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Sample records for baginha stryphnodendron guianense

  1. Seed gum of Stryphnodendron barbatiman (Barbatimao)

    SciTech Connect

    Reicher, F.; Leitner, S.C.S.; Fontana, J.D.; Correa, J.B.C.; Sierakowski, M.R.

    1991-12-31

    Stryphnodendron barbatiman (barbatimao) is a native tree that is found throughout the {open_quotes}Cerrados,{close_quotes} a region of Central Brazil. Plant seeds, on water extraction, furnished 28 g% galactomannan (dry-weight basis), the monosaccharide composition of which (galactose to mannose ratio, 1.0:1.5) fits in the legume heteromannan group. This seed gum, after Sevag deproteinization, still retained 6 g% of associated protein and had a molecular weight of about 1.8 MD on gel filtration. A high intrinsic viscosity (1300 cP) was observed for the polysaccharide sample obtained after reflux of the crushed seeds in 80% aqueous methanol.

  2. New tools and insights to assist with the molecular identification of Simulium guianense s.l., main Onchocerca volvulus vector within the highland areas of the Amazonia onchocerciasis focus.

    PubMed

    Crainey, James L; Mattos-Glória, Aline; Hamada, Neusa; Luz, Sérgio L B

    2014-03-01

    Following the success of the Onchocerciasis Elimination Programme for the Americas (OEPA), there is now just one Latin American onchocerciasis focus where onchocerciasis transmission is described as 'on-going:' the Amazonia Onchocerciasis focus. In the hyperendemic highland areas of the Amazonia focus, Simulium guianense s.l. Wise are the most important vectors of the disease. Populations of S. guianense s.l. are, however, known to vary in their cytogenetics and in a range of behaviours, including in their biting habits. In the hypoendemic lowland areas of the Amazonia focus, for example, S. guianense s.l. are generally regarded as zoophilic and consequently unimportant to disease transmission. Robust tools, to discriminate among various populations of S. guianense s.l. have, however, not yet been developed. In the work reported here, we have assessed the utility of a ribosomal DNA sequence fragment spanning the nuclear ribosomal ITS-1, ITS-2 and 5.8S sequence regions and a ∼850 nucleotide portion of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase gene (CO1) for species-level identification and for resolving the within species substructuring. We report here how we have generated 78 CO1 sequences from a rich set of both zoophilic and anthropophilic populations of S. guianense s.l. that were collected from eight sites that are broadly distributed across Brazil. Consistent with previous findings, our analysis supports the genetic isolation of Simulium litobranchium from S. guianense s.l. In contrast with previous findings, however, our results did not provide support for the divergence of the two species prior to the radiation of S. guianense s.l. In our analysis of the S. guianense s.l. ribosomal DNA sequence trace files we generated, we provide clear evidence of multiple within-specimen single nucleotide polymorphisms and indels suggesting that S. guianense s.l. ribosomal DNA is not a good target for conventional DNA barcoding. This is the first report of S. guianense s

  3. An insight into the sialome of Simulium guianense (DIPTERA:SIMulIIDAE), the main vector of River Blindness Disease in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Little is known about the composition and function of the saliva in black flies such as Simulium guianense, the main vector of river blindness disease in Brazil. The complex salivary potion of hematophagous arthropods counteracts their host's hemostasis, inflammation, and immunity. Results Transcriptome analysis revealed ubiquitous salivary protein families--such as the Antigen-5, Yellow, Kunitz domain, and serine proteases--in the S. guianense sialotranscriptome. Insect-specific families were also found. About 63.4% of all secreted products revealed protein families found only in Simulium. Additionally, we found a novel peptide similar to kunitoxin with a structure distantly related to serine protease inhibitors. This study revealed a relative increase of transcripts of the SVEP protein family when compared with Simulium vittatum and S. nigrimanum sialotranscriptomes. We were able to extract coding sequences from 164 proteins associated with blood and sugar feeding, the majority of which were confirmed by proteome analysis. Conclusions Our results contribute to understanding the role of Simulium saliva in transmission of Onchocerca volvulus and evolution of salivary proteins in black flies. It also consists of a platform for mining novel anti-hemostatic compounds, vaccine candidates against filariasis, and immuno-epidemiologic markers of vector exposure. PMID:22182526

  4. Antifungal Activity of Condensed Tannins from Stryphnodendron adstringens: Effect on Candida tropicalis Growth and Adhesion Properties.

