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Sample records for baculatum type strain

  1. Complete genome sequence of Desulfomicrobium baculatum type strain (XT)

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, A; Spring, Stefan; Goker, Markus; Schneider, Susan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Meincke, Linda; Sims, David; Brettin, Tom; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2009-01-01

    Desulfomicrobium baculatum is the type species of the genus Desulfomicrobium, which is the type genus of the family Desulfomicrobiaceae. It is of phylogenetic interest because of the isolated location of the family Desulfomicrobiaceae within the order Desulfovibrionales. D. baculatum strain XT is a Gram-negative, motile, sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from wa-ter-saturated manganese carbonate ore. It is strictly anaerobic and does not require NaCl for growth, although NaCl concentrations up to 6% (w/v) are tolerated. The metabolism is respi-ratory or fermentative. In the presence of sulfate, pyruvate and lactate are incompletely oxi-dized to acetate and CO2. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the deltaproteobacterial family Desulfomicrobiaceae, and this 3,942,657 bp long single replicon genome with its 3494 protein-coding and 72 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  2. Complete genome sequence of Desulfomicrobium baculatum type strain (XT)

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, Alex; Spring, Stefan; Goker, Markus; Schneider, Susanne; Lapidus, Alla; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jefferies, Cynthia C; Meincke, Linda; Sims, David; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C; Han, Cliff; Chain, Patrick; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Lucas, Susan

    2009-05-20

    Desulfomicrobium baculatum is the type species of the genus Desulfomicrobium, which is the type genus of the family Desulfomicrobiaceae. It is of phylogenetic interest because of the isolated location of the family Desulfomicrobiaceae within the order Desulfovibrionales. D. baculatum strain XT is a Gram-negative, motile, sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from water-saturated manganese carbonate ore. It is strictly anaerobic and does not require NaCl for growth, although NaCl concentrations up to 6percent (w/v) are tolerated. The metabolism is respiratory or fermentative. In the presence of sulfate, pyruvate and lactate are incompletely oxidized to acetate and CO2. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the deltaproteobacterial family Desulfomicrobiaceae, and this 3,942,657 bp long single replicon genome with its 3494 protein-coding and 72 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  3. Complete genome sequence of Desulfomicrobium baculatum type strain (XT)

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, Alex; Spring, Stefan; Göker, Markus; Schneider, Susanne; Lapidus, Alla; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia C.; Meincke, Linda; Sims, David; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Chain, Patrick; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lucas, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Desulfomicrobium baculatum is the type species of the genus Desulfomicrobium, which is the type genus of the family Desulfomicrobiaceae. It is of phylogenetic interest because of the isolated location of the family Desulfomicrobiaceae within the order Desulfovibrionales. D. baculatum strain XT is a Gram-negative, motile, sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from water-saturated manganese carbonate ore. It is strictly anaerobic and does not require NaCl for growth, although NaCl concentrations up to 6% (w/v) are tolerated. The metabolism is respiratory or fermentative. In the presence of sulfate, pyruvate and lactate are incompletely oxidized to acetate and CO2. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the deltaproteobacterial family Desulfomicrobiaceae, and this 3,942,657 bp long single replicon genome with its 3494 protein-coding and 72 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304634

  4. Existence of lysogenic bacteriophages in Bacillus thuringiensis type strains.

    PubMed

    Roh, Jong Yul; Park, Jong Bin; Liu, Qin; Kim, Song Eun; Tao, Xueying; Choi, Tae Woong; Choi, Jae Young; Kim, Woo Jin; Jin, Byung Rae; Je, Yeon Ho

    2013-07-01

    We screened the existence of bacteriophages in 67 Bacillus thuringiensis type strains by phage DNA extraction and PCR using phage terminase small subunit (TerS)-specific primers to the supernatants and the precipitated pellets of Bt cultures, and by transmission electron microscopy. The various bacteriophages were observed from the supernatants of 22 type strains. Ten type strains showed the extracted phage DNAs and the amplified fragment by TerS PCR but 12 type strains showed only the phage DNAs. Their morphological characteristic suggests that they belong to Family Siphoviridae which had a long tail and symmetrical head. PMID:23632013

  5. Prior Inoculation with Type B Strains of Francisella tularensis Provides Partial Protection against Virulent Type A Strains in Cottontail Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Brown, Vienna R; Adney, Danielle R; Olea-Popelka, Francisco; Bowen, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent bacterium that is capable of causing severe disease (tularemia) in a wide range of species. This organism is characterized into two distinct subspecies: tularensis (type A) and holarctica (type B) which vary in several crucial ways, with some type A strains having been found to be considerably more virulent in humans and laboratory animals. Cottontail rabbits have been widely implicated as a reservoir species for this subspecies; however, experimental inoculation in our laboratory revealed type A organisms to be highly virulent, resulting in 100% mortality following challenge with 50-100 organisms. Inoculation of cottontail rabbits with the same number of organisms from type B strains of bacteria was found to be rarely lethal and to result in a robust humoral immune response. The objective of this study was to characterize the protection afforded by a prior challenge with type B strains against a later inoculation with a type A strain in North American cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus spp). Previous infection with a type B strain of organism was found to lengthen survival time and in some cases prevent death following inoculation with a type A2 strain of F. tularensis. In contrast, inoculation of a type A1b strain was uniformly lethal in cottontail rabbits irrespective of a prior type B inoculation. These findings provide important insight about the role cottontail rabbits may play in environmental maintenance and transmission of this organism.

  6. Typing of Histoplasma capsulatum strains by fatty acid profile analysis.

    PubMed

    Zarnowski, Robert; Miyazaki, Makoto; Dobrzyn, Agnieszka; Ntambi, James M; Woods, Jon P

    2007-06-01

    The performance of fatty acid profiling for strain differentiation of Histoplasma capsulatum was assessed. Total fatty acids were isolated from the yeast-phase cells of seven stock and two previously unreported clinical strains of H. capsulatum var. capsulatum, as well as from one unreported clinical strain and one stock strain of H. capsulatum var. duboisii, and one strain of each of three other dimorphic zoopathogenic fungal species, Blastomyces dermatitidis, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Sporothrix schenckii. Different colony morphology and pigmentation types of the H. capsulatum strains were also included. The most frequently occurring fatty acids were oleic, palmitic, stearic and linoleic acids. There were variations in the relative percentage fatty acid contents of H. capsulatum strains that could be used for strain identification and discrimination. Differentiation between H. capsulatum strains was achieved by the comparison of detected fatty acids accompanied by principal component analysis using calculated Varimax-rotated principal component loadings. Statistical analysis yielded three major principal components that explained over 94 % of total variance in the data. All the strains of H. capsulatum var. capsulatum RFLP classes II and III were grouped into two distinct clusters: the heterogenic RFLP class I formed a large, but also well-defined group, whereas the outgroup strains of H. capsulatum var. duboisii, B. dermatitidis, P. brasiliensis and S. schenckii were shifted away. These data suggest that fatty acid profiling can be used in H. capsulatum strain classification and epidemiological studies that require strain differentiation at the intraspecies level. PMID:17510264

  7. Comparison of four molecular methods to type Salmonella Enteritidis strains.

    PubMed

    Campioni, Fábio; Pitondo-Silva, André; Bergamini, Alzira M M; Falcão, Juliana P

    2015-05-01

    This study compared the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-PCR (ERIC-PCR), multilocus variable-number of tanden-repeat analysis (MLVA), and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) methods for typing 188 Salmonella Enteritidis strains from different sources isolated over a 24-year period in Brazil. PFGE and ERIC-PCR were more efficient than MLVA for subtyping the strains. However, MLVA provided additional epidemiological information for those strains. In addition, MLST showed the Brazilian strains as belonging to the main clonal complex of S. Enteritidis, CC11, and provided the first report of two new STs in the S. enterica database but could not properly subtype the strains. Our results showed that the use of PFGE or ERIC-PCR together with MLVA is suitable to efficiently subtype S. Enteritidis strains and provide important epidemiological information. PMID:25703542

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of the Aeromonas diversa Type Strain.

    PubMed

    Farfán, Maribel; Spataro, Nino; Sanglas, Ariadna; Albarral, Vicenta; Lorén, J Gaspar; Bosch, Elena; Fusté, M Carmen

    2013-06-27

    We present here the first genome sequence of the Aeromonas diversa type strain (CECT 4254(T)). This strain was isolated from the leg wound of a patient in New Orleans (Louisiana) and was originally described as enteric group 501 and distinguished from A. schubertii by DNA-DNA hybridization and phenotypical characterization.

  9. [Multilocus sequence-typing for characterization of Moscow strains of Haemophilus influenzae type b].

    PubMed

    Platonov, A E; Mironov, K O; Iatsyshina, S B; Koroleva, I S; Platonova, O V; Gushchin, A E; Shipulin, G A

    2003-01-01

    Haemophilius influenzae, type b (Hib) bacteria, were genotyped by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) using 5 loci (adk, fucK, mdh, pgi, recA). 42 Moscow Hib strains (including 38 isolates form cerebrospinal fluid of children, who had purulent meningitis in 1999-2001, and 4 strains isolated from healthy carriers of Hib), as well as 2 strains from Yekaterinburg were studied. In MLST a strain is characterized, by alleles and their combinations (an allele profile) referred to also as sequence-type (ST). 9 Sts were identified within the Russian Hib bacteria: ST-1 was found in 25 strains (57%), ST-12 was found in 8 strains (18%), ST-11 was found in 4 strains (9%) and ST-15 was found in 2 strains (4.5%); all other STs strains (13, 14, 16, 17, 51) were found in isolated cases (2.3%). A comparison of allelic profiles and of nucleotide sequences showed that 93% of Russian isolates, i.e. strain with ST-1, 11, 12, 13, 15 and 17, belong to one and the same clonal complex. 2 isolates from Norway and Sweden from among 7 foreign Hib strains studied up to now can be described as belonging to the same clonal complex; 5 Hib strains were different from the Russian ones. PMID:12800772

  10. Revision of the taxonomic status of type strains of Mesorhizobium loti and reclassification of strain USDA 3471T as the type strain of Mesorhizobiumerdmanii sp. nov. and ATCC 33669T as the type strain of Mesorhizobiumjarvisii sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Hidalgo, Pilar; Ramírez-Bahena, Martha Helena; Flores-Félix, José David; Rivas, Raúl; Igual, José M; Mateos, Pedro F; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio; León-Barrios, Milagros; Peix, Álvaro; Velázquez, Encarna

    2015-06-01

    The species Mesorhizobim loti was isolated from nodules of Lotus corniculatus and its type strain deposited in several collections. Some of these type strains, such as those deposited in the USDA and ATCC collections before 1990, are not coincident with the original strain, NZP 2213T, deposited in the NZP culture collection. The analysis of the 16S rRNA gene showed that strains USDA 3471T and ATCC 33669T formed independent branches from that occupied by Mesorhizobium loti NZP 2213T and related to those occupied by Mesorhizobium opportunistum WSM2075T and Mesorhizobium huakuii IFO 15243T, respectively, with 99.9 % similarity in both cases. However, the analysis of concatenated recA, atpD and glnII genes with similarities lower than 96, 98 and 94 %, respectively, between strains USDA 3471T and M. opportunistum WSM2075T and between strains ATCC 33669T and M. huakuii IFO 15243T, indicated that the strains USDA 3471T and ATCC 33669T represent different species of the genus Mesorhizobium. These results were confirmed by DNA-DNA hybridization experiments and phenotypic characterization. Therefore, the two strains were reclassified as representatives of the two species Mesorhizobium erdmanii sp. nov. (type strain USDA 3471T = CECT 8631T = LMG 17826t2T) and Mesorhizobium jarvisii sp. nov. (type strain ATCC 33669T = CECT 8632T = LMG 28313T).

  11. Complete genome sequence of Methanocorpusculum labreanum type strain Z

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Dalin, Eileen; Barry, Kerrie; Pitluck, Sam; Hauser, Loren John; Land, Miriam L; Lucas, Susan; Richardson, P M; Whitman, W. B.; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2009-01-01

    Methanocorpusculum labreanum is a methanogen belonging to the order Methanomicrobiales within the archaeal phylum Euryarchaeota. The type strain Z was isolated from surface sediments of Tar Pit Lake in the La Brea Tar Pits in Los Angeles, California. M. labreanum is of phylogenetic interest because at the time the sequencing project began only one genome had previously been sequenced from the order Methanomicrobiales. We report here the complete genome sequence of M. labreanum type strain Z and its annotation. This is part of a 2006 Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program project to sequence genomes of diverse Archaea.

  12. Complete genome sequence of Methanoculleus marisnigri type strain JR1

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Dalin, Eileen; Barry, Kerrie; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Han, Cliff; Brettin, Tom; Detter, J. Chris; Bruce, David; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pitluck, Sam; Hauser, Loren John; Land, Miriam L; Lucas, Susan; Richardson, P M; Whitman, W. B.; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2009-01-01

    Methanoculleus marisnigri Romesser et al. 1981 is a methanogen belonging to the order Methanomicrobiales within the archaeal phylum Euryarchaeota. The type strain, JR1, was isolated from anoxic sediments of the Black Sea. M. marisnigri is of phylogenetic interest because at the time the sequencing project began only one genome had previously been sequenced from the order Methanomicrobiales. We report here the complete genome sequence of M. marisnigri type strain JR1 and its annotation. This is part of a Joint Genome Institute 2006 Community Sequencing Program to sequence genomes of diverse Archaea.

  13. A study of the effect of apparent strain on thermal stress measurement for two types of elevated temperature strain gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    A weldable type strain gage was used to measure low level thermal stress in an elevated temperature environment. Foil strain gages used in a comparative manner reveal that the apparent strain of weldable strain gages is not sufficiently known to acquire accurate low level thermal stress data. Apparent strain data acquired from coupon tests reveals a large scatter in apparent strain characteristics among the weldable strain gages. It is concluded that apparent strain data for individual weldable strain gages must be required prior to installation if valid thermal stress data is to be obtained through the temperature range of room temperature to 755 K (900 F).

  14. MLVA typing of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae bacterins and field strains

    PubMed Central

    Tamiozzo, P.; Zamora, R.; Lucchesi, P. M. A.; Estanguet, A.; Parada, J.; Carranza, A.; Camacho, P.; Ambrogi, A.

    2015-01-01

    Because of the lack of information about both the genetic characteristics of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae commercial vaccines and their relationship with field strains, the authors attempted to identify genetic subtypes of some M hyopneumoniae bacterins, and to compare them with M. hyopneumoniae field strains. Six commercial M hyopneumoniae bacterins and 28 bronchoalveolar lavages from pigs at slaughter from three herds were analysed by Multiple-Locus Variable number tandem repeat Analysis (MLVA) on p146R1, p146R3, H4, H5 and p95 loci. The results obtained showed the presence of more than one M hyopneumoniae genotype in some pigs and also in one of the bacterins analysed. It is also worth noting that MLVA typing allowed the distinction among circulating field strains and also when comparing them with vaccine strains, which, knowing the relatedness among them, could be useful in the research of the efficacy of the vaccines. PMID:26495127

  15. MLVA typing of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae bacterins and field strains.

    PubMed

    Tamiozzo, P; Zamora, R; Lucchesi, P M A; Estanguet, A; Parada, J; Carranza, A; Camacho, P; Ambrogi, A

    2015-01-01

    Because of the lack of information about both the genetic characteristics of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae commercial vaccines and their relationship with field strains, the authors attempted to identify genetic subtypes of some M hyopneumoniae bacterins, and to compare them with M. hyopneumoniae field strains. Six commercial M hyopneumoniae bacterins and 28 bronchoalveolar lavages from pigs at slaughter from three herds were analysed by Multiple-Locus Variable number tandem repeat Analysis (MLVA) on p146R1, p146R3, H4, H5 and p95 loci. The results obtained showed the presence of more than one M hyopneumoniae genotype in some pigs and also in one of the bacterins analysed. It is also worth noting that MLVA typing allowed the distinction among circulating field strains and also when comparing them with vaccine strains, which, knowing the relatedness among them, could be useful in the research of the efficacy of the vaccines. PMID:26495127

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Plesiomonas shigelloides Type Strain NCTC10360

    PubMed Central

    Fazal, Mohammed-Abbas; Burnett, Edward; Deheer-Graham, Ana; Oliver, Karen; Holroyd, Nancy; Russell, Julie E.

    2016-01-01

    Plesiomonas shigelloides is a Gram-negative rod within the Enterobacteriaceae family. It is a gastrointestinal pathogen of increasing notoriety, often associated with diarrheal disease. P. shigelloides is waterborne, and infection is often linked to the consumption of seafood. Here, we describe the first complete genome for P. shigelloides type strain NCTC10360. PMID:27660796

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus megaterium Type Strain ATCC 14581

    PubMed Central

    Arya, Gitanjali; Petronella, Nicholas; Crosthwait, Jennifer; Carrillo, Catherine D.

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus megaterium is a Gram-positive, rod-shaped, spore-forming bacterium of biotechnological importance. Here, we report a 5.7-Mbp draft genome sequence of B. megaterium ATCC 14581, which is the type strain of the species. PMID:25395629

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus megaterium Type Strain ATCC 14581.

    PubMed

    Arya, Gitanjali; Petronella, Nicholas; Crosthwait, Jennifer; Carrillo, Catherine D; Shwed, Philip S

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus megaterium is a Gram-positive, rod-shaped, spore-forming bacterium of biotechnological importance. Here, we report a 5.7-Mbp draft genome sequence of B. megaterium ATCC 14581, which is the type strain of the species. PMID:25395629

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of Plesiomonas shigelloides Type Strain NCTC10360.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Sarah; Fazal, Mohammed-Abbas; Burnett, Edward; Deheer-Graham, Ana; Oliver, Karen; Holroyd, Nancy; Parkhill, Julian; Russell, Julie E

    2016-01-01

    Plesiomonas shigelloides is a Gram-negative rod within the Enterobacteriaceae family. It is a gastrointestinal pathogen of increasing notoriety, often associated with diarrheal disease. P. shigelloides is waterborne, and infection is often linked to the consumption of seafood. Here, we describe the first complete genome for P. shigelloides type strain NCTC10360. PMID:27660796

  20. Genome Sequence of Type Strains of Genus Stenotrophomonas

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Prashant P.; Midha, Samriti; Kumar, Sanjeet; Patil, Prabhu B.

    2016-01-01

    Genomic resource of type strains and historically important strains of genus Stenotrophomonas allowed us to reveal the existence of 18 distinct species by applying modern phylogenomic criterions. Apart from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, S. africana represents another species of clinical importance. Interestingly, Pseudomonas hibsicola, P. beteli, and S. pavani that are of plant origin are closer to S. maltophilia than the majority of the environmental isolates. The genus has an open pan-genome. By providing the case study on genes encoding metallo-β-lactamase and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindrome Repeats (CRISPR) regions, we have tried to show the importance of this genomic dataset in understanding its ecology. PMID:27014232

  1. The Evolutionary Biology and Population Genetics Underlying Fungal Strain Typing

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, John W.; Geiser, David M.; Burt, Austin; Koufopanou, Vassiliki

    1999-01-01

    Strain typing of medically important fungi and fungal population genetics have been stimulated by new methods of tapping DNA variation. The aim of this contribution is to show how awareness of fungal population genetics can increase the utility of strain typing to better serve the interests of medical mycology. Knowing two basic features of fungal population biology, the mode of reproduction and genetic differentiation or isolation, can give medical mycologists information about the intraspecific groups that are worth identifying and the number and type of markers that would be needed to do so. The same evolutionary information can be just as valuable for the selection of fungi for development and testing of pharmaceuticals or vaccines. The many methods of analyzing DNA variation are evaluated in light of the need for polymorphic loci that are well characterized, simple, independent, and stable. Traditional population genetic and new phylogenetic methods for analyzing mode of reproduction, genetic differentiation, and isolation are reviewed. Strain typing and population genetic reports are examined for six medically important species: Coccidioides immitis, Histoplasma capsulatum, Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumigatus, and A. flavus. Research opportunities in the areas of genomics, correlation of clinical variation with genetic variation, amount of recombination, and standardization of approach are suggested. PMID:9880478

  2. Complete genome sequence of Streptobacillus moniliformis type strain (9901T)

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, Matt; Gronow, Sabine; Lapidus, Alla L.; Ivanova, N; Copeland, A; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Chen, Feng; Sims, David; Meincke, Linda; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, Cliff; Detter, J. Chris; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Rohde, Manfred; Sproer, Cathrin; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Chain, Patrick S. G.

    2009-01-01

    Streptobacillus moniliformis Levaditi et al. 1925 is the sole and type species of the genus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its isolated location in the sparsely populated and neither taxonomically nor genomically much accessed family 'Leptotrichiaceae' within the phylum 'Fusobacteria'. S. moniliformis, a Gram-negative, non-motile and pleomorphic bacterium, is the etiologic agent of rat bite fever and Haverhill fever. Strain 9901T, the type strain of the species, was isolated from a patient with rat bite fever. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is only the second completed genome sequence of the order 'Fusobacteriales' and no more than the third sequence from the phylum 'Fusobacteria'. The 1,662,578 bp long chromosome and the 10,702 bp plasmid with a total of 1511 protein-coding and 55 RNA genes are part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  3. Complete genome sequence of Intrasporangium calvum type strain (7 KIPT)

    PubMed Central

    Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Chertkov, Olga; Yasawong, Montri; Lucas, Susan; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Detter, Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Rohde, Manfred; Pukall, Rüdiger; Sikorski, Johannes; Göker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla

    2010-01-01

    Intrasporangium calvum Kalakoutskii et al. 1967 is the type species of the genus Intrasporangium, which belongs to the actinobacterial family Intrasporangiaceae. The species is a Gram-positive bacterium that forms a branching mycelium, which tends to break into irregular fragments. The mycelium of this strain may bear intercalary vesicles but does not contain spores. The strain described in this study is an airborne organism that was isolated from a school dining room in 1967. One particularly interesting feature of I. calvum is that the type of its menaquinone is different from all other representatives of the family Intrasporangiaceae. This is the first completed genome sequence from a member of the genus Intrasporangium and also the first sequence from the family Intrasporangiaceae. The 4,024,382 bp long genome with its 3,653 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304734

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium chelonae Type Strain ATCC 35752

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Nabeeh A.; Davidson, Rebecca M.; de Moura, Vinicius Calado Nogueira; Garcia, Benjamin J.; Reynolds, Paul R.; Epperson, L. Elaine; Farias-Hesson, Eveline; DeGroote, Mary Ann; Jackson, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium chelonae is a rapidly growing opportunistic nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) species that causes infections in humans and other hosts. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Mycobacterium chelonae type strain ATCC 35752, consisting of 4.89 Mbp, 63.96% G+C content, 4,489 protein-coding genes, 48 tRNAs, and 3 rRNA genes. PMID:26021923

  5. Is there Link between the Type of the Volumetric Strain Curve and Elastic Constants, Porosity, Stress and Strain Characteristics ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palchik, V.

    2013-03-01

    The stress [crack damage stress ( σ cd) and uniaxial compressive strength ( σ c)] and strain characteristics [maximum total volumetric strain ( ɛ cd), axial failure strain ( ɛ af)], porosity ( n) and elastic constants [elastic modulus ( E) and Poisson's ratio ( ν)] and their ratios were coordinated with the existence of two different types (type 1 and type 2) of volumetric strain curve. Type 1 volumetric strain curve has a reversal point and, therefore, σ cd is less than the uniaxial compressive strength ( σ c). Type 2 has no reversal point, and the bulk volume of rock decreases until its failure occurs (i.e., σ cd = σ c). It is confirmed that the ratio between the elastic modulus ( E) and the parameter λ = n/ ɛ cd strongly affects the crack damage stress ( σ cd) for both type 1 and type 2 volumetric strain curves. It is revealed that heterogeneous carbonate rock samples exhibit different types of the volumetric strain curve even within the same rock formation, and the range of σ cd/ σ c = 0.54-1 for carbonate rocks is wider than the range (0.71 < σ cd/ σ c < 0.84) obtained by other researchers for granites, sandstones and quartzite. It is established that there is no connection between the type of the volumetric strain curve and values of n, E, σ cd, ν, E/(1 - 2 ν), M R = E/ σ c and E/ λ. On the other hand, the type of volumetric strain curve is connected with the values of λ and the ratio between the axial failure strain ( ɛ af) and the maximum total volumetric strain ( ɛ cd). It is argued that in case of small ɛ af/ ɛ cd-small λ, volumetric strain curve follows the type 2.

  6. Complete genome sequence of Halanaerobium praevalens type strain (GSLT)

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, N; Sikorski, Johannes; Chertkov, Olga; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Huntemann, Marcel; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Kannan, K. Palani; Rohde, Manfred; Tindall, Brian; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla L.

    2011-01-01

    Halanaerobium praevalens Zeikus et al. 1984 is the type species of the genus Halanaero- bium, which in turn is the type genus of the family Halanaerobiaceae. The species is of inter- est because it is able to reduce a variety of nitro-substituted aromatic compounds at a high rate, and because of its ability to degrade organic pollutants. The strain is also of interest be- cause it functions as a hydrolytic bacterium, fermenting complex organic matter and produc- ing intermediary metabolites for other trophic groups such as sulfate-reducing and methano- genic bacteria. It is further reported as being involved in carbon removal in the Great Salt Lake, its source of isolation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a representative of the genus Halanaerobium and the second genome sequence from a type strain of the fami- ly Halanaerobiaceae. The 2,309,262 bp long genome with its 2,110 protein-coding and 70 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  7. [Multilocus VNTR-typing of Francisella tularensis strains].

    PubMed

    Vodop'ianov, A S; Vodop'ianov, S O; Pavlovich, N V; Mishan'kin, B N

    2004-01-01

    In the analysis of F. tularensis genome with the use of the specially developed program "DNA" a great number of loci containing tandem repeats were found. For analysis, 3 of them were selected and designated as FtA, FtB, FtC. The study of DNA of 40 F. tularensis strains in the polymerase chain reaction with specific primers to these loci a great variability in the number of repeats was established, the presence of 17 alleles being found in locus FtA, 5 alleles in locus FtB and 5 alleles in locus FtC. The strains under study formed 24 variants of genotypes, whose occurrence varied from 0.025 to 0.125. Taking into account the variability of the detected loci and a great number of potential loci VNTR in the genome, further development of this method will facilitate the creation of local and general data bases of the strains, thus ensuring more effective genetic typing of F. tularensis. PMID:15188553

  8. High-Resolution Typing of Leptospira interrogans Strains by Multispacer Sequence Typing

    PubMed Central

    Zilber, Anne-Laure; Picardeau, Mathieu; Ayral, Florence; Artois, Marc; Demont, Pierre; Kodjo, Angeli

    2014-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a worldwide zoonosis which is responsible for the typical form of Weil's disease. The epidemiological surveillance of the Leptospira species agent is important for host prevalence control. Although the genotyping methods have progressed, the identification of some serovars remains ambiguous. We investigated the multispacer sequence typing (MST) method for genotyping strains belonging to the species Leptospira interrogans, which is the main agent of leptospirosis worldwide. A total of 33 DNA samples isolated from the reference strains of L. interrogans serogroups Icterohaemorrhagiae, Australis, Canicola, and Grippotyphosa, which are the most prevalent serogroups in France, were analyzed by both the variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) and MST methods. An MST database has been constructed from the DNA of these reference strains to define the MST profiles. The MST profiles corroborated with the VNTR results. Moreover, the MST analysis allowed the identification at the serovar level or potentially to the isolate level for strains belonging to L. interrogans serovar Icterohaemorrhagiae, which then results in a higher resolution than VNTR (Hunter-Gaston index of 0.94 versus 0.68). Regarding L. interrogans serogroups Australis, Canicola, and Grippotyphosa, the MST and VNTR methods similarly identified the genotype. The MST method enabled the acquisition of simple and robust results that were based on the nucleotide sequences. The MST identified clinical isolates in correlation with the reference serovar profiles, thus permitting an epidemiological surveillance of circulating L. interrogans strains, especially for the Icterohaemorrhagiae serogroup, which includes the most prevalent strains of public health interest. PMID:24478489

  9. Complete genome sequence of Methanospirillum hungatei type strain JF1.

    PubMed

    Gunsalus, Robert P; Cook, Lauren E; Crable, Bryan; Rohlin, Lars; McDonald, Erin; Mouttaki, Housna; Sieber, Jessica R; Poweleit, Nicole; Zhou, Hong; Lapidus, Alla L; Daligault, Hajnalka Erzsebet; Land, Miriam; Gilna, Paul; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Culley, David E; McInerney, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Methanospirillum hungatei strain JF1 (DSM 864) is a methane-producing archaeon and is the type species of the genus Methanospirillum, which belongs to the family Methanospirillaceae within the order Methanomicrobiales. Its genome was selected for sequencing due to its ability to utilize hydrogen and carbon dioxide and/or formate as a sole source of energy. Ecologically, M. hungatei functions as the hydrogen- and/or formate-using partner with many species of syntrophic bacteria. Its morphology is distinct from other methanogens with the ability to form long chains of cells (up to 100 μm in length), which are enclosed within a sheath-like structure, and terminal cells with polar flagella. The genome of M. hungatei strain JF1 is the first completely sequenced genome of the family Methanospirillaceae, and it has a circular genome of 3,544,738 bp containing 3,239 protein coding and 68 RNA genes. The large genome of M. hungatei JF1 suggests the presence of unrecognized biochemical/physiological properties that likely extend to the other Methanospirillaceae and include the ability to form the unusual sheath-like structure and to successfully interact with syntrophic bacteria. PMID:26744606

  10. Effect of strain rate on the compressive deformation behaviors of lotus-type porous copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin-hua; Huang, Hai-you; Xie, Jian-xin

    2014-07-01

    Lotus-type porous copper was fabricated by unidirectional solidification, and compressive experiments were subsequently conducted in the strain rate range of 10-3-2400 s-1 with the compressive direction parallel to the pores. A GLEEBLE-1500 thermal-mechanical simulation system and a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) were used to investigate the effect of strain rate on the compressive deformation behaviors of lotus-type porous copper. The influence mechanism of strain rate was also analyzed by the strain-controlling method and by high-speed photography. The results indicated that the stress-strain curves of lotus-typed porous copper consist of a linear elastic stage, a plateau stage, and a densification stage at various strain rates. At low strain rate (< 1.0 s-1), the strain rate had little influence on the stress-strain curves; but when the strain rate exceeded 1.0 s-1, it was observed to strongly affect the plateau stage, showing obvious strain-rate-hardening characteristics. Strain rate also influenced the densification initial strain. The densification initial strain at high strain rate was less than that at low strain rate. No visible inhomogeneous deformation caused by shockwaves was observed in lotus-type porous copper during high-strain-rate deformation. However, at high strain rate, the bending deformation characteristics of the pore walls obviously differed from those at low strain rate, which was the main mechanism by which the plateau stress exhibited strain-rate sensitivity when the strain rate exceeded a certain value and exhibited less densification initial strain at high strain rate.

  11. Complete genome sequence of Treponema succinifaciens type strain (6091T)

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Cliff; Gronow, Sabine; Teshima, Hazuki; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Zeytun, Ahmet; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Detter, J. Chris

    2011-01-01

    Treponema succinifaciens Cwyk and Canale-Parola 1981 is of interest because this strictly anaerobic, apathogenic member of the genus Treponema oxidizes carbohydrates and couples the Embden-Meyerhof pathway via activity of a pyruvate-formate lyase to the production of acetyl-coenzyme A and formate. This feature separates this species from most other anaerob- ic spirochetes. The genome of T. succinifaciens 6091T is only the second completed and pub- lished type strain genome from the genus Treponema in the family Spirochaetaceae. The 2,897,425 bp long genome with one plasmid harbors 2,723 protein-coding and 63 RNA genes and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  12. Complete genome sequence of Kytococcus sedentarius type strain (strain 541T)

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, David; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Chen, Feng; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; D'haeseleer, Patrick; Chain, Patrick; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Schneider, Susanne; Goker, Markus; Pukall, Rudiger; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2009-05-20

    Kytococcus sedentarius (ZoBell and Upham 1944) Stackebrandt et al. 1995 is the type strain of the species, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its location in the Dermacoccaceae, a poorly studied family within the actinobacterial suborder Micrococcineae. K. sedentarius is known for the production of oligoketide antibiotics as well as for its role as an opportunistic pathogen causing valve endocarditis, hemorrhagic pneumonia, and pitted keratolysis. It is strictly aerobic and can only grow when several amino acids are provided in the medium. The strain described in this report is a free-living, nonmotile, Gram-positive bacterium, originally isolated from a marine environment. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Dermacoccaceae and the 2,785,024 bp long single replicon genome with its 2639 protein-coding and 64 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  13. Complete genome sequence of Actinosynnema mirum type strain (101T)

    SciTech Connect

    Land, Miriam; Lapidus, Alla; Mayilraj, Shanmugam; Chen, Feng; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Chertkov, Olga; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jefferies, Cynthia; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Chain, Patrick; Tindall, Brian; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2009-05-20

    Actinosynnema mirum Hasegawa et al. 1978 is the type species of the genus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its central phylogenetic location in the Actino-synnemataceae, a rapidly growing family within the actinobacterial suborder Pseudo-nocardineae. A. mirum is characterized by its motile spores borne on synnemata and as a producer of nocardicin antibiotics. It is capable of growing aerobically and under a moderate CO2 atmosphere. The strain is a Gram-positive, aerial and substrate mycelium producing bacterium, originally isolated from a grass blade collected from the Raritan River, New Jersey. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Actinosynnemataceae, and only the second sequence from the actinobacterial suborder Pseudonocardineae. The 8,248,144 bp long single replicon genome with its 7100 protein-coding and 77 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  14. Complete genome sequence of Actinosynnema mirum type strain (101T)

    SciTech Connect

    Land, Miriam L; Lapidus, Alla L.; Mayilraj, Shanmugam; Chen, Feng; Copeland, A; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Chertkov, Olga; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Brettin, Thomas S; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Tindall, Brian; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2009-01-01

    Actinosynnema mirum Hasegawa et al. 1978 is the type species of the genus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its central phylogenetic location in the Actino-synnemataceae, a rapidly growing family within the actinobacterial suborder Pseudo-nocardineae. A. mirum is characterized by its motile spores borne on synnemata and as a producer of nocardicin antibiotics. It is capable of growing aerobically and under a moderate CO2 atmosphere. The strain is a Gram-positive, aerial and substrate mycelium producing bacterium, originally isolated from a grass blade collected from the Raritan River, New Jersey. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Actinosynnemataceae, and only the second sequence from the actinobacterial suborder Pseudonocardineae. The 8,248,144 bp long single replicon genome with its 7100 protein-coding and 77 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  15. Complete genome sequence of Actinosynnema mirum type strain (101T)

    PubMed Central

    Land, Miriam; Lapidus, Alla; Mayilraj, Shanmugam; Chen, Feng; Copeland, Alex; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Chertkov, Olga; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia C.; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Chain, Patrick; Tindall, Brian J.; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2009-01-01

    Actinosynnema mirum Hasegawa et al. 1978 is the type species of the genus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its central phylogenetic location in the Actino-synnemataceae, a rapidly growing family within the actinobacterial suborder Pseudo-nocardineae. A. mirum is characterized by its motile spores borne on synnemata and as a producer of nocardicin antibiotics. It is capable of growing aerobically and under a moderate CO2 atmosphere. The strain is a Gram-positive, aerial and substrate mycelium producing bacterium, originally isolated from a grass blade collected from the Raritan River, New Jersey. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Actinosynnemataceae, and only the second sequence from the actinobacterial suborder Pseudonocardineae. The 8,248,144 bp long single replicon genome with its 7100 protein-coding and 77 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304636

  16. Pseudocompact-Type Growth and Conversion of Growth Types of Strains of Staphylococcus aureus In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Kosaku; Takahashi, Masami; Takeuchi, Yoshio

    1969-01-01

    Some strains of Staphylococcus aureus grew as compact colonies in Brain Heart Infusion–serum-soft agar but as diffuse colonies in a modified Staphylococcus 110–serum-soft agar. These strains were designated “pseudocompact.” Strains showing compact-type colonial morphology in both media were designated “compact,” whereas strains showing diffuse-type growth in both media were designated “diffuse.” It was observed that the most recently isolated strains of S. aureus were of the pseudocompact type, whereas most stock culture strains tested were of the compact type. Using cultures recently isolated from clinical material, it was shown that pseudocompact strains convert to compact-type growth after prolonged incubation. Interconversion of compact, diffuse, and pseudocompact growth forms could be induced in vitro by appropriate cultural conditions, and conversion of growth type was also observed in vivo. Femoral abscesses produced in mice by four different compact-type strains showed conversion to diffuse or pseudocompact-type growth during the course of the infection. Images PMID:4898983

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of Aurantimicrobium minutum Type Strain KNCT, a Planktonic Ultramicrobacterium Isolated from River Water.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Ryosuke; Fujisawa, Takatomo; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Nishide, Hiroyo; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Baba, Tomoya; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Naganuma, Takeshi; Niki, Hironori

    2016-01-01

    Aurantimicrobium minutum type strain KNC(T) is a planktonic ultramicrobacterium isolated from river water in western Japan. Strain KNC(T) has an extremely small, streamlined genome of 1,622,386 bp comprising 1,575 protein-coding sequences. The genome annotation suggests that strain KNC(T) has an actinorhodopsin-based photometabolism. PMID:27365350

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of 24570, the Type Strain of Shigella flexneri

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Kate S.

    2015-01-01

    Shigella flexneri is a diarrheal pathogen that causes a large disease burden worldwide. We sequenced the genome of the publicly available type strain (S. flexneri 2a strain 24570) of this bacterial species to increase its utility as a reference. We present genome assembly results and comparisons with other reference strains. PMID:26021915

  19. Genetic typing of the senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM) strains with microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Xia, C; Higuchi, K; Shimizu, M; Matsushita, T; Kogishi, K; Wang, J; Chiba, T; Festing, M F; Hosokawa, M

    1999-03-01

    The Senescence-Accelerated Mouse (SAM) strains constitute a murine model of accelerated senescence originating from the ancestral AKR/J strains and consist of nine senescence-prone (SAMP) strains and four senescence-resistant (SAMR) strains. The chromosomes (Chrs) of the SAM strains were typed with 581 microsatellite markers amplified by PCR, and the fundamental genetic information of the SAM strains was obtained. One-third of the examined markers displayed polymorphism among the strains, and only two alleles were detected in almost all loci among the SAM and AKR/J strains. However, in 12 loci (5.6% of total 215 polymorphic markers), the third allele was detected among the SAM strains. The genetic typing and developmental history suggested that the SAM strains were related inbred strains developed by the accidental crossing between the AKR/J strain and other unknown strain(s). Comparison of the distribution of the loci in the SAMP and the SAMR series revealed notable differences in the four regions on Chrs 4, 14, 16, and 17. This indicated that some of these chromosomal sites might contain the genes responsible for accelerated senescence in the SAMP series. PMID:10051317

  20. Strain typing of acetic acid bacteria responsible for vinegar production by the submerged elaboration method.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pérez, Rocío; Torres, Carmen; Sanz, Susana; Ruiz-Larrea, Fernanda

    2010-12-01

    Strain typing of 103 acetic acid bacteria isolates from vinegars elaborated by the submerged method from ciders, wines and spirit ethanol, was carried on in this study. Two different molecular methods were utilised: pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of total DNA digests with a number of restriction enzymes, and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) - PCR analysis. The comparative study of both methods showed that restriction fragment PFGE of SpeI digests of total DNA was a suitable method for strain typing and for determining which strains were present in vinegar fermentations. Results showed that strains of the species Gluconacetobacter europaeus were the most frequent leader strains of fermentations by the submerged method in the studied vinegars, and among them strain R1 was the predominant one. Results showed as well that mixed populations (at least two different strains) occurred in vinegars from cider and wine, whereas unique strains were found in spirit vinegars, which offered the most stressing conditions for bacterial growth.

  1. Discriminatory Indices of Typing Methods for Epidemiologic Analysis of Contemporary Staphylococcus aureus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Marcela; Hogan, Patrick G.; Satola, Sarah W.; Crispell, Emily; Wylie, Todd; Gao, Hongyu; Sodergren, Erica; Weinstock, George M.; Burnham, Carey-Ann D.; Fritz, Stephanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Historically, a number of typing methods have been evaluated for Staphylococcus aureus strain characterization. The emergence of contemporary strains of community-associated S. aureus, and the ensuing epidemic with a predominant strain type (USA300), necessitates re-evaluation of the discriminatory power of these typing methods for discerning molecular epidemiology and transmission dynamics, essential to investigations of hospital and community outbreaks. We compared the discriminatory index of 5 typing methods for contemporary S. aureus strain characterization. Children presenting to St. Louis Children's Hospital and community pediatric practices in St. Louis, Missouri (MO), with community-associated S. aureus infections were enrolled. Repetitive sequence-based PCR (repPCR), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), staphylococcal protein A (spa), and staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC) mec typing were performed on 200 S. aureus isolates. The discriminatory index of each method was calculated using the standard formula for this metric, where a value of 1 is highly discriminatory and a value of 0 is not discriminatory. Overall, we identified 26 distinct strain types by repPCR, 17 strain types by PFGE, 30 strain types by MLST, 68 strain types by spa typing, and 5 strain types by SCCmec typing. RepPCR had the highest discriminatory index (D) of all methods (D = 0.88), followed by spa typing (D = 0.87), MLST (D = 0.84), PFGE (D = 0.76), and SCCmec typing (D = 0.60). The method with the highest D among MRSA isolates was repPCR (D = 0.64) followed by spa typing (D = 0.45) and MLST (D = 0.44). The method with the highest D among MSSA isolates was spa typing (D = 0.98), followed by MLST (D = 0.93), repPCR (D = 0.92), and PFGE (D = 0.89). Among isolates designated USA300 by PFGE, repPCR was most discriminatory, with 10 distinct strain types identified (D = 0.63). We

  2. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITIES OF ESCHERICHIA COLI 0157:H7 AND WILD-TYPE ESCHERICHIA COLI STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of a number of human-virulent and "wild-type" Escherichia coli strains in phosphate buffered water was measured. The impact of pH, ionic strength, cation type (valence) and concentration, and bacterial strain on the EPM was investigated. Resul...

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of the Mycobacterium immunogenum Type Strain CCUG 47286

    PubMed Central

    Jaén-Luchoro, Daniel; Seguí, Carolina; Aliaga-Lozano, Francisco; Salvà-Serra, Francisco; Busquets, Antonio; Gomila, Margarita; Ramírez, Antonio; Ruiz, Mikel; Lalucat, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Mycobacterium immunogenum type strain CCUG 47286, a nontuberculous mycobacterium. The whole genome has 5,573,781 bp and covers as many as 5,484 predicted genes. This genome contributes to the task of closing the still-existing gap of genomes of rapidly growing mycobacterial type strains. PMID:27231356

  4. Functional comparison of PML-type and archetype strains of JC virus.

    PubMed

    Sock, E; Renner, K; Feist, D; Leger, H; Wegner, M

    1996-03-01

    Isolates of the human polyomavirus JC can be grouped as either PML-type or archetype strains primarily on the basis of divergence in their regulatory regions. Only PML-type viruses have so far been found to be associated with the human demyelinating disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Here we have compared the functional properties of archetype and PML-type regulatory regions with regard to DNA replication and viral gene expression. No significant differences could be detected between archetype and PML-type regions in their ability to direct episomal DNA replication in the presence of JC virus T antigen. When viral gene expression was examined, early- and late-gene promoters from all PML-type strains exhibited a significantly higher activity in glial than in nonglial cells. Surprisingly, archetype strain promoters were also preferentially active in glial cells, although this effect was less pronounced than in PML-type strains. Furthermore, all promoters from archetype strains reacted to the presence of viral T antigen or the glial transcription factor Tst-1/Oct6 in a manner similar to the promoters of the PML-type viral strain Mad-1. Interestingly, T antigen and Tst-1/Oct6 were found to function in a species-specific and cell-type-specific manner, respectively. We concluded from our experiments that the differences in the regulatory regions cannot account for the different biology of archetype and PML-type viral strains.

  5. Complete genome sequence of Mesorhizobium opportunistum type strain WSM2075

    SciTech Connect

    Reeve, Wayne; Nandesena, Kemanthi; YatesIII, John R.; Tiwari, Ravi; O'Hara, Graham; Ninawi, Mohamed; Chertkov, Olga; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Woyke, Tanja; Pitluck, Sam; Nolan, Matt; Land, Miriam L; Copeland, A; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pati, Amrita; Mavromatis, K; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ivanova, N; Meenakshi, Uma; Howieson, John

    2013-01-01

    Mesorhizobium opportunistum strain WSM2075T was isolated inWestern Australia in 2000 from root nodules of the pasture legume Biserrula pelecinus that had beeninoculated with M. ciceri bv. biserrulae WSM1271. WSM2075T is an aerobic, motile, Gram negative, non-spore-forming rod that has gained the ability to nodulate B. pelecinus but is completely ineffective in N2 fixation with this host. This report reveals thegenome of M. opportunistum strain WSM2075T contains a chromosome ofsize 6,884,444 bp which encodes 6,685 protein-coding genes and 62 RNA-onlyencoding genes. This genome does not contain any plasmids but has a 455.7 kbgenomic island from Mesorhizobium ciceri bv. biserrulae WSM1271 that has been integrated into a phenylalanine-tRNA gene.

  6. Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacterial and Archaeal Type Strains, Phase III: the genomes of soil and plant-associated and newly described type strains.

    PubMed

    Whitman, William B; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Zhou, Yuguang; Lilburn, Timothy G; Beck, Brian J; De Vos, Paul; Vandamme, Peter; Eisen, Jonathan A; Garrity, George; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2015-01-01

    The Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea (GEBA) project was launched by the JGI in 2007 as a pilot project to sequence about 250 bacterial and archaeal genomes of elevated phylogenetic diversity. Herein, we propose to extend this approach to type strains of prokaryotes associated with soil or plants and their close relatives as well as type strains from newly described species. Understanding the microbiology of soil and plants is critical to many DOE mission areas, such as biofuel production from biomass, biogeochemistry, and carbon cycling. We are also targeting type strains of novel species while they are being described. Since 2006, about 630 new species have been described per year, many of which are closely aligned to DOE areas of interest in soil, agriculture, degradation of pollutants, biofuel production, biogeochemical transformation, and biodiversity.

  7. Interfacial strain effect on type-I and type-II core/shell quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheshlaghi, Negar; Pisheh, Hadi Sedaghat; Karim, M. Rezaul; Malkoc, Derya; Ünlü, Hilmi

    2016-09-01

    A comparative experimental and theoretical study on the calculation of capped core diameter in ZnSe/ZnS, CdSe/Cd(Zn)S type-I and ZnSe/CdS type-II core/shell nanocrystals is presented. The lattice mismatch induced interface strain between core and shell was calculated from continuum elastic theory and applied in effective mass approximation method to obtain the corresponding capped core diameter. The calculated results were compared with diameter of bare cores (CdSe and ZnSe) from transmission electron microscopy images to obtain the amount of the stretched or squeezed core after deposition of tensile or compressive shells. The result of the study showed that the core is squeezed in ZnSe/ZnS and CdSe/Cd(Zn)S after compressive shell and stretched in ZnSe/CdS after tensile shell deposition. The stretched and squeezed amount of the capped core found to be in proportion with lattice mismatch amount in the core/shell structure.

  8. Complete genome sequence of Staphylothermus marinus Stetter and Fiala 1986 type strain F1

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Sun, Hui; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Dalin, Eileen; Lucas, Susan; Barry, Kerrie; Land, Miriam L; Richardson, P M; Huber, Harald; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2009-01-01

    Staphylothermus marinus Fiala and Stetter 1986 belongs to the order Desulfurococcales within the archaeal phylum Crenarchaeota. S. marinus is a hyperthermophilic, sulfur-dependent, anaerobic heterotroph. Strain F1 was isolated from geothermally heated sediments at Vulcano, Italy, but S. marinus has also been isolated from a hydrothermal vent on the East Pacific Rise. We report the complete genome of S. marinus strain F1, the type strain of the species. This is the fifth reported complete genome sequence from the order Desulfurococcales.

  9. Complete genome sequence of Methanospirillum hungatei type strain JF1

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gunsalus, Robert; Cook, Lauren E.; Crable, Bryan R.; Rohlin, Lars; McDonald, Erin; Mouttaki, Housna; Sieber, Jessica R.; Poweleit, Nicole; Zhou, Hong; Lapidus, Alla; et al

    2016-01-06

    Methanospirillum hungatei strain JF1 is a hydrogenotrophic methanogen that belongs to the order Methanomicrobiales. Members of the genus Methanospirillum are commonly encountered in syntrophic association with fermenting microorganisms. M. hungatei serves as the model partner organism in laboratory cocultures that syntrophically oxidize fatty and aromatic acids. Furthermore, when grown syntrophically, M. hungatei rapidly uses the hydrogen or formate produced by its syntrophic partner and maintains the concentration of these metabolites at very low levels so that the degradation of the syntrophic substrate is thermodynamically favorable.

  10. Molecular relationships between type Asia 1 new strain from China and type O Panasia strains of foot-and-mouth-disease virus.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Shang, You-Jun; Liu, Zai-Xin; Liu, Xiang-Tao; Cai, Xue-Peng

    2007-10-01

    The complete genome of Asia 1/HNK/CHA/05 strain of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) was sequenced, which was isolated from Chinese Hongkong in 2005. It is 8187 nt long in size and contains 5'-UTR, polyprotein region, and 3'-UTR. Polyprotein region can be divided into four parts of L, P1, P2 and P3. In this report, these six parts of the whole genome of the strain were compared with 12 reference strains using DNAStar and Simplot softwares. The comparison of P1 confirmed that Asia 1/HNK/CHA/05 has a high identity with nine type Asia 1 reference sequences from 85.9 to 92.6% (Ind/491/97 strain is the highest) but from 69.6 to 69.7% with three type O Panasia sequences. The identities of 5'-UTR, L, P2, P3 and 3'-UTR with three Panasia strains are from 89.0 to 90.6%, 92.5 to 93.4%, 94.8 to 95.5%, 96.0 to 96.7% and 90.7 to 92.5% separately, but with nine type Asia 1 strains are from 83.5 to 85.9%, 87.7 to 90.7%, 87.0 to 91.6%, 91.6 to 92.8% and 86.0 to 100% separately, which illuminates the closer relationship between Asia 1/HNK/CHA/05 and Panasia strains in 5'-UTR, L, nonstructural region and 3'-UTR although they do not belong to the same serotype. The SimPlot software was used to examine the authentic relationships of Asia 1/HNK/CHA/05 with 12 reference sequences. It was found that Asia 1/HNK/CHA/05 strain has a highest similarity with three Panasia strains especially Tibet/CHA/99 in 5'-UTR, L, nonstructural region and 3'-UTR but has a highest similarity with Asia 1/Ind/491/97 strain in P1 region, which suggested that the gene recombination had occurred around nucleotide position 1811 and 3971in the polyprotein region between Tibet/CHA/99 and Ind/491/97 to recombine the Asia 1/HNK/CHA/05 strain.

  11. Draft Genome Sequences of Mycobacterium setense Type Strain DSM-45070 and the Nonpathogenic Strain Manresensis, Isolated from the Bank of the Cardener River in Manresa, Catalonia, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Vilaplana, Cristina; Velasco, Juan; Pluvinet, Raquel; Santín, Sheila; Prat, Cristina; Julián, Esther; Alcaide, Fernando; Comas, Iñaki; Sumoy, Lauro; Cardona, Pere-Joan

    2015-01-01

    We present here the draft genome sequences of two Mycobacterium setense strains. One of them corresponds to the M. setense type strain DSM-45070, originally isolated from a patient with a posttraumatic chronic skin abscess. The other one corresponds to the nonpathogenic M. setense strain Manresensis, isolated from the Cardener River crossing Manresa, Catalonia, Spain. A comparative genomic analysis shows a smaller genome size and fewer genes in M. setense strain Manresensis relative to those of the type strain, and it shows the genome segments unique to each strain. PMID:25657273

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of a Klebsiella pneumoniae Strain (New Sequence Type 2357) Carrying Tn3926.

    PubMed

    Weng, Xing-Bei; Mi, Zu-Huang; Wang, Chun-Xin; Zhu, Jian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    We present the draft genome sequence of a Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase-producing sequence type 2357 (ST2357) strain, NB60, which contains drug-resistant genes encoding resistance to beta-lactams, fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, colistin, macrolides, and tetracycline. Strain NB60 was isolated from human blood, making it an important tool for studying K. pneumoniae pathogenesis. PMID:27660779

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of a Klebsiella pneumoniae Strain (New Sequence Type 2357) Carrying Tn3926

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Zu-huang; Wang, Chun-xin; Zhu, Jian-ming

    2016-01-01

    We present the draft genome sequence of a Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase–producing sequence type 2357 (ST2357) strain, NB60, which contains drug-resistant genes encoding resistance to beta-lactams, fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, colistin, macrolides, and tetracycline. Strain NB60 was isolated from human blood, making it an important tool for studying K. pneumoniae pathogenesis. PMID:27660779

  14. Draft Whole-Genome Sequence of the Type Strain Bacillus horikoshii DSM 8719

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-González, Ismael L.

    2016-01-01

    Members of the Bacillus genus have been extensively studied because of their ability to produce enzymes with high biotechnological value. Here, we report the draft of the whole-genome sequence of the type strain Bacillus horikoshii DSM 8719, an alkali-tolerant strain. PMID:27417833

  15. Draft Whole-Genome Sequence of the Type Strain Bacillus horikoshii DSM 8719.

    PubMed

    Hernández-González, Ismael L; Olmedo-Álvarez, Gabriela

    2016-07-14

    Members of the Bacillus genus have been extensively studied because of their ability to produce enzymes with high biotechnological value. Here, we report the draft of the whole-genome sequence of the type strain Bacillus horikoshii DSM 8719, an alkali-tolerant strain.

  16. Comparative studies of strains Ictero No. I and RGA as the type strain of Leptospira interrogans: agglutinin absorption test, protein and antigen profiles, and enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Hata, K; Ono, E; Yanagawa, R

    1988-01-01

    Strain Ictero No. I, the first isolate of Leptospira, isolated by Inada and Ido in 1914, was found to be sufficiently qualified to be the type strain of Leptospira interrogans rather than strain RGA. In an agglutinin absorption test, anti-Ictero No. I serum was not absorbed completely with strain RGA, and 25% of the homologous titer remained unabsorbed, while anti-RGA serum was completely absorbed with strain Ictero No. I. Thus, strain Ictero No. I was not serologically identical with strain RGA, and the two strains were considered to be different serovars. A protein band with a molecular weight of approximately 33,000 daltons was detected in strain Ictero No. I but not in strain RGA by SDS-PAGE. By Western blotting, this protein band was detectable with anti-Ictero No. I serum but not with anti-RGA serum. The presence of the 33K protein in strain Ictero No. I, but not in strain RGA, was confirmed by radioimmunoprecipitation using [125I]-labeled antigens, indicating that the protein antigen was surface-exposed. Only 8 of the 89 enzymes activities were different between strains Ictero No. I and RGA (line Sapporo). From the above results, we propose that strain Ictero No. I should be designated as the type strain of L. interrogans instead of strain RGA.

  17. Genomic analysis of Skermanella stibiiresistens type strain SB22T

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wentao; Huang, Jing; Li, Mingshun; Li, Xiangyang; Wang, Gejiao

    2014-01-01

    Members of genus Skermanella were described as Gram-negative, motile, aerobic, rod-shaped, obligate-heterotrophic bacteria and unable to fix nitrogen. In this study, the genome sequence of Skermanella stibiiresistens SB22T is reported. Phylogenetic analysis using core proteins confirmed the phylogenetic assignment based on 16S rRNA gene sequences. Strain SB22T has all the proteins for complete glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle and pentose phosphate pathway. The RuBisCO encoding genes cbbL1S1 and nitrogenase delta subunit gene anfG are absent, consistent with its inability to fix carbon and nitrogen, respectively. In addition, the genome possesses a series of flagellar assembly and chemotaxis genes to ensure its motility. PMID:25197493

  18. Gauge factors of fibre Bragg grating strain sensors in different types of optical fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jülich, Florian; Aulbach, Laura; Wilfert, Andre; Kratzer, Peter; Kuttler, Rolf; Roths, Johannes

    2013-09-01

    Gauge factors of fibre Bragg grating (FBG)-based strain sensors that had been inscribed into three different types of optical fibres, which differ in core diameters and doping concentrations, were determined at room temperature with high accuracy. Repeated measurements were carried out with several samples of each type of fibre to allow statistical evaluations. For each type, the gauge factors were measured in two configurations: when the bare fibres were glued on a specimen at the location of the FBG and when they were vertically suspended and not bonded to any structure at the location of the FBG. By combining the results of both configurations, the strain transfer ratio of the gluing process and the strain-optic coefficient, peff, of the different types of fibres were determined. The strain-optic coefficient was found to vary up to 1.5% for the different types of optical fibres. The strain transfer ratio was obtained to be close to unity (>99%), showing the high quality of the gluing technique employed. The investigations demonstrate that highly accurate strain sensing is possible with fibre-optic strain sensors. The results are important for the development of accurate and reliable attaching techniques for coated sensor fibres and fibre-optic sensor patches.

  19. ORGANIZATION TYPES AND ROLE STRAINS--AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF COMPLEX ORGANIZATIONS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PALOLI, ERNEST G.

    AN INVESTIGATION WAS MADE ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CONTRASTING ORGANIZATIONAL TYPES CREATED IN THE LABORATORY SETTING AND THE DISTRIBUTION OF THREE TYPES OF ROLE STRAINS--ROLE UNCERTAINTY, ROLE DISPARITY, AND ROLE INCOMPATIBILITY. THE TWO ORGANIZATION TYPES STUDIED DIFFERED IN DEGREE OF SPECIALIZATION, EMPHASIS ON RULES AND REGULATIONS, AMOUNT…

  20. The Mechanism for Type I Interferon Induction by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is Bacterial Strain-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Wiens, Kirsten E.; Ernst, Joel D.

    2016-01-01

    Type I interferons (including IFNαβ) are innate cytokines that may contribute to pathogenesis during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. To induce IFNβ, Mtb must gain access to the host cytosol and trigger stimulator of interferon genes (STING) signaling. A recently proposed model suggests that Mtb triggers STING signaling through bacterial DNA binding cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) in the cytosol. The aim of this study was to test the generalizability of this model using phylogenetically distinct strains of the Mtb complex (MTBC). We infected bone marrow derived macrophages with strains from MTBC Lineages 2, 4 and 6. We found that the Lineage 6 strain induced less IFNβ, and that the Lineage 2 strain induced more IFNβ, than the Lineage 4 strain. The strains did not differ in their access to the host cytosol and IFNβ induction by each strain required both STING and cGAS. We also found that the three strains shed similar amounts of bacterial DNA. Interestingly, we found that the Lineage 6 strain was associated with less mitochondrial stress and less mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the cytosol compared with the Lineage 4 strain. Treating macrophages with a mitochondria-specific antioxidant reduced cytosolic mtDNA and inhibited IFNβ induction by the Lineage 2 and 4 strains. We also found that the Lineage 2 strain did not induce more mitochondrial stress than the Lineage 4 strain, suggesting that additional pathways contribute to higher IFNβ induction. These results indicate that the mechanism for IFNβ by Mtb is more complex than the established model suggests. We show that mitochondrial dynamics and mtDNA contribute to IFNβ induction by Mtb. Moreover, we show that the contribution of mtDNA to the IFNβ response varies by MTBC strain and that additional mechanisms exist for Mtb to induce IFNβ. PMID:27500737

  1. The Mechanism for Type I Interferon Induction by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is Bacterial Strain-Dependent.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Kirsten E; Ernst, Joel D

    2016-08-01

    Type I interferons (including IFNαβ) are innate cytokines that may contribute to pathogenesis during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. To induce IFNβ, Mtb must gain access to the host cytosol and trigger stimulator of interferon genes (STING) signaling. A recently proposed model suggests that Mtb triggers STING signaling through bacterial DNA binding cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) in the cytosol. The aim of this study was to test the generalizability of this model using phylogenetically distinct strains of the Mtb complex (MTBC). We infected bone marrow derived macrophages with strains from MTBC Lineages 2, 4 and 6. We found that the Lineage 6 strain induced less IFNβ, and that the Lineage 2 strain induced more IFNβ, than the Lineage 4 strain. The strains did not differ in their access to the host cytosol and IFNβ induction by each strain required both STING and cGAS. We also found that the three strains shed similar amounts of bacterial DNA. Interestingly, we found that the Lineage 6 strain was associated with less mitochondrial stress and less mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the cytosol compared with the Lineage 4 strain. Treating macrophages with a mitochondria-specific antioxidant reduced cytosolic mtDNA and inhibited IFNβ induction by the Lineage 2 and 4 strains. We also found that the Lineage 2 strain did not induce more mitochondrial stress than the Lineage 4 strain, suggesting that additional pathways contribute to higher IFNβ induction. These results indicate that the mechanism for IFNβ by Mtb is more complex than the established model suggests. We show that mitochondrial dynamics and mtDNA contribute to IFNβ induction by Mtb. Moreover, we show that the contribution of mtDNA to the IFNβ response varies by MTBC strain and that additional mechanisms exist for Mtb to induce IFNβ. PMID:27500737

  2. Complete genome sequence of Geodermatophilus obscurus type strain (G-20).

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Natalia; Sikorski, Johannes; Jando, Marlen; Munk, Christine; Lapidus, Alla; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, Alex; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Meincke, Linda; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Geodermatophilus obscurus Luedemann 1968 is the type species of the genus, which is the type genus of the family Geodermatophilaceae. G. obscurus is of interest as it has frequently been isolated from stressful environments such as rock varnish in deserts, and as it exhibits interesting phenotypes such as lytic capability of yeast cell walls, UV-C resistance, strong production of extracellular functional amyloid (FuBA) and manganese oxidation. This is the first completed genome sequence of the family Geodermatophilaceae. The 5,322,497 bp long genome with its 5,161 protein-coding and 58 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  3. Virulence type and tissue tropism of Staphylococcus strains originating from Hungarian rabbit farms.

    PubMed

    Német, Zoltán; Albert, Ervin; Nagy, Krisztina; Csuka, Edit; Dán, Ádám; Szenci, Ottó; Hermans, Katleen; Balka, Gyula; Biksi, Imre

    2016-09-25

    Staphylococcosis has a major economic impact on rabbit farming worldwide. Previous studies described a highly virulent variant, which is disseminated across Europe. Such strains are reported to be capable of inducing uncontrollable outbreaks. The authors describe a survey conducted on 374 Staphylococcus strains isolated from rabbit farms, mostly from Hungary, between 2009 and 2014, from a variety of pathological processes. The virulence type of the strains was determined using a multiplex PCR system. 84.2% of the strains belonged to a previously rarely isolated atypical highly virulent type. Only 6.1% belonged to the typical highly virulent genotype. Even low virulent strains were present at a higher percentage (6.4%). For a small group of strains (3.2%) the detection of the femA gene failed, indicating that these strains probably do not belong to the Staphylococcus aureus species. The results reveal the possibility of the asymptomatic presence of highly virulent strains on rabbit farms. "Non-aureus" Staphylococcus sp. can also have a notable role in the etiology of rabbit staphylococcosis. An association with the lesions and the virulence type was demonstrated. Statistical analysis of data on organotropism showed a significant correlation between septicaemia and the highly virulent genotype. PMID:27599923

  4. Diffusion and persistence of multidrug resistant Salmonella Typhimurium strains phage type DT120 in southern Italy.

    PubMed

    De Vito, Danila; Monno, Rosa; Nuccio, Federica; Legretto, Marilisa; Oliva, Marta; Coscia, Maria Franca; Dionisi, Anna Maria; Calia, Carla; Capolongo, Carmen; Pazzani, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Sixty-two multidrug resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains isolated from 255 clinical strains collected in Southern Italy in 2006-2008 were characterised for antimicrobial resistance genes, pulsotype, and phage type. Most strains (83.9%) were resistant to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline (ACSSuT) encoded in 88.5% by the Salmonella genomic island (SGI1) and in 11.5% by the InH-like integron (bla OXA-30-aadA1) and catA1, sul1, and tet(B) genes. STYMXB.0061 (75%) and DT120 (84.6%) were the prevalent pulsotype and phage type identified in these strains, respectively. Five other resistance patterns were found either in single or in a low number of isolates. The pandemic clone DT104 (ACSSuT encoded by SGI1) has been identified in Italy since 1992, while strains DT120 (ACSSuT encoded by SGI1) have never been previously reported in Italy. In Europe, clinical strains DT120 have been reported from sporadic outbreaks linked to the consumption of pork products. However, none of these strains were STYMXB.0061 and SGI1 positive. The prevalent identification and persistence of DT120 isolates would suggest, in Southern Italy, a phage type shifting of the pandemic DT104 clone pulsotype STYMXB.0061. Additionally, these findings raise epidemiological concern about the potential diffusion of these emerging multidrug resistant (SGI linked) DT120 strains.

  5. Genome Sequence of SG33 Strain and Recombination between Wild-Type and Vaccine Myxoma Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Gretillat, Magalie; Py, Robert; Gelfi, Jacqueline; Guérin, Jean-Luc; Bertagnoli, Stéphane

    2011-01-01

    Myxomatosis in Europe is the result of the release of a South America strain of myxoma virus in 1952. Several attenuated strains with origins in South America or California have since been used as vaccines in the rabbit industry. We sequenced the genome of the SG33 myxoma virus vaccine strain and compared it with those of other myxoma virus strains. We show that SG33 genome carries a large deletion in its right end. Furthermore, our data strongly suggest that the virus isolate from which SG33 is derived results from an in vivo recombination between a wild-type South America (Lausanne) strain and a California MSD-derived strain. These findings raise questions about the use of insufficiently attenuated virus in vaccination. PMID:21470452

  6. Typing of strains from a single-source outbreak of Pseudomonas pickettii.

    PubMed Central

    Dimech, W J; Hellyar, A G; Kotiw, M; Marcon, D; Ellis, S; Carson, M

    1993-01-01

    Plasmid profiles, genome restriction fragment polymorphisms, carbohydrate oxidation-fermentation reactions, methylumbelliferyl substrate hydrolysis patterns, antimicrobial susceptibilities, and results obtained with the Biolog GN biochemical substrate kit were used to type 19 common-source, but mixed-biotype, outbreak strains and one epidemiologically distinct strain of Pseudomonas pickettii. Biotyping with conventional and methylumbelliferyl substrates failed to distinguish between strains. Plasmid profile testing was found to be inconsistent and not reproducible. The Biolog GN kit allowed greater strain differentiation than restriction fragment polymorphism did (12 biotypes versus 5 biotypes); antimicrobial susceptibility testing yielded 4 biotypes, and oxidation-fermentation tests gave 3 biotypes. Oxidation-fermentation results were consistent with restriction fragment polymorphs in all but 1 of the 20 strains tested. For ease of typing, comprehensive typeability, and reproducibility, oxidation-fermentation tests should be performed initially and followed if necessary by restriction fragment polymorph analysis for the elucidation of P. pickettii infection outbreaks. Images PMID:8263186

  7. Regulation of oxygen vacancy types on SnO2 (110) surface by external strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Z. H.; Min, Y. M.; Liu, X. X.; Ding, J. Q.; Guo, J. H.; Hu, F. R.; Liu, L. Z.

    2016-05-01

    In tin dioxide nanostructures, oxygen vacancies (OVs) play an important role in their optical properties and thus regulation of both OV concentration and type via external strain is crucial to exploration of more applications. First-principle calculations of SnO2 (110) surface disclose that asymmetric deformations induced by external strain not only lead to its intrinsic surface elastic changes, but also result in different OV formation energy. In the absence of external strain, the energetically favorable oxygen vacancies(EFOV) appear in the bridging site of second layer. When -3.5% external strain is applied along y direction, the EFOV moves into plane site. This can be ascribed that the compressed deformation gives rise to redistribution of electronic wave function near OVs, therefore, formation of newly bond structures. Our results suggest that different type OVs in SnO2 surface can be controlled by strain engineering.

  8. Evaluation of Protein A Gene Polymorphic Region DNA Sequencing for Typing of Staphylococcus aureus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Shopsin, B.; Gomez, M.; Montgomery, S. O.; Smith, D. H.; Waddington, M.; Dodge, D. E.; Bost, D. A.; Riehman, M.; Naidich, S.; Kreiswirth, B. N.

    1999-01-01

    Three hundred and twenty isolates of Staphylococcus aureus were typed by DNA sequence analysis of the X region of the protein A gene (spa). spa typing was compared to both phenotypic and molecular techniques for the ability to differentiate and categorize S. aureus strains into groups that correlate with epidemiological information. Two previously characterized study populations were examined. A collection of 59 isolates (F. C. Tenover, R. Arbeit, G. Archer, J. Biddle, S. Byrne, R. Goering, G. Hancock, G. A. Hébert, B. Hill, R. Hollis, W. R. Jarvis, B. Kreiswirth, W. Eisner, J. Maslow, L. K. McDougal, J. M. Miller, M. Mulligan, and M. A. Pfaller, J. Clin. Microbiol. 32:407–415, 1994) from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) was used to test for the ability to discriminate outbreak from epidemiologically unrelated strains. A separate collection of 261 isolates form a multicenter study (R. B. Roberts, A. de Lencastre, W. Eisner, E. P. Severina, B. Shopsin, B. N. Kreiswirth, and A. Tomasz, J. Infect. Dis. 178:164–171, 1998) of methicillin-resistant S. aureus in New York City (NYC) was used to compare the ability of spa typing to group strains along clonal lines to that of the combination of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and Southern hybridization. In the 320 isolates studied, spa typing identified 24 distinct repeat types and 33 different strain types. spa typing distinguished 27 of 29 related strains and did not provide a unique fingerprint for 4 unrelated strains from the four outbreaks of the CDC collection. In the NYC collection, spa typing provided a clonal assignment for 185 of 195 strains within the five major groups previously described. spa sequencing appears to be a highly effective rapid typing tool for S. aureus that, despite some expense of specificity, has significant advantages in terms of speed, ease of use, ease of interpretation, and standardization among laboratories. PMID:10523551

  9. Complete genome sequence of Arcobacter nitrofigilis type strain (CIT)

    SciTech Connect

    Pati, Amrita; Gronow, Sabine; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Chertkov, Olga; Bruce, David; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Jeffries, Cynthia; Detter, J. Chris; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2010-01-01

    Arcobacter nitrofigilis (McClung et al. 1983) Vandamme et al. 1991 is the type species of the genus Arcobacter in the epsilonproteobacterial family Campylobacteraceae. The species was first described in 1983 as Campylobacter nitrofigilis [1] after its detection as a free-living, nitrogen-fixing Campylobacter species associated with Spartina alterniflora Loisel. roots [2]. It is of phylogenetic interest because of its lifestyle as a symbiotic organism in a marine environment in contrast to many other Arcobacter species which are associated with warm-blooded animals and tend to be pathogenic. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a type stain of the genus Arcobacter. The 3,192,235 bp genome with its 3,154 protein-coding and 70 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  10. Draft Genome Sequences for Clostridium thermocellum Wild-Type Strain YS and Derived Cellulose Adhesion-Defective Mutant Strain AD2

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven D; Lamed, Raphael; Morag, Ely; Borovok, Ilya; Shoham, Yuval; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Johnson, Courtney M; Yang, Zamin; Land, Miriam L; Utturkar, Sagar M; Keller, Martin; Bayer, Edward A

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum wild-type strain YS is an anaerobic, thermophilic, cellulolytic bacterium capable of directly converting cellulosic substrates into ethanol. Strain YS and a derived cellulose adhesion-defective mutant strain AD2 played pivotal roles in describing the original cellulosome concept. We present their draft genome sequences.

