Science.gov

Sample records for baker protocols irradiation

  1. Baker cyst

    MedlinePlus

    Popliteal cyst; Bulge-knee ... A Baker cyst is caused by swelling in the knee. The swelling is due to an increase in the fluid that ... squeezes into the back of the knee. Baker cyst commonly occurs with: A tear in the meniscal ...

  2. BAKER'S CYST

    PubMed Central

    Demange, Marco Kawamura

    2015-01-01

    Baker's cysts are located in the posteromedial region of the knee between the medial belly of the gastrocnemius muscle and semimembranosus tendon. In adults, these cysts are related to intra-articular lesions, which may consist of meniscal lesions or arthrosis. In children, these cysts are usually found on physical examination or imaging studies, and they generally do not have any clinical relevance. Ultrasound examination is appropriate for identifying and measuring the popliteal cyst. The main treatment approach should focus on the joint lesions, and in most cases there is no need to address the cyst directly. Although almost all knee cysts are benign (Baker's cysts and parameniscal cysts), presence of some signs makes it necessary to suspect malignancy: symptoms disproportionate to the size of the cyst, absence of joint damage (e.g. meniscal tears) that might explain the existence of the cyst, unusual cyst topography, bone erosion, cyst size greater than 5 cm and tissue invasion (joint capsule). PMID:27027065

  3. Dosimetry Formalism and Implementation of a Homogenous Irradiation Protocol to Improve the Accuracy of Small Animal Whole-Body Irradiation Using a 137Cs Irradiator.

    PubMed

    Brodin, N Patrik; Chen, Yong; Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Guha, Chandan; Tomé, Wolfgang A

    2016-02-01

    Shielded Cs irradiators are routinely used in pre-clinical radiation research to perform in vitro or in vivo investigations. Without appropriate dosimetry and irradiation protocols in place, there can be large uncertainty in the delivered dose of radiation between irradiated subjects that could lead to inaccurate and possibly misleading results. Here, a dosimetric evaluation of the JL Shepard Mark I-68A Cs irradiator and an irradiation technique for whole-body irradiation of small animals that allows one to limit the between subject variation in delivered dose to ±3% are provided. Mathematical simulation techniques and Gafchromic EBT film were used to describe the region within the irradiation cavity with homogeneous dose distribution (100% ± 5%), the dosimetric impact of varying source-to-subject distance, and the variation in attenuation thickness due to turntable rotation. Furthermore, an irradiation protocol and dosimetry formalism that allows calculation of irradiation time for whole-body irradiation of small animals is proposed that is designed to ensure a more consistent dose delivery between irradiated subjects. To compare this protocol with the conventional irradiation protocol suggested by the vendor, high-resolution film dosimetry measurements evaluating the dose difference between irradiation subjects and the dose distribution throughout subjects was performed using phantoms resembling small animals. Based on these results, there can be considerable variation in the delivered dose of > ± 5% using the conventional irradiation protocol for whole-body irradiation doses below 5 Gy. Using the proposed irradiation protocol this variability can be reduced to within ±3% and the dosimetry formalism allows for more accurate calculation of the irradiation time in relation to the intended prescription dose. PMID:26710162

  4. Advanced protocol for the detection of irradiated food by electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoyama, Yuhei; Ukai, Mitsuko; Nakamura, Hideo

    2007-11-01

    Using ESR (electron spin resonance) spectroscopy, we found various free radicals in a pepper before and after irradiation. The representative ESR spectrum of the pepper composed of a sextet centered at g=2.0, a singlet at the same g-value and a singlet at g=4.0. This reflects the evidence of three independent radicals in the pepper before irradiation. Upon gamma ray irradiation, a new pair of signals appeared. The progressive saturation behavior (PSB) at various microwave power levels indicates quite different relaxation behaviors of those signals. For the evaluation of radiation-induced radicals and irradiation effects we propose a new protocol using the PSB method. This would call for an advanced protocol for the detection of irradiated foods.

  5. An ESR protocol based on relaxation phenomena of irradiated Japanese pepper.

    PubMed

    Ukai, Mitsuko; Nakamura, Hideo; Shimoyama, Yuhei

    2006-03-13

    We found various free radicals in a commercially available pepper in Japan before and after irradiation using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The typical ESR spectrum of the pepper consists of a sextet centered at g = 2.0, a singlet at the same g-value and a singlet at g = 4.0. Upon gamma ray irradiation, a new pair of signals appeared in the pepper. The progressive saturation behavior (PSB) at various microwave power levels indicated quite different relaxation behaviors of those radicals. Namely, the peak intensity of the organic free radical component decreases in a monotonic fashion, whereas the Mn2+ and Fe3+ ESR signals substantially keep constant. This reflects the evidence of three independent radicals in the pepper before irradiation. The PSB of the pair peaks as induced by irradiation possessed quite different PSB from that of the free radical located at g = 2.0. We proposed a new protocol for the ESR detection of irradiated foods by the PSB method at different microwave power levels. This would call for a major modification of the CEN protocol in European Union.

  6. Baker & Taylor's George Coe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fialkoff, Francine

    2009-01-01

    In his 30 years as a library wholesaler, first as VP and general manager of Brodart Books, Library, and School Automation divisions and since 2000 as president of the Library & Education division of Baker & Taylor (B&T), George Coe has been instrumental in a whole host of innovations. They go way beyond the selection, processing, and delivery of…

  7. On the range of applicability of Baker`s approach to the frame problem

    SciTech Connect

    Kartha, G.N.

    1996-12-31

    We investigate the range of applicability of Baker`s approach to the frame problem using an action language. We show that for temporal projection and deterministic domains, Baker`s approach gives the intuitively expected results.

  8. Irreversible quantum baker map.

    PubMed

    Łoziński, Artur; Pakoński, Prot; Zyczkowski, Karol

    2002-12-01

    We propose a generalization of the model of classical baker map on the torus, in which the images of two parts of the phase space do overlap. This transformation is irreversible and cannot be quantized by means of a unitary Floquet operator. A corresponding quantum system is constructed as a completely positive map acting in the space of density matrices. We investigate spectral properties of this superoperator and their link with the increase of the entropy of initially pure states.

  9. Monitoring Mount Baker Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malone, S.D.; Frank, D.

    1976-01-01

    Hisotrically active volcanoes in the conterminous United States are restricted to the Cascade Range and extend to the Cascade Range and extend from Mount Baker near the Canadian border to Lassen Peak in northern California. Since 1800 A.D, most eruptive activity has been on a relatively small scale and has not caused loss of life or significant property damage. However, future  volcanism predictably will have more serious effects because of greatly increased use of land near volcanoes during the present century. (See "Appraising Volcanic Hazards of the Cascade Range of the Northwestern United States," Earthquake Inf. Bull., Sept.-Oct. 1974.) The recognition an impending eruption is highly important in order to minimize the potential hazard to people and property. Thus, a substantial increase in hydrothermal activity at Mount Baker in March 1975 ( see "Mount Baker Heating Up," July-Aug. 1975 issue) was regarded as a possible first signal that an eruption might occur, and an intensive monitoring program was undertaken. 

  10. Baker nominated to Science Board

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    President Ronald Reagan has announced his intention to nominate Warren J. Baker to the National Science Board (NSB), according to an announcement by the National Science Foundation (NSF). Baker is the president of California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo. A civil engineer by training, his research specialty is soil dynamics.The 24-member NSB is the policy-making body of the NSF. Provided that the Senate confirms his appointment, Baker will serve on the board until May 1988.

  11. Structural, thermal, functional, antioxidant & antimicrobial properties of β-d-glucan extracted from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cereviseae)-Effect of γ-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Asma Ashraf; Gani, Adil; Masoodi, F A; Amin, Furheen; Wani, Idrees Ahmed; Khanday, Firdous Ahmad; Gani, Asir

    2016-04-20

    This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of γ-irradiation (0, 5, 10, 20, 30 & 50kGy) on the structural, functional, antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of yeast β-d-glucan. The samples were characterized by ATR-FTIR, gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and the thermal properties were studied using DSC. There was a decrease in the average molecular weight of β-d-glucan as the irradiation dose increased. The functional properties of irradiated yeast β-d-glucan were largely influenced by the action of gamma radiation like swelling power and viscosity decreases with increase in the irradiation dose while as fat binding capacity, emulsifying properties, foaming properties and bile acid binding capacity shows an increasing trend. All the antioxidant properties carried out using six different assays increased significantly (p≤0.05) in a dose dependent manner. The antibacterial activity of yeast β-d-glucan also showed an increasing trend with increase in the irradiation dose from 5 to 50kDa. PMID:26876872

  12. Baker rises to the top

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, W.

    1997-03-19

    With its recent acquisition of Petrolite (St. Louis), Baker Performance Chemicals (BPC; Houston), a unit of Baker Hughes, leapfrogs Nalco-Exxon Energy Chemicals to become the biggest purveyor of oil field chemicals. {open_quotes}Petrolite and Baker were number two and number three,{close_quotes} says Credit Suisse First Boston analyst Gordon T. Hall, who adds that the combined operations will have at least $700 million/year in sales and be positioned to expand, primarily outside the US Hall says the Nalco-Exxon jv, the only other major oil field chemicals player, has sales of less than $650 million/year. Although Baker Hughes does no break out sales by division, BPC president Glen Bassett says sales last year were {open_quotes}more than $300 million{close_quotes} but not as high as Petrolite`s $361 million. {open_quotes}It`s Baker Hughes`s intent to merge Petrolite and [BPC],{close_quotes} Bassett says. Baker paid $689 million to obtain Petrolite, which was under shareholder pressure to seek a buyer . Petrolite is Baker`s third acquisition in a year. Last summer it bought Suramco Chemical Research (Lloydminster, AB) and BASF`s oil field chemicals business. Reports that the purchase could trigger FTC scrutiny may have been overblown. {open_quotes}I don`t believe there are any antitrust issues,{close_quotes} says Joe Pilaro, president of BRAE Partners (Princeton, NJ), an investment advisory firm. Petrolite`s products complement, rather than parallel, those of Baker Hughes, he says.

  13. The scope of Baker's law.

    PubMed

    Pannell, John R; Auld, Josh R; Brandvain, Yaniv; Burd, Martin; Busch, Jeremiah W; Cheptou, Pierre-Olivier; Conner, Jeffrey K; Goldberg, Emma E; Grant, Alannie-Grace; Grossenbacher, Dena L; Hovick, Stephen M; Igic, Boris; Kalisz, Susan; Petanidou, Theodora; Randle, April M; de Casas, Rafael Rubio; Pauw, Anton; Vamosi, Jana C; Winn, Alice A

    2015-11-01

    Baker's law refers to the tendency for species that establish on islands by long-distance dispersal to show an increased capacity for self-fertilization because of the advantage of self-compatibility when colonizing new habitat. Despite its intuitive appeal and broad empirical support, it has received substantial criticism over the years since it was proclaimed in the 1950s, not least because it seemed to be contradicted by the high frequency of dioecy on islands. Recent theoretical work has again questioned the generality and scope of Baker's law. Here, we attempt to discern where the idea is useful to apply and where it is not. We conclude that several of the perceived problems with Baker's law fall away when a narrower perspective is adopted on how it should be circumscribed. We emphasize that Baker's law should be read in terms of an enrichment of a capacity for uniparental reproduction in colonizing situations, rather than of high selfing rates. We suggest that Baker's law might be tested in four different contexts, which set the breadth of its scope: the colonization of oceanic islands, metapopulation dynamics with recurrent colonization, range expansions with recurrent colonization, and colonization through species invasions.

  14. 21 CFR 172.325 - Bakers yeast protein.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bakers yeast protein. 172.325 Section 172.325 Food... Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.325 Bakers yeast protein. Bakers yeast protein may be safely used in food in accordance with the following conditions: (a) Bakers yeast protein is...

  15. 21 CFR 172.898 - Bakers yeast glycan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bakers yeast glycan. 172.898 Section 172.898 Food... Multipurpose Additives § 172.898 Bakers yeast glycan. Bakers yeast glycan may be safely used in food in accordance with the following conditions: (a) Bakers yeast glycan is the comminuted, washed, pasteurized,...

  16. 21 CFR 172.325 - Bakers yeast protein.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bakers yeast protein. 172.325 Section 172.325 Food... Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.325 Bakers yeast protein. Bakers yeast protein may be safely used in food in accordance with the following conditions: (a) Bakers yeast protein is...

  17. 21 CFR 172.325 - Bakers yeast protein.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bakers yeast protein. 172.325 Section 172.325 Food... Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.325 Bakers yeast protein. Bakers yeast protein may be safely used in food in accordance with the following conditions: (a) Bakers yeast protein is...

  18. 'BioQuaRT' project: design of a novel in situ protocol for the simultaneous visualisation of chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei after irradiation at microbeam facilities.

    PubMed

    Patrono, C; Monteiro Gil, O; Giesen, U; Langner, F; Pinto, M; Rabus, H; Testa, A

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the 'BioQuaRT' (Biologically weighted Quantities in RadioTherapy) project is to develop measurement techniques for characterising charged particle track structure on different length scales, and to correlate at the cellular level the track structure properties with the biological effects of radiation. This multi-scale approach will allow characterisation of the radiation qualities used in radiotherapy and the related biological effects. Charged-particle microbeam facilities were chosen as the platforms for all radiobiology experiments in the 'BioQuaRT' project, because they allow targeting single cells (or compartments of a cell) with a predefined number of ionising particles and correlating the cell-by-cell induced damage with type and energy of the radiation and with the number of ions per cell. Within this project, a novel in situ protocol was developed for the analysis of the misrepaired and/or unrepaired chromosome damage induced by charged-particle irradiations at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) ion microbeam facility. Among the cytogenetic biomarkers to detect and estimate radiation-induced DNA damage in radiobiology, chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei were chosen. The characteristics of the PTB irradiation system required the design of a special in situ assay: specific irradiation dishes with a base made from a biofoil 25-µm thick and only 3000-4000 cells seeded and irradiated per dish. This method was developed on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, one of the most commonly used cell lines in radiobiology in vitro experiments. The present protocol allows the simultaneous scoring of chromosome aberrations and micronuclei on the same irradiated dish. Thanks to its versatility, this method could also be extended to other radiobiological applications besides the single-ion microbeam irradiations.

  19. 'BioQuaRT' project: design of a novel in situ protocol for the simultaneous visualisation of chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei after irradiation at microbeam facilities.

    PubMed

    Patrono, C; Monteiro Gil, O; Giesen, U; Langner, F; Pinto, M; Rabus, H; Testa, A

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the 'BioQuaRT' (Biologically weighted Quantities in RadioTherapy) project is to develop measurement techniques for characterising charged particle track structure on different length scales, and to correlate at the cellular level the track structure properties with the biological effects of radiation. This multi-scale approach will allow characterisation of the radiation qualities used in radiotherapy and the related biological effects. Charged-particle microbeam facilities were chosen as the platforms for all radiobiology experiments in the 'BioQuaRT' project, because they allow targeting single cells (or compartments of a cell) with a predefined number of ionising particles and correlating the cell-by-cell induced damage with type and energy of the radiation and with the number of ions per cell. Within this project, a novel in situ protocol was developed for the analysis of the misrepaired and/or unrepaired chromosome damage induced by charged-particle irradiations at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) ion microbeam facility. Among the cytogenetic biomarkers to detect and estimate radiation-induced DNA damage in radiobiology, chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei were chosen. The characteristics of the PTB irradiation system required the design of a special in situ assay: specific irradiation dishes with a base made from a biofoil 25-µm thick and only 3000-4000 cells seeded and irradiated per dish. This method was developed on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, one of the most commonly used cell lines in radiobiology in vitro experiments. The present protocol allows the simultaneous scoring of chromosome aberrations and micronuclei on the same irradiated dish. Thanks to its versatility, this method could also be extended to other radiobiological applications besides the single-ion microbeam irradiations. PMID:25877532

  20. Josephine Baker: psychoanalysis and the colonial fetish.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Anne Anlin

    2006-01-01

    This paper traces an intricate path connecting racial fantasy, aesthetic judgment, and the larger cultural problem of inter-subjective recognition. In particular, the author examines the theme of fetishism, both sexual and racial, in a Western historical, colonial context, in order to unravel a set of disturbances that cohere around the racial fetish then and now. Taking the figure of an entertainment icon of the 1920s, Josephine Baker, as a case study, the author shows how the imagination of the colonizing white male was both articulated and disrupted by Baker as a ready-made representation of the cultural, racial, and sexual other. PMID:16482962

  1. 21 CFR 184.1983 - Bakers yeast extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bakers yeast extract. 184.1983 Section 184.1983... GRAS § 184.1983 Bakers yeast extract. (a) Bakers yeast extract is the food ingredient resulting from concentration of the solubles of mechanically ruptured cells of a selected strain of yeast,...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1983 - Bakers yeast extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bakers yeast extract. 184.1983 Section 184.1983... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1983 Bakers yeast extract. (a) Bakers yeast extract... a selected strain of yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It may be concentrated or dried. (b)...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1983 - Bakers yeast extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bakers yeast extract. 184.1983 Section 184.1983... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1983 Bakers yeast extract. (a) Bakers yeast extract... a selected strain of yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It may be concentrated or dried. (b)...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1983 - Bakers yeast extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bakers yeast extract. 184.1983 Section 184.1983... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1983 Bakers yeast extract. (a) Bakers yeast extract... a selected strain of yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It may be concentrated or dried. (b)...

  5. Monkey Baker in bio-pack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    A squirrel monkey, Baker, in bio-pack couch being readied for Jupiter (AM-18 flight). Jupiter, AM-18 mission, also carried an American-born rhesus monkey, Able into suborbit. The flight was successful and both monkeys were recovered in good condition. AM-18 was launched on May 28, 1959.

  6. Ella Baker: A Leader Behind the Scenes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dallard, Shyrlee

    This book examines the life of Ella Baker, the civil rights worker who was a key figure in the formation of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), and other civil rights organizations. The biography, which is aimed at young readers aged 10 and older, recounts the history of the…

  7. Saccharomyces cerevisiae osteomyelitis in an immunocompetent baker.

    PubMed

    Seng, Piseth; Cerlier, Alexandre; Cassagne, Carole; Coulange, Mathieu; Legré, Regis; Stein, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Invasive infection caused by Saccharomyces cerevisiae is rare. We report the first case of osteomyelitis caused by S. cerevisiae (baker's yeast) in a post-traumatic patient. The clinical outcome was favorable after surgical debridement, prolonged antifungal treatment and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. PMID:27347482

  8. Factors which affect the frequency of sporulation and tetrad formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae baker's yeasts.

    PubMed

    Codón, A C; Gasent-Ramírez, J M; Benítez, T

    1995-02-01

    To clarify the role that respiration, the mitochondrial genome, and interactions of mitochondria and nucleus play on sporulation and to improve the sporogenic ability of several baker's yeasts, an investigation of the effects of different media and culture conditions on baker's yeast sporulation was undertaken. When standard protocols were followed, the sporulation frequency varied between 20 and 60% and the frequency of four-spore asci varied between 1 and 6%. Different presporulation and sporulation media, the use of solid versus liquid media, and incubation at 22 versus 30 degrees C were checked, and the cells were collected from presporulation media in either exponential or stationary phase. Best results, yielding sporulation and four-spore ascus formation frequencies up to 97 and 60%, respectively, were obtained by collection of the cells in exponential phase from liquid presporulation medium with 10% glucose and transfer of them to sporulation medium with 0.5% potassium acetate at 22 degrees C. Under these conditions, the most important factor was the growth phase (exponential versus stationary) at which cells from presporulation medium were collected. Changes in sporulation frequencies were also measured after transfer of mitochondria from different sources to baker's yeasts. When mitochondria from laboratory, baker's, and wine yeasts were transferred to baker's and laboratory petite strains, sporulation and four-spore ascus formation frequencies dropped dramatically either to no sporulation at all or to less than 50% in both parameters. This transfer also resulted in an increase in the frequency of petite mutant formation but yielded similar growth and respiration rates in glycerol.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Water-quality effects on Baker Lake of recent volcanic activity at Mount Baker, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bortleson, Gilbert Carl; Wilson, Reed T.; Foxworthy, B.L.

    1976-01-01

    Increased volcanic activity on Mount Baker, which began in March 1975, represents the greatest known activity of a Cascade Range volcano since eruptions at Lassen Peak, Calif. during 1914-17. Emissions of dust and increased emanations of steam, other gases, and heat from the Sherman Crater area of the mountain focused attention on the possibility of hazardous events, including lava flows, pyroclastic eruptions, avalanches, and mudflows. However, the greatest undesirable natural results that have been observed after one year of the increased activity are an increase in local atmospheric pollution and a decrease in the quality of some local water resources, including Baker Lake. Baker Lake, a hydropower reservoir behind Upper Baker Dam, supports a valuable fishery resource and also is used for recreation. The lake's feedwater is from Baker River and many smaller streams, some of which, like Boulder Creek, drain parts of Mount Baker. Boulder Creek receives water from Sherman Crater, and its channel is a likely route for avalanches or mudflows that might originate in the crater area. Boulder Creek drains only about 5 percent of the total drainage area of Baker Lake, but during 1975 carried sizeable but variable loads of acid and dissolved minerals into the lake. Sulfurous gases and the fumarole dust from Sherman Crater are the main sources for these materials, which are brought into upper Boulder Creek by meltwater from the crater. In September 1973, before the increased volcanic activity, Boulder Creek near the lake had a pH of 6.0-6.6; after the increase the pH ranged as low as about 3.5. Most nearby streams had pH values near 7. On April 29, in Boulder Creek the dissolved sulfate concentration was 6 to 29 times greater than in nearby creeks or in Baker River; total iron was 18-53 times greater than in nearby creeks; and other major dissolved constituents generally 2 to 7 times greater than in the other streams. The short-term effects on Baker Lake of the acidic

  10. 21 CFR 172.381 - Vitamin D2 bakers yeast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vitamin D2 bakers yeast. 172.381 Section 172.381... Additives § 172.381 Vitamin D2 bakers yeast. Vitamin D2 bakers yeast may be used safely in foods as a source of vitamin D2 and as a leavening agent in accordance with the following prescribed conditions:...

  11. 21 CFR 172.381 - Vitamin D2 bakers yeast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vitamin D2 bakers yeast. 172.381 Section 172.381... CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.381 Vitamin D2 bakers yeast. Vitamin D2 bakers yeast may be used safely in foods as a source of vitamin D2 and as a leavening agent in accordance...

  12. A Convenient and Efficient Protocol for the Synthesis of HBIW Catalyzed by Silica Nanoparticles under Ultrasound Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabian, Ramak; Ramazani, Ali; Mohtat, Bita; Azizkhani, Vahid; Joo, Sang Woo; Rouhani, Morteza

    2014-10-01

    2,4,6,8,10,12-Hexabenzyl-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaazatetracyclo[5.5.0.05,9.03,11]dodecane (hexabenzylhexaazaisowurtzitane, HBIW) has been synthesized by the reaction of benzylamine and glyoxal (40% aqueous solution) in acetonitrile as a solvent catalyzed by silica nanoparticles (SiO2 NPs, ca. 42 nm) under ultrasound irradiation. The effects of solvent, catalyst, and ultrasonic power are discussed. With optimized reaction conditions, HBIW was synthesized under the influence of ultrasound irradiation. Compared with conventional methods, the remarkable advantages of this method are the simple experimental procedure, shorter reaction time, and high product yield.

  13. Obituary: James Gilbert Baker, 1914-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Neal Kenton

    2005-12-01

    Dr. James Gilbert Baker, renowned astronomer and optical physicist, died 29 June 2005 at his home in Bedford, New Hampshire at the age of 90. Although his scientific interest was astronomy, his extraordinary ability in optical design led to the creation of hundreds of optical systems that supported astronomy, aerial reconnaissance, instant photography (Polaroid SX70 camera), and the US space programs. He was the recipient of numerous awards for his creative work. He was born in Louisville, Kentucky, on 11 November 1914, the fourth child of Jesse B. Baker and Hattie M. Stallard. After graduating from Louisville DuPont Manual High, he went on to attend the University of Louisville majoring in Mathematics. He became very close to an Astronomy Professor, Dr. Moore, and many times used his telescopes to do nightly observations. While at the university, he built mirrors for his own telescopes and helped form the Louisville Astronomical Society in 1933. At the University of Louisville, he also met his future wife, Elizabeth Katherine Breitenstein of Jefferson County, Kentucky. He received his BA in 1935 at the height of the Depression. He began his graduate work in astronomy at the Harvard College Observatory. After his MA (1936), he was appointed a Junior Fellow (1937-1943) in the Prestigious Harvard Society of Fellows. He received his PhD in 1942 from Harvard in rather an unusual fashion, which is worth retelling. During an Astronomy Department dinner, Dr. Harlow Shapley (the director) asked him to give a talk. According to the "Courier-Journal Magazine", "Dr. Shapley stood up and proclaimed an on-the-spot departmental meeting and asked for a vote on recommending Baker for a Ph.D. on the basis of the 'oral exam' he had just finished. The vote was unanimous." It was at Harvard College Observatory during this first stage of his career that he collaborated with Donald H. Menzel, Lawrence H. Aller, and George H. Shortley on a landmark set of papers on the physical processes

  14. Obituary: James Gilbert Baker, 1914-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Neal Kenton

    2005-12-01

    Dr. James Gilbert Baker, renowned astronomer and optical physicist, died 29 June 2005 at his home in Bedford, New Hampshire at the age of 90. Although his scientific interest was astronomy, his extraordinary ability in optical design led to the creation of hundreds of optical systems that supported astronomy, aerial reconnaissance, instant photography (Polaroid SX70 camera), and the US space programs. He was the recipient of numerous awards for his creative work. He was born in Louisville, Kentucky, on 11 November 1914, the fourth child of Jesse B. Baker and Hattie M. Stallard. After graduating from Louisville DuPont Manual High, he went on to attend the University of Louisville majoring in Mathematics. He became very close to an Astronomy Professor, Dr. Moore, and many times used his telescopes to do nightly observations. While at the university, he built mirrors for his own telescopes and helped form the Louisville Astronomical Society in 1933. At the University of Louisville, he also met his future wife, Elizabeth Katherine Breitenstein of Jefferson County, Kentucky. He received his BA in 1935 at the height of the Depression. He began his graduate work in astronomy at the Harvard College Observatory. After his MA (1936), he was appointed a Junior Fellow (1937-1943) in the Prestigious Harvard Society of Fellows. He received his PhD in 1942 from Harvard in rather an unusual fashion, which is worth retelling. During an Astronomy Department dinner, Dr. Harlow Shapley (the director) asked him to give a talk. According to the "Courier-Journal Magazine", "Dr. Shapley stood up and proclaimed an on-the-spot departmental meeting and asked for a vote on recommending Baker for a Ph.D. on the basis of the 'oral exam' he had just finished. The vote was unanimous." It was at Harvard College Observatory during this first stage of his career that he collaborated with Donald H. Menzel, Lawrence H. Aller, and George H. Shortley on a landmark set of papers on the physical processes

  15. Hypertonic Dextrose Injection for The Treatment of a Baker's Cyst.

    PubMed

    Yavuz, Ferdi; Kibar, Sibel; Balaban, Birol

    2016-02-01

    We present extremely rare and interesting case of a Baker's cyst treated with hypertonic dextrose injection. A 54-year-old female patient had a Baker's cyst which was diagnosed by an ultrasonography. After the failure of the two-weekly conservative treatment, we injected hypertonic dextrose (25%) into her right knee joint for the treatment of a Baker's cyst. Two weeks after the injection, the patient reported improvement in posterior knee pain, and an US showed a resolution of the posterior knee cyst. Certainly hypertonic dextrose injection for the treatment of a Baker's cyst appears to be a reasonable treatment option. Further studies are needed in order to elucidate the efficacy of hypertonic dextrose injection in the treatment of Baker's cysts.

  16. Celebrating the Fiftieth Baker Gordon Symposium on Cosmetic Surgery: The Legacy of Thomas J. Baker, M.D.

    PubMed

    Stuzin, James M

    2016-02-01

    The Baker Gordon Symposium on Cosmetic Surgery celebrates its fiftieth year. A review of its history mirrors the evolution of aesthetic surgery in terms of advancements in techniques, and the acceptance of cosmetic surgery as a credible subspecialty of plastic surgery. Beginning in 1967, the Baker Gordon Symposium was the first live surgery symposium that focused on aesthetic surgery, and set a precedent for aesthetic surgery education over the ensuing decades. Historically, the pioneers in aesthetic techniques first presented their innovations at the Baker Gordon Symposium, helping to educate and train their peers to perform cosmetic procedures. The legacy of Thomas Baker is intertwined with the history of the Baker Gordon Symposium, both in terms of his contributions to plastic surgery education, and to the acceptance of the subspecialty of aesthetic surgery.

  17. Alanine/EPR dosimetry applied to the verification of a total body irradiation protocol and treatment planning dose calculation using a humanoid phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Schaeken, B.; Lelie, S.; Meijnders, P.; Van den Weyngaert, D.; Janssens, H.; Verellen, D.

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: To avoid complications in total body irradiation (TBI), it is important to achieve a homogeneous dose distribution throughout the body and to deliver a correct dose to the lung which is an organ at risk. The purpose of this work was to validate the TBI dose protocol and to check the accuracy of the 3D dose calculations of the treatment planning system. Methods: Dosimetry based on alanine/electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) was used to measure dose at numerous locations within an anthropomorphic phantom (Alderson) that was irradiated in a clinical TBI beam setup. The alanine EPR dosimetry system was calibrated against water calorimetry in a Co-60 beam and the absorbed dose was determined by the use of ''dose-normalized amplitudes'' A{sub D}. The dose rate of the TBI beam was checked against a Farmer ionization chamber. The phantom measurements were compared to 3D dose calculations from a treatment planning system (Pinnacle) modeled for standard dose calculations. Results: Alanine dosimetry allowed accurate measurements which were in accordance with ionization chamber measurements. The combined relative standard measurement uncertainty in the Alderson phantom was U{sub r}(A{sub D})=0.6%. The humanoid phantom was irradiated to a reference dose of 10 Gy, limiting the lung dose to 7.5 Gy. The ratio of the average measured dose midplane in the craniocaudal direction to the reference dose was 1.001 with a spread of {+-}4.7% (1 sd). Dose to the lung was measured in 26 locations and found, in average, 1.8% lower than expected. Lung dose was homogeneous in the ventral-dorsal direction but a dose gradient of 0.10 Gy cm{sup -1} was observed in the craniocaudal direction midline within the lung lobe. 3D dose calculations (Pinnacle) were found, in average, 2% lower compared to dose measurements on the body axis and 3% lower for the lungs. Conclusions: The alanine/EPR dosimetry system allowed accurate dose measurements which enabled the authors to validate their TBI

  18. Occupational asthma: a case of Baker's asthma.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Thomas R; Sheffer, Albert L

    2004-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most prominent respiratory diseases worldwide. It is defined by airflow limitation and/or airway hyperresponsiveness and can be exacerbated by a number of environmental allergens. When allergic asthma exacerbations are attributed to stimuli in a particular work environment, then occupational asthma must be considered. Incidence estimates vary, but in 1999 the Surveillance of Work-Related and Occupational Respiratory Disease in the United Kingdom estimated 4293 incident cases of occupational respiratory disease, an increase of 1427 cases over the previous year. Occupational asthma represented 26% of these cases. Baker's asthma is one of the most frequently reported types of occupational asthma in several countries. Diagniostic steps include thorough history, careful exam, and demonstration of functional reversible airflow obstruction. Treatment modalities used for occupational asthma are similar to those used in the management of other forms of asthma, with particular attention to reducing the level of exposure to the inciting allergen.

  19. STS-71 Payload Commander Dr. Ellen S. Baker suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    STS-71 Payload Commander Dr. Ellen S. Baker is assisted by a suit technician as she dons her launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building. Her third spaceflight will be an historic one for Baker, a medical doctor, as she oversees the series of scientific investigations that will be conducted during the first docking of the U.S. Space Shuttle to the Russian Space Station Mir. Baker and six fellow crew members -- four Americans and two Russian cosmonauts -- will shortly depart for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff during a 10- minute launch window opening at 3:32 p.m. EDT.

  20. Baker-Akhiezer functions and generalised Macdonald-Mehta integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigin, M. V.; Hallnäs, M. A.; Veselov, A. P.

    2013-05-01

    For the rational Baker-Akhiezer functions associated with special arrangements of hyperplanes with multiplicities we establish an integral identity, which may be viewed as a generalisation of the self-duality property of the usual Gaussian function with respect to the Fourier transformation. We show that the value of properly normalised Baker-Akhiezer function at the origin can be given by an integral of Macdonald-Mehta type and explicitly compute these integrals for all known Baker-Akhiezer arrangements. We use the Dotsenko-Fateev integrals to extend this calculation to all deformed root systems, related to the non-exceptional basic classical Lie superalgebras.

  1. Leavening ability of baker's yeast exposed to hyperosmotic media.

    PubMed

    Hirasawa, R; Yokoigawa, K

    2001-01-15

    To develop a simple and rapid method for enhancing the leavening ability of baker's yeast, we examined the fermentation ability of baker's yeast exposed to hyperosmotic media. When baker's yeast cells were incubated at 25 degrees C for 1 h in a hyperosmotic medium containing 0.5% yeast extract, 0.5% peptone and 20% sucrose, the cells showed a higher fermentation ability in the subsequent fermentation test than those untreated. The increased ratios were from 40 to 60% depending on the strains used. Glucose and fructose showed a similar effect to that of sucrose, but sorbitol was less effective. A high correlation between the intracellular glycerol content and fermentation ability after the osmotic treatment suggested that glycerol accumulated during the hyperosmotic treatment was used in the subsequent fermentation as a substrate, lessened the lag time, and consequently enhanced the fermentation ability. Various baker's yeasts also showed a high leavening ability in dough after the hyperosmotic treatment.

  2. Baker's Cyst with Intramuscular Extension into Vastus Medialis Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Wan; Suh, Jeung Tak; Son, Seung Min; Moon, Tae Yong; Lee, In Sook; Choi, Kyung Un

    2012-01-01

    Baker's cysts are one of the most common cystic lesions around the knee joint and mainly caused by fluid distension of the gastrocnemius-semimembranous bursa that is situated along the medial side of the popliteal fossa. Typically, a Baker's cyst extends along the intermuscular planes around the knee joint and may enlarge any direction. However, it is mostly located in the inferomedial or superficial layers of the knee joint and less commonly extends laterally or proximally. Expansion of the cyst tends to respect the intermuscular planes, and Baker's cysts along the intramuscular route have been rarely reported. Thus, we report a case of Baker's cyst with intramuscular extension into the vastus medialis muscle. PMID:23269965

  3. Deteriorative kinetics of baker's yeast during thermal drying

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X.D.

    1999-10-01

    An attempt was made to determine the kinetic model, which describes the degradation of activity and viability during thermal drying of baker's yeast. The pellets of baker's yeast were dried under a variety of conditions using a laboratory scale VFB dryer to generate a broad database. The data used in determining the parameters for the kinetic model, such as the average moisture content, temperature as well as the relative activity and viability of baker's yeast were measured under dynamic procedure. The extensive data from the experiments under a variety of conditions enable the model to predict the quality retention of baker's yeast in a rather wide range during thermal drying. The interpretation procedure of raw data was described in detail.

  4. The mettle of moral fundamentalism: a reply to Robert Baker.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, Tom L

    1998-12-01

    This article is a reply to Robert Baker's attempt to rebut moral fundamentalism, while grounding international bioethics in a form of contractarianism. Baker is mistaken in several of his interpretations of the alleged moral fundamentalism and findings of the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments. He also misunderstands moral fundamentalism generally and wrongly categorizes it as morally bankrupt. His negotiated contract model is, in the final analysis, itself a form of the moral fundamentalism he declares bankrupt.

  5. On a three-dimensional implementation of the baker's transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrière, Philippe

    2007-11-01

    A three-dimensional, steady flow configuration intended to mimic the baker's map is studied by means of numerical simulation. The Poincaré sections computed from a finite element solution of the velocity field show that the behavior is dominated by chaotic advection. The value obtained for the Lyapunov exponent is very close to the theoretical value of ln2 predicted by the baker's map.

  6. Inventions on baker's yeast strains and specialty ingredients.

    PubMed

    Gélinas, Pierre

    2009-06-01

    Baker's yeast is one of the oldest food microbial starters. Between 1927 and 2008, 165 inventions on more than 337 baker's yeast strains were patented. The first generation of patented yeast strains claimed improved biomass yield at the yeast plant, higher gassing power in dough or better survival to drying to prepare active dry baker's yeast. Especially between 1980 and 1995, a major interest was given to strains for multiple bakery applications such as dough with variable sugar content and stored at refrigeration (cold) or freezing temperatures. During the same period, genetically engineered yeast strains became very popular but did not find applications in the baking industry. Since year 2000, patented baker's yeast strains claimed aroma, anti-moulding or nutritive properties to better meet the needs of the baking industry. In addition to patents on yeast strains, 47 patents were issued on baker's yeast specialty ingredients for niche markets. This review shows that patents on baker's yeast with improved characteristics such as aromatic or nutritive properties have regularly been issued since the 1920's. Overall, it also confirms recent interest for a very wide range of tailored-made yeast-based ingredients for bakery applications. PMID:20653532

  7. Production of baker's yeast using date juice.

    PubMed

    Beiroti, A; Hosseini, S N

    2007-07-01

    Baker's yeast is an important additive among the products which improves bread quality and for present time is being produced in different countries by batch, fed batch or continuous cultures. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is used in fermentation of starch in dough, giving a favourable taste and produces a variety of vitamins and proteins. The main ingredient in yeast production is carbon source such as beet molasses, cane molasses, and so on. Since beet molasses has other major function as in high yield alcohol production and also due to the bioenvironmental issues and related wastewater treatment, the use of other carbohydrate sources may be considered. One of these carbohydrate sources is date which is wasted a great deal annually in this country (Iran) . In this study, the capability of date to act as a suitable carbon sources was investigated. The waste date turned into juice and consequently production and growth rate of Sacchromyces cervisiae were studied with this juice. A maximum possible yield of 50% was obtained by the optimum medium (P3), at pH 3.4, 30 degrees C, 1.4 vvm aeration rate and agitation of 500 r/min. PMID:17822056

  8. 75 FR 12167 - Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act; Public Accommodation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-15

    ... COMMISSION 16 CFR Part 1450 Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act; Public Accommodation AGENCY... ``public accommodation'' as used in the Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act. DATES: Written...; blittle@cpsc.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: A. Background The Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa...

  9. Baker: Apprenticeship Course Outline. Apprenticeship and Industry Training. 2412

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Advanced Education and Technology, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The graduate of the Baker apprenticeship program is a certified journeyperson who will be able to: (1) prepare and bake all types of high quality yeast raised products in commercial quantities; (2) produce and decorate various types of cakes, cookies and pastries commonly available in commercial bakeries; (3) use efficiently and safely all hand…

  10. 61. VIEW FROM NORTHEAST OF LAUNDER FROM BAKER COOLER TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. VIEW FROM NORTHEAST OF LAUNDER FROM BAKER COOLER TO MILLING. LAUNDER PIERCES THE SOUTH FOUNDATION WALL BETWEEN MILL SOLUTION TANKS No. 1 AND No. 2. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  11. 21 CFR 172.898 - Bakers yeast glycan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bakers yeast glycan. 172.898 Section 172.898 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives §...

  12. 21 CFR 172.898 - Bakers yeast glycan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bakers yeast glycan. 172.898 Section 172.898 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN...

  13. Stego Optical Encryption Based on Chaotic Baker's Map Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Iqtadar; Gondal, Muhammad Asif

    2014-06-01

    In this article, an optical image encryption algorithm based on chaotic baker's map is presented. The stego-image is encrypted with the help of double random phase encoding algorithm and then produced disorder with the help of chaotic transformation. Security test shows that the reading of proposed algorithm is very close to the optimal values.

  14. New Saccharomyces cerevisiae baker's yeast displaying enhanced resistance to freezing.

    PubMed

    Codón, Antonio C; Rincón, Ana M; Moreno-Mateos, Miguel A; Delgado-Jarana, Jesús; Rey, Manuel; Limón, Carmen; Rosado, Ivan V; Cubero, Beatriz; Peñate, Xenia; Castrejón, Francisco; Benítez, Tahía

    2003-01-15

    Three procedures were used to obtain new Saccharomyces cerevisiae baker's yeasts with increased storage stability at -20, 4, 22, and 30 degrees C. The first used mitochondria from highly ethanol-tolerant wine yeast, which were transferred to baker's strains. Viability of the heteroplasmons was improved shortly after freezing. However, after prolonged storage, viability dramatically decreased and was accompanied by an increase in the frequency of respiratory-deficient (petite) mutant formation. This indicated that mitochondria were not stable and were incompatible with the nucleus. The strains tested regained their original resistance to freezing after recovering their own mitochondria. The second procedure used hybrid formation after protoplast fusion and isolation on selective media of fusants from baker's yeast meiotic products resistant to parafluorphenylalanine and cycloheximide, respectively. No hybrids were obtained when using the parentals, probably due to the high ploidy of the baker's strains. Hybrids obtained from nonisogenic strains manifested in all cases a resistance to freezing intermediate between those of their parental strains. Hybrids from crosses between meiotic products of the same strain were always more sensitive than their parentals. The third method was used to develop baker's yeast mutants resistant to 2-deoxy-d-glucose (DOG) and deregulated for maltose and sucrose metabolism. Mutant DOG21 displayed a slight increase in trehalose content and viability both in frozen doughs and during storage at 4 and 22 degrees C. This mutant also displayed a capacity to ferment, under laboratory conditions, both lean and sweet fresh and frozen doughs. For industrial uses, fermented lean and sweet bakery products, both from fresh and frozen doughs obtained with mutant DOG21, were of better quality with regard to volume, texture, and organoleptic properties than those produced by the wild type.

  15. Reinstatement of the genus Colopalpus Pritchard and Baker (1958) and re-description of Colopalpus matthyssei Pritchard and Baker (1958), the type species of this genus (Acari, Tenuipalpidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pritchard and Baker (1958) erected the genus Colopalpus with Tenuipalpus matthyssei (Pritchard and Baker) a species described from Laguna, The Philippines, as the type species. Meyer (1979) treated the genus as a junior synonym of Tenuipalpus Donnadieu. In this paper, we re-describe the female, male...

  16. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Baker Quadrangle, Oregon and Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardi, M L; Robins, J W

    1982-05-01

    The Baker Quadrangle, Oregon, and Idaho, was evaluated to identify areas containing geologic environments favorable for uranium deposits. The criteria used was developed for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. Stream-sediment reconnaissance and detailed surface studies were augmented by subsurface-data interpretion and an aerial radiometric survey. Results indicate that lower Pliocene sedimentary rocks in the Lower Powder River Valley-Virtue Flat basin are favorable characteristics, they remain unevaluated because of lack of subsurface data. Tertiary sandstones, possibly present at depth in the Long and Cascade Valleys, also remain unevaluated due to lack of subsurface data. All remaining environments in the Baker Quadrangle are unfavorable for all classes of uranium deposits.

  17. Ruptured Baker's cyst with compartment syndrome: an extremely unusual complication.

    PubMed

    Hamlet, Mark; Galanopoulos, Ilias; Mahale, Avinash; Ashwood, Neil

    2012-12-20

    A 69-year-old man presented with sudden onset of pain with acute tense swelling of his left leg. Initially he was treated empirically with antibiotics for cellulitis while the possibility of deep vein thrombosis was ruled out. His symptoms gradually worsened with progressive distal neurological deficit and increasing pain. Further investigations suggested that he had a ruptured Baker's cyst in the calf with development of compartment syndrome.

  18. Remodeling Amyloid Fibers: Baker's Yeast Shows Us the Way.

    PubMed

    Asp, Eva; Proschitsky, Ming; Krishnan, Rajaraman

    2015-08-20

    Proteopathies are a large and diverse group of human diseases that are caused by protein misfolding. Well-known examples of proteopathies are Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, which are both linked to amyloid fibril formation. In this issue of Chemistry & Biology, Castellano et al. (2015) describe the way to harness the power of a protein from baker's yeast, Hsp104, to disaggregate the fibrils. PMID:26295834

  19. Coupled modified baker's transformations for the Ising model.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, H

    1999-12-01

    An invertible coupled map lattice is proposed for the Ising model. Each elemental map is a modified baker's transformation, which is a two-dimensional map of X and Y. The time evolution of the spin variable is memorized in the binary representation of the Y variable. The temporal entropy and time correlation of the spin variable are calculated from the snapshot configuration of the Y variables.

  20. Diffraction from Embedded Reflectors in Li-Baker HFGW Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, R. C.

    Recent experimentation and speculation about the design of a sensitive detector for high-frequency gravitational waves (HFGW) has centered around a number of principles. Those detectors that have been built so far have not yet realized sensitivity sufficient to investigate the cosmic high-frequency relic gravitational wave background, analogous to the cosmic microwave background. A proposal for a more sensitive HFGW detector due to Baker and based upon a principle first enunciated by Li and co-workers has become known as the Li-Baker detector. Its possible design details are currently the subject of scientific debate. One significant aspect concerns the design of the reflector(s) needed to direct the photons produced by the incident HFGW towards a set of microwave receivers. If the reflector(s) is(are) placed within a Gaussian microwave beam, then they become sources of diffraction that can potentially overpower the required signal because the diffracted power will not be distinguishable from photons produced by interaction with the HFGW. This means that diffraction is potentially a source of shot noise at the microwave receivers and, if extreme, may also swamp the receivers. In this paper some estimates of this diffraction are obtained and the design of the reflector(s) is discussed. The Li-Baker detector must be designed in such a way that the diffraction reaching the microwave receivers is reduced as far as possible by employing a suitable geometry and highly absorbent walls for the interaction volume.

  1. Construction of a lactose-assimilating strain of baker's yeast.

    PubMed

    Adam, A C; Prieto, J A; Rubio-Texeira, M; Polaina, J

    1999-09-30

    A recombinant strain of baker's yeast has been constructed which can assimilate lactose efficiently. This strain has been designed to allow its propagation in whey, the byproduct resulting from cheese-making. The ability to metabolize lactose is conferred by the functional expression of two genes from Kluyveromyces lactis, LAC12 and LAC4, which encode a lactose permease and a beta-galactosidase, respectively. To make the recombinant strain more acceptable for its use in bread-making, the genetic transformation of the host baker's yeast was carried out with linear fragments of DNA of defined sequence, carrying as the only heterologous material the coding regions of the two K. lactis genes. Growth of the new strain on cheese whey affected neither the quality of bread nor the yeast gassing power. The significance of the newly developed strain is two-fold: it affords a cheap alternative to the procedure generally used for the propagation of baker's yeast, and it offers a profitable use for cheese whey.

  2. Microfluidic baker's transformation device for three-dimensional rapid mixing.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Takao; Omoto, Yusuke; Osato, Keiko; Kaji, Noritada; Suzuki, Norikazu; Naito, Toyohiro; Watanabe, Masaki; Okamoto, Yukihiro; Tokeshi, Manabu; Shamoto, Eiji; Baba, Yoshinobu

    2011-10-01

    We developed a new passive-type micromixer based on the baker's transformation and realized a fast mixing of a protein solution, which has lower diffusion constant. The baker's transformation is an ideal mixing method, but there is no report on the microfluidic baker's transformation (MBT), since it is required to fabricate the complicated three-dimensional (3D) structure to realize the MBT device. In this note, we successfully fabricate the MBT device by using precision diamond cutting of an oxygen-free copper substrate for the mould fabrication and PDMS replication. The MBT device with 10.4 mm mixing length enables us to achieve complete mixing of a FITC solution (D = 2.6 × 10(-10) m(2) s(-1)) within 51 ms and an IgG solution (D = 4.6 × 10(-11) m(2) s(-1)) within 306 ms. Its mixing speed is 70-fold higher for a FITC solution and 900-fold higher for an IgG solution than the mixing speed by the microchannel without MBT structures. The Péclet number to attain complete mixing in the MBT device is estimated to be 6.9 × 10(4).

  3. Monkey Baker at U.S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1958-01-01

    On May 28, 1958, Jupiter Intermediate Range Ballistic Missile provided by U.S. Army team in Huntsville, Alabama, launched a nose cone carrying Baker, a South American squirrel monkey and Able, an American-born rhesus monkey. Baker, pictured here and commonly known as 'Miss Baker', was later given a home at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center until her death on November 29, 1984. Able died in 1958. (Photo - Courtesy of Huntsville/Madison County Public Library)

  4. Latest Pleistocene and Holocene glacier fluctuations on Mount Baker, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, Gerald; Menounos, Brian; Ryane, Chanone; Riedel, Jon; Clague, John J.; Koch, Johannes; Clark, Douglas; Scott, Kevin; Davis, P. Thompson

    2012-08-01

    Glaciers on stratovolcanoes of the Pacific Northwest of North America offer opportunities for dating late Pleistocene and Holocene glacier advances because tephra and fossil wood are common in lateral moraines and in glacier forefields. We capitalize on this opportunity by examining the Holocene glacial record at Mount Baker, an active stratovolcano in northwest Washington. Earlier workers concluded that glaciers on Mount Baker during the early Holocene were more extensive than during the Little Ice Age and hypothesized that the explanation lay in unusual climatic or hypsometric effects peculiar to large volcanoes. We show that the main argument for an early Holocene glacier advance on Mount Baker, namely the absence of ca 10,000-year-old tephra on part of the south flank of the mountain, is incorrect. Moreover, a lake-sediment core indicates that a small cirque moraine previously thought be of early Holocene age is also likely older than the tephra and consequently of late Pleistocene age. Lateral and end moraines and wood mats ca 2 km downvalley of the present snout of Deming Glacier indicate that an advance during the Younger Dryas interval was little more extensive than the climactic Little Ice Age advance. Tephra and wood between tills in the left lateral moraine of Easton Glacier suggest that ice on Mount Baker was restricted in the early Holocene and that Neoglaciation began ca 6 ka. A series of progressively more extensive Neoglacial advances, dated to about 2.2, 1.6, 0.9, and 0.4 ka, are recorded by stacked tills in the right lateral moraine of Deming Glacier. Intervening retreats were long enough to allow establishment of forests on the moraine. Wood mats in moraines of Coleman and Easton glaciers indicate that Little Ice Age expansion began before 0.7 ka and was followed by retreat and a readvance ca 0.5 ka. Tree-ring and lichen data indicate glaciers on the south side of the mountain reached their maximum extents in the mid-1800s. The similarity between

  5. A defense of fundamental principles and human rights: a reply to Robert Baker.

    PubMed

    Macklin, Ruth

    1998-12-01

    This article seeks to rebut Robert Baker's contention that attempts to ground international bioethics in fundamental principles cannot withstand the challenges posed by multiculturalism and postmodernism. First, several corrections are provided of Baker's account of the conclusions reached by the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments. Second, a rebuttal is offered to Baker's claim that an unbridgeable moral gap exists between Western individualism and non-Western communalism. In conclusion, this article argues that Baker's "nonnegotiable primary goods" cannot do the work of "classical human rights" and that the latter framework is preferable from both a practical and a theoretical standpoint.

  6. On the equivalence between stochastic baker's maps and two-dimensional spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindgren, K.

    2010-05-01

    We show that there is a class of stochastic bakers transformations that is equivalent to the class of equilibrium solutions of two-dimensional spin systems with finite interaction. The construction is such that the equilibrium distribution of the spin lattice is identical to the invariant measure in the corresponding bakers transformation. We illustrate the equivalence by deriving two stochastic bakers maps representing the Ising model at a temperature above and below the critical temperature, respectively. A calculation of the invariant measure and the free energy in the baker system is then shown to be in agreement with analytic results of the two-dimensional Ising model.

  7. New Evidence for Holocene Glacier Fluctuations on Mt. Baker, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, P. T.; Osborn, G.; Menounos, B.; Ryane, C.; Clague, J.; Riedel, J.; Koch, J.; Scott, K.

    2005-12-01

    Ongoing research on Mt. Baker, an active Cascades stratovolcano, provides new constraints on the timing of Holocene glacier fluctuations. Previously mapped deposits on the southwest flank of Mt. Baker suggested to some that glacial advances during the early to mid- Holocene were more extensive than those during the Little Ice Age (LIA). This interpretation was based on the presence and absence of Mazama (ca. 6800 14C yr BP) and Mt. Baker set OP (ca. 5800 14C yr BP) tephras, and a scoria deposited at ca. 8,800 14C yr BP. Our work indicates a more complex distribution of the scoria than previously thought, as well as its presence on deposits reported to be scoria-free. In addition, many of the landforms previously mapped as moraines are bedrock or bedrock-cored ridges. At Easton Glacier, we identified two tills separated by an abrupt unconformity in the east lateral moraine about 20 m below the moraine crest. The unconformity is marked by (1) a deformed mat of peat and detrital wood fragments and trunks up to 0.5 m in diameter, (2) two tephra layers, and (3) a thick red silt below the two tephra layers that may be a weathering product of the tephra(s) or, alternatively, a third, weathered tephra. The two tephras have field characteristics identical to those of Mazama and Baker Set OP present on the south flank of the volcano. Two samples of detrital wood yielded ages of 5260 ± 70 and 5240 ± 70 14C yr BP, which we interpret to indicate (1) construction of a moraine prior to 6800 14C yr by a glacier with an extent similar to that of the LIA, (2) retreat of the glacier, stabilization of the moraine, and establishment of a forest, and (3) advance of the glacier at ca. 5200 14C yr, overriding the vegetated moraine surface. This advance is correlative with the well-known `Garibaldi Advance' in the southern Coast Mountains of British Columbia. At Coleman Glacier, an unconformity about 12 m below the crest of the southwest lateral moraine is marked by a laterally

  8. Foundations of invasion genetics: the Baker and Stebbins legacy.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Spencer C H

    2015-05-01

    Invasion genetics is a relatively new discipline that investigates patterns of genetic variation in populations of invasive species and their ecological and evolutionary consequences. Evolutionary biologists have a long-standing interest in colonizing species, owing to their short life cycles and widespread distributions, but not until publication of The Genetics of Colonizing Species (1965), edited by H.G. Baker and G.L. Stebbins, was a synthesis on the genetics and evolution of colonizers available. Here, I make the case that the Baker and Stebbins volume is the foundational document for invasion genetics, and in conjunction with the increased use of genetic markers and development of invasion biology, resulted in the birth of this new field over the past two decades. I consider the historical origins and legacy of the Baker and Stebbins volume and review some of the key issues that were addressed. I provide biographical sketches of the two editors, emphasizing their contrasting backgrounds and personalities. I review examples from my own work on plant invasions that are relevant to issues discussed by contributors to the volume. These include the following: determinants of invasion success, life history trade-offs, generalist vs. specialist strategies, general-purpose genotypes, adaptive phenotypic plasticity, mating systems and the influence of bottlenecks on genetic variation. I conclude by posing several key questions in invasion genetics and argue that one of the main challenges that the area faces is to integrate experimental field studies of the ecology and demography of populations with the largely descriptive approaches that have tended to dominate most research to date. PMID:25442107

  9. Removal of heavy metal from industrial effluents using Baker's yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferdous, Anika; Maisha, Nuzhat; Sultana, Nayer; Ahmed, Shoeb

    2016-07-01

    Bioremediation of wastewater containing heavy metals is one of the major challenges in environmental biotechnology. Heavy metals are not degraded and as a result they remain in the ecosystem, and pose serious health hazards as it comes in contact with human due to anthropogenic activities. Biological treatment with various microorganisms has been practiced widely in recent past, however, accessing and maintaining the microorganisms have always been a challenge. Microorganisms like Baker's yeast can be very promising biosorbents as they offer high surface to volume ratio, large availability, rapid kinetics of adsorption and desorption and low cost. The main aim of this study is to evaluate the applicability of the biosorption process using baker's yeast. Here we present an experimental investigation of biosorption of Chromium (Cr) from water using commercial Baker's Yeast. It was envisaged that yeast, dead or alive, would adsorb heavy metals, however, operating parameters could play vital roles in determining the removal efficiency. Parameters, such as incubation time, pH, amount of biosorbent and heavy metal concentration were varied to investigate the impacts of those parameters on removal efficiency. Rate of removal was found to be inversely proportional to the initial Cr (+6) concentrations but the removal rate per unit biomass was a weakly dependent on initial Cr(+6) concentrations. Biosorption process was found to be more efficient at lower pH and it exhibited lower removal with the increase in solution pH. The optimum incubation time was found to be between 6-8 hours and optimum pH for the metal ion solution was 2. The effluents produced in leather industries are the major source of chromium pollution in Bangladesh and this study has presented a very cost effective yet efficient heavy metal removal approach that can be adopted for such kind of wastewater.

  10. Fermentative capacity of baker's yeast exposed to hyperbaric stress.

    PubMed

    Campelo, Ana F; Belo, Isabel

    2004-08-01

    Baker's yeast suspensions were incubated at different pressures (from 1 bar to 6 bar) and different gases [air, O(2) and a mixture of 8% (v/v) CO(2), 21% O(2) and N(2)]. Raising the air pressure from 1 bar to 6 bar stimulated cell growth but had no effect on leavening ability or viability of the cells. A 50% reduction of the CO(2) produced in dough occurred with 6 bar O(2) which also stopped growth. The fermentative capacity of the cells was stimulated by the cells exposure to increased CO(2) partial pressure up to 0.48 bar.

  11. An algorithm for the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matone, Marco

    2015-05-01

    A simple algorithm, which exploits the associativity of the BCH formula, and that can be generalized by iteration, extends the remarkable simplification of the BakerCampbell-Hausdorff (BCH) formula, recently derived by Van-Brunt and Visser. We show that if [ X, Y] = uX + vY + cI, [ Y, Z] = wY + zZ + dI, and, consistently with the Jacobi identity, [ X, Z] = mX + nY + pZ + eI, then

  12. 51. VIEW OF CRUSHER ADDITION FROM EAST. SHOWS BAKER COOLER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. VIEW OF CRUSHER ADDITION FROM EAST. SHOWS BAKER COOLER AT LOWER LEFT, AND FOUNDATIONS FOR ROD MILL BETWEEN COOLER AND STEPHENS-ADAMSON INCLINED BUCKET ELEVATOR. THE BELT CONVEYOR TO RIGHT OF ELEVATOR FED ELEVATOR FROM ROD MILL. 100-TON ORE BIN AND DUST COLLECTOR IS BEHIND FRAMING BENT. NOTE CONVEYOR EMERGING FROM BOTTOM OF ORE BIN, THIS AND THE INCLINED ELEVATOR FED THE SYMONS SCREEN (MISSING). - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  13. STS-81 Commander Michael Baker at SLF for TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-81 Mission Commander Michael A. Baker arrives at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility in his NASA T-38 jet. He and five other crew members will participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for the planned Jan. 12 launch. STS-81 will be the fifth Shuttle-Mir docking. During the flight, Mission Specialist J.M. 'Jerry' Linenger will transfer to the Russian Mir Space Station for an extended stay, replacing astronaut John E. Blaha, who will return to Earth on the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis at the conclusion of the scheduled nine-day STS-81 mission.

  14. A generalization of the Baker-Hausdorff lemma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendaš, Istok P.; Popović, Duška B.

    2010-10-01

    Two operator identities involving a q-commutator, [A,B]≡AB+qBA, where A and B are two arbitrary (generally noncommuting) linear operators acting on the same linear space and q is a variable that commutes with these two operators, are formulated, proved and discussed. The first identity is a direct generalization of the Baker-Hausdorff lemma, whereas the second involves the time derivative of the exponential function of a time-dependant operator. It is indicated how these two identities can be used to good advantage to treat the Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation of the Dirac Hamiltonian for a particle in an external electromagnetic field.

