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Sample records for balmer spectra

  1. Rapid variations of balmer line strengths in the spectra of Be stars. Ph.D. Thesis; [photoelectric spectrophotometric measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbeath, K. B.

    1974-01-01

    Low resolution photoelectric spectrophotometric measurements of the first four members of the Balmer series in the spectra of one Be and five Be (shell) stars were obtained with the 92-cm telescope and image dissecting scanner. Equivalent widths were computed for each observation, and their standard deviations from the mean values were examined. Results indicate that in three of the program stars, at least one of the Balmer lines shows significant fluctuations in equivalent width. These fluctuations amount to a few per cent of total line strength and the time scales appear to be on the order of three to thirty minutes. The fluctuations are not always present in a given star, indicating that the mechanism producing them may not be continuous. The noncontinuous and nonperiodic nature of the variations, along with their short time scale suggest some form of flare-like or shock origin for the phenomenon.

  2. MASSIVE AND NEWLY DEAD: DISCOVERY OF A SIGNIFICANT POPULATION OF GALAXIES WITH HIGH-VELOCITY DISPERSIONS AND STRONG BALMER LINES AT z {approx} 1.5 FROM DEEP KECK SPECTRA AND HST/WFC3 IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Bezanson, Rachel; Van Dokkum, Pieter; Van de Sande, Jesse; Franx, Marijn; Kriek, Mariska

    2013-02-10

    We present deep Keck/LRIS spectroscopy and Hubble Space Telescope/WFC3 imaging in the rest-frame optical for a sample of eight galaxies at z {approx} 1.5 with high photometrically determined stellar masses. The data are combined with five Very Large Telescope/X-Shooter spectra. We find that these 13 galaxies have high velocity dispersions, with a median of {sigma} = 301 km s{sup -1}. This high value is consistent with their relatively high stellar masses and compact sizes. We study their stellar populations using the strength of Balmer absorption lines, which are not sensitive to dust absorption. We find a large range in Balmer absorption strength, with many galaxies showing very strong lines indicating young ages. The median H{delta}{sub A} equivalent width, determined directly or inferred from the H10 line, is 5.4 A, indicating a luminosity-weighted age of {approx}1 Gyr. Although this value may be biased toward higher values because of selection effects, high-dispersion galaxies with such young ages are extremely rare in the local universe. Interestingly, we do not find a simple correlation with rest-frame U - V color: some of the reddest galaxies have very strong Balmer absorption lines, which may indicate the importance of multiple bursts of star formation. These results demonstrate that many high-dispersion galaxies at z {approx} 1.5 were recently quenched. This implies that there must be a population of star-forming progenitors at z {approx} 2 with high velocity dispersions or linewidths, which are notoriously absent from CO/H{alpha} selected surveys.

  3. Segunda discontinuidad de Balmer y procesos físicos en envolturas extendidas de estrellas Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibbo, I.; Cruzado, A.; Ringuelet, A.

    We study a group of Be stars in which the second Balmer jump is observed. Our aim is to correlate the second Balmer jump with other spectral features. Spectroscopic observations were performed with the 2.15 m telescope at Complejo Astronómico el Leoncito, CASLEO (San Juan, Argentina). In December 2001 and August 2002 high resolution echelle spectra were obtained with a REOSC echelle spectrograph. We find that, when a second Balmer jump in emission is observed, an emission in λ = 4233,17 Å of FeII multiplet 27 is also, generally seen. Besides, the electron temperature of the region of the envelope where the second jump is formed is estimated assuming that radiative recombinations cause the flux emission in the Balmer continuum. The temperature values obtained in this way are found correlated with the measure of the second Balmer jump.

  4. Understanding the Balmer Bubble in the Vela Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinn, Brian; Smith, C.; Points, S.; Heathcote, S.

    2014-01-01

    We present imaging and spectroscopic data and analysis of the Balmer-dominated filament that is ahead of the eastern edge of the radiative shock of Bullet C in the Vela Supernova Remnant. This filament was discovered in 2002 by Carlin & Smith(2002), and was suggested to be a non-radiative shock. Images of the filament were taken using Hα and R band filters on the SMARTS 0.9m telescope at CTIO. These images were then compared to images taken in 2006 using the MOSAIC II imager on the Blanco Telescope at CTIO, in an attempt to detect proper motion of the filament. Comparison over the 7 year baseline failed to show proper motion of the filament. From this result, we are able to place an upper limit of ~270 km/s on the velocity of the Balmer-dominated filament. We also obtained moderate resolution spectra of the Balmer-dominated filament and the radiative shock using the Goodman Spectrograph at SOAR Telescope. Spectroscopic analysis of the Balmer-dominated filament failed to detect a broad component of the Hα emission line, which would be expected for a high velocity non-radiative shock.

  5. Anomalous Balmer continuum temperatures in the Orion Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Donald L.; Dufour, Reginald J.

    1994-01-01

    New long-slit spectra of the Orion Nebula in the near-ultraviolet were used to calculate the Balmer recombination temperature, T(Bac), from the Balmer discontinuity at 3646 A. The spatially resolved data show a decrease in temperature moving to the west of Theta(sup 1) Ori C, from 8400 K at a distance of 40 sec to a low of 2800 K at a distance of 220 sec. Such values are much lower than previously reported. The effect of scattered starlight on these results is calculated and shown to be less than 10%. Previous studies which found scattered light to be important at the discontinuity are in error. Such low temperatures and their impact on nebular physics and abundances are disconcerting and require further study.

  6. Balmer's Manuscripts and the Construction of His Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banet, Leo

    1970-01-01

    Presents the results of an analysis of Balmer's draft manuscripts, which revealed new and pertinent details about the genesis of the Balmer series. In particular the origin and nature of Balmer's geometrical construction for the series is described. In addition, it is shown that the Balmer series played a direct role in the formulation of the…

  7. Balmer's Manuscripts and the Construction of His Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banet, Leo

    1970-01-01

    Presents the results of an analysis of Balmer's draft manuscripts, which revealed new and pertinent details about the genesis of the Balmer series. In particular the origin and nature of Balmer's geometrical construction for the series is described. In addition, it is shown that the Balmer series played a direct role in the formulation of the…

  8. On the Balmer discontinuity of BIa supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorec, Juan; Mercado-Ibanez, Roger

    1987-11-01

    Observed Balmer discontinuities of BIa supergiants, obtained in the Barbier-Chalonge-Divan system using 13-color photometry, are compared with those predicted using classical models of stellar atmospheres. The differences noted between observations and theory for beta = 1 are shown to be a function of the effective temperature. Radii of the supergiants are usually higher when the spectral type is later, suggesting that models of extended atmospheres may explain both the Balmer discontinuities of the supergiants and their far-UV flux distributions.

  9. Discovery of Variable Hydrogen Balmer Absorption Lines with Inverse Decrement in PG 1411+442

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xi-Heng; Pan, Xiang; Zhang, Shao-Hua; Sun, Lu-Ming; Wang, Jian-Guo; Ji, Tuo; Yang, Chen-Wei; Liu, Bo; Jiang, Ning; Zhou, Hong-Yan

    2017-07-01

    We present new optical spectra of the well-known broad absorption line (BAL) quasar PG 1411+442, using the DBSP spectrograph at the Palomar 200 inch telescope in 2014 and 2017 and the YFOSC spectrograph at the Lijiang 2.4 m telescope in 2015. A blueshifted narrow absorption line system is clearly revealed in 2014 and 2015 consisting of hydrogen Balmer series and metastable He i lines. The velocity of these lines is similar to the centroid velocity of the UV BALs, suggesting that both originate from the outflow. The Balmer lines vary significantly between the two observations and vanished in 2017. They were also absent in the archived spectra obtained before 2001. The variation is thought to be driven by photoionization change. Besides, the absorption lines show inversed Balmer decrement, i.e., the apparent optical depths of higher-order Balmer absorption lines are larger than those of lower-order lines, which is inconsistent with the oscillator strengths of the transitions. We suggest that such anomalous line ratios can be naturally explained by the thermal structure of a background accretion disk, which allows the obscured part of the disk to contribute differently to the continuum flux at different wavelengths. High-resolution spectroscopic and photometric monitoring would be very useful to probe the structure of the accretion disk as well as the geometry and physical conditions of the outflow.

  10. Balmer-α spectrum measurements of the LHD one-third ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M.; Kenmotsu, T.; Kisaki, M.; Nakano, H.; Tsumori, K.; Nishiura, M.

    2016-02-15

    Wavelength spectra of Balmer-α light from plasmas in the extraction region of the Large Helical Device-R&D negative ion source, or the LHD one-third ion source have exhibited a blue shift as a negative bias voltage was applied to the plasma grid. The blue shift increased as the negative bias voltage with respect to the local plasma potential was increased. The measured spectra were compared with the velocity distributions of surface reflected hydrogen atoms calculated by atomic collisions in amorphous target code. The arc power and the source H{sub 2} pressure also affected the shift and broadening in the observed Balmerspectra. The possibility of identifying the negative hydrogen ions produced at the low work function plasma grid surface by high resolution spectroscopy is discussed.

  11. Flare model sensitivity of the Balmer spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falchi, A.; Falciani, R.; Smaldone, L. A.; Tozzi, G. P.

    1989-01-01

    Careful studies of various chromospheric spectral signatures are very important in order to explore their possible sensitivity to the modifications of the thermodynamic quantities produced by the flare occurrence. Pioneer work of Canfield and co-workers have shown how the H alpha behavior is able to indicate different changes in the atmospheric parameters structure associated to the flare event. It was decided to study the behavior of the highest Balmer lines and of the Balmer continuum in different solar flare model atmospheres. These spectral features, originating in the deep photosphere in a quiet area, may have a sensitivity different from H alpha to the modification of a flare atmosphere. The details of the method used to compute the Stark profile of the higher Balmer line (n is greater than or equal to 6) and their merging were extensively given elsewhere (Donati-Falchi et al., 1985; Falchi et al., 1989). The models used were developed by Ricchiazzi in his thesis (1982) evaluating the chromospheric response to both the nonthermal electron flux, for energy greater than 20 kev, (F sub 20) and to the thermal conduction, (F sub c). The effect of the coronal pressure values (P sub O) at the apex of the flare loop is also included.

  12. Formation of broad Balmer wings in symbiotic stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Seok-Jun; Heo, Jeong-Eun; Hong, Chae-Lin; Lee, Hee-Won

    2016-07-01

    Symbiotic stars are binary systems composed of a hot white dwarf and a mass losing giant. In addition to many prominent emission lines symbiotic stars exhibit Raman scattered O VI features at 6825 and 7088 Å. Another notable feature present in the spectra of many symbiotics is the broad wings around Balmer lines. Astrophysical mechanisms that can produce broad wings include Thomson scattering by free electrons and Raman scattering of Ly,β and higher series by neutral hydrogen. In this poster presentation we produce broad wings around Hα and H,β adopting a Monte Carlo techinique in order to make a quantitative comparison of these two mechanisms. Thomson wings are characterized by the exponential cutoff given by the termal width whereas the Raman wings are dependent on the column density and continuum shape in the far UV region. A brief discussion is provided.

  13. Variations of the ultraviolet Fe II and Balmer continuum emission in the Seyfert galaxy NGC 5548

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maoz, D.; Netzer, H.; Peterson, B. M.; Bechtold, J.; Bertram, R.; Bochkarev, N. G.; Carone, T. E.; Dietrich, M.; Filippenko, A. V.; Kollatschny, W.

    1993-01-01

    We present measurements of the Balmer continuum/Fe II emission blend between 2160 and 4130 A in the Seyfert galaxy NGC 5548. The measurements are from spectra obtained as part of the combined space-based and ground-based monitoring program of this object in 1988-1989. An iterative scheme is used to determine and subtract the continuum emission underlying the emission blend so as to obtain a light curve sampled once every four days. The small blue bump is an important component of the emission-line cooling, constituting about one third of the line flux in this object. Its flux varies with an amplitude of approximately +/- 20 percent about the mean, similar to the amplitude of the Balmer line variations during the same period. Its light curve resembles that of Ly-alpha, with a lag of about 10 days behind the continuum variations. The bump variation amplitude is independent of the wavelength interval where it is measured, which indicates that both the Balmer continuum and Fe II emission have comparable variation amplitudes. These results suggest that the Fe II UV multiplets and the Balmer continuum are emitted in the same parts of the broad-line region as most other broad emission lines in this object.

  14. Geocoronal Balmer-alpha Emission Observed by the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper During the Southern Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Haffner, L. M.; Nossal, S. M.; Wilson, M. L.; Freer, C. W.; Babler, B.; Gardner, D.; Roesler, F. L.

    2015-12-01

    After a successful eleven-year run at Kitt Peak Observatory (AZ), the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) was moved to Cerro Tololo (Chile) in 2009 to complete the southern portion of the Galactic Balmer-alpha survey. Although WHAM is primarily used for making observations of the interstellar medium, the terrestrial emission present in each of WHAM's astronomical spectra offers a rich resource for studying the Earth's atmosphere. Here we present an overview of the terrestrial Balmer-alpha emission collected during WHAM's first five years of operation under southern skies. Seasonal trends and comparisons with northern hemisphere observations will be discussed. WHAM can detect Balmer-alpha emission as faint as 0.05R in a 30s exposure, covering a 200 km/s (4.4 Angstrom) spectral region with 12 km/s spectral resolution from a 1 degree beam on the sky. With this sensitivity, hundreds of spectra can be collected in a single clear night. Although not capable of fully resolving the geocoronal Balmer-alpha line profile itself, WHAM's sensitivity makes it an exceptional instrument for geocoronal Balmer-alpha intensity observations. This work is supported by NSF award AGS-1352311 and AST-1108911.

  15. On Production Mechanisms For Balmer Line Radiation From 'Cold' Atomic Hydrogen and Deuterium In Fusion Edge Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hey, John Douglas

    2010-10-29

    Published arguments, which assign dominant roles to atomic metastability and molecular ion dissociation in the production of 'narrow' Zeeman component Balmer line radiation from the tokamak edge plasma, have been examined critically in relation to: l-redistribution by proton collisions, molecular ion-proton equipartition, and ion acceleration by the plasma sheath (scrape-off layer) potential. These processes are found to constrain the contributions from metastable atoms and from dissociative excitation of molecular ions to 'narrow' Balmer spectra emitted from the plasma edge, in relation to the corresponding contributions from electron impact-induced dissociative excitation of neutral molecules.

  16. Estrellas Bn: discontinuidad de Balmer; parámetros fundamentales y colores infrarrojos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochetti, Y. R.; Arias, M. L.; Cidale, L. S.; Granada, A.; Zorec, J.

    2015-08-01

    Bn stars are mainly main sequence objects with B spectral types, that display in their spectra broad hydrogen lines in absorption. This line broadening is originated by high rotational velocities. We know that high rotation is probably an essential factor in the development of the Be phenomenon: B stars with high rotational velocity and hydrogen lines in emission, which present an extended envelope. Thus, it is interesting to analyze Bn stars in a broader context, that includes Be stars, with the purpose of investigating their properties, the link between the formation of the envelopes and rotation, and the conditions which define the presence of emission lines. In this work we study a sample of 62 Bn star and 70 Be star spectra in the Balmer jump region. We analyze the presence and intensity of the second Balmer discontinuity, which reveals the existence of circumstellar material, its correlation with the projected rotational velocity, V sen(i), and the fundamental parameters of the stars. We also study the distribution of both groups in different infrared color-color diagrams, to generate methods to classify them in highly obscured regions. Our study suggests that Bn stars are the late counterpart of Be stars. The high projected rotational velocity, the spectral type distribution in both groups, and the presence of Bn stars with a second Balmer discontinuity in absorption, related with dense material close the photosphere, provide evidence that support this hypothesis.

  17. Balmer Absorption Lines in FeLoBALs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, K.; Iwata, I.; Ohta, K.; Tamura, N.; Ando, M.; Akiyama, M.; Kiuchi, G.; Nakanishi, K.

    2007-10-01

    We discovered non-stellar Balmer absorption lines in two many-narrow-trough FeLoBALs (mntBALs) by the near-infrared spectroscopy with Subaru/CISCO. Presence of the non-stellar Balmer absorption lines is known to date only in the Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151; thus our discovery is the first cases for quasars. Since all known active galactic nuclei with Balmer absorption lines share similar characteristics, it is suggested that there is a population of BAL quasars which have unique structures at their nuclei or unique evolutionary phase.

  18. Balmer line profiles for infalling T Tauri envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, Lee

    1992-01-01

    The possibility that the Balmer emission lines of T Tauri stars arise in infalling envelopes rather than winds is considered. Line profiles for the upper Balmer lines are presented for models with cone geometry, intended to simulate the basic features of magnetospheric accretion from a circumstellar disk. An escape probability treatment is used to determine line source functions in nonspherically symmetric geometry. Thermalization effects are found to produce nearly symmetric H-alpha line profiles at the same time the higher Balmer series lines exhibit inverse P Cygni profiles. The infall models produce centrally peaked emission line wings, in good agreement with observations of many T Tauri stars. It is suggested that the Balmer emission of many T Tauri stars may be produced in an infalling envelope, with blue shifted absorption contributed by an overlying wind. Some of the observed narrow absorption components with small blueshifts may also arise in the accretion column.

  19. Geocoronal Balmer-alpha Doppler Widths and Effective Temperatures Near Solar Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Roesler, F. L.; Nossal, S. M.

    2010-12-01

    Geocoronal hydrogen Balmer-alpha Doppler widths and effective temperatures retrieved from high spectral resolution line profile observations are presented. These observations were made between 08 January 2000 and 21 November 2001 from Pine Bluff Observatory (WI) with a double etalon Fabry-Perot spectrometer operating at a resolving power of 80,000. This rich data set spans sixty-four nights of observations (1404 spectra in total) over 20 dark-moon periods. Observed trends in the line profile, including seasonal variations in the retrieved (neutral) exobase temperatures, will be discussed.

  20. Integral Field Spectroscopy of Balmer-dominated Shocks in the Magellanic Cloud Supernova Remnant N103B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghavamian, Parviz; Seitenzahl, Ivo R.; Vogt, Frédéric P. A.; Dopita, M. A.; Terry, Jason P.; Williams, Brian J.; Winkler, P. Frank

    2017-10-01

    We present results of integral field spectroscopy of Balmer-dominated shocks in the LMC supernova remnant (SNR) N103B, carried out using the Wide Field Integral Spectrograph (WiFeS ) on the 2.3 m telescope at the Siding Spring Observatory in Australia. Existing X-ray studies of N103B have indicated an SN Ia origin. Radiative shock emission from clumpy material surrounding the SNR may result from interaction of the forward shock with relic stellar wind material, possibly implicating a thermonuclear explosion in a single-degenerate binary system. The recently discovered Balmer-dominated shocks mark the impact of the forward shock with low density, partially neutral CSM gas, and form a partial shell encircling clumps of material exhibiting radiative shocks. The WiFeS spectra of N103B reveal broad Hα emission having a width as high as 2350 km s‑1 along the northern rim, and both Hα and Hβ broad profiles having widths around 1300 km s‑1 along the southern rim. Fits to the Hα line profiles indicate that in addition to the usual broad and narrow emission components, a third component of intermediate width exists in these Balmer-dominated shocks, ranging from around 125 km s‑1 up to 225 km s‑1 in width. This is consistent with predictions of recent Balmer-dominated shock models, which predict that an intermediate-width component will be generated in a fast neutral precursor. We derive a Sedov age of approximately 685 ± 20 years for N103B from the Balmer-dominated spectra, consistent with the young age of 380–860 years estimated from light echo studies.

  1. Cascade excitation in the geocoronal hydrogen Balmer α line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nossal, S.; Roesler, F. L.; Coakley, M. M.

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports high-accuracy measurements of geocoronal Balmer α line profiles and demonstrates that the profiles are well fit with a model which includes cascade excitation by solar Lyman series radiation from n>3 in addition to the direct excitation of n=3 by solar Lyman β. The increase in the signal-to-noise of our data is made possible by the use of the Fabry-Perot annular summing technique implemented at our Fabry-Perot facility at the University of Wisconsin's Pine Bluff Observatory. The new sensitivity has allowed us to make a detailed examination of line profile asymmetries and to conclude that they are compatible with predictions that of the order of 10% of the geocoronal Balmer α emission is caused by the cascade process. Cascade excitation alters the observed profile because it produces Balmer α emission along fine structure paths yielding slightly shifted wavelengths not present in direct Lyman β excitation, which is the predominant excitation mechanism for geocoronal Balmer α. We discuss how fine structure excitation affects studies of non-Maxwellian exospheric hydrogen velocity distributions and effective temperatures through Balmer α line profile measurements. In a broader context, we consider how inclusion of the cascade excited emission in future radiation models can enhance their accuracy and their potential for assisting in the isolation in the data of shorter-term solar geophysical effects and longer timescale changes in exospheric hydrogen densities.

  2. Variation in the Pre-transit Balmer Line Signal Around the Hot Jupiter HD 189733b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauley, P. Wilson; Redfield, Seth; Jensen, Adam G.; Barman, Travis

    2016-07-01

    As followup to our recent detection of a pre-transit signal around HD 189733 b, we obtained full pre-transit phase coverage of a single planetary transit. The pre-transit signal is again detected in the Balmer lines but with variable strength and timing, suggesting that the bow shock geometry reported in our previous work does not describe the signal from the latest transit. We also demonstrate the use of the Ca ii H and K residual core flux as a proxy for the stellar activity level throughout the transit. A moderate trend is found between the pre-transit absorption signal in the 2013 data and the Ca ii H flux. This suggests that some of the 2013 pre-transit hydrogen absorption can be attributed to varying stellar activity levels. A very weak correlation is found between the Ca ii H core flux and the Balmer line absorption in the 2015 transit, hinting at a smaller contribution from stellar activity compared to the 2013 transit. We simulate how varying stellar activity levels can produce changes in the Balmer line transmission spectra. These simulations show that the strength of the 2013 and 2015 pre-transit signals can be reproduced by stellar variability. If the pre-transit signature is attributed to circumplanetary material, its evolution in time can be described by accretion clumps spiraling toward the star, although this interpretation has serious limitations. Further high-cadence monitoring at Hα is necessary to distinguish between true absorption by transiting material and short-term variations in the stellar activity level.

  3. Study on the asymmetry of the Balmer lines

    SciTech Connect

    Gigosos, Marco Antonio; Gonzalez, Manuel Angel

    2006-12-01

    A comparison between computer simulated Balmer lines and recent experimental profiles is shown in this work. The influence of different effets on the calculated profiles is discussed. Though several points must still be clarified a little deeper, the agreement between experimental and calculated profiles guarantees a good understanding of the relevant physical effects.