  11. Complete genome sequence of Gordonia bronchialis type strain (3410T)

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, N; Sikorski, Johannes; Jando, Marlen; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Copeland, A; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Chen, Feng; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Han, Cliff; Detter, J C; Brettin, Thomas S; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2010-01-01

    Gordonia bronchialis Tsukamura 1971 is the type species of the genus. G. bronchialis is a human-pathogenic organism that has been isolated from a large variety of human tissues. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of the family Gordoniaceae. The 5,290,012 bp long genome with its 4,944 protein-coding and 55 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  12. Complete genome sequence of Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans type strain (ICPT)

    SciTech Connect

    Clum, Alicia; Nolan, Matt; Lang, Elke; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Copeland, Alex; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Goker, Markus; Spring, Stefan; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jefferies, Cynthia C.; Chain, Patrick; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla

    2009-05-20

    Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans (Clark and Norris 1996) is the sole and type species of the genus, which until recently was the only genus within the actinobacterial family Acidimicrobiaceae and in the order Acidomicrobiales. Rapid oxidation of iron pyrite during autotrophic growth in the absence of an enhanced CO2 concentration is characteristic for A. ferrooxidans. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the order Acidomicrobiales, and the 2,158,157 bp long single replicon genome with its 2038 protein coding and 54 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  13. Complete genome sequence of Thermomonospora curvata type strain (B9)

    SciTech Connect

    Chertkov, Olga; Sikorski, Johannes; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ngatchou, Olivier Duplex; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Brettin, Thomas S; Han, Cliff; Detter, J. Chris; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2011-01-01

    Thermomonospora curvata Henssen 1957 is the type species of the genus Thermomonospora. This genus is of interest because members of this clade are sources of new antibiotics, enzymes, and products with pharmacological activity. In addition, members of this genus participate in the active degradation of cellulose. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Thermomonosporaceae. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 5,639,016 bp long genome with its 4,985 protein-coding and 76 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  14. Complete genome sequence of Sulfurospirillum deleyianum type strain (5175T)

    SciTech Connect

    Sikorski, Johannes; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Rohde, Manfred; Lang, Elke; Spring, Stefan; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Sulfurospirillum deleyianum Schumacher et al. 1993 is the type species of the genus Sulfurospirillum. S. deleyianum is a model organism for studying sulfur reduction and dissimilatory nitrate reduction as energy source for growth. Also, it is a prominent model organism for studying the structural and functional characteristics of the cytochrome c nitrite reductase. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of the genus Sulfurospirillum. The 2,306,351 bp long genome with its 2291 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  15. Complete genome sequence of Spirosoma linguale type strain (1T)

    SciTech Connect

    Lail, Kathleen; Sikorski, Johannes; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, A; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Detter, J. Chris; Schutze, Andrea; Rohde, Manfred; Tindall, Brian; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Chen, Feng

    2010-01-01

    Spirosoma linguale Migula 1894 is the type species of the genus. S. linguale is a free-living and non-pathogenic organism, known for its peculiar ringlike and horseshoe-shaped cell morphology. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete ge-nome sequence and annotation. This is only the third completed genome sequence of a member of the family Cytophagaceae. The 8,491,258 bp long genome with its eight plas-mids, 7,069 protein-coding and 60 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacte-ria and Archaea project.

  16. Strain typing of acetic acid bacteria responsible for vinegar production by the submerged elaboration method.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pérez, Rocío; Torres, Carmen; Sanz, Susana; Ruiz-Larrea, Fernanda

    2010-12-01

    Strain typing of 103 acetic acid bacteria isolates from vinegars elaborated by the submerged method from ciders, wines and spirit ethanol, was carried on in this study. Two different molecular methods were utilised: pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of total DNA digests with a number of restriction enzymes, and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) - PCR analysis. The comparative study of both methods showed that restriction fragment PFGE of SpeI digests of total DNA was a suitable method for strain typing and for determining which strains were present in vinegar fermentations. Results showed that strains of the species Gluconacetobacter europaeus were the most frequent leader strains of fermentations by the submerged method in the studied vinegars, and among them strain R1 was the predominant one. Results showed as well that mixed populations (at least two different strains) occurred in vinegars from cider and wine, whereas unique strains were found in spirit vinegars, which offered the most stressing conditions for bacterial growth. PMID:20832673

  17. Comparative DNA sequence analysis of the host shutoff genes of different strains of herpes simplex virus: type 2 strain HG52 encodes a truncated UL41 product.

    PubMed

    Everett, R D; Fenwick, M L

    1990-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) particles contain a factor which can shut off host protein synthesis during the earliest stages of infection. The efficiency of shutoff varies between different strains of virus, type 2 strains being generally more active than type 1 strains. However, HSV-2 strain HG52 is deficient in host cell shutoff. We have investigated the basis of the different shutoff phenotypes of a strong shutoff strain (HSV-2 strain G), a weak shutoff virus (HSV-1 strain 17 syn+) and HG52 by comparative DNA sequence analysis of gene UL41, which encodes the virion-associated host shutoff factor. The results show that the UL41 genes of strains G and 17 are 86% homologous and that the lack of shutoff by HG52 is likely to be explained by a frameshift mutation within its UL41 coding sequence.

  18. Scarlet fever and types of erythrogenic toxins produced by the infecting streptococcal strains.

    PubMed

    Knöll, H; Srámek, J; Vrbová, K; Gerlach, D; Reichardt, W; Köhler, W

    1991-12-01

    Group A streptococcal strains were isolated from the throats of 46 children suffering from scarlet fever. For detection of erythrogenic toxins (ETs), the culture supernatants were concentrated 100 times by ethanol precipitation and solubilisation in acetate buffer. ELISA was used to identify ETA and double immunodiffusion to identify ETB and ETC. The presence of the ETA gene was detected by a specific DNA probe. ETA (alone or in combination with ETB and/or ETC) was found in 51.9% of the strains, ETB (alone or in combination with ETA and/or ETC) in 76.9% and ETC (in combination with ETA and ETB) in 28.9%. Only 5.8% of strains did not produce any detectable ET. In SDS-PAGE, supernatants of ETB-producing strains showed a pronounced band in either the region of the proteinase zymogen or the active proteinase. There was no correlation between the type of erythrogenic toxin and the serological M or T type of the producing strain. The mitogenic potency of culture supernatants did not differ significantly irrespective of the toxin type(s) present. Culture supernatants of strains without a detectable amount of the known ETs were highly mitogenic, indicating the production of other streptococcal mitogens. A correlation with clinical symptoms was determined with regard to exanthema and fever. Strains producing two or three toxins caused a more intense exanthema. Patient temperature was higher (greater than or equal to 38 degrees C) when the infecting strain produced ETB. The toxin-producing patterns of the strains of this study were compared with those isolated during the last epidemic outbreak of scarlet fever in East Germany.

  19. Thermal Output of WK-Type Strain Gauges on Various Materials at Cryogenic and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalkowski, Matthew K.; Rivers, H. Kevin; Smith, Russell W.

    1998-01-01

    Strain gage apparent strain (thermal output) is one of the largest sources of error associated with the measurement of strain when temperatures and mechanical loads are varied. In this paper, experimentally determined apparent strains of WK-type strain gages, installed on both metallic and composite-laminate materials of various lay-ups and resin systems for temperatures ranging from -450 F to 230 F are presented. For the composite materials apparent strain in both the 0 ply orientation angle and the 90 ply orientation angle were measured. Metal specimens tested included: aluminum-lithium alloy (Al-LI 2195-T87), aluminum alloy (Al 2219-T87), and titanium alloy. Composite materials tested include: graphite-toughened-epoxy (IM7/997- 2), graphite-bismaleimide (IM7/5260), and graphite-K3 (IM7/K3B). The experimentally determined apparent strain data are curve fit with a fourth-order polynomial for each of the materials studied. The apparent strain data and the polynomials that are fit to the data are compared with those produced by the strain gage manufacturer, and the results and comparisons are presented. Unacceptably high errors between the manufacture's data and the experimentally determined data were observed (especially at temperatures below - 270-F).

  20. Complete genome sequence of Cellulomonas flavigena type strain (134T)

    SciTech Connect

    Abt, Birte; Foster, Brian; Lapidus, Alla L.; Clum, Alicia; Sun, Hui; Pukall, Rudiger; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Cellulomonas flavigena (Kellerman and McBeth 1912) Bergey et al. 1923 is the type species of the genus Cellulomonas of the actinobacterial family Cellulomonadaceae. Members of the genus Cellulomonas are of special interest for their ability to degrade cellulose and hemicellulose, particularly with regard to the use of biomass as an alternative energy source. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the genus Cellulomonas, and next to the human pathogen Tropheryma whipplei the second complete genome sequence within the actinobacterial family Cellulomonadaceae. The 4,123,179 bp long single replicon genome with its 3,735 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  1. Complete genome sequence of Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius type strain (104-IAT)

    PubMed Central

    Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Sikorski, Johannes; Lapidus, Alla; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, Alex; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Chain, Patrick; Meincke, Linda; Sims, David; Chertkov, Olga; Han, Cliff; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Wahrenburg, Claudia; Rohde, Manfred; Pukall, Rüdiger; Göker, Markus; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2010-01-01

    Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius (Darland and Brock 1971) is the type species of the larger of the two genera in the bacillal family ‘Alicyclobacillaceae’. A. acidocaldarius is a free-living and non-pathogenic organism, but may also be associated with food and fruit spoilage. Due to its acidophilic nature, several enzymes from this species have since long been subjected to detailed molecular and biochemical studies. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of the family ‘Alicyclobacillaceae’. The 3,205,686 bp long genome (chromosome and three plasmids) with its 3,153 protein-coding and 82 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304673

  2. Complete genome sequence of Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans type strain (ICPT)

    SciTech Connect

    Clum, Alicia; Nolan, Matt; Lang, Elke; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Copeland, A; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Goker, Markus; Spring, Stefan; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla L.

    2009-01-01

    Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans (Clark and Norris 1996) is the sole and type species of the ge-nus, which until recently was the only genus within the actinobacterial family Acidimicrobia-ceae and in the order Acidomicrobiales. Rapid oxidation of iron pyrite during autotrophic growth in the absence of an enhanced CO2 concentration is characteristic for A. ferrooxidans. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome se-quence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the order Acidomi-crobiales, and the 2,158,157 bp long single replicon genome with its 2038 protein coding and 54 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  3. Complete genome sequence of Weeksella virosa type strain (9751T)

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, Elke; Teshima, Hazuki; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Nolan, Matt; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Pati, Amrita; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Kopitz, marcus; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Tindall, Brian; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2011-01-01

    Weeksella virosa Holmes et al. 1987 is the sole member and type species of the genus Weeksella which belongs to the family Flavobacteriaceae of the phylum Bacteroidetes. Twenty-nine isolates, collected from clinical specimens provided the basis for the taxon description. While the species seems to be a saprophyte of the mucous membranes of healthy man and warm-blooded animals a causal relationship with disease has been reported in a few instances. Except for the ability to produce indole and to hydrolyze Tween and proteins such as casein and gelatin, this aerobic, non-motile, non-pigmented bacterial species is metabolically inert in most traditional biochemical tests. The 2,272,954 bp long genome with its 2,105 protein-coding and 76 RNA genes consists of one circular chromosome and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  4. Complete genome sequence of Haliscomenobacter hydrossis type strain (OT)

    SciTech Connect

    Daligault, Hajnalka E.; Lapidus, Alla L.; Zeytun, Ahmet; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Huntemann, Marcel; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Verbarg, Susanne; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    Haliscomenobacter hydrossis van Veen et al. 1973 is the type species of the genus Halisco- menobacter, which belongs to order 'Sphingobacteriales'. The species is of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location in the tree of life, especially the so far genomically un- charted part of it, and because the organism grows in a thin, hardly visible hyaline sheath. Members of the species were isolated from fresh water of lakes and from ditch water. The genome of H. hydrossis is the first completed genome sequence reported from a member of the family 'Saprospiraceae'. The 8,771,651 bp long genome with its three plasmids of 92 kbp, 144 kbp and 164 kbp length contains 6,848 protein-coding and 60 RNA genes, and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  5. Complete genome sequence of Meiothermus ruber type strain (21T)

    SciTech Connect

    Tindall, Brian; Sikorski, Johannes; Lucas, Susan; Goltsman, Eugene; Copeland, A; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Fahnrich, Regine; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla L.

    2010-01-01

    Meiothermus ruber (Loginova et al. 1984) Nobre et al. 1996 is the type species of the genus Meiothermus. This thermophilic genus is of special interest, as its members can be affiliated to either low-temperature or high-temperature groups. The temperature related split is in accordance with the chemotaxonomic feature of the polar lipids. M. ruber is a representative of the low-temperature group. This is the first completed genome sequence of the genus Meiothermus and only the third genome sequence to be published from a member of the family Thermaceae. The 3,097,457 bp long genome with its 3,052 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  6. Complete genome sequence of Ferrimonas balearica type strain (PATT)

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, Matt; Sikorski, Johannes; Davenport, Karen W.; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Tapia, Roxanne; Brettin, Thomas S; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Yasawong, Montri; Rohde, Manfred; Tindall, Brian; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla L.

    2010-01-01

    Ferrimonas balerica (Rossello-Mora et al. 1996) is the type species of the genus Ferrimonas, which belongs to the gammaproteobacterial family Ferrimonadaceae. The species is a Gram-negative, motile, facultatively anaerobic and non spore-forming bacterium, which is of special interest because it is a chemoorganotroph and has a strictly respiratory metabolism with oxygen, nitrate, Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide, Fe(III)-citrate, MnO2, selenate, selenite and thiosulfate as electron acceptors. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the genus Ferrimonas and also the first sequence from a member of the family Ferrimonadaceae. The 4,279,159 bp long genome with its 3,803 protein-coding and 144 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  7. Complete genome sequence of Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius type strain (104-IAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Mavromatis, K; Sikorski, Johannes; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, A; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, N; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Meincke, Linda; Sims, David; Chertkov, Olga; Han, Cliff; Brettin, Tom; Detter, J C; Wahrenburg, Claudia; Rohde, Manfred; Pukall, Rudiger; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2010-01-01

    Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius (Darland and Brock 1971) is the type species of the larger of the two genera in the bacillal family Alicyclobacillaceae . A. acidocaldarius is a free-living and non-pathogenic organism, but may also be associated with food and fruit spoilage. Due to its acidophilic nature, several enzymes from this species have since long been subjected to detailed molecular and biochemical studies. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of the family Alicyclobacillaceae . The 3,205,686 bp long genome (chromosome and three plasmids) with its 3,153 protein-coding and 82 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  8. Complete genome sequence of Oceanithermus profundus type strain (506T)

    SciTech Connect

    Pati, Amrita; Zhang, Xiaojing; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Hauser, Loren John; Jeffries, Cynthia; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Ruhl, Alina; Mwirichia, Romano; Rohde, Manfred; Tindall, Brian; Sikorski, Johannes; Wirth, Reinhard; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Detter, J. Chris; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Land, Miriam L

    2011-01-01

    Oceanithermus profundus Miroshnichenko et al. 2003 is the type species of the genus Oceanithermus, which belongs to the family Thermaceae. The genus currently comprises two species whose members are thermophilic and are able to reduce sulfur compounds and nitrite. The organism is adapted to the salinity of sea water, is able to utilize a broad range of carbohydrates, some proteinaceous substrates, organic acids and alcohols. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the genus Oceanithermus and the fourth sequence from the family Thermaceae. The 2,439,291 bp long genome with its 2,391 protein-coding and 54 RNA genes consists of one chromosome and a 135,351 bp long plasmid, and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  9. Complete genome sequence of Cellulomonas flavigena type strain (134T)

    PubMed Central

    Abt, Birte; Foster, Brian; Lapidus, Alla; Clum, Alicia; Sun, Hui; Pukall, Rüdiger; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Cellulomonas flavigena (Kellerman and McBeth 1912) Bergey et al. 1923 is the type species of the genus Cellulomonas of the actinobacterial family Cellulomonadaceae. Members of the genus Cellulomonas are of special interest for their ability to degrade cellulose and hemicellulose, particularly with regard to the use of biomass as an alternative energy source. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the genus Cellulomonas, and next to the human pathogen Tropheryma whipplei the second complete genome sequence within the actinobacterial family Cellulomonadaceae. The 4,123,179 bp long single replicon genome with its 3,735 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304688

  10. Complete genome sequence of Cellulomonas flavigena type strain (134).

    PubMed

    Abt, Birte; Foster, Brian; Lapidus, Alla; Clum, Alicia; Sun, Hui; Pukall, Rüdiger; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-07-29

    Cellulomonas flavigena (Kellerman and McBeth 1912) Bergey et al. 1923 is the type species of the genus Cellulomonas of the actinobacterial family Cellulomonadaceae. Members of the genus Cellulomonas are of special interest for their ability to degrade cellulose and hemicellulose, particularly with regard to the use of biomass as an alternative energy source. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the genus Cellulomonas, and next to the human pathogen Tropheryma whipplei the second complete genome sequence within the actinobacterial family Cellulomonadaceae. The 4,123,179 bp long single replicon genome with its 3,735 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  11. Complete genome sequence of Ignisphaera aggregans type strain (AQ1.S1T)

    SciTech Connect

    Goker, Markus; Held, Brittany; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Spring, Stefan; Yasawong, Montri; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Tapia, Roxanne; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Palaniappan, Krishna; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Brettin, Thomas S; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Rohde, Manfred; Sikorski, Johannes; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Ignisphaera aggregans Niederberger et al. 2006 is the type and sole species of genus Ignisphaera. This archaeal species is characterized by a cocci-shaped, strictly anaerobic, moderately acidophilic, heterotrophic hyperthermophile and fermentative phenotype. The type strain AQ1.S1T was isolated from a near neutral, boiling spring in Kuirau Park, Rotorua, New Zealand. This is the first completed genome sequence of the genus Ignisphaera and the fifth genome (fourth type strain) sequence in the family Desulfurococcaceae. The 1,875,953 bp long genome with its 2,061 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  12. Complete genome sequence of the larval shellfish pathogen Vibrio Tubiashii type strain ATCC 19109

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vibrio tubiashii is a larval shellfish pathogen. Here we report the first closed genome sequence for this species (American Type Culture Collection type strain 19109), which has two chromosomes (3,294,490 and 1,766,582 bp), two megaplasmids (251,408 and 122,808 bp) and two plasmids (57,076 and 47,9...

  13. Occurrence of protein a in staphylococcal strains: quantitative aspects and correlation to antigenic and bacteriophage types.

    PubMed

    Kronvall, G; Dossett, J H; Quie, P G; Williams, R C

    1971-01-01

    Protein A of Staphylococcus aureus can be detected on cell walls of intact bacteria by use of radioactively labeled myeloma globulin. Of 156 strains of S. aureus, 141 (90%) contained protein A. None of 47 S. epidermidis strains was positive for protein A. The production of protein A was influenced by incubation temperature but not by differences in incubation time or inoculum size. A medium containing a high concentration of NaCl suppressed the production of protein A by 90%. Formalin treatment of protein A-containing strains caused a decrease in the amount detected, but no further decrease was detected after storage at 4 C. No correlation was found between absence or presence of protein A and phage type or phage group. Sixteen S. aureus strains were studied extensively. There was no correlation between protein A and any of the 26 antigenic characteristics which have been previously described in these strains.

  14. Occurrence of protein a in staphylococcal strains: quantitative aspects and correlation to antigenic and bacteriophage types.

    PubMed

    Kronvall, G; Dossett, J H; Quie, P G; Williams, R C

    1971-01-01

    Protein A of Staphylococcus aureus can be detected on cell walls of intact bacteria by use of radioactively labeled myeloma globulin. Of 156 strains of S. aureus, 141 (90%) contained protein A. None of 47 S. epidermidis strains was positive for protein A. The production of protein A was influenced by incubation temperature but not by differences in incubation time or inoculum size. A medium containing a high concentration of NaCl suppressed the production of protein A by 90%. Formalin treatment of protein A-containing strains caused a decrease in the amount detected, but no further decrease was detected after storage at 4 C. No correlation was found between absence or presence of protein A and phage type or phage group. Sixteen S. aureus strains were studied extensively. There was no correlation between protein A and any of the 26 antigenic characteristics which have been previously described in these strains. PMID:16557923

  15. Complete genome sequence of Pyrolobus fumarii type strain (1AT)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Goker, Markus; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Huntemann, Marcel; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Pagani, Ioanna; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Huber, Harald; Yasawong, Montri; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Abt, Birte; Sikorski, Johannes; Wirth, Reinhard; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla L.

    2011-01-01

    Pyrolobus fumarii Bl chl et al. 1997 is the type species of the genus Pyrolobus, which be- longs to the crenarchaeal family Pyrodictiaceae. The species is a facultatively microaerophilic non-motile crenarchaeon. It is of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location in the tree of life and because it is a hyperthermophilic chemolithoautotroph known as the primary producer of organic matter at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. P. fumarii exhibits currently the highest optimal growth temperature of all life forms on earth (106 C). This is the first com- pleted genome sequence of a member of the genus Pyrolobus to be published and only the second genome sequence from a member of the family Pyrodictiaceae. Although Diversa Corporation announced the completion of sequencing of the P. fumarii genome on Septem- ber 25, 2001, this sequence was never released to the public. The 1,843,267 bp long genome with its 1,986 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  16. [PCR-RAPD typing of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains].

    PubMed

    Bogiel, Tomasz; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2010-01-01

    P. aeruginosa rods are opportunistic pathogens responsible generally for nosocomial infections. Resistance to carbapenems, observed among them, is a serious threat due to ability to be transmitted between bacterial species. The aim of our study was to evaluate the usefulness of PCR-RAPD technique in typing of 16 carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa strains isolated in 2007 from different patients of University HospitalNo. 1 of dr A. Jurasz Collegium Medicum of L. Rydygier in Bydgoszcz Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń. Study shows increasing frequency of isolation that type of strains when compared to 2006. Percentage of carbapenem-resistant isolates raised from 12,4% in 2006 to 22.9% in 2007. The majority of examined strains were obtained from patients of the Intensive Care Units (25.0%) and were isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage (25.0%), urine (25.0%) and wound swabs (18.8%) samples. Examined P. aeruginosa strains demonstrated resistance to doripenem (81.3%) and piperacillin (75.0%) and susceptibility to colistin (100.0%), amikacin (81.3%), netilmicin and norfloxacin (75.0% each). Using PCR-RAPD amplification with 208 and 272 primers, 14 and 16 DNA patterns were obtained, respectively. Usefulness of PCR-RAPD in carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa strains typing was proved in case of strains presenting similar and/or different antimicrobials susceptibility patterns.

  17. Pyroprinting: a rapid and flexible genotypic fingerprinting method for typing bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Black, Michael W; VanderKelen, Jennifer; Montana, Aldrin; Dekhtyar, Alexander; Neal, Emily; Goodman, Anya; Kitts, Christopher L

    2014-10-01

    Bacterial strain typing is commonly employed in studies involving epidemiology, population ecology, and microbial source tracking to identify sources of fecal contamination. Methods for differentiating strains generally use either a collection of phenotypic traits or rely on some interrogation of the bacterial genotype. This report introduces pyroprinting, a novel genotypic strain typing method that is rapid, inexpensive, and discriminating compared to the most sensitive methods already in use. Pyroprinting relies on the simultaneous pyrosequencing of polymorphic multicopy loci, such as the intergenic transcribed spacer regions of rRNA operons in bacterial genomes. Data generated by sequencing combinations of variable templates are reproducible and intrinsically digitized. The theory and development of pyroprinting in Escherichia coli, including the selection of similarity thresholds to define matches between isolates, are presented. The pyroprint-based strain differentiation limits and phylogenetic relevance compared to other typing methods are also explored. Pyroprinting is unique in its simplicity and, paradoxically, in its intrinsic complexity. This new approach serves as an excellent alternative to more cumbersome or less phylogenetically relevant strain typing methods.

  18. Characterization of SCCmec types, antibiotic resistance, and toxin gene profiles of Staphylococcus aureus strains.

    PubMed

    Szczuka, Ewa; Grabska, Katarzyna; Trawczyński, Krzysztof; Bosacka, Karolina; Kaznowski, Adam

    2013-09-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) causes serious nosocomial and community acquired infections. Resistance to methicillin is mediated by the mecA gene, which is inserted in a mobile genetic element called staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec). We determined the SCCmec types, the occurrence of genes encoding toxic shock syndrome toxin (tst), exfoliative toxin (eta, etb), Panton-Valentine leukocidin (pvl) as well as antibiotic susceptibility of these isolates. Among 65 hospital-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (HA-MRSA) strains, SCCmec types II, III and IV were identified. Type III SCCmec was the most prevalent (62%), followed by mec types II (24%) and IV (14%). Four community acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) strains carried SCCmec type IV and were pvl-positive. The most prevalent gene among HA-MRSA was pvl. The toxic shock syndrome toxin and exfoliative toxin genes were found only in hospital-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus. The results of this study demonstrate that the SCCmec type III is predominant among strains recovered from hospitalized patients with infections and that these strains were resistant to many antibiotics used in the treatment of staphylococcal infections.

  19. Flagellin typing of Bordetella bronchiseptica strains originating from different host species.

    PubMed

    Khayer, Bernadett; Magyar, Tibor; Wehmann, Enikő

    2014-10-10

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is a widespread Gram-negative pathogen occurring in different mammal species. It is known to play a role in the aetiology of infectious atrophic rhinitis of swine, canine kennel cough, respiratory syndromes of cats, rabbits and guinea pigs, and sporadic human cases have also been reported. In this study, 93 B. bronchiseptica strains were examined from a broad range of host species and different geographical regions using restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of polymerase chain reaction products of flaA to reveal the possible host-specificity of the flagellin. Eight types (A-H) of flaA were identified, including five newly described ones (D-H). All but one of the 22 B. bronchiseptica strains from swine showed type B fragment pattern. The eighteen Hungarian isolates of canine origin were uniform (type A) while in other countries type B and D were also present in dogs. The sequence and phylogenetic analysis of 36 representative strains of flaA types revealed four clusters. These clusters correlated with flaA PCR-RFLP types and host species, especially in pigs and dogs. The revealed diversity of the strains isolated from human cases indicated possible zoonotic transmissions from various animal sources. PMID:25153650

  20. Flagellin typing of Bordetella bronchiseptica strains originating from different host species.

    PubMed

    Khayer, Bernadett; Magyar, Tibor; Wehmann, Enikő

    2014-10-10

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is a widespread Gram-negative pathogen occurring in different mammal species. It is known to play a role in the aetiology of infectious atrophic rhinitis of swine, canine kennel cough, respiratory syndromes of cats, rabbits and guinea pigs, and sporadic human cases have also been reported. In this study, 93 B. bronchiseptica strains were examined from a broad range of host species and different geographical regions using restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of polymerase chain reaction products of flaA to reveal the possible host-specificity of the flagellin. Eight types (A-H) of flaA were identified, including five newly described ones (D-H). All but one of the 22 B. bronchiseptica strains from swine showed type B fragment pattern. The eighteen Hungarian isolates of canine origin were uniform (type A) while in other countries type B and D were also present in dogs. The sequence and phylogenetic analysis of 36 representative strains of flaA types revealed four clusters. These clusters correlated with flaA PCR-RFLP types and host species, especially in pigs and dogs. The revealed diversity of the strains isolated from human cases indicated possible zoonotic transmissions from various animal sources.

  1. Comparative genomics of wild type yeast strains unveils important genome diversity

    PubMed Central

    Carreto, Laura; Eiriz, Maria F; Gomes, Ana C; Pereira, Patrícia M; Schuller, Dorit; Santos, Manuel AS

    2008-01-01

    Background Genome variability generates phenotypic heterogeneity and is of relevance for adaptation to environmental change, but the extent of such variability in natural populations is still poorly understood. For example, selected Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains are variable at the ploidy level, have gene amplifications, changes in chromosome copy number, and gross chromosomal rearrangements. This suggests that genome plasticity provides important genetic diversity upon which natural selection mechanisms can operate. Results In this study, we have used wild-type S. cerevisiae (yeast) strains to investigate genome variation in natural and artificial environments. We have used comparative genome hybridization on array (aCGH) to characterize the genome variability of 16 yeast strains, of laboratory and commercial origin, isolated from vineyards and wine cellars, and from opportunistic human infections. Interestingly, sub-telomeric instability was associated with the clinical phenotype, while Ty element insertion regions determined genomic differences of natural wine fermentation strains. Copy number depletion of ASP3 and YRF1 genes was found in all wild-type strains. Other gene families involved in transmembrane transport, sugar and alcohol metabolism or drug resistance had copy number changes, which also distinguished wine from clinical isolates. Conclusion We have isolated and genotyped more than 1000 yeast strains from natural environments and carried out an aCGH analysis of 16 strains representative of distinct genotype clusters. Important genomic variability was identified between these strains, in particular in sub-telomeric regions and in Ty-element insertion sites, suggesting that this type of genome variability is the main source of genetic diversity in natural populations of yeast. The data highlights the usefulness of yeast as a model system to unravel intraspecific natural genome diversity and to elucidate how natural selection shapes the yeast genome

  2. Primary Isolation Strain Determines Both Phage Type and Receptors Recognised by Campylobacter jejuni Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Martine C. Holst; Gencay, Yilmaz Emre; Birk, Tina; Baldvinsson, Signe Berg; Jäckel, Claudia; Hammerl, Jens A.; Vegge, Christina S.; Neve, Horst; Brøndsted, Lone

    2015-01-01

    In this study we isolated novel bacteriophages, infecting the zoonotic bacterium Campylobacter jejuni. These phages may be used in phage therapy of C. jejuni colonized poultry to prevent spreading of the bacteria to meat products causing disease in humans. Many C. jejuni phages have been isolated using NCTC12662 as the indicator strain, which may have biased the selection of phages. A large group of C. jejuni phages rely on the highly diverse capsular polysaccharide (CPS) for infection and recent work identified the O-methyl phosphoramidate modification (MeOPN) of CPS as a phage receptor. We therefore chose seven C. jejuni strains each expressing different CPS structures as indicator strains in a large screening for phages in samples collected from free-range poultry farms. Forty-three phages were isolated using C. jejuni NCTC12658, NCTC12662 and RM1221 as host strains and 20 distinct phages were identified based on host range analysis and genome restriction profiles. Most phages were isolated using C. jejuni strains NCTC12662 and RM1221 and interestingly phage genome size (140 kb vs. 190 kb), host range and morphological appearance correlated with the isolation strain. Thus, according to C. jejuni phage grouping, NCTC12662 and NCTC12658 selected for CP81-type phages, while RM1221 selected for CP220-type phages. Furthermore, using acapsular ∆kpsM mutants we demonstrated that phages isolated on NCTC12658 and NCTC12662 were dependent on the capsule for infection. In contrast, CP220-type phages isolated on RM1221 were unable to infect non-motile ∆motA mutants, hence requiring motility for successful infection. Hence, the primary phage isolation strain determines both phage type (CP81 or CP220) as well as receptors (CPS or flagella) recognised by the isolated phages. PMID:25585385

  3. Complete Proteome of a Quinolone-Resistant Salmonella Typhimurium Phage Type DT104B Clinical Strain

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Susana; Nunes-Miranda, Júlio D.; Pinto, Luís; Santos, Hugo M.; de Toro, María; Sáenz, Yolanda; Torres, Carmen; Capelo, José Luis; Poeta, Patrícia; Igrejas, Gilberto

    2014-01-01

    Salmonellosis is one of the most common and widely distributed foodborne diseases. The emergence of Salmonella strains that are resistant to a variety of antimicrobials is a serious global public health concern. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium definitive phage type 104 (DT104) is one of these emerging epidemic multidrug resistant strains. Here we collate information from the diverse and comprehensive range of experiments on Salmonella proteomes that have been published. We then present a new study of the proteome of the quinolone-resistant Se20 strain (phage type DT104B), recovered after ciprofloxacin treatment and compared it to the proteome of reference strain SL1344. A total of 186 and 219 protein spots were recovered from Se20 and SL1344 protein extracts, respectively, after two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The signatures of 94% of the protein spots were successfully identified through matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Three antimicrobial resistance related proteins, whose genes were previously detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), were identified in the clinical strain. The presence of these proteins, dihydropteroate synthase type-2 (sul2 gene), aminoglycoside resistance protein A (strA gene) and aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase type Ib-cr4 (aac(6')-Ib-cr4 gene), was confirmed in the DT104B clinical strain. The aac(6')-Ib-cr4 gene is responsible for plasmid-mediated aminoglycoside and quinolone resistance. This is a preliminary analysis of the proteome of these two S. Typhimurium strains and further work is being developed to better understand how antimicrobial resistance is developing in this pathogen. PMID:25196519

  4. Complete genome sequence of the Antarctic Halorubrum lacusprofundi type strain ACAM 34.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Iain J; DasSarma, Priya; Lucas, Susan; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Tice, Hope; Dalin, Eileen; Bruce, David C; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Sims, David; Brettin, Thomas S; Detter, John C; Han, Cliff S; Larimer, Frank; Hauser, Loren; Land, Miriam; Ivanova, Natalia; Richardson, Paul; Cavicchioli, Ricardo; DasSarma, Shiladitya; Woese, Carl R; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2016-01-01

    Halorubrum lacusprofundi is an extreme halophile within the archaeal phylum Euryarchaeota. The type strain ACAM 34 was isolated from Deep Lake, Antarctica. H. lacusprofundi is of phylogenetic interest because it is distantly related to the haloarchaea that have previously been sequenced. It is also of interest because of its psychrotolerance. We report here the complete genome sequence of H. lacusprofundi type strain ACAM 34 and its annotation. This genome is part of a 2006 Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program project to sequence genomes of diverse Archaea.

  5. Complete genome sequence of the Antarctic Halorubrum lacusprofundi type strain ACAM 34

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Anderson, Iain J.; DasSarma, Priya; Lucas, Susan; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Tice, Hope; Dalin, Eileen; Bruce, David C.; Goodwin, Lynne; et al

    2016-01-01

    Halorubrum lacusprofundi is an extreme halophile within the archaeal phylum Euryarchaeota. The type strain ACAM 34 was isolated from Deep Lake, Antarctica. H. lacusprofundi is of phylogenetic interest because it is distantly related to the haloarchaea that have previously been sequenced. It is also of interest because of its psychrotolerance. We report here the complete genome sequence of H. lacusprofundi type strain ACAM 34 and its annotation. In conclusion, this genome is part of a 2006 Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program project to sequence genomes of diverse Archaea.

  6. Complete genome sequence of Halopiger xanaduensis type strain (SH6T)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Tindall, Brian; Rohde, Manfred; Lucas, Susan; Han, James; Lapidus, Alla L.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Peters, Lin; Pati, Amrita; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pagani, Ioanna; Teshima, Hazuki; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Land, Miriam L; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ivanova, N

    2012-01-01

    Halopiger xanaduensis is the type species of the genus Halopiger and belongs to the euryarchaeal family Halobacteriaceae. H. xanaduensis strain SH-6, which is designated as the type strain, was isolated from the sediment of a salt lake in Inner Mongolia, Lake Shangmatala. Like other members of the family Halobacteriaceae, it is an extreme halophile requiring at least 2.5 M salt for growth. We report here the sequencing and annotation of the 4,355,268 bp genome, which includes one chromosome and three plasmids. This genome is part of a Joint Genome Institute (JGI) Community Sequencing Program (CSP) project to sequence diverse haloarchaeal genomes.

  7. Complete genome sequence of the Antarctic Halorubrum lacusprofundi type strain ACAM 34

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain J.; DasSarma, Priya; Lucas, Susan; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Tice, Hope; Dalin, Eileen; Bruce, David C.; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Sims, David; Brettin, Thomas S.; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff S.; Larimer, Frank; Hauser, Loren; Land, Miriam; Ivanova, Natalia; Richardson, Paul; Cavicchioli, Ricardo; DasSarma, Shiladitya; Woese, Carl R.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2016-01-01

    Halorubrum lacusprofundi is an extreme halophile within the archaeal phylum Euryarchaeota. The type strain ACAM 34 was isolated from Deep Lake, Antarctica. H. lacusprofundi is of phylogenetic interest because it is distantly related to the haloarchaea that have previously been sequenced. It is also of interest because of its psychrotolerance. We report here the complete genome sequence of H. lacusprofundi type strain ACAM 34 and its annotation. In conclusion, this genome is part of a 2006 Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program project to sequence genomes of diverse Archaea.

  8. Complete genome sequence of the Antarctic Halorubrum lacusprofundi type strain ACAM 34.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Iain J; DasSarma, Priya; Lucas, Susan; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Tice, Hope; Dalin, Eileen; Bruce, David C; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Sims, David; Brettin, Thomas S; Detter, John C; Han, Cliff S; Larimer, Frank; Hauser, Loren; Land, Miriam; Ivanova, Natalia; Richardson, Paul; Cavicchioli, Ricardo; DasSarma, Shiladitya; Woese, Carl R; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2016-01-01

    Halorubrum lacusprofundi is an extreme halophile within the archaeal phylum Euryarchaeota. The type strain ACAM 34 was isolated from Deep Lake, Antarctica. H. lacusprofundi is of phylogenetic interest because it is distantly related to the haloarchaea that have previously been sequenced. It is also of interest because of its psychrotolerance. We report here the complete genome sequence of H. lacusprofundi type strain ACAM 34 and its annotation. This genome is part of a 2006 Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program project to sequence genomes of diverse Archaea. PMID:27617060

  9. Genetic Diversity and Evolution of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Strains with Different Phage Types

    PubMed Central

    Pettengill, James; Strain, Errol; Allard, Marc W.; Ahmed, Rafiq; Zhao, Shaohua; Brown, Eric W.

    2014-01-01

    Phage typing has been used for the epidemiological surveillance of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis for over 2 decades. However, knowledge of the genetic and evolutionary relationships between phage types is very limited, making differences difficult to interpret. Here, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified from whole-genome comparisons were used to determine the relationships between some S. Enteritidis phage types (PTs) commonly associated with food-borne outbreaks in the United States. Emphasis was placed on the predominant phage types PT8, PT13a, and PT13 in North America. With >89,400 bp surveyed across 98 S. Enteritidis isolates representing 14 distinct phage types, 55 informative SNPs were discovered within 23 chromosomally anchored loci. To maximize the discriminatory and evolutionary partitioning of these highly homogeneous strains, sequences comprising informative SNPs were concatenated into a single combined data matrix and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. The resultant phylogeny allocated most S. Enteritidis isolates into two distinct clades (clades I and II) and four subclades. Synapomorphic (shared and derived) sets of SNPs capable of distinguishing individual clades/subclades were identified. However, individual phage types appeared to be evolutionarily disjunct when mapped to this phylogeny, suggesting that phage typing may not be valid for making phylogenetic inferences. Furthermore, the set of SNPs identified here represents useful genetic markers for strain differentiation of more clonal S. Enteritidis strains and provides core genotypic markers for future development of a SNP typing scheme with S. Enteritidis. PMID:24574287

  10. Population Structure and Antimicrobial Resistance Profiles of Streptococcus suis Serotype 2 Sequence Type 25 Strains.

    PubMed

    Athey, Taryn B T; Teatero, Sarah; Takamatsu, Daisuke; Wasserscheid, Jessica; Dewar, Ken; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Fittipaldi, Nahuel

    2016-01-01

    Strains of serotype 2 Streptococcus suis are responsible for swine and human infections. Different serotype 2 genetic backgrounds have been defined using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). However, little is known about the genetic diversity within each MLST sequence type (ST). Here, we used whole-genome sequencing to test the hypothesis that S. suis serotype 2 strains of the ST25 lineage are genetically heterogeneous. We evaluated 51 serotype 2 ST25 S. suis strains isolated from diseased pigs and humans in Canada, the United States of America, and Thailand. Whole-genome sequencing revealed numerous large-scale rearrangements in the ST25 genome, compared to the genomes of ST1 and ST28 S. suis strains, which result, among other changes, in disruption of a pilus island locus. We report that recombination and lateral gene transfer contribute to ST25 genetic diversity. Phylogenetic analysis identified two main and distinct Thai and North American clades grouping most strains investigated. These clades also possessed distinct patterns of antimicrobial resistance genes, which correlated with acquisition of different integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs). Some of these ICEs were found to be integrated at a recombination hot spot, previously identified as the site of integration of the 89K pathogenicity island in serotype 2 ST7 S. suis strains. Our results highlight the limitations of MLST for phylogenetic analysis of S. suis, and the importance of lateral gene transfer and recombination as drivers of diversity in this swine pathogen and zoonotic agent. PMID:26954687

  11. Population Structure and Antimicrobial Resistance Profiles of Streptococcus suis Serotype 2 Sequence Type 25 Strains

    PubMed Central

    Athey, Taryn B. T.; Teatero, Sarah; Takamatsu, Daisuke; Wasserscheid, Jessica; Dewar, Ken; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Fittipaldi, Nahuel

    2016-01-01

    Strains of serotype 2 Streptococcus suis are responsible for swine and human infections. Different serotype 2 genetic backgrounds have been defined using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). However, little is known about the genetic diversity within each MLST sequence type (ST). Here, we used whole-genome sequencing to test the hypothesis that S. suis serotype 2 strains of the ST25 lineage are genetically heterogeneous. We evaluated 51 serotype 2 ST25 S. suis strains isolated from diseased pigs and humans in Canada, the United States of America, and Thailand. Whole-genome sequencing revealed numerous large-scale rearrangements in the ST25 genome, compared to the genomes of ST1 and ST28 S. suis strains, which result, among other changes, in disruption of a pilus island locus. We report that recombination and lateral gene transfer contribute to ST25 genetic diversity. Phylogenetic analysis identified two main and distinct Thai and North American clades grouping most strains investigated. These clades also possessed distinct patterns of antimicrobial resistance genes, which correlated with acquisition of different integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs). Some of these ICEs were found to be integrated at a recombination hot spot, previously identified as the site of integration of the 89K pathogenicity island in serotype 2 ST7 S. suis strains. Our results highlight the limitations of MLST for phylogenetic analysis of S. suis, and the importance of lateral gene transfer and recombination as drivers of diversity in this swine pathogen and zoonotic agent. PMID:26954687

  12. Highly strained AlAs-type interfaces in InAs/AlSb heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallet, M.; Claveau, Y.; Warot-Fonrose, B.; Gatel, C.; Nicolai, J.; Combe, N.; Magen, C.; Teissier, R.; Baranov, A. N.; Ponchet, A.

    2016-05-01

    Spontaneously formed Al-As type interfaces of the InAs/AlSb system grown by molecular beam epitaxy for quantum cascade lasers were investigated by atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. Experimental strain profiles were compared to those coming from a model structure. High negative out-of-plane strains with the same order of magnitude as perfect Al-As interfaces were observed. The effects of the geometrical phase analysis used for strain determination were evidenced and discussed in the case of abrupt and huge variations of both atomic composition and bond length as observed in these interfaces. Intensity profiles performed on the same images confirmed that changes of chemical composition are the source of high strain fields at interfaces. The results show that spontaneously assembled interfaces are not perfect but extend over 2 or 3 monolayers.

  13. Make Histri: reconstructing the exchange history of bacterial and archaeal type strains.

    PubMed

    Verslyppe, Bert; De Smet, Wim; De Baets, Bernard; De Vos, Paul; Dawyndt, Peter

    2011-07-01

    Each transfer of a microbial strain between a Biological Resource Center (BRC) and an individual researcher or another BRC imposes a risk of contamination or human error. Such artifacts jeopardize the quality of scientific results. In order to trace back possible scientific discrepancies that can be linked to failure of authenticity of the biological material involved, we launched the 'Make Histri' project that aims at reconstructing the exchange history ('Histri') of all bacterial and archaeal type strains as can be deduced from the information contained in BRC online catalogs. A Histri, visualized as a rooted tree, contains all known strain numbers attributed to the various cultures of a given strain, annotated with additional information about each transfer of microbial material. PMID:21514082

  14. MLVA typing reveals higher genetic homogeneity among S. Enteritidis strains isolated from food, humans and chickens in Brazil in comparison to the North American strains.

    PubMed

    Campioni, Fábio; Davis, Margaret; Medeiros, Marta Inês C; Falcão, Juliana P; Shah, Devendra H

    2013-03-15

    Salmonella Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is a major causative agent of food-borne gastroenteritis associated with the consumption of contaminated poultry products. In this study we used multilocus variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs) analysis (MLVA) to discriminate a total of 188 S. Enteritidis strains recovered from human (n=67), food (n=61) and chickens (n=60) during a 24 year period (1986 through 2010) in Brazil. MLVA profiles of the 188 strains from Brazil were compared to the MLVA profiles of 100 human clinical (n=52) and poultry-associated (n=48) strains isolated in North America between 1986 and 2008. MLVA typing led to classification of the 288 strains from Brazil and North America into two major clusters named A and B with 35% of similarity. Cluster A consisted of a vast majority of strains isolated from North America (n=71) and only three strains isolated from Brazil which included two pre-pandemic strains (SE5 and SE4). In contrast, cluster B consisted of all of the post-pandemic strains isolated from Brazil (n=185) and fewer strains isolated from North America (n=29). In general, MLVA typing showed that the North American strains were more genetically diverse whereas Brazilian strains were more genetically clonal. The clustering of pre-pandemic strains from Brazil with the North American strains suggests the possibility that the pre-pandemic strains were more likely genetically diverse; however after 1993 a new and prevalent subtype of S. Enteritidis was introduced in this country. This is the first study describing MLVA genotyping of the S. Enteritidis strains isolated from Brazil.

  15. Usefulness of phage typing and "two-way ribotyping" to differentiate Salmonella enteritidis strains.

    PubMed

    Landeras, E; Usera, M A; Calderón, C; Mendoza, M C

    1997-12-01

    The capacity to differentiate Salmonella enteritidis strains by phage typing and "two-way ribotyping" performed with PstI and SphI was evaluated. The typeability was 96.8% in phage typing and 100% in ribotyping. The series was differentiated into 13 phage types, 19 combined ribotypes, and 39 subtypes or clonal lines by combining results from both methods (of which 11, 13, and 35, respectively, were represented by natural strains). Ribotyping differentiated strains ascribed to PTs 1, 4, 6a, 7, 8, RDNC and UPT. Conversely, some strains of PTs 1, 4, 5a, 6, 6a, 7, 34, RDNC and UPT fall into the most frequent combined ribotype. A dendrogram of genetic similarity generated from the combined ribotypes was traced, and, at a 0.82 similarity level, it showed a major cluster (including 17 combined ribotypes, 88.4% strains ascribed to all PTs tested except PT11), a minor cluster, and four additional lines more loosely related.

  16. HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON STRAIN-INDUCED MARTENSITE FORMATION IN TYPE 304L STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M; Ps Lam, P

    2008-12-11

    Unstable austenitic stainless steels undergo a strain-induced martensite transformation. The effect of hydrogen on this transformation is not well understood. Some researchers believe that hydrogen makes the transformation to martensite more difficult because hydrogen is an austenite stabilizer. Others believe that hydrogen has little or no effect at all on the transformation and claim that the transformation is simply a function of strain and temperature. Still other researchers believe that hydrogen should increase the ability of the metal to transform due to hydrogen-enhanced dislocation mobility and slip planarity. While the role of hydrogen on the martensite transformation is still debated, it has been experimentally verified that this transformation does occur in hydrogen-charged materials. What is the effect of strain-induced martensite on hydrogen embrittlement? Martensite near crack-tips or other highly strained regions could provide much higher hydrogen diffusivity and allow for quicker hydrogen concentration. Martensite may be more intrinsically brittle than austenite and has been shown to be severely embrittled by hydrogen. However, it does not appear to be a necessary condition for embrittlement since Type 21-6-9 stainless steel is more stable than Type 304L stainless steel but susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. In this study, the effect of hydrogen on strain-induced martensite formation in Type 304L stainless steel was investigated by monitoring the formation of martensite during tensile tests of as-received and hydrogen-charged samples and metallographically examining specimens from interrupted tensile tests after increasing levels of strain. The effect of hydrogen on the fracture mechanisms was also studied by examining the fracture features of as-received and hydrogen-charged specimens and relating them to the stress-strain behavior.

  17. Genomic Diversity between Strains of the Same Serotype and Multilocus Sequence Type among Pneumococcal Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Nuno A.; McCluskey, Jackie; Jefferies, Johanna M. C.; Hinds, Jason; Smith, Andrew; Clarke, Stuart C.; Mitchell, Tim J.; Paterson, Gavin K.

    2006-01-01

    The important human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is known to be a genetically diverse species. We have used comparative genome hybridization (CGH) microarray analysis to investigate this diversity in a collection of clinical isolates including several capsule serotype 14 pneumococci, a dominant serotype among disease isolates. We have identified three new regions of diversity among pneumococcal isolates and, importantly, clearly demonstrate genetic differences between strains of the same multilocus sequence type (ST) and capsule serotype. CGH may therefore, under certain circumstances, prove to be a valuable tool to supplement current typing methods. Finally, we show that these clonal strains with the same serotype and ST behave differently in an animal model. Strains of the same ST and serotype therefore have important genetic and phenotypic differences. PMID:16714583

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of the Larval Shellfish Pathogen Vibrio tubiashii Type Strain ATCC 19109.

    PubMed

    Richards, Gary P; Needleman, David S; Watson, Michael A; Bono, James L

    2014-12-18

    Vibrio tubiashii is a larval shellfish pathogen. Here, we report the first closed genome sequence for this species (ATCC type strain 19109), which consists of two chromosomes (3,294,490 and 1,766,582 bp), two megaplasmids (251,408 and 122,808 bp), and two plasmids (57,076 and 47,973 bp).

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptococcus gordonii Type Strain CCUG 33482T

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsson, Hedvig E.; Gonzales-Siles, Lucia; Hallbäck, Erika T.; Jaén-Luchoro, Daniel; Boulund, Fredrik; Sikora, Per; Karlsson, Roger; Svensson, Liselott; Bennasar, Antoni; Engstrand, Lars; Kristiansson, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus gordonii type strain CCUG 33482T is a member of the Streptococcus mitis group, isolated from a case of subacute bacterial endocarditis. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of S. gordonii CCUG 33482T, composed of 41 contigs of a total size of 2.15 Mb with 2,061 annotated coding sequences. PMID:27013051

  20. Draft Whole-Genome Sequence of the Type Strain Bacillus aquimaris TF12T

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-González, Ismael L.

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus aquimaris TF12 is a Gram-positive bacteria isolated from a tidal flat of the Yellow Sea in South Korea. We report the draft whole-genome sequence of Bacillus aquimaris TF12, the type strain of a set of bacteria typically associated with marine habitats and with a potentially high biotechnology value. PMID:27417832

  1. Draft Genome Sequences of Eight Type Strains of the Genus Demequina

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, Natsuko; Oguchi, Akio; Komaki, Hisayuki; Tamura, Tomohiko; Fujita, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequences of the type strains of Demequina aestuarii, Demequina aurantiaca, Demequina flava, Demequina globuliformis, Demequina lutea, Demequina oxidasica, Demequina salsinemoris, and Demequina sediminicola. The genome sequences presented here will facilitate taxonomical, ecological, and functional studies of members of the genus Demequina. PMID:25883289

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae Type Strain B-78 (ATCC 27164).

    PubMed

    Mirajkar, Nandita S; Johnson, Timothy J; Gebhart, Connie J

    2016-01-01

    Reported herein is the complete genome sequence of the type strain B-78 (ATCC 27164) of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, the etiological agent of swine dysentery. The 3.1-Mb genome consists of a 3.056-Mb chromosome and a 45-kb plasmid, with 2,617 protein-coding genes, 39 RNA genes, and 40 pseudogenes. PMID:27540064

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of the Xanthomonas bromi Type Strain LMG 947

    PubMed Central

    Hersemann, Lena; Wibberg, Daniel; Blom, Jochen; Widmer, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the Xanthomonas bromi type strain LMG 947, an important pathogen of bromegrasses (Bromus spp.). Comparative analysis with other Xanthomonas spp. that are pathogenic on forage grasses will assist the analysis of host-plant adaptation at the genome level. PMID:27609927

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Moraxella catarrhalis Type Strain CCUG 353T.

    PubMed

    Jakobsson, Hedvig E; Salvà-Serra, Francisco; Thorell, Kaisa; Gonzales-Siles, Lucia; Boulund, Fredrik; Karlsson, Roger; Sikora, Per; Engstrand, Lars; Kristiansson, Erik; Moore, Edward R B

    2016-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a Gram-negative commensal and pathogenic bacterium found in the human respiratory tract. It is associated with otitis media and respiratory tract infections. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of M. catarrhalis type strain CCUG 353(T), composed of 18 contigs and a total size of 1.89 Mb. PMID:27313296

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of the Type Strain of the Acetogenic Bacterium Moorella thermoacetica DSM 521T

    PubMed Central

    Poehlein, Anja; Bengelsdorf, Frank R.; Esser, Carola; Schiel-Bengelsdorf, Bettina; Daniel, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the closed genome sequence of the type strain Moorella thermoacetica DSM 521T, an acetogenic bacterium, which is able to grow autotrophically on H2 + CO2 and/or CO, using the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. The genome consists of a circular chromosome (2.53 Mb). PMID:26450731

  6. Two Genome Sequences of Klebsiella pneumoniae Strains with Sequence Type 23 and Capsular Serotype K1

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hsi-Hsu; Chen, Yao-Shen; Hsiao, Hao-Wen; Hsueh, Pei-Tan; Ni, Wei-Fen

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the whole-genome sequences of Klebsiella pneumoniae ED2 and ED23, isolated, respectively, from bacteremic patients with liver abscesses (ED2) and patients with primary liver abscess and metastatic meningitis (ED23). Both strains were of multilocus sequence type 23 with capsule serotype K1. PMID:27795261

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of the Xanthomonas bromi Type Strain LMG 947.

    PubMed

    Hersemann, Lena; Wibberg, Daniel; Blom, Jochen; Widmer, Franco; Kölliker, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the Xanthomonas bromi type strain LMG 947, an important pathogen of bromegrasses (Bromus spp.). Comparative analysis with other Xanthomonas spp. that are pathogenic on forage grasses will assist the analysis of host-plant adaptation at the genome level. PMID:27609927

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of the Xanthomonas cassavae Type Strain CFBP 4642.

    PubMed

    Bolot, Stéphanie; Munoz Bodnar, Alejandra; Cunnac, Sébastien; Ortiz, Erika; Szurek, Boris; Noël, Laurent D; Arlat, Matthieu; Jacques, Marie-Agnès; Gagnevin, Lionel; Portier, Perrine; Fischer-Le Saux, Marion; Carrere, Sébastien; Koebnik, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of the Xanthomonas cassavae type strain CFBP 4642, the causal agent of bacterial necrosis on cassava plants. These data will allow the comparison of this nonvascular pathogen with the vascular pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis, both infecting the same host, which will facilitate the development of diagnostic tools. PMID:23990580

  9. Draft Whole-Genome Sequence of the Type Strain Bacillus aquimaris TF12T.

    PubMed

    Hernández-González, Ismael L; Olmedo-Álvarez, Gabriela

    2016-07-14

    Bacillus aquimaris TF12 is a Gram-positive bacteria isolated from a tidal flat of the Yellow Sea in South Korea. We report the draft whole-genome sequence of Bacillus aquimaris TF12, the type strain of a set of bacteria typically associated with marine habitats and with a potentially high biotechnology value.

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Moraxella catarrhalis Type Strain CCUG 353T

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsson, Hedvig E.; Gonzales-Siles, Lucia; Boulund, Fredrik; Karlsson, Roger; Sikora, Per; Kristiansson, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a Gram-negative commensal and pathogenic bacterium found in the human respiratory tract. It is associated with otitis media and respiratory tract infections. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of M. catarrhalis type strain CCUG 353T, composed of 18 contigs and a total size of 1.89 Mb. PMID:27313296

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of the Type Strain of Aeromonas schubertii, ATCC 43700

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lihui; Zhang, Defeng; Fu, Xiaozhe; Shi, Cunbin; Lin, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    We sequenced the complete genome of the type strain of Aeromonas schubertii, ATCC 43700. The full genome sequence of A. schubertii ATCC 43700 is 4,356,858 bp, which encodes 3,842 proteins and contains 110 predicted RNA genes. PMID:26893413

  12. Genome sequencing of phomopsis longicolla type strain twh p74 causing phomopsis seed decay in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phomopsis longicolla (syn. Diaporthe longicolla) is the primary cause of Phomopsis seed decay in soybean. We report the de novo assembled draft genome sequence of P. longicolla type strain TWH P74. The resulting draft genome was estimated to be approximately 64 Mb in size with an overall G+C content...

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae Type Strain B-78 (ATCC 27164)

    PubMed Central

    Mirajkar, Nandita S.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Reported herein is the complete genome sequence of the type strain B-78 (ATCC 27164) of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, the etiological agent of swine dysentery. The 3.1-Mb genome consists of a 3.056-Mb chromosome and a 45-kb plasmid, with 2,617 protein-coding genes, 39 RNA genes, and 40 pseudogenes. PMID:27540064

  14. Unexpected diversity of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type IV in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Kong, Fanrong; Xiao, Meng; Wang, Qinning; O'Sullivan, Matthew; Sintchenko, Vitali; Ma, Lin; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L

    2010-10-01

    Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) is a large mobile genetic element which is used frequently for subtyping of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains. MRSA SCCmec type IV not only predominates among community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA) strains but also is associated with several genetic lineages of hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA) and with other species. The objective of this study was to investigate the diversity of MRSA strains classified as SCCmec type IV by using a multiplex PCR-based reverse line blot (mPCR/RLB) hybridization assay as well as spa typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Sixty-two primer pairs and 63 probes were designed to interrogate each open reading frame (ORF) of SCCmec type IV sequences. A set of 131 MRSA SCCmec type IV isolates were classified into 79 subtypes by this method. There was considerable concordance between SCCmec type IV subtyping, spa typing, and PFGE patterns for clinical isolates, and the stability of SCCmec type IV subtyping was comparable to that of the other two methods. Using an in-house computer program, we showed that a subset of 20 genetic markers could achieve the same level of discrimination between isolates as the full set of 62, with a Simpson's index of diversity of 0.975. SCCmec type IV has a much higher level of diversity than previously suggested. The application of the mPCR/RLB hybridization assay to MRSA SCCmec type IV subtyping can improve the discriminatory power and throughput of MRSA typing and has the potential to enhance rapid infection control surveillance and outbreak detection.

  15. Induction of dendritic cell production of type I and type III interferons by wild-type and vaccine strains of measles virus: role of defective interfering RNAs.

    PubMed

    Shivakoti, Rupak; Siwek, Martina; Hauer, Debra; Schultz, Kimberly L W; Griffin, Diane E

    2013-07-01

    The innate immune response to viral infection frequently includes induction of type I interferons (IFN), but many viruses have evolved ways to block this response and increase virulence. In vitro studies of IFN production after infection of susceptible cells with measles virus (MeV) have often reported greater IFN synthesis after infection with vaccine than with wild-type strains of MeV. However, the possible presence in laboratory virus stocks of 5' copy-back defective interfering (DI) RNAs that induce IFN independent of the standard virus has frequently confounded interpretation of data from these studies. To further investigate MeV strain-dependent differences in IFN induction and the role of DI RNAs, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) were infected with the wild-type Bilthoven strain and the vaccine Edmonston-Zagreb strain with and without DI RNAs. Production of type I IFN, type III IFN, and the interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) Mx and ISG56 by infected cells was assessed with a flow cytometry-based IFN bioassay, quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR), and immunoassays. Bilthoven infected moDCs less efficiently than Edmonston-Zagreb. Presence of DI RNAs in vaccine stocks resulted in greater maturation of moDCs, inhibition of virus replication, and induction of higher levels of IFN and ISGs. Production of type I IFN, type III IFN, and ISG mRNA and protein was determined by both the level of infection and the presence of DI RNAs. At the same levels of infection and in the absence of DI RNA, IFN induction was similar between wild-type and vaccine strains of MeV. PMID:23678166

  16. Severity-related molecular differences among nineteen strains of dengue type 2 viruses.

    PubMed

    Pandey, B D; Igarashi, A

    2000-01-01

    Comparative nucleotide sequencing was carried out on dengue type 2 virus (DEN-2) strains isolated from patients in Northeast Thailand during the epidemic season in 1993. The patients exhibited different clinical manifestations ranging from dengue fever (DF) to dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF)/dengue shock syndrome (DSS). The results classified 19 DEN-2 strains into 3 subtypes according to nonsynonymous amino acid replacements. The strain isolated from a DSS patient eliciting secondary serological response belonged to subtype I, whereas 13 strains isolated from DHF patients with secondary response and 2 strains from DF patients with primary response belonged to subtype II. On the other hand, 3 strains isolated from DF cases evoking either primary or secondary response belonged to subtype III. These results suggest that subtype III virus infection could result in clinically milder manifestation irrespective of the serological response compared with subtype I or II viruses. The RNA secondary structure predicted for the 3' noncoding region showed 4 different structures (A, B, C, and D). The result also indicates that different subtypes of DEN-2 serotypes are circulating in a single epidemic in Thailand.

  17. Cyclic strain and motion control produce opposite oxidative responses in two human endothelial cell types.

    PubMed

    Sung, Hak-Joon; Yee, Andrew; Eskin, Suzanne G; McIntire, Larry V

    2007-07-01

    The phenotype of endothelial cells (ECs) is specific to the vascular bed from which they originate. To examine how mechanical forces alter the phenotype of different ECs, we compared the effects of cyclic strain and motion control on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and metabolism and cell adhesion molecule expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) vs. human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC). HUVEC and HAEC were subjected to cyclic strain (10% or 20%, 1 Hz), to a motion control that simulated fluid agitation over the cells without strain, or to static conditions for 24 h. We measured H(2)O(2) production with dichlorodihydrofluorescein acetate and superoxide with dihydroethidium fluorescence changes; superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities spectrophotometrically; and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 protein expression with Western blot analyses. HUVEC under cyclic strain showed 1) higher intracellular H(2)O(2) levels, 2) increased SOD, catalase, and GPx activities, and 3) greater VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 protein expression, compared with motion control or static conditions. However, in HAEC, motion control induced higher levels of ROS, enzyme activities associated with ROS defense, and VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression than cyclic strain. The opposite responses obtained with these two human EC types may reflect their vessels of origin, in that HAEC are subjected to higher cyclic strain deformations in vivo than HUVEC.

  18. Complete genome sequence of Dehalogenimonas lykanthroporepellens type strain (BL-DC-9T) and comparison to Dehalococcoides strains

    SciTech Connect

    Siddaramappa, Shivakumara; Delano, Susana; Green, Lance D.; Daligault, Hajnalka E.; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, James; Woyke, Tanja; Pitluck, Sam; Pennacchio, Len; Nolan, Matt; Land, Miriam L; Chang, Yun-Juan; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Hauser, Loren John; Lapidus, Alla L.; Yan, Jun; Bowman, Kimberly; Da Costa, Milton S,; Rainey, Fred A.; Moe, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Dehalogenimonas lykanthroporepellens is the type species of the genus Dehalogenimonas, which belongs to a deeply branching lineage within the phylum Chloroflexi. This strictly anaerobic, mesophilic, non spore forming, Gram negative staining bacterium was first isolated from chlorinated solvent contaminated groundwater at a Superfund site located near Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA. D. lykanthroporepellens was of interest for genome sequencing for two reasons: (a) its unusual ability to couple growth with reductive dechlorination of environmentally important polychlorinated aliphatic alkanes and (b) its phylogenetic position distant from previously sequenced bacteria. The 1,686,510 bp circular chromosome of strain BL-DC-9{sup T} contains 1,720 predicted protein coding genes, 47 tRNA genes, a single large subunit rRNA (23S-5S) locus, and a single, orphan, small unit rRNA (16S) locus.

  19. Complete genome sequence of Dehalogenimonas lykanthroporepellens type strain (BL-DC-9(T)) and comparison to "Dehalococcoides" strains.

    PubMed

    Siddaramappa, Shivakumara; Challacombe, Jean F; Delano, Susana F; Green, Lance D; Daligault, Hajnalka; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Shunsheng; Goodwin, Lynne; Han, James; Woyke, Tanja; Pitluck, Sam; Pennacchio, Len; Nolan, Matt; Land, Miriam; Chang, Yun-Juan; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Hauser, Loren; Lapidus, Alla; Yan, Jun; Bowman, Kimberly S; da Costa, Milton S; Rainey, Fred A; Moe, William M

    2012-05-25

    Dehalogenimonas lykanthroporepellens is the type species of the genus Dehalogenimonas, which belongs to a deeply branching lineage within the phylum Chloroflexi. This strictly anaerobic, mesophilic, non spore-forming, Gram-negative staining bacterium was first isolated from chlorinated solvent contaminated groundwater at a Superfund site located near Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA. D. lykanthroporepellens was of interest for genome sequencing for two reasons: (a) an unusual ability to couple growth with reductive dechlorination of environmentally important polychlorinated aliphatic alkanes and (b) a phylogenetic position that is distant from previously sequenced bacteria. The 1,686,510 bp circular chromosome of strain BL-DC-9(T) contains 1,720 predicted protein coding genes, 47 tRNA genes, a single large subunit rRNA (23S-5S) locus, and a single, orphan, small subunit rRNA (16S) locus.

  20. Molecular typing of uropathogenic E. coli strains by the ERIC-PCR method

    PubMed Central

    Ardakani, Maryam Afkhami; Ranjbar, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the most common cause of urinary infections in hospitals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ERIC-PCR method for molecular typing of uropathogenic E. coli strains isolated from hospitalized patients. Methods In a cross sectional study, 98 E. coli samples were collected from urine samples taken from patients admitted to Baqiyatallah Hospital from June 2014 to January 2015. The disk agar diffusion method was used to determine antibiotic sensitivity. DNA proliferation based on repetitive intergenic consensus was used to classify the E. coli strains. The products of proliferation were electrophoresed on 1.5% agarose gel, and their dendrograms were drawn. The data were analyzed by online Insillico software. Results The method used in this research proliferated numerous bands (4–17 bands), ranging from 100 to 3000 base pairs. The detected strains were classified into six clusters (E1–E6) with 70% similarity between them. Conclusion In this study, uropathogenic E. coli strains belonged to different genotypic clusters. It was found that ERIC-PCR had good differentiation power for molecular typing of uropathogenic E. coli strains isolated from the patients in the study. PMID:27280007

  1. Global carbon utilization profiles of wild-type, mutant, and transformant strains of Hypocrea jecorina.

    PubMed

    Druzhinina, Irina S; Schmoll, Monika; Seiboth, Bernhard; Kubicek, Christian P

    2006-03-01

    The ascomycete Hypocrea jecorina (Trichoderma reesei), an industrial producer of cellulases and hemicellulases, can efficiently degrade plant polysaccharides. However, the catabolic pathways for the resulting monomers and their relationship to enzyme induction are not well known. Here we used the Biolog Phenotype MicroArrays technique to evaluate the growth of H. jecorina on 95 carbon sources. For this purpose, we compared several wild-type isolates, mutants producing different amounts of cellulases, and strains transformed with a heterologous antibiotic resistance marker gene. The wild-type isolates and transformed strains had the highest variation in growth patterns on individual carbon sources. The cellulase mutants were relatively similar to their parental strains. Both in the mutant and in the transformed strains, the most significant changes occurred in utilization of xylitol, erythritol, D-sorbitol, D-ribose, D-galactose, L-arabinose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, maltotriose, and beta-methyl-glucoside. Increased production of cellulases was negatively correlated with the ability to grow on gamma-aminobutyrate, adonitol, and 2-ketogluconate; and positively correlated with that on d-sorbitol and saccharic acid. The reproducibility, relative simplicity, and high resolution (+/-10% of increase in mycelial density) of the phenotypic microarrays make them a useful tool for the characterization of mutant and transformed strains and for a global analysis of gene function.

  2. A highly strained InAs/GaSb type II superlattice for LWIR detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yiqiao; Moy, Aaron; Mi, Kan; Lu, Wentao; Chow, Peter

    2013-09-01

    IR photo detectors are in high demand for various military and civilian applications, such as airborne surveillance, remote sensing, environmental monitoring, and spectrometry. Recently InAs/GaSb type II superlattice (T2SL) has attracted numerous R and D interest since SLS is the only IR material that has a theoretical prediction of higher performance than HgCdTe. Here we report the improvement of SL photo diodes through a new design with highly-strained type-II superlattice (HS-T2SL). The HS-T2SL consists of a highly compressively strained thick InSb layer at InAs/GaSb interfaces. The presence of coherent strain shifts the band edges such that the SL energy gap is reduced. This reduced band gap is advantageous to photodetectors because longer cut-off wavelengths can be obtained with reduced layer thickness in the strained SL. The highly compressive strain in HS-T2SL also leads to an even higher optical absorption coefficient and lower dark current. Applying this new design resistance-area product (R0A) is measured as high as 2.1 Ohm-cm2 at 85K for 14.8-μm-cutoff photo diodes without any dark current suppression barriers. The fabricated 14.5μm-cutoff photo diode shows Johnson-noiselimited peak detectivity of 8.4×1010 cmHz1/2/W at zero bias at 85K.