    PubMed

    Morey, Alexandre T; de Souza, Felipe C; Santos, Jussevania P; Pereira, Caibe A; Cardoso, Juscelio D; de Almeida, Ricardo S C; Costa, Marco A; de Mello, João C P; Nakamura, Celso V; Pinge-Filho, Phileno; Yamauchi, Lucy M; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli F

    2016-01-01

    Candida species are some of the most common causes of fungal infection worldwide. The limited efficacy of clinically available antifungals warrants the search for new compounds for treating candidiasis. This study evaluated the effect of condensed tannin-rich fraction (F2 fraction) of Stryphnodendron adstringens on in vitro and in vivo growth of Candida tropicalis, and on yeast adhesion properties. F2 exhibited a fungistatic effect with the minimum inhibitory concentration ranging from 0.5 to 8.0 μg/mL. A significant reduction in biofilm mass was observed after either pretreatment of planktonic cells for 2 h (mean reduction of 46.31±8.17%) or incubation during biofilm formation (mean reduction of 28.44±13.38%) with 4x MIC of F2. Prior exposure of planktonic cells to this F2 concentration also significantly decreased yeast adherence on HEp-2 cells (mean reduction of 43.13±14.29%), cell surface hydrophobicity (mean reduction of 25.89±10.49%) and mRNA levels of the genes ALST1-3 (2.9-, 1.8- and 1.8-fold decrease, respectively). Tenebrio molitor larvae, which are susceptible to C. tropicalis infection, were used for in vivo testing. Treatment with 128 and 256 μg/mL F2 significantly increased the survival of infected larvae. These results indicate a combined effect of F2 on inhibition of yeast growth and interference in yeast adhesion, which may contribute to the suppression of infection caused by C. tropicalis, thus reinforcing the potential of the condensed tannins from S. adstringens for the development of novel antifungal agents.

  5. Antifungal Activity of Condensed Tannins from Stryphnodendron adstringens: Effect on Candida tropicalis Growth and Adhesion Properties.

    PubMed

    Morey, Alexandre T; de Souza, Felipe C; Santos, Jussevania P; Pereira, Caibe A; Cardoso, Juscelio D; de Almeida, Ricardo S C; Costa, Marco A; de Mello, João C P; Nakamura, Celso V; Pinge-Filho, Phileno; Yamauchi, Lucy M; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli F

    2016-01-01

    Candida species are some of the most common causes of fungal infection worldwide. The limited efficacy of clinically available antifungals warrants the search for new compounds for treating candidiasis. This study evaluated the effect of condensed tannin-rich fraction (F2 fraction) of Stryphnodendron adstringens on in vitro and in vivo growth of Candida tropicalis, and on yeast adhesion properties. F2 exhibited a fungistatic effect with the minimum inhibitory concentration ranging from 0.5 to 8.0 μg/mL. A significant reduction in biofilm mass was observed after either pretreatment of planktonic cells for 2 h (mean reduction of 46.31±8.17%) or incubation during biofilm formation (mean reduction of 28.44±13.38%) with 4x MIC of F2. Prior exposure of planktonic cells to this F2 concentration also significantly decreased yeast adherence on HEp-2 cells (mean reduction of 43.13±14.29%), cell surface hydrophobicity (mean reduction of 25.89±10.49%) and mRNA levels of the genes ALST1-3 (2.9-, 1.8- and 1.8-fold decrease, respectively). Tenebrio molitor larvae, which are susceptible to C. tropicalis infection, were used for in vivo testing. Treatment with 128 and 256 μg/mL F2 significantly increased the survival of infected larvae. These results indicate a combined effect of F2 on inhibition of yeast growth and interference in yeast adhesion, which may contribute to the suppression of infection caused by C. tropicalis, thus reinforcing the potential of the condensed tannins from S. adstringens for the development of novel antifungal agents. PMID:26696018

  6. Antioxidant effect of Stryphnodendron rotundifolium Martius extracts from Cariri-Ceará State (Brazil): potential involvement in its therapeutic use.