  4. Discovery of an activity cycle in the solar analog HD 45184. Exploring Balmer and metallic lines as activity proxy candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, M.; González, J. F.; Jaque Arancibia, M.; Buccino, A.; Saffe, C.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Most stellar activity cycles similar to that found in the Sun have been detected by using the chromospheric Ca ii H&K lines as stellar activity proxies. However, it is unclear whether such activity cycles can be identified using other optical lines. Aims: We aim to detect activity cycles in solar-analog stars and determine whether they can be identified through other optical lines, such as Fe II and Balmer lines. We study the solar-analog star HD 45184 using HARPS spectra. The temporal coverage and high quality of the spectra allow us to detect both long- and short-term activity variations. Methods: We analysed the activity signatures of HD 45184 by using 291 HARPS spectra obtained between 2003 and 2014. To search for line-core flux variations, we focused on Ca ii H&K and Balmer Hα and Hβ lines, which are typically used as optical chromospheric activity indicators. We calculated the HARPS-S index from Ca ii H&K lines and converted it into the Mount Wilson scale. In addition, we also considered the equivalent widths of Balmer lines as activity indicators. Moreover, we analysed the possible variability of Fe ii and other metallic lines in the optical spectra. The spectral variations were analysed for periodicity using the Lomb-Scargle periodogram. Results: We report for the first time a long-term 5.14-yr activity cycle in the solar-analog star HD 45184 derived from Mount Wilson S index. This makes HD 45184 one of most similar stars to the Sun with a known activity cycle. The variation is also evident in the first lines of the Balmer series, which do not always show a correlation with activity in solar-type stars. Notably, unlike the solar case, we also found that the equivalent widths of the high photospheric Fe ii lines (4924 Å, 5018 Å and 5169 Å) are modulated (±2 mÅ) by the chromospheric cycle of the star. These metallic lines show variations above 4σ in the rms spectrum, while some Ba ii and Ti ii lines present variations at 3σ level, which

  5. SPECTROSCOPIC ANALYSIS OF HOT, HYDROGEN-RICH WHITE DWARFS: THE PRESENCE OF METALS AND THE BALMER-LINE PROBLEM

    SciTech Connect

    Gianninas, A.; Bergeron, P.; Dupuis, J.; Ruiz, M. T. E-mail: bergeron@astro.umontreal.c E-mail: mtruiz@das.uchile.c

    2010-09-01

    We present an analysis of optical spectra for 29 DAO white dwarfs. First, we present our new up-to-date model atmosphere grids computed without the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium in which we have included carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen at solar abundances. We demonstrate that the addition of these metals in the model atmospheres is essential in overcoming the Balmer-line problem, which manifests itself as an inability to fit all the Balmer lines simultaneously with consistent atmospheric parameters. We then present the spectroscopic analysis of our sample of DAO white dwarfs for which we determine the effective temperature, surface gravity, and helium abundance. We also present 18 hot DA white dwarfs that also suffer from the Balmer-line problem. We analyze these stars with models analogous to those for the DAO white dwarfs save for the presence of helium. Systematic differences between our newly determined atmospheric parameters with respect to previous determinations are explored. Far-ultraviolet spectra from the FUSE archive are then examined to demonstrate that there exists a correlation between higher metallic abundances and instances of the Balmer-line problem. The implications of these findings for all hot, hydrogen-rich white dwarfs are discussed. Specifically, the possible evolutionary scenario for DAO white dwarfs is revised and post-extreme horizontal branch evolution is no longer needed to explain the evolution for the majority of the DAO stars. Finally, we discuss how the presence of metals might drive a weak stellar wind which in turn could explain the presence of helium in DAO white dwarfs.

  6. Measurement of the deuterium Balmer series line emission on EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C. R.; Xu, Z.; Jin, Z.; Zhang, P. F.; Huang, J. Gao, W.; Gao, W.; Chang, J. F.; Xu, J. C.; Duan, Y. M.; Chen, Y. J.; Zhang, L.; Wu, Z. W.; Li, J. G.; Hou, Y. M.

    2016-11-15

    Volume recombination plays an important role towards plasma detachment for magnetically confined fusion devices. High quantum number states of the Balmer series of deuterium are used to study recombination. On EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak), two visible spectroscopic measurements are applied for the upper/lower divertor with 13 channels, respectively. Both systems are coupled with Princeton Instruments ProEM EMCCD 1024B camera: one is equipped on an Acton SP2750 spectrometer, which has a high spectral resolution ∼0.0049 nm with 2400 gr/mm grating to measure the D{sub α}(H{sub α}) spectral line and with 1200 gr/mm grating to measure deuterium molecular Fulcher band emissions and another is equipped on IsoPlane SCT320 using 600 gr/mm to measure high-n Balmer series emission lines, allowing us to study volume recombination on EAST and to obtain the related line averaged plasma parameters (T{sub e}, n{sub e}) during EAST detached phases. This paper will present the details of the measurements and the characteristics of deuterium Balmer series line emissions during density ramp-up L-mode USN plasma on EAST.

  7. Measurement of the deuterium Balmer series line emission on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. R.; Huang, J.; Gao, W.; Gao, W.; Xu, Z.; Chang, J. F.; Hou, Y. M.; Jin, Z.; Xu, J. C.; Duan, Y. M.; Zhang, P. F.; Chen, Y. J.; Zhang, L.; Wu, Z. W.; Li, J. G.

    2016-11-01

    Volume recombination plays an important role towards plasma detachment for magnetically confined fusion devices. High quantum number states of the Balmer series of deuterium are used to study recombination. On EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak), two visible spectroscopic measurements are applied for the upper/lower divertor with 13 channels, respectively. Both systems are coupled with Princeton Instruments ProEM EMCCD 1024B camera: one is equipped on an Acton SP2750 spectrometer, which has a high spectral resolution ˜0.0049 nm with 2400 gr/mm grating to measure the Dα(Hα) spectral line and with 1200 gr/mm grating to measure deuterium molecular Fulcher band emissions and another is equipped on IsoPlane SCT320 using 600 gr/mm to measure high-n Balmer series emission lines, allowing us to study volume recombination on EAST and to obtain the related line averaged plasma parameters (Te, ne) during EAST detached phases. This paper will present the details of the measurements and the characteristics of deuterium Balmer series line emissions during density ramp-up L-mode USN plasma on EAST.

  8. Broad Balmer Absorption Line Variability: Evidence of Gas Transverse Motion in the QSO SDSS J125942.80+121312.6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiheng; Zhou, Hongyan; Shu, Xinwen; Zhang, Shaohua; Ji, Tuo; Pan, Xiang; Sun, Luming; Zhao, Wen; Hao, Lei

    2016-03-01

    We report on the discovery of broad Balmer absorption lines variability in the QSO SDSS J125942.80+121312.6, based on the optical and near-infrared spectra taken from the SDSS-I, SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), and TripleSpec observations over a timescale of 5.8 years in the QSO's rest-frame. The blueshifted absorption profile of Hβ shows a variation of more than 5σ at a high velocity portion (\\gt 3000 {km} {{{s}}}-1) of the trough. We perform a detailed analysis for the physical conditions of the absorber using Balmer lines as well as metastable He i and optical Fe ii absorptions (λ4233 from b4P5/2 level and λ5169 from a6S5/2) at the same velocity. These Fe ii lines are identified in the QSO spectra for the first time. According to the photoionization simulations, we estimate a gas density of n({{H}})≈ {10}9.1 {{cm}}-3 and a column density of {N}{col}({{H}})≈ {10}23 {{cm}}-2 for the BOSS data, but the model fails to predict the variations of ionic column densities between the SDSS and BOSS observations if changes in ionizing flux are assumed. We thus propose transverse motion of the absorbing gas being the cause of the observed broad Balmer absorption line variability. In fact, we find that the changes in covering factors of the absorber can well-reproduce all of the observed variations. The absorber is estimated ∼0.94 pc away from the central engine, which is where the outflow likely experiences deceleration due to the collision with the surrounding medium. This scheme is consistent with the argument that LoBAL QSOs may represent the transition from obscured star-forming galaxies to classic QSOs.

  9. Pressure Shift and Gravitational RedShift of Balmer Lines in White Dwarfs: Rediscussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halenka, Jacek; Olchawa, Wieslaw; Madej, Jerzy; Grabowski, Boleslaw

    2015-08-01

    The Stark-induced shift and asymmetry, the so-called pressure shift (PS) of Hα and Hβ Balmer lines in spectra of DA white dwarfs (WDs), have been examined in detail as masking effects in measurements of the gravitational redshift in WDs. The results are compared with our earlier ones from a quarter of a century ago. In these earlier papers, the standard, symmetrical Stark line profiles, as a dominant constituent of the Balmer line profiles but shifted as a whole by the PS effect, were applied to all spectrally active layers of the WD atmosphere. At present, in each of the WD layers, the Stark line profiles (especially of Hβ) are inherently asymmetrical and shifted due to the effects of strong inhomogeneity of the perturbing fields in plasma. To calculate the Stark line profiles in successive layers of the WD atmosphere we used the modified Full Computer Simulation Method, able to take adequately into account the complexity of local elementary quantum processes in plasma. In the case of the Hα line, the present value of Stark-induced shift of the synthetic Hα line profile is about half the previous one and it is negligible in comparison with the gravitational redshift. In the case of the Hβ line, the present value of Stark-induced shift of the synthetic Hβ line profile is about twice the previous one. The source of this extra shift is the asymmetry of Hβ peaks. In memory of Jan Jerzy Kubikowski (1927-1968)—one of the pioneers of plasma in astrophysics.

  10. PRESSURE SHIFT AND GRAVITATIONAL REDSHIFT OF BALMER LINES IN WHITE DWARFS: REDISCUSSION

    SciTech Connect

    Halenka, Jacek; Olchawa, Wieslaw; Madej, Jerzy; Grabowski, Boleslaw E-mail: wolch@uni.opole.pl E-mail: bgrab@uni.opole.pl

    2015-08-01

    The Stark-induced shift and asymmetry, the so-called pressure shift (PS) of H{sub α} and H{sub β} Balmer lines in spectra of DA white dwarfs (WDs), have been examined in detail as masking effects in measurements of the gravitational redshift in WDs. The results are compared with our earlier ones from a quarter of a century ago. In these earlier papers, the standard, symmetrical Stark line profiles, as a dominant constituent of the Balmer line profiles but shifted as a whole by the PS effect, were applied to all spectrally active layers of the WD atmosphere. At present, in each of the WD layers, the Stark line profiles (especially of H{sub β}) are inherently asymmetrical and shifted due to the effects of strong inhomogeneity of the perturbing fields in plasma. To calculate the Stark line profiles in successive layers of the WD atmosphere we used the modified Full Computer Simulation Method, able to take adequately into account the complexity of local elementary quantum processes in plasma. In the case of the H{sub α} line, the present value of Stark-induced shift of the synthetic H{sub α} line profile is about half the previous one and it is negligible in comparison with the gravitational redshift. In the case of the H{sub β} line, the present value of Stark-induced shift of the synthetic H{sub β} line profile is about twice the previous one. The source of this extra shift is the asymmetry of H{sub β} peaks.

  11. Hydrogen Balmer Series Self-Absorption Measurement in Laser-Induced Air Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Ghaneshwar; Parigger, Christian

    2015-05-01

    In experimental studies of laser-induced plasma, we use focused Nd:YAG laser radiation to generate optical breakdown in laboratory air. A Czerny-Turner type spectrometer and an ICCD camera are utilized to record spatially and temporally resolved spectra. Time-resolved spectroscopy methods are employed to record plasma dynamics for various time delays in the range of 0.300 microsecond to typically 10 microsecond after plasma initiation. Early plasma emission spectra reveal hydrogen alpha and ionized nitrogen lines for time delays larger than 0.3 microsecond, the hydrogen beta line emerges from the free-electron background radiation later in the plasma decay for time delays in excess of 1 microsecond. The self-absorption analyses include comparisons of recorded data without and with the use of a doubling mirror. The extent of self-absorption of the hydrogen Balmer series is investigated for various time delays from plasma generation. There are indications of self-absorption of hydrogen alpha by comparison with ionized nitrogen lines at a time delay of 0.3 microsecond. For subsequent time delays, self-absorption effects on line-widths are hardly noticeable, despite the fact of the apparent line-shape distortions. Of interest are comparisons of inferred electron densities from hydrogen alpha and hydrogen beta lines as the plasma decays, including assessments of spatial variation of electron density.

  12. Investigation of the Stark broadening of Balmer beta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helbig, V.; Nick, K.-P.

    1981-10-01

    The Stark broadening of the Balmer line Hβ was studied in a high-current wall-stabilized arc at electron densities between 1.75 and 14.4 × 1016 cm-3. The electron density was obtained by means of a two-wavelength Michelson interferometer. The reduced half-widths of Hβ were compared with the theories of Griem et al, Vidal et al and Seidel. A slight increase in the reduced half-widths with increasing electron density was observed, just as predicted by theory. The absolute values, however, were smaller than the theoretical ones. There was good agreement with the experimental data of Bässler and Kock. The results of Wiese, Kelleher and Paquette differ from our data by 5-10% depending on the electron density.

  13. On the Origin of the Flare Emission in IRIS’ SJI 2832 Filter:Balmer Continuum or Spectral Lines?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleint, Lucia; Heinzel, Petr; Krucker, Säm

    2017-03-01

    Continuum (“white-light,” WL) emission dominates the energetics of flares. Filter-based observations, such as the IRIS SJI 2832 filter, show WL-like brightenings during flares, but it is unclear whether the emission arises from real continuum emission or enhanced spectral lines, possibly turning into emission. The difficulty in filter-based observations, contrary to spectral observations, is to determine which processes contribute to the observed brightening during flares. Here we determine the contribution of the Balmer continuum and the spectral line emission to IRIS’ SJI 2832 emission by analyzing the appropriate passband in simultaneous IRIS NUV spectra. We find that spectral line emission can contribute up to 100% to the observed slitjaw images (SJI) emission, that the relative contributions usually temporally vary, and that the highest SJI enhancements that are observed are most likely because of the Balmer continuum. We conclude that care should be taken when calling SJI 2832 a continuum filter during flares, because the influence of the lines on the emission can be significant.

  14. Componente de la envoltura en la discontinuidad de Balmer de estrellas Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrmann, R. D.; Cidale, L.

    En modelos de atmósferas en expansión de estrellas Be se estudia la contribución al salto de Balmer de una envoltura circunestelar. Se busca relacionar el salto de Balmer fotosférico y el salto de Balmer originado en la envoltura con los distintos parámetros de la atmósfera (dimensión de la cromosfera, ley de expansión, tasa de pérdida de masa, etc.).

  15. Evolution of Balmer jump selected galaxies in the ALHAMBRA survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troncoso Iribarren, P.; Infante, L.; Padilla, N.; Lacerna, I.; Garcia, S.; Orsi, A.; Muñoz Arancibia, A.; Moustakas, J.; Cristóbal-Hornillos, D.; Moles, M.; Fernández-Soto, A.; Martínez, V. J.; Cerviño, M.; Alfaro, E. J.; Ascaso, B.; Arnalte-Mur, P.; Nieves-Seoane, L.; Benítez, N.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Samples of star-forming galaxies at different redshifts have been traditionally selected via color techniques. The ALHAMBRA survey was designed to perform a uniform cosmic tomography of the Universe, and we here exploit it to trace the evolution of these galaxies. Aims: Our objective is to use the homogeneous optical coverage of the ALHAMBRA filter system to select samples of star-forming galaxies at different epochs of the Universe and study their properties. Methods: We present a new color-selection technique, based on the models of spectral evolution convolved with the ALHAMBRA bands and the redshifted position of the Balmer jump to select star-forming galaxies in the redshift range 0.5 Balmer-jump Galaxies (BJGs). We applied the iSEDfit Bayesian approach to fit each detailed spectral energy distribution and determined star-formation rate (SFR), stellar mass, age, and absolute magnitudes. The mass of the halos in which these samples reside were found through a clustering analysis. Results: Five volume-limited BJG subsamples with different mean redshifts are found to reside in halos of median masses ~1012.5 ± 0.2 M⊙ slightly increasing toward z = 0.5. This increment is similar to numerical simulations results, which suggests that we trace the evolution of an evolving population of halos as they grow to reach a mass of ~1012.7 ± 0.1 at z = 0.5. The likely progenitors of our samples at z ~ 3 are Lyman-break galaxies, which at z ~ 2 would evolve into star-forming BzK galaxies, and their descendants in the local Universe are galaxies with luminosities of 1-3 L∗. Hence, this allows us to follow the putative evolution of the SFR, stellar mass, and age of these galaxies. Conclusions: From z ~ 1.0 to z ~ 0.5, the stellar mass of the volume-limited BJG samples changes almost not at all with redshift, suggesting that major mergers play a minor role in the evolution of these galaxies. The SFR evolution accounts for the small

  16. Circumstellar Variations and Microflaring in FK Comae Berenices: Time-Resolved Balmer Line Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, J. M.; Foing, B. H.; Gondoin, Ph.; Stempels, H. C.; Sonnentrucker, P.; Le Poole, R. S.; Ehrenfreund, P.; de Jong, J. A.; Schrijvers, C.; Henrichs, H.; ESA-MUSICOS Collaboration

    We present results from the analysis of spectra of the fast rotating giant FK Comae Berenices, obtained with the recently commissioned ESA-MUSICOS spectrograph at the INT and with the Aurelie spectrograph at the OHP. The Balmer lines broad emission is modelled as arising from structures extending up to 4 stellar radii. The absorption is modelled due to the presence of a shell of cold and dense gas (solar-like filaments), near the corotation radius, covering about 20% of the stellar disc. The extended emission is believed to arise in giant structures reminiscent of active loops or prominences. Time resolved Hα emission spectroscopy indicates that these structures undergo continuous microflaring. Based on data sets from May and November 1996 and May and June 1997, we describe different time scales for variability, from yearly rise of activity to hourly microflares. Based on observations with the ESA-MUSICOS spectrograph at the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope, ING Observatory, Spain and with the Aurelie spectrograph at the 1.52 m Coude Telescope, Observatoire de Haute-Provence, France

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SDSS quasars balmer emission lines (Liu+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Shen, Y.; Bian, F.; Loeb, A.; Tremaine, S.

    2017-03-01

    We start with the SDSS DR7 quasar catalog (Schneider et al. 2010AJ....139.2360S, Cat. VII/260), adopting the spectral measurements of Shen et al. (2011, J/ApJS/194/45). Among the SDSS DR7 quasars, 20,774 are at z < 0.83, where SDSS spectra cover Hβ and [O III] λλ4959, 5007 (hereafter [O III] for short). From this parent sample of 20,774 objects we select a subset of 399 with offset broad Balmer emission lines, based on the spectral region around Hβ and [O III]. Our selection was a combination of automated spectral fitting (Shen et al. 2008, J/ApJ/680/169; 2011, J/ApJS/194/45) and visual examination. Here and throughout, we refer to the 399 objects as the "offset" sample. Using the spectral models, we measure the offset of the broad emission lines relative to the systemic velocity. The systemic redshift is estimated from the core component of [O III], which may be different (by a median offset of 32 km/s with a standard deviation of 125 km/s) from the nominal redshift listed by the DR7 catalog based on the SDSS spectroscopic pipeline (Stoughton et al. 2002AJ....123..485S). Our adopted systemic redshift agrees with the improved redshift for SDSS quasars from Hewett & Wild (2010, J/MNRAS/405/2302) within uncertainties. (1 data file).

  18. Hydrogen Balmer alpha intensity distributions and line profiles from multiple scattering theory using realistic geocoronal models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. E., Jr.; Meier, R. R.; Hodges, R. R., Jr.; Tinsley, B. A.

    1987-01-01

    The H Balmer alpha nightglow is investigated by using Monte Carlo models of asymmetric geocoronal atomic hydrogen distributions as input to a radiative transfer model of solar Lyman-beta radiation in the thermosphere and atmosphere. It is shown that it is essential to include multiple scattering of Lyman-beta radiation in the interpretation of Balmer alpha airglow data. Observations of diurnal variation in the Balmer alpha airglow showing slightly greater intensities in the morning relative to evening are consistent with theory. No evidence is found for anything other than a single sinusoidal diurnal variation of exobase density. Dramatic changes in effective temperature derived from the observed Balmer alpha line profiles are expected on the basis of changing illumination conditions in the thermosphere and exosphere as different regions of the sky are scanned.

  19. Excessive Balmer line broadening in a plane cathode abnormal glow discharge in hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Cvetanovic, N.; Kuraica, M.M.; Konjevic, N.

    2005-02-01

    Results of a Doppler spectroscopy study of the hydrogen Balmer alpha line in an abnormal glow discharge operated in pure hydrogen are reported. Measurements of line shapes are performed side-on to the discharge axis in a low electric field region of negative glow. The excessive Balmer alpha broadening is detected and its presence and linewidth is related to the collisions of fast hydrogen atoms with molecular hydrogen. The collision model enabled also an estimation of effective cross section data from the Balmer alpha axial intensity decay curves. Large excessive Balmer alpha line broadening in pure hydrogen and its dependence upon the direction of observation with respect to the electric field is in contradiction to the resonance transfer model, proposed byMills et al. in several publications [see, e.g., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 31, 338 (2003)].

  20. Hydrogen Balmer alpha intensity distributions and line profiles from multiple scattering theory using realistic geocoronal models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. E., Jr.; Meier, R. R.; Hodges, R. R., Jr.; Tinsley, B. A.

    1987-01-01

    The H Balmer alpha nightglow is investigated by using Monte Carlo models of asymmetric geocoronal atomic hydrogen distributions as input to a radiative transfer model of solar Lyman-beta radiation in the thermosphere and atmosphere. It is shown that it is essential to include multiple scattering of Lyman-beta radiation in the interpretation of Balmer alpha airglow data. Observations of diurnal variation in the Balmer alpha airglow showing slightly greater intensities in the morning relative to evening are consistent with theory. No evidence is found for anything other than a single sinusoidal diurnal variation of exobase density. Dramatic changes in effective temperature derived from the observed Balmer alpha line profiles are expected on the basis of changing illumination conditions in the thermosphere and exosphere as different regions of the sky are scanned.

  1. Hour-timescale profile variations in the broad Balmer lines of the Seyfert galaxy Hour-timescale profile variations in the broad Balmer lines of the Seyfert galaxy Markarian 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asatrian, Norayr S.

