI. Overall, "cloudy urine" had the highest accuracy (83.1%), and "leukocytes in the urine" had the highest sensitivity (82.8%). The highest specificity was for "fever" (99.0%); however, it had a very low sensitivity (6.9%). Subjects were able to predict their own UTI with an accuracy of 66.2%, and the negative predictive value (82.8%) was substantially higher than the positive predictive value (32.6%). The UTI signs and symptoms can predict a UTI more accurately than individual subjects can by using subjective impressions of their own signs and symptoms. Subjects were better at predicting when they did not have a UTI than when they did have a UTI.

  4. Population Dynamics and Niche Distribution of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli during Acute and Chronic Urinary Tract Infection ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Drew J.; Chen, Swaine L.; Hultgren, Scott J.; Seed, Patrick C.

    2011-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) have complex dynamics, with uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the major causative agent, capable of colonization from the urethra to the kidneys in both extracellular and intracellular niches while also producing chronic persistent infections and frequent recurrent disease. In mouse and human bladders, UPEC invades the superficial epithelium, and some bacteria enter the cytoplasm to rapidly replicate into intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs) comprised of ∼104 bacteria each. Through IBC formation, UPEC expands in numbers while subverting aspects of the innate immune response. Within 12 h of murine bladder infection, half of the bacteria are intracellular, with 3 to 700 IBCs formed. Using mixed infections with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and wild-type (WT) UPEC, we discovered that each IBC is clonally derived from a single bacterium. Genetically tagged UPEC and a multiplex PCR assay were employed to investigate the distribution of UPEC throughout urinary tract niches over time. In the first 24 h postinfection (hpi), the fraction of tags dramatically decreased in the bladder and kidney, while the number of CFU increased. The percentage of tags detected at 6 hpi correlated to the number of IBCs produced, which closely matched a calculated multinomial distribution based on IBC clonality. The fraction of tags remaining thereafter depended on UTI outcome, which ranged from resolution of infection with or without quiescent intracellular reservoirs (QIRs) to the development of chronic cystitis as defined by persistent bacteriuria. Significantly more tags remained in mice that developed chronic cystitis, arguing that during the acute stages of infection, a higher number of IBCs precedes chronic cystitis than precedes QIR formation. PMID:21807904

  5. Diagnostic accuracy of the urinalysis for urinary tract infection in infants <3 months of age.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Alan R; Chang, Pearl W; Shen, Mark W; Biondi, Eric A; Greenhow, Tara L

    2015-06-01

    The 2011 American Academy of Pediatrics urinary tract infection (UTI) guideline suggests incorporation of a positive urinalysis (UA) into the definition of UTI. However, concerns linger over UA sensitivity in young infants. Infants with the same pathogenic organism in the blood and urine (bacteremic UTI) have true infections and represent a desirable population for examination of UA sensitivity. We collected UA results on a cross-sectional sample of 276 infants <3 months of age with bacteremic UTI from 11 hospital systems. Sensitivity was calculated on infants who had at least a partial UA performed and had ≥50 000 colony-forming units per milliliter from the urine culture. Specificity was determined by using a random sample of infants from the central study site with negative urine cultures. The final sample included 245 infants with bacteremic UTI and 115 infants with negative urine cultures. The sensitivity of leukocyte esterase was 97.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 94.5%-99.2%) and of pyuria (>3 white blood cells/high-power field) was 96% (95% CI 92.5%-98.1%). Only 1 infant with bacteremic UTI (Group B Streptococcus) and a complete UA had an entirely negative UA. In infants with negative urine cultures, leukocyte esterase specificity was 93.9% (95% CI 87.9 - 97.5) and of pyuria was 91.3% (84.6%-95.6%). In young infants with bacteremic UTI, UA sensitivity is higher than previous reports in infants with UTI in general. This finding can be explained by spectrum bias or by inclusion of faulty gold standards (contaminants or asymptomatic bacteriuria) in previous studies. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. Comparison of urinary tract infection rates among 2- to 12-month-old febrile infants with RSV infections using 1999 and 2011 AAP diagnostic criteria.

    PubMed

    Kaluarachchi, Dinushan; Kaldas, Virginia; Roques, Euripedes; Nunez, Randolph; Mendez, Magda

    2014-07-01

    Infants with RSV infections have been found to have a clinically significant rate of urinary tract infections (UTIs). The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published a revised Clinical Practice Guideline on UTIs in 2011, which includes major changes in diagnostic criteria for UTIs. Past research has been done using previous diagnostic criteria. The objective of the study is to assess the rate of UTIs in febrile infants with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections according to the 2011 revised AAP Diagnostic Criteria and compare the rate of UTIs against the 1999 AAP Diagnostic Criteria. A retrospective comparative study of febrile infants (2-12 months) with RSV infections admitted to the Inpatient Pediatric unit of Lincoln Medical and Mental Center, Bronx, NY, from September through April 2006 to 2012. We applied the AAP's 1999 and 2011 diagnostic criteria for UTIs separately to assess the rates of UTIs. A total of 359 RSV-positive febrile patients who were investigated for UTIs were enrolled. Pyuria was found in 11.1% (40/359), positive urine culture 10 000 to 50 000 was found in 1.4% (5/359) and ≥50 000 in 4.7% (17/359). The rate of UTIs using AAP's 1999 criteria was 6.1% (22/359), and using the 2011 criteria the rate was 1.1% (4/359). The rate of UTIs was significantly different between the 2 groups (odds ratio [confidence interval] = 0.17 [0.05, 0.5], P = .001). The rate of UTIs in RSV-positive febrile infants is very low (1.1%) with the 2011 AAP diagnostic criteria. Previously described increased risk of UTIs may represent asymptomatic bacteriuria or contaminated specimens. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Urine culture guided antibiotic interventions: A pharmacist driven antimicrobial stewardship effort in the ED.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Rowan, Nicole; Pflugeisen, Bethann Mangel; Alajbegovic, Sanjin