  15. Enhanced leavening properties of baker's yeast by reducing sucrase activity in sweet dough.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cui-Ying; Lin, Xue; Feng, Bing; Liu, Xiao-Er; Bai, Xiao-Wen; Xu, Jia; Pi, Li; Xiao, Dong-Guang

    2016-07-01

    Leavening ability in sweet dough is required for the commercial applications of baker's yeast. This property depends on many factors, such as glycolytic activity, sucrase activity, and osmotolerance. This study explored the importance of sucrase level on the leavening ability of baker's yeast in sweet dough. Furthermore, the baker's yeast strains with varying sucrase activities were constructed by deleting SUC2, which encodes sucrase or replacing the SUC2 promoter with the VPS8/TEF1 promoter. The results verify that the sucrase activity negatively affects the leavening ability of baker's yeast strains under high-sucrose conditions. Based on a certain level of osmotolerance, sucrase level plays a significant role in the fermentation performance of baker's yeast, and appropriate sucrase activity is an important determinant for the leavening property of baker's yeast in sweet dough. Therefore, modification on sucrase activity is an effective method for improving the leavening properties of baker's yeast in sweet dough. This finding provides guidance for the breeding of industrial baker's yeast strains for sweet dough leavening. The transformants BS1 with deleted SUC2 genetic background provided decreased sucrase activity (a decrease of 39.3 %) and exhibited enhanced leavening property (an increase of 12.4 %). Such a strain could be useful for industrial applications.

  16. The Archives of the History of American Psychology: An Interview with David B. Baker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prieto, Loreto R.

    2001-01-01

    Presents an interview with David B. Baker, Director of the Archives of the History of American Psychology. Covers topics such as: Baker's interest in the history of psychology, his work at the Archives of the History of American Psychology, and recommendations for teachers when addressing history in non-history courses. (CMK)

  17. STS-43 Pilot Baker eats a sandwich on OV-104's forward flight deck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-43 Pilot Michael A. Baker, seated at the forward flight deck pilots station controls, eats a freefloating peanut butter and jelly sandwich while holding a carrot. Surrounding Baker on Atlantis', Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104's, flight deck are procedural checklists, control panels, and windows. A lemonade drink bag is velcroed to overhead panel O9.

  18. Vandals in the Stacks? A Response to Nicholson Baker's Assault on Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Richard J.

    The book "Double Fold" is an investigation into what its author Nicholas Baker, a novelist and essayist, terms as a deception of research libraries and their maintenance of books and newspapers, their paper collections. This book is a response to Baker's writings, based on the author's perspective as an archivist. The first chapter introduces…

  19. 75 FR 65261 - Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act; Public Accommodation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-22

    ... accommodations facility'' on March 15, 2010 (75 FR 12167). The proposed interpretive rule would interpret... COMMISSION 16 CFR Part 1450 Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act; Public Accommodation AGENCY... ``public accommodations facility'' as used in the Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act....

  20. 75 FR 21985 - Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act; Interpretation of Unblockable Drain

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-27

    ... a notice in the Federal Register (74 FR 54301) announcing that it would be conducting a public... COMMISSION 16 CFR Part 1450 Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act; Interpretation of Unblockable... ``unblockable drain'' as used in the Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act (``VGB Act''). DATES:...

  1. A Fabric of Half-Truths: A Response to Keith Baker on Structured English Immersion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meier, Nicholas

    1999-01-01

    A California teacher in a successful Structured English Program criticizes Keith Baker's November 1998 article's inaccuracies. Baker fails to recognize that gains of immersion and early-exit students in David Ramirez's study are not sustained over time. Also, he erroneously compares study results of defined and ill-defined programs. (MLH)

  2. Enhanced leavening properties of baker's yeast by reducing sucrase activity in sweet dough.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cui-Ying; Lin, Xue; Feng, Bing; Liu, Xiao-Er; Bai, Xiao-Wen; Xu, Jia; Pi, Li; Xiao, Dong-Guang

    2016-07-01

    Leavening ability in sweet dough is required for the commercial applications of baker's yeast. This property depends on many factors, such as glycolytic activity, sucrase activity, and osmotolerance. This study explored the importance of sucrase level on the leavening ability of baker's yeast in sweet dough. Furthermore, the baker's yeast strains with varying sucrase activities were constructed by deleting SUC2, which encodes sucrase or replacing the SUC2 promoter with the VPS8/TEF1 promoter. The results verify that the sucrase activity negatively affects the leavening ability of baker's yeast strains under high-sucrose conditions. Based on a certain level of osmotolerance, sucrase level plays a significant role in the fermentation performance of baker's yeast, and appropriate sucrase activity is an important determinant for the leavening property of baker's yeast in sweet dough. Therefore, modification on sucrase activity is an effective method for improving the leavening properties of baker's yeast in sweet dough. This finding provides guidance for the breeding of industrial baker's yeast strains for sweet dough leavening. The transformants BS1 with deleted SUC2 genetic background provided decreased sucrase activity (a decrease of 39.3 %) and exhibited enhanced leavening property (an increase of 12.4 %). Such a strain could be useful for industrial applications. PMID:27041690

  3. 75 FR 24973 - United States v. Baker Hughes Inc., et al.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-06

    ... Antitrust Division United States v. Baker Hughes Inc., et al. Notice is hereby given pursuant to the... Stipulation and Order, and Competitive Impact Statement have been filed with the United States District Court for the District of Columbia in United States v. ] Baker Hughes Inc., et al., Civil Action No....

  4. Recipe for Working Together: Gen. Colin Powell and the Baker's Dough Mural.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herberholz, Barbara

    2001-01-01

    Describes the process for creating a baker's-dough mural that would become a permanent part of the community and relates a visit made to the Sacramento (California) Boys & Girls Club by General Colin Powell. Discusses Powell's part in creating the mural. Includes the steps for how to make a Baker's-dough mural. (CMK)

  5. Long term cerebral and vascular complications after irradiation of the neck in head and neck cancer patients: a prospective cohort study: study rationale and protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Successful treatment options for cancer result in more young long-term survivors prone for long-term complications. Carotid artery vasculopathy is a potential long-term complication after radiotherapy of the neck, resulting in cerebrovascular events and probably deficits in cognitive and motor functioning. Better insight into the underlying pathofysiology of radiotherapy induced carotid artery vasculopathy is needed for prognostic purposes and to develop preventive strategies. Methods/Design The current study is a prospective cohort study on the long-term cerebral and vascular complications after radiotherapy of the neck, in 103 patients treated for head and neck cancer, included in our study database between 2002 and 2008. Baseline protocol (before radiotherapy) included screening for cerebrovascular risk factors and intima media thickness measurement of carotid arteries by ultrasonography. Follow-up assessment more than 5 years after radiotherapy included screening of cerebrovascular risk factors, cerebrovascular events, neurological examination with gait and balance tests, extensive neuropsychological examination, self-report questionnaires, ultrasonography of the carotid arteries with measurement of intima media thickness and elastography, magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and magnetic resonance angiography of the carotid arteries. Discussion The current study adds to the understanding of the causes and consequences of long-term cerebral and vascular changes after radiotherapy of the neck. These data will be helpful to develop a protocol for diagnostic and preventive strategies for long-term neurological complications in future head and neck cancer patients with anticipated radiotherapy treatment. PMID:24942263

  6. Generation of thiols by biotransformation of cysteine-aldehyde conjugates with baker's yeast.

    PubMed

    Huynh-Ba, Tuong; Matthey-Doret, Walter; Fay, Laurent B; Bel Rhlid, Rachid

    2003-06-01

    Baker's yeast was shown to catalyze the transformation of cysteine-furfural conjugate into 2-furfurylthiol. The biotransformation's yield and kinetics were influenced by the reaction parameters such as pH, incubation mode (aerobic and anaerobic), and substrate concentration. 2-Furfurylthiol was obtained in an optimal 37% yield when cysteine-furfural conjugate at a 20 mM concentration was anaerobically incubated with whole cell baker's yeast at pH 8.0 and 30 degrees C. Similarly to 2-furfurylthiol, 5-methyl-2-furfurylthiol (11%), benzylthiol (8%), 2-thiophenemethanethiol (22%), 3-methyl-2-thiophenemethanethiol (3%), and 2-pyrrolemethanethiol (6%) were obtained from the corresponding cysteine-aldehyde conjugates by incubation with baker's yeast. This work indicates the versatile bioconversion capacity of baker's yeast for the generation of thiols from cysteine-aldehyde conjugates. Thanks to its food-grade character, baker's yeast provides a biochemical tool to produce thiols, which can be used as flavorings in foods and beverages.

  7. Maximizing biomass concentration in baker's yeast process by using a decoupled geometric controller for substrate and dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Chopda, Viki R; Rathore, Anurag S; Gomes, James

    2015-11-01

    Biomass production by baker's yeast in a fed-batch reactor depends on the metabolic regime determined by the concentration of glucose and dissolved oxygen in the reactor. Achieving high biomass concentration in turn is dependent on the dynamic interaction between the glucose and dissolved oxygen concentration. Taking this into account, we present in this paper the implementation of a decoupled input-output linearizing controller (DIOLC) for maximizing biomass in a fed-batch yeast process. The decoupling is based on the inversion of 2×2 input-output matrix resulting from global linearization. The DIOLC was implemented online using a platform created in LabVIEW employing a TCP/IP protocol via the reactor's built-in electronic system. An improvement in biomass yield by 23% was obtained compared to that using a PID controller. The results demonstrate superior capability of the DIOLC and that the cumulative effect of smoother control action contributes to biomass maximization. PMID:26233328

  8. Polynomial Decay of Correlations in the Generalized Baker's Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Christopher; Murray, Rua

    2013-08-01

    We introduce a family of area preserving generalized baker's transformations acting on the unit square and having sharp polynomial rates of mixing for Holder data. The construction is geometric, relying on the graph of a single variable "cut function". Each baker's map B is non-uniformly hyperbolic and while the exact mixing rate depends on B, all polynomial rates can be attained. The analysis of mixing rates depends on building a suitable Young tower for an expanding factor. The mechanisms leading to a slow rate of correlation decay are especially transparent in our examples due to the simple geometry in the construction. For this reason we propose this class of maps as an excellent testing ground for new techniques for the analysis of decay of correlations in non-uniformly hyperbolic systems. Finally, some of our examples can be seen to be extensions of certain 1-D non-uniformly expanding maps that have appeared in the literature over the last twenty years thereby providing a unified treatment of these interesting and well-studied examples.

  9. Protocol for PIT: a phase III trial of prophylactic irradiation of tracts in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma following invasive chest wall intervention

    PubMed Central

    Bayman, N; Ardron, D; Ashcroft, L; Baldwin, D R; Booton, R; Darlison, L; Edwards, J G; Lang-Lazdunski, L; Lester, J F; Peake, M; Rintoul, R C; Snee, M; Taylor, P; Lunt, C

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Histological diagnosis of malignant mesothelioma requires an invasive procedure such as CT-guided needle biopsy, thoracoscopy, video-assisted thorascopic surgery (VATs) or thoracotomy. These invasive procedures encourage tumour cell seeding at the intervention site and patients can develop tumour nodules within the chest wall. In an effort to prevent nodules developing, it has been widespread practice across Europe to irradiate intervention sites postprocedure—a practice known as prophylactic irradiation of tracts (PIT). To date there has not been a suitably powered randomised trial to determine whether PIT is effective at reducing the risk of chest wall nodule development. Methods and analysis In this multicentre phase III randomised controlled superiority trial, 374 patients who can receive radiotherapy within 42 days of a chest wall intervention will be randomised to receive PIT or no PIT. Patients will be randomised on a 1:1 basis. Radiotherapy in the PIT arm will be 21 Gy in three fractions. Subsequent chemotherapy is given at the clinicians’ discretion. A reduction in the incidence of chest wall nodules from 15% to 5% in favour of radiotherapy 6 months after randomisation would be clinically significant. All patients will be followed up for up to 2 years with monthly telephone contact and at least four outpatient visits in the first year. Ethics and dissemination PIT was approved by NRES Committee North West—Greater Manchester West (REC reference 12/NW/0249) and recruitment is currently on-going, the last patient is expected to be randomised by the end of 2015. The analysis of the primary end point, incidence of chest wall nodules 6 months after randomisation, is expected to be published in 2016 in a peer reviewed journal and results will also be presented at scientific meetings and summary results published online. A follow-up analysis is expected to be published in 2018. Trial registration number ISRCTN04240319; NCT01604005; Pre

  10. Identity of Baker's species described in the Oriental leafhopper genus Pythamus (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) with description of a new genus.

    PubMed

    Wei, Cong; Webb, Michael D; Zhang, Yalin

    2014-01-01

    Baker's (1915) species described in the Oriental leafhopper genus Pythamus Melichar are revised. One species, Pythamus melichari Baker 1915, is placed in a new genus, Pythochandra Wei & Webb, gen. n.. The four varieties of P. melichari described by Baker (1915, 1923) (borneensis, bilobatus, decoratus and singaporensis) are elevated to species level and placed in the new genus stat. n., comb. n.. All species are briefly described and a key is provided for their separation. Two other species, Pythamus productus Baker and P. decoratus Baker, known only from females, are retained in Pythamus pending further studies.

  11. Neoglacial fluctuations of Deming Glacier, Mt. Baker, Washington USA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, G.; Menounos, B.; Scott, K.; Clague, J. J.; Tucker, D.; Riedel, J.; Davis, P.

    2007-12-01

    Deming Glacier flows from the upper west slopes of Mt. Baker, a stratovolcano in the Cascade Range of Washington, USA. The north and south lateral moraines of Deming Glacier are composed of at least four tills separated by layers of detrital wood and sheared stumps in growth position. The stratigraphy records fluctuations of the glacier during the Holocene. The outer ten rings of an in situ stump from the middle wood layer, which is about 40 m below the north lateral moraine crest and 1.2 km downvalley from the present glacier terminus, yielded an age of 1750 ± 50~~ 14C yr BP [1810-1550 cal yr BP]. The stump revealed at least 300 rings and thus records a period of landscape stability and relatively restricted glaciation for several hundred years prior to ca. 1750 14C yr BP . Samples from the lowest wood layer also have been submitted for radiocarbon dating. Outer rings of detrital wood samples collected from two wood mats exposed in the south lateral moraine, 2.3 km downvalley of the glacier terminus, returned radiocarbon ages of 1600 ± 30~~ 14C yr BP [1550- 1410 cal yr BP] and 430 ± 30~~ 14C yr BP [AD 1420-1620]. These data indicate that Deming Glacier advanced over a vegetated moraine sometime after 1810 cal yr BP to a position less extensive that it achieved at the peak of the Little Ice Age. The glacier then receded before it began its final and most extensive Holocene advance after AD 1420. The older advance is correlative with the 'First Millennium AD' advance, recently recognized throughout western North America. The younger advance coincides with an advance of Mt. Baker's Easton Glacier [AD 1430-1630], and advances of many alpine glaciers elsewhere in western North America. Our data suggest that glaciers on Mt. Baker fluctuated in a similar manner to alpine glaciers in the Coast Mountains of British Columbia and in other mountain ranges of northwest North America during Neoglaciation.

  12. Improving the freeze tolerance of bakers' yeast by loading with trehalose.

    PubMed

    Hirasawa, R; Yokoigawa, K; Isobe, Y; Kawai, H

    2001-03-01

    We examined the freeze tolerance of bakers' yeast loaded with exogenous trehalose. Freeze-tolerant and freeze-sensitive compressed bakers' yeast samples were soaked at several temperatures in 0.5 M and 1 M trehalose and analyzed. The intracellular trehalose contents in both types of bakers' yeast increased with increasing soaking period. The initial trehalose-accumulation rate increased with increasing exogenous trehalose concentration and soaking temperature. The maximum trehalose content was almost identical (200-250 mg/g of dry cells) irrespective of the soaking temperature and the type of bakers' yeast, but depended on the exogenous trehalose concentration. The leavening ability of both types of bakers' yeast loaded with trehalose was almost identical to that of the respective original cells, irrespective of the soaking conditions. The freeze-tolerant ratio (FTR) of both types of bakers' yeast increased with increasing intracellular trehalose content. However, FTR decreased during over-soaking after the maximum amount of trehalose had accumulated. FTR of the freeze-sensitive bakers' yeast was more efficiently improved than that of the freeze-tolerant type.

  13. Leaf Epidermis of the Rheophyte Dyckia brevifolia Baker (Bromeliaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Ghislaine Maria; de Souza, Thaysi Ventura; Voltolini, Caroline Heinig; Reis, Ademir

    2013-01-01

    Some species of Dyckia Schult. f., including Dyckia brevifolia Baker, are rheophytes that live in the fast-moving water currents of streams and rivers which are subject to frequent flooding, but also period of low water. This study aimed to analyze the leaf epidermis of D. brevifolia in the context of epidermal adaptation to this aquatic plant's rheophytic habitat. The epidermis is uniseriate, and the cuticle is thickened. The inner periclinal and anticlinal walls of the epidermal cells are thickened and lignified. Stomata are tetracytic, located in the depressions in relation to the surrounding epidermal cells, and covered by peltate trichomes. While the epidermal characteristics of D. brevifolia are similar to those of Bromeliaceae species, this species has made particular adaptations of leaf epidermis in response to its rheophytic environment. PMID:23864825

  14. Baker's yeast assay procedure for testing heavy metal toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Bitton, G.; Koopman, B.; Wang, H.D.

    1984-01-01

    Baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) is microorganism which is commercially available and sold as packaged dry pellets in any food store at low cost. Studies have been undertaken on the effects of organic xenobiotics as well as heavy metals on yeast metabolism. This type of study has been generally useful in examining the mechanism(s) of chemical toxicity. However, a rapid and quantitative toxicity test using S. cerevisiae as the test organism has not been developed. The purpose of this study was to develop a toxicity assay for heavy metals, using commercial dry yeast as the test microorganism. This rapid and simple procedure is based on the reduction of 2-(p-iodophenyl)-3-(p-nitrophenyl)-5-phenyltetrazolium chloride (INT) to INT-formazan by the yeast electron transport system. The scoring of active cells following exposure to heavy metals was undertaken according to the MINT (malachite green-INT) method developed by Bitton and Koopman.

  15. Genetic and phenotypic characteristics of baker's yeast: relevance to baking.

    PubMed

    Randez-Gil, Francisca; Córcoles-Sáez, Isaac; Prieto, José A

    2013-01-01

    Yeasts rarely encounter ideal physiological conditions during their industrial life span; therefore, their ability to adapt to changing conditions determines their usefulness and applicability. This is especially true for baking strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The success of this yeast in the ancient art of bread making is based on its capacity to rapidly transform carbohydrates into CO2 rather than its unusual resistance to environmental stresses. Moreover, baker's yeast must exhibit efficient respiratory metabolism during yeast manufacturing, which determines biomass yield. However, optimal growth conditions often have negative consequences in other commercially important aspects, such as fermentative power or stress tolerance. This article reviews the genetic and physiological characteristics of baking yeast strains, emphasizing the activation of regulatory mechanisms in response to carbon source and stress signaling and their importance in defining targets for strain selection and improvement.

  16. Converting baker's waste into alcohol. Revised final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Halsey, R.; Wilson, P.B.

    1982-01-01

    All types of baker's waste (including waste from candy manufacturers) can be converted into alcohol to be used as a fuel. All types of waste at any stage in process can be converted, such as: basic ingredients (including floor sweepings); dry mixes (including floor sweepings); dough at any stage; partially or fully cooked products; and day old returned products. The basic steps are the same, only the initial preparation will vary slightly. The variation will be: amount of water to be added and amount and type of nutrients (if any) to be added. The basic steps are: slurrying, liquefying to put starch into liquid state, saccharifying to convert starch into fermentable sugars, fermentation to convert sugars into alcohol, and distillation to separate the alcohol from the mash. Each step is discussed in detail along with problems that may arise. Directions are given and materials (enzymes, yeast, etc.) and equipment are descibed briefly.

  17. Ross E. Baker, DC: A Canadian chiropractic survivor

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Douglas M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is an historical biography of a fortunate man. It begins with a glimpse of Ross E. Baker’s origins in south-western Ontario, watches him going to school and working in Hamilton before joining the Canadian Army and shipping off to Europe to fight in the Second World War. At War’s end, the article picks up Dr. Baker as he comes home, starts a family, becomes a chiropractor and sustains a viable practice. Now in the twilight of life, the good doctor is last seen content with his retirement, spending days at his cottage property, reviewing his memoirs and reflecting on the tumult, terror and eventual triumph of the D-Day landing at Normandy. PMID:24587499

  18. The vertebrate fauna of Ichauway, Baker County, GA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, L.L.; Steen, D.A.; Stober, J.M.; Freeman, Mary C.; Golladay, S.W.; Conner, L.M.; Cochrane, J.

    2006-01-01

    Less than 4% of the once extensive Pinus palustris (longleaf pine) ecosystem remains today. Although longleaf pine habitats are recognized for their high species diversity, few published accounts document the vertebrate faunas of remaining tracts. Here we report on the vertebrate species richness of lchauway, an 11,300-ha property in Baker County, GA. The property includes ca. 7300 ha of longleaf pine with native ground cover, along with more than 30 seasonal wetlands and ca. 45 km of riparian habitat associated with Ichawaynochaway Creek, Big Cypress Creek, and the Flint River. The fauna includes 61 species of fish, 31 amphibians, 53 reptiles, 191 birds, and 41 mammals. Despite the relative isolation of the property from other natural ecosystems, the vertebrate fauna of lchauway is remarkably diverse and may offer an example of reference conditions to guide restoration of longleaf pine forests, associated seasonal wetlands, and riparian areas elsewhere in the southeastern U S.

  19. Communications protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Xiaoming (Inventor); Baras, John S. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to an improved communications protocol which increases the efficiency of transmission in return channels on a multi-channel slotted Alohas system by incorporating advanced error correction algorithms, selective retransmission protocols and the use of reserved channels to satisfy the retransmission requests.

  20. Supermarket baker's asthma: how accurate is routine health surveillance?

    PubMed Central

    Brant, A; Nightingale, S; Berriman, J; Sharp, C; Welch, J; Newman, T; Cullinan, P

    2005-01-01

    Background: Regular health surveillance is commonly recommended for workers exposed to occupational antigens but little is known about how effective it is in identifying cases. Aims: To report one large company's surveillance and compare its findings with those of a standard cross-sectional survey in the same workforce. Methods: A supermarket company with 324 in-store bakeries producing bread from raw ingredients conducted a three-stage health surveillance programme in around 3000 bakery employees. The first stage involved the administration of a simple respiratory questionnaire. If chest symptoms were present a second questionnaire focusing on their work relationship was administered. If positive a blood sample was requested for the measurement of specific IgE to flour and fungal α-amylase. The results were compared to an independent cross-sectional survey of employees in 20 of the company's stores. Results: Two hundred and ninety nine (92%) of the company's bakeries took part in surveillance. The overall employee response for the first stage was 77%; a quarter of those with respiratory symptoms reported that they were work related. Seventy four (61%) of those with work related chest symptoms had a measurement of specific IgE to either flour or fungal α-amylase, of whom 30 (41%) had a positive result. Surveillance estimated that 1% of bakery employees (1% bakers, 2% managers, 0.6% confectioners) had work related symptoms with specific IgE. This compared with 4% (7.5% bakers, 3.3% managers, 0% confectioners) in the cross-sectional survey (n = 166, 93% response). Conclusion: Comparison with a standard cross-sectional survey suggests that routine surveillance can underestimate the workplace burden of disease. The reasons may include technical or resource issues and uncertainties over confidentiality or the perceived consequences of participation. More research needs to be done looking into the design and efficacy of surveillance in occupational asthma. PMID

  1. Improved vanillin production in baker's yeast through in silico design

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Vanillin is one of the most widely used flavouring agents, originally obtained from cured seed pods of the vanilla orchid Vanilla planifolia. Currently vanillin is mostly produced via chemical synthesis. A de novo synthetic pathway for heterologous vanillin production from glucose has recently been implemented in baker's yeast, Saccharamyces cerevisiae. In this study we aimed at engineering this vanillin cell factory towards improved productivity and thereby at developing an attractive alternative to chemical synthesis. Results Expression of a glycosyltransferase from Arabidopsis thaliana in the vanillin producing S. cerevisiae strain served to decrease product toxicity. An in silico metabolic engineering strategy of this vanillin glucoside producing strain was designed using a set of stoichiometric modelling tools applied to the yeast genome-scale metabolic network. Two targets (PDC1 and GDH1) were selected for experimental verification resulting in four engineered strains. Three of the mutants showed up to 1.5 fold higher vanillin β-D-glucoside yield in batch mode, while continuous culture of the Δpdc1 mutant showed a 2-fold productivity improvement. This mutant presented a 5-fold improvement in free vanillin production compared to the previous work on de novo vanillin biosynthesis in baker's yeast. Conclusion Use of constraints corresponding to different physiological states was found to greatly influence the target predictions given minimization of metabolic adjustment (MOMA) as biological objective function. In vivo verification of the targets, selected based on their predicted metabolic adjustment, successfully led to overproducing strains. Overall, we propose and demonstrate a framework for in silico design and target selection for improving microbial cell factories. PMID:21059201

  2. 4. JoAnn SieburgBaker, Photographer, September 1977. VIEW OF POWER BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. JoAnn Sieburg-Baker, Photographer, September 1977. VIEW OF POWER BUILDING (ELECTRICAL TRANSFORMER). - Salem Manufacturing Company, Arista Cotton Mill, Brookstown & Marshall Streets, Winston-Salem, Forsyth County, NC

  3. Simple improvement in freeze-tolerance of bakers' yeast with poly-gamma-glutamate.

    PubMed

    Yokoigawa, Kumio; Sato, Machiko; Soda, Kenji

    2006-09-01

    We examined the effect of poly-gamma-glutamate (PGA) on the freeze-tolerance of four types of commercial bakers' yeast (freeze-tolerant, osmotic-tolerant, low-temperature-sensitive, and ordinary bakers' yeasts). The survival ratio of ordinary bakers' yeast cells frozen at -30 degrees C for 3 d in a medium (0.5% yeast extract, 0.5% peptone, and 2% glucose: YPD medium) was improved by adding more than 1% PGA to the medium; the survival ratio increased from about 10% to more than 70%. All PGA preparations, which differed in average molecular mass (50, 2,000, 4,000, 6,000, 8,000, and 10,000 kDa), showed a similar cryoprotecive effect on the cells. Similar results were also obtained with other types of bakers' yeast, sake yeast and beer yeast. When the four types of bakers' yeast cell were frozen at -30 degrees C for 3 d in dough supplemented with more than 1% PGA, the cells (after freezing and thawing) showed higher leavening ability than those frozen in dough without PGA, irrespective of the molecular mass of PGA. Thus, PGA appears to protect bakers' yeast from lethal freeze injury, leading to a high leavening ability after freezing and thawing. PGA did not decrease the original leavening ability of the bakers' yeast, and was not decomposed by the yeast cells. PGA suppressed the decrease in leavening ability during a prolonged fermentation time, probably because PGA adsorbed inhibitory metabolites accumulated in the dough. PGA could prove useful for improving the freeze-tolerance of bakers' yeast by its addition to dough.

  4. STS-52 Pilot Baker, in LES/LEH, during JSC WETF bailout exercises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-52 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, Pilot Michael A. Baker smiles from under his launch and entry helmet (LEH) and from behind the communications carrier assembly (CCA) microphones as he adjusts his parachute harness. Baker, fully outfitted in a launch and entry suit (LES), prepares for emergency egress (bailout) training exercise in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool. The WETF's 25-ft deep pool will be used in this simulation of a water landing.

  5. Simple improvement in freeze-tolerance of bakers' yeast with poly-gamma-glutamate.

    PubMed

    Yokoigawa, Kumio; Sato, Machiko; Soda, Kenji

    2006-09-01

    We examined the effect of poly-gamma-glutamate (PGA) on the freeze-tolerance of four types of commercial bakers' yeast (freeze-tolerant, osmotic-tolerant, low-temperature-sensitive, and ordinary bakers' yeasts). The survival ratio of ordinary bakers' yeast cells frozen at -30 degrees C for 3 d in a medium (0.5% yeast extract, 0.5% peptone, and 2% glucose: YPD medium) was improved by adding more than 1% PGA to the medium; the survival ratio increased from about 10% to more than 70%. All PGA preparations, which differed in average molecular mass (50, 2,000, 4,000, 6,000, 8,000, and 10,000 kDa), showed a similar cryoprotecive effect on the cells. Similar results were also obtained with other types of bakers' yeast, sake yeast and beer yeast. When the four types of bakers' yeast cell were frozen at -30 degrees C for 3 d in dough supplemented with more than 1% PGA, the cells (after freezing and thawing) showed higher leavening ability than those frozen in dough without PGA, irrespective of the molecular mass of PGA. Thus, PGA appears to protect bakers' yeast from lethal freeze injury, leading to a high leavening ability after freezing and thawing. PGA did not decrease the original leavening ability of the bakers' yeast, and was not decomposed by the yeast cells. PGA suppressed the decrease in leavening ability during a prolonged fermentation time, probably because PGA adsorbed inhibitory metabolites accumulated in the dough. PGA could prove useful for improving the freeze-tolerance of bakers' yeast by its addition to dough. PMID:17046536

  6. Self-cloning baker's yeasts that accumulate proline enhance freeze tolerance in doughs.

    PubMed

    Kaino, Tomohiro; Tateiwa, Tetsuya; Mizukami-Murata, Satomi; Shima, Jun; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2008-09-01

    We constructed self-cloning diploid baker's yeast strains by disrupting PUT1, encoding proline oxidase, and replacing the wild-type PRO1, encoding gamma-glutamyl kinase, with a pro1(D154N) or pro1(I150T) allele. The resultant strains accumulated intracellular proline and retained higher-level fermentation abilities in the frozen doughs than the wild-type strain. These results suggest that proline-accumulating baker's yeast is suitable for frozen-dough baking.

  7. Overexpression of the transcription activator Msn2 enhances the fermentation ability of industrial baker's yeast in frozen dough.

    PubMed

    Sasano, Yu; Haitani, Yutaka; Hashida, Keisuke; Ohtsu, Iwao; Shima, Jun; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    We constructed a self-cloning diploid baker's yeast strain that overexpressed the transcription activator Msn2. It showed higher tolerance to freeze-thaw stress and higher intracellular trehalose level than observed in the wild-type strain. Overexpression of Msn2 also enhanced the fermentation ability of baker's yeast cells in frozen dough. Hence, Msn2-overexpressing baker's yeast should be useful in frozen-dough baking. PMID:22451415

  8. Obituary: Norman Hodgson Baker, Jr., 1931-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfand, David J.

    2005-12-01

    Norman H. Baker, a key contributor to the foundation of modern stellar pulsation theory and former editor of the "Astronomical Journal", died on 11 October 2005 in Watertown, New York near his beloved summer home in Natural Bridge. He succumbed to complications of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia, a bone marrow lymphoma that he had successfully surmounted for twenty-two years. Norm, as he was known to all, was born 23 October 1931 in Fergus Falls, Minnesota to Norman Hodgson and Jeannette (née Lieber) Baker. He attended the University of Minnesota where he met the first of many lifelong astronomical friends, Bill Erickson. He received his BA in 1952. He went on to do his PhD, "Radiation from Particle Interactions which Create Current," at Cornell University under Phil Morrison. He then moved to a postdoctoral position at the Max Planck Institut für Physik und Astrophysik in München with the intent of pursuing his work in plasma physics with Ludwig Biermann and Arnulf Schlüter. However, Rudolf (Rudi) Kippenhan snatched him away to pursue what became his lifelong interest, stellar physics. This was the dawn of the era in which electronic computers were becoming practical for scientific calculations, and Norm immediately adopted this new tool. Indeed, he remained at the forefront of computing technology throughout his life: He was certainly the first member of the Astronomy Department at Columbia to buy a Mac, and was undoubtedly one of the few emeritus professors in the world known by all the administrative staff as the first person to turn to when stumped by a computer problem. Following his first paper with Kippenhan on stellar rotation, Norm turned his attention to stellar pulsations, a topic he would pursue throughout his career. His 1962 paper in "Zeitschrift für Astrophysik" on pulsational models of Cepheids (Baker and Kippenhan 1962, 54, 155) is a classic in the field. The first figure displays the three dimensional model of the atmospheric absorption

  9. Victorian clitoridectomy: Isaac Baker Brown and his harmless operative procedure.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, E

    1981-08-01

    Examines the use of clitoridectomy in Victorian England as an example of the persistent connection between belief system and medical practice. The Victorian context of gynecological practice is briefly described, followed by a discussion of the use of clitoridectomy by Isaac Baker Brown, an eminent gynecological surgeon who advocated its use to cure a variety of nervous disorders. Brown's 1866 book. "On the curability of certain forms of insanity, epilepsy, catalepsy, and hysteria in females" sparked a controversy over the place of clitoridectomy in gynecological practice which culminated in ostracism of Brown by the medical establishment. The primary reason for Brown's ostracism appears to have been his desire to gain public recognition for a practice that was quietly employed by others; his efforts were viewed as a threat by male physicians who had only recently achieved success in establishing gynecology as a legitimate branch of medicine. Few doctors who condemned the operations advocated by Brown disputed his contention that female emotional disorders were based on genital misfunctions. The scientific investigation called for by Brown to justify his methods might, if carried out, have helped dispel some of the myths concerning female anatomy and psychology which flourished in the medical profession and social mores of the day.

  10. Lipid content and cryotolerance of bakers' yeast in frozen doughs.

    PubMed

    Gélinas, P; Fiset, G; Willemot, C; Goulet, J

    1991-02-01

    The relationship between lipid content and tolerance to freezing at -50 degrees C was studied in Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown under batch or fed-batch mode and various aeration and temperature conditions. A higher free-sterol-to-phospholipid ratio as well as higher free sterol and phospholipid contents correlated with the superior cryoresistance in dough or in water of the fed-batch-grown compared with the batch-grown cells. For both growth modes, the presence of excess dissolved oxygen in the culture medium greatly improved yeast cryoresistance and trehalose content (P. Gélinas, G. Fiset, A. LeDuy, and J. Goulet, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 26:2453-2459, 1989) without significantly changing the lipid profile. Under the batch or fed-batch modes, no correlation was found between the cryotolerance of bakers' yeast and the total cellular lipid content, the total sterol content, the phospholipid unsaturation index, the phosphate or crude protein content, or the yeast cell morphology (volume and roundness). PMID:16348412

  11. Coupled skinny baker's maps and the Kaplan-Yorke conjecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröger, Maik; Hunt, Brian R.

    2013-09-01

    The Kaplan-Yorke conjecture states that for ‘typical’ dynamical systems with a physical measure, the information dimension and the Lyapunov dimension coincide. We explore this conjecture in a neighborhood of a system for which the two dimensions do not coincide because the system consists of two uncoupled subsystems. We are interested in whether coupling ‘typically’ restores the equality of the dimensions. The particular subsystems we consider are skinny baker's maps, and we consider uni-directional coupling. For coupling in one of the possible directions, we prove that the dimensions coincide for a prevalent set of coupling functions, but for coupling in the other direction we show that the dimensions remain unequal for all coupling functions. We conjecture that the dimensions prevalently coincide for bi-directional coupling. On the other hand, we conjecture that the phenomenon we observe for a particular class of systems with uni-directional coupling, where the information and Lyapunov dimensions differ robustly, occurs more generally for many classes of uni-directionally coupled systems (also called skew-product systems) in higher dimensions.

  12. Carboxylase Levels and Carbon Dioxide Fixation in Baker's Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Cazzulo, J. J.; Claisse, L. M.; Stoppani, A. O. M.

    1968-01-01

    Levels of pyruvate carboxylase (PC), phosphopyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), and malate dehydrogenase (decarboxylating) were compared in wild-type bakers' yeast (I), a cytoplasmic-respiratory mutant (II), a biotin-deficient wild-type yeast (III), and a biotin-deficient respiratory mutant (IV). PC activities were greatly reduced in III and IV, whereas PEPC was reduced in II and IV. Malate dehydrogenase (decarboxylating) could not be detected in any of the yeasts. With yeast I growing on glucose as the sole carbon source, PEPC decreased to negligible levels during the logarithmic phase of growth (glucose repression effect), whereas PC increased. Both enzymes reverted to their original levels during the stationary phase, when glucose in the medium was exhausted. In agreement with the leading role of PC for CO2 assimilation, the rates of 14CO2 fixation in yeasts I and II were approximately equal and were much higher than that in yeast IV. With I and II, most of the 14C was distributed similarly in oxalacetate derivatives; with yeast IV, most of 14C appeared in a compound apparently unrelated to CO2 fixation via C4-dicarboxylic acids. PMID:5732499

  13. Early Holocene glaciation on Mount Baker, Washington State, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul A.; Easterbrook, Don J.; Clark, Peter U.

    2000-07-01

    The relation between radiocarbon-dated tephras and glacial moraines on the south flank of Mount Baker, Washington, records evidence of an early Holocene glacier advance. Scoria that erupted from a local cinder cone 8420±70 14C yr BP (9450±100 cal yr) occurs immediately in front of, but not on, a complex of moraines overlain by Mazama ash. Radiocarbon ages of 7670±130 14C yr BP (8415±110 cal yr) and 7045±65 14C yr BP (7890±90 cal yr) were obtained from charred wood below the Mazama ash and above till of the moraines, bracketing the age of the glacial advance between ˜7700 and 8400 14C yr BP (˜8400 and 9450 cal yr). Well-preserved Little Ice Age moraines occur proximal to the maximum Holocene positions. Assuming that precipitation regimes were similar, depression of former equilibrium line altitudes suggests that climate during the early Holocene event was at most ˜2°C cooler than present, and ˜0.5°C cooler than the Little Ice Age.

  14. Vernonia condensata Baker (Asteraceae): A Promising Source of Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Jucélia Barbosa; Temponi, Vanessa dos Santos; Gasparetto, Carolina Miranda; Fabri, Rodrigo Luiz; Aragão, Danielle Maria de Oliveira; Pinto, Nícolas de Castro Campos; Ribeiro, Antônia; Scio, Elita; Del-Vechio-Vieira, Glauciemar; de Sousa, Orlando Vieira

    2013-01-01

    The present study evaluated the antioxidant potential of Vernonia condensata Baker (Asteraceae). Dried and powdered leaves were exhaustively extracted with ethanol by static maceration followed by partition to obtain the hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, and butanol fractions. Total phenols and flavonoids contents were determined through spectrophotometry and flavonoids were identified by HPLC-DAD system. The antioxidant activity was assessed by DPPH radical scavenging activity, TLC-bioautography, reducing power of Fe+3, phosphomolybdenum, and TBA assays. The total phenolic content and total flavonoids ranged from 0.19 to 23.11 g/100 g and from 0.13 to 4.10 g/100 g, respectively. The flavonoids apigenin and luteolin were identified in the ethyl acetate fraction. The IC50 of DPPH assay varied from 4.28 to 75.10 µg/mL and TLC-bioautography detected the antioxidant compounds. The reducing power of Fe+3 was 19.98 to 336.48 μg/mL, while the reaction with phosphomolybdenum ranged from 13.54% to 32.63% and 56.02% to 135.00% considering ascorbic acid and rutin as reference, respectively. At 30 mg/mL, the ethanolic extract and fractions revealed significant effect against lipid peroxidation. All these data sustain that V. condensata is an important and promising source of bioactive substances with antioxidant activity. PMID:24489987

  15. Free radical scavenging potential of Chlorophytum tuberosum Baker.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, Sreevidya; Govindarajan, Raghavan; Vijayakumar, Madhavan; Mehrotra, Shanta

    2006-04-01

    Chlorophytum tuberosum Baker commonly referred as 'Musli' has been widely used as a potent 'Rasayana' drug in 'Ayurveda' as a rejuvenator and tonic. Antioxidant potential of Chlorophytum tuberosum has been investigated for their ability to scavenge 1,1,diphenyl picryl hydrazyl (DPPH), nitric oxide radical along with their capacity to reduce lipid peroxidation in rat liver homogenate, chelation of ferrous ion, radical scavenging potential using chemiluminescence and their total antioxidant capacity. Sugar, starch, protein, and Vitamin C content were estimated spectrophotometrically along with the percentages of the individual amino acids by HPLC and individual sugars by using HPTLC as standardization tool. The extract has been found to possess antioxidant activity in all the models tested as evident by IC50 values being 225.31, 888.44, 809.22 and 422.97 microg/ml for scavenging of DPPH, nitric oxide, lipid peroxidation and ferry bi-pyridyl complex, respectively, along with a integral anitoxidant activity of 2.986 nmol ascorbic acid/g equivalents in photochemiluminescence assay.

  16. Vernonia condensata Baker (Asteraceae): a promising source of antioxidants.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Jucélia Barbosa; Temponi, Vanessa dos Santos; Gasparetto, Carolina Miranda; Fabri, Rodrigo Luiz; Aragão, Danielle Maria de Oliveira; Pinto, Nícolas de Castro Campos; Ribeiro, Antônia; Scio, Elita; Del-Vechio-Vieira, Glauciemar; de Sousa, Orlando Vieira; Alves, Maria Silvana

    2013-01-01

    The present study evaluated the antioxidant potential of Vernonia condensata Baker (Asteraceae). Dried and powdered leaves were exhaustively extracted with ethanol by static maceration followed by partition to obtain the hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, and butanol fractions. Total phenols and flavonoids contents were determined through spectrophotometry and flavonoids were identified by HPLC-DAD system. The antioxidant activity was assessed by DPPH radical scavenging activity, TLC-bioautography, reducing power of Fe(+3), phosphomolybdenum, and TBA assays. The total phenolic content and total flavonoids ranged from 0.19 to 23.11 g/100 g and from 0.13 to 4.10 g/100 g, respectively. The flavonoids apigenin and luteolin were identified in the ethyl acetate fraction. The IC50 of DPPH assay varied from 4.28 to 75.10 µg/mL and TLC-bioautography detected the antioxidant compounds. The reducing power of Fe(+3) was 19.98 to 336.48  μg/mL, while the reaction with phosphomolybdenum ranged from 13.54% to 32.63% and 56.02% to 135.00% considering ascorbic acid and rutin as reference, respectively. At 30 mg/mL, the ethanolic extract and fractions revealed significant effect against lipid peroxidation. All these data sustain that V. condensata is an important and promising source of bioactive substances with antioxidant activity.

  17. Total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, D.E.; Ferguson, R.M.; Simmons, R.L.; Kim, T.H.; Slavin, S.; Najarian, J.S.

    1983-05-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation by itself can produce sufficient immunosuppression to prolong the survival of a variety of organ allografts in experimental animals. The degree of prolongation is dose-dependent and is limited by the toxicity that occurs with higher doses. Total lymphoid irradiation is more effective before transplantation than after, but when used after transplantation can be combined with pharmacologic immunosuppression to achieve a positive effect. In some animal models, total lymphoid irradiation induces an environment in which fully allogeneic bone marrow will engraft and induce permanent chimerism in the recipients who are then tolerant to organ allografts from the donor strain. If total lymphoid irradiation is ever to have clinical applicability on a large scale, it would seem that it would have to be under circumstances in which tolerance can be induced. However, in some animal models graft-versus-host disease occurs following bone marrow transplantation, and methods to obviate its occurrence probably will be needed if this approach is to be applied clinically. In recent years, patient and graft survival rates in renal allograft recipients treated with conventional immunosuppression have improved considerably, and thus the impetus to utilize total lymphoid irradiation for its immunosuppressive effect alone is less compelling. The future of total lymphoid irradiation probably lies in devising protocols in which maintenance immunosuppression can be eliminated, or nearly eliminated, altogether. Such protocols are effective in rodents. Whether they can be applied to clinical transplantation remains to be seen.

  18. The relationship of freeze tolerance with intracellular compounds in baker's yeasts.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaojian; Miao, Yelian; Chen, Jie Yu; Chen, Jun; Li, Wenli; He, Xun; Wang, Jining

    2014-03-01

    Freeze-tolerant baker's yeasts are required for the processing of frozen doughs. The present study was carried out to investigate the cell survival rate after frozen storage and the change of fermentability in dough due to frozen storage, and to discuss quantitatively the relationship of freeze tolerance with intracellular trehalose, amino acids, and glycerol, using six types of baker's yeasts as the test materials. The experimental results showed that the fermentability of yeast cells in frozen dough was strongly correlated with the cell survival rate. The baker's yeast with a higher level of cell survival rate had a larger increase in the total intracellular compound content after frozen storage, and the cell survival rate increased linearly with increasing total intracellular compound content in frozen yeast cells. Trehalose was a primary compound affecting freeze tolerance, followed by glutamic acid, arginine, proline, asparagic acid, and glycerol. The basic information provided by the present study is useful for exploring the freeze-tolerance mechanisms of baker's yeast cells, breeding better freeze-tolerant baker's yeast strains, and developing more effective cryoprotectants. PMID:24482281

  19. Obituary: Norman Hodgson Baker, Jr., 1931-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfand, David J.

    2005-12-01

    Norman H. Baker, a key contributor to the foundation of modern stellar pulsation theory and former editor of the "Astronomical Journal", died on 11 October 2005 in Watertown, New York near his beloved summer home in Natural Bridge. He succumbed to complications of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia, a bone marrow lymphoma that he had successfully surmounted for twenty-two years. Norm, as he was known to all, was born 23 October 1931 in Fergus Falls, Minnesota to Norman Hodgson and Jeannette (née Lieber) Baker. He attended the University of Minnesota where he met the first of many lifelong astronomical friends, Bill Erickson. He received his BA in 1952. He went on to do his PhD, "Radiation from Particle Interactions which Create Current," at Cornell University under Phil Morrison. He then moved to a postdoctoral position at the Max Planck Institut für Physik und Astrophysik in München with the intent of pursuing his work in plasma physics with Ludwig Biermann and Arnulf Schlüter. However, Rudolf (Rudi) Kippenhan snatched him away to pursue what became his lifelong interest, stellar physics. This was the dawn of the era in which electronic computers were becoming practical for scientific calculations, and Norm immediately adopted this new tool. Indeed, he remained at the forefront of computing technology throughout his life: He was certainly the first member of the Astronomy Department at Columbia to buy a Mac, and was undoubtedly one of the few emeritus professors in the world known by all the administrative staff as the first person to turn to when stumped by a computer problem. Following his first paper with Kippenhan on stellar rotation, Norm turned his attention to stellar pulsations, a topic he would pursue throughout his career. His 1962 paper in "Zeitschrift für Astrophysik" on pulsational models of Cepheids (Baker and Kippenhan 1962, 54, 155) is a classic in the field. The first figure displays the three dimensional model of the atmospheric absorption

  20. Rational Protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cachin, Christian

    Security research continues to provide a plethora of new protocols and mechanisms; these solutions patch either existing vulnerabilities found in practical systems or solve hypothetical security problems in the sense that the problem is often conceived at the same time when the first solution is proposed. Yet only a very small fraction of this research is relevant to ordinary users in the sense that they are willing to actually deploy the technology.

  1. 78 FR 40443 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request-Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-05

    ... of April 19, 2013 (76 FR 23546), the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC or Commission... COMMISSION Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request--Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act... verify whether pools and spas are in compliance with the Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety...

  2. Semisolid state fermentation of baker's yeast in an air-fluidized bed fermentor.

    PubMed

    Hong, K; Tanner, R D; Crooke, P S; Malaney, G W

    1988-08-01

    In an attempt to grow microorganisms other than fungi using a solid-state fermentation process, a model system of Baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) was cultured in an air-fluidized bed fermentor. A semisolid potato mixture (pretreated with alpha-amylase) was used for the substrate in this highly aerated system. The growth of Baker's yeast in this air-fluidized bed process was easily controllable and very reproducible. Once feasible moisture levels and air flow rates were determined, the independent variables studied were the amount of the enzyme used for digesting the potato starch, the size of the yeast inoculum, and the concentration of the added defined medium.

  3. Opto-digital spectrum encryption by using Baker mapping and gyrator transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hang; Zhao, Jiguang; Liu, Zhengjun; Du, Xiaoping

    2015-03-01

    A concept of spectrum information hidden technology is proposed in this paper. We present an optical encryption algorithm for hiding both the spatial and spectrum information by using the Baker mapping in gyrator transform domains. The Baker mapping is introduced for scrambling the every single band of the hyperspectral image before adding the random phase functions. Subsequently, three thin cylinder lenses are controlled by PC for implementing the gyrator transform. The amplitude and phase information in the output plane can be regarded as the encrypted information and main key. Some numerical simulations are made to test the validity and capability of the proposed encryption algorithm.

  4. Self-cloning baker's yeasts that accumulate proline enhance freeze tolerance in doughs.

    PubMed

    Kaino, Tomohiro; Tateiwa, Tetsuya; Mizukami-Murata, Satomi; Shima, Jun; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2008-09-01

    We constructed self-cloning diploid baker's yeast strains by disrupting PUT1, encoding proline oxidase, and replacing the wild-type PRO1, encoding gamma-glutamyl kinase, with a pro1(D154N) or pro1(I150T) allele. The resultant strains accumulated intracellular proline and retained higher-level fermentation abilities in the frozen doughs than the wild-type strain. These results suggest that proline-accumulating baker's yeast is suitable for frozen-dough baking. PMID:18641164

  5. Opto-digital image encryption by using Baker mapping and 1-D fractional Fourier transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhengjun; Li, She; Liu, Wei; Liu, Shutian

    2013-03-01

    We present an optical encryption method based on the Baker mapping in one-dimensional fractional Fourier transform (1D FrFT) domains. A thin cylinder lens is controlled by computer for implementing 1D FrFT at horizontal direction or vertical direction. The Baker mapping is introduced to scramble the amplitude distribution of complex function. The amplitude and phase of the output of encryption system are regarded as encrypted image and key. Numerical simulation has been performed for testing the validity of this encryption scheme.

  6. Effects of SNF1 on Maltose Metabolism and Leavening Ability of Baker's Yeast in Lean Dough.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cui-Ying; Bai, Xiao-Wen; Lin, Xue; Liu, Xiao-Er; Xiao, Dong-Guang

    2015-12-01

    Maltose metabolism of baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) in lean dough is negatively influenced by glucose repression, thereby delaying the dough fermentation. To improve maltose metabolism and leavening ability, it is necessary to alleviate glucose repression. The Snf1 protein kinase is well known to be essential for the response to glucose repression and required for transcription of glucose-repressed genes including the maltose-utilization genes (MAL). In this study, the SNF1 overexpression and deletion industrial baker's yeast strains were constructed and characterized in terms of maltose utilization, growth and fermentation characteristics, mRNA levels of MAL genes (MAL62 encoding the maltase and MAL61 encoding the maltose permease) and maltase and maltose permease activities. Our results suggest that overexpression of SNF1 was effective to glucose derepression for enhancing MAL expression levels and enzymes (maltase and maltose permease) activities. These enhancements could result in an 18% increase in maltose metabolism of industrial baker's yeast in LSMLD medium (the low sugar model liquid dough fermentation medium) containing glucose and maltose and a 15% increase in leavening ability in lean dough. These findings provide a valuable insight of breeding industrial baker's yeast for rapid fermentation.

  7. 77 FR 39675 - Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, Baker County, OR; North Fork Burnt River Mining

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, Baker County, OR; North Fork Burnt... changed to the Whitman District Ranger. This 2012 North Fork Burnt River Mining Record of Decision will replace and supercede the 2004 North Fork Burnt River Mining Record of Decision only where necessary...

  8. 75 FR 51748 - North Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ... Vanderheyden, District Ranger, Mt. Baker Ranger District, phone (360) 854-2601, e-mail jvanderheyden@fs.fed.us...-Snoqualmie National Forest Web site at http://www.fs.fed.us/r6/mbs/projects/rac.shtml . Comments may be sent via e-mail to jvanderheyden@fs.fed.us or via facsimile to (360) 856-1934. All comments,...

  9. 76 FR 13345 - North Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ..., District Ranger, Mt. Baker Ranger District, phone (360) 854-2601, e-mail jvanderheyden@fs.fed.us...-Snoqualmie National Forest Web site at http://www.fs.fed.us/r6/mbs/projects/rac.shtml . Comments may be sent via e-mail to jvanderheyden@fs.fed.us or via facsimile to (360) 856-1934. All comments,...

  10. 75 FR 30367 - North Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ... Vanderheyden, District Ranger, Mt. Baker Ranger District, phone (360) 854-2601, e-mail jvanderheyden@fs.fed.us...-Snoqualmie National Forest Web site at http://www.fs.fed.us/r6/mbs/projects/rac.shtml . Comments may be sent via e-mail to jvanderheyden@fs.fed.us or via facsimile to (360) 856-1934. All comments,...

  11. 77 FR 48950 - North Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-15

    ..., Mt. Baker Ranger District, phone (360) 854-2601, email jvanderheyden@fs.fed.us . Individuals who use... National Forest Web site at: http://www.fs.fed.us/r6/mbs/projects/rac.shtml . Comments may be sent via email to jvanderheyden@fs.fed.us or via facsimile to (360) 856-1934. All comments, including names...

  12. Transcriptional regulation of fermentative and respiratory metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae industrial bakers' strains.

    PubMed

    Dueñas-Sánchez, Rafael; Gutiérrez, Gabriel; Rincón, Ana M; Codón, Antonio C; Benítez, Tahía

    2012-09-01

    Bakers' yeast-producing companies grow cells under respiratory conditions, at a very high growth rate. Some desirable properties of bakers' yeast may be altered if fermentation rather than respiration occurs during biomass production. That is why differences in gene expression patterns that take place when industrial bakers' yeasts are grown under fermentative, rather than respiratory conditions, were examined. Macroarray analysis of V1 strain indicated changes in gene expression similar to those already described in laboratory Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains: repression of most genes related to respiration and oxidative metabolism and derepression of genes related to ribosome biogenesis and stress resistance in fermentation. Under respiratory conditions, genes related to the glyoxylate and Krebs cycles, respiration, gluconeogenesis, and energy production are activated. DOG21 strain, a partly catabolite-derepressed mutant derived from V1, displayed gene expression patterns quite similar to those of V1, although lower levels of gene expression and changes in fewer number of genes as compared to V1 were both detected in all cases. However, under fermentative conditions, DOG21 mutant significantly increased the expression of SNF1 -controlled genes and other genes involved in stress resistance, whereas the expression of the HXK2 gene, involved in catabolite repression, was considerably reduced, according to the pleiotropic stress-resistant phenotype of this mutant. These results also seemed to suggest that stress-resistant genes control desirable bakers' yeast qualities.

  13. A generalization of Baker's quadratic formulae for hyperelliptic ℘-functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athorne, Chris

    2011-07-01

    We present a generalization of a compact form, due to Baker, for quadratic identities satisfied by the three-index ℘-functions on curves of genus g=2, and a further generalization of a new result in genus g=3. The compact forms involve a bordered determinant containing 2(g-1)(g+1) free parameters.

  14. Remembering Community Inclusion: Stories From the Life of Jack Eldon Baker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millington, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    Jack Eldon Baker was born, lived, and died in Gilbert, Arkansas. The story of his life is retold in excerpts from a memorial publication published by the people of the town. This article also makes the case that his story is an example of community inclusion. Through the voices of those who knew him, we see Jack as a person who gave to the…

  15. 78 FR 27215 - Baker County Oregon; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing With the Commission and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-09

    ...: Mason Dam Hydroelectric Project. f. Location: The proposed project would be located on the Powder River... instream flow releases from Mason dam and established under existing agreements between the Reclamation, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and/or the Baker Valley Irrigation District. Generation...

  16. Baker's Helper. DOT No. 313.684-010. Cafeteria Occupations. Coordinator's Guide. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East Texas State Univ., Commerce. Occupational Curriculum Lab.

    This study guide is one of eight individualized units developed for students enrolled in cooperative part-time training and employed in a cafeteria. Each self-paced unit is composed of information about one specific occupation; this unit focuses on the duties of the baker's helper. Materials provided in this guide for coordinator use include a…

  17. Assessment of VOC emissions and their control from baker's yeast manufacturing facilities. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, R.; Williamson, M.

    1992-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Control Technology Center (CTC) conducted a study to obtain information on the baker's yeast manufacturing industry. Baker's yeast is produced by a fermentation process that generates large quantities of ethanol and acetaldehyde. Currently, 13 facilities produce baker's yeast in the United States. The volatile organic compound (VOC) emission rate from a typical facility is estimated at 82 megagrams per year (90 tons per year). The majority of these emissions occurs in the final trade fermentations. The VOC emission alternatives that were evaluated during the study were process control measures to reduce the formation of VOC emissions as well as wet scrubbers, carbon adsorbers, incinerators, condensers, and biological filters to control VOC emissions. Of these approaches, it appears that process control measures, catalytic incinerators, or a combination of add-on control techniques (e.g., wet scrubbers followed by an incinerator or a biological filter) are the most feasible approaches for controlling yeast process emissions. Based on the results of the study, the control efficiency associated with the add-on control systems is estimated to be 95 to 98 percent. The report contains information on the baker's yeast fermentation process, the number and locations of yeast plants, the potential emissions from the process, and an evaluation of potential emission control options.

  18. Simultaneous accumulation of proline and trehalose in industrial baker's yeast enhances fermentation ability in frozen dough.

    PubMed

    Sasano, Yu; Haitani, Yutaka; Hashida, Keisuke; Ohtsu, Iwao; Shima, Jun; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2012-05-01

    Freeze tolerance is a necessary characteristic for industrial baker's yeast because frozen-dough baking is one of the key technologies for supplying oven-fresh bakery products to consumers. Both proline and trehalose are known to function as cryoprotectants in yeast cells. In order to enhance the freeze tolerance of yeast cells, we constructed a self-cloning diploid baker's yeast strain with simultaneous accumulation of proline, by expressing the PRO1-I150T allele, encoding the proline-feedback inhibition-less sensitive γ-glutamyl kinase, and trehalose, by disrupting the NTH1 gene, encoding neutral trehalase. The resultant strain retained higher tolerance to oxidative and freezing stresses than did the single proline- or trehalose-accumulating strain. Interestingly, our results suggest that proline and trehalose protect yeast cells from short-term and long-term freezing, respectively. Simultaneous accumulation of proline and trehalose in industrial baker's yeast also enhanced the fermentation ability in the frozen dough compared with the single accumulation of proline or trehalose. These results indicate that baker's yeast that accumulates both proline and trehalose is applicable for frozen-dough baking. PMID:22280966

  19. Thermal surveillance of active volcanoes. [infrared scanner recordings of thermal anomalies of Mt. Baker volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, J. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. By the end of 1973, aerial infrared scanner traverses for thermal anomaly recordings of all Cascade Range volcanoes were essentially completed. Amplitude level slices of the Mount Baker anomalies were completed and compiled at a scale of 1:24,000, thus producing, for the first time, an accurate map of the distribution and intensity of thermal activity on Mount Baker. The major thermal activity is concentrated within the crater south of the main summit and although it is characterized by intensive solfataric activity and warm ground, it is largely subglacial, causing the development of sizable glacier perforation features. The outgoing radiative flux from the east breach anomalies is sufficient to account for the volume of ice melted to form the glacier perforations. DCP station 6251 has been monitoring a thermally anomalous area on the north slope of Mount Baker. The present thermal activity of Mount Baker accounts for continuing hydrothermal alteration in the crater south of the main summit and recurrent debris avalanches from Sherman Peak on its south rim. The infrared anomalies mapped as part of the experiment SR 251 are considered the basic evidence of the subglacial heating which was the probable triggering mechanism of an avalanche down Boulder Glacier on August 20-21, 1973.