    PubMed

    da Costa, José Galberto Martins; Leite, Gerlânia de Oliveira; Dubois, Albys Ferrer; Seeger, Rodrigo Lopes; Boligon, Aline Augusti; Athayde, Margareth Linde; Campos, Adriana Rolim; da Rocha, João Batista Teixeira

    2012-01-01

    Stryphnodendron rotundifolium is a phytotherapic used in the northeast of Brazil for the treatment of inflammatory processes which normally are associated with oxidative stress. Consequently, we have tested the antioxidant properties of hydroalcoholic (HAB) and aqueous extracts (AB) from the bark and aqueous extract (AL) from the leaves of Stryphnodendron rotundifolium to determine a possible association between antioxidant activity and the popular use of this plant. Free radical scavenger properties were assessed by the quenching of 1',1'-diphenil-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and the calculated IC(50) were: HAB = 5.4 ± 0.7, AB = 12.0 ± 2.6, and AL = 46.3 ± 12.3 µg/mL. Total phenolic contents were: HAB = 102.7 ± 2.8, AB = 114.4 ± 14.6, and AL = 93.8 ± 9.1 µg/mg plant). HPLC/DAD analyses indicated that gallic acid, catechin, rutin and caffeic acid were the major components of the crude extracts of S. rotundifolium. Plant extracts inhibited Fe(II)-induced lipid peroxidation in brain homogenates. Iron chelation was also investigated and only HBA exhibited a weak activity. Taken together, the results suggest that S. rotundifolium could be considered an effective agent in the prevention of diseases associated with oxidative stress.

  7. Stryphnodendron adstringens: Clarifying Wound Healing in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Sandra Cristina Girotto; Bueno, Fernanda Giacomini; Panizzon, Gean Pier; Morais, Gutierrez; Dos Santos, Paulo Victor Pires; Baesso, Mauro Luciano; Leite-Mello, Eneri Vieira de Souza; de Mello, João Carlos Palazzo

    2015-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a serious public health problem in which a major complication is impaired wound healing. Among the strategies developed to foster tissue repair is the use of medicinal plants. The bark of Stryphnodendron adstringens, which is popularly used as an aid in wound healing, has a documented effect on wound repair in normal rats. This study evaluated the healing action of the crude extract of S. adstringens in diabetic rats, and its chemical content. Compounds present in the crude extract were characterized by mass spectrometry. In diabetic rats (streptozotocin 35 mg/kg), two wounds made in the skin were treated daily for 4, 7, 10, and 14 days with gel containing 1 % crude extract or with base gel. Histological analyses involved the measurement of the length and thickness of the re-epithelialized surface, quantification of the number of cells in mitosis, and types I and III collagen fibers. Also, cutaneous permeation by photoacoustic spectroscopy, and the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor by Western blot were assessed. The crude extract fingerprint showed masses indicating proanthocyanidins. The crude extract mainly stimulated cell migration and proliferation of keratinocytes at the beginning of the treatment in addition to stimulating the replacement of type III collagen fibers by type I collagen fibers at 10 and 14 days. The photoacoustic spectroscopy technique showed that the gel containing 1 % of crude extract permeated through the skin to the dermis, where the crude extract was found. Vascular endothelial growth factor was stimulated after 7 days of treatment with the crude extract and cyclooxygenase-2 at 4, 7, and 10 days. The crude extract of S. adstringens acted in tissue repair in wounds in diabetic rats by stimulating the production of collagen fibers at the wound site. The crude extract favored the formation of a more organized extracellular matrix and filled the entire extent of the wound, and also

  8. Acute and Chronic Toxicity of an Aqueous Fraction of the Stem Bark of Stryphnodendron adstringens (Barbatimão) in Rodents.

    PubMed

    Costa, Marco Antonio; Palazzo de Mello, João Carlos; Kaneshima, Edílson Nobuyoshi; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; Dias Filho, Benedito Prado; Audi, Elisabeth Aparecida; Nakamura, Celso Vataru

    2013-01-01

    Stryphnodendron adstringens has a high tannin content and is used as an antiseptic and antimicrobial and in the treatment of leucorrhea, gonorrhea, wound healing, and gastritis. The present study evaluated the toxic effects of the heptamer prodelphinidin (F2) from the stem bark of S. adstringens in rodents. In the acute toxicity test, the mice that received oral doses exhibited reversible effects, with an LD50 of 3.015 mg · kg(-1). In the chronic toxicity test at 90 days, Wistar rats were treated with different doses of F2 (10, 100, and 200 mg · kg(-1)). In the biochemical, hematological, and histopathological examinations and open-field test, the different dose groups did not exhibit significant differences compared with controls. The present results indicate that F2 from the stem bark of S. adstringens caused no toxicity with acute and chronic oral treatment in rodents at the doses administered.