    2017-04-01

    Antibiotics are overprescribed for abnormal urine tests including asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB), contributing to rising antimicrobial resistance rates. Pharmacists reviewed urine cultures daily from emergency department (ED) encounters to assess antibiotic appropriateness. We studied antibiotic prescribing practices and assessed compliance to national guidelines, correlations with urine analysis (UA) components, and opportunities for antimicrobial stewardship in the ED. This quality improvement project (QIP) was a prospective cohort study at a community hospital ED, with data collected from finalized urine cultures resulting October 30, 2014 through January 5, 2015. Analyses were conducted using Chi-squared and Fisher Exact tests and stepwise multiple logistic regression. Urine cultures from 457 encounters were reviewed, of which 136 met the inclusion criteria as non-pregnant and asymptomatic for urinary tract infection (UTI). 43% of 136 patients were treated with antibiotics, for a total of 426 antibiotic days. Pharmacist interventions for these patients resulted in 122/426 (29%) of potential antibiotic days saved. Factors found to significantly increase the odds of antibiotic prescribing in asymptomatic patients included presence of leukocyte esterase (OR=4.5, 95% CI: 1.2-17.2; p=0.03) or nitrites (OR=10.8, 95% CI: 1.7-68.1; p=0.01) in the urine and age≥75 (OR=3.5, 95% CI: 1.2-9.6, p=0.02). Pharmacist intervention in discontinuing or modifying antibiotics for asymptomatic patients with urine cultures reduced unnecessary antibiotic exposure and was a first step in antimicrobial stewardship efforts in the ED. Future work includes limiting urine tests and subsequent antibiotic therapy for non-pregnant asymptomatic patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Treatment of asymptomatic UTI in older delirious medical in-patients: A prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Monidipa; Brymer, Chris; Elsayed, Sameer

    2017-09-01

    Despite clinical practice guidelines, asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) in older people is frequently treated. A common reason for treating ASB is a change in mental status. To determine how often asymptomatic UTI is treated in older medically ill delirious individuals and its association with functional recovery. Consecutive older medical in-patients were screened for delirium, and followed in hospital. Treatment for asymptomatic UTI was defined as documented treatment for a possible urinary tract infection with antibiotics, without concurrent infectious or urinary symptoms. The primary outcome was functional recovery at discharge or 3 months post-discharge. Poor functional recovery was defined by any one of death, new permanent long-term institutionalization or decreased ability to perform activities of daily living. The study sample comprised 343 delirious in-patients, of which 237 (69%) had poor functional recovery. Ninety two (27%) delirious in-patients were treated for asymptomatic UTI. Treatment for asymptomatic UTI was associated with poor functional recovery compared to other delirious in-patients (RR 1.30, 95% CI: 1.14-1.48 overall). Similar results were seen when the analysis was restricted to only bacteriuric delirious individuals. Seven (7.5%) individuals treated for asymptomatic UTI developed Clostridium difficile infection compared to eight (3.2%) in the remainder of the delirious cohort (OR 2.45, 95% CI: 0.86-6.96). These results suggest that treatment of asymptomatic UTI in older medical in-patients with delirium is common, and of questionable benefit. Further research is needed to establish guidelines to minimize over-treatment of UTI in older delirious in-patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Urine Culture Testing in Community Nursing Homes: Gateway to Antibiotic Overprescribing.

    PubMed

    Sloane, Philip D; Kistler, Christine E; Reed, David; Weber, David J; Ward, Kimberly; Zimmerman, Sheryl

    2017-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe current practice around urine testing and identify factors leading to overtreatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria in community nursing homes (NHs) DESIGN Observational study of a stratified random sample of NH patients who had urine cultures ordered in NHs within a 1-month study period SETTING 31 NHs in North Carolina PARTICIPANTS 254 NH residents who had a urine culture ordered within the 1-month study period METHODS We conducted an NH record audit of clinical and laboratory information during the 2 days before and 7 days after a urine culture was ordered. We compared these results with the urine antibiogram from the 31 NHs. RESULTS Empirical treatment was started in 30% of cases. When cultures were reported, previously untreated cases received antibiotics 89% of the time for colony counts of ≥100,000 CFU/mL and in 35% of cases with colony counts of 10,000-99,000 CFU/mL. Due to the high rate of prescribing when culture results returned, 74% of these patients ultimately received a full course of antibiotics. Treated and untreated patients did not significantly differ in temperature, frequency of urinary signs and symptoms, or presence of Loeb criteria for antibiotic initiation. Factors most commonly associated with urine culture ordering were acute mental status changes (32%); change in the urine color, odor, or sediment (17%); and dysuria (15%). CONCLUSIONS Urine cultures play a significant role in antibiotic overprescribing. Antibiotic stewardship efforts in NHs should include reduction in culture ordering for factors not associated with infection-related morbidity as well as more scrutiny of patient condition when results become available. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:524-531.