  20. 78 FR 25693 - Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest; Snohomish County, WA; Green Mountain Lookout Removal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-02

    ... Forest Service Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest; Snohomish County, WA; Green Mountain Lookout Removal.... SUMMARY: This project would remove the historic fire lookout on Green Mountain and relocate it to Circle... Wilderness in connection with the removal. Green Mountain Lookout is approximately one air mile...

  1. 78 FR 33048 - Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest; Snohomish County, WA; Green Mountain Lookout Removal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-03

    .... 85), beginning a 30 day comment period. Please see the Notice of Intent (FR Doc. 2013- 10322) for... Forest Service Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest; Snohomish County, WA; Green Mountain Lookout Removal... hereby gives notice that it is extending the public scoping comment period for the Green Mountain...

  2. 76 FR 62605 - Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act; Interpretation of Unblockable Drain

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ... (76 FR 47436), we published a final rule to incorporate into our regulations ANSI/APSP-16 2011 as the... issued a final interpretive rule in the Federal Register (75 FR 21985) interpreting ``unblockable drain... COMMISSION 16 CFR Part 1450 Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act; Interpretation of...

  3. 78 FR 23546 - Proposed Extension of Approval of Information Collection; Comment Request: Virginia Graeme Baker...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-19

    ... Pool and Spa Safety Act; Compliance Form AGENCY: Consumer Product Safety Commission. ACTION: Notice... information collection regarding a form used to verify whether pools and spas are in compliance with the Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act. The Office of Management and Budget (OMB)...

  4. Effects of SNF1 on Maltose Metabolism and Leavening Ability of Baker's Yeast in Lean Dough.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cui-Ying; Bai, Xiao-Wen; Lin, Xue; Liu, Xiao-Er; Xiao, Dong-Guang

    2015-12-01

    Maltose metabolism of baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) in lean dough is negatively influenced by glucose repression, thereby delaying the dough fermentation. To improve maltose metabolism and leavening ability, it is necessary to alleviate glucose repression. The Snf1 protein kinase is well known to be essential for the response to glucose repression and required for transcription of glucose-repressed genes including the maltose-utilization genes (MAL). In this study, the SNF1 overexpression and deletion industrial baker's yeast strains were constructed and characterized in terms of maltose utilization, growth and fermentation characteristics, mRNA levels of MAL genes (MAL62 encoding the maltase and MAL61 encoding the maltose permease) and maltase and maltose permease activities. Our results suggest that overexpression of SNF1 was effective to glucose derepression for enhancing MAL expression levels and enzymes (maltase and maltose permease) activities. These enhancements could result in an 18% increase in maltose metabolism of industrial baker's yeast in LSMLD medium (the low sugar model liquid dough fermentation medium) containing glucose and maltose and a 15% increase in leavening ability in lean dough. These findings provide a valuable insight of breeding industrial baker's yeast for rapid fermentation. PMID:26580148

  5. Electronically Transmitted Threats and Higher Education: Oppression, Free Speech, and Jake Baker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder, Jared C.

    2013-01-01

    When Jake Baker wrote a violent, sexually themed story about one of his classmates and emailed it to a friend, the case that ensued highlighted how new technologies have created fresh ways for students to harass, oppress, or be oppressed by others. This article examines concepts of violence and cultural imperialism oppression, primarily as defined…

  6. 76 FR 72718 - Notice of Availability of the Draft Baker Resource Management Plan and Environmental Impact...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-25

    ... planning criteria for review and was published in the Federal Register on January 15, 2008 (73 FR 2520...: Livestock Grazing--How will livestock grazing on public lands be addressed? All four issues center on the.... The BLM Baker Field Office conducted an inventory of rivers and streams to determine eligibility...

  7. Construction of a Stable alpha-Galactosidase-Producing Baker's Yeast Strain.

    PubMed

    Liljeström-Suominen, Pirkko L; Joutsjoki, Vesa; Korhola, Matti

    1988-01-01

    Molasses is widely used as a substrate for commercial yeast production. The complete hydrolysis of raffinose, which is present in beet molasses, by Saccharomyces strains requires the secretion of alpha-galactosidase, in addition to the secretion of invertase. Raffinose is not completely utilized by commercially available yeast strains used for baking, which are Mel. In this study we integrated the yeast MEL1 gene, which codes for alpha-galactosidase, into a commercial mel baker's yeast strain. The Mel phenotype of the new strain was stable. The MEL1 gene was expressed when the new Mel baker's yeast was grown in molasses medium under conditions similar to those used for baker's yeast production at commercial factories. The alpha-galactosidase produced by this novel baker's yeast strain hydrolyzed all the melibiose that normally accumulates in the growth medium. As a consequence, additional carbohydrate was available to the yeasts for growth. The new strain also produced considerably more alpha-galactosidase than did a wild-type Mel strain and may prove useful for commercial production of alpha-galactosidase.

  8. Construction of a Stable α-Galactosidase-Producing Baker's Yeast Strain

    PubMed Central

    Liljeström-Suominen, Pirkko L.; Joutsjoki, Vesa; Korhola, Matti

    1988-01-01

    Molasses is widely used as a substrate for commercial yeast production. The complete hydrolysis of raffinose, which is present in beet molasses, by Saccharomyces strains requires the secretion of α-galactosidase, in addition to the secretion of invertase. Raffinose is not completely utilized by commercially available yeast strains used for baking, which are Mel−. In this study we integrated the yeast MEL1 gene, which codes for α-galactosidase, into a commercial mel0 baker's yeast strain. The Mel+ phenotype of the new strain was stable. The MEL1 gene was expressed when the new Mel+ baker's yeast was grown in molasses medium under conditions similar to those used for baker's yeast production at commercial factories. The α-galactosidase produced by this novel baker's yeast strain hydrolyzed all the melibiose that normally accumulates in the growth medium. As a consequence, additional carbohydrate was available to the yeasts for growth. The new strain also produced considerably more α-galactosidase than did a wild-type Mel+ strain and may prove useful for commercial production of α-galactosidase. Images PMID:16347529

  9. Chicks in Charge: Andrea Baker & Amy Daniels--Airport High School Media Center, Columbia, SC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This article briefly discusses two librarians exploration of Linux. Andrea Baker and Amy Daniels were tired of telling their students that new technology items were not in the budget. They explored Linux, which is a program that recycles older computers, installs free operating systems and free software.

  10. Use of Enzymes in Organic Synthesis: Reduction of Ketones by Baker's Yeast Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, James; Sigurdsson, Snorri Th.

    2005-01-01

    The reduction of ethyl acetoacetate using common baker's yeast is a traditional experiment that shows the stereoselective power of a biochemical system. Addition of organic solvents to aqueous reaction system increased the yields and reproducibility of the experiment thus overcoming the two problems associated with the experiment, low yield, and…

  11. Data-Based Personnel Decisions: Baker Middle's Intensive Support List

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Kimberly Kappler; Chopin, Scarlet Lilian

    2015-01-01

    Focused on the use of teacher evaluation data, this case was designed for use in two principal licensure courses, one on data literacy and the other on supervision and personnel. The principal of Baker Middle School has been instructed by the superintendent to use data from the state's new teacher evaluation system to determine which teachers…

  12. The natural extensions of β-transformations which generalize baker's transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Do Yong

    2009-02-01

    We consider the natural extensions of β-transformations. For some specific β, the extensions can be viewed as generalized baker's transformations, i.e. they flatten and stretch and then cut and stack a two-dimensional domain. This paper characterizes such β and studies their properties.

  13. An anomalous swarm of low-frequency events at Mount Baker, Washington, June-August 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, S. C.; Thelen, W. A.; Caplan-Auerbach, J.; Malone, S. D.; Wright, A.

    2009-12-01

    Between June 16 and August 22, 2009, a swarm of least 39 low-frequency (LF) seismic events occurred at shallow depths beneath Mount Baker, a Cascade Range composite stratovolcano located in northern Washington. The LF events had several characteristics similar to classic volcanic low-frequency events, including narrowly peaked spectra (~3 Hz) and somewhat extended codas. They occurred at relatively regular time intervals, at first averaging one every 3-4 days and then accelerating in mid-July to one per day before tailing off in late August. Many were recorded at stations as distant as 220 km, and those that were located by the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network (PNSN) had coda-duration magnitudes of Md 1.5-2.2. Many events had similar (cross-correlation coefficient = 0.7) waveforms, indicating that the source type and location were similar for most events. A search through the PNSN catalog from 2000-2009 found 8 LF events with similar characteristics to the 2009 events; thus shallow LF events are not unprecedented at Mount Baker, but also clearly have never been detected at rates as high as the 2009 swarm. Mount Baker has been seismically monitored since 1972, although the network has consisted of only a single short-period seismometer ~6 km west of the summit and a total of 6 weak-motion seismometers within 50 km. The location threshold at Mount Baker is thus quite poor (estimated to be Md 1.6), and it is likely that some prior shallow LF events have gone undetected. Detection of the 2009 LF events was enabled in part by addition of 2 new PNSN stations at 30 and 38 km from Mount Baker (although these stations only improved the estimated location threshold from Md 1.7 to Md 1.6) and also through automatically produced, multi-station, 10-minute spectrograms that have made visual detection of such events much easier. Thus it is difficult to know whether the 2009 swarm is unprecedented at Mount Baker, although we can be reasonably sure that no similar swarms have

  14. Reconstructing streamflow variation of the Baker River from tree-rings in Northern Patagonia since 1765

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, Antonio; Bahamondez, Alejandra; González-Reyes, Alvaro; Muñoz, Ariel A.; Cuq, Emilio; Ruiz-Gómez, Carolina

    2015-10-01

    The understanding of the long-term variation of large rivers streamflow with a high economic and social relevance is necessary in order to improve the planning and management of water resources in different regions of the world. The Baker River has the highest mean discharge of those draining both slopes of the Andes South of 20°S and it is among the six rivers with the highest mean streamflow in the Pacific domain of South America (1100 m3 s-1 at its outlet). It drains an international basin of 29,000 km2 shared by Chile and Argentina and has a high ecologic and economic value including conservation, tourism, recreational fishing, and projected hydropower. This study reconstructs the austral summer - early fall (January-April) streamflow for the Baker River from Nothofagus pumilio tree-rings for the period 1765-2004. Summer streamflow represents 45.2% of the annual discharge. The regression model for the period (1961-2004) explains 54% of the variance of the Baker River streamflow (R2adj = 0.54). The most significant temporal pattern in the record is the sustained decline since the 1980s (τ = -0.633, p = 1.0144 ∗ 10-5 for the 1985-2004 period), which is unprecedented since 1765. The Correlation of the Baker streamflow with the November-April observed Southern Annular Mode (SAM) is significant (1961-2004, r = -0.55, p < 0.001). The Baker record is also correlated with the available SAM tree-ring reconstruction based on other species when both series are filtered with a 25-year spline and detrended (1765-2004, r = -0.41, p < 0.01), emphasizing SAM as the main climatic forcing of the Baker streamflow. Three of the five summers with the highest streamflow in the entire reconstructed record occurred after the 1950s (1977, 1958 and 1959). The causes of this high streamflow events are not yet clear and cannot be associated with the reported recent increase in the frequency of glacial-lake outburst floods (GLOFs). The decreasing trend in the observed and reconstructed

  15. Production of Aromatic Plant Terpenoids in Recombinant Baker's Yeast.

    PubMed

    Emmerstorfer-Augustin, Anita; Pichler, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Plant terpenoids are high-value compounds broadly applied as food additives or fragrances in perfumes and cosmetics. Their biotechnological production in yeast offers an attractive alternative to extraction from plants. Here, we provide two optimized protocols for the production of the plant terpenoid trans-nootkatol with recombinant S. cerevisiae by either (I) converting externally added (+)-valencene with resting cells or (II) cultivating engineered self-sufficient production strains. By synthesis of the hydrophobic compounds in self-sufficient production cells, phase transfer issues can be avoided and the highly volatile products can be enriched in and easily purified from n-dodecane, which is added to the cell broth as second phase. PMID:26843167

  16. Racial science in social context: John R. Baker on eugenics, race, and the public role of the scientist.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Michael G

    2004-09-01

    In 1974 a British biologist, John Randal Baker (1900-1984), published a large and controversial book simply entitled Race that reiterated persistent eugenicist themes concerning the relation between race, intelligence, and progress. The history of Baker's book is a case study in the politics of scientific publishing, and his ideas influenced scholars associated with later works such as The Bell Curve. Baker, a student of Julian Huxley, was a longtime participant in the British eugenics movement and opponent of what he took to be a facile belief in human equality. In 1942, together with Michael Polanyi, he founded the Society for Freedom in Science to oppose those who advocated the central planning of scientific research. Baker's eugenics, political activities, and views on race express an elitist individualism, associated with the conservative wing of the eugenics movement, that this paper explores in the context of his career as a whole.

  17. Validation of antifreeze properties of glutathione based on its thermodynamic characteristics and protection of baker's yeast during cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Li; Yao, Huiyuan

    2007-06-13

    The antifreeze ability of glutathione was evaluated on the basis of its thermodynamic characteristics and protection of baker's yeast during cryopreservation at -30 degrees C. The thermodynamic characteristics and protection of baker's yeast of glutathione were similar to those of known antifreeze proteins, such as carrot antifreeze protein and holly antifreeze protein. These properties included lowering the freezing point at about 0.20 degrees C non-colligatively, decreasing freezable water content, controlling the movement of free water for its strong hydrophilicity, and improving baker's yeast survival during the simulated processing of frozen dough. Therefore, glutathione was viewed to be an antifreeze protein like substance on the basis of its unique thermodynamic characteristics and protection of baker's yeast. The method combining thermodynamic characteristic analysis and protection evaluation is a new and simple way to screen new antifreeze proteins. PMID:17508758

  18. Racial science in social context: John R. Baker on eugenics, race, and the public role of the scientist.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Michael G

    2004-09-01

    In 1974 a British biologist, John Randal Baker (1900-1984), published a large and controversial book simply entitled Race that reiterated persistent eugenicist themes concerning the relation between race, intelligence, and progress. The history of Baker's book is a case study in the politics of scientific publishing, and his ideas influenced scholars associated with later works such as The Bell Curve. Baker, a student of Julian Huxley, was a longtime participant in the British eugenics movement and opponent of what he took to be a facile belief in human equality. In 1942, together with Michael Polanyi, he founded the Society for Freedom in Science to oppose those who advocated the central planning of scientific research. Baker's eugenics, political activities, and views on race express an elitist individualism, associated with the conservative wing of the eugenics movement, that this paper explores in the context of his career as a whole. PMID:15747772

  19. Effects of MAL61 and MAL62 overexpression on maltose fermentation of baker's yeast in lean dough.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cui-Ying; Lin, Xue; Song, Hai-Yan; Xiao, Dong-Guang

    2015-08-01

    The predominant fermentable sugar in lean dough is maltose. To improve the leavening ability of baker's yeast in lean dough, maltose metabolism should be improved. Maltase (alpha-glucosidase, encoded by MAL62) and maltose permease (encoded by MAL61) are the major factors involved in maltose metabolism. The major rate-limiting factor in maltose metabolism and leavening ability of baker's yeast remains unclear. In this work, MAL61 and/or MAL62 overexpression strains were constructed to investigate the decisive factor for maltose metabolism of industrial baker's yeast in lean dough. Our results show that elevated maltose permease activity by MAL61 overexpression yielded less improvement in maltose fermentation compared to elevated maltase activity by MAL62 overexpression. Significant increase in maltase activity by MAL62 overexpression could result in a 44% increase in leavening ability of industrial baker's yeast in lean dough and a 39% increase in maltose metabolism in a medium containing glucose and maltose. Thus, maltase was the rate-limiting factor in maltose fermentation of industrial baker's yeast in lean dough. This study lays a foundation for breeding of industrial baker's yeast for quick dough leavening.

  20. I Want to Believe: A Short Psychobiography of Mary Baker Eddy.

    PubMed

    Dean, Taylor Wilson

    2016-01-01

    The 18th and 19th centuries were beset with new religious movements in the United States: Shakers, Latter Day Saints, Millerites, and Seventh Day Adventists to name a few. One group, Christian Science, held radically different views than their counterparts and their origins lay in the most unlikely of places, a perpetually ill and poor woman from New Hampshire. Much has been said about Mary Baker Eddy: some say that she was a prophet, others that she was a fraud. Herein no such judgments are made. This study seeks to look into the life of Mary Baker Eddy from a psychological lens in the hopes that insight can be gained into the founding of the First Church of Jesus Christ Scientist and perhaps to allay the binary of Mrs. Eddy as either prophet or fanatic. PMID:27480014

  1. Assessment of increased thermal activity at Mount Baker, Washington, March 1975-March 1976

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frank, David; Meier, Mark Frederick; Swanson, Donald A.; with contributions by Babcock, James W.; Fretwell, Marvin O.; Malone, Stephen D.; Rosenfeld, Charles L.; Shreve, Ronald L.; Wilcox, Ray E.

    1977-01-01

    In March 1975 Mount Baker showed a large increase in thermal emission, which has persisted for more than 1 year. Fumarole ejecta accompanied the thermal activity from March to September, but the ejecta had no constituents that suggest a magmatic source. Estimates of that part of the total heat flux that would account for the observed snow and ice loss show that the heat-flow increase was roughly one order of magnitude, from about 2 megawatts at 10 watts per square meter, averaged over Sherman Crater before 1975, to about 30 megawatts at 180 watts per square meter, during 1975. Almost half of the glacier that occupied the basin of Sherman Crater was melted in 1975. The new activity generated great concern among the public and the government agencies responsible for geological evaluation of potential hazards and for protection of life and property. The past geologic history, current topography, rock alteration, and location of major fumarolic activity indicate that large rock avalanches and mudflows on the east slope in Boulder Creek valley are the potential hazards of most significance related to present conditions. The most probable types of large mass movements would be mudflows, having speeds of as much as 50 kilometers per hour, that would originate from mixtures of snow, ice, and melt water and avalanches of structurally weak clay-rich rocks that make up the rim of Sherman Crater. Similar mudflows from the volcano have traveled at least 12 kilometers 8 times during the past 10,000 years. A possible worst case event, however, might be a larger, air-cushioned avalanche of as much as 20 to 30 million cubic meters that could hit Baker Lake at speeds of more than 300 kilometers per hour and generate a wave of water large enough to overtop Upper Baker Dam. At least 30 million cubic meters of potentially unstable material occurs as hydrothermally altered remnants of the rim of Sherman Crater and could provide the required volume for the estimated worst case event or

  2. Sorbose Counterflow as a Measure of Intracellular Glucose in Baker's Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Peter O.; Cirill, Vincent P.

    1965-01-01

    Wilkins, Peter O. (New Jersey College of Medicine and Dentistry, Jersey City), and Vincent P. Cirillo. Sorbose counterflow as a measure of intracellular glucose in baker's yeast. J. Bacteriol. 90:1605–1610. 1965.—The intracellular concentration of glucose in metabolizing baker's yeast was determined indirectly from the glucose-induced counterflow of previously accumulated sorbose. The method is based on the concept that sugar transport in yeast is a symmetrical facilitated diffusion. The intracellular glucose concentration increased with an increase in the extracellular concentration and was higher in aerobiosis than in anaerobiosis. The concentrations were considerably greater than those obtained by direct analysis of intracellular glucose. Calculation of the apparent maximal velocity of glucose transport yielded values which varied with the rate of metabolism and the extracellular concentration. This suggests that during glucose metabolism the transport of hexoses includes elements that are not revealed by experiments involving metabolic inhibitors or nonmetabolizable sugars. PMID:5854586

  3. 75 FR 27287 - South Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... (425) 888-1421, e-mail jfranzel@fs.fed.us . Individuals who use telecommunication devices for the deaf... Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest Web site at: http://www.fs.fed.us/r6/mbs/projects/rac.shtm . Comments may be sent via e-mail to jfranzel@fs.fed.us or via facsimile (fax) to 425-8881910. All...

  4. Baker-Barry Tunnel Lighting: Evaluation of a Potential GATEWAY Demonstrations Project

    SciTech Connect

    Tuenge, Jason R.

    2011-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is evaluating the Baker-Barry Tunnel as a potential GATEWAY Demonstrations project for deployment of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology. The National Park Service (NPS) views this project as a possible proving ground and template for implementation of light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires in other NPS tunnels, thereby expanding the estimated 40% energy savings from 132 MWh/yr for this tunnel to a much larger figure national

  5. Microbiological and fermentative properties of baker's yeast starter used in breadmaking.

    PubMed

    Reale, A; Di Renzo, T; Succi, M; Tremonte, P; Coppola, R; Sorrentino, E

    2013-08-01

    This study assessed the levels of microbial contaminants in liquid, compressed and dry commercial baker's yeasts used as starters in breadmaking. Eumycetes, Enterobacteriaceae, total and fecal coliforms, Bacillus spp., and lactic acid bacteria (LAB), in particular enterococci, were quantified. Results obtained in this study highlighted that baker's yeast could represent a potential vehicle of spoilage and undesirable microorganisms into the baking environment, even if these do not influence the leavening activity in the dough, as ascertained by rheofermentometer analysis. Different microbial groups, such as spore-forming bacteria and moulds, were found in baker's yeast starters. Moreover, different species of LAB, which are considered the main contaminants in large-scale yeast fermentations, were isolated and identified by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) and 16S rDNA sequencing. The most recurrent species were Lactobacillus plantarum, Enterococcus faecalis, and Enterococcus durans, isolated from both compressed and dry starters, whereas strains belonging to Leuconostoc and Pediococcus genera were found only in dry ones. Nested-Polymerase Chain Reaction (Nested-PCR) and Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA-PCR (RAPD-PCR) were also used to highlight the biodiversity of the different commercial yeast strains, and to ascertain the culture purity.

  6. Enhanced leavening ability of baker's yeast by overexpression of SNR84 with PGM2 deletion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xue; Zhang, Cui-Ying; Bai, Xiao-Wen; Xiao, Dong-Guang

    2015-06-01

    Dough-leavening ability is one of the main aspects considered when selecting a baker's yeast strain for baking industry. Generally, modification of maltose metabolic pathway and known regulatory networks of maltose metabolism were used to increase maltose metabolism to improve leavening ability in lean dough. In this study, we focus on the effects of PGM2 (encoding for the phosphoglucomutase) and SNR84 (encoding for the H/ACA snoRNA) that are not directly related to both the maltose metabolic pathway and known regulatory networks of maltose metabolism on the leavening ability of baker's yeast in lean dough. The results show that the modifications on PGM2 and/or SNR84 are effective ways in improving leavening ability of baker's yeast in lean dough. Deletion of PGM2 decreased cellular glucose-1-phosphate and overexpression of SNR84 increased the maltose permease activity. These changes resulted in 11, 19 and 21% increases of the leavening ability for PGM2 deletion, SNR84 overexpression and SNR84 overexpression combining deleted PGM2, respectively.

  7. Functional genomic analysis of commercial baker's yeast during initial stages of model dough-fermentation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Fumiko; Ando, Akira; Nakamura, Toshihide; Takagi, Hiroshi; Shima, Jun

    2006-12-01

    Gene expression profiles of baker's yeast during initial dough-fermentation were investigated using liquid fermentation (LF) media to obtain insights at the molecular level into rapid adaptation mechanisms of baker's yeast. Results showed that onset of fermentation caused drastic changes in gene expression profiles within 15 min. Genes involved in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle were down-regulated and genes involved in glycolysis were up-regulated, indicating a metabolic shift from respiration to fermentation. Genes involved in ethanol production (PDC genes and ADH1), in glycerol synthesis (GPD1 and HOR2), and in low-affinity hexose transporters (HXT1 and HXT3) were up-regulated at the beginning of model dough-fermentation. Among genes up-regulated at 15 min, several genes classified as transcription were down-regulated within 30 min. These down-regulated genes are involved in messenger RNA splicing and ribosomal protein biogenesis and in transcriptional regulator (SRB8, MIG1). In contrast, genes involved in amino acid metabolism and in vitamin metabolism, such as arginine biosynthesis, riboflavin biosynthesis, and thiamin biosynthesis, were subsequently up-regulated after 30 min. Interestingly, the genes involved in the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway were also subsequently up-regulated. Our study presents the first overall description of the transcriptional response of baker's yeast during dough-fermentation, and will thus help clarify genomic responses to various stresses during commercial fermentation processes. PMID:16943074

  8. Enhanced leavening ability of baker's yeast by overexpression of SNR84 with PGM2 deletion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xue; Zhang, Cui-Ying; Bai, Xiao-Wen; Xiao, Dong-Guang

    2015-06-01

    Dough-leavening ability is one of the main aspects considered when selecting a baker's yeast strain for baking industry. Generally, modification of maltose metabolic pathway and known regulatory networks of maltose metabolism were used to increase maltose metabolism to improve leavening ability in lean dough. In this study, we focus on the effects of PGM2 (encoding for the phosphoglucomutase) and SNR84 (encoding for the H/ACA snoRNA) that are not directly related to both the maltose metabolic pathway and known regulatory networks of maltose metabolism on the leavening ability of baker's yeast in lean dough. The results show that the modifications on PGM2 and/or SNR84 are effective ways in improving leavening ability of baker's yeast in lean dough. Deletion of PGM2 decreased cellular glucose-1-phosphate and overexpression of SNR84 increased the maltose permease activity. These changes resulted in 11, 19 and 21% increases of the leavening ability for PGM2 deletion, SNR84 overexpression and SNR84 overexpression combining deleted PGM2, respectively. PMID:25877163

  9. Determination of cellular carbohydrates in peanut fungal pathogens and baker's yeast by capillary electrophoresis and electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M; Melouk, H A; Chenault, K; El Rassi, Z

    2001-11-01

    In this work, the quantitation of cellular carbohydrates, namely chitin and glucan, in peanut fungal pathogens and baker's yeast was carried out by capillary electrophoresis (CE) and capillary electrochromatography (CEC). The chitin and glucan of the fungi were hydrolyzed by the enzymes chitinase and glucanase, respectively, to their corresponding sugar monomers N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and glucose (Glc). These two monosaccharides were then tagged with 6-aminoquinoline (6-AQ) to allow their separation and detection in CE and CEC. The 6-AQ derivatives of GlcNAc and Glc formed the basis for the determination by CE and CEC of chitin and glucan in peanut fungi and baker's yeast. Several parameters affecting the separation of the 6-AQ derivatives of GlcNAc and Glc, including the separation voltage and the composition of the running electrolyte, were investigated. Under the optimized separation conditions, the contents of cellular carbohydrates including N-acetylglucosamine, chitin, glucose, and glucan in some fungi, such as Sclerotinia minor, Sclerotium rolfsii, and baker's yeast, were successfully determined. The method described here allowed the assessment of genetic differences in Sclerotium rolfsii isolates from various locations. PMID:11714314

  10. Bioethanol production from Ficus religiosa leaves using microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    Klein, Miri; Griess, Ofir; Pulidindi, Indra Neel; Perkas, Nina; Gedanken, Aharon

    2016-07-15

    A microwave assisted feasible process for the production of bioethanol from Ficus religiosa leaves was developed. Under the process conditions (8 min. microwave irradiation, 1 M HCl), 10.1 wt% glucose yield was obtained from the leaves. Microwave based hydrolysis process yielded higher glucose content (10.1 wt%) compared to the conventional hydrothermal process (4.1 wt%). Upon fermentation of the hydrolysate using Baker's yeast, 3 wt% (dry wt. basis) of bioethanol was produced. PMID:27064733

  11. Helicopter magnetic and electromagnetic surveys at Mounts Adams, Baker and Rainier, Washington: implications for debris flow hazards and volcano hydrology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finn, Carol A.; Deszcz-Pan, Maria

    2011-01-01

    High‐resolution helicopter magnetic and electromagnetic (HEM) data flown over the rugged, ice‐covered Mt. Adams, Mt. Baker and Mt. Rainier volcanoes (Washington), reveal the distribution of alteration, water and ice thickness essential to evaluating volcanic landslide hazards. These data, combined with geological mapping and rock property measurements, indicate the presence of appreciable thicknesses (>500 m) of water‐saturated hydrothermally altered rock west of the modern summit of Mount Rainier in the Sunset Amphitheater region and in the central core of Mount Adams north of the summit. Alteration at Mount Baker is restricted to thinner (<300 m) zones beneath Sherman Crater and the Dorr Fumarole Fields. The EM data identified water‐saturated rocks from the surface to the detection limit (100–200 m) in discreet zones at Mt. Rainier and Mt Adams and over the entire summit region at Mt. Baker. The best estimates for ice thickness are obtained over relatively low resistivity (<800 ohm‐m) ground for the main ice cap on Mt. Adams and over most of the summit of Mt. Baker. The modeled distribution of alteration, pore fluids and partial ice volumes on the volcanoes helps identify likely sources for future alteration‐related debris flows, including the Sunset Amphitheater region at Mt. Rainier, steep cliffs at the western edge of the central altered zone at Mount Adams and eastern flanks of Mt. Baker.

  12. Petrogenesis of Mt. Baker Basalts and Andesites: Constraints From Mineral Chemistry and Phase Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullen, E.; McCallum, I. S.

    2009-12-01

    Basalts in continental arcs are volumetrically subordinate to andesites and this is the case for Mt. Baker in the northern Cascade magmatic arc. However, basalts provide indirect evidence on mantle compositions and processes that produce magmas parental to the abundant andesites and dacites of the stratocones. Basalts at Mt. Baker erupted from monogenetic vents peripheral to the andesitic stratocone. Flows are variable in composition; some samples would more appropriately be classified as basaltic andesites. The “basalts” have relatively low Mg/(Mg+Fe) indicating that they have evolved from their original compositions. Samples studied are Park Butte, Tarn Plateau, Lk. Shannon, Sulphur Cr. basalts, and Cathedral Crag, Hogback, and Rankin Ridge basaltic andesites. Mt. Baker lavas belong to the calc-alkaline basalt suite (CAB) defined by Bacon et al. (1997) and preserve arc geochemical features. High alumina olivine tholeiite (HAOT) are absent. Equilibrium mineral pairs and whole rock compositions were used to calculate pre-eruptive temperatures, water contents, and redox states of the “basalts.” All samples have zoned olivine phenocrysts with Fo68 to Fo87 cores and chromite inclusions. Cpx and zoned plagioclase occur in all flows, but opx occurs only in Cathedral Crag, Rankin Ridge, and Tarn Plateau. Ti-magnetite and ilmenite coexist in all flows except for Sulphur Cr., Lk. Shannon and Hogback, which contain a single Fe-Ti oxide. Liquidus temperatures range from 1080 to 1232°C and are negatively correlated with water contents. Water contents estimated using liquidus depression due to H2O (0.8 to 5.4 wt.%) agree well with plag core-whole rock equilibria estimates (1.2 to 3.9 wt.%). Park Butte, Sulphur Cr. and Lk. Shannon had <1.5 wt.% H2O, and Cathedral Crag is most hydrous. Redox states from ol-chr pairs (QFM +0.1 to +2.8) and Fe-Ti oxide pairs (QFM -0.6 to +1.8) indicate that Park Butte and Sulphur Cr. are most oxidized and Cathedral Crag most reduced

  13. Improvement of tolerance to freeze-thaw stress of baker's yeast by cultivation with soy peptides.

    PubMed

    Izawa, Shingo; Ikeda, Kayo; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Inoue, Yoshiharu

    2007-06-01

    The tolerance to freeze-thaw stress of yeast cells is critical for frozen-dough technology in the baking industry. In this study, we examined the effects of soy peptides on the freeze-thaw stress tolerance of yeast cells. We found that the cells cultured with soy peptides acquired improved tolerance to freeze-thaw stress and retained high leavening ability in dough after frozen storage for 7 days. The final quality of bread regarding its volume and texture was also improved by using yeast cells cultured with soy peptides. These findings promote the utilization of soy peptides as ingredients of culture media to improve the quality of baker's yeast.

  14. This photocopy of an engineering drawing shows the BakerPerkins 150gallon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    This photocopy of an engineering drawing shows the Baker-Perkins 150-gallon mixer installation in the building. Austin, Field & Fry, Architects Engineers, 22311 West Third Street, Los Angeles 57, California: Edwards Test Station Complex, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Edwards Air Force Base, Edwards, California: "150 Gallon Mixer System Bldg. E-34, Plans, Sections & Details," drawing no. E34/6-0, 10 July 1963. California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Plant Engineering: engineering drawings of structures at JPL Edwards Facility. Drawings on file at JPL Plant Engineering, Pasadena, California - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Mixer, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  15. Dissociative identity disorder: a feminist approach to inpatient treatment using Jean Baker Miller's Relational Model.

    PubMed

    Riggs, S R; Bright, M A

    1997-08-01

    Women diagnosed with Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) may experience episodic crises characterized by intense states of disconnection from self and others. Crises which result in potential harm to self/others may require inpatient treatment. With economic emphasis on shorter lengths of stay, a treatment program or model which focuses on the DID patient's sense of connectedness to self and others can enhance treatment efforts during brief inpatient hospitalizations. The Relational Model of Jean Baker Miller uses mutuality and empowerment within the therapeutic relationship and inpatient mileu to move the patient beyond therapeutic impasse/crisis toward a state of greater connectedness to self and others.

  16. Comment on ‘Special-case closed form of the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff formula’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, C. F.

    2016-05-01

    Recently Van-Brunt and Visser (2015 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 48 225207) succeeded in explicitly evaluating the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff (BCH) expansion series for the noncommuting operators X and Y, provided that the two operators satisfy the commutation relation: [X,Y]={uX}+{vY}+{cI}, and the operator I commutes with both of them. In this comment we show that the closed-form BCH formula of this special case can be straightforwardly derived by the means of the Wei-Norman theorem and no summation of the infinite series is needed.

  17. Classical predictability and coarse-grained evolution of the quantum baker's map

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, Artur; Soklakov, Andrei N.; Schack, Ruediger

    2006-06-15

    We investigate how classical predictability of the coarse-grained evolution of the quantum baker's map depends on the character of the coarse-graining. Our analysis extends earlier work by Brun and Hartle [Phys. Rev. D 60, 123503 (1999)] to the case of a chaotic map. To quantify predictability, we compare the rate of entropy increase for a family of coarse-grainings in the decoherent histories formalism. We find that the rate of entropy increase is dominated by the number of scales characterizing the coarse-graining.

  18. Multi-Baker Map as a Model of Digital PD Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csernák, Gábor; Gyebrószki, Gergely; Stépán, Gábor

    Digital stabilization of unstable equilibria of linear systems may lead to small amplitude stochastic-like oscillations. We show that these vibrations can be related to a deterministic chaotic dynamics induced by sampling and quantization. A detailed analytical proof of chaos is presented for the case of a PD controlled oscillator: it is shown that there exists a finite attracting domain in the phase-space, the largest Lyapunov exponent is positive and the existence of a Smale horseshoe is also pointed out. The corresponding two-dimensional micro-chaos map is a multi-baker map, i.e. it consists of a finite series of baker’s maps.

  19. Comparison of melibiose utilizing baker's yeast strains produced by genetic engineering and classical breeding.

    PubMed

    Vincent, S F; Bell, P J; Bissinger, P; Nevalainen, K M

    1999-02-01

    Yeast strains currently used in the baking industry cannot fully utilize the trisaccharide raffinose found in beet molasses due to the absence of melibiase (alpha-galactosidase) activity. To overcome this deficiency, the MEL1 gene encoding melibiase enzyme was introduced into baker's yeast by both classical breeding and recombinant DNA technology. Both types of yeast strains were capable of vigorous fermentation in the presence of high levels of sucrose, making them suitable for the rapidly developing Asian markets where high levels of sugar are used in bread manufacture. Melibiase expression appeared to be dosage-dependent, with relatively low expression sufficient for complete melibiose utilization in a model fermentation system.

  20. The Optical Performance of the 81/90/3032mm ADH Baker-Schmidt Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, A. D.

    1997-07-01

    The optical performance of the ADH Baker-Schmidt telescope is discussed in the light of test plates taken by the author and the comments from its maker, Perkin Elmer Corp. U.S.A. Although modern optical tests are needed to make a final judgement on the correction requirements, the ADH telescope seems to be a feasible, future refurbishment project. There is no question as to the cost effectiveness of using existing optics, including a full-aperture objective prism. The use of modern detector devices for galactic and extragalactic studies, including low-dispersion spectroscopy, such as developed for other large Schmidts is suggested.

  1. Active site - a site of binding of affinity inhibitors in baker's yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Svyato, I.E.; Sklyankina, V.A.; Avaeva, S.M.

    1986-03-20

    The interaction of the enzyme-substrate complex with methyl phosphate, O-phosphoethanolamine, O-phosphopropanolamine, N-acetylphosphoserine, and phosphoglyolic acid, as well as pyrophosphatase, modified by monoesters of phosphoric acid, with pyrophosphate and tripolyphosphate, was investigated. It was shown that the enzyme containing the substrate in the active site does not react with monophosphates, but modified pyrophosphatase entirely retains the ability to bind polyanions to the regulatory site. It is concluded that the inactivation of baker's yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase by monoesters of phosphoric acid, which are affinity inhibitors of it, is the result of modification of the active site of the enzyme.

  2. On-line optimal control for fed-batch culture of baker's yeast production

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, W.T.; Chen, K.C.; Chiou, H.W.

    1985-05-01

    A method of on-line optimal control for fed-batch culture of bakers yeast production is proposed. The feed rate is taken as the control variable. The specific growth rate of the yeast is the output variable and is determined from the balance equation of oxygen. A moving model is obtained by using the data from the feed rate and the specific growth rate. Based on the moving model, an optimal feed rate for fed-batch culture is then achieved. 11 references.

  3. Occupational eosinophilic bronchitis in a foundry worker exposed to isocyanate and a baker exposed to flour

    PubMed Central

    Stefano, Fabio Di; Giampaolo, Luca Di; Verna, Nicola; Gioacchino, Mario Di

    2007-01-01

    Eosinophilic bronchitis without asthma may occur as a consequence of occupational exposure. The cases of a foundry worker and a baker who developed symptoms, respectively, due to exposure to isocyanate and flour, are reported. Cough was not associated with variable airflow obstruction or with airway hyper‐responsiveness and was responsive to inhaled corticosteroids. The eosinophilia detectable in their sputum was causally related to the occupational exposure in the workplace. The examination of induced sputum should be used in addition to the objective monitoring of lung function for workers who have asthma‐like symptoms in an occupational setting. PMID:16055615

  4. PCR-directed in vivo plasmid construction using homologous recombination in baker's yeast.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Erik C

    2011-01-01

    A variety of applications require the creation of custom-designed plasmids, including transgenic reporters, heterologous gene fusions, and phenotypic rescue plasmids. These plasmids are created traditionally using restriction digests and in vitro ligation reactions, but these techniques are dependent on available restriction sites and can be laborious given the size and number of fragments to be ligated. The baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae provides a powerful platform to create nearly any plasmid through PCR-directed yeast-mediated ligation. This technique can ligate complex plasmids of up to 50 kilobasepairs (kb) in vivo to produce plasmids with precisely defined sequences.

  5. Ground-water data in the Baker County-northern Malheur County area, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collins, C.A.

    1979-01-01

    Ground-water data for the Baker County-northern Malheur area, Oregon, are tabulated for the Bureau of Land Management. The data include well and spring records, a well-location map, drillers ' logs of wells, observation-well hydrographs, and chemical analyses of ground-water samples. The reported yields of wells and springs in the area ranged from less than 1 to 2 ,500 gallons per minute. Dissolved solids in ground-water samples ranged from 50 to 1,587 milligrams per liter, and arsenic ranged from 0.001 to 0.317 milligrams per liter. (Woodard-USGS)

  6. Proline accumulation in baker's yeast enhances high-sucrose stress tolerance and fermentation ability in sweet dough.

    PubMed

    Sasano, Yu; Haitani, Yutaka; Ohtsu, Iwao; Shima, Jun; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    During bread-making processes, yeast cells are exposed to various baking-associated stresses. High-sucrose concentrations exert severe osmotic stress that seriously damages cellular components by generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Previously, we found that the accumulation of proline conferred freeze-thaw stress tolerance and the baker's yeast strain that accumulated proline retained higher-level fermentation abilities in frozen doughs than the wild-type strain. In this study, we constructed self-cloning diploid baker's yeast strains that accumulate proline. These resultant strains showed higher cell viability and lower intracellular oxidation levels than that observed in the wild-type strain under high-sucrose stress condition. Proline accumulation also enhanced the fermentation ability in high-sucrose-containing dough. These results demonstrate the usefulness of proline-accumulating baker's yeast for sweet dough baking. PMID:22041027

  7. Alternative parallel ring protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, R.; Foudriat, E. C.; Maly, Kurt J.; Kale, V.

    1990-01-01

    Communication protocols are know to influence the utilization and performance of communication network. The effect of two token ring protocols on a gigabit network with multiple ring structure is investigated. In the first protocol, a mode sends at most one message on receiving a token. In the second protocol, a mode sends all the waiting messages when a token is received. The behavior of these protocols is shown to be highly dependent on the number of rings as well as the load in the network.

  8. Quality parameters and RAPD-PCR differentiation of commercial baker's yeast and hybrid strains.

    PubMed

    El-Fiky, Zaki A; Hassan, Gamal M; Emam, Ahmed M

    2012-06-01

    Baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is a key component in bread baking. Total of 12 commercial baker's yeast and 2 hybrid strains were compared using traditional quality parameters. Total of 5 strains with high leavening power and the 2 hybrid strains were selected and evaluated for their alpha-amylase, maltase, glucoamylase enzymes, and compared using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). The results revealed that all selected yeast strains have a low level of alpha-amylase and a high level of maltase and glucoamylase enzymes. Meanwhile, the Egyptian yeast strain (EY) had the highest content of alpha-amylase and maltase enzymes followed by the hybrid YH strain. The EY and YH strains have the highest content of glucoamylase enzyme almost with the same level. The RAPD banding patterns showed a wide variation among commercial yeast and hybrid strains. The closely related Egyptian yeast strains (EY and AL) demonstrated close similarity of their genotypes. The 2 hybrid strains were clustered to Turkish and European strains in 1 group. The authors conclude that the identification of strains and hybrids using RAPD technique was useful in determining their genetic relationship. These results can be useful not only for the basic research, but also for the quality control in baking factories.

  9. Origin, distribution, and rapid removal of hydrothermally formed clay at Mount Baker, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frank, David

    1983-01-01

    Clay minerals are locally abundant in two hydrothermal areas at Mount Baker-Sherman Crater and the Dorr Fumarole Field. The silt- and clay-size fractions of volcanic debris that is undergoing alteration at and near the ground surface around areas of current fumarolic activity in Sherman Crater are largely dominated by alunite and a silica phase, either opal or cristobalite, but contain some kaolinite and smectite. Correspondingly, the chemistry of solutions at the surface of the crater, as represented by the crater lake, favors the formation of alunite over kaolinite. In contrast, vent-filling debris that was ejected to the surface from fumaroles in 1975 contains more than 20 percent clay-size material in which kaolinite and smectite are dominant. The youngest eruptive deposit (probably 19th century) on the crater rim was also altered prior to ejection and contains as much as 27 percent clay-size material in which kaolinite, smectite, pyrophyllite, and mixed-layer illitesmectite are abundant. The hydrothermal products, kaolinite and alunite, are present in significant amounts in five large Holocene mudflows that originated at the upper cone of Mount Baker. The distribution of kaolinite in crater and valley deposits indicates that, with the passage of time, increasingly greater amounts of this clay mineral have been incorporated into large mass movements from the upper cone. Either erosion has cut into more kaolinitic parts of the core of Sherman Crater, or the amount of kaolinite has increased through time in Sherman Crater.

  10. The trial of Abner Baker, Jr., MD: monomania and McNaughtan rules in antebellum America.

    PubMed

    White, R

    1990-01-01

    On the third of October 1845, in a small mountain community in Kentucky, Abner Baker, Jr., MD, was executed for the murder of his brother-in-law Daniel Bates. At the trial Baker's attorney argued unsuccessfully that at the time of the crime the accused suffered from monomania, a form of mental disease, and therefore should not be held responsible for the act. The trial bears historical significance by the fact that it took place only a year after the formation of the Association of Medical Superintendents of American Institutions for the Insane, the first professional organization of psychiatrists in the United States, and two years after the McNaughtan ruling in British jurisprudence which molded the insanity plea around the concept of "knowing right from wrong." Because it took place at this particular juncture in the history of both law and medicine, it provides a revealing portrait of how medical and legal concepts on insanity interacted with the indigenous social and political circumstances of antebellum America.

  11. Lipid composition of commercial bakers' yeasts having different freeze-tolerance in frozen dough.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Y; Yokoigawa, K; Kawai, F; Kawai, H

    1996-11-01

    The lipid composition of some commercial bakers' yeasts having different freeze-sensitivity in frozen dough was investigated to clarify the correlation between their lipid composition and freeze-tolerance. The total lipid content including neutral lipid, free fatty acid, sterol, and phospholipid ranged between 23.0 to 32.2 mg/100 mg protein of the yeasts tested. Phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidylserine were the main phospholipids found in all yeast strains, but no distinct difference in these components between freeze-tolerant and freeze-sensitive strains was observed. Palmitoleic (C16:1), oleic (C18:1), palmitic (16:0), and stearic (C18:0) acids were the major fatty acids present in total lipid and phospholipid, and unsaturation indices of fatty acid in these lipid components were almost equal by the strains. The molar ratios of sterol to phospholipid of freeze-sensitive strains were higher than those of freeze-tolerant strains. The difference in the sterol-phospholipid ratio that influences the fluidity of plasma membranes in yeast cells was supposed to reflect the difference in freeze-sensitivity of bakers' yeast. PMID:8987866

  12. Magma at depth: A retrospective analysis of the 1975 unrest at Mount Baker, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crider, Juliet G.; Frank, David; Malone, Stephen D.; Poland, Michael P.; Werner, Cynthia; Caplan-Auerbach, Jacqueline

    2011-01-01

    Mount Baker volcano displayed a short interval of seismically-quiescent thermal unrest in 1975, with high emissions of magmatic gas that slowly waned during the following three decades. The area of snow-free ground in the active crater has not returned to pre-unrest levels, and fumarole gas geochemistry shows a decreasing magmatic signature over that same interval. A relative microgravity survey revealed a substantial gravity increase in the ~30 years since the unrest, while deformation measurements suggest slight deflation of the edifice between 1981-83 and 2006-07. The volcano remains seismically quiet with regard to impulsive volcano-tectonic events, but experiences shallow (10 km) long-period earthquakes. Reviewing the observations from the 1975 unrest in combination with geophysical and geochemical data collected in the decades that followed, we infer that elevated gas and thermal emissions at Mount Baker in 1975 resulted from magmatic activity beneath the volcano: either the emplacement of magma at mid-crustal levels, or opening of a conduit to a deep existing source of magmatic volatiles. Decadal-timescale, multi-parameter observations were essential to this assessment of magmatic activity.

  13. Magma at depth: a retrospective analysis of the 1975 unrest at Mount Baker, Washington, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crider, Juliet G.; Frank, David; Malone, Stephen D.; Poland, Michael P.; Werner, Cynthia; Caplan-Auerbach, Jacqueline

    2011-03-01

    Mount Baker volcano displayed a short interval of seismically-quiescent thermal unrest in 1975, with high emissions of magmatic gas that slowly waned during the following three decades. The area of snow-free ground in the active crater has not returned to pre-unrest levels, and fumarole gas geochemistry shows a decreasing magmatic signature over that same interval. A relative microgravity survey revealed a substantial gravity increase in the ~30 years since the unrest, while deformation measurements suggest slight deflation of the edifice between 1981-83 and 2006-07. The volcano remains seismically quiet with regard to impulsive volcano-tectonic events, but experiences shallow (<3 km) low-frequency events likely related to glacier activity, as well as deep (>10 km) long-period earthquakes. Reviewing the observations from the 1975 unrest in combination with geophysical and geochemical data collected in the decades that followed, we infer that elevated gas and thermal emissions at Mount Baker in 1975 resulted from magmatic activity beneath the volcano: either the emplacement of magma at mid-crustal levels, or opening of a conduit to a deep existing source of magmatic volatiles. Decadal-timescale, multi-parameter observations were essential to this assessment of magmatic activity.

  14. W. Ritchie Russell, A.B. Baker, and Fred Plum: Pioneers of ventilatory management in poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Wijdicks, Eelco F M

    2016-09-13

    Historically, neurologists were not involved in the day-to-day management of critically ill patients with bulbar poliomyelitis, but some were. The major contributions of 3 neurologists-W. Ritchie Russell, A.B. Baker, and Fred Plum-in the respiratory management of poliomyelitis have not been recognized. Russell's work was instrumental in identifying multiple types of poliomyelitis defined by their respiratory needs, and he advised treatment that varied from simple postural drainage to use of respirators. He participated in the development of the Radcliffe respiratory pump. Baker recognized the essential involvement of the vagal nerve in respiratory distress, but also observed that involvement of vital centers without cranial nerve involvement would lead to irregular and shallow respiration in some patients and in others with marked dysautonomic features. A similar finding of central involvement of respiration was noted by Plum, who also stressed the importance of hypercapnia. Plum emphasized measurements of vital capacity and techniques to minimize trauma with suctioning after tracheostomy. These 3 neurologists understood the importance of airway and ventilator management, which is currently one of the many pillars of neurocritical care. PMID:27621379

  15. Glacier terminus fluctuations on Mt. Baker, Washington, USA, 1940-1990, and climatic variations

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, J.T. )

    1993-11-01

    The terminus positions of six glaciers located on Mount Baker, Washington, were mapped by photogrammetric techniques at 2- to 7-yr intervals for the period 1940-1990. Although the timing varied slightly, each of the glaciers experienced a similar fluctuation sequence consisting of three phases: (1) rapid retreat, beginning prior to 1940 and lasting through the late 1940s to early 1950s; (2) approximately 30 yr of advance, ending in the late 1970s to early 1980s; (3) retreat though 1990. Terminus positions changed by up to 750 m during phases, with the advance phase increasing the lengths of glaciers by 13 to 24%. These fluctuations are well explained by variations in a smoothed time-series of accumulation-season precipitation and ablation-season mean temperature. The study glaciers appear to respond to interannual scale changes in climate within 20 yr or less. The glaciers on Mount Baker have a maritime location and a large percentage of area at high elevation, which may make their termini undergo greater fluctuations in response to climatic changes, especially precipitation variations, than most other glaciers in the North Cascades region. 40 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Tissue irradiator

    DOEpatents

    Hungate, F.P.; Riemath, W.F.; Bunnell, L.R.

    1975-12-16

    A tissue irradiator is provided for the in-vivo irradiation of body tissue. The irradiator comprises a radiation source material contained and completely encapsulated within vitreous carbon. An embodiment for use as an in- vivo blood irradiator comprises a cylindrical body having an axial bore therethrough. A radioisotope is contained within a first portion of vitreous carbon cylindrically surrounding the axial bore, and a containment portion of vitreous carbon surrounds the radioisotope containing portion, the two portions of vitreous carbon being integrally formed as a single unit. Connecting means are provided at each end of the cylindrical body to permit connections to blood- carrying vessels and to provide for passage of blood through the bore. In a preferred embodiment, the radioisotope is thulium-170 which is present in the irradiator in the form of thulium oxide. A method of producing the preferred blood irradiator is also provided, whereby nonradioactive thulium-169 is dispersed within a polyfurfuryl alcohol resin which is carbonized and fired to form the integral vitreous carbon body and the device is activated by neutron bombardment of the thulium-169 to produce the beta-emitting thulium-170.

  17. Disruption of the CAR1 gene encoding arginase enhances freeze tolerance of the commercial baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Shima, Jun; Sakata-Tsuda, Yuko; Suzuki, Yasuo; Nakajima, Ryouichi; Watanabe, Hajime; Kawamoto, Shinichi; Takano, Hiroyuki

    2003-01-01

    The effect of intracellular charged amino acids on freeze tolerance in dough was determined by constructing homozygous diploid arginase-deficient mutants of commercial baker's yeast. An arginase mutant accumulated higher levels of arginine and/or glutamate and showed increased leavening ability during the frozen-dough baking process, suggesting that disruption of the CAR1 gene enhances freeze tolerance.

  18. Disruption of the CAR1 gene encoding arginase enhances freeze tolerance of the commercial baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Shima, Jun; Sakata-Tsuda, Yuko; Suzuki, Yasuo; Nakajima, Ryouichi; Watanabe, Hajime; Kawamoto, Shinichi; Takano, Hiroyuki

    2003-01-01

    The effect of intracellular charged amino acids on freeze tolerance in dough was determined by constructing homozygous diploid arginase-deficient mutants of commercial baker's yeast. An arginase mutant accumulated higher levels of arginine and/or glutamate and showed increased leavening ability during the frozen-dough baking process, suggesting that disruption of the CAR1 gene enhances freeze tolerance. PMID:12514069

  19. The Isolation of Invertase from Baker's Yeast: A Four-Part Exercise in Protein Purification and Characterization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timerman, Anthony P.; Fenrick, Angela M.; Zamis, Thomas M.

    2009-01-01

    A sequence of exercises for the isolation and characterization of invertase (E.C. 3.1.2.26) from baker's yeast obtained from a local grocery store is outlined. Because the enzyme is colorless, the use of colored markers and the sequence of purification steps are designed to "visualize" the process by which a colorless protein is selectively…

  20. 75 FR 65263 - Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act; Public Accommodation; Withdrawal of Proposed Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-22

    ... of such establishment as the residence of such proprietor'' (75 FR 12167). The Commission is... definition of ``public accommodations facility in the Federal Register of March 15, 2010 (75 FR 12167). The... COMMISSION 16 CFR Part 1450 Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act; Public Accommodation;...

  1. The Effects of Baker-Miller Pink on Physiological and Cognitive Behavior of Emotionally Disturbed and Regular Education Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliam, James E.

    1991-01-01

    Fourteen emotionally disturbed junior high students and 16 regular education students were exposed to 2 experimental conditions with white and Baker-Miller pink visual stimuli. Analysis revealed significant differences on systolic and diastolic blood pressure but not on pulse, grip strength, nor the Digit-Symbol test of the Wechsler Adult…

  2. Eruptive history and geochronology of the Mount Baker volcanic field, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hildreth, W.; Fierstein, J.; Lanphere, M.

    2003-01-01

    Mount Baker, a steaming, ice-mantled, andesitic stratovolcano, is the most conspicuous component of a multivent Quaternary volcanic field active almost continuously since 1.3 Ma. More than 70 packages of lava flows and ???110 dikes have been mapped, ???500 samples chemically analyzed, and ???80 K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar ages determined. Principal components are (1) the ignimbrite-filled Kulshan caldera (1.15 Ma) and its precaldera and postcaldera rhyodacite lavas and dikes (1.29-0.99 Ma); (2) ???60 intracaldera, hydrothermally altered, andesite-dacite dikes and pods-remnants of a substantial early-postcaldera volcanic center (1.1-0.6 Ma); (3) unaltered intracaldera andesite lavas and dikes, including those capping Ptarmigan and Lasiocarpa Ridges and Table Mountain (0.5-0.2 Ma); (4) the long-lived Chowder Ridge focus (1.29-0.1 Ma)-an andesite to rhyodacite eruptive complex now glacially reduced to ???50 dikes and remnants of ???10 lava flows; (5) Black Buttes stratocone, basaltic to dacitic, and several contemporaneous peripheral volcanoes (0.5-0.2 Ma); and (6) Mount Baker stratocone and contemporaneous peripheral volcanoes (0.1 Ma to Holocene). Glacial ice has influenced eruptions and amplified erosion throughout the lifetime of the volcanic field. Although more than half the material erupted has been eroded, liberal and conservative volume estimates for 77 increments of known age yield cumulative curves of volume erupted vs. time that indicate eruption rates in the range 0.17-0.43 km3/k.y. for major episodes and longterm background rates of 0.02-0.07 km3/k.y. Andesite and rhyodacite each make up nearly half of the 161 ?? 56 km3 of products erupted, whereas basalt and dacite represent only a few cubic kilometers, each representing 1%-3% the total. During the past 4 m.y., the principal magmatic focus has migrated stepwise 25 km southwestward, from the edge of the Chilliwack batholith to present-day Mount Baker.

  3. Irradiation subassembly

    DOEpatents

    Seim, O.S.; Filewicz, E.C.; Hutter, E.

    1973-10-23

    An irradiation subassembly for use in a nuclear reactor is described which includes a bundle of slender elongated irradiation -capsules or fuel elements enclosed by a coolant tube and having yieldable retaining liner between the irradiation capsules and the coolant tube. For a hexagonal bundle surrounded by a hexagonal tube the yieldable retaining liner may consist either of six segments corresponding to the six sides of the tube or three angular segments each corresponding in two adjacent sides of the tube. The sides of adjacent segments abut and are so cut that metal-tometal contact is retained when the volume enclosed by the retaining liner is varied and Springs are provided for urging the segments toward the center of the tube to hold the capsules in a closely packed configuration. (Official Gazette)

  4. Meltwater palaeohydrology of the Baker River basin (Chile/Argentina) during Late Pleistocene deglaciation of the Northern Patagonia Icefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorndycraft, Varyl; Bendle, Jacob; Benito, Gerardo; Sancho, Carlos; Palmer, Adrian; Rodríguez, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    The Late Pleistocene deglaciation of the Northern Patagonia Icefield (NPI) was characterised by rapid ice sheet thinning and retreat, and the development of large proglacial lake systems characterised by continental scale drainage reversals. In this region, research has focused primarily on the identification of former ice-limits (e.g. moraine ridges) for geochronological analyses, with little attention given to the meltwater palaeohydrology of major river valleys. The Baker River catchment drains the majority of the eastern ice shed of the NPI, with a basin area of 29,000 km2 that includes the large transboundary lakes of General Carrera/Buenos Aires and Cochrane/Puerreydón. The Baker River valley is aligned north to south, crossing the east-west valleys of the main NPI outflow glaciers, and thus represents an important aspect of regional Late Pleistocene palaeogeography. The Baker River valley therefore has the potential to refine regional models of deglaciation through better understanding of relationships between glacier dynamics, ice dammed lakes and meltwater pathways. Here we present geomorphological mapping from the Atlantic-Pacific drainage divide (over 150 km east of the Cordillera) to the lower Baker valley, in order to reconstruct Late Pleistocene palaeohydrology. We provide new mapping of palaeolake shoreline elevations and evidence for glacial lake outburst flood (GLOF) pathways that require a re-evaluation of the currently accepted palaeogeographic models. For example, the palaeohydrological evidence does not support existing models of a unified Buenos Aires/Puerreydón mega-lake at ca. 400m elevation. We propose a relative chronology of palaeohydrological events that help refine the published moraine chronology derived from cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating. Controls on Late Pleistocene meltwater palaeohydrology of the Baker catchment are discussed, including the interplay of glacial processes and regional tectonics, in particular, dynamic

  5. The RTS2 protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubánek, Petr; Jelínek, Martin; French, John; Prouza, Michal; Vítek, Stanislav; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J.; Reglero, Victor

    2008-07-01

    Remote Telescope System 2nd version (RTS2) is an open source project aimed at developing a software environment to control a fully robotic observatory. RTS2 consists of various components, which communicate via an ASCII based protocol. As the protocol was from the beginning designed as an observatory control system, it provides some unique features, which are hard to find in the other communication systems. These features include advanced synchronisation mechanisms and strategies for setting variables. This presentation describes the protocol and its unique features. It also assesses protocol performance, and provides examples how the RTS2 library can be used to quickly build an observatory control system.

