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Sample records for baculatum type strain

  1. Complete genome sequence of Desulfomicrobium baculatum type strain (XT)

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, Alex; Spring, Stefan; Goker, Markus; Schneider, Susanne; Lapidus, Alla; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jefferies, Cynthia C; Meincke, Linda; Sims, David; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C; Han, Cliff; Chain, Patrick; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Lucas, Susan

    2009-05-20

    Desulfomicrobium baculatum is the type species of the genus Desulfomicrobium, which is the type genus of the family Desulfomicrobiaceae. It is of phylogenetic interest because of the isolated location of the family Desulfomicrobiaceae within the order Desulfovibrionales. D. baculatum strain XT is a Gram-negative, motile, sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from water-saturated manganese carbonate ore. It is strictly anaerobic and does not require NaCl for growth, although NaCl concentrations up to 6percent (w/v) are tolerated. The metabolism is respiratory or fermentative. In the presence of sulfate, pyruvate and lactate are incompletely oxidized to acetate and CO2. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the deltaproteobacterial family Desulfomicrobiaceae, and this 3,942,657 bp long single replicon genome with its 3494 protein-coding and 72 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  2. Complete genome sequence of Desulfomicrobium baculatum type strain (XT)

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, A; Spring, Stefan; Goker, Markus; Schneider, Susan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Meincke, Linda; Sims, David; Brettin, Tom; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2009-01-01

    Desulfomicrobium baculatum is the type species of the genus Desulfomicrobium, which is the type genus of the family Desulfomicrobiaceae. It is of phylogenetic interest because of the isolated location of the family Desulfomicrobiaceae within the order Desulfovibrionales. D. baculatum strain XT is a Gram-negative, motile, sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from wa-ter-saturated manganese carbonate ore. It is strictly anaerobic and does not require NaCl for growth, although NaCl concentrations up to 6% (w/v) are tolerated. The metabolism is respi-ratory or fermentative. In the presence of sulfate, pyruvate and lactate are incompletely oxi-dized to acetate and CO2. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the deltaproteobacterial family Desulfomicrobiaceae, and this 3,942,657 bp long single replicon genome with its 3494 protein-coding and 72 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  3. SNIT: SNP identification for strain typing

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    With ever-increasing numbers of microbial genomes being sequenced, efficient tools are needed to perform strain-level identification of any newly sequenced genome. Here, we present the SNP identification for strain typing (SNIT) pipeline, a fast and accurate software system that compares a newly sequenced bacterial genome with other genomes of the same species to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and small insertions/deletions (indels). Based on this information, the pipeline analyzes the polymorphic loci present in all input genomes to identify the genome that has the fewest differences with the newly sequenced genome. Similarly, for each of the other genomes, SNIT identifies the input genome with the fewest differences. Results from five bacterial species show that the SNIT pipeline identifies the correct closest neighbor with 75% to 100% accuracy. The SNIT pipeline is available for download at http://www.bhsai.org/snit.html PMID:21902825

  4. Typing of Proteus strains by proticine production and sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Senior, B W

    1977-02-01

    A simple, reliable and highly discriminating scheme for the bacteriocine typing of Proteus has been developed. Strains are typed on MacConkey's agar according to their ability to produce a proticine active against one of 14 indicator strains having a single and specific proticine sensitivity and also according to their sensitivity to the different proticines of 13 proticine-producing strains. This new scheme of combined production and sensitivity typing was formulated after 250 strains of Proteus from clinical material had been examined for the production of proticines active against the 24 indicator strains of Cradock-Watson's proticine typing scheme and for proticine activity and sensitivity towards each other. Three new types of proticinogenic strains were discovered and defined. Strains producing proticines of types 1, 2 and 3 were isolated frequently. These common proticines could be subtyped by their different actions on newly characterised indicator strains. By means of this production/sensitivity (P/S) typing scheme, 250 Proteus strains were differentiated into 90 distinct types, whereas typing by sensitivity alone distinguished only 40 types and typing by production alone distinguished only 20 types (including subtypes).

  5. SNIT: SNP Identification for Strain Typing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Durkin S, Schneewind O, Nierman WC: Genome sequencing and analysis of Yersina pestis KIM D27, an avirulent strain exempt from select agent regulation. PLoS...gener- ated from next-generation sequencing (NGS) data, we selected the recently published Yersinia pestis KIM D27 genome [12]. The Y. pestis D27 strain...is a deriva- tive of Y. pestis KIM 10 strain (accession no. NC_004088). The Y. pestis KIM D27 draft genome (accession no. ADDC00000000) was generated

  6. Competitive inhibition between different Clostridium botulinum types and strains.

    PubMed

    Eklund, M W; Poysky, F T; Peterson, M E; Paranjpye, R N; Pelroy, G A

    2004-12-01

    Mixtures of proteolytic and nonproteolytic strains of toxigenic Clostridium botulinum types A, B, and F; nonproteolytic types B, E, and F; Clostridium sporogenes; and nontoxic E-like organisms resembling nonproteolytic C. botulinum were tested against each other for the purpose of selecting a mixture of compatible C. botulinum strains for inoculated pack studies on the basis of their sensitivity to bacteriophages and bacteriocin-like agents. All of the proteolytic strains produced bacteriocin-like agents that were inhibitory to three or more of the other proteolytic types and C. sporogenes. When selected strains of proteolytic types A and B were grown together, type A cultures produced neurotoxin, but type B toxin production was inhibited. Nonproteolytic strains of C. botulinum also produced bacteriocin-like agents against each other. Of these, type E strain EF4 produced bacteriocin-like agents against both proteolytic and nonproteolytic types of C. botulinum and C. sporogenes. EF4, however, was not inhibitory to the nontoxigenic E-like strains. When EF4 was grown with type A strain 62A, it had an inhibitory effect on type A toxin production. Strain 62A inactivated the type E toxin of EF4 after 7 to 21 days at 30 degrees C. On the basis of the production of these bacteriocin-like agents by different strains of C. botulinum and their potential effect on neurotoxin production, it is very important that compatible strains are used in mixtures for inoculated pack studies to determine the safety of a food process or product.

  7. Draft Genome Assembly of Neisseria lactamica Type Strain A7515.

    PubMed

    Minogue, T D; Daligault, H A; Davenport, K W; Bishop-Lilly, K A; Bruce, D C; Chain, P S; Chertkov, O; Coyne, S R; Freitas, T; Frey, K G; Jaissle, J; Koroleva, G I; Ladner, J T; Palacios, G F; Redden, C L; Xu, Y; Johnson, S L

    2014-09-25

    We present the scaffolded genome assembly of Neisseria lactamica type strain A7515 (ATCC 23970) as submitted to NCBI under accession no. JOVI00000000. This type strain of the lactose-fermenting Neisseria species is often used in quality control testing and intra-genus phylogenetic analyses. The assembly includes four contigs placed into a single scaffold.

  8. Prior Inoculation with Type B Strains of Francisella tularensis Provides Partial Protection against Virulent Type A Strains in Cottontail Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Vienna R.; Adney, Danielle R.; Olea-Popelka, Francisco; Bowen, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent bacterium that is capable of causing severe disease (tularemia) in a wide range of species. This organism is characterized into two distinct subspecies: tularensis (type A) and holarctica (type B) which vary in several crucial ways, with some type A strains having been found to be considerably more virulent in humans and laboratory animals. Cottontail rabbits have been widely implicated as a reservoir species for this subspecies; however, experimental inoculation in our laboratory revealed type A organisms to be highly virulent, resulting in 100% mortality following challenge with 50–100 organisms. Inoculation of cottontail rabbits with the same number of organisms from type B strains of bacteria was found to be rarely lethal and to result in a robust humoral immune response. The objective of this study was to characterize the protection afforded by a prior challenge with type B strains against a later inoculation with a type A strain in North American cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus spp). Previous infection with a type B strain of organism was found to lengthen survival time and in some cases prevent death following inoculation with a type A2 strain of F. tularensis. In contrast, inoculation of a type A1b strain was uniformly lethal in cottontail rabbits irrespective of a prior type B inoculation. These findings provide important insight about the role cottontail rabbits may play in environmental maintenance and transmission of this organism. PMID:26474413

  9. Diphthericin types, bacteriophage types and serotypes of Corynebacterium diphtheriae strains isolated in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, L. F.; Colman, G.

    1973-01-01

    A dipthericin typing scheme has been constructed using 441 strains of Corynebacterium diptheriae isolated in eastern Australia from 1962 to 1971. Ten types have been distinguished using seven strains of C. diphtheriae and two strains of C. belfanti as indicators of the diphthericins produced by the newly isolated strains. Strains grouped into types L2, L3 and L3a were found only in Melbourne and types L1 and L4 were predominant in Sydney. Type L5 strains were isolated intermittently throughout the period of study and were found in all eastern states. Numerical analysis of the characteristics of the strains suggests that associations exist between, on the one hand, diphthericin type and, on the other hand, bacteriophage type, serotype and biochemical activity. PMID:4203597

  10. Comparison of four molecular methods to type Salmonella Enteritidis strains.

    PubMed

    Campioni, Fábio; Pitondo-Silva, André; Bergamini, Alzira M M; Falcão, Juliana P

    2015-05-01

    This study compared the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-PCR (ERIC-PCR), multilocus variable-number of tanden-repeat analysis (MLVA), and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) methods for typing 188 Salmonella Enteritidis strains from different sources isolated over a 24-year period in Brazil. PFGE and ERIC-PCR were more efficient than MLVA for subtyping the strains. However, MLVA provided additional epidemiological information for those strains. In addition, MLST showed the Brazilian strains as belonging to the main clonal complex of S. Enteritidis, CC11, and provided the first report of two new STs in the S. enterica database but could not properly subtype the strains. Our results showed that the use of PFGE or ERIC-PCR together with MLVA is suitable to efficiently subtype S. Enteritidis strains and provide important epidemiological information.

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium chimaera Type Strain Fl-0169

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report the draft genome sequence of the type strain Mycobacterium chimaera Fl-0169T, a member of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). M. chimaera Fl-0169T was isolated from a patient in Italy and is highly similar to strains of M. chimaera isolated in Ireland, though Fl-016...

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium chimaera Type Strain Fl-0169

    PubMed Central

    Tokarev, Vasily; Kessler, Collin; McLimans, Christopher; Gomez-Alvarez, Vicente; Wright, Justin; King, Dawn; Lamendella, Regina

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report here the draft genome sequence of the type strain Mycobacterium chimaera Fl-0169, a member of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). M. chimaera Fl-0169T was isolated from a patient in Italy and is highly similar to strains of M. chimaera isolated in Ireland, although Fl-0169T possesses unique virulence genes. PMID:28232435

  13. Multilocus sequence typing of oenological Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Rosario; Gómez, Alicia; Robles, Virginia; Rodríguez, Patricia; Cebollero, Eduardo; Tabera, Laura; Carrascosa, Alfonso V; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2009-12-01

    This study describes the application of a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis for molecular discrimination at the strain level of Spanish wine yeast strains. The discrimination power of MLST is compared to mitochondrial RFLP analysis. Fragments of the ADP1, ACC1, RPN2, GLN4, and ALA1 genes were amplified by PCR from chromosomal DNA of 18 wine Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. Ten polymorphic sites were found in the five loci analyzed showing 13 different genotypes, with 11 of them represented by only one strain. RFLP analysis of the same 18 wine yeast strains showed seventeen different mitochondrial patterns. Phylogenetic relationships among the strains analyzed, inferred by MLST data, showed wine isolates of S. cerevisiae as a rather homogeneous group. The discrimination potential of mitochondrial RFLP analysis was superior to the MLST scheme used in this work. However, MLST analysis allowed an easy construction of reliable phylogenetic trees. MLST analysis offers the possibility of typing wine S. cerevisiae strains simultaneously to the study of the genetic relationship among them.

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium chimaera Type Strain Fl-0169.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, Stacy; Tokarev, Vasily; Kessler, Collin; McLimans, Christopher; Gomez-Alvarez, Vicente; Wright, Justin; King, Dawn; Lamendella, Regina

    2017-02-23

    We report here the draft genome sequence of the type strain Mycobacterium chimaera Fl-0169, a member of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). M. chimaera Fl-0169(T) was isolated from a patient in Italy and is highly similar to strains of M. chimaera isolated in Ireland, although Fl-0169(T) possesses unique virulence genes. Copyright © 2017 Pfaller et al.

  15. [Multilocus sequence-typing for characterization of Moscow strains of Haemophilus influenzae type b].

    PubMed

    Platonov, A E; Mironov, K O; Iatsyshina, S B; Koroleva, I S; Platonova, O V; Gushchin, A E; Shipulin, G A

    2003-01-01

    Haemophilius influenzae, type b (Hib) bacteria, were genotyped by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) using 5 loci (adk, fucK, mdh, pgi, recA). 42 Moscow Hib strains (including 38 isolates form cerebrospinal fluid of children, who had purulent meningitis in 1999-2001, and 4 strains isolated from healthy carriers of Hib), as well as 2 strains from Yekaterinburg were studied. In MLST a strain is characterized, by alleles and their combinations (an allele profile) referred to also as sequence-type (ST). 9 Sts were identified within the Russian Hib bacteria: ST-1 was found in 25 strains (57%), ST-12 was found in 8 strains (18%), ST-11 was found in 4 strains (9%) and ST-15 was found in 2 strains (4.5%); all other STs strains (13, 14, 16, 17, 51) were found in isolated cases (2.3%). A comparison of allelic profiles and of nucleotide sequences showed that 93% of Russian isolates, i.e. strain with ST-1, 11, 12, 13, 15 and 17, belong to one and the same clonal complex. 2 isolates from Norway and Sweden from among 7 foreign Hib strains studied up to now can be described as belonging to the same clonal complex; 5 Hib strains were different from the Russian ones.

  16. Revision of the taxonomic status of type strains of Mesorhizobium loti and reclassification of strain USDA 3471T as the type strain of Mesorhizobiumerdmanii sp. nov. and ATCC 33669T as the type strain of Mesorhizobiumjarvisii sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Hidalgo, Pilar; Ramírez-Bahena, Martha Helena; Flores-Félix, José David; Rivas, Raúl; Igual, José M; Mateos, Pedro F; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio; León-Barrios, Milagros; Peix, Álvaro; Velázquez, Encarna

    2015-06-01

    The species Mesorhizobim loti was isolated from nodules of Lotus corniculatus and its type strain deposited in several collections. Some of these type strains, such as those deposited in the USDA and ATCC collections before 1990, are not coincident with the original strain, NZP 2213T, deposited in the NZP culture collection. The analysis of the 16S rRNA gene showed that strains USDA 3471T and ATCC 33669T formed independent branches from that occupied by Mesorhizobium loti NZP 2213T and related to those occupied by Mesorhizobium opportunistum WSM2075T and Mesorhizobium huakuii IFO 15243T, respectively, with 99.9 % similarity in both cases. However, the analysis of concatenated recA, atpD and glnII genes with similarities lower than 96, 98 and 94 %, respectively, between strains USDA 3471T and M. opportunistum WSM2075T and between strains ATCC 33669T and M. huakuii IFO 15243T, indicated that the strains USDA 3471T and ATCC 33669T represent different species of the genus Mesorhizobium. These results were confirmed by DNA-DNA hybridization experiments and phenotypic characterization. Therefore, the two strains were reclassified as representatives of the two species Mesorhizobium erdmanii sp. nov. (type strain USDA 3471T = CECT 8631T = LMG 17826t2T) and Mesorhizobium jarvisii sp. nov. (type strain ATCC 33669T = CECT 8632T = LMG 28313T).

  17. Brunenders: a partially attenuated historic poliovirus type I vaccine strain.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Barbara P; Liu, Ying; Brandjes, Alies; van Hoek, Vladimir; de Los Rios Oakes, Isabel; Lewis, John; Wimmer, Eckard; Custers, Jerome H H V; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Cello, Jeronimo; Edo-Matas, Diana

    2015-09-01

    Brunenders, a type I poliovirus (PV) strain, was developed in 1952 by J. F. Enders and colleagues through serial in vitro passaging of the parental Brunhilde strain, and was reported to display partial neuroattenuation in monkeys. This phenotype of attenuation encouraged two vaccine manufacturers to adopt Brunenders as the type I component for their inactivated poliovirus vaccines (IPVs) in the 1950s, although today no licensed IPV vaccine contains Brunenders. Here we confirmed, in a transgenic mouse model, the report of Enders on the reduced neurovirulence of Brunenders. Although dramatically neuroattenuated relative to WT PV strains, Brunenders remains more virulent than the attenuated oral vaccine strain, Sabin 1. Importantly, the neuroattenuation of Brunenders does not affect in vitro growth kinetics and in vitro antigenicity, which were similar to those of Mahoney, the conventional type I IPV vaccine strain. We showed, by full nucleotide sequencing, that Brunhilde and Brunenders differ at 31 nucleotides, eight of which lead to amino acid changes, all located in the capsid. Upon exchanging the Brunenders capsid sequence with that of the Mahoney capsid, WT neurovirulence was regained in vivo, suggesting a role for the capsid mutations in Brunenders attenuation. To date, as polio eradication draws closer, the switch to using attenuated strains for IPV is actively being pursued. Brunenders preceded this novel strategy as a partially attenuated IPV strain, accompanied by decades of successful use in the field. Providing data on the attenuation of Brunenders may be of value in the further construction of attenuated PV strains to support the grand pursuit of the global eradication of poliomyelitis.

  18. Complete genome sequence of Methanoculleus marisnigri type strain JR1

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Dalin, Eileen; Barry, Kerrie; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Han, Cliff; Brettin, Tom; Detter, J. Chris; Bruce, David; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pitluck, Sam; Hauser, Loren John; Land, Miriam L; Lucas, Susan; Richardson, P M; Whitman, W. B.; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2009-01-01

    Methanoculleus marisnigri Romesser et al. 1981 is a methanogen belonging to the order Methanomicrobiales within the archaeal phylum Euryarchaeota. The type strain, JR1, was isolated from anoxic sediments of the Black Sea. M. marisnigri is of phylogenetic interest because at the time the sequencing project began only one genome had previously been sequenced from the order Methanomicrobiales. We report here the complete genome sequence of M. marisnigri type strain JR1 and its annotation. This is part of a Joint Genome Institute 2006 Community Sequencing Program to sequence genomes of diverse Archaea.

  19. Complete genome sequence of Methanocorpusculum labreanum type strain Z

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Dalin, Eileen; Barry, Kerrie; Pitluck, Sam; Hauser, Loren John; Land, Miriam L; Lucas, Susan; Richardson, P M; Whitman, W. B.; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2009-01-01

    Methanocorpusculum labreanum is a methanogen belonging to the order Methanomicrobiales within the archaeal phylum Euryarchaeota. The type strain Z was isolated from surface sediments of Tar Pit Lake in the La Brea Tar Pits in Los Angeles, California. M. labreanum is of phylogenetic interest because at the time the sequencing project began only one genome had previously been sequenced from the order Methanomicrobiales. We report here the complete genome sequence of M. labreanum type strain Z and its annotation. This is part of a 2006 Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program project to sequence genomes of diverse Archaea.

  20. A study of the effect of apparent strain on thermal stress measurement for two types of elevated temperature strain gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    A weldable type strain gage was used to measure low level thermal stress in an elevated temperature environment. Foil strain gages used in a comparative manner reveal that the apparent strain of weldable strain gages is not sufficiently known to acquire accurate low level thermal stress data. Apparent strain data acquired from coupon tests reveals a large scatter in apparent strain characteristics among the weldable strain gages. It is concluded that apparent strain data for individual weldable strain gages must be required prior to installation if valid thermal stress data is to be obtained through the temperature range of room temperature to 755 K (900 F).

  1. Molecular methods for strain typing of Candida albicans: a review.

    PubMed

    Saghrouni, F; Ben Abdeljelil, J; Boukadida, J; Ben Said, M

    2013-06-01

    Candida albicans is one of the most medically important fungi because of its high frequency as a commensal and pathogenic microorganism causing superficial as well as invasive infections. Strain typing and delineation of the species are essential for understanding its biology, epidemiology and population structure. A wide range of molecular techniques have been used for this purpose including non-DNA-based methods (multi-locus enzyme electrophoresis), conventional DNA-based methods (electrophoretic karyotyping, random amplified polymorphic DNA, amplified fragment length polymorphism, restriction enzyme analysis with and without hybridization, rep-PCR) and DNA-based methods called exact typing methods because they generate unambiguous and highly reproducible typing data (including microsatellite length polymorphism and multi-locus sequence typing). In this review, the main molecular methods used for C. albicans strain typing are summarized, and their advantages and limitations are discussed with regard to their discriminatory power, reproducibility, cost and ease of performance.

  2. [Standard algorithm of molecular typing of Yersinia pestis strains].

    PubMed

    Eroshenko, G A; Odinokov, G N; Kukleva, L M; Pavlova, A I; Krasnov, Ia M; Shavina, N Iu; Guseva, N P; Vinogradova, N A; Kutyrev, V V

    2012-01-01

    Development of the standard algorithm of molecular typing of Yersinia pestis that ensures establishing of subspecies, biovar and focus membership of the studied isolate. Determination of the characteristic strain genotypes of plague infectious agent of main and nonmain subspecies from various natural foci of plague of the Russian Federation and the near abroad. Genotyping of 192 natural Y. pestis strains of main and nonmain subspecies was performed by using PCR methods, multilocus sequencing and multilocus analysis of variable tandem repeat number. A standard algorithm of molecular typing of plague infectious agent including several stages of Yersinia pestis differentiation by membership: in main and nonmain subspecies, various biovars of the main subspecies, specific subspecies; natural foci and geographic territories was developed. The algorithm is based on 3 typing methods--PCR, multilocus sequence typing and multilocus analysis of variable tandem repeat number using standard DNA targets--life support genes (terC, ilvN, inv, glpD, napA, rhaS and araC) and 7 loci of variable tandem repeats (ms01, ms04, ms06, ms07, ms46, ms62, ms70). The effectiveness of the developed algorithm is shown on the large number of natural Y. pestis strains. Characteristic sequence types of Y. pestis strains of various subspecies and biovars as well as MLVA7 genotypes of strains from natural foci of plague of the Russian Federation and the near abroad were established. The application of the developed algorithm will increase the effectiveness of epidemiologic monitoring of plague infectious agent, and analysis of epidemics and outbreaks of plague with establishing the source of origin of the strain and routes of introduction of the infection.

  3. MLVA typing of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae bacterins and field strains

    PubMed Central

    Tamiozzo, P.; Zamora, R.; Lucchesi, P. M. A.; Estanguet, A.; Parada, J.; Carranza, A.; Camacho, P.; Ambrogi, A.

    2015-01-01

    Because of the lack of information about both the genetic characteristics of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae commercial vaccines and their relationship with field strains, the authors attempted to identify genetic subtypes of some M hyopneumoniae bacterins, and to compare them with M. hyopneumoniae field strains. Six commercial M hyopneumoniae bacterins and 28 bronchoalveolar lavages from pigs at slaughter from three herds were analysed by Multiple-Locus Variable number tandem repeat Analysis (MLVA) on p146R1, p146R3, H4, H5 and p95 loci. The results obtained showed the presence of more than one M hyopneumoniae genotype in some pigs and also in one of the bacterins analysed. It is also worth noting that MLVA typing allowed the distinction among circulating field strains and also when comparing them with vaccine strains, which, knowing the relatedness among them, could be useful in the research of the efficacy of the vaccines. PMID:26495127

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius Type Strain LMG 22219

    PubMed Central

    Abouelkhair, Mohamed A.; Riley, Matthew C.; Bemis, David A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report the first complete genome sequence of LMG 22219 (=ON 86T = CCUG 49543T), the Staphylococcus pseudintermedius type strain isolated from feline lung tissue. This sequence information will facilitate phylogenetic comparisons of staphylococcal species and other bacteria at the genome level. PMID:28209834

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius Type Strain LMG 22219.

    PubMed

    Abouelkhair, Mohamed A; Riley, Matthew C; Bemis, David A; Kania, Stephen A

    2017-02-16

    We report the first complete genome sequence of LMG 22219 (=ON 86(T) = CCUG 49543(T)), the Staphylococcus pseudintermedius type strain isolated from feline lung tissue. This sequence information will facilitate phylogenetic comparisons of staphylococcal species and other bacteria at the genome level.

  6. Characterization of six type A strains of Clostridium botulinum that contain type B toxin gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Kirma, Nameer; Ferreira, Joseph L; Baumstark, Barbara R

    2004-02-16

    Six Clostridium botulinum isolates exhibiting type A toxicity as measured by the mouse bioassay were found to contain both type A and type B neurotoxin DNA sequences. The six strains were divided into three groups based on the DNA sequence of the type B neurotoxin gene. Members of each group exhibited 100% sequence identity over the 3876 bp type B toxin open reading frame. The type B toxin sequence of all groups differed at more than 60 positions when compared to the BGB control strain.

  7. Strain typing with IS200 fingerprints in Salmonella abortusovis.

    PubMed Central

    Schiaffino, A; Beuzón, C R; Uzzau, S; Leori, G; Cappuccinelli, P; Casadesús, J; Rubino, S

    1996-01-01

    A collection of Salmonella abortusovis isolates was examined for the presence of insertion element IS200. All proved to contain three or four copies of the element. One IS200 hybridization band of approximately 9 kb was found in all isolates, indicating that all S. abortusovis strains carry an IS200 element in similar or identical locations; this band can be potentially useful for serovar identification. S. abortusovis collection isolates from distinct geographic areas were highly polymorphic, suggesting that IS200 fingerprints might provide information on the geographic origin of S. abortusovis strains. Isolates obtained from the same geographic area (the island of Sardinia, Italy) were less polymorphic: all shared three constant IS200 hybridization bands, indicating that they derive from a single ancestor. Most strains analyzed contained an additional copy of IS200 in the variable region of the virulence plasmid. Certain Sardinian flocks proved to be infected by only one S. abortusovis strain, while others harbored two strains. Strain typing with IS200 fingerprints proved to be more reliable than plasmid analysis, because the latter yielded a high degree of polymorphism, even among isolates from the same flock. PMID:8779575

  8. Rapid typing, subtyping and RNA quantification of influenza virus type A strains in respiratory secretions.

    PubMed

    Percivalle, Elena; Rovida, Francesca; Piralla, Antonio; Rognoni, Vanina; Zavattoni, Maurizio; Baldanti, Fausto; Marchi, Antonietta; Gerna, Giuseppe

    2008-07-01

    During the winter-spring season 2006-2007, 38 influenza virus strains were identified in patients admitted to hospital with an acute respiratory tract infection. Infections were diagnosed in parallel by direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) staining using type-specific monoclonal antibodies and real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR targeting the gene M (nt 25-124). In addition, virus strains were isolated in MDCK cells. Overall, 37 influenza virus strains were type A, and one type B. Of these, 35 (80.4%) were detected and typed by real-time RT-PCR, 34 (80.1%) by DFA, and 27 (71.0%) by virus isolation. Subtyping of 37 influenza virus A strains by RT-PCR and DFA gave the following results: 4/6 H1 strains were correctly subtyped by both methods, while of the 29 H3 strains subtyped by RT-PCR 7 were missed by DFA. Thus, the overall concordance of the two subtyping methods was 28/37 (75.7%). Viral RNA quantification by real-time PCR showed that when respiratory secretion collection was done within 5 days after the onset of symptoms, viral load was greater than 1 x 10(6) RNA copies/ml. In conclusion, typing and subtyping of influenza virus type A strains may benefit from both MAbs and RT-PCR, while viral RNA quantification may provide an indication of symptom onset.

  9. Genome Sequence of Type Strains of Genus Stenotrophomonas

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Prashant P.; Midha, Samriti; Kumar, Sanjeet; Patil, Prabhu B.

    2016-01-01

    Genomic resource of type strains and historically important strains of genus Stenotrophomonas allowed us to reveal the existence of 18 distinct species by applying modern phylogenomic criterions. Apart from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, S. africana represents another species of clinical importance. Interestingly, Pseudomonas hibsicola, P. beteli, and S. pavani that are of plant origin are closer to S. maltophilia than the majority of the environmental isolates. The genus has an open pan-genome. By providing the case study on genes encoding metallo-β-lactamase and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindrome Repeats (CRISPR) regions, we have tried to show the importance of this genomic dataset in understanding its ecology. PMID:27014232

  10. Complete genome sequence of Rhodospirillum rubrum type strain (S1).

    PubMed

    Munk, A Christine; Copeland, Alex; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Barry, Kerrie; Detter, John C; Hammon, Nancy; Israni, Sanjay; Pitluck, Sam; Brettin, Thomas; Bruce, David; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Gilna, Paul; Schmutz, Jeremy; Larimer, Frank; Land, Miriam; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Richardson, Paul; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Zhang, Yaoping; Roberts, Gary P; Reslewic, Susan; Schwartz, David C

    2011-07-01

    Rhodospirillum rubrum (Esmarch 1887) Molisch 1907 is the type species of the genus Rhodospirillum, which is the type genus of the family Rhodospirillaceae in the class Alphaproteobacteria. The species is of special interest because it is an anoxygenic phototroph that produces extracellular elemental sulfur (instead of oxygen) while harvesting light. It contains one of the most simple photosynthetic systems currently known, lacking light harvesting complex 2. Strain S1(T) can grow on carbon monoxide as sole energy source. With currently over 1,750 PubMed entries, R. rubrum is one of the most intensively studied microbial species, in particular for physiological and genetic studies. Next to R. centenum strain SW, the genome sequence of strain S1(T) is only the second genome of a member of the genus Rhodospirillum to be published, but the first type strain genome from the genus. The 4,352,825 bp long chromosome and 53,732 bp plasmid with a total of 3,850 protein-coding and 83 RNA genes were sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Program DOEM 2002.

  11. The evolutionary biology and population genetics underlying fungal strain typing.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J W; Geiser, D M; Burt, A; Koufopanou, V

    1999-01-01

    Strain typing of medically important fungi and fungal population genetics have been stimulated by new methods of tapping DNA variation. The aim of this contribution is to show how awareness of fungal population genetics can increase the utility of strain typing to better serve the interests of medical mycology. Knowing two basic features of fungal population biology, the mode of reproduction and genetic differentiation or isolation, can give medical mycologists information about the intraspecific groups that are worth identifying and the number and type of markers that would be needed to do so. The same evolutionary information can be just as valuable for the selection of fungi for development and testing of pharmaceuticals or vaccines. The many methods of analyzing DNA variation are evaluated in light of the need for polymorphic loci that are well characterized, simple, independent, and stable. Traditional population genetic and new phylogenetic methods for analyzing mode of reproduction, genetic differentiation, and isolation are reviewed. Strain typing and population genetic reports are examined for six medically important species: Coccidioides immitis, Histoplasma capsulatum, Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumigatus, and A. flavus. Research opportunities in the areas of genomics, correlation of clinical variation with genetic variation, amount of recombination, and standardization of approach are suggested.

  12. Complete genome sequence of Streptobacillus moniliformis type strain (9901T)

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, Matt; Gronow, Sabine; Lapidus, Alla L.; Ivanova, N; Copeland, A; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Chen, Feng; Sims, David; Meincke, Linda; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, Cliff; Detter, J. Chris; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Rohde, Manfred; Sproer, Cathrin; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Chain, Patrick S. G.

    2009-01-01

    Streptobacillus moniliformis Levaditi et al. 1925 is the sole and type species of the genus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its isolated location in the sparsely populated and neither taxonomically nor genomically much accessed family 'Leptotrichiaceae' within the phylum 'Fusobacteria'. S. moniliformis, a Gram-negative, non-motile and pleomorphic bacterium, is the etiologic agent of rat bite fever and Haverhill fever. Strain 9901T, the type strain of the species, was isolated from a patient with rat bite fever. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is only the second completed genome sequence of the order 'Fusobacteriales' and no more than the third sequence from the phylum 'Fusobacteria'. The 1,662,578 bp long chromosome and the 10,702 bp plasmid with a total of 1511 protein-coding and 55 RNA genes are part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Marinobacter vinifirmus Type Strain FB1.

    PubMed

    Stepanov, Victor G; Roberts, Deborah J; Fox, George E

    2017-09-28

    The gammaproteobacterium Marinobacter vinifirmus is associated with moderately saline environments and is often found in marine ecosystems. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of M. vinifirmus type strain FB1 (3.8 Mbp, 3,588 predicted genes). The presented sequence will improve our understanding of the taxonomy and evolution of the genus Marinobacter. Copyright © 2017 Stepanov et al.

  14. Complete genome sequence of Halanaerobium praevalens type strain (GSLT)

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, N; Sikorski, Johannes; Chertkov, Olga; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Huntemann, Marcel; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Kannan, K. Palani; Rohde, Manfred; Tindall, Brian; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla L.

    2011-01-01

    Halanaerobium praevalens Zeikus et al. 1984 is the type species of the genus Halanaero- bium, which in turn is the type genus of the family Halanaerobiaceae. The species is of inter- est because it is able to reduce a variety of nitro-substituted aromatic compounds at a high rate, and because of its ability to degrade organic pollutants. The strain is also of interest be- cause it functions as a hydrolytic bacterium, fermenting complex organic matter and produc- ing intermediary metabolites for other trophic groups such as sulfate-reducing and methano- genic bacteria. It is further reported as being involved in carbon removal in the Great Salt Lake, its source of isolation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a representative of the genus Halanaerobium and the second genome sequence from a type strain of the fami- ly Halanaerobiaceae. The 2,309,262 bp long genome with its 2,110 protein-coding and 70 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  15. Complete genome sequence of Sebaldella termitidis type strain (NCTC 11300).

    PubMed

    Harmon-Smith, Miranda; Celia, Laura; Chertkov, Olga; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Detter, John C; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Pati, Amrita; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Brettin, Thomas; Göker, Markus; Beck, Brian; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Chen, Feng

    2010-03-30

    Sebaldella termitidis (Sebald 1962) Collins and Shah 1986, is the only species in the genus Sebaldella within the fusobacterial family 'Leptotrichiaceae'. The sole and type strain of the species was first isolated about 50 years ago from intestinal content of Mediterranean termites. The species is of interest for its very isolated phylogenetic position within the phylum Fusobacteria in the tree of life, with no other species sharing more than 90% 16S rRNA sequence similarity. The 4,486,650 bp long genome with its 4,210 protein-coding and 54 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  16. Type II strained layer superlattice: A potential future IR solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tidrow, Meimei Z.

    2009-11-01

    Type II strained layer superlattice (SLS) has been making tremendous progress in the past few years funded by the Missile Defense Agency Advanced Technology Directorate (MDA/DV) under the Passive EO/IR Program. SLS has shown great potential as a future solution for infrared military systems. In this presentation, the most recent progress in SLS development will be presented. The presentation will also discuss the comparison of SLS with mercury-cadmium-telluride (HgCdTe) using Rule 07, SLS minority carrier lifetime issues, and future directions.

  17. Complete genome sequence of Tsukamurella paurometabola type strain (no. 33).

    PubMed

    Munk, A Christine; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Brettin, Thomas; Yasawong, Montri; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Sikorski, Johannes; Göker, Markus; Detter, John C; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2011-07-01

    Tsukamurella paurometabola corrig. (Steinhaus 1941) Collins et al. 1988 is the type species of the genus Tsukamurella, which is the type genus to the family Tsukamurellaceae. The species is not only of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location, but also because it is a human opportunistic pathogen with some strains of the species reported to cause lung infection, lethal meningitis, and necrotizing tenosynovitis. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the genus Tsukamurella and the first genome sequence of a member of the family Tsukamurellaceae. The 4,479,724 bp long genome contains a 99,806 bp long plasmid and a total of 4,335 protein-coding and 56 RNA genes, and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  18. Complete genome sequence of Chitinophaga pinensis type strain (UQM 2034).

    PubMed

    Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Abt, Birte; Spring, Stefan; Lapidus, Alla; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Copeland, Alex; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Chen, Feng; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Chain, Patrick; Saunders, Elizabeth; Detter, John C; Brettin, Thomas; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lucas, Susan

    2010-02-28

    Chitinophaga pinensis Sangkhobol and Skerman 1981 is the type strain of the species which is the type species of the rapidly growing genus Chitinophaga in the sphingobacterial family 'Chitinophagaceae'. Members of the genus Chitinophaga vary in shape between filaments and spherical bodies without the production of a fruiting body, produce myxospores, and are of special interest for their ability to degrade chitin. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family 'Chitinophagaceae', and the 9,127,347 bp long single replicon genome with its 7,397 protein-coding and 95 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  19. Complete genome sequence of Desulfohalobium retbaense type strain (HR(100)).

    PubMed

    Spring, Stefan; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, Alex; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Land, Miriam; Chen, Feng; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Munk, Christine; Kiss, Hajnalka; Chain, Patrick; Han, Cliff; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C; Schüler, Esther; Göker, Markus; Rohde, Manfred; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-28

    Desulfohalobium retbaense (Ollivier et al. 1991) is the type species of the polyphyletic genus Desulfohalobium, which comprises, at the time of writing, two species and represents the family Desulfohalobiaceae within the Deltaproteobacteria. D. retbaense is a moderately halophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium, which can utilize H(2) and a limited range of organic substrates, which are incompletely oxidized to acetate and CO(2), for growth. The type strain HR(100) (T) was isolated from sediments of the hypersaline Retba Lake in Senegal. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the family Desulfohalobiaceae. The 2,909,567 bp genome (one chromosome and a 45,263 bp plasmid) with its 2,552 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  20. [Capsular types, virulence factors and DNA types of Klebsiella oxytoca strains isolated from blood and bile].

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Yuka; Yagi, Tetsuya; Mochizuki, Mariko; Ohta, Michio

    2012-03-01

    Klebsiella oxytoca is an opportunistic pathogen and is isolated at the second highest frequency among genus Klebsiella from hospitalized patients. According to previous reports, the major virulence factors of K. pneumoniae include capsules and several kinds of pill, whereas the virulence factors of K. oxytoca have not been well investigated. We noticed an increased frequency of K. oxytoca isolates from patients who had undergone a biliary tract operation in a general hospital from May through November, 2009. We then performed a PCR analysis of the virulence factors and an epidemiological analysis with capsular typing (serotyping) and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) for K. oxytoca of 11 blood isolates and 10 bile isolates. As a result, serotypes of K9, K15, K26, K31, K43, K47, K55, K70, and K79 were identified in these strains, and K1 and K2 which are frequent serotypes in K. pneumoniae strains were not observed. Two blood isolates of the K55 serotype showed almost the same PFGE pattern, suggesting that these isolates were very closely related and caused cross-infection in a hospital ward. Strains of the K43 serotype were three blood isolates and 1 bile isolate, all of which showed different PFGE patterns. There were no common isolates among the blood and bile isolates. A PCR search revealed that fimH and mrkD genes which are relevant to type 1 and type 2 pili, respectively, were present in all strains, whereas kfuBC, an iron uptake gene, and cf29a were detected in only a few strains. Neither of the mucoid phenotype-related genes magA and rmpA was present in any strains. These results strongly suggest that type 1 and/or type 3 pili would have important roles in the pathogenesis of blood infection and bile infection caused by K. oxytoca.

  1. Complete genome sequence of Streptobacillus moniliformis type strain (9901T)

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Matt; Gronow, Sabine; Lapidus, Alla; Ivanova, Natalia; Copeland, Alex; Lucas, Susan; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, Sam; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Sims, David; Meincke, Linda; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Brettin, Thomas; Han, Cliff; Detter, John C.; Ovchinikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Rohde, Manfred; Spröer, Cathrin; Göker, Markus; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Chain, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Streptobacillus moniliformis Levaditi et al. 1925 is the type and sole species of the genus Streptobacillus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its isolated location in the sparsely populated and neither taxonomically nor genomically much accessed family 'Leptotrichiaceae' within the phylum Fusobacteria. The 'Leptotrichiaceae' have not been well characterized, genomically or taxonomically. S. moniliformis,is a Gram-negative, non-motile, pleomorphic bacterium and is the etiologic agent of rat bite fever and Haverhill fever. Strain 9901T, the type strain of the species, was isolated from a patient with rat bite fever. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is only the second completed genome sequence of the order Fusobacteriales and no more than the third sequence from the phylum Fusobacteria. The 1,662,578 bp long chromosome and the 10,702 bp plasmid with a total of 1511 protein-coding and 55 RNA genes are part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304670

  2. Comparative metabolic flux analysis of an Ashbya gossypii wild type strain and a high riboflavin-producing mutant strain.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Bo-Young; Wittmann, Christoph; Kato, Tatsuya; Park, Enoch Y

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we analyzed the central metabolic pathway of an Ashbya gossypii wild type strain and a riboflavin over-producing mutant strain developed in a previous study in order to characterize the riboflavin over-production pathway. (13)C-Metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) was carried out in both strains, and the resulting data were fit to a steady-state flux isotopomer model using OpenFLUX. Flux to pentose-5-phosphate (P5P) via the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) was 9% higher in the mutant strain compared to the wild type strain. The flux from purine synthesis to riboflavin in the mutant strain was 1.6%, while that of the wild type strain was only 0.1%, a 16-fold difference. In addition, the flux from the cytoplasmic pyruvate pool to the extracellular metabolites, pyruvate, lactate, and alanine, was 2-fold higher in the mutant strain compared to the wild type strain. This result demonstrates that increased guanosine triphosphate (GTP) flux through the PPP and purine synthesis pathway (PSP) increased riboflavin production in the mutant strain. The present study provides the first insight into metabolic flux through the central carbon pathway in A. gossypii and sets the foundation for development of a quantitative and functional model of the A. gossypii metabolic network.

  3. Dependence of temperature and strain coefficients on fiber grating type and its application to simultaneous temperature and strain measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Xuewen; Liu, Yu; Zhao, Donghui; Gwandu, Bashir; Floreani, Filip; Zhang, Lin; Bennion, Ian

    2002-05-01

    We report an investigation of the dependence of the temperature and strain coefficients on the grating type for fiber Bragg gratings that are UV inscribed in B/Ge-codoped fiber with and without hydrogenation. The results reveal that all types of grating exhibit similar strain sensitivities but markedly different temperature sensitivities, greater for gratings inscribed in hydrogen-free rather than hydrogenated fiber and substantially less in type IA gratings than all others. The sensitivity characteristics of these gratings have been used to implement a new type of dual-grating sensor for simultaneous measurement of temperature and strain that has properties superior to those of previously reported structures.

  4. Development of a duplex PCR for rapid detection and differentiation of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae vaccine strains and wild type strains.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Weifeng; Wu, Chao; Kang, Chao; Cai, Chengzhi; Jin, Meilin

    2017-02-01

    The differentiation of vaccine strains from wild type strains is important for disease control. A duplex PCR for rapid detection and differentiation of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae vaccine strains and wild type strains was developed based on the DNA polymerase IV gene. This duplex PCR was sensitive and specific. The detection results were coincident with that of a single nucleotide polymorphisms based PCR but the detection process was more rapid. In conclusion, this duplex PCR was a useful tool for Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae infections' differential diagnosis in China.

  5. Types of strain among family members of individuals with autism spectrum disorder across the lifespan.

    PubMed

    Shivers, Carolyn M; Krizova, Katarina; Lee, Gloria K

    2017-09-01

    Although increased caregiver strain is often found among family caregivers of individuals with autism spectrum disorder, it is still unclear as to how different types of strain relate to amount and types of caregiving across the lifespan. The present study examined different types of strain (i.e. subjective internalized strain, subjective externalized strain, and objective strain) and how such strain relates to the amount of caregiving responsibilities. Data was collected via online survey from a sample of 193 family caregivers of individuals with ASD from the United States, Canada, and the Republic of Ireland. Participants completed measures of strain and caregiving responsibilities, as well as coping, demographics, and services needed and received by the individual with ASD. Caregivers reported higher levels of objective strain than subjective, and caregiving responsibility was related to objective and subjective internalized strain. Coping style was strongly correlated with all types of strain, and unmet service needs were significantly related to objective and subjective internalized strain. Caregiving behaviors were only related to objective strain. The present results indicate that, although caregiving responsibility is related to objective and subjective internalized strain, the relationship is perhaps not as strong as the relationship between coping mechanisms and strain. Future research is needed to understand different types of strain and develop strategies to help caregivers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. EPIDEMIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR TYPING OF BRUCELLA STRAINS CIRCULATING IN GEORGIA.

    PubMed

    Sidamonidze, K; Ramishvili, M; Kalandadze, I; Tsereteli, D; Nikolich, M P

    2015-10-01

    In 2009-2013, 851 cases of brucellosis were registered in Georgia. Most cases of brucellosis were found in eastern Georgia (91.3% of cases). Mainly men were infected with brucellosis (81.0%).The age group with the most frequent cases of brucellosis is 30-59 years (48.5%). Brucellosis is rarely found among children(0-4 years - 2.0%, 5-14 years - 8.0%). Brucellosis cases were linked to professional activity; mainly by farmers (33.0% of those infected) and shepherds (27.0%). Biotyping Brucella by microbiological methods alone has limitations, so molecular typing was implemented in this study to confirm species. Isolates from human blood and ruminant milk or blood were identified by a bacteriological algorithm and confirmed by real-time PCR (Brucella T1, Idaho Technology). Species identity was confirmed using the AMOS conventional PCR assay, which differentiates four human pathogenic species but cannot recognize certain biovars within them. This gap was addressed by using more universal species-specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) assays. Real-time PCR was used to confirm 86 Brucella strains (48 human, 38 animal isolates) obtained 2009-2011. AMOS PCR supported the biochemical test results for 53 B. melitensis and four B. abortus strains, but not for 29 suspected B. abortus human and animal isolates. SNP typing of all 86 isolates supported the AMOS PCR results but also confirmed the species of the 29 strains not amplified by AMOS PCR. In 2009-2013 years the prevalence of brucellosis was still high. Nowadays cases of brucellosis are higher in the western part of Georgia than in the 1991-2005 period by a factor of 2.62. Brucellosis continues to be mainly an infection in males, because men are mostly engaged in sheep and cattle care. Combined AMOS PCR and SNP typing in this study provided the first genetic confirmation that both B. abortus and B. melitensis are actively circulating in humans and animals in Georgia.

  7. Complete genome sequence of Methanospirillum hungatei type strain JF1

    DOE PAGES

    Gunsalus, Robert; Cook, Lauren E.; Crable, Bryan R.; ...

    2016-01-06

    Methanospirillum hungatei strain JF1 (DSM 864) is a methane-producing archaeon and is the type species of the genus Methanospirillum, which belongs to the family Methanospirillaceae within the order Methanomicrobiales. Its genome was selected for sequencing due to its ability to utilize hydrogen and carbon dioxide and/or formate as a sole source of energy. Ecologically, M. hungatei functions as the hydrogen- and/or formate-using partner with many species of syntrophic bacteria. Its morphology is distinct from other methanogens with the ability to form long chains of cells (up to 100 m in length), which are enclosed within a sheath-like structure, and terminalmore » cells with polar flagella. The genome of M. hungatei strain JF1 is the first completely sequenced genome of the family Methanospirillaceae, and it has a circular genome of 3,544,738 bp containing 3,239 protein coding and 68 RNA genes. Furthermore, the large genome of M. hungatei JF1 suggests the presence of unrecognized biochemical/physiological properties that likely extend to the other Methanospirillaceae and include the ability to form the unusual sheath-like structure and to successfully interact with syntrophic bacteria.« less

  8. Complete genome sequence of Kytococcus sedentarius type strain (541T)

    PubMed Central

    Sims, David; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Chen, Feng; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; D'haeseleer, Patrik; Chain, Patrick; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Schneider, Susanne; Göker, Markus; Pukall, Rüdiger; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2009-01-01

    Kytococcus sedentarius (ZoBell and Upham 1944) Stackebrandt et al. 1995 is the type strain of the species, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its location in the Dermacoccaceae, a poorly studied family within the actinobacterial suborder Micrococcineae. Kytococcus sedentarius is known for the production of oligoketide antibiotics as well as for its role as an opportunistic pathogen causing valve endocarditis, hemorrhagic pneumonia, and pitted keratolysis. It is strictly aerobic and can only grow when several amino acids are provided in the medium. The strain described in this report is a free-living, nonmotile, Gram-positive bacterium, originally isolated from a marine environment. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Dermacoccaceae and the 2,785,024 bp long single replicon genome with its 2639 protein-coding and 64 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304632

  9. Complete genome sequence of Nakamurella multipartita type strain (Y-104).

    PubMed

    Tice, Hope; Mayilraj, Shanmugam; Sims, David; Lapidus, Alla; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, Alex; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Meincke, Linda; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Detter, John C; Brettin, Thomas; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Chen, Feng

    2010-03-30

    Nakamurella multipartita (Yoshimi et al. 1996) Tao et al. 2004 is the type species of the monospecific genus Nakamurella in the actinobacterial suborder Frankineae. The nonmotile, coccus-shaped strain was isolated from activated sludge acclimated with sugar-containing synthetic wastewater, and is capable of accumulating large amounts of polysaccharides in its cells. Here we describe the features of the organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Nakamurellaceae. The 6,060,298 bp long single replicon genome with its 5415 protein-coding and 56 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  10. Complete genome sequence of Pirellula staleyi type strain (ATCC 27377).

    PubMed

    Clum, Alicia; Tindall, Brian J; Sikorski, Johannes; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Lucas, Susan; Glavina, Tijana; Del Rio; Nolan, Matt; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, Sam; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Chertkov, Olga; Brettin, Thomas; Han, Cliff; Detter, John C; Kuske, Cheryl; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Ovchinikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Mikhailova, Natalia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Chain, Patrick; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla

    2009-12-30

    Pirellula staleyi Schlesner and Hirsch 1987 is the type species of the genus Pirellula of the family Planctomycetaceae. Members of this pear- or teardrop-shaped bacterium show a clearly visible pointed attachment pole and can be distinguished from other Planctomycetes by a lack of true stalks. Strains closely related to the species have been isolated from fresh and brackish water, as well as from hypersaline lakes. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of the order Planctomyces and only the second sequence from the phylum Planctobacteria/Planctomycetes. The 6,196,199 bp long genome with its 4773 protein-coding and 49 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  11. Proposal for strained type II superlattice infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. L.; Mailhiot, C.

    1987-09-01

    It is shown that strained type II superlattices made of InAs-Ga(1-x)In(x)Sb(x) about 0.4 have favorable optical properties for infrared detection. By adjusting the layer thicknesses and the alloy composition, a wide range of wavelengths can be reached. Optical absorption calculations for a case where the cutoff wavelength is about 10 microns show that, near threshold, the absorption is as good as for the HgCdTe alloy with the same band gap. The electron effective mass is nearly isotropic and equal to 0.04 m. This effective mass should give favorable electrical properties, such as small diode tunneling currents and good mobilities, and diffusion lengths.

  12. Complete genome sequence of Treponema succinifaciens type strain (6091T)

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Cliff; Gronow, Sabine; Teshima, Hazuki; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Zeytun, Ahmet; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Detter, J. Chris

    2011-01-01

    Treponema succinifaciens Cwyk and Canale-Parola 1981 is of interest because this strictly anaerobic, apathogenic member of the genus Treponema oxidizes carbohydrates and couples the Embden-Meyerhof pathway via activity of a pyruvate-formate lyase to the production of acetyl-coenzyme A and formate. This feature separates this species from most other anaerob- ic spirochetes. The genome of T. succinifaciens 6091T is only the second completed and pub- lished type strain genome from the genus Treponema in the family Spirochaetaceae. The 2,897,425 bp long genome with one plasmid harbors 2,723 protein-coding and 63 RNA genes and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  13. Electrophoretic Mobilities of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Wild-Type Escherichia coli Strains

    PubMed Central

    Lytle, Darren A.; Rice, Eugene W.; Johnson, Clifford H.; Fox, Kim R.

    1999-01-01

    The electrophoretic mobilities (EPMs) of a number of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and wild-type E. coli strains were measured. The effects of pH and ionic strength on the EPMs were investigated. The EPMs of E. coli O157:H7 strains differed from those of wild-type strains. As the suspension pH decreased, the EPMs of both types of strains increased. PMID:10388724

  14. Taxonomy of primycin producing actinomycetes. I. Description of the type strain of thermomonospora galeriensis.

    PubMed

    Szabó, I M; Marton, M; Kulcsár, G; Buti, I

    1976-01-01

    Strain FBUA 1274 (=strain 28/650707, Hungarian National Collection of Medical Bacteria, National Institute of Public Health, Budapest) is designated the type strain of Thermonospora galeriensis (Vályi-Nagy et al.) comb. nov., and the morphological characteristics of this strain are described.

  15. Complete genome sequence of Kytococcus sedentarius type strain (strain 541T)

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, David; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Chen, Feng; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; D'haeseleer, Patrick; Chain, Patrick; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Schneider, Susanne; Goker, Markus; Pukall, Rudiger; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2009-05-20

    Kytococcus sedentarius (ZoBell and Upham 1944) Stackebrandt et al. 1995 is the type strain of the species, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its location in the Dermacoccaceae, a poorly studied family within the actinobacterial suborder Micrococcineae. K. sedentarius is known for the production of oligoketide antibiotics as well as for its role as an opportunistic pathogen causing valve endocarditis, hemorrhagic pneumonia, and pitted keratolysis. It is strictly aerobic and can only grow when several amino acids are provided in the medium. The strain described in this report is a free-living, nonmotile, Gram-positive bacterium, originally isolated from a marine environment. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Dermacoccaceae and the 2,785,024 bp long single replicon genome with its 2639 protein-coding and 64 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  16. env Gene typing of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 strains on electronic microarrays.

    PubMed

    Saunders, N A; Alexander, S; Tatt, I

    2005-04-01

    The NanoChip system was used for subtyping human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains using probes complementary to the V1 region of the env gene. Probes for six subtypes (A to D, F, and G) and two circulating recombinant forms (AG and AE) of HIV-1 group M were included. The specificity of these oligonucleotides had been evaluated previously in a DNA enzyme immunoassay. Samples from 112 patient sera were used as templates in a nested reverse transcription-PCR to produce amplicons that were applied to the array. The array was then hybridized successively to pairs of oligonucleotide probes. The strains were assigned a subtype on the basis of their probe hybridization patterns. One strain gave a contradictory pattern and was designated as untypeable by the NanoChip assay. Eighty-eight strains gave hybridization patterns that allowed a correct subtype designation to be made by the NanoChip assay compared to either the sequence or the heteroduplex mobility assay (HMA)-determined subtypes. Thirteen strains that reacted with the subtype A probe (SA2) were incorrectly assigned to subtype A, or to one of the related circulating recombinant types (AE or AG), on the basis of reactions with probe SAE1 or SAG1. The results indicate that these oligonucleotides have relatively low specificities. The probe subtypes of three strains matched the subtypes determined for the gag and pol genes but not the env gene, suggesting that a recombination event may have occurred within the env gene. Overall, the NanoChip assay gave results comparable to those for HMA and sequencing and provides a convenient and cost-effective means by which to subtype HIV-1.

  17. env Gene Typing of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Strains on Electronic Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, N. A.; Alexander, S.; Tatt, I.

    2005-01-01

    The NanoChip system was used for subtyping human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains using probes complementary to the V1 region of the env gene. Probes for six subtypes (A to D, F, and G) and two circulating recombinant forms (AG and AE) of HIV-1 group M were included. The specificity of these oligonucleotides had been evaluated previously in a DNA enzyme immunoassay. Samples from 112 patient sera were used as templates in a nested reverse transcription-PCR to produce amplicons that were applied to the array. The array was then hybridized successively to pairs of oligonucleotide probes. The strains were assigned a subtype on the basis of their probe hybridization patterns. One strain gave a contradictory pattern and was designated as untypeable by the NanoChip assay. Eighty-eight strains gave hybridization patterns that allowed a correct subtype designation to be made by the NanoChip assay compared to either the sequence or the heteroduplex mobility assay (HMA)-determined subtypes. Thirteen strains that reacted with the subtype A probe (SA2) were incorrectly assigned to subtype A, or to one of the related circulating recombinant types (AE or AG), on the basis of reactions with probe SAE1 or SAG1. The results indicate that these oligonucleotides have relatively low specificities. The probe subtypes of three strains matched the subtypes determined for the gag and pol genes but not the env gene, suggesting that a recombination event may have occurred within the env gene. Overall, the NanoChip assay gave results comparable to those for HMA and sequencing and provides a convenient and cost-effective means by which to subtype HIV-1. PMID:15815017

  18. A physical genome map of the Burkholderia cepacia type strain.

    PubMed

    Rodley, P D; Römling, U; Tümmler, B

    1995-07-01

    Burkholderia cepacia (basonym Pseudomonas cepacia), the type species of the new genus Burkholderia, is of interest, not only because of its broad catabolic capacity and its ability to antagonize soil-borne plant pathogens, but also because of its causative role in infections in man, which are particularly evident in patients with cystic fibrosis. A physical map of the 8.1 Mb genome of the B. cepacia type-strain ATCC 25416 was constructed by applying two-dimensional pulsed-field gel electrophoresis techniques. Placed onto the macrorestriction map were 38 SpeI, 11 SwaI, 11 PacI, 11 PmeI and six I-CeuI sites, resulting in an average resolution of 105 kbp. Random single-hit linearization by irradiation and restriction mapping uncovered the presence of four circular replicons of 3.65 Mb, 3.17 Mb, 1.07 Mb and 200 kbp in size. The largest replicon harbours four rrn operons while the other two Megabase-size replicons each contain a single rrn operon, suggesting that the genome has three chromosomes and a large plasmid. Within the beta subdivision of proteobacteria, the existence of multiple replicons is not confined to B. cepacia. The phylogenetically related species Burkholderia glumae, Burkholderia pickettii, Burkholderia solanacearum, Alcaligenes eutrophus and the so far unassigned Pseudomonas glathei were also found to harbour more than one Megabase-size replicon.

  19. Draft Genome Sequences of Type Strain Sediminibacterium salmoneum NJ-44 and Sediminibacterium sp. Strain C3, a Novel Strain Isolated from Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Ayarza, Joaquín M.; Figuerola, Eva L. M.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Sediminibacterium comprises species present in diverse natural and engineered environments. Here, we report for the first time the genome sequences of the type strain Sediminibacterium salmoneum NJ-44 (NBRC 103935) and Sediminibacterium sp. strain C3 (BNM541), isolated from activated sludge, a valuable model for the study of substrate-dependent autoaggregation. PMID:24435857

  20. Complete genome sequence of Actinosynnema mirum type strain (101T)

    SciTech Connect

    Land, Miriam; Lapidus, Alla; Mayilraj, Shanmugam; Chen, Feng; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Chertkov, Olga; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jefferies, Cynthia; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Chain, Patrick; Tindall, Brian; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2009-05-20

    Actinosynnema mirum Hasegawa et al. 1978 is the type species of the genus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its central phylogenetic location in the Actino-synnemataceae, a rapidly growing family within the actinobacterial suborder Pseudo-nocardineae. A. mirum is characterized by its motile spores borne on synnemata and as a producer of nocardicin antibiotics. It is capable of growing aerobically and under a moderate CO2 atmosphere. The strain is a Gram-positive, aerial and substrate mycelium producing bacterium, originally isolated from a grass blade collected from the Raritan River, New Jersey. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Actinosynnemataceae, and only the second sequence from the actinobacterial suborder Pseudonocardineae. The 8,248,144 bp long single replicon genome with its 7100 protein-coding and 77 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  1. Complete genome sequence of Halomicrobium mukohataei type strain (arg-2).

    PubMed

    Tindall, Brian J; Schneider, Susanne; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Saunders, Elizabeth; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chain, Patrick; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Brettin, Thomas; Han, Cliff; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Detter, John C

    2009-11-22

    Halomicrobium mukohataei (Ihara et al. 1997) Oren et al. 2002 is the type species of the genus Halomicrobium. It is of phylogenetic interest because of its isolated location within the large euryarchaeal family Halobacteriaceae. H. mukohataei is an extreme halophile that grows essentially aerobically, but can also grow anaerobically under a change of morphology and with nitrate as electron acceptor. The strain, whose genome is described in this report, is a free-living, motile, Gram-negative euryarchaeon, originally isolated from Salinas Grandes in Jujuy, Andes highlands, Argentina. Its genome contains three genes for the 16S rRNA that differ from each other by up to 9%. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence from the poorly populated genus Halomicrobium, and the 3,332,349 bp long genome (chromosome and one plasmid) with its 3416 protein-coding and 56 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  2. Complete genome sequence of Actinosynnema mirum type strain (101T)

    SciTech Connect

    Land, Miriam L; Lapidus, Alla L.; Mayilraj, Shanmugam; Chen, Feng; Copeland, A; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Chertkov, Olga; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Brettin, Thomas S; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Tindall, Brian; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2009-01-01

    Actinosynnema mirum Hasegawa et al. 1978 is the type species of the genus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its central phylogenetic location in the Actino-synnemataceae, a rapidly growing family within the actinobacterial suborder Pseudo-nocardineae. A. mirum is characterized by its motile spores borne on synnemata and as a producer of nocardicin antibiotics. It is capable of growing aerobically and under a moderate CO2 atmosphere. The strain is a Gram-positive, aerial and substrate mycelium producing bacterium, originally isolated from a grass blade collected from the Raritan River, New Jersey. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Actinosynnemataceae, and only the second sequence from the actinobacterial suborder Pseudonocardineae. The 8,248,144 bp long single replicon genome with its 7100 protein-coding and 77 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  3. Molecular typing of Brucella melitensis endemic strains and differentiation from the vaccine strain Rev-1.

    PubMed

    Noutsios, Georgios T; Papi, Rigini M; Ekateriniadou, Loukia V; Minas, Anastasios; Kyriakidis, Dimitrios A

    2012-03-01

    In the present study forty-four Greek endemic strains of Br. melitensis and three reference strains were genotyped by Multi locus Variable Number Tandem Repeat (ML-VNTR) analysis based on an eight-base pair tandem repeat sequence that was revealed in eight loci of Br. melitensis genome. The forty-four strains were discriminated from the vaccine strain Rev-1 by Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) and Denaturant Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE). The ML-VNTR analysis revealed that endemic, reference and vaccine strains are genetically closely related, while most of the loci tested (1, 2, 4, 5 and 7) are highly polymorphic with Hunter-Gaston Genetic Diversity Index (HGDI) values in the range of 0.939 to 0.775. Analysis of ML-VNTRs loci stability through in vitro passages proved that loci 1 and 5 are non stable. Therefore, vaccine strain can be discriminated from endemic strains by allele's clusters of loci 2, 4, 6 and 7. RFLP and DGGE were also employed to analyse omp2 gene and reveled different patterns among Rev-1 and endemic strains. In RFLP, Rev-1 revealed three fragments (282, 238 and 44 bp), while endemic strains two fragments (238 and 44 bp). As for DGGE, the electrophoretic mobility of Rev-1 is different from the endemic strains due to heterologous binding of DNA chains of omp2a and omp2b gene. Overall, our data show clearly that it is feasible to genotype endemic strains of Br. melitensis and differentiate them from vaccine strain Rev-1 with ML-VNTR, RFLP and DGGE techniques. These tools can be used for conventional investigations in brucellosis outbreaks.

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Tannerella forsythia Type Strain ATCC 43037.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Valentin; Pabinger, Stephan; Chen, Tsute; Messner, Paul; Dewhirst, Floyd E; Schäffer, Christina

    2015-06-11

    Tannerella forsythia is an oral pathogen implicated in the development of periodontitis. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the Tannerella forsythia strain ATCC 43037. The previously available genome of this designation (NCBI reference sequence NC_016610.1) was discovered to be derived from a different strain, FDC 92A2 (= ATCC BAA-2717).

  5. Monoclonal antibody typing of Chlamydia psittaci strains derived from avian and mammalian species.

    PubMed Central

    Fukushi, H; Nojiri, K; Hirai, K

    1987-01-01

    A total of 77 Chlamydia psittaci strains of avian, human, and mammalian origin were grouped into four serovars with 11 monoclonal antibodies recognizing the lipopolysaccharide and the major outer membrane protein antigens. The avian and human strains, which were closely related to each other, were distinct from the mammalian strains. Immunological typing of C. psittaci with monoclonal antibodies seems practical. PMID:3667918

  6. Genome Sequence of the Thermophile Bacillus coagulans Hammer, the Type Strain of the Species

    PubMed Central

    Su, Fei; Tao, Fei; Tang, Hongzhi

    2012-01-01

    Here we announce a 3.0-Mb assembly of the Bacillus coagulans Hammer strain, which is the type strain of the species within the genus Bacillus. Genomic analyses based on the sequence may provide insights into the phylogeny of the species and help to elucidate characteristics of the poorly studied strains of Bacillus coagulans. PMID:23105047

  7. Complete genome sequence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae type 2a strain 309, isolated in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kenri, Tsuyoshi; Horino, Atsuko; Matsui, Mari; Sasaki, Yuko; Suzuki, Satowa; Narita, Mitsuo; Ohya, Hitomi; Okazaki, Norio; Shibayama, Keigo

    2012-03-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae strain 309, a type 2a (subtype 2 variant) strain of this bacterium, has variations in the P1 protein, which is responsible for attachment of the bacterium to host cells. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of M. pneumoniae strain 309 isolated from a pneumonia patient in Japan.

  8. Genome sequence of the thermophile Bacillus coagulans Hammer, the type strain of the species.

    PubMed

    Su, Fei; Tao, Fei; Tang, Hongzhi; Xu, Ping

    2012-11-01

    Here we announce a 3.0-Mb assembly of the Bacillus coagulans Hammer strain, which is the type strain of the species within the genus Bacillus. Genomic analyses based on the sequence may provide insights into the phylogeny of the species and help to elucidate characteristics of the poorly studied strains of Bacillus coagulans.

  9. Multilocus sequence typing reveals that Bacillus cereus strains isolated from clinical infections have distinct phylogenetic origins.