  10. Pediatric urinary tract infections in a tertiary care center from north India.

    PubMed

    Taneja, Neelam; Chatterjee, Shiv Sekhar; Singh, Meenakshi; Singh, Surjit; Sharma, Meera

    2010-01-01

    Paediatric urinary tract infections (UTI) are associated with high morbidity and long term complications like renal scarring, hypertension, and chronic renal failure. A cause of occult febrile illness, they often remain undiagnosed. We studied the clinical and microbiologic profile and antibiotic resistance profile of such infections in paediatric UTI patients at our center. Clean catch mid-stream urine samples for culture were received from 1974 children aged<12 yr over a period of 6 months.Quantitative wet mount microscopy and semiquantitative culture on cysteine lactose electrolyte deficient medium were done to diagnose UTI. Isolates were identified by standard biochemical tests and antimicrobial sensitivity was determined. Clinical details including risk factors and underlying illness were noted. Significant bacteriuria was found in 558 children (28.3%). Male gender (25.6%), age<1 yr (77.5%), vesicoureteric reflux disease (VUR) (19.9%) and posterior urethral valve (PUV) (27.6%) were common risk factors in children suffering from UTI.Pyuria was detected in 53.6 per cent of infections. Common uropathogens isolated were Escherichia coli (47.1%), Klebsiella spp. (15.6%), Enterococcus fecalis (8.7%), members of tribe Proteae (5.9%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5.9%) and Candida spp. (5.5%). Against lactose fermenting Enterobacteriaceae, in-vitro resistance was least against amikacin (32.5%), nitrofurantoin (26.7%) and imipenem (3.7%). Among enterococci, vancomycin resistant enterococci constituted 12 per cent of the strains. 93.4 per cent of the UTI detected was nosocomial. Paediatric UTI was common in children with male gender, age<1 yr, and in children suffering from VUR and PUV. Spectrum of pathogens causing paediatric UTI in our center had a preponderance of nosocomial multi-drug resistant pathogens.

  11. The "Choosing Wisely" initiative in infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Clara; Berner, Reinhard; Bogner, Johannes R; Cornely, Oliver A; de With, Katja; Herold, Susanne; Kern, Winfried V; Lemmen, Sebastian; Pletz, Mathias W; Ruf, Bernhard; Salzberger, Bernd; Stellbrink, Hans Jürgen; Suttorp, Norbert; Ullmann, Andrew J; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Jung, Norma

    2017-06-01

    "Choosing Wisely" is a growing international campaign aiming at practice changes to improve patient health and safety by both, conduct of essential and avoidance of unnecessary diagnostic, preventive and therapeutic procedures. The goal is to create an easily recognizable and distributable list ("Choosing Wisely items") that addresses common over- and underuse in the management of infectious diseases. The German Society of Infectious Diseases (DGI) participates in the campaign "Klug Entscheiden" by the German Society of Internal Medicine. Committee members of the (DGI) listed potential 'Choosing Wisely items'. Topics were subjected to systematic evidence review and top ten items were selected for appropriateness. Five positive and negative recommendations were approved via individual member vote. The final recommendations are: (1) Imperatively start antimicrobial treatment and remove the focus in Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection. (2) Critically ill patients with signs of infection need early appropriate antibiotic therapy. (3) Annual influenza vaccination should be given to individuals with age >60 years, patients with specific co-morbidities and to contact persons who may spread influenza to others. (4) All children should receive measles vaccine. (5) Prefer oral formulations of highly bioavailable antimicrobials whenever possible. (6) Avoid prescribing antibiotics for uncomplicated upper respiratory tract infections. (7) Do not treat asymptomatic bacteriuria with antibiotics. (8) Do not treat Candida detected in respiratory or gastrointestinal tract specimens. (9) Do not prolong prophylactic administration of antibiotics in patients after they have left the operating room. (10) Do not treat an elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) or procalcitonin with antibiotics for patients without signs of infection. Physicians will reduce potential harm to patients and increase the value of health care when implementing these recommendations.

  12. Bacterial profile of urinary tract infection and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern among pregnant women attending at Antenatal Clinic in Dil Chora Referral Hospital, Dire Dawa, Eastern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Derese, Behailu; Kedir, Haji; Teklemariam, Zelalem; Weldegebreal, Fitsum; Balakrishnan, Senthilkumar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to determine the bacterial profile of urinary tract infection (UTI) and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern among pregnant women attending at antenatal clinic in Dil Chora Referral Hospital, Dire Dawa, Eastern Ethiopia. Patients and methods An institutional-based cross-sectional study was conducted from February 18, 2015 to March 25, 2015. Clean-catch midstream urine specimens were collected from 186 pregnant women using sterile containers. Then, culture and antimicrobial susceptibility tests were performed by standard disk diffusion method. Patient information was obtained using pretested structured questionnaire. Data were entered and cleaned using EpiData Version 3 and then exported to Statistical Package for Social Science (Version 16) for further analysis. Results The prevalence of significant bacteriuria was 14%. Gram-negative bacteria were more prevalent (73%). Escherichia coli (34.6%), coagulase-negative staphylococci (19.2%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (15.4%), and Klebsiella spp. (11.5%) were common bacterial isolates, where most of them were resistant against ampicillin, amoxicillin, tetracycline, trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole, and chloramphenicol. Multidrug resistance (resistance in ≥2 drugs) was seen in 100% of the isolated bacteria. A majority of the bacterial isolates were sensitive to ciprofloxacin, ceftriaxone, erythromycin, and gentamicin. Conclusion This study found a number of bacterial isolates with very high resistance to the commonly prescribed drugs from pregnant women with and without symptoms of UTI. Therefore, the early routine detection of causative agents of UTI and determining their drug susceptibility pattern are important for pregnant women to avoid complications in mother and fetus. Ciprofloxacin, ceftriaxone, gentamicin, and erythromycin can be used with great care for the empirical treatment of UTI. PMID:26937197