  3. An Ultra-Violet Tolerant Wild-Type Strain of Melanin-Producing Bacillus thuringiensis

    PubMed Central

    Sansinenea, Estibaliz; Salazar, Francisco; Ramirez, Melanie; Ortiz, Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bacillus thuringiensis is the most successful biological control agent used in agriculture, forestry and mosquito control. However, the insecticidal activity of the B. thuringiensis formulation is not very stable and rapidly loses its biological activity under field conditions, due to the ultraviolet radiation in sunlight. Melanin is known to absorb radiation therefore photo protection of B. thuringiensis based on melanin has been extensively studied. Objectives: The aim of this study was to find a wild type strain of naturally melanin-producing B. thuringiensis to avoid any mutation or manipulation that can affect the Cry protein content. Materials and Methods: Bacillus thuringiensis strains were isolated from soils of different States of Mexico and pigment extraction was followed by lowering the pH to 2 using 1N HCl. Pigment was characterized by some chemical tests based on its solubility, bleaching by H2O2 and flocculation with FeCl3, and using an Infrared (IR) spectrum. Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation experiment was performed to probe the melanin efficacy. Results: ELI52 strain of B. thuringiensis was confirmed to naturally produce melanin. The Cry protein analysis suggested that ELI52 is probably a B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis strain with toxic activity against the Diptera order of insects. Ultra Violet protection efficacy of melanin was probed counting total viable colonies after UV radiation and comparing the results with the non-producing melanin strain L-DOPA (L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) was also detected in the culture. ELI52 strain showed an antagonistic effect over some common bacteria from the environment. Conclusions: ELI52 wild-type strain of B. thuringiensis is a good bio-insecticide that produces melanin with UV-resistance that is probably toxic against the Diptera order of insects and can inhibit the growth of other environmental bacteria. PMID:26421136

  4. Demonstration of Serologically Different Capsular Types Among Strains of Staphylococcus aureus by the Serum-Soft Agar Technique

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Kosaku

    1971-01-01

    Colonies of Staphylococcus aureus exhibiting diffuse-type growth in regular serum-soft agar containing 7.5% sodium chloride were isolated. After isolation, further identification of the encapsulated strains of S. aureus was performed. With this procedure, 19 encapsulated strains were obtained from 103 clinical specimens (18.4%). With these strains, three serologically distinct diffuse types of organisms were observed by the conversion of diffuse to compact type colonial morphology in serum-soft agar containing specific antidiffuse sera. Capsule-inhibiting activity of antisera was adsorbable with homologous encapsulated organisms and not adsorbed with either heterologous encapsulated organisms nor the derived compact variant, suggesting a specific activity for the antispecific capsular antibody. Fourteen strains were similar to the Smith diffuse-type strain, four strains were the same as NS58D, and one was identical to NS41D. These were provisionally designated as capsule types A, B, and C, respectively. Images PMID:16558012

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Sphingopyxis macrogoltabida Type Strain NBRC 15033, Originally Isolated as a Polyethylene Glycol Degrader

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Yuji; Numata, Mitsuru; Tsuchikane, Kieko; Hosoyama, Akira; Yamazoe, Atsushi; Tsuda, Masataka; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Kawai, Fusako

    2015-01-01

    Sphingopyxis macrogoltabida strain 203, the type strain of the species, grew on polyethylene glycol (PEG) and has been deposited to the stock culture at the Biological Resource Center, National Institute of Technology and Evaluation (NITE), under the number NBRC 15033. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of strain NBRC 15033. Unfortunately, genes for PEG degradation were missing. PMID:26659674

  6. Complete genome sequence of Rhodospirillum rubrum type strain (S1T)

    SciTech Connect

    Munk, Christine; Copeland, A; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Barry, Kerrie; Detter, J. Chris; Hammon, Nancy; Israni, Sanjay; Pitluck, Sam; Brettin, Thomas S; Bruce, David; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Gilna, Paul; Schmutz, Jeremy; Larimer, Frank W; Land, Miriam L; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Mavromatis, K; Richardson, P M; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Zhang, Yaoping; Roberts, Gary P.; Reslewic, Susan; Schwartz, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Rhodospirillum rubrum (Esmarch 1887) Molisch 1907 is the type species of the genus Rho- dospirillum, which is the type genus of the family Rhodospirillaceae in the class Alphaproteo- bacteria. The species is of special interest because it is an anoxygenic phototroph that pro- duces extracellular elemental sulfur (instead of oxygen) while harvesting light. It contains one of the most simple photosynthetic systems currently known, lacking light harvesting complex 2. Strain S1T can grow on carbon monoxide as sole energy source. With currently over 1,750 PubMed entries, R. rubrum is one of the most intensively studied microbial species, in partic- ular for physiological and genetic studies. Next to R. centenum strain SW, the genome se- quence of strain S1T is only the second genome of a member of the genus Rhodospirillum to be published, but the first type strain genome from the genus. The 4,352,825 bp long chro- mosome and 53,732 bp plasmid with a total of 3,850 protein-coding and 83 RNA genes were sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Program DOEM 2002.

  7. Epidemiology of Candida infection. II. Application of biochemical methods for typing of Candida albicans strains.

    PubMed

    Budak, A

    1990-01-01

    Biochemical profiles of 350 C. albicans isolates from five towns in Poland and from Freiburg in Germany were determined on the basis of nine biochemical tests of Odds and Abbott method. API 20 C AUX system and additionally a resistogram. The analysis of the strains according to Odds' and Abbotts's system showed that investigated strains can be typed into 9 profile codes of common biochemical patterns. There were some differences among the profiles according to their geographical origin and anatomical sources of the isolation. On the basis of the ability C. albicans strains to assimilate of carbon sources, 350 isolates were categorised into 13 separate auxotrophic profiles with the major one: 2,576,174 accounting for 81% of the total. The majority of the investigated isolates were susceptible to antifungal agents (83%). A disproportionate distribution of auxotrophic profiles limited the use of resistogram method and API 20 C AUX as systems for typing C. albicans strains. On the other hand, the method of Odds and Abbott provides valuable criteria for typing of C. albicans. PMID:2130802

  8. Foliar Chlorosis in Symbiotic Host and Nonhost Plants Induced by Rhizobium tropici Type B Strains

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Kevin P.; Handelsman, Jo

    1993-01-01

    Rhizobium tropici CIAT899 induced chlorosis in the leaves of its symbiotic hosts, common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), siratro (Macroptilium atropurpureum Urb.), and Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit. Chlorosis induction by strains CIAT899 and CT9005, an exopolysaccharide-deficient mutant of CIAT899, required carbon substrate. When the bacteria were added at planting in a solution of mannitol (50 g/liter), as few as 103 cells of CIAT899 were sufficient to induce chlorosis in bean plants. All carbon sources tested, including organic acids and mono- and disaccharides, supported chlorosis induction. The addition of a carbon source did not affect the growth rate or the population density of CT9005 in the bean plant rhizosphere. Cell-free filtrates of cultures of CT9005 did not induce detectable chlorosis. All type B strains of R. tropici tested also induced chlorosis in common bean. Type A strains of R. tropici and all other species of bacteria tested did not induce chlorosis. Several lines of evidence indicated that nodulation was not required for chlorosis induction. Strain RSP900, a pSym-cured derivative of CIAT899, induced chlorosis in wild-type P. vulgaris. In addition, NOD125, a nodulation-defective line of common bean, developed chlorosis when inoculated with CIAT899, but did not develop nodules. CIAT899 consistently induced severe chlorosis in the leaves of the nonhost legumes alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and Berseem clover (Trifolium alexandrinum L.), and induced chlorosis in 29 to 58% of the plants tested of sunflower, cucumber, and tomato seedlings, but it did not induce chlorosis in the leaves of corn or wheat. Chlorosis induction in nonhost plants also required carbon substrate. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that R. tropici type B strains produce a chlorosis-inducing factor that affects a wide range of plant species. PMID:16348994

  9. CC8 MRSA Strains Harboring SCCmec Type IVc are Predominant in Colombian Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, J. Natalia; Ocampo, Ana M.; Vanegas, Johanna M.; Rodriguez, Erika A.; Mediavilla, José R.; Chen, Liang; Muskus, Carlos E.; A. Vélez, Lázaro; Rojas, Carlos; Restrepo, Andrea V.; Ospina, Sigifredo; Garcés, Carlos; Franco, Liliana; Bifani, Pablo; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Correa, Margarita M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent reports highlight the incursion of community-associated MRSA within healthcare settings. However, knowledge of this phenomenon remains limited in Latin America. The aim of this study was to evaluate the molecular epidemiology of MRSA in three tertiary-care hospitals in Medellín, Colombia. Methods An observational cross-sectional study was conducted from 2008–2010. MRSA infections were classified as either community-associated (CA-MRSA) or healthcare-associated (HA-MRSA), with HA-MRSA further classified as hospital-onset (HAHO-MRSA) or community-onset (HACO-MRSA) according to standard epidemiological definitions established by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Genotypic analysis included SCCmec typing, spa typing, PFGE and MLST. Results Out of 538 total MRSA isolates, 68 (12.6%) were defined as CA-MRSA, 243 (45.2%) as HACO-MRSA and 227 (42.2%) as HAHO-MRSA. The majority harbored SCCmec type IVc (306, 58.7%), followed by SCCmec type I (174, 33.4%). The prevalence of type IVc among CA-, HACO- and HAHO-MRSA isolates was 92.4%, 65.1% and 43.6%, respectively. From 2008 to 2010, the prevalence of type IVc-bearing strains increased significantly, from 50.0% to 68.2% (p = 0.004). Strains harboring SCCmec IVc were mainly associated with spa types t1610, t008 and t024 (MLST clonal complex 8), while PFGE confirmed that the t008 and t1610 strains were closely related to the USA300-0114 CA-MRSA clone. Notably, strains belonging to these three spa types exhibited high levels of tetracycline resistance (45.9%). Conclusion CC8 MRSA strains harboring SCCmec type IVc are becoming predominant in Medellín hospitals, displacing previously reported CC5 HA-MRSA clones. Based on shared characteristics including SCCmec IVc, absence of the ACME element and tetracycline resistance, the USA300-related isolates in this study are most likely related to USA300-LV, the recently-described ‘Latin American variant’ of USA300. PMID:22745670

  10. Finite Strain in the Forearc Mantle: Testing the B-type Fabric Anisotropy Hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneller, E. A.; van Keken, P.; Karato, S.; Park, J.

    2005-12-01

    Seismic observations from many subduction zones show that the seismically fast direction is perpendicular to the direction of convergence. This is opposite of what is expected from models that assume flow is parallel to plate motion and the seismically fast axis of olivine [100] aligns sub-parallel to the shear direction (A-type fabric). Recent deformation experiments on olivine aggregates show that under low-temperature and high-stress conditions, the fast axis of olivine aligns sub-perpendicular to the shear direction (B-type fabric)(Jung and Karato, 2001; Katayama et al., 2004). B-type fabric has potential to explain convergence-perpendicular anisotropy in subduction zones with flow parallel to plate motion. Kneller et al. (2005) used combined data from deformation experiments on olivine aggregates and dynamical models of subduction zones to predict the distribution of B-type fabric in the mantle wedge. This study predicted that the forearc mantle has suitable thermal and stress conditions for B-type fabric and a rapid transition toward the backarc to conditions more suitable for other olivine fabrics. A vertical projection of the volcanic arc into the mantle wedge is predicted to mark the fabric transition between B-type and A-, E-, or C-type fabrics depending on water content. An important aspect not thoroughly investigated by our previous research is finite strain accumulation across the predicted fabric transition. In this study we present finite strain calculation for non-Newtonian subduction zone models with composite water-dependent rheology. This composite rheology includes experimentally based Peierls, dislocation, and diffusion creep. We predict greater than 100 % strain accumulation across 75 km for material traveling into the forearc mantle. This strain accumulation may be sufficient to produce a well developed B-type fabric. Furthermore, material enters the forearc mantle from a low-strain-rate thermal boundary layer at the base of the overriding

  11. Selective enrichment media bias the types of Salmonella enterica strains isolated from mixed strain cultures and complex enrichment broths.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    For foodborne outbreak investigations it can be difficult to isolate the relevant strain from food and/or environmental sources. If the sample is contaminated by more than one strain of the pathogen the relevant strain might be missed. In this study mixed cultures of Salmonella enterica were grown in one set of standard enrichment media to see if culture bias patterns emerged. Nineteen strains representing four serogroups and ten serotypes were compared in four-strain mixtures in Salmonella-only and in cattle fecal culture enrichment backgrounds using Salmonella enrichment media. One or more strain(s) emerged as dominant in each mixture. No serotype was most fit, but strains of serogroups C2 and E were more likely to dominate enrichment culture mixtures than strains of serogroups B or C1. Different versions of Rappaport-Vassiliadis (RV) medium gave different patterns of strain dominance in both Salmonella-only and fecal enrichment culture backgrounds. The fittest strains belonged to serogroups C1, C2, and E, and included strains of S. Infantis, S. Thompson S. Newport, S. 6,8:d:-, and S. Give. Strains of serogroup B, which included serotypes often seen in outbreaks such as S. Typhimurium, S. Saintpaul, and S. Schwarzengrund were less likely to emerge as dominant strains in the mixtures when using standard RV as part of the enrichment. Using a more nutrient-rich version of RV as part of the protocol led to a different pattern of strains emerging, however some were still present in very low numbers in the resulting population. These results indicate that outbreak investigations of food and/or other environmental samples should include multiple enrichment protocols to ensure isolation of target strains of Salmonella.

  12. Complete genome sequence of Kosakonia sacchari type strain SP1T

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mingyue; Zhu, Bo; Lin, Li; Yang, Litao; Li, Yangrui; An, Qianli

    2014-01-01

    Kosakonia sacchari sp. nov. is a new species within the new genus Kosakonia, which was included in the genus Enterobacter. K sacchari is a nitrogen-fixing bacterium named for its association with sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.). K sacchari bacteria are Gram-negative, aerobic, non-spore-forming, motile rods. Strain SP1T (=CGMCC1.12102T=LMG 26783T) is the type strain of the K sacchari sp. nov and is able to colonize and fix N2 in association with sugarcane plants, thus promoting plant growth. Here we summarize the features of strain SP1T and describe its complete genome sequence. The genome contains a single chromosome and no plasmids, 4,902,024 nucleotides with 53.7% GC content, 4,460 protein-coding genes and 105 RNA genes including 22 rRNA genes, 82 tRNA genes, and 1 ncRNA gene. PMID:25197499

  13. Complete genome sequence of Tolumonas auensis type strain (TA 4T)

    SciTech Connect

    Chertkov, Olga; Copeland, A; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Berry, Alison M; Detter, J. Chris; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Hammon, Nancy; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, Sam; Richardson, P M; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Schmutz, Jeremy; Brettin, Thomas S; Larimer, Frank W; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Spring, Stefan; Rohde, Manfred; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ivanova, N; Goker, Markus; Beller, Harry R.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    Tolumonas auensis Fischer-Romero et al. 1996 is currently the only validly named species of the genus Tolumonas in the family Aeromonadaceae. The strain is of interest because of its ability to produce toluene from phenylalanine and other phenyl precursors, as well as phenol from tyrosine. This is of interest because toluene is normally considered to be a tracer of anthropogenic pollution in lakes, but T. auensis represents a biogenic source of toluene. Oth- er than Aeromonas hydrophila subsp. hydrophila, T. auensis strain TA 4T is the only other member in the family Aeromonadaceae with a completely sequenced type-strain genome. The 3,471,292 bp chromosome with a total of 3,288 protein-coding and 116 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Program JBEI 2008.

  14. Complete genome sequence of Tolumonas auensis type strain (TA 4T)

    SciTech Connect

    Chertkov, Olga; Copeland, Alex; Lucas1, Susa; Lapidus, Alla; Berry, KerrieW.; Detter, JohnC.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Hammon, Nancy; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, Sam; Richardson, Paul; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Saunders, Elizabeth; Schmutz, Jeremy; Brettin, Thomas; Larimer, Frank; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Spring, Stefan; Rohde, Manfred; Kyrpides, NikosC.; Ivanova, Natalia; Göker, Markus; Beller, HarryR.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2011-10-04

    Tolumonas auensis (Fischer-Romero et al. 1996) is currently the only validly named species of the genus Tolumonas in the family Aeromonadaceae. The strain is of interest because of its ability to produce toluene from phenylalanine and other phenyl precursors, as well as phenol from tyrosine. This is of interest because toluene is normally considered to be a tracer of anthropogenic pollution in lakes, but T. auensis represents a biogenic source of toluene. Other than Aeromonas hydrophila subsp. hydrophila, T. auensis strain TA 4T is the only other member in the family Aeromonadaceae with a completely sequenced type-strain genome. The 3,471,292-bp chromosome with a total of 3,288 protein-coding and 116 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Program JBEI 2008.

  15. Organophosphonate Utilization by the Wild-Type Strain of Penicillium notatum

    PubMed Central

    Bujacz, B.; Wieczorek, P.; Krzysko-Lupicka, T.; Golab, Z.; Lejczak, B.; Kavfarski, P.

    1995-01-01

    We studied the biodegradation of compounds containing phosphorus-to-carbon bonds by using a wild-type strain of Penicillium notatum. The substrate specificity of this strain was studied, and we found that it is able to utilize structurally diverse organophosphonates as sole sources of phosphorus. This ability seems to be inducible, as indicated by the presence of a lag phase during growth. A popular herbicide, glyphosate, inhibited fungal growth, but it was also degraded by the fungus if it was applied in sublethal doses. This indicates that P. notatum may play an important role in biodegradation of organophosphonates. The strain which we used did not metabolize any of the phosphonates which we tested when they were used as sole carbon or nitrogen sources. PMID:16535094

  16. Phylogeny and Strain Typing of Escherichia coli, Inferred from Variation at Mononucleotide Repeat Loci

    PubMed Central

    Diamant, Eran; Palti, Yniv; Gur-Arie, Riva; Cohen, Helit; Hallerman, Eric M.; Kashi, Yechezkel

    2004-01-01

    Multilocus sequencing of housekeeping genes has been used previously for bacterial strain typing and for inferring evolutionary relationships among strains of Escherichia coli. In this study, we used shorter intergenic sequences that contained simple sequence repeats (SSRs) of repeating mononucleotide motifs (mononucleotide repeats [MNRs]) to infer the phylogeny of pathogenic and commensal E. coli strains. Seven noncoding loci (four MNRs and three non-SSRs) were sequenced in 27 strains, including enterohemorrhagic (six isolates of O157:H7), enteropathogenic, enterotoxigenic, B, and K-12 strains. The four MNRs were also sequenced in 20 representative strains of the E. coli reference (ECOR) collection. Sequence polymorphism was significantly higher at the MNR loci, including the flanking sequences, indicating a higher mutation rate in the sequences flanking the MNR tracts. The four MNR loci were amplifiable by PCR in the standard ECOR A, B1, and D groups, but only one (yaiN) in the B2 group was amplified, which is consistent with previous studies that suggested that B2 is the most ancient group. High sequence compatibility was found between the four MNR loci, indicating that they are in the same clonal frame. The phylogenetic trees that were constructed from the sequence data were in good agreement with those of previous studies that used multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. The results demonstrate that MNR loci are useful for inferring phylogenetic relationships and provide much higher sequence variation than housekeeping genes. Therefore, the use of MNR loci for multilocus sequence typing should prove efficient for clinical diagnostics, epidemiology, and evolutionary study of bacteria. PMID:15066845

  17. Exciton binding energies and the valence-band offset in mixed type-I--type-II strained-layer superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Peyla, P.; Merle d'Aubigne, Y.; Wasiela, A.; Romestain, R.; Mariette, H. ); Sturge, M.D. ); Magnea, N.; Tuffigo, H. )

    1992-07-15

    Strained CdTe-Cd{sub 1{minus}{ital x}}Zn{sub {ital x}}Te superlattices are of mixed type: electrons and heavy holes are confined to the CdTe layers (type I) while light holes are confined to the Cd{sub 1{minus}{ital x}}Zn{sub {ital x}}Te layers (type II). In this paper we calculate the exciton binding energy (EBE) as a function of superlattice period for both type-I (spatially direct) and type-II (spatially indirect) excitons. For the heavy-hole (type-I) exciton the binding energy is larger than the bulk value, and varies only slowly with the period down to small periods, where the exciton acquires a three-dimensional character and our calculation breaks down. For the light-hole (type-II) exciton the binding energy at large period is much smaller, due to the spatial separation of electron and hole. As the period decreases, the binding energy increases steadily to reach its bulk value for vanishingly small period. Given the EBE's, we can fit the already published data on the exciton transition energies with a single adjustable parameter, the average valence-band offset'' (averaged over the heavy and light holes). This is the algebraic sum of the chemical-offset and the hydrostatic-strain contribution, and is found to be (2{plus minus}4)% of the difference in band gap between the barrier and well. This value lies in the range predicted theoretically.

  18. Detection and Strain Typing of Ancient Mycobacterium leprae from a Medieval Leprosy Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, G. Michael; Tucker, Katie; Butler, Rachel; Pike, Alistair W. G.; Lewis, Jamie; Roffey, Simon; Marter, Philip; Lee, Oona Y-C; Wu, Houdini H. T.; Minnikin, David E.; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Singh, Pushpendra; Cole, Stewart T.; Stewart, Graham R.

    2013-01-01

    Nine burials excavated from the Magdalen Hill Archaeological Research Project (MHARP) in Winchester, UK, showing skeletal signs of lepromatous leprosy (LL) have been studied using a multidisciplinary approach including osteological, geochemical and biomolecular techniques. DNA from Mycobacterium leprae was amplified from all nine skeletons but not from control skeletons devoid of indicative pathology. In several specimens we corroborated the identification of M. leprae with detection of mycolic acids specific to the cell wall of M. leprae and persistent in the skeletal samples. In five cases, the preservation of the material allowed detailed genotyping using single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and multiple locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). Three of the five cases proved to be infected with SNP type 3I-1, ancestral to contemporary M. leprae isolates found in southern states of America and likely carried by European migrants. From the remaining two burials we identified, for the first time in the British Isles, the occurrence of SNP type 2F. Stable isotope analysis conducted on tooth enamel taken from two of the type 3I-1 and one of the type 2F remains revealed that all three individuals had probably spent their formative years in the Winchester area. Previously, type 2F has been implicated as the precursor strain that migrated from the Middle East to India and South-East Asia, subsequently evolving to type 1 strains. Thus we show that type 2F had also spread westwards to Britain by the early medieval period. PMID:23638071

  19. Molecular analysis of Porcine Circovirus Type 2 strains from Uruguay: evidence for natural occurring recombination.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Natalia; Mirazo, Santiago; Castro, Gustavo; Arbiza, Juan

    2013-10-01

    Porcine Circovirus Type 2 (PCV2) is a worldwide distributed virus and is considered an important emerging pathogen related to several distinct disease syndromes in pigs. Genomic structure consists of three major open reading frames (ORFs). ORF1 (rep gene) encodes replication-related proteins, ORF2 (cap gene) encodes the capsid protein and ORF3 encodes a protein putatively involved in virus-induced apoptosis. Based on cap gene sequences, PCV2 strains are classified into two main genotypes, PCV2a with five clusters (2A-2E) and PCV2b with three clusters (1A-1C). According to previous theoretical studies, PCV2 strains can eventually undergo intra and inter-genotype recombination, mainly within the rep gene. Ever since, several evidences of recombination in the field have been reported and confirmed this hypothesis. In South America, data regarding molecular characterization of PCV2 strains is still scant. Genotyping studies in the region have concluded that PCV2b is the predominant circulating genotype in the region and till now, no recombinant strains have ever been reported. In this work we thoroughly characterized at the molecular level Uruguayan PCV2 strains by extensive sequence data analysis. Moreover, recombination software tools were applied to explore and characterize eventual occurrence of natural recombination events. Two recombinant PCV2 strains were detected in this study, as a consequence of an inter-genotype recombination event between PCV2b-1A and PCV2a-2D, as the major and minor parent, respectively. According to recombination software analysis, in both cases the event occurred within the ORF1. Herein, extensive viral sequence dataset is provided, including the characterization of the first PCV2 recombinant strains ever reported in South America. Additionally, our results suggested a multi-centered source of PCV2 infection in Uruguay, which probably involved Brazilian and European origins.

  20. Monoclonal antibodies to the h1 agglutinogen from Staphylococcus aureus 17A. Serological testing with type strains.

    PubMed

    Haaheim, L R; Lund, H

    1984-12-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies to the h1 agglutinogen were produced by conventional means, and slide agglutination of S. aureus type strains was performed with protein A affinity purified IgG1 antibodies. In accordance with Oeding's serotype system the type strains 17A and 670 were strongly and consistently agglutinated. In addition, however, several of the remaining twelve type strains investigated showed varying reaction patterns. Our results indicate that the h1 agglutinogen may be more widely distributed among S. aureus strains than previously assumed. PMID:6532111

  1. Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: The one thousand microbial genomes (KMG-I) project.

    PubMed

    Kyrpides, Nikos C; Woyke, Tanja; Eisen, Jonathan A; Garrity, George; Lilburn, Timothy G; Beck, Brian J; Whitman, William B; Hugenholtz, Phil; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2014-06-15

    The Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea (GEBA) project was launched by the JGI in 2007 as a pilot project with the objective of sequencing 250 bacterial and archaeal genomes. The two major goals of that project were (a) to test the hypothesis that there are many benefits to the use the phylogenetic diversity of organisms in the tree of life as a primary criterion for generating their genome sequence and (b) to develop the necessary framework, technology and organization for large-scale sequencing of microbial isolate genomes. While the GEBA pilot project has not yet been entirely completed, both of the original goals have already been successfully accomplished, leading the way for the next phase of the project. Here we propose taking the GEBA project to the next level, by generating high quality draft genomes for 1,000 bacterial and archaeal strains. This represents a combined 16-fold increase in both scale and speed as compared to the GEBA pilot project (250 isolate genomes in 4+ years). We will follow a similar approach for organism selection and sequencing prioritization as was done for the GEBA pilot project (i.e. phylogenetic novelty, availability and growth of cultures of type strains and DNA extraction capability), focusing on type strains as this ensures reproducibility of our results and provides the strongest linkage between genome sequences and other knowledge about each strain. In turn, this project will constitute a pilot phase of a larger effort that will target the genome sequences of all available type strains of the Bacteria and Archaea.

  2. Filamentous sulfur bacteria of activated sludge: characterization of Thiothrix, Beggiatoa, and Eikelboom type 021N strains.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, T M; Unz, R F

    1985-01-01

    Seventeen strains of filamentous sulfur bacteria were isolated in axenic culture from activated sludge mixed liquor samples and sulfide-gradient enrichment cultures. Isolation procedures involved plating a concentrated inoculum of washed filaments onto media containing sulfide or thiosulfate. The isolates were identified as Thiothrix spp., Beggiatoa spp., and an organism of uncertain taxonomic status, designated type 021N. All bacteria were gram negative, reduced nitrate, and formed long, multicellular trichomes with internal reserves of sulfur, volutin, and sudanophilic material. Thiothrix spp. formed rosettes and gonidia, and four of six strains were ensheathed. Type 021N organisms utilized glucose, lacked a sheath, and differed from Thiothrix spp. in several aspects of cellular and cultural morphology. Beggiatoa spp. lacked catalase and oxidase, and filaments were motile. Biochemical and physiological characterization of the isolates revealed important distinguishing features between the three groups of bacteria. Strain differences were most evident among the Thiothrix cultures. A comparison of the filamentous sulfur bacteria with freshwater strains of Leucothrix was made also. Images PMID:4004221

  3. Multilocus sequence typing and virulence analysis of Haemophilus parasuis strains isolated in five provinces of China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liyan; Ma, Lina; Liu, Yongan; Gao, Pengcheng; Li, Youquan; Li, Xuerui; Liu, Yongsheng

    2016-10-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is the etiological agent of Glässers disease, which causes high morbidity and mortality in swine herds. Although H. parasuis strains can be classified into 15 serovars with the Kielstein-Rapp-Gabrielson serotyping scheme, a large number of isolates cannot be classified and have been designated 'nontypeable' strains. In this study, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of H. parasuis was used to analyze 48 H. parasuis field strains isolated in China and two strains from Australia. Twenty-six new alleles and 29 new sequence types (STs) were detected, enriching the H. parasuis MLST databases. A BURST analysis indicated that H. parasuis lacks stable population structure and is highly heterogeneous, and that there is no association between STs and geographic area. When an UPGMA dendrogram was constructed, two major clades, clade A and clade B, were defined. Animal experiments, in which guinea pigs were challenged intraperitoneally with the bacterial isolates, supported the hypothesis that the H. parasuis STs in clade A are generally avirulent or weakly virulent, whereas the STs in clade B tend to be virulent. PMID:27431332

  4. Novel BOX repeat PCR assay for high-resolution typing of Streptococcus pneumoniae strains.

    PubMed Central

    van Belkum, A; Sluijuter, M; de Groot, R; Verbrugh, H; Hermans, P W

    1996-01-01

    Typing data obtained by specifically targeting a single, high-stringency PCR at the pneumococcal BOX repeat element for 28 strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae completely corroborated the resolutions attained by five genotypic procedures as described by Hermans et al. (P.W.M. Hermans, M. Sluijter, T. Hoogenboezem, H. Heersma, A. van Belkum, and R. de Groot, J. Clin. Microbiol. 33:1606-1612, 1995). All pairs of strains, except one, derived from both the cerebrospinal fluid and blood of the same individual were shown to be identical. Moreover, other, epidemiologically unrelated isolates were demonstrated to be unique. Considering the combined data from the five typing techniques applied previously as the "gold standard," the single BOX PCR test demonstrated excellent resolving powers while maintaining epidemiological linkage. PMID:8727898

  5. Complete genome sequence of Hippea maritima type strain (MH2T)

    SciTech Connect

    Huntemann, Marcel; Lu, Megan; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Jeffries, Cynthia; Detter, J. Chris; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Mavromatis, K

    2011-01-01

    Hippea maritima (Miroshnichenko et al. 1999) is the type species of the genus Hippea, which belongs to the family Desulfurellaceae within the class Deltaproteobacteria. The anaerobic, moderately thermophilic marine sulfur-reducer was first isolated from shallow-water hot vents in Matipur Harbor, Papua New Guinea. H. maritima was of interest for genome se- quencing because of its isolated phylogenetic location, as a distant next neighbor of the ge- nus Desulfurella. Strain MH2T is the first type strain from the order Desulfurellales with a com- pletely sequenced genome. The 1,694,430 bp long linear genome with its 1,723 protein- coding and 57 RNA genes consists of one circular chromosome and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  6. Whole-Genome Sequence of Chlamydia gallinacea Type Strain 08-1274/3

    PubMed Central

    Hölzer, Martin; Laroucau, Karine; Creasy, Heather Huot; Ott, Sandra; Vorimore, Fabien; Bavoil, Patrik M.; Marz, Manja

    2016-01-01

    The recently introduced bacterial species Chlamydia gallinacea is known to occur in domestic poultry and other birds. Its potential as an avian pathogen and zoonotic agent is under investigation. The whole-genome sequence of its type strain, 08-1274/3, consists of a 1,059,583-bp chromosome with 914 protein-coding sequences (CDSs) and a plasmid (p1274) comprising 7,619 bp with 9 CDSs. PMID:27445388

  7. Type A personality as a moderator of the effects of role conflict, role ambiguity and role overload on individual strain.

    PubMed

    Orpen, C

    1982-06-01

    The relations between three types of role stress (role ambiguity, role conflict, role overload) and three measures of individual strain were examined in a sample of 91 middle managers. Separate measures of psychological strain (anxiety, resentment, depression), physical strain (headaches, dizziness, shortage of breath, nausea, fatigue) were developed. In addition, the heart rate, blood pressure, and respiration rate of each subject was assessed. The relations between role conflict and physical strain and between role conflict and psychological strain were significantly positive and higher among Type A personalities than among Type B personalities. The relations between role stress and heart rate, blood pressure, and respiration rate were negligible and were not moderated by personality (Type A or Type B). The results highlight the important role of personality factors in determining how people react to different kinds of stress.

  8. Mouse model of Sanfilippo syndrome type B: relation of phenotypic features to background strain.

    PubMed

    Gografe, Sylvia I; Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana; Willing, Alison E; Haas, Ken; Chamizo, Wilfredo; Sanberg, Paul R

    2003-12-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome type B or mucopolysaccharidosis type III B (MPS IIIB) is a lysosomal storage disorder that is inherited in autosomal recessive manner. It is characterized by systemic heparan sulfate accumulation in lysosomes due to deficiency of the enzyme alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase (Naglu). Devastating clinical abnormalities with severe central nervous system involvement and somatic disease lead to premature death. A mouse model of Sanfilippo syndrome type B was created by targeted disruption of the gene encoding Naglu, providing a powerful tool for understanding pathogenesis and developing novel therapeutic strategies. However, the JAX GEMM Strain B6.129S6-Naglutm1Efn mouse, although showing biochemical similarities to humans with Sanfilippo syndrome, exhibits aging and behavioral differences. We observed idiosyncrasies, such as skeletal dysmorphism, hydrocephalus, ocular abnormalities, organomegaly, growth retardation, and anomalies of the integument, in our breeding colony of Naglu mutant mice and determined that several of them were at least partially related to the background strain C57BL/6. These background strain abnormalities, therefore, potentially mimic or overlap signs of the induced syndrome in our mice. Our observations may prove useful in studies of Naglu mutant mice. The necessity for distinguishing background anomalies from signs of the modeled disease is apparent. PMID:14727810

  9. Detection and typing of integrons in epidemic strains of Acinetobacter baumannii found in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Turton, Jane F; Kaufmann, Mary E; Glover, Judith; Coelho, Juliana M; Warner, Marina; Pike, Rachel; Pitt, Tyrone L

    2005-07-01

    Integrons were sought in Acinetobacter isolates from hospitals in the United Kingdom by integrase gene PCR. Isolates were compared by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and most belonged to a small number of outbreak strains or clones of A. baumannii, which are highly successful in the United Kingdom. Class 1 integrons were found in all of the outbreak isolates but in none of the sporadic isolates. No class 2 integrons were found. Three integrons were identified among the main outbreak strains and clones. While a particular integron was usually associated with a strain or clone, some members carried a different integron. Some integrons were associated with more than one strain. The cassette arrays of two of the integrons were very similar, both containing gene aacC1, which confers resistance to gentamicin, two open reading frames coding for unknown products (orfX, orfX'), and gene aadA1a, which confers resistance to spectinomycin and streptomycin. The larger of these integrons had two copies of the first (orfX) of the gene cassettes coding for unknown products. The third integron, with a cassette array containing gene aacA4, which codes for amikacin, netilmicin, and tobramycin resistance; a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, catB8; and gene aadA1, conferring resistance to spectinomycin and streptomycin, was associated with an OXA-23 carbapenemase-producing clone, which has spread rapidly in hospitals in the United Kingdom during 2003 and 2004. These integron cassette arrays have been found in other outbreak strains of A. baumannii from other countries. We conclude that integrons are useful markers for epidemic strains of A. baumannii and that integron typing provides valuable information for epidemiological studies.

  10. Complete genome sequence of Streptosporangium roseum type strain (NI 9100T)

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, Matt; Sikorski, Johannes; Jando, Marlen; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, Sam; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Chertkov, Olga; Sims, David; Meincke, Linda; Brettin, Thomas S; Han, Cliff; Detter, J. Chris; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Streptosporangium roseum Crauch 1955 is the type strain of the species which is the type species of the genus Streptosporangium. The pinkish coiled Streptomyces-like organism with a spore case was isolated from vegetable garden soil in 1955. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the family Streptosporangiaceae, and the second largest microbial genome sequence ever deciphered. The 10,369,518 bp long genome with its 9421 protein-coding and 80 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  11. Genome sequence of the Antarctic rhodopsins- containing flavobacterium Gillisia limnaea type strain (R- 8282T)

    SciTech Connect

    Riedel, Thomas; Held, Brittany; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Tice, Hope; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Mavromatis, K; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Rohde, Manfred; Tindall, Brian; Detter, J. Chris; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Gillisia limnaea Van Trappen et al. 2004 is the type species of the genus Gillisia, which is a mem- ber of the well characterized family Flavobacteriaceae. The genome of G. limnea R-8282T is the first sequenced genome (permanent draft) from a type strain of the genus Gillisia. Here we de- scribe the features of this organism, together with the permanent-draft genome sequence and an- notation. The 3,966,857 bp long chromosome (two scaffolds) with its 3,569 protein-coding and 51 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  12. Complete genome sequence of Thermosphaera aggregans type strain (M11TLT)

    SciTech Connect

    Spring, Stefan; Rachel, Dr. Reinhard; Lapidus, Alla L.; Davenport, Karen W.; Tice, Hope; Copeland, A; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Heimerl, Dr. Thomas; Weikl, Fabian; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Thermosphaera aggregans Huber et al. 1998 is the type species of the genus Thermosphaera, which comprises at the time of writing only one species. This species represents archaea with a hyperthermophilic, heterotrophic, strictly anaerobic and fermentative phenotype. The type strain M11TLT was isolated from a water-sediment sample of a hot terrestrial spring (Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming). Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 1,316,595 bp long single replicon genome with its 1,410 protein-coding and 47 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  13. Limited In Vivo Production of Type I or Type III Interferon After Infection of Macaques with Vaccine or Wild-Type Strains of Measles Virus

    PubMed Central

    Shivakoti, Rupak; Hauer, Debra; Adams, Robert J.; Lin, Wen-Hsuan W.; Duprex, William Paul; de Swart, Rik L.

    2015-01-01

    The innate immune response to viral infections often includes induction of types I and III interferons (IFNs) and production of antiviral proteins. Measles is a severe virus-induced rash disease, but in vitro studies suggest that in the absence of defective interfering RNAs, neither wild-type (WT) nor vaccine strains of measles virus (MeV) induce IFN. To determine whether IFN is produced in vivo, we studied tissues from macaques infected with vaccine or WT strains of MeV using quantitative reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction to assess levels of IFN and IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) mRNAs and a flow cytometry-based bioassay to assess levels of biologically active IFN. There was little to no induction of type I IFN, type III IFN, Mx, or ISG56 mRNAs in monkeys infected with vaccine or WT MeV and no IFN detection by bioassay. Therefore, the innate responses to infection with vaccine or WT strains of MeV are not dependent on IFN production. PMID:25517681

  14. Microbiological diagnosis and molecular typing of Legionella strains during an outbreak of legionellosis in Southern Germany.

    PubMed

    Essig, Andreas; von Baum, Heike; Gonser, Theodor; Haerter, Georg; Lück, Christian

    2016-02-01

    An explosive outbreak of Legionnaires' disease with 64 reported cases occurred in Ulm/Neu-Ulm in the South of Germany in December 2009/January 2010 caused by Legionella (L.) pneumophila serogroup 1, monoclonal (mAb) subtype Knoxville, sequence type (ST) 62. Here we present the clinical microbiological results from 51 patients who were diagnosed at the University hospital of Ulm, the results of the environmental investigations and of molecular typing of patients and environmental strains. All 50 patients from whom urine specimens were available were positive for L. pneumophila antigen when an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (EIA) was used following concentration of those urine samples that tested initially negative. The sensitivity of the BinaxNow rapid immunographic assay (ICA), after 15 min reading and after 60 min reading were 70% and 84%, respectively. Direct typing confirmed the monoclonal subtype Knoxville in 5 out of 8 concentrated urine samples. Real time PCR testing of respiratory tract specimens for L. pneumophila was positive in 15 out of 25 (60%) patients. Direct nested sequence based typing (nSBT) in some of these samples allowed partial confirmation of ST62. L. pneumophila serogroup 1, monoclonal subtype Knoxville ST62, defined as the epidemic strain was isolated from 8 out of 31 outbreak patients (26%) and from one cooling tower confirming it as the most likely source of the outbreak. While rapid detection of Legionella antigenuria was crucial for the recognition and management of the outbreak, culture and molecular typing of the strains from patients and environmental specimens was the clue for the rapid identification of the source of infection. PMID:26868659

  15. [Multilocus sequence-typing of vibrio cholerae strains with various epidemic importance].

    PubMed

    Mironova, L V; Afanas'ev, M V; Goldapel, E G; Balakhonov, S V

    2015-01-01

    The allele polymorphism of the housekeeping genes (dnaE, lap, recA, pgm, gyrB, cat, chi, gmd) from the Vibrio cholerae strains with different epidemic importance (n = 41) isolated in Siberia and at the Far East during the cholera pandemic VII was tested. All toxigenic strains isolated at the period of epidemic complications irrespective of time and source of isolation were characterized by the identical allele profile and belonged to the same sequence-type. Nine sequence types were detected in non-epidemic isolates. The dendrogram clustering was associated with the serogroup and in some cases with the territory and time of isolation. The structure heterogeneity of the non-toxigenic V. cholerae housekeeping genes was in most cases caused by the synonymous nucleotide replacements (Dn/Ds < 1) indicating the prevalence of the negative V. cholerae at the analyzed genome sites. The revealed distinctions in the structure of housekeeping genes of the V. cholerae with different epidemic importance can be regarded as evidence of various evolutional directions in these strain groups.

  16. Application of whole-genome sequencing for bacterial strain typing in molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Salipante, Stephen J; SenGupta, Dhruba J; Cummings, Lisa A; Land, Tyler A; Hoogestraat, Daniel R; Cookson, Brad T

    2015-04-01

    Nosocomial infections pose a significant threat to patient health; however, the gold standard laboratory method for determining bacterial relatedness (pulsed-field gel electrophoresis [PFGE]) remains essentially unchanged 20 years after its introduction. Here, we explored bacterial whole-genome sequencing (WGS) as an alternative approach for molecular strain typing. We compared WGS to PFGE for investigating presumptive outbreaks involving three important pathogens: vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (n=19), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (n=17), and Acinetobacter baumannii (n=15). WGS was highly reproducible (average≤0.39 differences between technical replicates), which enabled a functional, quantitative definition for determining clonality. Strain relatedness data determined by PFGE and WGS roughly correlated, but the resolution of WGS was superior (P=5.6×10(-8) to 0.016). Several discordant results were noted between the methods. A total of 28.9% of isolates which were indistinguishable by PFGE were nonclonal by WGS. For A. baumannii, a species known to undergo rapid horizontal gene transfer, 16.2% of isolate pairs considered nonidentical by PFGE were clonal by WGS. Sequencing whole bacterial genomes with single-nucleotide resolution demonstrates that PFGE is prone to false-positive and false-negative results and suggests the need for a new gold standard approach for molecular epidemiological strain typing.

  17. [Multilocus sequence-typing of vibrio cholerae strains with various epidemic importance].

    PubMed

    Mironova, L V; Afanas'ev, M V; Goldapel, E G; Balakhonov, S V

    2015-01-01

    The allele polymorphism of the housekeeping genes (dnaE, lap, recA, pgm, gyrB, cat, chi, gmd) from the Vibrio cholerae strains with different epidemic importance (n = 41) isolated in Siberia and at the Far East during the cholera pandemic VII was tested. All toxigenic strains isolated at the period of epidemic complications irrespective of time and source of isolation were characterized by the identical allele profile and belonged to the same sequence-type. Nine sequence types were detected in non-epidemic isolates. The dendrogram clustering was associated with the serogroup and in some cases with the territory and time of isolation. The structure heterogeneity of the non-toxigenic V. cholerae housekeeping genes was in most cases caused by the synonymous nucleotide replacements (Dn/Ds < 1) indicating the prevalence of the negative V. cholerae at the analyzed genome sites. The revealed distinctions in the structure of housekeeping genes of the V. cholerae with different epidemic importance can be regarded as evidence of various evolutional directions in these strain groups. PMID:26182664

  18. Application of whole-genome sequencing for bacterial strain typing in molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Salipante, Stephen J; SenGupta, Dhruba J; Cummings, Lisa A; Land, Tyler A; Hoogestraat, Daniel R; Cookson, Brad T

    2015-04-01

    Nosocomial infections pose a significant threat to patient health; however, the gold standard laboratory method for determining bacterial relatedness (pulsed-field gel electrophoresis [PFGE]) remains essentially unchanged 20 years after its introduction. Here, we explored bacterial whole-genome sequencing (WGS) as an alternative approach for molecular strain typing. We compared WGS to PFGE for investigating presumptive outbreaks involving three important pathogens: vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (n=19), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (n=17), and Acinetobacter baumannii (n=15). WGS was highly reproducible (average≤0.39 differences between technical replicates), which enabled a functional, quantitative definition for determining clonality. Strain relatedness data determined by PFGE and WGS roughly correlated, but the resolution of WGS was superior (P=5.6×10(-8) to 0.016). Several discordant results were noted between the methods. A total of 28.9% of isolates which were indistinguishable by PFGE were nonclonal by WGS. For A. baumannii, a species known to undergo rapid horizontal gene transfer, 16.2% of isolate pairs considered nonidentical by PFGE were clonal by WGS. Sequencing whole bacterial genomes with single-nucleotide resolution demonstrates that PFGE is prone to false-positive and false-negative results and suggests the need for a new gold standard approach for molecular epidemiological strain typing. PMID:25631811

  19. Molecular Analysis of Acinetobacter baumannii Strains Isolated in Lebanon Using Four Different Typing Methods

    PubMed Central

    Rafei, Rayane; Dabboussi, Fouad; Hamze, Monzer; Eveillard, Matthieu; Lemarié, Carole; Gaultier, Marie-Pierre; Mallat, Hassan; Moghnieh, Rima; Husni-Samaha, Rola; Joly-Guillou, Marie-Laure; Kempf, Marie

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzed 42 Acinetobacter baumannii strains collected between 2009–2012 from different hospitals in Beyrouth and North Lebanon to better understand the epidemiology and carbapenem resistance mechanisms in our collection and to compare the robustness of pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) and blaOXA-51 sequence-based typing (SBT). Among 31 carbapenem resistant strains, we have detected three carbapenem resistance genes: 28 carried the blaOXA-23 gene, 1 the blaOXA-24 gene and 2 strains the blaOXA-58 gene. This is the first detection of blaOXA-23 and blaOXA-24 in Lebanon. PFGE identified 11 types and was the most discriminating technique followed by rep-PCR (9 types), blaOXA-51 SBT (8 types) and MLST (7 types). The PFGE type A'/ST2 was the dominant genotype in our collection present in Beyrouth and North Lebanon. The clustering agreement between all techniques was measured by adjust Wallace coefficient. An overall agreement has been demonstrated. High values of adjust Wallace coefficient were found with followed combinations: PFGE to predict MLST types  = 100%, PFGE to predict blaOXA-51 SBT = 100%, blaOXA-51 SBT to predict MLST = 100%, MLST to predict blaOXA-51 SBT = 84.7%, rep-PCR to predict MLST = 81.5%, PFGE to predict rep-PCR = 69% and rep-PCR to predict blaOXA-51 SBT = 67.2%. PFGE and MLST are gold standard methods for outbreaks investigation and population structure studies respectively. Otherwise, these two techniques are technically, time and cost demanding. We recommend the use of blaOXA-51 SBT as first typing method to screen isolates and assign them to their corresponding clonal lineages. Repetitive sequence-based PCR is a rapid tool to access outbreaks but careful interpretation of results must be always performed. PMID:25541711

  20. Effects of Megaplasmid Loss on Growth of Neurotoxigenic Clostridium butyricum Strains and Botulinum Neurotoxin Type E Expression

    PubMed Central

    Scalfaro, Concetta; Iacobino, Angelo; Grande, Laura; Morabito, Stefano; Franciosa, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium butyricum strains that atypically produce the botulinum neurotoxin type E (BoNT/E) possess a megaplasmid of unknown functions in their genome. In this study, we cured two botulinum neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains of their megaplasmids, and compared the obtained megaplasmid-cured strains to their respective wild-type parental strains. Our results showed that the megaplasmids do not confer beta-lactam resistance on the neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains, although they carry several putative beta-lactamase genes. Instead, we found that the megaplasmids are essential for growth of the neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains at the relatively low temperature of 15°C, and are also relevant for growth of strains under limiting pH and salinity conditions, as well as under favorable environmental conditions. Moreover, the presence of the megaplasmids was associated with increased transcript levels of the gene encoding BoNT/E in the C. butyricum type E strains, indicating that the megaplasmids likely contain transcriptional regulators. However, the levels of BoNT/E in the supernatants of the cured and uncured strains were similar after 24 and 48 h culture, suggesting that expression of BoNT/E in the C. butyricum type E strains is not ultimately controlled by the megaplasmids. Together, our results reveal that the C. butyricum type E megaplasmids exert pleiotropic effects on the growth of their microbial hosts under optimal and limiting environmental conditions, and also highlight the possibility of original regulatory mechanisms controlling the expression of BoNT/E. PMID:26941734

  1. Effects of Megaplasmid Loss on Growth of Neurotoxigenic Clostridium butyricum Strains and Botulinum Neurotoxin Type E Expression.

    PubMed

    Scalfaro, Concetta; Iacobino, Angelo; Grande, Laura; Morabito, Stefano; Franciosa, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium butyricum strains that atypically produce the botulinum neurotoxin type E (BoNT/E) possess a megaplasmid of unknown functions in their genome. In this study, we cured two botulinum neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains of their megaplasmids, and compared the obtained megaplasmid-cured strains to their respective wild-type parental strains. Our results showed that the megaplasmids do not confer beta-lactam resistance on the neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains, although they carry several putative beta-lactamase genes. Instead, we found that the megaplasmids are essential for growth of the neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains at the relatively low temperature of 15°C, and are also relevant for growth of strains under limiting pH and salinity conditions, as well as under favorable environmental conditions. Moreover, the presence of the megaplasmids was associated with increased transcript levels of the gene encoding BoNT/E in the C. butyricum type E strains, indicating that the megaplasmids likely contain transcriptional regulators. However, the levels of BoNT/E in the supernatants of the cured and uncured strains were similar after 24 and 48 h culture, suggesting that expression of BoNT/E in the C. butyricum type E strains is not ultimately controlled by the megaplasmids. Together, our results reveal that the C. butyricum type E megaplasmids exert pleiotropic effects on the growth of their microbial hosts under optimal and limiting environmental conditions, and also highlight the possibility of original regulatory mechanisms controlling the expression of BoNT/E. PMID:26941734

  2. Staphylococcus aureus strains associated with food poisoning outbreaks in France: comparison of different molecular typing methods, including MLVA

    PubMed Central

    Roussel, Sophie; Felix, Benjamin; Vingadassalon, Noémie; Grout, Joël; Hennekinne, Jacques-Antoine; Guillier, Laurent; Brisabois, Anne; Auvray, Fréderic

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcal food poisoning outbreaks (SFPOs) are frequently reported in France. However, most of them remain unconfirmed, highlighting a need for a better characterization of isolated strains. Here we analyzed the genetic diversity of 112 Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from 76 distinct SFPOs that occurred in France over the last 30 years. We used a recently developed multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) protocol and compared this method with pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), spa-typing and carriage of genes (se genes) coding for 11 staphylococcal enterotoxins (i.e., SEA, SEB, SEC, SED, SEE, SEG, SEH, SEI, SEJ, SEP, SER). The strains known to have an epidemiological association with one another had identical MLVA types, PFGE profiles, spa-types or se gene carriage. MLVA, PFGE and spa-typing divided 103 epidemiologically unrelated strains into 84, 80, and 50 types respectively demonstrating the high genetic diversity of S. aureus strains involved in SFPOs. Each MLVA type shared by more than one strain corresponded to a single spa-type except for one MLVA type represented by four strains that showed two different-but closely related-spa-types. The 87 enterotoxigenic strains were distributed across 68 distinct MLVA types that correlated all with se gene carriage except for four MLVA types. The most frequent se gene detected was sea, followed by seg and sei and the most frequently associated se genes were sea-seh and sea-sed-sej-ser. The discriminatory ability of MLVA was similar to that of PFGE and higher than that of spa-typing. This MLVA protocol was found to be compatible with high throughput analysis, and was also faster and less labor-intensive than PFGE. MLVA holds promise as a suitable method for investigating SFPOs and tracking the source of contamination in food processing facilities in real time. PMID:26441849

  3. Receptor usage and differential downregulation of CD46 by measles virus wild-type and vaccine strains.

    PubMed

    Schneider-Schaulies, J; Schnorr, J J; Brinckmann, U; Dunster, L M; Baczko, K; Liebert, U G; Schneider-Schaulies, S; ter Meulen, V

    1995-04-25

    Recently, two cell surface molecules, CD46 and moesin, have been found to be functionally associated with measles virus (MV) infectivity of cells. We investigated the receptor usage of MV wild-type, subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, and vaccine strains and their effect on the down-regulation of CD46 after infection. We found that the infection of human cell lines with all 19 MV strains tested was inhibitable with antibodies against CD46. In contrast, not all strains of MV led to the downregulation of CD46 following infection. The group of CD46 non-downregulating strains comprised four lymphotropic wild-type isolates designated AB, DF, DL, and WTF. Since the downregulation of CD46 is caused by interaction with newly synthesized MV hemagglutinin (MV-H), we tested the capability of recombinant MV-H proteins to downregulate CD46. Recombinant MV-H proteins of MV strains Edmonston, Halle, and CM led to the down-regulation of CD46, whereas those of DL and WTF did not. This observed differential downregulation by different MV strains has profound consequences, since lack of CD46 on the cell surface leads to susceptibility of cells to complement lysis. These results suggest that lymphotropic wild-type strains of MV which do not downregulate CD46 may have an advantage for replication in vivo. The relatively weak immune response against attenuated vaccine strains of MV compared with wild-type strains might be related to this phenomenon. PMID:7732009

  4. Dual Control of Quorum Sensing by Two TraM-Type Antiactivators in Agrobacterium tumefaciens Octopine Strain A6

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Hai-Bao; Chen, Guozhou; Chen, Lingling; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2006-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens wild-type strains have a unique quorum-sensing (QS)-dependent Ti plasmid conjugative transfer phenotype in which QS signaling is activated by corresponding conjugative opine inducers. Strain K588, with a nopaline-type chromosomal background harboring an octopine-type Ti plasmid, however, is a spontaneous mutant displaying a constitutive phenotype in QS. In this study, we show that a single amino acid mutation (L54P) in the QS antiactivator TraM encoded by the traM gene of Ti plasmid is responsible for the constitutive phenotype of strain K588. Introduction of the L54P point mutation to the TraM of wild-type strain A6 by allelic replacement, however, failed to generate the expected constitutive phenotype in this octopine-type strain. Intriguingly, the QS-constitutive phenotype appeared when the pTiA6 carrying the mutated traM was placed in the chromosomal background of the nopaline-type strain C58C1RS, suggesting an unknown inhibitory factor(s) encoded by the chromosomal background of strain A6 but not by C58C1RS. Low-stringency Southern blotting analysis showed that strain A6, but not strain C58 and its derivatives, contains a second traM homologue. The homologue, designated traM2, has 64% and 65% identities with traM at the DNA and peptide levels, respectively. Similar to TraM, TraM2 is a potent antiactivator that functions by blocking TraR, the QS activator, from specific binding to the tra gene promoters. Deletion of traM2 in strain A6 harboring the mutated traM confers a constitutive QS phenotype. The results demonstrate that the QS system in strain A6 is subjected to the dual control of TraM and TraM2. PMID:16547030

  5. Strain-balanced Si/SiGe type-II superlattices for near-infrared photodetection

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Dyan; Richardson, Christopher J. K.

    2014-07-21

    Strain balanced silicon-silicon germanium type-II superlattice p-i-n photodetectors grown on a silicon germanium relaxed buffer layer are shown to exhibit an absorption band that extends beyond 0.7 eV (λ = 1.77 μm) with dark current densities of 27 μA cm{sup −2}. Simulations of the absorption edge, which are based on x-ray diffraction characterization, low observed dark current densities, and low dislocation densities, are consistent with fully strained heterostructures. Potential applications for devices made from this heterostructure design could include integrated silicon detectors, or low-noise absorption regions for infrared-extended silicon based avalanche photodiodes.

  6. Complete genome sequence of Stackebrandtia nassauensis type strain (LLR-40K-21T)

    SciTech Connect

    Munk, Chris; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Jando, Marlen; Mayilraj, Shanmugam; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Chen, Feng; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Detter, John C.; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Chain, Patrick; Pitluck, Sam; Göker, Markus; Ovchinikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2009-12-30

    Stackebrandtia nassauensis Labeda and Kroppenstedt (2005) is the type species of the genus Stackebrandtia, and a member of the actinobacterial family Glycomycetaceae. Stackebrandtia currently contains two species, which are differentiated from Glycomyces spp. by cellular fatty acid and menaquinone composition. Strain LLR-40K-21T is Gram-positive, aerobic, and nonmotile, with a branched substrate mycelium and on some media an aerial mycelium. The strain was originally isolated from a soil sample collected from a road side in Nassau, Bahamas. We describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. Lastly, this is the first complete genome sequence of the actinobacterial suborder Glycomycineae. The 6,841,557 bp long single replicon genome with its 6487 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  7. A Hairpin Ribozyme Inhibits Expression of Diverse Strains of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Mang; Ojwang, Joshua; Yamada, Osamu; Hampel, Arnold; Rapapport, Jay; Looney, David; Wong-Staal, Flossie

    1993-07-01

    Ribozymes have enormous potential as antiviral agents. We have previously reported that a hairpin ribozyme expressed under the control of the β-actin promoter that cleaves human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA in the leader sequence can inhibit HIV-1 (pHXB2gpt) expression. For such a ribozyme in a retroviral vector delivery system to be useful in gene therapy for the treatment of HIV-1 infection, it must be able to inhibit the expression of multiple HIV-1 strains. We have now cloned this ribozyme into various regular expression vectors (including retroviral vectors) by using various gene expression control strategies. Here we show by transient transfection that inhibition of expression of diverse strains of HIV-1 can be achieved by this ribozyme expressed in the proper vectors. These data further support the potential of this hairpin ribozyme as a therapeutic agent for HIV-1.

  8. Biological activities of pertussigen from Bordetella pertussis strains of various agglutinogen types.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, M

    1984-01-01

    Pertussigen prepared from Bordetella pertussis strains of various agglutinogen types was found to have similar biological activities in mice, and to give precipitin lines of identity in agar diffusion tests. The doses required to induce histamine hypersensitivity ranged from 0.9 to 9.5 ng, and to induce leukocytosis from 124 to 190 ng. When pertussigen was detoxified by treatment with glutaraldehyde, it protected mice from intracerebral challenge with B. pertussis at doses of from 12.7 to 24.4 micrograms. The results showed that all smooth strains of B. pertussis produced pertussigen that was biologically and serologically similar, and that it was produced independently of fimbrial hemagglutinin. PMID:6088952

  9. Complete genome sequence of Anaerococcus prevotii type strain (PC1T)

    SciTech Connect

    LaButti, Kurt; Pukall, Rudiger; Steenblock, Katja; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Copeland, A; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Brettin, Tom; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Barry, Kerrie; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla L.

    2009-01-01

    Anaerococcus prevotii (Foubert and Douglas 1948) Ezaki et al. 2001 is the type species of the genus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its arguable assignment to the provisionally arranged family Peptostreptococcaceae . A. prevotii is an obligate anaerobic coccus, usually arranged in clumps or tetrads. The strain, whose genome is described here, was originally isolated from human plasma; other strains of the species were also isolated from clinical specimen. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the genus. Next to Finegoldia magna, A. prevotii is only the second species from the family Peptostreptococcaceae for which a complete genome sequence is described. The 1,998,633 bp long genome (chromosome and one plasmid) with its 1852 protein-coding and 61 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  10. Complete genome sequence of Saccharomonospora viridis type strain (P101T)

    SciTech Connect

    Pati, Amrita; Sikorski, Johannes; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, Sam; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Chertkov, Olga; Brettin, Thomas; Han, Cliff; Detter, John C.; Kuske, Cheryl; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Chain, Patrick; D'haeseleer, Patrik; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Rohde, Manfred; Tindall, Brian J.; Goker, Markus; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides1, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2009-05-20

    Saccharomonospora viridis (Schuurmans et al. 1956) Nonomurea and Ohara 1971 is the type species of the genus Saccharomonospora which belongs to the family Pseudonocardiaceae. S. viridis is of interest because it is a Gram-negative organism classified amongst the usually Gram-positive actinomycetes. Members of the species are frequently found in hot compost and hay, and its spores can cause farmer?s lung disease, bagassosis, and humidifier fever. Strains of the species S. viridis have been found to metabolize the xenobiotic pentachlorophenol (PCP). The strain described in this study has been isolated from peat-bog in Ireland. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the family Pseudonocardiaceae, and the 4,308,349 bp long single replicon genome with its 3906 protein-coding and 64 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  11. Complete genome sequence of the gliding, heparinolytic Pedobacter saltans type strain (113T)

    SciTech Connect

    Liolios, Konstantinos; Sikorski, Johannes; Lu, Megan; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, N; Pagani, Ioanna; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Kotsyurbenko, Oleg; Rohde, Manfred; Tindall, Brian; Abt, Birte; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2011-01-01

    Pedobacter saltans Steyn et al. 1998 is one of currently 32 species in the genus Pedobacter within the family Sphingobacteriaceae. The species is of interest for its isolated location in the tree of life. Like other members of the genus P. saltans is heparinolytic. Cells of P. saltans show a peculiar gliding, dancing motility and can be distinguished from other Pedobacter strains by their ability to utilize glycerol and the inability to assimilate D-cellobiose. The ge- nome presented here is only the second completed genome sequence of a type strain from a member of the family Sphingobacteriaceae to be published. The 4,635,236 bp long genome with its 3,854 protein-coding and 67 RNA genes consists of one chromosome, and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  12. Complete genome sequence of Pedobacter heparinus type strain (HIM 762-3T)

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Cliff; Spring, Stefan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Copeland, A; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Chertkov, Olga; Brettin, Tom; Goker, Markus; Rohde, Manfred; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Detter, J. Chris

    2009-01-01

    Pedobacter heparinus (Payza and Korn 1956) Steyn et al. 1998 comb. nov. is the type species of the rapidly growing genus Pedobacter within the family Sphingobacteriaceae of the phy-lum Bacteroidetes . P. heparinus is of interest, because it was the first isolated strain shown to grow with heparin as sole carbon and nitrogen source and because it produces several en-zymes involved in the degradation of mucopolysaccharides. All available data about this species are based on a sole strain that was isolated from dry soil. Here we describe the fea-tures of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first report on a complete genome sequence of a member of the genus Pedobacter, and the 5,167,383 bp long single replicon genome with its 4287 protein-coding and 54 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  13. Complete genome sequence of Pedobacter heparinus type strain (HIM 762-3T)

    PubMed Central

    Han, Cliff; Spring, Stefan; Lapidus, Alla; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Tice, Hope; Copeland, Alex; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia C.; Saunders, Elizabeth; Chertkov, Olga; Brettin, Thomas; Göker, Markus; Rohde, Manfred; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Detter, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Pedobacter heparinus (Payza and Korn 1956) Steyn et al. 1998 comb. nov. is the type species of the rapidly growing genus Pedobacter within the family Sphingobacteriaceae of the phylum ‘Bacteroidetes’. P. heparinus is of interest, because it was the first isolated strain shown to grow with heparin as sole carbon and nitrogen source and because it produces several enzymes involved in the degradation of mucopolysaccharides. All available data about this species are based on a sole strain that was isolated from dry soil. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first report on a complete genome sequence of a member of the genus Pedobacter, and the 5,167,383 bp long single replicon genome with its 4287 protein-coding and 54 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304637

  14. Complete genome sequence of Methanoplanus petrolearius type strain (SEBR 4847T)

    SciTech Connect

    Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Djao, Olivier Duplex; Daligault, Hajnalka E.; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Sikorski, Johannes; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Methanoplanus petrolearius Ollivier et al. 1998 is the type strain of the genus Methanoplanus. The strain was originally isolated from an offshore oil field from the Gulf of Guinea. Members of the genus Methanoplanus are of interest because they play an important role in the carbon cycle and also because of their significant contribution to the global warming by methane emission in the atmosphere. Like other Archaea of the family Methanomicrobiales, the members of the genus Methanoplanus are able to use CO2 as carbon and as energy source. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Methanomicrobiaceae and the sixth complete genome sequence from the order Methanomicrobiales. The 2,843,290 bp long genome with its 2,824 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  15. Complete genome sequence of Thermobaculum terrenum type strain (YNP1T)

    SciTech Connect

    Kiss, Hajnalka; Cleland, David M; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Lu, Megan; Brettin, Thomas S; Detter, J. Chris; Goker, Markus; Tindall, Brian; Beck, Brian; McDermott, Timothy; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Cheng, Jan-Fang

    2010-01-01

    Thermobaculum terrenum (Botero et al. 2004) is the only species within the proposed genus Thermobaculum . Strain YNP1T represents the only cultivated member of an environmental clone group within the phylum Chloroflexi. Nonconformance to Rule 30(3a) of the Bacteriological Code prevents prevents valid publication of either the species and genus name for this phylogentically isolated bacterium that was cultivated from slightly acidic extreme thermal soil in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming (USA). Depending on its final taxonomic allocation, this is probably the third completed genome sequence of a member of the class Thermomicrobia and the seventh type strain genome from the phylum Cloroflexi. The 3,101,581 bp long genome with its 2,872 protein-coding and 58 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  16. Complete genome sequence of Pedobacter heparinus type strain (HIM 762-3T)

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Cliff; Spring, Stefan; Lapidus, Alla; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Copeland, Alex; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jefferies, Cynthia C.; Saunders, Elizabeth; Chertkov, Olga; Brettin, Thomas; Goker, Markus; Rohde, Manfred; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Detter, John C.

    2009-05-20

    Pedobacter heparinus (Payza and Korn 1956) Steyn et al. 1998 comb. nov. is the type species of the rapidly growing genus Pedobacter within the family Sphingobacteriaceae of the phylum 'Bacteroidetes'. P. heparinus is of interest, because it was the first isolated strain shown to grow with heparin as sole carbon and nitrogen source and because it produces several enzymes involved in the degradation of mucopolysaccharides. All available data about this species are based on a sole strain that was isolated from dry soil. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first report on a complete genome sequence of a member of the genus Pedobacter, and the 5,167,383 bp long single replicon genome with its 4287 protein-coding and 54 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  17. Characterization of exochelins of the Mycobacterium bovis type strain and BCG substrains.

    PubMed

    Gobin, J; Wong, D K; Gibson, B W; Horwitz, M A

    1999-04-01

    Pathogenic mycobacteria must acquire iron in the host in order to multiply and cause disease. To do so, they release abundant quantities of siderophores called exochelins, which have the capacity to scavenge iron from host iron-binding proteins and deliver it to the mycobacteria. In this study, we have characterized the exochelins of Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of bovine and occasionally of human tuberculosis, and the highly attenuated descendant of M. bovis, bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), widely used as a vaccine against human tuberculosis. The M. bovis type strain, five substrains of M. bovis BCG (Copenhagen, Glaxo, Japanese, Pasteur, and Tice), and two strains of virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis all produce the same set of exochelins, although the relative amounts of individual exochelins may differ. Among these mycobacteria, the total amount of exochelins produced is greatest in M. tuberculosis, intermediate in M. bovis, and smallest in M. bovis BCG.

  18. Live Attenuated Shigella dysenteriae Type 1 Vaccine Strains Overexpressing Shiga Toxin B Subunit ▿

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tao; Grassel, Christen; Levine, Myron M.; Barry, Eileen M.

    2011-01-01

    Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1 (S. dysenteriae 1) is unique among the Shigella species and serotypes in the expression of Shiga toxin which contributes to more severe disease sequelae and the ability to cause explosive outbreaks and pandemics. S. dysenteriae 1 shares characteristics with other Shigella species, including the capability of causing clinical illness with a very low inoculum (10 to 100 CFU) and resistance to multiple antibiotics, underscoring the need for efficacious vaccines and therapeutics. Following the demonstration of the successful attenuating capacity of deletion mutations in the guaBA operon in S. flexneri 2a vaccine strains in clinical studies, we developed a series of S. dysenteriae 1 vaccine candidates containing the fundamental attenuating mutation in guaBA. All strains are devoid of Shiga toxin activity by specific deletion of the gene encoding the StxA subunit, which encodes enzymatic activity. The StxB subunit was overexpressed in several derivatives by either plasmid-based constructs or chromosomal manipulation to include a strong promoter. All strains are attenuated for growth in vitro in the HeLa cell assay and for plaque formation and were safe in the Serény test and immunogenic in the guinea pigs. Each strain induced robust serum and mucosal anti-S. dysenteriae 1 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) responses and protected against wild-type challenge. Two strains engineered to overexpress StxB induced high titers of Shiga toxin neutralizing antibodies. These candidates demonstrate the potential for a live attenuated vaccine to protect against disease caused by S. dysenteriae 1 and potentially to protect against the toxic effects of other Shiga toxin 1-expressing pathogens. PMID:21969003

  19. Strain of implants depending on occlusion types in mandibular implant-supported fixed prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Byoung-Sup; Heo, Seong-Joo; Koak, Jai-Young; Kim, Seong-Kyun

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE This study investigated the strain of implants using a chewing simulator with strain gauges in mandibular implant-supported fixed prostheses under various dynamic loads. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three implant-supported 5-unit fixed prostheses were fabricated with three different occlusion types (Group I: Canine protected occlusion, Group II: Unilaterally balanced occlusion, Group III: Bilaterally balanced occlusion). Two strain gauges were attached to each implant abutment. The programmed dynamic loads (0 - 300 N) were applied using a chewing simulator (MTS 858 Mini Bionix II systems, MTS systems corp., Minn, USA) and the strains were monitored. The statistical analyses were performed using the paired t-test and the ANOVA. RESULTS The mean strain values (MSV) for the working sides were 151.83 µε, 176.23 µε, and 131.07 µε for Group I, Group II, and Group III, respectively. There was a significant difference between Group II and Group III (P < .05). Also, the MSV for non-working side were 58.29 µε, 72.64 µε, and 98.93 µε for Group I, Group II, and Group III, respectively. One was significantly different from the others with a 95% confidence interval (P < .05). CONCLUSION The MSV for the working side of Groups I and II were significantly different from that for the non-working side (Group I: t = 7.58, Group II: t = 6.25). The MSV for the working side of Group II showed significantly larger than that of Group III (P < .01). Lastly, the MSV for the non-working side of Group III showed significantly larger than those of Group I or Group II (P < .01). PMID:21503186

  20. Complex Population Structure and Virulence Differences among Serotype 2 Streptococcus suis Strains Belonging to Sequence Type 28

    PubMed Central

    Athey, Taryn B. T.; Auger, Jean-Philippe; Teatero, Sarah; Dumesnil, Audrey; Takamatsu, Daisuke; Wasserscheid, Jessica; Dewar, Ken; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Fittipaldi, Nahuel

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is a major swine pathogen and a zoonotic agent. Serotype 2 strains are the most frequently associated with disease. However, not all serotype 2 lineages are considered virulent. Indeed, sequence type (ST) 28 serotype 2 S. suis strains have been described as a homogeneous group of low virulence. However, ST28 strains are often isolated from diseased swine in some countries, and at least four human ST28 cases have been reported. Here, we used whole-genome sequencing and animal infection models to test the hypothesis that the ST28 lineage comprises strains of different genetic backgrounds and different virulence. We used 50 S. suis ST28 strains isolated in Canada, the United States and Japan from diseased pigs, and one ST28 strain from a human case isolated in Thailand. We report a complex population structure among the 51 ST28 strains. Diversity resulted from variable gene content, recombination events and numerous genome-wide polymorphisms not attributable to recombination. Phylogenetic analysis using core genome single-nucleotide polymorphisms revealed four discrete clades with strong geographic structure, and a fifth clade formed by US, Thai and Japanese strains. When tested in experimental animal models, strains from this latter clade were significantly more virulent than a Canadian ST28 reference strain, and a closely related Canadian strain. Our results highlight the limitations of MLST for both phylogenetic analysis and virulence prediction and raise concerns about the possible emergence of ST28 strains in human clinical cases. PMID:26375680

  1. Use of AFLP, plasmid typing and phenotyping in a comparative study to assess genetic diversity of Shigella flexneri strains.