    PubMed

    Barker, Margaret; Thakker, Bishan; Priest, Fergus G

    2005-04-01

    Eight strains of Bacillus cereus isolated from bacteremia and soft tissue infections were assigned to seven sequence types (STs) by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Two strains from different locations had identical STs. The concatenated sequences of the seven STs were aligned with 65 concatenated sequences from reference STs and a neighbor-joining tree was constructed. Two strains were distantly related to all reference STs. Three strains were recovered in a clade that included Bacillus anthracis, B. cereus and rare Bacillus thuringiensis strains while the other three strains were assigned to two STs that were more closely affiliated to most of the B. thuringiensis STs. We conclude that invasive B. cereus strains do not form a single clone or clonal complex of highly virulent strains.

  10. Strain typing of acetic acid bacteria responsible for vinegar production by the submerged elaboration method.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pérez, Rocío; Torres, Carmen; Sanz, Susana; Ruiz-Larrea, Fernanda

    2010-12-01

    Strain typing of 103 acetic acid bacteria isolates from vinegars elaborated by the submerged method from ciders, wines and spirit ethanol, was carried on in this study. Two different molecular methods were utilised: pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of total DNA digests with a number of restriction enzymes, and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) - PCR analysis. The comparative study of both methods showed that restriction fragment PFGE of SpeI digests of total DNA was a suitable method for strain typing and for determining which strains were present in vinegar fermentations. Results showed that strains of the species Gluconacetobacter europaeus were the most frequent leader strains of fermentations by the submerged method in the studied vinegars, and among them strain R1 was the predominant one. Results showed as well that mixed populations (at least two different strains) occurred in vinegars from cider and wine, whereas unique strains were found in spirit vinegars, which offered the most stressing conditions for bacterial growth.

  11. Discriminatory Indices of Typing Methods for Epidemiologic Analysis of Contemporary Staphylococcus aureus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Marcela; Hogan, Patrick G.; Satola, Sarah W.; Crispell, Emily; Wylie, Todd; Gao, Hongyu; Sodergren, Erica; Weinstock, George M.; Burnham, Carey-Ann D.; Fritz, Stephanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Historically, a number of typing methods have been evaluated for Staphylococcus aureus strain characterization. The emergence of contemporary strains of community-associated S. aureus, and the ensuing epidemic with a predominant strain type (USA300), necessitates re-evaluation of the discriminatory power of these typing methods for discerning molecular epidemiology and transmission dynamics, essential to investigations of hospital and community outbreaks. We compared the discriminatory index of 5 typing methods for contemporary S. aureus strain characterization. Children presenting to St. Louis Children's Hospital and community pediatric practices in St. Louis, Missouri (MO), with community-associated S. aureus infections were enrolled. Repetitive sequence-based PCR (repPCR), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), staphylococcal protein A (spa), and staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC) mec typing were performed on 200 S. aureus isolates. The discriminatory index of each method was calculated using the standard formula for this metric, where a value of 1 is highly discriminatory and a value of 0 is not discriminatory. Overall, we identified 26 distinct strain types by repPCR, 17 strain types by PFGE, 30 strain types by MLST, 68 strain types by spa typing, and 5 strain types by SCCmec typing. RepPCR had the highest discriminatory index (D) of all methods (D = 0.88), followed by spa typing (D = 0.87), MLST (D = 0.84), PFGE (D = 0.76), and SCCmec typing (D = 0.60). The method with the highest D among MRSA isolates was repPCR (D = 0.64) followed by spa typing (D = 0.45) and MLST (D = 0.44). The method with the highest D among MSSA isolates was spa typing (D = 0.98), followed by MLST (D = 0.93), repPCR (D = 0.92), and PFGE (D = 0.89). Among isolates designated USA300 by PFGE, repPCR was most discriminatory, with 10 distinct strain types identified (D = 0.63). We

  12. Discriminatory Indices of Typing Methods for Epidemiologic Analysis of Contemporary Staphylococcus aureus Strains.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Marcela; Hogan, Patrick G; Satola, Sarah W; Crispell, Emily; Wylie, Todd; Gao, Hongyu; Sodergren, Erica; Weinstock, George M; Burnham, Carey-Ann D; Fritz, Stephanie A

    2015-09-01

    Historically, a number of typing methods have been evaluated for Staphylococcus aureus strain characterization. The emergence of contemporary strains of community-associated S. aureus, and the ensuing epidemic with a predominant strain type (USA300), necessitates re-evaluation of the discriminatory power of these typing methods for discerning molecular epidemiology and transmission dynamics, essential to investigations of hospital and community outbreaks. We compared the discriminatory index of 5 typing methods for contemporary S. aureus strain characterization. Children presenting to St. Louis Children's Hospital and community pediatric practices in St. Louis, Missouri (MO), with community-associated S. aureus infections were enrolled. Repetitive sequence-based PCR (repPCR), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), staphylococcal protein A (spa), and staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC) mec typing were performed on 200 S. aureus isolates. The discriminatory index of each method was calculated using the standard formula for this metric, where a value of 1 is highly discriminatory and a value of 0 is not discriminatory. Overall, we identified 26 distinct strain types by repPCR, 17 strain types by PFGE, 30 strain types by MLST, 68 strain types by spa typing, and 5 strain types by SCCmec typing. RepPCR had the highest discriminatory index (D) of all methods (D = 0.88), followed by spa typing (D = 0.87), MLST (D = 0.84), PFGE (D = 0.76), and SCCmec typing (D = 0.60). The method with the highest D among MRSA isolates was repPCR (D = 0.64) followed by spa typing (D = 0.45) and MLST (D = 0.44). The method with the highest D among MSSA isolates was spa typing (D = 0.98), followed by MLST (D = 0.93), repPCR (D = 0.92), and PFGE (D = 0.89). Among isolates designated USA300 by PFGE, repPCR was most discriminatory, with 10 distinct strain types identified (D = 0.63). We identified 45

  13. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITIES OF ESCHERICHIA COLI 0157:H7 AND WILD-TYPE ESCHERICHIA COLI STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of a number of human-virulent and "wild-type" Escherichia coli strains in phosphate buffered water was measured. The impact of pH, ionic strength, cation type (valence) and concentration, and bacterial strain on the EPM was investigated. Resul...

  14. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITIES OF ESCHERICHIA COLI 0157:H7 AND WILD-TYPE ESCHERICHIA COLI STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of a number of human-virulent and "wild-type" Escherichia coli strains in phosphate buffered water was measured. The impact of pH, ionic strength, cation type (valence) and concentration, and bacterial strain on the EPM was investigated. Resul...

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of the Mycobacterium immunogenum Type Strain CCUG 47286

    PubMed Central

    Jaén-Luchoro, Daniel; Seguí, Carolina; Aliaga-Lozano, Francisco; Salvà-Serra, Francisco; Busquets, Antonio; Gomila, Margarita; Ramírez, Antonio; Ruiz, Mikel; Lalucat, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Mycobacterium immunogenum type strain CCUG 47286, a nontuberculous mycobacterium. The whole genome has 5,573,781 bp and covers as many as 5,484 predicted genes. This genome contributes to the task of closing the still-existing gap of genomes of rapidly growing mycobacterial type strains. PMID:27231356

  16. Association of Ocular Toxoplasmosis with Type I Toxoplasma gondii Strains: Direct Genotyping from Peripheral Blood Samples▿

    PubMed Central

    Switaj, Karolina; Master, Adam; Borkowski, Piotr Karol; Skrzypczak, Magdalena; Wojciechowicz, Jacek; Zaborowski, Piotr

    2006-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii strains were genotyped directly from blood samples of patients with ocular toxoplasmosis. Analysis of nontranscribed spacer 2 revealed that all detected strains belonged to type I, suggesting an association of ocular toxoplasmosis with this type. The method shows the usefulness of blood samples for genotyping in ocular toxoplasmosis. PMID:17005742

  17. Use of colony-based bacterial strain typing for tracking the fate of Lactobacillus strains during human consumption

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) are important components of the healthy gut flora and have been used extensively as probiotics. Understanding the cultivable diversity of LAB before and after probiotic administration, and being able to track the fate of administered probiotic isolates during feeding are important parameters to consider in the design of clinical trials to assess probiotic efficacy. Several methods may be used to identify bacteria at the strain level, however, PCR-based methods such as Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) are particularly suited to rapid analysis. We examined the cultivable diversity of LAB in the human gut before and after feeding with two Lactobacillus strains, and also tracked the fate of these two administered strains using a RAPD technique. Results A RAPD typing scheme was developed to genetically type LAB isolates from a wide range of species, and optimised for direct application to bacterial colony growth. A high-throughput strategy for fingerprinting the cultivable diversity of human faeces was developed and used to determine: (i) the initial cultivable LAB strain diversity in the human gut, and (ii) the fate of two Lactobacillus strains (Lactobacillus salivarius NCIMB 30211 and Lactobacillus acidophilus NCIMB 30156) contained within a capsule that was administered in a small-scale human feeding study. The L. salivarius strain was not cultivated from the faeces of any of the 12 volunteers prior to capsule administration, but appeared post-feeding in four. Strains matching the L. acidophilus NCIMB 30156 feeding strain were found in the faeces of three volunteers prior to consumption; after taking the Lactobacillus capsule, 10 of the 12 volunteers were culture positive for this strain. The appearance of both Lactobacillus strains during capsule consumption was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Conclusion We have shown that genetic strain typing of the cultivable human gut microbiota can be evaluated using a high

  18. Multilocus sequence typing analyses of Clostridium perfringens type A strains harboring tpeL and netB genes.

    PubMed

    Nakano, V; Ignacio, A; Llanco, L; Bueris, V; Sircili, M P; Avila-Campos, M J

    2017-04-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an anaerobic bacterium ubiquitous in various environments, especially in soil and the gastrointestinal tract of healthy humans and animals. In this study, multilocus sequence typing protocol was used to investigate genotypic relationships among 40 C. perfringens strains isolated from humans and broiler chicken with necrotic enteritis [NE]. The results indicated a few clonal populations, mainly observed in human strains, with 32.5% of all strains associated with one of three clonal complexes and 30 sequences types. The CC-1 cluster showed an interesting and unexpected result because it contained seven strains [six from animals and one of human origin]. Detection assays for toxin genes tpeL and netB were also performed. The netB gene was only observed in 7.5% of the strains from healthy human. The toxin gene tpeL was detected in 22.5% of the C. perfringens strains isolated from three individuals and in six broilers with NE. Our study describes the role of some C. perfringens strains of human origin acting as reservoirs of virulence genes and sources of infection. In addition, the strains of human and animal origin were found to be genetically distinct but phylogenetically close, and the human strains showed more diversity than the animal strains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Phylogeny and identification of Pantoea species and typing of Pantoea agglomerans strains by multilocus gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    Delétoile, Alexis; Decré, Dominique; Courant, Stéphanie; Passet, Virginie; Audo, Jennifer; Grimont, Patrick; Arlet, Guillaume; Brisse, Sylvain

    2009-02-01

    Pantoea agglomerans and other Pantoea species cause infections in humans and are also pathogenic to plants, but the diversity of Pantoea strains and their possible association with hosts and disease remain poorly known, and identification of Pantoea species is difficult. We characterized 36 Pantoea strains, including 28 strains of diverse origins initially identified as P. agglomerans, by multilocus gene sequencing based on six protein-coding genes, by biochemical tests, and by antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Phylogenetic analysis and comparison with other species of Enterobacteriaceae revealed that the genus Pantoea is highly diverse. Most strains initially identified as P. agglomerans by use of API 20E strips belonged to a compact sequence cluster together with the type strain, but other strains belonged to diverse phylogenetic branches corresponding to other species of Pantoea or Enterobacteriaceae and to probable novel species. Biochemical characteristics such as fosfomycin resistance and utilization of d-tartrate could differentiate P. agglomerans from other Pantoea species. All 20 strains of P. agglomerans could be distinguished by multilocus sequence typing, revealing the very high discrimination power of this method for strain typing and population structure in this species, which is subdivided into two phylogenetic groups. PCR detection of the repA gene, associated with pathogenicity in plants, was positive in all clinical strains of P. agglomerans, suggesting that clinical and plant-associated strains do not form distinct populations. We provide a multilocus gene sequencing method that is a powerful tool for Pantoea species delineation and identification and for strain tracking.

  20. Production of toxin by Clostridium botulinum type A strains cured by plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    Weickert, M J; Chambliss, G H; Sugiyama, H

    1986-01-01

    Twelve strains of Clostridium botulinum type A and seven strains of Clostridium sporogenes were screened for plasmids by agarose gel electrophoresis of cleared lysates of cells from 5 ml of mid-log-phase culture. Nine type A strains had one or more plasmids of 4.3, 6.8, or 36 megadaltons (MDa); several strains showed a large plasmid of 61 MDa, but it was not consistently recovered. Four C. sporogenes strains had one or more plasmids of 4.3, 5.6 or 36 MDa. Isolates obtained from cultures of plasmid-containing C. botulinum type A strains grown in ionic detergent broth and from spontaneously arising variants were screened both for toxin production and for plasmid content. Toxigenicity of C. botulinum could not be correlated with the presence of any one plasmid. Images PMID:3082278

  1. Vibrio pelagius: differences of the type strain deposited at various culture collections.

    PubMed

    Macián, M C; Ludwig, W; Schleifer, K H; Garay, E; Pujalte, M J

    2000-10-01

    A critical evaluation of published and own taxonomic and phylogenetic studies on Vibrio pelagius showed substantial diversity of strains received as type strains from various Culture Collections. The comparison of data based upon 16S rRNA sequence analyses, earlier genomic DNA-DNA similarity studies as well as physiological investigations and the original description indicate that Vibrio pelagius strains CECT 4202T and ATCC 25916T really represent the originally described type species whereas strains NCIMB 1900T and CIP 102762T highly likely are representatives of Vibrio natriegens.

  2. Effects of a Mutant Strain and a Wild Type Strain of Verticillium lecanii on Heterodera glycines Populations in the Greenhouse

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Susan L. F.; Meyer, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    A wild type strain ofVerticillium lecanii and a mutant strain with increased tolerance to the fungicide benomyl were evaluated in greenhouse experiments for effects on Heterodera glycines populations. Nematodes were applied at 300 eggs and juveniles per 4,550-cm³ pot (two soybean plants in 4,990 g loamy sand per pot) and at both 300 and 10,000 eggs and juveniles per 1,720-cm³ pot (one soybean plant in 2,060 g sand per pot). With 300 nematodes added per pot, both V. lecanii strains significantly reduced nematode populations in loamy sand (fungus applied at 0.02% dry weight per dry weight loamy sand) and sand (0.006% and 0.06% fungus application rates). The mutant strain applied at 0.002% to sand also significantly reduced cyst numbers. When 10,000 nematodes were added per pot, only the mutant strain at 0.06% significantly decreased population. Various media were tested for isolation of the fungus strains from prills, loamy sand, and sand, but the fungi were recovered from few of the greenhouse pots. PMID:19277306

  3. Complete genome sequence of Mesorhizobium opportunistum type strain WSM2075

    SciTech Connect

    Reeve, Wayne; Nandesena, Kemanthi; YatesIII, John R.; Tiwari, Ravi; O'Hara, Graham; Ninawi, Mohamed; Chertkov, Olga; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Woyke, Tanja; Pitluck, Sam; Nolan, Matt; Land, Miriam L; Copeland, A; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pati, Amrita; Mavromatis, K; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ivanova, N; Meenakshi, Uma; Howieson, John

    2013-01-01

    Mesorhizobium opportunistum strain WSM2075T was isolated inWestern Australia in 2000 from root nodules of the pasture legume Biserrula pelecinus that had beeninoculated with M. ciceri bv. biserrulae WSM1271. WSM2075T is an aerobic, motile, Gram negative, non-spore-forming rod that has gained the ability to nodulate B. pelecinus but is completely ineffective in N2 fixation with this host. This report reveals thegenome of M. opportunistum strain WSM2075T contains a chromosome ofsize 6,884,444 bp which encodes 6,685 protein-coding genes and 62 RNA-onlyencoding genes. This genome does not contain any plasmids but has a 455.7 kbgenomic island from Mesorhizobium ciceri bv. biserrulae WSM1271 that has been integrated into a phenylalanine-tRNA gene.

  4. Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacterial and Archaeal Type Strains, Phase III: the genomes of soil and plant-associated and newly described type strains.

    PubMed

    Whitman, William B; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Zhou, Yuguang; Lilburn, Timothy G; Beck, Brian J; De Vos, Paul; Vandamme, Peter; Eisen, Jonathan A; Garrity, George; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2015-01-01

    The Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea (GEBA) project was launched by the JGI in 2007 as a pilot project to sequence about 250 bacterial and archaeal genomes of elevated phylogenetic diversity. Herein, we propose to extend this approach to type strains of prokaryotes associated with soil or plants and their close relatives as well as type strains from newly described species. Understanding the microbiology of soil and plants is critical to many DOE mission areas, such as biofuel production from biomass, biogeochemistry, and carbon cycling. We are also targeting type strains of novel species while they are being described. Since 2006, about 630 new species have been described per year, many of which are closely aligned to DOE areas of interest in soil, agriculture, degradation of pollutants, biofuel production, biogeochemical transformation, and biodiversity.

  5. Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacterial and Archaeal Type Strains, Phase III: the genomes of soil and plant-associated and newly described type strains

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea (GEBA) project was launched by the JGI in 2007 as a pilot project to sequence about 250 bacterial and archaeal genomes of elevated phylogenetic diversity. Herein, we propose to extend this approach to type strains of prokaryotes associated with soil or plants and their close relatives as well as type strains from newly described species. Understanding the microbiology of soil and plants is critical to many DOE mission areas, such as biofuel production from biomass, biogeochemistry, and carbon cycling. We are also targeting type strains of novel species while they are being described. Since 2006, about 630 new species have been described per year, many of which are closely aligned to DOE areas of interest in soil, agriculture, degradation of pollutants, biofuel production, biogeochemical transformation, and biodiversity. PMID:26203337

  6. Draft Genome Sequences for Two Metal-Reducing Pelosinus fermentans Strains Isolated from a Cr(VI) Contaminated Site and for Type Strain R7

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven D; Podar, Mircea; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Johnson, Courtney M; Yang, Zamin Koo; Utturkar, Sagar M; Land, Miriam L; Mosher, Jennifer J; Hurt, Jr., Richard Ashley; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Arkin, Adam; Hazen, Terry C; Elias, Dwayne A

    2012-01-01

    Pelosinus fermentans 16S rRNA gene sequences have been reported from diverse geographical sites since the recent isolation of the type strain. We present the genome sequence of the P. fermentans type strain R7 (DSM 17108) and genome sequences for two new strains with different abilities to reduce iron, chromate, and uranium.

  7. Differentiation of wild-type varicella-zoster strains from India and the Oka vaccine strain using a VZV open reading frame - 62 based PCR-RFLP technique.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Karishma S; Lahiri, Kunal K; Kapila, Ketoki; Kumar, Satish; Gupta, Rajiv M; Karade, Santosh

    2008-08-01

    Since the introduction of varicella vaccination in India, surveillance of circulating VZV strains has gained significance. Differentiating wild-type VZV strains from the Oka vaccine strain can be achieved only by molecular genotyping methods. The development of PCR methods for VZV strain differentiation has been hampered by the fact that the VZV genome is highly conserved. We used VZV ORF 62 PCR-RFLP analysis to identify and differentiate wild-type VZV strains in India from the Oka vaccine strain. Digestion of VZV ORF 62 amplicons with SmaI, enabled accurate strain differentiation; the Oka strain was positive for three SmaI sites, compared to two SmaI sites in the wild-type VZV strains that we tested.

  8. The Houghton strain of Eimeria tenella: a review of the type strain selected for genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chapman, H D; Shirley, M W

    2003-04-01

    A landmark decision was taken in 2002 by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) in the UK to fund the genome sequencing of an eimerian (apicomplexan) parasite from the fowl. The project is a joint collaboration between the Institute for Animal Health (IAH) at Compton, UK and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Cambridge, UK (see http://www.sanger.ac.uk/Projects/E_tenella/ and http://www.iah.bbsrc.ac.uk/eimeria/). The species chosen, Eimeria tenella, is the best known member of the genus and the Houghton (H) strain is one of the most widely studied. The H strain was isolated in 1949 in the UK. It was maintained initially at the Houghton Poultry Research Station (HPRS), Houghton, and, following closure of that laboratory in 1992, thereafter at the IAH in Compton. At various times the parasite has been provided to other institutions and research groups carrying out coccidiosis research in the fowl. The H strain has been utilised in many fundamental studies on the eimerian life cycle and its relationship with the host. It has also been used to investigate the nature of drug resistance, and to derive attenuated lines-one of which, a "precocious line", is a component of a multivalent live attenuated coccidiosis vaccine (Paracox vaccine, Schering-Plough Animal Health). In this article, some immunological, epidemiological, genetic, and chemotherapeutic investigations with the H strain are reviewed, a summary is provided of the biological characteristics of the parasite and some of the core methods used to prepare purified extracellular life cycle stages for experimental studies or passage are given.

  9. Complete genome sequence of Staphylothermus marinus Stetter and Fiala 1986 type strain F1

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Sun, Hui; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Dalin, Eileen; Lucas, Susan; Barry, Kerrie; Land, Miriam L; Richardson, P M; Huber, Harald; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2009-01-01

    Staphylothermus marinus Fiala and Stetter 1986 belongs to the order Desulfurococcales within the archaeal phylum Crenarchaeota. S. marinus is a hyperthermophilic, sulfur-dependent, anaerobic heterotroph. Strain F1 was isolated from geothermally heated sediments at Vulcano, Italy, but S. marinus has also been isolated from a hydrothermal vent on the East Pacific Rise. We report the complete genome of S. marinus strain F1, the type strain of the species. This is the fifth reported complete genome sequence from the order Desulfurococcales.

  10. Interfacial strain effect on type-I and type-II core/shell quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheshlaghi, Negar; Pisheh, Hadi Sedaghat; Karim, M. Rezaul; Malkoc, Derya; Ünlü, Hilmi

    2016-09-01

    A comparative experimental and theoretical study on the calculation of capped core diameter in ZnSe/ZnS, CdSe/Cd(Zn)S type-I and ZnSe/CdS type-II core/shell nanocrystals is presented. The lattice mismatch induced interface strain between core and shell was calculated from continuum elastic theory and applied in effective mass approximation method to obtain the corresponding capped core diameter. The calculated results were compared with diameter of bare cores (CdSe and ZnSe) from transmission electron microscopy images to obtain the amount of the stretched or squeezed core after deposition of tensile or compressive shells. The result of the study showed that the core is squeezed in ZnSe/ZnS and CdSe/Cd(Zn)S after compressive shell and stretched in ZnSe/CdS after tensile shell deposition. The stretched and squeezed amount of the capped core found to be in proportion with lattice mismatch amount in the core/shell structure.

  11. Draft Genome Sequences of Mycobacterium setense Type Strain DSM-45070 and the Nonpathogenic Strain Manresensis, Isolated from the Bank of the Cardener River in Manresa, Catalonia, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Vilaplana, Cristina; Velasco, Juan; Pluvinet, Raquel; Santín, Sheila; Prat, Cristina; Julián, Esther; Alcaide, Fernando; Comas, Iñaki; Sumoy, Lauro; Cardona, Pere-Joan

    2015-01-01

    We present here the draft genome sequences of two Mycobacterium setense strains. One of them corresponds to the M. setense type strain DSM-45070, originally isolated from a patient with a posttraumatic chronic skin abscess. The other one corresponds to the nonpathogenic M. setense strain Manresensis, isolated from the Cardener River crossing Manresa, Catalonia, Spain. A comparative genomic analysis shows a smaller genome size and fewer genes in M. setense strain Manresensis relative to those of the type strain, and it shows the genome segments unique to each strain. PMID:25657273

  12. Experimental infection of specific pathogen free piglets with French strains of Streptococcus suis capsular type 2.

    PubMed Central

    Berthelot-Hérault, F; Cariolet, R; Labbé, A; Gottschalk, M; Cardinal, J Y; Kobisch, M

    2001-01-01

    A standardized model of Streptococcus suis type 2 infection in specific-pathogen-free piglets, housed in high-security barns, was used to compare the virulence of 3 French field strains of S. suis serotype 2 isolated from tonsils of a healthy pig (strain 65) or from diseased pigs (meningitis, strain 166', or septicemia, strain 24). In one of the 2 trials, 7-week-old pigs, in 3 groups of 8, were inoculated intravenously with 2 x 10(8) colony-forming units of S. suis type 2. In each group, 1 uninfected animal was a sentinel. Eight animals were also used as negative control group. The experiment was repeated under similar conditions with strains 65 and 166'. Virulence differed markedly among these S. suis strains when clinical signs, zootechnical performances, lesions, and bacteriological data were analyzed. Strain 65 did not induce clinical signs in inoculated pigs. In contrast, pigs infected with the other 2 strains exhibited clinical signs and typical lesions of S. suis type 2 infections. Differences in virulence were also observed between the 2 virulent strains. Sentinel animals exhibited the same manifestations as those recorded in inoculated piglets. Results were similar in the second trial, indicating that under the present experimental conditions, results were reproducible. The standardized conditions described in this study could be a useful tool to further study about the S. suis infection. PMID:11480526

  13. High-resolution typing reveals distinct Chlamydia trachomatis strains in an at-risk population in Nanjing, China.

    PubMed

    Bom, Reinier J M; van den Hoek, Anneke; Wang, Qianqiu; Long, Fuquan; de Vries, Henry J C; Bruisten, Sylvia M

    2013-08-01

    We investigated Chlamydia trachomatis strains from Nanjing, China, and whether these strains differed from Amsterdam, the Netherlands. C. trachomatis type was determined with multilocus sequence typing. Most strains were specific to Nanjing, but some clustered with strains from Amsterdam. This demonstrates a geographical variation in C. trachomatis previously left undetected.

  14. Draft Whole-Genome Sequence of the Type Strain Bacillus horikoshii DSM 8719

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-González, Ismael L.

    2016-01-01

    Members of the Bacillus genus have been extensively studied because of their ability to produce enzymes with high biotechnological value. Here, we report the draft of the whole-genome sequence of the type strain Bacillus horikoshii DSM 8719, an alkali-tolerant strain. PMID:27417833

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of a Klebsiella pneumoniae Strain (New Sequence Type 2357) Carrying Tn3926

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Zu-huang; Wang, Chun-xin; Zhu, Jian-ming

    2016-01-01

    We present the draft genome sequence of a Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase–producing sequence type 2357 (ST2357) strain, NB60, which contains drug-resistant genes encoding resistance to beta-lactams, fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, colistin, macrolides, and tetracycline. Strain NB60 was isolated from human blood, making it an important tool for studying K. pneumoniae pathogenesis. PMID:27660779

  16. Genome sequence of Brucella melitensis strain 128, an isolate of biovar 3 of sequence type 8.

    PubMed

    Li, Tiefeng; Yuan, Xitong; Ding, Jiabo; Zhen, Qing; Ke, Yuehua; Wang, Yufei; Huang, Liuyu; Mao, Kairong; Chen, Zeliang; Wang, Dali

    2012-12-01

    Brucella melitensis is the most common Brucella species causing human brucellosis. B. melitensis is divided into 3 biovars. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of B. melitensis strain 128, a strain of biovar 3 of sequence type 8, which is prevalent in China.

  17. Draft Whole-Genome Sequence of the Type Strain Bacillus horikoshii DSM 8719.

    PubMed

    Hernández-González, Ismael L; Olmedo-Álvarez, Gabriela

    2016-07-14

    Members of the Bacillus genus have been extensively studied because of their ability to produce enzymes with high biotechnological value. Here, we report the draft of the whole-genome sequence of the type strain Bacillus horikoshii DSM 8719, an alkali-tolerant strain.

  18. Typing of Streptococcus mutans strains isolated from caries free and susceptible subjects by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Tahmourespour, Arezoo; Nabinejad, Abdolreza; Shirian, Hannaneh; Rosa, Edvaldo Antonio Ribeiro; Tahmourespour, Sanaz

    2013-01-01

    This study was evaluated the clonal diversity of Streptococcus mutans in caries-free and caries-active subjects using MLEE. Strains from caries-free subjects were grouped in a single taxon. Unrooted dendrogram showed that different strains clustered in four different clades, also showed that more than one clonal type can be found in a same individual.

  19. Pathogenicity of three genetically diverse strains of PRRSV Type 1 in specific pathogen free pigs.

    PubMed

    Stadejek, Tomasz; Larsen, Lars E; Podgórska, Katarzyna; Bøtner, Anette; Botti, Sara; Dolka, Izabella; Fabisiak, Michał; Heegaard, Peter M H; Hjulsager, Charlotte K; Huć, Tomasz; Kvisgaard, Lise K; Sapierzyński, Rafał; Nielsen, Jens

    2017-05-16

    Studies from Eastern European countries proved that porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus Type 1 (PRRSV-1) harbours high genetic diversity and that genetically divergent subtypes 2-4 circulate in this area. In the present study, we compared the pathogenicity of two different PRRSV-1 subtype 2 strains and a strain representing PRRSV-1 subtype 1. Four groups of 8-week-old specific pathogen free pigs were either infected with subtype 2 strain ILI6, subtype 2 strain or BOR59, subtype 1 strain 18794, or mock inoculated. The most pronounced clinical signs were observed in pigs infected with BOR59. Pigs from both subtype 2 strain infected groups exhibited significantly elevated mean body temperatures on DPI 2 compared to the other two groups, the difference remaining significant up to DPI 13 for the BOR59 group, only. The pigs in the latter group also displayed significantly highest levels of early viremia together with the most rapid APP response. Overall, the results indicated that BOR59 strain can be considered a highly pathogenic strain, similarly to subtype 3 strains Lena and SU1-bel, while the virulence of the other subtype 2 strain ILI6 was intermediate between BOR59 and subtype 1 strain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Complete genome sequence of Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans type strain (5575).

    PubMed

    Spring, Stefan; Lapidus, Alla; Schröder, Maren; Gleim, Dorothea; Sims, David; Meincke, Linda; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Copeland, Alex; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Chain, Patrick; Saunders, Elizabeth; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C; Göker, Markus; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Han, Cliff

    2009-11-22

    Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans Widdel and Pfennig 1977 was one of the first sulfate-reducing bacteria known to grow with acetate as sole energy and carbon source. It is able to oxidize substrates completely to carbon dioxide with sulfate as the electron acceptor, which is reduced to hydrogen sulfide. All available data about this species are based on strain 5575(T), isolated from piggery waste in Germany. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a Desulfotomaculum species with validly published name. The 4,545,624 bp long single replicon genome with its 4370 protein-coding and 100 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  1. Complete genome sequence of Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans type strain (5575T)

    SciTech Connect

    Spring, Stefan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Schroder, Maren; Gleim, Dorothea; Sims, David; Meincke, Linda; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Copeland, A; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Chen, Feng; Lucas, Susan; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Brettin, Tom; Detter, J. Chris; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Han, Cliff

    2009-01-01

    Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans Widdel and Pfennig 1977 was one of the first sulfate-reducing bacteria known to grow with acetate as sole energy and carbon source. It is able to oxidize substrates completely to carbon dioxide with sulfate as the electron acceptor, which is reduced to hydrogen sulfide. All available data about this species are based on strain 5575T, isolated from piggery waste in Germany. Here we describe the features of this organ-ism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a Desulfotomaculum species with validly published name. The 4,545,624 bp long single replicon genome with its 4370 protein-coding and 100 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Type Strain Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus ATCC 27374.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Luciana M; Resende, Daniela M; Dorneles, Elaine M S; Horácio, Elvira C A; Alves, Fernanda L; Gonçalves, Leilane O; Tavares, Grace S; Stynen, Ana Paula R; Lage, Andrey P; Ruiz, Jeronimo C

    2016-12-15

    Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus is a zoonotic bacterium important for animal and public health. The complete sequencing and annotation of the genome of the type strain C. fetus subsp. fetus ATCC 27374 are reported here.

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of Type Strain Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus ATCC 27374

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Luciana M.; Resende, Daniela M.; Dorneles, Elaine M. S.; Horácio, Elvira C. A.; Alves, Fernanda L.; Gonçalves, Leilane O.; Tavares, Grace S.; Stynen, Ana Paula R.; Lage, Andrey P.

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus is a zoonotic bacterium important for animal and public health. The complete sequencing and annotation of the genome of the type strain C. fetus subsp. fetus ATCC 27374 are reported here. PMID:27979934

  4. ORGANIZATION TYPES AND ROLE STRAINS--AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF COMPLEX ORGANIZATIONS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PALOLI, ERNEST G.

    AN INVESTIGATION WAS MADE ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CONTRASTING ORGANIZATIONAL TYPES CREATED IN THE LABORATORY SETTING AND THE DISTRIBUTION OF THREE TYPES OF ROLE STRAINS--ROLE UNCERTAINTY, ROLE DISPARITY, AND ROLE INCOMPATIBILITY. THE TWO ORGANIZATION TYPES STUDIED DIFFERED IN DEGREE OF SPECIALIZATION, EMPHASIS ON RULES AND REGULATIONS, AMOUNT…

  5. Complete genome sequence of Geodermatophilus obscurus type strain (G-20).

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Natalia; Sikorski, Johannes; Jando, Marlen; Munk, Christine; Lapidus, Alla; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, Alex; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Meincke, Linda; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-03-30

    Geodermatophilus obscurus Luedemann 1968 is the type species of the genus, which is the type genus of the family Geodermatophilaceae. G. obscurus is of interest as it has frequently been isolated from stressful environments such as rock varnish in deserts, and as it exhibits interesting phenotypes such as lytic capability of yeast cell walls, UV-C resistance, strong production of extracellular functional amyloid (FuBA) and manganese oxidation. This is the first completed genome sequence of the family Geodermatophilaceae. The 5,322,497 bp long genome with its 5,161 protein-coding and 58 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  6. Molecular subtyping of Salmonella enteritidis phage type 8 strains from the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Usera, M A; Popovic, T; Bopp, C A; Strockbine, N A

    1994-01-01

    Salmonella enteritidis is now the most common serotype of the genus Salmonella reported in the United States. Bacteriophage typing has been helpful for subdividing S. enteritidis strains from different sources in the United States. Most S. enteritidis outbreaks reported were egg related, and the majority of them were caused by strains of phage type 8. To determine whether restriction fragment length polymorphism of the rRNA genes (ribotyping) and of the genomic DNAs from two lysogenic phages from S. enteritidis could be used to discriminate between S. enteritidis phage type 8 strains, we conducted Southern hybridization studies on 24 isolates from different outbreaks and six non-outbreak-associated strains using DNA probes for 16S and 23S rRNA genes and S. enteritidis typing phages 1 and 2 from the Ward typing system (L. R. Ward, J. D. H. de Sa, and B. Rowe, Epidemiol. Infect. 99:291-294, 1987). Of seven restriction endonucleases screened with the probe for rRNA genes, AccI provided the best discrimination between strains; six distinct patterns were observed. AccI ribosomal DNA patterns 1 to 6 were detected among 76.7, 3.3, 6.7, 3.3, 3.3, and 6.7% of isolates tested, respectively. Strains of AccI ribosomal DNA pattern 3 could be further subdivided into two additional patterns by using SmaI. Epidemiologically related strains had identical patterns. No discrimination between strains was achieved by probes for phages 1 and 2. No sequences homologous to the phage I probe were detected among phage type 8 strains, and all strains tested with six restriction enzymes had the same hybridization pattern with the phage 2 probe. These findings demonstrate that ribotyping with AccI and SmaI provides an additional means of discriminating between some phage type 8 strains; however, ribotyping and the phage 2 hybridization results from egg-related outbreak strains support previous findings that these strains are closely related. Images PMID:7907343

  7. Diffusion and persistence of multidrug resistant Salmonella Typhimurium strains phage type DT120 in southern Italy.

    PubMed

    De Vito, Danila; Monno, Rosa; Nuccio, Federica; Legretto, Marilisa; Oliva, Marta; Coscia, Maria Franca; Dionisi, Anna Maria; Calia, Carla; Capolongo, Carmen; Pazzani, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Sixty-two multidrug resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains isolated from 255 clinical strains collected in Southern Italy in 2006-2008 were characterised for antimicrobial resistance genes, pulsotype, and phage type. Most strains (83.9%) were resistant to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline (ACSSuT) encoded in 88.5% by the Salmonella genomic island (SGI1) and in 11.5% by the InH-like integron (bla OXA-30-aadA1) and catA1, sul1, and tet(B) genes. STYMXB.0061 (75%) and DT120 (84.6%) were the prevalent pulsotype and phage type identified in these strains, respectively. Five other resistance patterns were found either in single or in a low number of isolates. The pandemic clone DT104 (ACSSuT encoded by SGI1) has been identified in Italy since 1992, while strains DT120 (ACSSuT encoded by SGI1) have never been previously reported in Italy. In Europe, clinical strains DT120 have been reported from sporadic outbreaks linked to the consumption of pork products. However, none of these strains were STYMXB.0061 and SGI1 positive. The prevalent identification and persistence of DT120 isolates would suggest, in Southern Italy, a phage type shifting of the pandemic DT104 clone pulsotype STYMXB.0061. Additionally, these findings raise epidemiological concern about the potential diffusion of these emerging multidrug resistant (SGI linked) DT120 strains.

  8. Virulence type and tissue tropism of Staphylococcus strains originating from Hungarian rabbit farms.

    PubMed

    Német, Zoltán; Albert, Ervin; Nagy, Krisztina; Csuka, Edit; Dán, Ádám; Szenci, Ottó; Hermans, Katleen; Balka, Gyula; Biksi, Imre

    2016-09-25

    Staphylococcosis has a major economic impact on rabbit farming worldwide. Previous studies described a highly virulent variant, which is disseminated across Europe. Such strains are reported to be capable of inducing uncontrollable outbreaks. The authors describe a survey conducted on 374 Staphylococcus strains isolated from rabbit farms, mostly from Hungary, between 2009 and 2014, from a variety of pathological processes. The virulence type of the strains was determined using a multiplex PCR system. 84.2% of the strains belonged to a previously rarely isolated atypical highly virulent type. Only 6.1% belonged to the typical highly virulent genotype. Even low virulent strains were present at a higher percentage (6.4%). For a small group of strains (3.2%) the detection of the femA gene failed, indicating that these strains probably do not belong to the Staphylococcus aureus species. The results reveal the possibility of the asymptomatic presence of highly virulent strains on rabbit farms. "Non-aureus" Staphylococcus sp. can also have a notable role in the etiology of rabbit staphylococcosis. An association with the lesions and the virulence type was demonstrated. Statistical analysis of data on organotropism showed a significant correlation between septicaemia and the highly virulent genotype. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Genome sequence of SG33 strain and recombination between wild-type and vaccine myxoma viruses.

    PubMed

    Camus-Bouclainville, Christelle; Gretillat, Magalie; Py, Robert; Gelfi, Jacqueline; Guérin, Jean Luc; Bertagnoli, Stéphane

    2011-04-01

    Myxomatosis in Europe is the result of the release of a South America strain of myxoma virus in 1952. Several attenuated strains with origins in South America or California have since been used as vaccines in the rabbit industry. We sequenced the genome of the SG33 myxoma virus vaccine strain and compared it with those of other myxoma virus strains. We show that SG33 genome carries a large deletion in its right end. Furthermore, our data strongly suggest that the virus isolate from which SG33 is derived results from an in vivo recombination between a wild-type South America (Lausanne) strain and a California MSD-derived strain. These findings raise questions about the use of insufficiently attenuated virus in vaccination.

  10. Analysis of chromosome-sized DNA and genome typing of isolated strains of Taylorella equigenitalis.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, M; Asami, Y; Miyazawa, T; Samata, T; Isayama, Y; Honda, M; Ide, Y

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of chromosome-sized DNA and genome typing of Taylorella equigenitalis NCTC11184, Kentucky 188, and five strains of T. equigenitalis isolated in Japan were carried out. The three restriction enzymes used, ApaI, NaeI and NotI, cleaved the genomic DNAs of five Japanese strains of T. equigenitalis into relatively limited numbers of restriction fragments, which were well resolved on crossed-field gel electrophoresis (CFGE). The respective profiles after CFGE of the restriction fragments from all five strains were essentially identical to each other after digestion by ApaI, NaeI or NotI. Hence it appears that these strains have a common genome type with respect to these three restriction enzymes. It was also shown that the respective profiles from these strains were essentially different from those of T. equigenitalis NCTC11184 and those of Kentucky 188 after digestion with ApaI, NaeI or NotI.

  11. Regulation of oxygen vacancy types on SnO{sub 2} (110) surface by external strain

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Z. H.; Min, Y. M.; Liu, X. X.; Ding, J. Q.; Liu, L. Z. E-mail: lzliu@nju.edu.cn; Guo, J. H.; Hu, F. R. E-mail: lzliu@nju.edu.cn

    2016-05-15

    In tin dioxide nanostructures, oxygen vacancies (OVs) play an important role in their optical properties and thus regulation of both OV concentration and type via external strain is crucial to exploration of more applications. First-principle calculations of SnO{sub 2} (110) surface disclose that asymmetric deformations induced by external strain not only lead to its intrinsic surface elastic changes, but also result in different OV formation energy. In the absence of external strain, the energetically favorable oxygen vacancies(EFOV) appear in the bridging site of second layer. When -3.5% external strain is applied along y direction, the EFOV moves into plane site. This can be ascribed that the compressed deformation gives rise to redistribution of electronic wave function near OVs, therefore, formation of newly bond structures. Our results suggest that different type OVs in SnO{sub 2} surface can be controlled by strain engineering.

  12. Regulation of oxygen vacancy types on SnO2 (110) surface by external strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Z. H.; Min, Y. M.; Liu, X. X.; Ding, J. Q.; Guo, J. H.; Hu, F. R.; Liu, L. Z.

    2016-05-01

    In tin dioxide nanostructures, oxygen vacancies (OVs) play an important role in their optical properties and thus regulation of both OV concentration and type via external strain is crucial to exploration of more applications. First-principle calculations of SnO2 (110) surface disclose that asymmetric deformations induced by external strain not only lead to its intrinsic surface elastic changes, but also result in different OV formation energy. In the absence of external strain, the energetically favorable oxygen vacancies(EFOV) appear in the bridging site of second layer. When -3.5% external strain is applied along y direction, the EFOV moves into plane site. This can be ascribed that the compressed deformation gives rise to redistribution of electronic wave function near OVs, therefore, formation of newly bond structures. Our results suggest that different type OVs in SnO2 surface can be controlled by strain engineering.

  13. Comparing in vitro and in vivo virulence phenotypes of Burkholderia pseudomallei type G strains.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Eric R G; Kilgore, Paul B; Mott, Tiffany M; Pradenas, Gonzalo A; Torres, Alfredo G

    2017-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bpm) is a saprophytic rod-shaped gram-negative bacterium and the causative agent of melioidosis. This disease has previously been described as endemic in areas such as northern Australia and Southeast Asia, but, more recently, a better understanding of the epidemiology of melioidosis indicated that the disease is distributed worldwide, including regions of the Americas and Africa. A 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) typing system has been developed for Bpm and has revealed that ITS types C, E, and hybrid CE are mainly associated with Australia and Southeast Asia while type G strains are more associated with cases of melioidosis in the Western Hemisphere. The purpose of the current study was to determine the in vitro and in vivo virulence profiles of the understudied Bpm type G strains Ca2009, Ca2013a, Mx2013, and 724644 and compared such phenotypes to the commonly studied Bpm type C strain K96243. We evaluated virulence by measuring invasion/uptake and survival of these Bpm strains in murine respiratory epithelial LA-4 cells and alveolar macrophage MH-S cells using different multiplicity of infections (MOIs of 1 and 10). We also calculated the lethal dose 50 values (LD50) in BALB/c mice that were inoculated intranasally with either Ca2009, Ca2013a, or Mx2013. Overall, the virulence and lethality phenotypes of Bpm type G strains were similar to the Bpm type C strain K96243. Additional comparative analyses between the Bpm ITS types may lead to a better understanding of the contribution of the ITS type to the epidemiology and ecology of Bpm strains.

  14. Comparing in vitro and in vivo virulence phenotypes of Burkholderia pseudomallei type G strains

    PubMed Central

    Mott, Tiffany M.; Pradenas, Gonzalo A.

    2017-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bpm) is a saprophytic rod-shaped gram-negative bacterium and the causative agent of melioidosis. This disease has previously been described as endemic in areas such as northern Australia and Southeast Asia, but, more recently, a better understanding of the epidemiology of melioidosis indicated that the disease is distributed worldwide, including regions of the Americas and Africa. A 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) typing system has been developed for Bpm and has revealed that ITS types C, E, and hybrid CE are mainly associated with Australia and Southeast Asia while type G strains are more associated with cases of melioidosis in the Western Hemisphere. The purpose of the current study was to determine the in vitro and in vivo virulence profiles of the understudied Bpm type G strains Ca2009, Ca2013a, Mx2013, and 724644 and compared such phenotypes to the commonly studied Bpm type C strain K96243. We evaluated virulence by measuring invasion/uptake and survival of these Bpm strains in murine respiratory epithelial LA-4 cells and alveolar macrophage MH-S cells using different multiplicity of infections (MOIs of 1 and 10). We also calculated the lethal dose 50 values (LD50) in BALB/c mice that were inoculated intranasally with either Ca2009, Ca2013a, or Mx2013. Overall, the virulence and lethality phenotypes of Bpm type G strains were similar to the Bpm type C strain K96243. Additional comparative analyses between the Bpm ITS types may lead to a better understanding of the contribution of the ITS type to the epidemiology and ecology of Bpm strains. PMID:28414823

  15. Evaluation of Protein A Gene Polymorphic Region DNA Sequencing for Typing of Staphylococcus aureus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Shopsin, B.; Gomez, M.; Montgomery, S. O.; Smith, D. H.; Waddington, M.; Dodge, D. E.; Bost, D. A.; Riehman, M.; Naidich, S.; Kreiswirth, B. N.

    1999-01-01

    Three hundred and twenty isolates of Staphylococcus aureus were typed by DNA sequence analysis of the X region of the protein A gene (spa). spa typing was compared to both phenotypic and molecular techniques for the ability to differentiate and categorize S. aureus strains into groups that correlate with epidemiological information. Two previously characterized study populations were examined. A collection of 59 isolates (F. C. Tenover, R. Arbeit, G. Archer, J. Biddle, S. Byrne, R. Goering, G. Hancock, G. A. Hébert, B. Hill, R. Hollis, W. R. Jarvis, B. Kreiswirth, W. Eisner, J. Maslow, L. K. McDougal, J. M. Miller, M. Mulligan, and M. A. Pfaller, J. Clin. Microbiol. 32:407–415, 1994) from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) was used to test for the ability to discriminate outbreak from epidemiologically unrelated strains. A separate collection of 261 isolates form a multicenter study (R. B. Roberts, A. de Lencastre, W. Eisner, E. P. Severina, B. Shopsin, B. N. Kreiswirth, and A. Tomasz, J. Infect. Dis. 178:164–171, 1998) of methicillin-resistant S. aureus in New York City (NYC) was used to compare the ability of spa typing to group strains along clonal lines to that of the combination of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and Southern hybridization. In the 320 isolates studied, spa typing identified 24 distinct repeat types and 33 different strain types. spa typing distinguished 27 of 29 related strains and did not provide a unique fingerprint for 4 unrelated strains from the four outbreaks of the CDC collection. In the NYC collection, spa typing provided a clonal assignment for 185 of 195 strains within the five major groups previously described. spa sequencing appears to be a highly effective rapid typing tool for S. aureus that, despite some expense of specificity, has significant advantages in terms of speed, ease of use, ease of interpretation, and standardization among laboratories. PMID:10523551

  16. Dual toxin-producing strain of Clostridium botulinum type Bf isolated from a California patient with infant botulism.

    PubMed

    Barash, Jason R; Arnon, Stephen S

    2004-04-01

    A retrospective study of Clostridium botulinum strains isolated from patients from California with infant botulism identified the fourth known C. botulinum strain that produces both type B and type F botulinum toxins. This unique strain represented 0.12% of the California infant botulism case isolates from 1976 to 2003. The relative concentrations of type B and F toxins produced were temperature dependent.

  17. Complete genome sequence of Nocardiopsis dassonvillei type strain (IMRU 509).

    PubMed

    Sun, Hui; Lapidus, Alla; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxane; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Djao, Olivier Duplex Ngatchou; Rohde, Manfred; Sikorski, Johannes; Göker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-11-30

    Nocardiopsis dassonvillei (Brocq-Rousseau 1904) Meyer 1976 is the type species of the genus Nocardiopsis, which in turn is the type genus of the family Nocardiopsaceae. This species is of interest because of its ecological versatility. Members of N. dassonvillei have been isolated from a large variety of natural habitats such as soil and marine sediments, from different plant and animal materials as well as from human patients. Moreover, representatives of the genus Nocardiopsis participate actively in biopolymer degradation. This is the first complete genome sequence in the family Nocardiopsaceae. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 6,543,312 bp long genome consist of a 5.77 Mbp chromosome and a 0.78 Mbp plasmid and with its 5,570 protein-coding and 77 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  18. Complete genome sequence of Arcobacter nitrofigilis type strain (CIT)

    SciTech Connect

    Pati, Amrita; Gronow, Sabine; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Chertkov, Olga; Bruce, David; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Jeffries, Cynthia; Detter, J. Chris; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2010-01-01

    Arcobacter nitrofigilis (McClung et al. 1983) Vandamme et al. 1991 is the type species of the genus Arcobacter in the epsilonproteobacterial family Campylobacteraceae. The species was first described in 1983 as Campylobacter nitrofigilis [1] after its detection as a free-living, nitrogen-fixing Campylobacter species associated with Spartina alterniflora Loisel. roots [2]. It is of phylogenetic interest because of its lifestyle as a symbiotic organism in a marine environment in contrast to many other Arcobacter species which are associated with warm-blooded animals and tend to be pathogenic. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a type stain of the genus Arcobacter. The 3,192,235 bp genome with its 3,154 protein-coding and 70 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  19. Draft Genome Sequences for Clostridium thermocellum Wild-Type Strain YS and Derived Cellulose Adhesion-Defective Mutant Strain AD2

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven D; Lamed, Raphael; Morag, Ely; Borovok, Ilya; Shoham, Yuval; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Johnson, Courtney M; Yang, Zamin; Land, Miriam L; Utturkar, Sagar M; Keller, Martin; Bayer, Edward A

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum wild-type strain YS is an anaerobic, thermophilic, cellulolytic bacterium capable of directly converting cellulosic substrates into ethanol. Strain YS and a derived cellulose adhesion-defective mutant strain AD2 played pivotal roles in describing the original cellulosome concept. We present their draft genome sequences.

  20. A qPCR method to characterize the sex type of the cell strains from rats.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Junbei; Li, Zhilin; Wan, Qian; Chen, Qiang; Liu, Mianxue; Jiang, Xiaohui; Xie, Linfeng

    2016-10-01

    A simple and fast method was established to identify the sex types of the rat-derived cell strains. The single copy X-chromosome-linked gene AR and the single copy Y-chromosome-linked gene Sry were both detected with qPCR for the rat genomic DNA sample and the AR/Sry ratio was calculated. According to the law of the AR/Sry ratio, a new method to identify the sex types of the rat-derived cell strains was developed. The new assay was proved effective. The new assay showed advantages over the traditional sex type identification PCR methods, which detected only the Sry gene. Moreover, the new method was used to identify the sex types of two rat-derived cell strains unknown for the sex types and the results were confirmed with the in situ hybridization. Finally, the problem of the cross contamination between the female and the male samples was addressed and discussed extensively.

  1. Phylogeny of Flabellulidae (Amoebozoa: Leptomyxida) inferred from SSU rDNA sequences of the type strain of Flabellula citata Schaeffer, 1926 and newly isolated strains of marine amoebae.

    PubMed

    Dyková, Iva; Fiala, Ivan; Pecková, Hana; Dvoráková, Helena

    2008-12-01

    New strains of non-vannellid flattened amoebae isolated from fish, an invertebrate and the marine environment were studied together with Flabellula citata Schaeffer, 1926 selected by morphology as a reference strain. The study revealed a paucity of features distinguishing individual strains at the generic level, but clearly evidenced mutual phylogenetic relationships within the assemblage of strains as well as their affiliation to the Leptomyxida. In this study, the SSU rDNA dataset of leptomyxids was expanded and a new branching pattern was presented within this lineage of Amoebozoa. Sequences of three newly introduced strains clustered in close relationship with the type strain of F. citata, the type species of the genus. Three strains, including one resembling Flamella sp., were positioned within a sister-group containing Paraflabellula spp. Results of phylogenetic analysis confirmed doubts of previous authors regarding generic assignment of several Rhizanmoeba and Ripidomnyxa strains.

  2. Complete genome sequence of Thermomonospora curvata type strain (B9)

    SciTech Connect

    Chertkov, Olga; Sikorski, Johannes; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ngatchou, Olivier Duplex; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Brettin, Thomas S; Han, Cliff; Detter, J. Chris; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2011-01-01

    Thermomonospora curvata Henssen 1957 is the type species of the genus Thermomonospora. This genus is of interest because members of this clade are sources of new antibiotics, enzymes, and products with pharmacological activity. In addition, members of this genus participate in the active degradation of cellulose. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Thermomonosporaceae. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 5,639,016 bp long genome with its 4,985 protein-coding and 76 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  3. Complete genome sequence of Sulfurospirillum deleyianum type strain (5175T)

    PubMed Central

    Sikorski, Johannes; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Saunders, Elizabeth; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chain, Patrick; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Rohde, Manfred; Lang, Elke; Spring, Stefan; Göker, Markus; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Sulfurospirillum deleyianum Schumacher et al. 1993 is the type species of the genus Sulfurospirillum. S. deleyianum is a model organism for studying sulfur reduction and dissimilatory nitrate reduction as an energy source for growth. Also, it is a prominent model organism for studying the structural and functional characteristics of cytochrome c nitrite reductase. Here, we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of the genus Sulfurospirillum. The 2,306,351 bp long genome with its 2,291 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304697

  4. Complete genome sequence of Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans type strain (ICPT)

    SciTech Connect

    Clum, Alicia; Nolan, Matt; Lang, Elke; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Copeland, Alex; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Goker, Markus; Spring, Stefan; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jefferies, Cynthia C.; Chain, Patrick; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla

    2009-05-20

    Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans (Clark and Norris 1996) is the sole and type species of the genus, which until recently was the only genus within the actinobacterial family Acidimicrobiaceae and in the order Acidomicrobiales. Rapid oxidation of iron pyrite during autotrophic growth in the absence of an enhanced CO2 concentration is characteristic for A. ferrooxidans. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the order Acidomicrobiales, and the 2,158,157 bp long single replicon genome with its 2038 protein coding and 54 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  5. Complete genome sequence of Sulfurospirillum deleyianum type strain (5175T)

    SciTech Connect

    Sikorski, Johannes; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Rohde, Manfred; Lang, Elke; Spring, Stefan; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Sulfurospirillum deleyianum Schumacher et al. 1993 is the type species of the genus Sulfurospirillum. S. deleyianum is a model organism for studying sulfur reduction and dissimilatory nitrate reduction as energy source for growth. Also, it is a prominent model organism for studying the structural and functional characteristics of the cytochrome c nitrite reductase. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of the genus Sulfurospirillum. The 2,306,351 bp long genome with its 2291 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  6. Complete genome sequence of Spirosoma linguale type strain (1T)

    SciTech Connect

    Lail, Kathleen; Sikorski, Johannes; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, A; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Detter, J. Chris; Schutze, Andrea; Rohde, Manfred; Tindall, Brian; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Chen, Feng

    2010-01-01

    Spirosoma linguale Migula 1894 is the type species of the genus. S. linguale is a free-living and non-pathogenic organism, known for its peculiar ringlike and horseshoe-shaped cell morphology. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete ge-nome sequence and annotation. This is only the third completed genome sequence of a member of the family Cytophagaceae. The 8,491,258 bp long genome with its eight plas-mids, 7,069 protein-coding and 60 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacte-ria and Archaea project.

  7. Complete genome sequence of Gordonia bronchialis type strain (3410T)

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Natalia; Sikorski, Johannes; Jando, Marlen; Lapidus, Alla; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Tice, Hope; Copeland, Alex; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Chen, Feng; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Chain, Patrick; Saunders, Elizabeth; Han, Cliff; Detter, John C.; Brettin, Thomas; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2010-01-01

    Gordonia bronchialis Tsukamura 1971 is the type species of the genus. G. bronchialis is a human-pathogenic organism that has been isolated from a large variety of human tissues. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of the family Gordoniaceae. The 5,290,012 bp long genome with its 4,944 protein-coding and 55 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304674

  8. Complete genome sequence of Gordonia bronchialis type strain (3410T)

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, N; Sikorski, Johannes; Jando, Marlen; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Copeland, A; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Chen, Feng; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Han, Cliff; Detter, J C; Brettin, Thomas S; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2010-01-01

    Gordonia bronchialis Tsukamura 1971 is the type species of the genus. G. bronchialis is a human-pathogenic organism that has been isolated from a large variety of human tissues. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of the family Gordoniaceae. The 5,290,012 bp long genome with its 4,944 protein-coding and 55 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  9. Molecular typing of environmental and clinical strains of Vibrio vulnificus isolated in the northeastern USA.

    PubMed

    Reynaud, Yann; Pitchford, Steven; De Decker, Sophie; Wikfors, Gary H; Brown, Christopher L

    2013-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is a ubiquitous marine bacterium that is responsible for infections and some seafood-related illnesses and deaths in the United States, mainly in individuals with compromised health status in the Gulf of Mexico region. Most phylogenetic studies focus on V. vulnificus strains isolated in the southern United States, but almost no genetic data are available on northeastern bacterial isolates of clinical or environmental origin. Our goal in this study was to examine the genetic diversity of environmental strains isolated from commercially-produced oysters and in clinical strains of known pathogenicity in northeastern United States. We conducted analyses of a total of eighty-three strains of V. vulnificus, including 18 clinical strains known to be pathogenic. A polyphasic, molecular-typing approach was carried out, based upon established biotypes, vcg, CPS, 16S rRNA types and three other genes possibly associated with virulence (arylsulfatase A, mtlABC, and nanA). An established Multi Locus Sequence Typing (MLST) method was also performed. Phylogenetic analyses of these markers and MLST results produced similar patterns of clustering of strains into two main lineages (we categorized as 'LI' and 'LII'), with clinical and environmental strains clustering together in both lineages. Lineage LII was comprised primarily but not entirely of clinical bacterial isolates. Putative virulence markers were present in both clinical and environmental strains. These results suggest that some northeastern environmental strains of V. vulnificus are phylogenetically close to clinical strains and probably are capable of virulence. Further studies are necessary to assess the risk of human illness from consuming raw oysters harvested in the northeastern US.

  10. Molecular Typing of Environmental and Clinical Strains of Vibrio vulnificus Isolated in the Northeastern USA

    PubMed Central

    Reynaud, Yann; Pitchford, Steven; De Decker, Sophie; Wikfors, Gary H.; Brown, Christopher L.

    2013-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is a ubiquitous marine bacterium that is responsible for infections and some seafood-related illnesses and deaths in the United States, mainly in individuals with compromised health status in the Gulf of Mexico region. Most phylogenetic studies focus on V. vulnificus strains isolated in the southern United States, but almost no genetic data are available on northeastern bacterial isolates of clinical or environmental origin. Our goal in this study was to examine the genetic diversity of environmental strains isolated from commercially-produced oysters and in clinical strains of known pathogenicity in northeastern United States. We conducted analyses of a total of eighty-three strains of V. vulnificus, including 18 clinical strains known to be pathogenic. A polyphasic, molecular-typing approach was carried out, based upon established biotypes, vcg, CPS, 16S rRNA types and three other genes possibly associated with virulence (arylsulfatase A, mtlABC, and nanA). An established Multi Locus Sequence Typing (MLST) method was also performed. Phylogenetic analyses of these markers and MLST results produced similar patterns of clustering of strains into two main lineages (we categorized as ‘LI’ and ‘LII’), with clinical and environmental strains clustering together in both lineages. Lineage LII was comprised primarily but not entirely of clinical bacterial isolates. Putative virulence markers were present in both clinical and environmental strains. These results suggest that some northeastern environmental strains of V. vulnificus are phylogenetically close to clinical strains and probably are capable of virulence. Further studies are necessary to assess the risk of human illness from consuming raw oysters harvested in the northeastern US. PMID:24386187

  11. Thermal Output of WK-Type Strain Gauges on Various Materials at Cryogenic and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalkowski, Matthew K.; Rivers, H. Kevin; Smith, Russell W.

    1998-01-01

    Strain gage apparent strain (thermal output) is one of the largest sources of error associated with the measurement of strain when temperatures and mechanical loads are varied. In this paper, experimentally determined apparent strains of WK-type strain gages, installed on both metallic and composite-laminate materials of various lay-ups and resin systems for temperatures ranging from -450 F to 230 F are presented. For the composite materials apparent strain in both the 0 ply orientation angle and the 90 ply orientation angle were measured. Metal specimens tested included: aluminum-lithium alloy (Al-LI 2195-T87), aluminum alloy (Al 2219-T87), and titanium alloy. Composite materials tested include: graphite-toughened-epoxy (IM7/997- 2), graphite-bismaleimide (IM7/5260), and graphite-K3 (IM7/K3B). The experimentally determined apparent strain data are curve fit with a fourth-order polynomial for each of the materials studied. The apparent strain data and the polynomials that are fit to the data are compared with those produced by the strain gage manufacturer, and the results and comparisons are presented. Unacceptably high errors between the manufacture's data and the experimentally determined data were observed (especially at temperatures below - 270-F).

  12. Complete genome sequence of Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius type strain (104-IAT)

    PubMed Central

    Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Sikorski, Johannes; Lapidus, Alla; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, Alex; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Chain, Patrick; Meincke, Linda; Sims, David; Chertkov, Olga; Han, Cliff; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Wahrenburg, Claudia; Rohde, Manfred; Pukall, Rüdiger; Göker, Markus; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2010-01-01

    Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius (Darland and Brock 1971) is the type species of the larger of the two genera in the bacillal family ‘Alicyclobacillaceae’. A. acidocaldarius is a free-living and non-pathogenic organism, but may also be associated with food and fruit spoilage. Due to its acidophilic nature, several enzymes from this species have since long been subjected to detailed molecular and biochemical studies. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of the family ‘Alicyclobacillaceae’. The 3,205,686 bp long genome (chromosome and three plasmids) with its 3,153 protein-coding and 82 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304673

  13. Complete genome sequence of Weeksella virosa type strain (9751T)

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, Elke; Teshima, Hazuki; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Nolan, Matt; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Pati, Amrita; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Kopitz, marcus; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Tindall, Brian; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2011-01-01

    Weeksella virosa Holmes et al. 1987 is the sole member and type species of the genus Weeksella which belongs to the family Flavobacteriaceae of the phylum Bacteroidetes. Twenty-nine isolates, collected from clinical specimens provided the basis for the taxon description. While the species seems to be a saprophyte of the mucous membranes of healthy man and warm-blooded animals a causal relationship with disease has been reported in a few instances. Except for the ability to produce indole and to hydrolyze Tween and proteins such as casein and gelatin, this aerobic, non-motile, non-pigmented bacterial species is metabolically inert in most traditional biochemical tests. The 2,272,954 bp long genome with its 2,105 protein-coding and 76 RNA genes consists of one circular chromosome and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  14. Complete genome sequence of Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius type strain (104-IAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Mavromatis, K; Sikorski, Johannes; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, A; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, N; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Meincke, Linda; Sims, David; Chertkov, Olga; Han, Cliff; Brettin, Tom; Detter, J C; Wahrenburg, Claudia; Rohde, Manfred; Pukall, Rudiger; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2010-01-01

    Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius (Darland and Brock 1971) is the type species of the larger of the two genera in the bacillal family Alicyclobacillaceae . A. acidocaldarius is a free-living and non-pathogenic organism, but may also be associated with food and fruit spoilage. Due to its acidophilic nature, several enzymes from this species have since long been subjected to detailed molecular and biochemical studies. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of the family Alicyclobacillaceae . The 3,205,686 bp long genome (chromosome and three plasmids) with its 3,153 protein-coding and 82 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  15. Complete genome sequence of Ferrimonas balearica type strain (PATT)

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, Matt; Sikorski, Johannes; Davenport, Karen W.; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Tapia, Roxanne; Brettin, Thomas S; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Yasawong, Montri; Rohde, Manfred; Tindall, Brian; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla L.

    2010-01-01

    Ferrimonas balerica (Rossello-Mora et al. 1996) is the type species of the genus Ferrimonas, which belongs to the gammaproteobacterial family Ferrimonadaceae. The species is a Gram-negative, motile, facultatively anaerobic and non spore-forming bacterium, which is of special interest because it is a chemoorganotroph and has a strictly respiratory metabolism with oxygen, nitrate, Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide, Fe(III)-citrate, MnO2, selenate, selenite and thiosulfate as electron acceptors. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the genus Ferrimonas and also the first sequence from a member of the family Ferrimonadaceae. The 4,279,159 bp long genome with its 3,803 protein-coding and 144 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  16. Complete genome sequence of Oceanithermus profundus type strain (506T)

    SciTech Connect

    Pati, Amrita; Zhang, Xiaojing; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Hauser, Loren John; Jeffries, Cynthia; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Ruhl, Alina; Mwirichia, Romano; Rohde, Manfred; Tindall, Brian; Sikorski, Johannes; Wirth, Reinhard; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Detter, J. Chris; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Land, Miriam L

    2011-01-01

    Oceanithermus profundus Miroshnichenko et al. 2003 is the type species of the genus Oceanithermus, which belongs to the family Thermaceae. The genus currently comprises two species whose members are thermophilic and are able to reduce sulfur compounds and nitrite. The organism is adapted to the salinity of sea water, is able to utilize a broad range of carbohydrates, some proteinaceous substrates, organic acids and alcohols. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the genus Oceanithermus and the fourth sequence from the family Thermaceae. The 2,439,291 bp long genome with its 2,391 protein-coding and 54 RNA genes consists of one chromosome and a 135,351 bp long plasmid, and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  17. Complete genome sequence of Cellulomonas flavigena type strain (134).