  13. Urinary tract infection in the neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Vigil, Humberto R.

    2016-01-01

    There is a high incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract function. This results in significant morbidity and health care utilization. Multiple well-established risk factors unique to a neurogenic bladder (NB) exist while others require ongoing investigation. It is important for care providers to have a good understanding of the different structural, physiological, immunological and catheter-related risk factors so that they may be modified when possible. Diagnosis remains complicated. Appropriate specimen collection is of paramount importance and a UTI cannot be diagnosed based on urinalysis or clinical presentation alone. A culture result with a bacterial concentration of ≥103 CFU/mL in combination with symptoms represents an acceptable definition for UTI diagnosis in NB patients. Cystoscopy, ultrasound and urodynamics should be utilized for the evaluation of recurrent infections in NB patients. An acute, symptomatic UTI should be treated with antibiotics for 5–14 days depending on the severity of the presentation. Antibiotic selection should be based on local and patient-based resistance patterns and the spectrum should be as narrow as possible if there are no concerns regarding urosepsis. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) should not be treated because of rising resistance patterns and lack of clinical efficacy. The most important preventative measures include closed catheter drainage in patients with an indwelling catheter and the use of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) over other methods of bladder management if possible. The use of hydrophilic or impregnated catheters is not recommended. Intravesical Botox, bacterial interference and sacral neuromodulation show significant promise for the prevention of UTIs in higher risk NB patients and future, multi-center, randomized controlled trials are required. PMID:26904414

  14. Antibiotic Overconsumption in Pregnant Women With Urinary Tract Symptoms in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Sekikubo, Musa; Hedman, Karolina; Mirembe, Florence; Brauner, Annelie

    2017-08-15

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common bacterial infections in women. During pregnancy physiological changes, like frequency, mimic UTI symptoms, and therefore bacteriological cultures are needed to confirm the diagnosis. However, in developing countries antibiotic therapy is commonly initiated without culture confirmation. We investigated the prevalence of bacteriuria among pregnant women with and without UTI symptoms in Uganda. In total 2 562 urine samples were evaluated with nitrite and leukocyte esterase tests, using urine culture and/or dipslide with species identification as reference. The prevalence of culture-proven UTI among pregnant women with UTI symptoms was 4%. Since treatment is initiated based only on the presence of symptoms, 96% were erroneously given antibiotics. Further, there is a high prevalence of resistance to commonly used antibiotics, with 18 % ESBL and 36 % multidrug resistant Escherichia coli strains. Nitrite, leukocyte esterase tests, and urine microscopy alone were of poor diagnostic value. Using dipslide, gynecologists and nurses, not trained in microbiology, were mostly able to identify E. coli and negative cultures. Mixed Gram-negative flora, suggesting fecal contamination was, however, in the majority of cases interpreted as a single pathogenic bacterium and would have resulted in antibiotic treatment. To prevent excessive use of antibiotics, dipslide possibly supported by a combination of nitrite and leukocyte esterase tests can be used. Trained frontline health care professionals correctly diagnosed E. coli UTI and negative urine cultures, which would help preventing antibiotic misuse. In addition, regular screening for antibiotic resistance would improve correct treatment. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. A systematic review of non-antibiotic measures for the prevention of urinary tract infections in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ghouri, Flavia; Hollywood, Amelia; Ryan, Kath

    2018-04-13

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common in pregnancy and account for the highest proportion of primary care antibiotic prescriptions issued to pregnant women in the UK. It is well known that antibiotic use is associated with increased antimicrobial resistance and therefore measures to minimise antibiotic use for UTI prevention have been studied. The efficacy and safety of these measures in pregnancy have not been addressed and therefore the aim of this study was to systematically review the literature to identify and evaluate potential measures to prevent UTIs in pregnant women. Ten databases (EMBASE, AMED, BNI, CINAHL, Medline, PubMed, PsycINFO, Cochrane Trials, Scopus and Science Direct) were systematically searched in July 2017 for studies reporting non-antibiotic measures to prevent UTIs in pregnancy. The terms ("urinary tract infection" or UTI or bacteriuria or cystitis) AND (prevention) AND (pregnan*) were used. The quality of the publications was appraised using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) checklists for cohort study, case-control study and randomised controlled trial. The results were synthesised using a textual narrative approach. Search results yielded 3276 publications and after reviewing titles and removing duplicates, 57 full text articles were assessed for eligibility and eight were included in the review. Five different approaches (hygiene measures, cranberry juice, immunisation, ascorbic acid and Canephron® N) have been identified, all of which are reported to be safe in pregnancy. The quality of the evidence varied considerably and only hygiene measures were supported by evidence to be recommended in practice. Future work needs to concentrate on strengthening the evidence base through improved design and reporting of studies with a focus on immunisation, ascorbic acid and Canephron® N.

  16. Value of routine urine culture in the assessment of preterm labor.

    PubMed

    Hundley, Andrew F; Onderdonk, Andrew B; Greenberg, James A

    2003-11-01

    To assess the utility and expense of routine urine culture in women evaluated for preterm labor. A retrospective study of 1,429 patients evaluated for preterm labor over a calendar year. Patients evaluated for preterm labor were identified using the hospital's admissions database and then cross-referenced with the hospital microbiology laboratory's database to identify those who had urine cultures sent as part of their evaluation. The charts of patients with a positive urine culture were further reviewed to evaluate the diagnosis and outcome. Five hundred twelve urine cultures were sent for analysis of preterm labor, and 6 (1.2%) reported growth of > 100,000 colonies of a single bacterium. Of these 6 patients, 5 reported symptoms consistent with a urinary tract infection, while the 6th was asymptomatic. Fisher's exact test showed no clinical significance for a positive urine culture as a predictor of preterm delivery (P = .68). Sensitivity was 0.7% (95% CI, 0.0-4.3), and specificity was 98.6% (95% CI, 96.7-99.5). A cost difference of $29,676 existed between charges and reimbursements. A positive culture was not a significant risk factor for preterm delivery. The 1 patient who delivered preterm with a positive culture probably had cervical incompetence as the cause of preterm delivery. The routine use of urine cultures in the assessment of preterm labor is costly and adds little value to obtaining a diagnosis except in the presence of specific complaints at our institution. Urine culture identified a single patient with asymptomatic bacteriuria being evaluated for preterm labor, and she probably had another etiology for her advanced cervical examination.