    PubMed

    Herrera, S; Cabrera, R; Ramirez, M M; Usera, M A; Echeita, M A

    2002-12-01

    Shigella flexneri infections are one of the main causes of acute diarrhoea in Cuba. Twenty strains isolated from sporadic cases in nine different Cuban provinces were characterized. Serotyping, antibiotic-resistance typing, plasmid-typing and AFLP-typing were used to determine their suitability for use in epidemiological studies of S. flexneri. The predominant serotypes were serotype 6 (35%) and serotype 2 (35%). Eleven different plasmid profiles were detected (Diversity Index = 0.92). AFLP-typing discriminated 12 different patterns (DI = 0.95), these patterns were not coincident with plasmid-typing patterns. Both techniques combined distinguished 14 patterns among the 20 studied strains (DI = 0.99). There was no consistent relationship between plasmid-typing and AFLP-typing patterns or antibiotic-resistance typing patterns. Ninety-five percent of S. flexneri strains were multiresistant.

  2. Use of AFLP, plasmid typing and phenotyping in a comparative study to assess genetic diversity of Shigella flexneri strains.

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, S.; Cabrera, R.; Ramirez, M. M.; Usera, M. A.; Echeita, M. A.

    2002-01-01

    Shigella flexneri infections are one of the main causes of acute diarrhoea in Cuba. Twenty strains isolated from sporadic cases in nine different Cuban provinces were characterized. Serotyping, antibiotic-resistance typing, plasmid-typing and AFLP-typing were used to determine their suitability for use in epidemiological studies of S. flexneri. The predominant serotypes were serotype 6 (35%) and serotype 2 (35%). Eleven different plasmid profiles were detected (Diversity Index = 0.92). AFLP-typing discriminated 12 different patterns (DI = 0.95), these patterns were not coincident with plasmid-typing patterns. Both techniques combined distinguished 14 patterns among the 20 studied strains (DI = 0.99). There was no consistent relationship between plasmid-typing and AFLP-typing patterns or antibiotic-resistance typing patterns. Ninety-five percent of S. flexneri strains were multiresistant. PMID:12558326

  3. Comparison of the Proteomes of Three Yeast Wild Type Strains: CEN.PK2, FY1679 and W303

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Peter Mose; Blomberg, Anders; Görg, Angelika; Roepstorff, Peter; Norbeck, Joakim; Fey, Stephen John

    2001-01-01

    Yeast deletion strains created during gene function analysis projects very often show drastic phenotypic differences depending on the genetic background used. These results indicate the existence of important molecular differences between the CEN.PK2, FY1679 and W303 wild type strains. To characterise these differences we have compared the protein expression levels between CEN.PK2, FY1679 and W303 strains using twodimensional gel electrophoresis and identified selected proteins by mass spectrometric analysis. We have found that FY1679 and W303 strains are more similar to each other than to the CEN.PK2 strain. This study identifies 62 proteins that are differentially expressed between the strains and provides a valuable source of data for the interpretation of yeast mutant phenotypes observed in CEN.PK2, FY1679 and W303 strains. PMID:18628919

  4. Genome Sequence of a Neisseria meningitidis Capsule Null Locus Strain from the Clonal Complex of Sequence Type 198

    PubMed Central

    Schork, Sabine; Schlüter, Andreas; Blom, Jochen; Schneiker-Bekel, Susanne; Pühler, Alfred; Goesmann, Alexander; Frosch, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a commensal and accidental pathogen exclusively of humans. Although the production of polysaccharide capsules is considered to be essential for meningococcal virulence, there have been reports of constitutively unencapsulated strains causing invasive meningococcal disease (IMD). Here we report the genome sequence of a capsule null locus (cnl) strain of sequence type 198 (ST-198), which is found in half of the reported cases of IMD caused by cnl meningococcal strains. PMID:22933768

  5. The naturally attenuated Kunjin strain of West Nile virus shows enhanced sensitivity to the host type I interferon response.

    PubMed

    Daffis, Stephane; Lazear, Helen M; Liu, Wen Jun; Audsley, Michelle; Engle, Michael; Khromykh, Alexander A; Diamond, Michael S

    2011-06-01

    The host determinants that contribute to attenuation of the naturally occurring nonpathogenic strain of West Nile virus (WNV), the Kunjin strain (WNV(KUN)), remain unknown. Here, we show that compared to a highly pathogenic North American strain, WNV(KUN) exhibited an enhanced sensitivity to the antiviral effects of type I interferon. Our studies establish that the virulence of WNV(KUN) can be restored in cells and mice deficient in specific interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) or the common type I interferon receptor. Thus, WNV(KUN) is attenuated primarily through its enhanced restriction by type I interferon- and IRF-3-dependent mechanisms.

  6. A MAT1–2 wild-type strain from Penicillium chrysogenum: functional mating-type locus characterization, genome sequencing and mating with an industrial penicillin-producing strain

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, Julia; Dahlmann, Tim A; Gümüşer, Hendrik; Kück, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    In heterothallic ascomycetes, mating is controlled by two nonallelic idiomorphs that determine the ‘sex’ of the corresponding strains. We recently discovered mating-type loci and a sexual life cycle in the penicillin-producing fungus, Penicillium chrysogenum. All industrial penicillin production strains worldwide are derived from a MAT1-1 isolate. No MAT1-2 strain has been investigated in detail until now. Here, we provide the first functional analysis of a MAT1-2 locus from a wild-type strain. Similar to MAT1-1, the MAT1-2 locus has functions beyond sexual development. Unlike MAT1-1, the MAT1-2 locus affects germination and surface properties of conidiospores and controls light-dependent asexual sporulation. Mating of the MAT1-2 wild type with a MAT1-1 high penicillin producer generated sexual spores. We determined the genomic sequences of parental and progeny strains using next-generation sequencing and found evidence for genome-wide recombination. SNP calling showed that derived industrial strains had an uneven distribution of point mutations compared with the wild type. We found evidence for meiotic recombination in all chromosomes. Our results point to a strategy combining the use of mating-type genes, genetics, and next-generation sequencing to optimize conventional strain improvement methods. PMID:25521009

  7. The Draft Genome Sequence of the Yersinia entomophaga Entomopathogenic Type Strain MH96T

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, Mark R. H.; Beattie, Amy; Altermann, Eric; Moraga, Roger M.; Harper, Lincoln A.; Calder, Joanne; Laugraud, Aurelie

    2016-01-01

    Here we report the draft genome of Yersinia entomophaga type strain MH96T. The genome shows 93.8% nucleotide sequence identity to that of Yersinia nurmii type strain APN3a-cT, and comprises a single chromosome of approximately 4,275,531 bp. In silico analysis identified that, in addition to the previously documented Y. entomophaga Yen-TC gene cluster, the genome encodes a diverse array of toxins, including two type III secretion systems, and five rhs-associated gene clusters. As well as these multicomponent systems, several orthologs of known insect toxins, such as VIP2 toxin and the binary toxin PirAB, and distant orthologs of some mammalian toxins, including repeats-in-toxin, a cytolethal distending toxin, hemolysin-like genes and an adenylate cyclase were identified. The genome also contains a large number of hypothetical proteins and orthologs of known effector proteins, such as LopT, as well as genes encoding a wide range of proteolytic determinants, including metalloproteases and pathogen fitness determinants, such as genes involved in iron metabolism. The bioinformatic data derived from the current in silico analysis, along with previous information on the pathobiology of Y. entomophaga against its insect hosts, suggests that a number of these virulence systems are required for survival in the hemocoel and incapacitation of the insect host. PMID:27187466

  8. A piezoelectric-based infinite stiffness generation method for strain-type load sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuwen; Shao, Shubao; Chen, Jie; Xu, Minglong

    2015-11-01

    Under certain application conditions like nanoindentation technology and the mechanical property measurement of soft materials, the elastic deformation of strain-type load sensors affects their displacement measurement accuracy. In this work, a piezoelectric-based infinite stiffness generation method for strain-type load sensors that compensates for this elastic deformation is presented. The piezoelectric material-based deformation compensation method is proposed. An Hottinger Baldwin Messtechnik GmbH (HBM) Z30A/50N load sensor acts as the foundation of the method presented in this work. The piezoelectric stack is selected based on its size, maximum deformation value, blocking force and stiffness. Then, a clamping and fixing structure is designed to integrate the HBM sensor with the piezoelectric stack. The clamping and fixing structure, piezoelectric stack and HBM load sensor comprise the sensing part of the enhanced load sensor. The load-deformation curve and the voltage-deformation curve of the enhanced load sensor are then investigated experimentally. Because a hysteresis effect exists in the piezoelectric structure, the relationship between the control signal and the deformation value of the piezoelectric material is nonlinear. The hysteresis characteristic in a quasi-static condition is studied and fitted using a quadratic polynomial, and its coefficients are analyzed to enable control signal prediction. Applied arithmetic based on current theory and the fitted data is developed to predict the control signal. Finally, the experimental effects of the proposed method are presented. It is shown that when a quasi-static load is exerted on this enhanced strain-type load sensor, the deformation is reduced and the equivalent stiffness appears to be almost infinite.

  9. Complete genome sequence of Sebaldella termitidis type strain (NCTC 11300T)

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon-Smith, Miranda; Celia, Laura; Chertkov, Olga; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Detter, J. Chris; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Pati, Amrita; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Goker, Markus; Beck, Brian; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Chen, Feng

    2010-01-01

    Sebaldella termitidis (Sebald 1962) Collins and Shah 1986, is the only species in the genus Sebaldella within the fusobacterial family Leptotrichiaceae . The sole and type strain of the species was first isolated about 50 years ago from intestinal content of Mediterranean ter-mites. The species is of interest for its very isolated phylogenetic position within the phylum Fusobacteria in the tree of life, with no other species sharing more than 90% 16S rRNA se-quence similarity. The 4,486,650 bp long genome with its 4,210 protein-coding and 54 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  10. Complete genome sequence of Sanguibacter keddieii type strain (ST-74T)

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, Natalia; Sikorski, Johannes; Sims, David; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Chen, Feng; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Pati, Amrita; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; D'haeseleer, Patrik; Chain, Patrick; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Goker, Markus; Pukall, Rudiger; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2009-05-20

    Sanguibacter keddieii is the type species of the genus Sanguibacter, the only described genus within the family of Sanguibacteraceae. Phylogenetically, this family is located in the neighbourhood of the genus Oerskovia and the family Cellulomonadaceae within the actinobacterial suborder Micrococcineae. The strain described in this report was isolated from blood of apparently healthy cows. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the family Sanguibacteraceae, and the 4,253,413 bp long single replicon genome with its 3735 protein-coding and 70 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  11. Complete genome sequence of Thermosediminibacter oceani type strain (JW/IW-1228PT)

    SciTech Connect

    Pitluck, Sam; Yasawong, Montri; Munk, Christine; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Sikorski, Johannes; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Thermosediminibacter oceani (Lee et al. 2006) is the type species of the genus Thermosediminibacter in the family Thermoanaerobacteraceae. The anaerobic, barophilic, chemoorganotrophic thermophile is characterized by straight to curved Gram-negative rods. The strain described in this study has been isolated from a core sample of deep sea sediments of the Peruvian high productivity upwelling system. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the genus Thermosediminibacter and the seventh genome sequence in the family Thermoanaerobacteraceae. The 2,280,035 bp long genome with its 2,285 protein-coding and 63 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium chelonae Type Strain CCUG 47445, a Rapidly Growing Species of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Jaén-Luchoro, Daniel; Salvà-Serra, Francisco; Aliaga-Lozano, Francisco; Seguí, Carolina; Busquets, Antonio; Ramírez, Antonio; Ruíz, Mikel; Gomila, Margarita; Lalucat, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium chelonae strains are ubiquitous rapidly growing mycobacteria associated with skin and soft tissue infections, cellulitis, abscesses, osteomyelitis, catheter infections, disseminated diseases, and postsurgical infections after implants with prostheses, transplants, and even hemodialysis procedures. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of M. chelonae type strain CCUG 47445. PMID:27284158

  13. Genome Sequence of Listeria monocytogenes Strain F6540 (Sequence Type 360) Collected from Food Samples in Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Gnaneshan, Saravanamuttu; Hsueh, Ya-Chih; Liang, Lindsay; Teatero, Sarah; Fittipaldi, Nahuel

    2016-01-01

    Comparative genomic analysis between pathogenic and nonpathogenic Listeria monocytogenes strains provides a good model for studying the virulence of this organism. Here, we report the genome sequence of the nonpathogenic L. monocytogenes strain F6540 (sequence type 360) identified specifically in food samples in Ontario, Canada, in 2010. PMID:26769922

  14. Characterization of true stress-true strain curves obtained by hot deformation of different types of steels

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, G.E.S.; Ruzzante, J.E. . Grupo Deformacion en Caliente CNEA, Buenos Aires . Dept. Materials)

    1993-10-01

    The results of hot torsion tests in order to characterize the true stress-true strain curves at a high temperature for six different types of steel (carbon, free-cutting and alloyed), were presented in a previous work, and from those results, an expression was proposed to calculate the peak strain [bar [epsilon

  15. Characterization of Microbulbifer strain CMC-5, a new biochemical variant of Microbulbifer elongatus type strain DSM6810T isolated from decomposing seaweeds.

    PubMed

    Jonnadula, RaviChand; Verma, Pankaj; Shouche, Yogesh S; Ghadi, Sanjeev C

    2009-12-01

    A Gram-negative, rod-shaped, non-spore forming, non-motile and moderate halophilic bacteria designated as strain CMC-5 was isolated from decomposing seaweeds by enrichment culture. The growth of strain CMC-5 was assessed in synthetic seawater-based medium containing polysaccharide. The bacterium degraded and utilized agar, alginate, carrageenan, xylan, carboxymethyl cellulose and chitin. The strain was characterized using a polyphasic approach for taxonomic identification. Cellular fatty acid analysis showed the presence of iso-C(15:0) as major fatty acid and significant amounts of iso-C(17:1x9c) and C(18:1x7c). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequence indicated that strain CMC-5 is phylogenetically related to Microbulbifer genus and 99% similar to type strain Microbulbifer elongatus DSM6810T. However in contrast to Microbulbifer elongatus DSM6810T, strain CMC-5 is non-motile, utilizes glucose, galactose, inositol and xylan, does not utilize fructose and succinate nor does it produce H2S. Further growth of bacterial strain CMC-5 was observed when inoculated in seawater-based medium containing sterile pieces of Gracilaria corticata thalli. The bacterial growth was associated with release of reducing sugar in the broth suggesting its role in carbon recycling of polysaccharides from seaweeds in marine ecosystem.

  16. Unlocking Bloch-type chirality in ultrathin magnets through uniaxial strain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gong; N'Diaye, Alpha T; Kang, Sang Pyo; Kwon, Hee Young; Won, Changyeon; Wu, Yizheng; Qiu, Z Q; Schmid, Andreas K

    2015-01-01

    Chiral magnetic domain walls are of great interest because lifting the energetic degeneracy of left- and right-handed spin textures in magnetic domain walls enables fast current-driven domain wall propagation. Although two types of magnetic domain walls are known to exist in magnetic thin films, Bloch- and Néel-walls, up to now the stabilization of homochirality was restricted to Néel-type domain walls. Since the driving mechanism of thin-film magnetic chirality, the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, is thought to vanish in Bloch-type walls, homochiral Bloch walls have remained elusive. Here we use real-space imaging of the spin texture in iron/nickel bilayers on tungsten to show that chiral domain walls of mixed Bloch-type and Néel-type can indeed be stabilized by adding uniaxial strain in the presence of interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. Our findings introduce Bloch-type chirality as a new spin texture, which may open up new opportunities to design spin-orbitronics devices. PMID:25798953

  17. Biodiversity of Clostridium botulinum Type E Strains Isolated from Fish and Fishery Products

    PubMed Central

    Hyytiä, Eija; Hielm, Sebastian; Björkroth, Johanna; Korkeala, Hannu

    1999-01-01

    The genetic biodiversity of Clostridium botulinum type E strains was studied by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with two macrorestriction enzymes (SmaI-XmaI and XhoI) and by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis with two primers (OPJ 6 and OPJ 13) to characterize 67 Finnish isolates from fresh fish and fishery products, 15 German isolates from farmed fish, and 10 isolates of North American or North Atlantic origin derived mainly from different types of seafood. The effects of fish species, processing, and geographical origin on the epidemiology of the isolates were evaluated. Cluster analysis based on macrorestriction profiles was performed to study the genetic relationships of the isolates. PFGE and RAPD analyses were combined and resulted in the identification of 62 different subtypes among the 92 type E isolates analyzed. High genetic biodiversity among the isolates was observed regardless of their source. Finnish and North American or North Atlantic isolates did not form distinctly discernible clusters, in contrast with the genetically homogeneous group of German isolates. On the other hand, indistinguishable or closely related genetic profiles among epidemiologically unrelated samples were detected. It was concluded that the high genetic variation was probably a result of a lack of strong selection factors that would influence the evolution of type E. The wide genetic biodiversity observed among type E isolates indicates the value of DNA-based typing methods as a tool in contamination studies in the food industry and in investigations of botulism outbreaks. PMID:10224001

  18. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) strain HSZP host shutoff gene: nucleotide sequence and comparison with HSV-1 strains differing in early shutoff of host protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Vojvodová, A; Matis, J; Kúdelová, M; Rajcáni, J

    1997-01-01

    The UL41 gene of the HSZP strain of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) defective with respect to the early shutoff of host protein synthesis was sequenced and compared with the corresponding HSV-1 strain KOS and 17 gene sequences. In comparison with strain 17, nine mutations (base changes) were HSZP specific, five KOS specific and four were common for both strains. Nine mutations caused codon changes. Three of these mapped to the nonconserved regions and the others to the conserved regions of the functional map of UL41 gene. One KOS specific mutation mapped to the region responsible for the binding of the virion host shutoff (vhs) protein to the alpha-transinducing factor (VP16). The possible relationship between mutations and host shutoff function is discussed. The nucleotide sequence data of the UL41 gene of HSZP and KOS have been submitted to the Genbank nucleotide database and have been assigned the accession numbers Z72337 and Z72338.

  19. Complete genome sequence of Hydrogenobacter thermophilus type strain (TK-6T)

    SciTech Connect

    Zeytun, Ahmet; Sikorski, Johannes; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Han, James; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ngatchou, Olivier Duplex; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Han, Cliff; Detter, J. Chris; Ubler, Susanne; Rohde, Manfred; Tindall, Brian; Wirth, Reinhard; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogenobacter thermophilus Kawasumi et al. 1984 is the type species of the genus Hydrogenobacter. H. thermophilus was the first obligate autotrophic organism reported among aerobic hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria. Strain TK-6T is of interest because of the unusually efficient hydrogen-oxidizing ability of this strain, which results in a faster generation time compared to other autotrophs. It is also able to grow anaerobically using nitrate as an electron acceptor when molecular hydrogen is used as the energy source, and able to aerobically fix CO2 via the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle. This is the fifth completed genome sequence in the family Aquificaceae, and the second genome sequence determined from a strain derived from the original isolate. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 1,742,932 bp long genome with its 1,899 protein-coding and 49 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  20. Multilocus Microsatellite Typing as a New Tool for Discrimination of Leishmania infantum MON-1 Strains

    PubMed Central

    Ochsenreither, Sebastian; Kuhls, Katrin; Schaar, Matthias; Presber, Wolfgang; Schönian, Gabriele

    2006-01-01

    The Leishmania donovani complex, which consists of L. donovani, L. infantum-L. chagasi, and L. archibaldi, is responsible for visceral manifestations of leishmaniasis. Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis is the standard method for the characterization and identification of strains of Leishmania. For L. infantum, the predominance of zymodeme MON-1 significantly reduces the discriminative power of this approach. In the present study, we developed 17 independent polymorphic microsatellite markers for the typing of strains of L. infantum, with the main emphasis on zymodeme MON-1. The discriminative powers of 11 markers selected from among these markers were tested by using a panel of 63 isolates of the L. donovani complex. Unique multilocus genotypes were observed for the strains analyzed, with only three exceptions. Model-based and distance-based analyses of the data set showed comparable results. It was possible to discriminate between L. donovani sensu stricto, a non-MON-1 group of L. infantum isolates, and a MON-1 group of L. infantum isolates. Within MON-1, three clusters with geographical correlations became apparent. The frequency of heterozygosity in the alleles analyzed varied extremely between the different groups of isolates. The main clusters described are not consistent with species definitions based on isoenzyme analysis but confirm the results of former PCR-based investigations. PMID:16455904

  1. Complete genome sequence of the orange-red pigmented, radioresistant Deinococcus proteolyticus type strain (MRPT)

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, A; Zeytun, Ahmet; Yasawong, Montri; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Mavromatis, K; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Jeffries, Cynthia; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Sikorski, Johannes; Pukall, Rudiger; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla L.

    2012-01-01

    Deinococcus proteolyticus (ex Kobatake et al. 1973) Brook and Murray 1981 is one of currently 47 species in the genus Deinococcus within the family Deinococcaceae. Strain MRPTT was isolated from faeces of Lama glama; it shares with various other species of the genus the extreme radiation resistance, with D. proteolyticus being resistant up to 1.5 Mrad of gamma radiation. Strain MRPT{sup T} is of further interest for its carotenoid pigment. The genome presented here is only the fifth completed genome sequence of a member of the genus Deinococcus (and the forth type strain) to be published, and will hopefully contribute to a better understanding of how members of this genus adapted to high gamma- or UV ionizing-radiation. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 2,886,836 bp long genome with its four large plasmids of 97 kbp, 132 kbp, 196 kbp and 315 kbp harbours 2,741 protein-coding and 58 RNA genes and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  2. Cell Wall Glycopolymers of Type Strains from Three Species of the Genus Actinoplanes.

    PubMed

    Streshinskaya, G M; Sashkov, A S; Tul'skaya, E M; Senchenkova, S N; Dmitrenok, A S; Piskunkova, N F; Bueva, O V; Evtushenko, L I

    2016-09-01

    The structures of cell wall glycopolymers from the type strains of three Actinoplanes species were investigated using chemical methods, NMR spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. Actinoplanes digitatis VKM Ac-649(T) contains two phosphate-containing glycopolymers: poly(diglycosyl-1-phosphate) →6)-α-D-GlcpNAc-(1-P-6)-α-D-GlcpN-(1→ and teichoic acid →1)-sn-Gro-(3-P-3)-β-[β-D-GlcpNAc-(1→2]-D-Galp-(1→. Two glycopolymers were identified in A. auranticolor VKM Ac-648(T) and A. cyaneus VKM Ac-1095(T): minor polymer - unsubstituted 2,3-poly(glycerol phosphate), widely abundant in actinobacteria (Ac-648(T)), and mannan with trisaccharide repeating unit →2)-α-D-Manp-(1→2)-α-D-Manp-(1→6)-α-D-Manp-(1→ (Ac-1095(T)). In addition, both microorganisms contain a teichuronic acid of unique structure containing a pentasaccharide repeating unit with two residues of glucopyranose and three residues of diaminouronic acids in D-manno- and/or D-gluco-configuration. Each of the strains demonstrates peculiarities in the structure of teichuronic acid with respect to the ratio of diaminouronic acids and availability and location of O-methyl groups in glucopyranose residues. All investigated strains contain a unique set of glycopolymers in their cell walls with structures not described earlier for prokaryotes. PMID:27682172

  3. A staggered approach for the coupling of Cahn-Hilliard type diffusion and finite strain elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Areias, P.; Samaniego, E.; Rabczuk, T.

    2016-02-01

    We develop an algorithm and computational implementation for simulation of problems that combine Cahn-Hilliard type diffusion with finite strain elasticity. We have in mind applications such as the electro-chemo-mechanics of lithium ion (Li-ion) batteries. We concentrate on basic computational aspects. A staggered algorithm is proposed for the coupled multi-field model. For the diffusion problem, the fourth order differential equation is replaced by a system of second order equations to deal with the issue of the regularity required for the approximation spaces. Low order finite elements are used for discretization in space of the involved fields (displacement, concentration, nonlocal concentration). Three (both 2D and 3D) extensively worked numerical examples show the capabilities of our approach for the representation of (i) phase separation, (ii) the effect of concentration in deformation and stress, (iii) the effect of strain in concentration, and (iv) lithiation. We analyze convergence with respect to spatial and time discretization and found that very good results are achievable using both a staggered scheme and approximated strain interpolation.

  4. Recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 strains with targeted mutations relevant for aciclovir susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Brunnemann, Anne-Kathrin; Liermann, Kristin; Deinhardt-Emmer, Stefanie; Maschkowitz, Gregor; Pohlmann, Anja; Sodeik, Beate; Fickenscher, Helmut; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Krumbholz, Andi

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a novel reliable method to assess the significance of individual mutations within the thymidine kinase (TK) gene of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) to nucleoside analogue resistance. Eleven defined single nucleotide polymorphisms that occur in the TK gene of clinical HSV-1 isolates and a fluorescence reporter were introduced into the HSV-1 strain 17+ that had been cloned into a bacterial artificial chromosome. The susceptibility of these different strains to aciclovir, penciclovir, brivudin, and foscarnet was determined with a modified cytopathic effect reduction assay. The strains were also tested for their aciclovir susceptibility by measuring the relative fluorescence intensity as an indicator for HSV-1 replication and by quantifying the virus yield. Our data indicate that the amino acid substitutions R41H, R106H, A118V, L139V, K219T, S276R, L298R, S345P, and V348I represent natural polymorphisms of the TK protein, whereas G61A and P84L mediate broad cross-resistance against aciclovir, penciclovir, brivudin, and susceptibility to foscarnet. This method allows the definition of the resistance genotype of otherwise unclear mutations in the TK gene of HSV-1. Thus, it provides a scientific basis for antiviral testing in clinical isolates of patients suffering from serious diseases and will facilitate testing of new antivirals against HSV-1. PMID:27426251

  5. Genome sequence of the Thermotoga thermarum type strain (LA3(T)) from an African solfataric spring.

    PubMed

    Göker, Markus; Spring, Stefan; Scheuner, Carmen; Anderson, Iain; Zeytun, Ahmet; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Rohde, Manfred; Detter, John C; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla

    2014-06-15

    Thermotoga thermarum Windberger et al. 1989 is a member to the genomically well characterized genus Thermotoga in the phylum 'Thermotogae'. T. thermarum is of interest for its origin from a continental solfataric spring vs. predominantly marine oil reservoirs of other members of the genus. The genome of strain LA3T also provides fresh data for the phylogenomic positioning of the (hyper-)thermophilic bacteria. T. thermarum strain LA3(T) is the fourth sequenced genome of a type strain from the genus Thermotoga, and the sixth in the family Thermotogaceae to be formally described in a publication. Phylogenetic analyses do not reveal significant discrepancies between the current classification of the group, 16S rRNA gene data and whole-genome sequences. Nevertheless, T. thermarum significantly differs from other Thermotoga species regarding its iron-sulfur cluster synthesis, as it contains only a minimal set of the necessary proteins. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 2,039,943 bp long chromosome with its 2,015 protein-coding and 51 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  6. Genome sequence of the Thermotoga thermarum type strain (LA3T) from an African solfataric spring

    PubMed Central

    Göker, Markus; Spring, Stefan; Scheuner, Carmen; Anderson, Iain; Zeytun, Ahmet; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Rohde, Manfred; Detter, John C.; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla

    2014-01-01

    Thermotoga thermarum Windberger et al. 1989 is a member to the genomically well characterized genus Thermotoga in the phylum ‘Thermotogae’. T. thermarum is of interest for its origin from a continental solfataric spring vs. predominantly marine oil reservoirs of other members of the genus. The genome of strain LA3T also provides fresh data for the phylogenomic positioning of the (hyper-)thermophilic bacteria. T. thermarum strain LA3T is the fourth sequenced genome of a type strain from the genus Thermotoga, and the sixth in the family Thermotogaceae to be formally described in a publication. Phylogenetic analyses do not reveal significant discrepancies between the current classification of the group, 16S rRNA gene data and whole-genome sequences. Nevertheless, T. thermarum significantly differs from other Thermotoga species regarding its iron-sulfur cluster synthesis, as it contains only a minimal set of the necessary proteins. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 2,039,943 bp long chromosome with its 2,015 protein-coding and 51 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:25197486

  7. Ribosomal multilocus sequence typing: universal characterization of bacteria from domain to strain

    PubMed Central

    Bliss, Carly M.; Bennett, Julia S.; Bratcher, Holly B.; Brehony, Carina; Colles, Frances M.; Wimalarathna, Helen; Harrison, Odile B.; Sheppard, Samuel K.; Cody, Alison J.; Maiden, Martin C. J.

    2012-01-01

    No single genealogical reconstruction or typing method currently encompasses all levels of bacterial diversity, from domain to strain. We propose ribosomal multilocus sequence typing (rMLST), an approach which indexes variation of the 53 genes encoding the bacterial ribosome protein subunits (rps genes), as a means of integrating microbial genealogy and typing. As with multilocus sequence typing (MLST), rMLST employs curated reference sequences to identify gene variants efficiently and rapidly. The rps loci are ideal targets for a universal characterization scheme as they are: (i) present in all bacteria; (ii) distributed around the chromosome; and (iii) encode proteins which are under stabilizing selection for functional conservation. Collectively, the rps loci exhibit variation that resolves bacteria into groups at all taxonomic and most typing levels, providing significantly more resolution than 16S small subunit rRNA gene phylogenies. A web-accessible expandable database, comprising whole-genome data from more than 1900 bacterial isolates, including 28 draft genomes assembled de novo from the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) sequence read archive, has been assembled. The rps gene variation catalogued in this database permits rapid and computationally non-intensive identification of the phylogenetic position of any bacterial sequence at the domain, phylum, class, order, family, genus, species and strain levels. The groupings generated with rMLST data are consistent with current nomenclature schemes and independent of the clustering algorithm used. This approach is applicable to the other domains of life, potentially providing a rational and universal approach to the classification of life that is based on one of its fundamental features, the translation mechanism. PMID:22282518

  8. Ribosomal multilocus sequence typing: universal characterization of bacteria from domain to strain.

    PubMed

    Jolley, Keith A; Bliss, Carly M; Bennett, Julia S; Bratcher, Holly B; Brehony, Carina; Colles, Frances M; Wimalarathna, Helen; Harrison, Odile B; Sheppard, Samuel K; Cody, Alison J; Maiden, Martin C J

    2012-04-01

    No single genealogical reconstruction or typing method currently encompasses all levels of bacterial diversity, from domain to strain. We propose ribosomal multilocus sequence typing (rMLST), an approach which indexes variation of the 53 genes encoding the bacterial ribosome protein subunits (rps genes), as a means of integrating microbial genealogy and typing. As with multilocus sequence typing (MLST), rMLST employs curated reference sequences to identify gene variants efficiently and rapidly. The rps loci are ideal targets for a universal characterization scheme as they are: (i) present in all bacteria; (ii) distributed around the chromosome; and (iii) encode proteins which are under stabilizing selection for functional conservation. Collectively, the rps loci exhibit variation that resolves bacteria into groups at all taxonomic and most typing levels, providing significantly more resolution than 16S small subunit rRNA gene phylogenies. A web-accessible expandable database, comprising whole-genome data from more than 1900 bacterial isolates, including 28 draft genomes assembled de novo from the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) sequence read archive, has been assembled. The rps gene variation catalogued in this database permits rapid and computationally non-intensive identification of the phylogenetic position of any bacterial sequence at the domain, phylum, class, order, family, genus, species and strain levels. The groupings generated with rMLST data are consistent with current nomenclature schemes and independent of the clustering algorithm used. This approach is applicable to the other domains of life, potentially providing a rational and universal approach to the classification of life that is based on one of its fundamental features, the translation mechanism.

  9. Establishment of latent herpes simplex virus type 1 infection in resistant, sensitive, and immunodeficient mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Ellison, A R; Yang, L; Voytek, C; Margolis, T P

    2000-03-01

    Productive infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 is limited by both innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. The purpose of the current study was to determine whether these mechanisms also play a role in the establishment of latent HSV infection. First we examined the trigeminal ganglia (TG) of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), interferon-gamma knockout (GKO), and beige (a strain deficient in natural killer cell activity) mice following ocular inoculation with HSV. Although infection of SCID mice was invariably lethal, we consistently found latently infected neurons in the TG of these animals at 2-4 days postinoculation. HSV infection of GKO and beige mice, while not lethal, was characterized by a greater number of productively infected TG neurons and/or a delay in the time to peak productive infection compared to C57BL/6 controls. However, as assayed by both in situ hybridization for LAT expression and quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) for viral DNA, we found that HSV established a latent infection in GKO and beige mice as efficiently as in C57BL/6 controls. We subsequently examined the TG of "HSV-sensitive" strains of mice (Swiss-Webster, CBA, and BALB/c) following ocular infection with HSV. At the peak of acute ganglionic infection the number of productively infected TG neurons in each of these mouse strains was about sevenfold greater than in the "HSV-resistant" strain C57BL/6, consistent with previously reported differences in susceptibility to lethal challenge with HSV. However, as assayed by both in situ hybridization for LAT and Q-PCR for viral DNA, we found that HSV established a latent infection in Swiss-Webster, CBA, and BALB/c mice as efficiently as in C57BL/6 controls. We conclude that HSV efficiently establishes latent infection in the TG of mice in the absence of innate and adaptive immune mechanisms that are essential for limiting productive viral infection.

  10. Accumulation of a bioactive benzoisochromanequinone compound kalafungin by a wild type antitumor-medermycin-producing streptomycete strain.

    PubMed

    Lü, Jin; He, Qiang; Huang, Luyao; Cai, Xiaofeng; Guo, Wenwen; He, Jing; Zhang, Lili; Li, Aiying

    2015-01-01

    Medermycin and kalafungin, two antibacterial and antitumor antibiotics isolated from different streptomycetes, share an identical polyketide skeleton core. The present study reported the discovery of kalafungin in a medermycin-producing streptomycete strain for the first time. A mutant strain obtained through UV mutagenesis showed a 3-fold increase in the production of this antibiotic, compared to the wild type strain. Heterologous expression experiments suggested that its production was severely controlled by the gene cluster for medermycin biosynthesis. In all, these findings suggested that kalafungin and medermycin could be accumulated by the same streptomycete and share their biosynthetic pathway to some extent in this strain. PMID:25695632

  11. Accumulation of a Bioactive Benzoisochromanequinone Compound Kalafungin by a Wild Type Antitumor-Medermycin-Producing Streptomycete Strain

    PubMed Central

    Lü, Jin; He, Qiang; Huang, Luyao; Cai, Xiaofeng; Guo, Wenwen; He, Jing; Zhang, Lili; Li, Aiying

    2015-01-01

    Medermycin and kalafungin, two antibacterial and antitumor antibiotics isolated from different streptomycetes, share an identical polyketide skeleton core. The present study reported the discovery of kalafungin in a medermycin-producing streptomycete strain for the first time. A mutant strain obtained through UV mutagenesis showed a 3-fold increase in the production of this antibiotic, compared to the wild type strain. Heterologous expression experiments suggested that its production was severely controlled by the gene cluster for medermycin biosynthesis. In all, these findings suggested that kalafungin and medermycin could be accumulated by the same streptomycete and share their biosynthetic pathway to some extent in this strain. PMID:25695632

  12. Accumulation of a bioactive benzoisochromanequinone compound kalafungin by a wild type antitumor-medermycin-producing streptomycete strain.

    PubMed

    Lü, Jin; He, Qiang; Huang, Luyao; Cai, Xiaofeng; Guo, Wenwen; He, Jing; Zhang, Lili; Li, Aiying

    2015-01-01

    Medermycin and kalafungin, two antibacterial and antitumor antibiotics isolated from different streptomycetes, share an identical polyketide skeleton core. The present study reported the discovery of kalafungin in a medermycin-producing streptomycete strain for the first time. A mutant strain obtained through UV mutagenesis showed a 3-fold increase in the production of this antibiotic, compared to the wild type strain. Heterologous expression experiments suggested that its production was severely controlled by the gene cluster for medermycin biosynthesis. In all, these findings suggested that kalafungin and medermycin could be accumulated by the same streptomycete and share their biosynthetic pathway to some extent in this strain.

  13. Complete genome sequence of Truepera radiovictrix type strain (RQ-24T)

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, N; Rohde, Christine; Munk, Christine; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Mavromatis, K; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Tindall, Brian; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla L.

    2011-01-01

    Truepera radiovictrix Albuquerque et al. 2005 is the type species of the genus Truepera within the phylum Deinococcus/Thermus. T. radiovictrix is of special interest not only because of its isolated phylogenetic location in the order Deinococcales, but also because of its ability to grow under multiple extreme conditions in alkaline, moderately saline, and high temperature habitats. Of particular interest is the fact that, T. radiovictrix is also remarkably resistant to ionizing radiation, a feature it shares with members of the genus Deinococcus. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the family Trueperaceae and the fourth type strain genome sequence from a member of the order Deinococcales. The 3,260,398 bp long genome with its 2,994 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes consists of one circular chromosome and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  14. Complete genome sequence of Desulfarculus baarsii type strain (2st14T)

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Christine; Spring, Stefan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Davenport, Karen W.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Nolan, Matt; Copeland, A; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, N; Pagani, Ioanna; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Rohde, Manfred; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Land, Miriam L

    2010-01-01

    Desulfarculus baarsii (Widdel 1981) Kuever et al. 2006 is the type and only species of the genus Desulfarculus, which represents the family Desulfarculaceae and the order Desulfarculales. This species is a mesophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium with the capability to oxidize acetate and fatty acids of up to 18 carbon atoms completely to CO2. The acetyl-CoA/CODH (Wood-Ljungdahl) pathway is used by this species for the complete oxidation of carbon sources and autotrophic growth on formate. The type strain 2st14T was isolated from a ditch sediment collected near the University of Konstanz, Germany. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the order Desulfarculales. The 3,655,731 bp long single replicon genome with its 3,303 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  15. Complete genome sequence of Segniliparus rotundus type strain (CDC 1076T)

    SciTech Connect

    Sikorski, Johannes; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Misra, Monica; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Jando, Marlen; Schneider, Susan; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chertkov, Olga; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Segniliparus rotundus Butler 2005 is the type species of the genus Segniliparus, which is cur-rently the only genus in the corynebacterial family Segniliparaceae. This family is of large in-terest because of a novel late-emerging genus-specific mycolate pattern. The type strain has been isolated from human sputum and is probably an opportunistic pathogen. Here we de-scribe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and anno-tation. This is the first completed genome sequence of the family Segniliparaceae. The 3,157,527 bp long genome with its 3,081 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  16. Complete genome sequence of Thermosphaera aggregans type strain (M11TLT)

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Stefan; Rachel, Reinhard; Lapidus, Alla; Davenport, Karen; Tice, Hope; Copeland, Alex; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia C.; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Heimerl, Thomas; Weikl, Fabian; Brambilla, Evelyne; Göker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Thermosphaera aggregans Huber et al. 1998 is the type species of the genus Thermosphaera, which comprises at the time of writing only one species. This species represents archaea with a hyperthermophilic, heterotrophic, strictly anaerobic and fermentative phenotype. The type strain M11TLT was isolated from a water-sediment sample of a hot terrestrial spring (Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming). Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 1,316,595 bp long single replicon genome with its 1,410 protein-coding and 47 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304709

  17. Complete genome sequence of Conexibacter woesei type strain (ID131577T)

    SciTech Connect

    Pukall, Rudiger; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, A; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Mavromatis, K; Ivanova, N; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Meincke, Linda; Sims, David; Detter, J. Chris; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2010-01-01

    The genus Conexibacter (Monciardini et al. 2003) represents the type genus of the family Conexibacteraceae (Stackebrandt 2005, emend. Zhi et al. 2009) with Conexibacter woesei as the type species of the genus. C. woesei is a representative of a deep evolutionary line of des-cent within the class Actinobacteria. Strain ID131577T was originally isolated from temperate forest soil in Gerenzano (Italy). Cells are small, short rods that are motile by peritrichous fla-gella. They may form aggregates after a longer period of growth and, then as a typical charac-teristic, an undulate structure is formed by self-aggregation of flagella with entangled bacteri-al cells. Here we describe the features of the organism, together with the complete sequence and annotation. The 6,359,369 bp long genome of C. woesei contains 5,950 protein-coding and 48 RNA genes and is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  18. Complete genome sequence of Thermosphaera aggregans type strain (M11TL).

    PubMed

    Spring, Stefan; Rachel, Reinhard; Lapidus, Alla; Davenport, Karen; Tice, Hope; Copeland, Alex; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia C; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Heimerl, Thomas; Weikl, Fabian; Brambilla, Evelyne; Göker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Thermosphaera aggregans Huber et al. 1998 is the type species of the genus Thermosphaera, which comprises at the time of writing only one species. This species represents archaea with a hyperthermophilic, heterotrophic, strictly anaerobic and fermentative phenotype. The type strain M11TL(T) was isolated from a water-sediment sample of a hot terrestrial spring (Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming). Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 1,316,595 bp long single replicon genome with its 1,410 protein-coding and 47 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304709

  19. Complete genome sequence of Desulfohalobium retbaense type strain (HR100T)

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Stefan; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, Alex; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Land, Miriam; Chen, Feng; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Munk, Christine; Kiss, Hajnalka; Chain, Patrick; Han, Cliff; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Schüler, Esther; Göker, Markus; Rohde, Manfred; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Desulfohalobium retbaense (Ollivier et al. 1991) is the type species of the polyphyletic genus Desulfohalobium, which comprises, at the time of writing, two species and represents the family Desulfohalobiaceae within the Deltaproteobacteria. D. retbaense is a moderately halophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium, which can utilize H2 and a limited range of organic substrates, which are incompletely oxidized to acetate and CO2, for growth. The type strain HR100T was isolated from sediments of the hypersaline Retba Lake in Senegal. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the family Desulfohalobiaceae. The 2,909,567 bp genome (one chromosome and a 45,263 bp plasmid) with its 2,552 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304676

  20. Complete genome sequence of Tsukamurella paurometabola type strain (no. 33T)

    SciTech Connect

    Munk, Christine; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Brettin, Thomas S; Yasawong, Montri; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Sikorski, Johannes; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2011-01-01

    Tsukamurella paurometabola corrig. (Steinhaus 1941) Collins et al. 1988 is the type species of the genus Tsukamurella, which is the type genus to the family Tsukamurellaceae. The spe- cies is not only of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location, but also because it is a human opportunistic pathogen with some strains of the species reported to cause lung in- fection, lethal meningitis, and necrotizing tenosynovitis. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the genus Tsukamurella and the first genome sequence of a member of the family Tsukamurellaceae. The 4,479,724 bp long genome contains a 99,806 bp long plasmid and a total of 4,335 protein-coding and 56 RNA genes, and is a part of the Ge- nomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  1. Complete genome sequence of Sphaerobacter thermophilus type strain (S 6022T)

    SciTech Connect

    Pati, Amrita; LaButti, Kurt; Pukall, Rudiger; Nolan, Matt; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Copeland, A; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pitluck, Sam; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Brettin, Thomas S; Sikorski, Johannes; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla L.

    2010-01-01

    Sphaerobacter thermophilus Demharter et al. 1989 is the sole and type species of the genus Sphaerobacter, which is the type genus of the family Sphaerobacteraceae, the order Sphaerobacterales and the subclass Sphaerobacteridae. Phylogenetically, it belongs to the genomically little studied class of the Thermomicrobia in the bacterial phylum Chloroflexi. Here, the genome of strain S 6022T is described which is an obligate aerobe that was originally isolated from an aerated laboratory-scale fermentor that was pulse fed with municipal sewage sludge. We describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the thermomicrobial subclass Sphaerobacteridae, and the second sequence from the chloroflexal class Thermomicrobia. The 3,993,764 bp genome with its 3,525 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  2. Complete genome sequence of Chitinophaga pinensis type strain (UQM 2034T)

    SciTech Connect

    Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Abt, Birte; Spring, Stefan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Copeland, A; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Chen, Feng; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Detter, J C; Brettin, Thomas S; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lucas, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Chitinophaga pinensis Sangkhobol and Skerman 1981 is the type strain of the species which is the type species of the rapidly growing genus Chitinophaga in the sphingobacterial family Chitinophagaceae . Members of the genus Chitinophaga vary in shape between filaments and spherical bodies without the production of a fruiting body, produce myxospores, and are of special interest for their ability to degrade chitin. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Chitinophagaceae , and the 9,127,347 bp long single replicon genome with its 7,397 protein-coding and 95 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  3. Complete genome sequence of Desulfohalobium retbaense type strain (HR100T)

    SciTech Connect

    Spring, Stefan; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, A; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Land, Miriam L; Chen, Feng; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Munk, Christine; Kiss, Hajnalka; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Han, Cliff; Brettin, Thomas S; Detter, J. Chris; Schuler, Esther; Goker, Markus; Rohde, Manfred; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Desulfohalobium retbaense (Ollivier et al. 1991) is the type species of the polyphyletic genus Desulfohalobium, which comprises, at the time of writing, two species and represents the family Desulfohalobiaceae within the Deltaproteobacteria. D. retbaense is a moderately halophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium, which can utilize H2 and a limited range of organic substrates, which are incompletely oxidized to acetate and CO2, for growth. The type strain HR100T was isolated from sediments of the hypersaline Retba Lake in Senegal. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the family Desulfohalobiaceae. The 2,909,567 bp genome (one chromosome and a 45,263 bp plasmid) with its 2,552 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  4. Complete genome sequence of Thermosphaera aggregans type strain (M11TL).

    PubMed

    Spring, Stefan; Rachel, Reinhard; Lapidus, Alla; Davenport, Karen; Tice, Hope; Copeland, Alex; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia C; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Heimerl, Thomas; Weikl, Fabian; Brambilla, Evelyne; Göker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-06-15

    Thermosphaera aggregans Huber et al. 1998 is the type species of the genus Thermosphaera, which comprises at the time of writing only one species. This species represents archaea with a hyperthermophilic, heterotrophic, strictly anaerobic and fermentative phenotype. The type strain M11TL(T) was isolated from a water-sediment sample of a hot terrestrial spring (Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming). Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 1,316,595 bp long single replicon genome with its 1,410 protein-coding and 47 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  5. Complete genome sequence of Mahella australiensis type strain (50-1 BONT)

    SciTech Connect

    Sikorski, Johannes; Teshima, Hazuki; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Huntemann, Marcel; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Ngatchou, Olivier Duplex; Rohde, Manfred; Pukall, Rudiger; Spring, Stefan; Abt, Birte; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Eisen, Jonathan; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla L.

    2011-01-01

    Mahella australiensis Bonilla Salinas et al. 2004 is the type species of the genus Mahella, which belongs to the family Thermoanaerobacteraceae. The species is of interest because it differs from other known anaerobic spore-forming bacteria in its G+C content, and in certain phenotypic traits, such as carbon source utilization and relationship to temperature. Moreo- ver, it has been discussed that this species might be an indigenous member of petroleum and oil reservoirs. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the genus Mahella and the ninth completed type strain genome sequence from the family Thermoanaerobacte- raceae. The 3,135,972 bp long genome with its 2,974 protein-coding and 59 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  6. Activation of dormant bacterial genes by Nonomuraea sp. strain ATCC 39727 mutant-type RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Talà, Adelfia; Wang, Guojun; Zemanova, Martina; Okamoto, Susumu; Ochi, Kozo; Alifano, Pietro

    2009-02-01

    There is accumulating evidence that the ability of actinomycetes to produce antibiotics and other bioactive secondary metabolites has been underestimated due to the presence of cryptic gene clusters. The activation of dormant genes is therefore one of the most important areas of experimental research for the discovery of drugs in these organisms. The recent observation that several actinomycetes possess two RNA polymerase beta-chain genes (rpoB) has opened up the possibility, explored in this study, of developing a new strategy to activate dormant gene expression in bacteria. Two rpoB paralogs, rpoB(S) and rpoB(R), provide Nonomuraea sp. strain ATCC 39727 with two functionally distinct and developmentally regulated RNA polymerases. The product of rpoB(R), the expression of which increases after transition to stationary phase, is characterized by five amino acid substitutions located within or close to the so-called rifampin resistance clusters that play a key role in fundamental activities of RNA polymerase. Here, we report that rpoB(R) markedly activated antibiotic biosynthesis in the wild-type Streptomyces lividans strain 1326 and also in strain KO-421, a relaxed (rel) mutant unable to produce ppGpp. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that the rpoB(R)-specific missense H426N mutation was essential for the activation of secondary metabolism. Our observations also indicated that mutant-type or duplicated, rpoB often exists in nature among rare actinomycetes and will thus provide a basis for further basic and applied research.

  7. Complete genome sequence of Capnocytophaga ochracea type strain (VPI 2845T)

    SciTech Connect

    Mavromatis, K; Gronow, Sabine; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Land, Miriam L; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Bruce, David; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, N; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Brettin, Thomas S; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Bristow, James; Goker, Markus; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Capnocytophaga ochracea (Pr vot et al. 1956) Leadbetter et al. 1982 is the type species of the genus Capnocytophaga. It is of interest because of its location in the Flavobacteriaceae, a genomically not yet charted family within the order Flavobacteriales. The species grows as fusiform to rod shaped cells which tend to form clumps and are able to move by gliding. C. ochracea is known as a capnophilic (CO2-requiring) organism with the ability to grow under anaerobic as well as aerobic conditions (oxygen concentration larger than 15%), here only in the presence of 5% CO2. Strain VPI 2845T, the type strain of the species, is portrayed in this report as a gliding, Gram-negative bacterium, originally isolated from a human oral cavity. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome se-quence, and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence from the flavobacterial genus Capnocytophaga, and the 2,612,925 bp long single replicon genome with its 2193 protein-coding and 59 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  8. Complete genome sequence of Veillonella parvula type strain (Te3T)

    SciTech Connect

    Gronow, Sabine; Welnitz, Sabine; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Ivanova, N; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, A; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, Sam; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Brettin, Thomas S; Han, Cliff; Detter, J. Chris; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Pati, Amrita; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lucas, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Veillonella parvula (Veillon and Zuber 1898) Pr vot 1933 is the type species of the genus Veillonella in the family Veillonellaceae within the order Clostridiales. The species V. parvula is of interest because it is frequently isolated from dental plaque in the human oral cavity and can cause opportunistic infections. The species is strictly anaerobic and grows as small cocci which usually occur in pairs. Veillonellae are characterized by their unusual metabolism which is centered on the activity of the enzyme methylmalonyl-CoA decarboxylase. Strain Te3T, the type strain of the species, was isolated from the human intestinal tract. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the large clostridial family Veillonellaceae, and the 2,132,142 bp long single replicon genome with its 1859 protein-coding and 61 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  9. Complete genome sequence of Capnocytophaga ochracea type strain (VPI 2845T)

    SciTech Connect

    Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Gronow, Sabine; Saunders, Elizabeth; Land, Miriam; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Tice1, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chain, Patrick; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jefferies, Cynthia C.; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Bristow, James; Goker, Markus; Rohde, Manfred; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2009-05-20

    Capnocytophaga ochracea (Prevot et al. 1956) Leadbetter et al. 1982 is the type species of the genus Capnocytophaga. It is of interest because of its location in the Flavobacteriaceae, a genomically yet uncharted family within the order Flavobacteriales. The species grows as fusiform to rod shaped cells which tend to form clumps and are able to move by gliding. C. ochracea is known as a capnophilic organism with the ability to grow under anaerobic as well as under aerobic conditions (oxygen concentration larger than 15percent), here only in the presence of 5percent CO2. Strain VPI 2845T, the type strain of the species, is portrayed in this report as a gliding, Gram-negative bacterium, originally isolated from a human oral cavity. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence from the flavobacterial genus Capnocytophaga, and the 2,612,925 bp long single replicon genome with its 2193 protein-coding and 59 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  10. Proteomic response to physiological fermentation stresses in a wild-type wine strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Trabalzini, Lorenza; Paffetti, Alessandro; Scaloni, Andrea; Talamo, Fabio; Ferro, Elisa; Coratza, Grazietta; Bovalini, Lucia; Lusini, Paola; Martelli, Paola; Santucci, Annalisa

    2003-01-01

    We report a study on the adaptive response of a wild-type wine Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, isolated from natural spontaneous grape must, to mild and progressive physiological stresses due to fermentation. We observed by two-dimensional electrophoresis how the yeast proteome changes during glucose exhaustion, before the cell enters its complete stationary phase. On the basis of their identification, the proteins representing the S. cerevisiae proteomic response to fermentation stresses were divided into three classes: repressed proteins, induced proteins and autoproteolysed proteins. In an overall view, the proteome adaptation of S. cerevisiae at the time of glucose exhaustion seems to be directed mainly against the effects of ethanol, causing both hyperosmolarity and oxidative responses. Stress-induced autoproteolysis is directed mainly towards specific isoforms of glycolytic enzymes. Through the use of a wild-type S. cerevisiae strain and PMSF, a specific inhibitor of vacuolar proteinase B, we could also distinguish the specific contributions of the vacuole and the proteasome to the autoproteolytic process. PMID:12401115

  11. Direct linkage of mitochondrial genome variation to risk factors for type 2 diabetes in conplastic strains

    PubMed Central

    Pravenec, Michal; Hyakukoku, Masaya; Houstek, Josef; Zidek, Vaclav; Landa, Vladimir; Mlejnek, Petr; Miksik, Ivan; Dudová-Mothejzikova, Kristyna; Pecina, Petr; Vrbacký, Marek; Drahota, Zdenek; Vojtiskova, Alena; Mracek, Tomas; Kazdova, Ludmila; Oliyarnyk, Olena; Wang, Jiaming; Ho, Christopher; Qi, Nathan; Sugimoto, Ken; Kurtz, Theodore

    2007-01-01

    Recently, the relationship of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variants to metabolic risk factors for diabetes and other common diseases has begun to attract increasing attention. However, progress in this area has been limited because (1) the phenotypic effects of variation in the mitochondrial genome are difficult to isolate owing to confounding variation in the nuclear genome, imprinting phenomena, and environmental factors; and (2) few animal models have been available for directly investigating the effects of mtDNA variants on complex metabolic phenotypes in vivo. Substitution of different mitochondrial genomes on the same nuclear genetic background in conplastic strains provides a way to unambiguously isolate effects of the mitochondrial genome on complex traits. Here we show that conplastic strains of rats with identical nuclear genomes but divergent mitochondrial genomes that encode amino acid differences in proteins of oxidative phosphorylation exhibit differences in major metabolic risk factors for type 2 diabetes. These results (1) provide the first direct evidence linking naturally occurring variation in the mitochondrial genome, independent of variation in the nuclear genome and other confounding factors, to inherited variation in known risk factors for type 2 diabetes; and (2) establish that spontaneous variation in the mitochondrial genome per se can promote systemic metabolic disturbances relevant to the pathogenesis of common diseases. PMID:17693571

  12. Multilocus Sequence Typing of Porphyromonas gingivalis Strains from Different Geographic Origins

    PubMed Central

    Enersen, Morten; Olsen, Ingar; van Winkelhoff, Arie J.; Caugant, Dominique A.

    2006-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is an important periodontal pathogen that can be isolated from both active and inactive periodontal lesions. Apparently, differences in virulence between P. gingivalis strains exist, but the mechanisms underlying these differences are not yet fully understood. To obtain more information about pathogenicity and virulence of P. gingivalis, it is relevant to assess the genetic population structure of the species and to examine the occurrence of putative virulence factors against the genetic background. Presently, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) is the best method for analyzing bacterial population structures. Forty P. gingivalis strains from worldwide sources were analyzed by MLST. Internal 310- to 420-bp DNA fragments of the eight ubiquitous chromosomal genes, ftsQ, hagB, gdpxJ, pepO, mcmA, recA, pga, and nah, were amplified by PCR and then sequenced. The number of alleles at individual loci ranged from 2 to 19, and a total of 33 allelic profiles, or sequence types (STs), were identified. Nucleotide variation between alleles was located at one or a few sites. Identical or similar STs were found in isolates from different geographic regions. Our results showed signs of a clonal population structure with a level of recombination not as high as that previously suggested for the species. We also found that P. gingivalis isolates from individual patients were genetically heterogeneous. PMID:16390944

  13. Use of the VNTR typing technique to determine the origin of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains isolated from Filipino patients in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jihye; Tupasi, Thelma E; Park, Young Kil

    2014-05-01

    With increasing international interchange of personnel, international monitoring is necessary to decrease tuberculosis incidence in the world. This study aims to develop a new tool to determine origin of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains isolated from Filipino patients living in Korea. Thirty-two variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) loci were used for discrimination of 50 Filipino M. tuberculosis strains isolated in the Philippines, 317 Korean strains isolated in Korea, and 8 Filipino strains isolated in Korea. We found that the VNTR loci 0580, 0960, 2531, 2687, 2996, 0802, 2461, 2163a, 4052, 0424, 1955, 2074, 2347, 2401, 3171, 3690, 2372, 3232, and 4156 had different mode among copy numbers or exclusively distinct copy number in VNTR typing between Filipino and Korean M. tuberculosis strains. When these differences of the VNTR loci were applied to 8 Filipino M. tuberculosis strains isolated in Korea, 6 of them revealed Filipino type while 2 of them had Korean type. Using the differences of mode or repeated number of VNTR loci were very useful in distinguishing the Filipino strain from Korean strain.

  14. Difference in Degradation Patterns on Inulin-type Fructans among Strains of Lactobacillus delbrueckii and Lactobacillus paracasei

    PubMed Central

    TSUJIKAWA, Yuji; NOMOTO, Ryohei; OSAWA, Ro

    2013-01-01

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii strains were assessed for their degradation patterns of various carbohydrates with specific reference to inulin-type fructans in comparison with those of Lactobacillus paracasei strains. Firstly, growth curves on glucose, fructose, sucrose and inulin-type fructans with increasing degrees of fructose polymerization (i.e., 1-kestose, fructo-oligosaccharides and inulin) of the strains were compared. L. paracasei DSM 20020 grew well on all these sugars, while the growth rates of the 4 L. delbrueckii strains were markedly higher on the fructans with a greater degree of polymerization than on fructose and sucrose. Secondly, sugar compositions of spent cultures of the strains of L. delbrueckii and L. paracasei grown in mMRS containing either the fructans or inulin were determined by thin layer chromatography, in which the spent cultures of L. paracasei DSM 20020 showed spots of short fructose and sucrose fractions, whereas those of the L. delbrueckii strains did not show such spots at all. These results suggest that, unlike the L. paracasei strains, the L. delbrueckii strains do not degrade the inulin-type fructans extracellularly, but transport the fructans capable of greater polymerization preferentially into their cells to be degraded intracellularly for their growth. PMID:24936375

  15. Cadmium tolerance, cysteine and thiol peptide levels in wild type and chromium-tolerant strains of Scenedesmus acutus (Chlorophyceae).

    PubMed

    Torricelli, Elena; Gorbi, Gessica; Pawlik-Skowronska, Barbara; Di Toppi, Luigi Sanità; Corradi, Maria Grazia

    2004-07-14

    Two strains of the unicellular green alga Scenedesmus acutus with different sensitivity to hexavalent chromium were compared for their tolerance of cadmium, by means of growth and recovery tests, and determination of cysteine, reduced glutathione and phytochelatin content, after short-term exposure to various cadmium concentrations (from 1.125 to 27 microM). Growth experiments showed that, after 7-day treatments with cadmium, the chromium-tolerant strain reached a significantly higher cell density and, after 24-h exposure to Cd, was able to resume growth significantly better than the wild type. Constitutive level of cysteine was higher in the chromium-tolerant strain, while glutathione levels were similar in the two strains. The higher content of cysteine and the maintenance of both reduced glutathione and phytochelatin high levels in the presence of cadmium, support the higher cadmium co-tolerance of the chromium-tolerant strain in comparison with the wild type one. PMID:15177949

  16. Comparison and analysis of the nucleotide sequences of pilin genes from Haemophilus influenzae type b strains Eagan and M43.

    PubMed Central

    Forney, L J; Marrs, C F; Bektesh, S L; Gilsdorf, J R

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated antigenic differences among the pili expressed by various strains of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib). In order to understand the molecular basis for these differences, the structural gene for pilin was cloned from Hib strain Eagan (p+) and the nucleotide sequence was compared to those of strains M43 (p+) and 770235 b0f+, which had been previously determined. The pilin gene of Hib strain Eagan (p+) had a 648-bp open reading frame that encoded a 20-amino-acid leader sequence followed by the 196 amino acids found in mature pilin. The translated sequence was three amino acids larger than pilins of strains M43 (p+) and 770235 b0f+ and was 78% identical and 95% homologous when conservative amino acid substitutions were considered. Differences between the amino acid sequences were not localized to any one region but rather were distributed throughout the proteins. Comparison of protein hydrophilicity profiles showed several hydrophilic regions with sequences that were conserved between strain Eagan (p+) and pilins of other Hib strains, and these regions represent potentially conserved antigenic domains. Southern blot analyses using an intragenic probe from the pilin gene of strain Eagan (p+) showed that the pilin gene was conserved among all type b and nontypeable strains of H. influenzae examined, and only a single copy was present in these strains. Homologous genes were not present in the phylogenetically related species Pasteurella multocida, Pasteurella haemolytica, and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. These data indicate that the pilin gene was highly conserved among different strains of H. influenzae and that small differences in the pilin amino acid sequences account for the observed antigenic differences of assembled pili from these strains. Images PMID:2037360

  17. Interference of the low-pH inactivated herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) strain HSZP with the early shutoff function of superinfecting HSV-1 strain KOS.

    PubMed

    Matis, J; Kúdelová, M; Rajcáni, J

    1999-03-01

    In former studies, we described that the HSZP strain of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was defective with respect to the early shutoff of host protein synthesis but was effective at interfering with the early shutoff function of the HSV-1 strain KOS, even when heat-inactivated or neutralized by antibody. However, the HSZP strain failed to interfere when inactivated with zinc ions or purified from cells treated with 2-deoxy-D-glucose. In this study, we provide evidence that the ability of the purified low-pH inactivated (citrate buffer, pH 3.0) and gel-filtered (Sephadex G-25) HSZP virions to adsorb host cells was not significantly affected. However, their ability to induce interference with the early shutoff function of the superinfecting HSV-1 strain KOS was restricted. In comparison with native virus, up to eight times more low-pH inactivated HSZP virions were needed to interfere with the shutoff by strain KOS. The interference was not due to exclusion of strain KOS by HSZP at the level of adsorption and/or penetration. The restriction was partially overcome by treatment of the cells with polyethylene glycol after adsorption of the low-pH inactivated HSZP virions. This observation indicates that the direct fusion of the virion envelope of low-pH inactivated HSZP with the plasma cell membrane was predominantly hampered.

  18. [Fungi in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2: prevalence, species of isolated strains].

    PubMed

    Maciejewska, Alina; Jaskółowska, Agnieszka; Kwaśniewska, Jolanta

    2004-01-01

    In 77 diabetic patients the detection of fungi was carried out in the oral cavity, digestive tract, genital organs and skin lesions. Patient age ranged from 39 to 82 years, with the Body Mass Index (BMI) from 22 to the highest values of 46.5. Diabetes control was assessed by determination of the glucose level in serum after overnight fasting and after lunch, as well as by determination of the HbA(1c) level. Fungi were diagnosed in 61 patients (79.6%). The total of 111 fungal strains were isolated in 319 cultures evaluated from 12 biological materials. Fungal strains were detected in the highest percentage in oral cavity (77.9%), in the lower percentage in anus (33.8%), vagina discharge (11.6%) and the region of vulva (14.3%). Fungi were observed in one focus--exclusively in the oral cavity--in 28 (36.4%) patients, whereas they occurred in multifocal infections in 33 (42.9%) patients. The isolated fungal strains were classified into 4 genera (Candida, Saccharomyces, Trichosporon, Aspergillus) and 12 species. The most frequently detected fungi were C. albicans (55.2%), followed by C. glabrata (12.4%), C parapsilosis (10.5%) and C. tropicalis (9.5%). Relatively low percentage of fungi identified in vagina was associated, among others, with the fact that most of the female patients with diabetes were at the postmenopausal period. In all the patients in whom fungi were isolated from the vagina contents, these fungi were also found in other ontocenoses. The increase in percentage of fungal strains from genera other than Candida in patients with a higher risk is of clinical importance, as some of them are resistant in vitro to azole derivatives e.g. fluconazole. The digestive tract is thought to be the most frequent fungal habitat. A considerable prevalence of fungi, multifocal infections, particularly related to oral cavity and anus, and occurrence of high percentage of strains different from C. albicans species of Candida genus in female patients with type 2 diabetes

  19. Multilocus sequence typing of Mycoplasma hyorhinis strains identified by a real-time TaqMan PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Tocqueville, Véronique; Ferré, Séverine; Nguyen, Ngoc Hong Phuc; Kempf, Isabelle; Marois-Créhan, Corinne

    2014-05-01

    A real-time TaqMan PCR assay based on the gene encoding the protein p37 was developed to detect Mycoplasma hyorhinis. Its specificity was validated with 29 epidemiologically unrelated M. hyorhinis strains (28 field strains and one reference strain) and other mycoplasma species or with other microorganisms commonly found in pigs. The estimated detection limit of this qPCR assay was 125 microorganism equivalents/μl. The same 29 epidemiologically unrelated M. hyorhinis strains and four previously fully sequenced strains were typed by two portable typing methods, the sequencing of the p37 gene and a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme. The first method revealed 18 distinct nucleotide sequences and insufficient discriminatory power (0.934). The MLST scheme was developed with the sequenced genomes of the M. hyorhinis strains HUB-1, GDL-1, MCLD, and SK76 and based on the genes dnaA, rpoB, gyrB, gltX, adk, and gmk. In total, 2,304 bp of sequence was analyzed for each strain. MLST was capable of subdividing the 33 strains into 29 distinct sequence types. The discriminatory power of the method was >0.95, which is the threshold value for interpreting typing results with confidence (D=0.989). Population analysis showed that recombination in M. hyorhinis occurs and that strains are diverse but with a certain clonality (one unique clonal complex was identified). The new qPCR assay and the robust MLST scheme are available for the acquisition of new knowledge on M. hyorhinis epidemiology. A web-accessible database has been set up for the M. hyorhinis MLST scheme at http://pubmlst.org/mhyorhinis/.

  20. Genome Analysis of Listeria monocytogenes Sequence Type 8 Strains Persisting in Salmon and Poultry Processing Environments and Comparison with Related Strains.

    PubMed

    Fagerlund, Annette; Langsrud, Solveig; Schirmer, Bjørn C T; Møretrø, Trond; Heir, Even

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important foodborne pathogen responsible for the disease listeriosis, and can be found throughout the environment, in many foods and in food processing facilities. The main cause of listeriosis is consumption of food contaminated from sources in food processing environments. Persistence in food processing facilities has previously been shown for the L. monocytogenes sequence type (ST) 8 subtype. In the current study, five ST8 strains were subjected to whole-genome sequencing and compared with five additionally available ST8 genomes, allowing comparison of strains from salmon, poultry and cheese industry, in addition to a human clinical isolate. Genome-wide analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) confirmed that almost identical strains were detected in a Danish salmon processing plant in 1996 and in a Norwegian salmon processing plant in 2001 and 2011. Furthermore, we show that L. monocytogenes ST8 was likely to have been transferred between two poultry processing plants as a result of relocation of processing equipment. The SNP data were used to infer the phylogeny of the ST8 strains, separating them into two main genetic groups. Within each group, the plasmid and prophage content was almost entirely conserved, but between groups, these sequences showed strong divergence. The accessory genome of the ST8 strains harbored genetic elements which could be involved in rendering the ST8 strains resilient to incoming mobile genetic elements. These included two restriction-modification loci, one of which was predicted to show phase variable recognition sequence specificity through site-specific domain shuffling. Analysis indicated that the ST8 strains harbor all important known L. monocytogenes virulence factors, and ST8 strains are commonly identified as the causative agents of invasive listeriosis. Therefore, the persistence of this L. monocytogenes subtype in food processing facilities poses a significant concern for food safety

  1. Genome Analysis of Listeria monocytogenes Sequence Type 8 Strains Persisting in Salmon and Poultry Processing Environments and Comparison with Related Strains.

    PubMed

    Fagerlund, Annette; Langsrud, Solveig; Schirmer, Bjørn C T; Møretrø, Trond; Heir, Even

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important foodborne pathogen responsible for the disease listeriosis, and can be found throughout the environment, in many foods and in food processing facilities. The main cause of listeriosis is consumption of food contaminated from sources in food processing environments. Persistence in food processing facilities has previously been shown for the L. monocytogenes sequence type (ST) 8 subtype. In the current study, five ST8 strains were subjected to whole-genome sequencing and compared with five additionally available ST8 genomes, allowing comparison of strains from salmon, poultry and cheese industry, in addition to a human clinical isolate. Genome-wide analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) confirmed that almost identical strains were detected in a Danish salmon processing plant in 1996 and in a Norwegian salmon processing plant in 2001 and 2011. Furthermore, we show that L. monocytogenes ST8 was likely to have been transferred between two poultry processing plants as a result of relocation of processing equipment. The SNP data were used to infer the phylogeny of the ST8 strains, separating them into two main genetic groups. Within each group, the plasmid and prophage content was almost entirely conserved, but between groups, these sequences showed strong divergence. The accessory genome of the ST8 strains harbored genetic elements which could be involved in rendering the ST8 strains resilient to incoming mobile genetic elements. These included two restriction-modification loci, one of which was predicted to show phase variable recognition sequence specificity through site-specific domain shuffling. Analysis indicated that the ST8 strains harbor all important known L. monocytogenes virulence factors, and ST8 strains are commonly identified as the causative agents of invasive listeriosis. Therefore, the persistence of this L. monocytogenes subtype in food processing facilities poses a significant concern for food safety.

  2. Genome Analysis of Listeria monocytogenes Sequence Type 8 Strains Persisting in Salmon and Poultry Processing Environments and Comparison with Related Strains

    PubMed Central

    Fagerlund, Annette; Langsrud, Solveig; Schirmer, Bjørn C. T.; Møretrø, Trond; Heir, Even

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important foodborne pathogen responsible for the disease listeriosis, and can be found throughout the environment, in many foods and in food processing facilities. The main cause of listeriosis is consumption of food contaminated from sources in food processing environments. Persistence in food processing facilities has previously been shown for the L. monocytogenes sequence type (ST) 8 subtype. In the current study, five ST8 strains were subjected to whole-genome sequencing and compared with five additionally available ST8 genomes, allowing comparison of strains from salmon, poultry and cheese industry, in addition to a human clinical isolate. Genome-wide analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) confirmed that almost identical strains were detected in a Danish salmon processing plant in 1996 and in a Norwegian salmon processing plant in 2001 and 2011. Furthermore, we show that L. monocytogenes ST8 was likely to have been transferred between two poultry processing plants as a result of relocation of processing equipment. The SNP data were used to infer the phylogeny of the ST8 strains, separating them into two main genetic groups. Within each group, the plasmid and prophage content was almost entirely conserved, but between groups, these sequences showed strong divergence. The accessory genome of the ST8 strains harbored genetic elements which could be involved in rendering the ST8 strains resilient to incoming mobile genetic elements. These included two restriction-modification loci, one of which was predicted to show phase variable recognition sequence specificity through site-specific domain shuffling. Analysis indicated that the ST8 strains harbor all important known L. monocytogenes virulence factors, and ST8 strains are commonly identified as the causative agents of invasive listeriosis. Therefore, the persistence of this L. monocytogenes subtype in food processing facilities poses a significant concern for food safety

  3. A touchdown PCR for the differentiation of equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) field strains from the modified live vaccine strain RacH.