    PubMed

    Abt, Birte; Foster, Brian; Lapidus, Alla; Clum, Alicia; Sun, Hui; Pukall, Rüdiger; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-07-29

    Cellulomonas flavigena (Kellerman and McBeth 1912) Bergey et al. 1923 is the type species of the genus Cellulomonas of the actinobacterial family Cellulomonadaceae. Members of the genus Cellulomonas are of special interest for their ability to degrade cellulose and hemicellulose, particularly with regard to the use of biomass as an alternative energy source. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the genus Cellulomonas, and next to the human pathogen Tropheryma whipplei the second complete genome sequence within the actinobacterial family Cellulomonadaceae. The 4,123,179 bp long single replicon genome with its 3,735 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  18. Complete genome sequence of Kangiella koreensis type strain (SW-125).

    PubMed

    Han, Cliff; Sikorski, Johannes; Lapidus, Alla; Nolan, Matt; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Copeland, Alex; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Chain, Patrick; Saunders, Elizabeth; Brettin, Thomas; Göker, Markus; Tindall, Brian J; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Detter, John C

    2009-11-22

    Kangiella koreensis (Yoon et al. 2004) is the type species of the genus and is of phylogenetic interest because of the very isolated location of the genus Kangiella in the gammaproteobacterial order Oceanospirillales. K. koreensis SW-125(T) is a Gram-negative, non-motile, non-spore-forming bacterium isolated from tidal flat sediments at Daepo Beach, Yellow Sea, Korea. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence from the genus Kangiella and only the fourth genome from the order Oceanospirillales. This 2,852,073 bp long single replicon genome with its 2647 protein-coding and 48 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  19. Complete genome sequence of Haliangium ochraceum type strain (SMP-2).

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Natalia; Daum, Chris; Lang, Elke; Abt, Birte; Kopitz, Markus; Saunders, Elizabeth; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Copeland, Alex; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Chen, Feng; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Pati, Amrita; Mikhailova, Natalia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Detter, John C; Brettin, Thomas; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Bristow, Jim; Markowitz, Victor; Eisen, Jonathan A; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-28

    Haliangium ochraceum Fudou et al. 2002 is the type species of the genus Haliangium in the myxococcal family 'Haliangiaceae'. Members of the genus Haliangium are the first halophilic myxobacterial taxa described. The cells of the species follow a multicellular lifestyle in highly organized biofilms, called swarms, they decompose bacterial and yeast cells as most myxobacteria do. The fruiting bodies contain particularly small coccoid myxospores. H. ochraceum encodes the first actin homologue identified in a bacterial genome. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the myxococcal suborder Nannocystineae, and the 9,446,314 bp long single replicon genome with its 6,898 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  20. Complete genome sequence of Haliscomenobacter hydrossis type strain (OT)

    SciTech Connect

    Daligault, Hajnalka E.; Lapidus, Alla L.; Zeytun, Ahmet; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Huntemann, Marcel; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Verbarg, Susanne; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    Haliscomenobacter hydrossis van Veen et al. 1973 is the type species of the genus Halisco- menobacter, which belongs to order 'Sphingobacteriales'. The species is of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location in the tree of life, especially the so far genomically un- charted part of it, and because the organism grows in a thin, hardly visible hyaline sheath. Members of the species were isolated from fresh water of lakes and from ditch water. The genome of H. hydrossis is the first completed genome sequence reported from a member of the family 'Saprospiraceae'. The 8,771,651 bp long genome with its three plasmids of 92 kbp, 144 kbp and 164 kbp length contains 6,848 protein-coding and 60 RNA genes, and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  1. Complete genome sequence of Cellulomonas flavigena type strain (134T)

    PubMed Central

    Abt, Birte; Foster, Brian; Lapidus, Alla; Clum, Alicia; Sun, Hui; Pukall, Rüdiger; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Cellulomonas flavigena (Kellerman and McBeth 1912) Bergey et al. 1923 is the type species of the genus Cellulomonas of the actinobacterial family Cellulomonadaceae. Members of the genus Cellulomonas are of special interest for their ability to degrade cellulose and hemicellulose, particularly with regard to the use of biomass as an alternative energy source. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the genus Cellulomonas, and next to the human pathogen Tropheryma whipplei the second complete genome sequence within the actinobacterial family Cellulomonadaceae. The 4,123,179 bp long single replicon genome with its 3,735 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304688

  2. Complete genome sequence of Cellulomonas flavigena type strain (134T)

    SciTech Connect

    Abt, Birte; Foster, Brian; Lapidus, Alla L.; Clum, Alicia; Sun, Hui; Pukall, Rudiger; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Cellulomonas flavigena (Kellerman and McBeth 1912) Bergey et al. 1923 is the type species of the genus Cellulomonas of the actinobacterial family Cellulomonadaceae. Members of the genus Cellulomonas are of special interest for their ability to degrade cellulose and hemicellulose, particularly with regard to the use of biomass as an alternative energy source. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the genus Cellulomonas, and next to the human pathogen Tropheryma whipplei the second complete genome sequence within the actinobacterial family Cellulomonadaceae. The 4,123,179 bp long single replicon genome with its 3,735 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  3. [MLST types of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium strains isolated from blood cultures].

    PubMed

    Arslan, Uğur; Demir, Esra; Oryaşin, Erman; Türk Dağı, Hatice; Tuncer, Inci; Fındık, Duygu; Bozdoğan, Bülent

    2013-07-01

    Enterococci, particularly vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), are important nosocomial pathogens with limited treatment options. Enterococci have low-level resistance to penicillins and aminoglycosides and are intrinsically resistant to cephalosporins. In addition, they can acquire high-level resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics, aminoglycosides and glycopeptides. The aim of this study was to determine glycopeptide resistance mechanisms and genetic relationships of vancomycin-resistant E.faecium strains isolated from blood cultures between 2003-2009 years by molecular epidemiologic methods. A total of 38 VRE strains isolated from blood cultures were included in this study. The isolates were identified by conventional methods and Phoenix 100 BD automated system (Becton Dickinson Diagnostic Systems, USA) and confirmed by sequence analysis of 16S rRNA amplicons. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed by the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method accor-ding to the CLSI standards. MIC values of vancomycin were determined in vancomycin resistant strains by E-test (AB Biodisk, Sweden) method. Vancomycin resistance genes included vanA, vanB, vanC, and vanD were investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Clonal relationship between strains was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Sequence analysis was performed for examples selected for multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of each pulsotype and subtype. Thirty eight strains of enterococci isolated from blood cultures were defined as E.faecium by phenotypic methods and confirmed by 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Vancomycin MIC values of strains were determined as > 256 µg/ml by E test. The vanA gene was detected in all isolates. Clonal relationship of 38 isolates E.faecium carrying the vanA gene was determined by PFGE and MLST methods. PFGE detected four pulsotypes (A-D) and one sporadic isolate. Twenty nine strains belonged to A pulsotype, three strains belonged to B pulsotype, two strains

  4. [Homology analysis and historical tracing for inter-continental Burkholderia pseudomallei strains of sequence type 562].

    PubMed

    Zheng, X; Wang, L X; Wu, H; Chen, H; Zhu, X; He, J R; Xia, L X; Li, W

    2017-05-10

    Objective: To understand the homology of sequence type 562 (ST562) strains of Burkholderia pseudomallei which circulated in two separate continents (Asia and Australia) at different times. Methods:SpeⅠrestriction fragments and 4-locus multiple locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA-4) profiles were extracted from MSHR5858 (ST562 Australia strain) and 350105 (ST562 historical strain of Hainan) genomes respectively by in silico analysis and then compared with the PFGE and MLVA-4 results of five ST562 clinical isolates from Hainan to test their homology. Synteny and homology between MSHR5858 and 350105 genomes were evaluated with bioinformatics methods. Results: Five ST562 clinical strains from Hainan shared same PFGE pattern (similarity>97%) and this pattern coincided to the map of SpeⅠrestriction fragments of Australian strain MSHR5858. The amounts of genomic restriction fragments (SpeⅠ) for MSHR5858 and 350105 were 31 and 34 respectively, with 31 of them matched by each other. Five ST562 clinical strains of Hainan were distinct by MLVA-4 profiles, among which HPPH43 (MLVA-4 profile: 10, 8, 10, 8) was close to Australia strain MSHR5858 (10, 8, 8, 6), containing identical repeat numbers at VNTR loci 2341k and 1788k; while HK003 (11, 8, 15, 7) and HK061 (11, 8, 17, 7) similar to Hainan historical strain 350105 (11, 8, 11, 8), with same repeat numbers at loci 2341k and 1788k also. High-degree synteny and consistency on genomic contents were observed between 350105 and MSHR5858, indicating a similar origin for the 2 strains. Conclusion: All inter-continental and historical ST562 strains of B. pseudomallei had similar genomic characteristics, supporting the assumption that they had a common origin. Also, it is possible that Hainan historical strain 350105 is the ancestor of all circulating ST562 strains.

  5. Complete genome sequence of the larval shellfish pathogen Vibrio Tubiashii type strain ATCC 19109

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Vibrio tubiashii is a larval shellfish pathogen. Here we report the first closed genome sequence for this species (American Type Culture Collection type strain 19109), which has two chromosomes (3,294,490 and 1,766,582 bp), two megaplasmids (251,408 and 122,808 bp) and two plasmids (57,076 and 47,9...

  6. Complete genome sequence of Denitrovibrio acetiphilus type strain (N2460).

    PubMed

    Kiss, Hajnalka; Lang, Elke; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Nolan, Matt; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Chen, Feng; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Detter, John C; Brettin, Thomas; Spring, Stefan; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-06-15

    Denitrovibrio acetiphilus Myhr and Torsvik 2000 is the type species of the genus Denitrovibrio in the bacterial family Deferribacteraceae. It is of phylogenetic interest because there are only six genera described in the family Deferribacteraceae. D. acetiphilus was isolated as a representative of a population reducing nitrate to ammonia in a laboratory column simulating the conditions in off-shore oil recovery fields. When nitrate was added to this column undesirable hydrogen sulfide production was stopped because the sulfate reducing populations were superseded by these nitrate reducing bacteria. Here we describe the features of this marine, mesophilic, obligately anaerobic organism respiring by nitrate reduction, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the second complete genome sequence of the order Deferribacterales and the class Deferribacteres, which is the sole class in the phylum Deferribacteres. The 3,222,077 bp genome with its 3,034 protein-coding and 51 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  7. Complete genome sequence of Pyrolobus fumarii type strain (1AT)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Goker, Markus; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Huntemann, Marcel; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Pagani, Ioanna; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Huber, Harald; Yasawong, Montri; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Abt, Birte; Sikorski, Johannes; Wirth, Reinhard; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla L.

    2011-01-01

    Pyrolobus fumarii Bl chl et al. 1997 is the type species of the genus Pyrolobus, which be- longs to the crenarchaeal family Pyrodictiaceae. The species is a facultatively microaerophilic non-motile crenarchaeon. It is of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location in the tree of life and because it is a hyperthermophilic chemolithoautotroph known as the primary producer of organic matter at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. P. fumarii exhibits currently the highest optimal growth temperature of all life forms on earth (106 C). This is the first com- pleted genome sequence of a member of the genus Pyrolobus to be published and only the second genome sequence from a member of the family Pyrodictiaceae. Although Diversa Corporation announced the completion of sequencing of the P. fumarii genome on Septem- ber 25, 2001, this sequence was never released to the public. The 1,843,267 bp long genome with its 1,986 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  8. In vitro permissivity of bovine cells for wild-type and vaccinal myxoma virus strains.

    PubMed

    Pignolet, Béatrice; Duteyrat, Jean-Luc; Allemandou, Aude; Gelfi, Jacqueline; Foucras, Gilles; Bertagnoli, Stéphane

    2007-09-27

    Myxoma virus (MYXV), a leporide-specific poxvirus, represents an attractive candidate for the generation of safe, non-replicative vaccine vector for non-host species. However, there is very little information concerning infection of non-laboratory animals species cells with MYXV. In this study, we investigated interactions between bovine cells and respectively a wild type strain (T1) and a vaccinal strain (SG33) of MYXV. We showed that bovine KOP-R, BT and MDBK cell lines do not support MYXV production. Electron microscopy observations of BT-infected cells revealed the low efficiency of viral entry and the production of defective virions. In addition, infection of bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) occurred at a very low level, even following non-specific activation, and was always abortive. We did not observe significant differences between the wild type strain and the vaccinal strain of MYXV, indicating that SG33 could be used for new bovine vaccination strategies.

  9. Complete genome sequence of Clostridium pasteurianum NRRL B-598, a non-type strain producing butanol.

    PubMed

    Sedlar, Karel; Kolek, Jan; Skutkova, Helena; Branska, Barbora; Provaznik, Ivo; Patakova, Petra

    2015-11-20

    The strain Clostridium pasteurianum NRRL B-598 is non-type, oxygen tolerant, spore-forming, mesophilic and heterofermentative strain with high hydrogen production and ability of acetone-butanol fermentation (ethanol production being negligible). Here, we present the annotated complete genome sequence of this bacterium, replacing the previous draft genome assembly. The genome consisting of a single circular 6,186,879 bp chromosome with no plasmid was determined using PacBio RSII and Roche 454 sequencing.

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia cordobensis Type Strain LMG 27620, Isolated from Agricultural Soils in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Draghi, Walter Omar; Mancini Villagra, Ulises M.; Wall, Luis Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Burkholderia are commonly found in diverse ecological niches in nature. We report here the draft genome sequence of Burkholderia cordobensis type strain LMG 27620, isolated from agricultural soil in Córdoba, Argentina. This strain harbors several genes involved in chitin utilization and phenol degradation, which make it an interesting candidate for biocontrol purposes and xenobiotic degradation in polluted environments. PMID:26494680

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of JVAP01T, the Type Strain of the Novel Species Acinetobacter dijkshoorniae

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Orth, Dietmar; Cosgaya, Clara; Telli, Murat; Mosqueda, Noraida; Marí-Almirall, Marta

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the type strain of Acinetobacter dijkshoorniae, a novel human pathogen within the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus–Acinetobacter baumannii (ACB) complex. Strain JVAP01T has an estimated genome size of 3.9 Mb, exhibits a 38.8% G+C content, and carries a plasmid with the blaNDM-1 carbapenemase gene. PMID:28082506

  12. Complete genome sequence of the type strain Cupriavidus necator N-1.

    PubMed

    Poehlein, Anja; Kusian, Bernhard; Friedrich, Bärbel; Daniel, Rolf; Bowien, Botho

    2011-09-01

    Here we announce the complete genome sequence of the copper-resistant bacterium Cupriavidus necator N-1, the type strain of the genus Cupriavidus. The genome consists of two chromosomes and two circular plasmids. Based on genome comparison, the chromosomes of C. necator N-1 share a high degree of similarity with the two chromosomal replicons of the bioplastic-producing hydrogen bacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16. The two strains differ in their plasmids and the presence of hydrogenase genes, which are absent in strain N-1. Copyright © 2011, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of the Type Strain Cupriavidus necator N-1 ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Poehlein, Anja; Kusian, Bernhard; Friedrich, Bärbel; Daniel, Rolf; Bowien, Botho

    2011-01-01

    Here we announce the complete genome sequence of the copper-resistant bacterium Cupriavidus necator N-1, the type strain of the genus Cupriavidus. The genome consists of two chromosomes and two circular plasmids. Based on genome comparison, the chromosomes of C. necator N-1 share a high degree of similarity with the two chromosomal replicons of the bioplastic-producing hydrogen bacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16. The two strains differ in their plasmids and the presence of hydrogenase genes, which are absent in strain N-1. PMID:21742890

  14. Multiplex PCR for Identification of Two Capsular Types in Epidemic KPC-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Sequence Type 258 Strains

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang; Chavda, Kalyan D.; Findlay, Jacqueline; Peirano, Gisele; Hopkins, Katie; Pitout, Johann D. D.; Bonomo, Robert A.; Woodford, Neil; DeLeo, Frank R.

    2014-01-01

    We developed a multiplex PCR assay capable of identifying two capsular polysaccharide synthesis sequence types (sequence type 258 [ST258] cps-1 and cps-2) in epidemic Klebsiella pneumoniae ST258 strains. The assay performed with excellent sensitivity (100%) and specificity (100%) for identifying cps types in 60 ST258 K. pneumoniae sequenced isolates. The screening of 419 ST258 clonal isolates revealed a significant association between cps type and K. pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC) variant: cps-1 is largely associated with KPC-2, while cps-2 is primarily associated with KPC-3. PMID:24733470

  15. Molecular typing of Candida albicans strains isolated from denture wearers by repetitive sequence-based PCR.

    PubMed

    Abaci, O; Haliki-Uztan, A; Ozturk, B; Toksavul, S; Ulusoy, M; Boyacioglu, H

    2011-02-01

    Long-term use of prosthesis is the most important risk factor for the colonization of Candida species on the mucosal surfaces, which can lead to the development of denture-related stomatitis (DRS). Some individuals wearing prosthesis develop DRS and others do not. C. albicans strains isolated from both groups were genotypically compared. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the strain causing prosthesis stomatitis was different from the other strains genotypically. The study included 90 individuals wearing different prostheses and 20 control individuals with natural teeth. In the study 109 C. albicans strains were used which were isolated from the saliva samples and the mucosal surfaces of the tongues and palates of 51 individuals and then defined phenotypically. Phenotypic diagnosis of the isolates was genotypically verified by using species-specific PCR. For molecular typing, repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence polymerase chain reaction (REP-PCR) was employed. The results of the study revealed that REP-PCR had the capability to separate 109 C. albicans strains and six reference strains into 44 genotypes. Whereas C. albicans strains showed heterogenic distribution, C. albicans strains isolated from the individuals suffering from prosthesis stomatitis showed no specific genotypes. REP-PCR is a simple, fast and low-cost method and helped work on a great number of samples.

  16. Phylogeny and virulence of naturally occurring type III secretion system-deficient Pectobacterium strains.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Sook; Ma, Bing; Perna, Nicole T; Charkowski, Amy O

    2009-07-01

    Pectobacterium species are enterobacterial plant-pathogenic bacteria that cause soft rot disease in diverse plant species. Previous epidemiological studies of Pectobacterium species have suffered from an inability to identify most isolates to the species or subspecies level. We used three previously described DNA-based methods, 16S-23S intergenic transcribed spacer PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, to examine isolates from diseased stems and tubers and found that MLSA provided the most reliable classification of isolates. We found that strains belonging to at least two Pectobacterium clades were present in each field examined, although representatives of only three of five Pectobacterium clades were isolated. Hypersensitive response and DNA hybridization assays revealed that strains of both Pectobacterium carotovorum and Pectobacterium wasabiae lack a type III secretion system (T3SS). Two of the T3SS-deficient strains assayed lack genes adjacent to the T3SS gene cluster, suggesting that multiple deletions occurred in Pectobacterium strains in this locus, and all strains appear to have only six rRNA operons instead of the seven operons typically found in Pectobacterium strains. The virulence of most of the T3SS-deficient strains was similar to that of T3SS-encoding strains in stems and tubers.

  17. Damage type and strain mode associations in human compact bone bending fatigue.

    PubMed

    Boyce, T M; Fyhrie, D P; Glotkowski, M C; Radin, E L; Schaffler, M B

    1998-05-01

    When compact bone is subjected to fatigue loading, it develops matrix microdamage, which reduces the tissue's ability to resist fracture. The relative influence of different strain modes on damage and strength in compact bone has not been characterized, to our knowledge. In this study, the nonuniform strain field produced by four-point bending was used to introduce fatigue damage into tibial bending beam specimens from men 40-49 years old. The specimens were then bulk-stained with basic fuchsin to mark damage surfaces and were examined histologically and with confocal microscopy to describe damage morphologies and position relative to tension and compression-strained regions of the specimen. Histomorphometric methods were used to quantify the amounts of different types of bone microdamage. Three major types were observed. In regions subjected to tensile strains, the bone had focal regions of diffusely increased basic fuchsin staining (i.e., diffuse microdamage). Confocal microscopy of these regions showed them to be composed of extensive networks of fine, ultrastructural-level cracks. In compressive strain regions, the tissue developed linear microcracks in interstitial areas similar to those originally described by Frost. Fine, tearing-type (wispy-appearing) cracks were observed near and in the plane of the neutral axis. The paths of these fine cracks were not influenced by microstructural boundaries. Other minor damage morphologies (sector-stained osteons, delamination of regions of lamellae, and intraosteonal cracking) were observed, but their distribution was unrelated to local strain field. Thus. in fatigue of human compact bone, the principal mechanisms of matrix failure (i.e., linear microcrack, diffuse damage foci, and tearing-type damage) are strongly dependent on local strain type.

  18. Mapping of attenuating sequences of an avirulent poliovirus type 2 strain.

    PubMed

    Moss, E G; O'Neill, R E; Racaniello, V R

    1989-05-01

    A mouse model for poliomyelitis was used to identify genomic sequences that attenuate neurovirulence of poliovirus strain P2/P712. This type 2 strain is avirulent in primates and mice yet grows as well as virulent strains in cell culture. The approach used was to exchange portions of the genome of the mouse-virulent P2/Lansing strain with the corresponding region from P2/P712 to identify sequences that could attenuate Lansing neurovirulence in mice. A full-length infectious cDNA of P2/P712 was assembled and used to construct recombinants between P2/P712 and P2/Lansing. The results of neurovirulence testing of 11 recombinants indicated that strong attenuating determinants are located in the 5' noncoding region of P2/P712 and a region encoding capsid protein VP1 and 2Apro, 2B, and part of 2C. An attenuating determinant was further localized to between nucleotides 456 and 628 of P2/P712. A third sequence from P2/P712, nucleotides 752 to 2268, encoding VP4, VP2, and part of VP3, was weakly attenuating. The sequence from nucleotide 4454, approximately halfway through the 2C-coding region, to the end of the P2/P712 genome did not contain attenuating determinants. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that P2/P712 differs from the type 2 Sabin vaccine strain by only 22 nucleotides. Six differences lead to amino acid changes in the coding region, and four differences are in the 5' noncoding region. These studies show that, like the type 1 and type 3 Sabin vaccine strains, the attenuated type 2 strain P712 contains multiple attenuating sequences, including strongly attenuating sequences in the 5' noncoding region of the genome.

  19. MetaMLST: multi-locus strain-level bacterial typing from metagenomic samples

    PubMed Central

    Zolfo, Moreno; Tett, Adrian; Jousson, Olivier; Donati, Claudio; Segata, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    Metagenomic characterization of microbial communities has the potential to become a tool to identify pathogens in human samples. However, software tools able to extract strain-level typing information from metagenomic data are needed. Low-throughput molecular typing schema such as Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) are still widely used and provide a wealth of strain-level information that is currently not exploited by metagenomic methods. We introduce MetaMLST, a software tool that reconstructs the MLST loci of microorganisms present in microbial communities from metagenomic data. Tested on synthetic and spiked-in real metagenomes, the pipeline was able to reconstruct the MLST sequences with >98.5% accuracy at coverages as low as 1×. On real samples, the pipeline showed higher sensitivity than assembly-based approaches and it proved successful in identifying strains in epidemic outbreaks as well as in intestinal, skin and gastrointestinal microbiome samples. PMID:27651451

  20. CodY Promotes Sporulation and Enterotoxin Production by Clostridium perfringens Type A Strain SM101.

    PubMed

    Li, Jihong; Freedman, John C; Evans, Daniel R; McClane, Bruce A

    2017-03-01

    Clostridium perfringens type D strains cause enterotoxemia and enteritis in livestock via epsilon toxin production. In type D strain CN3718, CodY was previously shown to increase the level of epsilon toxin production and repress sporulation. C. perfringens type A strains producing C. perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) cause human food poisoning and antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Sporulation is critical for C. perfringens type A food poisoning since spores contribute to transmission and resistance in the harsh food environment and sporulation is essential for CPE production. Therefore, the current study asked whether CodY also regulates sporulation and CPE production in SM101, a derivative of C. perfringens type A food-poisoning strain NCTC8798. An isogenic codY-null mutant of SM101 showed decreased levels of spore formation, along with lower levels of CPE production. A complemented strain recovered wild-type levels of both sporulation and CPE production. When this result was coupled with the earlier results obtained with CN3718, it became apparent that CodY regulation of sporulation varies among different C. perfringens strains. Results from quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR analysis clearly demonstrated that, during sporulation, codY transcript levels remained high in SM101 but rapidly declined in CN3718. In addition, abrB gene expression patterns varied significantly between codY-null mutants of SM101 and CN3718. Compared to the levels in their wild-type parents, the level of abrB gene expression decreased in the CN3718 codY-null mutant strain but significantly increased in the SM101 codY-null mutant strain, demonstrating CodY-dependent regulation differences in abrB expression between these two strains. This difference appears to be important since overexpression of the abrB gene in SM101 reduced the levels of sporulation and enterotoxin production, supporting the involvement of AbrB repression in regulating C. perfringens sporulation. Copyright © 2017

  1. Comparative genomics of wild type yeast strains unveils important genome diversity

    PubMed Central

    Carreto, Laura; Eiriz, Maria F; Gomes, Ana C; Pereira, Patrícia M; Schuller, Dorit; Santos, Manuel AS

    2008-01-01

    Background Genome variability generates phenotypic heterogeneity and is of relevance for adaptation to environmental change, but the extent of such variability in natural populations is still poorly understood. For example, selected Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains are variable at the ploidy level, have gene amplifications, changes in chromosome copy number, and gross chromosomal rearrangements. This suggests that genome plasticity provides important genetic diversity upon which natural selection mechanisms can operate. Results In this study, we have used wild-type S. cerevisiae (yeast) strains to investigate genome variation in natural and artificial environments. We have used comparative genome hybridization on array (aCGH) to characterize the genome variability of 16 yeast strains, of laboratory and commercial origin, isolated from vineyards and wine cellars, and from opportunistic human infections. Interestingly, sub-telomeric instability was associated with the clinical phenotype, while Ty element insertion regions determined genomic differences of natural wine fermentation strains. Copy number depletion of ASP3 and YRF1 genes was found in all wild-type strains. Other gene families involved in transmembrane transport, sugar and alcohol metabolism or drug resistance had copy number changes, which also distinguished wine from clinical isolates. Conclusion We have isolated and genotyped more than 1000 yeast strains from natural environments and carried out an aCGH analysis of 16 strains representative of distinct genotype clusters. Important genomic variability was identified between these strains, in particular in sub-telomeric regions and in Ty-element insertion sites, suggesting that this type of genome variability is the main source of genetic diversity in natural populations of yeast. The data highlights the usefulness of yeast as a model system to unravel intraspecific natural genome diversity and to elucidate how natural selection shapes the yeast genome

  2. Complete Proteome of a Quinolone-Resistant Salmonella Typhimurium Phage Type DT104B Clinical Strain

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Susana; Nunes-Miranda, Júlio D.; Pinto, Luís; Santos, Hugo M.; de Toro, María; Sáenz, Yolanda; Torres, Carmen; Capelo, José Luis; Poeta, Patrícia; Igrejas, Gilberto

    2014-01-01

    Salmonellosis is one of the most common and widely distributed foodborne diseases. The emergence of Salmonella strains that are resistant to a variety of antimicrobials is a serious global public health concern. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium definitive phage type 104 (DT104) is one of these emerging epidemic multidrug resistant strains. Here we collate information from the diverse and comprehensive range of experiments on Salmonella proteomes that have been published. We then present a new study of the proteome of the quinolone-resistant Se20 strain (phage type DT104B), recovered after ciprofloxacin treatment and compared it to the proteome of reference strain SL1344. A total of 186 and 219 protein spots were recovered from Se20 and SL1344 protein extracts, respectively, after two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The signatures of 94% of the protein spots were successfully identified through matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Three antimicrobial resistance related proteins, whose genes were previously detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), were identified in the clinical strain. The presence of these proteins, dihydropteroate synthase type-2 (sul2 gene), aminoglycoside resistance protein A (strA gene) and aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase type Ib-cr4 (aac(6')-Ib-cr4 gene), was confirmed in the DT104B clinical strain. The aac(6')-Ib-cr4 gene is responsible for plasmid-mediated aminoglycoside and quinolone resistance. This is a preliminary analysis of the proteome of these two S. Typhimurium strains and further work is being developed to better understand how antimicrobial resistance is developing in this pathogen. PMID:25196519

  3. Primary Isolation Strain Determines Both Phage Type and Receptors Recognised by Campylobacter jejuni Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Martine C. Holst; Gencay, Yilmaz Emre; Birk, Tina; Baldvinsson, Signe Berg; Jäckel, Claudia; Hammerl, Jens A.; Vegge, Christina S.; Neve, Horst; Brøndsted, Lone

    2015-01-01

    In this study we isolated novel bacteriophages, infecting the zoonotic bacterium Campylobacter jejuni. These phages may be used in phage therapy of C. jejuni colonized poultry to prevent spreading of the bacteria to meat products causing disease in humans. Many C. jejuni phages have been isolated using NCTC12662 as the indicator strain, which may have biased the selection of phages. A large group of C. jejuni phages rely on the highly diverse capsular polysaccharide (CPS) for infection and recent work identified the O-methyl phosphoramidate modification (MeOPN) of CPS as a phage receptor. We therefore chose seven C. jejuni strains each expressing different CPS structures as indicator strains in a large screening for phages in samples collected from free-range poultry farms. Forty-three phages were isolated using C. jejuni NCTC12658, NCTC12662 and RM1221 as host strains and 20 distinct phages were identified based on host range analysis and genome restriction profiles. Most phages were isolated using C. jejuni strains NCTC12662 and RM1221 and interestingly phage genome size (140 kb vs. 190 kb), host range and morphological appearance correlated with the isolation strain. Thus, according to C. jejuni phage grouping, NCTC12662 and NCTC12658 selected for CP81-type phages, while RM1221 selected for CP220-type phages. Furthermore, using acapsular ∆kpsM mutants we demonstrated that phages isolated on NCTC12658 and NCTC12662 were dependent on the capsule for infection. In contrast, CP220-type phages isolated on RM1221 were unable to infect non-motile ∆motA mutants, hence requiring motility for successful infection. Hence, the primary phage isolation strain determines both phage type (CP81 or CP220) as well as receptors (CPS or flagella) recognised by the isolated phages. PMID:25585385

  4. Primary isolation strain determines both phage type and receptors recognised by Campylobacter jejuni bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Martine C Holst; Gencay, Yilmaz Emre; Birk, Tina; Baldvinsson, Signe Berg; Jäckel, Claudia; Hammerl, Jens A; Vegge, Christina S; Neve, Horst; Brøndsted, Lone

    2015-01-01

    In this study we isolated novel bacteriophages, infecting the zoonotic bacterium Campylobacter jejuni. These phages may be used in phage therapy of C. jejuni colonized poultry to prevent spreading of the bacteria to meat products causing disease in humans. Many C. jejuni phages have been isolated using NCTC12662 as the indicator strain, which may have biased the selection of phages. A large group of C. jejuni phages rely on the highly diverse capsular polysaccharide (CPS) for infection and recent work identified the O-methyl phosphoramidate modification (MeOPN) of CPS as a phage receptor. We therefore chose seven C. jejuni strains each expressing different CPS structures as indicator strains in a large screening for phages in samples collected from free-range poultry farms. Forty-three phages were isolated using C. jejuni NCTC12658, NCTC12662 and RM1221 as host strains and 20 distinct phages were identified based on host range analysis and genome restriction profiles. Most phages were isolated using C. jejuni strains NCTC12662 and RM1221 and interestingly phage genome size (140 kb vs. 190 kb), host range and morphological appearance correlated with the isolation strain. Thus, according to C. jejuni phage grouping, NCTC12662 and NCTC12658 selected for CP81-type phages, while RM1221 selected for CP220-type phages. Furthermore, using acapsular ∆kpsM mutants we demonstrated that phages isolated on NCTC12658 and NCTC12662 were dependent on the capsule for infection. In contrast, CP220-type phages isolated on RM1221 were unable to infect non-motile ∆motA mutants, hence requiring motility for successful infection. Hence, the primary phage isolation strain determines both phage type (CP81 or CP220) as well as receptors (CPS or flagella) recognised by the isolated phages.

  5. R-type pyocin is required for competitive growth advantage between Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains.

    PubMed

    Heo, Yun-Jeong; Chung, In-Young; Choi, Kelly B; Cho, You-Hee

    2007-01-01

    R-type pyocin is a bacteriophage tail-shaped bacteriocin produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but its physiological roles are relatively unknown. Here we describe a role of R-type pyocin in the competitive growth advantages between P. aeruginosa strains. Partial purification and gene disruption revealed that the major killing activity from the culture supernatant of PA14 is attributed to R-type pyocin, neither F-type nor S-type pyocins. These findings may provide insight into the forces governing P. aeruginosa population dynamics to promote and maintain its biodiversity.

  6. Complete genome sequence of the Antarctic Halorubrum lacusprofundi type strain ACAM 34

    DOE PAGES

    Anderson, Iain J.; DasSarma, Priya; Lucas, Susan; ...

    2016-09-10

    Halorubrum lacusprofundi is an extreme halophile within the archaeal phylum Euryarchaeota. The type strain ACAM 34 was isolated from Deep Lake, Antarctica. H. lacusprofundi is of phylogenetic interest because it is distantly related to the haloarchaea that have previously been sequenced. It is also of interest because of its psychrotolerance. We report here the complete genome sequence of H. lacusprofundi type strain ACAM 34 and its annotation. In conclusion, this genome is part of a 2006 Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program project to sequence genomes of diverse Archaea.

  7. Complete genome sequence of the Antarctic Halorubrum lacusprofundi type strain ACAM 34

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain J.; DasSarma, Priya; Lucas, Susan; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Tice, Hope; Dalin, Eileen; Bruce, David C.; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Sims, David; Brettin, Thomas S.; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff S.; Larimer, Frank; Hauser, Loren; Land, Miriam; Ivanova, Natalia; Richardson, Paul; Cavicchioli, Ricardo; DasSarma, Shiladitya; Woese, Carl R.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2016-09-10

    Halorubrum lacusprofundi is an extreme halophile within the archaeal phylum Euryarchaeota. The type strain ACAM 34 was isolated from Deep Lake, Antarctica. H. lacusprofundi is of phylogenetic interest because it is distantly related to the haloarchaea that have previously been sequenced. It is also of interest because of its psychrotolerance. We report here the complete genome sequence of H. lacusprofundi type strain ACAM 34 and its annotation. In conclusion, this genome is part of a 2006 Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program project to sequence genomes of diverse Archaea.

  8. Complete genome sequence of Halopiger xanaduensis type strain (SH6T)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Tindall, Brian; Rohde, Manfred; Lucas, Susan; Han, James; Lapidus, Alla L.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Peters, Lin; Pati, Amrita; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pagani, Ioanna; Teshima, Hazuki; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Land, Miriam L; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ivanova, N

    2012-01-01

    Halopiger xanaduensis is the type species of the genus Halopiger and belongs to the euryarchaeal family Halobacteriaceae. H. xanaduensis strain SH-6, which is designated as the type strain, was isolated from the sediment of a salt lake in Inner Mongolia, Lake Shangmatala. Like other members of the family Halobacteriaceae, it is an extreme halophile requiring at least 2.5 M salt for growth. We report here the sequencing and annotation of the 4,355,268 bp genome, which includes one chromosome and three plasmids. This genome is part of a Joint Genome Institute (JGI) Community Sequencing Program (CSP) project to sequence diverse haloarchaeal genomes.

  9. Complete genome sequence of the Antarctic Halorubrum lacusprofundi type strain ACAM 34.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Iain J; DasSarma, Priya; Lucas, Susan; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Tice, Hope; Dalin, Eileen; Bruce, David C; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Sims, David; Brettin, Thomas S; Detter, John C; Han, Cliff S; Larimer, Frank; Hauser, Loren; Land, Miriam; Ivanova, Natalia; Richardson, Paul; Cavicchioli, Ricardo; DasSarma, Shiladitya; Woese, Carl R; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2016-01-01

    Halorubrum lacusprofundi is an extreme halophile within the archaeal phylum Euryarchaeota. The type strain ACAM 34 was isolated from Deep Lake, Antarctica. H. lacusprofundi is of phylogenetic interest because it is distantly related to the haloarchaea that have previously been sequenced. It is also of interest because of its psychrotolerance. We report here the complete genome sequence of H. lacusprofundi type strain ACAM 34 and its annotation. This genome is part of a 2006 Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program project to sequence genomes of diverse Archaea.

  10. Discriminatory power and reproducibility of novel DNA typing methods for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex strains.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Kristin; Arnold, Catherine; Cataldi, Angel; Gutiérrez, M Cristina; Haas, Walter H; Panaiotov, Stefan; Skuce, Robin A; Supply, Philip; van der Zanden, Adri G M; van Soolingen, Dick

    2005-11-01

    In recent years various novel DNA typing methods have been developed which are faster and easier to perform than the current internationally standardized IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism typing method. However, there has been no overview of the utility of these novel typing methods, and it is largely unknown how they compare to previously published methods. In this study, the discriminative power and reproducibility of nine recently described PCR-based typing methods for Mycobacterium tuberculosis were investigated using the strain collection of the interlaboratory study of Kremer et al. This strain collection contains 90 M. tuberculosis complex and 10 non-M. tuberculosis complex mycobacterial strains, as well as 31 duplicated DNA samples to assess reproducibility. The highest reproducibility was found with variable numbers of tandem repeat typing using mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units (MIRU VNTR) and fast ligation-mediated PCR (FLiP), followed by second-generation spoligotyping, ligation-mediated PCR (LM-PCR), VNTR typing using five repeat loci identified at the Queens University of Belfast (QUB VNTR), and the Amadio speciation PCR. Poor reproducibility was associated with fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism typing, which was performed in three different laboratories. The methods were ordered from highest discrimination to lowest by the Hunter-Gaston discriminative index as follows: QUB VNTR typing, MIRU VNTR typing, FLiP, LM-PCR, and spoligotyping. We conclude that both VNTR typing methods and FLiP typing are rapid, highly reliable, and discriminative epidemiological typing methods for M. tuberculosis and that VNTR typing is the epidemiological typing method of choice for the near future.

  11. Early Cardiac Dysfunction in the Type 1 Diabetic Heart Using Speckle-Tracking Based Strain Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Danielle L.; Nichols, Cody E.; Croston, Tara L.; McLaughlin, Sarah L.; Petrone, Ashley B.; Lewis, Sara E.; Thapa, Dharendra; Long, Dustin M.; Dick, Gregory M.; Hollander, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced sensitivity in echocardiographic analyses may allow for early detection of changes in cardiac function beyond the detection limits of conventional echocardiographic analyses, particularly in a small animal model. The goal of this study was to compare conventional echocardiographic measurements and speckle-tracking based strain imaging analyses in a small animal model of type 1 diabetes mellitus. Conventional analyses revealed differences in ejection fraction, fractional shortening, cardiac output, and stroke volume in diabetic animals relative to controls at 6-weeks post-diabetic onset. In contrast, when assessing short- and long-axis speckle-tracking based strain analyses, diabetic mice showed changes in average systolic radial strain, radial strain rate, radial displacement, and radial velocity, as well as decreased circumferential and longitudinal strain rate, as early as 1-week post-diabetic onset and persisting throughout the diabetic study. Further, we performed regional analyses for the LV and found that the free wall region was affected in both the short- and long-axis when assessing radial dimension parameters. These changes began 1-week post-diabetic onset and remained throughout the progression of the disease. These findings demonstrate the use of speckle-tracking based strain as an approach to elucidate cardiac dysfunction from a global perspective, identifying left ventricular cardiac regions affected during the progression of type 1 diabetes mellitus earlier than contractile changes detected by conventional echocardiographic measurements. PMID:26654913

  12. Population Structure and Antimicrobial Resistance Profiles of Streptococcus suis Serotype 2 Sequence Type 25 Strains

    PubMed Central

    Athey, Taryn B. T.; Teatero, Sarah; Takamatsu, Daisuke; Wasserscheid, Jessica; Dewar, Ken; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Fittipaldi, Nahuel

    2016-01-01

    Strains of serotype 2 Streptococcus suis are responsible for swine and human infections. Different serotype 2 genetic backgrounds have been defined using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). However, little is known about the genetic diversity within each MLST sequence type (ST). Here, we used whole-genome sequencing to test the hypothesis that S. suis serotype 2 strains of the ST25 lineage are genetically heterogeneous. We evaluated 51 serotype 2 ST25 S. suis strains isolated from diseased pigs and humans in Canada, the United States of America, and Thailand. Whole-genome sequencing revealed numerous large-scale rearrangements in the ST25 genome, compared to the genomes of ST1 and ST28 S. suis strains, which result, among other changes, in disruption of a pilus island locus. We report that recombination and lateral gene transfer contribute to ST25 genetic diversity. Phylogenetic analysis identified two main and distinct Thai and North American clades grouping most strains investigated. These clades also possessed distinct patterns of antimicrobial resistance genes, which correlated with acquisition of different integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs). Some of these ICEs were found to be integrated at a recombination hot spot, previously identified as the site of integration of the 89K pathogenicity island in serotype 2 ST7 S. suis strains. Our results highlight the limitations of MLST for phylogenetic analysis of S. suis, and the importance of lateral gene transfer and recombination as drivers of diversity in this swine pathogen and zoonotic agent. PMID:26954687

  13. Whole genome sequence of Enterobacter ludwigii type strain EN-119T, isolated from clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Li, Gengmi; Hu, Zonghai; Zeng, Ping; Zhu, Bing; Wu, Lijuan

    2015-04-01

    Enterobacter ludwigii strain EN-119(T) is the type strain of E. ludwigii, which belongs to the E. cloacae complex (Ecc). This strain was first reported and nominated in 2005 and later been found in many hospitals. In this paper, the whole genome sequencing of this strain was carried out. The total genome size of EN-119(T) is 4952,770 bp with 4578 coding sequences, 88 tRNAs and 10 rRNAs. The genome sequence of EN-119(T) is the first whole genome sequence of E. ludwigii, which will further our understanding of Ecc. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Highly strained AlAs-type interfaces in InAs/AlSb heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Vallet, M. Warot-Fonrose, B.; Gatel, C.; Nicolai, J.; Ponchet, A.; Claveau, Y.; Combe, N.; Magen, C.; Teissier, R.; Baranov, A. N.

    2016-05-23

    Spontaneously formed Al-As type interfaces of the InAs/AlSb system grown by molecular beam epitaxy for quantum cascade lasers were investigated by atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. Experimental strain profiles were compared to those coming from a model structure. High negative out-of-plane strains with the same order of magnitude as perfect Al-As interfaces were observed. The effects of the geometrical phase analysis used for strain determination were evidenced and discussed in the case of abrupt and huge variations of both atomic composition and bond length as observed in these interfaces. Intensity profiles performed on the same images confirmed that changes of chemical composition are the source of high strain fields at interfaces. The results show that spontaneously assembled interfaces are not perfect but extend over 2 or 3 monolayers.

  15. Microplate technique to determine hemolytic activity for routine typing of Listeria strains.

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez Rodriguez, L; Vazquez Boland, J A; Fernandez Garayzabal, J F; Echalecu Tranchant, P; Gomez-Lucia, E; Rodriguez Ferri, E F; Suarez Fernandez, G

    1986-01-01

    Because the hemolysis produced by Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria seeligeri on blood agar is frequently difficult to interpret, we developed a microplate technique for the routine determination of hemolytic activity with erythrocyte suspensions. This microtechnique is a simple and reliable test for distinguishing clearly between hemolytic and nonhemolytic strains and could be used instead of the CAMP (Christie-Atkins-Munch-Petersen) test with Staphylococcus aureus in the routine typing of Listeria strains. Furthermore, our results suggest that the quantitation of the hemolytic activity of the Listeria strains, along with the D-xylose, L-rhamnose, and alpha-methyl-D-mannoside acidification tests, allows the differentiation of L. monocytogenes, L. seeligeri, and Listeria ivanovii. We also observed that the treatment of erythrocytes with crude exosubstances of rhodococcus equi, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, and S. aureus enhanced the hemolytic activity of all Listeria strains with this characteristic. PMID:3088037

  16. Molecular analysis and MIRU-VNTR typing of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains from various sources.

    PubMed

    Rónai, Z; Csivincsik, Á; Gyuranecz, M; Kreizinger, Z; Dán, Á; Jánosi, S

    2015-02-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of Johne's disease. Genotypic discrimination of MAP isolates is pivotal to epidemiological studies requisite for revealing infection sources and disease transmission. This study was undertaken to determine the genetic diversity of MAP strains from diverse sources. Five hundred and sixty-nine MAP isolates were collected during an 8-year period from nine animal species, originating from seven European countries, including the whole geographic region of Hungary. Isolates were classified into cattle type and sheep type, and 515 strains were included in mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable-number tandem repeat analysis. The same genotype was found in different host species cohabiting on the same property, demonstrating interspecies transmission. Detecting identical patterns in numerous related animals underlines the importance of vertical transmission. The revealed 15 genotypes expose relatively low strain diversity and indicate the need of an improved typing system that provides higher resolution in the case of this subspecies. Our results demonstrate the circulation and transmission of different MAP strain types among individuals, herds and even wildlife reservoirs in Hungary and other European countries; correlation between production type or breed and MAP genotype is hypothesized. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Effect of wheelchair mass, tire type and tire pressure on physical strain and wheelchair propulsion technique.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Sonja; Vegter, Riemer J K; van der Woude, Lucas H V

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of wheelchair mass, solid vs. pneumatic tires and tire pressure on physical strain and wheelchair propulsion technique. 11 Able-bodied participants performed 14 submaximal exercise blocks on a treadmill with a fixed speed (1.11 m/s) within 3 weeks to determine the effect of tire pressure (100%, 75%, 50%, 25% of the recommended value), wheelchair mass (0 kg, 5 kg, or 10 kg extra) and tire type (pneumatic vs. solid). All test conditions (except pneumatic vs. solid) were performed with and without instrumented measurement wheels. Outcome measures were power output (PO), physical strain (heart rate (HR), oxygen uptake (VO2), gross mechanical efficiency (ME)) and propulsion technique (timing, force application). At 25% tire pressure PO and subsequently VO2 were higher compared to 100% tire pressure. Furthermore, a higher tire pressure led to a longer cycle time and contact angle and subsequently lower push frequency. Extra mass did not lead to an increase in PO, physical strain or propulsion technique. Solid tires led to a higher PO and physical strain. The solid tire effect was amplified by increased mass (tire × mass interaction). In contrast to extra mass, tire pressure and tire type have an effect on PO, physical strain or propulsion technique of steady-state wheelchair propulsion. As expected, it is important to optimize tire pressure and tire type.

  18. SNP/RD typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains reveals local and worldwide disseminated clonal complexes.

    PubMed

    Schürch, Anita C; Kremer, Kristin; Hendriks, Amber C A; Freyee, Benthe; McEvoy, Christopher R E; van Crevel, Reinout; Boeree, Martin J; van Helden, Paul; Warren, Robin M; Siezen, Roland J; van Soolingen, Dick

    2011-01-01

    The Beijing strain is one of the most successful genotypes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis worldwide and appears to be highly homogenous according to existing genotyping methods. To type Beijing strains reliably we developed a robust typing scheme using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and regions of difference (RDs) derived from whole-genome sequencing data of eight Beijing strains. SNP/RD typing of 259 M. tuberculosis isolates originating from 45 countries worldwide discriminated 27 clonal complexes within the Beijing genotype family. A total of 16 Beijing clonal complexes contained more than one isolate of known origin, of which two clonal complexes were strongly associated with South African origin. The remaining 14 clonal complexes encompassed isolates from different countries. Even highly resolved clonal complexes comprised isolates from distinct geographical sites. Our results suggest that Beijing strains spread globally on multiple occasions and that the tuberculosis epidemic caused by the Beijing genotype is at least partially driven by modern migration patterns. The SNPs and RDs presented in this study will facilitate future molecular epidemiological and phylogenetic studies on Beijing strains.

  19. Usefulness of phage typing and "two-way ribotyping" to differentiate Salmonella enteritidis strains.

    PubMed

    Landeras, E; Usera, M A; Calderón, C; Mendoza, M C

    1997-12-01

    The capacity to differentiate Salmonella enteritidis strains by phage typing and "two-way ribotyping" performed with PstI and SphI was evaluated. The typeability was 96.8% in phage typing and 100% in ribotyping. The series was differentiated into 13 phage types, 19 combined ribotypes, and 39 subtypes or clonal lines by combining results from both methods (of which 11, 13, and 35, respectively, were represented by natural strains). Ribotyping differentiated strains ascribed to PTs 1, 4, 6a, 7, 8, RDNC and UPT. Conversely, some strains of PTs 1, 4, 5a, 6, 6a, 7, 34, RDNC and UPT fall into the most frequent combined ribotype. A dendrogram of genetic similarity generated from the combined ribotypes was traced, and, at a 0.82 similarity level, it showed a major cluster (including 17 combined ribotypes, 88.4% strains ascribed to all PTs tested except PT11), a minor cluster, and four additional lines more loosely related.

  20. Enrichment, Isolation, and Cultural Characteristics of Marine Strains of Clostridium botulinum Type C

    PubMed Central

    Segner, W. P.; Schmidt, C. F.; Boltz, J. K.

    1971-01-01

    Terrestrial strains of Clostridium botulinum type C, designated 468 and 571, were used to screen various media for growth and sporulation at 30 C. Of the various formulations tested, only egg meat medium fortified with 1% additions of yeast extract, ammonium sulfate, and glucose (FEM medium) gave good growth and satisfactory sporulation. FEM medium was used to recover four marine type C isolates from inshore sediments collected along the Atlantic, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Pacific coasts of the United States. The isolation techniques involved repeated transfer of cultures showing type C toxin in FEM medium and purification by a deep tube method. The medium used for purification was beef infusion-agar supplemented with 0.14% sodium bicarbonate and 0.1% l-cysteine hydrochloride. l-Cysteine was adopted in preference to sodium thioglycolate, because some lots of the latter were definitely inhibitory for growth. The addition of bicarbonate markedly increased viable spore counts of both the marine and terrestrial strains. Various cultural and biochemical characteristics of the marine and the terrestrial strains were compared. With the exception of some variations in their fermentation patterns, both groups showed similar characteristics. Of 23 fermentable compounds tested, the terrestrial strains attacked only glucose and mannose. The marine strains fermented glucose, mannose, galactose, and ribose actively; dextrin, inositol, maltose, and melibiose were weakly fermented. PMID:4944800

  1. Comparative genomics of type VI secretion systems in strains of Pantoea ananatis from different environments

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Type VI secretion system (T6SS) has been identified in several different bacteria, including the plant pathogenPantoea ananatis. Previous in silico analyses described three different T6SS loci present in the pathogenic strain of P. ananatis LMG 20103. This initial investigation has been extended to include an additional seven sequenced strains of P. ananatis together with 39 strains from different ecological niches. Comparative and phylogenetic analyses were used to investigate the distribution, evolution, intra-strain variability and operon structure of the T6SS in the sequenced strains. Results Three different T6SS loci were identified in P. ananatis strain LMG 20103 and designated PA T6SS 1-3. PA T6SS-1 was present in all sequenced strains of P. ananatis and in all 39 additional strains examined in this study. In addition, PA T6SS-1 included all 13 core T6SS genes required for synthesis of a functional T6SS. The plasmid-borne PA T6SS-2 also included all 13 core T6SS genes but was restricted to only 33% (15/46) of the strains examined. In addition, PA T6SS-2 was restricted to strains of P. ananatis isolated from symptomatic plant material. This finding raises the possibility of an association between PA T6SS-2 and either pathogenicity or host specificity. The third cluster PA T6SS-3 was present in all strains analyzed in this study but lacked 11 of the 13 core T6SS genes suggesting it may not encoded a functional T6SS. Inter-strain variability was also associated with hcp and vgrG islands, which are associated with the T6SS and encode a variable number of proteins usually of unknown function. These proteins may play a role in the fitness of different strains in a variety of ecological niches or as candidate T6SS effectors. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that PA T6SS-1 and PA T6SS-2 are evolutionarily distinct. Conclusion Our analysis indicates that the three T6SSs of P. ananatis appear to have been independently acquired and may play different

  2. HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON STRAIN-INDUCED MARTENSITE FORMATION IN TYPE 304L STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M; Ps Lam, P

    2008-12-11

    Unstable austenitic stainless steels undergo a strain-induced martensite transformation. The effect of hydrogen on this transformation is not well understood. Some researchers believe that hydrogen makes the transformation to martensite more difficult because hydrogen is an austenite stabilizer. Others believe that hydrogen has little or no effect at all on the transformation and claim that the transformation is simply a function of strain and temperature. Still other researchers believe that hydrogen should increase the ability of the metal to transform due to hydrogen-enhanced dislocation mobility and slip planarity. While the role of hydrogen on the martensite transformation is still debated, it has been experimentally verified that this transformation does occur in hydrogen-charged materials. What is the effect of strain-induced martensite on hydrogen embrittlement? Martensite near crack-tips or other highly strained regions could provide much higher hydrogen diffusivity and allow for quicker hydrogen concentration. Martensite may be more intrinsically brittle than austenite and has been shown to be severely embrittled by hydrogen. However, it does not appear to be a necessary condition for embrittlement since Type 21-6-9 stainless steel is more stable than Type 304L stainless steel but susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. In this study, the effect of hydrogen on strain-induced martensite formation in Type 304L stainless steel was investigated by monitoring the formation of martensite during tensile tests of as-received and hydrogen-charged samples and metallographically examining specimens from interrupted tensile tests after increasing levels of strain. The effect of hydrogen on the fracture mechanisms was also studied by examining the fracture features of as-received and hydrogen-charged specimens and relating them to the stress-strain behavior.

  3. Typing of Listeria monocytogenes Strains by Repetitive Element Sequence-Based PCR

    PubMed Central

    Jeršek, B.; Gilot, P.; Gubina, M.; Klun, N.; Mehle, J.; Tcherneva, E.; Rijpens, N.; Herman, L.

    1999-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes strains possess short repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) elements and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) sequences. We used repetitive element sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) to evaluate the potential of REP and ERIC elements for typing L. monocytogenes strains isolated from humans, animals, and foods. On the basis of rep-PCR fingerprints, L. monocytogenes strains were divided into four major clusters matching origin of isolation. rep-PCR fingerprints of human and animal isolates were different from those of food isolates. Computer evaluation of rep-PCR fingerprints allowed discrimination among the tested serotypes 1/2a, 1/2b, 1/2c, 3b, and 4b within each major cluster. The index of discrimination calculated for 52 epidemiologically unrelated isolates of L. monocytogenes was 0.98 for REP- and ERIC-PCR. Our results suggest that rep-PCR can provide an alternative method for L. monocytogenes typing. PMID:9854072

  4. wzi Gene Sequencing, a Rapid Method for Determination of Capsular Type for Klebsiella Strains

    PubMed Central

    Passet, Virginie; Haugaard, Anita Björk; Babosan, Anamaria; Kassis-Chikhani, Najiby; Struve, Carsten; Decré, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    Pathogens of the genus Klebsiella have been classified into distinct capsular (K) types for nearly a century. K typing of Klebsiella species still has important applications in epidemiology and clinical microbiology, but the serological method has strong practical limitations. Our objective was to evaluate the sequencing of wzi, a gene conserved in all capsular types of Klebsiella pneumoniae that codes for an outer membrane protein involved in capsule attachment to the cell surface, as a simple and rapid method for the prediction of K type. The sequencing of a 447-nucleotide region of wzi distinguished the K-type reference strains with only nine exceptions. A reference wzi sequence database was created by the inclusion of multiple strains representing K types associated with high virulence and multidrug resistance. A collection of 119 prospective clinical isolates of K. pneumoniae were then analyzed in parallel by wzi sequencing and classical K typing. Whereas K typing achieved typeability for 81% and discrimination for 94.4% of the isolates, these figures were 98.1% and 98.3%, respectively, for wzi sequencing. The prediction of K type once the wzi allele was known was 94%. wzi sequencing is a rapid and simple method for the determination of the K types of most K. pneumoniae clinical isolates. PMID:24088853

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptomyces specialis Type Strain GW41-1564 (DSM 41924)

    PubMed Central

    Loucif, Lotfi; Michelle, Caroline; Terras, Jérôme; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Raoult, Didier

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Streptomyces specialis type strain GW41-1564, which was isolated from soil. This 5.87-Mb genome exhibits a high G+C content of 72.72% and contains 5,486 protein-coding genes. PMID:28360168

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of the Clostridium difficile Type Strain DSM 1296T

    PubMed Central

    Bunk, Boyke; Wittmann, Johannes; Thürmer, Andrea; Spröer, Cathrin; Gronow, Sabine; Liesegang, Heiko; Daniel, Rolf; Overmann, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we sequenced the complete genome of the Clostridium difficile type strain DSM 1296T. A combination of single-molecule real-time (SMRT) and Illumina sequencing technology revealed the presence of one chromosome and two extrachromosomal elements, the bacteriophage phiCDIF1296T and a putative plasmid-like structure harboring genes of another bacteriophage. PMID:26450746

  7. Complete genome sequence of Helicobacter cinaedi type strain ATCC BAA-847.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Takeshita, Nozomi; Ohmagari, Norio; Kirikae, Teruo

    2012-10-01

    Here we report the completely annotated genome sequence of the Helicobacter cinaedi type strain (ATCC BAA-847), which is an emerging pathogen that causes cellulitis and bacteremia. The genome sequence will provide new insights into the diagnosis, pathogenic mechanisms, and drug resistance of H. cinaedi.

  8. Complete Genome Sequences for Three Chromosomes of the Burkholderia stabilis Type Strain (ATCC BAA-67).

    PubMed

    Bugrysheva, Julia V; Cherney, Blake; Sue, David; Conley, Andrew B; Rowe, Lori A; Knipe, Kristen M; Frace, Michael A; Loparev, Vladimir N; Avila, Julie R; Anderson, Kevin; Hodge, David R; Pillai, Segaran P; Weigel, Linda M

    2016-11-17

    We report here the complete annotated genome sequence of the Burkholderia stabilis type strain ATCC BAA-67. There were three circular chromosomes with a combined size of 8,527,947 bp and G+C composition of 66.4%. These characteristics closely resemble the genomes of other sequenced members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex.

  9. Genome Sequence of the Symbiotic Type Strain Rhizobium tibeticum CCBAU85039T.

    PubMed

    Torres Tejerizo, Gonzalo; Wibberg, Daniel; Winkler, Anika; Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Niehaus, Karsten; Pühler, Alfred; Kalinowski, Jörn; Lagares, Antonio; Schlüter, Andreas; Pistorio, Mariano

    2017-01-26

    Rhizobium tibeticum was originally isolated from root nodules of Trigonella archiducis-nicolai grown in Tibet, China. This species is also able to nodulate Medicago sativa and Phaseolus vulgaris The whole-genome sequence of the type strain, R. tibeticum CCBAU85039(T), is reported in this study.

  10. Draft Whole-Genome Sequence of the Type Strain Bacillus aquimaris TF12T

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-González, Ismael L.

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus aquimaris TF12 is a Gram-positive bacteria isolated from a tidal flat of the Yellow Sea in South Korea. We report the draft whole-genome sequence of Bacillus aquimaris TF12, the type strain of a set of bacteria typically associated with marine habitats and with a potentially high biotechnology value. PMID:27417832

  11. Draft Whole-Genome Sequence of the Type Strain Bacillus aquimaris TF12T.

    PubMed

    Hernández-González, Ismael L; Olmedo-Álvarez, Gabriela

    2016-07-14

    Bacillus aquimaris TF12 is a Gram-positive bacteria isolated from a tidal flat of the Yellow Sea in South Korea. We report the draft whole-genome sequence of Bacillus aquimaris TF12, the type strain of a set of bacteria typically associated with marine habitats and with a potentially high biotechnology value.

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Type Strain Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis NCTC 10354T

    PubMed Central

    Stynen, Ana Paula Reinato; Lage, Andrey Pereira; Moore, Robert J.; Rezende, Antonio Mauro; de Resende, Vivian D'Afonseca da Silva; Ruy, Patricia de Cássia; Daher, Nesley; Resende, Daniela de Melo; de Almeida, Sintia Silva; Soares, Siomar de Castro; de Abreu, Vinicius Augusto Carvalho; Rocha, Aryane Aparecida C. Magalhães; dos Santos, Anderson Rodrigues; Barbosa, Eudes Guilherme Vieira; Costa, Danielle Fonseca; Dorella, Fernanda Alves; Miyoshi, Anderson; de Lima, Alex Ranieri Jerônimo; Campos, Frederico Davi da Silva; de Sá, Pablo Gomes; Lopes, Thiago Souza; Rodrigues, Ryan Mauricio Araujo; Carneiro, Adriana Ribeiro; Leão, Thiago; Cerdeira, Louise Teixeira; Ramos, Rommel Thiago Jucá; Silva, Artur; Azevedo, Vasco; Ruiz, Jerônimo C.

    2011-01-01

    Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis is the etiologic agent of bovine genital campylobacteriosis, a sexually transmitted disease of cattle that is of worldwide importance. The complete sequencing and annotation of the genome of the type strain C. fetus subsp. venerealis NCTC 10354T are reported. PMID:21952544

  13. Growth media affect the volatilome and antimicrobial activity against Phytophthora infestans in four Lysobacter type strains.

    PubMed

    Lazazzara, Valentina; Perazzolli, Michele; Pertot, Ilaria; Biasioli, Franco; Puopolo, Gerardo; Cappellin, Luca

    2017-08-01

    Bacterial volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play important ecological roles in soil microbial interactions. Lysobacter spp. are key determinants of soil suppressiveness against phytopathogens and the production of non-volatile antimicrobial metabolites has been extensively characterised. However, the chemical composition and antagonistic properties of the Lysobacter volatilome have been poorly investigated. In this work, VOC emission profiles of four Lysobacter type strains grown on a sugar-rich and a protein-rich medium were analysed using solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and proton transfer reaction-time of flight-mass spectrometry. Lysobacter antibioticus, L. capsici, L. enzymogenes and L. gummosus type strains were recognised according to their volatilome assessed using both headspace mass spectrometry methods Moreover, the chemical profiles and functional properties of the Lysobacter volatilome differed according to the growth medium, and a protein-rich substrate maximised the toxic effect of the four Lysobacter type strains against Phytophthora infestans. Antagonistic (pyrazines, pyrrole and decanal) and non-antagonistic (delta-hexalactone and ethanol) VOCs against Ph. infestans or putative plant growth stimulator compounds (acetoin and indole) were mainly emitted by Lysobacter type strains grown on protein- and sugar-rich media respectively. Thus nutrient availability under soil conditions could affect the aggressiveness of Lysobacter spp. and possibly optimise interactions of these bacterial species with the other soil inhabitants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Genome sequencing of phomopsis longicolla type strain twh p74 causing phomopsis seed decay in soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phomopsis longicolla (syn. Diaporthe longicolla) is the primary cause of Phomopsis seed decay in soybean. We report the de novo assembled draft genome sequence of P. longicolla type strain TWH P74. The resulting draft genome was estimated to be approximately 64 Mb in size with an overall G+C content...

  15. Genome Sequence of the Symbiotic Type Strain Rhizobium tibeticum CCBAU85039T

    PubMed Central

    Wibberg, Daniel; Winkler, Anika; Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Niehaus, Karsten; Pühler, Alfred; Kalinowski, Jörn; Lagares, Antonio; Schlüter, Andreas; Pistorio, Mariano

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rhizobium tibeticum was originally isolated from root nodules of Trigonella archiducis-nicolai grown in Tibet, China. This species is also able to nodulate Medicago sativa and Phaseolus vulgaris. The whole-genome sequence of the type strain, R. tibeticum CCBAU85039T, is reported in this study. PMID:28126941

  16. Genetic relationships among reptilian and mammalian Campylobacter fetus strains determined by multilocus sequence typing.

    PubMed

    Dingle, Kate E; Blaser, Martin J; Tu, Zheng-Chao; Pruckler, Janet; Fitzgerald, Collette; van Bergen, Marcel A P; Lawson, Andrew J; Owen, Robert J; Wagenaar, Jaap A

    2010-03-01

    Reptile Campylobacter fetus isolates and closely related strains causing human disease were characterized by multilocus sequence typing. They shared approximately 90% nucleotide sequence identity with classical mammalian C. fetus, and there was evidence of recombination among members of these two groups. The reptile group represents a possible separate genomospecies capable of infecting humans.

  17. Complete genome sequence of Mycobacterium fortuitum subsp. fortuitum type strain DSM46621.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yung S; Adroub, Sabir A; Aleisa, Fajr; Mahmood, Hanan; Othoum, Ghofran; Rashid, Fahad; Zaher, Manal; Ali, Shahjahan; Bitter, Wilbert; Pain, Arnab; Abdallah, Abdallah M

    2012-11-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum is a member of the rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). It is ubiquitous in water and soil habitats, including hospital environments. M. fortuitum is increasingly recognized as an opportunistic nosocomial pathogen causing disseminated infection. Here we report the genome sequence of M. fortuitum subsp. fortuitum type strain DSM46621.

  18. Complete genome sequence of Dehalogenimonas lykanthroporepellens type strain (BL-DC-9T) and comparison to Dehalococcoides strains

    SciTech Connect

    Siddaramappa, Shivakumara; Delano, Susana; Green, Lance D.; Daligault, Hajnalka E.; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, James; Woyke, Tanja; Pitluck, Sam; Pennacchio, Len; Nolan, Matt; Land, Miriam L; Chang, Yun-Juan; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Hauser, Loren John; Lapidus, Alla L.; Yan, Jun; Bowman, Kimberly; Da Costa, Milton S,; Rainey, Fred A.; Moe, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Dehalogenimonas lykanthroporepellens is the type species of the genus Dehalogenimonas, which belongs to a deeply branching lineage within the phylum Chloroflexi. This strictly anaerobic, mesophilic, non spore forming, Gram negative staining bacterium was first isolated from chlorinated solvent contaminated groundwater at a Superfund site located near Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA. D. lykanthroporepellens was of interest for genome sequencing for two reasons: (a) its unusual ability to couple growth with reductive dechlorination of environmentally important polychlorinated aliphatic alkanes and (b) its phylogenetic position distant from previously sequenced bacteria. The 1,686,510 bp circular chromosome of strain BL-DC-9{sup T} contains 1,720 predicted protein coding genes, 47 tRNA genes, a single large subunit rRNA (23S-5S) locus, and a single, orphan, small unit rRNA (16S) locus.