    2014-07-01

    Part of results of the multi-epoch intranight optical spectroscopic monitoring of the Markarian 6 nucleus carried out at the telescopes of 6-m of the Special Astrophysical Observatory (Russia), 2.6-m of the Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory (Armenia) and 2-m of the Tautenburg Observatory (Germany) is presented. Observations were made in 1979, 1986, 1988-1991 and 2007-2009 during a total of 33 nights with an average sampling rate of 4 spectra per night. TV-scanner and long-slit spectrographs equipped with Image Tube and CCD detector arrays were used. Altogether we analyzed 110 Hβ and 58 Hα region spectra to search for intranight variability in the broad hydrogen emission line profiles. The typical spectral resolutions were 4 Å for scanner spectra, 6 Å for photographic spectra, and 5 Å and 10 Å for CCD spectra. The S/N ratio at the continuum level near the Hβ and Hα lines was in the range 15-50. The purpose of the search was to look for the characteristic variability signatures of different kinematical models of the broad emission-line region. We considered the centering and guiding errors which can result in differences between spectra. We found variations in the broad Balmer line difference profiles on time scale of hour with the level of significance of 3.6 σ to 5.0 σ. Variations take the form of narrow, small bumps located at the blue and red sides or only at the blue side of the lines. In the intermediate level of broad line flux, the Hβ and Hα profiles show fine structure. Detected profile changes occurred at the same radial velocity shifts as the details in the fine structure. The variability is at least 2 orders of magnitude more rapid than any observed for broad Balmer line profiles in AGNs that we are aware of in the literature. Discovered extremely rapid line-profile variability may be associated with reverberation effects. Two-sided profile changes may indicate the response of circularly rotating hydrogen clouds in the BLR to a light pulse

  2. Hydrogen Balmer Line Broadening in Solar and Stellar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Allred, Joel C.; Uitenbroek, Han; Tremblay, Pier-Emmanuel; Brown, Stephen; Carlsson, Mats; Osten, Rachel A.; Wisniewski, John P.; Hawley, Suzanne L.

    2017-03-01

    The broadening of the hydrogen lines during flares is thought to result from increased charge (electron, proton) density in the flare chromosphere. However, disagreements between theory and modeling prescriptions have precluded an accurate diagnostic of the degree of ionization and compression resulting from flare heating in the chromosphere. To resolve this issue, we have incorporated the unified theory of electric pressure broadening of the hydrogen lines into the non-LTE radiative-transfer code RH. This broadening prescription produces a much more realistic spectrum of the quiescent, A0 star Vega compared to the analytic approximations used as a damping parameter in the Voigt profiles. We test recent radiative-hydrodynamic (RHD) simulations of the atmospheric response to high nonthermal electron beam fluxes with the new broadening prescription and find that the Balmer lines are overbroadened at the densest times in the simulations. Adding many simultaneously heated and cooling model loops as a “multithread” model improves the agreement with the observations. We revisit the three-component phenomenological flare model of the YZ CMi Megaflare using recent and new RHD models. The evolution of the broadening, line flux ratios, and continuum flux ratios are well-reproduced by a multithread model with high-flux nonthermal electron beam heating, an extended decay phase model, and a “hot spot” atmosphere heated by an ultrarelativistic electron beam with reasonable filling factors: ∼0.1%, 1%, and 0.1% of the visible stellar hemisphere, respectively. The new modeling motivates future work to understand the origin of the extended gradual phase emission.

  3. HYDROGEN BALMER CONTINUUM IN SOLAR FLARES DETECTED BY THE INTERFACE REGION IMAGING SPECTROGRAPH (IRIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Heinzel, P.; Kleint, L.

    2014-10-20

    We present a novel observation of the white light flare (WLF) continuum, which was significantly enhanced during the X1 flare on 2014 March 29 (SOL2014-03-29T17:48). Data from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) in its near-UV channel show that at the peak of the continuum enhancement, the contrast at the quasi-continuum window above 2813 Å reached 100%-200% and can be even larger closer to Mg II lines. This is fully consistent with the hydrogen recombination Balmer-continuum emission, which follows an impulsive thermal and non-thermal ionization caused by the precipitation of electron beams through the chromosphere. However, a less probable photospheric continuum enhancement cannot be excluded. The light curves of the Balmer continuum have an impulsive character with a gradual fading, similar to those detected recently in the optical region on the Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode. This observation represents a first Balmer-continuum detection from space far beyond the Balmer limit (3646 Å), eliminating seeing effects known to complicate the WLF detection. Moreover, we use a spectral window so far unexplored for flare studies, which provides the potential to study the Balmer continuum, as well as many metallic lines appearing in emission during flares. Combined with future ground-based observations of the continuum near the Balmer limit, we will be able to disentangle various scenarios of the WLF origin. IRIS observations also provide a critical quantitative measure of the energy radiated in the Balmer continuum, which constrains various models of the energy transport and deposit during flares.

  4. Inferring divertor plasma properties from hydrogen Balmer and Paschen series spectroscopy in JET-ILW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomanowski, B. A.; Meigs, A. G.; Sharples, R. M.; Stamp, M.; Guillemaut, C.; Contributors, JET

    2015-11-01

    A parametrised spectral line profile model is formulated to investigate the diagnostic scope for recovering plasma parameters from hydrogenic Balmer and Paschen series spectroscopy in the context of JET-ILW divertor plasmas. The separate treatment of Zeeman and Stark contributions in the line model is tested against the PPP-B code which accounts for their combined influence on the spectral line shape. The proposed simplified model does not fully reproduce the Stark-Zeeman features for the α and β transitions, but good agreement is observed in the line width and wing profiles, especially for n  >  5. The line model has been applied to infer radial density profiles in the JET-ILW divertor with generally good agreement between the D 5\\to 2 , 5\\to 3 , 6\\to 2 , 7\\to 2 and 9\\to 2 lines for high recycling and detached conditions. In an L-mode detached plasma pulse the Langmuir probe measurements typically underestimated the density by a factor 2-3 and overestimated the electron temperature by a factor of 5-10 compared to spectroscopically derived values. The line model is further used to generate synthetic high-resolution spectra for low-n transitions to assess the potential for parameter recovery using a multi-parametric fitting technique. In cases with 4 parameter fits with a single Maxwellian neutral temperature component the D 4\\to 3 line yields the best results with parameter estimates within 10% of the input values. For cases with 9 parameter fits inclusive of a multi-component neutral velocity distribution function the quality of the fits is degraded. Simultaneous fitting of the D 3\\to 2 and 4\\to 3 profiles improves the fit quality significantly, highlighting the importance of complementary spectroscopic measurements for divertor plasma emission studies.

  5. Photoionization-driven Absorption-line Variability in Balmer Absorption Line Quasar LBQS 1206+1052

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Luming; Zhou, Hongyan; Ji, Tuo; Jiang, Peng; Liu, Bo; Liu, Wenjuan; Pan, Xiang; Shi, Xiheng; Wang, Jianguo; Wang, Tinggui; Yang, Chenwei; Zhang, Shaohua; Miller, Lauren P.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of absorption-line variability in mini-BAL quasar LBQS 1206+1052. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectrum demonstrates that the absorption troughs can be divided into two components of blueshift velocities of ∼700 and ∼1400 km s‑1 relative to the quasar rest frame. The former component shows rare Balmer absorption, which is an indicator of high-density absorbing gas; thus, the quasar is worth follow-up spectroscopic observations. Our follow-up optical and near-infrared spectra using MMT, YFOSC, TSpec, and DBSP reveal that the strengths of the absorption lines vary for both components, while the velocities do not change. We reproduce all of the spectral data by assuming that only the ionization state of the absorbing gas is variable and that all other physical properties are invariable. The variation of ionization is consistent with the variation of optical continuum from the V-band light curve. Additionally, we cannot interpret the data by assuming that the variability is due to a movement of the absorbing gas. Therefore, our analysis strongly indicates that the absorption-line variability in LBQS 1206+1052 is photoionization driven. As shown from photoionization simulations, the absorbing gas with blueshift velocity of ∼700 km s‑1 has a density in the range of 109 to 1010 cm‑3 and a distance of ∼1 pc, and the gas with blueshift velocity of ∼1400 km s‑1 has a density of 103 cm‑3 and a distance of ∼1 kpc.

  6. Broad Balmer-Line Absorption in SDSS J172341.10+555340.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Kentaro

    2010-10-01

    We present the discovery of Balmer-line absorption from Hα to H9 in an iron low-ionizaton broad absorption line (FeLoBAL) quasar, SDSS J172341.10+555340.5, by near-infrared spectroscopy with the Cooled Infrared Spectrograph and Camera for OHS (CISCO) attached to the Subaru Telescope. The redshift of the Balmer-line absorption troughs is 2.0530±0.0003, and it is blueshifted by 5370 km s-1 from the Balmer emission lines. It is more than 4000 km s-1 blueshifted from the previously known UV absorption lines. We detected relatively strong (EWrest = 20 Å) [OIII] emission lines that are similar to those found in other broad absorption line quasars with Balmer-line absorption. We also derived the column density of neutral hydrogen of 5.2 × 1017 cm-2 by using the curve of growth and taking account of Lyα trapping. We searched for UV absorption lines that had the same redshift with Balmer-line absorption, and found Ali III and Fe III absorption lines at z = 2.053 that correspond to previously unidentified absorption lines, and the presence of other blended troughs that were difficult to identify.

  7. ALIEN: A nebular spectra analysis software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, R.; Vazquez, R.

    2000-11-01

    A new C-coded software, designed to analyze nebular spectra, is presented. T his software is able to read the fluxes of the most important ions directly from IRAF's output file (splot.log). Spectra can be dereddened using the Balmer lines ratio and the Seaton's extinction law. Electron temperature and density, as well as ionic abundances by number are estimated by means of numeric calculations based on the five-level atom model. The dereddened spectra and the table containing the ionic abundances can be saved in a LaTex formatted file. This software has been initially designed to work with a low dispersion spectra.

  8. Is there an ADAF in Radio Galaxies with Double-Peaked Balmer Lines?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, T.; Murayama, T.; Shioya, Y.; Taniguchi, Y.

    In order to examine the prediction that the broad-line radio galaxies (BLRGs) with double-peaked Balmer lines harbor an accretion disk characterized by an advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) in their nuclei, we investigate narrow emission line flux ratios of the narrow-line regions which are photoionized by nuclear continuum radiation. By carrying out intensive photoionization model calculations, we find that the data of the BLRGs with the double-peaked Balmer lines are consistent with the models adopting the SED without a strong big blue bump, while the data of the BLRGs without the double-peaked emission lines are well described by the models adopting the SED with a strong big blue bump. This result supports the idea that the double-peaked Balmer lines arise at an outer region of an accretion disk which is illuminated by an inner, geometrically thick ADAF.

  9. New Observations of Balmer Continuum Flux in Solar Flares. Instrument Description and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotrč, P.; Procházka, O.; Heinzel, P.

    2016-03-01

    Increase in the Balmer continuum radiation during solar flares was predicted by various authors, but has never been firmly confirmed observationally using ground-based slit spectrographs. Here we describe a new post-focal instrument, the image selector, with which the Balmer continuum flux can be measured from the whole flare area, in analogy to successful detections of flaring dMe stars. The system was developed and put into operation at the horizontal solar telescope HSFA2 of the Ondřejov Observatory. We measure the total flux by a fast spectrometer from a limited but well-defined region on the solar disk. Using a system of diaphragms, the disturbing contribution of a bright solar disk can be eliminated as much as possible. Light curves of the measured flux in the spectral range 350 - 440 nm are processed, together with the Hα images of the flaring area delimited by the appropriate diaphragm. The spectral flux data are flat-fielded, calibrated, and processed to be compared with model predictions. Our analysis of the data proves that the described device is sufficiently sensitive to detect variations in the Balmer continuum during solar flares. Assuming that the Balmer-continuum kernels have at least a similar size as those visible in Hα, we find the flux increase in the Balmer continuum to reach 230 - 550 % of the quiet continuum during the observed X-class flare. We also found temporal changes in the Balmer continuum flux starting well before the onset of the flare in Hα.

  10. Geocoronal Balmer α line profile observations and forward-model analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Bishop, J.; Roesler, F. L.; Nossal, S. M.

    2006-05-01

    High spectral resolution geocoronal Balmer α line profile observations from Pine Bluff Observatory (PBO) are presented in the context of forward-model analysis. Because Balmer series column emissions depend significantly on multiple scattering, retrieval of hydrogen parameters of general aeronomic interest from these observations (e.g., the hydrogen column abundance) currently requires a forward modeling approach. This capability is provided by the resonance radiative transfer code LYAO_RT. We have recently developed a parametric data-model comparison search procedure employing an extensive grid of radiative transport model input parameters (defining a 6-dimensional parameter space) to map-out bounds for feasible forward model retrieved atomic hydrogen density distributions. We applied this technique to same-night (March, 2000) ground-based Balmer α data from PBO and geocoronal Lyman β measurements from the Espectrógrafo Ultravioleta extremo para la Radiación Difusa (EURD) instrument on the Spanish satellite MINISAT-1 (provided by J.F. Gómez and C. Morales of the Laboratorio de Astrofisica Espacial y Física Fundamental, INTA, Madrid, Spain) in order to investigate the modeling constraints imposed by two sets of independent geocoronal intensity measurements, both of which rely on astronomical calibration methods. In this poster we explore extending this analysis to the line profile information also contained in the March 2000 PBO Balmer α data set. In general, a decrease in the Doppler width of the Balmer α emission with shadow altitude is a persistent feature in every night of PBO observations in which a wide range of shadow altitudes are observed. Preliminary applications of the LYAO_RT code, which includes the ability to output Doppler line profiles for both the singly and multiply scattered contributions to the Balmer α emission line, displays good qualitative agreement with regard to geocoronal Doppler width trends observed from PBO. Model-data Balmer

  11. Stark spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen balmer-alpha line for electric field measurement in plasmas by saturation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, S.; Katayama, K.; Nakano, H.; Goto, M.; Sasaki, K.

    2016-09-01

    Detailed structures of electric fields in sheath and pre-sheath regions of various plasmas are interested from the viewpoint of basic plasma physics. Several researchers observed Stark spectra of Doppler-broadened Rydberg states to evaluate electric fields in plasmas; however, these measurements needed high-power, expensive tunable lasers. In this study, we carried out another Stark spectroscopy with a low-cost diode laser system. We applied saturation spectroscopy, which achieves a Doppler-free wavelength resolution, to observe the Stark spectrum of the Balmer-alpha line of atomic hydrogen in the sheath region of a low-pressure hydrogen plasma. The hydrogen plasma was generated in an ICP source which was driven by on-off modulated rf power at 20 kHz. A planar electrode was inserted into the plasma. Weak probe and intense pump laser beams were injected into the plasma from the counter directions in parallel to the electrode surface. The laser beams crossed with a small angle above the electrode. The observed fine-structure spectra showed shifts, deformations, and/or splits when varying the distance between the observation position and the electrode surface. The detection limit for the electric field was estimated to be several tens of V/cm.

  12. Two-toned Impact Crater in Balmer Basin: A Reflection of the Target?

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-03-26

    Materials excavated during formation of this ~450 m diameter impact crater have an unusual two-toned character, likely a reflection of heterogeneity in the target materials. This crater occurs in Balmer Basin. This image was taken by NASA Lunar Reconnai

  13. Simultaneous measurements of the hydrogen airglow emissions of Lyman alpha, Lyman beta, and Balmer alpha.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weller, C. S.; Meier, R. R.; Tinsley, B. A.

    1971-01-01

    Comparison of Lyman-alpha, 740- to 1050-A, and Balmer-alpha airglow measurements made at 134 deg solar-zenith angle on Oct. 13, 1969, with resonance-scattering models of solar radiation. Model comparison with Lyman-alpha data fixes the hydrogen column abundance over 215 km to 2 x 10 to the 13th per cu cm within a factor of 2. Differences between the Lyman-alpha model and data indicate a polar-equatorial departure from spherical symmetry in the hydrogen distribution. A Lyman-beta model based on the hydrogen distribution found to fit the Lyman-alpha data fits the spatial variation of the 740- to 1050-A data well from 100 to 130 km, but it does not fit the data well at higher altitudes; thus the presence of more rapidly absorbed shorter-wavelength radiation is indicated. This same resonance-scattering model yields Balmer-alpha intensities that result in good spatial agreement with the Balmer-alpha measurements, but a fivefold increase in the measured solar line center Lyman-beta flux is required (as required for the Lyman-beta measurement). The intensity ratio of Lyman-beta and Balmer-alpha at night is found to be a simple measure of the hydrogen optical depth if measurements with good accuracy can be made in the visible and ultraviolet spectrum.

  14. Characterization of Ejecta Facies of a Small Lunar Crater in Balmer Basin Using LROC Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, K. S.; Bell, J. F.

    2010-03-01

    Using a 0.93 m/pix Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) image, we investigate the distribution of impact ejecta of a small (D ~ 1 km) unnamed lunar primary crater located in Balmer Basin (-18.6°, 69.1°).

  15. BLACK HOLE MASS ESTIMATES BASED ON C IV ARE CONSISTENT WITH THOSE BASED ON THE BALMER LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Assef, R. J.; Denney, K. D.; Kochanek, C. S.; Peterson, B. M.; Kozlowski, S.; Dietrich, M.; Grier, C. J.; Khan, R.; Ageorges, N.; Buschkamp, P.; Gemperlein, H.; Hofmann, R.; Barrows, R. S.; Falco, E.; Kilic, M.; Feiz, C.; Germeroth, A.; Juette, M.; Knierim, V.; Laun, W.; and others

    2011-12-01

    Using a sample of high-redshift lensed quasars from the CASTLES project with observed-frame ultraviolet or optical and near-infrared spectra, we have searched for possible biases between supermassive black hole (BH) mass estimates based on the C IV, H{alpha}, and H{beta} broad emission lines. Our sample is based upon that of Greene, Peng, and Ludwig, expanded with new near-IR spectroscopic observations, consistently analyzed high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) optical spectra, and consistent continuum luminosity estimates at 5100 A. We find that BH mass estimates based on the full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of C IV show a systematic offset with respect to those obtained from the line dispersion, {sigma}{sub l}, of the same emission line, but not with those obtained from the FWHM of H{alpha} and H{beta}. The magnitude of the offset depends on the treatment of the He II and Fe II emission blended with C IV, but there is little scatter for any fixed measurement prescription. While we otherwise find no systematic offsets between C IV and Balmer line mass estimates, we do find that the residuals between them are strongly correlated with the ratio of the UV and optical continuum luminosities. This means that much of the dispersion in previous comparisons of C IV and H{beta} BH mass estimates are due to the continuum luminosities rather than to any properties of the lines. Removing this dependency reduces the scatter between the UV- and optical-based BH mass estimates by a factor of approximately two, from roughly 0.35 to 0.18 dex. The dispersion is smallest when comparing the C IV {sigma}{sub l} mass estimate, after removing the offset from the FWHM estimates, and either Balmer line mass estimate. The correlation with the continuum slope is likely due to a combination of reddening, host contamination, and object-dependent SED shapes. When we add additional heterogeneous measurements from the literature, the results are unchanged. Moreover, in a trial observation of a

  16. THE BALMER-DOMINATED BOW SHOCK AND WIND NEBULA STRUCTURE OF {gamma}-RAY PULSAR PSR J1741-2054

    SciTech Connect

    Romani, Roger W.; Shaw, Michael S.; Camilo, Fernando; Cotter, Garret; Sivakoff, Gregory R. E-mail: msshaw@stanford.ed

    2010-12-01

    We have detected an H{alpha} bow shock nebula around PSR J1741-2054, a pulsar discovered through its GeV {gamma}-ray pulsations. The pulsar is only {approx}1.''5 behind the leading edge of the shock. Optical spectroscopy shows that the nebula is non-radiative, dominated by Balmer emission. The H{alpha} images and spectra suggest that the pulsar wind momentum is equatorially concentrated and implies a pulsar space velocity {approx}150 km s{sup -1}, directed 15{sup 0} {+-} 10{sup 0} out of the plane of the sky. The complex H{alpha} profile indicates that different portions of the post-shock flow dominate line emission as gas moves along the nebula and provide an opportunity to study the structure of this unusual slow non-radiative shock under a variety of conditions. CXO ACIS observations reveal an X-ray pulsar wind nebula within this nebula, with a compact {approx}2.''5 equatorial structure and a trail extending several arcminutes behind. Together these data support a close ({<=}0.5 kpc) distance, a spin geometry viewed edge-on, and highly efficient {gamma}-ray production for this unusual, energetic pulsar.

  17. On the anomaly of Balmer line profiles of A-type stars. Fundamental binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalley, B.; Gardiner, R. B.; Kupka, F.; Bessell, M. S.

    2002-11-01

    In previous work, Gardiner et al. (\\cite{GKS99}) found evidence for a discrepancy between the Teff obtained from Balmer lines with that from photometry and fundamental values for A-type stars. An investigation into this anomaly is presented using Balmer line profiles of stars in binary system with fundamental values of both Teff and log g. A revision of the fundamental parameters for binary systems given by Smalley & Dworetsky (\\cite{SD95}) is also presented. The Teff obtained by fitting Hα and Hβ line profiles is compared to the fundamental values and those obtained from uvby photometry. We find that the discrepancy found by Gardiner et al. (\\cite{GKS99}) for stars in the range 7000 K <~ Teff <~ 9000 K is no longer evident. Partly based on DENIS data obtained at the European Southern Observatory.

  18. Winds from T Tauri stars. II - Balmer line profiles for inner disk winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, Lee; Hewett, Robert

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of calculations of Balmer emission line profiles using escape probability methods for T Tauri wind models with nonspherically symmetric geometry. The wind is assumed to originate in the inner regions of an accretion disk surrounding the T Tauri star, and flows outward in a 'cone' geometry. Two types of wind models are considered, both with monotonically increasing expansion velocities as a function of radial distance. For flows with large turbulent velocities, such as the HF Alfven wave-driven wind models, the effect of cone geometry is to increase the blue wing emission, and to move the absorption reversal close to line center. Line profiles for a wind model rotating with the same angular velocity as the inner disk are also calculated. The Balmer lines of this model are significantly broader than observed in most objects, suggesting that the observed emission lines do not arise in a region rotating at Keplerian velocity.