  6. Occupational asthma from exposure to rye flour in a Japanese baker.

    PubMed

    Oshikata, Chiyako; Tsurikisawa, Naomi; Saito, Akemi; Yasueda, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Kazuo

    2014-09-01

    Three years after beginning employment at a bakery, a 32-year-old Japanese man began experiencing acute asthma exacerbations after exposure to rye flour. Antigen-specific serum IgE antibodies were detected to the albumin and globulin, gliadin, prolamin, and glutenin protein fractions of rye flour purified from the crude antigen, but only to the albumin and globulin fraction of wheat flour. The histamine concentration producing one-half maximal effect was lower for all four rye flour fractions than for the wheat flour fractions. After inhalation of the albumin and globulin fraction of rye flour, forced expiratory volume in 1 sec decreased to 77.7% of that pre-provocation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of baker's asthma due to rye flour in Japan.

  7. Special-case closed form of the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van-Brunt, Alexander; Visser, Matt

    2015-06-01

    The Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff formula is a general result for the quantity Z(X,Y)=ln ({{e}X}{{e}Y}), where X and Y are not necessarily commuting. For completely general commutation relations between X and Y, (the free Lie algebra), the general result is somewhat unwieldy. However in specific physics applications the commutator [X,Y], while non-zero, might often be relatively simple, which sometimes leads to explicit closed form results. We consider the special case [X,Y]=uX+vY+cI, and show that in this case the general result reduces to Furthermore we explicitly evaluate the symmetric function f(u,v)=f(v,u), demonstrating that and relate this to previously known results. For instance this result includes, but is considerably more general than, results obtained from either the Heisenberg commutator [P,Q]=-i\\hbar I or the creation-destruction commutator [a,{{a}\\dagger }]=I.

  8. Enzymatic process for the fractionation of baker's yeast cell wall (Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

    PubMed

    Borchani, Chema; Fonteyn, Fabienne; Jamin, Guilhem; Paquot, Michel; Blecker, Christophe; Thonart, Philippe

    2014-11-15

    β-Glucans, homopolymers of glucose, are widespread in many microorganisms, mushrooms and plants. They have attracted attention because of their bioactive and medicinal functions. One important source of β-glucans is the cell wall of yeasts, especially that of baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Several processes for the isolation of β-glucans, using alkali, acid or a combination of both, result in degradation of the polymeric chains. In this paper, we have an enzymatic process for the isolation of glucans from yeast cell walls. As a result, β-glucans were obtained in a yield of 18.0% of the original ratio in the yeast cell walls. Therefore, this isolation process gave a better yield and higher β-glucan content than did traditional isolation methods. Furthermore, results showed that each extraction step of β-glucan had a significant effects on its chemical properties.

  9. Improvement of tolerance to freeze-thaw stress of baker's yeast by cultivation with soy peptides.

    PubMed

    Izawa, Shingo; Ikeda, Kayo; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Inoue, Yoshiharu

    2007-06-01

    The tolerance to freeze-thaw stress of yeast cells is critical for frozen-dough technology in the baking industry. In this study, we examined the effects of soy peptides on the freeze-thaw stress tolerance of yeast cells. We found that the cells cultured with soy peptides acquired improved tolerance to freeze-thaw stress and retained high leavening ability in dough after frozen storage for 7 days. The final quality of bread regarding its volume and texture was also improved by using yeast cells cultured with soy peptides. These findings promote the utilization of soy peptides as ingredients of culture media to improve the quality of baker's yeast. PMID:17505771

  10. Baker Construction, Cincinnati, Ohio. Solar energy system performance evaluation, October 1980-May 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Spears, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    The Baker Construction site is a single family residence in Ohio with a passive solar heating system, which consists of 302 square feet of 62 degree sloped greenhouse glazing, a 35,500-pound concrete mass wall, 10,400-pound concrete slab floor, 20 phase change storage rods, six 1-kW electric baseboard heaters, and a wood stove. A solar fraction of 55% is reported. Also the solar savings ratio and conventional fuel savings are given. The performance of the greenhouse collector subsystem, the heat storage subsystem, and the space heating subsystem are summarized as well as total system performance. Energy savings and weather data are also included. The design of the system, performance evaluation techniques, and sensor technology are also presented. (LEW)

  11. Post-fermentative production of glutathione by baker's yeast (S. cerevisiae) in compressed and dried forms.

    PubMed

    Musatti, Alida; Manzoni, Matilde; Rollini, Manuela

    2013-01-25

    The study was aimed at investigating the best biotransformation conditions to increase intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels in samples of baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) employing either the commercially available compressed and dried forms. Glucose, GSH precursors amino acids, as well as other cofactors, were dissolved in a biotransformation solution and yeast cells were added (5%dcw). Two response surface central composite designs (RSCCDs) were performed in sequence: in the first step the influence of amino acid composition (cysteine, glycine, glutamic acid and serine) on GSH accumulation was investigated; once their formulation was set up, the influence of other components was studied. Initial GSH content was found 0.53 and 0.47%dcw for compressed and dried forms. GSH accumulation ability of baker's yeast in compressed form was higher at the beginning of shelf life, that is, in the first week, and a maximum of 2.04%dcw was obtained. Performance of yeast in dried form was not found satisfactory, as the maximum GSH level was 1.18%dcw. When cysteine lacks from the reaction solution, yeast cells do not accumulate GSH. With dried yeast, the highest GSH yields occurred when cysteine was set at 3 g/L, glycine and glutamic acid at least at 4 g/L, without serine. Employing compressed yeast, the highest GSH yields occurred when cysteine and glutamic acid were set at 2-3 g/L, while glycine and serine higher than 2 g/L. Results allowed to set up an optimal and feasible procedure to obtain GSH-enriched yeast biomass, with up to threefold increase with respect to initial content.

  12. Gene Expression Analysis of Cold and Freeze Stress in Baker's Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Vargas, Sonia; Estruch, Francisco; Randez-Gil, Francisca

    2002-01-01

    We used mRNA differential display to assess yeast gene expression under cold or freeze shock stress conditions. We found both up- and down-regulation of genes, although repression was more common. We identified and sequenced several cold-induced genes exhibiting the largest differences. We confirmed, by Northern blotting, the specificity of the response for TPI1, which encodes triose-phosphate isomerase; ERG10, the gene for acetoacetyl coenzyme A thiolase; and IMH1, which encodes a protein implicated in protein transport. These genes also were induced under other stress conditions, suggesting that this cold response is mediated by a general stress mechanism. We determined the physiological significance of the cold-induced expression change of these genes in two baker's yeast strains with different sensitivities to freeze stress. The mRNA level of TPI1 and ERG10 genes was higher in freeze-stressed than in control samples of the tolerant strain. In contrast, both genes were repressed in frozen cells of the sensitive strain. Next, we examined the effects of ERG10 overexpression on cold and freeze-thaw tolerance. Growth of wild-type cells at 10°C was not affected by high ERG10 expression. However, YEpERG10 transformant cells exhibited increased freezing tolerance. Consistent with this, cells of an erg10 mutant strain showed a clear phenotype of cold and freeze sensitivity. These results give support to the idea that a cause-and-effect relationship between differentially expressed genes and cryoresistance exists in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and open up the possibility of design strategies to improve the freeze tolerance of baker's yeast. PMID:12039763

  13. Irradiated foods

    MedlinePlus

    ... it reduces the risk of food poisoning . Food irradiation is used in many countries. It was first approved in the U.S. to prevent sprouts on white potatoes, and to control insects on wheat and in certain spices and seasonings.

  14. National Sample Assessment Protocols

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training and Youth Affairs (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    These protocols represent a working guide for planning and implementing national sample assessments in connection with the national Key Performance Measures (KPMs). The protocols are intended for agencies involved in planning or conducting national sample assessments and personnel responsible for administering associated tenders or contracts,…

  15. Montreal protocol: Business opportunites

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    The Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer was signed by 24 countries in 1987, establishing measures for controlling the production and consumption of ozone-depleting substances. This publication begins with some background information on ozone depletion and the history of the Protocol. It then describes aspects of the Protocol`s Multilateral Fund, created to assist developing countries to meet Protocol deadlines: Its administration, structure, and how projects are initiated. Names, addresses, and phone/fax numbers of Fund contacts are provided. Canadian projects under the Fund are then reviewed and opportunities for Canadian environmental companies are noted. Finally, information sheets are presented which summarize Fund-related Canadian bilateral projects undertaken to date.

  16. Reliable broadcast protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, T. A.; Birman, Kenneth P.

    1989-01-01

    A number of broadcast protocols that are reliable subject to a variety of ordering and delivery guarantees are considered. Developing applications that are distributed over a number of sites and/or must tolerate the failures of some of them becomes a considerably simpler task when such protocols are available for communication. Without such protocols the kinds of distributed applications that can reasonably be built will have a very limited scope. As the trend towards distribution and decentralization continues, it will not be surprising if reliable broadcast protocols have the same role in distributed operating systems of the future that message passing mechanisms have in the operating systems of today. On the other hand, the problems of engineering such a system remain large. For example, deciding which protocol is the most appropriate to use in a certain situation or how to balance the latency-communication-storage costs is not an easy question.

  17. Food irradiation: Public opinion surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, S.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Canadian government are discussing the legislation, regulations and practical protocol necessary for the commercialization of food irradiation. Food industry marketing, public relations and media expertise will be needed to successfully introduce this new processing choice to retailers and consumers. Consumer research to date including consumer opinion studies and market trials conducted in the Netherlands, United States, South Africa and Canada will be explored for signposts to successful approaches to the introduction of irradiated foods to retailers and consumers. Research has indicated that the terms used to describe irradiation and information designed to reduce consumer fears will be important marketing tools. Marketers will be challenged to promote old foods, which look the same to consumers, in a new light. Simple like or dislike or intention to buy surveys will not be effective tools. Consumer fears must be identified and effectively handled to support a receptive climate for irradiated food products. A cooperative government, industry, health professional, consumer association and retailer effort will be necessary for the successful introduction of irradiated foods into the marketplace. Grocery Products Manufacturers of Canada is a national trade association of more than 150 major companies engaged in the manufacture of food, non-alcoholic beverages and array of other national-brand consumer items sold through retail outlets.

  18. Construction from a single parent of baker's yeast strains with high freeze tolerance and fermentative activity in both lean and sweet doughs.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, S; Ouchi, K

    1994-10-01

    From a freeze-tolerant baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), 2,333 spore clones were obtained. To improve the leavening ability in lean dough of the parent strain, we selected 555 of the high-maltose-fermentative spore clones by using a method in which a soft agar solution containing maltose and bromocresol purple was overlaid on yeast colonies. By measuring the gassing power in the dough, we selected 66 spore clones with a good leavening ability in lean dough and a total of 694 hybrids were constructed by crossing them. Among these hybrids, we obtained 50 novel freeze-tolerant strains with good leavening ability in all lean, regular, and sweet doughs comparable to that of commercial baker's yeast. Hybrids with improved leavening ability or freeze tolerance compared with the parent yeast and commercial baker's yeasts were also obtained. These results suggest that hybridization between spore clones derived from a single parent strain is effective for improving the properties of baker's yeasts.

  19. Reliable multicast protocol specifications protocol operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, John R.; Montgomery, Todd; Whetten, Brian

    1995-01-01

    This appendix contains the complete state tables for Reliable Multicast Protocol (RMP) Normal Operation, Multi-RPC Extensions, Membership Change Extensions, and Reformation Extensions. First the event types are presented. Afterwards, each RMP operation state, normal and extended, is presented individually and its events shown. Events in the RMP specification are one of several things: (1) arriving packets, (2) expired alarms, (3) user events, (4) exceptional conditions.

  20. Improvement of stress tolerance and leavening ability under multiple baking-associated stress conditions by overexpression of the SNR84 gene in baker's yeast.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xue; Zhang, Cui-Ying; Bai, Xiao-Wen; Feng, Bing; Xiao, Dong-Guang

    2015-03-16

    During the bread-making process, industrial baker's yeast cells are exposed to multiple baking-associated stresses, such as elevated high-temperature, high-sucrose and freeze-thaw stresses. There is a high demand for baker's yeast strains that could withstand these stresses with high leavening ability. The SNR84 gene encodes H/ACA snoRNA (small nucleolar RNA), which is known to be involved in pseudouridylation of the large subunit rRNA. However, the function of the SNR84 gene in baker's yeast coping with baking-associated stresses remains unclear. In this study, we explored the effect of SNR84 overexpression on baker's yeast which was exposed to high-temperature, high-sucrose and freeze-thaw stresses. These results suggest that overexpression of the SNR84 gene conferred tolerance of baker's yeast cells to high-temperature, high-sucrose and freeze-thaw stresses and enhanced their leavening ability in high-sucrose and freeze-thaw dough. These findings could provide a valuable insight for breeding of novel stress-resistant baker's yeast strains that are useful for baking.

  1. Improvement of stress tolerance and leavening ability under multiple baking-associated stress conditions by overexpression of the SNR84 gene in baker's yeast.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xue; Zhang, Cui-Ying; Bai, Xiao-Wen; Feng, Bing; Xiao, Dong-Guang

    2015-03-16

    During the bread-making process, industrial baker's yeast cells are exposed to multiple baking-associated stresses, such as elevated high-temperature, high-sucrose and freeze-thaw stresses. There is a high demand for baker's yeast strains that could withstand these stresses with high leavening ability. The SNR84 gene encodes H/ACA snoRNA (small nucleolar RNA), which is known to be involved in pseudouridylation of the large subunit rRNA. However, the function of the SNR84 gene in baker's yeast coping with baking-associated stresses remains unclear. In this study, we explored the effect of SNR84 overexpression on baker's yeast which was exposed to high-temperature, high-sucrose and freeze-thaw stresses. These results suggest that overexpression of the SNR84 gene conferred tolerance of baker's yeast cells to high-temperature, high-sucrose and freeze-thaw stresses and enhanced their leavening ability in high-sucrose and freeze-thaw dough. These findings could provide a valuable insight for breeding of novel stress-resistant baker's yeast strains that are useful for baking. PMID:25555226

  2. The Baker's Yeast Reduction of Keto-Esters in Organic Solvents: A One Week Research Project for Undergraduate Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, Michael

    1998-05-01

    An experiment has been designed which allows final year undergraduate students to carry out a mini-research project in one week and thus get a flavour of the joys and tribulations of conducting chemical research before they undertake a major research project. The experiment is an investigation into the reduction of alpha- or beta-keto esters using non-fermenting Baker's yeast in petroleum ether. There are a number of advantages to this method of using Baker's yeast, including a reduction in the amount of organic solvent used, and a much simplified purification procedure. During the course of the mini-project, the substrate specificity of the yeast is investigated, and the conditions for the optimisation of a particular keto ester are determined. Each product is analysed by a variety of analytical techniques including polarimetry, IR, NMR, and GC. In addition, the use of correct stereochemical nomenclature to describe prochiral, and chiral compounds as well as chemical reactions are discussed.

  3. Petrology and geochemistry of coeval andesite flows at Mount Baker, North Cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullen, E.; McCallum, I. S.

    2012-12-01

    At the Mt. Baker volcanic field in the northern Cascade arc, the coeval Coleman Pinnacle (CP) hornblende andesite and the Table Mountain (TM) two-pyroxene andesite have overlapping eruption ages (305±5 ka) and field relations show flow interlayering (Hildreth et al., 2003). Although primary vents can no longer be recognized, the distribution of dikes and outcrop patterns are consistent with eruption from vents close to the southern rim of Kulshan Caldera. Although both flow sets have similar ranges in SiO2, they have markedly different phenocryst assemblages, initial water contents, oxidation states, K2O contents, isotopic ratios and trace element abundances. In the more silicic CP andesite samples, plagioclase and hornblende are the dominant phenocrysts with microphenocrysts of titanomagnetite, ilmenite and apatite set in a fine-grained, crystalline groundmass. The most mafic CP andesite flow also contains orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene and inclusions of two-pyroxene andesite rich in apatite, Fe-Ti oxides (including pseudobrookite) and abundant quenched interstitial rhyolitic glass. In Table Mountain andesites, phenocrysts are plagioclase, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, titanomagnetite and ilmenite with minor resorbed olivine and late-stage amphibole in the lowermost flow. Coleman Pinnacle andesite is richer in K2O (2.7-3.2 wt.%), H2O (5-6 wt.%) and is more oxidized (fO2: NNO+1 to +1.7) than Table Mountain andesite (K2O: 1.6-2.4 wt.%, H2O: ~3 wt.%, fO2: NNO to NNO+0.7). Breakdown rims on CP amphibole are absent or very narrow while TM amphibole rims range from 25-30 μm, indicating integrated ascent rates of ~0.003 m/sec. Mg-rich rims on most CP amphiboles provide evidence for late magma mixing. High Fe3+ contents of amphiboles indicate dehydrogenation during the eruptive event. Phase equilibria for CP and TM flows are consistent with crystallization at PH2O of ~2kb but both flow sequences define distinct fractionation trends on [Pl] Ol-Wo-Qz projections. In Pb

  4. Isolation of diploid baker's yeast capable of strongly activating immune cells and analyses of the cell wall structure.

    PubMed

    Takada, Yuki; Mizobuchi, Ayano; Kato, Takayuki; Kasahara, Emiko; Ito, Chinatsu; Watanabe, Hajime; Kanzaki, Ken; Kitagawa, Seiichi; Tachibana, Taro; Azuma, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Diploid baker's yeast capable of strongly activating a mouse macrophage was constructed based on haploid mutant AQ-37 obtained previously. The obtained strain BQ-55 activated also human immune cells. To clarify a factor for the activation, the cell wall structure, especially the β-glucan structure, was analyzed, suggesting that the length of branching, β-1,6-glucan, may be one of the factors.

  5. An Unusual Cluster of Low-Frequency Earthquakes at Mount Baker, Washington, as Detected by a Local Broadband Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplan-Auerbach, J.; Thelen, W. A.; Moran, S. C.

    2009-12-01

    A recent cluster of shallow low-frequency earthquakes on Mount Baker volcano marks one of the most seismically active periods in the volcano’s instrumented history (since 1972). Although Mount Baker, the northernmost of the U. S. Cascade volcanoes, has a history of recorded unrest (including an episode of geothermal unrest in 1975-6), it has never exhibited high levels of seismicity. Most of Baker’s seismicity has been associated with glacial earthquakes and deep long-period events. However, between June and September 2009 at least 39 low-frequency events were recorded at Mount Baker, 21 of which were located by the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network (PNSN). Locations are shallow and are scattered over a 5 x 5 km area around the southwest flank of the edifice. However, waveform similarity between many events suggests that most are located fairly close together and that the scatter apparent in PNSN locations is largely because of picking errors and a sparse network. To better constrain earthquake locations and source mechanism, a network of five broadband seismometers was deployed on Mount Baker between July and October 2009. This network greatly reduced the magnitude threshold for locatable events, with approximately three times as many earthquakes located by the local network than with the existing regional network. The additional stations also provided better depth constraints. The local network detected a larger number of events than identical temporary networks deployed in 2007 and 2008, suggesting that the increase in seismicity is real. Earthquakes located with the addition of data from the local network still locate at shallow depths beneath the southwest flank, but location uncertainty is significantly improved. We are using waveform similarity to evaluate relative event locations and investigate possible source mechanisms for the earthquakes, and are developing a more accurate velocity model that includes station elevations. This will better determine

  6. Study of the kinetic parameters for synthesis and hydrolysis of pharmacologically active salicin isomer catalyzed by baker's yeast maltase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veličković, D. V.; Dimitrijević, A. S.; Bihelović, F. J.; Jankov, R. M.; Milosavić, N.

    2011-12-01

    One of the key elements for understanding enzyme reactions is determination of its kinetic parameters. Since transglucosylation is kinetically controlled reaction, besides the reaction of synthesis, very important is the reaction of enzymatic hydrolysis of created product. Therefore, in this study, kinetic parameters for synthesis and secondary hydrolysis of pharmacologically active α isosalicin by baker's yeast maltase were calculated, and it was shown that specifity of maltase for hydrolysis is approximately 150 times higher then for synthesis.

  7. Postglacial volcanic deposits at Mount Baker, Washington, and potential hazards from future eruptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hyde, Jack H.; Crandell, Dwight Raymond

    1978-01-01

    Eruptions and other geologic events at Mount Baker during the last 10,000 years have repeatedly affected adjacent areas, especially the valleys that head on the south and east sides of the volcano. Small volumes of tephra were erupted at least four times during the past 10,000 years. Future eruptions like these could cause as much as 35 centimeters of tephra to be deposited at sites 17 kilometers from the volcano, 15 centimeters of tephra to be deposited 29 kilometers from the volcano, and 5 centimeters, 44 kilometers from the volcano. Lava flows were erupted at least twice during the last 10,000 years and moved down two valleys. Future lava flows will not directly endanger people because lava typically moves so slowly that escape is possible. Hot pyroclastic flows evidently occurred during only one period and were confined to the Boulder Creek valley. Such flows can move at speeds of as much as 150 kilometers per hour and can bury valley floors under tens of meters of hot rock debris for at least 15 kilometers from the volcano. large mudflows, most of which contain hydrothermally altered rock debris, originated at Mount Baker at least eight times during the last 10,000 years. The largest mudflow reached 29 kilometers or more down the valley of the Middle Fork Nooksack River, west of the volcano, about 6,000 years ago. Extensive masses of hydrothermally altered rock that are potentially unstable exist today near the summit of the volcano, especially in the Sherman Crater - Sherman Peak area. Avalanches of this material could be triggered by steam explosions, earthquakes, or eruptions, or may occur because of slow-acting forces of processes that gradually decrease stability. large avalanches could move downslope at high speed and could grade downvalley into mudflows. Floods caused by rapid melting of snow and ice by lava or by hot rock debris could affect valley floors many tens of kilometers from the volcano and could have especially severe effects if they were to

  8. Simplifying the Reinsch algorithm for the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van-Brunt, Alexander; Visser, Matt

    2016-02-01

    The Goldberg version of the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff series computes the quantity Z ( X , Y ) = ln (" separators=" e X e Y ) = ∑ w g ( w ) w ( X , Y ) , where X and Y are not necessarily commuting in terms of "words" constructed from the {X, Y} "alphabet." The so-called Goldberg coefficients g(w) are the central topic of this article. This Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff series is a general purpose tool of very wide applicability in mathematical physics, quantum physics, and many other fields. The Reinsch algorithm for the truncated series permits one to calculate the Goldberg coefficients up to some fixed word length |w| by using nilpotent (|w| + 1) × (|w| + 1) matrices. We shall show how to further simplify the Reinsch algorithm, making its implementation (in principle) utterly straightforward using "off the shelf" symbolic manipulation software. Specific computations provide examples which help to provide a deeper understanding of the Goldberg coefficients and their properties. For instance, we shall establish some strict bounds (and some equalities) on the number of non-zero Goldberg coefficients. Unfortunately, we shall see that the number of nonzero Goldberg coefficients often grows very rapidly (in fact exponentially) with the word length |w|. Furthermore, the simplified Reinsch algorithm readily generalizes to many closely related but still quite distinct problems—we shall also present closely related results for the symmetric product S ( X , Y ) = ln (" separators=" e X / 2 e Y e X / 2 ) = ∑ w g S ( w ) w ( X , Y ) . Variations on such themes are straightforward. For instance, one can just as easily consider the "loop" product L ( X , Y ) = ln (" separators=" e X e Y e - X e - Y ) = ∑ w g L ( w ) w ( X , Y ) . This "loop" type of series is of interest, for instance, when considering either differential geometric parallel transport around a closed curve, non-Abelian versions of Stokes' theorem, or even Wigner rotation/Thomas precession in special

  9. Geochemical results of a hydrothermally altered area at Baker Creek, Blaine County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erdman, James A.; Moye, Falma J.; Theobald, Paul K.; McCafferty, Anne E.; Larsen, Richard K.

    2001-01-01

    The area immediately east of Baker Creek, Blaine County, Idaho, is underlain by a thick section of mafic to intermediate lava flows of the Eocene Challis Volcanic Group. Widespread propylitic alteration surrounds a zone of argillic alteration and an inner core of phyllic alteration. Silicified breccia is present along an east-trending fault within the zone of phyllic alteration. As part of a reconnaissance geochemical survey, soils and plants were sampled. Several species of plants (Douglas-fir [ Pseudotsuga menziesii ], mountain big sagebrush [ Artemisia tridentata ssp. vaseyana ], and elk sedge [ Carex geyerii ]) were collected from 10 upland localities and stream sediments, panned concentrates, and aquatic mosses were collected from 16 drainage basin localities all of which were generally within the area of alteration. Geochemical results yielded anomalous concentrations of molybenum, zinc, silver, and lead in at least half of the seven different sample media and of gold, thallium, arsenic, antimony, manganese, boron, cadmium, bismuth, copper, and beryllium in from one to four of the various media. Part of this suite of elements? silver, gold, arsenic, antimony, thallium, and manganese? suggests that the mineralization in the area is epithermal. Barite and pyrite (commonly botryoidal-framboidal) are widespread throughout the area sampled. Visible gold and pyromorphite (a secondary lead mineral) were identified in only one small drainage basin, but high levels of gold were detected in aquatic mosses over a larger area. Data from the upland and stream sampling indicate two possible mineralized areas. The first mineralized area was identified by a grab sample from an outcrop of quartz stockwork that contained 50 ppb Au, 1.5 ppm Ag, and 50 ppm Mo. Although the soil and plant species that were sampled in the area indicated mineralized bedrock, the Douglas-fir samples were the best indicators of the silver anomaly. The second possible mineralized area centers on the

  10. Improving freeze-tolerance of baker's yeast through seamless gene deletion of NTH1 and PUT1.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jian; Chen, Didi; Wang, Guanglu; Zhang, Cuiying; Du, Liping; Liu, Shanshan; Zhao, Yu; Xiao, Dongguang

    2016-06-01

    Baker's yeast strains with freeze-tolerance are highly desirable to maintain high leavening ability after freezing. Enhanced intracellular concentration of trehalose and proline in yeast is linked with freeze-tolerance. In this study, we constructed baker's yeast with enhanced freeze-tolerance by simultaneous deletion of the neutral trehalase-encoded gene NTH1 and the proline oxidase-encoded gene PUT1. We first used the two-step integration-based seamless gene deletion method to separately delete NTH1 and PUT1 in haploid yeast. Subsequently, through two rounds of hybridization and sporulation-based allelic exchange and colony PCR-mediated tetrad analysis, we obtained strains with restored URA3 and deletion of NTH1 and/or PUT1. The resulting strain showed higher cell survival and dough-leavening ability after freezing compared to the wild-type strain due to enhanced accumulation of trehalose and/or proline. Moreover, mutant with simultaneous deletion of NTH1 and PUT1 exhibits the highest relative dough-leavening ability after freezing compared to mutants with single-gene deletion perhaps due to elevated levels of both trehalose and proline. These results verified that it is applicable to construct frozen dough baker's yeast using the method proposed in this paper.

  11. Improving freeze-tolerance of baker's yeast through seamless gene deletion of NTH1 and PUT1.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jian; Chen, Didi; Wang, Guanglu; Zhang, Cuiying; Du, Liping; Liu, Shanshan; Zhao, Yu; Xiao, Dongguang

    2016-06-01

    Baker's yeast strains with freeze-tolerance are highly desirable to maintain high leavening ability after freezing. Enhanced intracellular concentration of trehalose and proline in yeast is linked with freeze-tolerance. In this study, we constructed baker's yeast with enhanced freeze-tolerance by simultaneous deletion of the neutral trehalase-encoded gene NTH1 and the proline oxidase-encoded gene PUT1. We first used the two-step integration-based seamless gene deletion method to separately delete NTH1 and PUT1 in haploid yeast. Subsequently, through two rounds of hybridization and sporulation-based allelic exchange and colony PCR-mediated tetrad analysis, we obtained strains with restored URA3 and deletion of NTH1 and/or PUT1. The resulting strain showed higher cell survival and dough-leavening ability after freezing compared to the wild-type strain due to enhanced accumulation of trehalose and/or proline. Moreover, mutant with simultaneous deletion of NTH1 and PUT1 exhibits the highest relative dough-leavening ability after freezing compared to mutants with single-gene deletion perhaps due to elevated levels of both trehalose and proline. These results verified that it is applicable to construct frozen dough baker's yeast using the method proposed in this paper. PMID:26965428

  12. Evaluation of baker's yeast strains exhibiting significant growth on Japanese beet molasses and compound analysis of the molasses types.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Hiroaki; Tamura, Masahiko; Shintani, Takahiro; Gomi, Katsuya

    2014-06-01

    Cane molasses, most of which is imported, is used as a raw material for production of baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) in Japan. On the other hand, beet molasses is scarcely used for this purpose, but it can be of great advantage to cane molasses because it is domestically produced in relatively high amounts as a by-product of beet sugar processing. However, the yield of baker's yeast is sometimes low with Japanese beet molasses compared to imported cane molasses. For the production of baker's yeast with Japanese beet molasses, we evaluated S. cerevisiae strains, including industrial and laboratory strains, to group them according to the growth profile on beet and cane molasses. To discuss the factors affecting growth, we further analyzed the major compounds in both types of molasses. Beet molasses seems to contain compounds that promote the growth of beet molasses-favoring strains rather than inhibit the growth of cane molasses-favoring strains. It was assumed that α-amino acid was one of the growth promotion factors for beet molasses-favoring strains.

  13. UV Impacts Avoided by the Montreal Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul; McKenzie, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Temporal and geographical variabilities in the future "World Expected" UV environment are compared with the "World Avoided", which would have occurred without the Montreal Protocol on protection of the ozone layer and its subsequent amendments and adjustments. Based on calculations of clear-sky UV irradiances, the effects of the Montreal Protocol have been hugely beneficial to avoid the health risks, such as skin cancer, which are associated with high UV, while there is only a small increase in health risks, such as vitamin D deficiency, that are associated with low UV. However, interactions with climate change may lead to changes in cloud and albedo, and possibly behavioural changes which could also be important.

  14. UV impacts avoided by the Montreal Protocol.

    PubMed

    Newman, Paul A; McKenzie, Richard

    2011-07-01

    Temporal and geographical variabilities in the future "world expected" UV environment are compared with the "world avoided", which would have occurred without the Montreal Protocol on Substances That Deplete the Ozone Layer and its subsequent amendments and adjustments. Based on calculations of clear-sky UV irradiances, the effects of the Montreal Protocol have been hugely beneficial to avoid the health risks, such as skin cancer, which are associated with high UV, while there is only a small increase in health risks, such as vitamin D deficiency, that are associated with low UV. However, interactions with climate change may lead to changes in cloud and albedo, and possibly behavioural changes that could also be important.

  15. Irradiation modes' impact on radical entrapment in photoactive resins.

    PubMed

    Leprince, J G; Lamblin, G; Devaux, J; Dewaele, M; Mestdagh, M; Palin, W M; Gallez, B; Leloup, G

    2010-12-01

    Different irradiation protocols are proposed to polymerize dental resins, and discordances remain concerning their impact on the material. To improve this knowledge, we studied entrapment of free radicals in unfilled Bis-GMA/TEGDMA (50:50 wt%) resin after light cure. The tested hypothesis was that various irradiation parameters (curing time, irradiance, and radiant exposure) and different irradiation modes (continuous and pulse-delay) led to different amounts of trapped free radicals. The analysis of cured samples (n = 3) by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) revealed that the concentrations of trapped free radicals significantly differed according to the curing protocol. When continuous modes with similar radiant exposure were compared, higher concentrations of trapped free radicals were measured for longer times with lower irradiance. Concerning pulse modes, the delay had no influence on trapped radical concentration. These results give new insights into the understanding of the photopolymerization process and highlight the relevance of using EPR when studying polymerization of dimethacrylate-based materials.

  16. The three zinc-containing alcohol dehydrogenases from baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Leskovac, Vladimir; Trivić, Svetlana; Pericin, Draginja

    2002-12-01

    This review is a summary of our current knowledge of the structure, function and mechanism of action of the three zinc-containing alcohol dehydrogenases, YADH-1, YADH-2 and YADH-3, in baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The opening section deals with the substrate specificity of the enzymes, covering the steady-state kinetic data for its most known substrates. In the following sections, the kinetic mechanism for this enzyme is reported, along with the values of all rate constants in the mechanism. The complete primary structures of the three isoenzymes of YADH are given, and the model of the 3D structure of the active site is presented. All known artificial mutations in the primary structure of the YADH are covered in full and described in detail. Further, the chemical mechanism of action for YADH is presented along with the complement of steady-state and ligand-binding data supporting this mechanism. Finally, the bio-organic chemistry of the hydride-transfer reactions catalyzed by the enzyme is covered: this chemistry explains the narrow substrate specificity and the enantioselectivity of the yeast enzyme.

  17. Matrix factorization-based data fusion for gene function prediction in baker's yeast and slime mold.

    PubMed

    Zitnik, Marinka; Zupan, Blaž

    2014-01-01

    The development of effective methods for the characterization of gene functions that are able to combine diverse data sources in a sound and easily-extendible way is an important goal in computational biology. We have previously developed a general matrix factorization-based data fusion approach for gene function prediction. In this manuscript, we show that this data fusion approach can be applied to gene function prediction and that it can fuse various heterogeneous data sources, such as gene expression profiles, known protein annotations, interaction and literature data. The fusion is achieved by simultaneous matrix tri-factorization that shares matrix factors between sources. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach by evaluating its performance on predicting ontological annotations in slime mold D. discoideum and on recognizing proteins of baker's yeast S. cerevisiae that participate in the ribosome or are located in the cell membrane. Our approach achieves predictive performance comparable to that of the state-of-the-art kernel-based data fusion, but requires fewer data preprocessing steps.

  18. Telescope Fabra ROA Montsec: A New Robotic Wide Field Baker-Nunn Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fors, Octavi; Núñez, Jorge; Muiños, José Luis; Montojo, Francisco Javier; Baena-Gallé, Roberto; Boloix, Jaime; Morcillo, Ricardo; Merino, María Teresa; Downey, Elwood C.; Mazur, Michael J.

    2013-05-01

    A Baker-Nunn Camera (BNC), originally installed at the Real Instituto y Observatorio de la Armada (ROA) in 1958, was refurbished and robotized. The new facility, called Telescope Fabra ROA Montsec (TFRM), was installed at the Observatori Astronòmic del Montsec (OAdM). The process of refurbishment is described in detail. Most of the steps of the refurbishment project were accomplished by purchasing commercial components, which involve little posterior engineering assembling work. The TFRM is a 0.5 m aperture f/0.96 optically modified BNC, which offers a unique combination of instrumental specifications: fully robotic and remote operation, wide field of view (4°.4 × 4°.4), moderate limiting magnitude (V ~ 19.5 mag), ability of tracking at arbitrary right ascension (α) and declination (δ) rates, as well as opening and closing CCD shutter at will during an exposure. Nearly all kinds of image survey programs can benefit from those specifications. Apart from other less time-consuming programs, since the beginning of science TFRM operations we have been conducting two specific and distinct surveys: super-Earths transiting around M-type dwarfs stars, and geostationary debris in the context of Space Situational Awareness/Space Surveillance and Tracking (SSA/SST) programs. Preliminary results for both cases will be shown.

  19. Matrix factorization-based data fusion for gene function prediction in baker's yeast and slime mold.

    PubMed

    Zitnik, Marinka; Zupan, Blaž

    2014-01-01

    The development of effective methods for the characterization of gene functions that are able to combine diverse data sources in a sound and easily-extendible way is an important goal in computational biology. We have previously developed a general matrix factorization-based data fusion approach for gene function prediction. In this manuscript, we show that this data fusion approach can be applied to gene function prediction and that it can fuse various heterogeneous data sources, such as gene expression profiles, known protein annotations, interaction and literature data. The fusion is achieved by simultaneous matrix tri-factorization that shares matrix factors between sources. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach by evaluating its performance on predicting ontological annotations in slime mold D. discoideum and on recognizing proteins of baker's yeast S. cerevisiae that participate in the ribosome or are located in the cell membrane. Our approach achieves predictive performance comparable to that of the state-of-the-art kernel-based data fusion, but requires fewer data preprocessing steps. PMID:24297565

  20. Clitoridectomy -- the disastrous downfall of Isaac Baker Brown, F.R.C.S. (1867).

    PubMed

    Fleming, J B

    1960-12-01

    The investigation of the circumstances surrounding the downfall of the surgeon Baker Brown is reviewed. In March 1866 Brown's book "The Curability of Certain Forms of Insanity, Epilepsy, Catalepsy, and Hysteria in Females" was published. Brown's thesis presented in this volume was that nervous affections complicating diseases of the female genitalia were the direct result of "peripheral excitement of the pudic nerve" or masturbation. Brown maintained that this excitement gave rise to disease which could be divided into 8 stages -- hysteria, spinal irritation, epileptoid fits or hysterical epilepsy, cataleptic fits, epileptic fits, idiocy, mania, death -- the 8th stage being arrived at, by gradations, more or less distinct, directly from the 1st stage. The book was harshly criticized by the editor of the "British Medical Journal." Brown proposed excision of the clitoris and nymphae as a cure of epilepsy in females. Brown's success as a bold and courageous operator, which raised him to an important position in the field, caused extreme jealousy among his rivals. By involving himself, however sincerely, with the highly controversial subject of clitoridectomy progress in ovariotomy was considerably slowed for a considerable period. Although his character and shortcomings remain open to speculation, there is little question that he was an acknowledged leader in ovariotomy.

  1. Adaptive evolution of baker's yeast in a dough-like environment enhances freeze and salinity tolerance.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Jaime; Andreu, Pasqual; Randez-Gil, Francisca; Prieto, Jose Antonio

    2010-03-01

    We used adaptive evolution to improve freeze tolerance of industrial baker's yeast. Our hypothesis was that adaptation to low temperature is accompanied by enhanced resistance of yeast to freezing. Based on this hypothesis, yeast was propagated in a flour-free liquid dough model system, which contained sorbitol and NaCl, by successive batch refreshments maintained constantly at 12°C over at least 200 generations. Relative to the parental population, the maximal growth rate (µ(max)) under the restrictive conditions, increased gradually over the time course of the experiment. This increase was accompanied by enhanced freeze tolerance. However, these changes were not the consequence of genetic adaptation to low temperature, a fact that was confirmed by prolonged selection of yeast cells in YPD at 12°C. Instead, the experimental populations showed a progressive increase in NaCl tolerance. This phenotype was likely achieved at the expense of others traits, since evolved cells showed a ploidy reduction, a defect in the glucose derepression mechanism and a loss in their ability to utilize gluconeogenic carbon sources. We discuss the genetic flexibility of S. cerevisiae in terms of adaptation to the multiple constraints of the experimental design applied to drive adaptive evolution and the technologically advantageous phenotype of the evolved population. PMID:21255321

  2. Effect of growth conditions and trehalose content on cryotolerance of bakers' yeast in frozen doughs.

    PubMed

    Gélinas, P; Fiset, G; Leduy, A; Goulet, J

    1989-10-01

    The cryotolerance in frozen doughs and in water suspensions of bakers' yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) previously grown under various industrial conditions was evaluated on a laboratory scale. Fed-batch cultures were very superior to batch cultures, and strong aeration enhanced cryoresistance in both cases for freezing rates of 1 to 56 degrees C min. Loss of cell viability in frozen dough or water was related to the duration of the dissolved-oxygen deficit during fed-batch growth. Strongly aerobic fed-batch cultures grown at a reduced average specific rate (mu = 0.088 h compared with 0.117 h) also showed greater trehalose synthesis and improved frozen-dough stability. Insufficient aeration (dissolved-oxygen deficit) and lower growth temperature (20 degrees C instead of 30 degrees C) decreased both fed-batch-grown yeast cryoresistance and trehalose content. Although trehalose had a cryoprotective effect in S. cerevisiae, its effect was neutralized by even a momentary lack of excess dissolved oxygen in the fed-batch growth medium. PMID:16348024

  3. Stress tolerance in doughs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae trehalase mutants derived from commercial Baker's yeast.

    PubMed

    Shima, J; Hino, A; Yamada-Iyo, C; Suzuki, Y; Nakajima, R; Watanabe, H; Mori, K; Takano, H

    1999-07-01

    Accumulation of trehalose is widely believed to be a critical determinant in improving the stress tolerance of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is commonly used in commercial bread dough. To retain the accumulation of trehalose in yeast cells, we constructed, for the first time, diploid homozygous neutral trehalase mutants (Deltanth1), acid trehalase mutants (Deltaath1), and double mutants (Deltanth1 ath1) by using commercial baker's yeast strains as the parent strains and the gene disruption method. During fermentation in a liquid fermentation medium, degradation of intracellular trehalose was inhibited with all of the trehalase mutants. The gassing power of frozen doughs made with these mutants was greater than the gassing power of doughs made with the parent strains. The Deltanth1 and Deltaath1 strains also exhibited higher levels of tolerance of dry conditions than the parent strains exhibited; however, the Deltanth1 ath1 strain exhibited lower tolerance of dry conditions than the parent strain exhibited. The improved freeze tolerance exhibited by all of the trehalase mutants may make these strains useful in frozen dough. PMID:10388673

  4. Impairment of the glycolytic system and actin in baker's yeast during frozen storage.

    PubMed

    Hatano, S; Udou, M; Koga, N; Honjoh, K; Miyamoto, T

    1996-01-01

    After frozen storage for 7 d, the viability and CO2 productivity of a conventional baker's yeast strain D greatly decreased. The viability of a freeze-tolerant strain, DFT, used for the frozen dough method slightly decreased after the same storage period, while the CO2 productivity greatly decreased. The CO2 productivity and DNase I inhibitory activity of actin of the cell-free extracts prepared immediately after thawing from 7-d frozen-stored cells markedly decreased in both strains. In DFT, however, the productivity and the inhibitory activity of the cell-free extract increased when the extract was prepared after incubation of the frozen-thawed cells at 30 degrees C. The increase in the inhibitory activity first occurred and then the increase in the CO2 productivity. Gel filtration patterns of actin and glycolytic enzymes were compared between cell-free extracts of both strains. Peaks of actin and activity peaks of hexokinase and pyruvate kinase decreased in the strain D after frozen storage, but only slightly in the strain DFT. After frozen storage, phosphofructokinase activity peak shifted to a lower molecular weight in strain D. PMID:8824826

  5. [Spatial distribution of Tenuipalpus heveae Baker (Acari: Tenuipalpidae) on rubber tree plantations].

    PubMed

    Martins, Gustavo L M; Vieira, Marineide R; Barbosa, José C; Dini, Thiago A; Manzano, Anderson M; Alves, Bruno M S; Silva, Rodolfo M

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this work was to study the spatial distribution of Tenuipalpus heveae Baker in rubber tree plantations. The experimental area was located in Marinópolis, State of São Paulo, and corresponded to a total of 1,000 plants (clone RRIM 600) divided in 100 plots of ten plants each. A total of 16 samplings were conducted, approximately once every 10 days, between December 2007 and June 2008. On each date, samples were taken from two plants per plot, each sample corresponding to the top 30 cm of a branch randomly taken from the median region of the canopy of each plant. The number of T. heveae was evaluated on three leaflets randomly taken from each sample, using a 20x power pocket magnifying glass. The number of mites was evaluated in two areas of 1 cm² delimited on the lower surface of each leaflet, being one along the midrib and the other along a lateral vein. The calculated dispersion indexes were: variance/mean relationship (I), index of Morisita (I´), coefficient of Green (Cx) and k exponent of negative binomial distribution. Tenuipalpus heveae showed aggregate distribution. The negative binomial distribution model was the most appropriate to represent the spatial distribution of the mite in the rubber tree plantation.

  6. Sequential sampling plan for Tenuipalpus heveae Baker (Acari: Tenuipalpidae) on rubber tree.

    PubMed

    Martins, G L M; Vieira, M R; Barbosa, J C

    2013-04-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop a sequential sampling plan for the decision-making process to control Tenuipalpus heveae Baker (Acari: Tenuipalpidae), an important pest of the rubber tree crop. The experimental area was represented by 1,000 plants of the RRIM 600 clone divided in 100 plots with 10 plants each. Leaves were collected and the number of mites determined under laboratory conditions. The sequential sampling plan was developed in accordance with the Sequential Test Likelihood Ratio. The value 0.10 was pre-established for α and β representing type I and type II errors, respectively. The level of control adopted was six mites per 12 cm(2). The operating characteristic curve and the curve of maximum expected sample were determined. Two lines were generated: the upper one, when the condition for chemical control is recommended (S1 = 23.3080 + 2.1972); and the lower, when chemical control is not recommended (S0 = -23.3080 + 2.1972). Sample size for the decision-making process to control T. heveae requires 6 to 18 plants.

  7. Antiplasmodial activity of compounds from Sloanea rhodantha (Baker) Capuron var. rhodantha from the Madagascar rain forest.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shugeng; Ranarivelo, Lalasoa; Ratsimbason, Michel; Randrianasolo, Sennen; Ratovoson, Fidy; Andrianjafy, Mamisoa; Kingston, David G I

    2006-12-01

    Bioassay-directed separation of the butanol-soluble portion of an extract of Sloanea rhodantha (Baker) Capuron var. Rhodantha (Elaeocarpaceae) active against the drug-sensitive HB3 strain of Plasmodium falciparum led to the isolation of seven phenolic compounds, gallic acid (1), 3,5-di-O-galloylquinic acid (2), 1,6-di-O-galloyl glucopyranoside (3), 3,4,5-tri-O-galloylquinic acid (4), 1-O-eudesmoylquinic acid (5), 1,2,3,6-tetra-O-galloyl glucopyranoside (6), and 3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl-(6'-O-galloyl)-O-b-D-glucopyranoside (7). The structure of the new compound 5 was established on the basis of interpretation of its 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic data. Compounds 2, 3, 4, 6, and 7 showed weak inhibitory activity against the drug-sensitive HB3 and the drug-resistant FCM29 strains of P. falciparum, with IC (50) values ranging from 8.0 - 43.0 and 16.1 - 93.0 microg/mL, respectively.

  8. Sequential sampling plan for Tenuipalpus heveae Baker (Acari: Tenuipalpidae) on rubber tree.

    PubMed

    Martins, G L M; Vieira, M R; Barbosa, J C

    2013-04-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop a sequential sampling plan for the decision-making process to control Tenuipalpus heveae Baker (Acari: Tenuipalpidae), an important pest of the rubber tree crop. The experimental area was represented by 1,000 plants of the RRIM 600 clone divided in 100 plots with 10 plants each. Leaves were collected and the number of mites determined under laboratory conditions. The sequential sampling plan was developed in accordance with the Sequential Test Likelihood Ratio. The value 0.10 was pre-established for α and β representing type I and type II errors, respectively. The level of control adopted was six mites per 12 cm(2). The operating characteristic curve and the curve of maximum expected sample were determined. Two lines were generated: the upper one, when the condition for chemical control is recommended (S1 = 23.3080 + 2.1972); and the lower, when chemical control is not recommended (S0 = -23.3080 + 2.1972). Sample size for the decision-making process to control T. heveae requires 6 to 18 plants. PMID:23949755

  9. [Spatial distribution of Tenuipalpus heveae Baker (Acari: Tenuipalpidae) on rubber tree plantations].

    PubMed

    Martins, Gustavo L M; Vieira, Marineide R; Barbosa, José C; Dini, Thiago A; Manzano, Anderson M; Alves, Bruno M S; Silva, Rodolfo M

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this work was to study the spatial distribution of Tenuipalpus heveae Baker in rubber tree plantations. The experimental area was located in Marinópolis, State of São Paulo, and corresponded to a total of 1,000 plants (clone RRIM 600) divided in 100 plots of ten plants each. A total of 16 samplings were conducted, approximately once every 10 days, between December 2007 and June 2008. On each date, samples were taken from two plants per plot, each sample corresponding to the top 30 cm of a branch randomly taken from the median region of the canopy of each plant. The number of T. heveae was evaluated on three leaflets randomly taken from each sample, using a 20x power pocket magnifying glass. The number of mites was evaluated in two areas of 1 cm² delimited on the lower surface of each leaflet, being one along the midrib and the other along a lateral vein. The calculated dispersion indexes were: variance/mean relationship (I), index of Morisita (I´), coefficient of Green (Cx) and k exponent of negative binomial distribution. Tenuipalpus heveae showed aggregate distribution. The negative binomial distribution model was the most appropriate to represent the spatial distribution of the mite in the rubber tree plantation. PMID:21120376

  10. Baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) antigen in obese and normal weight subjects.

    PubMed

    Salamati, S; Martins, C; Kulseng, B

    2015-02-01

    Baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and its cell wall components have been used as one of the alternatives to antibiotic growth promoters in the feed industry. Antibodies to cell wall mannan of this yeast (ASCA) have been traditionally used in the study of Crohn's disease (CD). We applied ASCA in relation to obesity. This study aims (i) to determine the concentration of ASCA (immunoglobulin A [IgA] and immunoglobulin G [IgG]) in obese compared with normal weight individuals and (ii) to determine if there is a correlation between ASCA concentrations, obesity indices and C-reactive protein. Forty obese individuals (body mass index [BMI] > 35 kg m(-2) ) and 18 healthy (BMI < 25 kg m(-2) ) volunteers participated in this case-control study. Binding activity of serum IgA and IgG to the cell wall mannan of S. cerevisiae was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. More than one-third of the obese individual (35%) showed elevated titres of ASCA compared with the control group (5%). This antibody was positively associated with weight (P = 0.01), BMI (P = 0.02) and waist circumference (P = 0.02), but not with C-reactive protein. It seems that ASCA are not only specific for CD but are also associated with obesity. S. cerevisiae or a related antigen may play a role in the matrix of this complex condition.

  11. Mineral resource potential map of the Natural Area Roadless Area, Baker County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cathcart, James B.; Patterson, Sam H.; Crandall, Thomas M.

    1983-01-01

    The Natural Area Roadless Area, which is in the Osceola National Forest in Baker County, Fla., is underlain by sedimentary rocks containing phosphate deposits that are not a potential mineral resource by todays standards. The region has a low potential for oil and gas and virtually no potential for other valuable minerals. The phosphate deposits are either slightly low in tonnage and P2O5 content, high in MgO and/or Fe2O3 + Al2O3, or the ratio of CaO to P2O5 is too high for deposits that can be mined profitably at the present time. A low potential for oil and gas is indicated by the numerous dry holes in the region and the absence of the formations that contain these hydrocarbons in southern and westernmost Florida. The only mineral material that has been produced in the study area is clayey sand, used in stabilizing Forest Service roads. This type of clayey sand has no particular value because there are virtually unlimited quantities in the surrounding region. The peaty material in the area is too high in ash content to be mined. Large quantities of limestone underlie the area but are too deeply buried to be quarried. Heavy-mineral and clay deposits, which are mined elsewhere in northern peninsular Florida, are not present in the study area.

  12. The amino acid sequence of the aspartate aminotransferase from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, V B; Maras, B; Barra, D; Doonan, S

    1991-01-01

    1. The single (cytosolic) aspartate aminotransferase was purified in high yield from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). 2. Amino-acid-sequence analysis was carried out by digestion of the protein with trypsin and with CNBr; some of the peptides produced were further subdigested with Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase or with pepsin. Peptides were sequenced by the dansyl-Edman method and/or by automated gas-phase methods. The amino acid sequence obtained was complete except for a probable gap of two residues as indicated by comparison with the structures of counterpart proteins in other species. 3. The N-terminus of the enzyme is blocked. Fast-atom-bombardment m.s. was used to identify the blocking group as an acetyl one. 4. Alignment of the sequence of the enzyme with those of vertebrate cytosolic and mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferases and with the enzyme from Escherichia coli showed that about 25% of residues are conserved between these distantly related forms. 5. Experimental details and confirmatory data for the results presented here are given in a Supplementary Publication (SUP 50164, 25 pages) that has been deposited at the British Library Document Supply Centre, Boston Spa. Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7 BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1991) 273, 5. PMID:1859361

  13. Estimates of streamflow characteristics for selected small streams, Baker River basin, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, John R.

    1987-01-01

    Regression equations were used to estimate streamflow characteristics at eight ungaged sites on small streams in the Baker River basin in the North Cascade Mountains, Washington, that could be suitable for run-of-the-river hydropower development. The regression equations were obtained by relating known streamflow characteristics at 25 gaging stations in nearby basins to several physical and climatic variables that could be easily measured in gaged or ungaged basins. The known streamflow characteristics were mean annual flows, 1-, 3-, and 7-day low flows and high flows, mean monthly flows, and flow duration. Drainage area and mean annual precipitation were not the most significant variables in all the regression equations. Variance in the low flows and the summer mean monthly flows was reduced by including an index of glacierized area within the basin as a third variable. Standard errors of estimate of the regression equations ranged from 25 to 88%, and the largest errors were associated with the low flow characteristics. Discharge measurements made at the eight sites near midmonth each month during 1981 were used to estimate monthly mean flows at the sites for that period. These measurements also were correlated with concurrent daily mean flows from eight operating gaging stations. The correlations provided estimates of mean monthly flows that compared reasonably well with those estimated by the regression analyses. (Author 's abstract)

  14. Quiescent hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide degassing from Mount Baker, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, K.A.; Doukas, M.P.; Gerlach, T.M.

    2001-01-01

    Volcanic H2S emission rate data are scant despite their importance in understanding magma degassing. We present results from direct airborne plume measurements of H2S and CO2 on a 21-orbit survey at eleven different altitudes around Mount Baker volcano in September 2000 utilizing instrumentation mounted in a light aircraft. Measured emission rates of H2S and CO2 were 5.5 td-1 and 187 td-1 respectively. Maximum concentrations of H2S and CO2 encountered within the 4-km-wide plume were 75 ppb and 2 ppm respectively. Utilizing the H2S signal as a marker for the plume allows the corresponding CO2 signal to be more easily and accurately distinguished from ambient CO2 background. This technique is sensitive enough for monitoring weakly degassing volcanoes in a pre-eruptive condition when scrubbing by hydrothermal fluid or aquifers might mask the presence of more acid magmatic gases such as SO2.

  15. Acetate but not propionate induces oxidative stress in bakers' yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Semchyshyn, Halyna M; Abrat, Oleksandra B; Miedzobrodzki, Jacek; Inoue, Yoshiharu; Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2011-01-01

    The influence of acetic and propionic acids on baker's yeast was investigated in order to expand our understanding of the effect of weak organic acid food preservatives on eukaryotic cells. Both acids decreased yeast survival in a concentration-dependent manner, but with different efficiencies. The acids inhibited the fluorescein efflux from yeast cells. The inhibition constant of fluorescein extrusion from cells treated with acetate was significantly lower in parental strain than in either PDR12 (ABC-transporter Pdr12p) or WAR1 (transcriptional factor of Pdr12p) defective mutants. The constants of inhibition by propionate were virtually the same in all strains used. Yeast exposure to acetate increased the level of oxidized proteins and the activity of antioxidant enzymes, while propionate did not change these parameters. This suggests that various mechanisms underlie the yeast toxicity by acetic and propionic acids. Our studies with mutant cells clearly indicated the involvement of Yap1p transcriptional regulator and de novo protein synthesis in superoxide dismutase up-regulation by acetate. The up-regulation of catalase was Yap1p independent. Yeast pre-incubation with low concentrations of H₂O₂ caused cellular cross-protection against high concentrations of acetate. The results are discussed from the point of view that acetate induces a prooxidant effect in vivo, whereas propionate does not. PMID:21605494

  16. Disruption of phospholipase B gene, PLB1, increases the survival of baker's yeast Torulaspora delbrueckii.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Y; Imai, K; Oishi, H; Tamai, Y

    1996-12-15

    An uracil auxotrophic mutant of baker's yeast Torulaspora delbrueckii, which is resistant to 5-fluoro-orotic acid, was complemented by transformation with YEp24 which harbors 2 microns origin and URA3 derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The phospholipase B in T. delbrueckii cells is active in both acidic and alkaline conditions. However, activity of phospholipase B gene (PLB1) in cells of disruption mutant (plb1:: URA3) was lost in both conditions, which indicates that all phospholipase B activity is encoded by a single gene (or a single polypeptide) in these yeast cells. Over-expression of PLB1 with YEp plasmid vector in T. delbrueckii cells showed approximately 2.5-fold increase in phospholipase B activity, comparing with that in wild-type cells. Cells of plb1 delta mutant showed increased survival when cells of plb1 delta mutant and wild-type strain were incubated in water at 30 degrees C. Cells of PLB1-over-expressed strain died rapidly even during the cultivation period, indicating that phospholipase B activity may be a determinant for the survival of this yeast.

  17. De novo biosynthesis of vanillin in fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) and baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

    PubMed

    Hansen, Esben H; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Kock, Gertrud R; Bünner, Camilla M; Kristensen, Charlotte; Jensen, Ole R; Okkels, Finn T; Olsen, Carl E; Motawia, Mohammed S; Hansen, Jørgen

    2009-05-01

    Vanillin is one of the world's most important flavor compounds, with a global market of 180 million dollars. Natural vanillin is derived from the cured seed pods of the vanilla orchid (Vanilla planifolia), but most of the world's vanillin is synthesized from petrochemicals or wood pulp lignins. We have established a true de novo biosynthetic pathway for vanillin production from glucose in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, also known as fission yeast or African beer yeast, as well as in baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Productivities were 65 and 45 mg/liter, after introduction of three and four heterologous genes, respectively. The engineered pathways involve incorporation of 3-dehydroshikimate dehydratase from the dung mold Podospora pauciseta, an aromatic carboxylic acid reductase (ACAR) from a bacterium of the Nocardia genus, and an O-methyltransferase from Homo sapiens. In S. cerevisiae, the ACAR enzyme required activation by phosphopantetheinylation, and this was achieved by coexpression of a Corynebacterium glutamicum phosphopantetheinyl transferase. Prevention of reduction of vanillin to vanillyl alcohol was achieved by knockout of the host alcohol dehydrogenase ADH6. In S. pombe, the biosynthesis was further improved by introduction of an Arabidopsis thaliana family 1 UDP-glycosyltransferase, converting vanillin into vanillin beta-D-glucoside, which is not toxic to the yeast cells and thus may be accumulated in larger amounts. These de novo pathways represent the first examples of one-cell microbial generation of these valuable compounds from glucose. S. pombe yeast has not previously been metabolically engineered to produce any valuable, industrially scalable, white biotech commodity.

  18. Improved Properties of Baker's Yeast Mutants Resistant to 2-Deoxy-d-Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Rincón, Ana M.; Codón, Antonio C.; Castrejón, Francisco; Benítez, Tahía

    2001-01-01

    We isolated spontaneous mutants from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast V1) that were resistant to 2-deoxy-d-glucose and had improved fermentative capacity on sweet doughs. Three mutants could grow at the same rate as the wild type in minimal SD medium (0.17% Difco yeast nitrogen base without amino acids and ammonium sulfate, 0.5% ammonium sulfate, 2% glucose) and had stable elevated levels of maltase and/or invertase under repression conditions but lower levels in maltose-supplemented media. Two of the mutants also had high levels of phosphatase active on 2-deoxy-d-glucose-6-phosphate. Dough fermentation (CO2 liberation) by two of the mutants was faster and/or produced higher final volumes than that by the wild type, both under laboratory and industrial conditions, when the doughs were supplemented with glucose or sucrose. However, the three mutants were slower when fermenting plain doughs. Fermented sweet bakery products obtained with these mutants were of better quality than those produced by the wild type, with regard to their texture and their organoleptic properties. PMID:11526034

  19. Precise clock synchronization protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luit, E. J.; Martin, J. M. M.

    1993-12-01

    A distributed clock synchronization protocol is presented which achieves a very high precision without the need for very frequent resynchronizations. The protocol tolerates failures of the clocks: clocks may be too slow or too fast, exhibit omission failures and report inconsistent values. Synchronization takes place in synchronization rounds as in many other synchronization protocols. At the end of each round, clock times are exchanged between the clocks. Each clock applies a convergence function (CF) to the values obtained. This function estimates the difference between its clock and an average clock and corrects its clock accordingly. Clocks are corrected for drift relative to this average clock during the next synchronization round. The protocol is based on the assumption that clock reading errors are small with respect to the required precision of synchronization. It is shown that the CF resynchronizes the clocks with high precision even when relatively large clock drifts are possible. It is also shown that the drift-corrected clocks remain synchronized until the end of the next synchronization round. The stability of the protocol is proven.