  19. Dual Toxin-Producing Strain of Clostridium botulinum Type Bf Isolated from a California Patient with Infant Botulism

    PubMed Central

    Barash, Jason R.; Arnon, Stephen S.

    2004-01-01

    A retrospective study of Clostridium botulinum strains isolated from patients from California with infant botulism identified the fourth known C. botulinum strain that produces both type B and type F botulinum toxins. This unique strain represented 0.12% of the California infant botulism case isolates from 1976 to 2003. The relative concentrations of type B and F toxins produced were temperature dependent. PMID:15071029

  20. Mating Type Gene (MAT) and Itraconazole Susceptibility of Trichophyton tonsurans Strains Isolated in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hiruma, Junichiro; Okubo, Miki; Kano, Rui; Kumagawa, Mai; Hiruma, Masataro; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Kamata, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Ryoji

    2016-06-01

    Infection by Trichophyton tonsurans is an emerging fungal epidemic in Japan. Itraconazole (ITZ) and terbinafine have been used for the treatment of this infection for 15 years. However, patients with T. tonsurans infections have been shown to remain uncured or to become reinfected, suggesting that subclinical infection or polyphyletic strains and/or antifungal drug-resistant strains might be occurring in Japan. In this study, PCR analysis was performed to confirm the presence of the mating type locus MAT in genomic DNA from 60 Japanese clinical isolates of T. tonsurans, and to assess the previously postulated clonal origin of clinical isolates of this species. Antifungal susceptibility testing on isolates also was performed to confirm the absence of strains resistant to ITZ. PCR analysis proved that all 60 strains contained the MAT1-1 allele, while none contained the MAT1-2 allele. As determined by E-test, the mean MIC of ITZ in the 60 strains was 0.023 mg/L (range 0.002-0.125 mg/L). All strains of T. tonsurans isolated in Japan were clonal and were not resistant to ITZ. Therefore, dermatophytosis due to T. tonsurans is expected to respond to ITZ, since clinical isolates of T. tonsurans tested to date have been susceptible to this antifungal. This infection is proliferating as a subclinical infection in Japan.

  1. Correlation between clinico-pathological outcome and typing of Haemophilus parasuis field strains.

    PubMed

    Aragon, Virginia; Cerdà-Cuéllar, Marta; Fraile, Lorenzo; Mombarg, Mark; Nofrarías, Miquel; Olvera, Alexandre; Sibila, Marina; Solanes, David; Segalés, Joaquim

    2010-05-19

    Haemophilus parasuis is the etiologic agent of Glässer's disease in pigs, which is pathologically characterized by serofibrinous polyserositis and arthritis. H. parasuis include virulent and non-virulent strains and confirmation of virulence in H. parasuis is still dependent on experimental reproduction of the disease. Since the variability in virulence is supported by serotyping and genotyping (particularly, multilocus sequence typing [MLST]), we examined the relationship between the classification of 8 field strains by these methods and their capacity to cause disease in snatch-farrowed, colostrum-deprived piglets. The severity of clinical signs and lesions produced by the different strains correlated with the quantity of H. parasuis recovered from the lesions. However, the virulence of the strains in the animal model did not show a total correlation with their serovar or their classification by MLST. More studies are needed to identify a virulence marker that could substitute animal experimentation in H. parasuis. In addition, we reproduced disease in domestic pigs with a strain isolated from the nasal cavity of wild boars. This result indicates the existence of virulent strains of H. parasuis in wild suids, which could produce disease under appropriate circumstances, and suggests a possible source of infection for domestic pigs. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Differentiation by molecular typing of Mycobacterium bovis strains causing tuberculosis in cattle and goats.

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, M; Samper, S; Gavigan, J A; García Marín, J F; Martín, C

    1995-01-01

    Forty Mycobacterium bovis isolates from cattle and goats were analyzed by using different repetitive genetic markers. The 23 M. bovis strains from goats were found to carry six to eight copies of the insertion sequence IS6110. In contrast, most of the bovine isolates contained only a single copy of this element. The standardized IS6110 fingerprinting by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), described for Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains, allowed the differentiation of caprine strains. Although this method was not useful for typing bovine isolates, the repetitive elements pTBN12 and DR proved to be suitable for this purpose. A procedure using PCR which amplifies IS6110 in the outward direction was found to be as sensitive as RFLP for typing M. bovis strains from goats. The use of PCR and RFLP methods based on the IS6110 polymorphism would be useful for epidemiological studies of caprine tuberculosis. The results are consistent with different strains of M. bovis being implicated in bovine and caprine tuberculosis. PMID:8576352

  3. Molecular typing of uropathogenic E. coli strains by the ERIC-PCR method.

    PubMed

    Ardakani, Maryam Afkhami; Ranjbar, Reza

    2016-04-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the most common cause of urinary infections in hospitals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ERIC-PCR method for molecular typing of uropathogenic E. coli strains isolated from hospitalized patients. In a cross sectional study, 98 E. coli samples were collected from urine samples taken from patients admitted to Baqiyatallah Hospital from June 2014 to January 2015. The disk agar diffusion method was used to determine antibiotic sensitivity. DNA proliferation based on repetitive intergenic consensus was used to classify the E. coli strains. The products of proliferation were electrophoresed on 1.5% agarose gel, and their dendrograms were drawn. The data were analyzed by online Insillico software. The method used in this research proliferated numerous bands (4-17 bands), ranging from 100 to 3000 base pairs. The detected strains were classified into six clusters (E1-E6) with 70% similarity between them. In this study, uropathogenic E. coli strains belonged to different genotypic clusters. It was found that ERIC-PCR had good differentiation power for molecular typing of uropathogenic E. coli strains isolated from the patients in the study.

  4. Spatial encoding in spinal sensorimotor circuits differs in different wild type mice strains

    PubMed Central

    Thelin, Jonas; Schouenborg, Jens

    2008-01-01

    Background Previous studies in the rat have shown that the spatial organisation of the receptive fields of nociceptive withdrawal reflex (NWR) system are functionally adapted through experience dependent mechanisms, termed somatosensory imprinting, during postnatal development. Here we wanted to clarify 1) if mice exhibit a similar spatial encoding of sensory input to NWR as previously found in the rat and 2) if mice strains with a poor learning capacity in various behavioural tests, associated with deficient long term potention, also exhibit poor adaptation of NWR. The organisation of the NWR system in two adult wild type mouse strains with normal long term potentiation (LTP) in hippocampus and two adult wild type mouse strains exhibiting deficiencies in corresponding LTP were used and compared to previous results in the rat. Receptive fields of reflexes in single hindlimb muscles were mapped with CO2 laser heat pulses. Results While the spatial organisation of the nociceptive receptive fields in mice with normal LTP were very similar to those in rats, the LTP impaired strains exhibited receptive fields of NWRs with aberrant sensitivity distributions. However, no difference was found in NWR thresholds or onset C-fibre latencies suggesting that the mechanisms determining general reflex sensitivity and somatosensory imprinting are different. Conclusion Our results thus confirm that sensory encoding in mice and rat NWR is similar, provided that mice strains with a good learning capability are studied and raise the possibility that LTP like mechanisms are involved in somatosensory imprinting. PMID:18495020

  5. An alternative approach for gene transfer in trees using wild-type Agrobacterium strains.

    PubMed

    Brasileiro, A C; Leplé, J C; Muzzin, J; Ounnoughi, D; Michel, M F; Jouanin, L

    1991-09-01

    Micropropagated shoots of three forest tree species, poplar (Populus tremula x P. alba), wild cherry (Prunus avium L.) and walnut (Juglans nigra x J. regia), were inoculated each with six different wild-type Agrobacterium strains. Poplar and wild cherry developed tumors that grew hormone-independently, whereas on walnut, gall formation was weak. On poplar and wild cherry, tumors induced by nopaline strains developed spontaneously shoots that had a normal phenotype and did not carry oncogenic T-DNA. From these observations, we have established a co-inoculation method to transform plants, using poplar as an experimental model. The method is based on inoculation of stem internodes with an Agrobacterium suspension containing both an oncogenic strain that induces shoot differentiation and a disarmed strain that provides the suitable genes in a binary vector. We used the vector pBI121 carrying neo (kanamycin resistance) and uidA (beta-glucuronidase) genes to facilitate early selection and screening. Poplar plants derived from kanamycin-resistant shoots that did not carry oncogenic T-DNA, were shown to contain and to express neo and uidA genes. These results suggest that wild-type Agrobacterium strains that induce shoot formation directly from tumors can be used as a general tool for gene transfer, avoiding difficult regeneration procedures.

  6. R-factor cointegrate formation in Salmonella typhimurium bacteriophage type 201 strains.

    PubMed Central

    Helmuth, R; Stephan, R; Bulling, E; van Leeuwen, W J; van Embden, J D; Guinée, P A; Portnoy, D; Falkow, S

    1981-01-01

    The genetic and molecular properties of the plasmids in Salmonella typhimurium phase type 201 isolated are described. Such strains are resistant to streptomycin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, ampicillin, kanamycin, and several other antimicrobial drugs, and are highly pathogenic for calves. These strains have been encountered with increasing frequency since 1972 in West Germany and The Netherlands. We show that isolates of this phage type constitute a very homogeneous group with regard to their extrachromosomal elements. These bacteria carry three small plasmids: pRQ3, a 4.2-megadalton (Md) colicinogenic plasmid; pRQ4, 3.4-Md plasmid that interferes with the propagation of phages; and pRQ5, a 3.2-Md cryptic plasmid. Tetracycline resistance resides on a conjugative 120-MD plasmid pRQ1, belonging to the incompatibility class H2. Other antibiotic resistance determinants are encoded by a nonconjugative 108-Md plasmid pRQ2. Transfer of multiple-antibiotic resistance to appropriate recipient strains was associated with the appearance of a 230-Md plasmid, pRQ6. It appears that pRQ6 is a stable cointegrate of pRQ1 and pRQ2. This cointegrate plasmid was transferable with the same efficiency as pRQ1. Other conjugative plasmids could mobilize pRQ2, but stable cointegrates were not detected in the transconjugants. Phase type 201 strains carry a prophage, and we show that phage pattern 201 reflects the interference with propagation of typing phages effected by this prophage and plasmid pRQ4 in strains of phage type 201. Images PMID:7012128

  7. Presence of genes for type III secretion system 2 in Vibrio mimicus strains

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Vibrios, which include more than 100 species, are ubiquitous in marine and estuarine environments, and several of them e.g. Vibrio cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus and V. mimicus, are pathogens for humans. Pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus strains possess two sets of genes for type III secretion system (T3SS), T3SS1 and T3SS2. The latter are critical for virulence of the organism and be classified into two distinct phylogroups, T3SS2α and T3SS2β, which are reportedly also found in pathogenic V. cholerae non-O1/non-O139 serogroup strains. However, whether T3SS2-related genes are present in other Vibrio species remains unclear. Results We therefore examined the distribution of the genes for T3SS2 in vibrios other than V. parahaemolyticus by using a PCR assay targeting both T3SS2α and T3SS2β genes. Among the 32 Vibrio species tested in our study, several T3SS2-related genes were detected in three species, V. cholerae, V. mimicus and V. hollisae, and most of the essential genes for type III secretion were present in T3SS2-positive V. cholerae and V. mimicus strains. Moreover, both V. mimicus strains possessing T3SS2α and T3SS2β were identified. The gene organization of the T3SS2 gene clusters in V. mimicus strains was fundamentally similar to that of V. parahaemolyticus and V. cholerae in both T3SS2α- and T3SS2β-possessing strains. Conclusions This study is the first reported evidence of the presence of T3SS2 gene clusters in V. mimicus strains. This finding thus provides a new insight into the pathogenicity of the V. mimicus species. PMID:21110901

  8. An Ultra-Violet Tolerant Wild-Type Strain of Melanin-Producing Bacillus thuringiensis

    PubMed Central

    Sansinenea, Estibaliz; Salazar, Francisco; Ramirez, Melanie; Ortiz, Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bacillus thuringiensis is the most successful biological control agent used in agriculture, forestry and mosquito control. However, the insecticidal activity of the B. thuringiensis formulation is not very stable and rapidly loses its biological activity under field conditions, due to the ultraviolet radiation in sunlight. Melanin is known to absorb radiation therefore photo protection of B. thuringiensis based on melanin has been extensively studied. Objectives: The aim of this study was to find a wild type strain of naturally melanin-producing B. thuringiensis to avoid any mutation or manipulation that can affect the Cry protein content. Materials and Methods: Bacillus thuringiensis strains were isolated from soils of different States of Mexico and pigment extraction was followed by lowering the pH to 2 using 1N HCl. Pigment was characterized by some chemical tests based on its solubility, bleaching by H2O2 and flocculation with FeCl3, and using an Infrared (IR) spectrum. Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation experiment was performed to probe the melanin efficacy. Results: ELI52 strain of B. thuringiensis was confirmed to naturally produce melanin. The Cry protein analysis suggested that ELI52 is probably a B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis strain with toxic activity against the Diptera order of insects. Ultra Violet protection efficacy of melanin was probed counting total viable colonies after UV radiation and comparing the results with the non-producing melanin strain L-DOPA (L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) was also detected in the culture. ELI52 strain showed an antagonistic effect over some common bacteria from the environment. Conclusions: ELI52 wild-type strain of B. thuringiensis is a good bio-insecticide that produces melanin with UV-resistance that is probably toxic against the Diptera order of insects and can inhibit the growth of other environmental bacteria. PMID:26421136

  9. Comparative sensitivity of the echovirus type 25 JV-4 prototype strain and two recent isolates to glutaraldehyde at low concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Chambon, M; Bailly, J L; Peigue-Lafeuille, H

    1994-01-01

    The sensitivity of two recently isolated antigenic variants of echovirus type 25 (Montpellier 76-1262 and Thionville 86-222) to glutaraldehyde (GTA) at low concentrations was compared with that of the JV-4 prototype strain. The purified viruses were treated under the same conditions with GTA at concentrations ranging from 0.002 to 0.10%. The wild strains exhibited significantly lower sensitivity to GTA than did the prototype strain; with 0.10% GTA, a 2 log10 unit reduction was obtained in 5 min for JV-4 and in 60 and 80 min for Montpellier 76-1262 and Thionville 86-222, respectively. A comparison with previous results obtained with poliovirus type 1 showed that the inactivation rates of echovirus type 25 wild strains were fivefold lower than those of the poliovirus type 1 Sabin strain. The comparative electrophoretic and immunoblot analyses showed differences in the results of GTA binding with capsid proteins of the viruses. Unlike in the poliovirus type 1 Mahoney strain and in the echovirus type 25 JV-4 reference strain, GTA produced only minor intermolecular cross-linkings in the viral particles of the two wild strains of echovirus type 25. Our results suggest that there are both intertypic and intratypic differences in the GTA sensitivities of enterovirus strains. They are of relevance to disinfection procedures in digestive endoscopy and to the choice of the enterovirus strain used for evaluating the efficacy of disinfectants. Images PMID:8135510

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Sphingopyxis macrogoltabida Type Strain NBRC 15033, Originally Isolated as a Polyethylene Glycol Degrader

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Yuji; Numata, Mitsuru; Tsuchikane, Kieko; Hosoyama, Akira; Yamazoe, Atsushi; Tsuda, Masataka; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Kawai, Fusako

    2015-01-01

    Sphingopyxis macrogoltabida strain 203, the type strain of the species, grew on polyethylene glycol (PEG) and has been deposited to the stock culture at the Biological Resource Center, National Institute of Technology and Evaluation (NITE), under the number NBRC 15033. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of strain NBRC 15033. Unfortunately, genes for PEG degradation were missing. PMID:26659674

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Sphingopyxis macrogoltabida Type Strain NBRC 15033, Originally Isolated as a Polyethylene Glycol Degrader.

    PubMed

    Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Nagata, Yuji; Numata, Mitsuru; Tsuchikane, Kieko; Hosoyama, Akira; Yamazoe, Atsushi; Tsuda, Masataka; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Kawai, Fusako

    2015-12-10

    Sphingopyxis macrogoltabida strain 203, the type strain of the species, grew on polyethylene glycol (PEG) and has been deposited to the stock culture at the Biological Resource Center, National Institute of Technology and Evaluation (NITE), under the number NBRC 15033. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of strain NBRC 15033. Unfortunately, genes for PEG degradation were missing. Copyright © 2015 Ohtsubo et al.

  12. Ribitol dehydrogenase of Klebsiella aerogenes. Sequence and properties of wild-type and mutant strains.

    PubMed Central

    Dothie, J M; Giglio, J R; Moore, C B; Taylor, S S; Hartley, B S

    1985-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the sequence of 249 amino acids in ribitol dehydrogenase-A from Klebsiella aerogenes. Continuous culture on xylitol yields strains that superproduce 'wild-type' enzyme but mutations appear to have arisen in this process. Other strains selected by such continuous culture produce enzymes with increased specific activity for xylitol but without loss of ribitol activity. One such enzyme, ribitol dehydrogenase-D, has Pro-196 for Gly-196. Another, ribitol dehydrogenase-B, has a different mutation. PMID:3904726

  13. Organophosphonate utilization by the wild-type strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed Central

    Zboińska, E; Lejczak, B; Kafarski, P

    1992-01-01

    The wild-type strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens was found to utilize a range of structurally diverse organophosphonates as its sole carbon or nitrogen sources. Representative compounds included aminoalkylphosphonates, hydroxyalkylphosphonates, oxoalkylphosphonates, and phosphono dipeptides. Among them, amino(phenyl)methylphosphonate,2-aminoethylphosphonate, aminomethylphosphonate, diisopropyl 9-aminofluoren-9-ylphosphonate, and 2-oxoalkylphosphonates were used by P. fluorescens as its sole sources of phosphorus. Only slight growth was observed on the herbicide glyphosate (N-phosphonomethylglycine), which was metabolized to aminomethylphosphonate. Neither phosphinothricin nor its dialanyl tripeptide, bialaphos, supported growth of P. fluorescens. The possible mechanisms of organophosphonate degradation by this strain are discussed. PMID:1444412

  14. Narrowing of antiferromagnetic domain wall in corundum-type Cr2O3 by lattice strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kota, Yohei; Imamura, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    The effect of lattice strain on single-ion magnetic anisotropy and antiferromagnetic domain wall width in corundum-type Cr2O3 is studied using first-principles calculations and micromagnetics simulations. Without lattice strain, the domain wall width L DW is about 80 nm. When the lattice constant a is increased by 1-2%, L DW is reduced to less than 20 nm due to the increase in the single-ion anisotropy constant K 1 to on the order of 106 erg/cm3.

  15. Microscopic observation of strain induced in heteroepitaxial layers with reflection type of infrared polariscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Masayoshi; Chu, Tao

    2000-03-01

    Photoelastic measurements using a reflection type of infrared polariscope have been done for the first time to investigate birefringence or residual strain induced in as-grown and pulsed-laser-annealed silicon-on-sapphire (SOS) wafers. It was found that the residual strain, arising from mismatchings of the lattice constants and the thermal expansion coefficients between silicon and sapphire, was reduced effectively by pulsed-laser annealing with laser energy density beyond a threshold value. Also found was a mosaic pattern due to local melting at about the threshold energy density, indicating the coexistence of solid and liquid phases.

  16. Complete genome sequence of Rhodospirillum rubrum type strain (S1T)

    SciTech Connect

    Munk, Christine; Copeland, A; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Barry, Kerrie; Detter, J. Chris; Hammon, Nancy; Israni, Sanjay; Pitluck, Sam; Brettin, Thomas S; Bruce, David; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Gilna, Paul; Schmutz, Jeremy; Larimer, Frank W; Land, Miriam L; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Mavromatis, K; Richardson, P M; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Zhang, Yaoping; Roberts, Gary P.; Reslewic, Susan; Schwartz, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Rhodospirillum rubrum (Esmarch 1887) Molisch 1907 is the type species of the genus Rho- dospirillum, which is the type genus of the family Rhodospirillaceae in the class Alphaproteo- bacteria. The species is of special interest because it is an anoxygenic phototroph that pro- duces extracellular elemental sulfur (instead of oxygen) while harvesting light. It contains one of the most simple photosynthetic systems currently known, lacking light harvesting complex 2. Strain S1T can grow on carbon monoxide as sole energy source. With currently over 1,750 PubMed entries, R. rubrum is one of the most intensively studied microbial species, in partic- ular for physiological and genetic studies. Next to R. centenum strain SW, the genome se- quence of strain S1T is only the second genome of a member of the genus Rhodospirillum to be published, but the first type strain genome from the genus. The 4,352,825 bp long chro- mosome and 53,732 bp plasmid with a total of 3,850 protein-coding and 83 RNA genes were sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Program DOEM 2002.

  17. [Multilocus sequence typing analysis of 47 Campylobacter jejuni strains isolated from poultry in Hubei province].

    PubMed

    Dong, Jun; Han, Mei; Zhou, Kang; Luo, Qingping; Shao, Huabin; Zhang, Tengfei

    2016-01-04

    To study the epidemiological and molecular characteristics of Campylobacter jejuni in poultry in Hubei province, we used multilocus sequence typing method to classify 47 local C. jejuni strains. Genomic DNA of each isolated strain was extract, seven housekeeping genes including aspA, g1nA, g1tA, glyA, pgm, tkt and uncA were amplified by PCR and sequenced, and then the sequences of genes were analyzed using MLST database. There were a total of 38 sequence types and 10 clonal complexes, and ST353 and ST464 complexes were the largest amount of the population of C. jejuni analyzed, of which 2 new allelic profile and 25 new sequence types were found. Phylogenetic tree shows that sequence types from different types of poultry and different regions were different. Forty-seven C. jejuni strains isolated from poultry in Hubei were analyzed using MLST and showed abundant genetic diversity, it will provide scientific data to the epidemiological investigation of C. jejuni in Hubei, China.

  18. Selective enrichment media bias the types of Salmonella enterica strains isolated from mixed strain cultures and complex enrichment broths.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    For foodborne outbreak investigations it can be difficult to isolate the relevant strain from food and/or environmental sources. If the sample is contaminated by more than one strain of the pathogen the relevant strain might be missed. In this study mixed cultures of Salmonella enterica were grown in one set of standard enrichment media to see if culture bias patterns emerged. Nineteen strains representing four serogroups and ten serotypes were compared in four-strain mixtures in Salmonella-only and in cattle fecal culture enrichment backgrounds using Salmonella enrichment media. One or more strain(s) emerged as dominant in each mixture. No serotype was most fit, but strains of serogroups C2 and E were more likely to dominate enrichment culture mixtures than strains of serogroups B or C1. Different versions of Rappaport-Vassiliadis (RV) medium gave different patterns of strain dominance in both Salmonella-only and fecal enrichment culture backgrounds. The fittest strains belonged to serogroups C1, C2, and E, and included strains of S. Infantis, S. Thompson S. Newport, S. 6,8:d:-, and S. Give. Strains of serogroup B, which included serotypes often seen in outbreaks such as S. Typhimurium, S. Saintpaul, and S. Schwarzengrund were less likely to emerge as dominant strains in the mixtures when using standard RV as part of the enrichment. Using a more nutrient-rich version of RV as part of the protocol led to a different pattern of strains emerging, however some were still present in very low numbers in the resulting population. These results indicate that outbreak investigations of food and/or other environmental samples should include multiple enrichment protocols to ensure isolation of target strains of Salmonella.

  19. Evaluation of chemotherapy with benznidazole and nifurtimox in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi strains of different types*

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, S. G.; Magalhães, J. B.; Pontes, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    A test was made of the susceptibility of 30 strains of Trypanosoma cruzi to chemotherapy with nifurtimox (Bay 2502) and benznidazole (Ro 7-1051). The strains had previously been classified as type I, II, or III according to their morphobiological and isoenzymic characteristics. Three type I strains, 14 type II strains, and 13 type III strains were studied. Mice were infected with 2 × 105 blood forms of these parasites and treated for 90 days with benznidazole or nifurtimox. All the surviving mice were submitted to parasitological tests (direct parasitaemia, xenodiagnosis, inoculation in new-born mice, and haemoculture) and serological tests (indirect immunofluorescence). As the latter remained positive in about 80% of the parasitologically negative animals, the cure rates were based on the more reliable parasitological tests. Type I strains displayed high susceptibility, type II strains showed medium to high susceptibility, and type III strains were highly resistant to both drugs. The fact that a particular strain type, with its own level of susceptibility, usually predominates in a given geographical area may explain the contradictory results after chemotherapy from different endemic areas. PMID:3936634

  20. Molecular analysis of Acinetobacter baumannii strains isolated in Lebanon using four different typing methods.

    PubMed

    Rafei, Rayane; Dabboussi, Fouad; Hamze, Monzer; Eveillard, Matthieu; Lemarié, Carole; Gaultier, Marie-Pierre; Mallat, Hassan; Moghnieh, Rima; Husni-Samaha, Rola; Joly-Guillou, Marie-Laure; Kempf, Marie

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzed 42 Acinetobacter baumannii strains collected between 2009-2012 from different hospitals in Beyrouth and North Lebanon to better understand the epidemiology and carbapenem resistance mechanisms in our collection and to compare the robustness of pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) and blaOXA-51 sequence-based typing (SBT). Among 31 carbapenem resistant strains, we have detected three carbapenem resistance genes: 28 carried the blaOXA-23 gene, 1 the blaOXA-24 gene and 2 strains the blaOXA-58 gene. This is the first detection of blaOXA-23 and blaOXA-24 in Lebanon. PFGE identified 11 types and was the most discriminating technique followed by rep-PCR (9 types), blaOXA-51 SBT (8 types) and MLST (7 types). The PFGE type A'/ST2 was the dominant genotype in our collection present in Beyrouth and North Lebanon. The clustering agreement between all techniques was measured by adjust Wallace coefficient. An overall agreement has been demonstrated. High values of adjust Wallace coefficient were found with followed combinations: PFGE to predict MLST types  = 100%, PFGE to predict blaOXA-51 SBT = 100%, blaOXA-51 SBT to predict MLST = 100%, MLST to predict blaOXA-51 SBT = 84.7%, rep-PCR to predict MLST = 81.5%, PFGE to predict rep-PCR = 69% and rep-PCR to predict blaOXA-51 SBT = 67.2%. PFGE and MLST are gold standard methods for outbreaks investigation and population structure studies respectively. Otherwise, these two techniques are technically, time and cost demanding. We recommend the use of blaOXA-51 SBT as first typing method to screen isolates and assign them to their corresponding clonal lineages. Repetitive sequence-based PCR is a rapid tool to access outbreaks but careful interpretation of results must be always performed.

  1. Structure and Genetic Content of the Megaplasmids of Neurotoxigenic Clostridium butyricum Type E Strains from Italy

    PubMed Central

    Iacobino, Angelo; Scalfaro, Concetta; Franciosa, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    We determined the genetic maps of the megaplasmids of six neutoroxigenic Clostridium butyricum type E strains from Italy using molecular and bioinformatics techniques. The megaplasmids are circular, not linear as we had previously proposed. The differently-sized megaplasmids share a genetic region that includes structural, metabolic and regulatory genes. In addition, we found that a 168 kb genetic region is present only in the larger megaplasmids of two tested strains, whereas it is absent from the smaller megaplasmids of the four remaining strains. The genetic region unique to the larger megaplasmids contains, among other features, a locus for clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR associated (cas) genes, i.e. a bacterial adaptive immune system providing sequence-specific protection from invading genetic elements. Some CRISPR spacer sequences of the neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains showed homology to prophage, phage and plasmid sequences from closely related clostridia species or from distant species, all sharing the intestinal habitat, suggesting that the CRISPR locus might be involved in the microorganism adaptation to the human or animal intestinal environment. Besides, we report here that each of four distinct CRISPR spacers partially matched DNA sequences of different prophages and phages, at identical nucleotide locations. This suggests that, at least in neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E, the CRISPR locus is potentially able to recognize the same conserved DNA sequence of different invading genetic elements, besides targeting sequences unique to previously encountered invading DNA, as currently predicted for a CRISPR locus. Thus, the results of this study introduce the possibility that CRISPR loci can provide resistance to a wider range of invading DNA elements than previously appreciated. Whether it is more advantageous for the peculiar neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains to maintain or to lose the

  2. Structure and genetic content of the megaplasmids of neurotoxigenic clostridium butyricum type E strains from Italy.

    PubMed

    Iacobino, Angelo; Scalfaro, Concetta; Franciosa, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    We determined the genetic maps of the megaplasmids of six neutoroxigenic Clostridium butyricum type E strains from Italy using molecular and bioinformatics techniques. The megaplasmids are circular, not linear as we had previously proposed. The differently-sized megaplasmids share a genetic region that includes structural, metabolic and regulatory genes. In addition, we found that a 168 kb genetic region is present only in the larger megaplasmids of two tested strains, whereas it is absent from the smaller megaplasmids of the four remaining strains. The genetic region unique to the larger megaplasmids contains, among other features, a locus for clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR associated (cas) genes, i.e. a bacterial adaptive immune system providing sequence-specific protection from invading genetic elements. Some CRISPR spacer sequences of the neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains showed homology to prophage, phage and plasmid sequences from closely related clostridia species or from distant species, all sharing the intestinal habitat, suggesting that the CRISPR locus might be involved in the microorganism adaptation to the human or animal intestinal environment. Besides, we report here that each of four distinct CRISPR spacers partially matched DNA sequences of different prophages and phages, at identical nucleotide locations. This suggests that, at least in neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E, the CRISPR locus is potentially able to recognize the same conserved DNA sequence of different invading genetic elements, besides targeting sequences unique to previously encountered invading DNA, as currently predicted for a CRISPR locus. Thus, the results of this study introduce the possibility that CRISPR loci can provide resistance to a wider range of invading DNA elements than previously appreciated. Whether it is more advantageous for the peculiar neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains to maintain or to lose the

  3. Foliar Chlorosis in Symbiotic Host and Nonhost Plants Induced by Rhizobium tropici Type B Strains

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Kevin P.; Handelsman, Jo

    1993-01-01

    Rhizobium tropici CIAT899 induced chlorosis in the leaves of its symbiotic hosts, common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), siratro (Macroptilium atropurpureum Urb.), and Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit. Chlorosis induction by strains CIAT899 and CT9005, an exopolysaccharide-deficient mutant of CIAT899, required carbon substrate. When the bacteria were added at planting in a solution of mannitol (50 g/liter), as few as 103 cells of CIAT899 were sufficient to induce chlorosis in bean plants. All carbon sources tested, including organic acids and mono- and disaccharides, supported chlorosis induction. The addition of a carbon source did not affect the growth rate or the population density of CT9005 in the bean plant rhizosphere. Cell-free filtrates of cultures of CT9005 did not induce detectable chlorosis. All type B strains of R. tropici tested also induced chlorosis in common bean. Type A strains of R. tropici and all other species of bacteria tested did not induce chlorosis. Several lines of evidence indicated that nodulation was not required for chlorosis induction. Strain RSP900, a pSym-cured derivative of CIAT899, induced chlorosis in wild-type P. vulgaris. In addition, NOD125, a nodulation-defective line of common bean, developed chlorosis when inoculated with CIAT899, but did not develop nodules. CIAT899 consistently induced severe chlorosis in the leaves of the nonhost legumes alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and Berseem clover (Trifolium alexandrinum L.), and induced chlorosis in 29 to 58% of the plants tested of sunflower, cucumber, and tomato seedlings, but it did not induce chlorosis in the leaves of corn or wheat. Chlorosis induction in nonhost plants also required carbon substrate. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that R. tropici type B strains produce a chlorosis-inducing factor that affects a wide range of plant species. PMID:16348994

  4. Foliar Chlorosis in Symbiotic Host and Nonhost Plants Induced by Rhizobium tropici Type B Strains.

    PubMed

    O'connell, K P; Handelsman, J

    1993-07-01

    Rhizobium tropici CIAT899 induced chlorosis in the leaves of its symbiotic hosts, common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), siratro (Macroptilium atropurpureum Urb.), and Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit. Chlorosis induction by strains CIAT899 and CT9005, an exopolysaccharide-deficient mutant of CIAT899, required carbon substrate. When the bacteria were added at planting in a solution of mannitol (50 g/liter), as few as 10 cells of CIAT899 were sufficient to induce chlorosis in bean plants. All carbon sources tested, including organic acids and mono- and disaccharides, supported chlorosis induction. The addition of a carbon source did not affect the growth rate or the population density of CT9005 in the bean plant rhizosphere. Cell-free filtrates of cultures of CT9005 did not induce detectable chlorosis. All type B strains of R. tropici tested also induced chlorosis in common bean. Type A strains of R. tropici and all other species of bacteria tested did not induce chlorosis. Several lines of evidence indicated that nodulation was not required for chlorosis induction. Strain RSP900, a pSym-cured derivative of CIAT899, induced chlorosis in wild-type P. vulgaris. In addition, NOD125, a nodulation-defective line of common bean, developed chlorosis when inoculated with CIAT899, but did not develop nodules. CIAT899 consistently induced severe chlorosis in the leaves of the nonhost legumes alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and Berseem clover (Trifolium alexandrinum L.), and induced chlorosis in 29 to 58% of the plants tested of sunflower, cucumber, and tomato seedlings, but it did not induce chlorosis in the leaves of corn or wheat. Chlorosis induction in nonhost plants also required carbon substrate. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that R. tropici type B strains produce a chlorosis-inducing factor that affects a wide range of plant species.

  5. Selective enrichment media bias the types of salmonella enterica strains isolated from mixed strain cultures and complex enrichment broths

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    For foodborne outbreak investigations it can be difficult to isolate the relevant strain from food and/or environmental sources. If the sample is contaminated by more than one strain of the organism the relevant strain might be missed. In this study mixed cultures of Salmonella enterica were grown...

  6. IS200 and multilocus sequence typing for the identification of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi strains from Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Gamboa, Areli; Silva, Claudia; Fernández-Mora, Marcos; Wiesner, Magdalena; Ponce de León, Alfredo; Calva, Edmundo

    2015-06-01

    In this work, IS200 and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) were used to analyze 19 strains previously serotyped as Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and isolated in Indonesia (16 strains), Mexico (2 strains), and Switzerland (1 strain). Most of the strains showed the most common Typhi sequence types, ST1 and ST2, and a new Typhi genotype (ST1856) was described. However, one isolate from Mexico and another from Indonesia were of the ST365 and ST426 sequence types, indicating that they belonged to serovars Weltevreden and Aberdeen, respectively. These results were supported by the amplification of IS200 fragments, which rapidly distinguish Typhi from other serovars. Our results demonstrate the utility of IS200 and MLST in the classification of Salmonella strains into serovars. These methods provide information on the clonal relatedness of strains isolated worldwide.

  7. CC8 MRSA Strains Harboring SCCmec Type IVc are Predominant in Colombian Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, J. Natalia; Ocampo, Ana M.; Vanegas, Johanna M.; Rodriguez, Erika A.; Mediavilla, José R.; Chen, Liang; Muskus, Carlos E.; A. Vélez, Lázaro; Rojas, Carlos; Restrepo, Andrea V.; Ospina, Sigifredo; Garcés, Carlos; Franco, Liliana; Bifani, Pablo; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Correa, Margarita M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent reports highlight the incursion of community-associated MRSA within healthcare settings. However, knowledge of this phenomenon remains limited in Latin America. The aim of this study was to evaluate the molecular epidemiology of MRSA in three tertiary-care hospitals in Medellín, Colombia. Methods An observational cross-sectional study was conducted from 2008–2010. MRSA infections were classified as either community-associated (CA-MRSA) or healthcare-associated (HA-MRSA), with HA-MRSA further classified as hospital-onset (HAHO-MRSA) or community-onset (HACO-MRSA) according to standard epidemiological definitions established by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Genotypic analysis included SCCmec typing, spa typing, PFGE and MLST. Results Out of 538 total MRSA isolates, 68 (12.6%) were defined as CA-MRSA, 243 (45.2%) as HACO-MRSA and 227 (42.2%) as HAHO-MRSA. The majority harbored SCCmec type IVc (306, 58.7%), followed by SCCmec type I (174, 33.4%). The prevalence of type IVc among CA-, HACO- and HAHO-MRSA isolates was 92.4%, 65.1% and 43.6%, respectively. From 2008 to 2010, the prevalence of type IVc-bearing strains increased significantly, from 50.0% to 68.2% (p = 0.004). Strains harboring SCCmec IVc were mainly associated with spa types t1610, t008 and t024 (MLST clonal complex 8), while PFGE confirmed that the t008 and t1610 strains were closely related to the USA300-0114 CA-MRSA clone. Notably, strains belonging to these three spa types exhibited high levels of tetracycline resistance (45.9%). Conclusion CC8 MRSA strains harboring SCCmec type IVc are becoming predominant in Medellín hospitals, displacing previously reported CC5 HA-MRSA clones. Based on shared characteristics including SCCmec IVc, absence of the ACME element and tetracycline resistance, the USA300-related isolates in this study are most likely related to USA300-LV, the recently-described ‘Latin American variant’ of USA300. PMID:22745670

  8. Single-strand conformation polymorphism of microsatellite for rapid strain typing of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Bai, Feng-Yan

    2007-11-01

    Single-strand conformation polymorphisms (SSCP) of Candida albicans' microsatellite CAI were characterized. Among the 76 clinical isolates recovered from different patients (independent strains), 60 distinct CAI SSCP patterns were recognized, resulting in a discriminatory power of 0.993. The multiple isolates recovered sequentially from the same or different body locations of the same patient showed exactly the same CAI SSCP pattern. The reliability of the SSCP analysis was confirmed by GeneScan and sequence analyses. From the same set of independent strains, 59 distinct CAI genotypes were identified by GeneScan analysis. Sequence comparison showed the advantage of SSCP over GeneSan analysis in the detection of point mutations in the microsatellite. The results indicated that PCR SSCP analysis of CAI microsatellite is a powerful and economical approach for rapid strain typing of C. albicans in clinical laboratories, especially in the detection of microevolutionary changes in microsatellites and in large-scale epidemiological investigation.

  9. Complete genome sequence of Tolumonas auensis type strain (TA 4T)

    SciTech Connect

    Chertkov, Olga; Copeland, Alex; Lucas1, Susa; Lapidus, Alla; Berry, KerrieW.; Detter, JohnC.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Hammon, Nancy; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, Sam; Richardson, Paul; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Saunders, Elizabeth; Schmutz, Jeremy; Brettin, Thomas; Larimer, Frank; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Spring, Stefan; Rohde, Manfred; Kyrpides, NikosC.; Ivanova, Natalia; Göker, Markus; Beller, HarryR.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2011-10-04

    Tolumonas auensis (Fischer-Romero et al. 1996) is currently the only validly named species of the genus Tolumonas in the family Aeromonadaceae. The strain is of interest because of its ability to produce toluene from phenylalanine and other phenyl precursors, as well as phenol from tyrosine. This is of interest because toluene is normally considered to be a tracer of anthropogenic pollution in lakes, but T. auensis represents a biogenic source of toluene. Other than Aeromonas hydrophila subsp. hydrophila, T. auensis strain TA 4T is the only other member in the family Aeromonadaceae with a completely sequenced type-strain genome. The 3,471,292-bp chromosome with a total of 3,288 protein-coding and 116 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Program JBEI 2008.

  10. Complete genome sequence of Tolumonas auensis type strain (TA 4T)

    SciTech Connect

    Chertkov, Olga; Copeland, A; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Berry, Alison M; Detter, J. Chris; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Hammon, Nancy; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, Sam; Richardson, P M; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Schmutz, Jeremy; Brettin, Thomas S; Larimer, Frank W; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Spring, Stefan; Rohde, Manfred; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ivanova, N; Goker, Markus; Beller, Harry R.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    Tolumonas auensis Fischer-Romero et al. 1996 is currently the only validly named species of the genus Tolumonas in the family Aeromonadaceae. The strain is of interest because of its ability to produce toluene from phenylalanine and other phenyl precursors, as well as phenol from tyrosine. This is of interest because toluene is normally considered to be a tracer of anthropogenic pollution in lakes, but T. auensis represents a biogenic source of toluene. Oth- er than Aeromonas hydrophila subsp. hydrophila, T. auensis strain TA 4T is the only other member in the family Aeromonadaceae with a completely sequenced type-strain genome. The 3,471,292 bp chromosome with a total of 3,288 protein-coding and 116 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Program JBEI 2008.

  11. Permissive growth of human adenovirus type 4 vaccine strain-based vector in porcine cell lines.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dong-sheng; Li, Xiao-jing; Wan, Wen-yan; Li, Hong-jie; Wang, Xiao-xue; Yang, Xia; Li, Yong-tao; Chang, Hong-tao; Chen, Lu; Wang, Chuan-qing; Zhao, Jun

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, there has been considerable interest in using adenoviruses as live vectors to develop recombinant vaccines. Previous studies have demonstrated the safety and effectiveness of HIV/SIV and influenza vaccine candidates based on human adenovirus type 4 (Ad4) replication-competent vectors in rhesus macaque and human model. To explore the possibility of human Ad4 vaccine strain used as a vector in developing porcine vaccines, the growth properties of replication-competent human Ad4 vaccine strain recombinant encoding EGFP in different porcine cell lines were investigated. All tested cell lines are permissive for Ad4 vaccine strain vector with varied replication efficiency. Thus, human Ad4 based vectors would be promising supplement to adenovirus vectors as a delivery vehicle for recombinant vaccines in swine industry.

  12. Genotyping of varicella-zoster virus (vzv) wild-type strains isolated in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Bostikova, Vanda; Salavec, Miloslav; Smetana, Jan; Chlibek, Roman; Kosina, Pavel; Prasil, Petr; Plisek, Stanislav; Splino, Miroslav; Bostik, Pavel

    2011-12-01

    Monitoring of the varicella-zoster virus is becoming an important tool for analysis of the circulation of individual strains of VZV which differ not only at the genomic level, but show a variability in their clinical and epidemiological characteristics. Such data are not available on a large scale from the Czech population and could help understanding the epidemiological and evolutionary characteristics of the virus, as well as its potential for reinfection and increased pathogenesis in the population groups at higher risk for complications. The main aim of this study was detection and monitoring of wild-type or vaccine VZV strain isolates in the region of Eastern Bohemia and genotypic characterization of these isolates. A total of 273 clinical samples were obtained from patients exhibiting symptoms of varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection manifested as chickenpox or herpes zoster (HZ) treated in the Faculty Hospital of Charles University, Medical School in Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic. Characterization of individual short VZV DNA sequences was performed utilizing restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs), PCR and sequencing. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in open reading frames (ORF) 21, 22 and 50 were used to identify individual VZV strains. All clinical isolates (97 from varicella, 176 from herpes zoster) were VZV positive wild-type strains. Sequencing analysis showed that 89 isolates were of the European E1 genotype, 180 were of the European E2 genotype and 2 were identified as the Mosaic M1 strain. In addition, for the first time in this region two unusual genotypes were identified, both representing a combination of E1 and M2 strain specific SNPs. Our prospective VZV genotyping study which is the first to monitor the VZV epidemiological situation in the Czech Republic using such a large set of clinical specimens, has provided valuable epidemiological data and identified two unique VZV recombinants.

  13. Phylogeny and Strain Typing of Escherichia coli, Inferred from Variation at Mononucleotide Repeat Loci

    PubMed Central

    Diamant, Eran; Palti, Yniv; Gur-Arie, Riva; Cohen, Helit; Hallerman, Eric M.; Kashi, Yechezkel

    2004-01-01

    Multilocus sequencing of housekeeping genes has been used previously for bacterial strain typing and for inferring evolutionary relationships among strains of Escherichia coli. In this study, we used shorter intergenic sequences that contained simple sequence repeats (SSRs) of repeating mononucleotide motifs (mononucleotide repeats [MNRs]) to infer the phylogeny of pathogenic and commensal E. coli strains. Seven noncoding loci (four MNRs and three non-SSRs) were sequenced in 27 strains, including enterohemorrhagic (six isolates of O157:H7), enteropathogenic, enterotoxigenic, B, and K-12 strains. The four MNRs were also sequenced in 20 representative strains of the E. coli reference (ECOR) collection. Sequence polymorphism was significantly higher at the MNR loci, including the flanking sequences, indicating a higher mutation rate in the sequences flanking the MNR tracts. The four MNR loci were amplifiable by PCR in the standard ECOR A, B1, and D groups, but only one (yaiN) in the B2 group was amplified, which is consistent with previous studies that suggested that B2 is the most ancient group. High sequence compatibility was found between the four MNR loci, indicating that they are in the same clonal frame. The phylogenetic trees that were constructed from the sequence data were in good agreement with those of previous studies that used multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. The results demonstrate that MNR loci are useful for inferring phylogenetic relationships and provide much higher sequence variation than housekeeping genes. Therefore, the use of MNR loci for multilocus sequence typing should prove efficient for clinical diagnostics, epidemiology, and evolutionary study of bacteria. PMID:15066845

  14. Development of Immunoassays for Burkholderia pseudomallei Typical and Atypical Lipopolysaccharide Strain Typing

    PubMed Central

    Nualnoi, Teerapat; Norris, Michael H.; Tuanyok, Apichai; Brett, Paul J.; Burtnick, Mary N.; Keim, Paul S.; Settles, Erik W.; Allender, Christopher J.; AuCoin, David P.

    2017-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a severe infection endemic to many tropical regions. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is recognized as an important virulence factor used by B. pseudomallei. Isolates of B. pseudomallei have been shown to express one of four different types of LPS (typical LPS, atypical LPS types B and B2, and rough LPS) and in vitro studies have demonstrated that LPS types may impact disease severity. The association between LPS types and clinical manifestations, however, is still unknown, in part because an effective method for LPS type identification is not available. Thus, we developed antigen capture immunoassays capable of distinguishing between the LPS types. Mice were injected with B or B2 LPS for atypical LPS–specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) isolation; only two mAbs (3A2 and 5B4) were isolated from mice immunized with B2 LPS. Immunoblot analysis and surface plasmon resonance demonstrated that 3A2 and 5B4 are reactive with both B2 and B LPS where 3A2 was shown to possess higher affinity. Assays were then developed using capsular polysaccharide–specific mAb 4C4 for bacterial capture and 4C7 (previously shown to bind typical LPS) or 3A2 mAbs for typical or atypical LPS strain detection, respectively. The evaluations performed with 197 strains of Burkholderia and non-Burkholderia species showed that the assays are reactive to B. pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei strains and have an accuracy of 98.8% (zero false positives and two false negatives) for LPS typing. The results suggest that the assays are effective and applicable for B. pseudomallei LPS typing. PMID:27994103

  15. Molecular analysis of Porcine Circovirus Type 2 strains from Uruguay: evidence for natural occurring recombination.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Natalia; Mirazo, Santiago; Castro, Gustavo; Arbiza, Juan

    2013-10-01

    Porcine Circovirus Type 2 (PCV2) is a worldwide distributed virus and is considered an important emerging pathogen related to several distinct disease syndromes in pigs. Genomic structure consists of three major open reading frames (ORFs). ORF1 (rep gene) encodes replication-related proteins, ORF2 (cap gene) encodes the capsid protein and ORF3 encodes a protein putatively involved in virus-induced apoptosis. Based on cap gene sequences, PCV2 strains are classified into two main genotypes, PCV2a with five clusters (2A-2E) and PCV2b with three clusters (1A-1C). According to previous theoretical studies, PCV2 strains can eventually undergo intra and inter-genotype recombination, mainly within the rep gene. Ever since, several evidences of recombination in the field have been reported and confirmed this hypothesis. In South America, data regarding molecular characterization of PCV2 strains is still scant. Genotyping studies in the region have concluded that PCV2b is the predominant circulating genotype in the region and till now, no recombinant strains have ever been reported. In this work we thoroughly characterized at the molecular level Uruguayan PCV2 strains by extensive sequence data analysis. Moreover, recombination software tools were applied to explore and characterize eventual occurrence of natural recombination events. Two recombinant PCV2 strains were detected in this study, as a consequence of an inter-genotype recombination event between PCV2b-1A and PCV2a-2D, as the major and minor parent, respectively. According to recombination software analysis, in both cases the event occurred within the ORF1. Herein, extensive viral sequence dataset is provided, including the characterization of the first PCV2 recombinant strains ever reported in South America. Additionally, our results suggested a multi-centered source of PCV2 infection in Uruguay, which probably involved Brazilian and European origins.

  16. Detection and strain typing of ancient Mycobacterium leprae from a medieval leprosy hospital.

    PubMed

    Taylor, G Michael; Tucker, Katie; Butler, Rachel; Pike, Alistair W G; Lewis, Jamie; Roffey, Simon; Marter, Philip; Lee, Oona Y-C; Wu, Houdini H T; Minnikin, David E; Besra, Gurdyal S; Singh, Pushpendra; Cole, Stewart T; Stewart, Graham R

    2013-01-01

    Nine burials excavated from the Magdalen Hill Archaeological Research Project (MHARP) in Winchester, UK, showing skeletal signs of lepromatous leprosy (LL) have been studied using a multidisciplinary approach including osteological, geochemical and biomolecular techniques. DNA from Mycobacterium leprae was amplified from all nine skeletons but not from control skeletons devoid of indicative pathology. In several specimens we corroborated the identification of M. leprae with detection of mycolic acids specific to the cell wall of M. leprae and persistent in the skeletal samples. In five cases, the preservation of the material allowed detailed genotyping using single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and multiple locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). Three of the five cases proved to be infected with SNP type 3I-1, ancestral to contemporary M. leprae isolates found in southern states of America and likely carried by European migrants. From the remaining two burials we identified, for the first time in the British Isles, the occurrence of SNP type 2F. Stable isotope analysis conducted on tooth enamel taken from two of the type 3I-1 and one of the type 2F remains revealed that all three individuals had probably spent their formative years in the Winchester area. Previously, type 2F has been implicated as the precursor strain that migrated from the Middle East to India and South-East Asia, subsequently evolving to type 1 strains. Thus we show that type 2F had also spread westwards to Britain by the early medieval period.

  17. Detection and Strain Typing of Ancient Mycobacterium leprae from a Medieval Leprosy Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, G. Michael; Tucker, Katie; Butler, Rachel; Pike, Alistair W. G.; Lewis, Jamie; Roffey, Simon; Marter, Philip; Lee, Oona Y-C; Wu, Houdini H. T.; Minnikin, David E.; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Singh, Pushpendra; Cole, Stewart T.; Stewart, Graham R.

    2013-01-01

    Nine burials excavated from the Magdalen Hill Archaeological Research Project (MHARP) in Winchester, UK, showing skeletal signs of lepromatous leprosy (LL) have been studied using a multidisciplinary approach including osteological, geochemical and biomolecular techniques. DNA from Mycobacterium leprae was amplified from all nine skeletons but not from control skeletons devoid of indicative pathology. In several specimens we corroborated the identification of M. leprae with detection of mycolic acids specific to the cell wall of M. leprae and persistent in the skeletal samples. In five cases, the preservation of the material allowed detailed genotyping using single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and multiple locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). Three of the five cases proved to be infected with SNP type 3I-1, ancestral to contemporary M. leprae isolates found in southern states of America and likely carried by European migrants. From the remaining two burials we identified, for the first time in the British Isles, the occurrence of SNP type 2F. Stable isotope analysis conducted on tooth enamel taken from two of the type 3I-1 and one of the type 2F remains revealed that all three individuals had probably spent their formative years in the Winchester area. Previously, type 2F has been implicated as the precursor strain that migrated from the Middle East to India and South-East Asia, subsequently evolving to type 1 strains. Thus we show that type 2F had also spread westwards to Britain by the early medieval period. PMID:23638071

  18. Strain Coupling of Conversion-type Fe3O4 Thin Films for Lithium Ion Batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Hwang, Sooyeon; Meng, Qingping; Chen, Ping-Fan; ...

    2017-05-29

    Lithiation/delithiation induces significant stresses and strains into the electrodes for lithium ion batteries, which can severely degrade their cycling performance. Moreover, this electrochemically induced strain can interact with the local strain existing at solid–solid interfaces. It is not clear how this interaction affects the lithiation mechanism. The effect of this coupling on the lithiation kinetics in epitaxial Fe3O4 thin film on a Nb-doped SrTiO3 substrate is investigated. In-situ and ex-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results show that the lithiation is suppressed by the compressive interfacial strain. At the interface between the film and substrate, the existence of LixFe3O4 rock-salt phasemore » during lithiation consequently restrains the film from delamination. 2D phase-field simulation verifies the effect of strain. This work provides critical insights of understanding the solid–solid interfaces of conversion-type electrodes.« less

  19. Type II strained layer superlattice: a potential infrared sensor material for space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L.; Tidrow, M. Z.; Novello, A.; Weichel, H.; Vohra, S.

    2008-02-01

    The Missile Defense Agency's Advanced Technology Office is developing advanced passive electro-optical and infrared sensors for future space-based seekers by exploring new infrared detector materials. A Type II strained layer superlattice, one of the materials under development, has shown great potential for space applications. Theoretical results indicate that strained layer superlattice has the promise to be superior to current infrared sensor materials, such as HgCdTe, quantum well infrared photodetectors, and Si:As. Strained layer superlattice-based infrared detector materials combine the advantages of HgCdTe and quantum well infrared photodetectors. The bandgap of strained layer superlattice can be tuned for strong broadband absorption throughout the short-, mid-, long-, and very long wavelength infrared bands. The electronic band structure can be engineered to suppress Auger recombination noise and reduce the tunneling current. The device structures can be easily stacked for multicolor focal plane arrays. The III-V semiconductor fabrication offers the potential of producing low-defect-density, large-format focal plane arrays with high uniformity and high operability. A current program goal is to extend wavelengths to longer than 14 μm for space applications. This paper discusses the advantages of strained layer superlattice materials and describes efforts to improve the material quality, device design, and device processing.

  20. Modulation of strain-specific differences in gene expression by cannabinoid type 2 receptor deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sophocleous, Antonia; Sims, Andrew H; Idris, Aymen I; Ralston, Stuart H

    2014-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that the skeletal consequences of cannabinoid receptor deficiency differ in different strains of mice. In order to explore the mechanisms responsible, we analysed global gene expression in bone from wild-type CD1 mice and littermates with targeted inactivation of the type 2 cannabinoid receptor (Cnr2 (-/-)) and compared the results with those obtained from a similar analysis of wild-type and Cnr2 (-/-) C57BL/6 mice. Trabecular bone volume was increased in Cnr2 (-/-) CD1 mice compared with wild-type littermates but decreased in Cnr2 (-/-) C57BL/6 mice. Microarray analysis identified 354 genes in which substantial differences in gene expression (>1.5-fold) were observed that were specifically affected by Cnr2 deficiency. Bioinformatic analysis of data from wild-type mice of each strain revealed Cnr2-dependent differences in expression of genes clustering within the gene ontology (GO) terms immune response (p < 0.0001), positive regulation of response to stimulus (p < 0.0001), nucleotide binding (p = 0.002), and ribonucleotide binding (p = 0.003). Bioinformatic analysis of data from Cnr2 (-/-) mice of each strain revealed associations between GO terms corresponding to the extracellular region (p = 0.002), the cell surface (p = 0.02), antigen binding (p = 0.03), external side of plasma membrane (p = 0.04), and regulation of the force of heart contraction (p = 0.04). We conclude that Cnr2 deficiency affects expression of a large number of genes in different strains of mice, and that these differences are likely to be responsible in part for the differences in skeletal phenotype that we and others have observed in mice with defective cannabinoid receptor signalling in different genetic backgrounds.

  1. Multicenter evaluation of arbitrarily primed PCR for typing of Staphylococcus aureus strains.

    PubMed Central

    van Belkum, A; Kluytmans, J; van Leeuwen, W; Bax, R; Quint, W; Peters, E; Fluit, A; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C; van den Brule, A; Koeleman, H

    1995-01-01

    Fifty-nine isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and a single strain of Staphylococcus intermedius were typed by arbitrarily primed PCR (AP-PCR). To study reproducibility and discriminatory abilities, AP-PCR was carried out in seven laboratories with a standardized amplification protocol, template DNA isolated in a single institution, and a common set of three primers with different resolving powers. The 60 strains could be divided into 16 to 30 different genetic types, depending on the laboratory. This difference in resolution was due to differences in technical procedures (as shown by the deliberate introduction of experimental variables) and/or the interpretation of the DNA fingerprints. However, this did not hamper the epidemiologically correct clustering of related strains. The average number of different genotypes identified exceeded those of the more traditional typing strategies (F. C. Tenover, R. Arbeit, G. Archer, J. Biddle, S. Byrne, R. Goering, G. Hancock, G. A. Hebert, B. Hill, R. Hollis, W. R. Jarvis, B. Kreiswirth, W. Eisner, J. Maslow, L. K. McDougal, J. M. Miller, M. Mulligan, and M. A. Pfaller, J. Clin. Microbiol. 32:407-415, 1994). Comparison of AP-PCR with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) indicated the existence of strains with constant PFGE types but variable AP-PCR types. The reverse (constant AP-PCR and variable PFGE patterns) was also observed. This indicates additional resolution for combined analyses. It is concluded that AP-PCR is well suited for genetic analysis and monitoring of nosocomial spreading of staphylococci. The interlaboratory reproducibility of DNA-banding patterns and the intralaboratory standardization need improvement. PMID:7650182

  2. Multicenter evaluation of arbitrarily primed PCR for typing of Staphylococcus aureus strains.

    PubMed

    van Belkum, A; Kluytmans, J; van Leeuwen, W; Bax, R; Quint, W; Peters, E; Fluit, A; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C; van den Brule, A; Koeleman, H

    1995-06-01

    Fifty-nine isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and a single strain of Staphylococcus intermedius were typed by arbitrarily primed PCR (AP-PCR). To study reproducibility and discriminatory abilities, AP-PCR was carried out in seven laboratories with a standardized amplification protocol, template DNA isolated in a single institution, and a common set of three primers with different resolving powers. The 60 strains could be divided into 16 to 30 different genetic types, depending on the laboratory. This difference in resolution was due to differences in technical procedures (as shown by the deliberate introduction of experimental variables) and/or the interpretation of the DNA fingerprints. However, this did not hamper the epidemiologically correct clustering of related strains. The average number of different genotypes identified exceeded those of the more traditional typing strategies (F. C. Tenover, R. Arbeit, G. Archer, J. Biddle, S. Byrne, R. Goering, G. Hancock, G. A. Hebert, B. Hill, R. Hollis, W. R. Jarvis, B. Kreiswirth, W. Eisner, J. Maslow, L. K. McDougal, J. M. Miller, M. Mulligan, and M. A. Pfaller, J. Clin. Microbiol. 32:407-415, 1994). Comparison of AP-PCR with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) indicated the existence of strains with constant PFGE types but variable AP-PCR types. The reverse (constant AP-PCR and variable PFGE patterns) was also observed. This indicates additional resolution for combined analyses. It is concluded that AP-PCR is well suited for genetic analysis and monitoring of nosocomial spreading of staphylococci. The interlaboratory reproducibility of DNA-banding patterns and the intralaboratory standardization need improvement.

  3. Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: The one thousand microbial genomes (KMG-I) project

    PubMed Central

    Woyke, Tanja; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Garrity, George; Lilburn, Timothy G.; Beck, Brian J.; Whitman, William B.; Hugenholtz, Phil; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    The Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea (GEBA) project was launched by the JGI in 2007 as a pilot project with the objective of sequencing 250 bacterial and archaeal genomes. The two major goals of that project were (a) to test the hypothesis that there are many benefits to the use the phylogenetic diversity of organisms in the tree of life as a primary criterion for generating their genome sequence and (b) to develop the necessary framework, technology and organization for large-scale sequencing of microbial isolate genomes. While the GEBA pilot project has not yet been entirely completed, both of the original goals have already been successfully accomplished, leading the way for the next phase of the project. Here we propose taking the GEBA project to the next level, by generating high quality draft genomes for 1,000 bacterial and archaeal strains. This represents a combined 16-fold increase in both scale and speed as compared to the GEBA pilot project (250 isolate genomes in 4+ years). We will follow a similar approach for organism selection and sequencing prioritization as was done for the GEBA pilot project (i.e. phylogenetic novelty, availability and growth of cultures of type strains and DNA extraction capability), focusing on type strains as this ensures reproducibility of our results and provides the strongest linkage between genome sequences and other knowledge about each strain. In turn, this project will constitute a pilot phase of a larger effort that will target the genome sequences of all available type strains of the Bacteria and Archaea. PMID:25197443

  4. Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: The one thousand microbial genomes (KMG-I) project.

    PubMed

    Kyrpides, Nikos C; Woyke, Tanja; Eisen, Jonathan A; Garrity, George; Lilburn, Timothy G; Beck, Brian J; Whitman, William B; Hugenholtz, Phil; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2014-06-15

    The Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea (GEBA) project was launched by the JGI in 2007 as a pilot project with the objective of sequencing 250 bacterial and archaeal genomes. The two major goals of that project were (a) to test the hypothesis that there are many benefits to the use the phylogenetic diversity of organisms in the tree of life as a primary criterion for generating their genome sequence and (b) to develop the necessary framework, technology and organization for large-scale sequencing of microbial isolate genomes. While the GEBA pilot project has not yet been entirely completed, both of the original goals have already been successfully accomplished, leading the way for the next phase of the project. Here we propose taking the GEBA project to the next level, by generating high quality draft genomes for 1,000 bacterial and archaeal strains. This represents a combined 16-fold increase in both scale and speed as compared to the GEBA pilot project (250 isolate genomes in 4+ years). We will follow a similar approach for organism selection and sequencing prioritization as was done for the GEBA pilot project (i.e. phylogenetic novelty, availability and growth of cultures of type strains and DNA extraction capability), focusing on type strains as this ensures reproducibility of our results and provides the strongest linkage between genome sequences and other knowledge about each strain. In turn, this project will constitute a pilot phase of a larger effort that will target the genome sequences of all available type strains of the Bacteria and Archaea.

  5. Multi Locus Sequence Typing scheme for Acidithiobacillus caldus strain evaluation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Nuñez, Harold; Loyola, David; Cárdenas, Juan Pablo; Holmes, David S; Johnson, D Barrie; Quatrini, Raquel

    2014-11-01

    Phenotypic, metabolic and genetic properties of several Acidithiobacillus caldus strains indicate the existence of as yet undefined levels of variation within the species. Inspite of this, intraspecies genetic diversity has not yet been explored in detail. In this study, the design and implementation of a Multi Locus Sequence Typing (MLST) scheme for At. caldus is described. This represents the first MLST-based study applied to industrial isolates of the species. Seven informative and discriminant MLST markers were selected using a sequence-driven approach and a custom-designed bioinformatic pipeline. The allelic profiles of thirteen At. caldus strains from diverse geographical origins and industrial settings were derived using this scheme. MLST-based population structure analysis indicated only moderate amounts of genetic diversity within the set of strains, further supporting their current assignment to a single species. Also, no clear evidence for geographical isolation could be derived from this study. However, the prevalence of sequence type 1 in heap leaching industrial settings support the view that bioprocess conditions and dynamics may have a strong influence on At. caldus (microbial) microdiversity patterns. The MLST scheme presented herein is a valuable tool for the identification and classification of strains of At. caldus for either ecological or evolutionary studies and possibly also for industrial monitoring purposes. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  6. Filamentous sulfur bacteria of activated sludge: characterization of Thiothrix, Beggiatoa, and Eikelboom type 021N strains.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, T M; Unz, R F

    1985-01-01

    Seventeen strains of filamentous sulfur bacteria were isolated in axenic culture from activated sludge mixed liquor samples and sulfide-gradient enrichment cultures. Isolation procedures involved plating a concentrated inoculum of washed filaments onto media containing sulfide or thiosulfate. The isolates were identified as Thiothrix spp., Beggiatoa spp., and an organism of uncertain taxonomic status, designated type 021N. All bacteria were gram negative, reduced nitrate, and formed long, multicellular trichomes with internal reserves of sulfur, volutin, and sudanophilic material. Thiothrix spp. formed rosettes and gonidia, and four of six strains were ensheathed. Type 021N organisms utilized glucose, lacked a sheath, and differed from Thiothrix spp. in several aspects of cellular and cultural morphology. Beggiatoa spp. lacked catalase and oxidase, and filaments were motile. Biochemical and physiological characterization of the isolates revealed important distinguishing features between the three groups of bacteria. Strain differences were most evident among the Thiothrix cultures. A comparison of the filamentous sulfur bacteria with freshwater strains of Leucothrix was made also. Images PMID:4004221

  7. Diphtheria in the Republic of Georgia: Use of Molecular Typing Techniques for Characterization of Corynebacterium diphtheriae Strains

    PubMed Central

    Sulakvelidze, Alexander; Kekelidze, Merab; Gomelauri, Tsaro; Deng, Yingkang; Khetsuriani, Nino; Kobaidze, Ketino; De Zoysa, Aruni; Efstratiou, Androulla; Morris, J. Glenn; Imnadze, Paata

    1999-01-01

    Sixty-six Corynebacterium diphtheriae strains (62 of the gravis biotype and 4 of the mitis biotype) isolated during the Georgian diphtheria epidemic of 1993 to 1998 and 13 non-Georgian C. diphtheriae strains (10 Russian and 3 reference isolates) were characterized by (i) biotyping, (ii) toxigenicity testing with the Elek assay and PCR, (iii) the randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique, and (iv) pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Fifteen selected strains were ribotyped. Six RAPD types and 15 PFGE patterns were identified among all strains examined, and 12 ribotypes were found among the 15 strains that were ribotyped. The Georgian epidemic apparently was caused by one major clonal group of C. diphtheriae (PFGE type A, ribotype R1), which was identical to the predominant epidemic strain(s) isolated during the concurrent diphtheria epidemic in Russia. A dendrogram based on the PFGE patterns revealed profound differences between the minor (nonpredominant) epidemic strains found in Georgia and Russia. The methodologies for RAPD typing, ribotyping, and PFGE typing of C. diphtheriae strains were improved to enable rapid and convenient molecular typing of the strains. The RAPD technique was adequate for biotype differentiation; however, PFGE and ribotyping were better (and equal to each other) at discriminating between epidemiologically related and unrelated isolates. PMID:10488190

  8. Helicobacter pylori with East Asian-type cagPAI genes is more virulent than strains with Western-type in some cagPAI genes.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiao-Yan; Yan, Jin-Jun; Yang, Ya-Chao; Wu, Chun-Mei; Hu, Yan; Geng, Jian-Li

    The severity of Helicobacter pylori-related disease is correlated with the presence and integrity of a cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI). cagPAI genotype may have a modifying effect on the pathogenic potential of the infecting strain. After analyzing the sequences of cagPAI genes, some strains with the East Asian-type cagPAI genes were selected for further analysis to examine the association between the diversity of the cagPAI genes and the virulence of H. pylori. The results showed that gastric mucosal inflammatory cell infiltration was significantly higher in patients with East Asian-type cagPAI genes H. pylori strain compared with mosaicism cagPAI genes H. pylori strain (p<0.05). H. pylori strains with the East Asian-type cagPAI genes were closely associated with IL-8 secretion in vitro and in vivo compared with H. pylori strains with the mosaicism cagPAI genes (p<0.01). H. pylori strains with East Asian-type cagPAI genes are able to strongly translocate CagA to host cells. These results suggest that H. pylori strains with East Asian-type cagPAI genes are more virulent than the strains of cagPAI gene/genes that are Western type. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Rabbit heart cell culture, strain RHF-1. II. Behavior of adenovirus types 1 to 4.