  17. [Prevention of Neonatal Group B Sreptococcal Infection. Spanish Recommendations. Update 2012. SEIMC/SEGO/SEN/SEQ/SEMFYC Consensus Document].

    PubMed

    Alós Cortés, Juan Ignacio; Andreu Domingo, Antonia; Arribas Mir, Lorenzo; Cabero Roura, Luis; de Cueto López, Marina; López Sastre, José; Melchor Marcos, Juan Carlos; Puertas Prieto, Alberto; de la Rosa Fraile, Manuel; Salcedo Abizanda, Salvador; Sánchez Luna, Manuel; Sanchez Pérez, María José; Torrejon Cardoso, Rafael

    2013-03-01

    Group B streptococci (GBS) remain the most common cause of early onset neonatal sepsis. In 2003 the Spanish Societies of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Neonatology, Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology, Chemotherapy, and Family and Community Medicine published updated recommendations for the prevention of early onset neonatal GBS infection. It was recommended to study all pregnant women at 35-37 weeks gestation to determine whether they were colonised by GBS, and to administer intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis (IAP) to all colonised women. There has been a significant reduction in neonatal GBS infection in Spain following the widespread application of IAP. Today most cases of early onset GBS neonatal infection are due to false negative results in detecting GBS, to the lack of communication between laboratories and obstetric units, and to failures in implementing the prevention protocol. In 2010, new recommendations were published by the CDC, and this fact, together with the new knowledge and experience available, has led to the publishing of these new recommendations. The main changes in these revised recommendations include: microbiological methods to identify pregnant GBS carriers and for testing GBS antibiotic sensitivity, and the antibiotics used for IAP are updated; The significance of the presence of GBS in urine, including criteria for the diagnosis of UTI and asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy are clarified; IAP in preterm labour and premature rupture of membranes, and the management of the newborn in relation to GBS carrier status of the mother are also revised. These recommendations are only addressed to the prevention of GBS early neonatal infection, are not effective against late neonatal infection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  18. Improving the processes of care and outcomes in obstetrics/gynecology.

    PubMed

    Simon, N V; Heaps, K P; Chodroff, C H

    1997-09-01

    The obstetrics/gynecology department of York Hospital (York Health System, York, Pennsylvania) initiated a program to improve the processes of care and control costs for common women's and newborns' health care services. Twelve clinical policies were established between June 1993 and February 1995. CONDUCTING THE QUALITY IMPROVEMENT (QI) PROJECTS: Using the plan-do-check-act (PDCA) improvement cycle method, the QI group established clinical pathways for high-volume conditions or procedures known to have low rates of complications and clinical guidelines for those conditions or procedures not requiring coordinated efforts of a group of health care professionals. EXAMPLE--PYELONEPHRITIS IN PREGNANCY: The literature had indicated that the prevalence of pyelonephritis can be decreased by identifying and treating asymptomatic bacteriuria early in prenatal care. After the validity of the clinical policy was demonstrated in the resident service, the policy was extended to all private obstetric practices. Dissemination of the finding that most of the admissions for pyelonephritis were for referred patients (for whom we had no control over prenatal care) or for patients referred by private physicians who were not yet following the guidelines quickly led to complete compliance by our obstetricians and other health care providers referring patients to the York Health System. The 12 clinical policies resulted in the elimination of 113 admissions and 5,595 inpatient days and in the reduction of the cost of patient care by $1,306,214 for the years 1994-1995 and 1995-1996 combined, without apparent adverse effects on patient health. A voluntary clinical policies program can change the culture of a department and lead to cost-effectiveness and better quality of patient care.

  19. [Bacterial and fungal flora in some clinical materials in children with diabetes type 1].

    PubMed

    Nowakowska, Maria; Jarosz-Chobot, Przemysława

    2002-01-01

    Children with poorly controlled diabetes are exposed to infections often caused by endogenous flora. To estimate incidence of pathogenic and opportunistic bacteria and fungi of Candida species. The urine, smears from the oral cavity and the pharynx as well as from the urogenital tract were examined in 130 children (62 boys and 68 girls) hospitalised because of newly diagnosed (53 children) or poorly controlled diabetes (77 patients). 29 children with short stature were the control group, in these children only the urine and smears from the oral cavity and the pharynx were only examined. Culture and identification of microorganisms were performed according to the methods used in microbiological diagnosis. Antifungal susceptibility testing was estimated with FUNGITEST Sanofi Pasteur and ATB Fungus bioMérieux. Staphylococcus aureus in 43 diabetic children (33%) was observed. Staphylococcus aureus from different clinical materials was isolated; there was no difference in the frequency of occurrence of S. aureus in flora of the oral cavity and the pharynx in diabetic children in comparison with healthy children. Streptococcus group B in 29 (22.3%) was isolated, among them in 10 children from the pharynx. In healthy children Streptococcus group B was not observed. A significant bacteriuria was observed in 15 diabetic children (11.5%) and in 2 healthy children (6.9%). Fungi in 58 diabetic children (44.6%) were observed. Most often isolated species was Candida albicans (49 children), rarely other species. Candida spp. from different clinical materials was isolated, also in a non significant amount from the urine. Microbial analysis of vagina should be routinely performed in diabetic adolescents. Urine of diabetics should be examined towards fungi.