  19. First Performance Results of a New Geocoronal Balmer-alpha Field-Widened Spatial Heterodyne Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, D.; Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Roesler, F. L.; Harlander, J.; Jaehnig, K.; Nossal, S. M.; Haffner, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    During 2013, a new, high resolution field-widened spatial heterodyne spectrometer (FW-SHS) uniquely designed to observe geocoronal Balmer-alpha emission ([Ha], 6563A) was installed at Pine Bluff Observatory (PBO) near Madison Wisconsin. FW-SHS observations were compared with an already well-characterized dual-etalon Fabry Perot Interferometer (FPI) optimized for [Ha], also at PBO. The FW-SHS is a robust new Fourier-transform instrument that combines a large throughput advantage with high spectral resolution and a relatively long spectral baseline (~10x that of the FPI) in a compact, versatile instrument with no moving parts. Coincident [Ha] observations by FW-SHS and FPI were obtained over similar integration times, resolving power (~80,000 at [Ha]) and field-of-view (1.8 and 1.4 degrees, respectively). This paper describes the FW-SHS first light performance and [Ha] observational results collected from observing nights across 2013 and 2014. Initial FW-SHS observations of Balmer-alpha intensity and temperature (doppler width) vs. viewing geometry (shadow altitude) show excellent relative agreement with the geocoronal observations previously obtained at PBO by FPI. The FW-SHS is capable of determining geocoronal Balmer-alpha doppler shifts on the order of 100 m/s across a 640km/s [Ha] spectral bandpass, with a temporal resolution on the order of minutes. These characteristics make the FW-SHS well suited for spectroscopic studies of relatively faint, diffuse-source geocoronal Balmer-alpha emission from Earth's upper atmosphere (~2-14R) and the interstellar medium in our Galaxy. Current and future observations expand long-term geocoronal hydrogen observation data sets already spanning two solar maximums.

  20. Remote sensing and geologic studies of the Balmer-Kapteyn region of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawke, B. Ray; Gillis, J. J.; Giguere, T. A.; Blewett, D. T.; Lawrence, D. J.; Lucey, P. G.; Smith, G. A.; Spudis, P. D.; Taylor, G. Jeffrey

    2005-06-01

    The Balmer-Kapteyn (B-K) region is located just east of Mare Fecunditatis on the east limb of the Moon. It is centered on the Balmer-Kapteyn basin, a pre-Nectarian impact structure that exhibits two rings, approximately 225 km and 450 km in diameter. Clementine multispectral images and Lunar Prospector (LP) gamma-ray spectrometer (GRS) data were used to investigate the composition, age, and origin of geologic units in the region. A major expanse of cryptomare was mapped within the B-K basin. Spectral and chemical data obtained for dark-haloed craters (DHCs) established that these impact craters excavated mare basalt from beneath higher-albedo, highland-rich surface units. The buried basalts exposed by DHCs in the region are dominated by low-titanium mare basalts. The fresh DHC FeO values (15.0-15.7 wt.%) that best represent those of buried mare basalts are well within the range of values exhibited by high-alumina mare basalts. While most cryptomare deposits occur beneath surfaces that range in age from Imbrian to Nectarian, it is possible that some mare flows were emplaced during pre-Nectarian time. Most cryptomare deposits in the B-K region were formed by the contamination of mare surfaces by highland-rich distal ejecta from surrounding impact craters. These Balmer-type cryptomare deposits are usually associated with light plains units. Major LP-GRS FeO enhancements are associated with cryptomaria in the Balmer-Kapteyn, Lomonosov-Fleming, Schiller-Schickard, and Mendel-Rydberg regions.

  1. The Balmer-Like Formula for Mass Distribution of Elementary Particle Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gareev, F. A.; Barabanov, M. Yu.; Kazacha, G. S.; Korovin, P. P.; Yamaleev, R. M.

    1998-09-01

    Elementary particle resonances have been systematically analyzed using all available experimental data. We have come to the conclusion that resonance decay product momenta and masses of resonances are to be quantized. The Balmer-like formula for mass distribution of elementary particle resonances has been obtained. These observations allow us to formulate a strategy of experimental searches for new resonances and systematize the already known one.

  2. A Possible Solution to the Lyman/Balmer Line Problem in Hot DA White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preval, Simon P.; Barstow, Martin A.; Badnell, Nigel R.; Holberg, Jay B.; Hubeny, Ivan

    2015-06-01

    Arguably, the best method for determining the effective temperature (Teff) and surface gravity (log g) of a DA white dwarf is by fitting the Hydrogen Lyman and Balmer absorption features. However, as has been shown for white dwarfs with Teff>50,000K, the calculated value from the Lyman and Balmer lines are discrepant, which worsens with increasing temperature. Many different solutions have been suggested, ranging from the input physics used to calculate the models, to interstellar reddening. We will focus on the former, and consider three variables. The first is the atomic data used, namely the number of transitions included in line blanketing treatments and the photoionization cross sections. The second is the stark broadening treatment used to synthesise the Lyman and Balmer line profiles, namely the calculations performed by Lemke (1997) and Tremblay & Bergeron (2009). Finally, the third is the atmospheric content. The model grids are calculated with a pure H composition, and a metal polluted composition using the abundances of Preval et al. (2013). We present the preliminary results of our analysis, whereby we have determined the Teff for a small selection of white dwarfs. We plan to extend our analysis by allowing metallicity to vary in future model grids.

  3. Second Epoch Hubble Space Telescope Observations of Kepler's Supernova Remnant: The Proper Motions of Balmer Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankrit, Ravi; Raymond, John C.; Blair, William P.; Long, Knox S.; Williams, Brian J.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Patnaude, Daniel J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the proper motions of Balmer-dominated filaments in Kepler’s supernova remnant using high resolution images obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope at two epochs separated by about 10 years. We use the improved proper motion measurements and revised values of shock velocities to derive a distance to Kepler of {5.1}-0.7+0.8 kpc. The main shock around the northern rim of the remnant has a typical speed of 1690 km s-1 and is encountering material with densities of about 8 cm-3. We find evidence for the variation of shock properties over small spatial scales, including differences in the driving pressures as the shock wraps around a curved cloud surface. We find that the Balmer filaments ahead of the ejecta knot on the northwest boundary of the remnant are becoming fainter and more diffuse. We also find that the Balmer filaments associated with circumstellar material in the interior regions of the remnant are due to shocks with significantly lower velocities and that the brightness variations among these filaments trace the density distribution of the material, which may have a disk-like geometry. Based on observations made with the Hubble Space Telescope.

  4. Black Hole Mass Estimates Based on C IV are Consistent with Those Based on the Balmer Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assef, R. J.; Denney, K. D.; Kochanek, C. S.; Peterson, B. M.; Kozłowski, S.; Ageorges, N.; Barrows, R. S.; Buschkamp, P.; Dietrich, M.; Falco, E.; Feiz, C.; Gemperlein, H.; Germeroth, A.; Grier, C. J.; Hofmann, R.; Juette, M.; Khan, R.; Kilic, M.; Knierim, V.; Laun, W.; Lederer, R.; Lehmitz, M.; Lenzen, R.; Mall, U.; Madsen, K. K.; Mandel, H.; Martini, P.; Mathur, S.; Mogren, K.; Mueller, P.; Naranjo, V.; Pasquali, A.; Polsterer, K.; Pogge, R. W.; Quirrenbach, A.; Seifert, W.; Stern, D.; Shappee, B.; Storz, C.; Van Saders, J.; Weiser, P.; Zhang, D.

    2011-12-01

    Using a sample of high-redshift lensed quasars from the CASTLES project with observed-frame ultraviolet or optical and near-infrared spectra, we have searched for possible biases between supermassive black hole (BH) mass estimates based on the C IV, Hα, and Hβ broad emission lines. Our sample is based upon that of Greene, Peng, & Ludwig, expanded with new near-IR spectroscopic observations, consistently analyzed high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) optical spectra, and consistent continuum luminosity estimates at 5100 Å. We find that BH mass estimates based on the full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of C IV show a systematic offset with respect to those obtained from the line dispersion, σ l , of the same emission line, but not with those obtained from the FWHM of Hα and Hβ. The magnitude of the offset depends on the treatment of the He II and Fe II emission blended with C IV, but there is little scatter for any fixed measurement prescription. While we otherwise find no systematic offsets between C IV and Balmer line mass estimates, we do find that the residuals between them are strongly correlated with the ratio of the UV and optical continuum luminosities. This means that much of the dispersion in previous comparisons of C IV and Hβ BH mass estimates are due to the continuum luminosities rather than to any properties of the lines. Removing this dependency reduces the scatter between the UV- and optical-based BH mass estimates by a factor of approximately two, from roughly 0.35 to 0.18 dex. The dispersion is smallest when comparing the C IV σ l mass estimate, after removing the offset from the FWHM estimates, and either Balmer line mass estimate. The correlation with the continuum slope is likely due to a combination of reddening, host contamination, and object-dependent SED shapes. When we add additional heterogeneous measurements from the literature, the results are unchanged. Moreover, in a trial observation of a remaining outlier, the origin of the deviation

  5. HRI Observations of Balmer Dominated Filaments in the SNR RCW86

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Knox S.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this project was to use the ROSAT HRI to study the recently discovered optical Balmer-dominated filaments in the young SNR R-CW86. The observations provide complete high-resolution X-ray coverage of the shell of the SNR. These X-ray observations are combined with new optical observations (both imaging and spectroscopic), and new high resolution radio observations to provide a better overall understanding of the state of the remnant (Sedov or reverse shock), its history (as the possible SNR of SN 185 AD), and the physics of non-radiative shocks.

  6. Hydrogen Balmer-α line broadening in a microwave plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatarova, E.; Dias, F. M.; Puac, N.; Ferreira, C. M.

    2007-02-01

    Emission spectroscopy was used to investigate the Balmer-α line broadening in a slot-antenna excited microwave plasma source operating in helium hydrogen and argon hydrogen mixtures, and in pure hydrogen at low pressure (p = 0.3 mbar). No evidence was found for excessive broadening of the Hα line under the present operating conditions, even though this line was found to be broader than the helium singlet line at 667.8 nm. The Doppler temperatures corresponding to this helium line (~650 K) are close to the rotational temperatures (~500 K) determined from the Q-branch of the Fulcher-α band under the same conditions. The Doppler temperatures corresponding to the Balmer-α broadening are about 3000 K. The Hα line shape does not change as the amount of hydrogen (up to 50%) in the He H2 mixture is changed. The results indicate selective heating of H atoms in low-pressure He H2, Ar H2 and H2 microwave plasmas.

  7. The variability of the double-peaked Balmer lines in the active nucleus of NGC 1097

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Eracleous, Michael; Livio, Mario; Wilson, Andrew S.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Halpern, Jules P.

    1995-01-01

    We present spectroscopic observations of the nucleus of the Seyfert/low-ionization nuclear emission-line region galaxy NGC 1097 spanning the period 1991-1994. The goal was to monitor anticipated variations of the broad, double-peaked Balmer lines which appeared abruptly in 1991. We find that the broad Balmer lines have varied significantly over the monitoring period, both in their integrated fluxes and in their profile shapes. The integrated H-alpha flux has decreased by a factor of 2, the (H-alpha)/(H-beta) ratio has increased, and the originally asymmetric H-alpha profile has become symmetric. The decline of the H-alpha flux and the change in the (H-alpha)/(H-beta) ratio can be interpreted as consequences of either increased obscuration along the line of sight, or a decline in the ionizing continuum, but neither of these scenarios can account for the change in profile shapes. A model attributing the line emission to a precessing elliptical ring around a 10(exp 6) solar mass nuclear black hole can reproduce the observed profile variations. In this scenario, the line-emitting ring is the result of the tidal disruption of a star by the black hole. Alternative scenarios associating the broad-line emission with a collimated bipolar outflow also remain viable, but binary black holes and inhomogeneous accretion disks are disfavored by the observed pattern of variability.

  8. Is There an Advection-dominated Accretion Flow in Radio Galaxies with Double-peaked Balmer Lines?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Tohru; Murayama, Takashi; Shioya, Yasuhiro; Taniguchi, Yoshiaki

    2002-03-01

    In order to examine the prediction that the broad-line radio galaxies (BLRGs) with double-peaked Balmer lines harbor an accretion disk characterized by an advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) in their nuclei, we investigate narrow emission line flux ratios of the narrow-line regions (NLRs) which are photoionized by nuclear continuum radiation. We compile data from the literature and confirm the pioneering work of Eracleous & Halpern that the BLRGs with the double-peaked Balmer emission exhibit larger flux ratios of both [O I] λ6300/[O III] λ5007 and [O II] λ3727/[O III] λ5007 than the BLRGs without the double-peaked Balmer emission. To examine whether or not these properties are attributed to the difference in the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the ionizing radiation between the BLRGs with and without the double-peaked Balmer emission, we perform photoionization model calculations using two types of input continuum radiation; one has the strong big blue bump which is expected for standard optically thick accretion disks and the other does not exhibit a strong big blue bump as expected for optically thin ADAFs. We find that the data of the BLRGs with the double-peaked Balmer lines are consistent with the models adopting the SED without a strong big blue bump, while the data of the BLRGs without the double-peaked emission lines are well described by the models adopting the SED with a strong big blue bump. On the other hand, the observed differences in the NLR emission are hard to explain by the difference in the contribution of shocks. These results support the idea that the double-peaked Balmer lines arise at an outer region of an accretion disk which is illuminated by an inner, geometrically thick ADAF.

  9. Stationary Inverted Balmer and Lyman populations for a CW HI water-plasma laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Randell L.

    2002-10-01

    Stationary inverted H Balmer and Lyman populations were observed from a low pressure water-vapor microwave discharge plasma. The ionization and population of excited atomic hydrogen levels was attributed to energy provided by a catalytic resonance energy transfer between hydrogen atoms and molecular oxygen formed in the water plasma. The catalysis mechanism was supported by the observation of O^2+ and H Balmer line broadening of 55 eV compared to 1 eV for hydrogen alone. The high hydrogen atom temperature with a relatively low electron temperature, Te = 2 eV, exhibited characteristics of cold recombining plasmas. These conditions of a water plasma favored an inverted population in the lower levels. Thus, the catalysis of atomic hydrogen may pump a cw HI laser. From our results, laser oscillations are may be possible from (i) n = 3, n = 4, n = 5, n = 6, n = 7, and n = 8 to n = 2, (ii) n = 4, n = 5, n = 6, and n = 7 to n = 3 and (iii) n = 5 and n = 6 to n = 4. Lines of the Balmer series of n = 5, and n = 6 to n = 2 and the Paschen series of n = 5 to n = 3 were of particular importance because of the potential to design blue and 1.3 micron infrared lasers, respectively, which are ideal for many communications and microelectronics applications. At a microwave input power of 9W/cm^3, a collisional radiative model showed that the hydrogen excited state population distribution was consistent with an n = 1arrow5,6 pumping power of an unprecedented 200W/cm^3. High power hydrogen gas lasers are anticipated at wavelengths, over a broad spectral range from far infrared to violet which may be miniaturized to micron dimensions. Such a hydrogen laser represents the first new atomic gas laser in over a decade, and it may prove to be the most efficient, versatile, and useful of all. A further application is the direct generation of electrical power using photovoltaic conversion of the spontaneous or stimulated water vapor plasma emission.

  10. Estudio observacional de la segunda discontinuidad de Balmer en estrellas Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochetti, Y. R.; Arias, M. L.; Cidale, L.; Zorec, J.

    Many Be stars show a second Balmer discontinuity (BD) which is related to the physical properties of their circumstellar envelopes. In this work we analize the presence and appearance (emission or absorption) of this BD in a sample of Be stars. We observe that the second BD is found in absorption among fast rotating mid- and late-B type stars while there is a tendency to observe it in emission among the hottest stars for any value of . This result suggests that the circumstellar envelopes emission volume of the latter group is larger and that the scale height of the disk could be higher than one expected from Keplerian rotation. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  11. The Balmer discontinuity as a test of the density and temperature distributions in circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruzado, A.; Zorec, J.; Vázquez, A.; Ringuelet, A.

    In this contribution we study both components of the Balmer discontinuity (BD) frequently seen in hot stars with line emission (Divan et al. 1978, Cidale et al. 2001). We pay attention to the effects produced on the photospheric component of the BD induced by the presence of a cricumstellar envelope (CE) and we study the intensity of the circumstellar component of the CE as a function of the density and temperature of the CE. The analysis of the observed BD in Be stars and B[e] stars carried with calculation similar to those presented here may lead us to determine the physical parameters that characterize the CE layers close to the central object and estimate the uncertainties on the fundamental parameter estimations of emission line stars when use is made of the their photospheric component of the BD (Zorec & Briot 1991, Cidale et al.2001).

  12. Stimulated emission and the flat Balmer decrements of cataclysmic variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elitzur, M.; Ferland, G. J.; Mathews, S. G.; Shields, G. A.

    1983-01-01

    Balmer emission lines from cataclysmic variables often have nearly equal intensities rather than the rapid decrement predicted by simple nebular theory. Traditionally, this has been interpreted in terms of local thermodynamic equilibrium emission from a dense gas with small volume located just above the accretion disk. It is shown that the intense radiation field within a close binary system can affect excited state populations and optical emission in ways which allow a relatively low density gas to closely mimic the high density situation. In at least one case, the old nova V603 Aql, the emitting gas has a low density and nearly fills the orbital plane of the system. If this is characteristic of other systems, then the determination of orbital parameters and masses of cataclysmic variables from emission line radial velocities, as well as the prediction of soft X-ray emission from accreting binaries, will be affected.

  13. Hydrogen Balmer series measurements and determination of Rydberg's constant using two different spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amrani, D.

    2014-07-01

    This paper investigates the use of two different methods, the optical and the computer-aided diffraction-grating spectrometer, to measure the wavelength of visible lines of Balmer series from the hydrogen atomic spectrum and estimate the value of Rydberg's constant. Analysis and interpretation of data showed that both methods, despite their difference in terms of the type of equipment used, displayed good performance in terms of precision of measurements of wavelengths of spectral lines. A comparison was carried out between the experimental value of Rydberg's constant obtained with both methods and the accepted value. The results of Rydberg's constant obtained with both the optical and computer-aided spectrometers were 1.099 28 × 10-7 m-1 and 1.095 13 × 10-7 m-1 with an error difference of 0.17% and 0.20% compared to the accepted value 1.097 373 × 10-7 m-1, respectively.

  14. The last Balmer line and H gamma in model B stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischel, D.; Klinglesmith, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    Profiles of the last few Balmer lines (H12-H27) and the full profiles of the H gamma line were computed for a grid of hydrogen line blanketed model atmospheres. The use of the last hydrogen line and the equivalent width of H gamma provide a quick means of estimating the effective temperature and surface gravity of B stars. Regression curves relating the quantum number of the last hydrogen line to the electron density in the model atmosphere are given. Futhermore, it is shown that the difference in the gravity determination deduced from H gamma equivalent widths using the Edmonds-Schuter-Wells formalism and the Griem wing formulae is, at worst, 0.18 in the common logarithm.

  15. A Guided-Inquiry Lab for the Analysis of the Balmer Series of the Hydrogen Atomic Spectrum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bopegedera, A. M. R. P.

    2011-01-01

    A guided-inquiry lab was developed to analyze the Balmer series of the hydrogen atomic spectrum. The emission spectrum of hydrogen was recorded with a homemade benchtop spectrophotometer. By drawing graphs and a trial-and-error approach, students discover the linear relationship presented in the Rydberg formula and connect it with the Bohr model…

  16. A Guided-Inquiry Lab for the Analysis of the Balmer Series of the Hydrogen Atomic Spectrum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bopegedera, A. M. R. P.

    2011-01-01

    A guided-inquiry lab was developed to analyze the Balmer series of the hydrogen atomic spectrum. The emission spectrum of hydrogen was recorded with a homemade benchtop spectrophotometer. By drawing graphs and a trial-and-error approach, students discover the linear relationship presented in the Rydberg formula and connect it with the Bohr model…

  17. Anomalous Broadening of Balmer H{sub {alpha}} Line in Aluminum and Copper Hollow Cathode Glow Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Sisovic, N. M.; Majstorovic, G. Lj.; Konjevic, N.

    2008-10-22

    The presented results are concerned with the shape of Balmer alpha line emitted from a low pressure DC glow discharge with aluminum (Al) and copper (Cu) hollow cathode (HC) in pure H{sub 2} and Ar-H{sub 2} gas mixture. The analysis indicates that the line profile represents a convolution of Gaussian profiles resulting from different collision excitation processes.

  18. Use of Fabry-Perot annular summing spectroscopy to acquire geocoronal hydrogen Balmer-α line profile data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nossal, Susan M.; Roesler, Fred L.; Coakley, Monica M.; Reynolds, Ronald J.

    1996-10-01

    A Fabry-Perot annular summing spectroscopy technique has been sued at the University of Wisconsin's Pine Bluff Observatory to acquire geocoronal Balmer-(alpha) line profile data with significantly improved precision and height resolution. The double-etalon Fabry-Perot interference pattern is imaged onto a photometrics PM512 CCD chip, thus enabling light to be gathered in multiple spectral bins simultaneously. In comparison with scanning systems we used earlier, the high quantum efficiency of the CCD and the multi-channel detection associated with the Fabry-Perot annular summing technique have enabled us to save a factor of about 10 in the integration time required for studies of the line profile. As a result, we are now able to both more precisely observe the line shape of the very faint Balmer- (alpha) emission and obtain data using shorter integration times. Our data illustrate the scientific potential for using this technique for the study of very faint extended emission line sources. The increase in the signal-to-noise of our data has enabled us to examine Balmer-(alpha) profile asymmetries which we have found to be compatible with predictions that on the order of 10 percent of the geocoronal Balmer-(alpha) excitation arises from cascades due to higher-member solar Lyman series excitation. This fine structure was overlooked in previous Balmer-(alpha) studies aimed at determining non-Maxwellian dynamical properties of exospheric hydrogen; we find that cascade excitation largely masks the expected very small dynamical perturbations to the line profile at low shadow heights, and must be more thoroughly studied before drawing conclusions about exospheric dynamics. Accounting for cascade laos leads to more realistic determinations of exospheric hydrogen temperatures near the exobase.