  9. Acute and Chronic Toxicity of an Aqueous Fraction of the Stem Bark of Stryphnodendron adstringens (Barbatimão) in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Marco Antonio; Palazzo de Mello, João Carlos; Kaneshima, Edílson Nobuyoshi; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; Dias Filho, Benedito Prado; Audi, Elisabeth Aparecida

    2013-01-01

    Stryphnodendron adstringens has a high tannin content and is used as an antiseptic and antimicrobial and in the treatment of leucorrhea, gonorrhea, wound healing, and gastritis. The present study evaluated the toxic effects of the heptamer prodelphinidin (F2) from the stem bark of S. adstringens in rodents. In the acute toxicity test, the mice that received oral doses exhibited reversible effects, with an LD50 of 3.015 mg · kg−1. In the chronic toxicity test at 90 days, Wistar rats were treated with different doses of F2 (10, 100, and 200 mg · kg−1). In the biochemical, hematological, and histopathological examinations and open-field test, the different dose groups did not exhibit significant differences compared with controls. The present results indicate that F2 from the stem bark of S. adstringens caused no toxicity with acute and chronic oral treatment in rodents at the doses administered. PMID:23970938

  10. Density-dependent processes in the transmission of human onchocerciasis: relationship between the numbers of microfilariae ingested and successful larval development in the simuliid vector.

    PubMed

    Basáñez, M G; Remme, J H; Alley, E S; Bain, O; Shelley, A J; Medley, G F; Anderson, R M

    1995-05-01

    A previous paper reported that the intake of Onchocerca volvulus microfilariae (mff) by different species of Simulium is essentially proportional to the parasite load in the skin of infected carriers. This paper examines the fate of the ingested mff in susceptible vectors to assess the relationship between parasite intake and infective larval output in blackfly species with and without well-developed cibarial armatures. Analysis is based on data from 3 onchocerciasis endemic areas: Guatemala (S. ochraceum s.l.), West Africa (S. damnosum s.l./S. sirbanum) and the Amazonian focus between South Venezuela and Northern Brazil (S. guianense and S. oyapockense s.l.). The data, which include published and unedited information collected in the field, record experimental studies of parasite uptake by wild flies maintained in captivity until the completion of the extrinsic incubation period. The relationship between L3 output (measured as the mean number of successful larvae/fly or, as the proportion of flies with infective larvae) and average microfilarial intake, was strongly non-linear. This non-linearity was best represented by a sigmoid function in case of armed simuliids (S. ochraceum s.l., S. oyapockense s.l.), or by a hyperbolic expression in that of unarmed flies (S. damnosum s.l., S. guianense). These results are compatible, respectively, with the patterns of 'initial facilitation' and 'limitation' described in culicid vectors of lymphatic filariases. A maximum mean number of 1-3 L3/fly was observed in all 4 vectors. It is concluded that O. volvulus larval development to the infective stage is regulated by density-dependent mechanisms acting at the early phase of microfilarial migration out of the blackfly's bloodmeal. Damage by the bucco-pharyngeal armature may also be density dependent. A hypothesis, based on this density dependence is forwarded to explain initial facilitation, so far only recorded in vectors with well-developed cibarial teeth. Our results provide

  11. [Discovery of Novel Biologically Active Compounds of Natural Origin, with a Focus on Anti-tumor Activity].

    PubMed

    Yokosuka, Akihito

    2015-01-01

    Numerous clinically valuable medicines, including anticancer drugs, have been developed from biologically active natural compounds and their structurally related derivatives. This review discusses novel natural compounds with promising biological activities and those with novel chemical structures. Glaziovianin A, an isoflavone isolated from the leaves of Ateleia glazioviana (Legminosae), inhibited cell cycle progression at the M-phase with an abnormal spindle structure. AU-1 and YG-1, 5β-steroidal glycosides isolated from the whole plants of Agave utahensis and the underground parts of Yucca glauca (Agavaceae), induced apoptosis of HL-60 cells via caspase-3 activation. Lycolicidinol, an alkaloid isolated from the bulbs of Lycoris albiflora (Amaryllidaceae), induced transient autophagy and morphological changes in mitochondria in the early stage of the apoptotic cell death process in HSC-2 cells. Taccasterosides isolated from the rhizomes of Tacca chantrieri (Taccaceae) and stryphnosides isolated from the pericarps of Stryphnodendron fissuratum (Legminosae) are steroidal and triterpene glycosides with unique chemical structures having novel sugar sequences.