  20. EPR study on gamma-irradiated fruits dehydrated via osmosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordanov, N. D.; Aleksieva, K.

    2007-06-01

    The shape and time stability of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of non- and γ-irradiated papaya, melon, cherry and fig samples dehydrated via osmosis are reported. It is shown that non-irradiated samples are generally EPR silent whereas γ-irradiated exhibit "sugar-like" EPR spectra. The recorded EPR spectra are monitored for a period of 7 months after irradiation (stored at low humidity and in the dark). The results suggest longer period of unambiguous identification of the radiation processing of osmose dehydrated fruits. Therefore, the Protocol EN 13708,2001 issued by CEN is fully applicable for the studied fruit samples.

  1. InterGroup Protocols

    2003-04-02

    Existing reliable ordered group communication protocols have been developed for local-area networks and do not in general scale well to a large number of nodes and wide-area networks. The InterGroup suite of protocols is a scalable group communication system that introduces an unusual approach to handling group membership, and supports a receiver-oriented selection of service. The protocols are intended for a wide-area network, with a large number of nodes, that has highly variable delays andmore » a high message loss rate, such as the Internet. The levels of the message delivery service range from unreliable unordered to reliable timestamp ordered.« less

  2. Optimal protocols for nonlocality distillation

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeyer, Peter; Rashid, Jibran

    2010-10-15

    Forster et al. recently showed that weak nonlocality can be amplified by giving the first protocol that distills a class of nonlocal boxes (NLBs) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 120401 (2009)] We first show that their protocol is optimal among all nonadaptive protocols. We next consider adaptive protocols. We show that the depth-2 protocol of Allcock et al. [Phys. Rev. A 80, 062107 (2009)] performs better than previously known adaptive depth-2 protocols for all symmetric NLBs. We present a depth-3 protocol that extends the known region of distillable NLBs. We give examples of NLBs for which each of the Forster et al., the Allcock et al., and our protocols perform best. The understanding we develop is that there is no single optimal protocol for NLB distillation. The choice of which protocol to use depends on the noise parameters for the NLB.

  3. Montreal Protocol benefits simulated with CCM SOCOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorova, T.; Rozanov, E.; Gröbner, J.; Hauser, M.; Schmutz, W.

    2012-07-01

    Ozone depletion is caused by the anthropogenic increase of halogen containing species in the atmosphere, which results in the enhancement of the concentration of reactive chlorine and bromine in the stratosphere. To reduce the influence of anthropogenic ozone-depleting substances (ODS), the Montreal Protocol was agreed by Governments in 1987, with several Amendments adopted later. In order to assess the benefits of the Montreal Protocol and its Amendments (MPA) on ozone and UV radiation, two different runs of the chemistry-climate model (CCM) SOCOL have been carried out. The first run was driven by the emission of ozone depleting substances (ODS) prescribed according to the restrictions of the Montreal Protocol and all its Amendments. For the second run we allow the ODS to grow by 3% annually. We find that the MPA would have saved up to 80% of the global annual total ozone by the end of the 21st century. Our calculations also show substantial changes in surface temperature and precipitations that could occur in the world without MPA implementations. To illustrate the changes in UV radiation at the surface and to emphasize certain features which can only be seen for some particular regions if the influence of the cloud cover changes is accounted for, we calculate geographical distribution of the erythemally weighted irradiance (Eery). For the no Montreal Protocol simulation Eery increases by factor of 4 to 16 between the 1970s and 2100. For the scenario including the Montreal Protocol it is found that UV radiation starts to decrease in 2000, with continuous decline of 5% to 10% at middle latitudes in the Northern and Southern hemispheres.

  4. WOODSTOVE DURABILITY TESTING PROTOCOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the development of an accelerated laboratory test to simulate in-home woodstove aging and degradation. nown as a stress test, the protocol determines the long-term durability of woodstove models in a 1- to 2-week time frame. wo avenues of research have been t...

  5. Antioxidant N-acetyltransferase Mpr1/2 of industrial baker's yeast enhances fermentation ability after air-drying stress in bread dough.

    PubMed

    Sasano, Yu; Takahashi, Shunsuke; Shima, Jun; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2010-03-31

    During bread-making processes, yeast cells are exposed to multiple stresses. Air-drying stress is one of the most harmful stresses by generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Previously, we discovered that the novel N-acetyltransferase Mpr1/2 confers oxidative stress tolerance by reducing intracellular ROS level in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sigma1278b strain. In this study, we revealed that Japanese industrial baker's yeast possesses one MPR gene. The nucleotide sequence of the MPR gene in industrial baker's yeast was identical to the MPR2 gene in Sigma1278b strain. Gene disruption analysis showed that the MPR2 gene in industrial baker's yeast is involved in air-drying stress tolerance by reducing the intracellular oxidation levels. We also found that expression of the Lys63Arg and Phe65Leu variants with enhanced enzymatic activity and stability, respectively, increased the fermentation ability of bread dough after exposure to air-drying stress compared with the wild-type Mpr1. In addition, our recent study showed that industrial baker's yeast cells accumulating proline exhibited enhanced freeze tolerance in bread dough. Proline accumulation also enhanced the fermentation ability after air-drying stress treatment in industrial baker's yeast. Hence, the antioxidant enzyme Mpr1/2 could be promising for breeding novel yeast strains that are tolerant to air-drying stress. PMID:20096471

  6. Inversion of Electromagnetic Data to Obtain Ice Thicknesses at Mts. Adams, Baker and Rainier, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deszcz-Pan, M.; Finn, C. A.; Anderson, E.

    2008-12-01

    Helicopter electromagnetic (HEM) data over Mt. Adams, Mt. Baker and Mt. Rainier volcanoes were originally collected to map altered zones for volcano hazards assessments but also can be used to obtain the thickness of ice by a numerical inverse process that includes magnetic susceptibility and dielectric properties of rocks in addition to the standard resistivity and thickness parameters. The multifrequency electromagnetic system used 5 coplanar (106400, 25400, 6121, 1515 and 388 Hz) and one coaxial (3315 Hz) coil. Transmitter and receiver coils in the electromagnetic sensor detected the electromagnetic response of the exposed and ice-covered ground at different frequencies to obtain information from different depths. A one- dimensional (1-D) program using analytic Jacobians was used to invert HEM data. The final three- dimensional model was stitched together from a series of 1-D inversions. Sensitivity tests of the responses to simple two-layer resistivity models representing volcano structure were calculated to guide the inverse process. The tests and practical noise levels showed that ppm response for a 10 ohm-m bottom layer, representing wet and altered rocks, below a very resistive, 1 M ohm-m layer, representing ice, is above the 40 ppm noise limit for up to depths of ~100 m. The results also showed that basement resistivities exceeding 1000 ohm-m below 30 m ice will not be well resolved. The effect of magnetic susceptibility on the measured Hz fields was evaluated for the case of a 30-m-thick top layer overlying a 1000 ohm-m bottom layer. The susceptibility of 0.025 SI strongly influences the in-phase component by lowering its value by a few ppm along the complete spectrum of frequencies. The in-phase and quadrature responses of the Hz component for varying relative dielectric permittivity were calculated for the same model and show that only the highest frequencies, above 10 kHz, are influenced by the dielectric properties of the model, and only for the case

  7. When is Deceptive Message Production More Effortful than Truth-Telling? A Baker's Dozen of Moderators.

    PubMed

    Burgoon, Judee K

    2015-01-01

    Deception is thought to be more effortful than telling the truth. Empirical evidence from many quarters supports this general proposition. However, there are many factors that qualify and even reverse this pattern. Guided by a communication perspective, I present a baker's dozen of moderators that may alter the degree of cognitive difficulty associated with producing deceptive messages. Among sender-related factors are memory processes, motivation, incentives, and consequences. Lying increases activation of a network of brain regions related to executive memory, suppression of unwanted behaviors, and task switching that is not observed with truth-telling. High motivation coupled with strong incentives or the risk of adverse consequences also prompts more cognitive exertion-for truth-tellers and deceivers alike-to appear credible, with associated effects on performance and message production effort, depending on the magnitude of effort, communicator skill, and experience. Factors related to message and communication context include discourse genre, type of prevarication, expected response length, communication medium, preparation, and recency of target event/issue. These factors can attenuate the degree of cognitive taxation on senders so that truth-telling and deceiving are similarly effortful. Factors related to the interpersonal relationship among interlocutors include whether sender and receiver are cooperative or adversarial and how well-acquainted they are with one another. A final consideration is whether the unit of analysis is the utterance, turn at talk, episode, entire interaction, or series of interactions. Taking these factors into account should produce a more nuanced answer to the question of when deception is more difficult than truth-telling. PMID:26733932

  8. Alternative control of Tetranychus evansi Baker & Pritchard (Acari: Tetranychidae) on tomato plants grown in greenhouses.

    PubMed

    Soto, Alberto; Venzon, Madelaine; Oliveira, Rafael M; Oliveira, Hamilton G; Pallini, Angelo

    2010-01-01

    Tetranychus evansi Baker & Pritchard is an important pest of solanaceous plants, including tomatoes. This mite is characterized by a high reproductive rate, which leads to high population growth in a short period of time causing important economic damage. Control of T. evansi is mainly through synthetic acaricides. In searching for environmentally friendly control measures, we evaluated the efficiency of alternative products to control T. evansi on tomato plants under greenhouse conditions. The products tested were lime sulphur and neem based products. We first estimated the lethal concentration (LC) and instantaneous rate of increase (r i) of T. evansi exposed to different product concentrations in laboratory conditions, and later tested the efficacy of LC95 and the concentrations that restrained mite population growth (r i = 0) in greenhouse conditions. The following treatments were repeated three times: NeemPro (81.0 and 71.6 mg a.i./l), Natuneem (31.1 and 20.4 mg ai/l), Organic Neem (39.1 and 30.4 mg a.i./l), lime sulphur (1.0 and 0.6%) and water (control). For all products, control provided by LC95 was higher than provided for lower concentrations (r i = 0) one day after spraying. However, after five days, for both concentrations, the percentage of T. evansi population reduction was superior to 95% and increased over time. Only plants sprayed with Natuneem (31.1 mg a.i./l) showed symptoms of phytotoxicity. Lime sulphur and neem based products, applied in appropriate concentrations and formulations, bear out as a viable alternative to control T. evansi on tomato plants.

  9. Climate change impacts on the Lehman-Baker Creek drainage in the Great Basin National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volk, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Global climate models (GCMs) forced by increased CO2 emissions forecast anomalously dry and warm trends over the southwestern U.S. for the 21st century. The effect of warmer conditions may result in decreased surface water resources within the Great Basin physiographic region critical for ecology, irrigation and municipal water supply. Here we use downscaled GCM output from the A2 and B1 greenhouse gas emission scenarios to force a Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) watershed model developed for the Lehman and Baker Creeks Drainage (LBCD) in the Great Basin National Park, NV for a century long time period. The goal is to quantify the effects of rising temperature to the water budget in the LBCD at monthly and annual timescales. Dynamically downscaled GCM projections are attained from the NSF EPSCoR Nevada Infrastructure for Climate Change Science, Education, and Outreach project and statistically downscaled output is retrieved from the "U.S. Bias Corrected and Downscaled WCRP CMIP3 Climate Projections". Historical daily climate and streamflow data have been collected simultaneously for periods extending 20 years or longer. Mann-Kendal trend test results showed a statistically significant (α= 0.05) long-term rising trend from 1895 to 2012 in annual and monthly average temperatures for the study area. A grid-based, PRMS watershed model of the LBCD has been created within ArcGIS 10, and physical parameters have been estimated at a spatial resolution of 100m. Simulation results will be available soon. Snow cover is expected to decrease and peak runoff to occur earlier in the spring, resulting in increased runoff, decreased infiltration/recharge, decreased baseflows, and decreased evapo-transpiration.

  10. Studies on the energy metabolism during anaerobic fermentation of glucose by baker's yeast.

    PubMed

    Hoogerheide, J C

    1975-01-01

    As a result of the intimate association of ADP phosphorylation with alcoholic fermentation, resulting in the synthesis of 2 mole ATP per mole glucose fermented, it may be calculated that a minimum of 672 mucal heat development may be expected for every mm-3 CO2 developed during alcoholic fermentation. When all ATP produced would be fully de-phosphorylated to ADP + Pi (e.g. by ATP-ase activity) a maximum heat development of 1200 mucal per mm-3 CO2 could be expected. Using the LKB-Flow-Microcalorimeter for measurement of heat development and at the same time the Warburg technique for measuring CO2 development during anaerobic glucose fermentation of a baker's yeast suspension, the heat development per mm-3 CO2 produced was calculated over a fermentation period of 90 min. Maintenance of strict anaerobic conditions in the Flow-Microcalorimeter vessel was complicated by diffusion of traces of oxygen via the Teflon transport lines, resulting in excessive heat development values, not representative for the alcoholic fermentation. This problem could be circumvented by removal of traces of oxygen by means of addition of the enzyme glucose-oxidase. Poisoning the respiratory enzyme system of the yeast by addition of KCN or azide, or using respiratory-deficient mutants of the yeast also resulted in heat development values, inherent with alcoholic fermentation. The values obtained were very close to the minimum of 672 mucal per mm-3 CO2, at least during the initial phases of fermentation, indicating that ADP regeneration from ATP, essential for maintaining the high fermentation rate, is not primarily the result of ATP-ase activity, but must be due to participation of ATP in energy-requiring synthetic reactions.

  11. Growth characteristics of freeze-tolerant baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae AFY in aerobic batch culture.

    PubMed

    Ji, Meng; Miao, Yelian; Chen, Jie Yu; You, Yebing; Liu, Feilong; Xu, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae AFY is a novel baker's yeast strain with strong freeze-tolerance, and can be used for frozen-dough processing. The present study armed to clarify the growth characteristics of the yeast AFY. Aerobic batch culture experiments of yeast AFY were carried out using media with various initial glucose concentrations, and the culture process was analyzed kinetically. The growth of the yeast AFY exhibited a diauxic pattern with the first growth stage consuming glucose and the second growth stage consuming ethanol. The cell yield decreased with increasing initial glucose concentration in the first growth stage, and also decreased with increasing initial ethanol concentration in the second growth stage. In the initial glucose concentration range of 5.0-40.0 g/L, the simultaneous equations of Monod equation, Luedeking-Piret equation and pseudo-Luedeking-Piret equation could be used to describe the concentrations of cell, ethanol and glucose in either of the two exponential growth phases. At the initial glucose concentrations of 5.0, 10.0 and 40.0 g/L, the first exponential growth phase had a maximal specific cell growth rate of 0.52, 0.98 and 0.99 h(-1), while the second exponential growth phase had a maximal specific cell growth rate of 0.11, 0.06 and 0.07 h(-1), respectively. It was indicated that the efficiency of the yeast production could be improved by reducing the ethanol production in the first growth stage. PMID:27186467

  12. Effects of elevated CO2 concentration and water deficit on fructan metabolism in Viguiera discolor Baker.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, V F; Silva, E A; Zaidan, L B P; Carvalho, M A M

    2013-05-01

    Elevated [CO2 ] is suggested to mitigate the negative effects of water stress in plants; however responses vary among species. Fructans are recognised as protective compounds against drought and other stresses, as well as having a role as reserve carbohydrates. We analysed the combined effects of elevated [CO2 ] and water deficit on fructan metabolism in the Cerrado species Viguiera discolor Baker. Plants were cultivated for 18 days in open-top chambers (OTC) under ambient (∼380 ppm), and high (∼760 ppm) [CO2 ]. In each OTC, plants were submitted to three treatments: (i) daily watering (control), (ii) withholding water (WS) for 18 days and (iii) re-watering (RW) on day 11. Analyses were performed at time 0 and days 5, 8, 11, 15 and 18. High [CO2 ] increased photosynthesis in control plants and increased water use efficiency in WS plants. The decline in soil water content was more distinct in WS 760 (WS under 760 ppm), although the leaf and tuberous root water status was similar to WS 380 plants (WS under 380 ppm). Regarding fructan active enzymes, 1-SST activity decreased in WS plants in both CO2 concentrations, a result consistent with the decline in photosynthesis and, consequently, in substrate availability. Under WS and both [CO2 ] treatments, 1-FFT and 1-FEH seemed to act in combination to generate osmotically active compounds and thus overcome water deficit. The proportion of hexoses to sucrose, 1-kestose and nystose (SKN) was higher in WS plants. In WS 760, this increase was higher than in WS 380, and was not accompanied by decreases in SKN at the beginning of the treatment, as observed in WS 380 plants. These results suggest that the higher [CO2 ] in the atmosphere contributed to maintain, for a longer period, the pool of hexoses and of low DP fructans, favouring the maintenance of the water status and plant survival under drought.

  13. [Presence of nitrates and nitrites in baker's products and in certain other flour products].

    PubMed

    Nabrzyski, M; Gajewska, R; Ganowiak, Z

    1990-01-01

    The results of the study demonstrated that the content of nitrates and nitrites in various baker's products varied from 0.96 (in wheat rolls and baguettes) to 44.07 mg KO3/kg in pumpernickel bread. In wholemeal bread, village bread, tourist bread, rye brown bread and Graham bread the content of these compounds was from 1.46 to 27.10 mg KNO3/kg. The mean content of nitrites in these bread sorts was 1.76 mg NaNo2/kg, range 0.10-4.40 mg NaNo2/kg. In white wheat flours (Wrocław flour, cake flour and Poznań flour) the content of nitrates ranged from 1.10 to 19.08 mg KNO3/kg, and in the dishes produced from them in household was from 0.50 to 16.33 mg KNO3/kg. The content of nitrites in these flours was in the range from 0.00 to 4.16 mg NaNo2/kg, and in the products prepared from them it was from 0.00 to 1.60 mg NaNO2/kg. Eleven types were tested also of popular biscuits, wafers, gingerbread and hard cakes in which the content of nitrates was from 3.66 to 17.72 mg/kg, and that of nitrites was from 0.00 to 8.80 mg NaNo2/kg. Considering the average consumption of these products per one person in the seashore region and the mean values of nitrates and nitrites it was calculated that they provided daily about 3.9 mg KNO3 and 0.4 NaNo2, that is about 1.8% of nitrates and 7.7% of nitrites consumed by adults in daily food ration.

  14. When is Deceptive Message Production More Effortful than Truth-Telling? A Baker's Dozen of Moderators.

    PubMed

    Burgoon, Judee K

    2015-01-01

    Deception is thought to be more effortful than telling the truth. Empirical evidence from many quarters supports this general proposition. However, there are many factors that qualify and even reverse this pattern. Guided by a communication perspective, I present a baker's dozen of moderators that may alter the degree of cognitive difficulty associated with producing deceptive messages. Among sender-related factors are memory processes, motivation, incentives, and consequences. Lying increases activation of a network of brain regions related to executive memory, suppression of unwanted behaviors, and task switching that is not observed with truth-telling. High motivation coupled with strong incentives or the risk of adverse consequences also prompts more cognitive exertion-for truth-tellers and deceivers alike-to appear credible, with associated effects on performance and message production effort, depending on the magnitude of effort, communicator skill, and experience. Factors related to message and communication context include discourse genre, type of prevarication, expected response length, communication medium, preparation, and recency of target event/issue. These factors can attenuate the degree of cognitive taxation on senders so that truth-telling and deceiving are similarly effortful. Factors related to the interpersonal relationship among interlocutors include whether sender and receiver are cooperative or adversarial and how well-acquainted they are with one another. A final consideration is whether the unit of analysis is the utterance, turn at talk, episode, entire interaction, or series of interactions. Taking these factors into account should produce a more nuanced answer to the question of when deception is more difficult than truth-telling.

  15. Characterization of genetically transformed Saccharomyces cerevisiae baker's yeasts able to metabolize melibiose.

    PubMed Central

    Gasent-Ramírez, J M; Codón, A C; Benítez, T

    1995-01-01

    Three transformant (Mel+) Saccharomyces cerevisiae baker's yeast strains, CT-Mel, VS-Mel, and DADI-Mel, have been characterized. The strains, which originally lacked alpha-galactosidase activity (Mel-), had been transformed with a DNA fragment which possessed an ILV1-SMR1 allele of the ILV2 gene and a MEL1 gene. The three transformed strains showed growth rates similar to those of the untransformed controls in both minimal and semi-industrial (molasses) media. The alpha-galactosidase specific activity of strain CT-Mel was twice that of VS-Mel and DADI-Mel. The yield, YX/S (milligrams of protein per milligram of substrate), in minimal medium with raffinose as the carbon source was 2.5 times higher in the transformed strains than in the controls and was 1.5 times higher in CT-Mel than in VS-Mel and DADI-Mel. When molasses was used, YX/S (milligrams of protein per milliliter of culture) increased 8% when the transformed strains CT-Mel and DADI-Mel were used instead of the controls. Whereas no viable spores were recovered from either DADI-Mel or VS-Mel tetrads, genetic analysis carried out with CT-Mel indicated that the MEL1 gene has been integrated in two of three homologous loci. Analysis of the DNA content by flow cytometry indicated that strain CT-Mel was 3n, whereas VS-Mel was 2n and DADI-Mel was 1.5n. Electrophoretic karyotype and Southern blot analyses of the transformed strains showed that the MEL1 gene has been integrated in the same chromosomic band, probably chromosome XIII, in the three strains.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7793932

  16. Some properties of an alcohol dehydrogenase partially purified from baker's yeast grown without added zinc.

    PubMed Central

    Dickenson, C J; Dickinson, F M

    1976-01-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase was partially purified from yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) grown in the presence of 20 muM-MnSO4 without added Zn2+ and from yeast grown in the presence of 1.8 muM-MnSO4. The enzyme from yeast grown with added Zn2+ has the same properties as the crystalline enzyme from commercial supplies of baker's yeast. The enzyme from yeast grown without added An2+ has quite different properties. It has a mol.wt. in the region of 72000 and an S 20 w of 5.8S. The values can be compared with a mol.wt. of 141000 and an S 20 w of 7.6S for the crystalline enzyme. ADP-ribose, a common impurity in commercial samples of NAD+, is a potent competitive inhibitor of the new enzyme (K1 = 0.5 muM), but is not so for the crystalline enzyme. The observed maximum rate of ethanol oxidation at pH 7.05 and 25 degrees C was decreased 12-fold by the presence of 0.06 mol of inhibitor/mol of NAD+ when using the enzyme from Zn2+-deficient yeast, but with crystalline enzyme the maximum rate was essentially unchanged by this concentration of inhibitor. The kinetic characteristics for the two enzymes with ethanol, butan-1-ol, acetaldehyde and butyraldehyde as substrates are markedly different. These kinetic differences are discussed in relation to the mechanism of catalysis for the enzyme from Zn2+-deficient yeast. PMID:179534

  17. Baker-Barry Tunnel Lighting: Evaluation of a Potential GATEWAY Demonstrations Project

    SciTech Connect

    Tuenge, Jason R.

    2011-06-28

    The U.S. Department of Energy is evaluating the Baker-Barry Tunnel as a potential GATEWAY Demonstrations project for deployment of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology. The National Park Service views this project as a possible proving ground and template for implementation of light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires in other tunnels, thereby expanding the estimated 40% energy savings from 132 MWh/yr to a much larger figure nationally. Most of the energy savings in this application is attributable to the instant-restrike capability of LED products and to their high tolerance for frequent on/off switching, used here to separately control either end of the tunnel during daytime hours. Some LED luminaires rival or outperform their high-intensity discharge (HID) counterparts in terms of efficacy, but options are limited, and smaller lumen packages preclude true one-for-one equivalence. However, LED products continue to improve in efficacy and affordability at a rate unmatched by other light source technologies; the estimated simple payback period of eight years (excluding installation costs and maintenance savings) can be expected to improve with time. The proposed revisions to the existing high-pressure sodium (HPS) lighting system would require slightly increased controls complexity and significantly increased luminaire types and quantities. In exchange, substantial annual savings (from reduced maintenance and energy use) would be complemented by improved quantity and quality of illumination. Although advanced lighting controls could offer additional savings, it is unclear whether such a system would prove cost-effective; this topic may be explored in future work.

  18. De Novo Biosynthesis of Vanillin in Fission Yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) and Baker's Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Esben H.; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Kock, Gertrud R.; Bünner, Camilla M.; Kristensen, Charlotte; Jensen, Ole R.; Okkels, Finn T.; Olsen, Carl E.; Motawia, Mohammed S.; Hansen, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Vanillin is one of the world's most important flavor compounds, with a global market of 180 million dollars. Natural vanillin is derived from the cured seed pods of the vanilla orchid (Vanilla planifolia), but most of the world's vanillin is synthesized from petrochemicals or wood pulp lignins. We have established a true de novo biosynthetic pathway for vanillin production from glucose in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, also known as fission yeast or African beer yeast, as well as in baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Productivities were 65 and 45 mg/liter, after introduction of three and four heterologous genes, respectively. The engineered pathways involve incorporation of 3-dehydroshikimate dehydratase from the dung mold Podospora pauciseta, an aromatic carboxylic acid reductase (ACAR) from a bacterium of the Nocardia genus, and an O-methyltransferase from Homo sapiens. In S. cerevisiae, the ACAR enzyme required activation by phosphopantetheinylation, and this was achieved by coexpression of a Corynebacterium glutamicum phosphopantetheinyl transferase. Prevention of reduction of vanillin to vanillyl alcohol was achieved by knockout of the host alcohol dehydrogenase ADH6. In S. pombe, the biosynthesis was further improved by introduction of an Arabidopsis thaliana family 1 UDP-glycosyltransferase, converting vanillin into vanillin β-d-glucoside, which is not toxic to the yeast cells and thus may be accumulated in larger amounts. These de novo pathways represent the first examples of one-cell microbial generation of these valuable compounds from glucose. S. pombe yeast has not previously been metabolically engineered to produce any valuable, industrially scalable, white biotech commodity. PMID:19286778

  19. Overexpression of the calcineurin target CRZ1 provides freeze tolerance and enhances the fermentative capacity of baker's yeast.

    PubMed

    Panadero, Joaquín; Hernández-López, Maria José; Prieto, José Antonio; Randez-Gil, Francisca

    2007-08-01

    Recent years have shown a huge growth in the market of industrial baker's yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), with the need for strains affording better performance in prefrozen dough. Evidence suggests that during the freezing process, cells can suffer biochemical damage caused by osmotic stress. Nevertheless, the involvement of ion-responsive transcriptional factors and pathways in conferring freeze resistance has not yet been examined. Here, we have investigated the role of the salt-responsive calcineurin-Crz1p pathway in mediating tolerance to freezing by industrial baker's yeast. Overexpression of CRZ1 in the industrial HS13 strain increased both salt and freeze tolerance and improved the leavening ability of baker's yeast in high-sugar dough. Moreover, engineered cells were able to produce more gas during fermentation of prefrozen dough than the parental strain. Similar effects were observed for overexpression of TdCRZ1, the homologue to CRZ1 in Torulaspora delbrueckii, suggesting that expression of calcineurin-Crz1p target genes can alleviate the harmful effects of ionic stress during freezing. However, overexpression of STZ and FTZ, two unrelated Arabidopsis thaliana genes encoding Cys(2)/His(2)-type zinc finger proteins, also conferred freeze resistance in yeast. Furthermore, experiments with Deltacnb1 and Deltacrz1 mutants failed to show a freeze-sensitive phenotype, even in cells pretreated with NaCl. Overall, our results demonstrate that overexpression of CRZ1 has the potential to be a useful tool for increasing freeze tolerance and fermentative capacity in industrial strains. However, these effects do not appear to be mediated through activation of known salt-responding pathways.

  20. Overexpression of the calcineurin target CRZ1 provides freeze tolerance and enhances the fermentative capacity of baker's yeast.

    PubMed

    Panadero, Joaquín; Hernández-López, Maria José; Prieto, José Antonio; Randez-Gil, Francisca

    2007-08-01

    Recent years have shown a huge growth in the market of industrial baker's yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), with the need for strains affording better performance in prefrozen dough. Evidence suggests that during the freezing process, cells can suffer biochemical damage caused by osmotic stress. Nevertheless, the involvement of ion-responsive transcriptional factors and pathways in conferring freeze resistance has not yet been examined. Here, we have investigated the role of the salt-responsive calcineurin-Crz1p pathway in mediating tolerance to freezing by industrial baker's yeast. Overexpression of CRZ1 in the industrial HS13 strain increased both salt and freeze tolerance and improved the leavening ability of baker's yeast in high-sugar dough. Moreover, engineered cells were able to produce more gas during fermentation of prefrozen dough than the parental strain. Similar effects were observed for overexpression of TdCRZ1, the homologue to CRZ1 in Torulaspora delbrueckii, suggesting that expression of calcineurin-Crz1p target genes can alleviate the harmful effects of ionic stress during freezing. However, overexpression of STZ and FTZ, two unrelated Arabidopsis thaliana genes encoding Cys(2)/His(2)-type zinc finger proteins, also conferred freeze resistance in yeast. Furthermore, experiments with Deltacnb1 and Deltacrz1 mutants failed to show a freeze-sensitive phenotype, even in cells pretreated with NaCl. Overall, our results demonstrate that overexpression of CRZ1 has the potential to be a useful tool for increasing freeze tolerance and fermentative capacity in industrial strains. However, these effects do not appear to be mediated through activation of known salt-responding pathways. PMID:17557846

  1. Identifying Water on Mt. Baker and Mt. St. Helens, WA with Geophysics: Implications for Volcanic Landslide Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, C.; Bedrosian, P.; Wisniewski, M.; Deszcz-Pan, M.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater position, abundance, and flow rates within a volcano affect the transmission of fluid pressure, transport of mass and heat and formation of mechanically weak hydrothermal alteration influencing the stability of volcanoes. In addition, eruptions can shatter volcanic rocks, weakening the edifice. Helicopter magnetic and electromagnetic (HEM) data collected over Mt. Baker and Mt. St. Helens volcanoes reveal the distribution of water, shattered volcanic rocks and hydrothermal alteration essential to evaluating volcanic landslide hazards. These data, combined with geological mapping and rock property measurements, indicate the presence of localized <100 m thick zones of water-saturated hydrothermally altered rock beneath Sherman Crater and the Dorr Fumarole Fields at Mt. Baker. Nuclear magnetic resonance data indicate that the hydrothermal clays contain ~50% bound water with no evidence for free water ponded beneath the ice. The HEM data suggest water-saturated fresh volcanic rocks from the surface to the detection limit (~100 m) over the entire summit of Mt. Baker (below the ice). A 50-100 m thick high resistivity layer (>1500 ohm-m) corresponding to domes, debris avalanche, volcanic rocks and glaciers mantles the crater at Mt. St. Helens. Shallow low resistivity layers corresponding to fresh, cold water and hot brines are observed below the high resistivity surface in EM data. Shallow ground water mainly concentrates in shattered dome material in the crater of Mt. St. Helens. Aeromagnetic data indicate the location of basalts sandwiched between debris avalanche deposits and shattered dome material. The combination of the EM and magnetic data help map the location of the shattered dome material that is considered to be the failure surface for the 1980 debris avalanche. The EM data image the regional groundwater table near the base of the volcano. The geophysical identification of groundwater and weak layers constrain landslide hazards assessments.

  2. Safety evaluation of irradiated foods in China: A condensed report

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, D. )

    1989-03-01

    Eight trials, with 439 human volunteers who consumed irradiated foods including rice, potatoes, mushrooms, peanuts, and Chinese sausages, as well as diets composed of multiple irradiated foods (irradiated at dosages of 0.2 to 8 kGy) that accounted for 60-66% of the entire diet, were carried out for 2-3 months according to a unified protocol. No adverse effects on body weight, blood pressure, ECG, hematology, blood enzyme activities, serum lipids or blood or urine 17-hydroxycortisol contents and no chromosomal aberration of peripheral blood lymphocytes were found. It is especially worthwhile to note that there was no change in the polyploidy after consumption of irradiated diets. On the basis of these results and a comprehensive analysis of the physical and chemical characteristics of irradiated foods, temporary hygienic standards for irradiated rice, potatoes, onions, garlic, Chinese sausages, peanuts, and mushrooms were promulgated by the Chinese Ministry of Public Health.

  3. Chiral Compounds and Green Chemistry in Undergraduate Organic Laboratories: Reduction of a Ketone by Sodium Borohydride and Baker's Yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Nicola; Clague, Allen; Schwarz, Kimberly

    2002-06-01

    We describe an integrated set of experiments for the undergraduate organic laboratory that allows students to compare and contrast biological and chemical means of introducing chirality into a molecule. The racemic reduction of ethyl acetoacetate with sodium borohydride and the same reduction in the presence of a tartaric acid ligand are described, and a capillary gas chromatography column packed with a chiral material for product analysis is introduced. The results of these two hydride reactions are compared with the results of a common undergraduate experiment, the baker's yeast reduction of ethyl acetoacetate.

  4. Use of Irradiated Foods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brynjolfsson, A.

    1985-01-01

    The safety of irradiated foods is reviewed. Guidelines and regulations for processing irradiated foods are considered. The radiolytic products formed in food when it is irradiated and its wholesomeness is discussed. It is concluded that food irradiation processing is not a panacea for all problems in food processing but when properly used will serve the space station well.

  5. Protocols for distributive scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Stephen F.; Fox, Barry

    1993-01-01

    The increasing complexity of space operations and the inclusion of interorganizational and international groups in the planning and control of space missions lead to requirements for greater communication, coordination, and cooperation among mission schedulers. These schedulers must jointly allocate scarce shared resources among the various operational and mission oriented activities while adhering to all constraints. This scheduling environment is complicated by such factors as the presence of varying perspectives and conflicting objectives among the schedulers, the need for different schedulers to work in parallel, and limited communication among schedulers. Smooth interaction among schedulers requires the use of protocols that govern such issues as resource sharing, authority to update the schedule, and communication of updates. This paper addresses the development and characteristics of such protocols and their use in a distributed scheduling environment that incorporates computer-aided scheduling tools. An example problem is drawn from the domain of space shuttle mission planning.

  6. Generalized teleportation protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Goren; Rigolin, Gustavo

    2006-04-15

    A generalized teleportation protocol (GTP) for N qubits is presented, where the teleportation channels are nonmaximally entangled and all the free parameters of the protocol are considered: Alice's measurement basis, her sets of acceptable results, and Bob's unitary operations. The full range of fidelity (F) of the teleported state and the probability of success (P{sub suc}) to obtain a given fidelity are achieved by changing these free parameters. A channel efficiency bound is found, where one can determine how to divide it between F and P{sub suc}. A one-qubit formulation is presented and then expanded to N qubits. A proposed experimental setup that implements the GTP is given using linear optics.

  7. Dysphonia risk screening protocol

    PubMed Central

    Nemr, Katia; Simões-Zenari, Marcia; da Trindade Duarte, João Marcos; Lobrigate, Karen Elena; Bagatini, Flavia Alves

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To propose and test the applicability of a dysphonia risk screening protocol with score calculation in individuals with and without dysphonia. METHOD: This descriptive cross-sectional study included 365 individuals (41 children, 142 adult women, 91 adult men and 91 seniors) divided into a dysphonic group and a non-dysphonic group. The protocol consisted of 18 questions and a score was calculated using a 10-cm visual analog scale. The measured value on the visual analog scale was added to the overall score, along with other partial scores. Speech samples allowed for analysis/assessment of the overall degree of vocal deviation and initial definition of the respective groups and after six months, the separation of the groups was confirmed using an acoustic analysis. RESULTS: The mean total scores were different between the groups in all samples. Values ranged between 37.0 and 57.85 in the dysphonic group and between 12.95 and 19.28 in the non-dysphonic group, with overall means of 46.09 and 15.55, respectively. High sensitivity and specificity were demonstrated when discriminating between the groups with the following cut-off points: 22.50 (children), 29.25 (adult women), 22.75 (adult men), and 27.10 (seniors). CONCLUSION: The protocol demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity in differentiating groups of individuals with and without dysphonia in different sample groups and is thus an effective instrument for use in voice clinics. PMID:27074171

  8. Mars Communication Protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazz, G. J.; Greenberg, E.

    2000-01-01

    Over the next decade, international plans and commitments are underway to develop an infrastructure at Mars to support future exploration of the red planet. The purpose of this infrastructure is to provide reliable global communication and navigation coverage for on-approach, landed, roving, and in-flight assets at Mars. The claim is that this infrastructure will: 1) eliminate the need of these assets to carry Direct to Earth (DTE) communications equipment, 2) significantly increase data return and connectivity, 3) enable small mission exploration of Mars without DTE equipment, 4) provide precision navigation i.e., 10 to 100m position resolution, 5) supply timing reference accurate to 10ms. This paper in particular focuses on two CCSDS recommendations for that infrastructure: CCSDS Proximity-1 Space Link Protocol and CCSDS File Delivery Protocol (CFDP). A key aspect of Mars exploration will be the ability of future missions to interoperate. These protocols establish a framework for interoperability by providing standard communication, navigation, and timing services. In addition, these services include strategies to recover gracefully from communication interruptions and interference while ensuring backward compatibility with previous missions from previous phases of exploration.

  9. Satellite Communications Using Commercial Protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Griner, James H.; Dimond, Robert; Frantz, Brian D.; Kachmar, Brian; Shell, Dan

    2000-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center has been working with industry, academia, and other government agencies in assessing commercial communications protocols for satellite and space-based applications. In addition, NASA Glenn has been developing and advocating new satellite-friendly modifications to existing communications protocol standards. This paper summarizes recent research into the applicability of various commercial standard protocols for use over satellite and space- based communications networks as well as expectations for future protocol development. It serves as a reference point from which the detailed work can be readily accessed. Areas that will be addressed include asynchronous-transfer-mode quality of service; completed and ongoing work of the Internet Engineering Task Force; data-link-layer protocol development for unidirectional link routing; and protocols for aeronautical applications, including mobile Internet protocol routing for wireless/mobile hosts and the aeronautical telecommunications network protocol.

  10. Robust Optimization of Biological Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Flaherty, Patrick; Davis, Ronald W.

    2015-01-01

    When conducting high-throughput biological experiments, it is often necessary to develop a protocol that is both inexpensive and robust. Standard approaches are either not cost-effective or arrive at an optimized protocol that is sensitive to experimental variations. We show here a novel approach that directly minimizes the cost of the protocol while ensuring the protocol is robust to experimental variation. Our approach uses a risk-averse conditional value-at-risk criterion in a robust parameter design framework. We demonstrate this approach on a polymerase chain reaction protocol and show that our improved protocol is less expensive than the standard protocol and more robust than a protocol optimized without consideration of experimental variation. PMID:26417115

  11. Detection of irradiated liquor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shengchu, Qi; Jilan, Wu; Rongyao, Yuan

    D-2,3-butanediol is formed by irradiation processes in irradiated liquors. This radiolytic product is not formed in unirradiated liquors and its presence can therefore be used to identify whether a liquor has been irradiated or not. The relation meso/dl≈1 for 2,3-butanediol and the amount present in irradiated liquors may therefore be used as an indication of the dose used in the irradiation.

  12. Overview of wideband packet protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherif, M. H.

    1992-10-01

    Wideband packet networks operate at rates equal to, or higher than, 64 kb/s, but lower than the basic broadband rate of 150 Mb/s, on cables or satellite links. Wideband packet protocols are the transmission protocols for these networks. They define open interfaces that can be used for public and private ISDNs. The protocols are defined in CCITT Recommendations G.764 and G.765. This paper describes the objectives of the wideband protocols, and how the objectives were achieved.

  13. Montreal Protocol Benefits simulated with CCM SOCOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorova, T.; Rozanov, E.; Gröbner, J.; Hauser, M.; Schmutz, W.

    2013-04-01

    Ozone depletion is caused by the anthropogenic increase of halogen-containing species in the atmosphere, which results in the enhancement of the concentration of reactive chlorine and bromine in the stratosphere. To reduce the influence of anthropogenic ozone-depleting substances (ODS), the Montreal Protocol was agreed by Governments in 1987, with several Amendments and Adjustments adopted later. In order to assess the benefits of the Montreal Protocol and its Amendments and Adjustments (MPA) on ozone and UV radiation, two different runs of the chemistry-climate model (CCM) SOCOL have been carried out. The first run was driven by the emission of ozone depleting substances (ODS) prescribed according to the restrictions of the MPA. For the second run we allow the ODS to grow by 3% annually. We find that the MPA would have saved up to 80% of the global annual total ozone by the end of the 21st century. Our calculations also show substantial changes of the stratospheric circulation pattern as well as in surface temperature and precipitations that could occur in the world without MPA implementations. To illustrate the changes in UV radiation at the surface and to emphasise certain features, which can only be seen for some particular regions if the influence of the cloud cover changes is accounted for, we calculate geographical distribution of the erythemally weighted irradiance (Eery). For the no Montreal Protocol simulation Eery increases by factor of 4 to 16 between the 1970s and 2100. For the scenario including the Montreal Protocol it is found that UV radiation starts to decrease in 2000, with continuous decline of 5% to 10% at middle latitudes in the both Northern and Southern Hemispheres.

  14. Ground penetrating radar survey of the ice-filled active crater of Mount Baker, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, M.; Clark, D. H.; Caplan-Auerbach, J.

    2010-12-01

    Sherman Crater, the center of volcanic activity at Mount Baker, in northwest Washington, provides an excellent site to study glacier dynamics in an active crater because of its history of sudden, significant increases in geothermal activity, its confined geometry, the potential hazards it poses to downstream reservoirs, and the paucity of recent research related to these hazards. We present results from a ground penetrating radar (GPR) survey of the crater conducted in the summers of 2009 and 2010, including characterization of the subglacial crater morphology, estimates for the crater glacier’s volume, maximum depth, annual mass balance and surface velocity and for the crater’s geothermal flux density. We used a GSSI SIR-3000 GPR system and a low frequency (80 MHz) antenna in common-offset (reflection) collection mode to image subglacial conditions along several west-east and south-north transects within the crater. We processed the GPR data with GSSI’s RADAN 6.0 and paired the surface elevations of each transect to the ice-surface topography using GPS locations and spot altimeter readings. GPR profiles reveal several sets of distinct basal and englacial reflectors. Along west-east (longitudinal) transects, the crater’s bedrock topography largely follows the glacier’s surface (high to the west, descending to the east), but the ice thins dramatically along the margin nearest the crater rim’s eastern breach. The prominent basal reflectors in the GPR transects are consistent with an ice/hydrothermally altered rock interface, but short more well-defined segments suggest the presence of bedrock (towards the center of the crater) and water (near the eastern breach) at the base of the ice. GPR data combined with surface ice melting measurements yield a first-order estimate for the area-averaged accumulation rate of 4.8 +/- 0.1 m yr-1 and ablation rate of 2.4 +/- 0.3 m yr-1 water equivalent from surface melting. The resulting calculated geothermal flux for

  15. Effects of GLC7 and REG1 deletion on maltose metabolism and leavening ability of baker's yeast in lean dough.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xue; Zhang, Cui-Ying; Bai, Xiao-Wen; Xiao, Dong-Guang

    2015-09-10

    Maltose metabolism and leavening ability of baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) in lean dough is negatively influenced by glucose repression. To improve maltose metabolism and leavening ability, it is necessary to alleviate glucose repression. In this study, we focus on the effects of regulators (GLC7 encoding the catalytic and REG1 encoding the regulatory subunits of protein phosphatase type 1) of glucose repression on maltose metabolism and leavening ability of baker's yeast in lean dough. To this end, GLC7 and/or REG1 deletions were constructed and characterized in terms of the growth characteristics, maltose metabolism, leavening ability, and enzyme activities. The results suggest that GLC7 and/or REG1 deletions increased maltose metabolism and leavening ability at different level with glucose derepression and increased enzymes (maltase and maltose permease) activities. In a medium containing glucose and maltose, at the point of glucose exhaustion the maltose metabolized and the leavening ability were increased 59.3% and 23.1%, respectively, in the case of a REG1 single gene deletion. PMID:26073997

  16. Effects of GLC7 and REG1 deletion on maltose metabolism and leavening ability of baker's yeast in lean dough.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xue; Zhang, Cui-Ying; Bai, Xiao-Wen; Xiao, Dong-Guang

    2015-09-10

    Maltose metabolism and leavening ability of baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) in lean dough is negatively influenced by glucose repression. To improve maltose metabolism and leavening ability, it is necessary to alleviate glucose repression. In this study, we focus on the effects of regulators (GLC7 encoding the catalytic and REG1 encoding the regulatory subunits of protein phosphatase type 1) of glucose repression on maltose metabolism and leavening ability of baker's yeast in lean dough. To this end, GLC7 and/or REG1 deletions were constructed and characterized in terms of the growth characteristics, maltose metabolism, leavening ability, and enzyme activities. The results suggest that GLC7 and/or REG1 deletions increased maltose metabolism and leavening ability at different level with glucose derepression and increased enzymes (maltase and maltose permease) activities. In a medium containing glucose and maltose, at the point of glucose exhaustion the maltose metabolized and the leavening ability were increased 59.3% and 23.1%, respectively, in the case of a REG1 single gene deletion.

  17. Superior molasses assimilation, stress tolerance, and trehalose accumulation of baker's yeast isolated from dried sweet potatoes (hoshi-imo).

    PubMed

    Nishida, Osamu; Kuwazaki, Seigo; Suzuki, Chise; Shima, Jun

    2004-07-01

    Yeast strains were isolated from dried sweet potatoes (hoshi-imo), a traditional preserved food in Japan. Dough fermentation ability, freeze tolerance, and growth rates in molasses, which are important characteristics of commercial baker's yeast, were compared between these yeast strains and a commercial yeast derivative that had typical characteristics of commercial strains. Classification tests including pulse-field gel electrophoresis and fermentation/assimilation ability of sugars showed that almost the stains isolated belonged to Saccharomyces cerevisiae. One strain, ONY1, accumulated intracellular trehalose at a higher level than commercial strain T128. Correlated with intracellular trehalose contents, the fermentation ability of high-sugar dough containing ONY1 was higher. ONY1 also showed higher freeze tolerance in both low-sugar and high-sugar doughs. The growth rate of ONY1 was significantly higher under batch and fed-batch cultivation conditions using either molasses or synthetic medium than that of strain T128. These results suggest that ONY1 has potential commercial use as baker's yeast for frozen dough and high-sugar dough.

  18. Superior molasses assimilation, stress tolerance, and trehalose accumulation of baker's yeast isolated from dried sweet potatoes (hoshi-imo).

    PubMed

    Nishida, Osamu; Kuwazaki, Seigo; Suzuki, Chise; Shima, Jun

    2004-07-01

    Yeast strains were isolated from dried sweet potatoes (hoshi-imo), a traditional preserved food in Japan. Dough fermentation ability, freeze tolerance, and growth rates in molasses, which are important characteristics of commercial baker's yeast, were compared between these yeast strains and a commercial yeast derivative that had typical characteristics of commercial strains. Classification tests including pulse-field gel electrophoresis and fermentation/assimilation ability of sugars showed that almost the stains isolated belonged to Saccharomyces cerevisiae. One strain, ONY1, accumulated intracellular trehalose at a higher level than commercial strain T128. Correlated with intracellular trehalose contents, the fermentation ability of high-sugar dough containing ONY1 was higher. ONY1 also showed higher freeze tolerance in both low-sugar and high-sugar doughs. The growth rate of ONY1 was significantly higher under batch and fed-batch cultivation conditions using either molasses or synthetic medium than that of strain T128. These results suggest that ONY1 has potential commercial use as baker's yeast for frozen dough and high-sugar dough. PMID:15277748

  19. Improvement of fermentation ability under baking-associated stress conditions by altering the POG1 gene expression in baker's yeast.

    PubMed

    Sasano, Yu; Haitani, Yutaka; Hashida, Keisuke; Oshiro, Satoshi; Shima, Jun; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    During the bread-making process, yeast cells are exposed to many types of baking-associated stress. There is thus a demand within the baking industry for yeast strains with high fermentation abilities under these stress conditions. The POG1 gene, encoding a putative transcription factor involved in cell cycle regulation, is a multicopy suppressor of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae E3 ubiquitin ligase Rsp5 mutant. The pog1 mutant is sensitive to various stresses. Our results suggested that the POG1 gene is involved in stress tolerance in yeast cells. In this study, we showed that overexpression of the POG1 gene in baker's yeast conferred increased fermentation ability in high-sucrose-containing dough, which is used for sweet dough baking. Furthermore, deletion of the POG1 gene drastically increased the fermentation ability in bread dough after freeze-thaw stress, which would be a useful characteristic for frozen dough baking. Thus, the engineering of yeast strains to control the POG1 gene expression level would be a novel method for molecular breeding of baker's yeast.

  20. Aquaporin expression correlates with freeze tolerance in baker's yeast, and overexpression improves freeze tolerance in industrial strains.

    PubMed

    Tanghe, An; Van Dijck, Patrick; Dumortier, Françoise; Teunissen, Aloys; Hohmann, Stefan; Thevelein, Johan M

    2002-12-01

    Little information is available about the precise mechanisms and determinants of freeze resistance in baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genomewide gene expression analysis and Northern analysis of different freeze-resistant and freeze-sensitive strains have now revealed a correlation between freeze resistance and the aquaporin genes AQY1 and AQY2. Deletion of these genes in a laboratory strain rendered yeast cells more sensitive to freezing, while overexpression of the respective genes, as well as heterologous expression of the human aquaporin gene hAQP1, improved freeze tolerance. These findings support a role for plasma membrane water transport activity in determination of freeze tolerance in yeast. This appears to be the first clear physiological function identified for microbial aquaporins. We suggest that a rapid, osmotically driven efflux of water during the freezing process reduces intracellular ice crystal formation and resulting cell damage. Aquaporin overexpression also improved maintenance of the viability of industrial yeast strains, both in cell suspensions and in small doughs stored frozen or submitted to freeze-thaw cycles. Furthermore, an aquaporin overexpression transformant could be selected based on its improved freeze-thaw resistance without the need for a selectable marker gene. Since aquaporin overexpression does not seem to affect the growth and fermentation characteristics of yeast, these results open new perspectives for the successful development of freeze-resistant baker's yeast strains for use in frozen dough applications. PMID:12450819

  1. Improvement of fermentation ability under baking-associated stress conditions by altering the POG1 gene expression in baker's yeast.

    PubMed

    Sasano, Yu; Haitani, Yutaka; Hashida, Keisuke; Oshiro, Satoshi; Shima, Jun; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    During the bread-making process, yeast cells are exposed to many types of baking-associated stress. There is thus a demand within the baking industry for yeast strains with high fermentation abilities under these stress conditions. The POG1 gene, encoding a putative transcription factor involved in cell cycle regulation, is a multicopy suppressor of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae E3 ubiquitin ligase Rsp5 mutant. The pog1 mutant is sensitive to various stresses. Our results suggested that the POG1 gene is involved in stress tolerance in yeast cells. In this study, we showed that overexpression of the POG1 gene in baker's yeast conferred increased fermentation ability in high-sucrose-containing dough, which is used for sweet dough baking. Furthermore, deletion of the POG1 gene drastically increased the fermentation ability in bread dough after freeze-thaw stress, which would be a useful characteristic for frozen dough baking. Thus, the engineering of yeast strains to control the POG1 gene expression level would be a novel method for molecular breeding of baker's yeast. PMID:23800735

  2. Communication complexity protocols for qutrits

    SciTech Connect

    Tamir, Boaz

    2007-03-15

    Consider a function where its entries are distributed among many parties. Suppose each party is allowed to send only a limited amount of information to a referee. The referee can use a classical protocol to compute the value of the global function. Is there a quantum protocol improving the results of all classical protocols? In a recent work Brukner et al. showed the deep connection between such problems and the theory of Bell inequalities. Here we generalize the theory to trits. There, the best classical protocol fails whereas the quantum protocol yields the correct answer.

  3. Optical Circuit Switched Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monacos, Steve P. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a system and method embodied in an optical circuit switched protocol for the transmission of data through a network. The optical circuit switched protocol is an all-optical circuit switched network and includes novel optical switching nodes for transmitting optical data packets within a network. Each optical switching node comprises a detector for receiving the header, header detection logic for translating the header into routing information and eliminating the header, and a controller for receiving the routing information and configuring an all optical path within the node. The all optical path located within the node is solely an optical path without having electronic storage of the data and without having optical delay of the data. Since electronic storage of the header is not necessary and the initial header is eliminated by the first detector of the first switching node. multiple identical headers are sent throughout the network so that subsequent switching nodes can receive and read the header for setting up an optical data path.

  4. Protocol Architecture Model Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhas, Chris

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Glenn Research Center (GRC) defines and develops advanced technology for high priority national needs in communications technologies for application to aeronautics and space. GRC tasked Computer Networks and Software Inc. (CNS) to examine protocols and architectures for an In-Space Internet Node. CNS has developed a methodology for network reference models to support NASA's four mission areas: Earth Science, Space Science, Human Exploration and Development of Space (REDS), Aerospace Technology. This report applies the methodology to three space Internet-based communications scenarios for future missions. CNS has conceptualized, designed, and developed space Internet-based communications protocols and architectures for each of the independent scenarios. The scenarios are: Scenario 1: Unicast communications between a Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) spacecraft inspace Internet node and a ground terminal Internet node via a Tracking and Data Rela Satellite (TDRS) transfer; Scenario 2: Unicast communications between a Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) International Space Station and a ground terminal Internet node via a TDRS transfer; Scenario 3: Multicast Communications (or "Multicasting"), 1 Spacecraft to N Ground Receivers, N Ground Transmitters to 1 Ground Receiver via a Spacecraft.

  5. Dr. Kathleen Drew-Baker, "Mother of the Sea", a Manchester scientist celebrated each year for half a century in Japan.

    PubMed

    Harris, Constance; Matsuda, Kazuhiko; Sattelle, David B

    2013-09-01

    2013 marks the 50th annual Drew festival in Uto City, Japan, celebrating the work of University of Manchester botanist, Dr. Kathleen Drew-Baker. Her insight into the reproductive biology of algae was the key to efficient farming of the seaweed "nori" which is a familiar component of Japanese food.

  6. Construction from a single parent of baker's yeast strains with high freeze tolerance and fermentative activity in both lean and sweet doughs.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, S; Ouchi, K

    1994-10-01

    From a freeze-tolerant baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), 2,333 spore clones were obtained. To improve the leavening ability in lean dough of the parent strain, we selected 555 of the high-maltose-fermentative spore clones by using a method in which a soft agar solution containing maltose and bromocresol purple was overlaid on yeast colonies. By measuring the gassing power in the dough, we selected 66 spore clones with a good leavening ability in lean dough and a total of 694 hybrids were constructed by crossing them. Among these hybrids, we obtained 50 novel freeze-tolerant strains with good leavening ability in all lean, regular, and sweet doughs comparable to that of commercial baker's yeast. Hybrids with improved leavening ability or freeze tolerance compared with the parent yeast and commercial baker's yeasts were also obtained. These results suggest that hybridization between spore clones derived from a single parent strain is effective for improving the properties of baker's yeasts. PMID:7986027

  7. Changing the Behaviour of Traditional Bakers in a Chinese Multi-Family Owned Food Company through Workplace Action Learning in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsey, Barry; Tse, Rex Chi-Hang

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explain the rationale for designing and implementing an action learning and research process to significantly transform the work behaviour of tradition-bound bakers to embrace leading ideas of a new workplace culture in order to diversify the product range of the moon cake and generally improve the…

  8. Commercial food irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Black, E.F.; Libby, L.M.

    1983-06-01

    Food irradiation is discussed. Irradiation exposes food to gamma rays from a cobalt-60 or a cesium-137 source, or to high-energy electrons emitted by an electron accelerator. A major advantage is that food can be packaged either before or after treatment. FDA regulations with regard to irradiation are discussed. Comments on an 'Advance Notice' on irradiation, published by the FDA in 1981 are summarized.

  9. Licklider Transmission Protocol Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Scott C.; Krupiarz, Chris

    2011-01-01

    This software is an implementation of the Licklider Transmission Protocol (LTP), a communications protocol intended to support the Bundle Protocol in Delay-Tolerant Network (DTN) operations. LTP is designed to provide retransmission-based reliability over links characterized by extremely long message round-trip times and/or frequent interruptions in connectivity. Communication in interplanetary space is the most prominent example of this sort of environment, and LTP is principally aimed at supporting long-haul reliable transmission over deep-space RF links. Like any reliable transport service employing ARQ (Automatic Repeat re-Quests), LTP is stateful. In order to assure the reception of a block of data it has sent, LTP must retain for possible retransmission all portions of that block which might not have been received yet. In order to do so, it must keep track of which portions of the block are known to have been received so far, and which are not, together with any additional information needed for purposes of retransmitting part, or all, of the block. Long round-trip times mean substantial delay between the transmission of a block of data and the reception of an acknowledgement from the block s destination, signaling arrival of the block. If LTP postponed transmission of additional blocks of data until it received acknowledgement of the arrival of all prior blocks, valuable opportunities to use what little deep space transmission bandwidth is available would be forever lost. For this reason, LTP is based in part on a notion of massive state retention. Any number of requested transmission conversations (sessions) may be concurrently in flight at various displacements along the link between two LTP engines, and the LTP engines must necessarily retain transmission status and retransmission resources for all of them. Moreover, if any of the data of a given block are lost en route, it will be necessary to retain the state of that transmission during an additional

  10. Petrogenesis of Mt. Baker basalts (Cascade arc): Constraints from thermobarometry, phase equilibria, trace elements and isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullen, E. K.; McCallum, I. S.

    2010-12-01

    Primitive arc basalts provide information on sub-arc mantle compositions and processes. The relative abundance of basalts in the Cascade arc decreases northward, and basalts are rare in the most northerly segment of the arc (Garibaldi belt) where the Mt. Baker volcanic field (MBVF) is located. Following reconstruction of the compositions of the primary basalts at MBVF (olivine addition ± plag subtraction), we have applied phase equilibria and forward-modeled trace element abundances and isotope ratios to obtain petrogenetic constraints. The most primitive lavas are the Sulphur Cr, Lk Shannon, and Park Butte basalts and the Hogback, Tarn Plateau, and Cathedral Crag basaltic andesites, ranging from 716 to 10 ka. Most erupted peripheral to the major centers. Spinel/olivine and Fe-Ti oxide oxybarometry indicate redox states of ~QFM + 1 corresponding to Fe3+/ΣFe = 0.20. Mg# ranges from 51 to 71. The lavas are medium-K and similar to calc-alkaline basalts and high-Mg basaltic andesites from the High Cascades. MBVF basalts have higher MgO and lower CaO and Al2O3 than typical CAB and HAOT, grading to alkalic compositions with TiO2 and Na2O of up to 1.65 and 5.4 wt%, respectively (Sulphur Cr). Phenocryst contents are 5 to 33% (plag + olivine ± cpx) and the lavas are holo- or hypocrystalline with glass contents of up to 15%. The whole rocks are close to equilibrium with olivine cores (range Fo 87-68). Plagioclase cores range from An 88-68. Reconstructed primary basalt compositions give liquidus T and P values (from olivine-liquid equilibria and silica activities) ranging from 1280°C and 1 GPa (Tarn Plateau) to 1350°C and 1.4 GPa (Sulphur Cr), corresponding to the upper mantle above the core of the mantle wedge. These estimates take into account the 1 to 3 wt% initial H2O contents of the basalts calculated using plagioclase cores. Phase equilibria of the primary basalts indicate a similar pressure range of 1-2 GPa and indicate a residual mantle assemblage of harzburgite

  11. Seismic Velocities and Thicknesses of Alluvial Deposits along Baker Creek in the Great Basin National Park, East-Central Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allander, Kip K.; Berger, David L.