  19. The Redshifted Hydrogen Balmer and Metastable He 1 Absorption Line System in Mini-FeLoBAL Quasar SDSS J112526.12+002901.3: A Parsec-scale Accretion Inflow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xi-Heng; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Hui-Yuan; Zhang, Shao-Hua; Ji, Tuo; Liu, Wen-Juan; Zhou, Hong-Yan

    2016-10-01

    The accretion of the interstellar medium onto central super-massive black holes is widely accepted as the source of the gigantic energy released by the active galactic nuclei. However, few pieces of observational evidence have been confirmed directly demonstrating the existence of the inflows. The absorption line system in the spectra of quasar SDSS J112526.12+002901.3 presents an interesting example in which the rarely detected hydrogen Balmer and metastable He i absorption lines are found redshifted to the quasar's rest frame along with the low-ionization metal absorption lines Mg ii, Fe ii, etc. The repeated SDSS spectroscopic observations suggest a transverse velocity smaller than the radial velocity. The motion of the absorbing medium is thus dominated by infall. The He i* lines present a powerful probe to the strength of ionizing flux, while the Balmer lines imply a dense environment. With the help of photoionization simulations, we find that the absorbing medium is exposed to the radiation with ionization parameter U ≈ 10-1.8, and the density is n({{H}})≈ {10}9 {{cm}}-3. Thus the absorbing medium is located ˜4 pc away from the central engine. According to the similarity in the distance and physical conditions between the absorbing medium and the torus, we strongly propose the absorption line system as a candidate for the accretion inflow, which originates in the inner surface of the torus.

  20. Doppler shift measurement of Balmer-alpha line spectrum emission from a plasma in a negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M. Doi, K.; Kisaki, M.; Nakano, H.; Tsumori, K.; Nishiura, M.

    2015-04-08

    Balmer-α light emission from the extraction region of the LHD one-third ion source has shown a characteristic Doppler broadening in the wavelength spectrum detected by a high resolution spectrometer. The spectrum resembles Gaussian distribution near the wavelength of the intensity peak, while it has an additional component of a broader foot. The measured broadening near the wavelength of the intensity peak corresponds to 0.6 eV hydrogen atom temperature. The spectrum exhibits a larger expansion in the blue wing which becomes smaller when the line of sight is tilted toward the driver region from the original observation axis parallel to the plasma grid. A surface collision simulation model predicts the possibility of hydrogen reflection at the plasma grid surface to form a broad Balmer-α light emission spectrum.

  1. Balmer alpha emission and hydrogen atom energy in ion-source discharges

    SciTech Connect

    McNeill, D.H.; Kim, J.

    1981-07-01

    The structure of the hydrogen Balmer alpha line emission profiles from three types of neutral beam injector ion source plasmas (filling pressure approx. 10 mTorr, electron density approx. 1 to 2 x 10/sup 12/ cm/sup -3/, electron temperature approx. 2 to 4 eV) is studied with the aid of a simple model for the neutral particle balance and H/sub ..cap alpha../ emission. A large fraction of the H/sub ..cap alpha../ is produced by dissociative excitation of H/sub 2/ and dissociative recombination of H/sub 2//sup +/, while the remainder is produced by excitation of H atoms, most of which have energies that are close to the characteristic H/sub 2/ dissociation energies. The H/sub ..cap alpha../ linewidth is thus insensitive to the discharge operating conditions and equals approx. 0.27 A when only slow (approx. 0.3 eV) dissociatively excited atoms are present or approx. 0.35 A when fast (> 1 eV) atoms, apparently also produced in dissociation reactions, are present as well.

  2. PROJECT VeSElkA: ANALYSIS OF BALMER LINE PROFILES OF SLOWLY ROTATING CHEMICALLY PECULIAR STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Khalack, V.; LeBlanc, F.

    2015-07-15

    We present results for the estimation of gravity, effective temperature, and radial velocity of poorly studied chemically peculiar stars recently observed with the spectropolarimeter Echelle SpectroPolarimetric Device for Observations of Stars at the Canada–France–Hawaii Telescope in the frame of the Vertical Stratification of Element Abundances project. The effective temperature and surface gravity values are determined for the very first time for four of the stars from our sample (HD 23878, HD 83373, HD 95608, and HD 164584). Grids of stellar atmosphere models with the corresponding fluxes have been calculated using version 15 of the PHOENIX code for effective temperatures in the range of 5000–15,000 K, for the logarithm of surface gravities in the range of 3.0–4.5 and for the metallicities from −1.0 to +1.5. We used these fluxes to fit the Balmer line profiles employing the code FITSB2 that produces estimates of the effective temperature, gravity, and radial velocity for each star. When possible, our results are compared to those previously published. The physical characteristics of 16 program stars are discussed with the future aim to study the abundance anomalies of chemical species and the possible vertical abundance stratification in their stellar atmosphere.

  3. The Balmer basin - Regional geology and geochemistry of an ancient lunar impact basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxwell, T. A.; Andre, C. G.

    1982-01-01

    Photogeologic, geochemical and geophysical information is cited to support the contention that an ancient multi-ringed basin exists in the east limb region of the moon, centered at 15 deg S and 70 deg E. The inner ring of the basin, with a diameter of 225 km, is composed of isolated rugged mountains of pre-Nectarian terra; the less distinct outer ring, whose diameter is approximately 450 km, is made up of irregular segments of surrounding large craters. It is noted that two units of light plains material occur in this area and that they are confined for the most part to the region within the proposed outer basin ring. According to orbital geochemical data, the younger unit (Imbrian age plains) consists of a mare basalt not unlike others of the nearside. This unit possesses high Mg/Al concentration ratios as determined from X-ray fluorescence data; it is also relatively high in Th and Fe when compared with the surrounding highlands. It is thought that the relatively high albedo of the Balmer plains may derive from either a reworking by numerous secondary craters from the surrounding impacts or a basaltic composition with higher albedo and lower Fe than the nearside maria.

  4. Anomalous Doppler broadening caused by exothermic reactions: application to hydrogen Balmer lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loureiro, J.; Amorim, J.

    2011-08-01

    The three- and one-dimensional velocity distributions of a product species created by an exothermic reaction are calculated using the energy conservation, with the aim of evaluating the impact of such processes on the anomalous broadening of Doppler lines. The calculations are performed to the reaction H{2/+} + H2 → H{3/+} + H, in which according to Christoffersen (1964) an amount of 1.56 eV is transferred to the product species. It is shown that the deviations relatively to Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions are significant as the internal energy defect ΔE increases, even within energies lower than 1.56 eV, and hence the profiles of excited H∗ atoms, associated with the emission of hydrogen Balmer lines, created in the sequence of H( n = 1) produced by the above reaction are not of Gaussian-type. The profiles are markedly flatter and squarer than Gaussian distributions. The validity of the species temperature determined from the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the lines, as well as the fit of the lines by multimodal Gaussian functions, is then analyzed.

  5. Analysis of neutral hydrogenic emission spectra in a tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, J.; Chung, J.; Jaspers, R. J. E.

    2015-10-01

    Balmer-α radiation by the excitation of thermal and fast neutral hydrogenic particles has been investigated in a magnetically confined fusion device, or tokamak, from the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR). From the diagnostic point of view, the emission from thermal neutrals is associated with passive spectroscopy and that from energetic neutrals that are usually injected from the outside of the tokamak to the active spectroscopy. The passive spectroscopic measurement for the thermal Balmer-α emission from deuterium and hydrogen estimates the relative concentration of hydrogen in a deuterium-fueled plasma and therefore, makes a useful tool to monitor the vacuum wall condition. The ratio of hydrogen to deuterium obtained from this measurement qualitatively correlates with the energy confinement of the plasma. The Doppler-shifted Balmer-α components from the fast neutrals features the spectrum of the motional Stark effect (MSE) which is an essential principle for the measurement of the magnetic pitch angle profile. Characterization of this active MSE spectra, especially with multiple neutral beam lines crossing along the observation line of sight, has been done for the guideline of the multi-ion-source heating beam operation and for the optimization of the narrow bandpass filters that are required for the polarimeter-based MSE diagnostic system under construction at KSTAR.

  6. Performance of sheath electric field measurement by saturation spectroscopy in Balmer-α line of atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Shusuke; Katayama, Kento; Nakano, Haruhisa; Goto, Motoshi; Sasaki, Koichi

    2017-03-01

    We developed a diode laser-based system for measuring the sheath electric fields in low-temperature plasmas. The Stark spectrum of the Balmer-α line of atomic hydrogen was measured by saturation spectroscopy with a fine spectral resolution. The spectrum observed experimentally was consistent with the theoretical Stark spectrum, and we succeeded in evaluating the electric field strength on the basis of the experimental Stark spectrum. A sensitive detection limit of 10 V/cm was achieved by the developed system.

  7. Spectra Of Star Clusters In The Large Magellanic Cloud As An Age Indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asa'd, Randa; Hanson, M. M.; Ahumada, A.

    2012-01-01

    In a recent study of 84 LMC stellar clusters, we showed there is only a weak correlation between the CMD age and the age assigned by means of their integrated photometry alone (Asa'd & Hanson, 2011). We seek to determine if integrated spectra alone can provide better age estimations of unresolved clusters. To investigate this, we are obtaining integrated spectra for our sample of 84 LMC clusters with CMD ages, and will present preliminary results for 7 clusters observed with the 4m Blanco Telescope (Chile) in the visible. We derive information about the age and the extinction of these clusters using the equivalent width of the Balmer lines, comparing the clusters' spectra with template spectra of star clusters with known parameters, and comparing the spectra with computational models. We will continue to obtain integrated spectra for all 84 clusters from our original study to investigate if spectra can provide more accurate age estimates than integrated photometry.

  8. Star formation in NGC 4449: MAMA-detector UV imagery and Fabry-Perot Balmer-line imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Robert S.; Home, Allen T.; Smith, Andrew M.; Bruhweiler, Fred C.; Cheng, K.P.; Hintzen, Paul M. N.; Oliversen, Ronald J.

    1994-01-01

    Using far-ultraviolet (FUV) and Balmer-line imagery, we investigate the star formation history of 22 large OB complexes in the Magellanic irregular galaxy NGC 4449. The FUV luminosity of NGC 4449 is comparable to those of late-type spirals and is greater than that of the LMC by approximately 2.4 mag, indicating substantial star formation in the last 10(exp 8) yr. FUV data were taken using a sounding-rocket telescope with a Multianode Microchannel Array (MAMA) detector, and Balmer-line data were taken using the Goddard Fabry-Perot Imager. The resulting imagery shows bright, roughly coincident FUV and H alpha sources throughout the extent of the visible galaxy. We model these sources using cluster-evolution codes. Although all sources are a few Myr old, clear age differences are found. In particular, several of the most recently active star formation regions are located together in the galaxy's northern periphery, which is apparently coincident with a large H I reservoir. The brightest and most massive OB complexes are found along the northeast-southwest surface brightness ridgeline (the 'bar'). Over the entire galaxy, star formation rates are consistent on timescales of 10(exp 6), 10(exp 8), and 10(exp 9) yr. A history of recent star formation is suggested with two main episodes, one predominantly in the bar ending approximately 5 Myr ago, and an ongoing one associated with an observed H I cloud.

  9. Star formation in NGC 4449: MAMA-detector UV imagery and Fabry-Perot Balmer-line imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Robert S.; Home, Allen T.; Smith, Andrew M.; Bruhweiler, Fred C.; Cheng, K.P.; Hintzen, Paul M. N.; Oliversen, Ronald J.

    1994-01-01

    Using far-ultraviolet (FUV) and Balmer-line imagery, we investigate the star formation history of 22 large OB complexes in the Magellanic irregular galaxy NGC 4449. The FUV luminosity of NGC 4449 is comparable to those of late-type spirals and is greater than that of the LMC by approximately 2.4 mag, indicating substantial star formation in the last 10(exp 8) yr. FUV data were taken using a sounding-rocket telescope with a Multianode Microchannel Array (MAMA) detector, and Balmer-line data were taken using the Goddard Fabry-Perot Imager. The resulting imagery shows bright, roughly coincident FUV and H alpha sources throughout the extent of the visible galaxy. We model these sources using cluster-evolution codes. Although all sources are a few Myr old, clear age differences are found. In particular, several of the most recently active star formation regions are located together in the galaxy's northern periphery, which is apparently coincident with a large H I reservoir. The brightest and most massive OB complexes are found along the northeast-southwest surface brightness ridgeline (the 'bar'). Over the entire galaxy, star formation rates are consistent on timescales of 10(exp 6), 10(exp 8), and 10(exp 9) yr. A history of recent star formation is suggested with two main episodes, one predominantly in the bar ending approximately 5 Myr ago, and an ongoing one associated with an observed H I cloud.

  10. Star formation in NGC 4449: MAMA-detector UV imagery and Fabry-Perot Balmer-line imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Robert S.; Home, Allen T.; Smith, Andrew M.; Bruhweiler, Fred C.; Cheng, K. P.; Hintzen, Paul M. N.; Oliversen, Ronald J.

    1994-08-01

    Using far-ultraviolet (FUV) and Balmer-line imagery, we investigate the star formation history of 22 large OB complexes in the Magellanic irregular galaxy NGC 4449. The FUV luminosity of NGC 4449 is comparable to those of late-type spirals and is greater than that of the LMC by approximately 2.4 mag, indicating substantial star formation in the last 108 yr. FUV data were taken using a sounding-rocket telescope with a Multianode Microchannel Array (MAMA) detector, and Balmer-line data were taken using the Goddard Fabry-Perot Imager. The resulting imagery shows bright, roughly coincident FUV and H alpha sources throughout the extent of the visible galaxy. We model these sources using cluster-evolution codes. Although all sources are a few Myr old, clear age differences are found. In particular, several of the most recently active star formation regions are located together in the galaxy's northern periphery, which is apparently coincident with a large H I reservoir. The brightest and most massive OB complexes are found along the northeast-southwest surface brightness ridgeline (the 'bar'). Over the entire galaxy, star formation rates are consistent on timescales of 106, 108, and 109 yr. A history of recent star formation is suggested with two main episodes, one predominantly in the bar ending approximately 5 Myr ago, and an ongoing one associated with an observed H I cloud.

  11. Constraining sub-parsec binary supermassive black holes in quasars with multi-epoch spectroscopy. II. The population with kinematically offset broad Balmer emission lines

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xin; Shen, Yue; Bian, Fuyan; Loeb, Abraham; Tremaine, Scott

    2014-07-10

    A small fraction of quasars have long been known to show bulk velocity offsets (of a few hundred to thousands of km s{sup –1}) in the broad Balmer lines with respect to the systemic redshift of the host galaxy. Models to explain these offsets usually invoke broad-line region gas kinematics/asymmetry around single black holes (BHs), orbital motion of massive (∼sub-parsec (sub-pc)) binary black holes (BBHs), or recoil BHs, but single-epoch spectra are unable to distinguish between these scenarios. The line-of-sight (LOS) radial velocity (RV) shifts from long-term spectroscopic monitoring can be used to test the BBH hypothesis. We have selected a sample of 399 quasars with kinematically offset broad Hβ lines from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Seventh Data Release quasar catalog, and have conducted second-epoch optical spectroscopy for 50 of them. Combined with the existing SDSS spectra, the new observations enable us to constrain the LOS RV shifts of broad Hβ lines with a rest-frame baseline of a few years to nearly a decade. While previous work focused on objects with extreme velocity offset (>10{sup 3} km s{sup –1}), we explore the parameter space with smaller (a few hundred km s{sup –1}) yet significant offsets (99.7% confidence). Using cross-correlation analysis, we detect significant (99% confidence) radial accelerations in the broad Hβ lines in 24 of the 50 objects, of ∼10-200 km s{sup –1} yr{sup –1} with a median measurement uncertainty of ∼10 km s{sup –1} yr{sup –1}, implying a high fraction of variability of the broad-line velocity on multi-year timescales. We suggest that 9 of the 24 detections are sub-pc BBH candidates, which show consistent velocity shifts independently measured from a second broad line (either Hα or Mg II) without significant changes in the broad-line profiles. Combining the results on the general quasar population studied in Paper I, we find a tentative anti-correlation between the velocity offset in the

  12. Constraining Sub-parsec Binary Supermassive Black Holes in Quasars with Multi-epoch Spectroscopy. II. The Population with Kinematically Offset Broad Balmer Emission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Shen, Yue; Bian, Fuyan; Loeb, Abraham; Tremaine, Scott

    2014-07-01

    A small fraction of quasars have long been known to show bulk velocity offsets (of a few hundred to thousands of km s-1) in the broad Balmer lines with respect to the systemic redshift of the host galaxy. Models to explain these offsets usually invoke broad-line region gas kinematics/asymmetry around single black holes (BHs), orbital motion of massive (~sub-parsec (sub-pc)) binary black holes (BBHs), or recoil BHs, but single-epoch spectra are unable to distinguish between these scenarios. The line-of-sight (LOS) radial velocity (RV) shifts from long-term spectroscopic monitoring can be used to test the BBH hypothesis. We have selected a sample of 399 quasars with kinematically offset broad Hβ lines from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Seventh Data Release quasar catalog, and have conducted second-epoch optical spectroscopy for 50 of them. Combined with the existing SDSS spectra, the new observations enable us to constrain the LOS RV shifts of broad Hβ lines with a rest-frame baseline of a few years to nearly a decade. While previous work focused on objects with extreme velocity offset (>103 km s-1), we explore the parameter space with smaller (a few hundred km s-1) yet significant offsets (99.7% confidence). Using cross-correlation analysis, we detect significant (99% confidence) radial accelerations in the broad Hβ lines in 24 of the 50 objects, of ~10-200 km s-1 yr-1 with a median measurement uncertainty of ~10 km s-1 yr-1, implying a high fraction of variability of the broad-line velocity on multi-year timescales. We suggest that 9 of the 24 detections are sub-pc BBH candidates, which show consistent velocity shifts independently measured from a second broad line (either Hα or Mg II) without significant changes in the broad-line profiles. Combining the results on the general quasar population studied in Paper I, we find a tentative anti-correlation between the velocity offset in the first-epoch spectrum and the average acceleration between two epochs

  13. The peculiar balmer decrement of SN 2009ip: Constraints on circumstellar geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Levesque, Emily M.; Stringfellow, Guy S.; Bally, John; Keeney, Brian A.; Ginsburg, Adam G.

    2014-01-01

    We present optical and near-IR spectroscopic observations of the luminous blue variable SN 2009ip during its remarkable photometric evolution of 2012. The spectra sample three key points in the SN 2009ip light curve, corresponding to its initial brightening in August (2012-A) and its dramatic rebrightening in early October (2012-B). Based on line fluxes and velocities measured in our spectra, we find a surprisingly low I(Hα)/I(Hβ) ratio (∼1.3-1.4) in the 2012-B spectra. Such a ratio implies either a rare Case B recombination scenario where Hα, but not Hβ, is optically thick, or an extremely high density for the circumstellar material of n{sub e} > 10{sup 13} cm{sup –3}. The Hα line intensity yields a minimum radiating surface area of ≳20,000 AU{sup 2} in Hα at the peak of SN 2009ip's photometric evolution. Combined with the nature of this object's spectral evolution in 2012, a high circumstellar density and large radiating surface area imply the presence of a thin disk geometry around the central star (and, consequently, a possible binary companion), suggesting that the observed 2012-B rebrightening of SN 2009ip can be attributed to the illumination of the disk's inner rim by fast-moving ejecta produced by the underlying events of 2012-A.

  14. Stark spectroscopy at Balmer-α line of atomic hydrogen for measuring sheath electric field in a hydrogen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Shusuke; Nakano, Haruhisa; Goto, Motoshi; Sasaki, Koichi

    2017-06-01

    This paper reports a diode laser based system which is applicable to the measurement of electric field in the sheath region of a hydrogen plasma. The electric field is deduced from the Stark spectrum of the Balmer-α line of atomic hydrogen. Saturation spectroscopy with a Doppler-free spectral resolution is adopted to detect the Stark effects of the low energy states. We have demonstrated a detection limit of 10 V cm-1, which is a sufficient sensitivity for investigating the structures of the sheath electric fields in low-temperature plasmas. We have discussed the detection limit, the measurement ambiguity, the spatial resolution, and the limitation of the developed method.

  15. Inequality spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2017-03-01

    Inequality indices are widely applied in economics and in the social sciences as quantitative measures of the socioeconomic inequality of human societies. The application of inequality indices extends to size-distributions at large, where these indices can be used as general gauges of statistical heterogeneity. Moreover, as inequality indices are plentiful, arrays of such indices facilitate high-detail quantification of statistical heterogeneity. In this paper we elevate from arrays of inequality indices to inequality spectra: continuums of inequality indices that are parameterized by a single control parameter. We present a general methodology of constructing Lorenz-based inequality spectra, apply the general methodology to establish four sets of inequality spectra, investigate the properties of these sets, and show how these sets generalize known inequality gauges such as: the Gini index, the extended Gini index, the Rényi index, and hill curves.

  16. Fe II, [O III], and Balmer Lines in High Redshift QSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, K. L.; Hill, G. J.; Elston, R.

    1992-12-01

    We present spectra of rest-frame optical lines in several high luminosity QSOs with z > 2, taken at KPNO with the Cryogenic Spectrometer on the 2.1m telescope. Using the spectra of the Hβ region, we have fit the amplitudes of Hβ , [O III], and Fe II (the latter using the I Zw 1 iron template created by Boroson and Green 1992). We have firm measurements of optical Fe II in three of the four objects, two of which should be considered strong optical Fe II emitters. We found significant [O III] flux in only one (1413+117, a lensed QSO; Kayser et al. 1990). Our measurements show several interesting results. First, the low measured [O III] fluxes are consistent with a high luminosity extrapolation of the low luminosity anticorrelation between L and [O III]. The strong [O III] measured for 1413+117 is consistent with an intermediate intrinsic luminosity and an amplification factor of 10 or more. The other two high redshift [O III] measurements in the literature (Kuhr et al. 1984; Carswell et al. 1991) are not consistent with this relation, having larger [O III] than expected. The [O III] and Fe II equivalent widths are consistent with the Boroson and Green (1992) low redshift sample, with the possible exception of 1413+117, which seems to have excess of [O III] or Fe II, lying in a region not populated by low redshift objects.