  12. Fungal Planet description sheets: 107-127.

    PubMed

    Crous, P W; Summerell, B A; Shivas, R G; Burgess, T I; Decock, C A; Dreyer, L L; Granke, L L; Guest, D I; Hardy, G E St J; Hausbeck, M K; Hüberli, D; Jung, T; Koukol, O; Lennox, C L; Liew, E C Y; Lombard, L; McTaggart, A R; Pryke, J S; Roets, F; Saude, C; Shuttleworth, L A; Stukely, M J C; Vánky, K; Webster, B J; Windstam, S T; Groenewald, J Z

    2012-06-01

    Novel species of microfungi described in the present study include the following from Australia: Phytophthora amnicola from still water, Gnomoniopsis smithogilvyi from Castanea sp., Pseudoplagiostoma corymbiae from Corymbia sp., Diaporthe eucalyptorum from Eucalyptus sp., Sporisorium andrewmitchellii from Enneapogon aff. lindleyanus, Myrmecridium banksiae from Banksia, and Pilidiella wangiensis from Eucalyptus sp. Several species are also described from South Africa, namely: Gondwanamyces wingfieldii from Protea caffra, Montagnula aloes from Aloe sp., Diaporthe canthii from Canthium inerne, Phyllosticta ericarum from Erica gracilis, Coleophoma proteae from Protea caffra, Toxicocladosporium strelitziae from Strelitzia reginae, and Devriesia agapanthi from Agapanthus africanus. Other species include Phytophthora asparagi from Asparagus officinalis (USA), and Diaporthe passiflorae from Passiflora edulis (South America). Furthermore, novel genera of coelomycetes include Chrysocrypta corymbiae from Corymbia sp. (Australia), Trinosporium guianense, isolated as a contaminant (French Guiana), and Xenosonderhenia syzygii, from Syzygium cordatum (South Africa). Pseudopenidiella piceae from Picea abies (Czech Republic), and Phaeocercospora colophospermi from Colophospermum mopane (South Africa) represent novel genera of hyphomycetes. Morphological and culture characteristics along with ITS DNA barcodes are provided for all taxa. PMID:23105159

  13. Fungal Planet description sheets: 107-127.

    PubMed

    Crous, P W; Summerell, B A; Shivas, R G; Burgess, T I; Decock, C A; Dreyer, L L; Granke, L L; Guest, D I; Hardy, G E St J; Hausbeck, M K; Hüberli, D; Jung, T; Koukol, O; Lennox, C L; Liew, E C Y; Lombard, L; McTaggart, A R; Pryke, J S; Roets, F; Saude, C; Shuttleworth, L A; Stukely, M J C; Vánky, K; Webster, B J; Windstam, S T; Groenewald, J Z

    2012-06-01

    Novel species of microfungi described in the present study include the following from Australia: Phytophthora amnicola from still water, Gnomoniopsis smithogilvyi from Castanea sp., Pseudoplagiostoma corymbiae from Corymbia sp., Diaporthe eucalyptorum from Eucalyptus sp., Sporisorium andrewmitchellii from Enneapogon aff. lindleyanus, Myrmecridium banksiae from Banksia, and Pilidiella wangiensis from Eucalyptus sp. Several species are also described from South Africa, namely: Gondwanamyces wingfieldii from Protea caffra, Montagnula aloes from Aloe sp., Diaporthe canthii from Canthium inerne, Phyllosticta ericarum from Erica gracilis, Coleophoma proteae from Protea caffra, Toxicocladosporium strelitziae from Strelitzia reginae, and Devriesia agapanthi from Agapanthus africanus. Other species include Phytophthora asparagi from Asparagus officinalis (USA), and Diaporthe passiflorae from Passiflora edulis (South America). Furthermore, novel genera of coelomycetes include Chrysocrypta corymbiae from Corymbia sp. (Australia), Trinosporium guianense, isolated as a contaminant (French Guiana), and Xenosonderhenia syzygii, from Syzygium cordatum (South Africa). Pseudopenidiella piceae from Picea abies (Czech Republic), and Phaeocercospora colophospermi from Colophospermum mopane (South Africa) represent novel genera of hyphomycetes. Morphological and culture characteristics along with ITS DNA barcodes are provided for all taxa.