    PubMed

    Osterrieder, N; Hübert, P H; Brandmüller, C; Kaaden, O R

    1994-12-01

    More than 50 reference strains and field isolates of equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) were examined by a touchdown PCR. Primers for specific amplification of EHV-1 DNA were chosen from the terminal and internal repeat regions of the EHV-1 genome where the high-passaged live vaccine strain RacH displays symmetric 850 bp deletions. The positive strand and one negative strand primer were designed to encompass the deletions present in RacH, and the second negative strand primer was designed to hybridize within these deletions. Discrimination between field isolates and the vaccine strain was achieved by the generation of amplification products of different size: In all EHV-1 reference strains and field isolates, a 495 bp DNA fragment was amplified specifically, whereas a 310 bp fragment was amplified when DNA of the vaccine strain RacH was used as a template. PCR amplification was only obtained in the presence of 8-10% dimethylsulfoxide and when the primer annealing temperatures were decreased stepwise from 72 degrees C to 60 degrees C. Under these conditions as little as 100 fg template DNA, corresponding to about 100 genome equivalents, could be detected. The PCR assay allows fast and sensitive discrimination of the modified live vaccine strain RacH from field strains of EHV-1 since it is applicable to viral DNA extracted from organ samples and paraffin-embedded tissues. It may thus be helpful for examining the potential involvement of the RacH live vaccine strain in abortions of vaccinated mares.

  4. Simultaneous isolation of emm89-type Streptococcus pyogenes strains with a wild-type or mutated covS gene from a single streptococcal toxic shock syndrome patient.

    PubMed

    Masuno, Katsuaki; Okada, Ryo; Zhang, Yan; Isaka, Masanori; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Shibata, Shinichiro; Hasegawa, Tadao

    2014-04-01

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) is a re-emerging infectious disease in many developed countries. Recent studies have suggested that mutations in CovRS, a two-component regulatory system in Streptococcus pyogenes, play important roles in the pathogenesis of STSS. However, in vivo evidence of the significance of CovRS in human infections has not been fully demonstrated. We investigated five S. pyogenes strains isolated simultaneously from the pharynx, sputum, knee joint, cerebrospinal fluid and blood of a single STSS patient. All were emm89-type strains, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis revealed that the strains of pharynx and blood were isogenic. The growth rates of the strains from pharynx and sputum were faster than those of the other strains. Protein profiles of the culture supernatants of strains from the pharynx and sputum were also different from those of the other strains. Sequence analyses revealed that strains from the knee joint, cerebrospinal fluid and blood contained a single nucleotide difference in the covS coding region, resulting in one amino acid change, compared with the other strains. Introduction of a plasmid containing the covS gene from the pharynx strain to the blood strain increased the production of SpeB protein. This suggests that the one amino acid alteration in CovS was relevant to pathogenesis. This report supports the idea that mutated CovS plays important roles in vivo in the dissemination of S. pyogenes from the upper respiratory tract of human to aseptic tissues such as blood and cerebrospinal fluid.

  5. Metal nanoparticle assisted polymerase chain reaction for strain typing of Salmonella Typhi.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Asma; Sarwar, Yasra; Raza, Zulfiqar Ali; Hussain, Syed Zajif; Mustafa, Tanveer; Khan, Waheed S; Ghauri, Muhammad Afzal; Haque, Abdul; Hussain, Irshad

    2015-11-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi (S. Typhi) is the causative agent of typhoid fever and remains a major health threat in most of the developing countries. The prompt diagnosis of typhoid directly from the patient's blood requires high level of sensitivity and specificity. Some of us were the first to report PCR based diagnosis of typhoid. This approach has since then been reported by many scientists using different genomic targets. Since the number of bacteria circulating in the blood of a patient can be as low as 0.3 cfu ml(-1), there is always a room for improvement in diagnostic PCR. In the present study, the role of different types of nanoparticles was investigated to improve the existing PCR based methods for diagnosis and strain typing of S. Typhi (targeting Variable Number of Tandem Repeats [VNTR]) by using optimized PCR systems. Three different types of nanoparticles were used i.e., citrate stabilized gold nanoparticles, rhamnolipid stabilized gold and silver nanoparticles, and magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. The non-specific amplification was significantly reduced in VNTR typing when gold and silver nanoparticles were used in an appropriate concentration. More importantly, the addition of nanoparticles decreased the non-specificity to a significant level in the case of multiplex PCR thus further validating the reliability of PCR for the diagnosis of typhoid.

  6. Metal nanoparticle assisted polymerase chain reaction for strain typing of Salmonella Typhi.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Asma; Sarwar, Yasra; Raza, Zulfiqar Ali; Hussain, Syed Zajif; Mustafa, Tanveer; Khan, Waheed S; Ghauri, Muhammad Afzal; Haque, Abdul; Hussain, Irshad

    2015-11-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi (S. Typhi) is the causative agent of typhoid fever and remains a major health threat in most of the developing countries. The prompt diagnosis of typhoid directly from the patient's blood requires high level of sensitivity and specificity. Some of us were the first to report PCR based diagnosis of typhoid. This approach has since then been reported by many scientists using different genomic targets. Since the number of bacteria circulating in the blood of a patient can be as low as 0.3 cfu ml(-1), there is always a room for improvement in diagnostic PCR. In the present study, the role of different types of nanoparticles was investigated to improve the existing PCR based methods for diagnosis and strain typing of S. Typhi (targeting Variable Number of Tandem Repeats [VNTR]) by using optimized PCR systems. Three different types of nanoparticles were used i.e., citrate stabilized gold nanoparticles, rhamnolipid stabilized gold and silver nanoparticles, and magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. The non-specific amplification was significantly reduced in VNTR typing when gold and silver nanoparticles were used in an appropriate concentration. More importantly, the addition of nanoparticles decreased the non-specificity to a significant level in the case of multiplex PCR thus further validating the reliability of PCR for the diagnosis of typhoid. PMID:26381602

  7. The Host Genotype and Environment Affect Strain Types of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum Inhabiting the Intestinal Tracts of Twins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Min; Hang, Xiaomin; Tan, Jing

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the influences of host genotype and environment on Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum inhabiting human intestines at the strain level, six pairs of twins, divided into two groups (children and adults), were recruited. Each group consisted of two monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs and one dizygotic (DZ) twin pair. Child twins had been living together from birth, while adult twins had been living separately for 5 to 10 years. A total of 345 B. longum subsp. longum isolates obtained from 60 fecal samples from these twins were analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and 35 sequence types (STs) were finally acquired. Comparison of strains within and between the twin pairs showed that no strains with identical STs were observed between unrelated individuals or within adult DZ twin pairs. Eight STs were found to be monophyletic, existing within MZ twins and child DZ twins. The similarity of strain types within child cotwins was significantly higher than that within adult cotwins, which indicated that environment was one of the important determinants in B. longum subsp. longum strain types inhabiting human intestines. However, although these differences between MZ and DZ twins were observed, it is still difficult to reach an exact conclusion about the impact of host genotype. This is mainly because of the limited number of subjects tested in the present study and the lack of strain types tracing in the same twin pairs from birth until adulthood. PMID:25956768

  8. ATCC 43642 replaces ATCC 23581 as the type strain of Leptospira interrogans (Stimson 1907) Wenyon 1926. Opinion 91. Judicial Commission of the International Committee on Systematics of Prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Tindall, B J

    2014-10-01

    The Judicial Commission affirms that, according to information presented to it, the type strain of Leptospira interrogans (Stimson 1907) Wenyon 1926 designated on the Approved Lists of Bacterial Names (ATCC 23581) has been shown not to represent an authentic culture of strain RGA (a member of the serovar Icterohaemorrhagiae) and ATCC 43642, derived from an authentic strain of strain RGA, a member of the serovar Icterohaemorrhagiae, is designated the type strain of Leptospira interrogans (Stimson 1907) Wenyon 1926.

  9. Genomic characterization of coxsackievirus type B3 strains associated with acute flaccid paralysis in south-western India.

    PubMed

    Laxmivandana, Rongala; Cherian, Sarah S; Yergolkar, Prasanna; Chitambar, Shobha D

    2016-03-01

    Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) associated with coxsackievirus type B3 (CV-B3) of the species Enterovirus B is an emerging concern worldwide. Although CV-B3-associated AFP in India has been demonstrated previously, the genomic characterization of these strains is unreported. Here, CV-B3 strains detected on the basis of the partial VP1 gene in 10 AFP cases and five asymptomatic contacts identified from different regions of south-western India during 2009-2010 through the Polio Surveillance Project were considered for complete genome sequencing and characterization. Phylogenetic analysis of complete VP1 gene sequences of global CV-B3 strains classified Indian CV-B3 strains into genogroup GVI, along with strains from Uzbekistan and Bangladesh, and into a new genogroup, GVII. Genomic divergence between genogroups of the study strains was 14.4 % with significantly lower divergence (1.8 %) within GVI (n = 12) than that within GVII (8.5 %) (n = 3). The strains from both AFP cases and asymptomatic contacts, identified mainly in coastal Karnataka and Kerala, belonged to the dominant genogroup GVI, while the GVII strains were recovered from AFP cases in north interior Karnataka. All study strains carried inter-genotypic recombination with the structural region similar to reference CV-B3 strains, and 5' non-coding regions and non-structural regions closer to other enterovirus B types. Domain II structures of 5' non-coding regions, described to modulate virus replication, were predicted to have varied structural folds in the two genogroups and were attributed to differing recombination patterns. The results indicate two distinct genomic compositions of CV-B3 strains circulating in India and suggest the need for concurrent analysis of viral and host factors to further understand the varied manifestations of their infections.

  10. Strain sensitivity and durability in p-type and n-type organic thin-film transistors with printed silver electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Kenjiro; Hikichi, Kenta; Sekine, Tomohito; Takeda, Yasunori; Minamiki, Tsukuru; Kumaki, Daisuke; Tokito, Shizuo

    2013-06-01

    Mechanical flexibility and compatibility of printing processes are key advantage that organic electronic devices have over conventional inorganic devices. However, one of the major remaining issues for organic devices is insufficient mechanical durability of printed electrodes. Here we have investigated the mechanical durability of both p-type and n-type organic thin-film transistors (TFTs) with ink-jet printed silver electrodes from silver nanoparticle inks. The modified silver nanoparticle inks enabled the strong adhesion to the underlying polymer layer, and the fabricated organic TFTs exhibited excellent reproducibility in the bending cycle tests. The strong channel length dependence on the strain sensitivity was observed in both p-type and n-type organic TFTs. The organic TFTs with a short-channel exhibited higher sensitivity to the bending strain. These results suggest that the flexible organic TFTs with printed silver electrodes have excellent mechanical durability and are useful for bending and strain sensors.

  11. Strain sensitivity and durability in p-type and n-type organic thin-film transistors with printed silver electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Kenjiro; Hikichi, Kenta; Sekine, Tomohito; Takeda, Yasunori; Minamiki, Tsukuru; Kumaki, Daisuke; Tokito, Shizuo

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical flexibility and compatibility of printing processes are key advantage that organic electronic devices have over conventional inorganic devices. However, one of the major remaining issues for organic devices is insufficient mechanical durability of printed electrodes. Here we have investigated the mechanical durability of both p-type and n-type organic thin-film transistors (TFTs) with ink-jet printed silver electrodes from silver nanoparticle inks. The modified silver nanoparticle inks enabled the strong adhesion to the underlying polymer layer, and the fabricated organic TFTs exhibited excellent reproducibility in the bending cycle tests. The strong channel length dependence on the strain sensitivity was observed in both p-type and n-type organic TFTs. The organic TFTs with a short-channel exhibited higher sensitivity to the bending strain. These results suggest that the flexible organic TFTs with printed silver electrodes have excellent mechanical durability and are useful for bending and strain sensors. PMID:23788235

  12. Full Genome Sequence-Based Comparative Study of Wild-Type and Vaccine Strains of Infectious Laryngotracheitis Virus from Italy.

    PubMed

    Piccirillo, Alessandra; Lavezzo, Enrico; Niero, Giulia; Moreno, Ana; Massi, Paola; Franchin, Elisa; Toppo, Stefano; Salata, Cristiano; Palù, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is an acute and highly contagious respiratory disease of chickens caused by an alphaherpesvirus, infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV). Recently, full genome sequences of wild-type and vaccine strains have been determined worldwide, but none was from Europe. The aim of this study was to determine and analyse the complete genome sequences of five ILTV strains. Sequences were also compared to reveal the similarity of strains across time and to discriminate between wild-type and vaccine strains. Genomes of three ILTV field isolates from outbreaks occurred in Italy in 1980, 2007 and 2011, and two commercial chicken embryo origin (CEO) vaccines were sequenced using the 454 Life Sciences technology. The comparison with the Serva genome showed that 35 open reading frames (ORFs) differed across the five genomes. Overall, 54 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 27 amino acid differences in 19 ORFs and two insertions in the UL52 and ORFC genes were identified. Similarity among the field strains and between the field and the vaccine strains ranged from 99.96% to 99.99%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a close relationship among them, as well. This study generated data on genomic variation among Italian ILTV strains revealing that, even though the genetic variability of the genome is well conserved across time and between wild-type and vaccine strains, some mutations may help in differentiating among them and may be involved in ILTV virulence/attenuation. The results of this study can contribute to the understanding of the molecular bases of ILTV pathogenicity and provide genetic markers to differentiate between wild-type and vaccine strains. PMID:26890525

  13. Full Genome Sequence-Based Comparative Study of Wild-Type and Vaccine Strains of Infectious Laryngotracheitis Virus from Italy

    PubMed Central

    Niero, Giulia; Moreno, Ana; Massi, Paola; Franchin, Elisa; Toppo, Stefano; Salata, Cristiano; Palù, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is an acute and highly contagious respiratory disease of chickens caused by an alphaherpesvirus, infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV). Recently, full genome sequences of wild-type and vaccine strains have been determined worldwide, but none was from Europe. The aim of this study was to determine and analyse the complete genome sequences of five ILTV strains. Sequences were also compared to reveal the similarity of strains across time and to discriminate between wild-type and vaccine strains. Genomes of three ILTV field isolates from outbreaks occurred in Italy in 1980, 2007 and 2011, and two commercial chicken embryo origin (CEO) vaccines were sequenced using the 454 Life Sciences technology. The comparison with the Serva genome showed that 35 open reading frames (ORFs) differed across the five genomes. Overall, 54 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 27 amino acid differences in 19 ORFs and two insertions in the UL52 and ORFC genes were identified. Similarity among the field strains and between the field and the vaccine strains ranged from 99.96% to 99.99%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a close relationship among them, as well. This study generated data on genomic variation among Italian ILTV strains revealing that, even though the genetic variability of the genome is well conserved across time and between wild-type and vaccine strains, some mutations may help in differentiating among them and may be involved in ILTV virulence/attenuation. The results of this study can contribute to the understanding of the molecular bases of ILTV pathogenicity and provide genetic markers to differentiate between wild-type and vaccine strains. PMID:26890525

  14. Profile of Cytokines and Chemokines Triggered by Wild-Type Strains of Rabies Virus in Mice.

    PubMed

    Appolinário, Camila Michele; Allendorf, Susan Dora; Peres, Marina Gea; Ribeiro, Bruna Devidé; Fonseca, Clóvis R; Vicente, Acácia Ferreira; Antunes, João Marcelo A de Paula; Megid, Jane

    2016-02-01

    Rabies is a lethal infectious disease that causes 55,000 human deaths per year and is transmitted by various mammalian species, such as dogs and bats. The host immune response is essential for avoiding viral progression and promoting viral clearance. Cytokines and chemokines are crucial in the development of an immediate antiviral response; the rabies virus (RABV) attempts to evade this immune response. The virus's capacity for evasion is correlated with its pathogenicity and the host's inflammatory response, with highly pathogenic strains being the most efficient at hijacking the host's defense mechanisms and thereby decreasing inflammation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression of a set of cytokine and chemokine genes that are related to the immune response in the brains of mice inoculated intramuscularly or intracerebrally with two wild-type strains of RABV, one from dog and the other from vampire bat. The results demonstrated that the gene expression profile is intrinsic to the specific rabies variant. The prompt production of cytokines and chemokines seems to be more important than their levels of expression for surviving a rabies infection. PMID:26711511

  15. Complete genome sequence of the thermophilic Acidobacteria, Pyrinomonas methylaliphatogenes type strain K22(T).

    PubMed

    Lee, Kevin C Y; Morgan, Xochitl C; Power, Jean F; Dunfield, Peter F; Huttenhower, Curtis; Stott, Matthew B

    2015-01-01

    Strain K22(T) is the type species of the recently- described genus Pyrinomonas, in subdivision 4 of the phylum Acidobacteria (Int J Syst Evol Micr. 2014; 64(1):220-7). It was isolated from geothermally-heated soil from Mt. Ngauruhoe, New Zealand, using low-nutrient medium. P. methylaliphatogenes K22(T) has a chemoheterotrophic metabolism; it can hydrolyze a limited range of simple carbohydrates and polypeptides. Its cell membrane is dominated by iso-branching fatty acids, and up to 40 % of its lipid content is membrane-spanning and ether lipids. It is obligately aerobic, thermophilic, moderately acidophilic, and non-spore-forming. The 3,788,560 bp genome of P. methylaliphatogenes K22(T) has a G + C content of 59.36 % and contains 3,189 protein-encoding and 55 non-coding RNA genes. Genomic analysis was consistent with nutritional requirements; in particular, the identified transporter classes reflect the oligotrophic nature of this strain.

  16. Profile of Cytokines and Chemokines Triggered by Wild-Type Strains of Rabies Virus in Mice.

    PubMed

    Appolinário, Camila Michele; Allendorf, Susan Dora; Peres, Marina Gea; Ribeiro, Bruna Devidé; Fonseca, Clóvis R; Vicente, Acácia Ferreira; Antunes, João Marcelo A de Paula; Megid, Jane

    2016-02-01

    Rabies is a lethal infectious disease that causes 55,000 human deaths per year and is transmitted by various mammalian species, such as dogs and bats. The host immune response is essential for avoiding viral progression and promoting viral clearance. Cytokines and chemokines are crucial in the development of an immediate antiviral response; the rabies virus (RABV) attempts to evade this immune response. The virus's capacity for evasion is correlated with its pathogenicity and the host's inflammatory response, with highly pathogenic strains being the most efficient at hijacking the host's defense mechanisms and thereby decreasing inflammation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression of a set of cytokine and chemokine genes that are related to the immune response in the brains of mice inoculated intramuscularly or intracerebrally with two wild-type strains of RABV, one from dog and the other from vampire bat. The results demonstrated that the gene expression profile is intrinsic to the specific rabies variant. The prompt production of cytokines and chemokines seems to be more important than their levels of expression for surviving a rabies infection.

  17. Complete genome sequence of Nitratifractor salsuginis type strain (E9I37-1T)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Sikorski, Johannes; Zeytun, Ahmet; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Huntemann, Marcel; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Ngatchou, Olivier Duplex; Rohde, Manfred; Tindall, Brian; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2011-01-01

    Nitratifractor salsuginis Nakagawa et al. 2005 is the type species of the genus Nitratifractor, a member of the family Nautiliaceae. The species is of interest because of its high capacity for nitrate reduction via conversion to N2 through respiration, which is a key compound in plant nutrition. The strain is also of interest because it represents the first mesophilic and faculta- tively anaerobic member of the Epsilonproteobacteria reported to grow on molecular hydro- gen. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the genus Nitratifractor and the second sequence from the family Nautiliaceae. The 2,101,285 bp long genome with its 2,121 protein-coding and 54 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  18. Complete genome sequence of Bacteroides helcogenes type strain (P 36-108T)

    SciTech Connect

    Pati, Amrita; Gronow, Sabine; Zeytun, Ahmet; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Detter, J. Chris; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lucas, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Bacteroides helcogenes Benno et al. 1983 is of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location and, although it has been found in pig feces and is known to be pathogenic for pigs, occurrence of this bacterium is rare and it does not cause significant damage in intensive animal husbandry. The genome of B. helcogenes P 36-108T is already the fifth completed and published type strain genome from the genus Bacteroides in the family Bacteroidaceae. The 3,998,906 bp long genome with its 3,353 protein-coding and 83 RNA genes consists of one circular chromosome and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  19. Complete genome sequence of Syntrophothermus lipocalidus type strain (TGB-C1T)

    SciTech Connect

    Ngatchou, Olivier Duplex; Zhang, Xiaojing; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Rohde, Manfred; Sikorski, Johannes; Spring, Stefan; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Held, Brittany; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Syntrophothermus lipocalidus Sekiguchi et al. 2000 is the type species of the genus Syntrophothermus. The species is of interest because of its strictly anaerobic lifestyle, its participation in the primary step of the degradation of organic maters, and for releasing products which serve as substrates for other microorganisms. It also contributes significantly to maintain a regular pH in its environment by removing the fatty acids through -oxidation. The strain is able to metabolize isobutyrate and butyrate, which are the substrate and the product of degradation of the substrate, respectively. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the genus Syntrophothermus and the second in the family Syntrophomonadaceae. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 2,405,559 bp long genome with its 2,385 protein-coding and 55 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  20. Non-contiguous finished genome sequence of Bacteroides coprosuis type strain (PC 139T)

    SciTech Connect

    Land, Miriam L; Held, Brittany; Gronow, Sabine; Abt, Birte; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Pati, Amrita; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Hauser, Loren John; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla L.

    2011-01-01

    Bacteroides coprosuis Whitehead et al. 2005 belongs to the genus Bacteroides, which is a member of the family Bacteroidaceae. Members of the genus Bacteroides in general are known as beneficial protectors of animal guts against pathogenic microorganisms, and as contributors to the degradation of complex molecules such as polysaccharides. B. coprosuis itself was isolated from a manure storage pit of a swine facility, but has not yet been found in an animal host. The species is of interest solely because of its isolated phylogenetic location. The genome of B. coprosuis is already the 5th sequenced type strain genome from the genus Bacteroides. The 2,991,798 bp long genome with its 2,461 protein-coding and 78 RNA genes and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  1. Complete genome sequence of Marivirga tractuosa type strain (H-43T)

    SciTech Connect

    Pagani, Ioanna; Chertkov, Olga; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Copeland, A; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Nolan, Matt; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Pitluck, Sam; Held, Brittany; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Jeffries, Cynthia; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Ngatchou, Olivier Duplex; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Spring, Stefan; Sikorski, Johannes; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2011-01-01

    Marivirga tractuosa (Lewin 1969) Nedashkovskaya et al. 2010 is the type species of the genus Marivirga, which belongs to the family Flammeovirgaceae. Members of this genus are of interest because of their gliding motility. The species is of interest because representative strains show resistance to several antibiotics, including gentamicin, kanamycin, neomycin, polymixin and streptomycin. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Flammeovirgaceae. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 4,511,574 bp long chromosome and the 4,916 bp plasmid with their 3,808 protein-coding and 49 RNA genes are a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  2. Complete genome sequence of Nakamurella multipartita type strain (Y-104T)

    PubMed Central

    Tice, Hope; Mayilraj, Shanmugam; Sims, David; Lapidus, Alla; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, Alex; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Meincke, Linda; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Detter, John C.; Brettin, Thomas; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Chen, Feng

    2010-01-01

    Nakamurella multipartita (Yoshimi et al. 1996) Tao et al. 2004 is the type species of the monospecific genus Nakamurella in the actinobacterial suborder Frankineae. The nonmotile, coccus-shaped strain was isolated from activated sludge acclimated with sugar-containing synthetic wastewater, and is capable of accumulating large amounts of polysaccharides in its cells. Here we describe the features of the organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Nakamurellaceae. The 6,060,298 bp long single replicon genome with its 5415 protein-coding and 56 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304699

  3. Complete genome sequence of thermophilic Bacillus smithii type strain DSM 4216(T).

    PubMed

    Bosma, Elleke F; Koehorst, Jasper J; van Hijum, Sacha A F T; Renckens, Bernadet; Vriesendorp, Bastienne; van de Weijer, Antonius H P; Schaap, Peter J; de Vos, Willem M; van der Oost, John; van Kranenburg, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus smithii is a facultatively anaerobic, thermophilic bacterium able to use a variety of sugars that can be derived from lignocellulosic feedstocks. Being genetically accessible, it is a potential new host for biotechnological production of green chemicals from renewable resources. We determined the complete genomic sequence of the B. smithii type strain DSM 4216(T), which consists of a 3,368,778 bp chromosome (GenBank accession number CP012024.1) and a 12,514 bp plasmid (GenBank accession number CP012025.1), together encoding 3880 genes. Genome annotation via RAST was complemented by a protein domain analysis. Some unique features of B. smithii central metabolism in comparison to related organisms included the lack of a standard acetate production pathway with no apparent pyruvate formate lyase, phosphotransacetylase, and acetate kinase genes, while acetate was the second fermentation product. PMID:27559429

  4. Complete genome sequence of Eggerthella lenta type strain (IPP VPI 0255T)

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, Elizabeth H; Pukall, Rudiger; Birte, Abt; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, A; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Meincke, Linda; Sims, David; Brettin, Tom; Detter, J. Chris; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Han, Cliff

    2009-01-01

    Eggerthella lenta (Eggerth 1935) Wade et al. 1999, emended W rdemann et al. 2009 is the type species of the genus Eggerthella, which belongs to the actinobacterial family Coriobacteriaceae. E. lenta is a Gram-positive, non-motile, non-sporulating pathogenic bacterium that can cause severe bacteremia. The strain described in this study has been isolated from a rectal tumor in 1935. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the genus Eggerthella, and the 3,632,260 bp long single replicon genome with its 3123 protein-coding and 58 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  5. Complete genome sequence of Olsenella uli type strain (VPI D76D-27CT)

    SciTech Connect

    Goker, Markus; Held, Brittany; Lucas, Susan; Nolan, Matt; Yasawong, Montri; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Rohde, Manfred; Sikorski, Johannes; Pukall, Rudiger; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Olsenella uli (Olsen et al. 1991) Dewhirst et al. 2001 is the type species of the genus Olsenella, which belongs to the actinobacterial family Coriobacteriaceae. The species is of interest because it is frequently isolated from dental plaque in periodontitis patients and can cause primary endodontic infection. The species is a Gram-positive, non-motile and non-sporulating bacterium. The strain described in this study has been isolated from human gingival crevices in 1982. This is the first completed sequence of the genus Olsenella and the fifth sequence from the family Coriobacteriaceae. The 2,051,896 bp long genome with its 1,795 protein-coding and 55 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  6. Complete genome sequence of Brachybacterium faecium type strain (Schefferle 6-10T)

    SciTech Connect

    Lapidus, Alla; Pukall, Rudiger; LaButti, Kurt; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Chen, Feng; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; D'haeseleer, Patrik; Chain, Patrick; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Johnathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2009-05-20

    Brachybacterium faecium Collins et al. 1988 is the type species of the genus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its location in the Dermabacteraceae, a rather isolated family within the actinobacterial suborder Micrococcineae. B. faecium is known for its rod-coccus growth cycle and the ability to degrade uric acid. It grows aerobically or weakly anaerobically. The strain described in this report is a free-living, nonmotile, Gram-positive bacterium, originally isolated from poultry deep litter. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the actinobacterial family Dermabacteraceae, and the 3,614,992 bp long single replicon genome with its 3129 protein-coding and 69 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  7. Complete genome sequence of Archaeoglobus profundus type strain (AV18T)

    PubMed Central

    von Jan, Mathias; Lapidus, Alla; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Copeland, Alex; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Goodwin, Lynne; Han, Cliff; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Chertkov, Olga; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Saunders, Elizabeth; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Chain, Patrick; Eichinger, Konrad; Huber, Harald; Spring, Stefan; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Wirth, Reinhard; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Archaeoglobus profundus (Burggraf et al. 1990) is a hyperthermophilic archaeon in the euryarchaeal class Archaeoglobi, which is currently represented by the single family Archaeoglobaceae, containing six validly named species and two strains ascribed to the genus 'Geoglobus' which is taxonomically challenged as the corresponding type species has no validly published name. All members were isolated from marine hydrothermal habitats and are obligate anaerobes. Here we describe the features of the organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the second completed genome sequence of a member of the class Archaeoglobi. The 1,563,423 bp genome with its 1,858 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304717

  8. Ring strain and total syntheses of modified macrocycles of the isoplagiochin type

    PubMed Central

    Backes, Timo; Hesidens, Kerstin; Kolz, Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    Summary Macrocycles of the bisbibenzyl-type are natural products that are found exclusively in bryophytes (liverworts). The molecular framework of the subtype “isoplagiochin” is of substantial structural interest because of the chirality of the entire molecule, which arises from two biaryl axes in combination with two helical two-carbon units in a cyclic arrangement. From a structural as well as a synthetic point of view we report on the total synthesis of compounds which possess more rigid two-carbon biaryl bridges like stilbene (E or Z) or even tolane moieties which were introduced starting with a Sonogashira protocol. The McMurry method proved to be a powerful tool for the cyclization to these considerably ring-strained macrocycles. PMID:20300508

  9. Complete genome sequence of Brachyspira murdochii type strain (56-150T)

    SciTech Connect

    Pati, Amrita; Sikorski, Johannes; Gronow, Sabine; Munk, Christine; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Detter, J. Chris; Bruce, David; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Spring, Stefan; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2010-01-01

    Brachyspira murdochii Stanton et al. 1992 is a non-pathogenic but host-associated spirochete of the family Brachyspiraceae. Initially isolated from the intestinal content of a healthy swine, the group B spirochaetes were first described under the basonym Serpulina murdochii. Members of the family Brachyspiraceae are of great phylogenetic interest because of the extremely isolated location of this family within the phylum Spirochaetes . Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a type strain of a member of the family Brachyspiraceaeand only the second genome sequence from a member of the genus Brachyspira. The 3,241,804 bp long genome with its 2,893 protein-coding and 40 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  10. Complete genome sequence of Rhodothermus marinus type strain (R-10T)

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, Matt; Gronow, Sabine; Lapidus, Alla L.; Ivanova, N; Copeland, A; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, Sam; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Sims, David; Meincke, Linda; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, Cliff; Detter, J. Chris; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Rohde, Manfred; Sproer, Cathrin; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Chain, Patrick S. G.

    2009-01-01

    Rhodothermus marinus Alfredsson et al. 1995 is the type species of the genus and is of phylogenetic interest because the Rhodothermaceae represent the deepest lineage in the phylum Bacteroidetes. R. marinus R-10T is a Gram-negative, non-motile, non-spore-forming bacterium isolated from marine hot springs off the coast of Iceland. Strain R-10T is strictly aerobic and requires slightly halophilic conditions for growth. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the genus Rhodothermus, and only the second sequence from members of the family Rhodothermaceae. The 3,386,737 bp genome (including a 125 kb plasmid) with its 2914 protein-coding and 48 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  11. The Phenotypic Effects of Royal Jelly on Wild-Type D. melanogaster Are Strain-Specific.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Stefanie L; Seggio, Joseph A; Nascimento, Nara F; Huh, Dana D; Hicks, Jasmin A; Sharp, Katherine A; Axelrod, Jeffrey D; Wang, Kevin C

    2016-01-01

    The role for royal jelly (RJ) in promoting caste differentiation of honeybee larvae into queens rather than workers is well characterized. A recent study demonstrated that this poorly understood complex nutrition drives strikingly similar phenotypic effects in Drosophila melanogaster, such as increased body size and reduced developmental time, making possible the use of D. melanogaster as a model system for the genetic analysis of the cellular mechanisms underlying RJ and caste differentiation. We demonstrate here that RJ increases the body size of some wild-type strains of D. melanogaster but not others, and report significant delays in developmental time in all flies reared on RJ. These findings suggest that cryptic genetic variation may be a factor in the D. melanogaster response to RJ, and should be considered when attempting to elucidate response mechanisms to environmental changes in non-honeybee species.

  12. Complete genome sequence of Rhodothermus marinus type strain (R-10T)

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Matt; Tindall, Brian J.; Pomrenke, Helga; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Saunders, Elizabeth; Han, Cliff; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Chain, Patrick; Pitluck, Sam; Ovchinikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Brettin, Thomas; Göker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Detter, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Rhodothermus marinus Alfredsson et al. 1995 is the type species of the genus and is of phylogenetic interest because the Rhodothermaceae represent the deepest lineage in the phylum Bacteroidetes. R. marinus R-10T is a Gram-negative, non-motile, non-spore-forming bacterium isolated from marine hot springs off the coast of Iceland. Strain R-10T is strictly aerobic and requires slightly halophilic conditions for growth. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the genus Rhodothermus, and only the second sequence from members of the family Rhodothermaceae. The 3,386,737 bp genome (including a 125 kb plasmid) with its 2914 protein-coding and 48 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304669

  13. Genetic and phylogenetic analysis of a new porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) strain in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan; He, Kongwang; Wen, Libin; Fan, Hongjie

    2015-12-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is the etiological agent associated with several pig diseases that are collectively referred to as porcine circovirus-associated disease (PCVAD). Unfortunately, PCV2 has had a serious economic impact on the swine industry. In this study, we report the genome sequence of a novel PCV2 isolate (JS2015) identified in pigs in Jiang Su, China. The complete DNA sequence was 1766 nucleotides long with an A+T content of 52.7%. It lacked a guanine (G) at nucleotide position 1045 compared to other reference PCV2 strains with a sequence length of 1766 nucleotides. Genetic characterization and phylogenetic analysis showed that the isolate JS2015 was most closely related to members of the PCV2d (AY181946) lineage. Our data provide insight into the epidemiology of porcine circovirus and may facilitate further study of the origin and evolution of PCV2. PMID:26395090

  14. Complete genome sequence of the sulfate-reducing firmicute Desulfotomaculum ruminis type strain (DLT)

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Stefan; Visser, Michael; Lu, Megan; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Larimer, Frank; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Detter, John C.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Woyke, Tanja; Schaap, Peter J.; Plugge, Caroline M.; Muyzer, Gerard; Kuever, Jan; Pereira, Inês A. C.; Parshina, Sofiya N.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; Stams, Alfons J.M.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Desulfotomaculum ruminis Campbell and Postgate 1965 is a member of the large genus Desulfotomaculum which contains 30 species and is contained in the family Peptococcaceae. This species is of interest because it represents one of the few sulfate-reducing bacteria that have been isolated from the rumen. Here we describe the features of D. ruminis together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 3,969,014 bp long chromosome with a total of 3,901 protein-coding and 85 RNA genes is the second completed genome sequence of a type strain of the genus Desulfotomaculum to be published, and was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program 2009. PMID:23408247

  15. Complete genome sequence of Parvibaculum lavamentivorans type strain (DS-1T)

    SciTech Connect

    Schleheck, David; Weiss, Michael; Pitluck, Sam; Bruce, David; Land, Miriam L; Han, Cliff; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Tapia, Roxanne; Detter, J. Chris; Brettin, Thomas S; Han, James; Woyke, Tanja; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pennacchio, Len; Nolan, Matt; Cook, Alasdair M.; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Thomas, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    Parvibaculum lavamentivorans DS-1T is the type species of the novel genus Parvibaculum in the novel family Rhodobiaceae (formerly Phyllobacteriaceae) of the order Rhizobiales of Al- phaproteobacteria. Strain DS-1T is a non-pigmented, aerobic, heterotrophic bacterium and represents the first tier member of environmentally important bacterial communities that cata- lyze the complete degradation of synthetic laundry surfactants. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 3,914,745 bp long genome with its predicted 3,654 protein coding genes is the first com- pleted genome sequence of the genus Parvibaculum, and the first genome sequence of a rep- resentative of the family Rhodobiaceae.

  16. Complete genome sequence of Nakamurella multipartita type strain (Y-104T)

    SciTech Connect

    Tice, Hope; Mayilraj, Shanmugam; Sims, David; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, A; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Meincke, Linda; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Detter, J. Chris; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Chen, Feng

    2010-01-01

    Nakamurella multipartita (Yoshimi et al. 1996) Tao et al. 2004 is the type species of the small one-species genus Nakamurella in the actinomycetal suborder Frankineae. The nonmotile, coccus-shaped strain was isolated from activated sludge acclimated with sugar-containing synthetic wastewater, and is able of accumulating large amounts of polysaccharides in its cells. Here we describe the features of the organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Nakamurellaceae. The 6,060,298 bp long single replicon genome with its 5415 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  17. Complete genome sequence of Acidaminococcus fermentans type strain (VR4T)

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yun-Juan; Pukall, Rudiger; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Nolan, Matt; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Detter, J. Chris; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Mikhailova, Natalia; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Jeffries, Cynthia; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Acidaminococcus fermentans (Rogosa 1969) is the type species of the genus Acidaminococcus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its isolated placement in a genomically little characterized region of the clostridial family Veillonellaceae. A. fermentans is known for its gastrointestinal tract habitat and its ability to oxidize trans-aconitate. It grows strictly anaerobically and utilizes glutamate, citrate and trans-aconitate as sole energy sources for growth. The strain described in this report is a nonsporulating, nonmotile, Gram-negative coccus, originally isolated from a pig alimentary tract. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the genus Acidaminococcus, and the 2,329,769 bp long genome with its 2,101 protein-coding and 81 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  18. Complete genome sequence of Pirellula staleyi type strain (ATCC 27377T)

    SciTech Connect

    Clum, Alicia; Tindall, Brian; Sikorski, Johannes; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, Sam; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Chertkov, Olga; Han, Cliff; Detter, J. Chris; Kuske, Cheryl R; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Mikhailova, Natalia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla L.

    2009-01-01

    Pirellula staleyi Schlesner and Hirsch 1987 is the type species of the genus Pirellula of the family Planctomycetaceae. Members of this pear- or teardrop-shaped bacterium show a clearly visible pointed attachment pole and can be distinguished from other Planctomycetes by a lack of true stalks. Strains closely related to the species have been isolated from fresh and brackish water, as well as from hypersaline lakes. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of the order Planctomyces and only the second sequence from the phylum Planctomycetes. The 6,196,199 bp long genome with its 4773 protein-coding and 49 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  19. Genome sequence of the phage-gene rich marine Phaeobacter arcticus type strain DSM 23566T

    PubMed Central

    Freese, Heike M.; Dalingault, Hajnalka; Petersen, Jörn; Pradella, Silke; Davenport, Karen; Teshima, Hazuki; Chen, Amy; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Chain, Patrick; Detter, John C.; Rohde, Manfred; Gronow, Sabine; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Woyke, Tanja; Brinkhoff, Thorsten; Göker, Markus; Overmann, Jörg; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Phaeobacter arcticus Zhang et al. 2008 belongs to the marine Roseobacter clade whose members are phylogenetically and physiologically diverse. In contrast to the type species of this genus, Phaeobacter gallaeciensis, which is well characterized, relatively little is known about the characteristics of P. arcticus. Here, we describe the features of this organism including the annotated high-quality draft genome sequence and highlight some particular traits. The 5,049,232 bp long genome with its 4,828 protein-coding and 81 RNA genes consists of one chromosome and five extrachromosomal elements. Prophage sequences identified via PHAST constitute nearly 5% of the bacterial chromosome and included a potential Mu-like phage as well as a gene-transfer agent (GTA). In addition, the genome of strain DSM 23566T encodes all of the genes necessary for assimilatory nitrate reduction. Phylogenetic analysis and intergenomic distances indicate that the classification of the species might need to be reconsidered. PMID:24501630

  20. Complete genome sequence of Kribbella flavida type strain (IFO 14399T)

    SciTech Connect

    Pukall, Rudiger; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, A; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; LaButti, Kurt; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pitluck, Sam; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    The genus Kribbella consists of 15 species, with Kribbella flavida (Park et al. 1999) as the type species. The name Kribbella was formed from the acronym of the Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, KRIBB. Strains of the various Kribbella species were originally isolated from soil, potato, alum slate mine, patinas of catacombs or from horse racecourses. Here we describe the features of K. flavida together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. In addition to the 5.3 Mbp genome of Nocardioides sp. JS614, this is only the second completed genome sequence of the family Nocardioidaceae. The 7,579,488 bp long genome with its 7,086 protein-coding and 60 RNA genes and is part of the Genomic Encyc-lopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  1. The Phenotypic Effects of Royal Jelly on Wild-Type D. melanogaster Are Strain-Specific

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Stefanie L.; Seggio, Joseph A.; Hicks, Jasmin A.; Sharp, Katherine A.; Axelrod, Jeffrey D.; Wang, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    The role for royal jelly (RJ) in promoting caste differentiation of honeybee larvae into queens rather than workers is well characterized. A recent study demonstrated that this poorly understood complex nutrition drives strikingly similar phenotypic effects in Drosophila melanogaster, such as increased body size and reduced developmental time, making possible the use of D. melanogaster as a model system for the genetic analysis of the cellular mechanisms underlying RJ and caste differentiation. We demonstrate here that RJ increases the body size of some wild-type strains of D. melanogaster but not others, and report significant delays in developmental time in all flies reared on RJ. These findings suggest that cryptic genetic variation may be a factor in the D. melanogaster response to RJ, and should be considered when attempting to elucidate response mechanisms to environmental changes in non-honeybee species. PMID:27486863

  2. Efficacy of a new tetravalent coryza vaccine against emerging variant type B strains.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Anton A C; van den Berg, Karin; Malo, Aris

    2003-06-01

    Outbreaks of infectious coryza have been reported in vaccinated flocks in different countries, indicating that new serotype(s) of Haemophilus paragallinarum may have evolved. Several field isolates from vaccinated flocks in the US, Ecuador, Argentina and Zimbabwe were examined and, apart from one serotype C strain, all were typed as serotype B. An inactivated commercial trivalent vaccine, containing serotypes A, B and C, protected against challenge with the serotype C isolate but protection against challenge with serotype B isolates was weaker, suggesting that they might represent a new variant immunotype. An experimental tetravalent oil adjuvant vaccine, containing one of the serotype B isolates, appeared immunogenic against all isolates after one vaccination. Its efficacy and safety were further tested in layer chickens housed under field conditions. Chickens were vaccinated at 8 and 16 weeks of age while controls were unvaccinated. Vaccinates and controls were challenged with type A, B, C and variant type B at 25, 45 or 65 weeks of age. There was good protection (P<0.05) against all four immunotypes after all challenges. No systemic reactions were observed and local reactions were similar to those found with the commercial trivalent vaccine. The tetravalent vaccine may therefore be a good choice for control of new field isolates.

  3. Truncation of type IV pilin induces mucoidy in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO579

    PubMed Central

    Ryan Withers, T; Heath Damron, F; Yin, Yeshi; Yu, Hongwei D

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram negative, opportunistic pathogen that uses the overproduction of alginate, a surface polysaccharide, to form biofilms in vivo. Overproduction of alginate, also known as mucoidy, affords the bacterium protection from the host's defenses and facilitates the establishment of chronic lung infections in individuals with cystic fibrosis. Expression of the alginate biosynthetic operon is primarily controlled by the alternative sigma factor AlgU (AlgT/σ22). In a nonmucoid strain, AlgU is sequestered by the transmembrane antisigma factor MucA to the cytoplasmic membrane. AlgU can be released from MucA via regulated intramembrane proteolysis by proteases AlgW and MucP causing the conversion to mucoidy. Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO579, a derivative of the nonmucoid strain PAO1, is mucoid due to an unidentified mutation (muc-23). Using whole genome sequencing, we identified 16 nonsynonymous and 15 synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP). We then identified three tandem single point mutations in the pilA gene (PA4525), as the cause of mucoidy in PAO579. These tandem mutations generate a premature stop codon resulting in a truncated version of PilA (PilA108), with a C-terminal motif of phenylalanine-threonine-phenylalanine (FTF). Inactivation of pilA108 confirmed it was required for mucoidy. Additionally, algW and algU were also required for mucoidy of PAO579. Western blot analysis indicated that MucA was less stable in PAO579 than nonmucoid PAO1 or PAO381. The mucoid phenotype and high PalgU and PalgD promoter activities of PAO579 require pilA108, algW, algU, and rpoN encoding the alternative sigma factor σ54. We also observed that RpoN regulates expression of algW and pilA in PAO579. Together, these results suggest that truncation in type IV pilin in P. aeruginosa strain PAO579 can induce mucoidy through an AlgW/AlgU-dependent pathway. PMID:23533140

  4. Wild-Type Measles Virus with the Hemagglutinin Protein of the Edmonston Vaccine Strain Retains Wild-Type Tropism in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Noriyo; Kato, Sei-ich; Ami, Yasushi; Suzaki, Yuriko; Suzuki, Tadaki; Sato, Yuko; Tsunetsugu-Yokota, Yasuko; Mori, Kazuyasu; Van Nguyen, Nguyen; Kimura, Hideki; Nagata, Kyosuke

    2012-01-01

    A major difference between vaccine and wild-type strains of measles virus (MV) in vitro is the wider cell specificity of vaccine strains, resulting from the receptor usage of the hemagglutinin (H) protein. Wild-type H proteins recognize the signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) (CD150), which is expressed on certain cells of the immune system, whereas vaccine H proteins recognize CD46, which is ubiquitously expressed on all nucleated human and monkey cells, in addition to SLAM. To examine the effect of the H protein on the tropism and attenuation of MV, we generated enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-expressing recombinant wild-type MV strains bearing the Edmonston vaccine H protein (MV-EdH) and compared them to EGFP-expressing wild-type MV strains. In vitro, MV-EdH replicated in SLAM+ as well as CD46+ cells, including primary cell cultures from cynomolgus monkey tissues, whereas the wild-type MV replicated only in SLAM+ cells. However, in macaques, both wild-type MV and MV-EdH strains infected lymphoid and respiratory organs, and widespread infection of MV-EdH was not observed. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that SLAM+ lymphocyte cells were infected preferentially with both strains. Interestingly, EGFP expression of MV-EdH in tissues and lymphocytes was significantly weaker than that of the wild-type MV. Taken together, these results indicate that the CD46-binding activity of the vaccine H protein is important for determining the cell specificity of MV in vitro but not the tropism in vivo. They also suggest that the vaccine H protein attenuates MV growth in vivo. PMID:22238320

  5. Genome sequence of Frateuria aurantia type strain (Kondo 67(T)), a xanthomonade isolated from Lilium auratium Lindl.

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Teshima, Hazuki; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla L.; Tice, Hope; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Mavromatis, K; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Rohde, Manfred; Lang, Elke; Detter, J. Chris; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    rateuria aurantia (ex Kondo and Ameyama 1958) Swings et al. 1980 is a member of the bispecific genus Frateuria in the family Xanthomonadaceae, which is already heavily targeted for non-type strain genome sequencing. Strain Kondo 67(T) was initially (1958) identified as a member of 'Acetobacter aurantius', a name that was not considered for the approved list. Kondo 67(T) was therefore later designated as the type strain of the newly proposed acetogenic species Frateuria aurantia. The strain is of interest because of its triterpenoids (hopane family). F. aurantia Kondo 67(T) is the first member of the genus Frateura whose genome sequence has been deciphered, and here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 3,603,458-bp long chromosome with its 3,200 protein-coding and 88 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  6. Identification of type II restriction and modification systems in Helicobacter pylori reveals their substantial diversity among strains

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qing; Morgan, Richard D.; Roberts, Richard J.; Blaser, Martin J.

    2000-01-01

    A total of 22 type II restriction endonucleases with 18 distinct specificities have been identified in six Helicobacter pylori strains. Among these 18 specificities are three completely new endonucleases, Hpy178III, Hpy99I, and Hpy188I, that specifically cleave DNA at TCNNGA, CGWCG, and TCNGA sites, respectively. The set of endonucleases identified in each strain varies, but all have four- or five-base recognition sequences. Among 16 H. pylori strains, examination of the DNA modification status at the recognition sites of 15 restriction endonucleases reveals that each strain has a substantially different complement of type II modification systems. We conclude that the type II restriction-modification systems in H. pylori are highly diverse between strains, a unique characteristic of H. pylori. The diverse methylation status of H. pylori chromosomal DNA may serve as a new typing system to discriminate H. pylori isolates for epidemiological and clinical purposes. This study also demonstrates that H. pylori is a rich source of type II restriction endonucleases. PMID:10944229

  7. Enterotoxin production, phage typing and serotyping of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from clinical materials and food.

    PubMed Central

    Melconian, A. K.; Brun, Y.; Fleurette, J.

    1983-01-01

    The production of enterotoxins A, B, C and F by strains of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from various clinical sources and from isolates implicated in food poisoning was investigated. One hundred and ninety one of the 374 clinical strains (51.1%) were found to be enterotoxigenic; of these, 81 (27.7%) strains produced enterotoxin A, 57 (15.3%) strains produced enterotoxin B, 23 (6.2%) strains produced enterotoxin C, and 64 (17.1%) strains produced enterotoxin F. These enterotoxigenic strains were most frequently lysed by phages of group III (21.5%) or were not typable (22%). Eighteen of the 29 strains implicated in food poisoning were enterotoxigenic. The correlation of antigens and bacteriophage patterns with enterotoxigenicity was determined: enterotoxin A being related to a4 antigen, enterotoxin B to phages of 94/96 complex with c1, o antigens, and enterotoxin F to phages of group I with 2632, k1k2, m antigens. PMID:6227656

  8. Draft Genome Sequences of Eight Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Strains Previously Characterized Using an Electrophoretic Typing Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Mussa, Huda J.; VanWagoner, Timothy M.; Seale, Thomas W.; Whitby, Paul W.; Stull, Terrence L.

    2015-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae is an important cause of human disease. Strains were selected for genome sequencing to represent the breadth of nontypeable strains within the species, as previously defined by the electrophoretic mobility of 16 metabolic enzymes. PMID:26607889

  9. Relationship between heat-labile enterotoxin secretion capacity and virulence in wild type porcine-origin enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains.

    PubMed

    Wijemanne, Prageeth; Xing, Jun; Berberov, Emil M; Marx, David B; Francis, David H; Moxley, Rodney A

    2015-01-01

    Heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) is an important virulence factor secreted by some strains of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). The prototypic human-origin strain H10407 secretes LT via a type II secretion system (T2SS). We sought to determine the relationship between the capacity to secrete LT and virulence in porcine-origin wild type (WT) ETEC strains. Sixteen WT ETEC strains isolated from cases of severe diarrheal disease were analyzed by GM1ganglioside enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure LT concentrations in culture supernatants. All strains had detectable LT in supernatants by 2 h of culture and 1 strain, which was particularly virulent in gnotobiotic piglets (3030-2), had the highest LT secretion level all porcine-origin WT strains tested (P<0.05). The level of LT secretion (concentration in supernatants at 6-h culture) explained 92% of the variation in time-to-a-moribund-condition (R2 = 0.92, P<0.0001) in gnotobiotic piglets inoculated with either strain 3030-2, or an ETEC strain of lesser virulence (2534-86), or a non-enterotoxigenic WT strain (G58-1). All 16 porcine ETEC strains were positive by PCR analysis for the T2SS genes, gspD and gspK, and bioinformatic analysis of 4 porcine-origin strains for which complete genomic sequences were available revealed a T2SS with a high degree of homology to that of H10407. Maximum Likelihood phylogenetic trees constructed using T2SS genes gspC, gspD, gspE and homologs showed that strains 2534-86 and 3030-2 clustered together in the same clade with other porcine-origin ETEC strains in the database, UMNK88 and UMN18. Protein modeling of the ATPase gene (gspE) further revealed a direct relationship between the predicted ATP-binding capacities and LT secretion levels as follows: H10407, -8.8 kcal/mol and 199 ng/ml; 3030-2, -8.6 kcal/mol and 133 ng/ml; and 2534-86, -8.5 kcal/mol and 80 ng/ml. This study demonstrated a direct relationship between predicted ATP-binding capacity of GspE and LT secretion, and

  10. Characteristics of the mosaic genome of a human parechovirus type 1 strain isolated from an infant with pneumonia in China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Runan; Luo, Lei; Zhao, Linqing; Deng, Jie; Wang, Fang; Sun, Yu; Song, Qinwei; Ding, Yaxin; Qian, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Human parechoviruses (HPeVs) belong to the Parechovirus genus of the large and growing family of Picornaviridae with a non-enveloped, single-stranded and positive-sense RNA. An HPeV strain was isolated from the nasopharyngeal aspirate specimen of a 2 months old infant hospitalized with pneumonia in Beijing, China and nominated as BJ-37359 followed the code of the specimen. Strain BJ-37359 was identified as HPeV1 by whole genome sequencing. The full genome of strain BJ-37359 consisted of 7336 nucleotides (nt), excluding a poly (A) tail and contained an ORF of 6537 nt flanked by 5'UTR of 709 nt and 3'UTR of 90 nt. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that strain BJ-37359 were clustered together with HPeV1 strains in the structural capsid protein region, while uncoupling in the non-structural gene regions. Analyses with Simplot and Bootscan indicated that multiple recombination events occurred in the non-structural region and VP0 region of strain BJ-37359 with other HPeV1, and other types might have contributed to the recombination, especially HPeV6 and HPeV7 strains. Recombination analyses indicated that strain BJ-37359 may have a mosaic genome with new genomic recombination breakpoints.

  11. Identification of a Lactobacillus plantarum strain that ameliorates chronic inflammation and metabolic disorders in obese and type 2 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Toshimitsu, T; Mochizuki, J; Ikegami, S; Itou, H

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we identified a strain of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) that induces high levels of IL-10 production by immune cells, and evaluated the ability of the strain to suppress chronic inflammation and ameliorate metabolic disorders in in vitro and in vivo models. Among a collection of LAB strains, Lactobacillus plantarum strain OLL2712 (OLL2712) induced the highest levels of IL-10 production in mouse-derived dendritic cells and peritoneal macrophages. The anti-inflammatory effects of this strain were evaluated using a co-culture system comprising RAW 264.7 and 3T3-L1 cells. We also administered heat-killed OLL2712 to obese and type 2 diabetic KKAy mice for 3 wk to evaluate the in vivo effects of the strain. The OLL2712 significantly decreased the production of proinflammatory cytokines in vitro. Likewise, the administration of OLL2712 significantly suppressed proinflammatory cytokine levels in both the visceral adipose tissue and the serum of KKAy mice, and reduced serum triglyceride concentrations. The strain also alleviated oxidative stress and adrenaline levels in the serum of KKAy mice. On the other hand, Lactobacillus gasseri strain MEP222804 (a moderate IL-10 inducer) did not ameliorate the systemic inflammation and hyperlipidemia in KKAy mice. Our results suggest that treatment with strong IL-10-inducing LAB has the potential to ameliorate metabolic disorders by suppressing chronic inflammation in the host animal.

  12. Vaccination with a modified-live bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) type 1a vaccine completely protected calves against challenge with BVDV type 1b strains.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wenzhi; Mattick, Debra; Smith, Linda; Umbaugh, Jerry; Trigo, Emilio

    2010-12-10

    Vaccination plays a significant role in the control of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infection and spread. Recent studies revealed that type 1b is the predominant BVDV type 1 subgenotype, representing more than 75% of field isolates of BVDV-1. However, nearly all current, commercially available BVDV type 1 vaccines contain BVDV-1a strains. Previous studies have indicated that anti-BVDV sera, induced by BVDV-1a viruses, show less neutralization activity to BVDV-1b isolates than type 1a. Therefore, it is critically important to evaluate BVDV-1a vaccines in their ability to prevent BVDV-1b infection in calves. In current studies, calves were vaccinated subcutaneously, intradermally or intranasally with a single dose of a multivalent, modified-live viral vaccine containing a BVDV-1a strain, and were challenged with differing BVDV-1b strains to determine the efficacy and duration of immunity of the vaccine against these heterologous virus strains. Vaccinated calves, in all administration routes, were protected from respiratory disease caused by the BVDV-1b viruses, as indicated by significantly fewer clinical signs, lower rectal temperatures, reduced viral shedding and greater white blood cell counts than non-vaccinated control animals. The BVDV-1a vaccine elicited efficacious protection in calves against each BVDV-1b challenge strain, with a duration of immunity of at least 6 months.

  13. Genome sequence of the phylogenetically isolated spirochete Leptonema illini type strain (3055T)

    SciTech Connect

    Huntemann, Marcel; Stackebrandt, Erko; Held, Brittany; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Rohde, Manfred; Gronow, Sabine; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla L.

    2013-01-01

    Leptonema illini Hovind-Hougen 1979 is the type species of the genus Leptonema, family Leptospiraceae, phylum Spirochaetes. Organisms of this family have a Gram-negative-like cell enve- lope consisting of a cytoplasmic membrane and an outer membrane. The peptidoglycan layer is as- sociated with the cytoplasmic rather than the outer membrane. The two flagella of members of Leptospiraceae extend from the cytoplasmic membrane at the ends of the bacteria into the periplasmic space and are necessary for their motility. Here we describe the features of the L. illini type strain, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first genome sequence (finished at the level of Improved High Quality Draft) to be reported from of a member of the genus Leptonema and a representative of the third genus of the family Leptospiraceae for which complete or draft genome sequences are now available. The three scaffolds of the 4,522,760 bp draft genome sequence reported here, and its 4,230 protein-coding and 47 RNA genes are part of the Ge- nomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  14. Genetic recombination of tick-borne flaviviruses among wild-type strains.

    PubMed

    Norberg, Peter; Roth, Anette; Bergström, Tomas

    2013-06-01

    Genetic recombination has been suggested to occur in mosquito-borne flaviviruses. In contrast, tick-borne flaviviruses have been thought to evolve in a clonal manner, although recent studies suggest that recombination occurs also for these viruses. We re-analyzed the data and found that previous conclusions on wild type recombination were probably falsely drawn due to misalignments of nucleotide sequences, ambiguities in GenBank sequences, or different laboratory culture histories suggestive of recombination events in laboratory. To evaluate if reliable predictions of wild type recombination of tick-borne flaviviruses can be made, we analyzed viral strains sequenced exclusively for this study, and other flavivirus sequences retrieved from GenBank. We detected genetic signals supporting recombination between viruses within the three clades of TBEV-Eu, TBEV-Sib and TBEV-Fe, respectively. Our results suggest that the tick-borne encephalitis viruses may undergo recombination under natural conditions, but that geographic barriers restrict most recombination events to involve only closely genetically related viruses.

  15. Comparative metabolic profiling of mce1 operon mutant vs wild-type Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Adriano; Medina-Cleghorn, Daniel; Marjanovic, Olivera; Nomura, Daniel K; Riley, Lee W

    2015-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis disrupted in a 13-gene operon (mce1) accumulates free mycolic acids (FM) in its cell wall and causes accelerated death in mice. Here, to more comprehensively analyze differences in their cell wall lipid composition, we used an untargeted metabolomics approach to compare the lipid profiles of wild-type and mce1 operon mutant strains. By liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we identified >400 distinct lipids significantly altered in the mce1 mutant compared to wild type. These lipids included decreased levels of saccharolipids and glycerophospholipids, and increased levels of alpha-, methoxy- and keto mycolic acids (MA), and hydroxyphthioceranic acid. The mutant showed reduced expression of mmpL8, mmpL10, stf0, pks2 and papA2 genes involved in transport and metabolism of lipids recognized to induce proinflammatory response; these lipids were found to be decreased in the mutant. In contrast, the transcripts of mmpL3, fasI, kasA, kasB, acpM and RV3451 involved in MA transport and metabolism increased; MA inhibits inflammatory response in macrophages. Since the mce1 operon is known to be regulated in intracellular M. tuberculosis, we speculate that the differences we observed in cell wall lipid metabolism and composition may affect host response to M. tuberculosis infection and determine the clinical outcome of such an infection. PMID:26319139

  16. Characterization of Clostridium difficile Strains in British Columbia, Canada: A Shift from NAP1 Majority (2008) to Novel Strain Types (2013) in One Region

    PubMed Central

    Jassem, Agatha N.; Prystajecky, Natalie; Marra, Fawziah; Kibsey, Pamela; Tan, Kennard; Umlandt, Patricia; Janz, Loretta; Champagne, Sylvie; Gamage, Bruce; Golding, George R.; Mulvey, Michael R.; Henry, Bonnie

    2016-01-01

    Background. Clostridium difficile is a major cause of gastrointestinal illness. Epidemic NAP1 strains contain toxins A and B, a deletion in repressor tcdC, and a binary toxin. Objectives. To determine the molecular epidemiology of C. difficile in British Columbia and compare between two time points in one region. Methods. C. difficile isolates from hospital and community laboratories (2008) and one Island Health hospital laboratory (2013) were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, PCR-ribotyping, toxin possession, tcdC genotype, and antimicrobial susceptibility. Results. In 2008, 42.7% of isolates had NAP1 designation. Hospital-collected isolates were associated with older patients and more NAP1 types. Unlike other isolates, most NAP1 isolates possessed binary toxin and a 19 bp loss in tcdC. All isolates were susceptible to metronidazole and vancomycin. A 2013 follow-up revealed a 28.9% decrease in NAP1 isolates and 20.0% increase in isolates without NAP designation in one region. Then, community-associated cases were seen in younger patients, while NAP types were evenly distributed. Isolates without NAP designation did not cluster with a PFGE pattern or ribotype. Conclusions. Evaluation of C. difficile infections within British Columbia revealed demographic associations, epidemiological shifts, and characteristics of strain types. Continuous surveillance of C. difficile will enable detection of emerging strains. PMID:27366181

  17. QTL Analysis of Type I and Type IIA Fibers in Soleus Muscle in a Cross between LG/J and SM/J Mouse Strains

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Andrew M.; Palmer, Abraham A.; Lionikas, Arimantas

    2011-01-01

    Properties of muscle fibers, i.e., their type, number and size, are important determinants of functional characteristics of skeletal muscle, and of the quality of meat in livestock. Genetic factors play an important role in determining variation in fiber properties, however, specific genes remain largely elusive. We examined histological properties of soleus muscle fibers in two strains of mice exhibiting a twofold difference in muscle mass, LG/J and SM/J, and their F2 intercross. The total number of muscle fibers (555 ± 106; mean ± SD) did not differ between the strains or between males and females. A higher percentage of type I fibers was observed in the LG/J compared to the SM/J strain (P < 0.001) in both males (45 ± 3 vs. 37 ± 4%) and females (58 ± 4 vs. 41 ± 3%). Across strains, females had a higher percentage of type I fibers than males (P < 0.001), and the sex effect was greater in the LG/J strain (strain-by-sex interaction, P < 0.001). The cross-sectional area (CSA) did not differ between type I and type IIA fibers, but was greater in the LG/J than the SM/J strain (1365 ± 268 vs. 825 ± 229 μm2, P < 0.001). Three significant quantitative trait locus (QTL) affecting CSA for type I and type IIA fibers mapped to chromosomes (Chr) 1, 6, and 11 and three suggestive QTL for percentage of type I fibers mapped to Chr 2, 3, and 4. Within each significant QTL, regions of conserved synteny were also implicated in variation of similar traits in an analogous study in pigs. Our results provide the evidence that the intercross between the SM/J and LG/J strains is a promising model to search for genes affecting muscle fiber properties. PMID:22303393

  18. QTL Analysis of Type I and Type IIA Fibers in Soleus Muscle in a Cross between LG/J and SM/J Mouse Strains.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Andrew M; Palmer, Abraham A; Lionikas, Arimantas

    2011-01-01

    Properties of muscle fibers, i.e., their type, number and size, are important determinants of functional characteristics of skeletal muscle, and of the quality of meat in livestock. Genetic factors play an important role in determining variation in fiber properties, however, specific genes remain largely elusive. We examined histological properties of soleus muscle fibers in two strains of mice exhibiting a twofold difference in muscle mass, LG/J and SM/J, and their F2 intercross. The total number of muscle fibers (555 ± 106; mean ± SD) did not differ between the strains or between males and females. A higher percentage of type I fibers was observed in the LG/J compared to the SM/J strain (P < 0.001) in both males (45 ± 3 vs. 37 ± 4%) and females (58 ± 4 vs. 41 ± 3%). Across strains, females had a higher percentage of type I fibers than males (P < 0.001), and the sex effect was greater in the LG/J strain (strain-by-sex interaction, P < 0.001). The cross-sectional area (CSA) did not differ between type I and type IIA fibers, but was greater in the LG/J than the SM/J strain (1365 ± 268 vs. 825 ± 229 μm(2), P < 0.001). Three significant quantitative trait locus (QTL) affecting CSA for type I and type IIA fibers mapped to chromosomes (Chr) 1, 6, and 11 and three suggestive QTL for percentage of type I fibers mapped to Chr 2, 3, and 4. Within each significant QTL, regions of conserved synteny were also implicated in variation of similar traits in an analogous study in pigs. Our results provide the evidence that the intercross between the SM/J and LG/J strains is a promising model to search for genes affecting muscle fiber properties.

  19. Effects that different types of sports have on the hearts of children and adolescents and the value of two-dimensional strain-strain-rate echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Binnetoğlu, Fatih Köksal; Babaoğlu, Kadir; Altun, Gürkan; Kayabey, Özlem

    2014-01-01

    Whether the hypertrophy found in the hearts of athletes is physiologic or a risk factor for the progression of pathologic hypertrophy remains controversial. The diastolic and systolic functions of athletes with left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy usually are normal when measured by conventional methods. More precise assessment of global and regional myocardial function may be possible using a newly developed two-dimensional (2D) strain echocardiographic method. This study evaluated the effects that different types of sports have on the hearts of children and adolescents and compared the results of 2D strain and strain-rate echocardiographic techniques with conventional methods. Athletes from clubs for five different sports (basketball, swimming, football, wrestling, and tennis) who had practiced regularly at least 3 h per week during at least the previous 2 years were included in the study. The control group consisted of sedentary children and adolescents with no known cardiac or systemic diseases (n = 25). The athletes were grouped according to the type of exercise: dynamic (football, tennis), static (wrestling), or static and dynamic (basketball, swimming). Shortening fraction and ejection fraction values were within normal limits for the athletes in all the sports disciplines. Across all 140 athletes, LV geometry was normal in 58 athletes (41.4 %), whereas 22 athletes (15.7 %) had concentric remodeling, 20 (14.3 %) had concentric hypertrophy, and 40 (28.6 %) had eccentric hypertrophy. Global LV longitudinal strain values obtained from the average of apical four-, two-, and three-chamber global strain values were significantly lower for the basketball players than for all the other groups (p < 0.001).

  20. Defect investigations in InAs/GaSb type-II strained layer superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Brianna

    InAs/GaSb type-II strained layer superlattices are a material used for infrared detection. By adjusting the thickness of the InAs and GaSb layers, the material bandgap can be tuned to absorb photons from 3-30 mum. Compared to competing materials such as HgCdTe and InSb, InAs/GaSb superlattices are more mechanically robust, have reduced tunneling currents, and can use strain to suppress Auger recombination. In spite of these advantages, this material still faces several challenges, including low minority carrier lifetime, resulting from trap levels that cause Schockley-Read-Hall recombination. These low lifetimes lead to reduced signal-to-noise ratio and higher dark current. Therefore, increasing the lifetime is important for improving this material's performance. However, to increase the carrier lifetimes, the origin of the traps must first be understood. In this work, several key suspect causes of the "killer" defect were evaluated. A commonly explored suspect in literature, the interfaces, was studied using time-resolved photoluminescence for three different samples. This characterization method was also used to determine if the doping atom and its layer placement significantly impacted the minority carrier lifetime. There is a substantial amount of evidence that the presence of gallium, or the GaSb layer itself harbors the defect. Thus, the rest of the study focused on aspects of GaSb. Layer intermixing of the In and As atoms into the GaSb layer was studied by intentionally incorporating In and As in bulk GaSb and using photocapacitance characterization to observe any possible defect level formation. In addition, trap level formation for different GaSb growth temperatures was also explored with this characterization technique. Finally, in an attempt to reduce trap densities, GaSb was grown with an increased level of Sb monomers rather than dimers. This material was characterized using dark current density measurements and photoluminescence.

  1. Pathogenesis of a Chinese strain of bovine adenovirus type 3 infection in albino guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hong-Fei; Zhu, Yuan-Mao; Yan, Hao; Ma, Lei; Wang, Xue-Zhi; Xue, Fei

    2014-12-01

    Bovine adenovirus type 3 (BAV-3) is considered one of the most important respiratory tract agents of cattle and is widespread among cattle around the world. A BAV-3 strain was isolated from a bovine nasal swab for the first time in China in 2009 and named HLJ0955. Subsequently, BAV-3 has frequently been isolated from calves with respiratory diseases in China. To date, only limited study on the pathogenesis of BAV-3 infection in cotton rats has been conducted, and the pathogenesis of BAV-3 infection in guinea pigs has not been reported. Therefore, sixteen albino guinea pigs were inoculated intranasally with HLJ0955. All of the infected guinea pigs had apparently elevated rectal temperatures (39.2 °C-39.9 °C) at 2-7 days post-inoculation (PI). Consolidation and petechial hemorrhage were also observed in guinea pigs experimentally infected with HLJ0955. Viral replication was detectable by virus isolation and titration and by immunohistochemistry in the lungs of guinea pigs as early as 24 h PI. Viral DNA was detectable in the lungs of infected guinea pigs during 11 days of observation by real-time PCR. Virus-neutralizing antibodies against BAV-3 were detectable from 11 days PI and reached a peak titer at 15 days PI. Histopathological changes mainly occurred in the lungs of infected guinea pigs and were characterized by thickening of alveolar septa, mononuclear cell infiltration, hemorrhage and alveolar epithelial necrosis. These results indicate that HLJ0955 can replicate in the lungs of guinea pigs and cause fever and gross and histological lesions. The guinea pig infection model of BAV-3 would serve as a useful system for monitoring the infection process and pathogenesis of the Chinese BAV-3 strain HLJ0955, as well as immune responses to BAV-3 vaccines.

  2. Assessing benzene-induced toxicity on wild type Euglena gracilis Z and its mutant strain SMZ.

    PubMed

    Peng, Cheng; Arthur, Dionne M; Sichani, Homa Teimouri; Xia, Qing; Ng, Jack C

    2013-11-01

    Benzene is a representative member of volatile organic compounds and has been widely used as an industrial solvent. Groundwater contamination of benzene may pose risks to human health and ecosystems. Detection of benzene in the groundwater using chemical analysis is expensive and time consuming. In addition, biological responses to environmental exposures are uninformative using such analysis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to employ a microorganism, Euglena gracilis (E. gracilis) as a putative model to monitor the contamination of benzene in groundwater. To this end, we examined the wild type of E. gracilis Z and its mutant form, SMZ in their growth rate, morphology, chlorophyll content, formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage in response to benzene exposure. The results showed that benzene inhibited cell growth in a dose response manner up to 48 h of exposure. SMZ showed a greater sensitivity compared to Z in response to benzene exposure. The difference was more evident at lower concentrations of benzene (0.005-5 μM) where growth inhibition occurred in SMZ but not in Z cells. We found that benzene induced morphological changes, formation of lipofuscin, and decreased chlorophyll content in Z strain in a dose response manner. No significant differences were found between the two strains in ROS formation and DNA damage by benzene at concentrations affecting cell growth. Based on these results, we conclude that E. gracilis cells were sensitive to benzene-induced toxicities for certain endpoints such as cell growth rate, morphological change, depletion of chlorophyll. Therefore, it is a potentially suitable model for monitoring the contamination of benzene and its effects in the groundwater.