  20. Effects of processing delay, temperature, and transport tube type on results of quantitative bacterial culture of canine urine.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Carly A; Bishop, Micah A; Pack, Julie D; Cook, Audrey K; Lawhon, Sara D

    2016-01-15

    To determine the impact of processing delay, temperature, and transport tube type on results of quantitative bacterial culture (QBC) of canine urine. Diagnostic test evaluation. 60 mL of pooled urine from 4 dogs, divided into six 10-mL aliquots. Urine aliquots were spiked with bacteria from 1 of 6 independent Escherichia coli cultures to achieve a target bacterial concentration of 10(5) CFUs/mL. One milliliter from each aliquot was transferred into 5 silicone-coated clot tubes (SCTs) and 5 urine transport tubes (UTTs). Samples were stored at 4°C (39°F) and 25°C (77°F) for 0, 8, and 24 hours, and then standard QBCs were performed. Median bacterial concentration for urine samples stored in a UTT for 24 hours at 4°C was lower than that for samples stored in an SCT under the same conditions. Conversely, a substantial decrease in median bacterial concentration was identified for samples stored for 24 hours in an SCT at 25°C, compared with the median concentration for samples stored in a UTT under the same conditions. Median bacterial concentration in samples stored in an SCT at 25°C for 24 hours (275 CFUs/mL) was less than the cutoff typically used to define clinically important bacteriuria by use of urine samples obtained via cystocentesis (ie, > 1,000 CFUs/mL). Canine urine samples submitted for immediate QBC should be transported in plain sterile tubes such as SCTs. When prolonged (24-hour) storage at room temperature is anticipated, urine samples should be transported in UTTs.

  1. Cutoff values for bacteria and leukocytes for urine sediment analyzer FUS200 in culture-positive urinary-tract infections.

    PubMed

    Kocer, Derya; Sarıguzel, Fatma M; Karakukcu, Cıgdem

    2014-08-01

    The microscopic analysis of urine is essential for the diagnosis of patients with urinary tract infections. Quantitative urine culture is the 'gold standard' method for definitive diagnosis of urinary-tract infections, but it is labor-intensive, time consuming, and does not provide the same-day results. The aim of this study was to evaluate the analytical and diagnostic performance of the FUS200 (Changchun Dirui Industry, China), a new urine sedimentation analyzer in comparison to urine culture as the reference method. We evaluated 1000 urine samples, submitted for culture and urine analysis with a preliminary diagnosis of urinary-tract infection. Cut-off values for the FUS200 were determined by comparing the results with urine cultures. The cut-off values by the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve technique, sensitivity, and specificity were calculated for bacteria and white blood cells (WBCs). Among the 1000 urine specimens submitted for culture, 637 cultures (63.7%) were negative, and 363 were (36.3%) positive. The best cut-off values obtained from ROC analysis were 16/μL for bacteriuria (sensitivity: 82.3%, specificity: 58%), and 34/μL for WBCs (sensitivity: 72.3%, specificity: 65.2%). The area under the curve (AUC) for the bacteria and WBCs count were 0.71 (95% CI: 0.67-0.74) and, 0.72 (95% CI: 0.69-0.76) respectively. The most important requirement of a rapid diagnostic screening test is sensitivity, and, in this perspective, an unsatisfactory sensitivity by using bacteria recognition and quantification performed by the FUS200 analyzer has been observed. After further technical improvements in particle recognition and laboratory personnel training, the FUS200 might show better results.

  2. Escherichia coli global gene expression in urine from women with urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Erin C; Lloyd, Amanda L; Rasko, David A; Faerber, Gary J; Mobley, Harry L T

    2010-11-11

    Murine models of urinary tract infection (UTI) have provided substantial data identifying uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) virulence factors and assessing their expression in vivo. However, it is unclear how gene expression in these animal models compares to UPEC gene expression during UTI in humans. To address this, we used a UPEC strain CFT073-specific microarray to measure global gene expression in eight E. coli isolates monitored directly from the urine of eight women presenting at a clinic with bacteriuria. The resulting gene expression profiles were compared to those of the same E. coli isolates cultured statically to exponential phase in pooled, sterilized human urine ex vivo. Known fitness factors, including iron acquisition and peptide transport systems, were highly expressed during human UTI and support a model in which UPEC replicates rapidly in vivo. While these findings were often consistent with previous data obtained from the murine UTI model, host-specific differences were observed. Most strikingly, expression of type 1 fimbrial genes, which are among the most highly expressed genes during murine experimental UTI and encode an essential virulence factor for this experimental model, was undetectable in six of the eight E. coli strains from women with UTI. Despite the lack of type 1 fimbrial expression in the urine samples, these E. coli isolates were generally capable of expressing type 1 fimbriae in vitro and highly upregulated fimA upon experimental murine infection. The findings presented here provide insight into the metabolic and pathogenic profile of UPEC in urine from women with UTI and represent the first transcriptome analysis for any pathogenic E. coli during a naturally occurring infection in humans.