    2009-01-01

    To better understand how proposed large-scale water withdrawals in Snake Valley may affect the water resources and hydrologic processes in the Great Basin National Park, the National Park Service needs to have a better understanding of the relations between streamflow and groundwater flow through alluvium and karst topography of the Pole Canyon Limestone. Information that is critical to understanding these relations is the thickness of alluvial deposits that overlay the Pole Canyon Limestone. In mid-April 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey and National Park Service used seismic refraction along three profiles adjacent to Baker Creek to further refine understanding of the local geology. Two refractors and three distinct velocity layers were detected along two of the profiles and a single refractor and two distinct velocity layers were detected along a third profile. In the unsaturated alluvium, average velocity was 2,000 feet per second, thickness ranged from about 7 to 20 feet along two profiles downstream of the Narrows, and thickness was at least 100 feet along a single profile upstream of the Narrows. Saturated alluvium was only present downstream of the Narrows - average velocity was 4,400 feet per second, and thickness ranged from about 40 to 110 feet. The third layer probably represented Pole Canyon Limestone or Tertiary granitic rock units with an average velocity of 12,500 feet per second. Along the upstream and middle profiles (profiles 3 and 1, respectively), the depth to top of the third layer ranged from at least 60 to 110 feet below land surface and is most likely the Pole Canyon Limestone. The third layer at the farthest downstream profile (profile 2) may be a Tertiary granitic rock unit. Baker Creek is disconnected from the groundwater system along the upstream profile (profile 3) and streamflow losses infiltrate vertically downward to the Pole Canyon Limestone. Along the downstream and middle profiles (profiles 2 and 1, respectively), the presence of

  12. Clinical Protocol Information System

    PubMed Central

    Wirtschafter, David D.; Gams, Richard; Ferguson, Carol; Blackwell, William; Boackle, Paul

    1980-01-01

    The Clinical Protocol Information System (CPIS) supports the clinical research and patient care objectives of the SouthEastern Cancer Study Group (SEG). The information system goals are to improve the evaluability of clinical trials, decrease the frequency of adverse patient events, implement drug toxicity surveillance, improve the availability of study data and demonstrate the criteria for computer networks that can impact on the general medical care of the community. Nodes in the network consist of Data General MicroNova MP-100 minicomputers that drive the interactive data dialogue and communicate with the network concentrator (another DG MicroNova) in Birmingham. Functions supported include: source data editing, care “advice,” care “audit,” care “explanation,” and treatment note printing. The complete database is updated nightly and resides on UAB's IBM 370/158-AP.

  13. Infrared Irradiation: Toward Green Chemistry, a Review.

    PubMed

    Escobedo, René; Miranda, René; Martínez, Joel

    2016-01-01

    This review provides a comprehensive overview of where infrared irradiation has been employed, mainly as regards activating green mode for natural products extractions, as well as to favor a reaction, highlighting its actual importance. It is also underlined that infrared irradiation heating has been around for a long time; however, only in the last eighteen years have many of its advantages been applied to satisfy a wide range of chemical processes, natural products extractions, and for the promotion of many kinds of reactions. In addition, it is brought to light that near infrared irradiation is more efficient than middle and far infrared irradiations, being easily controllable and with the quality of a fast responding heat source. Thus, the main objective of this review is to offer infrared irradiation as an alternative clean energy source to activate reactions, in addition to favor the selective extraction of natural products, all of which is within the Green Chemistry protocol. Some recent results from our laboratory are also included. PMID:27023535

  14. Infrared Irradiation: Toward Green Chemistry, a Review.

    PubMed

    Escobedo, René; Miranda, René; Martínez, Joel

    2016-03-26

    This review provides a comprehensive overview of where infrared irradiation has been employed, mainly as regards activating green mode for natural products extractions, as well as to favor a reaction, highlighting its actual importance. It is also underlined that infrared irradiation heating has been around for a long time; however, only in the last eighteen years have many of its advantages been applied to satisfy a wide range of chemical processes, natural products extractions, and for the promotion of many kinds of reactions. In addition, it is brought to light that near infrared irradiation is more efficient than middle and far infrared irradiations, being easily controllable and with the quality of a fast responding heat source. Thus, the main objective of this review is to offer infrared irradiation as an alternative clean energy source to activate reactions, in addition to favor the selective extraction of natural products, all of which is within the Green Chemistry protocol. Some recent results from our laboratory are also included.

  15. Infrared Irradiation: Toward Green Chemistry, a Review

    PubMed Central

    Escobedo, René; Miranda, René; Martínez, Joel

    2016-01-01

    This review provides a comprehensive overview of where infrared irradiation has been employed, mainly as regards activating green mode for natural products extractions, as well as to favor a reaction, highlighting its actual importance. It is also underlined that infrared irradiation heating has been around for a long time; however, only in the last eighteen years have many of its advantages been applied to satisfy a wide range of chemical processes, natural products extractions, and for the promotion of many kinds of reactions. In addition, it is brought to light that near infrared irradiation is more efficient than middle and far infrared irradiations, being easily controllable and with the quality of a fast responding heat source. Thus, the main objective of this review is to offer infrared irradiation as an alternative clean energy source to activate reactions, in addition to favor the selective extraction of natural products, all of which is within the Green Chemistry protocol. Some recent results from our laboratory are also included. PMID:27023535

  16. EXPEDITIOUS SOLVENT-FREE ORGANIC SYNTHESES USING MICROWAVE IRRADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microwave-expedited solvent-free synthetic processes involve the exposure of neat reactants to microwave (MW) irradiation in the presence of supported reagents or catalysts on mineral oxides. Recent developments are described and the salient features of these high yield protocol...

  17. Indoor air quality investigation protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, R.E.; Williams, P.L.

    1996-10-01

    Over the past 10 to 15 years, an increasing number of complaints about discomfort and health effects related to indoor air quality (IAQ) have been reported. The increase in complaints has been accompanied by an increase in requests for IAQ investigations. This study presents an overview of the many IAQ investigation protocols published since 1984. For analysis, the protocols are divided into four categories: solution-oriented, building diagnostics, industrial hygiene, and epidemiology. In general, the protocols begin with general observations, proceed to collect more specific data as indicated, and end with conclusions and recommendations. A generic IAQ protocol is presented that incorporates the common aspects of the various protocols. All of the current protocols place heavy emphasis on the ventilation system during the investigation. A major problem affecting all of the current protocols is the lack of generally accepted IAQ standards. IN addition, the use of questionnaires, occupant interviews, and personal diaries (as well as the point in the investigation at which they are administered) differs among the protocols. Medical evaluations and verification procedures also differ among the protocols.

  18. Sensor fusion with on-line gas emission multisensor arrays and standard process measuring devices in baker's yeast manufacturing process.

    PubMed

    Mandenius, C F; Eklöv, T; Lundström, I

    1997-07-20

    The use of a multisensor array for measuring the emission from a production-scale baker's yeast manufacturing process is reported. The sensor array, containing 14 different gas-sensitive semiconductor devices and an infrared gas sensor, was used to monitor the gas emission from a yeast culture bioreactor during fed-batch operation. The signal pattern from the sensors was evaluated in relation to two key process variables, the cell mass and the ethanol concentrations. Fusion with the on-line sensor signals for reactor weight and aeration rate made it possible to estimate cell mass and ethanol concentration using computation with backpropagating artificial neural nets. Identification of process states with the same fusion of sensor signals was realized using principal component analysis. (c) 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 55: 427-438, 1997.

  19. Detections of Acoustic-Tagged Green Sturgeon in Baker Bay on the Lower Columbia River during September - November 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsley, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic transmitters implanted in green sturgeon (Acipenser medirostris) captured in rivers in California were detected by acoustic receivers deployed within and around Baker Bay. The receivers were deployed at eight locations in the Bay and adjacent navigation channels of the Lower Columbia River during a period of anticipated channel dredging. Three of the transmitters detected were confirmed to have been implanted into green sturgeon in previous years; two were from the Sacramento River and one was from the Klamath River. The transmitters (fish) were within detection range of the receivers for only a short period, which is consistent with findings of earlier studies that green sturgeon make rapid and extensive intra-estuary movements.

  20. Baker's yeast β-glucan supplementation increases monocytes and cytokines post-exercise: implications for infection risk?

    PubMed

    Carpenter, K C; Breslin, W L; Davidson, T; Adams, A; McFarlin, B K

    2013-02-14

    Strenuous aerobic exercise is known to weaken the immune system, and while many nutritional supplements have been proposed to boost post-exercise immunity, few are known to be effective. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate whether 10 d of supplementation with a defined source of baker's yeast β-glucan (BG, Wellmune WGP®) could minimise post-exercise immunosuppression. Recreationally active men and women (n 60) completed two 10 d trial conditions using a cross-over design with a 7 d washout period: placebo (rice flour) and baker's yeast BG (250 mg/d of β-1,3/1,6-glucans derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae) before a bout of cycling (49 ± 6 min) in a hot (38 ± 2°C), humid (45 ± 2 % relative humidity) environment. Blood was collected at baseline (before supplement), pre- (PRE), post- (POST) and 2 h (2H) post-exercise. Total and subset monocyte concentration was measured by four-colour flow cytometry. Plasma cytokine levels and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated cytokine production were measured using separate multiplex assays. Total (CD14⁺) and pro-inflammatory monocyte concentrations (CD14⁺/CD16⁺) were significantly greater at POST and 2H (P<0·05) with BG supplementation. BG supplementation boosted LPS-stimulated production of IL-2, IL-4, IL-5 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) at PRE and POST (P<0·05). Plasma IL-4, IL-5 and IFN-γ concentrations were greater at 2H following BG supplementation. It appears that 10 d of supplementation with BG increased the potential of blood leucocytes for the production of IL-2, IL-4, IL-5 and IFN-γ. The key findings of the present study demonstrate that BG may have potential to alter immunity following a strenuous exercise session.

  1. Detection of irradiated ingredients included in low quantity in non-irradiated food matrix. 1. Extraction and ESR analysis of bones from mechanically recovered poultry meat.

    PubMed

    Marchioni, Eric; Horvatovich, Péter; Charon, Helène; Kuntz, Florent

    2005-05-18

    Protocol EN 1786 for the detection of irradiated food by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy was not conceived for the detection of irradiated bone-containing ingredients included in low concentration in non-irradiated food. An enzymatic hydrolysis method, realized at 55 degrees C, has been developed for the extraction of the bone fraction. When followed by a purification of the extracts by an aqueous solution of sodium polytungstate, this method made possible the detection of irradiated mechanically recovered poultry meat at very low inclusions (0.5%, wt/wt by ESR) in various meals (quenelles and precooked meals). PMID:15884794

  2. Publishing protocols for partnered research.

    PubMed

    Hysong, Sylvia J; Woodard, LeChauncy; Garvin, Jennifer H; Murawsky, Jeffrey; Petersen, Laura A

    2014-12-01

    Published scientific protocols are advocated as a means of controlling bias in research reporting. Indeed, many journals require a study protocol with manuscript submission. However, publishing protocols of partnered research (PPR) can be challenging in light of the research model's dynamic nature, especially as no current reporting standards exist. Nevertheless, as these protocols become more prevalent, a priori documentation of methods in partnered research studies becomes increasingly important. Using as illustration a suite of studies aimed at improving coordination and communication in the primary care setting, we sought to identify challenges in publishing PPR relative to traditional designs, present alternative solutions to PPR publication, and propose an initial checklist of content to be included in protocols of partnered research. Challenges to publishing PPR include reporting details of research components intended to be co-created with operational partners, changes to sampling and entry strategy, and alignment of scientific and operational goals. Proposed solutions include emulating reporting standards of qualitative research, participatory action research, and adaptive trial designs, as well as embracing technological tools that facilitate publishing adaptive protocols, with version histories that are able to be updated as major protocol changes occur. Finally, we present a proposed checklist of reporting elements for partnered research protocols. PMID:25355092

  3. The simulation of communication protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Carvalho Viola, F. E.

    1985-12-01

    Simulators for communication protocols specified in the ESTELLE and LC/1 languages are developed. The general principles of protocol simulation are reviewed; ESTELLE and LC/1 are characterized; a prototype LC/1 simulator based on predicate Petri nets is described; and a detailed specification for a driving interface for an ESTELLE simulator is given.

  4. Publishing protocols for partnered research.

    PubMed

    Hysong, Sylvia J; Woodard, LeChauncy; Garvin, Jennifer H; Murawsky, Jeffrey; Petersen, Laura A

    2014-12-01

    Published scientific protocols are advocated as a means of controlling bias in research reporting. Indeed, many journals require a study protocol with manuscript submission. However, publishing protocols of partnered research (PPR) can be challenging in light of the research model's dynamic nature, especially as no current reporting standards exist. Nevertheless, as these protocols become more prevalent, a priori documentation of methods in partnered research studies becomes increasingly important. Using as illustration a suite of studies aimed at improving coordination and communication in the primary care setting, we sought to identify challenges in publishing PPR relative to traditional designs, present alternative solutions to PPR publication, and propose an initial checklist of content to be included in protocols of partnered research. Challenges to publishing PPR include reporting details of research components intended to be co-created with operational partners, changes to sampling and entry strategy, and alignment of scientific and operational goals. Proposed solutions include emulating reporting standards of qualitative research, participatory action research, and adaptive trial designs, as well as embracing technological tools that facilitate publishing adaptive protocols, with version histories that are able to be updated as major protocol changes occur. Finally, we present a proposed checklist of reporting elements for partnered research protocols.

  5. Protocols.io: Virtual Communities for Protocol Development and Discussion.

    PubMed

    Teytelman, Leonid; Stoliartchouk, Alexei; Kindler, Lori; Hurwitz, Bonnie L

    2016-08-01

    The detailed know-how to implement research protocols frequently remains restricted to the research group that developed the method or technology. This knowledge often exists at a level that is too detailed for inclusion in the methods section of scientific articles. Consequently, methods are not easily reproduced, leading to a loss of time and effort by other researchers. The challenge is to develop a method-centered collaborative platform to connect with fellow researchers and discover state-of-the-art knowledge. Protocols.io is an open-access platform for detailing, sharing, and discussing molecular and computational protocols that can be useful before, during, and after publication of research results.

  6. Mechanical properties of acellular mouse lungs after sterilization by gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Uriarte, Juan J; Nonaka, Paula N; Campillo, Noelia; Palma, Renata K; Melo, Esther; de Oliveira, Luis V F; Navajas, Daniel; Farré, Ramon

    2014-12-01

    Lung bioengineering using decellularized organ scaffolds is a potential alternative for lung transplantation. Clinical application will require donor scaffold sterilization. As gamma-irradiation is a conventional method for sterilizing tissue preparations for clinical application, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of lung scaffold sterilization by gamma irradiation on the mechanical properties of the acellular lung when subjected to the artificial ventilation maneuvers typical within bioreactors. Twenty-six mouse lungs were decellularized by a sodium dodecyl sulfate detergent protocol. Eight lungs were used as controls and 18 of them were submitted to a 31kGy gamma irradiation sterilization process (9 kept frozen in dry ice and 9 at room temperature). Mechanical properties of acellular lungs were measured before and after irradiation. Lung resistance (RL) and elastance (EL) were computed by linear regression fitting of recorded signals during mechanical ventilation (tracheal pressure, flow and volume). Static (Est) and dynamic (Edyn) elastances were obtained by the end-inspiratory occlusion method. After irradiation lungs presented higher values of resistance and elastance than before irradiation: RL increased by 41.1% (room temperature irradiation) and 32.8% (frozen irradiation) and EL increased by 41.8% (room temperature irradiation) and 31.8% (frozen irradiation). Similar increases were induced by irradiation in Est and Edyn. Scanning electron microscopy showed slight structural changes after irradiation, particularly those kept frozen. Sterilization by gamma irradiation at a conventional dose to ensure sterilization modifies acellular lung mechanics, with potential implications for lung bioengineering. PMID:25241281

  7. An in vitro cell irradiation protocol for testing photopharmaceuticals and the effect of blue, green, and red light on human cancer cell lines† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5pp00424a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, S. L.; Siewert, B.; Askes, S. H. C.; Veldhuizen, P.; Zwier, R.; Heger, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, ultraviolet light (100–400 nm) is considered an exogenous carcinogen while visible light (400–780 nm) is deemed harmless. In this work, a LED irradiation system for in vitro photocytotoxicity testing is described. The LED irradiation system was developed for testing photopharmaceutical drugs, but was used here to determine the basal level response of human cancer cell lines to visible light of different wavelengths, without any photo(chemo)therapeutic. The effects of blue (455 nm, 10.5 mW cm–2), green (520 nm, 20.9 mW cm–2), and red light (630 nm, 34.4 mW cm–2) irradiation was measured for A375 (human malignant melanoma), A431 (human epidermoid carcinoma), A549 (human lung carcinoma), MCF7 (human mammary gland adenocarcinoma), MDA-MB-231 (human mammary gland adenocarcinoma), and U-87 MG (human glioblastoma-grade IV) cell lines. In response to a blue light dose of 19 J cm–2, three cell lines exhibited a minimal (20%, MDA-MB-231) to moderate (30%, A549 and 60%, A375) reduction in cell viability, compared to dark controls. The other cell lines were not affected. Effective blue light doses that produce a therapeutic response in 50% of the cell population (ED50) compared to dark conditions were found to be 10.9 and 30.5 J cm–2 for A375 and A549 cells, respectively. No adverse effects were observed in any of the six cell lines irradiated with a 19 J cm–2 dose of 520 nm (green) or 630 nm (red) light. The results demonstrate that blue light irradiation can have an effect on the viability of certain human cancer cell types and controls should be used in photopharmaceutical testing, which uses high-energy (blue or violet) visible light activation. PMID:27098927

  8. [Diagnostic protocol and special tests].

    PubMed

    Bellia, M; Pennarola, R

    2008-01-01

    Diagnostic protocol and special tests to ionizing radiations have a preventive function in the medical surveillance of the exposed worker. This protocol must be provided with laboratory and special test assessing fitness for working at the risk of ionizing radiations. The health of workers must be compatible with working conditions and radiation risk. This healthiness of workers is evalued in the time to give an assessment fitness for working at ionizing radiations. For this purpose the basic diagnostic protocol must guarantee minimum information about state of organs and apparatus in addition to the normality of the metabolisms. The diagnostic protocol of the exposed worker to ionizing radiations must be adapted to the specific clinical situation so as to finally make a costs-benefits balance sheet. PMID:19288808

  9. EPA Protocol Gas Verification Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate compressed gas calibration standards are needed to calibrate continuous emission monitors (CEMs) and ambient air quality monitors that are being used for regulatory purposes. US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established its traceability protocol to ensure that co...

  10. QUALITY CONTROL - VARIABILITY IN PROTOCOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory’s Quality Assurance Office, which published the popular pocket guide Preparing Perfect Project Plans, is now introducing another quality assurance reference aid. The document Variability in Protocols (VIP) was initially designed as a ...

  11. Optical imaging of irradiated and non-irradiated hearts (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolin, Stephanie; Chen, Guanchu; Medhora, Meetha M.; Camara, Amadou K. S.; Ranji, Mahsa

    2016-03-01

    Objective: In this study, the metabolic state of the heart tissue is studied in a rodent model of ischemia and reperfusion (IR) in rats exposed to irradiation injury using a cryofluorescence imaging technique. Mitochondrial metabolic state is evaluated by autofluorescence of mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes NADH and FAD. The redox ratio (NADH/FAD) is used as a biochemical/metabolic marker of oxidative stress, before, during and after IR. Materials and methods: Hearts were extracted from non-irradiated (control) and irradiated rats (Irr) given 15 Gy whole thorax irradiation rats (WTI). After 35 days, before the onset of radiation pneumonitis, these two groups of hearts were subjected to one of three treatments; Time control (TC; hearts perfused for the duration of the protocol without ischemia or IR), 25 minutes ischemia with no reperfusion and 25 minutes ischemia followed by 60 minutes reperfusion (IR). Hearts were removed from the Langendorff perfusion system and immediately snap frozen in liquid N2 to preserve the metabolic state after injury; 3-dimensional (3D) cryo-fluorescent imager was used to obtain in fixed time NADH and FAD fluorescence images and their distribution across the entire ventricles. In this study, a 30-μm axial resolution was used resulting in 550 cross-section images per heart. The 3D images of the redox ratio and their respective histograms were calculated in the six groups of hearts. Results: We compared the mean values of the redox ratio in each group, which demonstrate a reduced mitochondrial redox state in both irradiated and non-irradiated ischemic hearts and an oxidized mitochondrial redox state for both irradiated and non-irradiated ischemia-reperfusion hearts compared to control hearts. For non-irradiated hearts, ischemia and IR injuries resulted respectively in 61% increase and 54% decrease in redox ratio when compared with TC. For irradiated hearts, ischemia and IR injuries resulted respectively in 90% increase and 50% decrease

  12. Derivation of guidelines for uranium residual radioactive material in soil at the former Baker Brothers, Inc., Site, Toledo, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Nimmagadda, M.; Kamboj, S.; Yu, C.

    1995-04-01

    Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium in soil were derived for the former Baker Brothers, Inc., site in Toledo, Ohio. This site has been identified for remedial action under the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Single-nuclide and total-uranium guidelines were derived on the basis of the requirement that following remedial action, the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual living or working in the immediate vicinity of the site should not exceed a dose constraint of 30 mrem/yr for the current use and likely future use scenarios or a dose limit of 100 mrem/yr for less likely future use scenarios. The DOE residual radioactive material guideline computer code, RESRAD, was used in this evaluation; RESRAD implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for establishing residual radioactive material guidelines. Three scenarios were considered; each assumed that for a period of 1,000 years following remedial action, the site would be used without radiological restrictions. The three scenarios varied with regard to the type of site use, time spent at the site by the exposed individual, and sources of food and water consumed. The evaluation indicates that the dose constraint of 30 mrem/yr would not be exceeded for uranium (including uranium-234, uranium-235, and uranium-238) within 1,000 years, provided that the soil concentration of total combined uranium (uranium-234, uranium-235, and uranium-238) at the former Baker Brothers site did not exceed 710 pCi/g for Scenario A (industrial worker, current use) or 210 pCi/g for Scenario B (resident - municipal water supply, a likely future use). The dose limit of 100 mrem/yr would not be exceeded at the site if the total uranium concentration of the soil did not exceed 500 pCi/g for Scenario C (subsistence farmer - on-site well water, a plausible but unlikely future use).

  13. Baker's Yeast Beta Glucan Supplementation Increases Salivary IgA and Decreases Cold/Flu Symptomatic Days After Intense Exercise

    PubMed Central

    McFarlin, Brian K.; Carpenter, Katie C.; Davidson, Tiffany; McFarlin, Meredith A.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Strenuous exercise, such as running a marathon, is known to suppress mucosal immunity for up to 24 hr, which can increase the risk of developing an upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) and reduced performance capacity (Allgrove JE, Geneen L, Latif S, Gleeson M. Influence of a fed or fasted state on the s-IgA response to prolonged cycling in active men and women. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. 2009;19(3):209–221; Barrett B, Locken K, Maberry R, Schwamman J, Brown R, Bobula J, Stauffacher EA. The Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey (WURSS): a new research instrument for assessing the common cold. J Fam Pract. 2002;51(3):265; Carpenter KC, Breslin WL, Davidson T, Adams A, McFarlin BK. Baker's yeast beta glucan supplementation increases monocytes and cytokines post-exercise: implications for infection risk? Br J Nutr. 2012;1–9). While many dietary interventions have been used to combat postexercise immune suppression, most have been ineffective. The key purpose of this study was to determine if baker's yeast β-glucan (BG) could positively affect the immune system of individuals undergoing intense exercise stress using two experiments. In the first (E1; N = 182 men and women), BG was compared to placebo supplementation for the incidence of URTI symptoms for 28 days postmarathon. In the second (E2; N = 60 men and women) changes in salivary immunoglobulin A (IgA) were evaluated after 50-min of strenuous cycling when participants had been supplemented for 10 days with either BG (250 mg/day) or placebo (rice flour). For E1, subjects reported URTI symptoms using a daily health log. For E2, saliva was collected prior to, immediately, and 2-hr postexercise using a salivette. Data for E1 and E2 were analyzed using separate analyses of variance (ANOVAs) with repeated measures (p < .05). In E1, BG was associated with a 37% reduction in the number of cold/flu symptom days postmarathon compared to placebo (p = .026). In E2, BG was associated with a 32

  14. Beta-glucan-depleted, glycopeptide-rich extracts from Brewer's and Baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) lower interferon-gamma production by stimulated human blood cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Williams, Roderick; Dias, Daniel A; Jayasinghe, Nirupama; Roessner, Ute; Bennett, Louise E

    2016-04-15

    Regulation of the human immune system requires controlled pro- and anti-inflammatory responses for host defence against infection and disease states. Yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), as used in brewing and baking, are mostly known for ability to stimulate the human immune-system predominantly reflecting the pro-inflammatory cell wall β-glucans. However, in this study, using food-compatible processing methods, glycopeptide-enriched and β-glucan-depleted products were each prepared from Brewer's and Baker's yeasts, which suppressed production of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in human whole blood cell assay, signifying that anti-inflammatory factors are also present in yeast. Anti-inflammatory bioactivities of products prepared from Brewer's and Baker's yeast were compared with the commercial yeast product, Epicor®. While unfractionated Epicor was inactive, the C18 resin-binding fractions of Brewer's and Baker's yeast products and Epicor dose-dependently lowered IFN-γ, demonstrating that Epicor also contained both pro-inflammatory (β-glucans) and anti-inflammatory components. Anti-inflammatory activity was attributed to C18 resin-binding species glyco-peptides in Epicor and experimental yeast products. This study demonstrated that pro- and anti-inflammatory factors could be resolved and enriched in yeasts by suitable processing, with potential to improve specific activities.

  15. Metabolomic study of the fever model induced by baker's yeast and the antipyretic effects of aspirin in rats using nuclear magnetic resonance and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fusheng; Wang, Dongqin; Li, Xiaowei; Li, Zhenyu; Chao, Jung; Qin, Xuemei

    2013-01-01

    A metabolomic investigation of baker's yeast-induced fever in rats was carried out. Plasma derived from Sprague-Dawley rats treated by subcutaneous administration of 20% (w/v) baker's yeast was analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Statistical data analysis using t-test and orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis revealed many significant changes in the metabolic data in the plasma of the fever group. Clear separation was achieved between the fever and control groups. Seventeen marked metabolites were found in the fever group. The metabolites, which include amino acids, carbohydrate, organic acids, and fatty acids, mostly contributed to the discrimination of plasma samples from the control and fever groups. These results suggested that fever may involve in the perturbation of amino acid metabolism coupled with energy metabolism, lipid metabolism, and glycometabolism. After determining the antipyretic effects of aspirin on the fever group, four metabolites in the fever rat plasma were found to be signally regulated and recognized as potential biomarkers, including 3-hydroxybutyric acid, gamma-aminobutyric acid, glucose, and linoleic acid. The metabolic relationships that possibly exist between these potential biomarkers were speculated, and the mechanism of baker's yeast-induced fever was illustrated based on the metabolic relationships. This study found that metabolomic approaches such as GC-MS and NMR could be used as potential powerful tools to investigate the biochemical changes and mechanisms in certain pathological states at the metabolism level. PMID:23670098

  16. Beta-glucan-depleted, glycopeptide-rich extracts from Brewer's and Baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) lower interferon-gamma production by stimulated human blood cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Williams, Roderick; Dias, Daniel A; Jayasinghe, Nirupama; Roessner, Ute; Bennett, Louise E

    2016-04-15

    Regulation of the human immune system requires controlled pro- and anti-inflammatory responses for host defence against infection and disease states. Yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), as used in brewing and baking, are mostly known for ability to stimulate the human immune-system predominantly reflecting the pro-inflammatory cell wall β-glucans. However, in this study, using food-compatible processing methods, glycopeptide-enriched and β-glucan-depleted products were each prepared from Brewer's and Baker's yeasts, which suppressed production of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in human whole blood cell assay, signifying that anti-inflammatory factors are also present in yeast. Anti-inflammatory bioactivities of products prepared from Brewer's and Baker's yeast were compared with the commercial yeast product, Epicor®. While unfractionated Epicor was inactive, the C18 resin-binding fractions of Brewer's and Baker's yeast products and Epicor dose-dependently lowered IFN-γ, demonstrating that Epicor also contained both pro-inflammatory (β-glucans) and anti-inflammatory components. Anti-inflammatory activity was attributed to C18 resin-binding species glyco-peptides in Epicor and experimental yeast products. This study demonstrated that pro- and anti-inflammatory factors could be resolved and enriched in yeasts by suitable processing, with potential to improve specific activities. PMID:26617014

  17. Comminuting irradiated ferritic steel

    DOEpatents

    Bauer, Roger E.; Straalsund, Jerry L.; Chin, Bryan A.

    1985-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of comminuting irradiated ferritic steel by placing the steel in a solution of a compound selected from the group consisting of sulfamic acid, bisulfate, and mixtures thereof. The ferritic steel is used as cladding on nuclear fuel rods or other irradiated components.

  18. MASSIVE LEAKAGE IRRADIATOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Szilard, L.; Christy, R.F.; Friedman, F.L.

    1961-05-30

    An irradiator designed to utilize the neutrons that leak out of a reactor around its periphery is described. It avoids wasting neutron energy and reduces interference with the core flux to a minimum. This is done by surrounding all or most of the core with removable segments of the material to be irradiated within a matrix of reflecting material.

  19. Perspective on food irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-02-01

    Recent US Food and Drug Administration approval of irradiation treatment for fruit, vegetables and pork has stimulated considerable discussion in the popular press on the safety and efficacy of irradiation processing of food. This perspective is designed to summarize the current scientific information available on this issue.

  20. Irradiation Creep in Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

    2014-03-13

    An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

  1. Enhanced leavening properties of baker's yeast overexpressing MAL62 with deletion of MIG1 in lean dough.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xi; Zhang, Cuiying; Dong, Jian; Wu, Mingyue; Zhang, Yan; Xiao, Dongguang

    2012-10-01

    This study aimed to increase maltose fermentation in industrial baker's yeast to increase its leavening properties. To this end, we overexpressed MAL62 encoding alpha-glucosidase (maltase) and deleted MIG1 encoding a transcriptional repressor that regulates MAL gene expression. Strain overexpressing MAL62 showed 46.3 % higher alpha-glucosidase activity and enhanced leaving activity than the parental strain when tested in glucose-maltose low sugar model liquid dough (LSMLD). Deleting MIG1 was much less effective, but it could further strengthen leavening properties in a strain overexpressing MAL62. The relationship between maltose permease and alpha-glucosidase was further dissected by transforming the two genes. The results indicated that without increasing the maltose permease activity, maltose metabolism could also be enhanced by the increased alpha-glucosidase activity. Previous strategies for strain improvement have targeted the enhancement of alpha-glucosidase and maltose permease activities in concert. Our results suggest that increasing alpha-glucosidase activity is sufficient to improve maltose fermentation in lean dough.

  2. Biosynthesis of lead nanoparticles by the aquatic water fern, Salvinia minima Baker, when exposed to high lead concentration.

    PubMed

    Castro-Longoria, E; Trejo-Guillén, K; Vilchis-Nestor, A R; Avalos-Borja, M; Andrade-Canto, S B; Leal-Alvarado, D A; Santamaría, J M

    2014-02-01

    Salvinia minima Baker is a small floating aquatic fern that is efficient for the removal and storage of heavy metals such as lead and cadmium. In this study, we report that lead removal by S. minima causes large accumulation of lead inside the cells in the form of nanoparticles (PbNPs). The accumulation pattern of lead was analyzed in both, submerged root-like modified fronds (here named "roots"), and in its aerial leaf-like fronds ("leaves"). Analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) confirmed the biosynthesis of PbNPs by the plant. In both, roots and leaves, PbNPs were found to accumulate almost exclusively at the cell wall and closely associated to the cell membrane. Two types of PbNPs shapes were found in cells of both tissues, those associated to the cell wall were quasi-spherical with 17.2±4.2 nm of diameter, while those associated to the cell membrane/cytoplasm were elongated. Elongated particles were 53.7±29.6 nm in length and 11.1±2.4 nm wide. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) results indicate that cellulose, lignin and pectin are the major components that may be acting as the reducing agents for lead ions; these findings strongly suggest the potential use of this fern to further explore the bio-assisted synthesis of heavy metal nanostructures.

  3. Communitywide cryptosporidiosis outbreak associated with a surface water-supplied municipal water system--Baker City, Oregon, 2013.

    PubMed

    DeSilva, M B; Schafer, S; Kendall Scott, M; Robinson, B; Hills, A; Buser, G L; Salis, K; Gargano, J; Yoder, J; Hill, V; Xiao, L; Roellig, D; Hedberg, K

    2016-01-01

    Cryptosporidium, a parasite known to cause large drinking and recreational water outbreaks, is tolerant of chlorine concentrations used for drinking water treatment. Human laboratory-based surveillance for enteric pathogens detected a cryptosporidiosis outbreak in Baker City, Oregon during July 2013 associated with municipal drinking water. Objectives of the investigation were to confirm the outbreak source and assess outbreak extent. The watershed was inspected and city water was tested for contamination. To determine the community attack rate, a standardized questionnaire was administered to randomly sampled households. Weighted attack rates and confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Water samples tested positive for Cryptosporidium species; a Cryptosporidium parvum subtype common in cattle was detected in human stool specimens. Cattle were observed grazing along watershed borders; cattle faeces were observed within watershed barriers. The city water treatment facility chlorinated, but did not filter, water. The community attack rate was 28·3% (95% CI 22·1-33·6), sickening an estimated 2780 persons. Watershed contamination by cattle probably caused this outbreak; water treatments effective against Cryptosporidium were not in place. This outbreak highlights vulnerability of drinking water systems to pathogen contamination and underscores the need for communities to invest in system improvements to maintain multiple barriers to drinking water contamination.

  4. Database for the geologic map of the Mount Baker 30- by 60-minute quadrangle, Washington (I-2660)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tabor, R.W.; Haugerud, R.A.; Hildreth, Wes; Brown, E.H.

    2006-01-01

    This digital map database has been prepared by R.W. Tabor from the published Geologic map of the Mount Baker 30- by 60-Minute Quadrangle, Washington. Together with the accompanying text files as PDF, it provides information on the geologic structure and stratigraphy of the area covered. The database delineates map units that are identified by general age and lithology following the stratigraphic nomenclature of the U.S. Geological Survey. The authors mapped most of the geology at 1:100,000. The Quaternary contacts and structural data have been much simplified for the 1:100,000-scale map and database. The spatial resolution (scale) of the database is 1:100,000 or smaller. This database depicts the distribution of geologic materials and structures at a regional (1:100,000) scale. The report is intended to provide geologic information for the regional study of materials properties, earthquake shaking, landslide potential, mineral hazards, seismic velocity, and earthquake faults. In addition, the report contains information and interpretations about the regional geologic history and framework. However, the regional scale of this report does not provide sufficient detail for site development purposes.

  5. Biosynthesis of lead nanoparticles by the aquatic water fern, Salvinia minima Baker, when exposed to high lead concentration.

    PubMed

    Castro-Longoria, E; Trejo-Guillén, K; Vilchis-Nestor, A R; Avalos-Borja, M; Andrade-Canto, S B; Leal-Alvarado, D A; Santamaría, J M

    2014-02-01

    Salvinia minima Baker is a small floating aquatic fern that is efficient for the removal and storage of heavy metals such as lead and cadmium. In this study, we report that lead removal by S. minima causes large accumulation of lead inside the cells in the form of nanoparticles (PbNPs). The accumulation pattern of lead was analyzed in both, submerged root-like modified fronds (here named "roots"), and in its aerial leaf-like fronds ("leaves"). Analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) confirmed the biosynthesis of PbNPs by the plant. In both, roots and leaves, PbNPs were found to accumulate almost exclusively at the cell wall and closely associated to the cell membrane. Two types of PbNPs shapes were found in cells of both tissues, those associated to the cell wall were quasi-spherical with 17.2±4.2 nm of diameter, while those associated to the cell membrane/cytoplasm were elongated. Elongated particles were 53.7±29.6 nm in length and 11.1±2.4 nm wide. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) results indicate that cellulose, lignin and pectin are the major components that may be acting as the reducing agents for lead ions; these findings strongly suggest the potential use of this fern to further explore the bio-assisted synthesis of heavy metal nanostructures. PMID:24211828

  6. Activities of Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Enzymes, Glyoxylate Cycle Enzymes, and Fructose Diphosphatase in Bakers' Yeast During Adaptation to Acetate Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Gosling, J. P.; Duggan, P. F.

    1971-01-01

    Bakers' yeast oxidizes acetate at a high rate only after an adaptation period during which the capacity of the glyoxylate cycle is found to increase. There was apparently no necessity for the activity of acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase, the capacity of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, or the concentrations of the cytochromes to increase for this adaptation to occur. Elevation of fructose 1,6 diphosphatase occurred only when acetate oxidation was nearly maximal. Cycloheximide almost completely inhibited adaptation as well as increases in the activities of isocitrate lyase and aconitate hydratase, the only enzymes assayed. p-Fluorophenylalanine was partially effective and chloramphenicol did not inhibit at all. The presence of ammonium, which considerably delayed adaptation of the yeast to acetate oxidation, inhibited the increases in the activities of the glyoxylate cycle enzymes to different degrees, demonstrating noncoordinate control of these enzymes. Under the various conditions, the only enzyme activity increase consistently related to the rising oxygen uptake rate was that of isocitrate lyase which apparently limited the activity of the cycle. PMID:5557595

  7. Baker's Yeast Deficient in Storage Lipid Synthesis Uses cis-Vaccenic Acid to Reduce Unsaturated Fatty Acid Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Sec, Peter; Garaiova, Martina; Gajdos, Peter; Certik, Milan; Griac, Peter; Hapala, Ivan; Holic, Roman

    2015-07-01

    The role of cis-vaccenic acid (18:1n-7) in the reduction of unsaturated fatty acids toxicity was investigated in baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The quadruple mutant (QM, dga1Δ lro1Δ are1Δ are2Δ) deficient in enzymes responsible for triacylglycerol and steryl ester synthesis has been previously shown to be highly sensitive to exogenous unsaturated fatty acids. We have found that cis-vaccenic acid accumulated during cultivation in the QM cells but not in the corresponding wild type strain. This accumulation was accompanied by a reduction in palmitoleic acid (16:1n-7) content in the QM cells that is consistent with the proposed formation of cis-vaccenic acid by elongation of palmitoleic acid. Fatty acid analysis of individual lipid classes from the QM strain revealed that cis-vaccenic acid was highly enriched in the free fatty acid pool. Furthermore, production of cis-vaccenic acid was arrested if the mechanism of fatty acids release to the medium was activated. We also showed that exogenous cis-vaccenic acid did not affect viability of the QM strain at concentrations toxic for palmitoleic or oleic acids. Moreover, addition of cis-vaccenic acid to the growth medium provided partial protection against the lipotoxic effects of exogenous oleic acid. Transformation of palmitoleic acid to cis-vaccenic acid is thus a rescue mechanism enabling S. cerevisiae cells to survive in the absence of triacylglycerol synthesis as the major mechanism for unsaturated fatty acid detoxification.

  8. Construction of a Trp- commercial baker's yeast strain by using food-safe-grade dominant drug resistance cassettes.

    PubMed

    Estruch, Francisco; Prieto, José Antonio

    2003-12-01

    We have designed a food-safe-grade module for gene disruptions in commercial baker's yeast strains, which contains the G418 resistance cassette, KanMX4, flanked by direct repeats from the MEL1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This module was used to obtain a Trp(-) auxotrophic mutant of the polyploid HY strain by successive targeting to the TRP1 locus and later in vivo excision of the kan(r) marker. Southern blot analysis indicated that HY contains five copies of the TRP1 gene. However, after four disruption rounds, a strain named HYtrpM(4), unable to grow in the absence of tryptophan, was selected. Southern and Northern analysis of HYtrpM(4) cells showed that a remaining functional wild-type copy was still present, suggesting that the level of phosphoribosylanthranylate isomerase activity, resulting from a single copy of TRP1, is too low to sustain growth. Accordingly, a high reversion frequency of the Trp(-) phenotype, through gene conversion, was found in cells of the mutant strain. Nevertheless, this was not a drawback for its use as a recipient strain of heterologous genes. Indeed, YEpACT-X24 transformants were stable after 25 generations and expressed and secreted high levels of active recombinant xylanase. These data indicate that the new Trp(-) strain can be used to generate a stable recombinant yeast that fulfils all the requirements and market criteria for commercial utilisation.

  9. Asymmetric bioreduction of acetophenones by Baker's yeast and its cell-free extract encapsulated in sol-gel silica materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Katsuya; Nakamura, Hitomi; Nakanishi, Kazuma

    2014-02-01

    Baker's yeast (BY) encapsulated in silica materials was synthesized using a yeast cell suspension and its cell-free extract during a sol-gel reaction of tetramethoxysilane with nitric acid as a catalyst. The synthesized samples were fully characterized using various methods, such as scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption-desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetry, and differential thermal analysis. The BY cells were easily encapsulated inside silica-gel networks, and the ratio of the cells in the silica gel was approximately 75 wt%, which indicated that a large volume of BY was trapped with a small amount of silica. The enzyme activity (asymmetric reduction of prochiral ketones) of BY and its cell-free extract encapsulated in silica gel was investigated in detail. The activities and enantioselectivities of free and encapsulated BY were similar to those of acetophenone and its fluorine derivatives, which indicated that the conformation structure of BY enzymes inside silica-gel networks did not change. In addition, the encapsulated BY exhibited considerably better solvent (methanol) stability and recyclability compared to free BY solution. We expect that the development of BY encapsulated in sol-gel silica materials will significantly impact the industrial-scale advancement of high-efficiency and low-cost biocatalysts for the synthesis of valuable chiral alcohols.

  10. Communitywide cryptosporidiosis outbreak associated with a surface water-supplied municipal water system--Baker City, Oregon, 2013.

    PubMed

    DeSilva, M B; Schafer, S; Kendall Scott, M; Robinson, B; Hills, A; Buser, G L; Salis, K; Gargano, J; Yoder, J; Hill, V; Xiao, L; Roellig, D; Hedberg, K

    2016-01-01

    Cryptosporidium, a parasite known to cause large drinking and recreational water outbreaks, is tolerant of chlorine concentrations used for drinking water treatment. Human laboratory-based surveillance for enteric pathogens detected a cryptosporidiosis outbreak in Baker City, Oregon during July 2013 associated with municipal drinking water. Objectives of the investigation were to confirm the outbreak source and assess outbreak extent. The watershed was inspected and city water was tested for contamination. To determine the community attack rate, a standardized questionnaire was administered to randomly sampled households. Weighted attack rates and confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Water samples tested positive for Cryptosporidium species; a Cryptosporidium parvum subtype common in cattle was detected in human stool specimens. Cattle were observed grazing along watershed borders; cattle faeces were observed within watershed barriers. The city water treatment facility chlorinated, but did not filter, water. The community attack rate was 28·3% (95% CI 22·1-33·6), sickening an estimated 2780 persons. Watershed contamination by cattle probably caused this outbreak; water treatments effective against Cryptosporidium were not in place. This outbreak highlights vulnerability of drinking water systems to pathogen contamination and underscores the need for communities to invest in system improvements to maintain multiple barriers to drinking water contamination. PMID:26264893

  11. Protocols.io: Virtual Communities for Protocol Development and Discussion

    PubMed Central

    Stoliartchouk, Alexei; Kindler, Lori; Hurwitz, Bonnie L.

    2016-01-01

    The detailed know-how to implement research protocols frequently remains restricted to the research group that developed the method or technology. This knowledge often exists at a level that is too detailed for inclusion in the methods section of scientific articles. Consequently, methods are not easily reproduced, leading to a loss of time and effort by other researchers. The challenge is to develop a method-centered collaborative platform to connect with fellow researchers and discover state-of-the-art knowledge. Protocols.io is an open-access platform for detailing, sharing, and discussing molecular and computational protocols that can be useful before, during, and after publication of research results. PMID:27547938

  12. Protocols.io: Virtual Communities for Protocol Development and Discussion.

    PubMed

    Teytelman, Leonid; Stoliartchouk, Alexei; Kindler, Lori; Hurwitz, Bonnie L

    2016-08-01

    The detailed know-how to implement research protocols frequently remains restricted to the research group that developed the method or technology. This knowledge often exists at a level that is too detailed for inclusion in the methods section of scientific articles. Consequently, methods are not easily reproduced, leading to a loss of time and effort by other researchers. The challenge is to develop a method-centered collaborative platform to connect with fellow researchers and discover state-of-the-art knowledge. Protocols.io is an open-access platform for detailing, sharing, and discussing molecular and computational protocols that can be useful before, during, and after publication of research results. PMID:27547938

  13. Preliminary geochemical assessment of water in selected streams, springs, and caves in the Upper Baker and Snake Creek drainages in Great Basin National Park, Nevada, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paul, Angela P.; Thodal, Carl E.; Baker, Gretchen M.; Lico, Michael S.; Prudic, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Water in caves, discharging from springs, and flowing in streams in the upper Baker and Snake Creek drainages are important natural resources in Great Basin National Park, Nevada. Water and rock samples were collected from 15 sites during February 2009 as part of a series of investigations evaluating the potential for water resource depletion in the park resulting from the current and proposed groundwater withdrawals. This report summarizes general geochemical characteristics of water samples collected from the upper Baker and Snake Creek drainages for eventual use in evaluating possible hydrologic connections between the streams and selected caves and springs discharging in limestone terrain within each watershed.Generally, water discharging from selected springs in the upper Baker and Snake Creek watersheds is relatively young and, in some cases, has similar chemical characteristics to water collected from associated streams. In the upper Baker Creek drainage, geochemical data suggest possible hydrologic connections between Baker Creek and selected springs and caves along it. The analytical results for water samples collected from Wheelers Deep and Model Caves show characteristics similar to those from Baker Creek, suggesting a hydrologic connection between the creek and caves, a finding previously documented by other researchers. Generally, geochemical evidence does not support a connection between water flowing in Pole Canyon Creek to that in Model Cave, at least not to any appreciable extent. The water sample collected from Rosethorn Spring had relatively high concentrations of many of the constituents sampled as part of this study. This finding was expected as the water from the spring travelled through alluvium prior to being discharged at the surface and, as a result, was provided the opportunity to interact with soil minerals with which it came into contact. Isotopic evidence does not preclude a connection between Baker Creek and the water discharging from

  14. Test reactor irradiation coordination

    SciTech Connect

    Heartherly, D.W.; Siman Tov, I.I.; Sparks, D.W.

    1995-10-01

    This task was established to supply and coordinate irradiation services needed by NRC contractors other than ORNL. These services include the design and assembly of irradiation capsules as well as arranging for their exposure, disassembly, and return of specimens. During this period, the final design of the facility and specimen baskets was determined through an iterative process involving the designers and thermal analysts. The resulting design should permit the irradiation of all test specimens to within 5{degrees}C of their desired temperature. Detailing of all parts is ongoing and should be completed during the next reporting period. Procurement of the facility will also be initiated during the next review period.

  15. Alaskan Commodities Irradiation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Zarling, J.P.; Swanson, R.B.; Logan, R.R.; Das, D.K.; Lewis, C.E.; Workman, W.G.; Tumeo, M.A.; Hok, C.I.; Birklid, C.A.; Bennett, F.L.

    1988-12-01

    The ninety-ninth US Congress commissioned a six-state food irradiation research and development program to evaluate the commercial potential of this technology. Hawaii, Washington, Iowa, Oklahoma and Florida as well as Alaska have participated in the national program; various food products including fishery products, red meats, tropical and citrus fruits and vegetables have been studied. The purpose of the Alaskan study was to review and evaluate those factors related to the technical and economic feasibility of an irradiator in Alaska. This options analysis study will serve as a basis for determining the state's further involvement in the development of food irradiation technology. 40 refs., 50 figs., 53 tabs.

  16. Lightweight Distance Bounding Protocol against Relay Attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Seok; Cho, Kookrae; Yum, Dae Hyun; Hong, Sung Je; Lee, Pil Joong

    Traditional authentication protocols are based on cryptographic techniques to achieve identity verification. Distance bounding protocols are an enhanced type of authentication protocol built upon both signal traversal time measurement and cryptographic techniques to accomplish distance verification as well as identity verification. A distance bounding protocol is usually designed to defend against the relay attack and the distance fraud attack. As there are applications to which the distance fraud attack is not a serious threat, we propose a streamlined distance bounding protocol that focuses on the relay attack. The proposed protocol is more efficient than previous protocols and has a low false acceptance rate under the relay attack.

  17. A Simple XML Producer-Consumer Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Warren; Gunter, Dan; Quesnel, Darcy

    2000-01-01

    This document describes a simple XML-based protocol that can be used for producers of events to communicate with consumers of events. The protocol described here is not meant to be the most efficient protocol, the most logical protocol, or the best protocol in any way. This protocol was defined quickly and it's intent is to give us a reasonable protocol that we can implement relatively easily and then use to gain experience in distributed event services. This experience will help us evaluate proposals for event representations, XML-based encoding of information, and communication protocols. The next section of this document describes how we represent events in this protocol and then defines the two events that we choose to use for our initial experiments. These definitions are made by example so that they are informal and easy to understand. The following section then proceeds to define the producer-consumer protocol we have agreed upon for our initial experiments.

  18. Developing protocols for obstetric emergencies.

    PubMed

    Roth, Cheryl K; Parfitt, Sheryl E; Hering, Sandra L; Dent, Sarah A

    2014-01-01

    There is potential for important steps to be missed in emergency situations, even in the presence of many health care team members. Developing a clear plan of response for common emergencies can ensure that no tasks are redundant or omitted, and can create a more controlled environment that promotes positive health outcomes. A multidisciplinary team was assembled in a large community hospital to create protocols that would help ensure optimum care and continuity of practice in cases of postpartum hemorrhage, shoulder dystocia, emergency cesarean surgical birth, eclamptic seizure and maternal code. Assignment of team roles and responsibilities led to the evolution of standardized protocols for each emergency situation.

  19. Economics of food irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Deitch, J.

    1982-01-01

    This article examines the cost competitiveness of the food irradiation process. An analysis of the principal factors--the product, physical plant, irradiation source, and financing--that impact on cost is made. Equations are developed and used to calculate the size of the source for planned product throughput, efficiency factors, power requirements, and operating costs of sources, radionuclides, and accelerators. Methods of financing and capital investment are discussed. A series of tables show cost breakdowns of sources, buildings, equipment, and essential support facilities for both a cobalt-60 and a 10-MeV electron accelerator facility. Additional tables present irradiation costs as functions of a number of parameters--power input, source size, dose, and hours of annual operation. The use of the numbers in the tables are explained by examples of calculations of the irradiation costs for disinfestation of grains and radicidation of feed.

  20. FTP Extensions for Variable Protocol Specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allman, Mark; Ostermann, Shawn

    2000-01-01

    The specification for the File Transfer Protocol (FTP) assumes that the underlying network protocols use a 32-bit network address and a 16-bit transport address (specifically IP version 4 and TCP). With the deployment of version 6 of the Internet Protocol, network addresses will no longer be 32-bits. This paper species extensions to FTP that will allow the protocol to work over a variety of network and transport protocols.

  1. Identification of irradiated foodstuffs: results of a European test intercomparison.

    PubMed

    Raffi, J; Belliardo, J J; Agnel, J P; Vincent, P

    1993-01-01

    The results of an intercomparison, organized by the Community Bureau of Reference (Commission of the European Communities), on the use of Electron Spin Resonance spectroscopy for the identification of irradiated food are presented. A qualitative intercomparison was carried out using beef and trout bones, sardine scales, pistachio nut shells, dried grapes and papaya. Protocols are proposed for meat bones, fish bones (with some restrictions) and fruits such as dried grapes and papaya. The protocol for pistachio nuts and fruits such strawberries is more complicated and further research is needed prior the organization of future intercomparisons. A quantitative intercomparison on poultry bones was also organized. Laboratories were able to distinguish between chicken bones irradiated at 1 to 3 kGy or 7 to 10 kGy.

  2. Rock property measurements guide interpretation of electromagnetic, magnetic and gravity models at Mts. Adams, Baker, Rainier and St. Helens (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, C.; Bedrosian, P. A.; Horton, R.; Polster, S.

    2010-12-01

    Mt. Adams north of the summit. Alteration at Mt. Baker is restricted to thinner (<300 m) zones beneath Sherman Crater and the Dorr Fumerole Fields. The presence of water not only helps form clay minerals that weaken the edifice but also can reduce the pore pressures, increasing the potential for slope failure. In addition, water with entrained melting ice acts as a lubricant to transform debris avalanches into lahars. The EM data identified water-saturated rocks from the surface to the detection limit (100 - 200 m) in discreet zones at Mt. Rainier and Mt Adams and over the entire summit region at Mt. Baker. At Mt. St. Helens, perched aquifers are identified in the 1980 avalanche deposits as well as in older, thick breccia or avalanche deposits. The modeled distribution of alteration and pore fluids helps identify likely sources for future alteration-related debris flows and clearly shows that debris flow hazard studies on altered volcanoes are greatly enhanced by magnetic, EM and gravity data.

  3. FIELD SAMPLING PROTOCOLS AND ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    I have been asked to speak again to the environmental science class regarding actual research scenarios related to my work at Kerr Lab. I plan to discuss sampling protocols along with various field analyses performed during sampling activities. Many of the students have never see...

  4. A Student Teamwork Induction Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamau, Caroline; Spong, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    Faulty group processes have harmful effects on performance but there is little research about intervention protocols to pre-empt them in higher education. This naturalistic experiment compared a control cohort with an inducted cohort. The inducted cohort attended a workshop, consultations, elected a leader and used tools (a group log and group…

  5. Bundle Security Protocol for ION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Scott C.; Birrane, Edward J.; Krupiarz, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    This software implements bundle authentication, conforming to the Delay-Tolerant Networking (DTN) Internet Draft on Bundle Security Protocol (BSP), for the Interplanetary Overlay Network (ION) implementation of DTN. This is the only implementation of BSP that is integrated with ION.

  6. Volcanic Risk Perception and Preparedness in Communities within the Mount Baker and Glacier Peak Lahar Hazard Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corwin, K.; Brand, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    A community's ability to effectively respond to and recover from natural hazards depends on both the physical characteristics of the hazard and the community's inherent resilience. Resilience is shaped by a number of factors including the residents' perception of and preparedness for a natural hazard as well as the level of institutional preparedness. This study examines perception of and preparedness for lahar hazards from Mount Baker and Glacier Peak in Washington's Skagit Valley. Through an online survey, this study isolates the influence of specific variables (e.g., knowledge, past experience, scientific background, trust in various information sources, occupation, self-efficacy, sense of community) on risk perception and explores reasons behind the frequent disconnect between perception and preparedness. We anticipate that individuals with more extensive education in the sciences, especially geology or earth science, foster greater trust in scientists and a more accurate knowledge, understanding, and perception of the volcanic hazards in their community. Additionally, little research exists examining the extent to which first responders and leaders in response-related institutions prepare on a personal level. Since these individuals work toward community preparedness professionally, we hypothesize that they will be more prepared at home than members of the general public. Finally, the Skagit Valley has a significant history of flooding. We expect that the need to respond to and recover from frequent flooding creates a community with an inherently higher level of preparedness for other hazards such as lahars. The results of this study will contribute to the understanding of what controls risk perception and the interplay between perception and preparedness. At a broader level, this study provides local and state-level emergency managers information to evaluate and improve response capabilities and communication with the public and key institutions in order to

  7. Origin and age of postglacial deposits and assessment of potential hazards from future eruptions of Mount Baker, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hyde, Jack H.; Crandell, Dwight Raymond

    1975-01-01

    Eruptions and other geologic processes at Mount Baker during the last 10,000 years have repeatedly affected adjacent areas, and especially the valleys that head at the volcano. Most mudflows from the volcano were caused by massive avalanches of volcanic rock that had been partly altered to clay by steam and other gases. Future mudflows like these could move down valleys for distances of tens of kilometres. Floods caused by rapid melting of snow and ice by lava flows or hot rock debris could affect valley floors far from the volcano, especially if they occurred at a time of high stream discharge due to other causes. Small amounts of tephra (airborne rock debris) have been erupted at least four times during the last 10,000 years. Eruptions like these in the future probably would not seriously endanger human life except within a distance of perhaps a few kilometres of the vent. Lava flows have been erupted at least twice during the last 10,000 years, but have moved down only two valleys. Future lava flows will not directly endanger people because movement typically is so slow that escape is possible. Eruptions which caused pyroclastic flows (flows of hot rock debris) evidently occurred during only one period, and the flows were restricted to only one valley. Pyroclastic flows seriously endanger human life in areas they affect. Such flows move at speeds of as much as 100 km/hr and can bury valley floors under tens of metres of hot rock debris to distances of as much as 15 km from the volcano.

  8. Preparing for Volcanic Hazards: An Examination of Lahar Knowledge, Risk Perception, and Preparedness around Mount Baker and Glacier Peak, WA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corwin, K.; Brand, B. D.

    2015-12-01

    As the number of people living at risk from volcanic hazards in the U.S. Pacific Northwest continues to rise, so does the need for improved hazard science, mitigation, and response planning. The effectiveness of these efforts relies not only on scientists and policymakers, but on individuals and their risk perception and preparedness levels. This study examines the individual knowledge, perception, and preparedness of over 500 survey respondents living or working within the lahar zones of Mount Baker and Glacier Peak volcanoes. We (1) explore the common disconnect between accurate risk perception and adequate preparedness; (2) determine how participation in hazard response planning influences knowledge, risk perception, and preparedness; and (3) assess the effectiveness of current lahar hazard maps for public risk communication. Results indicate that a disconnect exists between perception and preparedness for the majority of respondents. While 82% of respondents accurately anticipate that future volcanic hazards will impact the Skagit Valley, this knowledge fails to motivate increased preparedness. A majority of respondents also feel "very responsible" for their own protection and provision of resources during a hazardous event (83%) and believe they have the knowledge and skills necessary to respond effectively to such an event (56%); however, many of these individuals still do not adequately prepare. When asked what barriers prevent them from preparing, respondents primarily cite a lack of knowledge about relevant local hazards. Results show that participation in response-related activities—a commonly recommended solution to this disconnect—minimally influences preparedness. Additionally, although local hazard maps successfully communicate the primary hazard—97% of respondents recognize the lahar hazard—many individuals incorrectly interpret other important facets of the maps. Those who participate in response-related activities fail to understand these

  9. Genetic analysis of mlh3 mutations reveals interactions between crossover promoting factors during meiosis in baker's yeast.