  3. Detection and differentiation of wild-type and a vaccine strain of Streptococcus equi ssp. equi using pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Livengood, Julia L; Lanka, Saraswathi; Maddox, Carol; Tewari, Deepanker

    2016-07-25

    Streptococcus equi subspecies equi (S. equi), the causative agent of strangles, is an important equine pathogen. Strangles is a highly contagious disease and a commercial modified live vaccine (MLV) is used for protection, which although effective, may also result in clinical signs of the disease. A rapid means to differentiate between the MLV and wild-type infection is crucial for quarantine release and limiting the disease spread. This study describes the use of a pyrosequencing assay targeting a single nucleotide deletion upstream of the SzPSe gene to distinguish between the wild-type and vaccine strains. A set of 96 characterized clinical specimens and isolates were tested using the assay. The assay was successful in differentiating between wild-type S. equi and the vaccine strains and in discriminating S. equi from other Streptococci. The vaccine strain was identified in 61.7% (29/47) of the strangles cases in horses with a history of MLV vaccination.

  4. Genotyping of Haemophilus influenzae type b strains and their incidence in the clinical samples isolated from Iranian patients

    PubMed Central

    Bagherzadeh Khodashahri, Somayeh; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Rahbar, Mohammad; Abdollahpour-Alitappeh, Meghdad; Vaziri, Farzam; Rahnamaye-Farzami, Mrjan; Mohammadzadeh, Mona; Davari, Mehdi; Fateh, Abolfazl; Masoumi, Morteza

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) is divided into two distinct genotypes, type I and type II, based on the structure of capsular polysaccharides. The capsulation locus of Haemophilus influenzae type b consists of three functionally distinct regions, designated regions 1 to 3. Region III contains hcsA and hcsB genes; however, notable sequence variation in this region can be used to recognize different Hib genotypes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and genotype of the Hib strains isolated from patients with invasive disease in Iran. Materials and Methods: In the present study, 8 pairs of primers were used for identification and serotyping of encapsulated Haemophilus influenzae strains, as well as confirmation of species identification. Additionally, in order to identify the capsular genotypes of Haemophilus influenzae type b (type I and II), two additional primer pairs were used to amplify the hcsA gene. Results: Out of 50 isolates of H. influenzae, four were found to be type b. Interestingly, among these 4 Hib isolates, 2 strains belonged to the type-II category. Conclusion: Our study shows that the prevalence of both Hib types I and II seems to be high in Iran. PMID:26668700

  5. Population Genetic Structure of Listeria monocytogenes Strains as Determined by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis and Multilocus Sequence Typing

    PubMed Central

    Henri, Clémentine; Félix, Benjamin; Guillier, Laurent; Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Michelon, Damien; Mariet, Jean-François; Aarestrup, Frank M.; Mistou, Michel-Yves; Hendriksen, René S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous bacterium that may cause the foodborne illness listeriosis. Only a small amount of data about the population genetic structure of strains isolated from food is available. This study aimed to provide an accurate view of the L. monocytogenes food strain population in France. From 1999 to 2014, 1,894 L. monocytogenes strains were isolated from food at the French National Reference Laboratory for L. monocytogenes and classified according to the five risk food matrices defined by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). A total of 396 strains were selected on the basis of different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) clusters, serotypes, and strain origins and typed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and the MLST results were supplemented with MLST data available from Institut Pasteur, representing human and additional food strains from France. The distribution of sequence types (STs) was compared between food and clinical strains on a panel of 675 strains. High congruence between PFGE and MLST was found. Out of 73 PFGE clusters, the two most prevalent corresponded to ST9 and ST121. Using original statistical analysis, we demonstrated that (i) there was not a clear association between ST9 and ST121 and the food matrices, (ii) serotype IIc, ST8, and ST4 were associated with meat products, and (iii) ST13 was associated with dairy products. Of the two major STs, ST121 was the ST that included the fewest clinical strains, which might indicate lower virulence. This observation may be directly relevant for refining risk analysis models for the better management of food safety. IMPORTANCE This study showed a very useful backward compatibility between PFGE and MLST for surveillance. The results enabled better understanding of the population structure of L. monocytogenes strains isolated from food and management of the health risks associated with L. monocytogenes food strains. Moreover, this work provided an accurate view

  6. Lipomyces chichibuensis sp. nov., isolated in Japan, and reidentification of the type strains of Lipomyces kononenkoae and Lipomyces spencermartinsiae.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Atsushi; Kawasaki, Hiroko

    2014-08-01

    We isolated two strains of a novel Lipomyces species from soil collected in Chichibu forest, Saitama prefecture, Japan. Based on their morphological and biochemical characteristics, along with multilocus sequence typing using the D1/D2 domain of the large-subunit (LSU) rRNA gene, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and the translation elongation factor 1 alpha gene (EF-1α), the two strains were shown to represent a novel species of the genus Lipomyces, described as Lipomyces chichibuensis sp. nov. (type strain CB08-2(T) = NBRC 109582(T) = CBS 12929(T); Mycobank no. MB808164). In addition, we reidentified the type strains of Lipomyces kononenkoae and Lipomyces spencermartinsiae maintained in culture collections based on phenotypic characters and/or DNA-DNA hybridization to ensure correct future identification of species of the genus Lipomyces. The correct type strains of L. kononenkoae and L. spencermartinsiae are NBRC 107661(T) ( = CBS 2514(T)) and NBRC 10376(T) ( = CBS 5608(T)), respectively. PMID:24812367

  7. Typing of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis strains by PCR analysis of inter-IS256 spacer length polymorphisms.

    PubMed Central

    Deplano, A; Vaneechoutte, M; Verschraegen, G; Struelens, M J

    1997-01-01

    IS256 elements are present in multiple copies in the staphylococcal genome, either flanking the transposon Tn4001 or independent of it. PCR-based analysis of inter-IS256 spacer polymorphisms was developed for typing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus epidermidis strains. Using SmaI macrorestriction analysis resolved by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) as the reference method for MRSA typing, excellent reproducibility (100%), discriminatory power (97%), and in vivo stability were observed. Good concordance of the results with those of other molecular typing methods was found for two MRSA collections. Inter-IS256 PCR analysis of a U.S. collection of MRSA strains (n = 36), previously characterized by 15 typing methods, showed more limited discrimination. Agreement was 78% with PFGE analysis and 83% with ribotyping (HindIII). Analysis of a second set of Belgian MRSA strains (n = 17), categorized into two widespread epidemic clones by PFGE analysis, showed 65% agreement. For typing of S. epidermidis strains (n = 26), inter-IS256 PCR showed complete typeability (100%) and good discriminatory power (85%). Inter-IS256 PCR analysis is proposed as an efficient molecular typing assay for epidemiological studies of MRSA or S. epidermidis isolates. PMID:9316911

  8. Tandem Tetramer-Based Microsatellite Fingerprinting for Typing of Proteus mirabilis Strains

    PubMed Central

    Cieślikowski, Tomasz; Gradecka, Dobrosława; Mielczarek, Magdalena; Kaca, Wiesław

    2003-01-01

    Two microsatellite tandem repeated tetramers, (GACA)4 and (CAAT)4, were used for Proteus mirabilis strain differentiation. The microsatellite-based PCR tests were applied for the examination of interstrain diversity for 87 P. mirabilis strains. Forty-six of the investigated strains were clinical isolates (5 were hospital isolates and 39 were outpatient clinic isolates); 42 strains were derived from the Kauffmann-Perch collection of laboratory strains. Fingerprinting done with the tetramers had a high discrimination ability [0.992 and 0.940 for (GACA)4 and (CAAT)4, respectively]. The distributions of clinical isolates among well-defined laboratory strains, determined by numerical analysis (unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic averages; Dice similarity coefficient), proved their genetic similarity to reference strains in the Kauffmann-Perch collection. This analysis also indicated that it is possible to estimate some phenotypic properties of P. mirabilis clinical isolates solely on the basis of microsatellite fingerprinting. PMID:12682159

  9. Immunity status of adults and children against poliomyelitis virus type 1 strains CHAT and Sabin (LSc-2ab) in Germany

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In October 2007, the working group CEN/TC 216 of the European Committee for standardisation suggested that the Sabin oral poliovirus vaccine type 1 strain (LSc-2ab) presently used for virucidal tests should be replaced by another attenuated vaccine poliovirus type 1 strain, CHAT. Both strains were historically used as oral vaccines, but the Sabin type 1 strain was acknowledged to be more attenuated. In Germany, vaccination against poliomyelitis was introduced in 1962 using the oral polio vaccine (OPV) containing Sabin strain LSc-2ab. The vaccination schedule was changed from OPV to an inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) containing wild polio virus type 1 strain Mahoney in 1998. In the present study, we assessed potential differences in neutralising antibody titres to Sabin and CHAT in persons with a history of either OPV, IPV, or OPV with IPV booster. Methods Neutralisation poliovirus antibodies against CHAT and Sabin 1 were measured in sera of 41 adults vaccinated with OPV. Additionally, sera from 28 children less than 10 years of age and immunised with IPV only were analysed. The neutralisation assay against poliovirus was performed according to WHO guidelines. Results The neutralisation activity against CHAT in adults with OPV vaccination history was significantly lower than against Sabin poliovirus type 1 strains (Wilcoxon signed-rank test P < 0.025). In eight sera, the antibody titres measured against CHAT were less than 8, although the titre against Sabin 1 varied between 8 and 64. Following IPV booster, anti-CHAT antibodies increased rapidly in sera of CHAT-negative adults with OPV history. Sera from children with IPV history neutralised CHAT and Sabin 1 strains equally. Conclusion The lack of neutralising antibodies against the CHAT strain in persons vaccinated with OPV might be associated with an increased risk of reinfection with the CHAT polio virus type 1, and this implies a putative risk of transmission of the virus to polio-free communities. We

  10. Early detection of cardiac dysfunction in the type 1 diabetic heart using speckle-tracking based strain imaging.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Danielle L; Nichols, Cody E; Croston, Tara L; McLaughlin, Sarah L; Petrone, Ashley B; Lewis, Sara E; Thapa, Dharendra; Long, Dustin M; Dick, Gregory M; Hollander, John M

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced sensitivity in echocardiographic analyses may allow for early detection of changes in cardiac function beyond the detection limits of conventional echocardiographic analyses, particularly in a small animal model. The goal of this study was to compare conventional echocardiographic measurements and speckle-tracking based strain imaging analyses in a small animal model of type 1 diabetes mellitus. Conventional analyses revealed differences in ejection fraction, fractional shortening, cardiac output, and stroke volume in diabetic animals relative to controls at 6-weeks post-diabetic onset. In contrast, when assessing short- and long-axis speckle-tracking based strain analyses, diabetic mice showed changes in average systolic radial strain, radial strain rate, radial displacement, and radial velocity, as well as decreased circumferential and longitudinal strain rate, as early as 1-week post-diabetic onset and persisting throughout the diabetic study. Further, we performed regional analyses for the LV and found that the free wall region was affected in both the short- and long-axis when assessing radial dimension parameters. These changes began 1-week post-diabetic onset and remained throughout the progression of the disease. These findings demonstrate the use of speckle-tracking based strain as an approach to elucidate cardiac dysfunction from a global perspective, identifying left ventricular cardiac regions affected during the progression of type 1 diabetes mellitus earlier than contractile changes detected by conventional echocardiographic measurements.

  11. Uniaxial strain-induced magnetic order transition from E-type to A-type in orthorhombic YMnO{sub 3} from first-principles

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S. X.; Fang, X. G.; Zhang, A. H.; Lu, X. B.; Gao, J. W.; Gao, X. S.; Zeng, M.; Liu, J.-M.

    2014-10-28

    The spin ordering magnetic structures of orthorhombic YMnO{sub 3} subjected to uniaxial strain have been investigated using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. On applying compressive uniaxial strain of −0.8% along the b orientation, the spin ordering magnetic structure is predicted to change from E-type to A-type antiferromagnetic orderings. The structure analysis also reveals that the uniaxial strain has a dramatic influence on the Mn-O bond lengths and Mn-O-Mn bond angles, allowing the gradual suppression of the alternation of the long and short Mn-O-Mn bonds in the ab plane. These changes present very interesting possibilities for engineering the spin ordering along with ferroelectric property in orthorhombic YMnO{sub 3}.

  12. Specificity and Strain-Typing Capabilities of Nanorod Array-Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy for Mycoplasma pneumoniae Detection.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Kelley C; Benitez, Alvaro J; Ratliff, Amy E; Crabb, Donna M; Sheppard, Edward S; Winchell, Jonas M; Dluhy, Richard A; Waites, Ken B; Atkinson, T Prescott; Krause, Duncan C

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a cell wall-less bacterial pathogen of the human respiratory tract that accounts for > 20% of all community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). At present the most effective means for detection and strain-typing is quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), which can exhibit excellent sensitivity and specificity but requires separate tests for detection and genotyping, lacks standardization between available tests and between labs, and has limited practicality for widespread, point-of-care use. We have developed and previously described a silver nanorod array-surface enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (NA-SERS) biosensing platform capable of detecting M. pneumoniae with statistically significant specificity and sensitivity in simulated and true clinical throat swab samples, and the ability to distinguish between reference strains of the two main genotypes of M. pneumoniae. Furthermore, we have established a qualitative lower endpoint of detection for NA-SERS of < 1 genome equivalent (cell/μl) and a quantitative multivariate detection limit of 5.3 ± 1 cells/μl. Here we demonstrate using partial least squares- discriminatory analysis (PLS-DA) of sample spectra that NA-SERS correctly identified M. pneumoniae clinical isolates from globally diverse origins and distinguished these from a panel of 12 other human commensal and pathogenic mycoplasma species with 100% cross-validated statistical accuracy. Furthermore, PLS-DA correctly classified by strain type all 30 clinical isolates with 96% cross-validated accuracy for type 1 strains, 98% cross-validated accuracy for type 2 strains, and 90% cross-validated accuracy for type 2V strains. PMID:26121242

  13. Specificity and Strain-Typing Capabilities of Nanorod Array-Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy for Mycoplasma pneumoniae Detection

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Kelley C.; Benitez, Alvaro J.; Ratliff, Amy E.; Crabb, Donna M.; Sheppard, Edward S.; Winchell, Jonas M.; Dluhy, Richard A.; Waites, Ken B.; Atkinson, T. Prescott; Krause, Duncan C.

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a cell wall-less bacterial pathogen of the human respiratory tract that accounts for > 20% of all community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). At present the most effective means for detection and strain-typing is quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), which can exhibit excellent sensitivity and specificity but requires separate tests for detection and genotyping, lacks standardization between available tests and between labs, and has limited practicality for widespread, point-of-care use. We have developed and previously described a silver nanorod array-surface enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (NA-SERS) biosensing platform capable of detecting M. pneumoniae with statistically significant specificity and sensitivity in simulated and true clinical throat swab samples, and the ability to distinguish between reference strains of the two main genotypes of M. pneumoniae. Furthermore, we have established a qualitative lower endpoint of detection for NA-SERS of < 1 genome equivalent (cell/μl) and a quantitative multivariate detection limit of 5.3 ± 1 cells/μl. Here we demonstrate using partial least squares- discriminatory analysis (PLS-DA) of sample spectra that NA-SERS correctly identified M. pneumoniae clinical isolates from globally diverse origins and distinguished these from a panel of 12 other human commensal and pathogenic mycoplasma species with 100% cross-validated statistical accuracy. Furthermore, PLS-DA correctly classified by strain type all 30 clinical isolates with 96% cross-validated accuracy for type 1 strains, 98% cross-validated accuracy for type 2 strains, and 90% cross-validated accuracy for type 2V strains. PMID:26121242

  14. Specificity and Strain-Typing Capabilities of Nanorod Array-Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy for Mycoplasma pneumoniae Detection.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Kelley C; Benitez, Alvaro J; Ratliff, Amy E; Crabb, Donna M; Sheppard, Edward S; Winchell, Jonas M; Dluhy, Richard A; Waites, Ken B; Atkinson, T Prescott; Krause, Duncan C

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a cell wall-less bacterial pathogen of the human respiratory tract that accounts for > 20% of all community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). At present the most effective means for detection and strain-typing is quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), which can exhibit excellent sensitivity and specificity but requires separate tests for detection and genotyping, lacks standardization between available tests and between labs, and has limited practicality for widespread, point-of-care use. We have developed and previously described a silver nanorod array-surface enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (NA-SERS) biosensing platform capable of detecting M. pneumoniae with statistically significant specificity and sensitivity in simulated and true clinical throat swab samples, and the ability to distinguish between reference strains of the two main genotypes of M. pneumoniae. Furthermore, we have established a qualitative lower endpoint of detection for NA-SERS of < 1 genome equivalent (cell/μl) and a quantitative multivariate detection limit of 5.3 ± 1 cells/μl. Here we demonstrate using partial least squares- discriminatory analysis (PLS-DA) of sample spectra that NA-SERS correctly identified M. pneumoniae clinical isolates from globally diverse origins and distinguished these from a panel of 12 other human commensal and pathogenic mycoplasma species with 100% cross-validated statistical accuracy. Furthermore, PLS-DA correctly classified by strain type all 30 clinical isolates with 96% cross-validated accuracy for type 1 strains, 98% cross-validated accuracy for type 2 strains, and 90% cross-validated accuracy for type 2V strains.

  15. [The development of reagents set in the format of DNA-chip for genetic typing of strains of Vibrio cholerae].

    PubMed

    Pudova, E A; Markelov, M L; Dedkov, V G; Tchekanova, T A; Sadjin, A I; Kirdiyashkina, N P; Bekova, M V; Deviyatkin, A A

    2014-05-01

    The necessity of development of methods of genic diagnostic of cholera is conditioned by continuation of the Seventh pandemic of cholera, taxonomic variability of strains of Vibrio cholerae involved into pandemic and also permanent danger of delivery of disease to the territory of the Russian Federation. The methods of genic diagnostic of cholera make it possible in a comparatively short time to maximally minutely characterize strains isolated from patients or their environment. The article presents information about working out reagents set for genetic typing of agents of cholera using DNA-chip. The makeup of DNA-chip included oligonucleotide probes making possible to differentiate strains of V. cholerae on serogroups and biovars and to determine their pathogenicity. The single DNA-chip makes it possible to genetically type up to 12 samples concurrently. At that, duration of analysis without accounting stage of DNA separation makes up to 5 hours. In the progress of work, 23 cholera and non-cholera strains were analyzed. The full compliance of DNA-chip typing results to previously known characteristics of strains. Hence, there is a reason to consider availability of further development of reagents set and possibility of its further application in laboratories of regional level and reference centers. PMID:25338464

  16. Multilocus sequence typing for the analysis of clonality among Candida albicans strains from a neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Song, Eun Song; Shin, Jong Hee; Jang, Hee-Chang; Choi, Min Ji; Kim, Soo Hyun; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; d'Enfert, Christophe; Choi, Young Youn

    2014-08-01

    Nosocomial Candida albicans infections are a significant problem in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). We investigated the clonality of C. albicans isolates recovered over an 8-year period from neonates at a NICU. We also validated multilocus sequence typing (MLST) compared with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) for the genotyping of C. albicans strains from the same NICU. A total of 43 clinical isolates (10 blood, 19 urine, and 14 other) were obtained from 43 neonates between 2005 and 2012. Clonal strains were defined as the isolation of two or more strains with identical or similar genotypes as determined with both MLST and PFGE. Using MLST, the 43 isolates yielded 25 diploid sequence types (DSTs) and 10 DSTs were shared by 28 isolates (65.1%). Among the 28 isolates sharing 10 DSTs, isolates from each of seven DSTs had the same or similar PFGE pattern. In addition, two sets of isolates that differed by MLST at only one locus had the same or similar PFGE pattern. Overall, when the MLST and PFGE results were combined, 22 isolates (51.2%) shared eight genotypes, suggesting clonal strains. Strains from each of seven genotypes (total, 19 isolates) were isolated among the 22 clonal strains within a 6-month period, whereas three strains of one genotype were obtained over a 3-year interval. Our findings suggest that horizontal transmission of C. albicans may occur more frequently than vertical transmission among NICU patients and that MLST appears to be a useful method for genotyping C. albicans strains isolated from NICU patients.

  17. Orientation Effects in Ballistic High-Strained P-type Si Nanowire FETs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-Hong; Huang, Qing-An; Yu, Hong; Lei, Shuang-Ying

    2009-01-01

    In order to design and optimize high-sensitivity silicon nanowire-field-effect transistor (SiNW FET) pressure sensors, this paper investigates the effects of channel orientations and the uniaxial stress on the ballistic hole transport properties of a strongly quantized SiNW FET placed near the high stress regions of the pressure sensors. A discrete stress-dependent six-band k.p method is used for subband structure calculation, coupled to a two-dimensional Poisson solver for electrostatics. A semi-classical ballistic FET model is then used to evaluate the ballistic current-voltage characteristics of SiNW FETs with and without strain. Our results presented here indicate that [110] is the optimum orientation for the p-type SiNW FETs and sensors. For the ultra-scaled 2.2 nm square SiNW, due to the limit of strong quantum confinement, the effect of the uniaxial stress on the magnitude of ballistic drive current is too small to be considered, except for the [100] orientation. However, for larger 5 nm square SiNW transistors with various transport orientations, the uniaxial tensile stress obviously alters the ballistic performance, while the uniaxial compressive stress slightly changes the ballistic hole current. Furthermore, the competition of injection velocity and carrier density related to the effective hole masses is found to play a critical role in determining the performance of the nanotransistors.

  18. Molecular Typing of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Strains: A Fundamental Tool for Tuberculosis Control and Elimination

    PubMed Central

    Cannas, Angela; Mazzarelli, Antonio; Di Caro, Antonino; Delogu, Giovanni; Girardi, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. An improvement of the strategies for disease control is necessary in both low- and high-incidence TB countries. Clinicians, epidemiologists, laboratory specialists, and public health players should work together in order to achieve a significant reduction in TB transmission and spread of drug-resistant strains. Effective TB surveillance relies on early diagnosis of new cases, appropriate therapy, and accurate detection of outbreaks in the community, in order to implement proper TB control strategies. To achieve this goal, information from classical and molecular epidemiology, together with patient clinical data need to be combined. In this review, we summarize the methodologies currently used in molecular epidemiology, namely molecular typing. We will discuss their efficiency to phylogenetically characterize Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates, and their ability to provide information that can be useful for disease control. We will also introduce next generation sequencing as the methodology that potentially could provide in a short time both, detection of new outbreaks and identification of resistance patterns. This could envision a potential of next generation sequencing as an important tool for accurate patient management and disease control. PMID:27403266

  19. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of leptospiral strains isolated from two geographic locations of Tamil Nadu, India.

    PubMed

    Kanagavel, Murugesan; Princy Margreat, Alphonse Asirvatham; Arunkumar, Manivel; Prabhakaran, Shanmugarajan Gnanasekaran; Shanmughapriya, Santhanam; Natarajaseenivasan, Kalimuthusamy

    2016-01-01

    Here the rodent carrier status for the transmission of human leptospirosis in Tiruchirappalli, district, Tamil Nadu, India was assessed. The predominantly circulating leptospiral STs were recognized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). A total of 113 rodents were trapped from different provinces of the Tiruchirappalli district. The most prevalent rodent was Bandicota bengalensis (37.2%), and of the total, 52.2% (n=59) rodents were found to be positive for leptospiral 16S rRNA. These results were validated with a leptospiral culture positivity of 45.8% (n=27). Three isolates from Chennai (2 rodents and 1 human) and 1 human isolate from Tiruchirappalli were included to understand the spatial variations and to track the source of human leptospirosis. The serogroup, serovar, and species level identification of all 31 isolates identified 28 to be Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Javanica and three as Leptospira interrogans serovar Autumnalis. MLST analysis defined all isolates to the existing ST profiles (ST145 and ST27) with the exception of 6 L. borgpetersenii (ST DR) isolates that showed variations in the sucA and pfkB loci. The DR ST was locally confined to Chatram province of Tiruchirappalli suggesting an epidemiological link. The predominant STs, ST145 and ST-DR form a group, indicating the presence of original strain that subsequently diverged evolutionarily into two STs. The variations between L. borgpetersenii in sucA and pfkB loci may be an indication that evolutionary changes transpired in Tiruchirappalli.

  20. Genome sequence of the ocean sediment bacterium Saccharomonospora marina type strain (XMU15T)

    SciTech Connect

    Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lu, Megan; Lucas, Susan; Copeland, A; Pitluck, Sam; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Potter, Gabriele; Land, Miriam L; Ivanova, N; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Li, Wen-Jun; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Woyke, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Saccharomonospora marina Liu et al. 2010 is a member to the genomically so far poorly characterized genus Saccharomonospora in the family Pseudonocardiaceae. Members of the genus Sacharomonospora are of interest because they originate from diverse habitats, such as leaf litter, manure, compost, surface of peat, moist, over-heated grain, and ocean sediment, where they might play a role in the primary degradation of plant material by attacking hemicellulose. Organisms belonging to the genus are usually Gram-positive staining, non-acid fast, and classify among the actinomycetes. Next to S. viridis and S. azurea, S. marina is the third member in the genus Saccharomonospora for with a completely sequenced (permanent draft status) type strain genome will be published. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. The 5,965,593 bp long chromosome with its 5,727 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE funded Community Sequencing Program (CSP) 2010 at the Joint Genome Institute (JGI).

  1. Genome sequence of the soil bacterium Saccharomonospora azurea type strain (NA-128T)

    SciTech Connect

    Klenk, Hans-Peter; Held, Brittany; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Hammon, Nancy; Pitluck, Sam; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Potter, Gabriele; Land, Miriam L; Ivanova, N; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Woyke, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Saccharomonospora azurea Runmao et al. 1987 is a member to the genomically so far poorly characterized genus Saccharomonospora in the family Pseudonocardiaceae. Members of the genus Sacharomonosoras are of interest because they originate from diverse habitats, such as leaf litter, manure, compost, surface of peat, moist and over-heated grain, where they might play a role in the primary degradation of plant material by attacking hemicellulose. They are Gram-negative staining organisms classified among the usually Gram-positive actinomycetes. Next to S. viridis, S. azurea is only the second member in the genus Saccharomonospora for with a completely sequenced type strain genome will be published. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence with project status 'permanent draft', and annotation. The 4,763,832 bp long chromosome with its 4,472 protein-coding and 58 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE funded Community Sequencing Program (CSP) 2010 at the Joint Genome Institute (JGI).

  2. Complete genome sequence of Halomicrobium mukohataei type strain (arg-2T)

    SciTech Connect

    Tindall, Brian; Schneider, Susan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Han, Cliff; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Detter, J. Chris

    2009-01-01

    Halomicrobium mukohataei (Ihara et al. 1997) Oren et al. 2002 is the type species of the genus Halomicrobium. It is of phylogenetic interest because of its isolated location within the large euryarchaeal family Halobacteriaceae. H. mukohataei is an extreme halophile that grows essentially aerobically, but can also grow anaerobically under change of morphology and with nitrate as electron acceptor. The strain whose genome is described in this report is a free-living, motile, Gram-negative euryarchaeon, originally isolated from Salinas Grandes in Jujuy, Andes highlands, Argentina. Its genome contains three genes for the 16S rRNA with differ from each other by up to 9%. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence from the poorly populated genus Halomicrobium, and the 3,332,349 bp long genome (chromosome and one plasmid) with its 3416 protein-coding and 56 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  3. Genome sequence of the chemoheterotrophic soil bacterium Saccharomonospora cyanea type strain (NA-134(T))

    SciTech Connect

    Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P.; Lu, Megan; Huntemann, Marcel; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Pitluck, Sam; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Potter, Gabriele; Land, Miriam L; Ivanova, N; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Saccharomonospora cyanea Runmao et al. 1988 is a member of the genus Saccharomonospora in the family Pseudonocardiaceae that is moderately well characterized at the genome level thus far. Members of the genus Saccharomonospora are of interest because they originate from diverse habitats, such as soil, leaf litter, manure, compost, surface of peat, moist, over-heated grain, and ocean sediment, where they probably play a role in the primary degradation of plant material by attacking hemicellulose. Species of the genus Saccharomonospora are usually Gram-positive, non-acid fast, and are classified among the actinomycetes. S. cyanea is characterized by a dark blue (= cyan blue) aerial mycelium. After S. viridis, S. azurea, and S. marina, S. cyanea is only the fourth member in the genus for which a completely sequenced (non-contiguous finished draft status) type strain genome will be published. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the draft genome sequence, and annotation. The 5,408,301 bp long chromosome with its 5,139 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE funded Community Sequencing Program (CSP) 2010 at the Joint Genome Institute (JGI).

  4. Francisella tularensis Strain Typing Using Multiple-Locus, Variable-Number Tandem Repeat Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Farlow, Jason; Smith, Kimothy L.; Wong, Jane; Abrams, Michelle; Lytle, Michael; Keim, Paul

    2001-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, the etiological agent of tularemia, is found throughout the Northern hemisphere. After analyzing the F. tularensis genomic sequence for potential variable-number tandem repeats (VNTRs), we developed a multilocus VNTR analysis (MLVA) typing system for this pathogen. Variation was detected at six VNTR loci in a set of 56 isolates from California, Oklahoma, Arizona, and Oregon and the F. tularensis live vaccine strain. PCR assays revealed diversity at these loci with total allele numbers ranging from 2 to 20, and Nei's diversity index values ranging from 0.36 to 0.93. Cluster analysis identified two genetically distinct groups consistent with the current biovar classification system of F. tularensis. These findings suggest that these VNTR markers are useful for identifying F. tularensis isolates at this taxonomic level. In this study, biovar B isolates were less diverse than those in biovar A, possibly reflecting the history of tularemia in North America. Seven isolates from a recent epizootic in Maricopa County, Ariz., were identical at all VNTR marker loci. Their identity, even at a hypervariable VNTR locus, indicates a common source of infection. This demonstrates the applicability of MLVA for rapid characterization and identification of outbreak isolates. Future construction of reference databases will allow faster outbreak tracking as well as providing a foundation for deciphering global genetic relationships. PMID:11526148

  5. Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea: Sequencing a Myriad of Type Strains

    PubMed Central

    Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Woyke, Tanja; Göker, Markus; Parker, Charles T.; Amann, Rudolf; Beck, Brian J.; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Chun, Jongsik; Colwell, Rita R.; Danchin, Antoine; Dawyndt, Peter; Dedeurwaerdere, Tom; DeLong, Edward F.; Detter, John C.; De Vos, Paul; Donohue, Timothy J.; Dong, Xiu-Zhu; Ehrlich, Dusko S.; Fraser, Claire; Gibbs, Richard; Gilbert, Jack; Gilna, Paul; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Jansson, Janet K.; Keasling, Jay D.; Knight, Rob; Labeda, David; Lapidus, Alla; Lee, Jung-Sook; Li, Wen-Jun; MA, Juncai; Markowitz, Victor; Moore, Edward R. B.; Morrison, Mark; Meyer, Folker; Nelson, Karen E.; Ohkuma, Moriya; Ouzounis, Christos A.; Pace, Norman; Parkhill, Julian; Qin, Nan; Rossello-Mora, Ramon; Sikorski, Johannes; Smith, David; Sogin, Mitch; Stevens, Rick; Stingl, Uli; Suzuki, Ken-ichiro; Taylor, Dorothea; Tiedje, Jim M.; Tindall, Brian; Wagner, Michael; Weinstock, George; Weissenbach, Jean; White, Owen; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Lixin; Zhou, Yu-Guang; Field, Dawn; Whitman, William B.; Garrity, George M.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Microbes hold the key to life. They hold the secrets to our past (as the descendants of the earliest forms of life) and the prospects for our future (as we mine their genes for solutions to some of the planet's most pressing problems, from global warming to antibiotic resistance). However, the piecemeal approach that has defined efforts to study microbial genetic diversity for over 20 years and in over 30,000 genome projects risks squandering that promise. These efforts have covered less than 20% of the diversity of the cultured archaeal and bacterial species, which represent just 15% of the overall known prokaryotic diversity. Here we call for the funding of a systematic effort to produce a comprehensive genomic catalog of all cultured Bacteria and Archaea by sequencing, where available, the type strain of each species with a validly published name (currently∼11,000). This effort will provide an unprecedented level of coverage of our planet's genetic diversity, allow for the large-scale discovery of novel genes and functions, and lead to an improved understanding of microbial evolution and function in the environment. PMID:25093819

  6. Genomic encyclopedia of bacteria and archaea: sequencing a myriad of type strains.

    PubMed

    Kyrpides, Nikos C; Hugenholtz, Philip; Eisen, Jonathan A; Woyke, Tanja; Göker, Markus; Parker, Charles T; Amann, Rudolf; Beck, Brian J; Chain, Patrick S G; Chun, Jongsik; Colwell, Rita R; Danchin, Antoine; Dawyndt, Peter; Dedeurwaerdere, Tom; DeLong, Edward F; Detter, John C; De Vos, Paul; Donohue, Timothy J; Dong, Xiu-Zhu; Ehrlich, Dusko S; Fraser, Claire; Gibbs, Richard; Gilbert, Jack; Gilna, Paul; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Jansson, Janet K; Keasling, Jay D; Knight, Rob; Labeda, David; Lapidus, Alla; Lee, Jung-Sook; Li, Wen-Jun; Ma, Juncai; Markowitz, Victor; Moore, Edward R B; Morrison, Mark; Meyer, Folker; Nelson, Karen E; Ohkuma, Moriya; Ouzounis, Christos A; Pace, Norman; Parkhill, Julian; Qin, Nan; Rossello-Mora, Ramon; Sikorski, Johannes; Smith, David; Sogin, Mitch; Stevens, Rick; Stingl, Uli; Suzuki, Ken-Ichiro; Taylor, Dorothea; Tiedje, Jim M; Tindall, Brian; Wagner, Michael; Weinstock, George; Weissenbach, Jean; White, Owen; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Lixin; Zhou, Yu-Guang; Field, Dawn; Whitman, William B; Garrity, George M; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2014-08-01

    Microbes hold the key to life. They hold the secrets to our past (as the descendants of the earliest forms of life) and the prospects for our future (as we mine their genes for solutions to some of the planet's most pressing problems, from global warming to antibiotic resistance). However, the piecemeal approach that has defined efforts to study microbial genetic diversity for over 20 years and in over 30,000 genome projects risks squandering that promise. These efforts have covered less than 20% of the diversity of the cultured archaeal and bacterial species, which represent just 15% of the overall known prokaryotic diversity. Here we call for the funding of a systematic effort to produce a comprehensive genomic catalog of all cultured Bacteria and Archaea by sequencing, where available, the type strain of each species with a validly published name (currently∼11,000). This effort will provide an unprecedented level of coverage of our planet's genetic diversity, allow for the large-scale discovery of novel genes and functions, and lead to an improved understanding of microbial evolution and function in the environment.

  7. Orientation Effects in Ballistic High-Strained P-type Si Nanowire FETs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-Hong; Huang, Qing-An; Yu, Hong; Lei, Shuang-Ying

    2009-01-01

    In order to design and optimize high-sensitivity silicon nanowire-field-effect transistor (SiNW FET) pressure sensors, this paper investigates the effects of channel orientations and the uniaxial stress on the ballistic hole transport properties of a strongly quantized SiNW FET placed near the high stress regions of the pressure sensors. A discrete stress-dependent six-band k.p method is used for subband structure calculation, coupled to a two-dimensional Poisson solver for electrostatics. A semi-classical ballistic FET model is then used to evaluate the ballistic current-voltage characteristics of SiNW FETs with and without strain. Our results presented here indicate that [110] is the optimum orientation for the p-type SiNW FETs and sensors. For the ultra-scaled 2.2 nm square SiNW, due to the limit of strong quantum confinement, the effect of the uniaxial stress on the magnitude of ballistic drive current is too small to be considered, except for the [100] orientation. However, for larger 5 nm square SiNW transistors with various transport orientations, the uniaxial tensile stress obviously alters the ballistic performance, while the uniaxial compressive stress slightly changes the ballistic hole current. Furthermore, the competition of injection velocity and carrier density related to the effective hole masses is found to play a critical role in determining the performance of the nanotransistors. PMID:22574043

  8. Genome sequence of the chemoheterotrophic soil bacterium Saccharomonospora cyanea type strain (NA-134T)

    PubMed Central

    Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P.; Lu, Megan; Huntemann, Marcel; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Pitluck, Sam; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Pötter, Gabriele; Land, Miriam; Ivanova, Natalia; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Detter, John C.; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Saccharomonospora cyanea Runmao et al. 1988 is a member of the genus Saccharomonospora in the family Pseudonocardiaceae that is moderately well characterized at the genome level thus far. Members of the genus Saccharomonospora are of interest because they originate from diverse habitats, such as soil, leaf litter, manure, compost, surface of peat, moist, over-heated grain, and ocean sediment, where they probably play a role in the primary degradation of plant material by attacking hemicellulose. Species of the genus Saccharomonospora are usually Gram-positive, non-acid fast, and are classified among the actinomycetes. S. cyanea is characterized by a dark blue (= cyan blue) aerial mycelium. After S. viridis, S. azurea, and S. marina, S. cyanea is only the fourth member in the genus for which a completely sequenced (non-contiguous finished draft status) type strain genome will be published. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the draft genome sequence, and annotation. The 5,408,301 bp long chromosome with its 5,139 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE funded Community Sequencing Program (CSP) 2010 at the Joint Genome Institute (JGI). PMID:24501643

  9. Type 2 NADH dehydrogenases in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 are involved in regulation rather than respiration.

    PubMed

    Howitt, C A; Udall, P K; Vermaas, W F

    1999-07-01

    Analysis of the genome of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 reveals three open reading frames (slr0851, slr1743, and sll1484) that may code for type 2 NAD(P)H dehydrogenases (NDH-2). The sequence similarity between the translated open reading frames and NDH-2s from other organisms is low, generally not exceeding 30% identity. However, NAD(P)H and flavin adenine dinucleotide binding motifs are conserved in all three putative NDH-2s in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. The three open reading frames were cloned, and deletion constructs were made for each. An expression construct containing one of the three open reading frames, slr1743, was able to functionally complement an Escherichia coli mutant lacking both NDH-1s and NDH-2s. Therefore, slr0851, slr1743, and sll1484 have been designated ndbA, ndbB, and ndbC, respectively. Strains that lacked one or more of the ndb genes were created in wild-type and photosystem (PS) I-less backgrounds. Deletion of ndb genes led to small changes in photoautotrophic growth rates and respiratory activities. Electron transfer rates into the plastoquinone pool in thylakoids in darkness were consistent with the presence of a small amount of NDH-2 activity in thylakoids. No difference was observed between wild-type and the Ndb-less strains in the banding patterns seen on native gels when stained for either NADH or NADPH dehydrogenase activity, indicating that the Ndb proteins do not accumulate to high levels. A striking phenotype of the PS I-less background strains lacking one or more of the NDH-2s is that they were able to grow at high light intensities that were lethal to the control strain but they retained normal PS II activity. We suggest that the Ndb proteins in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 are redox sensors and that they play a regulatory role responding to the redox state of the plastoquinone pool.

  10. Nonreplicating, Cyst-Defective Type II Toxoplasma gondii Vaccine Strains Stimulate Protective Immunity against Acute and Chronic Infection

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Live attenuated vaccine strains, such as type I nonreplicating uracil auxotroph mutants, are highly effective in eliciting lifelong immunity to virulent acute infection by Toxoplasma gondii. However, it is currently unknown whether vaccine-elicited immunity can provide protection against acute infection and also prevent chronic infection. To address this problem, we developed nonreverting, nonreplicating, live attenuated uracil auxotroph vaccine strains in the type II Δku80 genetic background by targeting the deletion of the orotidine 5′-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC) and uridine phosphorylase (UP) genes. Deletion of OMPDC induced a severe uracil auxotrophy with loss of replication, loss of virulence in mice, and loss of the ability to develop cysts and chronic infection. Vaccination of mice using type II Δku80 Δompdc mutants stimulated a fully protective CD8+ T cell-dependent immunity that prevented acute infection by type I and type II strains of T. gondii, and this vaccination also severely reduced or prevented cyst formation after type II challenge infection. Nonreverting, nonreplicating, and non-cyst-forming Δompdc mutants provide new tools to examine protective immune responses elicited by vaccination with a live attenuated type II vaccine. PMID:25776745

  11. Complete genome sequence of the Phaeobacter gallaeciensis type strain CIP 105210T (= DSM 26640T = BS107T)

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Oliver; Pradella, Silke; Rohde, Manfred; Scheuner, Carmen; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Göker, Markus; Petersen, Jörn

    2014-01-01

    Phaeobacter gallaeciensis CIP 105210T (= DSM 26640T = BS107T) is the type strain of the species Phaeobacter gallaeciensis. The genus Phaeobacter belongs to the marine Roseobacter group (Rhodobacteraceae, Alphaproteobacteria). Phaeobacter species are effective colonizers of marine surfaces, including frequent associations with eukaryotes. Strain BS107T was isolated from a rearing of the scallop Pecten maximus. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, comprising eight circular replicons with a total of 4,448 genes. In addition to a high number of extrachromosomal replicons, the genome contains six genomic island and three putative prophage regions, as well as a hybrid between a plasmid and a circular phage. Phylogenomic analyses confirm previous results, which indicated that the originally reported P. gallaeciensis type-strain deposit DSM 17395 belongs to P. inhibens and that CIP 105210T (= DSM 26640T) is the sole genome-sequenced representative of P. gallaeciensis. PMID:25197473

  12. Typing and selection of wild strains of Trichoderma spp. producers of extracellular laccase.

    PubMed

    Cázares-García, Saila Viridiana; Arredondo-Santoyo, Marina; Vázquez-Marrufo, Gerardo; Soledad Vázquez-Garcidueñas, Ma; Robinson-Fuentes, Virginia A; Gómez-Reyes, Víctor Manuel

    2016-05-01

    Using the ITS region and the gene tef1, 23 strains of the genus Trichoderma were identified as belonging to the species T. harzianum (n = 14), T. olivascens (n = 1), T. trixiae (n = 1), T. viridialbum (n = 1), T. tomentosum (n = 2), T. koningii (n = 1), T. atroviride (n = 1), T. viride (n = 1), and T. gamsii (n = 1). Strains expressing extracellular laccase activity were selected by decolorization/oxidation assays in solid media, using azo, anthraquinone, indigoid, and triphenylmethane dyes, and the phenolic substances tannic acid and guaiacol. No strain decolorized Direct Blue 71 or Chicago Blue 6B, but all of them weakly oxidized guaiacol, decolorized Methyl Orange, and efficiently oxidized tannic acid. Based in decolorization/oxidation assays, strains CMU-1 (T. harzianum), CMU-8 (T. atroviride), CMU-218 (T. viride), and CMU-221 (T. tomentosum) were selected for evaluating their extracellular laccase activity in liquid media. Strain CMU-8 showed no basal laccase activity, while strains CMU-1, CMU-218, and CMU-221 had a basal laccase activity of 1,313.88 mU/mL, 763.88 mU/mL, and 799.53 mU/mL, respectively. Addition of sorghum straw inhibited laccase activity in strain CMU-1 by 34%, relative to the basal culture, while strains CMU-8, CMU-21, and CMU-221 increased their laccase activity by 1,321.5%, 64%, and 47%, respectively. These results show that assayed phenolic substrates are good tools for selecting laccase producer strains in Trichoderma. These same assays indicate the potential use of studied strains for bioremediation processes. Straw laccase induction suggests that analyzed strains have potential for straw delignification in biopulping and other biotechnological applications. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:787-798, 2016. PMID:26821938

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of the Iron-Oxidizing, Acidophilic, and Halotolerant "Thiobacillus prosperus" Type Strain DSM 5130.

    PubMed

    Ossandon, Francisco J; Cárdenas, Juan Pablo; Corbett, Melissa; Quatrini, Raquel; Holmes, David S; Watkin, Elizabeth

    2014-10-23

    "Thiobacillus prosperus" is a halotolerant mesophilic acidophile that gains energy through iron and sulfur oxidation. Its physiology is poorly understood. Here, we describe the principal genomic features of the type strain of T. prosperus, DSM 5130. This is the first public genome sequence of an acidophilic halotolerant bacterium.

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of the Iron-Oxidizing, Acidophilic, and Halotolerant “Thiobacillus prosperus” Type Strain DSM 5130

    PubMed Central

    Ossandon, Francisco J.; Cárdenas, Juan Pablo; Corbett, Melissa; Quatrini, Raquel; Holmes, David S.

    2014-01-01

    “Thiobacillus prosperus” is a halotolerant mesophilic acidophile that gains energy through iron and sulfur oxidation. Its physiology is poorly understood. Here, we describe the principal genomic features of the type strain of T. prosperus, DSM 5130. This is the first public genome sequence of an acidophilic halotolerant bacterium. PMID:25342676

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of the Yeast Pseudozyma antarctica Type Strain JCM10317, a Producer of the Glycolipid Biosurfactants, Mannosylerythritol Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Saika, Azusa; Koike, Hideaki; Hori, Tomoyuki; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Sato, Shun; Habe, Hiroshi; Kitamoto, Dai

    2014-01-01

    The basidiomycetous yeast Pseudozyma antarctica is known as a producer of industrial enzymes and the extracellular glycolipids, mannosylerythritol lipids. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the type strain JCM10317. The draft genome assembly has a size of 18.1 Mb and a G+C content of 60.9%, and it consists of 197 scaffolds. PMID:25291760

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of the Yeast Pseudozyma antarctica Type Strain JCM10317, a Producer of the Glycolipid Biosurfactants, Mannosylerythritol Lipids.

    PubMed

    Saika, Azusa; Koike, Hideaki; Hori, Tomoyuki; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Sato, Shun; Habe, Hiroshi; Kitamoto, Dai; Morita, Tomotake

    2014-01-01

    The basidiomycetous yeast Pseudozyma antarctica is known as a producer of industrial enzymes and the extracellular glycolipids, mannosylerythritol lipids. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the type strain JCM10317. The draft genome assembly has a size of 18.1 Mb and a G+C content of 60.9%, and it consists of 197 scaffolds. PMID:25291760

  17. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Clostridium botulinum Group II (Nonproteolytic) Type B Strains (DB-2 and KAPB-3).

    PubMed

    Petronella, Nicholas; Kenwell, Robyn; Pagotto, Franco; Pightling, Arthur W

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum is important for food safety and studies of neurotoxins associated with human botulism. We present the draft genome sequences of two strains belonging to group II type B: one collected from Pacific Ocean sediments (DB-2) and another obtained during a botulism outbreak (KAPB-3). PMID:25377702

  18. Burkholderia pseudomallei strain type, based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, does not determine disease presentation in melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Allen C; Day, Nicholas P J; Mayo, Mark J; Gal, Daniel; Currie, Bart J

    2005-01-01

    Melioidosis, the infection due to Burkholderia pseudomallei, may present with a spectrum of severity and may affect any site in the body. Differential strain virulence and tropism suggested by previous studies would have implications for virulence and vaccine work. We explored clinical correlations using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing in a well-characterised clinical collection. Two methods of analysis were used based on band-based similarity values: first, a conventional cluster analysis formed by the unweighted paired group mean analysis, and second, an analysis of the distribution of the "within-group" and "between-group" Dice coefficient. Clinical isolates from 114 cases of melioidosis occurring in the Northern Territory, Australia were studied; 71 strain types were defined with a Simpson's index of 0.91. No correlation was found between strain type and disease severity or site of melioidosis on presentation, with no differences in similarity values found when comparing within and between-groups. In particular, isolates from patients with neurological melioidosis were not clustered. There was evidence of geographical localisation. This study suggests that the variation in strain type may not be as important as host and environmental factors in determining the pattern of disease.

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Phomopsis longicolla Type Strain TWH P74, a Fungus Causing Phomopsis Seed Decay in Soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phomopsis longicolla T.W. Hobbs is the primary cause of Phomopsis seed decay in soybean. We report the de novo assembled draft genome sequence of P. longicolla type strain TWH P74. The resulting draft genome was estimated to be approximately 64 Mb in size with an overall G+C content of 48.1%. The dr...

  20. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the IS900 sequence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis are strain type specific.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Elena; Aranaz, Alicia; de Juan, Lucia; Alvarez, Julio; Rodríguez, Sabrina; Romero, Beatriz; Bezos, Javier; Stevenson, Karen; Mateos, Ana; Domínguez, Lucas

    2009-07-01

    Insertion sequence IS900 is used as a target for the identification of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Previous reports have revealed single nucleotide polymorphisms within IS900. This study, which analyzed the IS900 sequences of a panel of isolates representing M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strain types I, II, and III, revealed conserved type-specific polymorphisms that could be utilized as a tool for diagnostic and epidemiological purposes.

  1. Impact of therapy and strain type on outcomes in urinary tract infections caused by carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    van Duin, David; Cober, Eric; Richter, Sandra S.; Perez, Federico; Kalayjian, Robert C.; Salata, Robert A.; Evans, Scott; Fowler, Vance G.; Kaye, Keith S.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKP) is an important healthcare-associated pathogen. We evaluated the impact of CRKP strain type and treatment on outcomes of patients with CRKP bacteriuria. Patients and methods Physician-diagnosed CRKP urinary tract infection (UTI)—defined as those patients who received directed treatment for CRKP bacteriuria—was studied in the multicentre, prospective Consortium on Resistance against Carbapenems in Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRaCKle) cohort. Strain typing by repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) was performed. Outcomes were classified as failure, indeterminate or success. Univariate and multivariate ordinal analyses to evaluate the associations between outcome, treatment and strain type were followed by binomial analyses. Results One-hundred-and-fifty-seven patients with physician-diagnosed CRKP UTI were included. After adjustment for CDC/National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN)-defined UTI, critical illness and receipt of more than one active antibiotic, patients treated with aminoglycosides were less likely to fail therapy [adjusted OR (aOR) for failure 0.34, 95% CI 0.15–0.73, P = 0.0049]. In contrast, patients treated with tigecycline were more likely to fail therapy (aOR for failure 2.29, 95% CI 1.03–5.13, P = 0.0425). Strain type data were analysed for 55 patients. The predominant clades were ST258A (n = 18, 33%) and ST258B (n = 26, 47%). After adjustment for CDC/NHSN-defined UTI and use of tigecycline and aminoglycosides, infection with strain type ST258A was associated with clinical outcome in ordinal analysis (P = 0.0343). In multivariate binomial models, strain type ST258A was associated with clinical failure (aOR for failure 5.82, 95% CI 1.47–28.50, P = 0.0113). Conclusions In this nested cohort study of physician-diagnosed CRKP UTI, both choice of treatment and CRKP strain type appeared to impact on clinical outcomes. PMID:25492391

  2. Practical approaches for application of resistance type strain gages on high temperature composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas C., Sr.

    1991-01-01

    Four major areas of interest with respect to utilizing strain gages on carbon/carbon (with SiC surfaces) and titanium matrix composites are addressed. Strain gage and adhesive combinations on carbon/carbon (C/C) at temperatures from minus 190 C to to 540 C, half-bridge gaging for reducing apparent strain on C/C using Poisson's ratio and bending configurations, a review of the 'field installation' techniques developed for gaging a C/C hypersonic generic elevon, and results of initial strain gaging efforts on titanium matrix composites are discussed. Current research in developing techniques for increasing the maximum temperature for strain gages on carbon/carbon are reviewed.

  3. Subband engineering in n-type silicon nanowires using strain and confinement.

    PubMed

    Stanojević, Zlatan; Sverdlov, Viktor; Baumgartner, Oskar; Kosina, Hans

    2012-04-01

    We present a model based on k · p theory which is able to capture the subband structure effects present in ultra-thin strained silicon nanowires. For electrons, the effective mass and valley minima are calculated for different crystal orientations, thicknesses, and strains. The actual enhancement of the transport properties depends highly on the crystal orientation of the nanowire axis; for certain orientations strain and confinement can play together to give a significant increase of the electron mobility. We also show that the effects of both strain and confinement on mobility are generally more pronounced in nanowires than in thin films. We show that optimal transport properties can be expected to be achieved through a mix of confinement and strain. Our results are in good agreement with recent experimental findings.

  4. Neutralization kinetics studies with type SAT 2 foot-and-mouth disease virus strains.

    PubMed Central

    Rweyemamu, M. M.; Booth, J. C.; Parry, N.; Pay, T. W.

    1977-01-01

    A comparison of homologous and heterologous rates of neutralization demonstrated that antigenic relationships of foot-and-mouth disease virus strains could be differentiated quantitatively by the kinetics of neutralization method described previously (Rwysed this way gave R values which were similar to those obtained with other neutralization test methods but which were generally smaller than those obtained with complement fixation test results. It was demonstrated that there were wide differences between the vaccine strains tested as demonstrated by R value relationships. An examination of r values, however, demonstrated that antisera to the Moz 1/70 strain were highly reactive with most of the virus strains from Central and Southern Africa. The selection of FMD virus strains with a wide serological range for vaccine production is discussed. PMID:68071

  5. Strains of the Propionibacterium acnes type III lineage are associated with the skin condition progressive macular hypomelanosis.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Emma; Liu, Jared; Yankova, Eliza; Cavalcanti, Silvana M; Magalhães, Marcelo; Li, Huiying; Patrick, Sheila; McDowell, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Progressive macular hypomelanosis (PMH) is a common skin disorder that causes hypopigmentation in a variety of skin types. Although the underlying aetiology of this condition is unclear, there is circumstantial evidence that links the skin bacterium Propionibacterium acnes to the condition. We now describe the first detailed population genetic analysis of P. acnes isolates recovered from paired lesional and non-lesional skin of PMH patients. Our results demonstrate a strong statistical association between strains from the type III phylogenetic lineage and PMH lesions (P = 0.0019), but not those representing other phylogroups, including those associated with acne (type IA1). We also demonstrate, based on in silico 16S rDNA analysis, that PMH isolates previously recovered from patients in Europe are also consistent with the type III lineage. Using comparative genome analysis, we identified multiple genomic regions that are specific for, or absent from, type III strains compared to other phylogroups. In the former case, these include open reading frames with putative functions in metabolism, transport and transcriptional regulation, as well as predicted proteins of unknown function. Further study of these genomic elements, along with transcriptional and functional analyses, may help to explain why type III strains are associated with PMH. PMID:27555369

  6. Strains of the Propionibacterium acnes type III lineage are associated with the skin condition progressive macular hypomelanosis

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, Emma; Liu, Jared; Yankova, Eliza; Cavalcanti, Silvana M.; Magalhães, Marcelo; Li, Huiying; Patrick, Sheila; McDowell, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Progressive macular hypomelanosis (PMH) is a common skin disorder that causes hypopigmentation in a variety of skin types. Although the underlying aetiology of this condition is unclear, there is circumstantial evidence that links the skin bacterium Propionibacterium acnes to the condition. We now describe the first detailed population genetic analysis of P. acnes isolates recovered from paired lesional and non-lesional skin of PMH patients. Our results demonstrate a strong statistical association between strains from the type III phylogenetic lineage and PMH lesions (P = 0.0019), but not those representing other phylogroups, including those associated with acne (type IA1). We also demonstrate, based on in silico 16S rDNA analysis, that PMH isolates previously recovered from patients in Europe are also consistent with the type III lineage. Using comparative genome analysis, we identified multiple genomic regions that are specific for, or absent from, type III strains compared to other phylogroups. In the former case, these include open reading frames with putative functions in metabolism, transport and transcriptional regulation, as well as predicted proteins of unknown function. Further study of these genomic elements, along with transcriptional and functional analyses, may help to explain why type III strains are associated with PMH. PMID:27555369

  7. Molecular characterization of Brazilian equid herpesvirus type 1 strains based on neuropathogenicity markers

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Enio; Lara, Maria do Carmo C.S.H.; Cunha, Elenice M.S.; Villalobos, Eliana M.C.; Mori, Claudia M.C.; Soares, Rodrigo M.; Brandão, Paulo E.; Fernandes, Wilson R.; Richtzenhain, Leonardo J.

    2015-01-01

    Partial nucleotide sequences of ORF72 (glycoprotein D, gD), ORF64 (infected cell protein 4, ICP4) and ORF30 (DNA polymerase) genes were compared with corresponding sequences of EHV-1 reference strains to characterize the molecular variability of Brazilian strains. Virus isolation assays were applied to 74 samples including visceral tissue, total blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and nasal swabs of specimens from a total of 64 animals. Only one CSF sample (Iso07/05 strain) was positive by virus isolation in cell culture. EHV-1 Iso07/05 neurologic strain and two abortion visceral tissues samples (Iso11/06 and Iso33/06) were PCR-positive for ORF33 (glycoprotein B, gB) gene of EHV-1. A sequence analysis of the ORF72, ORF64 and ORF30 genes from three EHV-1 archival strains (A3/97, A4/72, A9/92) and three clinical samples (Iso07/05, Iso11/06 and Iso33/06) suggested that among Brazilian EHV-1 strains, the amplified region of the gD gene sequence is highly conserved. Additionally, the analysis of ICP4 gene showed high nucleotide and amino acid identities when compared with genotype P strains, suggesting that the EHV-1 Brazilian strains belonged to the same group. All the EHV-1 Brazilian strains were classified as non-neuropathogenic variants (N752) based on the ORF30 analysis. These findings indicate a high conservation of the gD-, ICP4- and ORF30-encoding sequences. Different pathotypes of the EHV-1 strain might share identical genes with no specific markers, and tissue tropism is not completely dependent on the gD envelope, immediate-early ICP4 and DNA polymerase proteins. PMID:26273275

  8. Type IV Longus Pilus of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli: Occurrence and Association with Toxin Types and Colonization Factors among Strains Isolated in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Pichel, Mariana G.; Binsztein, Norma; Qadri, Firdausi; Girón, Jorge A.

    2002-01-01

    The longus type IV pilus structural gene (lngA) was sought among 217 clinical enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains isolated in Argentina. lngA was present in 20.7% of the isolates and was highly associated with ETEC producing heat-stable toxin and the most common colonization factors. The prevalence of longus among ETEC strains in Argentina was comparable to that of colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I), CFA/II, and CFA/IV in other regions of the world. PMID:11826000

  9. Genome sequence of a dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter soli type strain GSS01(T).

    PubMed

    Yang, Guiqin; Chen, Shanshan; Zhou, Shungui; Liu, Yongfeng

    2015-01-01

    Strain GSS01(T) (=KCTC 4545=MCCC 1 K00269) is the type strain of the species Geobacter soli. G. soli strain GSS01(T) is of interest due to its ability to reduce insoluble Fe(III) oxides with a wide range of electron donors. Here we describe some key features of this strain, together with the whole genome sequence and annotation. The genome of size 3,657,100 bp contains 3229 protein-coding and 54 RNA genes, including 2 16S rRNA genes. The genome of strain GSS01(T)contains 76 predicted cytochrome genes, 24 pilus assembly protein genes and several other genes, which were proposed to be related to the reduction of insoluble Fe(III) oxides. The genes associated with the electron donors and acceptors of strain GSS01(T) were predicted in the genome. Information gained from its sequence will be relevant to the future elucidation of extracellular electron transfer mechanism during the reduction of Fe(III) oxides. PMID:26634019

  10. Enhanced expression of recombinant beta toxin of Clostridium perfringens type B using a commercially available Escherichia coli strain.

    PubMed

    Bakhshi, Fatemah; Pilehchian Langroudi, Reza; Eimani, Bahram Golestani

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens beta toxin is only produced by types B and C and plays an important role in many human and animal diseases, causing fatal conditions that originate in the intestines. We compared the expression of C. perfringens type B vaccine strain recombinant beta toxin gene in the Escherichia coli strains Rosetta(DE3) and BL21(DE3). The beta toxin gene was extracted from pJETβ and ligated with pET22b(+). pET22β was transformed into E. coli strains BL21(DE3) and Rosetta(DE3). Recombinant protein was expressed as a soluble protein after isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) induction in strain Rosetta(DE3) but not in BL21(DE3). Expression was optimised by growing recombinant cells at 37 °C and at an induction of 0.5 mM, 1 mM, 1.5 mM IPTG. Expression was evaluated using sodium dodecyl sulfate Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The recombinant protein was purified via Ni-NTA and was analysed using western blot. We concluded that E. coli strain RosettaTM(DE3) can enhance the expression of C. perfringens recombinant beta toxin. PMID:27380656

  11. Cloning of a novel cryIC-type gene from a strain of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. galleriae.

    PubMed

    Kalman, S; Kiehne, K L; Libs, J L; Yamamoto, T

    1993-04-01

    A novel cryIC-type gene was isolated from a strain of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. galleriae. A new polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique with a set of several oligonucleotide primer pairs specific to the cryIC gene was used to screen a number of B. thuringiensis strains. PCR amplified several DNA fragments ranging from 100 bp to 1 kb for B. thuringiensis strains containing a cryIC gene. PCR fragments amplified from the Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. galleriae HD29 DNA differed from the fragments amplified from other cryIC-containing strains, indicating strain HD29 contained a novel cryIC-type gene. To isolate crystal genes homologous to cryIC, an HD29 gene library was probed with a 984-bp fragment of the amino-terminal coding region of the cryIC gene cloned from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. aizawai HD229. A putative toxin gene was isolated from a phage that hybridized strongly to the cryIC probe. Translation of the putative toxin DNA sequence revealed an open reading frame of 1,176 amino acids whose predicted molecular mass was 132.8 kDa. Comparisons of the toxin gene sequence with sequences of other cry genes indicated that this gene is a subclass of cryIC. We propose to designate this gene cryIC(b). In Escherichia coli, the cryIC(b) gene produced a protein of approximately 130 kDa toxic to Spodoptera exigua and Trichoplusia ni.

  12. Type II Toxoplasma gondii KU80 knockout strains enable functional analysis of genes required for cyst development and latent infection.

    PubMed

    Fox, Barbara A; Falla, Alejandra; Rommereim, Leah M; Tomita, Tadakimi; Gigley, Jason P; Mercier, Corinne; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Weiss, Louis M; Bzik, David J

    2011-09-01

    Type II Toxoplasma gondii KU80 knockouts (Δku80) deficient in nonhomologous end joining were developed to delete the dominant pathway mediating random integration of targeting episomes. Gene targeting frequency in the type II Δku80 Δhxgprt strain measured at the orotate (OPRT) and the uracil (UPRT) phosphoribosyltransferase loci was highly efficient. To assess the potential of the type II Δku80 Δhxgprt strain to examine gene function affecting cyst biology and latent stages of infection, we targeted the deletion of four parasite antigen genes (GRA4, GRA6, ROP7, and tgd057) that encode characterized CD8(+) T cell epitopes that elicit corresponding antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell populations associated with control of infection. Cyst development in these type II mutant strains was not found to be strictly dependent on antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell host responses. In contrast, a significant biological role was revealed for the dense granule proteins GRA4 and GRA6 in cyst development since brain tissue cyst burdens were drastically reduced specifically in mutant strains with GRA4 and/or GRA6 deleted. Complementation of the Δgra4 and Δgra6 mutant strains using a functional allele of the deleted GRA coding region placed under the control of the endogenous UPRT locus was found to significantly restore brain cyst burdens. These results reveal that GRA proteins play a functional role in establishing cyst burdens and latent infection. Collectively, our results suggest that a type II Δku80 Δhxgprt genetic background enables a higher-throughput functional analysis of the parasite genome to reveal fundamental aspects of parasite biology controlling virulence, pathogenesis, and transmission.

  13. Production of different types of mannosylerythritol lipids as biosurfactants by the newly isolated yeast strains belonging to the genus Pseudozyma.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Masaaki; Morita, Tomotake; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Kakugawa, Koji; Kitamoto, Dai

    2007-06-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MEL), which are abundantly secreted by yeasts, are one of the most promising biosurfactants known. To obtain various types of MEL and to attain a broad range of applications for them, screening of novel producers was undertaken. Thirteen strains of yeasts were successfully isolated as potential MEL producers; they showed high production yields of MEL of around 20 g l(-1) from 40 g l(-1) of soybean oil. Based on the taxonomical study, all the strains were classified to be the genus Pseudozyma. It is interesting to note that they were categorized into three groups according to their production patterns of MEL. The first group, which included 11 strains taxonomically closely related to high-level MEL producers such as Pseudozyma antarctica and Pseudozyma aphidis, mainly produced 4-O-[(4',6'-di-O-acetyl-2',3'-di-O-alkanoyl)-beta-D-mannopyranosyl]-meso-erythritol (MEL-A) together with 4-O-[(6'-mono-O-acetyl-2',3'-di-O-alkanoyl)-beta-D-mannopyranosyl]-meso-erythritol (MEL-B) and 4-O-[(4'-mono-O-acetyl-2',3'-di-O-alkanoyl)-beta-D-mannopyranosyl]-meso-erythritol (MEL-C) as the minor components. The second group of one strain, which was related to Pseudozyma tsukubaensis, predominantly produced MEL-B. The third group of one strain, which was closely related to Pseudozyma hubeiensis, mainly produced MEL-C; this is the first observation of the efficient production of MEL-C from soybean oil. Moreover, the major fatty acids of the obtained MEL-C were C(6), C(12), and C(16) acids, and were considerably different from those of the other MEL hitherto reported. The biosynthetic manner for MEL is thus likely to significantly vary among the Pseudozyma strains; the newly isolated strains would enable us to attain a large-scale production of MEL and to obtain various types of MEL with different hydrophobic structures. PMID:17505770

  14. High Incidence of Invasive Group A Streptococcus Disease Caused by Strains of Uncommon emm Types in Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Athey, Taryn B. T.; Teatero, Sarah; Sieswerda, Lee E.; Gubbay, Jonathan B.; Marchand-Austin, Alex; Li, Aimin; Wasserscheid, Jessica; Dewar, Ken; McGeer, Allison; Williams, David

    2015-01-01

    An outbreak of type emm59 invasive group A Streptococcus (iGAS) disease was declared in 2008 in Thunder Bay District, Northwestern Ontario, 2 years after a countrywide emm59 epidemic was recognized in Canada. Despite a declining number of emm59 infections since 2010, numerous cases of iGAS disease continue to be reported in the area. We collected clinical information on all iGAS cases recorded in Thunder Bay District from 2008 to 2013. We also emm typed and sequenced the genomes of all available strains isolated from 2011 to 2013 from iGAS infections and from severe cases of soft tissue infections. We used whole-genome sequencing data to investigate the population structure of GAS strains of the most frequently isolated emm types. We report an increased incidence of iGAS in Thunder Bay compared to the metropolitan area of Toronto/Peel and the province of Ontario. Illicit drug use, alcohol abuse, homelessness, and hepatitis C infection were underlying diseases or conditions that might have predisposed patients to iGAS disease. Most cases were caused by clonal strains of skin or generalist emm types (i.e., emm82, emm87, emm101, emm4, emm83, and emm114) uncommonly seen in other areas of the province. We observed rapid waxing and waning of emm types causing disease and their replacement by other emm types associated with the same tissue tropisms. Thus, iGAS disease in Thunder Bay District predominantly affects a select population of disadvantaged persons and is caused by clonally related strains of a few skin and generalist emm types less commonly associated with iGAS in other areas of Ontario. PMID:26491184

  15. Antimicrobial resistance and phage and molecular typing of Salmonella strains isolated from food for human consumption in Spain.

    PubMed

    Valdezate, S; Arroyo, M; González-Sanz, R; Ramíro, R; Herrera-León, S; Usera, M A; De la Fuente, M; Echeita, A

    2007-12-01

    The aims of this study were to ascertain the population structure and antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella enterica serovars isolated in 2002 from food in 16 Spanish regions. Serovars were characterized by serotyping, phage typing, antimicrobial susceptibility, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing, and 264 nonrelated strains were selected for further analysis. The main sources were eggs and their derivatives (21.6% of strains), poultry and related products (16.6%), and seafood (16.3%). High serotype diversity was detected (51 serotypes); the most common were Enteritidis (n = 96, 36.3%) and Typhimurium (n = 53, 20.1%), followed by a miscellaneous group of 49 different serotypes (n = 115, 43.5%). A 15% increase in Salmonella Enteritidis isolation was observed. Common phage types for Salmonella Enteritidis were PT1 (41.6% of isolates), PT4 (9.4%), PT6 (9.4%), and PT6a (9.4%), and common types for Salmonella Typhimurium were DTU302 (18.8%), DT104 (15.1%), and DT104B (13.2%). Salmonella Enteritidis strains were categorized into eight PFGE types with a similarity of 81 to 96%, and 73.9% of the strains were grouped into just one cluster. Salmonella Typhimurium isolates were divided into 13 PFGE types with a similarity of 64 to 86%, and one predominant clone contained 41.5% of the strains. Resistance rates for Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Typhimurium, and the miscellaneous group were, respectively, 8.3, 69.8, and 13.9% for ampicillin, 3.1, 52.8, and 59% for streptomycin, 40.6, 22.6, and 10.4% for nalidixic acid, 15.6, 71.7, and 31.1% for tetracycline, 7.3, 18.8, and 9.5% for trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, 0, 50.9, and 4.3% for chloramphenicol, and 6.2, 71.7, and 17.4% for multiple (at least four) antimicrobials. All the strains remained susceptible to other beta-lactams and fluoroquinolones. Surveillance of S. enterica isolated from food is strongly recommended to reduce community exposure to antimicrobial resistant strains.

  16. Loss of Hypermucoviscosity and Increased Fitness Cost in Colistin-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae Sequence Type 23 Strains

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Myung-Jin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of colistin resistance on virulence and fitness in hypermucoviscous (HV) Klebsiella pneumoniae sequence type 23 (ST23) strains. Colistin-resistant mutants were developed from three colistin-susceptible HV K. pneumoniae ST23 strains. The lipid A structures of strains were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Changes in HV were investigated using the string test, and extracellular polysaccharide production was quantified. The expression levels of the phoQ, pmrD, pmrB, pbgP, magA, and p-rmpA2 genes, serum resistance, and biofilm-forming activity were determined. The fitness of colistin-resistant mutants compared to that of the parental strains was examined by determining the competitive index (CI). The colistin-resistant mutants exhibited reduced HV, which was accompanied by decreased formation of capsular polysaccharides (CPS) and reduced expression of genes (magA and p-rmpA2). While there was enhanced expression of pmrD and pbgP in all colistin-resistant derivatives, there were differences in the expression levels of phoQ and pmrB between strains. MALDI-TOF analysis detected the addition of aminoarabinose or palmitate to the lipid A moiety of lipopolysaccharide in the colistin-resistant derivatives. In addition, survival rates in the presence of normal human serum were decreased in the mutant strains, and CI values (0.01 to 0.19) indicated significant fitness defects in the colistin-resistant derivatives compared to the respective parental strains. In hypervirulent HV K. pneumoniae strains, the acquisition of colistin resistance was accompanied by reduced CPS production, impaired virulence, and a significant fitness cost. PMID:26282408

  17. Two novel type II restriction-modification systems occupying genomically equivalent locations on the chromosomes of Listeria monocytogenes strains.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangmi; Ward, T J; Siletzky, R M; Kathariou, S

    2012-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is responsible for the potentially life-threatening food-borne disease listeriosis. One epidemic-associated clonal group of L. monocytogenes, epidemic clone I (ECI), harbors a Sau3AI-like restriction-modification (RM) system also present in the same genomic region in certain strains of other lineages. In this study, we identified and characterized two other, novel type II RM systems, LmoJ2 and LmoJ3, at this same locus. LmoJ2 and LmoJ3 appeared to recognize GCWGC (W = A or T) and GCNGC, respectively. Both RM systems consisted of genes with GC content below the genome average and were in the same genomic region in strains of different serotypes and lineages, suggesting site-specific horizontal gene transfer. Genomic DNA from the LmoJ2 and LmoJ3 strains grown at various temperatures (4 to 42°C) was resistant to digestion with restriction enzymes recognizing GCWGC or GCNGC, indicating that the methyltransferases were expressed under these conditions. Phages propagated in an LmoJ2-harboring strain exhibited moderately increased infectivity for this strain at 4 and 8°C but not at higher temperatures, while phages propagated in an LmoJ3 strain had dramatically increased infectivity for this strain at all temperatures. Among the sequenced Listeria phages, lytic phages possessed significantly fewer recognition sites for these RM systems than lysogenic phages, suggesting that in lytic phages sequence content evolved toward reduced susceptibility to such RM systems. The ability of LmoJ2 and LmoJ3 to protect against phages may affect the efficiency of phages as biocontrol agents for L. monocytogenes strains harboring these RM systems. PMID:22327591

  18. Loss of hypermucoviscosity and increased fitness cost in colistin-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae sequence type 23 strains.