  3. Universal screening and decolonization for control of MRSA in nursing homes: a cluster randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Cristina; Petignat, Christiane; Masserey, Eric; Büla, Christophe; Burnand, Bernard; Rousson, Valentin; Blanc, Dominique S; Zanetti, Giorgio

    2015-04-01

    The risk of carrying methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is higher among nursing home (NH) residents than in the general population. However, control strategies are not clearly defined in this setting. In this study, we compared the impact of standard precautions either alone (control) or combined with screening of residents and decolonization of carriers (intervention) to control MRSA in NHs. Cluster randomized controlled trial. NHs of the state of Vaud, Switzerland. Of 157 total NHs in Vaud, 104 (67%) participated in the study. Standard precautions were enforced in all participating NHs, and residents underwent MRSA screening at baseline and 12 months thereafter. All carriers identified in intervention NHs, either at study entry or among newly admitted residents, underwent topical decolonization combined with environmental disinfection, except in cases of MRSA infection, MRSA bacteriuria, or deep skin ulcers. NHs were randomly allocated to a control group (51 NHs, 2,412 residents) or an intervention group (53 NHs, 2,338 residents). Characteristics of NHs and residents were similar in both groups. The mean screening rates were 86% (range, 27%-100%) in control NHs and 87% (20%-100%) in intervention NHs. Prevalence of MRSA carriage averaged 8.9% in both control NHs (range, 0%-43%) and intervention NHs (range, 0%-38%) at baseline, and this rate significantly declined to 6.6% in control NHs and to 5.8% in intervention NHs after 12 months. However, the decline did not differ between groups (P=.66). Universal screening followed by decolonization of carriers did not significantly reduce the prevalence of the MRSA carriage rate at 1 year compared with standard precautions.

  4. Long-term Outcome of 1-step Kidney Transplantation and Bladder Augmentation Procedure in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Cleper, Roxana; Ben Meir, David; Krause, Irit; Livne, Pinchas; Mor, Eitan; Davidovits, Miriam; Dagan, Amit

    2018-06-01

    Guidelines for bladder augmentation (BA) in kidney transplantation (KT) recipients are not well-defined. In our center, simultaneous BA with KT (BA-KT) is performed. We assessed transplantation outcomes of this unique extensive procedure. A case-control single center retrospective study. Transplantation outcomes were compared with those of KT recipients who did not need BA. Compared with 22 patients who underwent KT only, for 9 who underwent BA-KT, surgical complications and the need for revision in the early posttransplantation period were similar; early graft function was better: estimated glomerular filtration rate, 96.5 ± 17.1 versus 79.4 ± 16.6 mL/min at 0 to 6 months (P = 0.02); posttransplantation clean intermittent catheterization was more often needed: by 78% (7/9) versus 13% (3/22); and asymptomatic bacteriuria was more common: 100% versus 9% during the first 6 months (P < 0.001), 55% versus 9% (P = 0.02) and 66.6% versus 9% during the first and second years, respectively (P = 0.004). Urinary tract infection (UTI) incidence was also higher: 100% versus 23% during the first 6 months and 44% versus 9% during the second year posttransplantation. Graft function deteriorated significantly in the BA-KT group by the fifth posttransplantation year: estimated glomerular filtration rate was 47.7 ± 39.7 mL/min versus 69 ± 21.3 mL/min, with only 6 (66%) of 9 functioning grafts versus 100% in the KT only group. Causes of graft loss were noncompliance with drug therapy in 2 patients and recurrent UTIs in 2 patients. Excellent short-term outcome for simultaneous BA-KT is threatened by graft loss due to a high prevalence of UTIs and patient noncompliance with the demanding complex posttransplantation therapy.

  5. Development and validation of a nomogram predicting recurrence risk in women with symptomatic urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Cai, Tommaso; Mazzoli, Sandra; Migno, Serena; Malossini, Gianni; Lanzafame, Paolo; Mereu, Liliana; Tateo, Saverio; Wagenlehner, Florian M E; Pickard, Robert S; Bartoletti, Riccardo

    2014-09-01

    To develop and externally validate a novel nomogram predicting recurrence risk probability at 12 months in women after an episode of urinary tract infection. The study included 768 women from Santa Maria Annunziata Hospital, Florence, Italy, affected by urinary tract infections from January 2005 to December 2009. Another 373 women with the same criteria enrolled at Santa Chiara Hospital, Trento, Italy, from January 2010 to June 2012 were used to externally validate and calibrate the nomogram. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression models tested the relationship between urinary tract infection recurrence risk, and patient clinical and laboratory characteristics. The nomogram was evaluated by calculating concordance probabilities, as well as testing calibration of predicted urinary tract infection recurrence with observed urinary tract infections. Nomogram variables included: number of partners, bowel function, type of pathogens isolated (Gram-positive/negative), hormonal status, number of previous urinary tract infection recurrences and previous treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria. Of the original development data, 261 out of 768 women presented at least one episode of recurrence of urinary tract infection (33.9%). The nomogram had a concordance index of 0.85. The nomogram predictions were well calibrated. This model showed high discrimination accuracy and favorable calibration characteristics. In the validation group (373 women), the overall c-index was 0.83 (P = 0.003, 95% confidence interval 0.51-0.99), whereas the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.85 (95% confidence interval 0.79-0.91). The present nomogram accurately predicts the recurrence risk of urinary tract infection at 12 months, and can assist in identifying women at high risk of symptomatic recurrence that can be suitable candidates for a prophylactic strategy. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  6. Inflammatory response to Escherichia coli urinary tract infection in the neurogenic bladder of the spinal cord injured host.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Rajeev; Madden-Fuentes, Ramiro J; Ortiz, Tara K; Balsara, Zarine; Tang, Yuping; Nseyo, Unwanaobong; Wiener, John S; Ross, Sherry S; Seed, Patrick C