  14. Seed source, seed traits, and frugivore habits: Implications for dispersal quality of two sympatric primates.

    PubMed

    Benítez-Malvido, Julieta; González-Di Pierro, Ana Ma; Lombera, Rafael; Guillén, Susana; Estrada, Alejandro

    2014-06-11

    • Premise of the study: Frugivore selection of fruits and treatment of seeds together with seed deposition site are crucial for the population dynamics of vertebrate-dispersed plants. However, frugivore species may influence dispersal quality differently even when feeding on the same fruit species and, while animals disperse some seeds, others simply fall beneath the parent plant.• Methods: In southern Mexico, we investigated to see if within-species seed traits (i.e., length, width, weight, and volume) and germination success differed according to seed source. For five tropical tree species we obtained ingested seeds from two sources, howler monkey (Alouatta pigra) and spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi) feces; and noningested seeds from two sources, the ground and tree crowns (with predispersed seeds used as control).• Key results: A principal components' analysis showed that traits of seeds ingested by howler monkeys differed from other sources while seeds ingested by spider monkeys were similar to noningested seeds. Howlers consumed on average the larger seeds in Ampelocera hottlei, Brosimum lactescens, and Dialium guianense. Both primate species consumed the smaller seeds in Spondias mombin, while no seed trait differences among seed sources were found in Spondias radlkoferi. For all five tree species, germination rate was greatest for seeds ingested by howler monkeys.• Conclusions: For the studied plant species, seed ingestion by howler monkeys confers higher dispersal quality than ingestion by spider monkeys or nondispersal. Dispersal services of both primate species, however, are not redundant and may contribute to germination heterogeneity within plant populations in tropical forests. PMID:24920763

  15. Pollen grain morphology of Fabaceae in the Special Protection Area (SPA) Pau-de-Fruta, Diamantina, Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Luz, Cynthia F P da; Maki, Erica S; Horák-Terra, Ingrid; Vidal-Torrado, Pablo; Mendonça Filho, Carlos Victor

    2013-01-01

    The presented paper considered the pollen morphology of thirteen species belonging to seven genera of the Fabaceae family occurring in the Pau-de-Fruta Special Protection Area (SPA), Diamantina, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The pollen grains of six species of Chamaecrista [C. cathartica (Mart.) H.S. Irwin & Barneby, C. debilis Vogel, C. flexuosa (L.) Greene, C. hedysaroides (Vogel) H.S. Irwin & Barneby, C. glandulosa (L.) Greene, and C. papillata H.S. Irwin & Barneby] have a similar morphology, characterized by three long colporated apertures with a central constriction. The species share specific morphological features regarding pollen size, endoaperture type (circular, lalongate or lolongate) and SEM ornamentation patterns of the exine (rugulate with perforations or perforate). Andira fraxinifolia Benth., Dalbergia miscolobium Benth, Galactia martii DC, Periandra mediterranea (Vell.) Taub., Senna rugosa (G.Don) H.S. Irwin & Barneby and Zornia diphylla (L.) Pers showed different pollen types in small to large size; oblate spheroidal to prolate form; colpus or colporus apertures; circular, lalongate or lolongate endoapertures and distinctive SEM ornamentation patterns of the exine (perforate, microreticulate, reticulate or rugulate with perforations). Only Stryphnodendron adstringens (Mart.) Coville presents polyads. The pollen morphology variation of these species allowed the Fabaceae family to be characterized as eurypalynous in the SPA Pau-de-Fruta.

  16. Characterization of nine microsatellite loci for the tree species Parapiptadenia rigida (Fabaceae-Mimosoideae) and their transferability.