    PubMed

    Sonntag Brown, Megan; Lim, Elisha; Chen, Cheng; Nishant, K T; Alani, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Crossing over between homologous chromosomes occurs during the prophase of meiosis I and is critical for chromosome segregation. In baker's yeast, two heterodimeric complexes, Msh4-Msh5 and Mlh1-Mlh3, act in meiosis to promote interference-dependent crossing over. Mlh1-Mlh3 also plays a role in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) by interacting with Msh2-Msh3 to repair insertion and deletion mutations. Mlh3 contains an ATP-binding domain that is highly conserved among MLH proteins. To explore roles for Mlh3 in meiosis and MMR, we performed a structure-function analysis of eight mlh3 ATPase mutants. In contrast to previous work, our data suggest that ATP hydrolysis by both Mlh1 and Mlh3 is important for both meiotic and MMR functions. In meiotic assays, these mutants showed a roughly linear relationship between spore viability and genetic map distance. To further understand the relationship between crossing over and meiotic viability, we analyzed crossing over on four chromosomes of varying lengths in mlh3Δ mms4Δ strains and observed strong decreases (6- to 17-fold) in crossing over in all intervals. Curiously, mlh3Δ mms4Δ double mutants displayed spore viability levels that were greater than observed in mms4Δ strains that show modest defects in crossing over. The viability in double mutants also appeared greater than would be expected for strains that show such severe defects in crossing over. Together, these observations provide insights for how Mlh1-Mlh3 acts in crossover resolution and MMR and for how chromosome segregation in Meiosis I can occur in the absence of crossing over.

  10. Survival of genetically modified and self-cloned strains of commercial baker's yeast in simulated natural environments: environmental risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Ando, Akira; Suzuki, Chise; Shima, Jun

    2005-11-01

    Although genetic engineering techniques for baker's yeast might improve the yeast's fermentation characteristics, the lack of scientific data on the survival of such strains in natural environments as well as the effects on human health prevent their commercial use. Disruption of acid trehalase gene (ATH1) improves freeze tolerance, which is a crucial characteristic in frozen-dough baking. In this study, ATH1 disruptants constructed by genetic modification (GM) and self-cloning (SC) techniques were used as models to study such effects because these strains have higher freeze tolerance and are expected to be used commercially. Behavior of the strains in simulated natural environments, namely, in soil and water, was studied by measuring the change in the number of viable cells and in the concentration of DNA that contains ATH1 loci. Measurements were made using a real-time PCR method during 40 days of cultivation. Results showed that the number of viable cells of GM and SC strains decreased in a time-dependent manner and that the decrease rate was nearly equal to or higher than that for wild-type (WT) yeast. For all three strains (SC, GM, and WT) in the two simulated natural environments (water and soil), the DNA remained longer than did viable cells but the decrease patterns of either the DNA or the viable cells of SC and GM strains had tendencies similar to those of the WT strain. In conclusion, disruption of ATH1 by genetic engineering apparently does not promote the survival of viable cells and DNA in natural environments. PMID:16269743

  11. Irradiation and food processing.

    PubMed

    Sigurbjörnsson, B; Loaharanu, P

    1989-01-01

    After more than four decades of research and development, food irradiation has been demonstrated to be safe, effective and versatile as a process of food preservation, decontamination or disinfection. Its various applications cover: inhibition of sprouting of root crops; insect disinfestation of stored products, fresh and dried food; shelf-life extension of fresh fruits, vegetables, meat and fish; destruction of parasites and pathogenic micro-organisms in food of animal origin; decontamination of spices and food ingredients, etc. Such applications provide consumers with the increase in variety, volume and value of food. Although regulations on food irradiation in different countries are largely unharmonized, national authorities have shown increasing recognition and acceptance of this technology based on the Codex Standard for Irradiated Foods and its associated Code of Practice. Harmonization of national legislations represents an important prerequisite to international trade in irradiated food. Consumers at large are still not aware of the safety and benefits that food irradiation has to offer. Thus, national and international organizations, food industry, trade associations and consumer unions have important roles to play in introducing this technology based on its scientific values. Public acceptance of food irradiation may be slow at the beginning, but should increase at a faster rate in the foreseeable future when consumers are well informed of the safety and benefits of this technology in comparison with existing ones. Commercial applications of food irradiation has already started in 18 countries at present. The volume of food or ingredients treated on a commercial scale varies from country to country ranging from several tons of spices to hundreds of thousands of tons of grains per annum. With the increasing interest of national authorities and the food industry in applying the process, it is anticipated that some 25 countries will use some 55 commercial

  12. Ethanol yield and volatile compound content in fermentation of agave must by Kluyveromyces marxianus UMPe-1 comparing with Saccharomyces cerevisiae baker's yeast used in tequila production.

    PubMed

    López-Alvarez, Arnoldo; Díaz-Pérez, Alma Laura; Sosa-Aguirre, Carlos; Macías-Rodríguez, Lourdes; Campos-García, Jesús

    2012-05-01

    In tequila production, fermentation is an important step. Fermentation determines the ethanol productivity and organoleptic properties of the beverage. In this study, a yeast isolated from native residual agave must was identified as Kluyveromyces marxianus UMPe-1 by 26S rRNA sequencing. This yeast was compared with the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pan1. Our findings demonstrate that the UMPe-1 yeast was able to support the sugar content of agave must and glucose up to 22% (w/v) and tolerated 10% (v/v) ethanol concentration in the medium with 50% cells survival. Pilot and industrial fermentation of agave must tests showed that the K. marxianus UMPe-1 yeast produced ethanol with yields of 94% and 96% with respect to fermentable sugar content (glucose and fructose, constituting 98%). The S. cerevisiae Pan1 baker's yeast, however, which is commonly used in some tequila factories, showed 76% and 70% yield. At the industrial level, UMPe-1 yeast shows a maximum velocity of fermentable sugar consumption of 2.27g·L(-1)·h(-1) and ethanol production of 1.38g·L(-1)·h(-1), providing 58.78g ethanol·L(-1) at 72h fermentation, which corresponds to 96% yield. In addition, the major and minor volatile compounds in the tequila beverage obtained from UMPe-1 yeast were increased. Importantly, 29 volatile compounds were identified, while the beverage obtained from Pan1-yeast contained fewer compounds and in lower concentrations. The results suggest that the K. marxianus UMPe-1 is a suitable yeast for agave must fermentation, showing high ethanol productivity and increased volatile compound content comparing with a S. cerevisiae baker's yeast used in tequila production.

  13. Ethanol yield and volatile compound content in fermentation of agave must by Kluyveromyces marxianus UMPe-1 comparing with Saccharomyces cerevisiae baker's yeast used in tequila production.

    PubMed

    López-Alvarez, Arnoldo; Díaz-Pérez, Alma Laura; Sosa-Aguirre, Carlos; Macías-Rodríguez, Lourdes; Campos-García, Jesús

    2012-05-01

    In tequila production, fermentation is an important step. Fermentation determines the ethanol productivity and organoleptic properties of the beverage. In this study, a yeast isolated from native residual agave must was identified as Kluyveromyces marxianus UMPe-1 by 26S rRNA sequencing. This yeast was compared with the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pan1. Our findings demonstrate that the UMPe-1 yeast was able to support the sugar content of agave must and glucose up to 22% (w/v) and tolerated 10% (v/v) ethanol concentration in the medium with 50% cells survival. Pilot and industrial fermentation of agave must tests showed that the K. marxianus UMPe-1 yeast produced ethanol with yields of 94% and 96% with respect to fermentable sugar content (glucose and fructose, constituting 98%). The S. cerevisiae Pan1 baker's yeast, however, which is commonly used in some tequila factories, showed 76% and 70% yield. At the industrial level, UMPe-1 yeast shows a maximum velocity of fermentable sugar consumption of 2.27g·L(-1)·h(-1) and ethanol production of 1.38g·L(-1)·h(-1), providing 58.78g ethanol·L(-1) at 72h fermentation, which corresponds to 96% yield. In addition, the major and minor volatile compounds in the tequila beverage obtained from UMPe-1 yeast were increased. Importantly, 29 volatile compounds were identified, while the beverage obtained from Pan1-yeast contained fewer compounds and in lower concentrations. The results suggest that the K. marxianus UMPe-1 is a suitable yeast for agave must fermentation, showing high ethanol productivity and increased volatile compound content comparing with a S. cerevisiae baker's yeast used in tequila production. PMID:22280963

  14. Enhanced freeze tolerance of baker's yeast by overexpressed trehalose-6-phosphate synthase gene (TPS1) and deleted trehalase genes in frozen dough.

    PubMed

    Tan, Haigang; Dong, Jian; Wang, Guanglu; Xu, Haiyan; Zhang, Cuiying; Xiao, Dongguang

    2014-08-01

    Several recombinant strains with overexpressed trehalose-6-phosphate synthase gene (TPS1) and/or deleted trehalase genes were obtained to elucidate the relationships between TPS1, trehalase genes, content of intracellular trehalose and freeze tolerance of baker's yeast, as well as improve the fermentation properties of lean dough after freezing. In this study, strain TL301(TPS1) overexpressing TPS1 showed 62.92 % higher trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (Tps1) activity and enhanced the content of intracellular trehalose than the parental strain. Deleting ATH1 exerted a significant effect on trehalase activities and the degradation amount of intracellular trehalose during the first 30 min of prefermentation. This finding indicates that acid trehalase (Ath1) plays a role in intracellular trehalose degradation. NTH2 encodes a functional neutral trehalase (Nth2) that was significantly involved in intracellular trehalose degradation in the absence of the NTH1 and/or ATH1 gene. The survival ratio, freeze-tolerance ratio and relative fermentation ability of strain TL301(TPS1) were approximately twice as high as those of the parental strain (BY6-9α). The increase in freeze tolerance of strain TL301(TPS1) was accompanied by relatively low trehalase activity, high Tps1 activity and high residual content of intracellular trehalose. Our results suggest that overexpressing TPS1 and deleting trehalase genes are sufficient to improve the freeze tolerance of baker's yeast in frozen dough. The present study provides guidance for the commercial baking industry as well as the research on the intracellular trehalose mobilization and freeze tolerance of baker's yeast. PMID:24951963

  15. Combined Expression of Aspergillus nidulans Endoxylanase X24 and Aspergillus oryzae (alpha)-Amylase in Industrial Baker's Yeasts and Their Use in Bread Making

    PubMed Central

    Monfort, A.; Blasco, A.; Prieto, J. A.; Sanz, P.

    1996-01-01

    The Aspergillus nidulans endoxylanase X24 and the Aspergillus oryzae (alpha)-amylase cDNAs were placed under the control of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae actin promoter (pACT1) and introduced into baker's yeast. Bread made with transformants expressing both enzymes (YEpACT-AMY-ACT-X24) showed a 30% increase in volume and reduced firmness in comparison with that produced with a commercial strain. Endoxylanase X24 and (alpha)-amylase seem to act synergistically to improve the quality of bread in terms of volume and density. PMID:16535419

  16. ORNL irradiation creep facility

    SciTech Connect

    Reiley, T.C.; Auble, R.L.; Beckers, R.M.; Bloom, E.E.; Duncan, M.G.; Saltmarsh, M.J.; Shannon, R.H.

    1980-09-01

    A machine was developed at ORNL to measure the rates of elongation observed under irradiation in stressed materials. The source of radiation is a beam of 60 MeV alpha particles from the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC). This choice allows experiments to be performed which simulate the effects of fast neutrons. A brief review of irradiation creep and experimental constraints associated with each measurement technique is given. Factors are presented which lead to the experimental choices made for the Irradiation Creep Facility (ICF). The ICF consists of a helium-filled chamber which houses a high-precision mechanical testing device. The specimen to be tested must be thermally stabilized with respect to the temperature fluctuations imposed by the particle beam which passes through the specimen. Electrical resistance of the specimen is the temperature control parameter chosen. Very high precision in length measurement and temperature control are required to detect the small elongation rates relevant to irradiation creep in the test periods available (approx. 1 day). The apparatus components and features required for the above are presented in some detail, along with the experimental procedures. The damage processes associated with light ions are discussed and displacement rates are calculated. Recent irradiation creep results are given, demonstrating the suitability of the apparatus for high resolution experiments. Also discussed is the suitability of the ICF for making high precision thermal creep measurements.

  17. Implementation and evaluation of a protocol management system for automated review of CT protocols.

    PubMed

    Grimes, Joshua; Leng, Shuai; Zhang, Yi; Vrieze, Thomas; McCollough, Cynthia

    2016-09-08

    Protocol review is important to decrease the risk of patient injury and increase the consistency of CT image quality. A large volume of CT protocols makes manual review labor-intensive, error-prone, and costly. To address these challenges, we have developed a software system for automatically managing and monitoring CT proto-cols on a frequent basis. This article describes our experiences in the implementation and evaluation of this protocol monitoring system. In particular, we discuss various strategies for addressing each of the steps in our protocol-monitoring workflow, which are: maintaining an accurate set of master protocols, retrieving protocols from the scanners, comparing scanner protocols to master protocols, reviewing flagged differences between the scanner and master protocols, and updating the scanner and/or master protocols. In our initial evaluation focusing only on abdo-men and pelvis protocols, we detected 309 modified protocols in a 24-week trial period. About one-quarter of these modified protocols were determined to contain inappropriate (i.e., erroneous) protocol parameter modifications that needed to be corrected on the scanner. The most frequently affected parameter was the series description, which was inappropriately modified 47 times. Two inappropriate modifications were made to the tube current, which is particularly important to flag as this parameter impacts both radiation dose and image quality. The CT protocol changes detected in this work provide strong motivation for the use of an automated CT protocol quality control system to ensure protocol accuracy and consistency.

  18. Implementation and evaluation of a protocol management system for automated review of CT protocols.

    PubMed

    Grimes, Joshua; Leng, Shuai; Zhang, Yi; Vrieze, Thomas; McCollough, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Protocol review is important to decrease the risk of patient injury and increase the consistency of CT image quality. A large volume of CT protocols makes manual review labor-intensive, error-prone, and costly. To address these challenges, we have developed a software system for automatically managing and monitoring CT proto-cols on a frequent basis. This article describes our experiences in the implementation and evaluation of this protocol monitoring system. In particular, we discuss various strategies for addressing each of the steps in our protocol-monitoring workflow, which are: maintaining an accurate set of master protocols, retrieving protocols from the scanners, comparing scanner protocols to master protocols, reviewing flagged differences between the scanner and master protocols, and updating the scanner and/or master protocols. In our initial evaluation focusing only on abdo-men and pelvis protocols, we detected 309 modified protocols in a 24-week trial period. About one-quarter of these modified protocols were determined to contain inappropriate (i.e., erroneous) protocol parameter modifications that needed to be corrected on the scanner. The most frequently affected parameter was the series description, which was inappropriately modified 47 times. Two inappropriate modifications were made to the tube current, which is particularly important to flag as this parameter impacts both radiation dose and image quality. The CT protocol changes detected in this work provide strong motivation for the use of an automated CT protocol quality control system to ensure protocol accuracy and consistency. PMID:27685112

  19. Optimized enzymatic dual functions of PaPrx protein by proton irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chul-Hong; Lee, Seung Sik; Kim, Kye Ryung; Jung, Myung Hwan; Lee, Sang Yeol; Cho, Eun Ju; Singh, Sudhir; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of proton irradiation on the function and structure of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa peroxiredoxin (PaPrx). Polyacrylamide gel demonstrated that PaPrx proteins exposed to proton irradiation at several doses exhibited simultaneous formation of high molecular weight (HMW) complexes and fragmentation. Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) analysis revealed that the number of fragments and very low molecular weight (LMW) structures increased as the proton irradiation dose increased. The peroxidase activity of irradiated PaPrx was preserved, and its chaperone activity was significantly increased by increasing the proton irradiation dose. The chaperone activity increased about 3–4 fold after 2.5 kGy proton irradiation, compared with that of non-irradiated PaPrx, and increased to almost the maximum activity after 10 kGy proton irradiation. We previously obtained functional switching in PaPrx proteins, by using gamma rays and electron beams as radiation sources, and found that the proteins exhibited increased chaperone activity but decreased peroxidase activity. Interestingly, in this study we newly found that proton irradiation could enhance both peroxidase and chaperone activities. Therefore, we can suggest proton irradiation as a novel protocol for conserved 2-Cys protein engineering. PMID:23753570

  20. Chapter 14: Chiller Evaluation Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Tiessen, A.

    2014-09-01

    This protocol defines a chiller measure as a project that directly impacts equipment within the boundary of a chiller plant. A chiller plant encompasses a chiller--or multiple chillers--and associated auxiliary equipment. This protocol primarily covers electric-driven chillers and chiller plants. It does not include thermal energy storage and absorption chillers fired by natural gas or steam, although a similar methodology may be applicable to these chilled water system components. Chillers provide mechanical cooling for commercial, institutional, multiunit residential, and industrial facilities. Cooling may be required for facility heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems or for process cooling loads (e.g., data centers, manufacturing process cooling). The vapor compression cycle, or refrigeration cycle, cools water in the chilled water loop by absorbing heat and rejecting it to either a condensing water loop (water cooled chillers) or to the ambient air (air-cooled chillers).

  1. Neonatal euthanasia: The Groningen Protocol.

    PubMed

    Vizcarrondo, Felipe E

    2014-11-01

    For the past thirty years, voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide of adult patients have been common practice in the Netherlands. Neonatal euthanasia was recently legalized in the Netherlands and the Groningen Protocol (GP) was developed to regulate the practice. Supporters claim compliance with the GP criteria makes neonatal euthanasia ethically permissible. An examination of the criteria used by the Protocol to justify the euthanasia of seriously ill neonates reveals the criteria are not based on firm moral principles. The taking of the life of a seriously ill person is not the solution to the pain and suffering of the dying process. It is the role of the medical professional to care for the ailing patient with love and compassion, always preserving the person's dignity. Neonatal euthanasia is not ethically permissible. PMID:25473136

  2. Building America House Simulation Protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Hendron, Robert; Engebrecht, Cheryn

    2010-09-01

    The House Simulation Protocol document was developed to track and manage progress toward Building America's multi-year, average whole-building energy reduction research goals for new construction and existing homes, using a consistent analytical reference point. This report summarizes the guidelines for developing and reporting these analytical results in a consistent and meaningful manner for all home energy uses using standard operating conditions.

  3. FOOD IRRADIATION REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Leyse, C.F.; Putnam, G.E.

    1961-05-01

    An irradiation apparatus is described. It comprises a pressure vessel, a neutronic reactor active portion having a substantially greater height than diameter in the pressure vessel, an annular tank surrounding and spaced from the pressure vessel containing an aqueous indium/sup 1//sup 1//sup 5/ sulfate solution of approximately 600 grams per liter concentration, means for circulating separate coolants through the active portion and the space between the annular tank and the pressure vessel, radiator means adapted to receive the materials to be irradiated, and means for flowing the indium/sup 1//sup 1//sup 5/ sulfate solution through the radiator means.

  4. Economics of food irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunstadt, Peter; Eng, P.; Steeves, Colyn; Beaulieu, Daniel; Eng, P.

    1993-07-01

    The number of products being radiation processed worldwide is constantly increasing and today includes such diverse items as medical disposables, fruits and vegetables, spices, meats, seafoods and waste products. This range of products to be processed has resulted in a wide range of irradiator designs and capital and operating cost requirements. This paper discusses the economics of low dose food irradiation applications and the effects of various parameters on unit processing costs. It provides a model for calculating specific unit processing costs by correlating known capital costs with annual operating costs and annual throughputs. It is intended to provide the reader with a general knowledge of how unit processing costs are derived.

  5. Fuel or irradiation subassembly

    DOEpatents

    Seim, O.S.; Hutter, E.

    1975-12-23

    A subassembly for use in a nuclear reactor is described which incorporates a loose bundle of fuel or irradiation pins enclosed within an inner tube which in turn is enclosed within an outer coolant tube and includes a locking comb consisting of a head extending through one side of the inner sleeve and a plurality of teeth which extend through the other side of the inner sleeve while engaging annular undercut portions in the bottom portion of the fuel or irradiation pins to prevent movement of the pins.

  6. Multiple protocol fluorometer and method

    DOEpatents

    Kolber, Zbigniew S.; Falkowski, Paul G.

    2000-09-19

    A multiple protocol fluorometer measures photosynthetic parameters of phytoplankton and higher plants using actively stimulated fluorescence protocols. The measured parameters include spectrally-resolved functional and optical absorption cross sections of PSII, extent of energy transfer between reaction centers of PSII, F.sub.0 (minimal), F.sub.m (maximal) and F.sub.v (variable) components of PSII fluorescence, photochemical and non-photochemical quenching, size of the plastoquinone (PQ) pool, and the kinetics of electron transport between Q.sub.a and PQ pool and between PQ pool and PSI. The multiple protocol fluorometer, in one embodiment, is equipped with an excitation source having a controlled spectral output range between 420 nm and 555 nm and capable of generating flashlets having a duration of 0.125-32 .mu.s, an interval between 0.5 .mu.s and 2 seconds, and peak optical power of up to 2 W/cm.sup.2. The excitation source is also capable of generating, simultaneous with the flashlets, a controlled continuous, background illumination.

  7. The reliable multicast protocol application programming interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery , Todd; Whetten, Brian

    1995-01-01

    The Application Programming Interface for the Berkeley/WVU implementation of the Reliable Multicast Protocol is described. This transport layer protocol is implemented as a user library that applications and software buses link against.

  8. Integrating protocol schedules with patients' personal calendars.

    PubMed

    Civan, Andrea; Gennari, John H; Pratt, Wanda

    2006-01-01

    We propose a new approach for integrating protocol care schedules into patients' personal calendars. This approach could provide patients with greater control over their current and future scheduling demands as they seek and receive protocol-based care. PMID:17238511

  9. A Wiki Based CT Protocol Management System.

    PubMed

    Szczykutowicz, Timothy P; Rubert, Nicholas; Belden, Daryn; Ciano, Amanda; Duplissis, Andrew; Hermanns, Ashley; Monette, Stephen; Saldivar, Elliott Janssen

    2015-01-01

    At the University of Wisconsin Madison Department of Radiology, CT protocol management requires maintenance of thousands of parameters for each scanner. Managing CT protocols is further complicated by the unique configurability of each scanner. Due to recent Joint Commission requirements, now all CT protocol changes must be documented and reviewed by a site's CT protocol optimization team. The difficulty of managing the CT protocols was not in assembling the protocols, but in managing and implementing changes. This is why a wiki based solution for protocol management was implemented. A wiki inherently keeps track of all changes, logging who made the changes and when, allowing for editing and viewing permissions to be controlled, as well as allowing protocol changes to be instantly relayed to all scanner locations.

  10. Planarian Immobilization, Partial Irradiation, and Tissue Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Guedelhoefer IV, Otto C.; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    The planarian, a freshwater flatworm, has proven to be a powerful system for dissecting metazoan regeneration and stem cell biology1,2. Planarian regeneration of any missing or damaged tissues is made possible by adult stem cells termed neoblasts3. Although these stem cells have been definitively shown to be pluripotent and singularly capable of reconstituting an entire animal4, the heterogeneity within the stem cell population and the dynamics of their cellular behaviors remain largely unresolved. Due to the large number and wide distribution of stem cells throughout the planarian body plan, advanced methods for manipulating subpopulations of stem cells for molecular and functional study in vivo are needed. Tissue transplantation and partial irradiation are two methods by which a subpopulation of planarian stem cells can be isolated for further study. Each technique has distinct advantages. Tissue transplantation allows for the introduction of stem cells, into a naïve host, that are either inherently genetically distinct or have been previously treated pharmacologically. Alternatively, partial irradiation allows for the isolation of stem cells within a host, juxtaposed to tissue devoid of stem cells, without the introduction of a wound or any breech in tissue integrity. Using these two methods, one can investigate the cell autonomous and non-autonomous factors that control stem cell functions, such as proliferation, differentiation, and migration. Both tissue transplantation5,6 and partial irradiation7 have been used historically in defining many of the questions about planarian regeneration that remain under study today. However, these techniques have remained underused due to the laborious and inconsistent nature of previous methods. The protocols presented here represent a large step forward in decreasing the time and effort necessary to reproducibly generate large numbers of grafted or partially irradiated animals with efficacies approaching 100 percent. We

  11. Developing family planning nurse practitioner protocols.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, J W; Roberto, D

    1984-01-01

    This article focuses on the process of development of protocols for family planning nurse practitioners. A rationale for the use of protocols, a definition of the types and examples, and the pros and cons of practice with protocols are presented. A how-to description for the development process follows, including methods and a suggested tool for critique and evaluation. The aim of the article is to assist nurse practitioners in developing protocols for their practice.

  12. 40 CFR 792.120 - Protocol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Protocol. 792.120 Section 792.120 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Protocol for and Conduct of A Study § 792.120 Protocol. (a)...

  13. Cryptanalysis on Cheng et al. protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Tejeshwari

    2016-06-01

    Deployment of new node in any wireless sensor network is a sensitive task. This is the reason why, an Access Control Protocol is required in WSN. In this paper, we demonstrate that Access Control Protocol proposed by Cheng et al.[1] for Wireless Sensor Network is insecure. The reason is that this protocol fails to resist the active attack.

  14. 21 CFR 312.83 - Treatment protocols.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Treatment protocols. 312.83 Section 312.83 Food...-debilitating Illnesses § 312.83 Treatment protocols. If the preliminary analysis of phase 2 test results appears promising, FDA may ask the sponsor to submit a treatment protocol to be reviewed under...

  15. 21 CFR 312.83 - Treatment protocols.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Treatment protocols. 312.83 Section 312.83 Food...-debilitating Illnesses § 312.83 Treatment protocols. If the preliminary analysis of phase 2 test results appears promising, FDA may ask the sponsor to submit a treatment protocol to be reviewed under...

  16. 21 CFR 312.83 - Treatment protocols.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Treatment protocols. 312.83 Section 312.83 Food...-debilitating Illnesses § 312.83 Treatment protocols. If the preliminary analysis of phase 2 test results appears promising, FDA may ask the sponsor to submit a treatment protocol to be reviewed under...

  17. 21 CFR 312.83 - Treatment protocols.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Treatment protocols. 312.83 Section 312.83 Food...-debilitating Illnesses § 312.83 Treatment protocols. If the preliminary analysis of phase 2 test results appears promising, FDA may ask the sponsor to submit a treatment protocol to be reviewed under...

  18. New practical treadmill protocol for clinical use.

    PubMed

    Wolthuis, R A; Froelicher, V F; Fischer, J; Noguera, I; Davis, G; Stewart, A J; Triebwasser, J H

    1977-05-01

    A new continuous treadmill protocol (USAFSAM) has been designed using a constant treadmill speed (3.3 miles/hour) and regular equal increments in treadmill grade (5%/3min). The constant treadmill speed requires only initial adaptation in patient stride, reduces technician adjustments and produces less electrocardiographic motion artifact than do protocols using multiple or higher treadmill speeds, or both. The regular equal increments in treadmill grade are easy to implement and provide a larger number of work loads than do protocols that are discontinuous or require larger changes in work load. The USAFSAM protocol was compared with the older Balke-Ware protocol in 26 healthy men (aged 30 to 59 years). Each fasting subject completed two maximal treadmill tests from each protocol. Measurements included minute heart rate from the electrocardiogram, auscultatory blood pressures and oxygen consumption obtained with standard techniques. Similarities in between-protocol measurements for submaximal and maximal treadmill efforts were impressive; differences were small and unimportant. Further, both protocols showed equal reproducibility for the measurements noted. Importantly, time to maximal effort was reduced by 24% with the USAFSAM protocol. The USAFSAM treadmill protocol has since been used in more than 500 clinical and screening examinations, thus confirming its advantages and practicality for routine clinical stress testing. Normal reference values previously established for the Balke-Ware protocol are shown to apply to the new USAFSAM protocol as well. PMID:857630

  19. Long-term changes in quiescent degassing at Mount Baker Volcano, Washington, USA; Evidence for a stalled intrusion in 1975 and connection to a deep magma source

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Werner, C.; Evans, William C.; Poland, M.; Tucker, D.S.; Doukas, M.P.

    2009-01-01

    Long-term changes have occurred in the chemistry, isotopic ratios, and emission rates of gas at Mount Baker volcano following a major thermal perturbation in 1975. In mid-1975 a large pulse in sulfur and carbon dioxide output was observed both in emission rates and in fumarole samples. Emission rates of CO2 and H2S were ??? 950 and 112??t/d, respectively, in 1975; these decreased to ??? 150 and < 1??t/d by 2007. During the peak of the activity the C/S ratio was the lowest ever observed in the Cascade Range and similar to magmatic signatures observed at other basaltic-andesite volcanoes worldwide. Increases in the C/S ratio and decreases in the CO2/CH4 ratio since 1975 suggest a long steady trend back toward a more hydrothermal gas signature. The helium isotope ratio is very high (> 7??Rc/RA), but has declined slightly since the mid-1970s, and ??13C-CO2 has decreased by ??? 1??? over time. Both trends are expected from a gradually crystallizing magma. While other scenarios are investigated, we conclude that magma intruded the mid- to shallow-crust beneath Mount Baker during the thermal awakening of 1975. Since that time, evidence for fresh magma has waned, but the continued emission of CO2 and the presence of a long-term hydrothermal system leads us to suspect some continuing connection between the surface and deep convecting magma.

  20. Heterologous expression of type I antifreeze peptide GS-5 in baker's yeast increases freeze tolerance and provides enhanced gas production in frozen dough.

    PubMed

    Panadero, Joaquin; Randez-Gil, Francisca; Prieto, Jose Antonio

    2005-12-28

    The demand for frozen-dough products has increased notably in the baking industry. Nowadays, no appropriate industrial baker's yeast with optimal gassing capacity in frozen dough is, however, available, and it is unlikely that classical breeding programs could provide significant improvements of this trait. Antifreeze proteins, found in diverse organisms, display the ability to inhibit the growth of ice, allowing them to survive at temperatures below 0 degrees C. In this study a recombinant antifreeze peptide GS-5 was expressed from the polar fish grubby sculpin (Myoxocephalus aenaeus) in laboratory and industrial baker's yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Production of the recombinant protein increased freezing tolerance in both strains tested. Furthermore, expression of the GS-5 encoding gene enhanced notably the gassing rate and total gas production in frozen and frozen sweet doughs. These effects are unlikely to be due to reduced osmotic damage during freezing/thawing, because recombinant cells showed growth behavior similar to that of the parent under hypermosmotic stress conditions. PMID:16366681

  1. In vivo Antihypertensive and Antihyperlipidemic Effects of the Crude Extracts and Fractions of Moringa stenopetala (Baker f.) Cufod. Leaves in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Geleta, Bekesho; Makonnen, Eyasu; Debella, Asfaw; Tadele, Ashenif

    2016-01-01

    Background: Moringa stenopetala (Baker f.) Cufod. is a medicinal plant that has been used in Ethiopian traditional medicine as a remedy for treatment of hypertension and diabetes. The aim of this study was to evaluate antihypertensive and antihyperlipidemic effect in fructose induced hypertensive rats. Methods: Rats were randomly divided into control and treatment groups (n = 6). Treatment groups were given daily extracts (250, 500, and 1000 mg/kg) orally with fructose. Whereas, positive, negative and normal control groups were received captopril (20 mg/kg/day with fructose), only fructose (66% w/v ad libitum) and distilled water ad libitum for 15 days, respectively. The blood pressure was measured every 5th day using tail cuff blood pressure analyzer, and on the 16th day the blood was sampled to evaluate antihyperlipidemic effect using clinical chemistry analyzer. Results: The study showed that aqueous and 70% ethanol extracts significantly prevented blood pressure increment in a dose dependent manner comparable to that of the standard drug. Similarly, the extracts suppressed increment in lipid profile (cholesterol, glucose, and triglycerides) compared with negative control. The biochemical test revealed that extracts produced a rise in liver but no effect on kidney function indicators compared with normal control. Conclusion: These findings revealed that both crude extracts of M. stenopetala (Baker f.) Cufod. possess antihypertensive and antihyperlipidemic effect. PMID:27148056

  2. Living organisms as an alternative to hyphenated techniques for metal speciation. Evaluation of baker's yeast immobilized on silica gel for Hg speciation*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Corona, Teresa; Madrid-Albarrán, Yolanda; Cámara, Carmen; Beceiro, Elisa

    1998-02-01

    The use of living organisms for metal preconcentration and speciation is discussed. Among substrates, Saccharomyces cerevisiae baker's yeast has been successfully used for the speciation of mercury [Hg(II) and CH 3Hg +], selenium [Se(IV) and Se(VI)] and antimony [Sb(III) and Sb(V)]. To illustrate the capabilities of these organisms, the analytical performance of baker's yeast immobilized on silica gel for on-line preconcentration and speciation of Hg(II) and methylmercury is reported. The immobilized cells were packed in a PTFE microcolumn, through which mixtures of organic and inorganic mercury solutions were passed. Retention of inorganic and organic mercury solutions took place simultaneously, with the former retained in the silica and the latter on the yeast. The efficiency uptake for both species was higher than 95% over a wide pH range. The speciation was carried out by selective and sequential elution with 0.02 mol L -1 HCl for methylmercury and 0.8 mol L -1 CN - for Hg(II). This method allows both preconcentration and speciation of mercury. The preconcentration factors were around 15 and 100 for methylmercury and mercury(II), respectively. The method has been successfully applied to spiked sea water samples.

  3. Expression of LIP1 and LIP2 genes from Geotrichum species in Baker's yeast strains and their application to the bread-making process.

    PubMed

    Monfort, A; Blasco, A; Sanz, P; Prieto, J A

    1999-02-01

    Lipolytic baker's yeast strains able to produce extracellular active lipase have been constructed by transformation with plasmids containing the LIP1 and LIP2 genes from Geotrichum sp. under the control of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae actin promoter (pACT1). Lipase productivity differed between both constructs, YEpACT-LIP1-t and YEpACT-LIP2-t, being higher for the strain bearing the LIP2 gene in all culture media tested. This result appeared not to be the consequence of a defect in the transcription of the LIP1 gene as revealed by Northern blot analysis. Replacing the signal sequence of LIP1 by that of LIP2 in the YEpACT-LIP1-t plasmid enhanced significantly the secretion of lipase 1, but the levels of lipase activity were still lower than those found for the YEpACT-LIP2-t transformant. Recombinant lipase 2 protein produced by baker's yeast exhibited biochemical properties similar to those of the natural enzyme. Fermented dough prepared with YEpACT-LIP2-t-carrying cells rendered a bread with a higher loaf volume and a more uniform crumb structure than that prepared with control yeast. These effects were stronger by the addition in the bread dough formulas of a preferment enriched in recombinant lipase 2.

  4. NSUF Irradiated Materials Library

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, James Irvin

    2015-09-01

    The Nuclear Science User Facilities has been in the process of establishing an innovative Irradiated Materials Library concept for maximizing the value of previous and on-going materials and nuclear fuels irradiation test campaigns, including utilization of real-world components retrieved from current and decommissioned reactors. When the ATR national scientific user facility was established in 2007 one of the goals of the program was to establish a library of irradiated samples for users to access and conduct research through competitively reviewed proposal process. As part of the initial effort, staff at the user facility identified legacy materials from previous programs that are still being stored in laboratories and hot-cell facilities at the INL. In addition other materials of interest were identified that are being stored outside the INL that the current owners have volunteered to enter into the library. Finally, over the course of the last several years, the ATR NSUF has irradiated more than 3500 specimens as part of NSUF competitively awarded research projects. The Logistics of managing this large inventory of highly radioactive poses unique challenges. This document will describe materials in the library, outline the policy for accessing these materials and put forth a strategy for making new additions to the library as well as establishing guidelines for minimum pedigree needed to be included in the library to limit the amount of material stored indefinitely without identified value.

  5. Update on meat irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, D.G.

    1997-12-01

    The irradiation of meat and poultry in the United States is intended to eliminate pathogenic bacteria from raw product, preferably after packaging to prevent recontamination. Irradiation will also increase the shelf life of raw meat and poultry products approximately two to three times the normal shelf life. Current clearances in the United States are for poultry (fresh or frozen) at doses from 1.5 to 3.0 kGy and for fresh pork at doses from 0.3 to 1.0 kGy. A petition for the clearance of all red meat was submitted to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in July 1994. The petition is for clearances of fresh meat at doses from 1.5 to 4.5 kGy and for frozen meat at {approximately}2.5 to 7.5 kGy. Clearance for red meat is expected before the end of 1997. There are 28 countries that have food irradiation clearances, of which 18 countries have clearances for meat or poultry. However, there are no uniform categories or approved doses for meat and poultry among the countries that could hamper international trade of irradiated meat and poultry.

  6. Irradiating insect pests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is a non-technical article focusing on phytosanitary uses of irradiation. In a series of interview questions, I present information on the scope of the invasive species problem and the contribution of international trade in agricultural products to the movement of invasive insects. This is foll...

  7. Reactive broadcasting protocol for video on demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, Jehan-Francois; Carter, Steven W.; Long, Darrell D. E.

    1999-12-01

    We propose a reactive broadcasting protocol that addresses the problem of distributing moderately popular videos in a more efficient fashion. Like all efficient broadcasting protocols, reactive broadcasting assumes that the customer set-top box has enough local storage to store at least one half of each video being watched. Unlike other broadcasting protocols, reactive broadcasting only broadcasts the later portions of each video. the initial segment of each video is distributed on demand using a stream tapping protocol. Our simulations show that reactive broadcasting outperforms both conventional broadcasting protocols and pure stream tapping for a wide range of video request rates.

  8. Nonblocking and orphan free message logging protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvisi, Lorenzo; Hoppe, Bruce; Marzullo, Keith

    1992-01-01

    Currently existing message logging protocols demonstrate a classic pessimistic vs. optimistic tradeoff. We show that the optimistic-pessimistic tradeoff is not inherent to the problem of message logging. We construct a message-logging protocol that has the positive features of both optimistic and pessimistic protocol: our protocol prevents orphans and allows simple failure recovery; however, it requires no blocking in failure-free runs. Furthermore, this protocol does not introduce any additional message overhead as compared to one implemented for a system in which messages may be lost but processes do not crash.

  9. A double fluorescence staining protocol to determine the cross-sectional area of myofibers using image analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mozdziak, P. E.; Fassel, T. A.; Schultz, E.; Greaser, M. L.; Cassens, R. G.

    1996-01-01

    A double fluorescence staining protocol was developed to facilitate computer based image analysis. Myofibers from experimentally treated (irradiated) and control growing turkey skeletal muscle were labeled with the anti-myosin antibody MF-20 and detected using fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC). Extracellular material was stained with concanavalin A (ConA)-Texas red. The cross-sectional area of the myofibers was determined by calculating the number of pixels (0.83 mu m(2)) overlying each myofiber after subtracting the ConA-Texas red image from the MF-20-FITC image for each region of interest. As expected, myofibers in the irradiated muscle were smaller (P < 0.05) than those in the non-irradiated muscle. This double fluorescence staining protocol combined with image analysis is accurate and less labor-intensive than classical procedures for determining the cross-sectional area of myofibers.

  10. INEEL AIR MODELING PROTOCOL ext

    SciTech Connect

    C. S. Staley; M. L. Abbott; P. D. Ritter

    2004-12-01

    Various laws stemming from the Clean Air Act of 1970 and the Clean Air Act amendments of 1990 require air emissions modeling. Modeling is used to ensure that air emissions from new projects and from modifications to existing facilities do not exceed certain standards. For radionuclides, any new airborne release must be modeled to show that downwind receptors do not receive exposures exceeding the dose limits and to determine the requirements for emissions monitoring. For criteria and toxic pollutants, emissions usually must first exceed threshold values before modeling of downwind concentrations is required. This document was prepared to provide guidance for performing environmental compliance-driven air modeling of emissions from Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory facilities. This document assumes that the user has experience in air modeling and dose and risk assessment. It is not intended to be a "cookbook," nor should all recommendations herein be construed as requirements. However, there are certain procedures that are required by law, and these are pointed out. It is also important to understand that air emissions modeling is a constantly evolving process. This document should, therefore, be reviewed periodically and revised as needed. The document is divided into two parts. Part A is the protocol for radiological assessments, and Part B is for nonradiological assessments. This document is an update of and supersedes document INEEL/INT-98-00236, Rev. 0, INEEL Air Modeling Protocol. This updated document incorporates changes in some of the rules, procedures, and air modeling codes that have occurred since the protocol was first published in 1998.

  11. Planetary Protection Alternate Protocol Certification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Amy; Barengoltz, Jack; Tisdale, David

    The talk presents a standardized approach for new method certification or alterative testing protocol (ATP) certification against the existing U.S. Planetary Protection Standards. In consideration of new method certification there are two phases of activities that are relevant to the certification process. The first is sample acquisition which typically incorporates swab or wipes sampling on relevant hardware, associated facilities and ground support equipment. The sampling methods introduce considerations of field sampling efficiency as it relates to spore distribution on the spacecraft, spacecraft material influences on the ability of the swab or wipe to remove spores from the hardware, the types of swabs and wipes used (polyester, cotton, macrofoam), and human sampling influences. The second portion of a new protocol certification looks specifically at the lab work-up or analysis of the samples provided to the laboratory. Variables in this process include selection of appropriate biomarkers, extraction efficiencies (removal of spores or constituents of interest from the sampling device), and a method's ability to accurately determine the number of spores present in the sample with a statistically valid level of confidence as described by parameters such as precision, accuracy, robustness, specificity and sensitivity. Considerations for alternative testing protocols such as those which utilize bioburden reduction techniques include selection of appropriate biomarkers for testing, test materials and a defined statistical approach that provides sufficient scientific data to support the modification of an existing NASA specification or the generation of a new NASA specification. Synergies between the U.S. and European Space Agency approaches will also be discussed.

  12. Effective Protocols for Mobile Communications and Networking

    SciTech Connect

    Espinoza, J.; Sholander, P.; Van Leeuwen, B,

    1998-12-01

    This report examines methods of mobile communications with an emphasis on mobile computing and wireless communications. Many of the advances in communications involve the use of Internet Protocol (IP), Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM), and ad hoc network protocols. However, many of the advances in these protocols have been focused on wired communications. Recently much focus has been directed at advancing communication technology in the area of mobile wireless networks. This report discusses various protocols used in mobile communications and proposes a number of extensions to existing protocols. A detailed discussion is also included on desirable protocol characteristics and evaluation criteria. In addition, the report includes a discussion on several network simulation tools that maybe used to evaluate network protocols.

  13. Protocolized Resuscitation of Burn Patients.

    PubMed

    Cancio, Leopoldo C; Salinas, Jose; Kramer, George C

    2016-10-01

    Fluid resuscitation of burn patients is commonly initiated using modified Brooke or Parkland formula. The fluid infusion rate is titrated up or down hourly to maintain adequate urine output and other endpoints. Over-resuscitation leads to morbid complications. Adherence to paper-based protocols, flow sheets, and clinical practice guidelines is associated with decreased fluid resuscitation volumes and complications. Computerized tools assist providers. Although completely autonomous closed-loop control of resuscitation has been demonstrated in animal models of burn shock, the major advantages of open-loop and decision-support systems are identifying trends, enhancing situational awareness, and encouraging burn team communication. PMID:27600131

  14. A structured data transfer protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, P.; Rots, A.

    1992-01-01

    The transfer of data between different computers and programs can be a major obstacle during data analysis. We present a new data transfer protocol which is based on a simple structure containing a value, an error, and a unit. Each of these members can be arrays or another structure. The ability to nest structures allows for the concept of objects. When using an object-oriented language such as C++, reference can be made to the object name instead of each element explicitly. Prototype code has been written which implements the basic design with enhancements planned for the future.

  15. Mars Sample Quarantine Protocol Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Editor); Bagby, John (Editor); Race, Margaret (Editor); Rummel, John (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Sample Quarantine Protocol (QP) Workshop was convened to deal with three specific aspects of the initial handling of a returned Mars sample: 1) biocontainment, to prevent uncontrolled release of sample material into the terrestrial environment; 2) life detection, to examine the sample for evidence of live organisms; and 3) biohazard testing, to determine if the sample poses any threat to terrestrial life forms and the Earth's biosphere. During the first part of the Workshop, several tutorials were presented on topics related to the workshop in order to give all participants a common basis in the technical areas necessary to achieve the objectives of the Workshop.

  16. ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN ORGANIC TRANSFORMATIONS USING MICROWAVE IRRADIATION UNDER SOLVENT-FREE CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microwave-expedited solvent-free synthetic processes involve the exposure of neat reactants to microwave (MW) irradiation in the presence of supported reagents or catalysts on mineral oxides. Recent developments are described and the salient features of these high yield protocols...

  17. Intermittent microwave irradiation facilitates antigen-antibody reaction in Western blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Ting; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2009-01-01

    We established a shortened protocol for western blot analysis using intermittent microwave irradiation. With this method, the procedure is completed within 1 h after applying the primary antibody, and thus greatly saves time. This procedure appears to be applicable to any antibody based on our experience of several years.

  18. Mathematics for the Baker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogdany, Melvin

    The curriculum guide offers a course of training in the fundamentals of mathematics as applied to baking. Problems specifically related to the baking trade are included to maintain a practical orientation. The course is designed to help the student develop proficiency in the basic computation of whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percentage,…

  19. Analyzing the effect of routing protocols on media access control protocols in radio networks

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, C. L.; Drozda, M.; Marathe, A.; Marathe, M. V.

    2002-01-01

    We study the effect of routing protocols on the performance of media access control (MAC) protocols in wireless radio networks. Three well known MAC protocols: 802.11, CSMA, and MACA are considered. Similarly three recently proposed routing protocols: AODV, DSR and LAR scheme 1 are considered. The experimental analysis was carried out using GloMoSim: a tool for simulating wireless networks. The main focus of our experiments was to study how the routing protocols affect the performance of the MAC protocols when the underlying network and traffic parameters are varied. The performance of the protocols was measured w.r.t. five important parameters: (i) number of received packets, (ii) average latency of each packet, (iii) throughput (iv) long term fairness and (v) number of control packets at the MAC layer level. Our results show that combinations of routing and MAC protocols yield varying performance under varying network topology and traffic situations. The result has an important implication; no combination of routing protocol and MAC protocol is the best over all situations. Also, the performance analysis of protocols at a given level in the protocol stack needs to be studied not locally in isolation but as a part of the complete protocol stack. A novel aspect of our work is the use of statistical technique, ANOVA (Analysis of Variance) to characterize the effect of routing protocols on MAC protocols. This technique is of independent interest and can be utilized in several other simulation and empirical studies.

  20. Protocols for calibrating multibeam sonar.

    PubMed

    Foote, Kenneth G; Chu, Dezhang; Hammar, Terence R; Baldwin, Kenneth C; Mayer, Larry A; Hufnagle, Lawrence C; Jech, J Michael

    2005-04-01

    Development of protocols for calibrating multibeam sonar by means of the standard-target method is documented. Particular systems used in the development work included three that provide the water-column signals, namely the SIMRAD SM2000/90- and 200-kHz sonars and RESON SeaBat 8101 sonar, with operating frequency of 240 kHz. Two facilities were instrumented specifically for the work: a sea well at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and a large, indoor freshwater tank at the University of New Hampshire. Methods for measuring the transfer characteristics of each sonar, with transducers attached, are described and illustrated with measurement results. The principal results, however, are the protocols themselves. These are elaborated for positioning the target, choosing the receiver gain function, quantifying the system stability, mapping the directionality in the plane of the receiving array and in the plane normal to the central axis, measuring the directionality of individual beams, and measuring the nearfield response. General preparations for calibrating multibeam sonars and a method for measuring the receiver response electronically are outlined. Advantages of multibeam sonar calibration and outstanding problems, such as that of validation of the performance of multibeam sonars as configured for use, are mentioned.

  1. ELECTRON IRRADIATION OF SOLIDS

    DOEpatents

    Damask, A.C.

    1959-11-01

    A method is presented for altering physical properties of certain solids, such as enhancing the usefulness of solids, in which atomic interchange occurs through a vacancy mechanism, electron irradiation, and temperature control. In a centain class of metals, alloys, and semiconductors, diffusion or displacement of atoms occurs through a vacancy mechanism, i.e., an atom can only move when there exists a vacant atomic or lattice site in an adjacent position. In the process of the invention highenergy electron irradiation produces additional vacancies in a solid over those normally occurring at a given temperature and allows diffusion of the component atoms of the solid to proceed at temperatures at which it would not occur under thermal means alone in any reasonable length of time. The invention offers a precise way to increase the number of vacancies and thereby, to a controlled degree, change the physical properties of some materials, such as resistivity or hardness.

  2. BIOLOGICAL IRRADIATION FACILITY

    DOEpatents

    McCorkle, W.H.; Cern, H.S.

    1962-04-24

    A facility for irradiating biological specimens with neutrons is described. It includes a reactor wherein the core is off center in a reflector. A high-exposure room is located outside the reactor on the side nearest the core while a low-exposure room is located on the opposite side. Means for converting thermal neutrons to fast neutrons are movably disposed between the reactor core and the high and low-exposure rooms. (AEC)

  3. Hyperparathyroidism after neck irradiation.

    PubMed

    Christmas, T J; Chapple, C R; Noble, J G; Milroy, E J; Cowie, A G

    1988-09-01

    A retrospective review of 1550 cases of hyperparathyroidism (HPT) treated surgically over a 30-year period reveals a past history of exposure to neck irradiation in 10 cases (0.7 per cent). The indication for radiotherapy was benign disease in nine and papillary thyroid carcinoma in one case. The mean interval between radiation exposure and the detection of HPT was 32 years (range 3-63 years). Patients treated with radioactive iodine alone developed HPT after a mean of 5 years while the interval for those treated with external beam therapy alone was a mean of 44 years. The parathyroid histology was adenoma in six cases, carcinoma in three cases and nodular hyperplasia in one case. All patients had coincident benign thyroid disease apart from one that had previously had papillary carcinoma and another with follicular carcinoma. Neck irradiation has been shown to confer an increased risk of HPT due to parathyroid adenoma and carcinoma. Radiotherapy for benign disease has generally been abandoned and these cases demonstrate a further contra-indication for the use of neck irradiation.

  4. Treatment planning for parotid sparing in the patient requiring bilateral neck irradiation.

    PubMed

    Marsh, L; Eisbruch, A; Watson, B; Martel, M K

    1996-01-01

    The use of three dimensional (3-D) planning techniques for treatment of head and neck cancers has primarily been used in cases which require only unilateral neck irradiation. However, tumors that require bilateral neck irradiation are commonly managed with parallel opposed treatment portals. A common morbidity associated with this standard form of treatment is xerostomia. In an effort to reduce the incidence of this debilitating side effect, a protocol has been developed which attempts to balance effective tumor control with preservation of salivary flow. Key to this protocol is the use of 3-D treatment planning. The close proximity of the targeted tissues to critical structures and the related dose requirements and/or restrictions of these tissues often require the treatment planner to utilize "non-standard" approaches to achieve the unique dose distributions necessary to meet protocol eligibility. This may include treatment planning options such as non-coplanar, non-axial beams; and modulation of beam intensity. PMID:8679070

  5. Mafic magmas from Mount Baker in the northern Cascade arc, Washington: probes into mantle and crustal processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Nicole E.; Debari, Susan M.

    2012-03-01

    Five mafic lava flows located on the southern flank of Mount Baker are among the most primitive in the volcanic field. A comprehensive dataset of whole rock and mineral chemistry reveals the diversity of these mafic lavas that come from distinct sources and have been variably affected by ascent through the crust. Disequilibrium textures present in all of the lavas indicate that crustal processes have affected the magmas. Despite this evidence, mantle source characteristics have been retained and three primitive endmember lava types are represented. These include (1) modified low-K tholeiitic basalt (LKOT-like), (2) typical calc-alkaline (CA) lavas, and (3) high-Mg basaltic andesite and andesite (HMBA and HMA). The Type 1 endmember, the basalt of Park Butte (49.3-50.3 wt% SiO2, Mg# 64-65), has major element chemistry similar to LKOT found elsewhere in the Cascades. Park Butte also has the lowest overall abundances of trace elements (with the exception of the HREE), indicating it is either derived from the most depleted mantle source or has undergone the largest degree of partial melting. The Type 2 endmember is represented by the basalts of Lake Shannon (50.7-52.6 wt% SiO2, Mg# 58-62) and Sulphur Creek (51.2-54.6 wt% SiO2, Mg# 56-57). These two lavas are comparable to calc-alkaline rocks found in arcs worldwide and have similar trace element patterns; however, they differ from each other in abundances of REE, indicating variation in degree of partial melting or fractionation. The Type 3 endmember is represented by the HMBA of Tarn Plateau (51.8-54.0 wt% SiO2, Mg# 68-70) and the HMA of Glacier Creek (58.3-58.7 wt% SiO2, Mg# 63-64). The strongly depleted HREE nature of these Type 3 units and their decreasing Mg# with increasing SiO2 suggests fractionation from a high-Mg basaltic parent derived from a source with residual garnet. Another basaltic andesite unit, Cathedral Crag (52.2-52.6 wt% SiO2, Mg# 55-58), is an Mg-poor differentiate of the Type 3 endmember. The calc

  6. The generation of a diverse suite of Late Pleistocene and Holocene basalt through dacite lavas from the northern Cascade arc at Mount Baker, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggerman, Troy David; Debari, S. M.

    2011-01-01

    Mt. Baker is a dominantly andesitic stratovolcano in the northern Cascade arc. In this study, we show that the andesites are not all derived from similar sources, and that open-system processes were dominant during their petrogenesis. To this end, we discuss petrographic observations, mineral chemistry, and whole rock major and trace element chemistry for three of Mt. Baker's late Pleistocene to Holocene lava flow units. These include the basalt and basaltic andesite of Sulphur Creek (SC) (51.4-55.8 wt% SiO2, Mg# 57-58), the Mg-rich andesite of Glacier Creek (GC) (58.3-58.7 wt% SiO2, Mg# 63-64), and the andesite and dacite of Boulder Glacier (BG) (60.2-64.2 wt% SiO2, Mg# 50-57). Phenocryst populations in all units display varying degrees of reaction and disequilibrium textures along with complicated zoning patterns indicative of open-system processes. All lavas are medium-K and calc-alkaline, but each unit displays distinctive trace element and REE characteristics that do not correlate with the average SiO2 content of the unit. The mafic lavas of SC have relatively elevated REE abundances with the lowest (La/Yb)N (~4.5). The intermediate GC andesites (Mg- and Ni-rich) have the lowest REE abundances and the highest (La/Yb)N (~6.7) with strongly depleted HREE. The more felsic BG lavas have intermediate REE abundances and (La/Yb)N (~6.4). The high-Mg character of the GC andesites can be explained by addition of 4% of a xenocrystic olivine component. However, their depleted REE patterns are similar to other high-Mg andesites reported from Mt. Baker and require a distinct mantle source. The two dominantly andesitic units (GC and BG) are different enough from each other that they could not have been derived from the same parent basalt. Nor could either of them have been derived from the SC basalt by crystal fractionation processes. Crystal fractionation also cannot explain the compositional diversity within each unit. Compositional diversity within the SC unit (basalt to

  7. Using mineral geochemistry to decipher slab, mantle, and crustal inputs to the generation of high-Mg andesites from Mount Baker and Glacier Peak, northern Cascade arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sas, M.; DeBari, S. M.; Clynne, M. A.; Rusk, B. G.

    2015-12-01

    A fundamental question in geology is whether subducting plates get hot enough to generate melt that contributes to magmatic output in volcanic arcs. Because the subducting plate beneath the Cascade arc is relatively young and hot, slab melt generation is considered possible. To better understand the role of slab melt in north Cascades magmas, this study focused on petrogenesis of high-Mg andesites (HMA) and basaltic andesites (HMBA) from Mt. Baker and Glacier Peak, Washington. HMA have unusually high Mg# relative to their SiO2 contents, as well as elevated La/Yb and Dy/Yb ratios that are interpreted to result from separation of melt from a garnet-bearing residuum. Debate centers on the garnet's origin as it could be present in mineral assemblages from the subducting slab, deep mantle, thick lower crust, or basalt fractionated at high pressure. Whole rock analyses were combined with major, minor, and trace element analyses to understand the origin of these HMA. In the Tarn Plateau (Mt. Baker) flow unit (51.8-54.0 wt.% SiO2, Mg# 68-70) Mg#s correlate positively with high La/Yb in clinopyroxene equilibrium liquids, suggesting an origin similar to that of Aleutian adakites, where slab-derived melts interact with the overlying mantle to become Mg-rich and subsequently mix with mantle-derived basalts. The source for high La/Yb in the Glacier Creek (Mt. Baker) flow unit (58.3-58.7 wt.% SiO2, Mg# 63-64) is more ambiguous. High whole rock Sr/P imply origin from a mantle that was hydrated by an enriched slab component (fluid ± melt). In the Lightning Creek (Glacier Peak) flow unit (54.8-57.9 SiO2, Mg# 69-72) Cr and Mg contents in Cr-spinel and olivine pairs suggest a depleted mantle source, and high whole rock Sr/P indicate hydration-induced mantle melting. Hence Lightning Creek is interpreted have originated from a refractory mantle source that interacted with a hydrous slab component (fluid ± melt). Our results indicate that in addition to slab-derived fluids, slab

  8. A Unified Fault-Tolerance Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, Paul; Gedser, Alfons; Pike, Lee; Maddalon, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    Davies and Wakerly show that Byzantine fault tolerance can be achieved by a cascade of broadcasts and middle value select functions. We present an extension of the Davies and Wakerly protocol, the unified protocol, and its proof of correctness. We prove that it satisfies validity and agreement properties for communication of exact values. We then introduce bounded communication error into the model. Inexact communication is inherent for clock synchronization protocols. We prove that validity and agreement properties hold for inexact communication, and that exact communication is a special case. As a running example, we illustrate the unified protocol using the SPIDER family of fault-tolerant architectures. In particular we demonstrate that the SPIDER interactive consistency, distributed diagnosis, and clock synchronization protocols are instances of the unified protocol.

  9. [The research protocol. Part I].

    PubMed

    Miranda-Novales, María Guadalupe; Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel

    2015-01-01

    One of the principal aims in research is the publication of the study in scientific journals. This implies two challenges: the first one, the election of an adequate research design, and the second one, the concrete and simple wording of the results for the study to be accepted in the most appropriate journal according to the scope. Despite numerous supporting documents are available for both issues, the publication process is long, tiresome, and can discourage the most enthusiastic researcher. This is the first of a series of articles with the objective to describe the steps from the research question to the publication of the study. First of all, the importance of the research design will be addressed. The structure of the protocol is essential to achieve the objectives, and provides a way to organize the investigation in a logic, comprehensible and efficient manner.

  10. [Climate change and Kyoto protocol].

    PubMed

    Ergasti, G; Pippia, V; Murzilli, G; De Luca D'Alessandro, E

    2009-01-01

    Due to industrial revolution and the heavy use of fossil fuels, the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere has increased dramatically during the last hundred years, and this has lead to an increase in mean global temperature. The environmental consequences of this are: the melting of the ice caps, an increase in mean sea-levels, catastrophic events such as floodings, hurricanes and earthquakes, changes to the animal and vegetable kingdoms, a growth in vectors and bacteria in water thus increasing the risk of infectious diseases and damage to agriculture. The toxic effects of the pollution on human health are both acute and chronic. The Kyoto Protocol is an important step in the campaign against climatic changes but it is not sufficient. A possible solution might be for the States which produce the most of pollution to adopt a better political stance for the environment and to use renewable resources for the production of energy.

  11. FDA perspective on food irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pauli, G.H.

    1994-12-31

    The Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN) monitors the safety of food irradiation. A few limited uses are regulated, and occasionally CFSAN receives a petition for a new use. Despite extensive studies (more than 400) showing the safety of food irradiation, a cloud of suspicion continues to hang over this issue in the mind of the public. People perceive food irradiation and direct body irradiation as having similar implications. Food irradiation is banned in two states in the United States. Food is irradiated for the following purposes: delay of ripening, prevention of sprouting, eradication of pests and sterilization, and allowing commodities to be stored unrefrigerated for long periods of time. The dosage depends on the purpose of the irradiation. Radiolytic products are formed during irradiation and during storage afterward. Most of these products are also formed during conventional preservation. In 1980, CFSAN, then the Bureau of Foods, introduced the term unique radiolytic products for compounds not identified in foods after conventional processing. Although the existence of URPs was never proven chemically, the term has caused anxiety. Irradiation of foods in the commercially useful range does not generate radioactivity above natural background. Because radiolytic products formed from beef, chicken, and pork are primarily the same, irradiated foods of similar food groups may be evaluated generically.