    PubMed

    ANKUDAS, M M; KHOOBYARIAN, N

    1962-12-01

    Ankudas, Milda M. (University of Illinois, Chicago) and Newton Khoobyarian. Rabbit heart cell cultures, strain RHF-1. II. Behavior of adenovirus types 1 to 4. J. Bacteriol. 84:1287-1291. 1962.-In general, the findings indicate that adsorption to RHF-1 cells of adenovirus types 1, 2, and 4, but not type 3, precedes the events leading toward virus multiplication. Adenovirus type 3 attained maximal adsorption (90%) in 2 hr, with no evidence of virus multiplication. Under optimal conditions in the present experiments, the type 1 virus appeared to be released from the infected cells at a much slower rate than types 2 and 4. No correlation seemed to exist between the extent of cytopathic changes produced by type 1 in RHF-1 cells and the rise in virus infectivity during the logarithmic phase. On the other hand, the progression of cytopathic effect of type 2- and type 4-infected cells appeared to be a direct result of virus propagation. Further-more, the relative yield of virus per host cell, though small in quantity, was more or less similar for all three types. Histopathologically, no marked difference among the cells infected with types 1, 2, and 4 was clearly evident. Upon serial subculturing of these viruses in RHF-1 cells, a concomitant decrease in infectious virus, as well as complement-fixing antigen titers at each passage level, was also noted.

  10. Use of variations in staphylococcal interspersed repeat units for molecular typing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Katherine J; Oppenheim, Beryl A; Gossain, Savita; Gao, Fang; Hawkey, Peter M

    2006-01-01

    Staphylococcal interspersed repeat unit typing has previously been shown to have the ability to discriminate between epidemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains in the United Kingdom. The current study illustrates its ability to distinguish between strains within an endemic setting thereby providing a rapid transportable typing method for the identification of transmission events.

  11. Complete genome sequence of Hippea maritima type strain (MH2T)

    SciTech Connect

    Huntemann, Marcel; Lu, Megan; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Jeffries, Cynthia; Detter, J. Chris; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Mavromatis, K

    2011-01-01

    Hippea maritima (Miroshnichenko et al. 1999) is the type species of the genus Hippea, which belongs to the family Desulfurellaceae within the class Deltaproteobacteria. The anaerobic, moderately thermophilic marine sulfur-reducer was first isolated from shallow-water hot vents in Matipur Harbor, Papua New Guinea. H. maritima was of interest for genome se- quencing because of its isolated phylogenetic location, as a distant next neighbor of the ge- nus Desulfurella. Strain MH2T is the first type strain from the order Desulfurellales with a com- pletely sequenced genome. The 1,694,430 bp long linear genome with its 1,723 protein- coding and 57 RNA genes consists of one circular chromosome and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  12. Novel BOX repeat PCR assay for high-resolution typing of Streptococcus pneumoniae strains.

    PubMed Central

    van Belkum, A; Sluijuter, M; de Groot, R; Verbrugh, H; Hermans, P W

    1996-01-01

    Typing data obtained by specifically targeting a single, high-stringency PCR at the pneumococcal BOX repeat element for 28 strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae completely corroborated the resolutions attained by five genotypic procedures as described by Hermans et al. (P.W.M. Hermans, M. Sluijter, T. Hoogenboezem, H. Heersma, A. van Belkum, and R. de Groot, J. Clin. Microbiol. 33:1606-1612, 1995). All pairs of strains, except one, derived from both the cerebrospinal fluid and blood of the same individual were shown to be identical. Moreover, other, epidemiologically unrelated isolates were demonstrated to be unique. Considering the combined data from the five typing techniques applied previously as the "gold standard," the single BOX PCR test demonstrated excellent resolving powers while maintaining epidemiological linkage. PMID:8727898

  13. Complete genome sequence of the thermophilic sulfur-reducer Hippea maritima type strain (MH(2)).

    PubMed

    Huntemann, Marcel; Lu, Megan; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Ovchinikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Detter, John C; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Göker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Mavromatis, Konstantinos

    2011-07-01

    Hippea maritima (Miroshnichenko et al. 1999) is the type species of the genus Hippea, which belongs to the family Desulfurellaceae within the class Deltaproteobacteria. The anaerobic, moderately thermophilic marine sulfur-reducer was first isolated from shallow-water hot vents in Matipur Harbor, Papua New Guinea. H. maritima was of interest for genome sequencing because of its isolated phylogenetic location, as a distant next neighbor of the genus Desulfurella. Strain MH(2) (T) is the first type strain from the order Desulfurellales with a completely sequenced genome. The 1,694,430 bp long linear genome with its 1,723 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes consists of one circular chromosome and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  14. Differentiation of Proteus mirabilis and Proteus vulgaris strains by means of proticine typing: a longitudinal epidemiological study.

    PubMed

    Sekaninová, G; Kolárová, M

    1996-05-01

    In the years 1979, 1980, 1982-83, 1986-87 and 1992-93, 673 strains of P. mirabilis and 25 strains of P. vulgaris were isolated from the urinary tracts of patients at a Teaching Hospital in Brno. In 1982-83 and 1992-93, strains of P. mirabilis and P. vulgaris were isolated from the urine and faeces of two groups of Brno population and used as controls. Using the P/S typing method, 94.7% of hospital isolates and 85.5% of control strains could be differentiated by their types. The strains that could not be typed (8.2%) were classified as PO/SO or N types; in the remaining strains, 182 various P/S types could be distinguished. The strains that could not be typed occurred more frequently in control groups (48 out of 337) than in hospital isolates (37 out of 698). Over the whole period, P5/S6, S7, S9 and P1/S2, S11 were the prevailing P/S types of hospital isolates and were placed, together with related types, in groups P5 and P1, respectively. In 1982-83, a significant shift (p < 0.01) from the initially prevailing P5/S6, S7, S9 type to the P1/S2, S11 type of P. mirabilis was recorded. Approximately one third of the hospital isolates in all the periods examined was found to be sporadic, with the exception of 1992-93 when the sporadic strains doubled in frequency (p < 0.01). In control strains, the frequency of sporadic types was twice that of the hospital isolates (p < 0.01) in 1982-83 and, 1992-93, it was equal to the frequency of hospital isolates. This implied a fall in the presence of hospital-acquired strains in the last period of study.

  15. Genome Sequence of Youngiibacter fragilis, the Type Strain of the Genus Youngiibacter.

    PubMed

    Wawrik, Colin B; Callaghan, Amy V; Stamps, Blake W; Wawrik, Boris

    2014-01-23

    The genome of Youngiibacter fragilis, the type strain of the newly described genus Youngiibacter, was sequenced. The genome consists of 3.996 Mb, with a G+C content of 46.6 mol%. Y. fragilis originates from coal-bed methane-produced water and may provide insight into the microbiological basis of biogas production in coal beds.

  16. Differentiation of the gene clusters encoding botulinum neurotoxin type A complexes in Clostridium botulinum type A, Ab, and A(B) strains.

    PubMed

    Franciosa, Giovanna; Floridi, Francesca; Maugliani, Antonella; Aureli, Paolo

    2004-12-01

    We describe a strategy to identify the clusters of genes encoding components of the botulinum toxin type A (boNT/A) complexes in 57 strains of Clostridium botulinum types A, Ab, and A(B) isolated in Italy and in the United States from different sources. Specifically, we combined the results of PCR for detecting the ha33 and/or p47 genes with those of boNT/A PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Three different type A toxin gene clusters were revealed; type A1 was predominant among the strains from the United States, whereas type A2 predominated among the Italian strains, suggesting a geographic distinction between strains. By contrast, no relationship between the toxin gene clusters and the clinical or food source of strains was evident. In two C. botulinum type A isolates from the United States, we recognized a third type A toxin gene cluster (designated type A3) which was similar to that previously described only for C. botulinum type A(B) and Ab strains. Total genomic DNA from the strains was subjected to pulsed-filed gel electrophoresis and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analyses, and the results were consistent with the boNT/A gene clusters obtained.

  17. Differentiation of the Gene Clusters Encoding Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A Complexes in Clostridium botulinum Type A, Ab, and A(B) Strains

    PubMed Central

    Franciosa, Giovanna; Floridi, Francesca; Maugliani, Antonella; Aureli, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    We describe a strategy to identify the clusters of genes encoding components of the botulinum toxin type A (boNT/A) complexes in 57 strains of Clostridium botulinum types A, Ab, and A(B) isolated in Italy and in the United States from different sources. Specifically, we combined the results of PCR for detecting the ha33 and/or p47 genes with those of boNT/A PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Three different type A toxin gene clusters were revealed; type A1 was predominant among the strains from the United States, whereas type A2 predominated among the Italian strains, suggesting a geographic distinction between strains. By contrast, no relationship between the toxin gene clusters and the clinical or food source of strains was evident. In two C. botulinum type A isolates from the United States, we recognized a third type A toxin gene cluster (designated type A3) which was similar to that previously described only for C. botulinum type A(B) and Ab strains. Total genomic DNA from the strains was subjected to pulsed-filed gel electrophoresis and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analyses, and the results were consistent with the boNT/A gene clusters obtained. PMID:15574917

  18. Strain typing of Zygosaccharomyces yeast species using a single molecular method based on polymorphism of the intergenic spacer region (IGS).

    PubMed

    Wrent, Petra; Rivas, Eva-María; Peinado, José M; de Silóniz, María-Isabel

    2010-08-15

    Unlike previously reported methods that need a combination of several typing techniques, we have developed a single method for strain typing of the Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Z. mellis and Z. rouxii spoilage species. Strains belonging to other species have also been included for comparison. We have demonstrated that the IGS-PCR RFLP method has a high discriminative power. Considering the three endonucleases used in this work, we have obtained a variability of 100% for Z. mellis and Z. rouxii strains and up to 70% for Z. bailii. We have also detected two misidentified Z. mellis strains (CBS 711 and CBS 7412) which have RFLP patterns with a set of bands characteristic of Z. rouxii strains. Sequencing of 26S rDNA D1/D2 domains and the 5.8-ITS rDNA region confirmed these strains as Z. rouxii. The method also groups three certified hybrid strains of Zygosaccharomyces in a separate cluster.

  19. Mouse model of Sanfilippo syndrome type B: relation of phenotypic features to background strain.

    PubMed

    Gografe, Sylvia I; Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana; Willing, Alison E; Haas, Ken; Chamizo, Wilfredo; Sanberg, Paul R

    2003-12-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome type B or mucopolysaccharidosis type III B (MPS IIIB) is a lysosomal storage disorder that is inherited in autosomal recessive manner. It is characterized by systemic heparan sulfate accumulation in lysosomes due to deficiency of the enzyme alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase (Naglu). Devastating clinical abnormalities with severe central nervous system involvement and somatic disease lead to premature death. A mouse model of Sanfilippo syndrome type B was created by targeted disruption of the gene encoding Naglu, providing a powerful tool for understanding pathogenesis and developing novel therapeutic strategies. However, the JAX GEMM Strain B6.129S6-Naglutm1Efn mouse, although showing biochemical similarities to humans with Sanfilippo syndrome, exhibits aging and behavioral differences. We observed idiosyncrasies, such as skeletal dysmorphism, hydrocephalus, ocular abnormalities, organomegaly, growth retardation, and anomalies of the integument, in our breeding colony of Naglu mutant mice and determined that several of them were at least partially related to the background strain C57BL/6. These background strain abnormalities, therefore, potentially mimic or overlap signs of the induced syndrome in our mice. Our observations may prove useful in studies of Naglu mutant mice. The necessity for distinguishing background anomalies from signs of the modeled disease is apparent.

  20. Molecular Epidemiology of Adenovirus Type 21 Respiratory Strains Isolated From US Military Trainees (1996-2014).

    PubMed

    Kajon, Adriana E; Hang, Jun; Hawksworth, Anthony; Metzgar, David; Hage, Elias; Hansen, Christian J; Kuschner, Robert A; Blair, Patrick; Russell, Kevin L; Jarman, Richard G

    2015-09-15

    The circulation of human adenovirus type 21 (HAdV21) in the United States has been documented since the 1960s in association with outbreaks of febrile respiratory illness (FRI) in military boot camps and civilian cases of respiratory disease. To describe the molecular epidemiology of HAdV21 respiratory infections across the country, 150 clinical respiratory isolates obtained from continuous surveillance of military recruit FRI, and 23 respiratory isolates recovered from pediatric and adult civilian cases of acute respiratory infection were characterized to compile molecular typing data spanning 37 years (1978-2014). Restriction enzyme analysis and genomic sequencing identified 2 clusters of closely related genomic variants readily distinguishable from the prototype and designated 21a-like and 21b-like. A-like variants predominated until 1999. A shift to b-like variants was noticeable by 2007 after a 7-year period (2000-2006) of cocirculation of the 2 genome types. US strains are phylogenetically more closely related to European and Asian strains isolated over the last 4 decades than to the Saudi Arabian prototype strain AV-1645 isolated in 1956. Knowledge of circulating HAdV21 variants and their epidemic behavior will be of significant value to local and global FRI surveillance efforts. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Phylogeny and Identification of Pantoea Species and Typing of Pantoea agglomerans Strains by Multilocus Gene Sequencing ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Delétoile, Alexis; Decré, Dominique; Courant, Stéphanie; Passet, Virginie; Audo, Jennifer; Grimont, Patrick; Arlet, Guillaume; Brisse, Sylvain

    2009-01-01

    Pantoea agglomerans and other Pantoea species cause infections in humans and are also pathogenic to plants, but the diversity of Pantoea strains and their possible association with hosts and disease remain poorly known, and identification of Pantoea species is difficult. We characterized 36 Pantoea strains, including 28 strains of diverse origins initially identified as P. agglomerans, by multilocus gene sequencing based on six protein-coding genes, by biochemical tests, and by antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Phylogenetic analysis and comparison with other species of Enterobacteriaceae revealed that the genus Pantoea is highly diverse. Most strains initially identified as P. agglomerans by use of API 20E strips belonged to a compact sequence cluster together with the type strain, but other strains belonged to diverse phylogenetic branches corresponding to other species of Pantoea or Enterobacteriaceae and to probable novel species. Biochemical characteristics such as fosfomycin resistance and utilization of d-tartrate could differentiate P. agglomerans from other Pantoea species. All 20 strains of P. agglomerans could be distinguished by multilocus sequence typing, revealing the very high discrimination power of this method for strain typing and population structure in this species, which is subdivided into two phylogenetic groups. PCR detection of the repA gene, associated with pathogenicity in plants, was positive in all clinical strains of P. agglomerans, suggesting that clinical and plant-associated strains do not form distinct populations. We provide a multilocus gene sequencing method that is a powerful tool for Pantoea species delineation and identification and for strain tracking. PMID:19052179

  2. Rapid identification of drug-type strains in Cannabis sativa using loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Masashi; Aragane, Masako; Nakamura, Kou; Watanabe, Kazuhito; Sasaki, Yohei

    2017-01-01

    In Cannabis sativa L., tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the primary psychoactive compound and exists as the carboxylated form, tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA). C. sativa is divided into two strains based on THCA content-THCA-rich (drug-type) strains and THCA-poor (fiber-type) strains. Both strains are prohibited by law in many countries including Japan, whereas the drug-type strains are regulated in Canada and some European countries. As the two strains cannot be discriminated by morphological analysis, a simple method for identifying the drug-type strains is required for quality control in legal cultivation and forensic investigation. We have developed a novel loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay for identifying the drug-type strains of C. sativa. We designed two selective LAMP primer sets for on-site or laboratory use, which target the drug-type THCA synthase gene. The LAMP assay was accomplished within approximately 40 min. The assay showed high specificity for the drug-type strains and its sensitivity was the same as or higher than that of conventional polymerase chain reaction. We also showed the effectiveness of melting curve analysis that was conducted after the LAMP assay. The melting temperature values of the drug-type strains corresponded to those of the cloned drug-type THCA synthase gene, and were clearly different from those of the cloned fiber-type THCA synthase gene. Moreover, the LAMP assay with simple sample preparation could be accomplished within 1 h from sample treatment to identification without the need for special devices or techniques. Our rapid, sensitive, specific, and simple assay is expected to be applicable to laboratory and on-site detection.

  3. Genome sequence of the Antarctic rhodopsins- containing flavobacterium Gillisia limnaea type strain (R- 8282T)

    SciTech Connect

    Riedel, Thomas; Held, Brittany; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Tice, Hope; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Mavromatis, K; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Rohde, Manfred; Tindall, Brian; Detter, J. Chris; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Gillisia limnaea Van Trappen et al. 2004 is the type species of the genus Gillisia, which is a mem- ber of the well characterized family Flavobacteriaceae. The genome of G. limnea R-8282T is the first sequenced genome (permanent draft) from a type strain of the genus Gillisia. Here we de- scribe the features of this organism, together with the permanent-draft genome sequence and an- notation. The 3,966,857 bp long chromosome (two scaffolds) with its 3,569 protein-coding and 51 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  4. Complete genome sequence of Thermosphaera aggregans type strain (M11TLT)

    SciTech Connect

    Spring, Stefan; Rachel, Dr. Reinhard; Lapidus, Alla L.; Davenport, Karen W.; Tice, Hope; Copeland, A; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Heimerl, Dr. Thomas; Weikl, Fabian; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Thermosphaera aggregans Huber et al. 1998 is the type species of the genus Thermosphaera, which comprises at the time of writing only one species. This species represents archaea with a hyperthermophilic, heterotrophic, strictly anaerobic and fermentative phenotype. The type strain M11TLT was isolated from a water-sediment sample of a hot terrestrial spring (Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming). Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 1,316,595 bp long single replicon genome with its 1,410 protein-coding and 47 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  5. Complete genome sequence of Streptosporangium roseum type strain (NI 9100T)

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, Matt; Sikorski, Johannes; Jando, Marlen; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, Sam; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Chertkov, Olga; Sims, David; Meincke, Linda; Brettin, Thomas S; Han, Cliff; Detter, J. Chris; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Streptosporangium roseum Crauch 1955 is the type strain of the species which is the type species of the genus Streptosporangium. The pinkish coiled Streptomyces-like organism with a spore case was isolated from vegetable garden soil in 1955. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the family Streptosporangiaceae, and the second largest microbial genome sequence ever deciphered. The 10,369,518 bp long genome with its 9421 protein-coding and 80 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  6. Comparison of activity to stimulate mucosal IgA production between Leuconostoc mesenteroides strain NTM048 and type strain JCM6124 in mice

    PubMed Central

    MATSUZAKI, Chiaki; MATSUMOTO, Kenji; KATOH, Toshihiko; YAMAMOTO, Kenji; HISA, Keiko

    2015-01-01

    The effects of Leuconostoc mesenteroides strain NTM048 and type strain JCM6124T on the murine immune system were characterized. Although the bacterial cells and exopolysaccharides of each strain induced immunoglobulin A production in Peyer’s patch cells, the effects of NTM048 were more potent than those of JCM6124T. Oral administration of the cells of each strain increased the fecal immunoglobulin A content in NTM048-treated mice, but not in JCM6124T-treated mice. A flow cytometric analysis showed that the CD4+ T-cell populations in the mouse spleens tended to increase in the NTM048 group. These results suggest that immunomodulating ability is characteristic of strain NTM048. PMID:26858930

  7. Highly strained Esaki tunnel diodes on InP substrate with type-III band alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karl, S.; Sprengel, S.; Amann, M.-C.

    2016-12-01

    The first of a kind InP-based Esaki tunnel diodes with type-III (broken gap) band alignment are presented. This type is expected to have the highest tunneling current densities at equal doping concentration and structure geometry, compared to homo-, type-I or type-II junctions. The broken gap alignment is achieved by highly strained n-Ga0.2In0.8As/p-GaAs0.2Sb0.8 junction layers. Samples were fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy, the junction doping was varied between 2 × 1018 cm-3 and 2 × 1019 cm-3. Peak current densities up to 34.0 kA cm-2, for a doping of 2 × 1019 cm-3, are reached. The peak tunneling current shows a low dependence on the doping level for the type-III aligned junction layers. For example, highly strained diodes with a doping concentration of 2 × 1018 cm-3 can reach peak tunnel current densities of 3.6 A cm-2, whereas, with the lattice-matched junction, one order of magnitude higher doping is required.

  8. Whole Genome Sequencing-Based Molecular Epidemiologic Analysis of Autochthonous Dengue Virus Type 1 Strains Circulating in Japan in 2014.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Shigeru; Nakayama, Eri; Kotaki, Akira; Moi, Meng Ling; Ikeda, Makiko; Yagasaki, Kazumi; Saito, Yuka; Shibasaki, Ken-Ichi; Saijo, Masayuki; Takasaki, Tomohiko

    2017-01-24

    Cases of autochthonous infections of dengue virus type 1 (DENV-1) were detected in Japan after a 70-year period devoid of dengue outbreaks. We previously showed that E gene sequences are identical in 11 of the 12 DENV-1 strains autochthonous to Japan. However, the E sequence represents only 14% of the DENV-1 genome. In the present study, we have sequenced the entire genome of 6 autochthonous DENV-1 strains that were isolated from patients during the 2014 outbreak. Sequencing of 5 Yoyogi group strains with identical E sequences and 1 Shizuoka strain with a different E sequence revealed that the first Yoyogi group strain differed from the Shizuoka strain by 18 amino acid residues. Furthermore, 2 Yoyogi group strains had different genomic sequences while the other 3 had identical genomes. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that the Hyogo strain, a Yoyogi group strain, was the first to diverge from the other 4 Yoyogi group strains. The E gene sequence of the Yoyogi group strains exhibits the highest homology to those of the strains isolated in Malaysia and Singapore between 2013 and 2014. The patient infected with the Hyogo strain visited Malaysia before the onset of dengue fever, suggesting that this was a case of dengue infection imported from Malaysia.

  9. Gender and General Strain Theory: A Comparison of Strains, Mediating, and Moderating Effects Explaining Three Types of Delinquency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Byongook; Morash, Merry

    2017-01-01

    The present study of 659 Korean adolescents tests General Strain Theory's (GST) utility in explaining gender differences in delinquency causation. It models the effects of key strains, negative emotions, and a composite measure of several conditioning factors separately for boys and girls and for delinquency. Consistent with the theory, males and…

  10. Draft genome sequence of type strain HBR26T and description of Rhizobium aethiopicum sp. nov.

    DOE PAGES

    Aserse, Aregu Amsalu; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; ...

    2017-01-26

    Rhizobium aethiopicum sp. nov. is a newly proposed species within the genus Rhizobium. This species includes six rhizobial strains; which were isolated from root nodules of the legume plant Phaseolus vulgaris growing in soils of Ethiopia. The species fixes nitrogen effectively in symbiosis with the host plant P. vulgaris, and is composed of aerobic, Gram-negative staining, rod-shaped bacteria. The genome of type strain HBR26 T of R. aethiopicum sp. nov. was one of the rhizobial genomes sequenced as a part of the DOE JGI 2014 Genomic Encyclopedia project designed for soil and plant-associated and newly described type strains. The genomemore » sequence is arranged in 62 scaffolds and consists of 6,557,588 bp length, with a 61% G + C content and 6221 protein-coding and 86 RNAs genes. The genome of HBR26 T contains repABC genes (plasmid replication genes) homologous to the genes found in five differen t Rhizobium etli CFN42 T plasmids, suggesting that HBR26 T may have five additional replicons other than the chromosome. In the genome of HBR26 T , the nodulation genes nodB, nodC, nodS, nodI, nodJ and nodD are located in the same module, and organized in a similar way as nod genes found in the genome of other known common bean-nodulating rhizobial species. nodA gene is found in a different scaffold, but it is also very similar to nodA genes of other bean-nodulating rhizobial strains. Though HBR26 T is distinct on the phylogenetic tree and based on ANI analysis (the highest value 90.2% ANI with CFN42 T ) from other bean-nodulating species, these nod genes and most nitrogen-fixing genes found in the genome of HBR26 T share high identity with the corresponding genes of known bean-nodulating rhizobial species (96-100% identity). This suggests that symbiotic genes might be shared between bean-nodulating rhizobia through horizontal gene transfer. R. aethiopicum sp. nov. was grouped into the genus Rhizobium but was distinct from all recognized species of that genus by

  11. Possible outcomes of reassortment in vivo between wild type and live attenuated influenza vaccine strains.

    PubMed

    Kiseleva, Irina; Dubrovina, Irina; Bazhenova, Ekaterina; Fedorova, Ekaterina; Larionova, Natalie; Rudenko, Larisa

    2012-12-07

    Reassortment of influenza viruses in nature has been well documented. Genetic reassortment plays a key role in emergence of new influenza A strains, including pandemic viruses. Permissive host can be simultaneously coinfected with multiple influenza viruses. During genetic reassortment gene segments are exchanged between parental viruses that may lead to some enhancement of virulence of reassortant progeny. At present, vaccination with live attenuated cold-adapted (ca) reassortant vaccine (LAIV) is used as an effective public health measure for influenza prophylaxis. However, there are concerns about a potential of simultaneous infection of human host with ca and wild type (wt) influenza viruses which might produce progeny that contain novel, more virulent genotypes. The aim of this study was to investigate potential consequences of reassortment of wt with LAIV strains in vivo. We demonstrated that reassortment of wt viruses with ca strains in guinea pigs have resulted in progeny virus which caused reduced macroscopic lesions of chicken embryos. According to phenotypical data 95% (19 out of 20) isolated reassortants were restricted in replication at elevated temperature of 40°C. None of reassortants were more virulent than wt parents, or revealed significantly higher macroscopic lesions than wt parental viruses. Our results suggest that genetic reassortment between wt and vaccine strain is unlikely to lead to virulent reassortant progeny. These findings provide additional support of LAIV safety data. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Microbiological diagnosis and molecular typing of Legionella strains during an outbreak of legionellosis in Southern Germany.

    PubMed

    Essig, Andreas; von Baum, Heike; Gonser, Theodor; Haerter, Georg; Lück, Christian

    2016-02-01

    An explosive outbreak of Legionnaires' disease with 64 reported cases occurred in Ulm/Neu-Ulm in the South of Germany in December 2009/January 2010 caused by Legionella (L.) pneumophila serogroup 1, monoclonal (mAb) subtype Knoxville, sequence type (ST) 62. Here we present the clinical microbiological results from 51 patients who were diagnosed at the University hospital of Ulm, the results of the environmental investigations and of molecular typing of patients and environmental strains. All 50 patients from whom urine specimens were available were positive for L. pneumophila antigen when an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (EIA) was used following concentration of those urine samples that tested initially negative. The sensitivity of the BinaxNow rapid immunographic assay (ICA), after 15 min reading and after 60 min reading were 70% and 84%, respectively. Direct typing confirmed the monoclonal subtype Knoxville in 5 out of 8 concentrated urine samples. Real time PCR testing of respiratory tract specimens for L. pneumophila was positive in 15 out of 25 (60%) patients. Direct nested sequence based typing (nSBT) in some of these samples allowed partial confirmation of ST62. L. pneumophila serogroup 1, monoclonal subtype Knoxville ST62, defined as the epidemic strain was isolated from 8 out of 31 outbreak patients (26%) and from one cooling tower confirming it as the most likely source of the outbreak. While rapid detection of Legionella antigenuria was crucial for the recognition and management of the outbreak, culture and molecular typing of the strains from patients and environmental specimens was the clue for the rapid identification of the source of infection.

  13. Complete Genome Sequences of the Plant Pathogens Ralstonia solanacearum Type Strain K60 and R. solanacearum Race 3 Biovar 2 Strain UW551.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Madeline M; MacIntyre, April M; Allen, Caitilyn

    2017-10-05

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a globally distributed plant pathogen that causes bacterial wilt diseases of many crop hosts, threatening both sustenance farming and industrial agriculture. Here, we present closed genome sequences for the R. solanacearum type strain, K60, and the cool-tolerant potato brown rot strain R. solanacearum UW551, a highly regulated U.S. select agent pathogen. Copyright © 2017 Hayes et al.

  14. Development and application of a new scheme of phages for typing and differentiating Salmonella strains from different sources.

    PubMed Central

    Castro, D; Morińigo, M A; Martinez-Manzanares, E; Cornax, R; Balebona, M C; Luque, A; Borrego, J J

    1992-01-01

    A set of 25 phages for typing and differentiating Salmonella strains from different origins (food, water, and disease outbreaks) is described. All the strains were typeable by use of the phages, whereas by the serological method more than 5% of the strains could not be classified. By using the phage typing scheme, 75 phage types were established, and all the results were reproducible 1 and 6 months later. Some phages were serotype and serogroup specific, which may be useful in additional tests for the identification of strains of some Salmonella serotypes. In addition, the strains responsible for an outbreak possessed the same phage type, which implies the potential epidemiological use of these phages. PMID:1624557

  15. Multilocus Microsatellite Typing (MLMT) of Strains from Turkey and Cyprus Reveals a Novel Monophyletic L. donovani Sensu Lato Group

    PubMed Central

    Amro, Ahmad; Mentis, Andreas; Pratlong, Francine; Dedet, Jean-Pierre; Votypka, Jan; Volf, Petr; Ozensoy Toz, Seray; Kuhls, Katrin; Schönian, Gabriele; Soteriadou, Ketty

    2012-01-01

    Background New foci of human CL caused by strains of the Leishmania donovani (L. donovani) complex have been recently described in Cyprus and the Çukurova region in Turkey (L. infantum) situated 150 km north of Cyprus. Cypriot strains were typed by Multilocus Enzyme Electrophoresis (MLEE) using the Montpellier (MON) system as L. donovani zymodeme MON-37. However, multilocus microsatellite typing (MLMT) has shown that this zymodeme is paraphyletic; composed of distantly related genetic subgroups of different geographical origin. Consequently the origin of the Cypriot strains remained enigmatic. Methodology/Principal Findings The Cypriot strains were compared with a set of Turkish isolates obtained from a CL patient and sand fly vectors in south-east Turkey (Çukurova region; CUK strains) and from a VL patient in the south-west (Kuşadasi; EP59 strain). These Turkish strains were initially analyzed using the K26-PCR assay that discriminates MON-1 strains by their amplicon size. In line with previous DNA-based data, the strains were inferred to the L. donovani complex and characterized as non MON-1. For these strains MLEE typing revealed two novel zymodemes; L. donovani MON-309 (CUK strains) and MON-308 (EP59). A population genetic analysis of the Turkish isolates was performed using 14 hyper-variable microsatellite loci. The genotypic profiles of 68 previously analyzed L. donovani complex strains from major endemic regions were included for comparison. Population structures were inferred by combination of Bayesian model-based and distance-based approaches. MLMT placed the Turkish and Cypriot strains in a subclade of a newly discovered, genetically distinct L. infantum monophyletic group, suggesting that the Cypriot strains may originate from Turkey. Conclusion The discovery of a genetically distinct L. infantum monophyletic group in the south-eastern Mediterranean stresses the importance of species genetic characterization towards better understanding, monitoring

  16. Novel strain properties distinguishing sporadic prion diseases sharing prion protein genotype and prion type

    PubMed Central

    Cracco, Laura; Notari, Silvio; Cali, Ignazio; Sy, Man-Sun; Chen, Shu G.; Cohen, Mark L.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Appleby, Brian S.; Zou, Wen-Quan; Caughey, Byron; Safar, Jiri G.; Gambetti, Pierluigi

    2017-01-01

    In most human sporadic prion diseases the phenotype is consistently associated with specific pairings of the genotype at codon 129 of the prion protein gene and conformational properties of the scrapie PrP (PrPSc) grossly identified types 1 and 2. This association suggests that the 129 genotype favours the selection of a distinct strain that in turn determines the phenotype. However, this mechanism cannot play a role in the phenotype determination of sporadic fatal insomnia (sFI) and a subtype of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) identified as sCJDMM2, which share 129 MM genotype and PrPSc type 2 but are associated with quite distinct phenotypes. Our detailed comparative study of the PrPSc conformers has revealed major differences between the two diseases, which preferentially involve the PrPSc component that is sensitive to digestion with proteases (senPrPSc) and to a lesser extent the resistant component (resPrPSc). We conclude that these variations are consistent with two distinct strains in sFI and sCJDMM2, and that the rarer sFI is the result of a variant strain selection pathway that might be favoured by a different brain site of initial PrPSc formation in the two diseases. PMID:28091514

  17. Molecular Analysis of Acinetobacter baumannii Strains Isolated in Lebanon Using Four Different Typing Methods

    PubMed Central

    Rafei, Rayane; Dabboussi, Fouad; Hamze, Monzer; Eveillard, Matthieu; Lemarié, Carole; Gaultier, Marie-Pierre; Mallat, Hassan; Moghnieh, Rima; Husni-Samaha, Rola; Joly-Guillou, Marie-Laure; Kempf, Marie

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzed 42 Acinetobacter baumannii strains collected between 2009–2012 from different hospitals in Beyrouth and North Lebanon to better understand the epidemiology and carbapenem resistance mechanisms in our collection and to compare the robustness of pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) and blaOXA-51 sequence-based typing (SBT). Among 31 carbapenem resistant strains, we have detected three carbapenem resistance genes: 28 carried the blaOXA-23 gene, 1 the blaOXA-24 gene and 2 strains the blaOXA-58 gene. This is the first detection of blaOXA-23 and blaOXA-24 in Lebanon. PFGE identified 11 types and was the most discriminating technique followed by rep-PCR (9 types), blaOXA-51 SBT (8 types) and MLST (7 types). The PFGE type A'/ST2 was the dominant genotype in our collection present in Beyrouth and North Lebanon. The clustering agreement between all techniques was measured by adjust Wallace coefficient. An overall agreement has been demonstrated. High values of adjust Wallace coefficient were found with followed combinations: PFGE to predict MLST types  = 100%, PFGE to predict blaOXA-51 SBT = 100%, blaOXA-51 SBT to predict MLST = 100%, MLST to predict blaOXA-51 SBT = 84.7%, rep-PCR to predict MLST = 81.5%, PFGE to predict rep-PCR = 69% and rep-PCR to predict blaOXA-51 SBT = 67.2%. PFGE and MLST are gold standard methods for outbreaks investigation and population structure studies respectively. Otherwise, these two techniques are technically, time and cost demanding. We recommend the use of blaOXA-51 SBT as first typing method to screen isolates and assign them to their corresponding clonal lineages. Repetitive sequence-based PCR is a rapid tool to access outbreaks but careful interpretation of results must be always performed. PMID:25541711

  18. Effects of Megaplasmid Loss on Growth of Neurotoxigenic Clostridium butyricum Strains and Botulinum Neurotoxin Type E Expression

    PubMed Central

    Scalfaro, Concetta; Iacobino, Angelo; Grande, Laura; Morabito, Stefano; Franciosa, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium butyricum strains that atypically produce the botulinum neurotoxin type E (BoNT/E) possess a megaplasmid of unknown functions in their genome. In this study, we cured two botulinum neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains of their megaplasmids, and compared the obtained megaplasmid-cured strains to their respective wild-type parental strains. Our results showed that the megaplasmids do not confer beta-lactam resistance on the neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains, although they carry several putative beta-lactamase genes. Instead, we found that the megaplasmids are essential for growth of the neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains at the relatively low temperature of 15°C, and are also relevant for growth of strains under limiting pH and salinity conditions, as well as under favorable environmental conditions. Moreover, the presence of the megaplasmids was associated with increased transcript levels of the gene encoding BoNT/E in the C. butyricum type E strains, indicating that the megaplasmids likely contain transcriptional regulators. However, the levels of BoNT/E in the supernatants of the cured and uncured strains were similar after 24 and 48 h culture, suggesting that expression of BoNT/E in the C. butyricum type E strains is not ultimately controlled by the megaplasmids. Together, our results reveal that the C. butyricum type E megaplasmids exert pleiotropic effects on the growth of their microbial hosts under optimal and limiting environmental conditions, and also highlight the possibility of original regulatory mechanisms controlling the expression of BoNT/E. PMID:26941734

  19. Effects of Megaplasmid Loss on Growth of Neurotoxigenic Clostridium butyricum Strains and Botulinum Neurotoxin Type E Expression.

    PubMed

    Scalfaro, Concetta; Iacobino, Angelo; Grande, Laura; Morabito, Stefano; Franciosa, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium butyricum strains that atypically produce the botulinum neurotoxin type E (BoNT/E) possess a megaplasmid of unknown functions in their genome. In this study, we cured two botulinum neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains of their megaplasmids, and compared the obtained megaplasmid-cured strains to their respective wild-type parental strains. Our results showed that the megaplasmids do not confer beta-lactam resistance on the neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains, although they carry several putative beta-lactamase genes. Instead, we found that the megaplasmids are essential for growth of the neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains at the relatively low temperature of 15°C, and are also relevant for growth of strains under limiting pH and salinity conditions, as well as under favorable environmental conditions. Moreover, the presence of the megaplasmids was associated with increased transcript levels of the gene encoding BoNT/E in the C. butyricum type E strains, indicating that the megaplasmids likely contain transcriptional regulators. However, the levels of BoNT/E in the supernatants of the cured and uncured strains were similar after 24 and 48 h culture, suggesting that expression of BoNT/E in the C. butyricum type E strains is not ultimately controlled by the megaplasmids. Together, our results reveal that the C. butyricum type E megaplasmids exert pleiotropic effects on the growth of their microbial hosts under optimal and limiting environmental conditions, and also highlight the possibility of original regulatory mechanisms controlling the expression of BoNT/E.

  20. Complete genome sequence of Pedobacter heparinus type strain (HIM 762-3T)

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Cliff; Spring, Stefan; Lapidus, Alla; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Copeland, Alex; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jefferies, Cynthia C.; Saunders, Elizabeth; Chertkov, Olga; Brettin, Thomas; Goker, Markus; Rohde, Manfred; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Detter, John C.

    2009-05-20

    Pedobacter heparinus (Payza and Korn 1956) Steyn et al. 1998 comb. nov. is the type species of the rapidly growing genus Pedobacter within the family Sphingobacteriaceae of the phylum 'Bacteroidetes'. P. heparinus is of interest, because it was the first isolated strain shown to grow with heparin as sole carbon and nitrogen source and because it produces several enzymes involved in the degradation of mucopolysaccharides. All available data about this species are based on a sole strain that was isolated from dry soil. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first report on a complete genome sequence of a member of the genus Pedobacter, and the 5,167,383 bp long single replicon genome with its 4287 protein-coding and 54 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  1. Complete genome sequence of Saccharomonospora viridis type strain (P101T)

    SciTech Connect

    Pati, Amrita; Sikorski, Johannes; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, Sam; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Chertkov, Olga; Brettin, Thomas; Han, Cliff; Detter, John C.; Kuske, Cheryl; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Chain, Patrick; D'haeseleer, Patrik; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Rohde, Manfred; Tindall, Brian J.; Goker, Markus; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides1, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2009-05-20

    Saccharomonospora viridis (Schuurmans et al. 1956) Nonomurea and Ohara 1971 is the type species of the genus Saccharomonospora which belongs to the family Pseudonocardiaceae. S. viridis is of interest because it is a Gram-negative organism classified amongst the usually Gram-positive actinomycetes. Members of the species are frequently found in hot compost and hay, and its spores can cause farmer?s lung disease, bagassosis, and humidifier fever. Strains of the species S. viridis have been found to metabolize the xenobiotic pentachlorophenol (PCP). The strain described in this study has been isolated from peat-bog in Ireland. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the family Pseudonocardiaceae, and the 4,308,349 bp long single replicon genome with its 3906 protein-coding and 64 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  2. Complete genome sequence of Thermobaculum terrenum type strain (YNP1T)

    SciTech Connect

    Kiss, Hajnalka; Cleland, David M; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Lu, Megan; Brettin, Thomas S; Detter, J. Chris; Goker, Markus; Tindall, Brian; Beck, Brian; McDermott, Timothy; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Cheng, Jan-Fang

    2010-01-01

    Thermobaculum terrenum (Botero et al. 2004) is the only species within the proposed genus Thermobaculum . Strain YNP1T represents the only cultivated member of an environmental clone group within the phylum Chloroflexi. Nonconformance to Rule 30(3a) of the Bacteriological Code prevents prevents valid publication of either the species and genus name for this phylogentically isolated bacterium that was cultivated from slightly acidic extreme thermal soil in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming (USA). Depending on its final taxonomic allocation, this is probably the third completed genome sequence of a member of the class Thermomicrobia and the seventh type strain genome from the phylum Cloroflexi. The 3,101,581 bp long genome with its 2,872 protein-coding and 58 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  3. Strain-balanced Si/SiGe type-II superlattices for near-infrared photodetection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Dyan; Richardson, Christopher J. K.

    2014-07-01

    Strain balanced silicon-silicon germanium type-II superlattice p-i-n photodetectors grown on a silicon germanium relaxed buffer layer are shown to exhibit an absorption band that extends beyond 0.7 eV (λ = 1.77 μm) with dark current densities of 27 μA cm-2. Simulations of the absorption edge, which are based on x-ray diffraction characterization, low observed dark current densities, and low dislocation densities, are consistent with fully strained heterostructures. Potential applications for devices made from this heterostructure design could include integrated silicon detectors, or low-noise absorption regions for infrared-extended silicon based avalanche photodiodes.

  4. Complete genome sequence of Stackebrandtia nassauensis type strain (LLR-40K-21T)

    SciTech Connect

    Munk, Christine; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Jando, Marlen; Mayilraj, Shanmugam; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Chen, Feng; Han, Cliff; Detter, J. Chris; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Pitluck, Sam; Goker, Markus; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2009-01-01

    Stackebrandtia nassauensis Labeda and Kroppenstedt (2005) is the type species of the genus Stackebrandtia, and a member of the actinobacterial family Glycomycetaceae. Strackebrandtia currently contains two species, which are differentiated from Glycomyces spp. by cellular fatty acid and menaquinone composition. Strain LLR-40K-21T is Gram-positive, aerobic, and nonmotile, with a branched substrate mycelium and on some media an aerial mycelium. The strain was originally isolated from a soil sample collected from a road side in Nassau, Bahamas. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the actinobacterial suborder Glycomycineae. The 6,841,557 bp long single replicon genome with its 6487 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  5. Complete genome sequence of the gliding, heparinolytic Pedobacter saltans type strain (113T)

    SciTech Connect

    Liolios, Konstantinos; Sikorski, Johannes; Lu, Megan; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, N; Pagani, Ioanna; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Kotsyurbenko, Oleg; Rohde, Manfred; Tindall, Brian; Abt, Birte; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2011-01-01

    Pedobacter saltans Steyn et al. 1998 is one of currently 32 species in the genus Pedobacter within the family Sphingobacteriaceae. The species is of interest for its isolated location in the tree of life. Like other members of the genus P. saltans is heparinolytic. Cells of P. saltans show a peculiar gliding, dancing motility and can be distinguished from other Pedobacter strains by their ability to utilize glycerol and the inability to assimilate D-cellobiose. The ge- nome presented here is only the second completed genome sequence of a type strain from a member of the family Sphingobacteriaceae to be published. The 4,635,236 bp long genome with its 3,854 protein-coding and 67 RNA genes consists of one chromosome, and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  6. Complete genome sequence of Pedobacter heparinus type strain (HIM 762-3T)

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Cliff; Spring, Stefan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Copeland, A; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Chertkov, Olga; Brettin, Tom; Goker, Markus; Rohde, Manfred; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Detter, J. Chris

    2009-01-01

    Pedobacter heparinus (Payza and Korn 1956) Steyn et al. 1998 comb. nov. is the type species of the rapidly growing genus Pedobacter within the family Sphingobacteriaceae of the phy-lum Bacteroidetes . P. heparinus is of interest, because it was the first isolated strain shown to grow with heparin as sole carbon and nitrogen source and because it produces several en-zymes involved in the degradation of mucopolysaccharides. All available data about this species are based on a sole strain that was isolated from dry soil. Here we describe the fea-tures of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first report on a complete genome sequence of a member of the genus Pedobacter, and the 5,167,383 bp long single replicon genome with its 4287 protein-coding and 54 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  7. Complete genome sequence of Stackebrandtia nassauensis type strain (LLR-40K-21T)

    SciTech Connect

    Munk, Chris; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Jando, Marlen; Mayilraj, Shanmugam; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Chen, Feng; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Detter, John C.; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Chain, Patrick; Pitluck, Sam; Göker, Markus; Ovchinikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2009-12-30

    Stackebrandtia nassauensis Labeda and Kroppenstedt (2005) is the type species of the genus Stackebrandtia, and a member of the actinobacterial family Glycomycetaceae. Stackebrandtia currently contains two species, which are differentiated from Glycomyces spp. by cellular fatty acid and menaquinone composition. Strain LLR-40K-21T is Gram-positive, aerobic, and nonmotile, with a branched substrate mycelium and on some media an aerial mycelium. The strain was originally isolated from a soil sample collected from a road side in Nassau, Bahamas. We describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. Lastly, this is the first complete genome sequence of the actinobacterial suborder Glycomycineae. The 6,841,557 bp long single replicon genome with its 6487 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  8. Characterization of exochelins of the Mycobacterium bovis type strain and BCG substrains.

    PubMed

    Gobin, J; Wong, D K; Gibson, B W; Horwitz, M A

    1999-04-01

    Pathogenic mycobacteria must acquire iron in the host in order to multiply and cause disease. To do so, they release abundant quantities of siderophores called exochelins, which have the capacity to scavenge iron from host iron-binding proteins and deliver it to the mycobacteria. In this study, we have characterized the exochelins of Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of bovine and occasionally of human tuberculosis, and the highly attenuated descendant of M. bovis, bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), widely used as a vaccine against human tuberculosis. The M. bovis type strain, five substrains of M. bovis BCG (Copenhagen, Glaxo, Japanese, Pasteur, and Tice), and two strains of virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis all produce the same set of exochelins, although the relative amounts of individual exochelins may differ. Among these mycobacteria, the total amount of exochelins produced is greatest in M. tuberculosis, intermediate in M. bovis, and smallest in M. bovis BCG.

  9. Complete genome sequence of Pedobacter heparinus type strain (HIM 762-3T)

    PubMed Central

    Han, Cliff; Spring, Stefan; Lapidus, Alla; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Tice, Hope; Copeland, Alex; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia C.; Saunders, Elizabeth; Chertkov, Olga; Brettin, Thomas; Göker, Markus; Rohde, Manfred; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Detter, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Pedobacter heparinus (Payza and Korn 1956) Steyn et al. 1998 comb. nov. is the type species of the rapidly growing genus Pedobacter within the family Sphingobacteriaceae of the phylum ‘Bacteroidetes’. P. heparinus is of interest, because it was the first isolated strain shown to grow with heparin as sole carbon and nitrogen source and because it produces several enzymes involved in the degradation of mucopolysaccharides. All available data about this species are based on a sole strain that was isolated from dry soil. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first report on a complete genome sequence of a member of the genus Pedobacter, and the 5,167,383 bp long single replicon genome with its 4287 protein-coding and 54 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304637

  10. Strain-balanced Si/SiGe type-II superlattices for near-infrared photodetection

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Dyan; Richardson, Christopher J. K.

    2014-07-21

    Strain balanced silicon-silicon germanium type-II superlattice p-i-n photodetectors grown on a silicon germanium relaxed buffer layer are shown to exhibit an absorption band that extends beyond 0.7 eV (λ = 1.77 μm) with dark current densities of 27 μA cm{sup −2}. Simulations of the absorption edge, which are based on x-ray diffraction characterization, low observed dark current densities, and low dislocation densities, are consistent with fully strained heterostructures. Potential applications for devices made from this heterostructure design could include integrated silicon detectors, or low-noise absorption regions for infrared-extended silicon based avalanche photodiodes.

  11. Complete genome sequence of the gliding, heparinolytic Pedobacter saltans type strain (113T)

    PubMed Central

    Liolios, Konstantinos; Sikorski, Johannes; Lu, Meagan; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, Natalia; Pagani, Ioanna; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Kotsyurbenko, Oleg; Rohde, Manfred; Tindall, Brian J.; Abt, Birte; Göker, Markus; Detter, John C.; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2011-01-01

    Pedobacter saltans Steyn et al. 1998 is one of currently 32 species in the genus Pedobacter within the family Sphingobacteriaceae. The species is of interest for its isolated location in the tree of life. Like other members of the genus P. saltans is heparinolytic. Cells of P. saltans show a peculiar gliding, dancing motility and can be distinguished from other Pedobacter strains by their ability to utilize glycerol and the inability to assimilate D-cellobiose. The genome presented here is only the second completed genome sequence of a type strain from a member of the family Sphingobacteriaceae to be published. The 4,635,236 bp long genome with its 3,854 protein-coding and 67 RNA genes consists of one chromosome, and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:22180808

  12. Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents of Streptococcus suis capsular type 2 strains isolated from pigs.

    PubMed

    Seol, B; Kelneric, Z; Hajsig, D; Madic, J; Naglic, T

    1996-03-01

    The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for thirty-three epidemiologicaly unrelated clinical isolates of Streptococcus suis capsular type 2 were determined in relation to ampicillin, ampicillin-sulbactam, amoxicillin, clavulanate-amoxicillin, penicillin G, cephalexin, gentamicin, streptomycin, erythromycin, tylosin and doxycycline, using the microtitre broth dilution procedure described by the U.S. National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS). Gentamicin was the most active compound tested, with an MIC for 90% of the strains tested (MIC(90)) of 0.4 mg/L. Overall, 70% of strains were resistant to doxycycline (MIC(90) > or = 100.0 mg/L), followed by penicillin G (51% of strains) (MIC(90) + or = 100.0 mg/L). Resistance to amoxicillin and ampicillin was 36.4% (MIC(90) 12.5 mg/L) and 33.3% (MIC(90) 50.0 mg/L), respectively. 15.2% of S. suis strains were resistant to streptomycin, tylosin and cephalexin with MIC90 values of 25.0 mg/L, 12.5 mg/L and 25.0 mg/L, respectively. A combination of ampicillin and sulbactam (MIC(90) 6.3 mg/L) and a combination of amoxicillin and clavulanate (MIC(90) 3.1 mg/L) as well as erythromycin (1.6 mg/L) were of the same efficacy, with a total of 9.1% resistant S. suis strains. This high percentage of resistance to doxycycline and penicillin G precludes the use of these antibiotics as empiric therapy of swine diseases.

  13. Complex Population Structure and Virulence Differences among Serotype 2 Streptococcus suis Strains Belonging to Sequence Type 28

    PubMed Central

    Athey, Taryn B. T.; Auger, Jean-Philippe; Teatero, Sarah; Dumesnil, Audrey; Takamatsu, Daisuke; Wasserscheid, Jessica; Dewar, Ken; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Fittipaldi, Nahuel

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is a major swine pathogen and a zoonotic agent. Serotype 2 strains are the most frequently associated with disease. However, not all serotype 2 lineages are considered virulent. Indeed, sequence type (ST) 28 serotype 2 S. suis strains have been described as a homogeneous group of low virulence. However, ST28 strains are often isolated from diseased swine in some countries, and at least four human ST28 cases have been reported. Here, we used whole-genome sequencing and animal infection models to test the hypothesis that the ST28 lineage comprises strains of different genetic backgrounds and different virulence. We used 50 S. suis ST28 strains isolated in Canada, the United States and Japan from diseased pigs, and one ST28 strain from a human case isolated in Thailand. We report a complex population structure among the 51 ST28 strains. Diversity resulted from variable gene content, recombination events and numerous genome-wide polymorphisms not attributable to recombination. Phylogenetic analysis using core genome single-nucleotide polymorphisms revealed four discrete clades with strong geographic structure, and a fifth clade formed by US, Thai and Japanese strains. When tested in experimental animal models, strains from this latter clade were significantly more virulent than a Canadian ST28 reference strain, and a closely related Canadian strain. Our results highlight the limitations of MLST for both phylogenetic analysis and virulence prediction and raise concerns about the possible emergence of ST28 strains in human clinical cases. PMID:26375680

  14. Determination of molecular phylogenetics of Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains by multilocus sequence typing.

    PubMed

    González-Escalona, Narjol; Martinez-Urtaza, Jaime; Romero, Jaime; Espejo, Romilio T; Jaykus, Lee-Ann; DePaola, Angelo

    2008-04-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is an important human pathogen whose transmission is associated with the consumption of contaminated seafood. There is a growing public health concern due to the emergence of a pandemic strain causing severe outbreaks worldwide. Many questions remain unanswered regarding the evolution and population structure of V. parahaemolyticus. In this work, we describe a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme for V. parahaemolyticus based on the internal fragment sequences of seven housekeeping genes. This MLST scheme was applied to 100 V. parahaemolyticus strains isolated from geographically diverse clinical (n = 37) and environmental (n = 63) sources. The sequences obtained from this work were deposited and are available in a public database (http://pubmlst.org/vparahaemolyticus). Sixty-two unique sequence types were identified, and most (50) were represented by a single isolate, suggesting a high level of genetic diversity. Three major clonal complexes were identified by eBURST analysis. Separate clonal complexes were observed for V. parahaemolyticus isolates originating from the Pacific and Gulf coasts of the United States, while a third clonal complex consisted of strains belonging to the pandemic clonal complex with worldwide distribution. The data reported in this study indicate that V. parahaemolyticus is genetically diverse with a semiclonal population structure and an epidemic structure similar to that of Vibrio cholerae. Genetic diversity in V. parahaemolyticus appears to be driven primarily by frequent recombination rather than mutation, with recombination ratios estimated at 2.5:1 and 8.8:1 by allele and site, respectively. Application of this MLST scheme to more V. parahaemolyticus strains and by different laboratories will facilitate production of a global picture of the epidemiology and evolution of this pathogen.

  15. Use of AFLP, plasmid typing and phenotyping in a comparative study to assess genetic diversity of Shigella flexneri strains.

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, S.; Cabrera, R.; Ramirez, M. M.; Usera, M. A.; Echeita, M. A.

    2002-01-01

    Shigella flexneri infections are one of the main causes of acute diarrhoea in Cuba. Twenty strains isolated from sporadic cases in nine different Cuban provinces were characterized. Serotyping, antibiotic-resistance typing, plasmid-typing and AFLP-typing were used to determine their suitability for use in epidemiological studies of S. flexneri. The predominant serotypes were serotype 6 (35%) and serotype 2 (35%). Eleven different plasmid profiles were detected (Diversity Index = 0.92). AFLP-typing discriminated 12 different patterns (DI = 0.95), these patterns were not coincident with plasmid-typing patterns. Both techniques combined distinguished 14 patterns among the 20 studied strains (DI = 0.99). There was no consistent relationship between plasmid-typing and AFLP-typing patterns or antibiotic-resistance typing patterns. Ninety-five percent of S. flexneri strains were multiresistant. PMID:12558326

  16. Effect of strain on electronic and magnetic properties of n-type Cr-doped WSe2 monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaomeng; Zhao, Xu; Ma, Xu; Wu, Ninghua; Xin, Qianqian; Wang, Tianxing

    2017-03-01

    Using first-principles calculations based on the density functional theory, we study the effect of strain on the electronic and magnetic properties of Cr-doped WSe2 monolayer. The results show that no magnetic moment is induced in the Cr-doped WSe2 monolayer without strain. For the Cr substitutions, the impurity states are close to the conduction bands, which indicate n-type doping occurs in this case. Then we applied strain (from -10% to 10%) to the doped system, and find that a little magnetic moment is induced with tensile strain from 6% to 9% and negligible. We find that the influence of strain on the magnetic properties is inappreciable in Cr-doped WSe2. Moreover, the tensile strain appears to be more effective in reducing the band gap of Cr-doped WSe2 monolayer than the compressive strain.

  17. Molecular identification of pathogenicity genes and ERIC types in Vibrio cholerae O1 epidemic strains from Mozambique.

    PubMed Central

    Folgosa, E.; Mastrandrea, S.; Cappuccinelli, P.; Uzzau, S.; Rappelli, P.; Brian, M. J.; Colombo, M. M.

    2001-01-01

    The phenotypic and genotypic profiles of the V. cholerae strains causing the Mozambican 1997-8 epidemic were characterized to provide a reference for comparison with other epidemic strains. A total of 75 strains of V. cholerae O1 isolated in different provinces, were analysed. Strains were characterized by PCR for detecting toxin genes (ctxA, zot and ace), virulence associated genes (tcpA. nanH, hlyA and torR) and ERIC sequences. All V. cholerae strains were serotype O1, Ogawa, biotype El Tor. MIC testing showed a high proportion of strains multi-resistant to drugs (100% to cotrimoxazole and 52% to tetracycline) and susceptibility to ciprofloxacin. The isolates contained two intact copies of the CTX genetic element and all other genes tested. PCR of restricted DNA revealed two ERIC types: the first in provincial isolates, also predominant in other African epidemic strains, and the second in Maputo isolates (the national capital). PMID:11561970

  18. Two Novel Toxin Variants Revealed by Whole-Genome Sequencing of 175 Clostridium botulinum Type E Strains

    PubMed Central

    Weedmark, K. A.; Lambert, D. L.; Mabon, P.; Hayden, K. L.; Urfano, C. J.; Leclair, D.; Van Domselaar, G.; Austin, J. W.

    2014-01-01

    We sequenced 175 Clostridium botulinum type E strains isolated from food, clinical, and environmental sources from northern Canada and analyzed their botulinum neurotoxin (bont) coding sequences (CDSs). In addition to bont/E1 and bont/E3 variant types, neurotoxin sequence analysis identified two novel BoNT type E variants termed E10 and E11. Strains producing type E10 were found along the eastern coastlines of Hudson Bay and the shores of Ungava Bay, while strains producing type E11 were only found in the Koksoak River region of Nunavik. Strains producing BoNT/E3 were widespread throughout northern Canada, with the exception of the coast of eastern Hudson Bay. PMID:25107978

  19. Molecular typing of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 clinical strains isolated in Italy.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Stefano; Scaturro, Maria; Rota, Maria Cristina; Caporali, Maria Grazia; Ricci, Maria Luisa

    2014-07-01

    Molecular typing methods for discriminating different bacterial isolates are essential epidemiological tools in prevention and control of Legionella infections and outbreaks. A selection of 56 out of 184 Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 (Lp1) clinical isolates, collected from different Italian regions between 1987 and 2012, and stored at the National Reference Laboratory for Legionella, were typed by monoclonal antibody (MAb) subgrouping, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and sequence based typing (SBT). These strains were isolated from 39 community (69.6%), 14 nosocomial (25%) and 3 travel associated (5.4%) Legionnaires'disease cases. MAb typing results showed a prevalence of MAb 3/1 positive isolates (75%) with the Philadelphia subgroup representing 35.7%, followed by Knoxville (23.2%), Benidorm (12.5%), Allentown/France (1.8%), Allentown/France-Philadelphia (1.8%). The remaining 25% were MAb 3/1 negative, namely 11 Olda (19.6%), 2 Oxford (3.6%) and 1 Bellingham (1.8%) subgroups. AFLP analysis detected 20 different genomic profiles. SBT analysis revealed 32 different sequence types (STs) with high diversity of STs (IODSTs=0.952) 12 of which were never described before. ST1 and ST23 were most frequently isolated as observed worldwide. A helpful analysis of data from SBT, MAb subgrouping and AFLP is provided, as well as a comparison to the Lp1 types investigated from other countries. This study describes the first Italian Lp1 strains database, providing molecular epidemiology data useful for future epidemiological investigations, especially of travel associated Legionnaires' diseases (TALD) cases, Italy being the country associated with the highest number of clusters.

  20. A MAT1–2 wild-type strain from Penicillium chrysogenum: functional mating-type locus characterization, genome sequencing and mating with an industrial penicillin-producing strain

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, Julia; Dahlmann, Tim A; Gümüşer, Hendrik; Kück, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    In heterothallic ascomycetes, mating is controlled by two nonallelic idiomorphs that determine the ‘sex’ of the corresponding strains. We recently discovered mating-type loci and a sexual life cycle in the penicillin-producing fungus, Penicillium chrysogenum. All industrial penicillin production strains worldwide are derived from a MAT1-1 isolate. No MAT1-2 strain has been investigated in detail until now. Here, we provide the first functional analysis of a MAT1-2 locus from a wild-type strain. Similar to MAT1-1, the MAT1-2 locus has functions beyond sexual development. Unlike MAT1-1, the MAT1-2 locus affects germination and surface properties of conidiospores and controls light-dependent asexual sporulation. Mating of the MAT1-2 wild type with a MAT1-1 high penicillin producer generated sexual spores. We determined the genomic sequences of parental and progeny strains using next-generation sequencing and found evidence for genome-wide recombination. SNP calling showed that derived industrial strains had an uneven distribution of point mutations compared with the wild type. We found evidence for meiotic recombination in all chromosomes. Our results point to a strategy combining the use of mating-type genes, genetics, and next-generation sequencing to optimize conventional strain improvement methods. PMID:25521009

  1. Multi-locus sequence typing of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis strains in Japan between 1973 and 2004.

    PubMed

    Noda, Tamie; Murakami, Koichi; Asai, Tetsuo; Etoh, Yoshiki; Ishihara, Tomoe; Kuroki, Toshiro; Horikawa, Kazumi; Fujimoto, Shuji

    2011-06-15

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) was responsible for a worldwide pandemic during the 1980s and 1990s; however, changes in the dominant lineage before and after this event remain unknown. This study determined S. Enteritidis lineages before and after this pandemic event in Japan using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Thirty S. Enteritidis strains were collected in Japan between 1973 and 2004, consisting of 27 human strains from individual episodes, a bovine strain, a liquid egg strain and an eggshell strain. Strains showed nine phage types and 17 pulsed-field profiles with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. All strains had homologous type 11 sequences without any nucleotide differences in seven housekeeping genes. These MLST results suggest that S. Enteritidis with the diversities revealed by phage typing and pulsed-field profiling has a highly clonal population. Although type 11 S. Enteritidis may exhibit both pleiotropic surface structure and pulsed-field type variation, it is likely to be a stable lineage derived from an ancestor before the 1980s and/or 1990s pandemic in Japan.