  17. Time-resolved EUV spectra from nitrogen Z-pinching capillary discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevrkla, Michal; Jančárek, Alexandr; Nawaz, Fahad; Parkman, Tomáś; Vrbová, Miroslava

    2015-05-01

    Time-integrated spectra and time-resolved spectra (20 ns resolution) of nitrogen discharge plasma radiation were recorded and analyzed. Plasma was created by a 70 kA, 29 ns rise-time current pulse flowing through a 5 mm inner diameter, 224 mm long capillary filled with nitrogen to initial pressure ˜0.1 ÷ 1 kPa. Spectra were captured in the wavelength range 8.3 ÷ 14 nm. This spectral region contains nitrogen Balmer series lines including potentially lasing NVII 2 - 3 transition1. Spectral lines were identified using the NIST database and the FLY kinetic code. Together with spectra the capillary current was measured. Due to the low inductance design of the driver, the pinch is observable directly from the measured current. 13.38 nm NVII 2 - 3 line was observed in gated, and also in time-integrated spectra for currents <60 kA. For higher gas-filling pressure also other Balmer series lines were observed.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Balmer break galaxies at z<1.5 star formation (Diaz Tello+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz Tello, J.; Donzelli, C.; Padilla, N.; Akiyama, M.; Fujishiro, N.; Yoshikawa, T.; Hanami, H.

    2016-05-01

    The galaxies presented in this article come from a sample constructed to study star formation activity of massive galaxies in the redshift range z=0.1-3.0 (Diaz Tello et al., 2013ApJ...771....7D; hereafter D13). The chosen field, the SXDF (RA=02:18:00, DE=-05:00:00; Furusawa et al., 2008, Cat. J/ApJS/176/1) has the advantage that deep photometric data is available in the bands u, B, R, i, z (Subaru), J, H, K (UKIRT), and in all MIR Spitzer bands. The parent sample was selected using the λ3646 Balmer and λ4000 break features as tracers of redshift, as described by Daddi et al. (2004ApJ...617..746D), utilizing the BzK color-color diagram to select star-forming galaxies in a particular redshift range. Furthermore, we used two color-color diagrams to select star-forming galaxies in a lower redshift range than the BzK diagram; these diagrams were presented in Hanami et al. (2012PASJ...64...70H; uVi and uRJ diagrams). (1 data file).

  19. Numerical and experimental study of atomic transport and Balmer line intensity in Linac4 negative ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, T. Nishida, K.; Hatayama, A.; Mattei, S.; Lettry, J.

    2015-04-08

    Time structure of Balmer H{sub α} line intensity in Linac4 RF plasma has been analyzed by the combined simulation model of atomic transport and Collisional-Radiative models. As a preliminary result, time variation of the line intensity in the ignition phase of RF plasma is calculated and compared with the experimental results by photometry. For the comparison, spatial distribution of the local H{sub α} photon emission rate at each time is calculated from the numerical model. The contribution of the local photon emission rates to the observed line intensity via optical viewing port is also investigated by application of the mock-up of the optical viewing port and the known light source. It has been clarified from the analyses that the higher and the lower peaks of the H{sub α} line intensity observed during 1 RF cycle is mainly due to the different spatial distributions in the electron energy distribution function and the resultant local photon emission rate. These results support previous suggestion that the existence of the capacitive electric field in axial direction leads to the higher/lower peaks of the line intensity.

  20. Doppler spectroscopy of hydrogen Balmer lines in a hollow cathode glow discharge in ammonia and argon-ammonia mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Sisovic, N. M.; Konjevic, N.

    2008-11-15

    The results of Doppler spectroscopy of hydrogen Balmer lines from a stainless steel (SS) and copper (Cu) hollow cathode (HC) glow discharge in ammonia and argon-ammonia mixture are reported. The experimental profiles in ammonia discharge are fitted well by superposing three Gaussian profiles. The half widths, in energy units, of narrow and medium Gaussians are in the ranges 0.3-0.4 eV and 3-4 eV, respectively, for both hollow cathodes what is expected on the basis of earlier electron beam{yields}NH{sub 3} experiments. The half widths of the largest Gaussian in ammonia are 46 and 55 eV for SS and Cu HC, respectively. In argon-ammonia discharge, three Gaussians are also required to fit experimental profiles. While half widths of narrow and medium Gaussians are similar to those in ammonia, the half widths of the largest Gaussians are 35 and 42 eV for SS and Cu HC, respectively. The half widths of the largest Gaussians in ammonia and in argon-ammonia mixture indicate the presence of excessive Doppler broadening.

  1. Measurements of neutral density profiles using a deuterium Balmer-alpha diagnostic in the C-2 FRC plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Deepak K.; Deng, B. H.; Knapp, K.; Sun, X.; Thompson, M. C.

    2012-10-15

    In C-2 field-reversed configuration (FRC) device, low neutral density outside the FRC separatrix is required to minimize the charge exchange loss of fast particles. Titanium gettering is used in C-2 to reduce the wall recycling and keep the neutral density low in plasma edge. The measurements of neutral density radial profile are desirable to understand the plasma recycling and the effects of titanium gettering. These measurements are also needed to study the interaction of neutral beams with FRC plasma and confinement of fast ions. Diagnostic based on absolute deuterium Balmer-alpha (D-alpha) radiation measurements is developed and deployed on C-2 device to measure the radial profile of neutral density. Simultaneous measurements of electron density and temperature are done using CO{sub 2} interferometer, Thomson scattering, and triple probes diagnostics along with absolute D-alpha radiation. Abel inversion was performed to get the time dependent radial profile of the local D-alpha emission density. Neutral density profiles are obtained under different machine conditions of titanium deposition.

  2. Spatially Resolved Spectroscopy of a Balmer-dominated Shock in the Cygnus Loop: An Extremely Thin Cosmic-Ray Precursor?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Maeda, Keiichi; Ohira, Yutaka; Yatsu, Yoichi; Mori, Koji; Aoki, Wako; Morihana, Kumiko; Raymond, John C.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Lee, Jae-Joon; Shimoda, Jiro; Yamazaki, Ryo

    2016-03-01

    We present high-resolution long-slit spectroscopy of a Balmer-dominated shock in the northeastern limb of the Cygnus Loop with the Subaru high dispersion spectrograph. By setting the slit angle along the shock normal, we investigate variations of the flux and profile of the Hα line from preshock to postshock regions with a spatial resolution of ˜4 × 1015 cm. The Hα line profile can be represented by a narrow (28.9 ± 0.7 km s-1) Gaussian in a diffuse region ahead of the shock, i.e., a photoionization precursor, and narrow (33.1 ± 0.2 km s-1) plus broad (130-230 km s-1) Gaussians at the shock itself. We find that the width of the narrow component abruptly increases up to 33.1 ± 0.2 km s-1, or 38.8 ± 0.4 km s-1 if we eliminate projected emission originating from the photoionization precursor, in an unresolved thin layer (≲4 × 1015 cm at a distance of 540 pc) at the shock. We show that the sudden broadening can be best explained by heating via damping of Alfvén waves in a thin cosmic-ray (CR) precursor, although other possibilities are not fully ruled out. The thickness of the CR precursor in the Cygnus Loop (a soft gamma-ray emitter) is an order of magnitude thinner than that in Tycho’s Knot g (a hard gamma-ray emitter), which may be caused by the different energy distribution of accelerated particles between the two sources. In this context, systematic studies might reveal a positive correlation between the thickness of the CR precursor and the hardness of the CR energy distribution.

  3. On the role of atomic metastability in the production of Balmer line radiation from ‘cold’ atomic hydrogen, deuterium and hydrogenic ion impurities in fusion edge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hey, J. D.

    2012-03-01

    Published arguments, which assign an important role to atomic metastability in the production of ‘narrow’ Zeeman component radiation from the boundary region of fusion plasmas, are examined critically in relation to l-redistribution by proton and electron collisions, and mixing of unperturbed atomic states by the ion microfield and microfield gradient. It is concluded that these important processes indeed severely constrain the contribution from ‘metastable’ states to the generation of the hydrogen Balmer spectra, for electron concentrations above 1012 cm-3, as pointed out before by the present author (Hey et al 1999 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 32 3555). The analysis of collision-induced l-redistribution represents an extension of that used previously (Hey et al 1996 Contrib. Plasma Phys. 36 583), applicable up to higher electron densities. For comparison purposes, we also consider the question of metastability of ionized helium in a low-temperature plasma, and that of some common hydrogenic impurities (C5+ and Ne9+) in a hydrogen (deuterium) fusion plasma. While for low nuclear charge Z the metastability of 2s1/2 levels is quenched by the plasma environment, it is much reduced in high-Z ions owing to the rapid increase with Z of the two-photon electric dipole (2E1) and magnetic dipole (M1) spontaneous transition rates to the ground state, whereas the role of the plasma in these cases is less important. The main new principle elaborated in this work is the sensitivity of atomic line strengths, and hence collision strengths, to perturbation by the plasma environment for transitions between fine-structure sublevels of the same principal quantum number. As the plasma microfield strength grows, ‘allowed’ transitions diminish in strength, while ‘forbidden’ transitions grow. However, owing to violation of the parity selection rule, there is an overall loss of collision strength available to transitions, resulting from the appearance of significant

  4. Balmer Filaments in Tycho’s Supernova Remnant: An Interplay between Cosmic-ray and Broad-neutral Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knežević, Sladjana; Läsker, Ronald; van de Ven, Glenn; Font, Joan; Raymond, John C.; Bailer-Jones, Coryn A. L.; Beckman, John; Morlino, Giovanni; Ghavamian, Parviz; Hughes, John P.; Heng, Kevin

    2017-09-01

    We present Hα spectroscopic observations and detailed modeling of the Balmer filaments in the supernova remnant (SNR) Tycho (SN 1572). We used GH α FaS (Galaxy Hα Fabry–Pérot Spectrometer) on the William Herschel Telescope with a 3.‧4 × 3.‧4 field of view, 0.″2 pixel scale, and {σ }{instr}=8.1 km s‑1 resolution at 1″ seeing for ∼10 hr, resulting in 82 spatial‑spectral bins that resolve the narrow Hα line in the entire SN 1572 northeastern rim. For the first time, we can therefore mitigate artificial line broadening from unresolved differential motion and probe Hα emission parameters in varying shock and ambient medium conditions. Broad Hα line remains unresolved within spectral coverage of 392 km s‑1. We employed Bayesian inference to obtain reliable parameter confidence intervals and to quantify the evidence for models with multiple line components. The median Hα narrow-line (NL) FWHM of all bins and models is {W}{NL}=(54.8+/- 1.8) km s‑1 at the 95% confidence level, varying within [35, 72] km s‑1 between bins and clearly broadened compared to the intrinsic (thermal) ≈20 km s‑1. Possible line splits are accounted for, significant in ≈ 18 % of the filament, and presumably due to remaining projection effects. We also find widespread evidence for intermediate-line emission of a broad-neutral precursor, with a median {W}{IL}=(180+/- 14) km s‑1 (95% confidence). Finally, we present a measurement of the remnant’s systemic velocity, {V}{LSR}=-34 km s‑1, and map differential line-of-sight motions. Our results confirm the existence and interplay of shock precursors in Tycho’s remnant. In particular, we show that suprathermal NL emission is near-universal in SN 1572, and that, in the absence of an alternative explanation, collisionless SNR shocks constitute a viable acceleration source for Galactic TeV cosmic-ray protons.

  5. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES, STAR FORMATION, AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY IN BALMER BREAK GALAXIES AT 0 < z < 1

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz Tello, J.; Donzelli, C.; Padilla, N.; Fujishiro, N.; Yoshikawa, T.; Hanami, H.; Hatsukade, B.

    2013-07-01

    We present a spectroscopic study with the derivation of the physical properties of 37 Balmer break galaxies, which have the necessary lines to locate them in star-forming-active galactic nuclei (AGNs) diagnostic diagrams. These galaxies span a redshift range from 0.045 to 0.93 and are somewhat less massive than similar samples of previous works. The studied sample has multiwavelength photometric data coverage from the ultraviolet to mid-infrared (MIR) Spitzer bands. We investigate the connection between star formation and AGN activity via optical, mass-excitation (MEx), and MIR diagnostic diagrams. Through optical diagrams, 31 (84%) star-forming galaxies, two (5%) composite galaxies, and three (8%) AGNs were classified, whereas from the MEx diagram only one galaxy was classified as AGN. A total of 19 galaxies have photometry available in all the IRAC/Spitzer bands. Of these, three AGN candidates were not classified as AGN in the optical diagrams, suggesting they are dusty/obscured AGNs, or that nuclear star formation has diluted their contributions. By fitting the spectral energy distribution of the galaxies, we derived the stellar masses, dust reddening E(B - V), ages, and UV star formation rates (SFRs). Furthermore, the relationship between SFR surface density ({Sigma}{sub SFR}) and stellar mass surface density per time unit ({Sigma}{sub M{sub */{tau}}}) as a function of redshift was investigated using the [O II] {lambda}3727, 3729, H{alpha} {lambda}6563 luminosities, which revealed that both quantities are larger for higher redshift galaxies. We also studied the SFR and specific SFR (SSFR) versus stellar mass and color relations, with the more massive galaxies having higher SFR values but lower SSFR values than less massive galaxies. These results are consistent with previous ones showing that, at a given mass, high-redshift galaxies have on average larger SFR and SSFR values than low-redshift galaxies. Finally, bluer galaxies have larger SSFR values than redder

  6. Physical Properties, Star Formation, and Active Galactic Nucleus Activity in Balmer Break Galaxies at 0 < z < 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Tello, J.; Donzelli, C.; Padilla, N.; Fujishiro, N.; Hanami, H.; Yoshikawa, T.; Hatsukade, B.

    2013-07-01

    We present a spectroscopic study with the derivation of the physical properties of 37 Balmer break galaxies, which have the necessary lines to locate them in star-forming-active galactic nuclei (AGNs) diagnostic diagrams. These galaxies span a redshift range from 0.045 to 0.93 and are somewhat less massive than similar samples of previous works. The studied sample has multiwavelength photometric data coverage from the ultraviolet to mid-infrared (MIR) Spitzer bands. We investigate the connection between star formation and AGN activity via optical, mass-excitation (MEx), and MIR diagnostic diagrams. Through optical diagrams, 31 (84%) star-forming galaxies, two (5%) composite galaxies, and three (8%) AGNs were classified, whereas from the MEx diagram only one galaxy was classified as AGN. A total of 19 galaxies have photometry available in all the IRAC/Spitzer bands. Of these, three AGN candidates were not classified as AGN in the optical diagrams, suggesting they are dusty/obscured AGNs, or that nuclear star formation has diluted their contributions. By fitting the spectral energy distribution of the galaxies, we derived the stellar masses, dust reddening E(B - V), ages, and UV star formation rates (SFRs). Furthermore, the relationship between SFR surface density (ΣSFR) and stellar mass surface density per time unit (\\Sigma _{M_{\\ast }/\\tau }) as a function of redshift was investigated using the [O II] λ3727, 3729, Hα λ6563 luminosities, which revealed that both quantities are larger for higher redshift galaxies. We also studied the SFR and specific SFR (SSFR) versus stellar mass and color relations, with the more massive galaxies having higher SFR values but lower SSFR values than less massive galaxies. These results are consistent with previous ones showing that, at a given mass, high-redshift galaxies have on average larger SFR and SSFR values than low-redshift galaxies. Finally, bluer galaxies have larger SSFR values than redder galaxies and for a given

  7. DUST EXTINCTION FROM BALMER DECREMENTS OF STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT 0.75 {<=} z {<=} 1.5 WITH HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE/WIDE-FIELD-CAMERA 3 SPECTROSCOPY FROM THE WFC3 INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC PARALLEL SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, A.; Siana, B.; Masters, D.; Henry, A. L.; Martin, C. L.; Scarlata, C.; Bedregal, A. G.; Malkan, M.; Ross, N. R.; Atek, H.; Colbert, J. W.; Teplitz, H. I.; Rafelski, M.; McCarthy, P.; Hathi, N. P.; Dressler, A.; Bunker, A.

    2013-02-15

    Spectroscopic observations of H{alpha} and H{beta} emission lines of 128 star-forming galaxies in the redshift range 0.75 {<=} z {<=} 1.5 are presented. These data were taken with slitless spectroscopy using the G102 and G141 grisms of the Wide-Field-Camera 3 (WFC3) on board the Hubble Space Telescope as part of the WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallel survey. Interstellar dust extinction is measured from stacked spectra that cover the Balmer decrement (H{alpha}/H{beta}). We present dust extinction as a function of H{alpha} luminosity (down to 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 41} erg s{sup -1}), galaxy stellar mass (reaching 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M {sub Sun }), and rest-frame H{alpha} equivalent width. The faintest galaxies are two times fainter in H{alpha} luminosity than galaxies previously studied at z {approx} 1.5. An evolution is observed where galaxies of the same H{alpha} luminosity have lower extinction at higher redshifts, whereas no evolution is found within our error bars with stellar mass. The lower H{alpha} luminosity galaxies in our sample are found to be consistent with no dust extinction. We find an anti-correlation of the [O III] {lambda}5007/H{alpha} flux ratio as a function of luminosity where galaxies with L {sub H{alpha}} < 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 41} erg s{sup -1} are brighter in [O III] {lambda}5007 than H{alpha}. This trend is evident even after extinction correction, suggesting that the increased [O III] {lambda}5007/H{alpha} ratio in low-luminosity galaxies is likely due to lower metallicity and/or higher ionization parameters.

  8. Vanadium Oxide in the Spectra of Mira Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelaz, M. W.; Luttermoser, D. G.; Piontek, R. A.

    1999-05-01

    Over the last three years, we have made spectroscopic measurements of twenty Mira variable stars, as a function of phase, probing their stellar atmospheres and underlying pulsation mechanisms. Measurement of variations in TiO and VO with phase can be used to help determine whether these molecular species are produced in an extended region above the layers where Balmer line emission occurs or below this shocked region. Piontek & Luttermoser (1999 IAPPPC, submitted), produce synthetic spectra for three Mira variables, R Leo, V CVn, and R CVn as a function of phase. Comparison of their synthetic spectra to our observed spectra yield the fundamental astrophysical parameters of effective temperatures and surface gravities. Spectra are synthesized with LTE stellar stmospheres code ATLAS, using the 6.6--million Indiana University atomic and molecular line dataset. Piontek & Luttermoser point out that the IU dataset does not include vanadium oxide (VO). Thus, there is a noticeable difference between the synthetic spectra and observed near-IR spectra corresponding to the B-X bands of VO (Mahanti 1935, Proc. Phys. Soc., 47, 43; Keenan & Schroeder 1952,L. W., ApJ, 115, 82). In order to incorporate the VO bands in the synthetic spectra, we need to establish tables of wavenumbers, lowest energy levels, and oscillator strengths. Producing the tables is non-trivial. Laboratory measurements of wavenumbers are used in the Just-Overlapping Line Approximation (JOLA; Tsuji 1966, PASJ, 18, 127) to calculate oscillator strengths. The JOLA technique and preliminary results will be presented. MWC greatly appreciates support from the National Science Foundation grant AST-9500756. RAP acknowledges the Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy 1998 Summer REU program supported by the National Science Foundation and thanks DGL for being his mentor.

  9. Time-resolved Properties and Global Trends in dMe Flares from Simultaneous Photometry and Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Wisniewski, John P.; Osten, Rachel A.; Hilton, Eric J.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Davenport, James R. A.

    2013-07-01

    We present a homogeneous analysis of line and continuum emission from simultaneous high-cadence spectra and photometry covering near-ultraviolet and optical wavelengths for 20 M dwarf flares. These data were obtained to study the white-light continuum components at bluer and redder wavelengths than the Balmer jump. Our goals were to break the degeneracy between emission mechanisms that have been fit to broadband colors of flares and to provide constraints for radiative-hydrodynamic (RHD) flare models that seek to reproduce the white-light flare emission. The main results from the analysis are the following: (1) the detection of Balmer continuum (in emission) that is present during all flares and with a wide range of relative contributions to the continuum flux at bluer wavelengths than the Balmer jump; (2) a blue continuum at flare maximum that is linearly decreasing with wavelength from λ = 4000-4800 Å, indicative of hot, blackbody emission with typical temperatures of T BB ~ 9000-14, 000 K (3) a redder continuum apparent at wavelengths longer than Hβ (λ >~ 4900 Å) which becomes relatively more important to the energy budget during the late gradual phase. The hot blackbody component and redder continuum component have been detected in previous studies of flares. However, we have found that although the hot blackbody emission component is relatively well-represented by a featureless, single-temperature Planck function, this component includes absorption features and has a continuum shape strikingly similar to the spectrum of an A-type star as directly observed in our flare spectra. New model constraints are presented for the time evolution among the hydrogen Balmer lines and between Ca II K and the blackbody continuum emission. We calculate Balmer jump flux ratios and compare to the solar-type flare heating predictions from RHD models. The model ratios are too large and the blue-optical (λ = 4000-4800 Å) slopes are too red in both the impulsive and gradual

  10. TIME-RESOLVED PROPERTIES AND GLOBAL TRENDS IN dMe FLARES FROM SIMULTANEOUS PHOTOMETRY AND SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Davenport, James R. A.; Wisniewski, John P.; Osten, Rachel A.; Hilton, Eric J.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Schmidt, Sarah J.

    2013-07-15

    We present a homogeneous analysis of line and continuum emission from simultaneous high-cadence spectra and photometry covering near-ultraviolet and optical wavelengths for 20 M dwarf flares. These data were obtained to study the white-light continuum components at bluer and redder wavelengths than the Balmer jump. Our goals were to break the degeneracy between emission mechanisms that have been fit to broadband colors of flares and to provide constraints for radiative-hydrodynamic (RHD) flare models that seek to reproduce the white-light flare emission. The main results from the analysis are the following: (1) the detection of Balmer continuum (in emission) that is present during all flares and with a wide range of relative contributions to the continuum flux at bluer wavelengths than the Balmer jump; (2) a blue continuum at flare maximum that is linearly decreasing with wavelength from {lambda} = 4000-4800 A, indicative of hot, blackbody emission with typical temperatures of T{sub BB} {approx} 9000-14, 000 K; (3) a redder continuum apparent at wavelengths longer than H{beta} ({lambda} {approx}> 4900 A) which becomes relatively more important to the energy budget during the late gradual phase. The hot blackbody component and redder continuum component have been detected in previous studies of flares. However, we have found that although the hot blackbody emission component is relatively well-represented by a featureless, single-temperature Planck function, this component includes absorption features and has a continuum shape strikingly similar to the spectrum of an A-type star as directly observed in our flare spectra. New model constraints are presented for the time evolution among the hydrogen Balmer lines and between Ca II K and the blackbody continuum emission. We calculate Balmer jump flux ratios and compare to the solar-type flare heating predictions from RHD models. The model ratios are too large and the blue-optical ({lambda} = 4000-4800 A) slopes are too

  11. Time resolved EUV spectra from Zpinching capillary discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jancarek, Alexandr; Nevrkla, Michal; Nawaz, Fahad

    2015-09-01

    We developed symmetrically charged driver to obtain high voltage, high current Z-pinching capillary discharge. Plasma is created by up to 70 kA, 29 ns risetime current pulse passing through a 5 mm inner diameter, 224 mm long capillary filled with gas to initial pressure in the range of 1 kPa. Due to the low inductance design of the driver, the pinch is observable directly from the measured current curve. Time-integrated and time-resolved spectra of discharge plasma radiation are recorded together with the capillary current and analyzed. The most encouraging spectra were captured in the wavelength range 8.3 ÷ 14 nm. This spectral region contains nitrogen Balmer series lines including potentially lasing NVII 2 - 3 transition. Spectral lines are identified in the NIST database using the FLY kinetic code. The line of 13.38 nm wavelength, transition NVII 2 - 3, was observed in gated, and also in time-integrated spectra for currents >60 kA. This work has been supported by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic grants LG13029.