    PubMed

    Choi, Myung-Jin; Ko, Kwan Soo

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of colistin resistance on virulence and fitness in hypermucoviscous (HV) Klebsiella pneumoniae sequence type 23 (ST23) strains. Colistin-resistant mutants were developed from three colistin-susceptible HV K. pneumoniae ST23 strains. The lipid A structures of strains were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Changes in HV were investigated using the string test, and extracellular polysaccharide production was quantified. The expression levels of the phoQ, pmrD, pmrB, pbgP, magA, and p-rmpA2 genes, serum resistance, and biofilm-forming activity were determined. The fitness of colistin-resistant mutants compared to that of the parental strains was examined by determining the competitive index (CI). The colistin-resistant mutants exhibited reduced HV, which was accompanied by decreased formation of capsular polysaccharides (CPS) and reduced expression of genes (magA and p-rmpA2). While there was enhanced expression of pmrD and pbgP in all colistin-resistant derivatives, there were differences in the expression levels of phoQ and pmrB between strains. MALDI-TOF analysis detected the addition of aminoarabinose or palmitate to the lipid A moiety of lipopolysaccharide in the colistin-resistant derivatives. In addition, survival rates in the presence of normal human serum were decreased in the mutant strains, and CI values (0.01 to 0.19) indicated significant fitness defects in the colistin-resistant derivatives compared to the respective parental strains. In hypervirulent HV K. pneumoniae strains, the acquisition of colistin resistance was accompanied by reduced CPS production, impaired virulence, and a significant fitness cost.

  19. Invasiveness as a putative additional virulence mechanism of some atypical Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli strains with different uncommon intimin types

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) produce attaching/effacing (A/E) lesions on eukaryotic cells mediated by the outer membrane adhesin intimin. EPEC are sub-grouped into typical (tEPEC) and atypical (aEPEC). We have recently demonstrated that aEPEC strain 1551-2 (serotype O non-typable, non-motile) invades HeLa cells by a process dependent on the expression of intimin sub-type omicron. In this study, we evaluated whether aEPEC strains expressing other intimin sub-types are also invasive using the quantitative gentamicin protection assay. We also evaluated whether aEPEC invade differentiated intestinal T84 cells. Results Five of six strains invaded HeLa and T84 cells in a range of 13.3%–20.9% and 5.8%–17.8%, respectively, of the total cell-associated bacteria. The strains studied were significantly more invasive than prototype tEPEC strain E2348/69 (1.4% and 0.5% in HeLa and T84 cells, respectively). Invasiveness was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. We also showed that invasion of HeLa cells by aEPEC 1551-2 depended on actin filaments, but not on microtubules. In addition, disruption of tight junctions enhanced its invasion efficiency in T84 cells, suggesting preferential invasion via a non-differentiated surface. Conclusion Some aEPEC strains may invade intestinal cells in vitro with varying efficiencies and independently of the intimin sub-type. PMID:19622141

  20. Antibiotic Sensitivity Patterns and Molecular Typing of Shigella sonnei Strains Using ERIC-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbar, Reza; Mirsaeed Ghazi, Farzaneh

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Shigella sonnei is considered as a major cause of diarrheal disease in both developing and developed countries. Iran is one of the endemic areas of shigellosis. The present study was undertaken to investigate the antibiotic susceptibility and genetic relatedness of S. sonnei strains isolated from pediatric patients in Tehran, Iran. Methods The study included all S. sonnei strains isolated from pediatric patients with diarrhea admitted to several hospitals in Tehran, Iran, during 2008-2010. Shigella spp. strains were recovered from patients using standard microbiological methods. S. sonnei strains were further studied by antimicrobial susceptibility testing and Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus (ERIC) - PCR analysis. Results Eighty nine Shigella isolates were isolated. S. sonnei was themost prevalent Shigella species (60.7%) followed by, S. flexneri (31.5%). Eleven antimicrobial resistance patterns (R1-R11) were identified among S. sonnei isolates. The majority of the strains were resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline and streptomycin. All isolates were susceptible to ciprofloxacin, ceftizoxime and chloramphenicol. All strains were typable by ERIC-PCR. Five ERIC-PCR patterns (E1-E5) were found among S. sonnei isolates; however the half of the isolates was clustered in E4 pattern. Conclusion The antibiotic resistance rates are increasing among S. sonnei strains. Moreover, a predominant clone or limited clones of S. sonnei were responsible for shigellosis caused by this Shigella species in pediatric patients in Tehran, Iran. PMID:26060624

  1. Membrane vesicles of Clostridium perfringens Type A strains induce innate and adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yanlong; Kong, Qingke; Roland, Kenneth L.; Curtiss, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Vesicle shedding from bacteria is a universal process in most Gram-negative bacteria and a few Gram-positive bacteria. In this report, we isolate extracellular membrane vesicles (MVs) from the supernatants of Gram-positive pathogen Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens). We demonstrated vesicle production in a variety of virulent and nonvirulent type A strains. MVs did not contain alpha-toxin and NetB toxin demonstrated by negative reaction to specific antibody and absence of specific proteins identified by LC-MS/MS. C. perfringens MVs contained DNA components such as 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S rRNA), alpha-toxin gene (plc) and the perfringolysin O gene (pfoA) demonstrated by PCR. We also identified a total of 431 proteins in vesicles by 1-D gel separation and LC-MS/MS analysis. In vitro studies demonstrated that vesicles could be internalized into murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells without direct cytotoxicity effects, causing release of inflammation cytokines including granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 (IL-1), which could also be detected in mice injected with MVs through intraperitoneal (i.p.) route. Mice immunized with C. perfringens MVs produced high titer IgG, especially IgG1, antibodies against C. perfringens membrane proteins. However, this kind of antibody could not provide protection in mice following challenge, though it could slightly postpone the time of death. Our results indicate that release of MVs from C. perfringens could provide a previously unknown mechanism to induce release of inflammatory cytokines, especially TNF-α, these findings may contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of C. perfringens infection. PMID:24631214

  2. Sharing of Escherichia coli sequence type ST131 and other multidrug-resistant and Urovirulent E. coli strains among dogs and cats within a household.

    PubMed

    Johnson, James R; Miller, Sybille; Johnston, Brian; Clabots, Connie; Debroy, Chitrita

    2009-11-01

    A multidrug-resistant (MDR) Escherichia coli strain from a human-associated pulsotype within sequence type ST131 (O25:H4) colonized three of five dogs and cats within a household. Of the four other colonizing strains identified, two were MDR and two colonized multiple hosts. The ST131 strain uniquely exhibited high resistance and virulence scores.

  3. High quality draft genome sequence of Bacteroides barnesiae type strain BL2T (DSM 18169T) from chicken caecum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Lapidus, Alla L.; Han, James; Trong, Stephan; Haynes, Matthew; Reddy, T. B. K.; Mikhailova, Natalia; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia N.; et al

    2015-08-02

    Bacteroides barnesiae Lan et al. 2006 is a species of the genus Bacteroides, which belongs to the family Bacteroidaceae. Strain BL2T is of interest because it was isolated from the gut of a chicken and the growing awareness that the anaerobic microbiota of the caecum is of benefit for the host and may impact poultry farming. We report that the 3,621,509 bp long genome with its 3,059 protein-coding and 97 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: the one thousand microbial genomes (KMG) project.

  4. An infectious molecular clone of an unusual macrophage-tropic and highly cytopathic strain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Collman, R; Balliet, J W; Gregory, S A; Friedman, H; Kolson, D L; Nathanson, N; Srinivasan, A

    1992-01-01

    We isolated and molecularly cloned a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strain (89.6) which is unusual because it is both macrophage-tropic and extremely cytopathic in lymphocytes. Moreover, this is the first well-characterized infectious molecularly cloned macrophage-tropic HIV-1 strain derived from peripheral blood. HIV-1 89.6 differs markedly from other macrophage-tropic isolates within the envelope V3 region, which is important in determining cell tropism and cytopathicity. HIV-1 89.6 may thus represent a transitional isolate between noncytopathic macrophage-tropic viruses and cytopathic lymphocyte-tropic viruses. Images PMID:1433527

  5. Over Six Thousand Trypanosoma cruzi Strains Classified into Discrete Typing Units (DTUs): Attempt at an Inventory.

    PubMed

    Brenière, Simone Frédérique; Waleckx, Etienne; Barnabé, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, presents wide genetic diversity. Currently, six discrete typing units (DTUs), named TcI to TcVI, and a seventh one called TcBat are used for strain typing. Beyond the debate concerning this classification, this systematic review has attempted to provide an inventory by compiling the results of 137 articles that have used it. A total of 6,343 DTU identifications were analyzed according to the geographical and host origins. Ninety-one percent of the data available is linked to South America. This sample, although not free of potential bias, nevertheless provides today's picture of T. cruzi genetic diversity that is closest to reality. DTUs were genotyped from 158 species, including 42 vector species. Remarkably, TcI predominated in the overall sample (around 60%), in both sylvatic and domestic cycles. This DTU known to present a high genetic diversity, is very widely distributed geographically, compatible with a long-term evolution. The marsupial is thought to be its most ancestral host and the Gran Chaco region the place of its putative origin. TcII was rarely sampled (9.6%), absent, or extremely rare in North and Central America, and more frequently identified in domestic cycles than in sylvatic cycles. It has a low genetic diversity and has probably found refuge in some mammal species. It is thought to originate in the south-Amazon area. TcIII and TcIV were also rarely sampled. They showed substantial genetic diversity and are thought to be composed of possible polyphyletic subgroups. Even if they are mostly associated with sylvatic transmission cycles, a total of 150 human infections with these DTUs have been reported. TcV and TcVI are clearly associated with domestic transmission cycles. Less than 10% of these DTUs were identified together in sylvatic hosts. They are thought to originate in the Gran Chaco region, where they are predominant and where putative parents exist (TcII and TcIII). Trends in host

  6. Over Six Thousand Trypanosoma cruzi Strains Classified into Discrete Typing Units (DTUs): Attempt at an Inventory

    PubMed Central

    Brenière, Simone Frédérique; Waleckx, Etienne; Barnabé, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, presents wide genetic diversity. Currently, six discrete typing units (DTUs), named TcI to TcVI, and a seventh one called TcBat are used for strain typing. Beyond the debate concerning this classification, this systematic review has attempted to provide an inventory by compiling the results of 137 articles that have used it. A total of 6,343 DTU identifications were analyzed according to the geographical and host origins. Ninety-one percent of the data available is linked to South America. This sample, although not free of potential bias, nevertheless provides today’s picture of T. cruzi genetic diversity that is closest to reality. DTUs were genotyped from 158 species, including 42 vector species. Remarkably, TcI predominated in the overall sample (around 60%), in both sylvatic and domestic cycles. This DTU known to present a high genetic diversity, is very widely distributed geographically, compatible with a long-term evolution. The marsupial is thought to be its most ancestral host and the Gran Chaco region the place of its putative origin. TcII was rarely sampled (9.6%), absent, or extremely rare in North and Central America, and more frequently identified in domestic cycles than in sylvatic cycles. It has a low genetic diversity and has probably found refuge in some mammal species. It is thought to originate in the south-Amazon area. TcIII and TcIV were also rarely sampled. They showed substantial genetic diversity and are thought to be composed of possible polyphyletic subgroups. Even if they are mostly associated with sylvatic transmission cycles, a total of 150 human infections with these DTUs have been reported. TcV and TcVI are clearly associated with domestic transmission cycles. Less than 10% of these DTUs were identified together in sylvatic hosts. They are thought to originate in the Gran Chaco region, where they are predominant and where putative parents exist (TcII and TcIII). Trends in

  7. Strain-induced martensitic transformation in type 321 austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridlova, M.; Hyspecka, L.; Wenger, F.; Ponthiaux, P.; Galland, J.; Kubecka, P.

    2003-10-01

    Strain-induced martensitic transformation in AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel was studied by means of compression, tension and friction tests at room temperature. Compression and tensile tests were done in air and friction tests were realised by using a pin-on-disk apparatus in deionised water. The strain-induced volume fraction of α'-martensite determined by X-ray diffraction analysis was correlated with different imposed pressures and tensile strams. It seems evident that strain induced α'- martensite increases as a function of the normal force and the number of rotations after friction tests; however, the role of sliding rate was negligible. The results were completed by values of friction coefficients. The strain-induced martensite formation is subject to hardening mechanism, which may contribute to cumulative damage of pin-on-disk friction specimens.

  8. Molecular Typing of Pathogenic Leptospira Serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae Strains Circulating in China during the Past 50 Years

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cuicai; Yang, Huimian; Li, Xiuwen; Cao, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Haijian; Zeng, Linzi; Xu, Jianmin; Xu, Yinghua; Chang, Yung-Fu; Guo, Xiaokui; Zhu, Yongzhang; Jiang, Xiugao

    2015-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is one of the most important neglected tropical infectious diseases worldwide. Icterohaemorrhagiae has been throughout recent history, and still is, the predominant serogroup of this pathogen in China. However, very little in detail is known about the serovars or genotypes of this serogroup. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, 120 epidemic strains from five geographically diverse regions in China collected over a 50 year period (1958~2008), and 8 international reference strains characterized by 16S rRNA sequencing and MLST analysis. 115, 11 and 2 strains were identified as L. interrogans, L. borgpetersenii, and L. kirschneri, respectively. 17 different STs were identified including 69 ST1 strains, 18 ST17, 18 ST128, 9 ST143 and 2 ST209. The remaining 12 strains belonged to 12 different STs. eBURST analysis demonstrated that, among the clonal complexes isolated (CCs), CC1 accounted for 73.3% (88/120) strains representing three STs: ST1, ST128 and ST98. ST1 was the most likely ancestral strain of this CC, followed by singleton CC17 (17/120) and CC143 (11/120). Further analysis of adding 116 serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae strains in the MLST database and studies previously described using global eBURST analysis and MST dendrogram revealed relatively similar ST clustering patterns with five main CCs and 8 singletons among these 244 strains. CC17 was found to be the most prevalent clone of pathogenic Leptospira circulating worldwide. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that ST1 and ST17 strains were distributed among 4 distinct serovars, indicating a highly complicated relationship between serovars and STs. Conclusions/Significance Our studies demonstrated a high level of genetic diversity in the serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae strains. Distinct from ST17 or ST37 circulating elsewhere, ST1 included in CC1, has over the past 50 years or so, proven to be the most prevalent ST of pathogenic leptospires isolated in China. Moreover, the

  9. Virulence of Entomopathogenic Nematodes to Plum Curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar: Effects of Strain, Temperature, and Soil Type

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro-Ilan, David I.; Leskey, Tracy C.; Wright, Starker E.

    2011-01-01

    The plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar, is a major pest of stone and pome fruit (e.g., apples, pears, peaches, cherries, etc.). Entomopathogenic nematodes (Steinernema spp. and Heterorhabditis spp.) may be used to control the larval stage of C. nenuphar following fruit drop. Indeed, certain entomopathogenic nematodes species have previously been shown to be highly effective in killing C. nenuphar larvae in laboratory and field trials. In field trials conducted in the Southeastern, USA, Steinernema riobrave has thus far been shown to be the most effective species. However, due to lower soil temperatures, other entomopathogenic nematode strains or species may be more appropriate for use against C. nenuphar in the insect’s northern range. Thus, the objective of this study was to conduct a broad screening of entomopathogenic nematodes. Under laboratory conditions, we determined the virulence of 13 nematode strains (comprising nine species) in two different soils (a loam and clay-loam) and three different temperatures (12°C, 18°C, and 25°C). Superior virulence was observed in S. feltiae (SN strain), S. rarum (17 C&E strain), and S. riobrave (355 strain). Promising levels of virulence were also observed in others including H. indica (HOM1 strain), H. bacteriophora (Oswego strain), S. kraussei, and S. carpocapsae (Sal strain). All nematode treatments were affected by temperature with the highest virulence observed at the highest temperature (25°C). In future research, field tests will be used to further narrow down the most suitable nematode species for C. nenuphar control. PMID:23430967

  10. Mycobacterium marinum Strains Can Be Divided into Two Distinct Types Based on Genetic Diversity and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    van der Sar, Astrid M.; Abdallah, Abdallah M.; Sparrius, Marion; Reinders, Erik; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; Bitter, Wilbert

    2004-01-01

    Mycobacterium marinum causes a systemic tuberculosis-like disease in a large number of poikilothermic animals and is used as a model for mycobacterial pathogenesis. In the present study, we infected zebra fish (Danio rerio) with different strains of M. marinum to determine the variation in pathogenicity. Depending on the M. marinum isolate, the fish developed an acute or chronic disease. Acute disease was characterized by uncontrolled growth of the pathogen and death of all animals within 16 days, whereas chronic disease was characterized by granuloma formation in different organs and survival of the animals for at least 4 to 8 weeks. Genetic analysis of the isolates by amplified fragment length polymorphism showed that M. marinum strains could be divided in two clusters. Cluster I contained predominantly strains isolated from humans with fish tank granuloma, whereas the majority of the cluster II strains were isolated from poikilothermic species. Acute disease progression was noted only with strains belonging to cluster I, whereas all chronic-disease-causing isolates belonged to cluster II. This difference in virulence was also observed in vitro: cluster I isolate Mma20 was able to infect and survive more efficiently in the human macrophage THP-1 and the carp leukocyte CLC cell lines than was the cluster II isolate Mma11. We conclude that strain characteristics play an important role in the pathogenicity of M. marinum. In addition, the correlation between genetic variation and host origin suggests that cluster I isolates are more pathogenic for humans. PMID:15501758

  11. High quality draft genome sequence of Corynebacterium ulceribovis type strain IMMIB-L1395T (DSM 45146T)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yassin, Atteyet F.; Lapidus, Alla; Han, James; Reddy, T. B. K.; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter; et al

    2015-08-05

    We report that the Corynebacterium ulceribovis strain IMMIB L-1395T (= DSM 45146T) is an aerobic to facultative anaerobic, Gram-positive, non-spore-forming, non-motile rod-shaped bacterium that was isolated from the skin of the udder of a cow, in Schleswig Holstein, Germany. The cell wall of C. ulceribovis contains corynemycolic acids. The cellular fatty acids are those described for the genus Corynebacterium, but tuberculostearic acid is not present. Here we describe the features of C. ulceribovis strain IMMIB L-1395T, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 2,300,451 bp long genome containing 2,104 protein-coding genes and 54 RNA-encoding genes and is partmore » of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: the one thousand microbial genomes (KMG) project.« less

  12. Genome sequence of the flexirubin-pigmented soil bacterium Niabella soli type strain (JS13-8T)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Munk, Christine; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Mavromatis, K; Pagani, Ioanna; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Rohde, Manfred; Tindall, Brian; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Ivanova, N

    2012-01-01

    Niabella soli Weon et al. 2008 is a member of the Chitinophagaceae, a family within the class Sphingobacteriia that is poorly characterized at the genome level, thus far. N. soli strain JS13-8T is of interest for its ability to produce a variety of glycosyl hydrolases. The ge- nome of N. soli strain JS13-8T is only the second genome sequence of a type strain from the family Chitinophagaceae to be published, and the first one from the genus Niabella. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 4,697,343 bp long chromosome with its 3,931 protein-coding and 49 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  13. High quality draft genome sequence of Corynebacterium ulceribovis type strain IMMIB-L1395T (DSM 45146T)

    SciTech Connect

    Yassin, Atteyet F.; Lapidus, Alla; Han, James; Reddy, T. B. K.; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2015-08-05

    We report that the Corynebacterium ulceribovis strain IMMIB L-1395T (= DSM 45146T) is an aerobic to facultative anaerobic, Gram-positive, non-spore-forming, non-motile rod-shaped bacterium that was isolated from the skin of the udder of a cow, in Schleswig Holstein, Germany. The cell wall of C. ulceribovis contains corynemycolic acids. The cellular fatty acids are those described for the genus Corynebacterium, but tuberculostearic acid is not present. Here we describe the features of C. ulceribovis strain IMMIB L-1395T, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 2,300,451 bp long genome containing 2,104 protein-coding genes and 54 RNA-encoding genes and is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: the one thousand microbial genomes (KMG) project.

  14. High-quality draft genome sequence of the Thermus amyloliquefaciens type strain YIM 77409(T) with an incomplete denitrification pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhou, En-Min; Murugapiran, Senthil K; Mefferd, Chrisabelle C; Liu, Lan; Xian, Wen-Dong; Yin, Yi-Rui; Ming, Hong; Yu, Tian-Tian; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Varghese, Neha; Mikhailova, Natalia; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T B K; Ngan, Chew Yee; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Spunde, Alexander; Kyrpides, Nikos; Woyke, Tanja; Li, Wen-Jun; Hedlund, Brian P

    2016-01-01

    Thermus amyloliquefaciens type strain YIM 77409(T) is a thermophilic, Gram-negative, non-motile and rod-shaped bacterium isolated from Niujie Hot Spring in Eryuan County, Yunnan Province, southwest China. In the present study we describe the features of strain YIM 77409(T) together with its genome sequence and annotation. The genome is 2,160,855 bp long and consists of 6 scaffolds with 67.4 % average GC content. A total of 2,313 genes were predicted, comprising 2,257 protein-coding and 56 RNA genes. The genome is predicted to encode a complete glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, and tricarboxylic acid cycle. Additionally, a large number of transporters and enzymes for heterotrophy highlight the broad heterotrophic lifestyle of this organism. A denitrification gene cluster included genes predicted to encode enzymes for the sequential reduction of nitrate to nitrous oxide, consistent with the incomplete denitrification phenotype of this strain. PMID:26925197

  15. Isolation and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against an attenuated vaccine strain of equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1).

    PubMed

    Meyer, H; Hübert, P H

    1988-09-01

    The production and differentiation of monoclonal antibodies (mabs) against the Rac-H strain of EHV-1 used as an attenuated live vaccine to prevent rhinopneumonitis and abortion is described. Seven different antigenic sites were detected by the 15 mabs produced. EHV-1 specific mabs as well as EHV-1 and -4 common mabs could be established, allowing easy typing of EHV isolates. One mab recognized the vaccine strain only. This reaction was used to investigate a possible involvement of the vaccine strain in cases of abortion. Common antigenic determinants with EHV-1,-3,-4 and BHV-1 could also be detected, indicating the presence of highly-conserved epitopes of alpha-herpesviruses.

  16. Multilocus sequence typing of bifidobacterial strains from infant's faeces and human milk: are bifidobacteria being sustainably shared during breastfeeding?

    PubMed

    Makino, H; Martin, R; Ishikawa, E; Gawad, A; Kubota, H; Sakai, T; Oishi, K; Tanaka, R; Ben-Amor, K; Knol, J; Kushiro, A

    2015-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are considered to be one of the most important beneficial intestinal bacteria for infants, contributing to the priming of the mucosal immune system. These microbes can also be detected in mother's milk, suggesting a potential role of human milk in the colonisation of infant's gut. However, little is known about the timing of bacteria appearance in human milk, and whether human milk is the first source of inoculation. Here, we investigated whether specific strains are shared sustainably between maternal milk and infant's gut. Faecal samples and human milk were collected from 102 healthy mother-infant pairs (infant's faeces: meconium, 7, 30 days of age; mother's milk: once before delivery, colostrum, 7, 30 days after delivery). Bifidobacterial strains were isolated from these samples, and were discriminated by means of multilocus sequencing typing. No bifidobacteria were detected from human milk collected before delivery, or colostrum. Strains were isolated only from human milk samples obtained 7 days after birth or later. On the other hand, bifidobacterial strains were obtained from infant's faeces throughout the study period, sometimes as early as the first day of life (meconium). We have found that bifidobacterial species belonging to Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium breve, and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum could be identified as monophyletic between infant's faeces and their mother's milk. These strains were confirmed to be sustainably shared between maternal milk and infant's gut. Moreover, monophyletic strains were isolated at the same time point or earlier from infant's faeces than from human milk, and none were isolated earlier from human milk than from infant's faeces. Although it remains unclear whether human milk is the first source of microbes for infants, our results confirm that human milk is a reservoir of bifidobacteria, and specific strains are shared between infant's intestine and human milk during breastfeeding. PMID

  17. Ocular avirulence of a herpes simplex virus type 1 strain is associated with heightened sensitivity to alpha/beta interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Su, Y H; Oakes, J E; Lausch, R N

    1990-01-01

    BALB/c mice infected on the scarified cornea with herpes simplex virus type 1 strain 35 [HSV-1(35)] rarely developed ocular disease even at challenge doses as high as 10(7) PFU per eye. In contrast, HSV-1(RE) consistently induced stromal keratitis at an inoculum of 2 x 10(4) PFU. The goal of this study was to determine the reason for the difference in virulence between the two HSV strains. Both HSV-1 strains replicated to similar titers in excised corneal "buttons." However, after in vivo infection of the cornea, the growth of strain 35 was evident only during the first 24 h postinfection, whereas the replication of strain RE persisted for at least 4 days. In vitro tests revealed that HSV-1(35) was greater than 10 times more sensitive to alpha/beta interferon (IFN-alpha/beta) than HSV-1(RE). Both strains induced comparable serum levels of IFN after intraperitoneal inoculation. The kinetics of HSV-1(35) clearance from the eye was markedly altered by treatment with rabbit anti-IFN-alpha/beta. Virus titers exceeding 10(4) PFU per eye could be demonstrated 4 to 5 days postinfection in mice given a single inoculation of antiserum 1 h after infection. Furthermore, anti-IFN treatment in 3-week-old mice infected with HSV-1(35) led to the development of clinically apparent corneal disease which subsequently progressed to stromal keratitis in the majority of recipients. These results indicate that the striking difference in the capacity of HSV-1(35) and HSV-1(RE) to induce corneal disease was related to the inherently greater sensitivity of strain 35 to IFN-alpha/beta produced by the host in response to infection. PMID:2157880

  18. Multilocus sequence typing of bifidobacterial strains from infant's faeces and human milk: are bifidobacteria being sustainably shared during breastfeeding?

    PubMed

    Makino, H; Martin, R; Ishikawa, E; Gawad, A; Kubota, H; Sakai, T; Oishi, K; Tanaka, R; Ben-Amor, K; Knol, J; Kushiro, A

    2015-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are considered to be one of the most important beneficial intestinal bacteria for infants, contributing to the priming of the mucosal immune system. These microbes can also be detected in mother's milk, suggesting a potential role of human milk in the colonisation of infant's gut. However, little is known about the timing of bacteria appearance in human milk, and whether human milk is the first source of inoculation. Here, we investigated whether specific strains are shared sustainably between maternal milk and infant's gut. Faecal samples and human milk were collected from 102 healthy mother-infant pairs (infant's faeces: meconium, 7, 30 days of age; mother's milk: once before delivery, colostrum, 7, 30 days after delivery). Bifidobacterial strains were isolated from these samples, and were discriminated by means of multilocus sequencing typing. No bifidobacteria were detected from human milk collected before delivery, or colostrum. Strains were isolated only from human milk samples obtained 7 days after birth or later. On the other hand, bifidobacterial strains were obtained from infant's faeces throughout the study period, sometimes as early as the first day of life (meconium). We have found that bifidobacterial species belonging to Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium breve, and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum could be identified as monophyletic between infant's faeces and their mother's milk. These strains were confirmed to be sustainably shared between maternal milk and infant's gut. Moreover, monophyletic strains were isolated at the same time point or earlier from infant's faeces than from human milk, and none were isolated earlier from human milk than from infant's faeces. Although it remains unclear whether human milk is the first source of microbes for infants, our results confirm that human milk is a reservoir of bifidobacteria, and specific strains are shared between infant's intestine and human milk during breastfeeding.

  19. PFGE standard operating procedures for Listeria monocytogenes: harmonizing the typing of food and clinical strains in Europe.

    PubMed

    Michelon, Damien; Félix, Benjamin; Vingadassalon, Noemie; Mariet, Jean-François; Larsson, Jonas T; Møller-Nielsen, Eva; Roussel, Sophie

    2015-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen responsible for a severe disease known as listeriosis. The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) coordinates a network of national public health laboratories (NPHLs) in charge of typing clinical strains. In food, it is the European Union Reference Laboratory for L. monocytogenes (EURL Lm), which manages a network of National Reference Laboratories (NRLs). A pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) standard operating procedure (EURL SOP) has been used routinely at the EURL Lm since 2007. The EURL Lm has recommended that NRLs use the EURL SOP, whereas the Statens Serum Institut (SSI), under contract for ECDC, requested that NPHLs use Halpins' SOP (HSOP) published in 2010 for the PulseNet USA network. An update of Halpins' SOP (uHSOP) was published in 2013. To facilitate the exchange of profiles among human and food European reference laboratories, it is crucial to ensure that the PFGE profiles obtained with these different SOPs are comparable. The aim here was to compare the EURL SOP with HSOP and uHSOP. The panel comprised 114 well-characterized SSI/EURL strains. All were characterized at the EURL using both the EURL SOP and uHSOP. Seventy of the 114 strains were also characterized at the SSI using HSOP. The EURL SOP and uHSOP produced indistinguishable combined (ApaI/AscI) profiles for the 114 strains tested. The EURL SOP and HSOP produced indistinguishable combined profiles for 69 of the 70 strains tested. One strain displayed for the AscI profile an additional low-intensity band at 184 kbp with HSOP. For this strain, SSI and EUR Lm had already observed the same profile from NPHLs and NRLs. However, this deviation is minor as it accounted for about 1% of all the 114 combined profiles. This study should facilitate the exchange of reproducible PFGE profiles among human and food reference laboratories.

  20. Transcriptomic analysis of Clostridium thermocellum Populus hydrolysate-tolerant mutant strain shows increased cellular efficiency in response to Populus hydrolysate compared to the wild type strain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The thermophilic, anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium thermocellum is a model organism for consolidated processing due to its efficient fermentation of cellulose. Constituents of dilute acid pretreatment hydrolysate are known to inhibit C. thermocellum and other microorganisms. To evaluate the biological impact of this type of hydrolysate, a transcriptomic analysis of growth in hydrolysate-containing medium was conducted on 17.5% v/v Populus hydrolysate-tolerant mutant (PM) and wild type (WT) strains of C. thermocellum. Results In two levels of Populus hydrolysate medium (0% and 10% v/v), the PM showed both gene specific increases and decreases of gene expression compared to the wild-type strain. The PM had increased expression of genes in energy production and conversion, and amino acid transport and metabolism in both standard and 10% v/v Populus hydrolysate media. In particular, expression of the histidine metabolism increased up to 100 fold. In contrast, the PM decreased gene expression in cell division and sporulation (standard medium only), cell defense mechanisms, cell envelope, cell motility, and cellulosome in both media. The PM downregulated inorganic ion transport and metabolism in standard medium but upregulated it in the hydrolysate media when compared to the WT. The WT differentially expressed 1072 genes in response to the hydrolysate medium which included increased transcription of cell defense mechanisms, cell motility, and cellulosome, and decreased expression in cell envelope, amino acid transport and metabolism, inorganic ion transport and metabolism, and lipid metabolism, while the PM only differentially expressed 92 genes. The PM tolerates up to 17.5% v/v Populus hydrolysate and growth in it elicited 489 genes with differential expression, which included increased expression in energy production and conversion, cellulosome production, and inorganic ion transport and metabolism and decreased expression in transcription and cell

  1. Biogenic amine production by Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strains in the model system of Dutch-type cheese.

    PubMed

    Flasarová, Radka; Pachlová, Vendula; Buňková, Leona; Menšíková, Anna; Georgová, Nikola; Dráb, Vladimír; Buňka, František

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the biogenic amine production of two starter strains of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris (strains from the Culture Collection of Dairy Microorganisms - CCDM 824 and CCDM 946) with decarboxylase positive activity in a model system of Dutch-type cheese during a 90-day ripening period at 10°C. During ripening, biogenic amine and free amino acid content, microbiological characteristics and proximate chemical properties were observed. By the end of the ripening period, the putrescine content in both samples with the addition of the biogenic amine producing strain almost evened out and the concentration of putrescine was >800mg/kg. The amount of tyramine in the cheeses with the addition of the strain of CCDM 824 approached the limit of 400mg/kg by the end of ripening. In the cheeses with the addition of the strain of CCDM 946 it even exceeded 500mg/kg. In the control samples, the amount of biogenic amines was insignificant.

  2. Evaluation of baker's yeast strains exhibiting significant growth on Japanese beet molasses and compound analysis of the molasses types.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Hiroaki; Tamura, Masahiko; Shintani, Takahiro; Gomi, Katsuya

    2014-06-01

    Cane molasses, most of which is imported, is used as a raw material for production of baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) in Japan. On the other hand, beet molasses is scarcely used for this purpose, but it can be of great advantage to cane molasses because it is domestically produced in relatively high amounts as a by-product of beet sugar processing. However, the yield of baker's yeast is sometimes low with Japanese beet molasses compared to imported cane molasses. For the production of baker's yeast with Japanese beet molasses, we evaluated S. cerevisiae strains, including industrial and laboratory strains, to group them according to the growth profile on beet and cane molasses. To discuss the factors affecting growth, we further analyzed the major compounds in both types of molasses. Beet molasses seems to contain compounds that promote the growth of beet molasses-favoring strains rather than inhibit the growth of cane molasses-favoring strains. It was assumed that α-amino acid was one of the growth promotion factors for beet molasses-favoring strains.

  3. Identification of enzymes and quantification of metabolic fluxes in the wild type and in a recombinant aspergillus oryzae strain

    PubMed

    Pedersen; Carlsen; Nielsen

    1999-01-01

    Two alpha-amylase-producing strains of Aspergillus oryzae, a wild-type strain and a recombinant containing additional copies of the alpha-amylase gene, were characterized with respect to enzyme activities, localization of enzymes to the mitochondria or cytosol, macromolecular composition, and metabolic fluxes through the central metabolism during glucose-limited chemostat cultivations. Citrate synthase and isocitrate dehydrogenase (NAD) activities were found only in the mitochondria, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP) activities were found only in the cytosol, and isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP), glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase, malate dehydrogenase, and glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD) activities were found in both the mitochondria and the cytosol. The measured biomass components and ash could account for 95% (wt/wt) of the biomass. The protein and RNA contents increased linearly with increasing specific growth rate, but the carbohydrate and chitin contents decreased. A metabolic model consisting of 69 fluxes and 59 intracellular metabolites was used to calculate the metabolic fluxes through the central metabolism at several specific growth rates, with ammonia or nitrate as the nitrogen source. The flux through the pentose phosphate pathway increased with increasing specific growth rate. The fluxes through the pentose phosphate pathway were 15 to 26% higher for the recombinant strain than for the wild-type strain.

  4. Genome sequence of Frateuria aurantia type strain (Kondô 67T), a xanthomonade isolated from Lilium auratium Lindl.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Iain; Teshima, Huzuki; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla; Tice, Hope; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Rohde, Manfred; Lang, Elke; Detter, John C.; Göker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Frateuria aurantia (ex Kondô and Ameyama 1958) Swings et al. 1980 is a member of the bispecific genus Frateuria in the family Xanthomonadaceae, which is already heavily targeted for non-type strain genome sequencing. Strain Kondô 67T was initially (1958) identified as a member of ‘Acetobacter aurantius’, a name that was not considered for the approved list. Kondô 67T was therefore later designated as the type strain of the newly proposed acetogenic species Frateuria aurantia. The strain is of interest because of its triterpenoids (hopane family). F. aurantia Kondô 67T is the first member of the genus Frateura whose genome sequence has been deciphered, and here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 3,603,458-bp long chromosome with its 3,200 protein-coding and 88 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:24501647

  5. Comparative neuropathology of ovine enterotoxemia produced by Clostridium perfringens type D wild-type strain CN1020 and its genetically modified derivatives.

    PubMed

    Garcia, J P; Giannitti, F; Finnie, J W; Manavis, J; Beingesser, J; Adams, V; Rood, J I; Uzal, F A

    2015-05-01

    Clostridium perfringens type D causes enterotoxemia in sheep and goats. The disease is mediated by epsilon toxin (ETX), which affects the cerebrovascular endothelium, increasing vascular permeability and leading to cerebral edema. In the present study, we compared the distribution and severity of the cerebrovascular changes induced in lambs by C. perfringens type D strain CN1020, its isogenic etx null mutant, and the ETX-producing complemented mutant. We also applied histochemical and immunohistochemical markers to further characterize the brain lesions induced by ETX. Both ETX-producing strains induced extensive cerebrovascular damage that did not differ significantly between each other in nature, neuroanatomic distribution, or severity. By contrast, lambs inoculated with the etx mutant or sterile, nontoxic culture medium did not develop detectable brain lesions, confirming that the neuropathologic effects observed in these infections are dependent on ETX production. Lambs treated with the wild-type and complemented strains showed perivascular and mural vascular edema, as well as serum albumin extravasation, particularly severe in the cerebral white matter, midbrain, medulla oblongata, and cerebellum. Brains of animals inoculated with the ETX-producing strains showed decreased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein and increased expression of aquaporin-4 in the end-feet processes of the astrocytes around blood vessels. Early axonal injury was demonstrated with anti-amyloid precursor protein immunohistochemistry. Perivascular accumulation of macrophages/microglia with intracytoplasmic albumin globules was also observed in these animals. This study demonstrates that ETX is responsible for the major cerebrovascular changes in C. perfringens type D-induced disease.

  6. The Effect of Fabric Type of Common Iranian Working Clothes on the Induced Cardiac and Physiological Strain Under Heat Stress.

    PubMed

    Parvari, Roh Allah; Aghaei, Habib Allah; Dehghan, Habibollah; Khademi, Abolfazl; Maracy, Mohammad Reza; Dehghan, Somayeh Farhang

    2015-01-01

    The present study compared the effect of fabric type of working clothes on heat strain responses in different levels of physical workload and under different kinds of weather conditions. Four kinds of working clothing fabric that are greatly popular in Iranian industry were assessed on 18 healthy male at 2 environments: hot and humid (dry temperature [DBt]: 35°C and relative humidity [RH]: 70%) and hot and dry (DBt: 40°C and RH: 40%). The physiological responses such as heart rate and core body temperature were reported. It was found that there were no significant differences between different types of clothing fabric on cardiac and physiological parameters. It can be recommended that 100% cotton clothing ensemble during low-workload activities and 30.2% cotton-69.8% polyester clothing ensemble during moderate-workload activities is used for Iranian workers to maintain the cardiac and physiological strains as low as possible.

  7. Complete genome sequence of the bile-resistant pigment- producing anaerobe Alistipes finegoldii type strain (AHN2437T)

    SciTech Connect

    Mavromatis, K; Stackebrandt, Erko; Munk, Christine; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mikhailova, Natalia; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Rohde, Manfred; Gronow, Sabine; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    Alistipes finegoldii Rautio et al. 2003 is one of five species of Alistipes with a validly pub- lished name: family Rikenellaceae, order Bacteroidetes, class Bacteroidia, phylum Bacteroidetes. This rod-shaped and strictly anaerobic organism has been isolated mostly from human tissues. Here we describe the features of the type strain of this species, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. A. finegoldii is the first member of the genus Alistipes for which the complete genome sequence of its type strain is now available. The 3,734,239 bp long single replicon genome with its 3,302 protein-coding and 68 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  8. Complete genome sequence of the bile-resistant pigment-producing anaerobe Alistipes finegoldii type strain (AHN2437T)

    PubMed Central

    Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Stackebrandt, Erko; Munk, Christine; Lapidus, Alla; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Rohde, Manfred; Gronow, Sabine; Göker, Markus; Detter, John C.; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    Alistipes finegoldii Rautio et al. 2003 is one of five species of Alistipes with a validly published name: family Rikenellaceae, order Bacteroidetes, class Bacteroidia, phylum Bacteroidetes. This rod-shaped and strictly anaerobic organism has been isolated mostly from human tissues. Here we describe the features of the type strain of this species, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. A. finegoldii is the first member of the genus Alistipes for which the complete genome sequence of its type strain is now available. The 3,734,239 bp long single replicon genome with its 3,302 protein-coding and 68 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:23961309

  9. [Current knowledge on the strain typing of the pathogenic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum var. capsulatum: a review of the findings].

    PubMed

    Reyes-Montes, M del R; Taylor, M L; Curiel-Quesada, E; Mesa-Arango, A C

    2000-12-01

    The classification of microbial strains is currently based on different typing methods, which must meet certain criteria in order to be widely used. Phenotypic and genotypic methods are being employed in the epidemiology of several fungal diseases. However, some problems associated to the phenotypic methods have fostered genotyping procedures, from DNA polymorphic diversity to gene sequencing studies, all aiming to differentiate and to relate fungal isolates or strains. Through these studies, it is possible to identify outbreaks, to detect nosocomial infection transmission, and to determine the source of infection, as well as to recognize virulent isolates. This paper is aimed at analyzing the methods recently used to type Histoplasma capsulatum, causative agent of the systemic mycosis known as histoplasmosis, in order to recommend those that yield reproducible and accurate results. PMID:15762806

  10. Phylogeography and molecular epidemiology of an epidemic strain of dengue virus type 1 in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Ocwieja, Karen E; Fernando, Anira N; Sherrill-Mix, Scott; Sundararaman, Sesh A; Tennekoon, Rashika N; Tippalagama, Rashmi; Krishnananthasivam, Shivankari; Premawansa, Gayani; Premawansa, Sunil; De Silva, Aruna Dharshan

    2014-08-01

    In 2009, a severe epidemic of dengue disease occurred in Sri Lanka, with higher mortality and morbidity than any previously recorded epidemic in the country. It corresponded to a shift to dengue virus 1 as the major disease-causing serotype in Sri Lanka. Dengue disease reached epidemic levels in the next 3 years. We report phylogenetic evidence that the 2009 epidemic DENV-1 strain continued to circulate within the population and caused severe disease in the epidemic of 2012. Bayesian phylogeographic analyses suggest that the 2009 Sri Lankan epidemic DENV-1 strain may have traveled directly or indirectly from Thailand through China to Sri Lanka, and after spreading within the Sri Lankan population, it traveled to Pakistan and Singapore. Our findings delineate the dissemination route of a virulent DENV-1 strain in Asia. Understanding such routes will be of particular importance to global control efforts.

  11. Phylogeography and Molecular Epidemiology of an Epidemic Strain of Dengue Virus Type 1 in Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Ocwieja, Karen E.; Fernando, Anira N.; Sherrill-Mix, Scott; Sundararaman, Sesh A.; Tennekoon, Rashika N.; Tippalagama, Rashmi; Krishnananthasivam, Shivankari; Premawansa, Gayani; Premawansa, Sunil; De Silva, Aruna Dharshan

    2014-01-01

    In 2009, a severe epidemic of dengue disease occurred in Sri Lanka, with higher mortality and morbidity than any previously recorded epidemic in the country. It corresponded to a shift to dengue virus 1 as the major disease-causing serotype in Sri Lanka. Dengue disease reached epidemic levels in the next 3 years. We report phylogenetic evidence that the 2009 epidemic DENV-1 strain continued to circulate within the population and caused severe disease in the epidemic of 2012. Bayesian phylogeographic analyses suggest that the 2009 Sri Lankan epidemic DENV-1 strain may have traveled directly or indirectly from Thailand through China to Sri Lanka, and after spreading within the Sri Lankan population, it traveled to Pakistan and Singapore. Our findings delineate the dissemination route of a virulent DENV-1 strain in Asia. Understanding such routes will be of particular importance to global control efforts. PMID:24799375

  12. Molecular typing of Leptospira spp. strains isolated from field mice confirms a link to human leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Li, S J; Wang, D M; Zhang, C C; Li, X W; Yang, H M; Tian, K C; Wei, X Y; Liu, Y; Tang, G P; Jiang, X G; Yan, J

    2013-11-01

    In recent years, human leptospirosis has been reported in Jinping and Liping counties, Guizhou province, but the leptospires have never been isolated. To track the source of infection and understand the aetiological characteristics, we performed surveillance for field mice carriage of leptospirosis in 2011. Four strains of leptospire were isolated from Apodemus agrarius. PCR confirmed the four isolates as pathogenic. Multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) showed that the four strains were closely related to serovar Lai strain 56601 belonging to serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae, which is consistent with the antibody detection results from local patients. Furthermore, the diversity of leptospiral isolates from different hosts and regions was demonstrated with MLVA. Our results suggest that A. agrarius may be the main carrier of Leptospira in Jinping and Liping counties, and the serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae serovar may be the epidemic serogroup of Leptospira. This will contribute to the control and prevention of leptospirosis in these localities. PMID:23406882

  13. Complete genome sequence of Mesorhizobium ciceri bv. biserrulae type strain (WSM1271T)

    SciTech Connect

    Nandesena, Kemanthi; Yates, Ron; Tiwari, Ravi; O'Hara, Graham; Howieson, John; Ninawi, Mohamed; Chertkov, Olga; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Woyke, Tanja; Pitluck, Sam; Nolan, Matt; Land, Miriam L; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pati, Amrita; Copeland, A; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ivanova, N; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Meenakshi, Uma; Reeve, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Mesorhizobium ciceri bv. biserrulae strain WSM1271T was isolated from root nodules of the pasture legume Biserrula pelecinus growing in the Mediterranean basin. Previous studies have shown this aerobic, motile, Gram negative, non-spore-forming rod preferably nodulates B. pelecinus a legume with many beneficial agronomic attributes for sustainable agriculture in Australia. We describe the genome of Mesorhizobium ciceri bv. biserrulae strain WSM1271T consisting of a 6,264,489 bp chro-mosome and a 425,539 bp plasmid that together encode 6,470 protein-coding genes and 61 RNA-only encoding genes.

  14. Tetrahydroindazole inhibitors of bacterial type II topoisomerases. Part 2: SAR development and potency against multidrug-resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Wiener, John J M; Gomez, Laurent; Venkatesan, Hariharan; Santillán, Alejandro; Allison, Brett D; Schwarz, Kimberly L; Shinde, Shirin; Tang, Liu; Hack, Michael D; Morrow, Brian J; Motley, S Timothy; Goldschmidt, Raul M; Shaw, Karen Joy; Jones, Todd K; Grice, Cheryl A

    2007-05-15

    We have previously reported a novel class of tetrahydroindazoles that display potency against a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, potentially via interaction with type II bacterial topoisomerases. Herein are reported SAR investigations of this new series. Several compounds possessing broad-spectrum potency were prepared. Further, these compounds exhibit activity against multidrug-resistant Gram-positive microorganisms equivalent to that against susceptible strains.

  15. Structural studies of the O-specific polysaccharide(s) from the lipopolysaccharide of Azospirillum brasilense type strain Sp7.

    PubMed

    Sigida, Elena N; Fedonenko, Yuliya P; Shashkov, Alexander S; Zdorovenko, Evelina L; Konnova, Svetlana A; Ignatov, Vladimir V; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2013-10-18

    Lipopolysaccharide was obtained by phenol-water extraction from dried bacterial cells of Azospirillum brasilense type strain Sp7. Mild acid hydrolysis of the lipopolysaccharide followed by GPC on Sephadex G-50 resulted in a polysaccharide mixture, which was studied by composition and methylation analyses, Smith degradation and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The following polysaccharide structures were established, where italics indicate a non-stoichiometric (∼40%) 2-O-methylation of l-rhamnose.

  16. Cloning, expression, and sequence analysis of the Haemophilus influenzae type b strain M43p+ pilin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Gilsdorf, J R; Marrs, C F; McCrea, K W; Forney, L J

    1990-01-01

    By using antiserum against Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) strain M43p+ denatured pilin, we screened a genomic library of Hib strain M43p+ and identified a clone that expressed pilin, but not assembled pili, on its surface. Southern blot analysis revealed the presence of one structural gene, which was also present in strain M42p-, a nonpiliated variant. Five exonuclease III deletion mutants, two of which had deletions that extended into the structural gene and failed to express pilin, were used to obtain the nucleotide sequence of the structural gene. The amino acid sequence of the open reading frame agrees with 38 of 40 amino acids from the published sequence of purified Hib M43p+ pilin. The pilin gene coded for a mature protein of 193 amino acids, with a calculated molecular mass of 21,101 daltons. Comparison of the Hib M43p+ pilin amino acid sequence with those of pilins of other bacteria revealed strong conservation of amino- and carboxy-terminal regions in M43p+ and Escherichia coli F17, type 1C, and several members of the P pili family, as well as Klebsiella pneumoniae type 3 MR/K, Bordetella pertussis serotype 2, and Serratia marcescens US46 fimbriae. Images PMID:1969389

  17. Comparative c-type cytochrome expression analysis in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C grown with soluble and insoluble oxidised metal electron acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Nissen, Silke; Liu, Xiaoxin; Chourey, Karuna; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Wagner, Darlene D; Pffifner, Susan; Loeffler, Frank E

    2012-01-01

    The genomes of Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C encode 40 and 69 putative c-type cytochrome genes, respectively. Deletion mutant and biochemical studies have assigned specific functions to a few c-type cytochromes involved in electron transfer to oxidised metals in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Although promising, the genetic approach is limited to gene deletions that produce a distinct phenotype, and organism for which a genetic system is available. To more comprehensively investigate and compare c-type cytochrome expression in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C, proteomic measurements were used to characterise lysates of cells grown with soluble Fe(III) (as ferric citrate) and insoluble Mn(IV) (as MnO2) as electron acceptors. Strain MR-1 expressed 19 and 20, and strain 2CP-C expressed 27 and 25 c-type cytochromes when grown with Fe(III) and Mn(IV), respectively. The majority of c-type cytochromes (77% for strain MR-1 and 63% for strain 2CP-C) were expressed under both growth conditions; however, the analysis also revealed unique c-type cytochromes that were specifically expressed in cells grown with soluble Fe(III) or insoluble Mn(IV). Proteomic characterisation proved to be a promising approach for determining the c-type cytochrome complement expressed under different growth conditions, and will help elucidating the specific functions of more c-type cytochromes that are the basis for Shewanella and Anaeromyxobacter respiratory versatility.

  18. Inulin-type fructan fermentation by bifidobacteria depends on the strain rather than the species and region in the human intestine.

    PubMed

    Selak, Marija; Rivière, Audrey; Moens, Frédéric; Van den Abbeele, Pieter; Geirnaert, Annelies; Rogelj, Irena; Leroy, Frédéric; De Vuyst, Luc

    2016-05-01

    Inulin-type fructans (ITF) are known to cause a health-promoting bifidogenic effect, although the ITF degradation capacity of bifidobacteria in different intestinal regions remains unclear. The present study aims at offering new insights into this link, making use of a collection of 190 bifidobacterial strains, encompassing strains from gut biopsies (terminal ileum and proximal colon; mucosa-associated strains) and the simulator of the human intestinal microbial ecosystem (SHIME®; proximal and distal colon vessels; lumen-associated strains). A multivariate data analysis of all fermentation data revealed four clusters corresponding with different types of ITF degradation fingerprints, which were not correlated with the region in the intestine, suggesting that the degradation of ITF is uniform along the human intestine. Strains from cluster 1 consumed fructose, while strains from cluster 2 consumed more oligofructose than fructose. Higher fructose and oligofructose consumption was characteristic for clusters 3 and 4 strains, which degraded inulin too. In general, the mucosa-associated strains from biopsy origin seemed to be more specialized in the consumption of fructose and oligofructose, while the lumen-associated strains from SHIME origin displayed a higher degradation degree of inulin. Further, intra-species variability in ITF degradation was found, indicating strain-specific variations. The coexistence of different bifidobacterial strains with different ITF degradation fingerprints within the same intestinal region suggests cooperation for the degradation of ITF, with opportunities for cross-feeding on strain and/or species level.

  19. Rapid Focused Sequencing: A Multiplexed Assay for Simultaneous Detection and Strain Typing of Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis

    PubMed Central

    Zolotova, Anna; Tan, Eugene; Selden, Richard F.

    2013-01-01

    Background The intentional release of Bacillus anthracis in the United States in 2001 has heightened concern about the use of pathogenic microorganisms in bioterrorism attacks. Many of the deadliest bacteria, including the Class A Select Agents Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis, are highly infectious via the pulmonary route when released in aerosolized form. Hence, rapid, sensitive, and reliable methods for detection of these biothreats and characterization of their potential impact on the exposed population are of critical importance to initiate and support rapid military, public health, and clinical responses. Methodology/Principal Findings We have developed microfluidic multiplexed PCR and sequencing assays based on the simultaneous interrogation of three pathogens per assay and ten loci per pathogen. Microfluidic separation of amplified fluorescently labeled fragments generated characteristic electrophoretic signatures for identification of each agent. The three sets of primers allowed significant strain typing and discrimination from non-pathogenic closely-related species and environmental background strains based on amplicon sizes alone. Furthermore, sequencing of the 10 amplicons per pathogen, termed “Rapid Focused Sequencing,” allowed an even greater degree of strain discrimination and, in some cases, can be used to determine virulence. Both amplification and sequencing assays were performed in microfluidic biochips developed for fast thermal cycling and requiring 7 µL per reaction. The 30-plex sequencing assay resulted in genotypic resolution of 84 representative strains belonging to each of the three biothreat species. Conclusions/Significance The microfluidic multiplexed assays allowed identification and strain differentiation of the biothreat agents Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis and clear discrimination from closely-related species and several environmental background strains. The

  20. Global distribution of Bartonella infections in domestic bovine and characterization of Bartonella bovis strains using multi-locus sequence typing.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ying; Malania, Lile; Alvarez Castillo, Danilo; Moran, David; Boonmar, Sumalee; Chanlun, Aran; Suksawat, Fanan; Maruyama, Soichi; Knobel, Darryn; Kosoy, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Bartonella bovis is commonly detected in cattle. One B. bovis strain was recently isolated from a cow with endocarditis in the USA, suggesting its role as an animal pathogen. In the present study, we investigated bartonella infections in 893 cattle from five countries (Kenya, Thailand, Japan, Georgia, and Guatemala) and 103 water buffaloes from Thailand to compare the prevalence of the infection among different regions and different bovid hosts. We developed a multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) scheme based on nine loci (16S rRNA, gltA, ftsZ, groEL, nuoG, ribC, rpoB, ssrA, and ITS) to compare genetic divergence of B. bovis strains, including 26 representatives from the present study and two previously described reference strains (one from French cows and another from a cow with endocarditis in the USA). Bartonella bacteria were cultured in 6.8% (7/103) of water buffaloes from Thailand; all were B. bovis. The prevalence of bartonella infections in cattle varied tremendously across the investigated regions. In Japan, Kenya, and the Mestia district of Georgia, cattle were free from the infection; in Thailand, Guatemala, and the Dusheti and Marneuli districts of Georgia, cattle were infected with prevalences of 10-90%. The Bartonella isolates from cattle belonged to three species: B. bovis (n=165), B. chomelii (n=9), and B. schoenbuchensis (n=1), with the latter two species found in Georgia only. MLST analysis suggested genetic variations among the 28 analyzed B. bovis strains, which fall into 3 lineages (I, II, and III). Lineages I and II were found in cattle while lineage III was restricted to water buffaloes. The majority of strains (17/28), together with the strain causing endocarditis in a cow in the USA, belonged to lineage I. Further investigations are needed to determine whether B. bovis causes disease in bovids.

  1. Live attenuated mutants of Francisella tularensis protect rabbits against aerosol challenge with a virulent type A strain.

    PubMed

    Reed, Douglas S; Smith, Le'kneitah P; Cole, Kelly Stefano; Santiago, Araceli E; Mann, Barbara J; Barry, Eileen M

    2014-05-01

    Francisella tularensis, a Gram-negative bacterium, is the causative agent of tularemia. No licensed vaccine is currently available for protection against tularemia, although an attenuated strain, dubbed the live vaccine strain (LVS), is given to at-risk laboratory personnel as an investigational new drug (IND). In an effort to develop a vaccine that offers better protection, recombinant attenuated derivatives of a virulent type A strain, SCHU S4, were evaluated in New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits. Rabbits vaccinated via scarification with the three attenuated derivatives (SCHU S4 ΔguaBA, ΔaroD, and ΔfipB strains) or with LVS developed a mild fever, but no weight loss was detected. Twenty-one days after vaccination, all vaccinated rabbits were seropositive for IgG to F. tularensis lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Thirty days after vaccination, all rabbits were challenged with aerosolized SCHU S4 at doses ranging from 50 to 500 50% lethal doses (LD50). All rabbits developed fevers and weight loss after challenge, but the severity was greater for mock-vaccinated rabbits. The ΔguaBA and ΔaroD SCHU S4 derivatives provided partial protection against death (27 to 36%) and a prolonged time to death compared to results for the mock-vaccinated group. In contrast, LVS and the ΔfipB strain both prolonged the time to death, but there were no survivors from the challenge. This is the first demonstration of vaccine efficacy against aerosol challenge with virulent type A F. tularensis in a species other than a rodent since the original work with LVS in the 1960s. The ΔguaBA and ΔaroD SCHU S4 derivatives warrant further evaluation and consideration as potential vaccines for tularemia and for identification of immunological correlates of protection.

  2. Mechanical properties of elytra from Tribolium castaneum wild-type and body color mutant strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cuticle tanning in insects involves simultaneous cuticular hardening and pigmentation. The dynamic mechanical properties of the highly modified and cuticle-rich forewings (elytra) from Tribolium castaneum (red flour beetle) body color mutant strains were investigated to determine the relationship b...

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptococcus gordonii Type Strain CCUG 33482T.

    PubMed

    Salvà-Serra, Francisco; Jakobsson, Hedvig E; Thorell, Kaisa; Gonzales-Siles, Lucia; Hallbäck, Erika T; Jaén-Luchoro, Daniel; Boulund, Fredrik; Sikora, Per; Karlsson, Roger; Svensson, Liselott; Bennasar, Antoni; Engstrand, Lars; Kristiansson, Erik; Moore, Edward R B

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus gordoniitype strain CCUG 33482(T)is a member of theStreptococcus mitisgroup, isolated from a case of subacute bacterial endocarditis. Here, we report the draft genome sequence ofS. gordoniiCCUG 33482(T), composed of 41 contigs of a total size of 2.15 Mb with 2,061 annotated coding sequences. PMID:27013051

  4. Virulence spectra of typed strains of Campylobacter jejuni from different sources: a blinded in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Stewart-Tull, D E S; Coote, J G; Thompson, D H; Candlish, Denise; Wardlaw, A C; Candlish, A

    2009-05-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a major cause of human diarrhoeal disease, but specific virulence mechanisms have not been well defined. The aims of the present blinded study were to measure and compare the in vivo properties of 40 serotyped, biotyped and genotyped C. jejuni isolates from different sources and genetic makeup. An 11-day-old chick embryo lethality assay, which measured embryo deaths and total viable bacteria over 72 h following inoculation of bacteria into the chorioallantoic membrane, revealed a spectrum of activity within the C. jejuni strains. Human and chicken isolates showed similar high virulence values for embryo deaths while the virulence of the bovine isolates was less pronounced. A one-way ANOVA comparison between the capacity of the strains to kill the chick embryos after 24 h with cytotoxicity towards cultured CaCo-2 cells was significant (P=0.025). After inoculation with a Campylobacter strain, mouse ligated ileal loops were examined histologically and revealed degrees of villous atrophy, abnormal mucosa, dilation of the lumen, congestion and blood in lumen, depending on the isolate examined. A 'total pathology score', derived for each C. jejuni strain after grading the pathology features for degree of severity, showed no apparent relationship with the source of isolation. Some relationship was found between amplified fragment length polymorphism groups and total ileal loop pathology scores, and a one-way ANOVA comparison of the mouse pathology scores against total chick embryo deaths after 72 h was significant (P=0.049). PMID:19369514

  5. Spreading of AbaR-type genomic islands in multidrug resistance Acinetobacter baumannii strains belonging to different clonal complexes.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, María Soledad; Vilacoba, Elisabet; Stietz, María Silvina; Merkier, Andrea Karina; Jeric, Paola; Limansky, Adriana S; Márquez, Carolina; Bello, Helia; Catalano, Mariana; Centrón, Daniela

    2013-07-01

    In order to determine the occurrence of AbaR-type genomic island in multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRAb) strains circulating in Argentina, Uruguay, and Chile, we studied 51 MDRAb isolates recovered from several hospitals over 30 years. AbaR-type genomic resistance islands were found in 36 MDRAb isolates since 1986 till now. MLST technique allowed us to identify the presence of four different Clonal Complexes (109, 104, 119, 113) among the positive AbaR-type island positive strains. This is the first description of AbaR-type islands in the CC104 and CC113 that are the most widespread Clonal Complexes in Argentina. In addition, PCR mapping exposed different arrays to those previously described, evidencing the plasticity of this island. Our results evidence a widespread distribution of the AbaR-type genomic islands along the time in the MDRAb population, including the epidemic global clone 1 (GC1) as well as different clonal complexes to those already described in the literature. PMID:23397241

  6. [Serological analysis of coagulase-negative staphylococci: study of characteristic agglutinogens in type strains of the nine species individualized by Schleifer and Kloos (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Pillet, J; Orta, B

    1977-01-01

    The occurrence of characteristic agglutinogens has been searched for in the type strains of the following species: Staphylococcus xylosus, S. cohnii, S. epidermidis, S. capitis, S. saprophyticus, S. warneri, S. haemolyticus, S. hominis and S. simulans. Serotyping of these nine strains and study of their antisera have been carried out with formalin-treated and autoclaved bacteria. It has been shown that the characteristic agglutinogens of S. epidermidis and S. haemolyticus were respectively identical to the agglutinogens previously described in the coagulase-negative type strain 52.186 and in the S. aureus type strain 18. Characteristic agglutinogens have been found in each of the other seven type strains. Agglutinogens found in S. xylosus and S. saprophyticus are thermolabile, the corresponding absorbed sera reacting only with the formalin-treated homologous strain. Concerning S. cohnii, S. capitis, S. hominis and S. simulans, their absorbed sera reacting both with formalin-treated and autoclaved homologous strains, the observed reactions can be accounted either by one thermostable agglutinogen or by two characteristic agglutinogens, one thermostable, the other thermolabile. In S. warneri, only one thermostable agglutinogen has been characterized, the specificity of the reaction observed between the absorbed S. warneri antiserum and the homologous formalin-treated strain having to be confirmed. The use for serotyping of absorbed sera prepared against the type strains of the species S. xylosus, S. cohnii, S. capitis, S. saprophyticus, S. warneri, S. hominis and S. simulans should permit to improve the individualization of coagulase-negative staphylococci. PMID:610502

  7. Regulation of Type IV Pili Contributes to Surface Behaviors of Historical and Epidemic Strains of Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Purcell, Erin B.; McKee, Robert W.; Bordeleau, Eric; Burrus, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The intestinal pathogen Clostridium difficile is an urgent public health threat that causes antibiotic-associated diarrhea and is a leading cause of fatal nosocomial infections in the United States. C. difficile rates of recurrence and mortality have increased in recent years due to the emergence of so-called “hypervirulent” epidemic strains. A great deal of the basic biology of C. difficile has not been characterized. Recent findings that flagellar motility, toxin synthesis, and type IV pilus (TFP) formation are regulated by cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) reveal the importance of this second messenger for C. difficile gene regulation. However, the function(s) of TFP in C. difficile remains largely unknown. Here, we examine TFP-dependent phenotypes and the role of c-di-GMP in controlling TFP production in the historical 630 and epidemic R20291 strains of C. difficile. We demonstrate that TFP contribute to C. difficile biofilm formation in both strains, but with a more prominent role in R20291. Moreover, we report that R20291 is capable of TFP-dependent surface motility, which has not previously been described in C. difficile. The expression and regulation of the pilA1 pilin gene differs between R20291 and 630, which may underlie the observed differences in TFP-mediated phenotypes. The differences in pilA1 expression are attributable to greater promoter-driven transcription in R20291. In addition, R20291, but not 630, upregulates c-di-GMP levels during surface-associated growth, suggesting that the bacterium senses its substratum. The differential regulation of surface behaviors in historical and epidemic C. difficile strains may contribute to the different infection outcomes presented by these strains. IMPORTANCE How Clostridium difficile establishes and maintains colonization of the host bowel is poorly understood. Surface behaviors of C. difficile are likely relevant during infection, representing possible interactions between the bacterium and the

  8. De novo Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Acremonium chrysogenum: High-Yield and Wild-Type Strains of Cephalosporin C Producer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Xie, Liping; Gong, Guihua; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Baoquan; Hu, Youjia

    2014-01-01

    β-lactam antibiotics are widely used in clinic. Filamentous fungus Acremonium chrysogenum is an important industrial fungus for the production of CPC, one of the major precursors of β-lactam antibiotics. Although its fermentation yield has been bred significantly over the past decades, little is known regarding molecular changes between the industrial strain and the wild type strain. This limits the possibility to improve CPC production further by molecular breeding. Comparative transcriptome is a powerful tool to understand the molecular mechanisms of CPC industrial high yield producer compared to wild type. A total of 57 million clean sequencing reads with an average length of 100 bp were generated from Illumina sequencing platform. 22,878 sequences were assembled. Among the assembled unigenes, 9502 were annotated and 1989 annotated sequences were assigned to 121 pathways by searching against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway (KEGG) database. Furthermore, we compared the transcriptome differences between a high-yield and a wild-type strain during fermentation. A total of 4329 unigenes with significantly different transcription level were identified, among which 1737 were up-regulated and 2592 were down-regulated. 24 pathways were subsequently determined which involve glycerolipid metabolism, galactose metabolism, and pyrimidine metabolism. We also examined the transcription levels of 18 identified genes, including 11 up-regulated genes and 7 down-regulated genes using reverse transcription quantitative -PCR (RT-qPCR). The results of RT-qPCR were consistent with the Illumina sequencing. In this study, the Illumina sequencing provides the most comprehensive sequences for gene expression profile of Acremonium chrysogenum and allows de novo transcriptome assembly while lacking genome information. Comparative analysis of RNA-seq data reveals the complexity of the transcriptome in the fermentation of different yield strains. This is an important

  9. Extracellular enzyme activities during lignocellulose degradation by Streptomyces spp. : a comparative study of wild-type and genetically manipulated strains

    SciTech Connect

    Ramachandra, M.; Crawford, D.L.; Pometto, A.L. III

    1987-12-01

    The wild-type ligninolytic actinomycete Streptomyces viridosporus T7A and two genetically manipulated strains with enhanced abilities to produce a water-soluble lignin degradation intermediate, an acid-precipitable polymeric lignin (APPL), were grown on lignocellulose in solid-state fermentation cultures. Culture filtrates were periodically collected, analyzed for APPL, and assayed for extracellular lignocellulose-catabolizing enzyme activities. Two APPL-overproducing strains, UV irradiation mutant T7A-81 and protoplast fusion recombinant SR-10, had higher and longer persisting peroxidase, esterase, and endoglucanase activities than did the wild-type strain T7A. Results implicated one or more of these enzymes in lignin solubilization. Only mutant T7A-81 had higher xylanase activity than the wild type. The peroxidase was induced by both lignocellulose and APPL. This extracellular enzyme has some similarities to previously described ligninases in fungi. This is the first report of such an enzyme in Streptomyces spp. Four peroxidase isozymes were present, and all catalyzed the oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine, while one also catalyzed hydrogen peroxide-dependent oxidation of homoprotocatechuic acid and caffeic acid. Three constitutive esterase isozymes were produced which differed in substrate specificity toward ..cap alpha..-naphthyl acetate and ..cap alpha..-naphthyl butyrate. Three endoglucanase bands, which also exhibited a low level of xylanase activity, were identified on polyacrylamide gels as was one xylanase-specific band. There were no major differences in the isoenzymes produced by the different strains. The probable role of each enzyme in lignocellulose degradation is discussed.

  10. Type II secretory pathway for surface secretion of DraD invasin from the uropathogenic Escherichia coli Dr+ strain.

    PubMed

    Zalewska-Piatek, Beata; Bury, Katarzyna; Piatek, Rafal; Bruzdziak, Piotr; Kur, Józef

    2008-07-01

    The virulence of the uropathogenic Escherichia coli Dr(+) IH11128 strain is associated with the presence of Dr fimbrial structures and a DraD invasin which can act as a fimbrial capping domain at the bacterial cell surface. However, a recent study suggests that the DraD protein is surface exposed in two forms: fimbria associated and fimbria nonassociated (prone to interaction with the N-terminal extension of the DraE protein located on the fimbrial tip). The actual mechanism of DraD surface secretion is presently unknown. We identified a previously unrecognized type II secretory pathway (secreton) in the uropathogenic E. coli Dr(+) strain which is well conserved among gram-negative bacteria and used mainly for secretion of virulence determinants. An active secreton is composed of 12 to 15 different proteins, among which GspD functions as an outer-membrane channel to permit extrusion of proteins in a folded state. Therefore, we inactivated the pathway by inserting the group II intron into a gspD gene of the type II secretion machinery by site-specific recombination. DraD secretion by the E. coli Dr(+) and gspD mutant strains was determined by immunofluorescence microscopy (with antibodies raised against DraD) and an assay of cell binding between bacteria and HeLa cells. The specificity of DraD-mediated bacterial binding for the integrin receptor was confirmed by examination of the adhesion of DraD-coated beads to HeLa cells in the presence and absence of alpha(5)beta(1) monoclonal antibodies. The investigations that we performed showed that type II secretion in E. coli Dr(+) strains leads to DraD translocation at the bacterial cell surfaces.