  2. Evaluation of Ribotyping as a Tool for Molecular Typing of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Strains of Worldwide Origin

    PubMed Central

    Voskressenskaya, Ekaterina; Leclercq, Alexandre; Tseneva, Galina; Carniel, Elisabeth

    2005-01-01

    Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is a gram-negative bacterium that infects a wide range of animals, including humans, and is transmitted by the fecal-oral route. This species is found globally and is responsible for human outbreaks, mainly in cold countries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of ribotyping for the molecular typing of worldwide isolates. For this purpose, 80 strains of Y. pseudotuberculosis belonging to the six classical serotypes and nine subserotypes and isolated from various countries and different hosts were analyzed. Combination of the EcoRI and EcoRV ribopatterns allowed the delineation of 27 ribotypes. In most instances, ribotypes were associated with specific subserotypes and allowed their subdivision. No association between the ribotype and the geographical origin of the strains was observed, arguing for a global spread of this organism. Similarly, no marked association between the ribotype and the type of host was noted, confirming the circulation of this pathogen in the environment, different animal species, and human hosts. Y. pseudotuberculosis exhibited ribopatterns very close to those of Y. pestis, although not completely identical. Altogether, the present study demonstrates that ribotyping may be a useful tool for molecular typing of global isolates of Y. pseudotuberculosis but that it has some limitations due to the small number of hybridizing bands that generate the diversity of the profiles. PMID:16333119

  3. Induction of Type I Interferon Signaling Determines the Relative Pathogenicity of Staphylococcus aureus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Dane; Planet, Paul J.; Soong, Grace; Narechania, Apurva; Prince, Alice

    2014-01-01

    The tremendous success of S. aureus as a human pathogen has been explained primarily by its array of virulence factors that enable the organism to evade host immunity. Perhaps equally important, but less well understood, is the importance of the intensity of the host response in determining the extent of pathology induced by S. aureus infection, particularly in the pathogenesis of pneumonia. We compared the pathogenesis of infection caused by two phylogenetically and epidemiologically distinct strains of S. aureus whose behavior in humans has been well characterized. Induction of the type I IFN cascade by strain 502A, due to a NOD2-IRF5 pathway, was the major factor in causing severe pneumonia and death in a murine model of pneumonia and was associated with autolysis and release of peptidogylcan. In contrast to USA300, 502A was readily eliminated from epithelial surfaces in vitro. Nonetheless, 502A caused significantly increased tissue damage due to the organisms that were able to invade systemically and trigger type I IFN responses, and this was ameliorated in Ifnar -/- mice. The success of USA300 to cause invasive infection appears to depend upon its resistance to eradication from epithelial surfaces, but not production of specific toxins. Our studies illustrate the important and highly variable role of type I IFN signaling within a species and suggest that targeted immunomodulation of specific innate immune signaling cascades may be useful to prevent the excessive morbidity associated with S. aureus pneumonia. PMID:24586160

  4. The Draft Genome Sequence of the Yersinia entomophaga Entomopathogenic Type Strain MH96T

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, Mark R. H.; Beattie, Amy; Altermann, Eric; Moraga, Roger M.; Harper, Lincoln A.; Calder, Joanne; Laugraud, Aurelie

    2016-01-01

    Here we report the draft genome of Yersinia entomophaga type strain MH96T. The genome shows 93.8% nucleotide sequence identity to that of Yersinia nurmii type strain APN3a-cT, and comprises a single chromosome of approximately 4,275,531 bp. In silico analysis identified that, in addition to the previously documented Y. entomophaga Yen-TC gene cluster, the genome encodes a diverse array of toxins, including two type III secretion systems, and five rhs-associated gene clusters. As well as these multicomponent systems, several orthologs of known insect toxins, such as VIP2 toxin and the binary toxin PirAB, and distant orthologs of some mammalian toxins, including repeats-in-toxin, a cytolethal distending toxin, hemolysin-like genes and an adenylate cyclase were identified. The genome also contains a large number of hypothetical proteins and orthologs of known effector proteins, such as LopT, as well as genes encoding a wide range of proteolytic determinants, including metalloproteases and pathogen fitness determinants, such as genes involved in iron metabolism. The bioinformatic data derived from the current in silico analysis, along with previous information on the pathobiology of Y. entomophaga against its insect hosts, suggests that a number of these virulence systems are required for survival in the hemocoel and incapacitation of the insect host. PMID:27187466

  5. The Draft Genome Sequence of the Yersinia entomophaga Entomopathogenic Type Strain MH96T.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Mark R H; Beattie, Amy; Altermann, Eric; Moraga, Roger M; Harper, Lincoln A; Calder, Joanne; Laugraud, Aurelie

    2016-05-11

    Here we report the draft genome of Yersinia entomophaga type strain MH96T. The genome shows 93.8% nucleotide sequence identity to that of Yersinia nurmii type strain APN3a-cT, and comprises a single chromosome of approximately 4,275,531 bp. In silico analysis identified that, in addition to the previously documented Y. entomophaga Yen-TC gene cluster, the genome encodes a diverse array of toxins, including two type III secretion systems, and five rhs-associated gene clusters. As well as these multicomponent systems, several orthologs of known insect toxins, such as VIP2 toxin and the binary toxin PirAB, and distant orthologs of some mammalian toxins, including repeats-in-toxin, a cytolethal distending toxin, hemolysin-like genes and an adenylate cyclase were identified. The genome also contains a large number of hypothetical proteins and orthologs of known effector proteins, such as LopT, as well as genes encoding a wide range of proteolytic determinants, including metalloproteases and pathogen fitness determinants, such as genes involved in iron metabolism. The bioinformatic data derived from the current in silico analysis, along with previous information on the pathobiology of Y. entomophaga against its insect hosts, suggests that a number of these virulence systems are required for survival in the hemocoel and incapacitation of the insect host.

  6. R-type bacteriocins in related strains of Xenorhabdus bovienii: Xenorhabdicin tail fiber modularity and contribution to competitiveness.

    PubMed

    Ciezki, Kristin; Murfin, Kristen; Goodrich-Blair, Heidi; Stock, S Patricia; Forst, Steven

    2017-01-01

    R-type bacteriocins are contractile phage tail-like structures that are bactericidal towards related bacterial species. The C-terminal region of the phage tail fiber protein determines target-binding specificity. The mutualistic bacteria Xenorhabdus nematophila and X. bovienii produce R-type bacteriocins (xenorhabdicins) that are selectively active against different Xenorhabdus species. We analyzed the P2-type remnant prophage clusters in draft sequences of nine strains of X. bovienii The C-terminal tail fiber region in each of the respective strains was unique and consisted of mosaics of modular units. The region between the main tail fiber gene (xbpH1) and the sheath gene (xbpS1) contained a variable number of modules encoding tail fiber fragments. DNA inversion and module exchange between strains was involved in generating tail fiber diversity. Xenorhabdicin-enriched fractions from three different X. bovienii strains isolated from the same nematode species displayed distinct activities against each other. In one set of strains, the strain that produced highly active xenorhabdicin was able to eliminate a sensitive strain. In contrast, xenorhabdicin activity was not a determining factor in the competitive fitness of a second set of strains. These findings suggest that related strains of X. bovienii use xenorhabdicin and additional antagonistic molecules to compete against each other.

  7. Comparative sensitivities of Sabin and Mahoney poliovirus type 1 prototype strains and two recent isolates to low concentrations of glutaraldehyde.

    PubMed Central

    Chambon, M; Jallat-Archimbaud, C; Bailly, J L; Gourgand, J M; Charbonne, F; Henquell, C; Fuchs, F; Peigue-Lafeuille, H

    1997-01-01

    Significant intratypic differences in the glutaraldehyde (GTA) sensitivity of echovirus isolates have been shown. While exploring ways to optimize the study of GTA sensitivity of enteroviruses, we also observed intratypic differences in poliovirus type 1 isolates collected in France. A suspension procedure was used for assessing the virucidal effect of GTA at low concentrations (< or = 0.10%) against purified viruses. Two recent isolates of poliovirus type 1 tested were first fully characterized by the PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) test. The RFLP pattern of clinical isolate 5617 was similar to that of poliovirus type 1 LS-c, 2ab (Sabin strain), confirming the vaccine origin of strain 5617. The RFLP pattern of strain 5915 recovered from sewage was different from that of the Mahoney strain, suggesting a genetic variation in this wild isolate. We then analyzed under the same controlled conditions the GTA sensitivities of both isolates and their respective prototype strains. The wild Mahoney and 5915 strains exhibited significantly lower sensitivities to GTA than did the vaccine Sabin and 5617 strains. The inactivation rates of clinical isolates 5617 and 5915 were very similar to those of their corresponding reference Sabin and Mahoney strains. Both the conformational structure of the capsid of each strain and the amino acid constitution of structural polypeptides could be involved in the variations observed. The relevance of our comparative sensitivity studies to standardization of virucidal tests is discussed. PMID:9251206

  8. Identification of Novel Linear Megaplasmids Carrying a ß-Lactamase Gene in Neurotoxigenic Clostridium butyricum Type E Strains

    PubMed Central

    Franciosa, Giovanna; Scalfaro, Concetta; Di Bonito, Paola; Vitale, Marco; Aureli, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Since the first isolation of type E botulinum toxin-producing Clostridium butyricum from two infant botulism cases in Italy in 1984, this peculiar microorganism has been implicated in different forms of botulism worldwide. By applying particular pulsed-field gel electrophoresis run conditions, we were able to show for the first time that ten neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains originated from Italy and China have linear megaplasmids in their genomes. At least four different megaplasmid sizes were identified among the ten neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains. Each isolate displayed a single sized megaplasmid that was shown to possess a linear structure by ATP-dependent exonuclease digestion. Some of the neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains possessed additional smaller circular plasmids. In order to investigate the genetic content of the newly identified megaplasmids, selected gene probes were designed and used in Southern hybridization experiments. Our results revealed that the type E botulinum neurotoxin gene was chromosome-located in all neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains. Similar results were obtained with the 16S rRNA, the tetracycline tet(P) and the lincomycin resistance protein lmrB gene probes. A specific mobA gene probe only hybridized to the smaller plasmids of the Italian C. butyricum type E strains. Of note, a ß-lactamase gene probe hybridized to the megaplasmids of eight neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains, of which seven from clinical sources and the remaining one from a food implicated in foodborne botulism, whereas this ß-lactam antibiotic resistance gene was absent form the megaplasmids of the two soil strains examined. The widespread occurrence among C. butyricum type E strains associated to human disease of linear megaplasmids harboring an antibiotic resistance gene strongly suggests that the megaplasmids could have played an important role in the emergence of C. butyricum type E as a human pathogen. PMID

  9. Characterization of Microbulbifer strain CMC-5, a new biochemical variant of Microbulbifer elongatus type strain DSM6810T isolated from decomposing seaweeds.

    PubMed

    Jonnadula, RaviChand; Verma, Pankaj; Shouche, Yogesh S; Ghadi, Sanjeev C

    2009-12-01

    A Gram-negative, rod-shaped, non-spore forming, non-motile and moderate halophilic bacteria designated as strain CMC-5 was isolated from decomposing seaweeds by enrichment culture. The growth of strain CMC-5 was assessed in synthetic seawater-based medium containing polysaccharide. The bacterium degraded and utilized agar, alginate, carrageenan, xylan, carboxymethyl cellulose and chitin. The strain was characterized using a polyphasic approach for taxonomic identification. Cellular fatty acid analysis showed the presence of iso-C(15:0) as major fatty acid and significant amounts of iso-C(17:1x9c) and C(18:1x7c). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequence indicated that strain CMC-5 is phylogenetically related to Microbulbifer genus and 99% similar to type strain Microbulbifer elongatus DSM6810T. However in contrast to Microbulbifer elongatus DSM6810T, strain CMC-5 is non-motile, utilizes glucose, galactose, inositol and xylan, does not utilize fructose and succinate nor does it produce H2S. Further growth of bacterial strain CMC-5 was observed when inoculated in seawater-based medium containing sterile pieces of Gracilaria corticata thalli. The bacterial growth was associated with release of reducing sugar in the broth suggesting its role in carbon recycling of polysaccharides from seaweeds in marine ecosystem.

  10. Phenotypic and molecular typing of Salmonella strains reveals different contamination sources in two commercial pig slaughterhouses.

    PubMed

    Botteldoorn, Nadine; Herman, Lieve; Rijpens, Nancy; Heyndrickx, Marc

    2004-09-01

    This study aimed to define the origin of Salmonella contamination on swine carcasses and the distribution of Salmonella serotypes in two commercial slaughterhouses during normal activity. Salmonellae were isolated from carcasses, from colons and mesenteric lymph nodes of individual pigs, and from the slaughterhouse environment. All strains were serotyped; Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica serotype Derby isolates were additionally typed beyond the serotype level by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and antibiotic resistance profiling (ARP); and a subset of 31 serotype Typhimurium strains were additionally phage typed. PFGE and ARP had the same discriminative possibility. Phage typing in combination with PFGE could give extra information for some strains. In one slaughterhouse, 21% of the carcasses were contaminated, reflecting a correlation with the delivery of infected pigs. Carcass contamination did not result only from infection of the corresponding pig; only 25% of the positive carcasses were contaminated with the same serotype or genotype found in the corresponding feces or mesenteric lymph nodes. In the other slaughterhouse, 70% of the carcasses were contaminated, and only in 4% was the same genotype or serotype detected as in the feces of the corresponding pigs. The other positive carcasses in both slaughterhouses were contaminated by genotypes present in the feces or lymph nodes of pigs slaughtered earlier that day or from dispersed sources in the environment. In slaughterhouses, complex contamination cycles may be present, resulting in the isolation of many different genotypes circulating in the environment due to the supply of positive animals and in the contamination of carcasses, probably through aerosols.

  11. Phenotypic and Molecular Typing of Salmonella Strains Reveals Different Contamination Sources in Two Commercial Pig Slaughterhouses

    PubMed Central

    Botteldoorn, Nadine; Herman, Lieve; Rijpens, Nancy; Heyndrickx, Marc

    2004-01-01

    This study aimed to define the origin of Salmonella contamination on swine carcasses and the distribution of Salmonella serotypes in two commercial slaughterhouses during normal activity. Salmonellae were isolated from carcasses, from colons and mesenteric lymph nodes of individual pigs, and from the slaughterhouse environment. All strains were serotyped; Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica serotype Derby isolates were additionally typed beyond the serotype level by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and antibiotic resistance profiling (ARP); and a subset of 31 serotype Typhimurium strains were additionally phage typed. PFGE and ARP had the same discriminative possibility. Phage typing in combination with PFGE could give extra information for some strains. In one slaughterhouse, 21% of the carcasses were contaminated, reflecting a correlation with the delivery of infected pigs. Carcass contamination did not result only from infection of the corresponding pig; only 25% of the positive carcasses were contaminated with the same serotype or genotype found in the corresponding feces or mesenteric lymph nodes. In the other slaughterhouse, 70% of the carcasses were contaminated, and only in 4% was the same genotype or serotype detected as in the feces of the corresponding pigs. The other positive carcasses in both slaughterhouses were contaminated by genotypes present in the feces or lymph nodes of pigs slaughtered earlier that day or from dispersed sources in the environment. In slaughterhouses, complex contamination cycles may be present, resulting in the isolation of many different genotypes circulating in the environment due to the supply of positive animals and in the contamination of carcasses, probably through aerosols. PMID:15345414

  12. Complete genome sequence of Sebaldella termitidis type strain (NCTC 11300T)

    PubMed Central

    Harmon-Smith, Miranda; Celia, Laura; Chertkov, Olga; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Detter, John C.; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Pati, Amrita; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Brettin, Thomas; Göker, Markus; Beck, Brian; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Chen, Feng

    2010-01-01

    Sebaldella termitidis (Sebald 1962) Collins and Shah 1986, is the only species in the genus Sebaldella within the fusobacterial family ‘Leptotrichiaceae’. The sole and type strain of the species was first isolated about 50 years ago from intestinal content of Mediterranean termites. The species is of interest for its very isolated phylogenetic position within the phylum Fusobacteria in the tree of life, with no other species sharing more than 90% 16S rRNA sequence similarity. The 4,486,650 bp long genome with its 4,210 protein-coding and 54 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304705

  13. Complete genome sequence of Sebaldella termitidis type strain (NCTC 11300T)

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon-Smith, Miranda; Celia, Laura; Chertkov, Olga; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Detter, J. Chris; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Pati, Amrita; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Goker, Markus; Beck, Brian; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Chen, Feng

    2010-01-01

    Sebaldella termitidis (Sebald 1962) Collins and Shah 1986, is the only species in the genus Sebaldella within the fusobacterial family Leptotrichiaceae . The sole and type strain of the species was first isolated about 50 years ago from intestinal content of Mediterranean ter-mites. The species is of interest for its very isolated phylogenetic position within the phylum Fusobacteria in the tree of life, with no other species sharing more than 90% 16S rRNA se-quence similarity. The 4,486,650 bp long genome with its 4,210 protein-coding and 54 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  14. Complete genome sequence of Thermosediminibacter oceani type strain (JW/IW-1228PT)

    SciTech Connect

    Pitluck, Sam; Yasawong, Montri; Munk, Christine; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Sikorski, Johannes; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Thermosediminibacter oceani (Lee et al. 2006) is the type species of the genus Thermosediminibacter in the family Thermoanaerobacteraceae. The anaerobic, barophilic, chemoorganotrophic thermophile is characterized by straight to curved Gram-negative rods. The strain described in this study has been isolated from a core sample of deep sea sediments of the Peruvian high productivity upwelling system. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the genus Thermosediminibacter and the seventh genome sequence in the family Thermoanaerobacteraceae. The 2,280,035 bp long genome with its 2,285 protein-coding and 63 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  15. Complete genome sequence of Sanguibacter keddieii type strain (ST-74T)

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, Natalia; Sikorski, Johannes; Sims, David; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Chen, Feng; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Pati, Amrita; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; D'haeseleer, Patrik; Chain, Patrick; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Goker, Markus; Pukall, Rudiger; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2009-05-20

    Sanguibacter keddieii is the type species of the genus Sanguibacter, the only described genus within the family of Sanguibacteraceae. Phylogenetically, this family is located in the neighbourhood of the genus Oerskovia and the family Cellulomonadaceae within the actinobacterial suborder Micrococcineae. The strain described in this report was isolated from blood of apparently healthy cows. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the family Sanguibacteraceae, and the 4,253,413 bp long single replicon genome with its 3735 protein-coding and 70 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  16. Genetic diversity of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis and the influence of strain type on infection and pathogenesis: a review.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Karen

    2015-06-19

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Map) is an important pathogen that causes a chronic, progressive granulomatous enteritis known as Johne's disease or paratuberculosis. The disease is endemic in many parts of the world and responsible for considerable losses to the livestock and associated industries. Diagnosis and control are problematic, due mostly to the long incubation period of the disease when infected animals show no clinical signs and are difficult to detect, and the ability of the organism to survive and persist in the environment. The existence of phenotypically distinct strains of Map has been known since the 1930s but the genetic differentiation of Map strain types has been challenging and only recent technologies have proven sufficiently discriminative for strain comparisons, tracing the sources of infection and epidemiological studies. It is important to understand the differences that exist between Map strains and how they influence both development and transmission of disease. This information is required to develop improved diagnostics and effective vaccines for controlling Johne's disease. Here I review the current classification of Map strain types, the sources of the genetic variability within strains, growth characteristics and epidemiological traits associated with strain type and the influence of strain type on infection and pathogenicity.

  17. Complete genome sequence of Hydrogenobacter thermophilus type strain (TK-6T)

    SciTech Connect

    Zeytun, Ahmet; Sikorski, Johannes; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Han, James; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ngatchou, Olivier Duplex; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Han, Cliff; Detter, J. Chris; Ubler, Susanne; Rohde, Manfred; Tindall, Brian; Wirth, Reinhard; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogenobacter thermophilus Kawasumi et al. 1984 is the type species of the genus Hydrogenobacter. H. thermophilus was the first obligate autotrophic organism reported among aerobic hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria. Strain TK-6T is of interest because of the unusually efficient hydrogen-oxidizing ability of this strain, which results in a faster generation time compared to other autotrophs. It is also able to grow anaerobically using nitrate as an electron acceptor when molecular hydrogen is used as the energy source, and able to aerobically fix CO2 via the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle. This is the fifth completed genome sequence in the family Aquificaceae, and the second genome sequence determined from a strain derived from the original isolate. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 1,742,932 bp long genome with its 1,899 protein-coding and 49 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  18. Strain aging and load relaxation behavior of type 316 stainless steel at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannula, S. P.; Korhonen, M. A.; Li, C. Y.

    1986-10-01

    The strain aging and load relaxation behavior of type 316 stainless steel (SS) at room temperature were studied. It is shown that rapid aging occurs in 316 SS at room temperature to an extent that affects the load relaxation behavior of the material. Qualitatively, the aging behavior was found to agree with those reported earlier for Fe-Ni-C-alloys, and the observed aging characteristics could be explained by using an earlier proposed vacancy-interstitial mechanism. The load relaxation behavior is analyzed in terms of Hart’s state variable model. Effects of strain aging and strain hardening on the load relaxation behavior and the scaling of the relaxation curves are determined. It is shown that aging can be accounted for by a time-dependent change in a model parameter, which is dependent on the mobile dislocation density and the dislocation mobility. In addition, a dependency on plastic state of the same parameter previously held constant was found. It is concluded that this phenomenon, which in 316 SS could be rationalized in terms of increasing forest dislocation density, is likely to be more general, and a provision for it should be made in the state variable theory.

  19. Multilocus Microsatellite Typing as a New Tool for Discrimination of Leishmania infantum MON-1 Strains

    PubMed Central

    Ochsenreither, Sebastian; Kuhls, Katrin; Schaar, Matthias; Presber, Wolfgang; Schönian, Gabriele

    2006-01-01

    The Leishmania donovani complex, which consists of L. donovani, L. infantum-L. chagasi, and L. archibaldi, is responsible for visceral manifestations of leishmaniasis. Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis is the standard method for the characterization and identification of strains of Leishmania. For L. infantum, the predominance of zymodeme MON-1 significantly reduces the discriminative power of this approach. In the present study, we developed 17 independent polymorphic microsatellite markers for the typing of strains of L. infantum, with the main emphasis on zymodeme MON-1. The discriminative powers of 11 markers selected from among these markers were tested by using a panel of 63 isolates of the L. donovani complex. Unique multilocus genotypes were observed for the strains analyzed, with only three exceptions. Model-based and distance-based analyses of the data set showed comparable results. It was possible to discriminate between L. donovani sensu stricto, a non-MON-1 group of L. infantum isolates, and a MON-1 group of L. infantum isolates. Within MON-1, three clusters with geographical correlations became apparent. The frequency of heterozygosity in the alleles analyzed varied extremely between the different groups of isolates. The main clusters described are not consistent with species definitions based on isoenzyme analysis but confirm the results of former PCR-based investigations. PMID:16455904

  20. Complete genome sequence of the orange-red pigmented, radioresistant Deinococcus proteolyticus type strain (MRPT)

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, A; Zeytun, Ahmet; Yasawong, Montri; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Mavromatis, K; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Jeffries, Cynthia; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Sikorski, Johannes; Pukall, Rudiger; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla L.

    2012-01-01

    Deinococcus proteolyticus (ex Kobatake et al. 1973) Brook and Murray 1981 is one of currently 47 species in the genus Deinococcus within the family Deinococcaceae. Strain MRPTT was isolated from faeces of Lama glama; it shares with various other species of the genus the extreme radiation resistance, with D. proteolyticus being resistant up to 1.5 Mrad of gamma radiation. Strain MRPT{sup T} is of further interest for its carotenoid pigment. The genome presented here is only the fifth completed genome sequence of a member of the genus Deinococcus (and the forth type strain) to be published, and will hopefully contribute to a better understanding of how members of this genus adapted to high gamma- or UV ionizing-radiation. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 2,886,836 bp long genome with its four large plasmids of 97 kbp, 132 kbp, 196 kbp and 315 kbp harbours 2,741 protein-coding and 58 RNA genes and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  1. Recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 strains with targeted mutations relevant for aciclovir susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Brunnemann, Anne-Kathrin; Liermann, Kristin; Deinhardt-Emmer, Stefanie; Maschkowitz, Gregor; Pohlmann, Anja; Sodeik, Beate; Fickenscher, Helmut; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Krumbholz, Andi

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a novel reliable method to assess the significance of individual mutations within the thymidine kinase (TK) gene of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) to nucleoside analogue resistance. Eleven defined single nucleotide polymorphisms that occur in the TK gene of clinical HSV-1 isolates and a fluorescence reporter were introduced into the HSV-1 strain 17+ that had been cloned into a bacterial artificial chromosome. The susceptibility of these different strains to aciclovir, penciclovir, brivudin, and foscarnet was determined with a modified cytopathic effect reduction assay. The strains were also tested for their aciclovir susceptibility by measuring the relative fluorescence intensity as an indicator for HSV-1 replication and by quantifying the virus yield. Our data indicate that the amino acid substitutions R41H, R106H, A118V, L139V, K219T, S276R, L298R, S345P, and V348I represent natural polymorphisms of the TK protein, whereas G61A and P84L mediate broad cross-resistance against aciclovir, penciclovir, brivudin, and susceptibility to foscarnet. This method allows the definition of the resistance genotype of otherwise unclear mutations in the TK gene of HSV-1. Thus, it provides a scientific basis for antiviral testing in clinical isolates of patients suffering from serious diseases and will facilitate testing of new antivirals against HSV-1. PMID:27426251

  2. Genome sequence of the Thermotoga thermarum type strain (LA3T) from an African solfataric spring

    PubMed Central

    Göker, Markus; Spring, Stefan; Scheuner, Carmen; Anderson, Iain; Zeytun, Ahmet; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Rohde, Manfred; Detter, John C.; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla

    2014-01-01

    Thermotoga thermarum Windberger et al. 1989 is a member to the genomically well characterized genus Thermotoga in the phylum ‘Thermotogae’. T. thermarum is of interest for its origin from a continental solfataric spring vs. predominantly marine oil reservoirs of other members of the genus. The genome of strain LA3T also provides fresh data for the phylogenomic positioning of the (hyper-)thermophilic bacteria. T. thermarum strain LA3T is the fourth sequenced genome of a type strain from the genus Thermotoga, and the sixth in the family Thermotogaceae to be formally described in a publication. Phylogenetic analyses do not reveal significant discrepancies between the current classification of the group, 16S rRNA gene data and whole-genome sequences. Nevertheless, T. thermarum significantly differs from other Thermotoga species regarding its iron-sulfur cluster synthesis, as it contains only a minimal set of the necessary proteins. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 2,039,943 bp long chromosome with its 2,015 protein-coding and 51 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:25197486

  3. Genome sequence of the Thermotoga thermarum type strain (LA3(T)) from an African solfataric spring.

    PubMed

    Göker, Markus; Spring, Stefan; Scheuner, Carmen; Anderson, Iain; Zeytun, Ahmet; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Rohde, Manfred; Detter, John C; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla

    2014-06-15

    Thermotoga thermarum Windberger et al. 1989 is a member to the genomically well characterized genus Thermotoga in the phylum 'Thermotogae'. T. thermarum is of interest for its origin from a continental solfataric spring vs. predominantly marine oil reservoirs of other members of the genus. The genome of strain LA3T also provides fresh data for the phylogenomic positioning of the (hyper-)thermophilic bacteria. T. thermarum strain LA3(T) is the fourth sequenced genome of a type strain from the genus Thermotoga, and the sixth in the family Thermotogaceae to be formally described in a publication. Phylogenetic analyses do not reveal significant discrepancies between the current classification of the group, 16S rRNA gene data and whole-genome sequences. Nevertheless, T. thermarum significantly differs from other Thermotoga species regarding its iron-sulfur cluster synthesis, as it contains only a minimal set of the necessary proteins. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 2,039,943 bp long chromosome with its 2,015 protein-coding and 51 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  4. Genome sequence of the Thermotoga thermarum type strain (LA3T) from an African solfataric spring

    DOE PAGES

    Goker, Markus; Spring, Stefan; Scheuner, Carmen; ...

    2014-06-15

    Thermotoga thermarum Windberger et al. 1989 is a member to the genomically well characterized genus Thermotoga in the phylum 'Thermotogae'. T. thermarum is of interest for its origin from a continental solfataric spring vs. predominantly marine oil reservoirs of other members of the genus. The genome of strain LA3T also provides fresh data for the phylogenomic positioning of the (hyper-)thermophilic bacteria. T. thermarum strain LA3T is the fourth sequenced genome of a type strain from the genus Thermotoga, and the sixth in the family Thermotogaceae to be formally described in a publication. Phylogenetic analyses do not reveal significant discrepancies betweenmore » the current classification of the group, 16S rRNA gene data and whole-genome sequences. Nevertheless, T. thermarum significantly differs from other Thermotoga species regarding its iron-sulfur cluster synthesis, as it contains only a minimal set of the necessary proteins. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 2,039,943 bp long chromosome with its 2,015 protein-coding and 51 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.« less

  5. A staggered approach for the coupling of Cahn-Hilliard type diffusion and finite strain elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Areias, P.; Samaniego, E.; Rabczuk, T.

    2016-02-01

    We develop an algorithm and computational implementation for simulation of problems that combine Cahn-Hilliard type diffusion with finite strain elasticity. We have in mind applications such as the electro-chemo-mechanics of lithium ion (Li-ion) batteries. We concentrate on basic computational aspects. A staggered algorithm is proposed for the coupled multi-field model. For the diffusion problem, the fourth order differential equation is replaced by a system of second order equations to deal with the issue of the regularity required for the approximation spaces. Low order finite elements are used for discretization in space of the involved fields (displacement, concentration, nonlocal concentration). Three (both 2D and 3D) extensively worked numerical examples show the capabilities of our approach for the representation of (i) phase separation, (ii) the effect of concentration in deformation and stress, (iii) the effect of strain in concentration, and (iv) lithiation. We analyze convergence with respect to spatial and time discretization and found that very good results are achievable using both a staggered scheme and approximated strain interpolation.

  6. Engineering a wild-type diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain for second-generation bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongxing; Shen, Yu; Wu, Meiling; Hou, Jin; Jiao, Chunlei; Li, Zailu; Liu, Xinli; Bao, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    The cost-effective production of second-generation bioethanol, which is made from lignocellulosic materials, has to face the following two problems: co-fermenting xylose with glucose and enhancing the strain's tolerance to lignocellulosic inhibitors. Based on our previous study, the wild-type diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain BSIF with robustness and good xylose metabolism genetic background was used as a chassis for constructing efficient xylose-fermenting industrial strains. The performance of the resulting strains in the fermentation of media with sugars and hydrolysates was investigated. The following two novel heterologous genes were integrated into the genome of the chassis cell: the mutant MGT05196(N360F), which encodes a xylose-specific, glucose-insensitive transporter and is derived from the Meyerozyma guilliermondii transporter gene MGT05196, and Ru-xylA (where Ru represents the rumen), which encodes a xylose isomerase (XI) with higher activity in S. cerevisiae. Additionally, endogenous modifications were also performed, including the overproduction of the xylulokinase Xks1p and the non-oxidative PPP (pentose phosphate pathway), and the inactivation of the aldose reductase Gre3p and the alkaline phosphatase Pho13p. These rationally designed genetic modifications, combined with alternating adaptive evolutions in xylose and SECS liquor (the leach liquor of steam-exploding corn stover), resulted in a final strain, LF1, with excellent xylose fermentation and enhanced inhibitor resistance. The specific xylose consumption rate of LF1 reached as high as 1.089 g g(-1) h(-1) with xylose as the sole carbon source. Moreover, its highly synchronized utilization of xylose and glucose was particularly significant; 77.6% of xylose was consumed along with glucose within 12 h, and the ethanol yield was 0.475 g g(-1), which is more than 93% of the theoretical yield. Additionally, LF1 performed well in fermentations with two different lignocellulosic hydrolysates

  7. [The presence of OXA type carbapenemases in Pseudomonas strains: first report from Turkey].

    PubMed

    Esenkaya Taşbent, Fatma; Özdemir, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    from the samples of patients in intensive-care units, and bronchoalveolar lavage specimens were the most prevalent samples (85/184; 46.2%). This study determined the presence and frequency of OXA type carbapenemases among Pseudomonas strains for the first time in our region and Turkey. These resistance genes demonstrated in Acinetobacter spp. were also detected in this study in Pseudomonas spp. and they may cause carbapenem resistance directly or by affecting the other resistance mechanisms with a synergistic effect. This study is expected to provide a basis for further studies to elucidate resistance mechanisms.

  8. Genome Sequence of Type Strain Fonsecaea multimorphosa CBS 980.96T, a Causal Agent of Feline Cerebral Phaeohyphomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Leao, Aniele C. Ribas; Weiss, Vinicius Almir; Vicente, Vania Aparecida; Costa, Flavia; Bombassaro, Amanda; Raittz, Roberto Tadeu; Steffens, Maria Berenice R.; Pedrosa, Fabio Oliveira; Gomes, Renata R.; Baura, Valter; Faoro, Helisson; Sfeir, Michelle Zibetti Tadra; Balsanelli, Eduardo; Moreno, Leandro F.; Najafzadeh, M. Javad

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT A draft genome sequence of type strain Fonsecaea multimorphosa CBS 980.96T was obtained. This species was first isolated from a cat with cerebral phaeohyphomycosis in Queensland, Australia. PMID:28209838

  9. Pathogenic characterization of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae Met-203 type SpaA strains from chronic and subacute swine erysipelas in Japan.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Mariko; Shimazaki, Yohko; Isshiki, Yukari; Kojima, Akemi; Hirano, Fumiya; Yamamoto, Kinya; Kijima, Mayumi; Nagai, Hidetaka

    2017-01-20

    To characterize the Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae Met-203 type surface protective antigen (Spa) A strains causing swine erysipelas in Japan, the nucleotide sequence of the hypervariable region of the spaA gene was determined in 80 E. rhusiopathiae (serotype 1a) isolates collected from pigs with chronic and subacute swine erysipelas in 14 prefectures in 2008-2014. In this study, 14 (17.5%) isolates were Met-203 type SpaA strains. We confirmed the pathogenicity of a Met-203 type SpaA strain in specific-pathogen-free pigs. In this experiment, the two challenged pigs displayed arthritis, urticaria and other clinical signs, but recovered within 10 days. Our results reveal the existence of the E. rhusiopathiae Met-203 type strains that have been causing chronic erysipelas in Japan.

  10. Pathogenic characterization of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae Met-203 type SpaA strains from chronic and subacute swine erysipelas in Japan

    PubMed Central

    UCHIYAMA, Mariko; SHIMAZAKI, Yohko; ISSHIKI, Yukari; KOJIMA, Akemi; HIRANO, Fumiya; YAMAMOTO, Kinya; KIJIMA, Mayumi; NAGAI, Hidetaka

    2016-01-01

    To characterize the Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae Met-203 type surface protective antigen (Spa) A strains causing swine erysipelas in Japan, the nucleotide sequence of the hypervariable region of the spaA gene was determined in 80 E. rhusiopathiae (serotype 1a) isolates collected from pigs with chronic and subacute swine erysipelas in 14 prefectures in 2008–2014. In this study, 14 (17.5%) isolates were Met-203 type SpaA strains. We confirmed the pathogenicity of a Met-203 type SpaA strain in specific-pathogen-free pigs. In this experiment, the two challenged pigs displayed arthritis, urticaria and other clinical signs, but recovered within 10 days. Our results reveal the existence of the E. rhusiopathiae Met-203 type strains that have been causing chronic erysipelas in Japan. PMID:27773881

  11. Complete genome sequence of Desulfarculus baarsii type strain (2st14T)

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Christine; Spring, Stefan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Davenport, Karen W.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Nolan, Matt; Copeland, A; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, N; Pagani, Ioanna; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Rohde, Manfred; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Land, Miriam L

    2010-01-01

    Desulfarculus baarsii (Widdel 1981) Kuever et al. 2006 is the type and only species of the genus Desulfarculus, which represents the family Desulfarculaceae and the order Desulfarculales. This species is a mesophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium with the capability to oxidize acetate and fatty acids of up to 18 carbon atoms completely to CO2. The acetyl-CoA/CODH (Wood-Ljungdahl) pathway is used by this species for the complete oxidation of carbon sources and autotrophic growth on formate. The type strain 2st14T was isolated from a ditch sediment collected near the University of Konstanz, Germany. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the order Desulfarculales. The 3,655,731 bp long single replicon genome with its 3,303 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  12. Complete genome sequence of Truepera radiovictrix type strain (RQ-24T)

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, N; Rohde, Christine; Munk, Christine; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Mavromatis, K; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Tindall, Brian; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla L.

    2011-01-01

    Truepera radiovictrix Albuquerque et al. 2005 is the type species of the genus Truepera within the phylum Deinococcus/Thermus. T. radiovictrix is of special interest not only because of its isolated phylogenetic location in the order Deinococcales, but also because of its ability to grow under multiple extreme conditions in alkaline, moderately saline, and high temperature habitats. Of particular interest is the fact that, T. radiovictrix is also remarkably resistant to ionizing radiation, a feature it shares with members of the genus Deinococcus. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the family Trueperaceae and the fourth type strain genome sequence from a member of the order Deinococcales. The 3,260,398 bp long genome with its 2,994 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes consists of one circular chromosome and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  13. Complete genome sequence of Mahella australiensis type strain (50-1 BONT)

    SciTech Connect

    Sikorski, Johannes; Teshima, Hazuki; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Huntemann, Marcel; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Ngatchou, Olivier Duplex; Rohde, Manfred; Pukall, Rudiger; Spring, Stefan; Abt, Birte; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Eisen, Jonathan; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla L.

    2011-01-01

    Mahella australiensis Bonilla Salinas et al. 2004 is the type species of the genus Mahella, which belongs to the family Thermoanaerobacteraceae. The species is of interest because it differs from other known anaerobic spore-forming bacteria in its G+C content, and in certain phenotypic traits, such as carbon source utilization and relationship to temperature. Moreo- ver, it has been discussed that this species might be an indigenous member of petroleum and oil reservoirs. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the genus Mahella and the ninth completed type strain genome sequence from the family Thermoanaerobacte- raceae. The 3,135,972 bp long genome with its 2,974 protein-coding and 59 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  14. Complete genome sequence of Conexibacter woesei type strain (ID131577T)

    PubMed Central

    Pukall, Rüdiger; Lapidus, Alla; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, Alex; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Chain, Patrick; Meincke, Linda; Sims, David; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2010-01-01

    The genus Conexibacter (Monciardini et al. 2003) represents the type genus of the family Conexibacteraceae (Stackebrandt 2005, emend. Zhi et al. 2009) with Conexibacter woesei as the type species of the genus. C. woesei is a representative of a deep evolutionary line of descent within the class Actinobacteria. Strain ID131577T was originally isolated from temperate forest soil in Gerenzano (Italy). Cells are small, short rods that are motile by peritrichous flagella. They may form aggregates after a longer period of growth and, then as a typical characteristic, an undulate structure is formed by self-aggregation of flagella with entangled bacterial cells. Here we describe the features of the organism, together with the complete sequence and annotation. The 6,359,369 bp long genome of C. woesei contains 5,950 protein-coding and 48 RNA genes and is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304704

  15. Complete genome sequence of Tsukamurella paurometabola type strain (no. 33T)

    PubMed Central

    Munk, A. Christine; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Brettin, Thomas; Yasawong, Montri; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Sikorski, Johannes; Göker, Markus; Detter, John C.; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2011-01-01

    Tsukamurella paurometabola corrig. (Steinhaus 1941) Collins et al. 1988 is the type species of the genus Tsukamurella, which is the type genus to the family Tsukamurellaceae. The species is not only of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location, but also because it is a human opportunistic pathogen with some strains of the species reported to cause lung infection, lethal meningitis, and necrotizing tenosynovitis. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the genus Tsukamurella and the first genome sequence of a member of the family Tsukamurellaceae. The 4,479,724 bp long genome contains a 99,806 bp long plasmid and a total of 4,335 protein-coding and 56 RNA genes, and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21886861

  16. Complete genome sequence of Conexibacter woesei type strain (ID131577T)

    SciTech Connect

    Pukall, Rudiger; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, A; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Mavromatis, K; Ivanova, N; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Meincke, Linda; Sims, David; Detter, J. Chris; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2010-01-01

    The genus Conexibacter (Monciardini et al. 2003) represents the type genus of the family Conexibacteraceae (Stackebrandt 2005, emend. Zhi et al. 2009) with Conexibacter woesei as the type species of the genus. C. woesei is a representative of a deep evolutionary line of des-cent within the class Actinobacteria. Strain ID131577T was originally isolated from temperate forest soil in Gerenzano (Italy). Cells are small, short rods that are motile by peritrichous fla-gella. They may form aggregates after a longer period of growth and, then as a typical charac-teristic, an undulate structure is formed by self-aggregation of flagella with entangled bacteri-al cells. Here we describe the features of the organism, together with the complete sequence and annotation. The 6,359,369 bp long genome of C. woesei contains 5,950 protein-coding and 48 RNA genes and is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  17. Complete genome sequence of Thermosphaera aggregans type strain (M11TL).

    PubMed

    Spring, Stefan; Rachel, Reinhard; Lapidus, Alla; Davenport, Karen; Tice, Hope; Copeland, Alex; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia C; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Heimerl, Thomas; Weikl, Fabian; Brambilla, Evelyne; Göker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-06-15

    Thermosphaera aggregans Huber et al. 1998 is the type species of the genus Thermosphaera, which comprises at the time of writing only one species. This species represents archaea with a hyperthermophilic, heterotrophic, strictly anaerobic and fermentative phenotype. The type strain M11TL(T) was isolated from a water-sediment sample of a hot terrestrial spring (Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming). Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 1,316,595 bp long single replicon genome with its 1,410 protein-coding and 47 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  18. Complete genome sequence of Chitinophaga pinensis type strain (UQM 2034T)

    SciTech Connect

    Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Abt, Birte; Spring, Stefan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Copeland, A; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Chen, Feng; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Detter, J C; Brettin, Thomas S; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lucas, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Chitinophaga pinensis Sangkhobol and Skerman 1981 is the type strain of the species which is the type species of the rapidly growing genus Chitinophaga in the sphingobacterial family Chitinophagaceae . Members of the genus Chitinophaga vary in shape between filaments and spherical bodies without the production of a fruiting body, produce myxospores, and are of special interest for their ability to degrade chitin. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Chitinophagaceae , and the 9,127,347 bp long single replicon genome with its 7,397 protein-coding and 95 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  19. Complete genome sequence of Sphaerobacter thermophilus type strain (S 6022T)

    SciTech Connect

    Pati, Amrita; LaButti, Kurt; Pukall, Rudiger; Nolan, Matt; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Copeland, A; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pitluck, Sam; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Brettin, Thomas S; Sikorski, Johannes; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla L.

    2010-01-01

    Sphaerobacter thermophilus Demharter et al. 1989 is the sole and type species of the genus Sphaerobacter, which is the type genus of the family Sphaerobacteraceae, the order Sphaerobacterales and the subclass Sphaerobacteridae. Phylogenetically, it belongs to the genomically little studied class of the Thermomicrobia in the bacterial phylum Chloroflexi. Here, the genome of strain S 6022T is described which is an obligate aerobe that was originally isolated from an aerated laboratory-scale fermentor that was pulse fed with municipal sewage sludge. We describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the thermomicrobial subclass Sphaerobacteridae, and the second sequence from the chloroflexal class Thermomicrobia. The 3,993,764 bp genome with its 3,525 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  20. Complete genome sequence of Jonesia denitrificans type strain (Prevot 55134T)

    SciTech Connect

    Pukall, Rudiger; Gehrich-Schroeter, Gabriele; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, Sam; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Copeland, A; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Detter, J. Chris; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Han, Cliff

    2009-01-01

    Jonesia denitrificans (Prevot 1961) Rocourt et al. 1987 is the type species of the genus Jonesia, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its isolated location in the actinobacterial suborder Micrococcineae. J. denitrificans is characterized by a typical coryneform morphology and is able to form irregular nonsporulating rods showing branched and clublike forms. Coccoid cells occur in older cultures. J. denitrificans is classified as a pathogenic organism for animals (vertebrates). The type strain whose genome is described here was originally isolated from cooked ox blood. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the genus for which a complete genome sequence is described. The 2,749,646 bp long genome with its 2558 protein-coding and 71 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  1. Complete genome sequence of Thermosphaera aggregans type strain (M11TLT)

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Stefan; Rachel, Reinhard; Lapidus, Alla; Davenport, Karen; Tice, Hope; Copeland, Alex; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia C.; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Heimerl, Thomas; Weikl, Fabian; Brambilla, Evelyne; Göker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Thermosphaera aggregans Huber et al. 1998 is the type species of the genus Thermosphaera, which comprises at the time of writing only one species. This species represents archaea with a hyperthermophilic, heterotrophic, strictly anaerobic and fermentative phenotype. The type strain M11TLT was isolated from a water-sediment sample of a hot terrestrial spring (Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming). Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 1,316,595 bp long single replicon genome with its 1,410 protein-coding and 47 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304709

  2. Complete genome sequence of Desulfohalobium retbaense type strain (HR100T)

    SciTech Connect

    Spring, Stefan; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, A; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Land, Miriam L; Chen, Feng; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Munk, Christine; Kiss, Hajnalka; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Han, Cliff; Brettin, Thomas S; Detter, J. Chris; Schuler, Esther; Goker, Markus; Rohde, Manfred; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Desulfohalobium retbaense (Ollivier et al. 1991) is the type species of the polyphyletic genus Desulfohalobium, which comprises, at the time of writing, two species and represents the family Desulfohalobiaceae within the Deltaproteobacteria. D. retbaense is a moderately halophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium, which can utilize H2 and a limited range of organic substrates, which are incompletely oxidized to acetate and CO2, for growth. The type strain HR100T was isolated from sediments of the hypersaline Retba Lake in Senegal. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the family Desulfohalobiaceae. The 2,909,567 bp genome (one chromosome and a 45,263 bp plasmid) with its 2,552 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  3. Complete genome sequence of Sphaerobacter thermophilus type strain (S 6022T)

    PubMed Central

    Pati, Amrita; LaButti, Kurt; Pukall, Rüdiger; Nolan, Matt; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Copeland, Alex; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pitluck, Sam; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chain, Patrick; Brettin, Thomas; Sikorski, Johannes; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla

    2010-01-01

    Sphaerobacter thermophilus Demharter et al. 1989 is the sole and type species of the genus Sphaerobacter, which is the type genus of the family Sphaerobacteraceae, the order Sphaerobacterales and the subclass Sphaerobacteridae. Phylogenetically, it belongs to the genomically little studied class of the Thermomicrobia in the bacterial phylum Chloroflexi. Here, the genome of strain S 6022T is described which is an obligate aerobe that was originally isolated from an aerated laboratory-scale fermentor that was pulse fed with municipal sewage sludge. We describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the thermomicrobial subclass Sphaerobacteridae, and the second sequence from the chloroflexal class Thermomicrobia. The 3,993,764 bp genome with its 3,525 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304677

  4. Complete genome sequence of Desulfohalobium retbaense type strain (HR100T)

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Stefan; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, Alex; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Land, Miriam; Chen, Feng; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Munk, Christine; Kiss, Hajnalka; Chain, Patrick; Han, Cliff; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Schüler, Esther; Göker, Markus; Rohde, Manfred; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Desulfohalobium retbaense (Ollivier et al. 1991) is the type species of the polyphyletic genus Desulfohalobium, which comprises, at the time of writing, two species and represents the family Desulfohalobiaceae within the Deltaproteobacteria. D. retbaense is a moderately halophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium, which can utilize H2 and a limited range of organic substrates, which are incompletely oxidized to acetate and CO2, for growth. The type strain HR100T was isolated from sediments of the hypersaline Retba Lake in Senegal. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the family Desulfohalobiaceae. The 2,909,567 bp genome (one chromosome and a 45,263 bp plasmid) with its 2,552 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304676

  5. Complete genome sequence of Mahella australiensis type strain (50-1 BONT)

    PubMed Central

    Sikorski, Johannes; Teshima, Hazuki; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Huntemann, Marcel; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Ngatchou-Djao, Olivier D.; Rohde, Manfred; Pukall, Rüdiger; Spring, Stefan; Abt, Birte; Göker, Markus; Detter, John C.; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla

    2011-01-01

    Mahella australiensis Bonilla Salinas et al. 2004 is the type species of the genus Mahella, which belongs to the family Thermoanaerobacteraceae. The species is of interest because it differs from other known anaerobic spore-forming bacteria in its G+C content, and in certain phenotypic traits, such as carbon source utilization and relationship to temperature. Moreover, it has been discussed that this species might be an indigenous member of petroleum and oil reservoirs. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the genus Mahella and the ninth completed type strain genome sequence from the family Thermoanaerobacteraceae. The 3,135,972 bp long genome with its 2,974 protein-coding and 59 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21886860

  6. Complete genome sequence of Chitinophaga pinensis type strain (UQM 2034T)

    PubMed Central

    Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Abt, Birte; Spring, Stefan; Lapidus, Alla; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Copeland, Alex; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Chen, Feng; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Chain, Patrick; Saunders, Elizabeth; Detter, John C.; Brettin, Thomas; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lucas, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Chitinophaga pinensis Sangkhobol and Skerman 1981 is the type strain of the species which is the type species of the rapidly growing genus Chitinophaga in the sphingobacterial family ‘Chitinophagaceae’. Members of the genus Chitinophaga vary in shape between filaments and spherical bodies without the production of a fruiting body, produce myxospores, and are of special interest for their ability to degrade chitin. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family ‘Chitinophagaceae’, and the 9,127,347 bp long single replicon genome with its 7,397 protein-coding and 95 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304681

  7. Complete genome sequence of Segniliparus rotundus type strain (CDC 1076T)

    SciTech Connect

    Sikorski, Johannes; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Misra, Monica; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Jando, Marlen; Schneider, Susan; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chertkov, Olga; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Segniliparus rotundus Butler 2005 is the type species of the genus Segniliparus, which is cur-rently the only genus in the corynebacterial family Segniliparaceae. This family is of large in-terest because of a novel late-emerging genus-specific mycolate pattern. The type strain has been isolated from human sputum and is probably an opportunistic pathogen. Here we de-scribe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and anno-tation. This is the first completed genome sequence of the family Segniliparaceae. The 3,157,527 bp long genome with its 3,081 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  8. Complete genome sequence of Tsukamurella paurometabola type strain (no. 33T)

    SciTech Connect

    Munk, Christine; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Brettin, Thomas S; Yasawong, Montri; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Sikorski, Johannes; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2011-01-01

    Tsukamurella paurometabola corrig. (Steinhaus 1941) Collins et al. 1988 is the type species of the genus Tsukamurella, which is the type genus to the family Tsukamurellaceae. The spe- cies is not only of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location, but also because it is a human opportunistic pathogen with some strains of the species reported to cause lung in- fection, lethal meningitis, and necrotizing tenosynovitis. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the genus Tsukamurella and the first genome sequence of a member of the family Tsukamurellaceae. The 4,479,724 bp long genome contains a 99,806 bp long plasmid and a total of 4,335 protein-coding and 56 RNA genes, and is a part of the Ge- nomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  9. Molecular Typing of Vibrio parahaemolyticus Strains Isolated from Mollusks in the North Adriatic Sea.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mohammad Shamsur; Carraro, Roberta; Cardazzo, Barbara; Carraro, Lisa; Meneguolo, Davide Boscolo; Martino, Maria Elena; Andreani, Nadia Andrea; Bordin, Paola; Mioni, Renzo; Barco, Lisa; Novelli, Enrico; Balzan, Stefania; Fasolato, Luca

    2017-08-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is an emerging foodborne pathogen in the Mediterranean, usually associated with shellfish consumption. The increase in the number of outbreaks in Europe is primarily associated with the global warming of the ocean that has a great impact on the spread and genetic selection of waterborne pathogens. The primary role of Italy in Europe's mollusk production, together with the fact that cases of infections with V. parahaemolyticus are not always notified to the European community, highlighted the necessity of acquiring new information about the epidemiological involvement of shellfish products. The aim of the study was to provide useful insights into the first steps of the Risk Assessment associated with V. parahaemolyticus through the molecular characterization of isolates from commercialized mollusks. A total of 102 strains identified as V. parahaemolyticus were investigated as part of a larger sampling (1-year survey) from several shellfish species collected from the Venice lagoon and the North Adriatic sea. All strains were characterized by multilocus sequence typing and tested for the presence of virulence genes (trh and tdh). The study of sampling/environmental factors and epidemiological analyses was performed to describe the behaviors of the different genetic populations. The population structure analysis highlighted three genetic clusters that could be subject to temperature selection during cold (≤15°C) and warm (>16°C) seasons. Moreover, other factors, such as molluscan species (clams/mussels), probably played a role in the distribution of genetic clusters. Although few strains carried the virulence factors (n = 6 trh(+)), epidemiological links with clinical isolates and a local dissemination of some sequence types were underlined. This work provides a useful background on the genotype spread as a first step in the Hazard Identification in light of future climate changes.

  10. Complete genome sequence of Capnocytophaga ochracea type strain (VPI 2845T)

    SciTech Connect

    Mavromatis, K; Gronow, Sabine; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Land, Miriam L; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Bruce, David; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, N; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Brettin, Thomas S; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Bristow, James; Goker, Markus; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Capnocytophaga ochracea (Pr vot et al. 1956) Leadbetter et al. 1982 is the type species of the genus Capnocytophaga. It is of interest because of its location in the Flavobacteriaceae, a genomically not yet charted family within the order Flavobacteriales. The species grows as fusiform to rod shaped cells which tend to form clumps and are able to move by gliding. C. ochracea is known as a capnophilic (CO2-requiring) organism with the ability to grow under anaerobic as well as aerobic conditions (oxygen concentration larger than 15%), here only in the presence of 5% CO2. Strain VPI 2845T, the type strain of the species, is portrayed in this report as a gliding, Gram-negative bacterium, originally isolated from a human oral cavity. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome se-quence, and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence from the flavobacterial genus Capnocytophaga, and the 2,612,925 bp long single replicon genome with its 2193 protein-coding and 59 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  11. Complete genome sequence of Capnocytophaga ochracea type strain (VPI 2845T)

    SciTech Connect

    Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Gronow, Sabine; Saunders, Elizabeth; Land, Miriam; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Tice1, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chain, Patrick; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jefferies, Cynthia C.; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Bristow, James; Goker, Markus; Rohde, Manfred; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2009-05-20

    Capnocytophaga ochracea (Prevot et al. 1956) Leadbetter et al. 1982 is the type species of the genus Capnocytophaga. It is of interest because of its location in the Flavobacteriaceae, a genomically yet uncharted family within the order Flavobacteriales. The species grows as fusiform to rod shaped cells which tend to form clumps and are able to move by gliding. C. ochracea is known as a capnophilic organism with the ability to grow under anaerobic as well as under aerobic conditions (oxygen concentration larger than 15percent), here only in the presence of 5percent CO2. Strain VPI 2845T, the type strain of the species, is portrayed in this report as a gliding, Gram-negative bacterium, originally isolated from a human oral cavity. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence from the flavobacterial genus Capnocytophaga, and the 2,612,925 bp long single replicon genome with its 2193 protein-coding and 59 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  12. Complete genome sequence of Capnocytophaga ochracea type strain (VPI 2845T)

    PubMed Central

    Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Gronow, Sabine; Saunders, Elizabeth; Land, Miriam; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chain, Patrick; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Bristow, James; Göker, Markus; Rohde, Manfred; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Capnocytophaga ochracea (Prévot et al. 1956) Leadbetter et al. 1982 is the type species of the genus Capnocytophaga. It is of interest because of its location in the Flavobacteriaceae, a genomically not yet charted family within the order Flavobacteriales. The species grows as fusiform to rod shaped cells which tend to form clumps and are able to move by gliding. C. ochracea is known as a capnophilic (CO2-requiring) organism with the ability to grow under anaerobic as well as aerobic conditions (oxygen concentration larger than 15%), here only in the presence of 5% CO2. Strain VPI 2845T, the type strain of the species, is portrayed in this report as a gliding, Gram-negative bacterium, originally isolated from a human oral cavity. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence from the flavobacterial genus Capnocytophaga, and the 2,612,925 bp long single replicon genome with its 2193 protein-coding and 59 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304645

  13. Job strain in different types of employment affects the immune response.

    PubMed

    Boscolo, Paolo; Forcella, Laura; Reale, Marcella; Vianale, Giovina; Battisti, Uliano; Bonfiglioli, Roberta; Cortini, Michela; Di Giampaolo, Luca; Di Donato, Angela; Salerno, Silvana

    2012-01-01

    The immune system, in cooperation with neuroendocrine functions, defends from cancer and infections mainly by the activity of blood natural killer (NK) cells. Blood NK activity may be influenced by the type of employment since work is the central part of life; moreover, job stress is a situation affecting both neuroendocrine and immune systems. This study examines anxiety (by STAI 1 and 2), job strain (by the Karasek's JCQ) and blood NK activity (by an in vitro radio-isotopic method) of 134 male workers. These men, over 38 years old with stable employment, were working in factories, in construction yards, in offices, as hospital attendants or as self-employed craftsmen. Workers in factories and in construction yards, with high job strain, showed lower NK activity, while office employees, with low job demand, and craftsmen with low anxiety and elevated decision latitude, showed higher NK activity; the level of NK activity of the hospital attendants was between the other groups. In conclusion, this study confirms that the type of employment, related to job stress, affects blood NK activity. Moreover, blood NK activity may be used in the bio-monitoring of workers at high risk.

  14. Complete genome sequence of Veillonella parvula type strain (Te3T)

    SciTech Connect

    Gronow, Sabine; Welnitz, Sabine; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Ivanova, N; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, A; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, Sam; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Brettin, Thomas S; Han, Cliff; Detter, J. Chris; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Pati, Amrita; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lucas, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Veillonella parvula (Veillon and Zuber 1898) Pr vot 1933 is the type species of the genus Veillonella in the family Veillonellaceae within the order Clostridiales. The species V. parvula is of interest because it is frequently isolated from dental plaque in the human oral cavity and can cause opportunistic infections. The species is strictly anaerobic and grows as small cocci which usually occur in pairs. Veillonellae are characterized by their unusual metabolism which is centered on the activity of the enzyme methylmalonyl-CoA decarboxylase. Strain Te3T, the type strain of the species, was isolated from the human intestinal tract. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the large clostridial family Veillonellaceae, and the 2,132,142 bp long single replicon genome with its 1859 protein-coding and 61 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  15. Experimental infection of lambs with C and S-type strains of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis: immunological and pathological findings

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The two main genotypes of recognized isolates of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) are cattle (C) and sheep (S) strains. An experimental infection was conducted to establish the effect of Map strain on the pathogenesis of ovine paratuberculosis. Twenty-four out of thirty 1.5-month-old Assaf lambs were divided into 4 groups of 6 and infected orally with three low passage field isolates, two of S- (22G and the pigmented Ovicap49) and one of C– (764) type, and the reference K-10 strain (C type). The remaining six animals were unchallenged controls. Animals were euthanized at 150 and 390 days post-infection (dpi). Throughout the experiment, the peripheral immune response was assessed and histological and molecular (PCR) studies were conducted on samples of intestine and related lymphoid tissue. Specific antibody and IFN-γ production was significantly higher in animals infected with the C strains, while no consistent IFN- γ responses were observed in the S-type strain infected groups. A positive intradermal skin test response was detected in all infected groups. Lambs infected with S-type strains had granulomatous lesions restricted to the lymphoid tissue with no differences in the lesion intensity over time. In both C–type strain groups, lesions were more severe at 150 dpi while at 390 dpi lesions, characterized by well-demarcated granulomas with fibrosis, decreased in severity. Only infected lambs were positive to PCR. These results suggest that the strain of Map has a strong influence over the immune and pathological responses developed by the host. Lesions induced by C–type strains in lambs show a regressive character and tend to decrease as the infection progresses. PMID:24428881

  16. Experimental infection of lambs with C and S-type strains of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis: immunological and pathological findings.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Miguel; Benavides, Julio; Sevilla, Iker A; Fuertes, Miguel; Castaño, Pablo; Delgado, Laetitia; García Marín, J Francisco; Garrido, Joseba M; Ferreras, M Carmen; Pérez, Valentín

    2014-01-16

    The two main genotypes of recognized isolates of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) are cattle (C) and sheep (S) strains. An experimental infection was conducted to establish the effect of Map strain on the pathogenesis of ovine paratuberculosis. Twenty-four out of thirty 1.5-month-old Assaf lambs were divided into 4 groups of 6 and infected orally with three low passage field isolates, two of S- (22G and the pigmented Ovicap49) and one of C- (764) type, and the reference K-10 strain (C type). The remaining six animals were unchallenged controls. Animals were euthanized at 150 and 390 days post-infection (dpi). Throughout the experiment, the peripheral immune response was assessed and histological and molecular (PCR) studies were conducted on samples of intestine and related lymphoid tissue. Specific antibody and IFN-γ production was significantly higher in animals infected with the C strains, while no consistent IFN- γ responses were observed in the S-type strain infected groups. A positive intradermal skin test response was detected in all infected groups. Lambs infected with S-type strains had granulomatous lesions restricted to the lymphoid tissue with no differences in the lesion intensity over time. In both C-type strain groups, lesions were more severe at 150 dpi while at 390 dpi lesions, characterized by well-demarcated granulomas with fibrosis, decreased in severity. Only infected lambs were positive to PCR. These results suggest that the strain of Map has a strong influence over the immune and pathological responses developed by the host. Lesions induced by C-type strains in lambs show a regressive character and tend to decrease as the infection progresses.

  17. Difference in Degradation Patterns on Inulin-type Fructans among Strains of Lactobacillus delbrueckii and Lactobacillus paracasei.

    PubMed

    Tsujikawa, Yuji; Nomoto, Ryohei; Osawa, Ro

    2013-01-01

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii strains were assessed for their degradation patterns of various carbohydrates with specific reference to inulin-type fructans in comparison with those of Lactobacillus paracasei strains. Firstly, growth curves on glucose, fructose, sucrose and inulin-type fructans with increasing degrees of fructose polymerization (i.e., 1-kestose, fructo-oligosaccharides and inulin) of the strains were compared. L. paracasei DSM 20020 grew well on all these sugars, while the growth rates of the 4 L. delbrueckii strains were markedly higher on the fructans with a greater degree of polymerization than on fructose and sucrose. Secondly, sugar compositions of spent cultures of the strains of L. delbrueckii and L. paracasei grown in mMRS containing either the fructans or inulin were determined by thin layer chromatography, in which the spent cultures of L. paracasei DSM 20020 showed spots of short fructose and sucrose fractions, whereas those of the L. delbrueckii strains did not show such spots at all. These results suggest that, unlike the L. paracasei strains, the L. delbrueckii strains do not degrade the inulin-type fructans extracellularly, but transport the fructans capable of greater polymerization preferentially into their cells to be degraded intracellularly for their growth.

  18. Detection of multiple strains of Pasteurella multocida in fowl cholera outbreaks by polymerase chain reaction-based typing.

    PubMed

    Shivachandra, S B; Kumar, A A; Gautam, R; Saxena, M K; Chaudhuri, P; Srivastava, S K

    2005-12-01

    Applicability of molecular methods for the detection and differentiation of Pasteurella multocida strains involved in two separate fowl cholera outbreaks in a single poultry farm was investigated. A total of 12 and 18 strains of P. multocida obtained from two separate outbreaks were subjected to phenotypic and genotypic characterization. Phenotypically, all strains were similar; however, DNA-based techniques by employing polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were found to be highly specific and sensitive for rapid detection and differentiation of strains. All 30 strains gave amplicons of approximately 460 bp and approximately 1,044 bp specific for P. multocida and capsular serogroup A in the Multiplex Capsular PCR typing system. Molecular typing techniques such as repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR, enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR and single primer PCR differentiated all 30 strains into different profiles. However, similar patterns of genome fragments were observed among all strains following restriction endonuclease analysis using the enzyme HpaII. The current investigation revealed involvement of the same and multiple strains of P. multocida in two outbreaks. The results also indicated that molecular methods of detection and typing are rapid in comparison with conventional methods for epidemiological investigations of fowl cholera outbreaks.

  19. Difference in Degradation Patterns on Inulin-type Fructans among Strains of Lactobacillus delbrueckii and Lactobacillus paracasei

    PubMed Central

    TSUJIKAWA, Yuji; NOMOTO, Ryohei; OSAWA, Ro

    2013-01-01

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii strains were assessed for their degradation patterns of various carbohydrates with specific reference to inulin-type fructans in comparison with those of Lactobacillus paracasei strains. Firstly, growth curves on glucose, fructose, sucrose and inulin-type fructans with increasing degrees of fructose polymerization (i.e., 1-kestose, fructo-oligosaccharides and inulin) of the strains were compared. L. paracasei DSM 20020 grew well on all these sugars, while the growth rates of the 4 L. delbrueckii strains were markedly higher on the fructans with a greater degree of polymerization than on fructose and sucrose. Secondly, sugar compositions of spent cultures of the strains of L. delbrueckii and L. paracasei grown in mMRS containing either the fructans or inulin were determined by thin layer chromatography, in which the spent cultures of L. paracasei DSM 20020 showed spots of short fructose and sucrose fractions, whereas those of the L. delbrueckii strains did not show such spots at all. These results suggest that, unlike the L. paracasei strains, the L. delbrueckii strains do not degrade the inulin-type fructans extracellularly, but transport the fructans capable of greater polymerization preferentially into their cells to be degraded intracellularly for their growth. PMID:24936375

  20. Comparison of two novel types of sensor to monitor the strain of concrete in F-T tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Haifeng; Liao, Kaixing; Kong, Xianglong; Li, Shengyuan; Ding, Yanbing; Sun, Changsen; Zhao, Xuefeng

    2017-04-01

    In order to monitor the strain of concrete caused by freeze-thaw (F-T) cycles, two novel types of white light interferometer (WLI) sensor are designed and tested. The first type of sensor is poured the whole saturated concrete cylinder which coiled optical fiber with epoxy for encapsulation, and the second type coat neutral silicone sealant on the surface of cylinder, where enwound with optical fiber only. Each of the type was conducted on two sensors, the sensor of the first type was named W-sensor, and the sensor of the second type was named S-sensor. The comparison of the two novel types of sensor was conducted based on the test results, and the test result showed that though all of the two types of sensor can monitor the variation of strain with the process of F-T cycles, however, the type of S-sensor is more stability and reasonable.

  1. Development of a molecular method for the typing of Brettanomyces bruxellensis (Dekkera bruxellensis) at the strain level.

    PubMed

    Miot-Sertier, C; Lonvaud-Funel, A

    2007-02-01

    In recent years, Brettanomyces/Dekkera bruxellensis has caused increasingly severe quality problems in the wine industry. A typing method at the strain level is needed for a better knowledge of the dispersion and the dynamics of these yeasts from grape to wine. Three molecular tools, namely random-amplified polymorphic DNA, PCR fingerprinting with microsatellite oligonucleotide primers and SAU-PCR, were explored for their relevance to typing strains of Brettanomyces bruxellensis. The results indicated that discrimination of each individual strain was not possible with a single PCR typing technique. We described a typing method for B. bruxellensis based on restriction enzyme analysis and pulse field gel electrophoresis (REA-PFGE). Results showed that electrophoretic profiles were reproducible and specific for each strain under study. Consequently, REA-PFGE should be considered for the discrimination of B. bruxellensis strains. This technique allowed a fine discrimination of B. bruxellensis, as strains were identified by a particular profile. This study constitutes a prerequisite for accurate and appropriate investigations on the diversity of strains throughout the winemaking and ageing process. Such studies will probably give clearer and more up-to-date information on the origin of the presence of Brettanomyces in wine after vinification when they are latent spoilage agents.