  12. Correlations between density distributions, optical spectra, and ion species in a hydrogen plasma (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortázar, O. D.; Megía-Macías, A.; Tarvainen, O.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.

    2016-02-01

    An experimental study of plasma distributions in a 2.45 GHz hydrogen discharge operated at 100 Hz repetition rate is presented. Ultrafast photography, time integrated visible light emission spectra, time resolved Balmer-alpha emission, time resolved Fulcher Band emission, ion species mass spectra, and time resolved ion species fraction measurements have been implemented as diagnostic tools in a broad range of plasma conditions. Results of plasma distributions and optical emissions correlated with H+, H2 + , and H3 + ion currents by using a Wien filter system with optical observation capability are reported. The magnetic field distribution and strength is found as the most critical factor for transitions between different plasma patterns and ion populations.

  13. Analysis of High Time Resolution Optical Spectra of RX J0558.0+5353

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, K. A.; Garnavich, P. M.; Noriega-Crespo, A.

    1996-12-01

    We analyze high time resolution optical spectra of the DQ Her type intermediate polar RX J0558.0+5353 obtained at the MMT in December 1995. The spectra cover nearly a complete orbit and reveal a pulse in the mean flux of the continua and in the fluxes of the Hβ , Hγ and He II 4686 lines. This pulse, with a fundamental frequency of approximately 165c/d and a first harmonic at 316c/d confirms the spin period reported by Skillman (1995). Measurements of radial velocities in the line wings suggest that the HeII emission arises from an inner region of the accretion disk, closer to the white dwarf than the region where the Balmer lines are emitted. Doppler tomography of Hβ and HeII lines yields visual confirmation of this picture of accretion and emissions in this intermediate polar system.

  14. Correlations between density distributions, optical spectra, and ion species in a hydrogen plasma (invited).

    PubMed

    Cortázar, O D; Megía-Macías, A; Tarvainen, O; Kalvas, T; Koivisto, H

    2016-02-01

    An experimental study of plasma distributions in a 2.45 GHz hydrogen discharge operated at 100 Hz repetition rate is presented. Ultrafast photography, time integrated visible light emission spectra, time resolved Balmer-alpha emission, time resolved Fulcher Band emission, ion species mass spectra, and time resolved ion species fraction measurements have been implemented as diagnostic tools in a broad range of plasma conditions. Results of plasma distributions and optical emissions correlated with H(+), H2(+), and H3(+) ion currents by using a Wien filter system with optical observation capability are reported. The magnetic field distribution and strength is found as the most critical factor for transitions between different plasma patterns and ion populations.

  15. The continuum emission spectrum of Hf 2-2 near the Balmer limit and the ORL versus CEL abundance and temperature discrepancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, P. J.; Sochi, Taha

    2014-05-01

    The continuum spectrum of the planetary nebula Hf 2-2 close to the Balmer discontinuity is modelled in the context of the long-standing problem of the abundance and temperature discrepancy found when analysing optical recombination lines and collisionally excited forbidden lines in nebulae. Models are constructed using single and double Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions as well as κ-distributions for the energies of the free electrons. New results for the necessary continuum and line emission coefficients are presented calculated with κ-distributed energies. The best fit to the observed continuum spectrum is found to be a model comprising two components with dramatically different temperatures and with a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of electron energies. On the basis of a χ2 analysis, this model is strongly favoured over a model with κ-distributed electron energies.

  16. Asymmetry of the Balmer-alpha line shape and recovery of the effective hydrogen temperature in the tokamak scrape-off layer

    SciTech Connect

    Neverov, V. S. Kukushkin, A. B.; Lisgo, S. W. Kukushkin, A. S.; Alekseev, A. G.

    2015-02-15

    An algorithm for recovering the effective temperature of atoms of hydrogen (and its isotopes) in the tokamak scrape-off layer from the asymmetry of the Balmer-alpha line shape is proposed. The algorithm is based on the parametrization of the asymmetry of the line shape caused by the nonlocal character of neutral hydrogen flux from the wall into the tokamak plasma. The accuracy of the algorithm is tested against the results of simulations of the velocity distribution function of deuterium neutrals in the scrape-off layer by the EIRENE code with the use of the source data on the main plasma component in the quasi-stationary stage of the inductive mode of ITER operation calculated by the SOLPS4.3 (B2-EIRENE) code.

  17. Correlation between Balmer /α emission and hydrogen flux through a superpermeable niobium membrane in a low-pressure multicusp plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruneteau, A. M.; Notkin, M. E.; Livshits, A. I.; Bacal, M.

    2002-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to correlate hydrogen or deuterium flux through superpermeable membranes with incident hydrogen or deuterium atom flux from the plasma. To this aim a hydrogen or deuterium plasma is created in a hybrid multicusp plasma source. We investigate Balmer α emission from the multicusp plasma and the output pressure behind a superpermeable niobium membrane immersed in the plasma.The output pressure is proportional to the flux of atoms and ions arriving on the membrane. We find that both output pressure and excited atoms emission satisfy plasma parameters relations. It is thus verified that plasma-driven superpermeation of hydrogen is due essentially to neutral atoms from the plasma incident to the membrane.

  18. A method of interpreting the Balmer-alpha high-resolution spectroscopy for tokamak edge plasmas with account of divertor stray light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neverov, V. S.; Kukushkin, A. B.; Alekseev, A. G.

    2016-01-01

    A method is suggested for interpreting the data from the Balmer-alpha high- resolution spectroscopy diagnostics of the edge plasma in the tokamak main chamber, which additionally uses the data from direct observation of the divertor. Such an extension of the diagnostics is motivated by the fact that in a tokamak-reactor with the metal first wall, like ITER tokamak, a significant role of the divertor stray light (DSL), which is emitted by the plasma in the divertor in the same spectral line and reflected from the first wall of the vacuum chamber to a spectrometer in the main chamber, is expected. The results of the first applications of the developed model to interpret the data from the JET-ILW tokamak experiments, which simulate the conditions of occurrence of the DSL in ITER, are discussed.

  19. The Multiwavelength Analysis Of Galaxies At z 1.5 And 4: Morphologies And SEDs Of Balmer-break Selected Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petty, Sara M.; de Mello, D. F.; Wiklind, T.; Gardner, J. P.

    2010-01-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of high-z galaxies at z 1.5 and 4, using Hubble Space Telescope optical (ACS), near-infrared (NICMOS), and mid-infrared images (Spitzer/IRAC). The morphologies of detected objects are categorized quantitatively by the Gini coefficient, M20, and the 2D Sersic index. A catalog of sources has been created and cross-matched between the multiple wavelengths. The data includes the ACS filters F606W and 850LP; NICMOS filters F110W, and F160W; and IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8 and 8.0 μm filters. The galaxies are extracted from the NICMOS parallel pointings as part of the UDF05 campaign. We use the Balmer-break to fit SEDs for 301 galaxies and obtain photometric redshifts, dust extinction, starburst age, bolometric luminosities, and metallicities. We measure G, M20, and Sérsic for a selection of the SED fitted data in the redshift regions 1.3 < z < 2 and 3 < z < 4. The quantitative morphologies are compared in the F606W, F850LP, F110W, and F160W images and are compared with a sample of LBGs at z 1.5 and 4. We compare the morphologies with the SED derived physical parameters. One major result shows that the luminosities are 16 times brighter for galaxies at z 4. Our purpose is to determine trends in morphologies as a function of redshift and physical parameters for Balmer-break selected galaxies which have older stellar populations than LBGs.

  20. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCE ANTICORRELATIONS IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER STARS: THE EFFECT ON CLUSTER INTEGRATED SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Coelho, P.; Percival, S. M.; Salaris, M. E-mail: smp@astro.livjm.ac.uk

    2011-06-10

    It is widely accepted that individual Galactic globular clusters harbor two coeval generations of stars, the first one born with the 'standard' {alpha}-enhanced metal mixture observed in field halo objects and the second one characterized by an anticorrelated CNONa abundance pattern overimposed on the first generation, {alpha}-enhanced metal mixture. We have investigated with appropriate stellar population synthesis models how this second generation of stars affects the integrated spectrum of a typical metal-rich Galactic globular cluster, like 47 Tuc, focusing our analysis on the widely used Lick-type indices. We find that the only indices appreciably affected by the abundance anticorrelations are Ca4227, G4300, CN{sub 1}, CN{sub 2}, and NaD. The age-sensitive Balmer line, Fe line, and the [MgFe] indices widely used to determine age, Fe, and total metallicity of extragalactic systems are largely insensitive to the second generation population. Enhanced He in second generation stars affects also the Balmer line indices of the integrated spectra, through the change of the turnoff temperature and-with the assumption that the mass-loss history of both stellar generations is the same-the horizontal branch morphology of the underlying isochrones.

  1. Reactor Neutrino Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Anna C.; Vogel, Petr

    2016-10-01

    We present a review of the antineutrino spectra emitted from reactors. Knowledge of these spectra and their associated uncertainties is crucial for neutrino oscillation studies. The spectra used to date have been determined either by converting measured electron spectra to antineutrino spectra or by summing over all of the thousands of transitions that make up the spectra, using modern databases as input. The uncertainties in the subdominant corrections to β-decay plague both methods, and we provide estimates of these uncertainties. Improving on current knowledge of the antineutrino spectra from reactors will require new experiments. Such experiments would also address the so-called reactor neutrino anomaly and the possible origin of the shoulder observed in the antineutrino spectra measured in recent high-statistics reactor neutrino experiments.

  2. [The radial velocity measurement accuracy of different spectral type low resolution stellar spectra at different signal-to-noise ratio].

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-Fei; Luo, A-Li; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2014-02-01

    The radial velocity of the star is very important for the study of the dynamics structure and chemistry evolution of the Milky Way, is also an useful tool for looking for variable or special objects. In the present work, we focus on calculating the radial velocity of different spectral types of low-resolution stellar spectra by adopting a template matching method, so as to provide effective and reliable reference to the different aspects of scientific research We choose high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) spectra of different spectral type stellar from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and add different noise to simulate the stellar spectra with different SNR. Then we obtain theradial velocity measurement accuracy of different spectral type stellar spectra at different SNR by employing a template matching method. Meanwhile, the radial velocity measurement accuracy of white dwarf stars is analyzed as well. We concluded that the accuracy of radial velocity measurements of early-type stars is much higher than late-type ones. For example, the 1-sigma standard error of radial velocity measurements of A-type stars is 5-8 times as large as K-type and M-type stars. We discuss the reason and suggest that the very narrow lines of late-type stars ensure the accuracy of measurement of radial velocities, while the early-type stars with very wide Balmer lines, such as A-type stars, become sensitive to noise and obtain low accuracy of radial velocities. For the spectra of white dwarfs stars, the standard error of radial velocity measurement could be over 50 km x s(-1) because of their extremely wide Balmer lines. The above conclusion will provide a good reference for stellar scientific study.

  3. Photographic spectra of fireballs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovička, J.

    2016-01-01

    Two methods of spectroscopy of meteors using image intensified video cameras and classical photographic film cameras are compared. Video cameras provide large number of low resolution spectra of meteors of normal brightness, which can be used for statistical studies. Large format film cameras have been used through the history and provide high resolution spectra, which can be used to derive temperature, density and absolute abundances of various elements in the radiating plasma. The sensitivity of films is, however, low and only spectra of bright meteors (fireballs) can be studied. Examples of photographic fireball spectra are provided.

  4. Crack spectra analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tiernan, M.

    1980-09-01

    Crack spectra derived from velocity data have been shown to exhibit systematics which reflect microstructural and textural differences between samples (Warren and Tiernan, 1980). Further research into both properties and information content of crack spectra have yielded the following: Spectral features are reproducible even at low pressures; certain observed spectral features may correspond to non-in-situ crack populations created during sample retrieval; the functional form of a crack spectra may be diagnostic of the sample's grain texture; hysteresis is observed in crack spectra between up and down pressure runs - it may be due to friction between the faces of closed crack populations.

  5. HST Spectra of White Dwarfs and the Mass-Radius Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, S. R. G.; Barstow, M. A.; Casewell, S. L.; Holberg, J. B.; Bond, H. E.

    2017-03-01

    We present HST spectra of the white dwarf HR1358b which is one of a number of white dwarfs we are studying in Sirius-like binaries. These binaries give us the best chance yet to test the mass-radius relation through observations of the Balmer lines of white dwarfs. These observations can be used to measure the white dwarf mass using both the spectroscopic method and the gravitational red-shift method. One of the major challenges for this type of observation is scattered light from the main sequence star contaminating the white dwarf spectrum. We will discuss methods that have been developed to correct for scattered light in the spectrum of HR1358b and the effect this correction can have on the mass-radius measurements.

  6. The Balmer Lines of He ii in the Blue Wing of the Hydrogen Lyman α Line Observed in a Quiescent Prominence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vial, J.-C.; Eurin, G.; Curdt, W.

    2015-02-01

    We revisit the prominence observations in the Lyman α line of Curdt et al. ( Astron. Astrophys. 511, L4, 2010) and focus on the bump in the blue wing of the line, which we identify with He ii Balmer lines. We determine the transition candidates, derive an upper limit for the width of the profile and an associated non-thermal velocity close to 0 km s-1, with the assumption that the kinetic temperature is equal to the formation temperature. We compare the total intensity with the corresponding H Lyman α intensity and find a ratio much lower than that measured by Ebadi, Vial, and Ajabshirizadeh ( Solar Phys. 257, 91, 2009) in other Lyman lines. We confirm this result with observations performed by Schwartz et al. (private communication, 2014), we discuss a possible interpretation, and suggest that this issue needs to be addressed closely in future observations.

  7. Objective identification of informative wavelength regions in galaxy spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, Ching-Wa; Szalay, Alexander S.; Budavári, Tamás; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Mahoney, Michael W.; Csabai, István; Dobos, Laszlo E-mail: szalay@jhu.edu

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the diversity in spectra is the key to determining the physical parameters of galaxies. The optical spectra of galaxies are highly convoluted with continuum and lines that are potentially sensitive to different physical parameters. Defining the wavelength regions of interest is therefore an important question. In this work, we identify informative wavelength regions in a single-burst stellar population model using the CUR Matrix Decomposition. Simulating the Lick/IDS spectrograph configuration, we recover the widely used D {sub n}(4000), Hβ, and Hδ {sub A} to be most informative. Simulating the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectrograph configuration with a wavelength range 3450-8350 Å and a model-limited spectral resolution of 3 Å, the most informative regions are: first region—the 4000 Å break and the Hδ line; second region—the Fe-like indices; third region—the Hβ line; and fourth region—the G band and the Hγ line. A principal component analysis on the first region shows that the first eigenspectrum tells primarily the stellar age, the second eigenspectrum is related to the age-metallicity degeneracy, and the third eigenspectrum shows an anti-correlation between the strengths of the Balmer and the Ca K and H absorptions. The regions can be used to determine the stellar age and metallicity in early-type galaxies that have solar abundance ratios, no dust, and a single-burst star formation history. The region identification method can be applied to any set of spectra of the user's interest, so that we eliminate the need for a common, fixed-resolution index system. We discuss future directions in extending the current analysis to late-type galaxies. ASCII formatted tables of the regional eigenspectra are available.

  8. Action spectra again?

    PubMed

    Coohill, T P

    1991-11-01

    Action spectroscopy has a long history and is of central importance to photobiological studies. Action spectra were among the first assays to point to chlorophyll as the molecule most responsible for plant growth and to DNA as the genetic material. It is useful to construct action spectra early in the investigation of new areas of photobiological research in an attempt to determine the wavelength limits of the radiation region causing the studied response. But due to the severe absorption of ultraviolet (UV) radiation by biological samples, UV action spectra were first limited to small cells (bacteria and fungi). Advances in techniques (e.g. single cell culture) and analysis allowed accurate action spectra to be reported even for mammalian cells. But precise analytical action spectra are often difficult to obtain when large, pigmented, or groups of cells are investigated. Here some action spectra are limited in interpretation and merely supply a wavelength vs effect curve. When polychromatic sources are employed, the interpretation of action spectra is even more complex and formidable. But such polychromatic action spectra can be more directly related to ambient responses. Since precise action spectra usually require the completion of a relatively large number of careful experiments using somewhat sophisticated equipment over a range of at least six wavelengths, they are often not pursued. But they remain central to the elucidation of the effect being studied. The worldwide community has agreed that stratospheric ozone is depleting, with the possibility of a consequent rise in the amount of UV-B (290-320 nm) reaching the earth's surface. It is therefore essential that new action spectra be completed for UV-B effects on a large variety of responses of human, animal, and aquatic plant systems. Combining these action spectra with the known amounts of UV-B reaching the biosphere can give rise to solar UV effectiveness spectra that, in turn, can give rise to estimates

  9. Interactive spectra demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmquist, Bruce C.

    2002-03-01

    This report describes an interactive demonstration to help students qualitatively understand emission, continuous, and absorption spectra. Students throw colored balls at a person representing an electron that can move between discrete energy levels.

  10. A combined optical and X-ray study of unobscured type 1 active galactic nuclei - II. Relation between X-ray emission and optical spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chichuan; Ward, Martin; Done, Chris

    2012-06-01

    In this second paper in a series of three, we study the properties of the various emission features and underlying continuum in the optical spectra of type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) by using the unobscured hard X-ray emission as a diagnostic. We introduce the use of the 'correlation spectrum technique' (CST) for the first time. We use this to show the strength of the correlation between the hard X-ray luminosity and each wavelength of the optical spectrum. This shows that for broad-line Seyfert 1 galaxies all the strong emission lines (the broad component of Hα and Hβ, [Ne III] λλ3869/3967, [O I] λλ6300/6364, [O II] λλ3726/3729 and [O III] λλ4959/5007) and the optical underlying continuum all strongly correlate with the hard X-ray emission. In contrast, the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies show a stronger correlation in the optical continuum but a weaker correlation in the lines. A cross-correlation with luminosity between the various Balmer line components and the broad-band spectral energy distribution (SED) components shows that the best correlation exists between the hard X-ray component and the broad component (BC) of the Balmer lines. Such a correlation is weaker for the intermediate (IC) and narrow components, which supports the view that the broad-line region (BLR) has the closest link with the AGN's compact X-ray emission. The equivalent widths of the Balmer line IC and BC are found to correlate with ?, ?, Balmer line full width at half-maximum (FWHM) and black hole mass. There is a non-linear dependence of the Balmer line IC and BC luminosities with ? and L5100, which suggests that a second-order factor such as the intermediate-line region (ILR) and BLR covering factors affect the Balmer line component luminosities. The Balmer decrement is found to decrease from ˜5 in the line core to ˜2 in the extended wings, with mean decrements of 2.1 in the BLR and 4.8 in the ILR. This suggests different physical conditions in these regions, such as

  11. Reddening and age for 13 southern Galactic open clusters determined from integrated spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahumada, A. V.; Clariá, J. J.; Bica, E.; Dutra, C. M.; Torres, M. C.

    2001-10-01

    In this study we present flux-calibrated integrated spectra in the range 3800-6800 Å for 13 concentrated open clusters with Galactic longitudes between 219deg and 316deg, nine of which have not been previously studied. Using the equivalent widths of the Balmer lines and comparing the cluster spectra with template spectra of Magellanic Clouds and Galactic star clusters with known parameters, we derive both foreground interstellar reddening values and age. For nine clusters these two parameters have been determined for the first time, while for the rest of the sample the results show good agreement with previous studies. The present analysis indicates four very young (Hogg 11, NGC 5606, vdB-RN 80 and Pismis 17), seven moderately young (ESO 429-SC13, Hogg 3, Hogg 12, Haffner 7, BH 87, NGC 2368 and Bochum 12) and two intermediate-age (Berkeley 75 and NGC 2635) open clusters. The derived foreground interstellar reddening values are in the range 0.00 <= E(B-V) <= 0.38. The age and reddening distributions of the present sample of relatively faint open clusters match those of open clusters with known parameters in a 90deg sector centered at l = 270deg. Based on observations made at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito, which is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba and San Juan, Argentina.

  12. Spectra of Surface Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-22

    with a wave follower during Marsen. J. Gophysical Res. 88, 9844-9849. 11. Hughes, B.A., 1978. The effects on internal waves on surface waves : 2...Spectra of Surface Waves K. Watson March 1989 JSR-88-130 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. DTIC SELECTE JUN0 11989 0 JASONE The...Arlington, VA 22209 8503Z 11. TITLE (hlde Secvfty Cof.kaftn) SPECTRA OF SURFACE WAVES (U) 12. PERSONAL AUTHOfRS) K. Watson 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME

  13. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  14. Quantum spectra and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce, Julio Cesar

    This work focuses on time-dependent quantum theory and methods for the study of the spectra and dynamics of atomic and molecular systems. Specifically, we have addressed the following two problems: (1) Development of a time-dependent spectral method for the construction of spectra of simple quantum systems. This includes the calculation of eigenenergies, the construction of bound and continuum eigenfunctions, and the calculation of photo cross-sections. Computational applications include the quadrupole photoabsorption spectra and dissociation cross-sections of molecular hydrogen from various vibrational states in its ground electronic potential-energy curve. This method is seen to provide an advantageous alternative, both from the computational and conceptual point of view, to existing standard methods. (2) Explicit time-dependent formulation of photoabsorption processes -- Analytical solutions of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation are constructed and employed for the calculation of probability densities, momentum distributions, fluxes, transition rates, expectation values and correlation functions. These quantities are seen to establish the link between the dynamics and the calculated, or measured, spectra and cross-sections, and to clarify the dynamical nature of the excitation, transition and ejection processes. Numerical calculations on atomic and molecular hydrogen corroborate and complement the previous results, allowing the identification of different regimes during the photoabsorption process.