  11. Genotypic Diversity and Population Structure of Vibrio vulnificus Strains Isolated in Taiwan and Korea as Determined by Multilocus Sequence Typing

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye-Jin; Cho, Jae-Chang

    2015-01-01

    The genetic diversity and population structure of Vibrio vulnificus isolates from Korea and Taiwan were investigated using PCR-based assays targeting putative virulence-related genes and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). BOX-PCR genomic fingerprinting identified 52 unique genotypes in 84 environmental and clinical V. vulnificus isolates. The majority (> 50%) of strains had pathogenic genotypes for all loci tested; moreover, many environmental strains had pathogenic genotypes. Although significant (p < 0.05) inter-relationships among the genotypes were observed, the association between genotype and strain source (environmental or clinical) was not significant, indicating that genotypic characteristics alone are not sufficient to predict the isolation source or the virulence of a given V. vulnificus strain and vice versa. MLST revealed 23–35 allelic types per locus analyzed, resulting in a total of 44 unique sequence types (STs). Two major monophyletic groups (lineages A and B) corresponding to the two known lineages of V. vulnificus were observed; lineage A had six STs that were exclusively environmental, whereas lineage B had STs from both environmental and clinical sources. Pathogenic and nonpathogenic genotypes predominated in MLST lineages B and A, respectively. In addition, V. vulnificus was shown to be in linkage disequilibrium (p < 0.05), although two different recombination tests (PHI and Sawyer’s tests) detected significant evidence of recombination. Tajima’s D test also indicated that V. vulnificus might be comprised of recently sub-divided lineages. These results suggested that the two lineages revealed by MLST correspond to two distinct ecotypes of V. vulnificus. PMID:26599487

  12. Genotypic Diversity and Population Structure of Vibrio vulnificus Strains Isolated in Taiwan and Korea as Determined by Multilocus Sequence Typing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Jin; Cho, Jae-Chang

    2015-01-01

    The genetic diversity and population structure of Vibrio vulnificus isolates from Korea and Taiwan were investigated using PCR-based assays targeting putative virulence-related genes and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). BOX-PCR genomic fingerprinting identified 52 unique genotypes in 84 environmental and clinical V. vulnificus isolates. The majority (> 50%) of strains had pathogenic genotypes for all loci tested; moreover, many environmental strains had pathogenic genotypes. Although significant (p < 0.05) inter-relationships among the genotypes were observed, the association between genotype and strain source (environmental or clinical) was not significant, indicating that genotypic characteristics alone are not sufficient to predict the isolation source or the virulence of a given V. vulnificus strain and vice versa. MLST revealed 23-35 allelic types per locus analyzed, resulting in a total of 44 unique sequence types (STs). Two major monophyletic groups (lineages A and B) corresponding to the two known lineages of V. vulnificus were observed; lineage A had six STs that were exclusively environmental, whereas lineage B had STs from both environmental and clinical sources. Pathogenic and nonpathogenic genotypes predominated in MLST lineages B and A, respectively. In addition, V. vulnificus was shown to be in linkage disequilibrium (p < 0.05), although two different recombination tests (PHI and Sawyer's tests) detected significant evidence of recombination. Tajima's D test also indicated that V. vulnificus might be comprised of recently sub-divided lineages. These results suggested that the two lineages revealed by MLST correspond to two distinct ecotypes of V. vulnificus. PMID:26599487

  13. Poles Apart: Arctic and Antarctic Octadecabacter strains Share High Genome Plasticity and a New Type of Xanthorhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Vollmers, John; Voget, Sonja; Dietrich, Sascha; Gollnow, Kathleen; Smits, Maike; Meyer, Katja; Brinkhoff, Thorsten; Simon, Meinhard; Daniel, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    The genus Octadecabacter is a member of the ubiquitous marine Roseobacter clade. The two described species of this genus, Octadecabacter arcticus and Octadecabacter antarcticus, are psychrophilic and display a bipolar distribution. Here we provide the manually annotated and finished genome sequences of the type strains O. arcticus 238 and O. antarcticus 307, isolated from sea ice of the Arctic and Antarctic, respectively. Both genomes exhibit a high genome plasticity caused by an unusually high density and diversity of transposable elements. This could explain the discrepancy between the low genome synteny and high 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity between both strains. Numerous characteristic features were identified in the Octadecabacter genomes, which show indications of horizontal gene transfer and may represent specific adaptations to the habitats of the strains. These include a gene cluster encoding the synthesis and degradation of cyanophycin in O. arcticus 238, which is absent in O. antarcticus 307 and unique among the Roseobacter clade. Furthermore, genes representing a new subgroup of xanthorhodopsins as an adaptation to icy environments are present in both Octadecabacter strains. This new xanthorhodopsin subgroup differs from the previously characterized xanthorhodopsins of Salinibacter ruber and Gloeobacter violaceus in phylogeny, biogeography and the potential to bind 4-keto-carotenoids. Biochemical characterization of the Octadecabacter xanthorhodopsins revealed that they function as light-driven proton pumps. PMID:23671678

  14. Variability of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 group O strains isolated from Cameroonian patients living in France.

    PubMed Central

    Loussert-Ajaka, I; Chaix, M L; Korber, B; Letourneur, F; Gomas, E; Allen, E; Ly, T D; Brun-Vézinet, F; Simon, F; Saragosti, S

    1995-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nucleotide sequences encoding p24Gag and the Env C2V3 region were obtained from seven patients who were selected on the basis of having paradoxical seronegativity on a subset of HIV enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay detection kits and having atypical Western blot (immunoblot) reactivity. Sequence analyses showed that all of these strains were more closely related to the recently described Cameroonian HIV isolates of group O (HIV-1 outlier) than to group M (HIV-1 major). All seven patients had Cameroonian origins but were living in France at the time the blood samples were taken. Characterization of a large number of group M strains has to date revealed eight distinct genetic subtypes (A to H). Genetic distances between sequences from available group O isolates were generally comparable to those observed in M intersubtype sequence comparisons, showing that the group O viruses are genetically very diverse. Analysis of sequences from these seven new viral strains, combined with the three previously characterized group O strains, revealed few discernable phylogenetic clustering patterns among the 10 patients' viral sequences. The level of diversity among group O sequences suggests that they may have a comparable (or greater) age than the M group sequences, although for unknown reasons, the latter group dispersed first and is the dominant lineage in the pandemic. PMID:7637010

  15. Poles apart: Arctic and Antarctic Octadecabacter strains share high genome plasticity and a new type of xanthorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Vollmers, John; Voget, Sonja; Dietrich, Sascha; Gollnow, Kathleen; Smits, Maike; Meyer, Katja; Brinkhoff, Thorsten; Simon, Meinhard; Daniel, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    The genus Octadecabacter is a member of the ubiquitous marine Roseobacter clade. The two described species of this genus, Octadecabacter arcticus and Octadecabacter antarcticus, are psychrophilic and display a bipolar distribution. Here we provide the manually annotated and finished genome sequences of the type strains O. arcticus 238 and O. antarcticus 307, isolated from sea ice of the Arctic and Antarctic, respectively. Both genomes exhibit a high genome plasticity caused by an unusually high density and diversity of transposable elements. This could explain the discrepancy between the low genome synteny and high 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity between both strains. Numerous characteristic features were identified in the Octadecabacter genomes, which show indications of horizontal gene transfer and may represent specific adaptations to the habitats of the strains. These include a gene cluster encoding the synthesis and degradation of cyanophycin in O. arcticus 238, which is absent in O. antarcticus 307 and unique among the Roseobacter clade. Furthermore, genes representing a new subgroup of xanthorhodopsins as an adaptation to icy environments are present in both Octadecabacter strains. This new xanthorhodopsin subgroup differs from the previously characterized xanthorhodopsins of Salinibacter ruber and Gloeobacter violaceus in phylogeny, biogeography and the potential to bind 4-keto-carotenoids. Biochemical characterization of the Octadecabacter xanthorhodopsins revealed that they function as light-driven proton pumps. PMID:23671678

  16. Transcriptome Profiling of Wild-Type and pga-Knockout Mutant Strains Reveal the Role of Exopolysaccharide in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Mayilvahanan; El Abbar, Faiha; Ramasubbu, Narayanan

    2015-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides have a diverse set of functions in most bacteria including a mechanistic role in protecting bacteria against environmental stresses. Among the many functions attributed to the exopolysaccharides, biofilm formation, antibiotic resistance, immune evasion and colonization have been studied most extensively. The exopolysaccharide produced by many Gram positive as well as Gram negative bacteria including the oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is the homopolymer of β(1,6)-linked N-acetylglucosamine. Recently, we reported that the PGA-deficient mutant of A. actinomycetemcomitans failed to colonize or induce bone resorption in a rat model of periodontal disease, and the colonization genes, apiA and aae, were significantly down regulated in the mutant strain. To understand the role of exopolysaccharide and the pga locus in the global expression of A. actinomycetemcomitans, we have used comparative transcriptome profiling to identify differentially expressed genes in the wild-type strain in relation to the PGA-deficient strain. Transcriptome analysis revealed that about 50% of the genes are differently expressed (P < 0.05 and fold change >1.5). Our study demonstrated that the absence of the pga locus affects the genes involved in peptidoglycan recycling, glycogen storage, and virulence. Further, using confocal microscopy and plating assays, we show that the viability of pga mutant strain is significantly reduced during biofilm growth. Thus, this study highlights the importance of pga genes and the exopolysaccharide in the virulence of A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:26221956

  17. Typing Discrepancy Between Phenotypic and Molecular Characterization Revealing an Emerging Biovar 9 Variant of Smooth Phage-Resistant B. abortus Strain 8416 in China

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yao-Xia; Li, Xu-Ming; Piao, Dong-Ri; Tian, Guo-Zhong; Jiang, Hai; Jia, En-Hou; Lin, Liang; Cui, Bu-Yun; Chang, Yung-Fu; Guo, Xiao-Kui; Zhu, Yong-Zhang

    2015-01-01

    A newly isolated smooth colony morphology phage-resistant strain 8416 isolated from a 45-year-old cattle farm cleaner with clinical features of brucellosis in China was reported. The most unusual phenotype was its resistance to two Brucella phages Tbilisi and Weybridge, but sensitive to Berkeley 2, a pattern similar to that of Brucella melitensis biovar 1. VITEK 2 biochemical identification system found that both strain 8416 and B. melitensis strains shared positive ILATk, but negative in other B. abortus strains. However, routine biochemical and phenotypic characteristics of strain 8416 were most similar to that of B. abortus biovar 9 except CO2 requirement. In addition, multiple PCR molecular typing assays including AMOS-PCR, B. abortus special PCR (B-ab PCR) and a novel sub-biovar typing PCR, indicated that strain 8416 may belong to either biovar 3b or 9 of B. abortus. Surprisingly, further MLVA typing results showed that strain 8416 was most closely related to B. abortus biovar 3 in the Brucella MLVA database, primarily differing in 4 out of 16 screened loci. Therefore, due to the unusual discrepancy between phenotypic (biochemical reactions and particular phage lysis profile) and molecular typing characteristics, strain 8416 could not be exactly classified to any of the existing B. abortus biovars and might be a new variant of B. abortus biovar 9. The present study also indicates that the present phage typing scheme for Brucella sp. is subject to variation and the routine Brucella biovar typing needs further studies. PMID:26696984

  18. Molecular typing of Salmonella typhi strains from Dhaka (Bangladesh) and development of DNA probes identifying plasmid-encoded multidrug-resistant isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Hermans, P W; Saha, S K; van Leeuwen, W J; Verbrugh, H A; van Belkum, A; Goessens, W H

    1996-01-01

    Seventy-eight Salmonella typhi strains isolated in 1994 and 1995 from patients living in Dhaka, Bangladesh, were subjected to phage typing, ribotyping, IS200 fingerprinting, and PCR fingerprinting. The collection displayed a high degree of genetic homogeneity, because restricted numbers of phage types and DNA fingerprints were observed. A significant number of the S. typhi strains (67%) were demonstrated to be multiple drug resistant (MDR). The vast majority of the MDR strains were resistant to chloramphenicol, ampicillin, trimethoprim, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline (R type CATmSSuT), a resistance phenotype that has also frequently been observed in India. Only two strains displayed a distinct MDR phenotype, R type AT-mSSuT. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis demonstrated the presence of large plasmids exclusively in the MDR strains of both R types. The plasmids present in the S. typhi strains of R type CATmSSuT could be conjugated to Escherichia coli and resulted in the complete transfer of the MDR phenotype. PCR fingerprinting allowed discrimination of MDR and susceptible strains. The DNA fragments enabling discrimination of MDR and susceptible S. typhi strains by PCR were useful genetic markers for identifying MDR encoded by large plasmids of the H1 incompatibility group. PMID:8735083

  19. Characterization of two new plasmid DNAs found in mitochondria of wild-type Neurospora intermedia strains.

    PubMed Central

    Stohl, L L; Collins, R A; Cole, M D; Lambowitz, A M

    1982-01-01

    Mitochondria from two Neurospora intermedia strains (P4O5-Labelle and Fiji N6-6) were found to contain plasmid DNAs in addition to the standard mitochondrial DNA species. The plasmid DNAs consist of monomeric circles (4.1-4.3 kbp and 5.2-5.3 kbp for Labelle and Fiji, respectively) and oligomers in which monomers are organized as head-to-tail repeats. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments showed that the plasmids have no substantial sequence homology to mtDNA, to each other, or to a previously characterized mitochondrial plasmid from N. crassa strain Mauriceville-lc (Collins et al. Cell 24, 443-452, 1981). The intramitochondrial location of the plasmids was established by cell fractionation and nuclease protection experiments. In sexual crosses, the plasmids showed strict maternal inheritance, the same as Neurospora mitochondrial DNA. The plasmids may represent a novel class of mitochondrial genetic elements. Images PMID:6280144

  20. Whole genome analysis of diverse Chlamydia trachomatis strains identifies phylogenetic relationships masked by current clinical typing

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Simon R.; Clarke, Ian N.; Seth-Smith, Helena M. B.; Solomon, Anthony W.; Cutcliffe, Lesley T.; Marsh, Peter; Skilton, Rachel J.; Holland, Martin J.; Mabey, David; Peeling, Rosanna W.; Lewis, David A.; Spratt, Brian G.; Unemo, Magnus; Persson, Kenneth; Bjartling, Carina; Brunham, Robert; de Vries, Henry J.C.; Morré, Servaas A.; Speksnijder, Arjen; Bébéar, Cécile M.; Clerc, Maïté; de Barbeyrac, Bertille; Parkhill, Julian; Thomson, Nicholas R.

    2012-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is responsible for both trachoma and sexually transmitted infections causing substantial morbidity and economic cost globally. Despite this, our knowledge of its population and evolutionary genetics is limited. Here we present a detailed whole genome phylogeny from representative strains of both trachoma and lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) biovars from temporally and geographically diverse sources. Our analysis demonstrates that predicting phylogenetic structure using the ompA gene, traditionally used to classify Chlamydia, is misleading because extensive recombination in this region masks true relationships. We show that in many instances ompA is a chimera that can be exchanged in part or whole, both within and between biovars. We also provide evidence for exchange of, and recombination within, the cryptic plasmid, another important diagnostic target. We have used our phylogenetic framework to show how genetic exchange has manifested itself in ocular, urogenital and LGV C. trachomatis strains, including the epidemic LGV serotype L2b. PMID:22406642

  1. Streptococcus equi subspecies equi in horses in Israel: seroprevalence and strain types.

    PubMed

    Tirosh-Levy, S; Blum, S E; Steward, K F; Waller, A S; Steinman, A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to determine the seroprevalence of Streptococcus equi in Israel, to monitor seropositive horses over time and to identify archived strains that were recovered from Israeli horses. A serological survey of 200 healthy horses on 20 farms throughout Israel was performed to detect recent exposure to S equi antigens A and C via indirect ELISA. Seroprevalence was 9.5 per cent (19/200) and positive horses were found in 30 per cent (6/20) of the farms. Sixteen horses that returned a positive serology result were retested three and six months later. Most (12/16) positive horses remained positive, which suggests the presence of animals with persistent infection. Molecular characterisation of S equi strains by sequencing of the SeM gene of 16 archived isolates of S equi that were recovered from clinical cases of strangles between 2008 and 2012 identified two strains: SeM-2 and SeM-28. PMID:27651915

  2. Streptococcus equi subspecies equi in horses in Israel: seroprevalence and strain types

    PubMed Central

    Tirosh-Levy, S.; Blum, S. E.; Steward, K. F.; Waller, A. S.; Steinman, A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to determine the seroprevalence of Streptococcus equi in Israel, to monitor seropositive horses over time and to identify archived strains that were recovered from Israeli horses. A serological survey of 200 healthy horses on 20 farms throughout Israel was performed to detect recent exposure to S equi antigens A and C via indirect ELISA. Seroprevalence was 9.5 per cent (19/200) and positive horses were found in 30 per cent (6/20) of the farms. Sixteen horses that returned a positive serology result were retested three and six months later. Most (12/16) positive horses remained positive, which suggests the presence of animals with persistent infection. Molecular characterisation of S equi strains by sequencing of the SeM gene of 16 archived isolates of S equi that were recovered from clinical cases of strangles between 2008 and 2012 identified two strains: SeM-2 and SeM-28.

  3. Streptococcus equi subspecies equi in horses in Israel: seroprevalence and strain types

    PubMed Central

    Tirosh-Levy, S.; Blum, S. E.; Steward, K. F.; Waller, A. S.; Steinman, A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to determine the seroprevalence of Streptococcus equi in Israel, to monitor seropositive horses over time and to identify archived strains that were recovered from Israeli horses. A serological survey of 200 healthy horses on 20 farms throughout Israel was performed to detect recent exposure to S equi antigens A and C via indirect ELISA. Seroprevalence was 9.5 per cent (19/200) and positive horses were found in 30 per cent (6/20) of the farms. Sixteen horses that returned a positive serology result were retested three and six months later. Most (12/16) positive horses remained positive, which suggests the presence of animals with persistent infection. Molecular characterisation of S equi strains by sequencing of the SeM gene of 16 archived isolates of S equi that were recovered from clinical cases of strangles between 2008 and 2012 identified two strains: SeM-2 and SeM-28. PMID:27651915

  4. Streptococcus equi subspecies equi in horses in Israel: seroprevalence and strain types.

    PubMed

    Tirosh-Levy, S; Blum, S E; Steward, K F; Waller, A S; Steinman, A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to determine the seroprevalence of Streptococcus equi in Israel, to monitor seropositive horses over time and to identify archived strains that were recovered from Israeli horses. A serological survey of 200 healthy horses on 20 farms throughout Israel was performed to detect recent exposure to S equi antigens A and C via indirect ELISA. Seroprevalence was 9.5 per cent (19/200) and positive horses were found in 30 per cent (6/20) of the farms. Sixteen horses that returned a positive serology result were retested three and six months later. Most (12/16) positive horses remained positive, which suggests the presence of animals with persistent infection. Molecular characterisation of S equi strains by sequencing of the SeM gene of 16 archived isolates of S equi that were recovered from clinical cases of strangles between 2008 and 2012 identified two strains: SeM-2 and SeM-28.

  5. Manuka-type honeys can eradicate biofilms produced by Staphylococcus aureus strains with different biofilm-forming abilities.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Turnbull, Lynne; Burke, Catherine M; Liu, Michael; Carter, Dee A; Schlothauer, Ralf C; Whitchurch, Cynthia B; Harry, Elizabeth J

    2014-01-01

    Chronic wounds are a major global health problem. Their management is difficult and costly, and the development of antibiotic resistance by both planktonic and biofilm-associated bacteria necessitates the use of alternative wound treatments. Honey is now being revisited as an alternative treatment due to its broad-spectrum antibacterial activity and the inability of bacteria to develop resistance to it. Many previous antibacterial studies have used honeys that are not well characterized, even in terms of quantifying the levels of the major antibacterial components present, making it difficult to build an evidence base for the efficacy of honey as an antibiofilm agent in chronic wound treatment. Here we show that a range of well-characterized New Zealand manuka-type honeys, in which two principle antibacterial components, methylglyoxal and hydrogen peroxide, were quantified, can eradicate biofilms of a range of Staphylococcus aureus strains that differ widely in their biofilm-forming abilities. Using crystal violet and viability assays, along with confocal laser scanning imaging, we demonstrate that in all S. aureus strains, including methicillin-resistant strains, the manuka-type honeys showed significantly higher anti-biofilm activity than clover honey and an isotonic sugar solution. We observed higher anti-biofilm activity as the proportion of manuka-derived honey, and thus methylglyoxal, in a honey blend increased. However, methylglyoxal on its own, or with sugar, was not able to effectively eradicate S. aureus biofilms. We also demonstrate that honey was able to penetrate through the biofilm matrix and kill the embedded cells in some cases. As has been reported for antibiotics, sub-inhibitory concentrations of honey improved biofilm formation by some S. aureus strains, however, biofilm cell suspensions recovered after honey treatment did not develop resistance towards manuka-type honeys. New Zealand manuka-type honeys, at the concentrations they can be applied

  6. Manuka-type honeys can eradicate biofilms produced by Staphylococcus aureus strains with different biofilm-forming abilities.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Turnbull, Lynne; Burke, Catherine M; Liu, Michael; Carter, Dee A; Schlothauer, Ralf C; Whitchurch, Cynthia B; Harry, Elizabeth J

    2014-01-01

    Chronic wounds are a major global health problem. Their management is difficult and costly, and the development of antibiotic resistance by both planktonic and biofilm-associated bacteria necessitates the use of alternative wound treatments. Honey is now being revisited as an alternative treatment due to its broad-spectrum antibacterial activity and the inability of bacteria to develop resistance to it. Many previous antibacterial studies have used honeys that are not well characterized, even in terms of quantifying the levels of the major antibacterial components present, making it difficult to build an evidence base for the efficacy of honey as an antibiofilm agent in chronic wound treatment. Here we show that a range of well-characterized New Zealand manuka-type honeys, in which two principle antibacterial components, methylglyoxal and hydrogen peroxide, were quantified, can eradicate biofilms of a range of Staphylococcus aureus strains that differ widely in their biofilm-forming abilities. Using crystal violet and viability assays, along with confocal laser scanning imaging, we demonstrate that in all S. aureus strains, including methicillin-resistant strains, the manuka-type honeys showed significantly higher anti-biofilm activity than clover honey and an isotonic sugar solution. We observed higher anti-biofilm activity as the proportion of manuka-derived honey, and thus methylglyoxal, in a honey blend increased. However, methylglyoxal on its own, or with sugar, was not able to effectively eradicate S. aureus biofilms. We also demonstrate that honey was able to penetrate through the biofilm matrix and kill the embedded cells in some cases. As has been reported for antibiotics, sub-inhibitory concentrations of honey improved biofilm formation by some S. aureus strains, however, biofilm cell suspensions recovered after honey treatment did not develop resistance towards manuka-type honeys. New Zealand manuka-type honeys, at the concentrations they can be applied

  7. Manuka-type honeys can eradicate biofilms produced by Staphylococcus aureus strains with different biofilm-forming abilities

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jing; Turnbull, Lynne; Burke, Catherine M.; Liu, Michael; Carter, Dee A.; Schlothauer, Ralf C.; Whitchurch, Cynthia B.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic wounds are a major global health problem. Their management is difficult and costly, and the development of antibiotic resistance by both planktonic and biofilm-associated bacteria necessitates the use of alternative wound treatments. Honey is now being revisited as an alternative treatment due to its broad-spectrum antibacterial activity and the inability of bacteria to develop resistance to it. Many previous antibacterial studies have used honeys that are not well characterized, even in terms of quantifying the levels of the major antibacterial components present, making it difficult to build an evidence base for the efficacy of honey as an antibiofilm agent in chronic wound treatment. Here we show that a range of well-characterized New Zealand manuka-type honeys, in which two principle antibacterial components, methylglyoxal and hydrogen peroxide, were quantified, can eradicate biofilms of a range of Staphylococcus aureus strains that differ widely in their biofilm-forming abilities. Using crystal violet and viability assays, along with confocal laser scanning imaging, we demonstrate that in all S. aureus strains, including methicillin-resistant strains, the manuka-type honeys showed significantly higher anti-biofilm activity than clover honey and an isotonic sugar solution. We observed higher anti-biofilm activity as the proportion of manuka-derived honey, and thus methylglyoxal, in a honey blend increased. However, methylglyoxal on its own, or with sugar, was not able to effectively eradicate S. aureus biofilms. We also demonstrate that honey was able to penetrate through the biofilm matrix and kill the embedded cells in some cases. As has been reported for antibiotics, sub-inhibitory concentrations of honey improved biofilm formation by some S. aureus strains, however, biofilm cell suspensions recovered after honey treatment did not develop resistance towards manuka-type honeys. New Zealand manuka-type honeys, at the concentrations they can be applied

  8. Acute heat stress induces differential gene expressions in the testes of a broiler-type strain of Taiwan country chickens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shih-Han; Cheng, Chuen-Yu; Tang, Pin-Chi; Chen, Chih-Feng; Chen, Hsin-Hsin; Lee, Yen-Pai; Huang, San-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The expression of testicular genes following acute heat stress has been reported in layer-type roosters, but few similar studies have been conducted on broilers. This study investigated the effect of acute heat stress on the gene expression in the testes of a broiler-type strain of Taiwan country chickens. Roosters were subjected to acute heat stress (38°C) for 4 h, and then exposed to 25°C, with testes collected 0, 2, and 6 h after the cessation of heat stress, using non-heat-stressed roosters as controls (n = 3 roosters per group). The body temperature and respiratory rate increased significantly (p<0.05) during the heat stress. The numbers of apoptotic cells increased 2 h after the acute heat stress (79 ± 7 vs. 322 ± 192, control vs. heat stress; p<0.05), which was earlier than the time of increase in layer-type roosters. Based on a chicken 44 K oligo microarray, 163 genes were found to be expressed significantly different in the testes of the heat-stressed chickens from those of the controls, including genes involved in the response to stimulus, protein metabolism, signal transduction, cell adhesion, transcription, and apoptosis. The mRNA expressions of upregulated genes, including HSP25, HSP90AA1, HSPA2, and LPAR2, and of downregulated genes, including CDH5, CTNNA3, EHF, CIRBP, SLA, and NTF3, were confirmed through quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Moreover, numerous transcripts in the testes exhibited distinct expressions between the heat-stressed broiler-type and layer-type chickens. We concluded that the transcriptional responses of testes to acute heat stress may differ between the broiler-type and layer-type roosters. Whether the differential expression patterns associate with the heat-tolerance in the strains require a further exploration.

  9. New bridge-circuit-type detector to measure precise resistance change of strain gauge at low temperature and magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Masashi; Kishii, Nobuya; Tateno, Shota

    2016-04-01

    We report a new highly accurate and versatile bridge-circuit-type detector that has a simple structure and demonstrates a low degree of error for measurements of thermal expansion and magnetostriction by the strain gauge method. As an example, a commercial physical property measurement system (PPMS) is combined with a compact bridge-circuit box. Thermal expansion and magnetostriction are calculated from the resistance of the bridge and bridge voltage, measured by the operation of a standard PPMS resistivity option. The performance of the new detector is demonstrated by measuring the temperature and magnetic field dependences of the strain to obtain the thermal expansion coefficient and magnetostriction of the single crystals of rare-earth compounds RAl2 (R = Dy, Tb).

  10. Computational classification of different wild-type zebrafish strains based on their variation in light-induced locomotor response.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Gaonan; Jelfs, Beth; Carmer, Robert; Venkatraman, Prahatha; Ghadami, Mohammad; Brown, Skye A; Pang, Chi Pui; Leung, Yuk Fai; Chan, Rosa H M; Zhang, Mingzhi

    2016-02-01

    Zebrafish larvae display a rapid and characteristic swimming behaviour after abrupt light onset or offset. This light-induced locomotor response (LLR) has been widely used for behavioural research and drug screening. However, the locomotor responses have long been shown to be different between different wild-type (WT) strains. Thus, it is critical to define the differences in the WT LLR to facilitate accurate interpretation of behavioural data. In this investigation, we used support vector machine (SVM) models to classify LLR data collected from three WT strains: AB, TL and TLAB (a hybrid of AB and TL), during early embryogenesis, from 3 to 9 days post-fertilisation (dpf). We analysed both the complete dataset and a subset of the data during the first 30after light change. This initial period of activity is substantially driven by vision, and is also known as the visual motor response (VMR). The analyses have resulted in three major conclusions: First, the LLR is different between the three WT strains, and at different developmental stages. Second, the distinguishable information in the VMR is comparable to, if not better than, the full dataset for classification purposes. Third, the distinguishable information of WT strains in the light-onset response differs from that in the light-offset response. While the classification accuracies were higher for the light-offset than light-onset response when using the complete LLR dataset, a reverse trend was observed when using a shorter VMR dataset. Together, our results indicate that one should use caution when extrapolating interpretations of LLR/VMR obtained from one WT strain to another.

  11. A Killed, Genetically Engineered Derivative of a Wild-Type Extraintestinal Pathogenic E. coli strain is a Vaccine Candidate

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Thomas A.; Beanan, Janet M.; Olson, Ruth; Genagon, Stacy A.; MacDonald, Ulrike; Cope, John J.; Davidson, Bruce A.; Johnston, Brian; Johnson, James R.

    2007-01-01

    Infections due to extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) result in significant morbidity, mortality and increased healthcare costs. An efficacious vaccine against ExPEC would be desirable. In this report we explore the use of killed-whole E. coli as a vaccine immunogen. Given the diversity of capsule and O-antigens in ExPEC we have hypothesized that alternative targets are viable vaccine candidates. We have also hypothesized that immunization with a genetically engineered strain that is deficient in the capsule and O-antigen will generate a greater immune response against antigens other than the capsular and O-antigen epitopes than a wild-type strain. Lastly, we hypothesize that mucosal immunization with killed E. coli has the potential to generate a significant immune response. In this study we demonstrated that nasal immunization with a formalin-killed ExPEC derivative deficient in capsule and O-antigen results in a significantly greater overall humoral response compared to its wild-type derivative (which demonstrates that capsule and/or the O-antigen impede the development of an optimal humoral immune response) and a significantly greater immune response against non-capsular and O-antigen epitopes. These antibodies also bound to a subset of heterologous ExPEC strains and enhanced neutrophil-mediated bactericidal activity against the homologous and a heterologous strain. Taken together these studies support the concept that formalin-killed genetically engineered ExPEC derivatives are whole cell vaccine candidates to prevent infections due to ExPEC. PMID:17306426

  12. Three Types of Taxis Used in the Response of Acidovorax sp. Strain JS42 to 2-Nitrotoluene

    PubMed Central

    Rabinovitch-Deere, Christine A.

    2012-01-01

    Acidovorax sp. strain JS42 is able to utilize 2-nitrotoluene (2NT) as its sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source. We report here that strain JS42 is chemotactic to 2NT and that the response is increased when cells are grown on compounds such as 2NT that are known to induce the first step of 2NT degradation. Assays with JS42 mutants unable to oxidize 2NT showed that the first step of 2NT metabolism was required for the induced response, but not for a portion of the constitutive response, indicating that 2NT itself is an attractant. The 2NT metabolite nitrite was shown to be a strong attractant for strain JS42, and sufficient nitrite was produced during the taxis assay to account for a large part of the induced response. A mutant with an inactivated ntdY gene, which is located adjacent to the 2NT degradation genes and codes for a putative methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein, showed a defect in taxis toward 2NT that may involve a reduced response to nitrite. Responses of a mutant defective for the energy-taxis receptor, Aer, indicated that a functional aer gene is required for a substantial part of the wild-type induced response to 2NT. In summary, strain JS42 utilizes three types of taxis to sense and respond to 2NT: constitutive 2NT-specific chemotaxis to directly sense 2NT, metabolism-dependent nitrite-specific chemotaxis that may be mediated by NtdY, and energy taxis mediated by Aer. PMID:22286989

  13. Core Genome Multilocus Sequence Typing for Identification of Globally Distributed Clonal Groups and Differentiation of Outbreak Strains of Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Escalona, Narjol; Hammack, Thomas S.; Allard, Marc W.; Strain, Errol A.; Brown, Eric W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many listeriosis outbreaks are caused by a few globally distributed clonal groups, designated clonal complexes or epidemic clones, of Listeria monocytogenes, several of which have been defined by classic multilocus sequence typing (MLST) schemes targeting 6 to 8 housekeeping or virulence genes. We have developed and evaluated core genome MLST (cgMLST) schemes and applied them to isolates from multiple clonal groups, including those associated with 39 listeriosis outbreaks. The cgMLST clusters were congruent with MLST-defined clonal groups, which had various degrees of diversity at the whole-genome level. Notably, cgMLST could distinguish among outbreak strains and epidemiologically unrelated strains of the same clonal group, which could not be achieved using classic MLST schemes. The precise selection of cgMLST gene targets may not be critical for the general identification of clonal groups and outbreak strains. cgMLST analyses further identified outbreak strains, including those associated with recent outbreaks linked to contaminated French-style cheese, Hispanic-style cheese, stone fruit, caramel apple, ice cream, and packaged leafy green salad, as belonging to major clonal groups. We further developed lineage-specific cgMLST schemes, which can include accessory genes when core genomes do not possess sufficient diversity, and this provided additional resolution over species-specific cgMLST. Analyses of isolates from different common-source listeriosis outbreaks revealed various degrees of diversity, indicating that the numbers of allelic differences should always be combined with cgMLST clustering and epidemiological evidence to define a listeriosis outbreak. IMPORTANCE Classic multilocus sequence typing (MLST) schemes targeting internal fragments of 6 to 8 genes that define clonal complexes or epidemic clones have been widely employed to study L. monocytogenes biodiversity and its relation to pathogenicity potential and epidemiology. We demonstrated

  14. Molecular Typing and Presence of Genetic Markers Among Strains of Banana Finger-Tip Rot Pathogen, Burkholderia cenocepacia, in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yung-An; Chan, Chih-Wen

    2007-02-01

    ABSTRACT Burkholderia cenocepacia (genomovar III of B. cepacia complex), the causal agent of banana finger-tip rot, is a common plant-associated bacterium but also an important opportunistic pathogen of humans. To better understand the nature of B. cenocepacia from banana, the genetic variation among B. cenocepacia isolates from various banana-growing regions in southern Taiwan was examined. Forty-four serial isolates recovered from diseased banana stigmata from three banana-growing regions during the periods ranging from 2002 to 2004 were investigated. All B. cenocepacia isolates picked from quinate-yeast extract tetracycline-polymyxin semiselective medium could cause onion maceration and were polymerase chain reaction (PCR) positive for bcscV, which is a type III secretion gene present in all members of the B. cepacia complex except B. cepacia (formerly genomovar I). Genetic diversity was assessed using recA PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism, recA nucleotide sequence analysis, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis assays. The assays revealed the genetic variability among the isolates and also allowed us to trace the relationship among isolates. The isolates all were assigned to genomovar III and consisted of two groups, A and B, which corresponded to recA lineage IIIA and IIIB. The group B strains were separated into B1 and B2 subgroups and the B1 strains were further divided into distinct lineages. The B1 strains were the most frequently detected and occurred in all regions tested. There was no significant difference between strains from each subgroup in the virulence on banana fingers of cv. Cavendish. PCR assays were further used to determine whether B. cenocepacia from banana contained the cable pilus subunit gene (cblA), IS1356, and B. cepacia epidemic strain marker (BCESM), which are DNA markers associated with epidemic B. cepacia clinic strains. The results indicated that cblA and IS1356 were absent but the BCESM was found in all isolates. The

  15. Glaciimonas alpina sp. nov. isolated from alpine glaciers and reclassification of Glaciimonas immobilis Cr9-12 as the type strain of Glaciimonas alpina sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Frasson, David; Udovičić, Matije; Frey, Beat; Lapanje, Aleš; Zhang, De-Chao; Margesin, Rosa; Sievers, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Psychrophilic bacterial strains were isolated from alpine glaciers in Switzerland and characterized taxonomically. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis of partial 16S rRNA and rpoB genes, three of those strains, strain 79 ( = CCOS 247), strain 4/58 ( = CCOS 250) and strain 4/56 ( = CCOS 258) clustered together with strain Cr9-12T and separately from the type strains Glaciimonas immobilis Cr9-30T and Glaciimonas singularis LMG 27070T. Strain Cr9-12T has been previously described as a strain of G. immobilis. The three newly isolated strains were compared phenotypically with strain Cr9-12T and with the type strains of the species G. immobilis and G. singularis. Cr9-12T and the three novel strains from an alpine glacier in Switzerland were Gram-stain-negative, non-motile, rod-shaped and psychrophilic and showed good growth throughout a temperature range of 1-20 °C and characteristically oxidized d-mannitol, l-fucose and bromosuccinic acid. The predominant cellular fatty acids of strain Cr9-12T and the three novel strains were summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or iso-C15 : 0 2-OH), C16 : 0 and C18 : 1ω7c. The respiratory quinone of these strains was ubiquinone 8 (UQ-8). The genomic DNA G+C content of Cr9-12T was 49.2 mol%. The combined data from phenotypic, phylogenetic and DNA-DNA relatedness studies strongly support the reclassification of strain Cr9-12T as representing a novel species. This strain and the isolates 79 ( = CCOS 247), 4/58 ( = CCOS 250) and 4/56 ( = CCOS 258) are representatives of a novel species of the genus Glaciimonas, for which the name Glaciimonas alpina sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Glaciimonas alpina is Cr9-12T ( = CCOS 761T = DSM 22814T).

  16. Non-contiguous finished genome sequence of Corynebacterium timonense type strain 5401744T

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Catherine; Raoult, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Corynebacterium timonense strain 5401744T is a member of the genus Corynebacterium which contains Gram-positive bacteria with a high G+C content. It was isolated from the blood of a patient with endocarditis. In this work, we describe a set of features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 2,553,575 bp long genome contains 2,401 protein-coding genes and 55 RNA genes, including between 5 and 6 rRNA operons. PMID:25197476

  17. Structural analysis of phage-borne stx genes and their flanking sequences in shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli and Shigella dysenteriae type 1 strains.

    PubMed

    Unkmeir, A; Schmidt, H

    2000-09-01

    The stx-flanking regions of 49 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli strains and nine Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1 strains containing either stx, stx(1), stx(2), or stx(2) variant genes, were examined. We analyzed these regions by PCR using a set of primers with one primer specific for the respective stx gene and a second primer complementary to sequences of Stx phages H-19B and 933W. We further characterized the amplification products by restriction endonuclease digestion and nucleotide sequencing. PCR products of stx(1)-containing E. coli strains of serogroups O157, O26, and 0103 showed the same lengths and similar restriction patterns. However, we failed to amplify the 3' stx-flanking region in stx(1)-harboring E. coli O111:H(-) strains. Stx2-producing E. coli strains revealed amplification products of different lengths and restriction patterns, suggesting greater heterogeneity than in stx(1)-positive strains. We also obtained specific PCR products for two Stx2c-producing and seven Stx2f-producing E. coli strains when they were subjected to PCR analysis. In nine S. dysenteriae type 1 strains, H-19B- and 933W-specific primers amplified only the 3' stx-flanking region. The results of our study demonstrate that the stx genes of all strains investigated are continuous with phage sequences. Whereas almost all strains except E. coli O111:H(-) strains were associated with a S-like gene, association with Q could not be demonstrated in nine S. dysenteriae type 1 strains and three E. coli strains. Furthermore, we showed that the organization of the stx-flanking regions is similar in all strains investigated, whereas fine-structure analysis showed subtle differences among the sequences examined. Our results support the hypothesis that stx genes in E. coli and S. dysenteriae are generally phage-borne.

  18. A Geobacter sulfurreducens Strain Expressing Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type IV Pili Localizes OmcS on Pili but Is Deficient in Fe(III) Oxide Reduction and Current Production

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xing; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Malvankar, Nikhil S.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Vargas, Madeline

    2014-01-01

    The conductive pili of Geobacter species play an important role in electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides, in long-range electron transport through current-producing biofilms, and in direct interspecies electron transfer. Although multiple lines of evidence have indicated that the pili of Geobacter sulfurreducens have a metal-like conductivity, independent of the presence of c-type cytochromes, this claim is still controversial. In order to further investigate this phenomenon, a strain of G. sulfurreducens, designated strain PA, was constructed in which the gene for the native PilA, the structural pilin protein, was replaced with the PilA gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Strain PA expressed and properly assembled P. aeruginosa PilA subunits into pili and exhibited a profile of outer surface c-type cytochromes similar to that of a control strain expressing the G. sulfurreducens PilA. Surprisingly, the strain PA pili were decorated with the c-type cytochrome OmcS in a manner similar to the control strain. However, the strain PA pili were 14-fold less conductive than the pili of the control strain, and strain PA was severely impaired in Fe(III) oxide reduction and current production. These results demonstrate that the presence of OmcS on pili is not sufficient to confer conductivity to pili and suggest that there are unique structural features of the G. sulfurreducens PilA that are necessary for conductivity. PMID:24296506

  19. Strain glass transition in a multifunctional β-type Ti alloy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Gao, Jinghui; Wu, Haijun; Yang, Sen; Ding, Xiangdong; Wang, Dong; Ren, Xiaobing; Wang, Yunzhi; Song, Xiaoping; Gao, Jianrong

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a class of multifunctional Ti alloys called GUM metals attracts tremendous attentions for their superior mechanical behaviors (high strength, high ductility and superelasticity) and novel physical properties (Invar effect, Elinvar effect and low modulus). The Invar and Elinvar effects are known to originate from structural or magnetic transitions, but none of these transitions were found in the GUM metals. This challenges our fundamental understanding of their physical properties. In this study, we show that the typical GUM metal Ti-23Nb-0.7Ta-2Zr-1.2O (at%) alloy undergoes a strain glass transition, where martensitic nano-domains are frozen gradually over a broad temperature range by random point defects. These nano-domains develop strong texture after cold rolling, which causes the lattice elongation in the rolling direction associated with the transition upon cooling and leads to its Invar effect. Moreover, its Elinvar effect and low modulus can also be explained by the nano-domain structure of strain glass. PMID:24500779

  20. Complete genome sequence of the moderately thermophilic mineral-sulfide-oxidizing firmicute Sulfobacillus acidophilus type strain (NALT)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Chertkov, Olga; Chen, Amy; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Pan, Chongle; Rohde, Manfred; Pukall, Rudiger; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Mavromatis, K

    2012-01-01

    Sulfobacillus acidophilus Norris et al. 1996 is a member of the genus Sulfobacillus which comprises five species of the order Clostridiales. Sulfobacillus species are of interest for comparison to other sulfur and iron oxidizers and also have biomining applications. This is the first completed genome sequence of a type strain of the genus Sulfobacillus, and the second published genome of a member of the species S. acidophilus. The genome, which consists of one chromosome and one plasmid with a total size of 3,557,831 bp, harbors 3,626 protein-coding and 69 RNA genes, and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  1. Alcoholic fermentation by wild-type Hansenula polymorpha and Saccharomyces cerevisiae versus recombinant strains with an elevated level of intracellular glutathione.

    PubMed

    Grabek-Lejko, Dorota; Kurylenko, Olena O; Sibirny, Vladimir A; Ubiyvovk, Vira M; Penninckx, Michel; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2011-11-01

    The ability of baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and of the thermotolerant methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha to produce ethanol during alcoholic fermentation of glucose was compared between wild-type strains and recombinant strains possessing an elevated level of intracellular glutathione (GSH) due to overexpression of the first gene of GSH biosynthesis, gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase, or of the central regulatory gene of sulfur metabolism, MET4. The analyzed strains of H. polymorpha with an elevated pool of intracellular GSH were found to accumulate almost twice as much ethanol as the wild-type strain during glucose fermentation, in contrast to GSH1-overexpressing S. cerevisiae strains, which also possessed an elevated pool of GSH. The ethanol tolerance of the GSH-overproducing strains was also determined. For this, the wild-type strain and transformants with an elevated GSH pool were compared for their viability upon exposure to exogenous ethanol. Unexpectedly, both S. cerevisiae and H. polymorpha transformants with a high GSH pool proved more sensitive to exogenous ethanol than the corresponding wild-type strains.

  2. Draft Genome Sequences of Four Bacterial Strains Isolated from a Polymicrobial Culture of Naked (N-Type) Emiliania huxleyi CCMP1516.

    PubMed

    Orata, Fabini D; Rosana, Albert Remus R; Xu, Yue; Simkus, Danielle N; Bramucci, Anna R; Boucher, Yan; Case, Rebecca J

    2016-01-01

    Strains of Sulfitobacter spp., Erythrobacter sp., and Marinobacter sp. were isolated from a polymicrobial culture of the naked (N-type) haptophyte Emiliania huxleyi strain CCMP1516. The genomes encode genes for the production of phytohormones, vitamins, and the consumption of their hosts' metabolic by-products, suggesting symbiotic interactions within this polymicrobial culture. PMID:27417846

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of Staphylococcus aureus MCRF184, a Necrotizing Fasciitis-Causing Methicillin-Sensitive Sequence Type 45 Staphylococcus Strain

    PubMed Central

    Aswani, Vijay; Mau, Bob

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of a highly virulent methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus strain, MCRF184, belonging to sequence type 45. This staphylococcal strain was isolated from a surgical biopsy specimen from a patient with necrotizing fasciitis. PMID:27174283

  4. Complete genome sequencing of a multidrug-resistant and human-invasive Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain of the emerging sequence type 213 genotype

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Calva, Edmundo; Silva, Claudia; Zaidi, Mussaret B.; Sanchez-Flores, Alejandro; Estrada, Karel; Silva, Genivaldo G. Z.; Soto-Jiménez, Luz M.; Wiesner, Magdalena; Fernández-Mora, Marcos; Edwards, Robert A.; et al

    2015-06-18

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium strain YU39 was isolated in 2005 in the state of Yucatán, Mexico, from a human systemic infection. The YU39 strain is representative of the multidrug-resistant emergent sequence type 213 (ST213) genotype. The YU39 complete genome is composed of a chromosome and seven plasmids.

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Strain YU15 (Sequence Type 19) Harboring the Salmonella Genomic Island 1 and Virulence Plasmid pSTV

    PubMed Central

    Calva, Edmundo; Puente, José L.; Zaidi, Mussaret B.

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium sequence type 19 (ST19) strain YU15, isolated in Yucatán, Mexico, from a human baby stool culture, was determined using PacBio technology. The chromosome contains five intact prophages and the Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1). This strain carries the Salmonella virulence plasmid pSTV. PMID:27081132

  6. Functional cloning of Vibrio parahaemolyticus type III secretion system 1 in Escherichia coli K-12 strain as a molecular syringe.

    PubMed

    Akeda, Yukihiro; Kimura, Tomomi; Yamasaki, Aiko; Kodama, Toshio; Iida, Tetsuya; Honda, Takeshi; Oishi, Kazunori

    2012-10-19

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) of gram-negative bacteria involves dedicated protein translocation machinery that directly injects proteins into target cells. Pathogenic bacteria already benefit from this unique system. The successful functional cloning of this useful tool into non-pathogenic bacteria would help establish novel clinical and basic biotechnology strategies in areas such as vaccine administration, the development of screening systems for anti-T3SS drugs and the target-specific delivery of bioactive compounds. In this study, we successfully cloned the Vibrio parahaemolyticus T3SS1 genetic locus into a non-pathogenic Escherichia coli K-12 strain. Assays performed here revealed that the T3SS1 cloned into the E. coli K-12 strain has the ability to translocate V. parahaemolyticus T3SS1 secreted proteins. Importantly, we also observed this system to allow the E. coli K-12 strain to inject foreign protein, as well as the V. parahaemolyticus T3SS effector, into cultured cells. These results demonstrate a prospective useful tool with experimental and therapeutic applications.

  7. High-quality draft genome sequence of the Thermus amyloliquefaciens type strain YIM 77409T with an incomplete denitrification pathway

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhou, En -Min; Murugapiran, Senthil K.; Mefferd, Chrisabelle C.; Liu, Lan; Xian, Wen -Dong; Yin, Yi -Rui; Ming, Hong; Yu, Tian -Tian; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia; et al

    2016-02-27

    Thermus amyloliquefaciens type strain YIM 77409T is a thermophilic, Gram-negative, non-motile and rod-shaped bacterium isolated from Niujie Hot Spring in Eryuan County, Yunnan Province, southwest China. In the present study we describe the features of strain YIM 77409T together with its genome sequence and annotation. The genome is 2,160,855 bp long and consists of 6 scaffolds with 67.4 % average GC content. A total of 2,313 genes were predicted, comprising 2,257 protein-coding and 56 RNA genes. The genome is predicted to encode a complete glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, and tricarboxylic acid cycle. Additionally, a large number of transporters and enzymesmore » for heterotrophy highlight the broad heterotrophic lifestyle of this organism. Furthermore, a denitrification gene cluster included genes predicted to encode enzymes for the sequential reduction of nitrate to nitrous oxide, consistent with the incomplete denitrification phenotype of this strain.« less

  8. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of a human T cell leukemia virus type 2 strain from French Guiana.

    PubMed

    Kazanji, M; Benoit, B; Meddeb, M; Meertens, L; Marty, C; Gessain, A; Talarmin, A

    2001-04-10

    Extensive studies have been carried out on native Amerindian populations living in French Guiana in an attempt to detect human T cell leukemia virus type 2 (HTLV-2). However, the first strain of this virus identified in this region was not detected in these populations, but in a Brazilian woman of Amerindian origin. Comparative analyses of the nucleotide sequences of 589 bp of the gp21 env gene and of 625 bp of the long terminal repeat (LTR) showed that this new HTLV-2 strain (HTLV-2 GUY) was of subtype A. Sequence comparison and phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that HTLV-2 GUY was closely related to a group of distinct variants of HTLV-2 subtype A strains originating mostly from Brazilian inhabitants and formerly called HTLV-2 subtype C. As there is a high level of immigration from Brazil in French Guiana, we carried out a seroepidemiological study of 175 Brazilians, mostly women (obtained from a serum databank) and 72 female Brazilian prostitutes living in French Guiana to determine whether HTLV-2 is likely to become an emerging infection in this area. No HTLV-2 infection was detected, indicating that this virus is unlikely to become prevalent in the near future.

  9. Importance of Cough and M. tuberculosis Strain Type as Risks for Increased Transmission within Households

    PubMed Central

    Jones-López, Edward C.; Kim, Soyeon; Fregona, Geisa; Marques-Rodrigues, Patricia; Hadad, David Jamil; Molina, Lucilia Pereira Dutra; Vinhas, Solange; Reilly, Nancy; Moine, Stephanie; Chakravorty, Soumitesh; Gaeddert, Mary; Ribeiro-Rodrigues, Rodrigo; Salgame, Padmini; Palaci, Moises; Alland, David; Ellner, Jerrold J.; Dietze, Reynaldo

    2014-01-01

    Rationale The degree to which tuberculosis (TB) is transmitted between persons is variable. Identifying the factors that contribute to transmission could provide new opportunities for TB control. Transmission is influenced by host, bacterial and environmental factors. However, distinguishing their individual effects is problematic because measures of disease severity are tightly correlated, and assessing the virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates is complicated by epidemiological and clinical confounders. Objectives To overcome these problems, we investigated factors potentially associated with TB transmission within households. Methods We evaluated patients with smear-positive (≥2+), pulmonary TB and classified M. tuberculosis strains into single nucleotide polymorphism genetic cluster groups (SCG). We recorded index case, household contact, and environmental characteristics and tested contacts with tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon-gamma release assay. Households were classified as high (≥70% of contacts with TST≥10 mm) and low (≤40%) transmission. We used logistic regression to determine independent predictors. Result From March 2008 to June 2012, we screened 293 TB patients to enroll 124 index cases and their 731 contacts. There were 23 low and 73 high transmission households. Index case factors associated with high transmission were severity of cough as measured by a visual analog cough scale (VACS) and the Leicester Cough Questionnaire (LCQ), and cavitation on chest radiograph. SCG 3b strains tended to be more prevalent in low (27.3%) than in high (12.5%) transmission households (p = 0.11). In adjusted models, only VACS (p<0.001) remained significant. SCG was associated with bilateral disease on chest radiograph (p = 0.002) and marginally associated with LCQ sores (p = 0.058), with group 3b patients having weaker cough. Conclusions We found differential transmission among otherwise clinically similar patients with

  10. Sequence determination of a mildly virulent strain (CU-2) of Gallid herpesvirus type 2 using 454 pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Spatz, Stephen J; Rue, Cary A

    2008-06-01

    The complete DNA sequence of the mildly virulent Gallid herpesvirus type 2 strain CU-2 was determined and consists of 176,922 bp with an overall gene organization typical of class E herpesviruses. Phylogenetically, this strain partitions in its own branch between the virulent strains RB-1B, Md11, and Md5, and the vaccine strain CVI988. Overall, the genome of CU-2 is more similar to that of CVI988, with identically sized unique short regions of 11,651 bp. As in CVI988, an insertion of 177 bp was identified in the overlapping genes encoding the Meq, RLORF6, and 23 kDa proteins within the repeat long region of the genome. A total of 15 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) common to both CU-2 and CVI988, and not occurring in virulent strains, were identified in the genes encoding UL29, UL45, UL50, UL52, LORF10, RLORF14a, RLORF12, Meq(RLORF7), 23kDa, ICP4, US3, and two hypothetical proteins MDV071.4 and MDV076.4. Each gene encoding UL29 and Meq contained two SNPs. Only one major open reading frame (ORF) encoding UL41, the virus host shutoff (VHS) ribonuclease, was disrupted in the CU-2 genome. An additional cytosine after the 25 codon is predicted to produce a truncated protein of 97 aa. Since GaHV-2 mutants lacking UL41 have been reported to retain their virulence, other factors are likely responsible for the low virulence of CU-2. It is largely suspected that SNPs in common with CVI988 along with the insertions in the Meq loci are responsible for its phenotype. Conversely, we identified 43 nonsynonymous mutations (within 23 genes) that may contribute to the virulence of CU-2. These SNPs are shared exclusively with all sequenced virulent strains (Md5, Md11, and RB-1B) and not present within the CVI988 genome. Although most occur in proteins of unknown function, a significant percentage is in proteins involved in virion assembly.

  11. Human T Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 2a Strains Among HIV Type 1-Coinfected Patients from Brazil Have Originated Mostly from Brazilian Amerindians

    PubMed Central

    Magri, Mariana Cavalheiro; Brigido, Luis Fernando de Macedo; Morimoto, Helena Kaminami

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The human T cell lymphotropic virus type 2 (HTLV-2) is found mainly in Amerindians and in intravenous drug users (IDUs) from urban areas of the United States, Europe, and Latin America. Worldwide, HTLV-2a and HTLV-2b subtypes are the most prevalent. Phylogenetic analysis of HTLV-2 isolates from Brazil showed the HTLV-2a subtype, variant -2c, which spread from Indians to the general population and IDUs. The present study searched for the types of HTLV-2 that predominate among HIV-1-coinfected patients from southern and southeastern Brazil. Molecular characterization of the LTR, env, and tax regions of 38 isolates confirmed the HTLV-2c variant in 37 patients, and one HTLV-2b in a patient from Paraguay. Phylogenetic analysis of sequences showed different clades of HTLV-2 associated with risk factors and geographic region. These clades could represent different routes of virus transmission and/or little diverse evolutionary rates of virus. Taking into account the results obtained in the present study and the lack of the prototypic North American HTLV-2a strain and HTLV-2b subtypes commonly detected among HIV-coinfected individuals worldwide, we could speculate on the introduction of Brazilian HTLV-2 strains in such populations before the introduction of HIV. PMID:23484539

  12. Human T cell lymphotropic virus type 2a strains among HIV type 1-coinfected patients from Brazil have originated mostly from Brazilian Amerindians.

    PubMed

    Magri, Mariana Cavalheiro; Brigido, Luis Fernando de Macedo; Morimoto, Helena Kaminami; Caterino-de-Araujo, Adele

    2013-07-01

    The human T cell lymphotropic virus type 2 (HTLV-2) is found mainly in Amerindians and in intravenous drug users (IDUs) from urban areas of the United States, Europe, and Latin America. Worldwide, HTLV-2a and HTLV-2b subtypes are the most prevalent. Phylogenetic analysis of HTLV-2 isolates from Brazil showed the HTLV-2a subtype, variant -2c, which spread from Indians to the general population and IDUs. The present study searched for the types of HTLV-2 that predominate among HIV-1-coinfected patients from southern and southeastern Brazil. Molecular characterization of the LTR, env, and tax regions of 38 isolates confirmed the HTLV-2c variant in 37 patients, and one HTLV-2b in a patient from Paraguay. Phylogenetic analysis of sequences showed different clades of HTLV-2 associated with risk factors and geographic region. These clades could represent different routes of virus transmission and/or little diverse evolutionary rates of virus. Taking into account the results obtained in the present study and the lack of the prototypic North American HTLV-2a strain and HTLV-2b subtypes commonly detected among HIV-coinfected individuals worldwide, we could speculate on the introduction of Brazilian HTLV-2 strains in such populations before the introduction of HIV.

  13. Genome sequence of the homoacetogenic bacterium Holophaga foetida type strain (TMBS4T)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Held, Brittany; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Mavromatis, K; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2012-01-01

    Holophaga foetida Liesack et al. 1994 is a member to the genomically so far poorly characterized family Holophagaceae in the class Holophagae within the phylum Acidibacteria. H. foetida is of interest for its ability to anaerobically degrade aromatic compounds and for its production of volatile sulfur compounds through a unique pathway. The genome of H. foetida strain TMBS4T is the first sequenced genome of a member of the class Holophagae. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence (improved high quality draft), and annotation. The 4,127,237 bp long chromosome with its 3,615 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  14. Gurson-type elastic-plastic damage model based on strain-rate plastic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balan, Tudor; Cazacu, Oana

    2013-12-01

    Ductile damage is generally described by stress-space analytical potentials. In this contribution, it is shown that strain rate potentials, which are exact conjugate of the stress-based potentials, can be equally used to describe the dilatational response of porous metals. This framework is particularly appropriate for porous materials with matrix described by complex yield criteria for which a closed-form expression of the stress-based potential is not available. Illustration of the new approach is done for porous metals containing randomly distributed spherical voids in a von Mises elasto-plastic matrix. Furthermore, a general time integration algorithm for simulation of the mechanical response using this new formulation is developed and implemented in Abaqus/Standard. The proposed model and algorithm are validated with respect to the Abaqus built-in GTN model, which is based on a stress potential, through the simulation of a tensile test on a round bar.

  15. Regulation of allantoate transport in wild-type and mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Chisholm, V T; Lea, H Z; Rai, R; Cooper, T G

    1987-01-01

    Accumulation of intracellular allantoin and allantoate is mediated by two distinct active transport systems in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Allantoin transport (DAL4 gene) is inducible, while allantoate uptake is constitutive (it occurs at full levels in the absence of any allantoate-related compounds from the culture medium). Both systems appear to be sensitive to nitrogen catabolite repression, feedback inhibition, and trans-inhibition. Mutants (dal5) that lack allantoate transport have been isolated. These strains also exhibit a 60% loss of allantoin transport capability. Conversely, dal4 mutants previously described are unable to transport allantoin and exhibit a 50% loss of allantoate transport. We interpret the pleiotropic behavior of the dal4 and dal5 mutations as deriving from a functional interaction between elements of the two transport systems. PMID:3549700

  16. Genome sequence of the organohalide-respiring Dehalogenimonas alkenigignens type strain (IP3-3(T)).

    PubMed

    Key, Trent A; Richmond, Dray P; Bowman, Kimberly S; Cho, Yong-Joon; Chun, Jongsik; da Costa, Milton S; Rainey, Fred A; Moe, William M

    2016-01-01

    Dehalogenimonas alkenigignens IP3-3(T) is a strictly anaerobic, mesophilic, Gram negative staining bacterium that grows by organohalide respiration, coupling the oxidation of H2 to the reductive dehalogenation of polychlorinated alkanes. Growth has not been observed with any non-polyhalogenated alkane electron acceptors. Here we describe the features of strain IP3-3(T) together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 1,849,792 bp high-quality-draft genome contains 1936 predicted protein coding genes, 47 tRNA genes, a single large subunit rRNA (23S-5S) locus, and a single, orphan, small unit rRNA (16S) locus. The genome contains 29 predicted reductive dehalogenase genes, a large majority of which lack cognate genes encoding membrane anchoring proteins. PMID:27340512

  17. Effects of Age, Hemoglobin Type and Parasite Strain on IgG Recognition of Plasmodium falciparum–Infected Erythrocytes in Malian Children

    PubMed Central

    Zeituni, Amir E.; Miura, Kazutoyo; Diakite, Mahamadou; Doumbia, Saibou; Moretz, Samuel E.; Diouf, Ababacar; Tullo, Gregory; Lopera-Mesa, Tatiana M.; Bess, Cameron D.; Mita-Mendoza, Neida K.; Anderson, Jennifer M.; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Long, Carole A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Naturally-acquired antibody responses to antigens on the surface of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (iRBCs) have been implicated in antimalarial immunity. To profile the development of this immunity, we have been studying a cohort of Malian children living in an area with intense seasonal malaria transmission. Methodology/Principal Findings We collected plasma from a sub-cohort of 176 Malian children aged 3-11 years, before (May) and after (December) the 2009 transmission season. To measure the effect of hemoglobin (Hb) type on antibody responses, we enrolled age-matched HbAA, HbAS and HbAC children. To quantify antibody recognition of iRBCs, we designed a high-throughput flow cytometry assay to rapidly test numerous plasma samples against multiple parasite strains. We evaluated antibody reactivity of each plasma sample to 3 laboratory-adapted parasite lines (FCR3, D10, PC26) and 4 short-term-cultured parasite isolates (2 Malian and 2 Cambodian). 97% of children recognized ≥1 parasite strain and the proportion of IgG responders increased significantly during the transmission season for most parasite strains. Both strain-specific and strain-transcending IgG responses were detected, and varied by age, Hb type and parasite strain. In addition, the breadth of IgG responses to parasite strains increased with age in HbAA, but not in HbAS or HbAC, children. Conclusions/Significance Our assay detects both strain-specific and strain-transcending IgG responses to iRBCs. The magnitude and breadth of these responses varied not only by age, but also by Hb type and parasite strain used. These findings indicate that studies of acquired humoral immunity should account for Hb type and test large numbers of diverse parasite strains. PMID:24124591

  18. Characterization of bacteriophages Cp1 and Cp2, the strain-typing agents for Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Abdelmonim Ali; Ogawa, Megumi; Kawasaki, Takeru; Fujie, Makoto; Yamada, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    The strains of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri, the causative agent of citrus canker, are historically classified based on bacteriophage (phage) sensitivity. Nearly all X. axonopodis pv. citri strains isolated from different regions in Japan are lysed by either phage Cp1 or Cp2; Cp1-sensitive (Cp1(s)) strains have been observed to be resistant to Cp2 (Cp2(r)) and vice versa. In this study, genomic and molecular characterization was performed for the typing agents Cp1 and Cp2. Morphologically, Cp1 belongs to the Siphoviridae. Genomic analysis revealed that its genome comprises 43,870-bp double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), with 10-bp 3'-extruding cohesive ends, and contains 48 open reading frames. The genomic organization was similar to that of Xanthomonas phage phiL7, but it lacked a group I intron in the DNA polymerase gene. Cp2 resembles morphologically Escherichia coli T7-like phages of Podoviridae. The 42,963-bp linear dsDNA genome of Cp2 contained terminal repeats. The Cp2 genomic sequence has 40 open reading frames, many of which did not show detectable homologs in the current databases. By proteomic analysis, a gene cluster encoding structural proteins corresponding to the class III module of T7-like phages was identified on the Cp2 genome. Therefore, Cp1 and Cp2 were found to belong to completely different virus groups. In addition, we found that Cp1 and Cp2 use different molecules on the host cell surface as phage receptors and that host selection of X. axonopodis pv. citri strains by Cp1 and Cp2 is not determined at the initial stage by binding to receptors. PMID:24123743

  19. High resolution melting curve analysis as a new tool for rapid identification of canine parvovirus type 2 strains.

    PubMed

    Bingga, Gali; Liu, Zhicheng; Zhang, Jianfeng; Zhu, Yujun; Lin, Lifeng; Ding, Shuangyang; Guo, Pengju

    2014-01-01

    A high resolution melting (HRM) curve method was developed to identify canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) strains by nested PCR. Two sets of primers, CPV-426F/426R and CPV-87R/87F, were designed that amplified a 52 bp and 53 bp product from the viral VP2 capsid gene. The region amplified by CPV-426F/426R included the A4062G and T4064A mutations in CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c. The region amplified by CPV-87F/87R included the A3045T mutation in the vaccine strains of CPV-2 and CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c. Faecal samples were obtained from 30 dogs that were CPV antigen-positive. The DNA was isolated from the faecal samples and PCR-amplified using the two sets of primers, and genotyped by HRM curve analysis. The PCR-HRM assay was able to distinguish single nucleotide polymorphisms between CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c using CPV-426F/426R. CPV-2a was distinguished from CPV-2b and CPV-2c by differences in the melting temperature. CPV-2b and CPV-2c could be distinguished based on the shape of the melting curve after generating heteroduplexes using a CPV-2b reference sample. The vaccine strains of CPV-2 were identified using CPV-87F/87R. Conventional methods for genotyping CPV strains are labor intensive, expensive or time consuming; the present PCR-based HRM assay might be an attractive alternative.

  20. Distribution of Clostridium botulinum Type E Strains in Nunavik, Northern Quebec, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Leclair, Daniel; Farber, Jeffrey M.; Doidge, Bill; Blanchfield, Burke; Suppa, Sandy; Pagotto, Franco

    2013-01-01

    The distribution and levels of Clostridium botulinum type E were determined from field sites used by Inuit hunters for butchering seals along the coast of Nunavik. The incidence rates of C. botulinum type E in shoreline soil along the coast were 0, 50, and 87.5% among samples tested for the Hudson Strait, Hudson Bay, and Ungava Bay regions, respectively. Spores were detected in seawater or coastal rock surfaces from 17.6% of butchering sites, almost all of which were located in southern Ungava Bay. Concentrations of C. botulinum type E along the Ungava Bay coast were significantly higher than on the coasts of Hudson Strait and Hudson Bay, with the highest concentrations (270 to 1,800/kg of sample) found near butchering sites located along the mouths of large rivers. The Koksoak River contained high levels of C. botulinum type E, with the highest median concentration (270/kg) found in sediments of the marine portion of the river. C. botulinum type E was found in the intestinal contents (4.4%) and skins (1.4%) of seals. A high genetic biodiversity of C. botulinum type E isolates was observed among the 21 butchering sites and their surroundings along the Nunavik coastline, with 83% of isolates (44/53) yielding distinct pulsed-field gel electrophoresis genotypes. Multiple sources of C. botulinum type E may be involved in the contamination of seal meat during butchering in this region, but the risk of contamination appears to be much higher from environmental sources along the shoreline of southern Ungava Bay and the sediments of the Koksoak River. PMID:23160120

  1. Genetic stability of vaccine strains by multilocus sequence typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis: Implications for quality control of the leptospiral vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yinghua; Zhang, Jinlong; Cui, Shenghui; Li, Min; Zhang, Ying; Xue, Honggang; Xin, Xiaofang; Wang, Junzhi

    2015-01-01

    Quality control of vaccine strains is directly associated with the safety and efficacy of inactivated whole bacterial vaccines. The assessment of genetic stability is one of the essential elements to guarantee the quality of vaccine strains. The multiple-valence inactivated leptospiral vaccine, comprising the main circulating serogroups, has played an important role in the control of Leptospira infection in China. In the present study, to assess the genetic stability of vaccine strains and develop novel quality control tests that enhance and extend the existing procedures, 7 Chinese leptospiral vaccine strains were characterized during in vivo and in vitro passages by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis. The seven vaccine strains were found to have distinct sequence types (STs) and PFGE profiles. Further analysis showed that the ST and PFGE pattern of each vaccine strain, after in vivo or serial in vitro passages (up to 20 passages), were identical to those of the initial strain, demonstrating that these strains were genetically stable and homogeneous. Taken together, PFGE and MLST provide a reproducible and reliable means for confirming the identity and genetic stability of vaccine seeds, suggesting that these approaches can be used to evaluate the quality of leptospiral vaccine strains. PMID:25806658

  2. Comprehensive analysis of type 1 fimbriae regulation in fimB-null strains from the multidrug resistant Escherichia coli ST131 clone.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sohinee; Roberts, Leah W; Phan, Minh-Duy; Tan, Lendl; Lo, Alvin W; Peters, Kate M; Paterson, David L; Upton, Mathew; Ulett, Glen C; Beatson, Scott A; Totsika, Makrina; Schembri, Mark A

    2016-09-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) of sequence type 131 (ST131) are a pandemic multidrug resistant clone associated with urinary tract and bloodstream infections. Type 1 fimbriae, a major UPEC virulence factor, are essential for ST131 bladder colonization. The globally dominant sub-lineage of ST131 strains, clade C/H30-R, possess an ISEc55 insertion in the fimB gene that controls phase-variable type 1 fimbriae expression via the invertible fimS promoter. We report that inactivation of fimB in these strains causes altered regulation of type 1 fimbriae expression. Using a novel read-mapping approach based on Illumina sequencing, we demonstrate that 'off' to 'on' fimS inversion is reduced in these strains and controlled by recombinases encoded by the fimE and fimX genes. Unlike typical UPEC strains, the nucleoid-associated H-NS protein does not strongly repress fimE transcription in clade C ST131 strains. Using a genetic screen to identify novel regulators of fimE and fimX in the clade C ST131 strain EC958, we defined a new role for the guaB gene in the regulation of type 1 fimbriae and in colonisation of the mouse bladder. Our results provide a comprehensive analysis of type 1 fimbriae regulation in ST131, and highlight important differences in its control compared to non-ST131 UPEC. PMID:27309594

  3. Trypanosoma cruzi strains isolated from human, vector, and animal reservoir in the same endemic region in Mexico and typed as T. cruzi I, discrete typing unit 1 exhibit considerable biological diversity.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Guillén, María del Carmen; Bernabé, Christian; Tibayrenc, Michel; Zavala-Castro, Jorge; Totolhua, José-Luis; Méndez-López, Julio; González-Mejía, Martha-Elba; Torres-Rasgado, Enrique; López-Colombo, Aurelio; Pérez-Fuentes, Ricardo

    2006-09-01

    In this study, three strains of Trypanosoma cruzi were isolated at the same time and in the same endemic region in Mexico from a human patient with chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (RyC-H); vector (Triatoma barberi) (RyC-V); and rodent reservoir (Peromyscus peromyscus) (RyC-R). The three strains were characterized by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis, random amplified polymorphic DNA, and by pathological profiles in experimental animals (biodemes). Based on the analysis of genetic markers the three parasite strains were typed as belonging to T. cruzi I major group, discrete typing unit 1. The pathological profile of RyC-H and RyC-V strains indicated medium virulence and low mortality and, accordingly, the strains should be considered as belonging to biodeme Type III. On the other hand, the parasites from RyC-R strain induced more severe inflammatory processes and high mortality (> 40%) and were considered as belonging to biodeme Type II. The relationship between genotypes and biological characteristics in T. cruzi strains is still debated and not clearly understood. An expert committee recommended in 1999 that Biodeme Type III would correspond to T. cruzi I group, whereas Biodeme Type II, to T. cruzi II group. Our findings suggest that, at least for Mexican isolates, this correlation does not stand and that biological characteristics such as pathogenicity and virulence could be determined by factors different from those identified in the genotypic characterization.

  4. Characterization of a novel gene for strain typing reveals substructuring of Aspergillus fumigatus across North America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fifty five epidemiologically linked Aspergillus fumigatus isolates obtained from six nosocomial outbreaks of invasive aspergillosis were sub-typed by sequencing the polymorphic region of the gene encoding a putative cell surface protein, Afu3g08990 (denoted as CSP). Comparative sequence analysis sh...