  2. Genome Analysis of Listeria monocytogenes Sequence Type 8 Strains Persisting in Salmon and Poultry Processing Environments and Comparison with Related Strains

    PubMed Central

    Fagerlund, Annette; Langsrud, Solveig; Schirmer, Bjørn C. T.; Møretrø, Trond; Heir, Even

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important foodborne pathogen responsible for the disease listeriosis, and can be found throughout the environment, in many foods and in food processing facilities. The main cause of listeriosis is consumption of food contaminated from sources in food processing environments. Persistence in food processing facilities has previously been shown for the L. monocytogenes sequence type (ST) 8 subtype. In the current study, five ST8 strains were subjected to whole-genome sequencing and compared with five additionally available ST8 genomes, allowing comparison of strains from salmon, poultry and cheese industry, in addition to a human clinical isolate. Genome-wide analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) confirmed that almost identical strains were detected in a Danish salmon processing plant in 1996 and in a Norwegian salmon processing plant in 2001 and 2011. Furthermore, we show that L. monocytogenes ST8 was likely to have been transferred between two poultry processing plants as a result of relocation of processing equipment. The SNP data were used to infer the phylogeny of the ST8 strains, separating them into two main genetic groups. Within each group, the plasmid and prophage content was almost entirely conserved, but between groups, these sequences showed strong divergence. The accessory genome of the ST8 strains harbored genetic elements which could be involved in rendering the ST8 strains resilient to incoming mobile genetic elements. These included two restriction-modification loci, one of which was predicted to show phase variable recognition sequence specificity through site-specific domain shuffling. Analysis indicated that the ST8 strains harbor all important known L. monocytogenes virulence factors, and ST8 strains are commonly identified as the causative agents of invasive listeriosis. Therefore, the persistence of this L. monocytogenes subtype in food processing facilities poses a significant concern for food safety

  3. First Whole-Genome Sequence of a Haemophilus influenzae Type e Strain Isolated from a Patient with Invasive Disease in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Giufrè, Maria; Cardines, Rita

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the present era of conjugate vaccines against Haemophilus influenzae type b, non-vaccine-preventable strains are of concern. Here, we report the first whole-genome sequence of an invasive H. influenzae type e strain. This genomic information will enable further investigations on encapsulated non-type b H. influenzae strains. PMID:28360180

  4. Multilocus sequence typing of Mycoplasma hyorhinis strains identified by a real-time TaqMan PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Tocqueville, Véronique; Ferré, Séverine; Nguyen, Ngoc Hong Phuc; Kempf, Isabelle; Marois-Créhan, Corinne

    2014-05-01

    A real-time TaqMan PCR assay based on the gene encoding the protein p37 was developed to detect Mycoplasma hyorhinis. Its specificity was validated with 29 epidemiologically unrelated M. hyorhinis strains (28 field strains and one reference strain) and other mycoplasma species or with other microorganisms commonly found in pigs. The estimated detection limit of this qPCR assay was 125 microorganism equivalents/μl. The same 29 epidemiologically unrelated M. hyorhinis strains and four previously fully sequenced strains were typed by two portable typing methods, the sequencing of the p37 gene and a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme. The first method revealed 18 distinct nucleotide sequences and insufficient discriminatory power (0.934). The MLST scheme was developed with the sequenced genomes of the M. hyorhinis strains HUB-1, GDL-1, MCLD, and SK76 and based on the genes dnaA, rpoB, gyrB, gltX, adk, and gmk. In total, 2,304 bp of sequence was analyzed for each strain. MLST was capable of subdividing the 33 strains into 29 distinct sequence types. The discriminatory power of the method was >0.95, which is the threshold value for interpreting typing results with confidence (D=0.989). Population analysis showed that recombination in M. hyorhinis occurs and that strains are diverse but with a certain clonality (one unique clonal complex was identified). The new qPCR assay and the robust MLST scheme are available for the acquisition of new knowledge on M. hyorhinis epidemiology. A web-accessible database has been set up for the M. hyorhinis MLST scheme at http://pubmlst.org/mhyorhinis/.

  5. Three cases of paralytic poliomyelitis associated with type 3 vaccine poliovirus strains in Bulgaria.

    PubMed

    Korsun, Neli; Kojouharova, Mira; Vladimirova, Nadezhda; Fiore, Lucia; Litvinenko, Ivan; Buttinelli, Gabriele; Fiore, Stefano; Voynova-Georgieva, Violeta; Mladenova, Zornitsa; Georgieva, Daniela

    2009-09-01

    Oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) can cause, in extremely rare cases vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis in recipients, or contacts of vaccinees. Three cases of vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis (two contacts and one recipient) occurred in the Bourgas region of Bulgaria in the spring of 2006. The first two cases, notified as acute flaccid paralysis, were 55 days old unvaccinated twin brothers, having been in contact with vaccinees. The third case concerned a 4-month-old infant who had received the first OPV dose 37 days prior to the onset of illness. Complete clinical, epidemiological, virological, serological and molecular investigations of the children with paralysis and their contacts were undertaken. In all the three cases type 3 polioviruses were isolated from fecal samples and characterized as Sabin-like poliovirus strains. Type 3 polioviruses isolated from the twin brothers demonstrated by sequence analysis U-to-C back mutation at nt 472 of the 5' UTR, known to correlate with neurovirulence, and mutation in the VP1 region. Type 3 poliovirus isolated from the third child demonstrated in the 3D sequenced region a recombination with Sabin type 1 poliovirus. In the latter region, three silent mutations and one, resulting in amino acid substitution, were also observed. The clinical, epidemiological and virological data and the neurological sequelae observed 60 days following the onset of paralysis, confirmed the diagnosis of vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis in all the three patients.

  6. Metal nanoparticle assisted polymerase chain reaction for strain typing of Salmonella Typhi.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Asma; Sarwar, Yasra; Raza, Zulfiqar Ali; Hussain, Syed Zajif; Mustafa, Tanveer; Khan, Waheed S; Ghauri, Muhammad Afzal; Haque, Abdul; Hussain, Irshad

    2015-11-07

    Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi (S. Typhi) is the causative agent of typhoid fever and remains a major health threat in most of the developing countries. The prompt diagnosis of typhoid directly from the patient's blood requires high level of sensitivity and specificity. Some of us were the first to report PCR based diagnosis of typhoid. This approach has since then been reported by many scientists using different genomic targets. Since the number of bacteria circulating in the blood of a patient can be as low as 0.3 cfu ml(-1), there is always a room for improvement in diagnostic PCR. In the present study, the role of different types of nanoparticles was investigated to improve the existing PCR based methods for diagnosis and strain typing of S. Typhi (targeting Variable Number of Tandem Repeats [VNTR]) by using optimized PCR systems. Three different types of nanoparticles were used i.e., citrate stabilized gold nanoparticles, rhamnolipid stabilized gold and silver nanoparticles, and magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. The non-specific amplification was significantly reduced in VNTR typing when gold and silver nanoparticles were used in an appropriate concentration. More importantly, the addition of nanoparticles decreased the non-specificity to a significant level in the case of multiplex PCR thus further validating the reliability of PCR for the diagnosis of typhoid.

  7. The Host Genotype and Environment Affect Strain Types of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum Inhabiting the Intestinal Tracts of Twins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Hang, Xiaomin; Tan, Jing; Yang, Hong

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the influences of host genotype and environment on Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum inhabiting human intestines at the strain level, six pairs of twins, divided into two groups (children and adults), were recruited. Each group consisted of two monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs and one dizygotic (DZ) twin pair. Child twins had been living together from birth, while adult twins had been living separately for 5 to 10 years. A total of 345 B. longum subsp. longum isolates obtained from 60 fecal samples from these twins were analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and 35 sequence types (STs) were finally acquired. Comparison of strains within and between the twin pairs showed that no strains with identical STs were observed between unrelated individuals or within adult DZ twin pairs. Eight STs were found to be monophyletic, existing within MZ twins and child DZ twins. The similarity of strain types within child cotwins was significantly higher than that within adult cotwins, which indicated that environment was one of the important determinants in B. longum subsp. longum strain types inhabiting human intestines. However, although these differences between MZ and DZ twins were observed, it is still difficult to reach an exact conclusion about the impact of host genotype. This is mainly because of the limited number of subjects tested in the present study and the lack of strain types tracing in the same twin pairs from birth until adulthood. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Decreased regional left ventricular myocardial strain in type 1 diabetic children: a first sign of diabetic cardiomyopathy?

    PubMed Central

    Hodzic, Amir; Ribault, Virginie; Maragnes, Pascale; Milliez, Paul; Saloux, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background and Objectives Type 1 diabetes is a major cardiovascular risk factor associated with an excess of mortality in young adults due to premature cardiovascular events, which includes heart failure. The relation between type 1 diabetes and cardiac structure and function in children was poorly documented. Our study investigates (1) whether type 1 diabetic children have echocardiographic signs of subclinical cardiac dysfunction assessed by tissue Doppler strain and (2) whether state of metabolic control and diabetes duration have any influence on the cardiac event. Methods Standard echocardiography and tissue Doppler imaging were prospectively performed in type 1 diabetic children. Left ventricular dimensions, standard indices of systolic and diastolic function, and septal longitudinal strain were investigated. Results Thirty consecutive asymptomatic diabetic children (age: 12.4 [5–17] years; males: 53%) were compared to 30 age and sex-matched healthy control subjects. Left ventricular mass index and diastolic septal thickness were significantly increased in diabetic children. There was no difference between two groups as regards the left ventricular ejection fraction and conventional mitral Doppler parameters (E, A, Ea). The global longitudinal systolic strain and strain rate were found to be decreased in children with diabetes. The global longitudinal early diastolic strain rate (Esr) was negatively correlated with metabolic control. Longitudinal strain was not correlated with diabetes duration. Conclusion Children with Type 1 diabetes had subclinical alterations in left ventricular size and longitudinal myocardial deformation. PMID:28191526

  9. Immunological inter-strain crossreactivity correlated to 18S rDNA sequence types in Acanthamoeba spp.

    PubMed

    Walochnik, J; Obwaller, A; Aspöck, H

    2001-02-01

    Various species of the genus Acanthamoeba have been described as potential pathogens; however, differentiation of acanthamoebae remains problematic. The genus has been divided into 12 18S rDNA sequence types, most keratitis causing strains exhibiting sequence type T4. We recently isolated a keratitis causing Acanthamoeba strain showing sequence type T6, but being morphologically identical to a T4 strain. The aim of our study was to find out, whether the 18S rDNA sequence based identification correlates to immunological differentiation. The protein and antigen profiles of the T6 isolate and three reference Acanthamoeba strains were investigated using two sera from Acanthamoeba keratitis patients and one serum from an asymptomatic individual. It was shown, that the T6 strain produces a distinctly different immunological pattern, while patterns within T4 were identical. Affinity purified antibodies were used to further explore immunological cross-reactivity between sequence types. Altogether, the results of our study support the Acanthamoeba 18S rDNA sequence type classification in the investigated strains.

  10. Prevalence of CTX-M-Type extended-spectrum β-lactamases in Escherichia coli strains isolated in poultry farms.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Rossana; Castro, Beatriz; Espigares, Elena; Rodríguez-Álvarez, Cristobalina; Lecuona, María; Moreno, Elena; Espigares, Miguel; Arias, Angeles

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the study was to detect the prevalence of CTX-M-type extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL) in Escherichia coli strains isolated in healthy chickens at poultry farms in Tenerife, Spain. From November 2012 to February 2013, 260 live chickens were screened. Samples were cultured in chromogenic media. Suspect strains were identified by Vitek 2 system and ESBL production was confirmed by the double-disk synergy test. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was performed with XbaI (Promega, Madison, WI) to ESBL-E. coli isolates. The presence of CTX-M-type was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Of 260 rectal swabs, 237 (91.1%) were ESBL-E. coli, 196 (75.38%) strains were characterized by PFGE, and CTX-M-type was detected in 116 (59.1%) of these strains. With respect to the susceptibility patterns of E. coli blaCTX-M strains, 7.8% showed resistance to more than two non-β-lactam antibiotics. In our area, the prevalence of CTX-M-type in E. coli isolated in chicken was even higher than those found in other countries. The impact of food animals as a possible reservoir for ESBL-E. coli, especially CTX-M-type ESBL, and the dissemination of such strains into the food production chain need to be assessed.

  11. Complete genome sequence of Methanospirillum hungatei type strain JF1

    SciTech Connect

    Gunsalus, Robert; Cook, Lauren E.; Crable, Bryan R.; Rohlin, Lars; McDonald, Erin; Mouttaki, Housna; Sieber, Jessica R.; Poweleit, Nicole; Zhou, Hong; Lapidus, Alla; Daligault, Hajnalka E.; Land, Miriam L.; Gilna, Paul; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyripides, Nikos; Culley, David E.; McInerney, Michael J.

    2016-01-06

    Methanospirillum hungatei strain JF1 (DSM 864) is a methane-producing archaeon and is the type species of the genus Methanospirillum, which belongs to the family Methanospirillaceae within the order Methanomicrobiales. Its genome was selected for sequencing due to its ability to utilize hydrogen and carbon dioxide and/or formate as a sole source of energy. Ecologically, M. hungatei functions as the hydrogen- and/or formate-using partner with many species of syntrophic bacteria. Its morphology is distinct from other methanogens with the ability to form long chains of cells (up to 100 m in length), which are enclosed within a sheath-like structure, and terminal cells with polar flagella. The genome of M. hungatei strain JF1 is the first completely sequenced genome of the family Methanospirillaceae, and it has a circular genome of 3,544,738 bp containing 3,239 protein coding and 68 RNA genes. Furthermore, the large genome of M. hungatei JF1 suggests the presence of unrecognized biochemical/physiological properties that likely extend to the other Methanospirillaceae and include the ability to form the unusual sheath-like structure and to successfully interact with syntrophic bacteria.

  12. Hydrogen Susceptibility of Pre-strained Type 316L Austenitic Stainless Steels in Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mati, D.; Takasaki, A.; Uematsu, S.

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents the observations made as a result of hydrogen effects in austenitic stainless steels which led to reduction of its original mechanical properties. This paper therefore seeks to understand the mechanisms and effects induced by hydrogen leading to embrittlement. The samples of Type 316L austenitic stainless steel with 20% pre-strain were charged with hydrogen through galvanostastic cathodic loading for 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours respectively, with sample as Cathode and the platinum wire as Anode. Afterwards, they were fractured under tensile test at a slow strain rates. The loss of ductility was evident as observed by the brittle nature of fracture. Small pieces were cut-off near the fracture region and examined through XRD and SEM analysis. The peak widening and slight shifting of the peak positions was observed. The surface cracking was also observed, an indication of surface-induced stresses. The severity of the effects increased with the hydrogen loading time, which is predictive of a real service conditions for austenite steels in aqueous environments.

  13. The origin of the prion agent of kuru: molecular and biological strain typing

    PubMed Central

    Wadsworth, Jonathan D.F.; Joiner, Susan; Linehan, Jacqueline M.; Asante, Emmanuel A.; Brandner, Sebastian; Collinge, John

    2008-01-01

    Kuru is an acquired human prion disease that primarily affected the Fore linguistic group of the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea. The central clinical feature of kuru is progressive cerebellar ataxia and, in sharp contrast to most cases of sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (CJD), dementia is a less prominent and usually late clinical feature. In this regard, kuru is more similar to variant CJD, which also has similar prodromal symptoms of sensory disturbance and joint pains in the legs and psychiatric and behavioural changes. Since a significant part of the clinicopathological diversity seen in human prion disease is likely to relate to the propagation of distinct human prion strains, we have compared the transmission properties of kuru prions with those isolated from patients with sporadic, iatrogenic and variant CJD in both transgenic and wild-type mice. These data have established that kuru prions have prion strain properties equivalent to those of classical (sporadic and iatrogenic) CJD prions but distinct from variant CJD prions. Here, we review these findings and discuss how peripheral routes of infection and other factors may be critical modifiers of the kuru phenotype. PMID:18849291

  14. Review. The origin of the prion agent of kuru: molecular and biological strain typing.

    PubMed

    Wadsworth, Jonathan D F; Joiner, Susan; Linehan, Jacqueline M; Asante, Emmanuel A; Brandner, Sebastian; Collinge, John

    2008-11-27

    Kuru is an acquired human prion disease that primarily affected the Fore linguistic group of the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea. The central clinical feature of kuru is progressive cerebellar ataxia and, in sharp contrast to most cases of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), dementia is a less prominent and usually late clinical feature. In this regard, kuru is more similar to variant CJD, which also has similar prodromal symptoms of sensory disturbance and joint pains in the legs and psychiatric and behavioural changes. Since a significant part of the clinicopathological diversity seen in human prion disease is likely to relate to the propagation of distinct human prion strains, we have compared the transmission properties of kuru prions with those isolated from patients with sporadic, iatrogenic and variant CJD in both transgenic and wild-type mice. These data have established that kuru prions have prion strain properties equivalent to those of classical (sporadic and iatrogenic) CJD prions but distinct from variant CJD prions. Here, we review these findings and discuss how peripheral routes of infection and other factors may be critical modifiers of the kuru phenotype.

  15. Profile of Cytokines and Chemokines Triggered by Wild-Type Strains of Rabies Virus in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Appolinário, Camila Michele; Allendorf, Susan Dora; Peres, Marina Gea; Ribeiro, Bruna Devidé; Fonseca, Clóvis R.; Vicente, Acácia Ferreira; de Paula Antunes, João Marcelo A.; Megid, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Rabies is a lethal infectious disease that causes 55,000 human deaths per year and is transmitted by various mammalian species, such as dogs and bats. The host immune response is essential for avoiding viral progression and promoting viral clearance. Cytokines and chemokines are crucial in the development of an immediate antiviral response; the rabies virus (RABV) attempts to evade this immune response. The virus's capacity for evasion is correlated with its pathogenicity and the host's inflammatory response, with highly pathogenic strains being the most efficient at hijacking the host's defense mechanisms and thereby decreasing inflammation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression of a set of cytokine and chemokine genes that are related to the immune response in the brains of mice inoculated intramuscularly or intracerebrally with two wild-type strains of RABV, one from dog and the other from vampire bat. The results demonstrated that the gene expression profile is intrinsic to the specific rabies variant. The prompt production of cytokines and chemokines seems to be more important than their levels of expression for surviving a rabies infection. PMID:26711511

  16. Prediction of dynamic behavior of mutant strains from limited wild-type data.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun-Seob; Ramkrishna, Doraiswami

    2012-03-01

    Metabolic engineering is the field of introducing genetic changes in organisms so as to modify their function towards synthesizing new products of high impact to society. However, engineered cells frequently have impaired growth rates thus seriously limiting the rate at which such products are made. The problem is attributable to inadequate understanding of how a metabolic network functions in a dynamic sense. Predictions of mutant strain behavior in the past have been based on steady state theories such as flux balance analysis (FBA), minimization of metabolic adjustment (MOMA), and regulatory on/off minimization (ROOM). Such predictions are restricted to product yields and cannot address productivity, which is of focal interest to applications. We demonstrate that our framework ( [Song and Ramkrishna, 2010] and [Song and Ramkrishna, 2011]), based on a “cybernetic” view of metabolic systems, makes predictions of the dynamic behavior of mutant strains of Escherichia coli from a limited amount of data obtained from the wild-type. Dynamic frameworks must necessarily address the issue of metabolic regulation, which the cybernetic approach does by postulating that metabolism is an optimal dynamic response of the organism to the environment in driving reactions towards ensuring survival. The predictions made in this paper are without parallel in the literature and lay the foundation for rational metabolic engineering. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Enhanced squalene production by wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains using safe chemical means.

    PubMed

    Naziri, Eleni; Mantzouridou, Fani; Tsimidou, Maria Z

    2011-09-28

    Interest is increasing in establishing renewable sources for squalene, a functional lipid, as the conventional ones are limited. In the present study, squalene production was achieved in a wild-type laboratory Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain by two safe chemical means using terbinafine (0.05-0.55 mM) and methyl jasmonate (MJ) (0-1.00 mM). Bioprocess kinetics optimized by response surface methodology and monitored by high-performance liquid chromatography revealed a clear dependence of growth and squalene content (SQC) and yield (SQY) on the above regulators. Maximum SQC (10.02±0.53 mg/g dry biomass) and SQY (20.70±1.00 mg/L) were achieved using 0.442 mM terbinafine plus 0.044 mM MJ after 28 h and 0.300 mM terbinafine after 30 h, respectively. A 10-fold increase in SQY was achieved in comparison to that in the absence of regulator. The ruggedness of optimum conditions for SQY was verified for five industrial strains. The cellular lipid fraction (∼12% of dry biomass) was rich in squalene (12-13%). Results are encouraging toward bioprocess scale up.

  18. Complete genome sequence of the thermophilic Acidobacteria, Pyrinomonas methylaliphatogenes type strain K22(T).

    PubMed

    Lee, Kevin C Y; Morgan, Xochitl C; Power, Jean F; Dunfield, Peter F; Huttenhower, Curtis; Stott, Matthew B

    2015-01-01

    Strain K22(T) is the type species of the recently- described genus Pyrinomonas, in subdivision 4 of the phylum Acidobacteria (Int J Syst Evol Micr. 2014; 64(1):220-7). It was isolated from geothermally-heated soil from Mt. Ngauruhoe, New Zealand, using low-nutrient medium. P. methylaliphatogenes K22(T) has a chemoheterotrophic metabolism; it can hydrolyze a limited range of simple carbohydrates and polypeptides. Its cell membrane is dominated by iso-branching fatty acids, and up to 40 % of its lipid content is membrane-spanning and ether lipids. It is obligately aerobic, thermophilic, moderately acidophilic, and non-spore-forming. The 3,788,560 bp genome of P. methylaliphatogenes K22(T) has a G + C content of 59.36 % and contains 3,189 protein-encoding and 55 non-coding RNA genes. Genomic analysis was consistent with nutritional requirements; in particular, the identified transporter classes reflect the oligotrophic nature of this strain.

  19. Superelastic stress-strain behavior in ferrogels with different types of magneto-elastic coupling.

    PubMed

    Cremer, Peet; Löwen, Hartmut; Menzel, Andreas M

    2016-09-29

    Colloidal magnetic particles embedded in an elastic polymer matrix constitute a smart material called a ferrogel. It responds to an applied external magnetic field by changes in elastic properties, which can be exploited for various applications such as dampers, vibration absorbers, or actuators. Under appropriate conditions, the stress-strain behavior of a ferrogel can display a fascinating feature: superelasticity, the capability to reversibly deform by a huge amount while barely altering the applied load. In previous work, using numerical simulations, we investigated this behavior assuming that the magnetic moments carried by the embedded particles can freely reorient to minimize their magnetic interaction energy. Here, we extend the analysis to ferrogels where restoring torques by the surrounding matrix hinder rotations towards a magnetically favored configuration. For example, the particles can be chemically cross-linked into the polymer matrix and the magnetic moments can be fixed to the particle axes. We demonstrate that these systems still feature a superelastic regime. As before, the nonlinear stress-strain behavior can be reversibly tailored during operation by external magnetic fields. Yet, the different coupling of the magnetic moments causes different types of response to external stimuli. For instance, an external magnetic field applied parallel to the stretching axis hardly affects the superelastic regime but stiffens the system beyond it. Other smart materials featuring superelasticity, e.g. metallic shape-memory alloys, have already found widespread applications. Our soft polymer systems offer many additional advantages such as a typically higher deformability and enhanced biocompatibility combined with high tunability.

  20. Strain sensitivity and durability in p-type and n-type organic thin-film transistors with printed silver electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Kenjiro; Hikichi, Kenta; Sekine, Tomohito; Takeda, Yasunori; Minamiki, Tsukuru; Kumaki, Daisuke; Tokito, Shizuo

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical flexibility and compatibility of printing processes are key advantage that organic electronic devices have over conventional inorganic devices. However, one of the major remaining issues for organic devices is insufficient mechanical durability of printed electrodes. Here we have investigated the mechanical durability of both p-type and n-type organic thin-film transistors (TFTs) with ink-jet printed silver electrodes from silver nanoparticle inks. The modified silver nanoparticle inks enabled the strong adhesion to the underlying polymer layer, and the fabricated organic TFTs exhibited excellent reproducibility in the bending cycle tests. The strong channel length dependence on the strain sensitivity was observed in both p-type and n-type organic TFTs. The organic TFTs with a short-channel exhibited higher sensitivity to the bending strain. These results suggest that the flexible organic TFTs with printed silver electrodes have excellent mechanical durability and are useful for bending and strain sensors. PMID:23788235

  1. Complete genome sequence of Bacteroides helcogenes type strain (P 36-108T)

    SciTech Connect

    Pati, Amrita; Gronow, Sabine; Zeytun, Ahmet; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Detter, J. Chris; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lucas, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Bacteroides helcogenes Benno et al. 1983 is of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location and, although it has been found in pig feces and is known to be pathogenic for pigs, occurrence of this bacterium is rare and it does not cause significant damage in intensive animal husbandry. The genome of B. helcogenes P 36-108T is already the fifth completed and published type strain genome from the genus Bacteroides in the family Bacteroidaceae. The 3,998,906 bp long genome with its 3,353 protein-coding and 83 RNA genes consists of one circular chromosome and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  2. Complete genome sequence of Marivirga tractuosa type strain (H-43T)

    SciTech Connect

    Pagani, Ioanna; Chertkov, Olga; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Copeland, A; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Nolan, Matt; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Pitluck, Sam; Held, Brittany; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Jeffries, Cynthia; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Ngatchou, Olivier Duplex; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Spring, Stefan; Sikorski, Johannes; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2011-01-01

    Marivirga tractuosa (Lewin 1969) Nedashkovskaya et al. 2010 is the type species of the genus Marivirga, which belongs to the family Flammeovirgaceae. Members of this genus are of interest because of their gliding motility. The species is of interest because representative strains show resistance to several antibiotics, including gentamicin, kanamycin, neomycin, polymixin and streptomycin. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Flammeovirgaceae. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 4,511,574 bp long chromosome and the 4,916 bp plasmid with their 3,808 protein-coding and 49 RNA genes are a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  3. Non-contiguous finished genome sequence of Bacteroides coprosuis type strain (PC 139T)

    SciTech Connect

    Land, Miriam L; Held, Brittany; Gronow, Sabine; Abt, Birte; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Pati, Amrita; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Hauser, Loren John; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla L.

    2011-01-01

    Bacteroides coprosuis Whitehead et al. 2005 belongs to the genus Bacteroides, which is a member of the family Bacteroidaceae. Members of the genus Bacteroides in general are known as beneficial protectors of animal guts against pathogenic microorganisms, and as contributors to the degradation of complex molecules such as polysaccharides. B. coprosuis itself was isolated from a manure storage pit of a swine facility, but has not yet been found in an animal host. The species is of interest solely because of its isolated phylogenetic location. The genome of B. coprosuis is already the 5th sequenced type strain genome from the genus Bacteroides. The 2,991,798 bp long genome with its 2,461 protein-coding and 78 RNA genes and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  4. Complete genome sequence of Brachybacterium faecium type strain (Schefferle 6-10T)

    SciTech Connect

    Lapidus, Alla; Pukall, Rudiger; LaButti, Kurt; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Chen, Feng; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; D'haeseleer, Patrik; Chain, Patrick; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Johnathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2009-05-20

    Brachybacterium faecium Collins et al. 1988 is the type species of the genus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its location in the Dermabacteraceae, a rather isolated family within the actinobacterial suborder Micrococcineae. B. faecium is known for its rod-coccus growth cycle and the ability to degrade uric acid. It grows aerobically or weakly anaerobically. The strain described in this report is a free-living, nonmotile, Gram-positive bacterium, originally isolated from poultry deep litter. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the actinobacterial family Dermabacteraceae, and the 3,614,992 bp long single replicon genome with its 3129 protein-coding and 69 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  5. Complete genome sequence of Acidaminococcus fermentans type strain (VR4T)

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yun-Juan; Pukall, Rudiger; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Nolan, Matt; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Detter, J. Chris; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Mikhailova, Natalia; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Jeffries, Cynthia; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Acidaminococcus fermentans (Rogosa 1969) is the type species of the genus Acidaminococcus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its isolated placement in a genomically little characterized region of the clostridial family Veillonellaceae. A. fermentans is known for its gastrointestinal tract habitat and its ability to oxidize trans-aconitate. It grows strictly anaerobically and utilizes glutamate, citrate and trans-aconitate as sole energy sources for growth. The strain described in this report is a nonsporulating, nonmotile, Gram-negative coccus, originally isolated from a pig alimentary tract. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the genus Acidaminococcus, and the 2,329,769 bp long genome with its 2,101 protein-coding and 81 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  6. The correct name of the taxon that contains the type strain of Rhodococcus equi.

    PubMed

    Tindall, B J

    2014-01-01

    Based on a nomenclatural point of view, the name Rhodococcus equi is associated, as required by the Bacteriological Code, with a defined position, rank and circumscription. A search of the literature indicates that the name Rhodococcus equi (Magnusson 1923) Goodfellow and Alderson 1977 has also been shown to be a synonym of Corynebacterium equi Magnusson 1923, Corynebacterium hoagii (Morse 1912) Eberson 1918 and Nocardia restricta (Turfitt 1944) McClung 1974. Application of the rules of the Bacteriological Code together with the currently inferred taxonomic concept associated with the species bearing the name Rhodococcus equi indicates that this is not the correct name of this taxon and the use of that name in the context of a circumscription that includes the type strain of the species Corynebacterium hoagii is contrary to the Rules of the Code.

  7. Complete genome sequence of Halogeometricum borinquense type strain (PR3T)

    DOE PAGES

    Malfatti, Stephanie; Tindall, Brian J.; Schneider, Susanne; ...

    2009-09-29

    Halogeometricum borinquense Montalvo-Rodríguez et al. 1998 is the type species of the genus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its distinct location between the halobacterial genera Haloquadratum and Halosarcina. H. borinquense requires extremely high salt (NaCl) concentrations for growth. It can not only grow aerobically but also anaerobically using nitrate as electron acceptor. The strain described in this report is a free-living, motile, pleomorphic, euryarchaeon, which was originally isolated from the solar salterns of Cabo Rojo, Puerto Rico. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first completemore » genome sequence of the halobacterial genus Halogeometricum, and this 3,944,467 bp long six replicon genome with its 3937 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.« less

  8. Complete genome sequence of Pirellula staleyi type strain (ATCC 27377T)

    SciTech Connect

    Clum, Alicia; Tindall, Brian; Sikorski, Johannes; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, Sam; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Chertkov, Olga; Han, Cliff; Detter, J. Chris; Kuske, Cheryl R; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Mikhailova, Natalia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla L.

    2009-01-01

    Pirellula staleyi Schlesner and Hirsch 1987 is the type species of the genus Pirellula of the family Planctomycetaceae. Members of this pear- or teardrop-shaped bacterium show a clearly visible pointed attachment pole and can be distinguished from other Planctomycetes by a lack of true stalks. Strains closely related to the species have been isolated from fresh and brackish water, as well as from hypersaline lakes. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of the order Planctomyces and only the second sequence from the phylum Planctomycetes. The 6,196,199 bp long genome with its 4773 protein-coding and 49 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  9. Complete genome sequence of Nitratifractor salsuginis type strain (E9I37-1T)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Sikorski, Johannes; Zeytun, Ahmet; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Huntemann, Marcel; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Ngatchou, Olivier Duplex; Rohde, Manfred; Tindall, Brian; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2011-01-01

    Nitratifractor salsuginis Nakagawa et al. 2005 is the type species of the genus Nitratifractor, a member of the family Nautiliaceae. The species is of interest because of its high capacity for nitrate reduction via conversion to N2 through respiration, which is a key compound in plant nutrition. The strain is also of interest because it represents the first mesophilic and faculta- tively anaerobic member of the Epsilonproteobacteria reported to grow on molecular hydro- gen. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the genus Nitratifractor and the second sequence from the family Nautiliaceae. The 2,101,285 bp long genome with its 2,121 protein-coding and 54 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  10. Complete genome sequence of Bacteroides helcogenes type strain (P 36-108T)

    PubMed Central

    Pati, Amrita; Gronow, Sabine; Zeytun, Ahmet; Lapidus, Alla; Nolan, Matt; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxane; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Detter, John C.; Brambilla, Evelyne; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lucas, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Bacteroides helcogenes Benno et al. 1983 is of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location and, although it has been found in pig feces and is known to be pathogenic for pigs, occurrence of this bacterium is rare and it does not cause significant damage in intensive animal husbandry. The genome of B. helcogenes P 36-108T is already the fifth completed and published type strain genome from the genus Bacteroides in the family Bacteroidaceae. The 3,998,906 bp long genome with its 3,353 protein-coding and 83 RNA genes consists of one circular chromosome and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21475586

  11. Complete genome sequence of Brachyspira murdochii type strain (56-150T)

    PubMed Central

    Pati, Amrita; Sikorski, Johannes; Gronow, Sabine; Munk, Christine; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Tio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Detter, John C.; Bruce, David; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Spring, Stefan; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Brachyspira murdochii Stanton et al. 1992 is a non-pathogenic, host-associated spirochete of the family Brachyspiraceae. Initially isolated from the intestinal content of a healthy swine, the ‘group B spirochaetes’ were first described as Serpulina murdochii. Members of the family Brachyspiraceae are of great phylogenetic interest because of the extremely isolated location of this family within the phylum ‘Spirochaetes’. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a type strain of a member of the family Brachyspiraceae and only the second genome sequence from a member of the genus Brachyspira. The 3,241,804 bp long genome with its 2,893 protein-coding and 40 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304710

  12. Complete genome sequence of Archaeoglobus profundus type strain (AV18T)

    PubMed Central

    von Jan, Mathias; Lapidus, Alla; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Copeland, Alex; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Goodwin, Lynne; Han, Cliff; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Chertkov, Olga; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Saunders, Elizabeth; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Chain, Patrick; Eichinger, Konrad; Huber, Harald; Spring, Stefan; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Wirth, Reinhard; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Archaeoglobus profundus (Burggraf et al. 1990) is a hyperthermophilic archaeon in the euryarchaeal class Archaeoglobi, which is currently represented by the single family Archaeoglobaceae, containing six validly named species and two strains ascribed to the genus 'Geoglobus' which is taxonomically challenged as the corresponding type species has no validly published name. All members were isolated from marine hydrothermal habitats and are obligate anaerobes. Here we describe the features of the organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the second completed genome sequence of a member of the class Archaeoglobi. The 1,563,423 bp genome with its 1,858 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304717

  13. Complete genome sequence of Nakamurella multipartita type strain (Y-104T)

    PubMed Central

    Tice, Hope; Mayilraj, Shanmugam; Sims, David; Lapidus, Alla; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, Alex; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Meincke, Linda; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Detter, John C.; Brettin, Thomas; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Chen, Feng

    2010-01-01

    Nakamurella multipartita (Yoshimi et al. 1996) Tao et al. 2004 is the type species of the monospecific genus Nakamurella in the actinobacterial suborder Frankineae. The nonmotile, coccus-shaped strain was isolated from activated sludge acclimated with sugar-containing synthetic wastewater, and is capable of accumulating large amounts of polysaccharides in its cells. Here we describe the features of the organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Nakamurellaceae. The 6,060,298 bp long single replicon genome with its 5415 protein-coding and 56 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304699

  14. Complete genome sequence of Halogeometricum borinquense type strain (PR3T)

    PubMed Central

    Malfatti, Stephanie; Tindall, Brian J.; Schneider, Susanne; Fähnrich, Regine; Lapidus, Alla; LaButtii, Kurt; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Chen, Feng; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Anderson, Iain; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; D’haeseleer, Patrik; Göker, Markus; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Chain, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Halogeometricum borinquense Montalvo-Rodríguez et al. 1998 is the type species of the genus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its distinct location between the halobacterial genera Haloquadratum and Halosarcina. H. borinquense requires extremely high salt (NaCl) concentrations for growth. It can not only grow aerobically but also anaerobically using nitrate as electron acceptor. The strain described in this report is a free-living, motile, pleomorphic, euryarchaeon, which was originally isolated from the solar salterns of Cabo Rojo, Puerto Rico. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the halobacterial genus Halogeometricum, and this 3,944,467 bp long six replicon genome with its 3937 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304651

  15. Complete genome sequence of Nakamurella multipartita type strain (Y-104T)

    SciTech Connect

    Tice, Hope; Mayilraj, Shanmugam; Sims, David; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, A; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Meincke, Linda; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Detter, J. Chris; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Chen, Feng

    2010-01-01

    Nakamurella multipartita (Yoshimi et al. 1996) Tao et al. 2004 is the type species of the small one-species genus Nakamurella in the actinomycetal suborder Frankineae. The nonmotile, coccus-shaped strain was isolated from activated sludge acclimated with sugar-containing synthetic wastewater, and is able of accumulating large amounts of polysaccharides in its cells. Here we describe the features of the organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Nakamurellaceae. The 6,060,298 bp long single replicon genome with its 5415 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  16. Complete genome sequence of Rhodothermus marinus type strain (R-10T)

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, Matt; Gronow, Sabine; Lapidus, Alla L.; Ivanova, N; Copeland, A; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, Sam; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Sims, David; Meincke, Linda; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, Cliff; Detter, J. Chris; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Rohde, Manfred; Sproer, Cathrin; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Chain, Patrick S. G.

    2009-01-01

    Rhodothermus marinus Alfredsson et al. 1995 is the type species of the genus and is of phylogenetic interest because the Rhodothermaceae represent the deepest lineage in the phylum Bacteroidetes. R. marinus R-10T is a Gram-negative, non-motile, non-spore-forming bacterium isolated from marine hot springs off the coast of Iceland. Strain R-10T is strictly aerobic and requires slightly halophilic conditions for growth. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the genus Rhodothermus, and only the second sequence from members of the family Rhodothermaceae. The 3,386,737 bp genome (including a 125 kb plasmid) with its 2914 protein-coding and 48 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  17. Complete genome sequence of Thermocrinis albus type strain (HI 11/12T)

    SciTech Connect

    Wirth, Reinhard; Sikorski, Johannes; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Misra, Monica; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tice, Hope; Han, Cliff; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Pati, Amrita; Anderson, Iain; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Bilek, Yvonne; Hader, Thomas; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Tindall, Brian; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Thermocrinis albus Eder and Huber 2002 is one of three species in the genus Thermocrinis in the family Aquificaceae. Members of this family have become of significant interest because of their involvement in global biogeochemical cycles in high-temperature ecosystems. This interest had already spurred several genome sequencing projects for members of the family. We here report the first completed genome sequence a member of the genus Thermocrinis and the first type strain genome from a member of the family Aquificaceae. The 1,500,577 bp long genome with its 1,603 protein-coding and 47 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyc-lopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  18. Complete genome sequence of Syntrophothermus lipocalidus type strain (TGB-C1T)

    SciTech Connect

    Ngatchou, Olivier Duplex; Zhang, Xiaojing; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Rohde, Manfred; Sikorski, Johannes; Spring, Stefan; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Held, Brittany; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Syntrophothermus lipocalidus Sekiguchi et al. 2000 is the type species of the genus Syntrophothermus. The species is of interest because of its strictly anaerobic lifestyle, its participation in the primary step of the degradation of organic maters, and for releasing products which serve as substrates for other microorganisms. It also contributes significantly to maintain a regular pH in its environment by removing the fatty acids through -oxidation. The strain is able to metabolize isobutyrate and butyrate, which are the substrate and the product of degradation of the substrate, respectively. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the genus Syntrophothermus and the second in the family Syntrophomonadaceae. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 2,405,559 bp long genome with its 2,385 protein-coding and 55 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  19. Genome sequence of the phage-gene rich marine Phaeobacter arcticus type strain DSM 23566T

    PubMed Central

    Freese, Heike M.; Dalingault, Hajnalka; Petersen, Jörn; Pradella, Silke; Davenport, Karen; Teshima, Hazuki; Chen, Amy; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Chain, Patrick; Detter, John C.; Rohde, Manfred; Gronow, Sabine; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Woyke, Tanja; Brinkhoff, Thorsten; Göker, Markus; Overmann, Jörg; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Phaeobacter arcticus Zhang et al. 2008 belongs to the marine Roseobacter clade whose members are phylogenetically and physiologically diverse. In contrast to the type species of this genus, Phaeobacter gallaeciensis, which is well characterized, relatively little is known about the characteristics of P. arcticus. Here, we describe the features of this organism including the annotated high-quality draft genome sequence and highlight some particular traits. The 5,049,232 bp long genome with its 4,828 protein-coding and 81 RNA genes consists of one chromosome and five extrachromosomal elements. Prophage sequences identified via PHAST constitute nearly 5% of the bacterial chromosome and included a potential Mu-like phage as well as a gene-transfer agent (GTA). In addition, the genome of strain DSM 23566T encodes all of the genes necessary for assimilatory nitrate reduction. Phylogenetic analysis and intergenomic distances indicate that the classification of the species might need to be reconsidered. PMID:24501630

  20. Complete genome sequence of Parvibaculum lavamentivorans type strain (DS-1T)

    PubMed Central

    Schleheck, David; Weiss, Michael; Pitluck, Sam; Bruce, David; Land, Miriam L.; Han, Shunsheng; Saunders, Elizabeth; Tapia, Roxanne; Detter, Chris; Brettin, Thomas; Han, James; Woyke, Tanja; Goodwin, Lynne; Pennacchio, Len; Nolan, Matt; Cook, Alasdair M.; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Thomas, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    Parvibaculum lavamentivorans DS-1T is the type species of the novel genus Parvibaculum in the novel family Rhodobiaceae (formerly Phyllobacteriaceae) of the order Rhizobiales of Alphaproteobacteria. Strain DS-1T is a non-pigmented, aerobic, heterotrophic bacterium and represents the first tier member of environmentally important bacterial communities that catalyze the complete degradation of synthetic laundry surfactants. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 3,914,745 bp long genome with its predicted 3,654 protein coding genes is the first completed genome sequence of the genus Parvibaculum, and the first genome sequence of a representative of the family Rhodobiaceae. PMID:22675581

  1. Complete genome sequence of the sulfate-reducing firmicute Desulfotomaculum ruminis type strain (DLT)

    SciTech Connect

    Spring, Stefan; Visser, Michael; Lu, Megan; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Larimer, Frank; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Detter, John C.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Woyke, Tanja; Schaap, Peter J.; Plugge, Caroline M.; Muyzer, Gerard; Kuever, Jan; Pereira, Inês A. C.; Parshina, Sofiya N.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; Stams, Alfons J. M.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2012-12-11

    Desulfotomaculum ruminis Campbell and Postgate 1965 is a member of the large genus Desulfotomaculum which contains 30 species and is contained in the family Peptococcaceae. This species is of interest because it represents one of the few sulfate- reducing bacteria that have been isolated from the rumen. Here we describe the features of D. ruminis together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 3,969,014 bp long chromosome with a total of 3,901 protein-coding and 85 RNA genes is the second completed genome sequence of a type strain of the genus Desulfotomaculum to be pub- lished, and was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program 2009.

  2. Complete genome sequence of Parvibaculum lavamentivorans type strain (DS-1T)

    SciTech Connect

    Schleheck, David; Weiss, Michael; Pitluck, Sam; Bruce, David; Land, Miriam L; Han, Cliff; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Tapia, Roxanne; Detter, J. Chris; Brettin, Thomas S; Han, James; Woyke, Tanja; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pennacchio, Len; Nolan, Matt; Cook, Alasdair M.; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Thomas, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    Parvibaculum lavamentivorans DS-1T is the type species of the novel genus Parvibaculum in the novel family Rhodobiaceae (formerly Phyllobacteriaceae) of the order Rhizobiales of Al- phaproteobacteria. Strain DS-1T is a non-pigmented, aerobic, heterotrophic bacterium and represents the first tier member of environmentally important bacterial communities that cata- lyze the complete degradation of synthetic laundry surfactants. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 3,914,745 bp long genome with its predicted 3,654 protein coding genes is the first com- pleted genome sequence of the genus Parvibaculum, and the first genome sequence of a rep- resentative of the family Rhodobiaceae.

  3. Complete genome sequence of Kribbella flavida type strain (IFO 14399T)

    SciTech Connect

    Pukall, Rudiger; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, A; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; LaButti, Kurt; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pitluck, Sam; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    The genus Kribbella consists of 15 species, with Kribbella flavida (Park et al. 1999) as the type species. The name Kribbella was formed from the acronym of the Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, KRIBB. Strains of the various Kribbella species were originally isolated from soil, potato, alum slate mine, patinas of catacombs or from horse racecourses. Here we describe the features of K. flavida together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. In addition to the 5.3 Mbp genome of Nocardioides sp. JS614, this is only the second completed genome sequence of the family Nocardioidaceae. The 7,579,488 bp long genome with its 7,086 protein-coding and 60 RNA genes and is part of the Genomic Encyc-lopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  4. The Phenotypic Effects of Royal Jelly on Wild-Type D. melanogaster Are Strain-Specific

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Stefanie L.; Seggio, Joseph A.; Hicks, Jasmin A.; Sharp, Katherine A.; Axelrod, Jeffrey D.; Wang, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    The role for royal jelly (RJ) in promoting caste differentiation of honeybee larvae into queens rather than workers is well characterized. A recent study demonstrated that this poorly understood complex nutrition drives strikingly similar phenotypic effects in Drosophila melanogaster, such as increased body size and reduced developmental time, making possible the use of D. melanogaster as a model system for the genetic analysis of the cellular mechanisms underlying RJ and caste differentiation. We demonstrate here that RJ increases the body size of some wild-type strains of D. melanogaster but not others, and report significant delays in developmental time in all flies reared on RJ. These findings suggest that cryptic genetic variation may be a factor in the D. melanogaster response to RJ, and should be considered when attempting to elucidate response mechanisms to environmental changes in non-honeybee species. PMID:27486863

  5. Complete genome sequence of the sulfate-reducing firmicute Desulfotomaculum ruminis type strain (DLT)

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Stefan; Visser, Michael; Lu, Megan; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Larimer, Frank; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Detter, John C.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Woyke, Tanja; Schaap, Peter J.; Plugge, Caroline M.; Muyzer, Gerard; Kuever, Jan; Pereira, Inês A. C.; Parshina, Sofiya N.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; Stams, Alfons J.M.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Desulfotomaculum ruminis Campbell and Postgate 1965 is a member of the large genus Desulfotomaculum which contains 30 species and is contained in the family Peptococcaceae. This species is of interest because it represents one of the few sulfate-reducing bacteria that have been isolated from the rumen. Here we describe the features of D. ruminis together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 3,969,014 bp long chromosome with a total of 3,901 protein-coding and 85 RNA genes is the second completed genome sequence of a type strain of the genus Desulfotomaculum to be published, and was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program 2009. PMID:23408247

  6. Complete genome sequence of Acidaminococcus fermentans type strain (VR4T)

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yun-Juan; Pukall, Rüdiger; Saunders, Elizabeth; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Nolan, Matt; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Detter, John C.; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Mikhailova, Natalia; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Brettin, Thomas; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Acidaminococcus fermentans (Rogosa 1969) is the type species of the genus Acidaminococcus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its isolated placement in a genomically little characterized region of the Firmicutes. A. fermentans is known for its habitation of the gastrointestinal tract and its ability to oxidize trans-aconitate. Its anaerobic fermentation of glutamate has been intensively studied and will now be complemented by the genomic basis. The strain described in this report is a nonsporulating, nonmotile, Gram-negative coccus, originally isolated from a pig alimentary tract. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Acidaminococcaceae, and the 2,329,769 bp long genome with its 2,101 protein-coding and 81 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304687

  7. Silica-induced malignant histiocytic lymphoma: incidence linked with strain of rat and type of silica.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, M. M.; Wagner, J. C.; Davies, R.; Griffiths, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    It has already been established that a single intrapleural inoculation of crystalline silica (quartz) produces malignant lymphomas of histiocytic type (MLHT) in Wistar-derived rats. It has now been shown that after treatment with Min-U-Sil, rats of the Alderley Park strain have a tumour incidence of 35%, whereas the incidence in Agus rats is 5% and in PVG 8%. There was also a significant difference in the incidence of MLHT caused by injecting different samples of crystalline silica, particularly of tridymite. There was correlation between cytotoxicity to mouse peritoneal macrophages and tumour incidence, except for one dust (DQ12). Zeta potential, number of particles and their size range were considered, but the incidence does not show a clear correlation with these measurements. The results are discussed. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 7 PMID:6252921

  8. Non-contiguous finished genome sequence of Bacteroides coprosuis type strain (PC139T)

    PubMed Central

    Land, Miriam; Held, Brittany; Gronow, Sabine; Abt, Birte; Lucas, Susan; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Tapia, Roxane; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Hauser, Loren; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Detter, John C.; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla

    2011-01-01

    Bacteroides coprosuis Whitehead et al. 2005 belongs to the genus Bacteroides, which is a member of the family Bacteroidaceae. Members of the genus Bacteroides in general are known as beneficial protectors of animal guts against pathogenic microorganisms, and as contributors to the degradation of complex molecules such as polysaccharides. B. coprosuis itself was isolated from a manure storage pit of a swine facility, but has not yet been found in an animal host. The species is of interest solely because of its isolated phylogenetic location. The genome of B. coprosuis is already the 5th sequenced type strain genome from the genus Bacteroides. The 2,991,798 bp long genome with its 2,461 protein-coding and 78 RNA genes and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21677860

  9. Complete genome sequence of Eggerthella lenta type strain (IPP VPI 0255T)

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, Elizabeth H; Pukall, Rudiger; Birte, Abt; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, A; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Meincke, Linda; Sims, David; Brettin, Tom; Detter, J. Chris; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Han, Cliff

    2009-01-01

    Eggerthella lenta (Eggerth 1935) Wade et al. 1999, emended W rdemann et al. 2009 is the type species of the genus Eggerthella, which belongs to the actinobacterial family Coriobacteriaceae. E. lenta is a Gram-positive, non-motile, non-sporulating pathogenic bacterium that can cause severe bacteremia. The strain described in this study has been isolated from a rectal tumor in 1935. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the genus Eggerthella, and the 3,632,260 bp long single replicon genome with its 3123 protein-coding and 58 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  10. Complete genome sequence of Olsenella uli type strain (VPI D76D-27CT)

    SciTech Connect

    Goker, Markus; Held, Brittany; Lucas, Susan; Nolan, Matt; Yasawong, Montri; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Rohde, Manfred; Sikorski, Johannes; Pukall, Rudiger; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Olsenella uli (Olsen et al. 1991) Dewhirst et al. 2001 is the type species of the genus Olsenella, which belongs to the actinobacterial family Coriobacteriaceae. The species is of interest because it is frequently isolated from dental plaque in periodontitis patients and can cause primary endodontic infection. The species is a Gram-positive, non-motile and non-sporulating bacterium. The strain described in this study has been isolated from human gingival crevices in 1982. This is the first completed sequence of the genus Olsenella and the fifth sequence from the family Coriobacteriaceae. The 2,051,896 bp long genome with its 1,795 protein-coding and 55 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  11. Cloning of equine herpesvirus type 1 438/77 strain genome as a bacterial artificial chromosome.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xueqiang; Yao, Huochun; Zhang, Cun; Lu, Chengping

    2011-01-01

    Equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) is a major cause of respiratory and reproductive diseases in horses worldwide. The genome of EHV-1 strain 438/77 (isolated from an aborted equine fetus) was cloned as a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) in E. coli without any gene deletions. The mini-F plasmid sequence was inserted in the middle of ORF19 and 20 via homologous recombination following co-transfection of viral DNA and plasmid pE19_20/HA into RK13 cells. Circular viral DNA was extracted from RK13 cells infected with purified recombinant virus expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) and electrophorated into E. coli DH10B cells. The clone harboring the BAC was screened and analyzed by PCR and RFLP. Reconstitution of the recombinant virus was achieved successfully by transfection of the BAC DNA into RK13 cells. The mini-F sequence in the reconstituted virus was subsequently removed by homologous recombination between virus DNA and plasmid pE1920XM, inducing a point mutation in the Xbal site in ORF19. Comparison of RFLP profiles of the rescued, recovered and the wild-type viral genome demonstrated that no unexpected changes occurred during mutagenesis. In vitro replication assays showed that BAC-reconstituted virus mutant growth kinetics and plaque formation morphology/size were indistinguishable to those measured for wild-type virus.

  12. Acetoin production by wild-type strains and a lactate dehydrogenase-deficient mutant of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Hillman, J D; Andrews, S W; Dzuback, A L

    1987-06-01

    Eleven different laboratory strains of Streptococcus mutans representing the various serogroups were found to produce an average of 6.0 +/- 4.8 mM acetoin when grown in glucose-containing medium under aerobic conditions. None of the strains produced detectable acetoin when grown anaerobically. A lactate dehydrogenase-deficient mutant produced acetoin both aerobically and anaerobically and in substantially greater amounts than the wild-type strains did. Substitution of mannitol for glucose resulted in decreased acetoin production by wild-type strains and the lactate dehydrogenase-deficient mutant, indicating a role for NADH2 in the regulation of the acetoin pathway. Pyruvate incorporated into the growth medium of a wild-type strain caused acetoin to be produced anaerobically and stimulated acetoin production aerobically. Cell extracts of a wild-type S. mutans strain were capable of producing acetoin from pyruvate and were (partly) dependent on thiamine PPi. Extracts prepared from aerobically grown cells had approximately twice the acetoin-producing activity as did extracts prepared from anaerobically grown cells. The results indicate that acetoin production by S. mutans may represent an auxiliary reaction of pyruvate dehydrogenase in this organism.

  13. Acetoin production by wild-type strains and a lactate dehydrogenase-deficient mutant of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed Central

    Hillman, J D; Andrews, S W; Dzuback, A L

    1987-01-01

    Eleven different laboratory strains of Streptococcus mutans representing the various serogroups were found to produce an average of 6.0 +/- 4.8 mM acetoin when grown in glucose-containing medium under aerobic conditions. None of the strains produced detectable acetoin when grown anaerobically. A lactate dehydrogenase-deficient mutant produced acetoin both aerobically and anaerobically and in substantially greater amounts than the wild-type strains did. Substitution of mannitol for glucose resulted in decreased acetoin production by wild-type strains and the lactate dehydrogenase-deficient mutant, indicating a role for NADH2 in the regulation of the acetoin pathway. Pyruvate incorporated into the growth medium of a wild-type strain caused acetoin to be produced anaerobically and stimulated acetoin production aerobically. Cell extracts of a wild-type S. mutans strain were capable of producing acetoin from pyruvate and were (partly) dependent on thiamine PPi. Extracts prepared from aerobically grown cells had approximately twice the acetoin-producing activity as did extracts prepared from anaerobically grown cells. The results indicate that acetoin production by S. mutans may represent an auxiliary reaction of pyruvate dehydrogenase in this organism. PMID:3570471

  14. Preliminary design of a tensile-strained p-type Si/SiGe quantum well infrared photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Gui Jiang; Lai, Hong Kai; Li, Cheng; Chen, Song Yan; Yu, Jin Zhong

    2008-03-01

    Considering tensile-strained p-type Si/Si1-yGey quantum wells grown on a relaxed Si1-xGex (0 0 1) virtual substrate (y < x), the hole subband structure and the effective masses of the first bound hole state in the quantum wells are calculated by using the 6 × 6 k sdot p method. Designs for tensile-strained p-type quantum well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs) based on the bound-to-quasi-bound transitions are discussed, which are expected to retain the ability of coupling normally incident infrared radiation without any grating couplers, have lower dark current than n-type QWIPs and also have a larger absorption coefficient and better transport characteristics than normal unstrained or compressive-strained p-type QWIPs.

  15. DNA typing methods for differentiation of Debaryomyces hansenii strains and other yeasts related to surface ripened cheeses.

    PubMed

    Petersen, K M; Møller, P L; Jespersen, L

    2001-09-19

    The discriminative power of ITS-PCR, ITS-PCR RFLP and mitochondrial (mt)-DNA RFLP were evaluated for differentiation of yeasts of importance for surface ripened cheeses. In total 60 isolates were included. Of these, 40 strains of the following species, Debaryomyces hansenii var. hansenii, D. hansenii var. fabryi, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida zeylanoides, Kluyveromyces lactis and Yarrowia lipolytica, were obtained from culture collections and 20 isolates of D. hansenii representing six different phenotypes were collected from seven Danish producers of surface ripened cheeses. ITS-PCR was evaluated for differentiation at species level on the 40 strains obtained from culture collections. Ten strains of each variety of D. hansenii and five strains of each of the above mentioned species were analysed. For each of the investigated species, a specific ITS1-5.8S rDNA-ITS2 region size was observed. Accordingly ITS-PCR was found valuable for differentiation at species level of yeasts of importance for surface ripened cheeses. ITS-PCR RFLP was investigated for the purpose of strain typing of D. hansenii. Ten CBS strains of each variety of D. hansenii were analysed. Only one enzyme (TaqI) out of several investigated (BamHI, DpnI, Fnu4HI, HaeIII, HindIII, HpaII, NlaII, Sau3AI, TaqI) demonstrated genetic diversity within the strains. This enzyme divided the 20 strains in three groups. Sequence analysis of the ITS1-5.8S rDNA-ITS2 region for the type strains of each variety of D. hansenii showed an identity of 99.84%, corresponding to a difference in one basepair. Based on these results, ITS-PCR RFLP was found ineffective for strain typing of D. hansenii. MtDNA RFLP using HaeIII and HpaII was evaluated for strain typing of D. hansenii on the 20 CBS strains of D. hansenii. The CBS strains were divided into 16 groups according to their restriction profiles, which proved the method useful for typing of D. hansenii at subspecies level. The 20 dairy isolates showed a lower genetic

  16. Genome sequence of Frateuria aurantia type strain (Kondo 67(T)), a xanthomonade isolated from Lilium auratium Lindl.

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Teshima, Hazuki; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla L.; Tice, Hope; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Mavromatis, K; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Rohde, Manfred; Lang, Elke; Detter, J. Chris; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    rateuria aurantia (ex Kondo and Ameyama 1958) Swings et al. 1980 is a member of the bispecific genus Frateuria in the family Xanthomonadaceae, which is already heavily targeted for non-type strain genome sequencing. Strain Kondo 67(T) was initially (1958) identified as a member of 'Acetobacter aurantius', a name that was not considered for the approved list. Kondo 67(T) was therefore later designated as the type strain of the newly proposed acetogenic species Frateuria aurantia. The strain is of interest because of its triterpenoids (hopane family). F. aurantia Kondo 67(T) is the first member of the genus Frateura whose genome sequence has been deciphered, and here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 3,603,458-bp long chromosome with its 3,200 protein-coding and 88 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  17. Meat quality and sensory attributes of a conventional and a Label Rouge-type broiler strain obtained at retail.

    PubMed

    Smith, D P; Northcutt, J K; Steinberg, E L

    2012-06-01

    Some consumers have reported preferences for meat from alternative broiler strains as compared with meat from conventional broiler strains relative to taste and texture, but relatively few objective measurements have been conducted on these particular strains. To directly compare meat quality from a Label Rouge-type alternative and a conventional broiler strain available at retail, 4 ready-to-cook conventional and 6 alternative strain carcasses were obtained from retail or a processing plant on each of 6 d. Boneless skinless breast fillets and boneless thighs were taken from each carcass and weighed. Raw meat was then assigned to different testing lots for cooking to evaluate yield, objective texture, meat color, sensory profile, and proximate composition (percentage protein, moisture, fat, and ash). Analyses of data revealed no significant difference (P < 0.05) due to broiler strain for percentage protein, moisture, fat, and ash, for either breast or thigh meat. Conventional breast (raw and cooked) weights were significantly higher than the alternative strain, but there was no difference in cooked yield. There were no differences between strain for thigh weights or yield. Both thigh and breast meat from the conventional broilers was more tender than meat from alternative broilers. Cooked conventional breast meat was darker and yellower, whereas cooked thigh was lighter, less red, and more yellow than alternative meat. Sensory analysis found no difference between strains for breast meat attributes. Conventional thigh meat scored higher than alternative for appearance, tenderness, juiciness, and how well the panelist liked the appearance, but there was no difference in aftertaste or overall liking. Although minimal differences were observed for cooked breast meat due to strain, conventional cooked thigh meat scored higher than the thigh meat from the Label Rouge-type alternative for most of the sensory attributes.

  18. Tensile-strained, n-type Ge as a gain medium for monolithic laser integration on Si.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jifeng; Sun, Xiaochen; Pan, Dong; Wang, Xiaoxin; Kimerling, Lionel C; Koch, Thomas L; Michel, Jurgen

    2007-09-03

    We analyze the optical gain of tensile-strained, n-type Ge material for Si-compatible laser applications. The band structure of unstrained Ge exhibits indirect conduction band valleys (L) lower than the direct valley (Gamma) by 136 meV. Adequate strain and n-type doping engineering can effectively provide population inversion in the direct bandgap of Ge. The tensile strain decreases the difference between the L valleys and the Gamma valley, while the extrinsic electrons from n-type doping fill the L valleys to the level of the Gamma valley to compensate for the remaining energy difference. Our modeling shows that with a combination of 0.25% tensile strain and an extrinsic electron density of 7.6x10(19)/cm(3) by n-type doping, a net material gain of ~400 cm(-1) can be obtained from the direct gap transition of Ge despite of the free carrier absorption loss. The threshold current density for lasing is estimated to be ~6kA cm(-2) for a typical edgeemitting double heterojunction structure. These results indicate that tensile strained n-type Ge is a good candidate for Si integrated lasers.

  19. Wild-Type Measles Virus with the Hemagglutinin Protein of the Edmonston Vaccine Strain Retains Wild-Type Tropism in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Noriyo; Kato, Sei-ich; Ami, Yasushi; Suzaki, Yuriko; Suzuki, Tadaki; Sato, Yuko; Tsunetsugu-Yokota, Yasuko; Mori, Kazuyasu; Van Nguyen, Nguyen; Kimura, Hideki; Nagata, Kyosuke

    2012-01-01

    A major difference between vaccine and wild-type strains of measles virus (MV) in vitro is the wider cell specificity of vaccine strains, resulting from the receptor usage of the hemagglutinin (H) protein. Wild-type H proteins recognize the signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) (CD150), which is expressed on certain cells of the immune system, whereas vaccine H proteins recognize CD46, which is ubiquitously expressed on all nucleated human and monkey cells, in addition to SLAM. To examine the effect of the H protein on the tropism and attenuation of MV, we generated enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-expressing recombinant wild-type MV strains bearing the Edmonston vaccine H protein (MV-EdH) and compared them to EGFP-expressing wild-type MV strains. In vitro, MV-EdH replicated in SLAM+ as well as CD46+ cells, including primary cell cultures from cynomolgus monkey tissues, whereas the wild-type MV replicated only in SLAM+ cells. However, in macaques, both wild-type MV and MV-EdH strains infected lymphoid and respiratory organs, and widespread infection of MV-EdH was not observed. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that SLAM+ lymphocyte cells were infected preferentially with both strains. Interestingly, EGFP expression of MV-EdH in tissues and lymphocytes was significantly weaker than that of the wild-type MV. Taken together, these results indicate that the CD46-binding activity of the vaccine H protein is important for determining the cell specificity of MV in vitro but not the tropism in vivo. They also suggest that the vaccine H protein attenuates MV growth in vivo. PMID:22238320

  20. Enterotoxin production, phage typing and serotyping of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from clinical materials and food.

    PubMed Central

    Melconian, A. K.; Brun, Y.; Fleurette, J.

    1983-01-01

    The production of enterotoxins A, B, C and F by strains of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from various clinical sources and from isolates implicated in food poisoning was investigated. One hundred and ninety one of the 374 clinical strains (51.1%) were found to be enterotoxigenic; of these, 81 (27.7%) strains produced enterotoxin A, 57 (15.3%) strains produced enterotoxin B, 23 (6.2%) strains produced enterotoxin C, and 64 (17.1%) strains produced enterotoxin F. These enterotoxigenic strains were most frequently lysed by phages of group III (21.5%) or were not typable (22%). Eighteen of the 29 strains implicated in food poisoning were enterotoxigenic. The correlation of antigens and bacteriophage patterns with enterotoxigenicity was determined: enterotoxin A being related to a4 antigen, enterotoxin B to phages of 94/96 complex with c1, o antigens, and enterotoxin F to phages of group I with 2632, k1k2, m antigens. PMID:6227656

  1. Draft Genome Sequences of Eight Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Strains Previously Characterized Using an Electrophoretic Typing Scheme.

    PubMed

    Mussa, Huda J; VanWagoner, Timothy M; Morton, Daniel J; Seale, Thomas W; Whitby, Paul W; Stull, Terrence L

    2015-11-25

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae is an important cause of human disease. Strains were selected for genome sequencing to represent the breadth of nontypeable strains within the species, as previously defined by the electrophoretic mobility of 16 metabolic enzymes.

  2. Draft Genome Sequences of Eight Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Strains Previously Characterized Using an Electrophoretic Typing Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Mussa, Huda J.; VanWagoner, Timothy M.; Seale, Thomas W.; Whitby, Paul W.; Stull, Terrence L.

    2015-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae is an important cause of human disease. Strains were selected for genome sequencing to represent the breadth of nontypeable strains within the species, as previously defined by the electrophoretic mobility of 16 metabolic enzymes. PMID:26607889

  3. Identification of a Lactobacillus plantarum strain that ameliorates chronic inflammation and metabolic disorders in obese and type 2 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Toshimitsu, T; Mochizuki, J; Ikegami, S; Itou, H

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we identified a strain of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) that induces high levels of IL-10 production by immune cells, and evaluated the ability of the strain to suppress chronic inflammation and ameliorate metabolic disorders in in vitro and in vivo models. Among a collection of LAB strains, Lactobacillus plantarum strain OLL2712 (OLL2712) induced the highest levels of IL-10 production in mouse-derived dendritic cells and peritoneal macrophages. The anti-inflammatory effects of this strain were evaluated using a co-culture system comprising RAW 264.7 and 3T3-L1 cells. We also administered heat-killed OLL2712 to obese and type 2 diabetic KKAy mice for 3 wk to evaluate the in vivo effects of the strain. The OLL2712 significantly decreased the production of proinflammatory cytokines in vitro. Likewise, the administration of OLL2712 significantly suppressed proinflammatory cytokine levels in both the visceral adipose tissue and the serum of KKAy mice, and reduced serum triglyceride concentrations. The strain also alleviated oxidative stress and adrenaline levels in the serum of KKAy mice. On the other hand, Lactobacillus gasseri strain MEP222804 (a moderate IL-10 inducer) did not ameliorate the systemic inflammation and hyperlipidemia in KKAy mice. Our results suggest that treatment with strong IL-10-inducing LAB has the potential to ameliorate metabolic disorders by suppressing chronic inflammation in the host animal. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Computerized restriction endonuclease analysis compared with O-serotype and phage type in the epidemiologic fingerprinting of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains.