    2014-05-01

    Urinary tract infections cause significant morbidity in patients with spinal cord injury. An in vivo spinal cord injured rat model of experimental Escherichia coli urinary tract infection mimics human disease with enhanced susceptibility to urinary tract infection compared to controls. We hypothesized that a dysregulated inflammatory response contributes to enhanced susceptibility to urinary tract infection. Spinal cord injured and sham injured rats were inoculated transurethrally with E. coli. Transcript levels of 84 inflammatory pathway genes were measured in bladder tissue of each group before infection, 24 hours after infection and after 5 days of antibiotic therapy. Before infection quantitative polymerase chain reaction array revealed greater than twofold up-regulation in the proinflammatory factor transcripts slc11a1, ccl4 and il1β, and down-regulation of the antimicrobial peptides lcn2 and mpo in spinal cord injured vs control bladders. At 24 hours after infection spinal cord injured bladders showed an attenuated innate immune response with decreased expression of il6, slc11a1, il1β and lcn2, and decreased il10 and slpi expression compared to controls. Despite clearance of bacteriuria with antibiotics spinal cord injured rats had delayed induction of il6 transcription and a delayed anti-inflammatory response with decreased il10 and slpi transcript levels relative to controls. Spinal cord injured bladders fail to mount a characteristic inflammatory response to E. coli infection and cannot suppress inflammation after infection is eliminated. This may lead to increased susceptibility to urinary tract infection and persistent chronic inflammation through neural mediated pathways, which to our knowledge remain to be defined. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Flow cytometry analysis using sysmex UF-1000i classifies uropathogens based on bacterial, leukocyte, and erythrocyte counts in urine specimens among patients with urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Monsen, Tor; Rydén, Patrik

    2015-02-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the second most common bacterial infection. Urine culture is the gold standard for diagnosis, but new techniques, such as flow cytometry analysis (FCA), have been introduced. The aim of the present study was to evaluate FCA characteristics regarding bacteriuria, leukocyturia, and erythrocyturia in relation to cultured uropathogens in specimens from patients with a suspected UTI. We also wanted to evaluate whether the FCA characteristics can identify uropathogens prior to culture. From a prospective study, 1,587 consecutive urine specimens underwent FCA prior to culture during January and February 2012. Outpatients and inpatients (79.6% and 19.4%, respectively) were included, of whom women represented 67.5%. In total, 620 specimens yielded growth, of which Escherichia coli represented 65%, Enterococcus spp. 8%, Klebsiella spp. 7%, and Staphylococcus spp. 5%. For the uropathogens, the outcome of FCA was compared against the results for specimens with E. coli and those with a negative culture. E. coli had high bacterial (median, 17,914/μl), leukocyte (median, 348/μl), and erythrocyte (median, 23/μl) counts. With the exception of Klebsiella spp., the majority of the uropathogens had considerable or significantly lower bacterial counts than that of E. coli. High leukocyte counts were found in specimens with Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and group C streptococci. Elevated erythrocyte counts were found for P. vulgaris, P. aeruginosa, and group C streptococci, as well as for Staphylococcus saprophyticus. In essence, FCA adds new information about the bacterial, leukocyte, and erythrocyte counts in urine specimens for different uropathogens. Based on FCA characteristics, uropathogens can be classified and identified prior to culture. E. coli and Klebsiella spp. have similar FCA characteristics. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Developing Mobile Clinical Decision Support for Nursing Home Staff Assessment of Urinary Tract Infection using Goal-Directed Design.

    PubMed

    Jones, Wallace; Drake, Cynthia; Mack, David; Reeder, Blaine; Trautner, Barbara; Wald, Heidi

    2017-06-20

    Unique characteristics of nursing homes (NHs) contribute to high rates of inappropriate antibiotic use for asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB), a benign condition. A mobile clinical decision support system (CDSS) may support NH staff in differentiating urinary tract infections (UTI) from ASB and reducing antibiotic days. We used Goal-Directed Design to: 1) Characterize information needs for UTI identification and management in NHs; 2) Develop UTI Decide, a mobile CDSS prototype informed by personas and scenarios of use constructed from Aim 1 findings; 3) Evaluate the UTI Decide prototype with NH staff. Focus groups were conducted with providers and nurses in NHs in Denver, Colorado (n= 24). Qualitative descriptive analysis was applied to focus group transcripts to identify information needs and themes related to mobile clinical decision support for UTI identification and management. Personas representing typical end users were developed; typical clinical context scenarios were constructed using information needs as goals. Usability testing was performed using cognitive walk-throughs and a think-aloud protocol. Four information needs were identified including guidance regarding resident assessment; communication with providers; care planning; and urine culture interpretation. Design of a web-based application incorporating a published decision support algorithm for evidence-based UTI diagnoses proceeded with a focus on nursing information needs during resident assessment and communication with providers. Certified nursing assistant (CNA) and registered nurse (RN) personas were constructed in 4 context scenarios with associated key path scenarios. After field testing, a high fidelity prototype of UTI Decide was completed and evaluated by potential end users. Design recommendations and content recommendations were elicited. Goal-Directed Design informed the development of a mobile CDSS supporting participant-identified information needs for UTI assessment and communication

  9. Does Nonpayment for Hospital-Acquired Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections Lead to Overtesting and Increased Antimicrobial Prescribing?

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Daniel J.; Meddings, Jennifer; Saint, Sanjay; Lautenbach, Ebbing; Shardell, Michelle; Anderson, Deverick; Milstone, Aaron M.; Drees, Marci; Pineles, Lisa; Safdar, Nasia; Bowling, Jason; Henderson, David; Yokoe, Deborah; Harris, Anthony D.

    2012-01-01

    Background. On 1 October 2008, in an effort to stimulate efforts to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI), the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) implemented a policy of not reimbursing hospitals for hospital-acquired CAUTI. Since any urinary tract infection present on admission would not fall under this initiative, concerns have been raised that the policy may encourage more testing for and treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria. Methods. We conducted a retrospective multicenter cohort study with time series analysis of all adults admitted to the hospital 16 months before and 16 months after policy implementation among participating Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America Research Network