    PubMed

    Costa, B F; Rodrigues, L A; Ruas, E A; Souza, L B; Ruas, C F; Vieira, B G; Conson, A R O; Ruas, P M

    2012-01-01

    Parapiptadenia rigida, locally known as angico, is a tropical tree common in the semideciduous Brazilian forest. Its wood is naturally resistant to insect attack and is useful for construction. Extracts from the tree have medicinal properties. We characterized nine microsatellite loci for P. rigida. Thirty-five alleles were detected in a sample of 45 individuals from 3 different populations, with an average of 3.9 alleles per locus. The average polymorphic information content ranged from 0.099 to 0.640. Observed and expected heterozygosities varied from 0.111 to 0.489 and from 0.106 to 0.707, respectively. One locus exhibited significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and four pairs of loci showed significant linkage disequilibrium. All nine primers were tested for cross-amplification in species from the Fabaceae-Mimosoidea family, yielding a transferability success rate of 7 loci in Stryphnodendron adstringens to 0 transferred loci in Pithecellobium incuriale and Inga marginata. These microsatellites will be valuable to study population genetics of this and other species where primer transferability was detected.

  17. In vitro acaricidal efficacy of plant extracts from Brazilian flora and isolated substances against Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Valente, Paula Pimentel; Amorim, Juliana Mendes; Castilho, Rachel Oliveira; Leite, Romário Cerqueira; Ribeiro, Múcio Flávio Barbosa

    2014-01-01

    The tick Rhipicephalus microplus causes significant losses in livestock cattle and has developed increasing resistance to the primary acaricides that are used to treat these infections. The objective of this study was to identify new biomolecules or isolated substances showing acaricidal activity from plants. Larval packet tests were conducted to evaluate the effects of 11 species of plants and three isolated substances (betulinic acid, eugenol, and nerolidol) on R. microplus. An adult female immersion test was performed with the substance that showed the highest larvicidal activity, which was evaluated for inhibition of reproduction. Tests using Licania tomentosa, Hymenaea stigonocarpa, Hymenaea courbaril, Stryphnodendron obovatum, Jacaranda cuspidifolia, Jacaranda ulei, Struthanthus polyrhizus, Chrysobalanus icaco, Vernonia phosphorea, Duguetia furfuracea, and Simarouba versicolor extracts as well as the isolated substance betulinic acid indicated lower acaricidal effects on R. microplus larvae. The extract displaying the best larvicidal activity was the ethanolic extract from L. tomentosa at a concentration of 60%, resulting in a mortality rate of 40.3%. However, nerolidol and eugenol showed larvicidal activity, which was highest for eugenol. Nerolidol caused a 96.5% mortality rate in the R. microplus larvae at a high concentration of 30%, and eugenol caused 100% mortality at a concentration of 0.3%. In the adult immersion test, 5% eugenol was identified as a good biomolecule for controlling R. microplus, as demonstrated by its high acaricidal activity and inhibition of oviposition. PMID:24221889

  18. In vitro antimicrobial activity of Brazilian medicinal plant extracts against pathogenic microorganisms of interest to dentistry.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Elizete Maria; Gomes, Rafael Tomaz; Freire, Natália Ribeiro; Aguiar, Evandro Guimarães; Brandão, Maria das Graças Lins; Santos, Vagner Rodrigues

    2011-03-01

    This study evaluated the susceptibility of oral pathogenic microorganisms Candida albicans, Streptococcus mutans, Staphylococcus aureus, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans to Brazilian medicinal plant extracts of Schinus terebinthifolius (aroeira), Croton campestris (velame), Lafoensia pacari (pacari), Centaurium erythraea (centáurea), Stryphnodendron adstringens (barbatimão), and Anacardium humile (cajuzinho-docerrado), as compared to standardized antimicrobial agents (nystatin, chloramphenicol and tetracycline hydrochloride). Ethanol, hexane and butane fractions from stem barks, rinds, leaves, and/or roots were extracted and tested. Antimicrobial diffusion agar test and MIC were performed according to CLSI. After 24 h of incubation at 37 °C, the diameter of inhibition zones and spectrophotometer readings were measured and compared. The results were reported as means ± standard deviation (M ± SD). With the exception of five extracts that showed no antimicrobial activity, all the extracts tested showed antimicrobial activity, in different levels. This study suggests that extracts from the plants tested could be an alternative therapeutic option for infectious conditions of the oral cavity, such as denture stomatitis, dental caries, and periodontitis.

  19. [Discovery of Novel Biologically Active Compounds of Natural Origin, with a Focus on Anti-tumor Activity].