    PubMed

    Garaizar, Javier; Latorre, Mikel; López-Molina, Nuria; Laconcha, Idoia; Alberdi, Leire; Rementeria, Aitor; Audicana, Ana; Uliarte, Rosario; Cisterna, Ramón

    1997-04-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) of chromosomal DNA using SalI enzyme, low-concentration (0.4%) agarose gels and digitalized data management of the REA patterns obtained for the typing of clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. METHODS: A group of 67 clinical unrelated isolates from 10 Spanish hospitals was used to study the discriminatory power, reproducibility and typeability of REA typing. RESULTS: A SalI REA pattern consisted of a variety (1--10) of restriction bands in the range between 12.2 and 48.5 kb and an unresolvable smear of low-molecular-weight bands. Forty different SalI REA patterns with an index of discrimination of 0.979 were obtained. Low typeability (91.04%) was the major limitation of REA typing. Analysis of blinded subcultures of eight Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains showed the reproducibility of REA typing to be 87.5%. Combined phenotypic typing (O-serotyping and phage typing) performed on the same group of strains showed comparable discrimination but much lower reproducibility. Isolates selected from five clusters of nosocomial infections in hospitals in the UK were typed by REA typing, and the results show high agreement when compared with conventional phenotypic typing methods in distinguishing between strains. CONCLUSIONS: These data underline the usefulness of REA typing enhanced with digitalized data management for the epidemiologic subtyping of clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates.

  5. Calomys callosus chronically infected by Toxoplasma gondii clonal type II strain and reinfected by Brazilian strains is not able to prevent vertical transmission

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Priscila S.; da Silva, Neide M.; de Freitas Barbosa, Bellisa; de Oliveira Gomes, Angelica; Ietta, Francesca; Shwab, E. K.; Su, Chunlei; Mineo, José R.; Ferro, Eloisa A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Considering that Toxoplasma gondii has shown high genetic diversity in Brazil, the aim of this study was to determine whether Calomys callosus chronically infected by the ME-49 strain might be susceptible to reinfection by these Brazilian strains, including vertical transmission of the parasite. Survival curves were analyzed in non-pregnant females chronically infected with ME-49 and reinfected with the TgChBrUD1 or TgChBrUD2 strain, and vertical transmission was analyzed after reinfection of pregnant females with these same strains. On the 19th day of pregnancy (dop), placentas, uteri, fetuses, liver, spleen, and lung were processed for detection of the parasite. Blood samples were collected for humoral and cellular immune response analyses. All non-pregnant females survived after reinfection and no changes were observed in body weight and morbidity scores. In pregnant females, parasites were detected in the placentas of ME-49 chronically infected females and reinfected females, but were only detected in the fetuses of reinfected females. TgChBrUD2 reinfected females showed more impaired pregnancy outcomes, presenting higher numbers of animals with fetal loss and a higher resorption rate, in parallel with higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and IgG2a subclass antibodies. Vertical transmission resulting from chronic infection of immunocompetent C. callosus is considered a rare event, being attributed instead to either reactivation or reinfection. That is, the pregnancy may be responsible for reactivation of the latent infection or the reinfection may promote T. gondii vertical transmission. Our results clearly demonstrate that, during pregnancy, protection against T. gondii can be breached after reinfection with parasites belonging to different genotypes, particularly when non-clonal strains are involved in this process and in this case the reinfection promoted vertical transmission of both type II and Brazilian T. gondii strains. PMID:25806028

  6. Strain-induced fetal type II epithelial cell differentiation is mediated via cAMP-PKA-dependent signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yulian; Maciejewski, Benjamin S; Lee, Nicole; Silbert, Ophira; McKnight, Nathan L; Frangos, John A; Sanchez-Esteban, Juan

    2006-10-01

    The signaling pathways by which mechanical forces modulate fetal lung development remain largely unknown. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that strain-induced fetal type II cell differentiation is mediated via the cAMP signaling pathway. Freshly isolated E19 fetal type II epithelial cells were cultured on collagen-coated silastic membranes and exposed to mechanical strain for varying intervals, to simulate mechanical forces during lung development. Unstretched samples were used as controls. Mechanical strain activated heterotrimeric G-protein alpha(s) subunit, cAMP, and the transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Incubation of E19 cells with the PKA inhibitor H-89 significantly decreased strain-induced CREB phosphorylation. Moreover, adenylate cyclase 5 and CREB genes were also mechanically induced. In contrast, components of the PKA-independent (Epac) pathway, including Rap-1 or B-Raf, were not phosphorylated by strain. The addition of forskolin or dibutyryl cAMP to unstretched E19 monolayers markedly upregulated expression of the type II cell differentiation marker surfactant protein C, whereas the Epac agonist 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP had no effect. Furthermore, incubation of E19 cells with the PKA inhibitor Rp-2'-O-monobutyryladenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate or transient transfection with plasmid DNA containing a PKA inhibitor expression vector significantly decreased strain-induced surfactant protein C mRNA expression. In conclusion, these studies indicate that the cAMP-PKA-dependent signaling pathway is activated by force in fetal type II cells and participates in strain-induced fetal type II cell differentiation.

  7. Effects that different types of sports have on the hearts of children and adolescents and the value of two-dimensional strain-strain-rate echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Binnetoğlu, Fatih Köksal; Babaoğlu, Kadir; Altun, Gürkan; Kayabey, Özlem

    2014-01-01

    Whether the hypertrophy found in the hearts of athletes is physiologic or a risk factor for the progression of pathologic hypertrophy remains controversial. The diastolic and systolic functions of athletes with left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy usually are normal when measured by conventional methods. More precise assessment of global and regional myocardial function may be possible using a newly developed two-dimensional (2D) strain echocardiographic method. This study evaluated the effects that different types of sports have on the hearts of children and adolescents and compared the results of 2D strain and strain-rate echocardiographic techniques with conventional methods. Athletes from clubs for five different sports (basketball, swimming, football, wrestling, and tennis) who had practiced regularly at least 3 h per week during at least the previous 2 years were included in the study. The control group consisted of sedentary children and adolescents with no known cardiac or systemic diseases (n = 25). The athletes were grouped according to the type of exercise: dynamic (football, tennis), static (wrestling), or static and dynamic (basketball, swimming). Shortening fraction and ejection fraction values were within normal limits for the athletes in all the sports disciplines. Across all 140 athletes, LV geometry was normal in 58 athletes (41.4 %), whereas 22 athletes (15.7 %) had concentric remodeling, 20 (14.3 %) had concentric hypertrophy, and 40 (28.6 %) had eccentric hypertrophy. Global LV longitudinal strain values obtained from the average of apical four-, two-, and three-chamber global strain values were significantly lower for the basketball players than for all the other groups (p < 0.001).

  8. Genome sequence of the phylogenetically isolated spirochete Leptonema illini type strain (3055T)

    SciTech Connect

    Huntemann, Marcel; Stackebrandt, Erko; Held, Brittany; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Rohde, Manfred; Gronow, Sabine; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla L.

    2013-01-01

    Leptonema illini Hovind-Hougen 1979 is the type species of the genus Leptonema, family Leptospiraceae, phylum Spirochaetes. Organisms of this family have a Gram-negative-like cell enve- lope consisting of a cytoplasmic membrane and an outer membrane. The peptidoglycan layer is as- sociated with the cytoplasmic rather than the outer membrane. The two flagella of members of Leptospiraceae extend from the cytoplasmic membrane at the ends of the bacteria into the periplasmic space and are necessary for their motility. Here we describe the features of the L. illini type strain, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first genome sequence (finished at the level of Improved High Quality Draft) to be reported from of a member of the genus Leptonema and a representative of the third genus of the family Leptospiraceae for which complete or draft genome sequences are now available. The three scaffolds of the 4,522,760 bp draft genome sequence reported here, and its 4,230 protein-coding and 47 RNA genes are part of the Ge- nomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  9. Genetic recombination of tick-borne flaviviruses among wild-type strains.

    PubMed

    Norberg, Peter; Roth, Anette; Bergström, Tomas

    2013-06-05

    Genetic recombination has been suggested to occur in mosquito-borne flaviviruses. In contrast, tick-borne flaviviruses have been thought to evolve in a clonal manner, although recent studies suggest that recombination occurs also for these viruses. We re-analyzed the data and found that previous conclusions on wild type recombination were probably falsely drawn due to misalignments of nucleotide sequences, ambiguities in GenBank sequences, or different laboratory culture histories suggestive of recombination events in laboratory. To evaluate if reliable predictions of wild type recombination of tick-borne flaviviruses can be made, we analyzed viral strains sequenced exclusively for this study, and other flavivirus sequences retrieved from GenBank. We detected genetic signals supporting recombination between viruses within the three clades of TBEV-Eu, TBEV-Sib and TBEV-Fe, respectively. Our results suggest that the tick-borne encephalitis viruses may undergo recombination under natural conditions, but that geographic barriers restrict most recombination events to involve only closely genetically related viruses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparative metabolic profiling of mce1 operon mutant vs wild-type Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Adriano; Medina-Cleghorn, Daniel; Marjanovic, Olivera; Nomura, Daniel K; Riley, Lee W

    2015-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis disrupted in a 13-gene operon (mce1) accumulates free mycolic acids (FM) in its cell wall and causes accelerated death in mice. Here, to more comprehensively analyze differences in their cell wall lipid composition, we used an untargeted metabolomics approach to compare the lipid profiles of wild-type and mce1 operon mutant strains. By liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we identified >400 distinct lipids significantly altered in the mce1 mutant compared to wild type. These lipids included decreased levels of saccharolipids and glycerophospholipids, and increased levels of alpha-, methoxy- and keto mycolic acids (MA), and hydroxyphthioceranic acid. The mutant showed reduced expression of mmpL8, mmpL10, stf0, pks2 and papA2 genes involved in transport and metabolism of lipids recognized to induce proinflammatory response; these lipids were found to be decreased in the mutant. In contrast, the transcripts of mmpL3, fasI, kasA, kasB, acpM and RV3451 involved in MA transport and metabolism increased; MA inhibits inflammatory response in macrophages. Since the mce1 operon is known to be regulated in intracellular M. tuberculosis, we speculate that the differences we observed in cell wall lipid metabolism and composition may affect host response to M. tuberculosis infection and determine the clinical outcome of such an infection. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Genome sequence of the phylogenetically isolated spirochete Leptonema illini type strain (3055T)

    PubMed Central

    Huntemann, Marcel; Stackebrandt, Erko; Held, Brittany; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Rohde, Manfred; Gronow, Sabine; Göker, Markus; Detter, John C.; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla

    2013-01-01

    Leptonema illini Hovind-Hougen 1979 is the type species of the genus Leptonema, family Leptospiraceae, phylum Spirochaetes. Organisms of this family have a Gram-negative-like cell envelope consisting of a cytoplasmic membrane and an outer membrane. The peptidoglycan layer is associated with the cytoplasmic rather than the outer membrane. The two flagella of members of Leptospiraceae extend from the cytoplasmic membrane at the ends of the bacteria into the periplasmic space and are necessary for their motility. Here we describe the features of the L. illini type strain, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first genome sequence (finished at the level of Improved High Quality Draft) to be reported from of a member of the genus Leptonema and a representative of the third genus of the family Leptospiraceae for which complete or draft genome sequences are now available. The three scaffolds of the 4,522,760 bp draft genome sequence reported here, and its 4,230 protein-coding and 47 RNA genes are part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:23991250

  12. Genome sequence of the phylogenetically isolated spirochete Leptonema illini type strain (3055(T)).

    PubMed

    Huntemann, Marcel; Stackebrandt, Erko; Held, Brittany; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Rohde, Manfred; Gronow, Sabine; Göker, Markus; Detter, John C; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla

    2013-01-01

    Leptonema illini Hovind-Hougen 1979 is the type species of the genus Leptonema, family Leptospiraceae, phylum Spirochaetes. Organisms of this family have a Gram-negative-like cell envelope consisting of a cytoplasmic membrane and an outer membrane. The peptidoglycan layer is associated with the cytoplasmic rather than the outer membrane. The two flagella of members of Leptospiraceae extend from the cytoplasmic membrane at the ends of the bacteria into the periplasmic space and are necessary for their motility. Here we describe the features of the L. illini type strain, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first genome sequence (finished at the level of Improved High Quality Draft) to be reported from of a member of the genus Leptonema and a representative of the third genus of the family Leptospiraceae for which complete or draft genome sequences are now available. The three scaffolds of the 4,522,760 bp draft genome sequence reported here, and its 4,230 protein-coding and 47 RNA genes are part of the G enomic E ncyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  13. Eye-mediated immune tolerance to Type II collagen in arthritis-prone strains of mice.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Shukkur M; Kumar, Ashok; Ashour, Hossam M

    2014-12-01

    Type II collagen (CII) is a cartilage structural protein that plays important roles in joint function, arthritis and ageing. In studying the ability of CII to induce eye-mediated specific immune tolerance, we have recently proven that CII is capable of inducing anterior chamber-associated immune deviation (ACAID) in Balb/c mice. Here, we study the ability of CII to induce eye-mediated immune tolerance in strains of mice that are prone to the induction of rheumatoid arthritis. Thus, we hypothesized that CII induces ACAID in DBA/1 mice and in C57BL/6 mice through the AC route (direct injection) or the intravenous route (adoptive transfer of in vitro-generated CII-specific ACAID macrophages or of CII-specific in vitro-generated T regulatory cells). Specific immune tolerance induction was assessed using both delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and local adoptive transfer (LAT) assays. Results indicated the ability of CII to generate CII-specific ACAID-mediated immune tolerance in vivo and in vitro in both DBA/1 mice and C57BL/6 mice. These findings could be beneficial in studies of immune tolerance induction using CII.

  14. Application of physico-chemical typing methods for the epidemiological analysis of Salmonella enteritidis strains of phage type 25/17.

    PubMed Central

    Seltmann, G.; Voigt, W.; Beer, W.

    1994-01-01

    Eighty-nine Salmonella enteritidis phage type 25/17 strains isolated from a localized outbreak in the German state Nordrhein-Westfalen (outbreak NWI) could not be further differentiated by biochemotyping and plasmid pattern analysis. They were submitted to a complex typing system consisting of modern physico-chemical analytical procedures. In lipopolysaccharide pattern analysis the strains proved to be homogeneous. In multilocus enzyme electrophoresis, outer membrane and whole cell protein pattern (WCPP) analysis, and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy (increasing extent of differentiation in the given order) strains deviating from each basal pattern were found. The extent of correspondence in these deviations was satisfactory. Forty-six strains of the same sero- and phage type, however, obtained from different outbreaks, were additionally typed. The results obtained with them indicate that the data of the first group were not restricted to strains from outbreak NWI, but of general validity. It was found that both WCPP and FT-IR represent valuable methods for the sub-grouping of bacteria. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7995351

  15. Vaccination with a modified-live bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) type 1a vaccine completely protected calves against challenge with BVDV type 1b strains.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wenzhi; Mattick, Debra; Smith, Linda; Umbaugh, Jerry; Trigo, Emilio

    2010-12-10

    Vaccination plays a significant role in the control of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infection and spread. Recent studies revealed that type 1b is the predominant BVDV type 1 subgenotype, representing more than 75% of field isolates of BVDV-1. However, nearly all current, commercially available BVDV type 1 vaccines contain BVDV-1a strains. Previous studies have indicated that anti-BVDV sera, induced by BVDV-1a viruses, show less neutralization activity to BVDV-1b isolates than type 1a. Therefore, it is critically important to evaluate BVDV-1a vaccines in their ability to prevent BVDV-1b infection in calves. In current studies, calves were vaccinated subcutaneously, intradermally or intranasally with a single dose of a multivalent, modified-live viral vaccine containing a BVDV-1a strain, and were challenged with differing BVDV-1b strains to determine the efficacy and duration of immunity of the vaccine against these heterologous virus strains. Vaccinated calves, in all administration routes, were protected from respiratory disease caused by the BVDV-1b viruses, as indicated by significantly fewer clinical signs, lower rectal temperatures, reduced viral shedding and greater white blood cell counts than non-vaccinated control animals. The BVDV-1a vaccine elicited efficacious protection in calves against each BVDV-1b challenge strain, with a duration of immunity of at least 6 months.

  16. Interlaboratory reproducibility of a single-locus sequence-based method for strain typing of Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Hurst, S F; Kidd, S E; Morrissey, C O; Snelders, E; Melchers, W J G; Castelli, M V; Mellado, E; Simmon, K; Petti, C A; Richardson, S; Zhang, S; Romanelli, A M; Wickes, B L; de Valk, H A; Klaassen, C H W; Balajee, S Arunmozhi

    2009-05-01

    Seven international laboratories tested the recently proposed single-locus typing strategy for Aspergillus fumigatus subtyping for interlaboratory reproducibility. Comparative sequence analyses of portions of the locus AFUA_3G08990, encoding a putative cell surface protein (denoted CSP), was performed with a panel of Aspergillus isolates. Each laboratory followed very different protocols for extraction of DNA, PCR, and sequencing. Results revealed that the CSP typing method was a reproducible and portable strain typing method.

  17. Contributions of NanI sialidase to Caco-2 cell adherence by Clostridium perfringens type A and C strains causing human intestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Jihong; McClane, Bruce A

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies showed that Clostridium perfringens type D animal disease strain CN3718 uses NanI sialidase for adhering to enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells. The current study analyzed whether NanI is similarly important when type A and C human intestinal disease strains attach to Caco-2 cells. A PCR survey determined that the nanI gene was absent from typical type A food poisoning (FP) strains carrying a chromosomal enterotoxin (CPE) gene or the genetically related type C Darmbrand (Db) strains. However, the nanI gene was present in type A strains from healthy humans, type A strains causing CPE-associated antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) or sporadic diarrhea (SD), and type C Pig-Bel strains. Consistent with NanI sialidase being the major C. perfringens sialidase when produced, FP and Db strains had little supernatant sialidase activity compared to other type A or C human intestinal strains. All type A and C human intestinal strains bound to Caco-2 cells, but NanI-producing strains had higher attachment levels. When produced, NanI can contribute to host cell attachment of human intestinal disease strains, since a nanI null mutant constructed in type A SD strain F4969 had lower Caco-2 cell adhesion than wild-type F4969 or a complemented strain. Further supporting a role for NanI in host cell attachment, sialidase inhibitors reduced F4969 adhesion to Caco-2 cells. Collectively, these results suggest that NanI may contribute to the intestinal attachment and colonization needed for the chronic diarrhea of CPE-associated AAD and SD, but this sialidase appears to be dispensable for the acute pathogenesis of type A FP or type C enteritis necroticans. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Contributions of NanI Sialidase to Caco-2 Cell Adherence by Clostridium perfringens Type A and C Strains Causing Human Intestinal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jihong

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies showed that Clostridium perfringens type D animal disease strain CN3718 uses NanI sialidase for adhering to enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells. The current study analyzed whether NanI is similarly important when type A and C human intestinal disease strains attach to Caco-2 cells. A PCR survey determined that the nanI gene was absent from typical type A food poisoning (FP) strains carrying a chromosomal enterotoxin (CPE) gene or the genetically related type C Darmbrand (Db) strains. However, the nanI gene was present in type A strains from healthy humans, type A strains causing CPE-associated antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) or sporadic diarrhea (SD), and type C Pig-Bel strains. Consistent with NanI sialidase being the major C. perfringens sialidase when produced, FP and Db strains had little supernatant sialidase activity compared to other type A or C human intestinal strains. All type A and C human intestinal strains bound to Caco-2 cells, but NanI-producing strains had higher attachment levels. When produced, NanI can contribute to host cell attachment of human intestinal disease strains, since a nanI null mutant constructed in type A SD strain F4969 had lower Caco-2 cell adhesion than wild-type F4969 or a complemented strain. Further supporting a role for NanI in host cell attachment, sialidase inhibitors reduced F4969 adhesion to Caco-2 cells. Collectively, these results suggest that NanI may contribute to the intestinal attachment and colonization needed for the chronic diarrhea of CPE-associated AAD and SD, but this sialidase appears to be dispensable for the acute pathogenesis of type A FP or type C enteritis necroticans. PMID:25135687

  19. Assessing benzene-induced toxicity on wild type Euglena gracilis Z and its mutant strain SMZ.

    PubMed

    Peng, Cheng; Arthur, Dionne M; Sichani, Homa Teimouri; Xia, Qing; Ng, Jack C

    2013-11-01

    Benzene is a representative member of volatile organic compounds and has been widely used as an industrial solvent. Groundwater contamination of benzene may pose risks to human health and ecosystems. Detection of benzene in the groundwater using chemical analysis is expensive and time consuming. In addition, biological responses to environmental exposures are uninformative using such analysis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to employ a microorganism, Euglena gracilis (E. gracilis) as a putative model to monitor the contamination of benzene in groundwater. To this end, we examined the wild type of E. gracilis Z and its mutant form, SMZ in their growth rate, morphology, chlorophyll content, formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage in response to benzene exposure. The results showed that benzene inhibited cell growth in a dose response manner up to 48 h of exposure. SMZ showed a greater sensitivity compared to Z in response to benzene exposure. The difference was more evident at lower concentrations of benzene (0.005-5 μM) where growth inhibition occurred in SMZ but not in Z cells. We found that benzene induced morphological changes, formation of lipofuscin, and decreased chlorophyll content in Z strain in a dose response manner. No significant differences were found between the two strains in ROS formation and DNA damage by benzene at concentrations affecting cell growth. Based on these results, we conclude that E. gracilis cells were sensitive to benzene-induced toxicities for certain endpoints such as cell growth rate, morphological change, depletion of chlorophyll. Therefore, it is a potentially suitable model for monitoring the contamination of benzene and its effects in the groundwater.

  20. Pathogenesis of a Chinese strain of bovine adenovirus type 3 infection in albino guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hong-Fei; Zhu, Yuan-Mao; Yan, Hao; Ma, Lei; Wang, Xue-Zhi; Xue, Fei

    2014-12-01

    Bovine adenovirus type 3 (BAV-3) is considered one of the most important respiratory tract agents of cattle and is widespread among cattle around the world. A BAV-3 strain was isolated from a bovine nasal swab for the first time in China in 2009 and named HLJ0955. Subsequently, BAV-3 has frequently been isolated from calves with respiratory diseases in China. To date, only limited study on the pathogenesis of BAV-3 infection in cotton rats has been conducted, and the pathogenesis of BAV-3 infection in guinea pigs has not been reported. Therefore, sixteen albino guinea pigs were inoculated intranasally with HLJ0955. All of the infected guinea pigs had apparently elevated rectal temperatures (39.2 °C-39.9 °C) at 2-7 days post-inoculation (PI). Consolidation and petechial hemorrhage were also observed in guinea pigs experimentally infected with HLJ0955. Viral replication was detectable by virus isolation and titration and by immunohistochemistry in the lungs of guinea pigs as early as 24 h PI. Viral DNA was detectable in the lungs of infected guinea pigs during 11 days of observation by real-time PCR. Virus-neutralizing antibodies against BAV-3 were detectable from 11 days PI and reached a peak titer at 15 days PI. Histopathological changes mainly occurred in the lungs of infected guinea pigs and were characterized by thickening of alveolar septa, mononuclear cell infiltration, hemorrhage and alveolar epithelial necrosis. These results indicate that HLJ0955 can replicate in the lungs of guinea pigs and cause fever and gross and histological lesions. The guinea pig infection model of BAV-3 would serve as a useful system for monitoring the infection process and pathogenesis of the Chinese BAV-3 strain HLJ0955, as well as immune responses to BAV-3 vaccines.

  1. Alterations in the equine herpesvirus type-1 (EHV-1) strain RacH during attenuation.

    PubMed

    Hübert, P H; Birkenmaier, S; Rziha, H J; Osterrieder, N

    1996-03-01

    The equine herpesvirus type-1 modified live-vaccine strain RacH (256th passage on porcine embryonic kidney cells) was investigated by restriction-enzyme analysis and compared to representative plaque isolates of the 12th passage (RacL11, RacL22) and 185th passage (RacM24, RacM36). The restriction patterns of all Rac plaque isolates differed compared with reference strain Ab4. The left UL terminus was shortened by 0.1 kbp and a missing BamHI site led to the fusion of the f and t fragments. In some Rac derivatives, losses of restriction sites without deletions were observed: 1. One BamHI site located in the ribosyl reductase gene was missing in RacH, RacM24, RacM36, and RacL22; and 2. An SalI site mapping to the gp14 (gB) gene was absent in RacM24, RacM36 and RacH. An identical deletion of 0.85 kbp in size was found in both copies of the inverted repeat (IR) regions of RacH. The deletion was present only in the terminal IR of the medium-passage derivative RacM36. By contrast, in the genomes of the apathogenic RacM24, as well as the pathogenic plaque isolates RacL11 and RacL22, no deletions in the IRs were detectable. Nucleotide-sequence and Northern-blot analyses revealed that the deletions led to the elimination of one or both copies of the gene 67 (IR6) open-reading frame in RacM36 and RacH and affected the gene 68 (EUS1) in RacH.

  2. Population Genetic Structure of Listeria monocytogenes Strains as Determined by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis and Multilocus Sequence Typing

    PubMed Central

    Henri, Clémentine; Félix, Benjamin; Guillier, Laurent; Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Michelon, Damien; Mariet, Jean-François; Aarestrup, Frank M.; Mistou, Michel-Yves; Hendriksen, René S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous bacterium that may cause the foodborne illness listeriosis. Only a small amount of data about the population genetic structure of strains isolated from food is available. This study aimed to provide an accurate view of the L. monocytogenes food strain population in France. From 1999 to 2014, 1,894 L. monocytogenes strains were isolated from food at the French National Reference Laboratory for L. monocytogenes and classified according to the five risk food matrices defined by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). A total of 396 strains were selected on the basis of different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) clusters, serotypes, and strain origins and typed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and the MLST results were supplemented with MLST data available from Institut Pasteur, representing human and additional food strains from France. The distribution of sequence types (STs) was compared between food and clinical strains on a panel of 675 strains. High congruence between PFGE and MLST was found. Out of 73 PFGE clusters, the two most prevalent corresponded to ST9 and ST121. Using original statistical analysis, we demonstrated that (i) there was not a clear association between ST9 and ST121 and the food matrices, (ii) serotype IIc, ST8, and ST4 were associated with meat products, and (iii) ST13 was associated with dairy products. Of the two major STs, ST121 was the ST that included the fewest clinical strains, which might indicate lower virulence. This observation may be directly relevant for refining risk analysis models for the better management of food safety. IMPORTANCE This study showed a very useful backward compatibility between PFGE and MLST for surveillance. The results enabled better understanding of the population structure of L. monocytogenes strains isolated from food and management of the health risks associated with L. monocytogenes food strains. Moreover, this work provided an accurate view

  3. Population Genetic Structure of Listeria monocytogenes Strains as Determined by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis and Multilocus Sequence Typing.

    PubMed

    Henri, Clémentine; Félix, Benjamin; Guillier, Laurent; Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Michelon, Damien; Mariet, Jean-François; Aarestrup, Frank M; Mistou, Michel-Yves; Hendriksen, René S; Roussel, Sophie

    2016-09-15

    Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous bacterium that may cause the foodborne illness listeriosis. Only a small amount of data about the population genetic structure of strains isolated from food is available. This study aimed to provide an accurate view of the L. monocytogenes food strain population in France. From 1999 to 2014, 1,894 L. monocytogenes strains were isolated from food at the French National Reference Laboratory for L. monocytogenes and classified according to the five risk food matrices defined by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). A total of 396 strains were selected on the basis of different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) clusters, serotypes, and strain origins and typed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and the MLST results were supplemented with MLST data available from Institut Pasteur, representing human and additional food strains from France. The distribution of sequence types (STs) was compared between food and clinical strains on a panel of 675 strains. High congruence between PFGE and MLST was found. Out of 73 PFGE clusters, the two most prevalent corresponded to ST9 and ST121. Using original statistical analysis, we demonstrated that (i) there was not a clear association between ST9 and ST121 and the food matrices, (ii) serotype IIc, ST8, and ST4 were associated with meat products, and (iii) ST13 was associated with dairy products. Of the two major STs, ST121 was the ST that included the fewest clinical strains, which might indicate lower virulence. This observation may be directly relevant for refining risk analysis models for the better management of food safety. This study showed a very useful backward compatibility between PFGE and MLST for surveillance. The results enabled better understanding of the population structure of L. monocytogenes strains isolated from food and management of the health risks associated with L. monocytogenes food strains. Moreover, this work provided an accurate view of L. monocytogenes

  4. Direct type II-indirect type I conversion of InP/GaAs/InP strained quantum wells induced by hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerling, M.; Pistol, M.-E.; Samuelson, L.; Seifert, W.; Fornell, J.-O.; Ledebo, L.

    1991-08-01

    Photoluminescence from thin strained layers of GaAs grown on InP has been studied under hydrostatic pressure. The structures are type II at atmospheric pressure. At higher pressures the structures change to type I with the lowest conduction band edge in the strained GaAs layer being the X minimum. This transformation is characterized by a drastic change in the pressure derivative of the emission energy and a rapid disappearance of the photoluminescence intensity at slightly higher pressures. A hydrostatic pressure derivative of less than one meV/kbar is measured for the valence band offset.

  5. Protection from lethal herpes simplex virus type 1 infection by vaccination with a UL41-deficient recombinant strain.

    PubMed

    Koshizuka, Tetsuo; Ishioka, Ken; Kobayashi, Takahiro; Ikuta, Kazufumi; Suzutani, Tatsuo

    2016-06-08

    The UL41 gene of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) encodes a virion host shut off protein which is involved in immune evasion. The growth and virulence of HSV-1 is markedly reduced by the deletion of UL41. In this report, the UL41-deleted recombinant HSV-1 strain VR∆41 was evaluated as a prophylactic live attenuated vaccine against lethal HSV-1 infection in a mouse model. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) inoculation with the VR∆41 strain clearly inhibited lethal wild-type HSV-1 (VR-3 strain) infection after both i.p. and intracerebral (i.c.) inoculations. Vaccination with the VR∆41 strain was safer than VR-3 vaccination and was able to protect against a wild-type challenge to the same degree as VR-3 vaccination. In contrast, i.p. inoculation with ultraviolet-irradiated VR-3 induced resistance against i.p. infection, but not against i.c. Although replication of the VR∆41 strain in mice was greatly reduced compared to that of the VR-3 strain, VR∆41 strain maintained the ability to spread to the central nervous system (CNS) from a peripheral inoculation site. These results indicated that the VR∆41 strain evoked a potent immune reaction through viral protein expression within CNS without the induction of lethal encephalitis. The entry of antigens into the CNS was essential for the establishment of protective immunity against the lethal HSV encephalitis. We concluded that only a live attenuated vaccine is able to afford a prophylactic effect against CNS infection with HSV. In order to fulfill this requirement, UL41-deleted viruses provide a strong candidate for use as a recombinant live vaccine.

  6. Capsular Polysaccharide (CPS) Release by Serotype 3 Pneumococcal Strains Reduces the Protective Effect of Anti-Type 3 CPS Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eun Hwa; Zhang, Fan; Lu, Ying-Jie

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of the serotype 3 (ST3) pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) remains unclear. While the synthesis of capsular polysaccharide (CPS) of most serotypes is wzy dependent, the strains of two serotypes, 3 and 37, synthesize CPS by the synthase-dependent pathway, resulting in a polysaccharide that is not covalently linked to peptidoglycan and can be released during growth. We hypothesized that the release of CPS during growth reduces anti-type 3 CPS antibody-mediated protection and may explain the lower efficacy of the type 3 component of PCV than that of other PCVs. The in vitro-released CPS concentrations per 107 CFU of ST3 and ST37 strains were significantly higher than those for the ST1, ST4, ST6B, and ST14 strains. Following intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection in mice, blood concentrations of CPS were significantly higher for the ST3 than for the ST4/5 strains. The opsonophagocytic killing assay (OPKA) titer of anti-type 3 CPS antibody was significantly reduced by type 3 CPS, culture supernatant, or serum from Streptococcus pneumoniae ST3 strain WU2-infected mice. Mice were injected with capsule-specific antibodies and challenged i.p. with or without the addition of sterile culture supernatant containing type-specific CPS. The addition of 0.2 μl of culture supernatant from WU2 inhibited passive protection, whereas 100-fold-more culture supernatant from S. pneumoniae ST4 strain TIGR4 was required for the inhibition of protection. We conclude that released type 3 CPS interferes with antibody-mediated killing and protection by anti-CPS antibodies. The relative failure of ST3 PCV may be due to CPS release, suggesting that alternative immunization approaches for ST3 may be necessary. PMID:26677201

  7. Capsular Polysaccharide (CPS) Release by Serotype 3 Pneumococcal Strains Reduces the Protective Effect of Anti-Type 3 CPS Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun Hwa; Zhang, Fan; Lu, Ying-Jie; Malley, Richard

    2015-12-16

    The efficacy of the serotype 3 (ST3) pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) remains unclear. While the synthesis of capsular polysaccharide (CPS) of most serotypes is wzy dependent, the strains of two serotypes, 3 and 37, synthesize CPS by the synthase-dependent pathway, resulting in a polysaccharide that is not covalently linked to peptidoglycan and can be released during growth. We hypothesized that the release of CPS during growth reduces anti-type 3 CPS antibody-mediated protection and may explain the lower efficacy of the type 3 component of PCV than that of other PCVs. The in vitro-released CPS concentrations per 10(7) CFU of ST3 and ST37 strains were significantly higher than those for the ST1, ST4, ST6B, and ST14 strains. Following intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection in mice, blood concentrations of CPS were significantly higher for the ST3 than for the ST4/5 strains. The opsonophagocytic killing assay (OPKA) titer of anti-type 3 CPS antibody was significantly reduced by type 3 CPS, culture supernatant, or serum from Streptococcus pneumoniae ST3 strain WU2-infected mice. Mice were injected with capsule-specific antibodies and challenged i.p. with or without the addition of sterile culture supernatant containing type-specific CPS. The addition of 0.2 μl of culture supernatant from WU2 inhibited passive protection, whereas 100-fold-more culture supernatant from S. pneumoniae ST4 strain TIGR4 was required for the inhibition of protection. We conclude that released type 3 CPS interferes with antibody-mediated killing and protection by anti-CPS antibodies. The relative failure of ST3 PCV may be due to CPS release, suggesting that alternative immunization approaches for ST3 may be necessary.

  8. Immunity status of adults and children against poliomyelitis virus type 1 strains CHAT and Sabin (LSc-2ab) in Germany

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In October 2007, the working group CEN/TC 216 of the European Committee for standardisation suggested that the Sabin oral poliovirus vaccine type 1 strain (LSc-2ab) presently used for virucidal tests should be replaced by another attenuated vaccine poliovirus type 1 strain, CHAT. Both strains were historically used as oral vaccines, but the Sabin type 1 strain was acknowledged to be more attenuated. In Germany, vaccination against poliomyelitis was introduced in 1962 using the oral polio vaccine (OPV) containing Sabin strain LSc-2ab. The vaccination schedule was changed from OPV to an inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) containing wild polio virus type 1 strain Mahoney in 1998. In the present study, we assessed potential differences in neutralising antibody titres to Sabin and CHAT in persons with a history of either OPV, IPV, or OPV with IPV booster. Methods Neutralisation poliovirus antibodies against CHAT and Sabin 1 were measured in sera of 41 adults vaccinated with OPV. Additionally, sera from 28 children less than 10 years of age and immunised with IPV only were analysed. The neutralisation assay against poliovirus was performed according to WHO guidelines. Results The neutralisation activity against CHAT in adults with OPV vaccination history was significantly lower than against Sabin poliovirus type 1 strains (Wilcoxon signed-rank test P < 0.025). In eight sera, the antibody titres measured against CHAT were less than 8, although the titre against Sabin 1 varied between 8 and 64. Following IPV booster, anti-CHAT antibodies increased rapidly in sera of CHAT-negative adults with OPV history. Sera from children with IPV history neutralised CHAT and Sabin 1 strains equally. Conclusion The lack of neutralising antibodies against the CHAT strain in persons vaccinated with OPV might be associated with an increased risk of reinfection with the CHAT polio virus type 1, and this implies a putative risk of transmission of the virus to polio-free communities. We

  9. Presence of alpha and a mating types in environmental and clinical collections of Cryptococcus neoformans var. gattii strains from Australia.

    PubMed

    Halliday, C L; Bui, T; Krockenberger, M; Malik, R; Ellis, D H; Carter, D A

    1999-09-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans var. gattii lives in association with certain species of eucalyptus trees and is a causative agent of cryptococcosis. It exists as two mating types, MATalpha and MATa, which is determined by a single-locus, two-allele system. In the closely related C. neoformans var. neoformans, the alpha mating type has been found to outnumber its a counterpart by at least 30:1, but there have been very limited data on the proportions of each mating type in C. neoformans var. gattii. In the present study, specific PCR primers were designed to amplify two separate alpha-mating-type genes from C. neoformans var. gattii strains. These were used to survey for the presence of the two mating types in clinical and environmental collections of C. neoformans var. gattii strains from Australia. Sixty-eight of 69 clinical isolates produced both alpha mating type-specific bands and were assumed to be of the alpha mating type. The majority of environmental isolates were also of the alpha mating type, but the a mating type was located in two separate areas. In one area, the a mating type outnumbered the alpha mating type by 27:2, but in the second area, the ratio of the two mating types was close to the 50:50 ratio expected for sexual recombination.

  10. Early detection of cardiac dysfunction in the type 1 diabetic heart using speckle-tracking based strain imaging.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Danielle L; Nichols, Cody E; Croston, Tara L; McLaughlin, Sarah L; Petrone, Ashley B; Lewis, Sara E; Thapa, Dharendra; Long, Dustin M; Dick, Gregory M; Hollander, John M

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced sensitivity in echocardiographic analyses may allow for early detection of changes in cardiac function beyond the detection limits of conventional echocardiographic analyses, particularly in a small animal model. The goal of this study was to compare conventional echocardiographic measurements and speckle-tracking based strain imaging analyses in a small animal model of type 1 diabetes mellitus. Conventional analyses revealed differences in ejection fraction, fractional shortening, cardiac output, and stroke volume in diabetic animals relative to controls at 6-weeks post-diabetic onset. In contrast, when assessing short- and long-axis speckle-tracking based strain analyses, diabetic mice showed changes in average systolic radial strain, radial strain rate, radial displacement, and radial velocity, as well as decreased circumferential and longitudinal strain rate, as early as 1-week post-diabetic onset and persisting throughout the diabetic study. Further, we performed regional analyses for the LV and found that the free wall region was affected in both the short- and long-axis when assessing radial dimension parameters. These changes began 1-week post-diabetic onset and remained throughout the progression of the disease. These findings demonstrate the use of speckle-tracking based strain as an approach to elucidate cardiac dysfunction from a global perspective, identifying left ventricular cardiac regions affected during the progression of type 1 diabetes mellitus earlier than contractile changes detected by conventional echocardiographic measurements.

  11. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing, antibiotic resistance, and plasmid profiles of Escherichia coli strains isolated from foods.

    PubMed

    Uysal, Ahmet; Durak, Yusuf

    2012-11-01

    Bacterial contamination in foods and antimicrobial resistance levels of common pathogenic strains causing food-borne disease are important in human health. Thus, typing technologies are important tools to determine primary sources of bacterial contamination. In this study, 40 Escherichia coli strains isolated from 85 food samples were evaluated in terms of genetic diversity, susceptibility to certain antibiotics, and plasmid profiles. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to identify the genetic relations of E. coli isolates. It was determined that the 40 E. coli strains revealed 32 different pulsotypes represented by 6 subtypes. Antibiotic susceptibility tests conducted by using a disc diffusion method against 15 antibiotics showed that although the isolates revealed 14 different types of resistance profiles, the strains showed the greatest resistance to ampicillin (77.5%), followed by ticarcillin-clavulanic acid (30%), tetracycline (22.5%), and cephalothin (14.5%). Plasmid isolations studies of the strains conducted by the method of alkaline lysis revealed that 18 (45%) of 40 E. coli strains contain 31 different plasmid bands ranging between 64.4 and 1 kb. The results showed that PFGE was a powerful method in tracking sources of food contamination and that the antibiotic resistance levels of food isolates were high and should be monitored.

  12. Production of novel types of antibacterial liamocins by diverse strains of Aureobasidium pullulans grown on different culture media.

    PubMed

    Leathers, Timothy D; Price, Neil P J; Bischoff, Kenneth M; Manitchotpisit, Pennapa; Skory, Christopher D

    2015-10-01

    To compare production of antibacterial liamocins (polyol lipids) by diverse strains of Aureobasidium pullulans grown on different culture media. Liamocins produced by strains of A. pullulans have potential agricultural and pharmaceutical applications as antibacterials with specificity against Streptococcus spp. Six strains of A. pullulans were characterized for liamocin production on four different culture media. The choice of strain and culture medium affected growth, liamocin yields, and production of contaminating pigments. Best growth and highest liamocin yields were obtained using A. pullulans strain NRRL 50384 grown on a sucrose basal medium. Unexpectedly, the choice of strain and culture medium also affected the structure of liamocins produced, providing novel types of liamocins. Liamocins varied not only in the ratios of trimer and tetramer polyester tail groups, but also in the nature of the polyol headgroup, which could include mannitol, arabitol, or glycerol. The ability to conveniently produce novel types of liamocins in good yields will provide novel antibacterials for applied uses, and facilitate structure-function studies on the mechanism of antibacterial activity.

  13. An ultra fast detection method reveals strain-induced Ca(2+) entry via TRPV2 in alveolar type II cells.

    PubMed

    Fois, Giorgio; Wittekindt, Oliver; Zheng, Xing; Felder, Erika Tatiana; Miklavc, Pika; Frick, Manfred; Dietl, Paul; Felder, Edward

    2012-09-01

    A commonly used technique to investigate strain-induced responses of adherent cells is culturing them on an elastic membrane and globally stretching the membrane. However, it is virtually impossible to acquire microscopic images immediately after the stretch with this method. Using a newly developed technique, we recorded the strain-induced increase of the cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](c)) in rat primary alveolar type II (ATII) cells at an acquisition rate of 30ms and without any temporal delay. We can show that the onset of the mechanically induced rise in [Ca(2+)](c) was very fast (<30 ms), and Ca(2+) entry was immediately abrogated when the stimulus was withdrawn. This points at a direct mechanical activation of an ion channel. RT-PCR revealed high expression of TRPV2 in ATII cells, and silencing TRPV2, as well as blocking TRPV channels with ruthenium red, significantly reduced the strain-induced Ca(2+) response. Moreover, the usually homogenous pattern of the strain-induced [Ca(2+)](c) increase was converted into a point-like response after both treatments. Also interfering with actin/myosin and integrin binding inhibited the strain-induced increase of [Ca(2)](c). We conclude that TRPV2 participates in strain-induced Ca(2+) entry in ATII cells and suggest a direct mechanical activation of the channel that depends on FAs and actin/myosin. Furthermore, our results underline the importance of cell strain systems that allow high temporal resolution.

  14. The effect of Clostridium perfringens type C strain CN3685 and its isogenic beta toxin null mutant in goats.

    PubMed

    Garcia, J P; Beingesser, J; Fisher, D J; Sayeed, S; McClane, B A; Posthaus, H; Uzal, F A

    2012-06-15

    Clostridium perfringens type C is an important cause of enteritis and/or enterocolitis in several animal species, including pigs, sheep, goats, horses and humans. The disease is a classic enterotoxemia and the enteric lesions and associated systemic effects are thought to be caused primarily by beta toxin (CPB), one of two typing toxins produced by C. perfringens type C. This has been demonstrated recently by fulfilling molecular Koch's postulates in rabbits and mice. We present here an experimental study to fulfill these postulates in goats, a natural host of C. perfringens type C disease. Nine healthy male or female Anglo Nubian goat kids were inoculated with the virulent C. perfringens type C wild-type strain CN3685, an isogenic CPB null mutant or a strain where the cpb null mutation had been reversed. Three goats inoculated with the wild-type strain presented abdominal pain, hemorrhagic diarrhea, necrotizing enterocolitis, pulmonary edema, hydropericardium and death within 24h of inoculation. Two goats inoculated with the CPB null mutant and two goats inoculated with sterile culture media (negative controls) remained clinically healthy during 24h after inoculation and no gross or histological abnormalities were observed in the tissues of any of them. Reversal of the null mutation to partially restore CPB production also increased virulence; 2 goats inoculated with this reversed mutant presented clinical and pathological changes similar to those observed in goats inoculated with the wild-type strain, except that spontaneous death was not observed. These results indicate that CPB is required for C. perfringens type C to induce disease in goats, supporting a key role for this toxin in natural C. perfringens type C disease pathogenesis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The effect of Clostridium perfringens type C strain CN3685 and its isogenic beta toxin null mutant in goats

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, J. P.; Beingesser, J.; Fisher, D. J.; Sayeed, S.; McClane, B. A.; Posthaus, H.; Uzal, F. A.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens type C is an important cause of enteritis and/or enterocolitis in several animal species, including pigs, sheep, goats, horses and humans. The disease is a classic enterotoxemia and the enteric lesions and associated systemic effects are thought to be caused primarily by beta toxin (CPB), one of two typing toxins produced by C. perfringens type C. This has been demonstrated recently by fulfilling molecular Koch’s postulates in rabbits and mice. We present here an experimental study to fulfill these postulates in goats, a natural host of C. perfringens type C disease. Nine healthy male or female Anglo Nubian goat kids were inoculated with the virulent C. perfringens type C wild-type strain CN3685, an isogenic CPB null mutant or a strain where the cpb null mutation had been reversed. Three goats inoculated with the wild-type strain presented abdominal pain, hemorrhagic diarrhea, necrotizing enterocolitis, pulmonary edema, hydropericardium and death within 24 h of inoculation. Two goats inoculated with the CPB null mutant and two goats inoculated with sterile culture media (negative controls) remained clinically healthy during 24 h after inoculation and no gross or histological abnormalities were observed in the tissues of any of them. Reversal of the null mutation to partially restore CPB production also increased virulence; 2 goats inoculated with this reversed mutant presented clinical and pathological changes similar to those observed in goats inoculated with the wild-type strain, except that spontaneous death was not observed. These results indicate that CPB is required for C. perfringens type C to induce disease in goats, supporting a key role for this toxin in natural C. perfringens type C disease pathogenesis. PMID:22296994

  16. Use of Dual-Grating Sensors Formed by Different Types of Fiber Bragg Gratings for Simultaneous Temperature and Strain Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Xuewen; Zhao, Donghui; Zhang, Lin; Bennion, Ian

    2004-04-01

    We report on a systematic investigation of the dependence of both temperature and strain sensitivities on the fiber Bragg grating type, including the well-known Type I, Type IIA, and a new type that we have designated Type IA, using both hydrogen-free and hydrogenated B/Ge codoped fibres. We have identified distinct sensitivity characteristics for each grating type, and we have used them to implement a novel dual-grating, dual-parameter sensor device. Three dual-grating sensing schemes with different combinations of grating type have been constructed and compared, and that of a Type IA-Type IIA combination exhibits the best performance, which is also superior to that of previously reported grating-based structures. The characteristics of the measurement errors in such dual-grating sensor systems is also presented in detail.

  17. Uniaxial strain-induced magnetic order transition from E-type to A-type in orthorhombic YMnO{sub 3} from first-principles

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S. X.; Fang, X. G.; Zhang, A. H.; Lu, X. B.; Gao, J. W.; Gao, X. S.; Zeng, M.; Liu, J.-M.

    2014-10-28

    The spin ordering magnetic structures of orthorhombic YMnO{sub 3} subjected to uniaxial strain have been investigated using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. On applying compressive uniaxial strain of −0.8% along the b orientation, the spin ordering magnetic structure is predicted to change from E-type to A-type antiferromagnetic orderings. The structure analysis also reveals that the uniaxial strain has a dramatic influence on the Mn-O bond lengths and Mn-O-Mn bond angles, allowing the gradual suppression of the alternation of the long and short Mn-O-Mn bonds in the ab plane. These changes present very interesting possibilities for engineering the spin ordering along with ferroelectric property in orthorhombic YMnO{sub 3}.

  18. Genome sequence of the chemoheterotrophic soil bacterium Saccharomonospora cyanea type strain (NA-134(T))

    SciTech Connect

    Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P.; Lu, Megan; Huntemann, Marcel; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Pitluck, Sam; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Potter, Gabriele; Land, Miriam L; Ivanova, N; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Saccharomonospora cyanea Runmao et al. 1988 is a member of the genus Saccharomonospora in the family Pseudonocardiaceae that is moderately well characterized at the genome level thus far. Members of the genus Saccharomonospora are of interest because they originate from diverse habitats, such as soil, leaf litter, manure, compost, surface of peat, moist, over-heated grain, and ocean sediment, where they probably play a role in the primary degradation of plant material by attacking hemicellulose. Species of the genus Saccharomonospora are usually Gram-positive, non-acid fast, and are classified among the actinomycetes. S. cyanea is characterized by a dark blue (= cyan blue) aerial mycelium. After S. viridis, S. azurea, and S. marina, S. cyanea is only the fourth member in the genus for which a completely sequenced (non-contiguous finished draft status) type strain genome will be published. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the draft genome sequence, and annotation. The 5,408,301 bp long chromosome with its 5,139 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE funded Community Sequencing Program (CSP) 2010 at the Joint Genome Institute (JGI).

  19. Genome sequence of the ocean sediment bacterium Saccharomonospora marina type strain (XMU15T)

    SciTech Connect

    Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lu, Megan; Lucas, Susan; Copeland, A; Pitluck, Sam; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Potter, Gabriele; Land, Miriam L; Ivanova, N; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Li, Wen-Jun; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Woyke, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Saccharomonospora marina Liu et al. 2010 is a member to the genomically so far poorly characterized genus Saccharomonospora in the family Pseudonocardiaceae. Members of the genus Sacharomonospora are of interest because they originate from diverse habitats, such as leaf litter, manure, compost, surface of peat, moist, over-heated grain, and ocean sediment, where they might play a role in the primary degradation of plant material by attacking hemicellulose. Organisms belonging to the genus are usually Gram-positive staining, non-acid fast, and classify among the actinomycetes. Next to S. viridis and S. azurea, S. marina is the third member in the genus Saccharomonospora for with a completely sequenced (permanent draft status) type strain genome will be published. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. The 5,965,593 bp long chromosome with its 5,727 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE funded Community Sequencing Program (CSP) 2010 at the Joint Genome Institute (JGI).

  20. Genome sequence of the soil bacterium Saccharomonospora azurea type strain (NA-128T)

    SciTech Connect

    Klenk, Hans-Peter; Held, Brittany; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Hammon, Nancy; Pitluck, Sam; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Potter, Gabriele; Land, Miriam L; Ivanova, N; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Woyke, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Saccharomonospora azurea Runmao et al. 1987 is a member to the genomically so far poorly characterized genus Saccharomonospora in the family Pseudonocardiaceae. Members of the genus Sacharomonosoras are of interest because they originate from diverse habitats, such as leaf litter, manure, compost, surface of peat, moist and over-heated grain, where they might play a role in the primary degradation of plant material by attacking hemicellulose. They are Gram-negative staining organisms classified among the usually Gram-positive actinomycetes. Next to S. viridis, S. azurea is only the second member in the genus Saccharomonospora for with a completely sequenced type strain genome will be published. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence with project status 'permanent draft', and annotation. The 4,763,832 bp long chromosome with its 4,472 protein-coding and 58 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE funded Community Sequencing Program (CSP) 2010 at the Joint Genome Institute (JGI).

  1. Molecular Typing of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Strains: A Fundamental Tool for Tuberculosis Control and Elimination.

    PubMed

    Cannas, Angela; Mazzarelli, Antonio; Di Caro, Antonino; Delogu, Giovanni; Girardi, Enrico

    2016-06-24

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. An improvement of the strategies for disease control is necessary in both low- and high-incidence TB countries. Clinicians, epidemiologists, laboratory specialists, and public health players should work together in order to achieve a significant reduction in TB transmission and spread of drug-resistant strains. Effective TB surveillance relies on early diagnosis of new cases, appropriate therapy, and accurate detection of outbreaks in the community, in order to implement proper TB control strategies. To achieve this goal, information from classical and molecular epidemiology, together with patient clinical data need to be combined. In this review, we summarize the methodologies currently used in molecular epidemiology, namely molecular typing. We will discuss their efficiency to phylogenetically characterize Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates, and their ability to provide information that can be useful for disease control. We will also introduce next generation sequencing as the methodology that potentially could provide in a short time both, detection of new outbreaks and identification of resistance patterns. This could envision a potential of next generation sequencing as an important tool for accurate patient management and disease control.

  2. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of leptospiral strains isolated from two geographic locations of Tamil Nadu, India.

    PubMed

    Kanagavel, Murugesan; Princy Margreat, Alphonse Asirvatham; Arunkumar, Manivel; Prabhakaran, Shanmugarajan Gnanasekaran; Shanmughapriya, Santhanam; Natarajaseenivasan, Kalimuthusamy

    2016-01-01

    Here the rodent carrier status for the transmission of human leptospirosis in Tiruchirappalli, district, Tamil Nadu, India was assessed. The predominantly circulating leptospiral STs were recognized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). A total of 113 rodents were trapped from different provinces of the Tiruchirappalli district. The most prevalent rodent was Bandicota bengalensis (37.2%), and of the total, 52.2% (n=59) rodents were found to be positive for leptospiral 16S rRNA. These results were validated with a leptospiral culture positivity of 45.8% (n=27). Three isolates from Chennai (2 rodents and 1 human) and 1 human isolate from Tiruchirappalli were included to understand the spatial variations and to track the source of human leptospirosis. The serogroup, serovar, and species level identification of all 31 isolates identified 28 to be Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Javanica and three as Leptospira interrogans serovar Autumnalis. MLST analysis defined all isolates to the existing ST profiles (ST145 and ST27) with the exception of 6 L. borgpetersenii (ST DR) isolates that showed variations in the sucA and pfkB loci. The DR ST was locally confined to Chatram province of Tiruchirappalli suggesting an epidemiological link. The predominant STs, ST145 and ST-DR form a group, indicating the presence of original strain that subsequently diverged evolutionarily into two STs. The variations between L. borgpetersenii in sucA and pfkB loci may be an indication that evolutionary changes transpired in Tiruchirappalli.

  3. Orientation Effects in Ballistic High-Strained P-type Si Nanowire FETs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jia-Hong; Huang, Qing-An; Yu, Hong; Lei, Shuang-Ying

    2009-01-01

    In order to design and optimize high-sensitivity silicon nanowire-field-effect transistor (SiNW FET) pressure sensors, this paper investigates the effects of channel orientations and the uniaxial stress on the ballistic hole transport properties of a strongly quantized SiNW FET placed near the high stress regions of the pressure sensors. A discrete stress-dependent six-band k.p method is used for subband structure calculation, coupled to a two-dimensional Poisson solver for electrostatics. A semi-classical ballistic FET model is then used to evaluate the ballistic current-voltage characteristics of SiNW FETs with and without strain. Our results presented here indicate that [110] is the optimum orientation for the p-type SiNW FETs and sensors. For the ultra-scaled 2.2 nm square SiNW, due to the limit of strong quantum confinement, the effect of the uniaxial stress on the magnitude of ballistic drive current is too small to be considered, except for the [100] orientation. However, for larger 5 nm square SiNW transistors with various transport orientations, the uniaxial tensile stress obviously alters the ballistic performance, while the uniaxial compressive stress slightly changes the ballistic hole current. Furthermore, the competition of injection velocity and carrier density related to the effective hole masses is found to play a critical role in determining the performance of the nanotransistors. PMID:22574043

  4. Genomic encyclopedia of bacteria and archaea: sequencing a myriad of type strains.

    PubMed

    Kyrpides, Nikos C; Hugenholtz, Philip; Eisen, Jonathan A; Woyke, Tanja; Göker, Markus; Parker, Charles T; Amann, Rudolf; Beck, Brian J; Chain, Patrick S G; Chun, Jongsik; Colwell, Rita R; Danchin, Antoine; Dawyndt, Peter; Dedeurwaerdere, Tom; DeLong, Edward F; Detter, John C; De Vos, Paul; Donohue, Timothy J; Dong, Xiu-Zhu; Ehrlich, Dusko S; Fraser, Claire; Gibbs, Richard; Gilbert, Jack; Gilna, Paul; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Jansson, Janet K; Keasling, Jay D; Knight, Rob; Labeda, David; Lapidus, Alla; Lee, Jung-Sook; Li, Wen-Jun; Ma, Juncai; Markowitz, Victor; Moore, Edward R B; Morrison, Mark; Meyer, Folker; Nelson, Karen E; Ohkuma, Moriya; Ouzounis, Christos A; Pace, Norman; Parkhill, Julian; Qin, Nan; Rossello-Mora, Ramon; Sikorski, Johannes; Smith, David; Sogin, Mitch; Stevens, Rick; Stingl, Uli; Suzuki, Ken-Ichiro; Taylor, Dorothea; Tiedje, Jim M; Tindall, Brian; Wagner, Michael; Weinstock, George; Weissenbach, Jean; White, Owen; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Lixin; Zhou, Yu-Guang; Field, Dawn; Whitman, William B; Garrity, George M; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2014-08-01

    Microbes hold the key to life. They hold the secrets to our past (as the descendants of the earliest forms of life) and the prospects for our future (as we mine their genes for solutions to some of the planet's most pressing problems, from global warming to antibiotic resistance). However, the piecemeal approach that has defined efforts to study microbial genetic diversity for over 20 years and in over 30,000 genome projects risks squandering that promise. These efforts have covered less than 20% of the diversity of the cultured archaeal and bacterial species, which represent just 15% of the overall known prokaryotic diversity. Here we call for the funding of a systematic effort to produce a comprehensive genomic catalog of all cultured Bacteria and Archaea by sequencing, where available, the type strain of each species with a validly published name (currently∼11,000). This effort will provide an unprecedented level of coverage of our planet's genetic diversity, allow for the large-scale discovery of novel genes and functions, and lead to an improved understanding of microbial evolution and function in the environment.

  5. Radiation tolerance of type-II strained layer superlattice-based interband cascade infrared photodetectors (ICIP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, Vincent M.; Treider, Laura A.; Morath, Christian P.; Tian, Zhaobing; Gautam, Nutan; Krishna, Sanjay

    2013-09-01

    For space-based imaging systems radiation tolerance to both displacement damage and total ionizing dose (TID) radiation effects continues to be a major performance concern. Here, the TID and proton irradiance tolerance of mid wave infrared interband cascade infrared photodetectors (ICIPs) based on InAs/GaSb type II strained-layer superlattice (T2SLS) absorbers is presented. Protons of energy of 63 MeV were used to irradiate the unbiased ICIP detectors at room temperature to a proton fluence of 7.5 x 1011 protons/cm2, corresponding to a TID of 100 kRads(Si). A comparison of the detector performance of a variety of ICIPs with different numbers of electron barrier sizes cascade stages is presented. Performance of detectors of varying size was characterized by dark current and quantum efficiency measurements at different temperatures. Results show changes, increase in dark current and a reduction in the quantum efficiency, consistent with an increase in the trap density.

  6. Infrared absorption of n-type tensile-strained Ge-on-Si.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoxin; Li, Haofeng; Camacho-Aguilera, Rodolfo; Cai, Yan; Kimerling, Lionel C; Michel, Jurgen; Liu, Jifeng

    2013-03-01

    We analyze the IR absorption of tensile-strained, n-type Ge for Si-compatible laser applications. A strong intervalley scattering from the indirect L valleys to the direct Γ valley in n+ Ge-on-Si is reported for the first time to our knowledge. The intervalley absorption edge is in good agreement with the theoretical value. On the other hand, we found that the classical λ2-dependent Drude model of intravalley free-carrier absorption (FCA) breaks down at λ<15 μm. A first-principle model has to be employed to reach a good agreement with the experimental data. The intravalley FCA loss is determined to be <20 cm(-1) for n=4×10(19) cm(-3) at λ=1.5-1.7 μm, an order lower than the results from Drude model. The strong L→Γ intervalley scattering favors electronic occupation of the direct Γ valley, thereby enhancing optical gain from the direct gap transition of Ge, while the low intravalley free-electron absorption at lasing wavelengths leads to low optical losses. These two factors explain why the first electrically pumped Ge-on-Si laser achieved a higher net gain than the theoretical prediction using λ2-dependent free-carrier losses of bulk Ge and indicate the great potential for further improvement of Ge-on-Si lasers.

  7. Orientation Effects in Ballistic High-Strained P-type Si Nanowire FETs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-Hong; Huang, Qing-An; Yu, Hong; Lei, Shuang-Ying

    2009-01-01

    In order to design and optimize high-sensitivity silicon nanowire-field-effect transistor (SiNW FET) pressure sensors, this paper investigates the effects of channel orientations and the uniaxial stress on the ballistic hole transport properties of a strongly quantized SiNW FET placed near the high stress regions of the pressure sensors. A discrete stress-dependent six-band k.p method is used for subband structure calculation, coupled to a two-dimensional Poisson solver for electrostatics. A semi-classical ballistic FET model is then used to evaluate the ballistic current-voltage characteristics of SiNW FETs with and without strain. Our results presented here indicate that [110] is the optimum orientation for the p-type SiNW FETs and sensors. For the ultra-scaled 2.2 nm square SiNW, due to the limit of strong quantum confinement, the effect of the uniaxial stress on the magnitude of ballistic drive current is too small to be considered, except for the [100] orientation. However, for larger 5 nm square SiNW transistors with various transport orientations, the uniaxial tensile stress obviously alters the ballistic performance, while the uniaxial compressive stress slightly changes the ballistic hole current. Furthermore, the competition of injection velocity and carrier density related to the effective hole masses is found to play a critical role in determining the performance of the nanotransistors.

  8. Genome sequence of the chemoheterotrophic soil bacterium Saccharomonospora cyanea type strain (NA-134T)

    PubMed Central

    Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P.; Lu, Megan; Huntemann, Marcel; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Pitluck, Sam; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Pötter, Gabriele; Land, Miriam; Ivanova, Natalia; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Detter, John C.; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Saccharomonospora cyanea Runmao et al. 1988 is a member of the genus Saccharomonospora in the family Pseudonocardiaceae that is moderately well characterized at the genome level thus far. Members of the genus Saccharomonospora are of interest because they originate from diverse habitats, such as soil, leaf litter, manure, compost, surface of peat, moist, over-heated grain, and ocean sediment, where they probably play a role in the primary degradation of plant material by attacking hemicellulose. Species of the genus Saccharomonospora are usually Gram-positive, non-acid fast, and are classified among the actinomycetes. S. cyanea is characterized by a dark blue (= cyan blue) aerial mycelium. After S. viridis, S. azurea, and S. marina, S. cyanea is only the fourth member in the genus for which a completely sequenced (non-contiguous finished draft status) type strain genome will be published. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the draft genome sequence, and annotation. The 5,408,301 bp long chromosome with its 5,139 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE funded Community Sequencing Program (CSP) 2010 at the Joint Genome Institute (JGI). PMID:24501643

  9. Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea: Sequencing a Myriad of Type Strains

    PubMed Central

    Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Woyke, Tanja; Göker, Markus; Parker, Charles T.; Amann, Rudolf; Beck, Brian J.; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Chun, Jongsik; Colwell, Rita R.; Danchin, Antoine; Dawyndt, Peter; Dedeurwaerdere, Tom; DeLong, Edward F.; Detter, John C.; De Vos, Paul; Donohue, Timothy J.; Dong, Xiu-Zhu; Ehrlich, Dusko S.; Fraser, Claire; Gibbs, Richard; Gilbert, Jack; Gilna, Paul; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Jansson, Janet K.; Keasling, Jay D.; Knight, Rob; Labeda, David; Lapidus, Alla; Lee, Jung-Sook; Li, Wen-Jun; MA, Juncai; Markowitz, Victor; Moore, Edward R. B.; Morrison, Mark; Meyer, Folker; Nelson, Karen E.; Ohkuma, Moriya; Ouzounis, Christos A.; Pace, Norman; Parkhill, Julian; Qin, Nan; Rossello-Mora, Ramon; Sikorski, Johannes; Smith, David; Sogin, Mitch; Stevens, Rick; Stingl, Uli; Suzuki, Ken-ichiro; Taylor, Dorothea; Tiedje, Jim M.; Tindall, Brian; Wagner, Michael; Weinstock, George; Weissenbach, Jean; White, Owen; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Lixin; Zhou, Yu-Guang; Field, Dawn; Whitman, William B.; Garrity, George M.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Microbes hold the key to life. They hold the secrets to our past (as the descendants of the earliest forms of life) and the prospects for our future (as we mine their genes for solutions to some of the planet's most pressing problems, from global warming to antibiotic resistance). However, the piecemeal approach that has defined efforts to study microbial genetic diversity for over 20 years and in over 30,000 genome projects risks squandering that promise. These efforts have covered less than 20% of the diversity of the cultured archaeal and bacterial species, which represent just 15% of the overall known prokaryotic diversity. Here we call for the funding of a systematic effort to produce a comprehensive genomic catalog of all cultured Bacteria and Archaea by sequencing, where available, the type strain of each species with a validly published name (currently∼11,000). This effort will provide an unprecedented level of coverage of our planet's genetic diversity, allow for the large-scale discovery of novel genes and functions, and lead to an improved understanding of microbial evolution and function in the environment. PMID:25093819

  10. The complete nucleotide sequence of RNA beta from the type strain of barley stripe mosaic virus.

    PubMed Central