  12. Canine adenovirus downstream processing protocol.

    PubMed

    Puig, Meritxell; Piedra, Jose; Miravet, Susana; Segura, María Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are efficient gene delivery tools. A major caveat with vectors derived from common human adenovirus serotypes is that most adults are likely to have been exposed to the wild-type virus and exhibit active immunity against the vectors. This preexisting immunity limits their clinical success. Strategies to circumvent this problem include the use of nonhuman adenovirus vectors. Vectors derived from canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2) are among the best-studied representatives. CAV-2 vectors are particularly attractive for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. In addition, CAV-2 vectors have shown great promise as oncolytic agents in virotherapy approaches and as vectors for recombinant vaccines. The rising interest in CAV-2 vectors calls for the development of scalable GMP compliant production and purification strategies. A detailed protocol describing a complete scalable downstream processing strategy for CAV-2 vectors is reported here. Clarification of CAV-2 particles is achieved by microfiltration. CAV-2 particles are subsequently concentrated and partially purified by ultrafiltration-diafiltration. A Benzonase(®) digestion step is carried out between ultrafiltration and diafiltration operations to eliminate contaminating nucleic acids. Chromatography purification is accomplished in two consecutive steps. CAV-2 particles are first captured and concentrated on a propyl hydrophobic interaction chromatography column followed by a polishing step using DEAE anion exchange monoliths. Using this protocol, high-quality CAV-2 vector preparations containing low levels of contamination with empty viral capsids and other inactive vector forms are typically obtained. The complete process yield was estimated to be 38-45 %. PMID:24132487

  13. Post-irradiation effects in polyethylenes irradiated under various atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suljovrujic, E.

    2013-08-01

    If a large amount of polymer free radicals remain trapped after irradiation of polymers, the post-irradiation effects may result in a significant alteration of physical properties during long-term shelf storage and use. In the case of polyethylenes (PEs) some failures are attributed to the post-irradiation oxidative degradation initiated by the reaction of residual free radicals (mainly trapped in crystal phase) with oxygen. Oxidation products such as carbonyl groups act as deep traps and introduce changes in carrier mobility and significant deterioration in the PEs electrical insulating properties. The post-irradiation behaviour of three different PEs, low density polyethylene (LDPE), linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) and high density polyethylene (HDPE) was studied; previously, the post-irradiation behaviour of the PEs was investigated after the irradiation in air (Suljovrujic, 2010). In this paper, in order to investigate the influence of different irradiation media on the post-irradiation behaviour, the samples were irradiated in air and nitrogen gas, to an absorbed dose of 300 kGy. The annealing treatment of irradiated PEs, which can substantially reduce the concentration of free radicals, is used in this study, too. Dielectric relaxation behaviour is related to the difference in the initial structure of PEs (such as branching, crystallinity etc.), to the changes induced by irradiation in different media and to the post-irradiation changes induced by storage of the samples in air. Electron spin resonance (ESR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), infra-red (IR) spectroscopy and gel measurements were used to determine the changes in the free radical concentration, crystal fraction, oxidation and degree of network formation, respectively.

  14. Layered protocols in voice interaction with computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. M.

    1987-02-01

    The Layered Protocol model for human computer interfaces is described, with special reference to the problems of voice input and output. In a layered protocol, each level passes virtual messages back and forth between human and computer. These virtual messages are realized in the form of interchanges at the level below. The protocol at a level is analogous to the syntax of a sentence, in that it is the method by which the content of a message can be given an agreed interpretation. Each protocol can be designed or evaluated independently of all the others in an interface. The stability of a protocol is determined by its response delays and by the channel capacity of the lower level protocols that support its messages. Sometimes an unstable protocol can be stabilized and speeded by reducing the message rate of the supporting protocols. Users have been observed to do this intuitively. Voice input provides special problems because of the relatively high error probability inherent in the recognizer: errors in other modalities are likely to be due to operator fault. This tends to lead to unwarranted distrust of voice input, and to demands for types of feedback that are probably inappropriate to the level of protocol to which the recognizer is suited. Voice output can be used by the computer to initiate protocols, or to provide a response channel for protocols under conditions where the user's eyes are otherwise occupied. Consideration of protocol demands helps to clarify the requirements for precision in recognition, and for the characteristics of computer responses to voice input; it helps also in judging appropriate conditions for the use of voice output.

  15. Autologous bone marrow transplantation following chemotherapy and irradiation in dogs with spontaneous lymphomas. [. gamma. rays

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, C.A.; Bull, M.; McCormick, K.; Kadin, M.; Lucas, D.

    1980-09-01

    Thirty dogs with spontaneous lymphomas were administered two to six cycles of chemotherapy and were randomized into 3 groups to receive 800 rads of total body irradiation and autologous bone marrow transplantation. Of 10 dogs irradiated after chemotherapy-induced remission and infused with remission marrow (group 1), 8 (80%) had successful grafts and experienced remissions lasting 62 to 1024 days. Of 9 dogs irradiated during remission and infused with remission marrow mixed with autologous tumor cells (group 2), 6 (66%) had remission lasting 15 to 45 days. Eleven dogs with progressive tumor growth (relapse) following chemotherapy were irradiated and infused with remission marrow (group 3). Tumor remission lasting 39 to 350 days was observed in 5 dogs (45%) in this group, and 6 dogs died in less than 30 days. Dogs in groups 1 to 3 had median survival times of 216, 60, and 45 days, respectively. The prolonged survival times for dogs in group 1 compared to dogs in groups 2 and 3 suggest that protocols involving irradiation and autologous marrow grafting in this model would be most effective when these protocols are applied to animals having a minimum tumor burden at the time of irradiation and when the grafting is done with tumor-free autologous marrow.

  16. A new species of Kentropyxia Baker, 1982 parasitic in the small intestine of Osteocephalus taurinus Steindachner (Anura: Hylidae) from the Brazilian Eastern Amazon.

    PubMed

    Feitosa, Lucas Aristóteles das Neves; Furtado, Adriano Penha; dos Santos, Jeannie Nascimento; Melo, Francisco Tiago de Vasconcelos

    2015-11-01

    Kentropyxia hylae n. sp. is described based on material from small intestine of Osteocephalus taurinus Steindachner from Caxiuanã National Forest, municipality of Melgaço, state of Pará, Brazil. The new species is easily distinguished from the type-species and only species of the genus, Kentropyxia sauria Baker, 1982, by its smaller dimensions, the presence of cervical alae, spicules divided into three parts: a robust, single pointed outer processes ending with small finger-like projections and latero-dorsal and latero-ventral processes branching at final portion of spicule into six main branches, each ending with 14 projections in the latero-dorsal process and 15 projections in the latero-ventral process and by the presence of a middle groove in bursa ray 4. This is the second species parasitic in hylids from the Brazilian Amazon and a new parasite for O. taurinus.

  17. Image encryption schemes for joint photographic experts group and graphics interchange format formats based on three-dimensional baker with compound chaotic sequence generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Shiyu; Tong, Xiaojun; Zhang, Miao

    2013-01-01

    We propose several methods to transplant the compound chaotic image encryption scheme with permutation based on three-dimensional (3-D) baker onto image formats such as the joint photographic experts group (JPEG) and graphics interchange format (GIF). The new methods avert the discrete cosine transform and quantization, which result in floating point precision loss, and succeed to encrypt and decrypt JPEG images lossless. The ciphered JPEG images generated by our solution own much better randomness than most other existing schemes. Our proposed method for GIF keeps the property of animation successfully. The security test results indicate the proposed methods have high security, and the speed of our algorithm is faster than classical solutions. Since JPEG and GIF image formats are popular contemporarily, we show that the prospect of chaotic image encryption is promising.

  18. Status Report on the UNIDROIT Space Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Paul B.

    2002-01-01

    In my status report on the UNIDROIT Space Protocol I will describe the history and purpose of the Space Protocol; I will state the Protocol's relationship to the UNIDROIT Convention on International Interests in Mobile Equipment in particular after the 2001 Cape Town Diplomatic Conference on the Convention. I will describe the COPUOS study of possible conflicts with the existing space law treaties and explain UNIDROIT's objective of avoiding conflicts between existing space law and the Space Protocol. Finally I will describe future steps to be taken.

  19. Quantum three-pass cryptography protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li; Wu, Ling-An; Liu, Songhao

    2002-09-01

    We present a new kind of quantum cryptography protocol based on Shamir's three-pass protocol of classical cryptography, which allows the transmission of qubits directly and secretly via the aid of an unjammable classical channel. In this protocol we implement the encryption and decryption transformations via rotations on the Poincare sphere of the photons polarization parameters. The key technique is that Bob's encryption rotation must be commutative with Alice s decryption rotation; this means that the axes of these two rotations must be parallel. We also present a security analysis of the protocol under a man-in-the-middle attack.

  20. Effects of dietary live and heat-inactive baker's yeast on growth, gut health, and disease resistance of Nile tilapia under high rearing density.

    PubMed

    Ran, Chao; Huang, Lu; Hu, Jun; Tacon, Philippe; He, Suxu; Li, Zhimin; Wang, Yibing; Liu, Zhi; Xu, Li; Yang, Yalin; Zhou, Zhigang

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the effects of baker's yeast as probiotics was evaluated in Nile tilapia reared at high density. Juvenile tilapia were distributed to tanks at high density (436 fish/m(3)) and fed with basal diet (CK) or diets supplemented with live (LY) or heat-inactivated yeast (HIY). Another group of fish reared at low density (218 fish/m(3)) and fed with basal diet was also included (LowCK). After 8 weeks of feeding, growth, feed utilization, gut microvilli morphology, digestive enzymes, and expressions of hsp70 and inflammation-related cytokines in the intestine were assessed. Intestinal microbiota was investigated using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Fish were challenged with Aeromonas hydrophila to evaluate disease resistance. High rearing density significantly decreased the growth, feed utilization, microvilli length, and disease resistance of fish (CK versus LowCK). Moreover, the intestinal hsp70 expression was increased in fish reared at high density, supporting a stress condition. Compared to CK group, supplementation of live yeast significantly increased gut microvilli length and trypsin activity, decreased intestinal hsp70 expression, and enhanced resistance of fish against A. hydrophila (reflected by reduced intestinal alkaline phosphatase activity 24 h post infection). The gut microbiota was not markedly influenced by either rearing density or yeast supplementation. Heat-inactivated yeast (HIY) didn't display the beneficial effects observed in LY except an increase in gut trypsin activity, suggesting the importance of yeast viability and thus secretory metabolites of yeast. In conclusion, live baker's yeast may alleviate the negative effects induced by crowding stress, and has the potential to be used as probiotics for tilapia reared at high density. PMID:27393237

  1. Isolation and characterization of a freeze-tolerant diploid derivative of an industrial baker's yeast strain and its use in frozen doughs.

    PubMed

    Teunissen, Aloys; Dumortier, Françoise; Gorwa, Marie-Françoise; Bauer, Jürgen; Tanghe, An; Loïez, Annie; Smet, Peter; Van Dijck, Patrick; Thevelein, Johan M

    2002-10-01

    The routine production and storage of frozen doughs are still problematic. Although commercial baker's yeast is highly resistant to environmental stress conditions, it rapidly loses stress resistance during dough preparation due to the initiation of fermentation. As a result, the yeast loses gassing power significantly during storage of frozen doughs. We obtained freeze-tolerant mutants of polyploid industrial strains following screening for survival in doughs prepared with UV-mutagenized yeast and subjected to 200 freeze-thaw cycles. Two strains in the S47 background with a normal growth rate and the best freeze tolerance under laboratory conditions were selected for production in a 20-liter pilot fermentor. Before frozen storage, the AT25 mutant produced on the 20-liter pilot scale had a 10% higher gassing power capacity than the S47 strain, while the opposite was observed for cells produced under laboratory conditions. AT25 also retained more freeze tolerance during the initiation of fermentation in liquid cultures and more gassing power during storage of frozen doughs. Other industrially important properties (yield, growth rate, nitrogen assimilation, and phosphorus content) were very similar. AT25 had only half of the DNA content of S47, and its cell size was much smaller. Several diploid segregants of S47 had freeze tolerances similar to that of AT25 but inferior performance for other properties, while an AT25-derived tetraploid, TAT25, showed only slightly improved freeze tolerance compared to S47. When AT25 was cultured in a 20,000-liter fermentor under industrial conditions, it retained its superior performance and thus appears to be promising for use in frozen dough production. Our results also show that a diploid strain can perform at least as well as a tetraploid strain for commercial baker's yeast production and usage. PMID:12324320

  2. Effects of dietary live and heat-inactive baker's yeast on growth, gut health, and disease resistance of Nile tilapia under high rearing density.

    PubMed

    Ran, Chao; Huang, Lu; Hu, Jun; Tacon, Philippe; He, Suxu; Li, Zhimin; Wang, Yibing; Liu, Zhi; Xu, Li; Yang, Yalin; Zhou, Zhigang

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the effects of baker's yeast as probiotics was evaluated in Nile tilapia reared at high density. Juvenile tilapia were distributed to tanks at high density (436 fish/m(3)) and fed with basal diet (CK) or diets supplemented with live (LY) or heat-inactivated yeast (HIY). Another group of fish reared at low density (218 fish/m(3)) and fed with basal diet was also included (LowCK). After 8 weeks of feeding, growth, feed utilization, gut microvilli morphology, digestive enzymes, and expressions of hsp70 and inflammation-related cytokines in the intestine were assessed. Intestinal microbiota was investigated using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Fish were challenged with Aeromonas hydrophila to evaluate disease resistance. High rearing density significantly decreased the growth, feed utilization, microvilli length, and disease resistance of fish (CK versus LowCK). Moreover, the intestinal hsp70 expression was increased in fish reared at high density, supporting a stress condition. Compared to CK group, supplementation of live yeast significantly increased gut microvilli length and trypsin activity, decreased intestinal hsp70 expression, and enhanced resistance of fish against A. hydrophila (reflected by reduced intestinal alkaline phosphatase activity 24 h post infection). The gut microbiota was not markedly influenced by either rearing density or yeast supplementation. Heat-inactivated yeast (HIY) didn't display the beneficial effects observed in LY except an increase in gut trypsin activity, suggesting the importance of yeast viability and thus secretory metabolites of yeast. In conclusion, live baker's yeast may alleviate the negative effects induced by crowding stress, and has the potential to be used as probiotics for tilapia reared at high density.

  3. Craniospinal irradiation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Scarlatescu, Ioana Avram, Calin N.; Virag, Vasile

    2015-12-07

    In this paper we present one treatment plan for irradiation cases which involve a complex technique with multiple beams, using the 3D conformational technique. As the main purpose of radiotherapy is to administrate a precise dose into the tumor volume and protect as much as possible all the healthy tissues around it, for a case diagnosed with a primitive neuro ectoderm tumor, we have developed a new treatment plan, by controlling one of the two adjacent fields used at spinal field, in a way that avoids the fields superposition. Therefore, the risk of overdose is reduced by eliminating the field divergence.

  4. Craniospinal irradiation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarlatescu, Ioana; Virag, Vasile; Avram, Calin N.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we present one treatment plan for irradiation cases which involve a complex technique with multiple beams, using the 3D conformational technique. As the main purpose of radiotherapy is to administrate a precise dose into the tumor volume and protect as much as possible all the healthy tissues around it, for a case diagnosed with a primitive neuro ectoderm tumor, we have developed a new treatment plan, by controlling one of the two adjacent fields used at spinal field, in a way that avoids the fields superposition. Therefore, the risk of overdose is reduced by eliminating the field divergence.

  5. GENERIC VERIFICATION PROTOCOL: DISTRIBUTED GENERATION AND COMBINED HEAT AND POWER FIELD TESTING PROTOCOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report is a generic verification protocol by which EPA’s Environmental Technology Verification program tests newly developed equipment for distributed generation of electric power, usually micro-turbine generators and internal combustion engine generators. The protocol will ...

  6. EXACT2: the semantics of biomedical protocols

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The reliability and reproducibility of experimental procedures is a cornerstone of scientific practice. There is a pressing technological need for the better representation of biomedical protocols to enable other agents (human or machine) to better reproduce results. A framework that ensures that all information required for the replication of experimental protocols is essential to achieve reproducibility. Methods We have developed the ontology EXACT2 (EXperimental ACTions) that is designed to capture the full semantics of biomedical protocols required for their reproducibility. To construct EXACT2 we manually inspected hundreds of published and commercial biomedical protocols from several areas of biomedicine. After establishing a clear pattern for extracting the required information we utilized text-mining tools to translate the protocols into a machine amenable format. We have verified the utility of EXACT2 through the successful processing of previously 'unseen' (not used for the construction of EXACT2) protocols. Results The paper reports on a fundamentally new version EXACT2 that supports the semantically-defined representation of biomedical protocols. The ability of EXACT2 to capture the semantics of biomedical procedures was verified through a text mining use case. In this EXACT2 is used as a reference model for text mining tools to identify terms pertinent to experimental actions, and their properties, in biomedical protocols expressed in natural language. An EXACT2-based framework for the translation of biomedical protocols to a machine amenable format is proposed. Conclusions The EXACT2 ontology is sufficient to record, in a machine processable form, the essential information about biomedical protocols. EXACT2 defines explicit semantics of experimental actions, and can be used by various computer applications. It can serve as a reference model for for the translation of biomedical protocols in natural language into a semantically

  7. Irradiation of northwest agricultural products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakin, D. E.; Tingey, G. I.

    1985-02-01

    Irradiation of food for disinfestation and preservation is increasing in importance because of increasing restrictions on various chemical treatments. Irradiation treatment is of particular interest in the Northwest because of a growing supply of agricultural products and the need to develop new export markets. Several products have, or could potentially have, significant export markets if stringent insect ocntrol procedures are developed and followed. Due to the recognized potential benefits of irradiation, this program was conducted to evaluate the benefits of using irradiation on Northwest agricultural products. Commodities currently included in the program are cherries, apples, asparagus, spices, hay, and hides.

  8. Food irradiation and sterilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josephson, Edward S.

    Radiation sterilization of food (radappertization) requires exposing food in sealed containers to ionizing radiation at absorbed doses high enough (25-70 kGy) to kill all organisms of food spoilage and public health significance. Radappertization is analogous to thermal canning is achieving shelf stability (long term storage without refrigeration). Except for dry products in which autolysis is negligible, the radappertization process also requires that the food be heated to an internal temperature of 70-80°C (bacon to 53°C) to inactivate autolytic enzymes which catalyze spoilage during storage without refrigeration. To minimize the occurence of irradiation induced off-flavors and odors, undesirable color changes, and textural and nutritional losses from exposure to the high doses required for radappertization, the foods are vacuum sealed and irradiated frozen (-40°C to -20°C). Radappertozed foods have the characteristic of fresh foods prepared for eating. Radappertization can substitute in whole or in part for some chemical food additives such as ethylene oxide and nitrites which are either toxic, carcinogenic, mutagenic, or teratogenic. After 27 years of testing for "wholesomeness" (safety for consumption) of radappertized foods, no confirmed evidence has been obtained of any adverse effecys of radappertization on the "wholesomeness" characteristics of these foods.

  9. 21 CFR 1301.18 - Research protocols.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... to 21 U.S.C. 355(i) and 21 CFR 130.3, I, (Name and Address of IND Sponsor) submitted a Notice of... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Research protocols. 1301.18 Section 1301.18 Food..., DISTRIBUTORS, AND DISPENSERS OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Registration § 1301.18 Research protocols. (a) A...

  10. Delay Tolerant Networking - Bundle Protocol Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SeGui, John; Jenning, Esther

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the addition of MACHETE models needed to support DTN, namely: the Bundle Protocol (BP) model. To illustrate the useof MACHETE with the additional DTN model, we provide an example simulation to benchmark its performance. We demonstrate the use of the DTN protocol and discuss statistics gathered concerning the total time needed to simulate numerous bundle transmissions.

  11. STANDARD MEASUREMENT PROTOCOLS - FLORIDA RADON RESEARCH PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The manual, in support of the Florida Radon Research Program, contains standard protocols for key measurements where data quality is vital to the program. t contains two sections. he first section, soil measurements, contains field sampling protocols for soil gas permeability and...

  12. Open commit protocols tolerating commission failures

    SciTech Connect

    Rothermel, K.; Pappe, S. )

    1993-06-01

    To ensure atomicity of transactions in disturbed systems so-called 2-phase commit (2PC) protocols have been proposed. The basic assumption of these protocols is that the processing nodes involved in transactions are [open quotes]sane,[close quotes] i.e., they only fail with omission failures, and nodes eventually recover from failures. Unfortunately, this assumption is not realistic for so-called Open Distributed Systems (ODSs), in which nodes may have totally different reliability characteristics. In ODSs, nodes can be classified into trusted nodes (e.g., a banking server) and nontrusted nodes (e.g., a home PC requesting a remote banking service). While trusted nodes are assumed to be sane, nontrusted nodes may fail permanently and even cause commission failures to occur. In this paper, we propose a family of 2PC protocols that tolerate any number of omission failures at trusted nodes and any number of commission and omission failures at nontrusted nodes. The proposed protocols ensure that (at least) the trusted nodes participating in a transaction eventually terminate the transaction in a consistent manner. Unlike Byzantine commit protocols, our protocols do not incorporate mechanisms for achieving Byzantine agreement, which has advantages in terms of complexity: Our protocols have the same or only a slightly higher message complexity than traditional 2PC protocols. 31 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Communication protocol standards for space data systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooke, Adrian J.; Desjardins, Richard

    1990-01-01

    The main elements and requirements of advanced space data networks are identified. The communication protocol standards for use on space missions during the coming decades are described. In particular, the blending of high-performance space-unique data transmission techniques with off-the-shelf open systems interconnection (OSI) protocols is described.

  14. 21 CFR 1301.18 - Research protocols.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Research protocols. 1301.18 Section 1301.18 Food... duration of the project. (v) Location where the research will be conducted. (vi) Statement of the security... security provisions (as proscribed in paragraph (a)(2)(vi) of this section for a research protocol) to,...

  15. 21 CFR 1301.18 - Research protocols.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Research protocols. 1301.18 Section 1301.18 Food... duration of the project. (v) Location where the research will be conducted. (vi) Statement of the security... security provisions (as proscribed in paragraph (a)(2)(vi) of this section for a research protocol) to,...

  16. Massive transfusion and massive transfusion protocol

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Vijaya; Shetmahajan, Madhavi

    2014-01-01

    Haemorrhage remains a major cause of potentially preventable deaths. Rapid transfusion of large volumes of blood products is required in patients with haemorrhagic shock which may lead to a unique set of complications. Recently, protocol based management of these patients using massive transfusion protocol have shown improved outcomes. This section discusses in detail both management and complications of massive blood transfusion. PMID:25535421

  17. 16 CFR 1212.4 - Test protocol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Test protocol. 1212.4 Section 1212.4... STANDARD FOR MULTI-PURPOSE LIGHTERS Requirements for Child-Resistance § 1212.4 Test protocol. (a) Child test panel. (1) The test to determine if a multi-purpose lighter is resistant to successful...

  18. 16 CFR 1210.4 - Test protocol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Test protocol. 1210.4 Section 1210.4... STANDARD FOR CIGARETTE LIGHTERS Requirements for Child Resistance § 1210.4 Test protocol. (a) Child test panel. (1) The test to determine if a lighter is resistant to successful operation by children uses...

  19. Massive transfusion and massive transfusion protocol.

    PubMed

    Patil, Vijaya; Shetmahajan, Madhavi

    2014-09-01

    Haemorrhage remains a major cause of potentially preventable deaths. Rapid transfusion of large volumes of blood products is required in patients with haemorrhagic shock which may lead to a unique set of complications. Recently, protocol based management of these patients using massive transfusion protocol have shown improved outcomes. This section discusses in detail both management and complications of massive blood transfusion.

  20. Irradiation hardening of pure tungsten exposed to neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xunxiang; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Fukuda, Makoto; Kumar, N. A. P. Kiran; Snead, Lance L.; Wirth, Brian D.; Katoh, Yutai

    2016-11-01

    Pure tungsten samples have been neutron irradiated in HFIR at 90-850 °C to 0.03-2.2 dpa. A dispersed barrier hardening model informed by the available microstructure data has been used to predict the hardness. Comparison of the model predictions and the measured Vickers hardness reveals the dominant hardening contribution at various irradiation conditions. For tungsten samples irradiated in HFIR, the results indicate that voids and dislocation loops contributed to the hardness increase in the low dose region (<0.3 dpa), while the formation of intermetallic second phase precipitation, resulting from transmutation, dominates the radiation-induced strengthening beginning with a relatively modest dose (>0.6 dpa). The precipitate contribution is most pronounced for the HFIR irradiations, whereas the radiation-induced defect cluster microstructure can rationalize the entirety of the hardness increase observed in tungsten irradiated in the fast neutron spectrum of Joyo and the mixed neutron spectrum of JMTR.

  1. Cryptanalysis of the arbitrated quantum signature protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Fei; Qin Sujuan; Guo Fenzhuo; Wen Qiaoyan

    2011-08-15

    As a new model for signing quantum messages, arbitrated quantum signature (AQS) has recently received a lot of attention. In this paper we study the cryptanalysis of previous AQS protocols from the aspects of forgery and disavowal. We show that in these protocols the receiver, Bob, can realize existential forgery of the sender's signature under known message attack. Bob can even achieve universal forgery when the protocols are used to sign a classical message. Furthermore, the sender, Alice, can successfully disavow any of her signatures by simple attack. The attack strategies are described in detail and some discussions about the potential improvements of the protocols are given. Finally we also present several interesting topics on AQS protocols that can be studied in future.

  2. Accuracy of NHANES periodontal examination protocols.

    PubMed

    Eke, P I; Thornton-Evans, G O; Wei, L; Borgnakke, W S; Dye, B A

    2010-11-01

    This study evaluates the accuracy of periodontitis prevalence determined by the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) partial-mouth periodontal examination protocols. True periodontitis prevalence was determined in a new convenience sample of 454 adults ≥ 35 years old, by a full-mouth "gold standard" periodontal examination. This actual prevalence was compared with prevalence resulting from analysis of the data according to the protocols of NHANES III and NHANES 2001-2004, respectively. Both NHANES protocols substantially underestimated the prevalence of periodontitis by 50% or more, depending on the periodontitis case definition used, and thus performed below threshold levels for moderate-to-high levels of validity for surveillance. Adding measurements from lingual or interproximal sites to the NHANES 2001-2004 protocol did not improve the accuracy sufficiently to reach acceptable sensitivity thresholds. These findings suggest that NHANES protocols produce high levels of misclassification of periodontitis cases and thus have low validity for surveillance and research.

  3. Security Weaknesses in Arbitrated Quantum Signature Protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Zhang, Kejia; Cao, Tianqing

    2014-01-01

    Arbitrated quantum signature (AQS) is a cryptographic scenario in which the sender (signer), Alice, generates the signature of a message and then a receiver (verifier), Bob, can verify the signature with the help of a trusted arbitrator, Trent. In this paper, we point out there exist some security weaknesses in two AQS protocols. Our analysis shows Alice can successfully disavow any of her signatures by a simple attack in the first protocol. Furthermore, we study the security weaknesses of the second protocol from the aspects of forgery and disavowal. Some potential improvements of this kind of protocols are given. We also design a new method to authenticate a signature or a message, which makes AQS protocols immune to Alice's disavowal attack and Bob's forgery attack effectively.

  4. Cryptanalysis of the arbitrated quantum signature protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fei; Qin, Su-Juan; Guo, Fen-Zhuo; Wen, Qiao-Yan

    2011-08-01

    As a new model for signing quantum messages, arbitrated quantum signature (AQS) has recently received a lot of attention. In this paper we study the cryptanalysis of previous AQS protocols from the aspects of forgery and disavowal. We show that in these protocols the receiver, Bob, can realize existential forgery of the sender's signature under known message attack. Bob can even achieve universal forgery when the protocols are used to sign a classical message. Furthermore, the sender, Alice, can successfully disavow any of her signatures by simple attack. The attack strategies are described in detail and some discussions about the potential improvements of the protocols are given. Finally we also present several interesting topics on AQS protocols that can be studied in future.

  5. The EXACT description of biomedical protocols

    PubMed Central

    Soldatova, Larisa N.; Aubrey, Wayne; King, Ross D.; Clare, Amanda

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: Many published manuscripts contain experiment protocols which are poorly described or deficient in information. This means that the published results are very hard or impossible to repeat. This problem is being made worse by the increasing complexity of high-throughput/automated methods. There is therefore a growing need to represent experiment protocols in an efficient and unambiguous way. Results: We have developed the Experiment ACTions (EXACT) ontology as the basis of a method of representing biological laboratory protocols. We provide example protocols that have been formalized using EXACT, and demonstrate the advantages and opportunities created by using this formalization. We argue that the use of EXACT will result in the publication of protocols with increased clarity and usefulness to the scientific community. Availability: The ontology, examples and code can be downloaded from http://www.aber.ac.uk/compsci/Research/bio/dss/EXACT/ Contact: Larisa Soldatova lss@aber.ac.uk PMID:18586727

  6. Principles and practice of a bellows-loaded compact irradiation vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Li, Meimei; Snead, Lance L.; Katoh, Yutai; Burchell, Timothy D.; McDuffee, Joel L.

    2013-08-01

    This article describes the key design principles and application of a mini-bellows loaded irradiation creep frame technology developed for use in the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR). For this irradiation vehicle, the bellows, frame, sample, and temperature monitor are contained within a hydraulic or fixed "rabbit" capsule of a few inches in length. Of critical importance and key to this technology is the viability and stability of the metallic bellows under the elevated temperature irradiation environment. Conceptual design and supporting analysis have been performed for tension and compression specimens. Benchtop verification has substantiated the modeling regarding the ability of the bellows to produce sufficient stress to induce irradiation creep in subsize specimens. Discussion focuses on the possible stress ranges in specimens induced by the miniature gas-pressurized bellows and the limitations imposed by the size and structure of thin-walled bellows. A brief discussion of pre- and post-irradiation measurement of the integrity of load frames irradiated to 4.4 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV) is presented. Following this protocol, the pre-irradiation loading to a sample is determined and post-irradiation loading inferred. An in-reactor creep testing technology using pressurized mini-bellows has been established for irradiation creep tests in tensile or compressive mode using the HFIR rabbit capsule design. Results from theoretical calculation and in-furnace tests confirmed that the pressurized bellows-loaded miniature creep frame can produce enough thrust force to induce irradiation creep in subsize specimens. Bellows materials, types and dimensions were selected considering in-reactor integrity, load transferring function, weldability, and in-reactor stability. Both stainless steel and IN 718 mini-bellows were proven to be capable of irradiation creep testing. A practical process for the testing and evaluation of applied stress has been developed and applied to in

  7. Randomized comparative trial of cervical block protocols for pain management during hysteroscopic removal of polyps and myomas

    PubMed Central

    Lukes, Andrea S; Roy, Kelly H; Presthus, James B; Diamond, Michael P; Berman, Jay M; Konsker, Kenneth A

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of two cervical block protocols for pain management during hysteroscopic removal of intrauterine polyps and myomas using the MyoSure® device. Patients and methods This was a randomized, comparative treatment trial conducted by five private Obstetrics and Gynecology practices in the USA. Forty premenopausal women aged 18 years and older were randomized to receive either a combination para/intracervical block protocol of 37 cc local anesthetic administered at six injections sites in association with the application of topic 1% lidocaine gel, or an intracervical block protocol of 22 cc local anesthetic administered at three injections sites without topical anesthetic, for pain management during hysteroscopic removal of intrauterine polyps and/or a single type 0 or type 1 submucosal myoma ≤3 cm. The main outcomes were a composite measure of procedure-related pain and pain during the postoperative recovery period, assessed by the Wong-Baker Faces Rating Scale (0= no pain to 10= maximum pain). The lesion characteristics, procedure time, and adverse events were summarized. Results A total of 17 polyps and eight myomas were removed in the para/intracervical block group, with diameters of 1.3±0.5 cm and 1.8±0.8 cm, respectively. In the intracervical block group, 25 polyps with a mean diameter of 1.2±0.7 cm and 7 myomas with a mean diameter of 1.9±0.9 cm were removed. The mean tissue resection time was 1.2±2.0 minutes and 1.2±1.4 minutes for the para/intracervical and intracervical block groups, respectively. The mean composite procedure-related pain score was low for both cervical block protocols, 1.3±1.4 in the para/intracervical block group vs 2.1±1.5 in the intracervical block group. During the postoperative recovery period, the mean pain scores were 0.3±0.7 vs 1.2±1.7 for the para/intracervical and intracervical block groups, respectively. There were no serious adverse events. Conclusion The MyoSure procedure for removal of

  8. Phytosanitary irradiation in south Asia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irradiation has the potential to solve phytosanitary problems related to trade in south Asia. In general, it is the phytosanitary treatment most tolerated by fresh agricultural commodities. Irradiation technology is available in some countries of the region but is only used for phytosanitary purpos...

  9. A Simple XML Producer-Consumer Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Warren; Gunter, Dan; Quesnel, Darcy; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    There are many different projects from government, academia, and industry that provide services for delivering events in distributed environments. The problem with these event services is that they are not general enough to support all uses and they speak different protocols so that they cannot interoperate. We require such interoperability when we, for example, wish to analyze the performance of an application in a distributed environment. Such an analysis might require performance information from the application, computer systems, networks, and scientific instruments. In this work we propose and evaluate a standard XML-based protocol for the transmission of events in distributed systems. One recent trend in government and academic research is the development and deployment of computational grids. Computational grids are large-scale distributed systems that typically consist of high-performance compute, storage, and networking resources. Examples of such computational grids are the DOE Science Grid, the NASA Information Power Grid (IPG), and the NSF Partnerships for Advanced Computing Infrastructure (PACIs). The major effort to deploy these grids is in the area of developing the software services to allow users to execute applications on these large and diverse sets of resources. These services include security, execution of remote applications, managing remote data, access to information about resources and services, and so on. There are several toolkits for providing these services such as Globus, Legion, and Condor. As part of these efforts to develop computational grids, the Global Grid Forum is working to standardize the protocols and APIs used by various grid services. This standardization will allow interoperability between the client and server software of the toolkits that are providing the grid services. The goal of the Performance Working Group of the Grid Forum is to standardize protocols and representations related to the storage and distribution of

  10. Commercial implementation of food irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welt, M. A.

    In July 1981, the first specifically designed multi-purpose irradiation facility for food irradiation was put into service by the Radiation Technology, Inc. subsidiary Process Technology, Inc. in West Memphis, Arkansas. The operational experience gained, resulted in an enhanced design which was put into commercial service in Haw River, North Carolina, by another subsidiary, Process Technology (N.C.), Inc. in October 1983. These facilities have enabled the food industry to assess the commercial viability of food irradiation. Further impetus towards commercialization of food irradiation was gained in March 1981 with the filing in the Federal Register, by the FDA, of an Advanced Proposed Notice of Rulemaking for Food Irradiation. Two years later in July 1983, the FDA approved the first food additive regulation involving food irradiation in nineteen years, when they approved the Radiation Technology, Inc. petition calling for the sanitization of spices, onion powder and garlic powder at a maximum dosage of 10 kGy. Since obtaining the spice irradiation approval, the FDA has accepted four additional petitions for filing in the Federal Register. One of the petitions which extended spice irradiation to include insect disinfestation has issued into a regulation while the remaining petitions covering the sanitization of herbs, spice blends, vegetable seasonings and dry powdery enzymes as well as the petition to irradiate hog carcasses and pork products for trichinae control at 1 kGy, are expected to issue either before the end of 1984 or early in 1985. More recently, food irradiation advocates in the United States received another vote of confidence by the announcement that a joint venture food irradiation facility to be constructed in Hawaii by Radiation Technology, is backed by a contractual committment for the processing of 40 million pounds of produce per year. Another step was taken when the Port of Salem, New Jersey announced that the Radiation Technology Model RT-4104

  11. STANDARD OPERATING PROTOCOLS FOR DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect

    Foss, D. L.; Stevens, J. L.; Gerdeman, F. W.

    2002-02-25

    Decommissioning projects at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites are conducted under project-specific decision documents, which involve extensive preparation time, public comment periods, and regulatory approvals. Often, the decision documents must be initiated at least one year before commencing the decommissioning project, and they are expensive and time consuming to prepare. The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) is a former nuclear weapons production plant at which hazardous substances and wastes were released or disposed during operations. As a result of the releases, RFETS was placed on the National Priorities List in 1989, and is conducting cleanup activities under a federal facilities compliance agreement. Working closely with interested stakeholders and state and federal regulatory agencies, RFETS has developed and implemented an improved process for obtaining the approvals. The key to streamlining the approval process has been the development of sitewide decision documents called Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement Standard Operating Protocols or ''RSOPs.'' RSOPs have broad applicability, and could be used instead of project-specific documents. Although no two decommissioning projects are exactly the same and they may vary widely in contamination and other hazards, the basic steps taken for cleanup are usually similar. Because of this, using RSOPs is more efficient than preparing a separate project-specific decision documents for each cleanup action. Over the Rocky Flats cleanup life cycle, using RSOPs has the potential to: (1) Save over 5 million dollars and 6 months on the site closure schedule; (2) Eliminate preparing one hundred and twenty project-specific decision documents; and (3) Eliminate writing seventy-five closure description documents for hazardous waste unit closure and corrective actions.

  12. Irradiated mandibular autografts

    SciTech Connect

    Hamaker, R.C.; Singer, M.I.; Shockley, W.W.; Pugh, N.; Shidnia, H.

    1983-09-15

    The cosmetic and functional disability associated with mandibular resection has been a major problem to the patient with direct invasion of the mandible by oral cancer. Marginal resections with combined postoperative radiation therapy have frequently been substituted for the more preferred segmental resections and resultant deformities. Presented are 15 cases of oral cavity cancer involving resection of the mandible, immediate radiation to 10,000 rad, and primary reconstruction as irradiated mandibular autografts. The longest following is 4 years and 3 months, with a success rate of 66%. Morbidity is minimal as compared to autogenous bone grafting. Tumor size, previous radiation, or use of regional flaps have not been a factor in the success of this method in reconstruction of the mandible primarily.

  13. Per-packet reservation MAC protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrasnica, Halid

    2006-10-01

    Recent and future communications networks have to provide QoS guarantees for a rapidly growing number of various telecommunications services. Therefore, various communications systems, such as wireless and fixed access networks, apply reservation MAC protocols, providing a good network utilization, which is particularly important access networks with typically limited data rates, and ensuring realization of different QoS guarantees for various telecommunications services. This is important because of a hard competition among communications technologies applied in the access area. The considered MAC protocols apply a per-packet reservation method to avoid the transmission gaps caused by per-burst reservation, and accordingly to achieve a better network utilization. However, the per-packet reservation increases the network load caused by the signaling, which calls for an efficient resource sharing strategy in the signaling channel. There are two basic solutions for capacity sharing in the signaling channel: random access, usually using slotted ALOHA, and dedicated access, realized by a polling method. Performance improvement of basic protocols can be carried out in different ways; by protocol extensions, a combination of different protocol solutions, and the application of adaptive protocols providing a change of access parameters according to the current network status. The best network performance is achieved by application of two-step reservation protocol, which combined with additional features, such as appropriate signaling procedure, priority and fairness mechanisms, and combined reservation domains, can fulfill requirements of services with high QoS demands.

  14. New logistics protocols for distributed interactive simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Darrin; Morrison, John; Katz, Warren; Felton, Erik; Herman, Deborah A.

    1995-06-01

    In today's environment, the transportation and maintenance of military forces is nearly as important as combat operations. Rapid deployment to regions of low-intensity conflict will become a very common training scenario for the U.S. military. Thus it is desirable to apply distributed simulation technology to train logistics personnel in their combat support roles. Currently, distributed interactive simulation (DIS) only contains rudimentary logistics protocols. This paper introduces new protocols designed to handle the logistics problem. The Newtonian protocol takes a physics-based approach to modeling interactions on the simulation network. This protocol consists of a family of protocol data units (PDUs) which are used to communicate forces in different circumstances. The protocol implements a small set of physical relations. This represents a flexible and general mechanism to describe battlefield interactions between network entities. The migratory object protocol (MOP) family addresses the transfer of control. General mechanisms provide the means to simulate resupply, repair, and maintenance of entities at any level of abstraction (individual soldier to division). It can also increase the fidelity of mine laying, enable handover of weapons for terminal guidance, allow for the distribution of aggregate-level simulation entities, provide capabilities for the simulation of personnel, etc.

  15. Snakebite management in Iran: Devising a protocol

    PubMed Central

    Monzavi, Seyed Mostafa; Dadpour, Bita; Afshari, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Snakebite in Iran has been a health concern. However, management of snakebite is not standardized and varies from center to center. This study is aimed at devising an evidence-based comprehensive protocol for snakebite management in Iran, to reduce unnecessary variations in practice. Materials and Methods: A narrative search in electronic databases was performed. Fifty peer-reviewed articles, guidelines, and textbooks were reviewed and practical details were extracted. Our currently used protocol in the Mashhad Toxicology Center was supplemented with this information. Consequently an improved wide-range protocol was developed. The protocol was then discussed and amended within a focus group comprised of medical toxicologists and internal medicine specialists. The amended version was finally discussed with expert physicians specialized in different areas of medicine, to be optimized by supplementing other specific considerations. Results: During a one-year process, the protocol was finalized. The final version of the protocol, which was designed in six steps, comprised of three components: A schematic algorithm, a severity grading scale, and instructions for supportive and adjunctive treatments. The algorithm pertains to both Viperidae and Elapidae snakebite envenomations and consists of a planned course of action and dosing of antivenom, based on the severity of the envenomation. Conclusion: Snakebite envenomation is a clinical toxicologic emergency, which needs to be treated in a timely and organized manner. Hence, a multi-aspect protocol was designed to improve the clinical outcomes, reduce unnecessary administration of antivenom, and help physicians make more proper clinical judgments. PMID:24778670

  16. Quantum key distribution protocol using random bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meslouhi, A.; Amellal, H.; Hassouni, Y.; El Baz, M.; El Allati, A.

    2016-04-01

    In order to enhance the quantum key distribution (QKD) security, a new protocol, “QKDPRB” based on random bases is proposed. It consists of using standard encoding bases moving circularly with a variable rotational angle α which depends on angular velocity ω(t); thus, the traditional bases turn into relative ones. To prove the security and the efficiency of the protocol, we present a universal demonstration which proves a high level security of the proposed protocol, even in the presence of the intercept and resend attack. Finally, the QKDPRB may improve the security of QKD.

  17. Performance evaluation of TCP over ABT protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ata, Shingo; Murata, Masayuki; Miyahara, Hideo

    1998-10-01

    ABT is promising for effectively transferring a highly bursty data traffic in ATM networks. Most of past studies focused on the data transfer capability of ABT within the ATM layer. In actual, however, we need to consider the upper layer transport protocol since the transport layer protocol also supports a network congestion control mechanism. One such example is TCP, which is now widely used in the Internet. In this paper, we evaluate the performance of TCP over ABT protocols. Simulation results show that the retransmission mechanism of ABT can effectively overlay the TCP congestion control mechanism so that TCP operates in a stable fashion and works well only as an error recovery mechanism.

  18. Influence of refrigerated storage time on efficacy of irradiation to reduce Salmonella on sliced Roma tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Niemira, Brendan A

    2011-06-01

    Contamination of tomatoes with Salmonella is a recurring food safety concern. Irradiation is a nonthermal intervention that can inactivate pathogens on fresh and minimally processed produce. However, the influence of tomato processing protocols, including time in refrigerated storage and time between slicing and irradiation, has not been determined. Roma tomatoes were sliced and inoculated with a cocktail of Salmonella outbreak strains. The inoculated tomatoes were held in refrigerated storage for various times after inoculation to simulate the potential time delay between packaging and irradiation. Tomatoes were irradiated immediately (0 h) or after 24, 48, or 72 h in storage. The surviving populations were recovered and enumerated. Irradiation effectively reduced Salmonella at all times. The D(10)-values (the dose necessary for a 1-log reduction of the pathogen) were not significantly different at each storage time and ranged from 0.382 to 0.473 kGy. These results suggest that the time required for holding of processed Roma tomatoes or shipment to an off-site irradiation service provider will not alter the efficacy of irradiation in a commercial environment.

  19. Airborne Magnetic and Electromagnetic Data map Rock Alteration and Water Content at Mount Adams, Mount Baker and Mount Rainier, Washington: Implications for Lahar Hazards and Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, C. A.; Deszcz-Pan, M.; Horton, R.; Breit, G.; John, D.

    2007-12-01

    High resolution helicopter-borne magnetic and electromagnetic (EM) data flown over the rugged, ice-covered, highly magnetic and mostly resistive volcanoes of Mount Rainier, Mount Adams and Mount Baker, along with rock property measurements, reveal the distribution of alteration, water and hydrothermal fluids that are essential to evaluating volcanic landslide hazards and understanding hydrothermal systems. Hydrothermally altered rocks, particularly if water saturated, can weaken stratovolcanoes, thereby increasing the potential for catastrophic sector collapses that can lead to far-traveled, destructive debris flows. Intense hydrothermal alteration significantly reduces the magnetization and resistivity of volcanic rock resulting in clear recognition of altered rock by helicopter magnetic and EM measurements. Magnetic and EM data, combined with geological mapping and rock property measurements, indicate the presence of appreciable thicknesses of hydrothermally altered rock west of the modern summit of Mount Rainier in the Sunset Amphitheater region, in the central core of Mount Adams north of the summit, and in much of the central cone of Mount Baker. We identify the Sunset Amphitheater region and steep cliffs at the western edge of the central altered zone at Mount Adams as likely sources for future debris flows. In addition, the EM data identified water-saturated rocks in the upper 100-200 m of the three volcanoes. The water-saturated zone could extend deeper, but is beyond the detection limits of the EM data. Water in hydrothermal fluids reacts with the volcanic rock to produce clay minerals. The formation of clay minerals and presence of free water reduces the effective stress, thereby increasing the potential for slope failure, and acts, with entrained melting ice, as a lubricant to transform debris avalanches into lahars. Therefore, knowing the distribution of water is also important for hazard assessments. Finally, modeling requires extremely low

  20. Proton irradiation of simple gas mixtures: Influence of irradiation parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sack, Norbert J.; Schuster, R.; Hofmann, A.

    1990-01-01

    In order to get information about the influence of irradiation parameters on radiolysis processes of astrophysical interest, methane gas targets were irradiated with 6.5 MeV protons at a pressure of 1 bar and room temperature. Yields of higher hydrocarbons like ethane or propane were found by analysis of irradiated gas samples using gas chromatography. The handling of the proton beam was of great experimental importance for determining the irradiation parameters. In a series of experiments current density of the proton beam and total absorbed energy were shown to have a large influence on the yields of produced hydrocarbons. Mechanistic interpretations of the results are given and conclusions are drawn with regard to the chemistry and the simulation of various astrophysical systems.

  1. New facility for post irradiation examination of neutron irradiated beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Ishitsuka, Etsuo; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    1995-09-01

    Beryllium is expected as a neutron multiplier and plasma facing materials in the fusion reactor, and the neutron irradiation data on properties of beryllium up to 800{degrees}C need for the engineering design. The acquisition of data on the tritium behavior, swelling, thermal and mechanical properties are first priority in ITER design. Facility for the post irradiation examination of neutron irradiated beryllium was constructed in the hot laboratory of Japan Materials Testing Reactor to get the engineering design data mentioned above. This facility consist of the four glove boxes, dry air supplier, tritium monitoring and removal system, storage box of neutron irradiated samples. Beryllium handling are restricted by the amount of tritium;7.4 GBq/day and {sup 60}Co;7.4 MBq/day.

  2. Protocol dependence of the jamming transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, Thibault; Behringer, Robert P.; Chakraborty, Bulbul; O'Hern, Corey S.; Shattuck, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a theoretical framework for predicting the protocol dependence of the jamming transition for frictionless spherical particles that interact via repulsive contact forces. We study isostatic jammed disk packings obtained via two protocols: isotropic compression and simple shear. We show that for frictionless systems, all jammed packings can be obtained via either protocol. However, the probability to obtain a particular jammed packing depends on the packing-generation protocol. We predict the average shear strain required to jam initially unjammed isotropically compressed packings from the density of jammed packings, shape of their basins of attraction, and path traversed in configuration space. We compare our predictions to simulations of shear strain-induced jamming and find quantitative agreement. We also show that the packing fraction range, over which shear strain-induced jamming occurs, tends to zero in the large system limit for frictionless packings with overdamped dynamics.

  3. Authentication Protocol using Quantum Superposition States

    SciTech Connect

    Kanamori, Yoshito; Yoo, Seong-Moo; Gregory, Don A.; Sheldon, Frederick T

    2009-01-01

    When it became known that quantum computers could break the RSA (named for its creators - Rivest, Shamir, and Adleman) encryption algorithm within a polynomial-time, quantum cryptography began to be actively studied. Other classical cryptographic algorithms are only secure when malicious users do not have sufficient computational power to break security within a practical amount of time. Recently, many quantum authentication protocols sharing quantum entangled particles between communicators have been proposed, providing unconditional security. An issue caused by sharing quantum entangled particles is that it may not be simple to apply these protocols to authenticate a specific user in a group of many users. An authentication protocol using quantum superposition states instead of quantum entangled particles is proposed. The random number shared between a sender and a receiver can be used for classical encryption after the authentication has succeeded. The proposed protocol can be implemented with the current technologies we introduce in this paper.

  4. Protocol to Exploit Waiting Resources for UASNs.

    PubMed

    Hung, Li-Ling; Luo, Yung-Jeng

    2016-01-01

    The transmission speed of acoustic waves in water is much slower than that of radio waves in terrestrial wireless sensor networks. Thus, the propagation delay in underwater acoustic sensor networks (UASN) is much greater. Longer propagation delay leads to complicated communication and collision problems. To solve collision problems, some studies have proposed waiting mechanisms; however, long waiting mechanisms result in low bandwidth utilization. To improve throughput, this study proposes a slotted medium access control protocol to enhance bandwidth utilization in UASNs. The proposed mechanism increases communication by exploiting temporal and spatial resources that are typically idle in order to protect communication against interference. By reducing wait time, network performance and energy consumption can be improved. A performance evaluation demonstrates that when the data packets are large or sensor deployment is dense, the energy consumption of proposed protocol is less than that of existing protocols as well as the throughput is higher than that of existing protocols.

  5. NREL Test-to-Failure Protocol (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Hacke, P.

    2012-03-01

    The presentation describes the test-to-failure protocol that was developed and piloted at NREL, stressing PV modules with multiple applications of damp heat (with bias) and thermal cycling until they fail.

  6. Protocol to Exploit Waiting Resources for UASNs.

    PubMed

    Hung, Li-Ling; Luo, Yung-Jeng

    2016-01-01

    The transmission speed of acoustic waves in water is much slower than that of radio waves in terrestrial wireless sensor networks. Thus, the propagation delay in underwater acoustic sensor networks (UASN) is much greater. Longer propagation delay leads to complicated communication and collision problems. To solve collision problems, some studies have proposed waiting mechanisms; however, long waiting mechanisms result in low bandwidth utilization. To improve throughput, this study proposes a slotted medium access control protocol to enhance bandwidth utilization in UASNs. The proposed mechanism increases communication by exploiting temporal and spatial resources that are typically idle in order to protect communication against interference. By reducing wait time, network performance and energy consumption can be improved. A performance evaluation demonstrates that when the data packets are large or sensor deployment is dense, the energy consumption of proposed protocol is less than that of existing protocols as well as the throughput is higher than that of existing protocols. PMID:27005624

  7. Oncotherapy: A System for Requesting Chemotherapy Protocols.

    PubMed

    Righi, Laura Vera

    2015-01-01

    A clinical decision support system is able to provide oncologists with suitable treatment options at the moment of decision making regarding which chemotherapy protocol is the best to apply to a particular oncological case. The National Cancer Institute has created a Guidelines Committee that establishes therapeutical options for each clinical case. The Health Informatics Department has developed Oncotherapy, a knowledge database that incorporates information provided by the Guidelines Committee. Oncotherapy includes a tailored information repository to provide oncologists in the public health system with the chemotherapy protocols available given three types of data: clinical diagnosis, clinical stage and therapy criteria. The protocol selected by the treating oncologist is sent back to Oncotherapy, which may create new knowledge that can be incorporated into the knowledge database. In this way, the system supports making the best decision according to the chemotherapy protocol options available. Furthermore, it can warn of errors that could result from mistakenly chosen therapies. PMID:26262420

  8. Routing protocols in wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Villalba, Luis Javier García; Orozco, Ana Lucila Sandoval; Cabrera, Alicia Triviño; Abbas, Cláudia Jacy Barenco

    2009-01-01

    The applications of wireless sensor networks comprise a wide variety of scenarios. In most of them, the network is composed of a significant number of nodes deployed in an extensive area in which not all nodes are directly connected. Then, the data exchange is supported by multihop communications. Routing protocols are in charge of discovering and maintaining the routes in the network. However, the appropriateness of a particular routing protocol mainly depends on the capabilities of the nodes and on the application requirements. This paper presents a review of the main routing protocols proposed for wireless sensor networks. Additionally, the paper includes the efforts carried out by Spanish universities on developing optimization techniques in the area of routing protocols for wireless sensor networks. PMID:22291515

  9. 21 CFR 58.120 - Protocol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., body weight range, sex, source of supply, species, strain, substrain, and age of the test system. (5... methods to be used. (b) All changes in or revisions of an approved protocol and the reasons...

  10. Routing Protocols in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Villalba, Luis Javier García; Orozco, Ana Lucila Sandoval; Cabrera, Alicia Triviño; Abbas, Cláudia Jacy Barenco

    2009-01-01

    The applications of wireless sensor networks comprise a wide variety of scenarios. In most of them, the network is composed of a significant number of nodes deployed in an extensive area in which not all nodes are directly connected. Then, the data exchange is supported by multihop communications. Routing protocols are in charge of discovering and maintaining the routes in the network. However, the appropriateness of a particular routing protocol mainly depends on the capabilities of the nodes and on the application requirements. This paper presents a review of the main routing protocols proposed for wireless sensor networks. Additionally, the paper includes the efforts carried out by Spanish universities on developing optimization techniques in the area of routing protocols for wireless sensor networks. PMID:22291515

  11. Evolution of Natural Attenuation Evaluation Protocols

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traditionally the evaluation of the efficacy of natural attenuation was based on changes in contaminant concentrations and mass reduction. Statistical tools and models such as Bioscreen provided evaluation protocols which now are being approached via other vehicles including m...

  12. A practical quantum bit commitment protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arash Sheikholeslam, S.; Aaron Gulliver, T.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new quantum bit commitment protocol which is secure against entanglement attacks. A general cheating strategy is examined and shown to be practically ineffective against the proposed approach.

  13. Putting the Human Back in the Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christianson, Bruce

    Hello, everyone, and welcome to the 14th International Security Protocols Workshop. I’m going to start with a quotation from someone who, at least in principle, is in charge of a very different security community than ours:

  14. A Look Back at the Montreal Protocol

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Montreal Protocol is an international treaty designed to protect the ozone layer. This video takes a look back at how scientists, industry leaders, and policy makers came together to regulate C...

  15. Protocol dependence of the jamming transition.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Thibault; Behringer, Robert P; Chakraborty, Bulbul; O'Hern, Corey S; Shattuck, Mark D

    2016-01-01

    We propose a theoretical framework for predicting the protocol dependence of the jamming transition for frictionless spherical particles that interact via repulsive contact forces. We study isostatic jammed disk packings obtained via two protocols: isotropic compression and simple shear. We show that for frictionless systems, all jammed packings can be obtained via either protocol. However, the probability to obtain a particular jammed packing depends on the packing-generation protocol. We predict the average shear strain required to jam initially unjammed isotropically compressed packings from the density of jammed packings, shape of their basins of attraction, and path traversed in configuration space. We compare our predictions to simulations of shear strain-induced jamming and find quantitative agreement. We also show that the packing fraction range, over which shear strain-induced jamming occurs, tends to zero in the large system limit for frictionless packings with overdamped dynamics. PMID:26871137

  16. Detection of irradiated ingredients included in low quantity in non-irradiated food matrix. 2. ESR analysis of mechanically recovered poultry meat and TL analysis of spices.

    PubMed

    Marchioni, Eric; Horvatovich, Péter; Charon, Helène; Kuntz, Florent

    2005-05-18

    Protocols EN 1786 and EN 1788 for the detection of irradiated food by electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) and thermoluminescence (TL) were not conceived for the detection of irradiated ingredients included in low concentration in nonirradiated food. An enzymatic hydrolysis method, realized at 55 degrees C, has been developed for the extraction of silicate minerals and bone fragments. When followed by a purification of the extracts by an aqueous solution of sodium polytungstate, this method made it possible to detect very low inclusions of irradiated spices (0.05%, wt/wt by TL) included in various meals (cheeses and precooked meals). Even for food containing together two ingredients (spices and mechanically recovered meat), it was possible to detect and identify them simultaneously. PMID:15884795

  17. AFIP-4 Irradiation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Danielle M Perez; Misti A Lillo; Gray S. Chang; Glenn A Roth; Nicolas Woolstenhulme; Daniel M Wachs

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Full size plate In center flux trap Position (AFIP) experiment AFIP-4 was designed to evaluate the performance of monolithic uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) fuels at a scale prototypic of research reactor fuel plates. The AFIP-4 test further examine the fuel/clad interface and its behavior under extreme conditions. After irradiation, fission gas retention measurements will be performed during post irradiation (PIE)1,2. The following report summarizes the life of the AFIP-4 experiment through end of irradiation, including a brief description of the safety analysis, as-run neutronic analysis results, hydraulic testing results, and thermal analysis results.

  18. AFIP-4 Irradiation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Danielle M Perez; Misti A Lillo; Gray S. Chang; Glenn A Roth; Nicolas Woolstenhulme; Daniel M Wachs

    2011-09-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Full size plate In center flux trap Position (AFIP) experiment AFIP-4 was designed to evaluate the performance of monolithic uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) fuels at a scale prototypic of research reactor fuel plates. The AFIP-4 test further examine the fuel/clad interface and its behavior under extreme conditions. After irradiation, fission gas retention measurements will be performed during post irradiation (PIE). The following report summarizes the life of the AFIP-4 experiment through end of irradiation, including a brief description of the safety analysis, as-run neutronic analysis results, hydraulic testing results, and thermal analysis results.

  19. Protocol Development | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The chemoprevention Phase I and II consortia must submit Letters of Intent for review and approval prior to the submission and review of the protocol. Letter of Intent (LOI) Process The chemoprevention Phase I and II consortia must submit Letters of Intent for review and approval prior to the submission and review of the protocol. DCP will solicit Letters of Intent from investigators who want to conduct clinical trials with specific agents. |

  20. Broadening and Simplifying the First SETI Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaud, M. A. G.

    The Declaration of Principles Concerning Activities Following the Detection of Extraterrestrial Intelligence, known informally as the First SETI Protocol, is the primary existing international guidance on this subject. During the fifteen years since the document was issued, several people have suggested revisions or additional protocols. This article proposes a broadened and simplified text that would apply to the detection of alien technology in our solar system as well as to electromagnetic signals from more remote sources.