    PubMed

    Yokosuka, Akihito

    2015-01-01

    Numerous clinically valuable medicines, including anticancer drugs, have been developed from biologically active natural compounds and their structurally related derivatives. This review discusses novel natural compounds with promising biological activities and those with novel chemical structures. Glaziovianin A, an isoflavone isolated from the leaves of Ateleia glazioviana (Legminosae), inhibited cell cycle progression at the M-phase with an abnormal spindle structure. AU-1 and YG-1, 5β-steroidal glycosides isolated from the whole plants of Agave utahensis and the underground parts of Yucca glauca (Agavaceae), induced apoptosis of HL-60 cells via caspase-3 activation. Lycolicidinol, an alkaloid isolated from the bulbs of Lycoris albiflora (Amaryllidaceae), induced transient autophagy and morphological changes in mitochondria in the early stage of the apoptotic cell death process in HSC-2 cells. Taccasterosides isolated from the rhizomes of Tacca chantrieri (Taccaceae) and stryphnosides isolated from the pericarps of Stryphnodendron fissuratum (Legminosae) are steroidal and triterpene glycosides with unique chemical structures having novel sugar sequences. PMID:26423865

  20. A review of poisonous plants that cause reproductive failure and malformations in the ruminants of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Riet-Correa, Franklin; Medeiros, Rosane M T; Schild, Ana Lucia

    2012-04-01

    The objective of this review is to provide a report on toxic plants causing reproductive problems in ruminants in Brazil. Aspidosperma pyrifolium causes abortion or stillbirth in goats, as well as most likely in sheep and cattle, in the semiarid regions of Northeastern Brazil. Intoxications by Ateleia glazioveana, Tetrapterys acutifolia and T. multiglandulosa result in abortion and neonatal mortality in cattle and sheep, and the same signs have been experimentally observed in goats. These three plants can also cause cardiac fibrosis and a nervous disease with spongiosis of the central nervous system. Other plants known to cause abortion include Enterolobium contortisiliquum, E. gummiferum, Stryphnodendron coriaceum, S. obovatum and S. fissuratum. These plants can also cause digestive signs and photosensitization. Abortions have been reported in animals intoxicated by nitrates and nitrites as well. Infertility, abortions and the birth of weak offspring have been reported in animals intoxicated by plants containing swainsonine, including Ipomoea spp., Turbina cordata and Sida carpinifolia. Trifolium subterraneum causes estrogenism in cattle. Mimosa tenuiflora and, most likely, M. ophthalmocentra cause malformations and embryonic mortality in goats, sheep and cattle in the semiarid regions of Northeastern Brazil.

  1. Inorganic profile of some Brazilian medicinal plants obtained from ethanolic extract and ''in natura'' samples

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, M.O.M.; de Sousa, P.T.; Salvador, V.L.R.; Sato, I.M.

    2004-10-03

    The Anadenathera macrocarpa, Schinus molle, Hymenaea courbaril, Cariniana legalis, Solidago microglossa and Stryphnodendron barbatiman, were collected ''in natura'' samples (leaves, flowers, barks and seeds) from different commercial suppliers. The pharmaco-active compounds in ethanolic extracts had been made by the Mato Grosso Federal University (UFMT). The energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF) spectrometry was used for the elemental analysis in different parts of the plants and respective ethanolic extracts. The Ca, Cl, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, P, Rb, S, Sr and Zn concentrations were determined by the fundamental parameters method. Some specimens showed a similar inorganic profile for ''in natura'' and ethanolic extract samples and some ones showed a distinct inorganic profile. For example, the Anadenathera macrocarpa showed a similar concentration in Mg, P, Cu, Zn and Rb elements in ''in natura'' and ethanolic extract samples; however very different concentration in Na, S, Cl, K , Ca, Mn, Fe and Sr was observed in distinctive samples. The Solidago microglossa showed the K, Ca, Cl, S, Mg, P and Fe elements as major constituents in both samples, suggesting that the extraction process did not affect in a considerable way the ''in natura'' inorganic composition. The elemental composition of the different parts of the plants (leaves, flowers, barks and seeds) has been also determined. For example, the Schinus molle specimen showed P, K, Cl and Ca elements as major constituents in the seeds, Mg, K and Sr in the barks and Mg, S, Cl and Mn in the leaves, demonstrating a differentiated elementary distribution. These inorganic profiles will contribute to evaluate the quality control of the Brazilian herbaceous trade and also will assist to identify which parts of the medicinal plants has greater therapeutic effect.