  15. Quantum Spectra and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce, Julio Cesar

    1992-01-01

    This work focuses on time-dependent quantum theory and methods for the study of the spectra and dynamics of atomic and molecular systems. Specifically, we have addressed the following two problems: (i) Development of a time-dependent spectral method for the construction of spectra of simple quantum systems--This includes the calculation of eigenenergies, the construction of bound and continuum eigenfunctions, and the calculation of photo cross-sections. Computational applications include the quadrupole photoabsorption spectra and dissociation cross-sections of molecular hydrogen from various vibrational states in its ground electronic potential -energy curve. This method is seen to provide an advantageous alternative, both from the computational and conceptual point of view, to existing standard methods. (ii) Explicit time-dependent formulation of photoabsorption processes --Analytical solutions of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation are constructed and employed for the calculation of probability densities, momentum distributions, fluxes, transition rates, expectation values and correlation functions. These quantities are seen to establish the link between the dynamics and the calculated, or measured, spectra and cross-sections, and to clarify the dynamical nature of the excitation, transition and ejection processes. Numerical calculations on atomic and molecular hydrogen corroborate and complement the previous results, allowing the identification of different regimes during the photoabsorption process.

  16. Parmeterization of spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornish, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    Following reception and analog to digital conversion (A/D) conversion, atmospheric radar backscatter echoes need to be processed so as to obtain desired information about atmospheric processes and to eliminate or minimize contaminating contributions from other sources. Various signal processing techniques have been implemented at mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radar facilities to estimate parameters of interest from received spectra. Such estimation techniques need to be both accurate and sufficiently efficient to be within the capabilities of the particular data-processing system. The various techniques used to parameterize the spectra of received signals are reviewed herein. Noise estimation, electromagnetic interference, data smoothing, correlation, and the Doppler effect are among the specific points addressed.

  17. Directional Ocean Wave Spectra

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    of Ocean Waves: Some Observations from R. K. Raney and LIMEX/LEWEX 󈨛 P. W, Vachon 104 Directional Spectra from the CCRS C-Band SAR during LEWEX P...11. Vachon , A. S. Bhogal, and i%’. G. Freeman I10 SAR Scattering Mechanisms as Inferred from LEWEX D. G, Tiller Spectral Intercomparisons 117...Duiring her stay. Michelle Champagne- on time scales usually recommended to define the mean. Philippe explored some of the aspects ofthe ’sind %aniahilits

  18. Barnacle Bill Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    These IMP spectra show the characteristics of the rock surface measured by the Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer (blue), the soil trapped in pits on the rock surface (red), and the deposit of bright drift on the top of the rock. The area measured by the APXS has the properties expected for nearly unweathered igneous rock, and the soil trapped in the pits is intermediate to the unweathered rock and the highly weathered drift material.

  19. Pattern recognition in spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebran, M.; Paletou, F.

    2017-06-01

    We present a new automated procedure that simultaneously derives the effective temperature Teff, surface gravity log g, metallicity [Fe/H], and equatorial projected rotational velocity ve sin i for stars. The procedure is inspired by the well-known PCA-based inversion of spectropolarimetric full-Stokes solar data, which was used both for Zeeman and Hanle effects. The efficiency and accuracy of this procedure have been proven for FGK, A, and late type dwarf stars of K and M spectral types. Learning databases are generated from the Elodie stellar spectra library using observed spectra for which fundamental parameters were already evaluated or with synthetic data. The synthetic spectra are calculated using ATLAS9 model atmospheres. This technique helped us to detect many peculiar stars such as Am, Ap, HgMn, SiEuCr and binaries. This fast and efficient technique could be used every time a pattern recognition is needed. One important application is the understanding of the physical properties of planetary surfaces by comparing aboard instrument data to synthetic ones.

  20. Spectra of Hot Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, S.; McKee, C. F.

    2003-12-01

    The turbulent core model for massive star formation (McKee & Tan 2002) generalizes the standard isothermal collapse model for low-mass stars to include turbulent pressure support. This model predicts reasonable massive star formation times of order 105 years, which is short enough to overcome the radiation pressure of the newly formed star. We calculate the millimeter and infrared spectrum predicted by the turbulent core model and compare with observations of several hot molecular cores. We consider spherically symmetric dust envelopes and use DUSTY, a 1-D radiative transfer code (Ivezic, Nenkova, Elitzur 1997), to numerically calculate the SEDs of these hot cores. We also analytically calculate the spectra in the asymptotic regions of low and high frequency and join these asymptotic forms smoothly by a fitting function that minimizes the relative error between the analytic and numerical spectra. Thus, we are able to express the functional dependence of the spectra of hot cores in terms of the dynamical variables of any given collapse model. This approach allows us to use observed SEDs as a diagnostic tool in inferring physical conditions in these cores.

  1. Lick slit spectra of thirty-eight objective prism quasar candidates and low metallicity halo stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tytler, David; Fan, Xiao-Ming; Junkkarinen, Vesa T.; Cohen, Ross D.

    1993-01-01

    Lick Observatory slit spectra of 38 objects which were claimed to have pronounced UV excess and emission lines are presented. Eleven QSOs, four galaxies at z of about 0.1, 22 stars, and one unidentified object with a low S/N spectrum were found. Of 11 objects which Zhan and Chen (1987, 1989) suggested were QSO with z(prism) not greater than 2.8; eight are QSOs. Six of the QSOs show absorption systems, including Q0000+027A with a relatively strong associated C IV absorption system, and Q0008+008 with a damped Ly-alpha system with an H I column density of 10 exp 21/sq cm. The equivalent widths of the Ca II K line, the G band, and the Balmer lines in 10 stars with the best spectra are measured, and metallicities are derived. Seven of them are in the range -2.5 to -1.7, while the others are less metal-poor.

  2. Determinations of Photon Spectra

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    COVERED O14. DATE OF REPORT (Year, Month, Day) 115. PAGE COUNT THESIS/ftFROW*W FROM TO 1989 1 54 16. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTATION A ?RQVk;U kOR 3UB LIC RELEASE...IAW AFR 190- 1 ERNEST A. HAYGOOD, 1st Lt, USAF Executive Officer, Civilian Institution ProQrams 17. COSATI CODES 18. SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on...spectra from measurements obtained with a sodium iodide counting system. A response matrix is computed by combining photon cross sections with

  3. Theoretical Studies of Molecular Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, Christopher (Technical Monitor); Freedman, Richard S.

    2002-01-01

    This summary describes the research activities of the principal investigator during the reporting period. The research includes spectroscopy, management of molecular databases, and generation of spectral line profiles and opacity data. The spectroscopy research includes oxygen broadening of nitric oxide (NO), analysis of CO2 spectra, analysis of HNO3 spectra, and analysis of CO spectra.

  4. Control spectra for Quito

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, Roberto; Rivas-Medina, Alicia; Caiza, Pablo; Quizanga, Diego

    2017-03-01

    The Metropolitan District of Quito is located on or very close to segments of reverse blind faults, Puengasí, Ilumbisí-La Bota, Carcelen-El Inca, Bellavista-Catequilla and Tangahuilla, making it one of the most seismically dangerous cities in the world. The city is divided into five areas: south, south-central, central, north-central and north. For each of the urban areas, elastic response spectra are presented in this paper, which are determined by utilizing some of the new models of the Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center (PEER) NGA-West2 program. These spectra are calculated considering the maximum magnitude that could be generated by the rupture of each fault segment, and taking into account the soil type that exists at different points of the city according to the Norma Ecuatoriana de la Construcción (2015). Subsequently, the recurrence period of earthquakes of high magnitude in each fault segment is determined from the physical parameters of the fault segments (size of the fault plane and slip rate) and the pattern of recurrence of type Gutenberg-Richter earthquakes with double truncation magnitude (Mmin and Mmax) is used.

  5. Continuum Fitting HST QSO Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tytler, David; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) method which we are using to fit and describe QSO spectra relies upon the fact that QSO continuum are generally very smooth and simple except for emission and absorption lines. To see this we need high signal-to-noise (S/N) spectra of QSOs at low redshift which have relatively few absorption lines in the Lyman-a forest. We need a large number of such spectra to use as the basis set for the PCA analysis which will find the set of principal component spectra which describe the QSO family as a whole. We have found that too few HST spectra have the required S/N and hence we need to supplement them with ground based spectra of QSOs at higher redshift. We have many such spectra and we have been working to make them suitable for this analysis. We have concentrated on this topic since 12/15/01.

  6. AGNs with composite spectra.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veron, P.; Goncalves, A. C.; Veron-Cetty, M.-P.

    1997-03-01

    The use of the Baldwin et al. (1981PASP...93....5B) or Veilleux & Osterbrock (1987ApJS...63..295V) diagnostic diagrams allows the unambiguous classification of the nuclear emission line regions of most galaxies into one of three categories: nuclear HII regions or starbursts, Seyfert 2 galaxies and Liners. However, a small fraction of them have a "transition" spectrum. We present spectral observations of 15 "transition" objects at high-dispersion (66Å/mm) around the Hα, [NII]λλ6548,6584 and/or Hβ, [OIII]λλ4959,5007 emission lines. We show that most of these spectra are composite, due to the simultaneous presence on the slit of a Seyfert nucleus and a HII region. Seyfert 2s and Liners seem to occupy relatively small and distinct volumes in the three-dimensional space λ5007/Hβ, λ6584/Hα, λ6300/Hα.

  7. WebSpectra: Online NMR and IR Spectra for Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlic, Craig A.; Fam, Barry C.; Miller, Michael M.

    2001-01-01

    WebSpectra is a World Wide Web site at UCLA through which organic chemistry students have convenient access to a library of problems in NMR and IR spectroscopy, ranging in difficulty from introductory to advanced. Students are presented with high-resolution spectra of unknown compounds in addition to the molecular formula. Expandable one-dimensional 1H and 13C NMR spectra are available for all problems and many also include IR, DEPT NMR, and/or COSY NMR spectra. In addition to the spectral problems, WebSpectra provides instructional documents on basic NMR and IR spectroscopy concepts. There is also an IR comparison tool that allows overlays of spectra and a search engine that allows students to locate specific types of compounds based upon name, formula, or functional group. The design and capabilities of this Web-based educational tool are described in this paper.

  8. Development of fatigue loading spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, J.M.; Watanabe, R.T.

    1989-01-01

    The present work on fatigue-loading spectra encompasses the current status of standardized stress-time histories, European approaches to standard loading spectrum development, transport aircraft airframe fatigue test spectra, the TURBISTAN fatigue-loading standard for fighter-aircraft engine disks, an automated procedure for the creation of flight-by-flight spectra, and the development of a wave-action standard history for fatigue testing relevant to tubular structures in the North Sea. Also treated is the use of the TURBISTAN mission spectra to evaluate fatigue crack growth in a rotating disk, fatigue-spectra development for airborne stores, a simplified analysis of fatigue-loading spectra, variable-amplitude load models for fatigue-damage crack growth, the tracking time service histories for multiaxis fatigue problems, and the compilation of procedures for fatigue crack propagation testing under complex load sequences.

  9. Sequencing BPS spectra

    DOE PAGES

    Gukov, Sergei; Nawata, Satoshi; Saberi, Ingmar; ...

    2016-03-02

    In this article, we provide both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explainmore » from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincar e polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel "sliding" property, which can be explained by using (re fined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identi fication of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d N = 2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. In conclusion, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.« less

  10. Sequencing BPS spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Gukov, Sergei; Nawata, Satoshi; Saberi, Ingmar; Stošić, Marko; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-03-02

    In this article, we provide both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explain from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincar e polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel "sliding" property, which can be explained by using (re fined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identi fication of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d N = 2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. In conclusion, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.

  11. Sequencing BPS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gukov, Sergei; Nawata, Satoshi; Saberi, Ingmar; Stošić, Marko; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-03-01

    This paper provides both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explain from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincaré polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel "sliding" property, which can be explained by using (refined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identification of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d {N}=2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. Lastly, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.

  12. Interpreting Chromosome Aberration Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Dan; Reeder, Christopher; Loucas, Bradford; Hlatky, Lynn; Chen, Allen; Cornforth, Michael; Sachs, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can damage cells by breaking both strands of DNA in multiple locations, essentially cutting chromosomes into pieces. The cell has enzymatic mechanisms to repair such breaks; however, these mechanisms are imperfect and, in an exchange process, may produce a large-scale rearrangement of the genome, called a chromosome aberration. Chromosome aberrations are important in killing cells, during carcinogenesis, in characterizing repair/misrepair pathways, in retrospective radiation biodosimetry, and in a number of other ways. DNA staining techniques such as mFISH ( multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization) provide a means for analyzing aberration spectra by examining observed final patterns. Unfortunately, an mFISH observed final pattern often does not uniquely determine the underlying exchange process. Further, resolution limitations in the painting protocol sometimes lead to apparently incomplete final patterns. We here describe an algorithm for systematically finding exchange processes consistent with any observed final pattern. This algorithm uses aberration multigraphs, a mathematical formalism that links the various aspects of aberration formation. By applying a measure to the space of consistent multigraphs, we will show how to generate model-specific distributions of aberration processes from mFISH experimental data. The approach is implemented by software freely available over the internet. As a sample application, we apply these algorithms to an aberration data set, obtaining a distribution of exchange cycle sizes, which serves to measure aberration complexity. Estimating complexity, in turn, helps indicate how damaging the aberrations are and may facilitate identification of radiation type in retrospective biodosimetry.

  13. Interpreting Chromosome Aberration Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Dan; Reeder, Christopher; Loucas, Bradford; Hlatky, Lynn; Chen, Allen; Cornforth, Michael; Sachs, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can damage cells by breaking both strands of DNA in multiple locations, essentially cutting chromosomes into pieces. The cell has enzymatic mechanisms to repair such breaks; however, these mechanisms are imperfect and, in an exchange process, may produce a large-scale rearrangement of the genome, called a chromosome aberration. Chromosome aberrations are important in killing cells, during carcinogenesis, in characterizing repair/misrepair pathways, in retrospective radiation biodosimetry, and in a number of other ways. DNA staining techniques such as mFISH ( multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization) provide a means for analyzing aberration spectra by examining observed final patterns. Unfortunately, an mFISH observed final pattern often does not uniquely determine the underlying exchange process. Further, resolution limitations in the painting protocol sometimes lead to apparently incomplete final patterns. We here describe an algorithm for systematically finding exchange processes consistent with any observed final pattern. This algorithm uses aberration multigraphs, a mathematical formalism that links the various aspects of aberration formation. By applying a measure to the space of consistent multigraphs, we will show how to generate model-specific distributions of aberration processes from mFISH experimental data. The approach is implemented by software freely available over the internet. As a sample application, we apply these algorithms to an aberration data set, obtaining a distribution of exchange cycle sizes, which serves to measure aberration complexity. Estimating complexity, in turn, helps indicate how damaging the aberrations are and may facilitate identification of radiation type in retrospective biodosimetry.

  14. The nuclear region of low luminosity flat radio spectrum sources. II. Emission-line spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, A. C.; Serote Roos, M.

    2004-01-01

    We report on the spectroscopic study of 19 low luminosity Flat Radio Spectrum (LL FRS) sources selected from Marchã's et al. (\\cite{March96}) 200 mJy sample. In the optical, these objects are mainly dominated by the host galaxy starlight. After correcting the data for this effect, we obtain a new set of spectra clearly displaying weak emission lines; such features carry valuable information concerning the excitation mechanisms at work in the nuclear regions of LL FRS sources. We have used a special routine to model the spectra and assess the intensities and velocities of the emission lines; we have analyzed the results in terms of diagnostic diagrams. Our analysis shows that 79% of the studied objects harbour a Low Ionization Nuclear Emission-line Region (or LINER) whose contribution was swamped by the host galaxy starlight. The remaining objects display a higher ionization spectrum, more typical of Seyferts; due to the poor quality of the spectra, it was not possible to identify any possible large Balmer components. The fact that we observe a LINER-type spectrum in LL FRS sources supports the idea that some of these objects could be undergoing an ADAF phase; in addition, such a low ionization emission-line spectrum is in agreement with the black hole mass values and sub-Eddington accretion rates published for some FRS sources. Based on observations collected at the Multiple Mirror Telescope on Mt. Hopkins. Full Fig. 1 is only available in electronic form at http://www.edpsciences.org

  15. Catalogue of representative meteor spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojáček, V.; Borovička, J.; Koten, P.; Spurný, P.; Štork, R.

    2016-01-01

    We present a library of low-resolution meteor spectra that includes sporadic meteors, members of minor meteor showers, and major meteor showers. These meteors are in the magnitude range from +2 to -3, corresponding to meteoroid sizes from 1 mm to10 mm. This catalogue is available online at the CDS for those interested in video meteor spectra.

  16. Projecting Spectra for Classroom Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadler, Philip

    1991-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive spectrum projector that makes high-dispersion, high-efficiency diffraction gratings using a holographic process. Discusses classroom applications such as transmission spectra, absorption spectra, reflection characteristics of materials, color mixing, florescence and phosphorescence, and break up spectral colors. (MDH)

  17. Reddening and age of six poorly studied star clusters of the Large Magellanic Cloud derived from integrated spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minniti, J. H.; Ahumada, A. V.; Clariá, J. J.; Benítez-Llambay, A.

    2014-05-01

    Aims: To increase the number of studied star clusters (SCs) of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), we present flux-calibrated integrated spectra in the optical range (λ = 3700-6800 Å) for six poorly studied LMC SCs of IVA type. This type corresponds to the age range between 200 and 400 Myr. We also aim at creating a new template spectrum representative of this age range at the metallicity level of the LMC. Methods: Foreground reddening E(B - V) values and ages are derived by applying the template matching method that consists of comparing the line strengths and continuum distribution of the cluster spectra with those of template cluster spectra with known properties. The equivalent width (EW) of the Balmer lines and the diagnostic diagrams involving the sum of EWs of selected spectral lines were also employed as age indicators. Results: For the first time, we provide estimates of the clusters' reddenings and ages. As expected, all the clusters appear to be of nearly the same age, their mean value being (400 ± 100) Myr, while the resulting mean E(B - V) values range between 0.00 and 0.10 mag. Conclusions: The present cluster sample complements previous ones in an effort to gather a spectral library with several clusters per age bin. By averaging the reddening-corrected integrated spectra, weighted by their signal-to-noise ratios (S/N), a new high S/N template spectrum of 400 Myr has been created. Integrated spectra for each star cluster are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/565/A49

  18. Measurement and analysis of atomic hydrogen and diatomic molecular AlO, C2, CN, and TiO spectra following laser-induced optical breakdown.

    PubMed

    Parigger, Christian G; Woods, Alexander C; Witte, Michael J; Swafford, Lauren D; Surmick, David M

    2014-02-14

    In this work, we present time-resolved measurements of atomic and diatomic spectra following laser-induced optical breakdown. A typical LIBS arrangement is used. Here we operate a Nd:YAG laser at a frequency of 10 Hz at the fundamental wavelength of 1,064 nm. The 14 nsec pulses with anenergy of 190 mJ/pulse are focused to a 50 µm spot size to generate a plasma from optical breakdown or laser ablation in air. The microplasma is imaged onto the entrance slit of a 0.6 m spectrometer, and spectra are recorded using an 1,800 grooves/mm grating an intensified linear diode array and optical multichannel analyzer (OMA) or an ICCD. Of interest are Stark-broadened atomic lines of the hydrogen Balmer series to infer electron density. We also elaborate on temperature measurements from diatomic emission spectra of aluminum monoxide (AlO), carbon (C2), cyanogen (CN), and titanium monoxide (TiO). The experimental procedures include wavelength and sensitivity calibrations. Analysis of the recorded molecular spectra is accomplished by the fitting of data with tabulated line strengths. Furthermore, Monte-Carlo type simulations are performed to estimate the error margins. Time-resolved measurements are essential for the transient plasma commonly encountered in LIBS.

  19. Measurement and Analysis of Atomic Hydrogen and Diatomic Molecular AlO, C2, CN, and TiO Spectra Following Laser-induced Optical Breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Parigger, Christian G.; Woods, Alexander C.; Witte, Michael J.; Swafford, Lauren D.; Surmick, David M.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we present time-resolved measurements of atomic and diatomic spectra following laser-induced optical breakdown. A typical LIBS arrangement is used. Here we operate a Nd:YAG laser at a frequency of 10 Hz at the fundamental wavelength of 1,064 nm. The 14 nsec pulses with anenergy of 190 mJ/pulse are focused to a 50 µm spot size to generate a plasma from optical breakdown or laser ablation in air. The microplasma is imaged onto the entrance slit of a 0.6 m spectrometer, and spectra are recorded using an 1,800 grooves/mm grating an intensified linear diode array and optical multichannel analyzer (OMA) or an ICCD. Of interest are Stark-broadened atomic lines of the hydrogen Balmer series to infer electron density. We also elaborate on temperature measurements from diatomic emission spectra of aluminum monoxide (AlO), carbon (C2), cyanogen (CN), and titanium monoxide (TiO). The experimental procedures include wavelength and sensitivity calibrations. Analysis of the recorded molecular spectra is accomplished by the fitting of data with tabulated line strengths. Furthermore, Monte-Carlo type simulations are performed to estimate the error margins. Time-resolved measurements are essential for the transient plasma commonly encountered in LIBS. PMID:24561875

  20. Outer atmospheres of cool stars. XII - A survey of IUE ultraviolet emission line spectra of cool dwarf stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, J. L.; Bornmann, P. L.; Carpenter, K. G.; Hege, E. K.; Wing, R. F.; Giampapa, M. S.; Worden, S. P.

    1982-01-01

    Quantitative information is obtained on the chromospheres and transition regions of M dwarf stars, in order to determine how the outer atmospheres of dMe stars differ from dM stars and how they compare with the outer atmospheres of quiet and active G and K type dwarfs. IUE spectra of six dMe and four dM stars, together with ground-based photometry and spectroscopy of the Balmer and Ca II H and K lines, show no evidence of flares. It is concluded, regarding the quiescent behavior of these stars, that emission-line spectra resemble that of the sun and contain emission lines formed in regions with 4000-20,000 K temperatures that are presumably analogous to the solar chromosphere, as well as regions with temperatures of 20,000-200,000 K that are presumably analogous to the solar transition region. Emission-line surface fluxes are proportional to the emission measure over the range of temperatures at which the lines are formed.

  1. Phonon spectra of alkali metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeković, S.; Vukajlović, F.; Veljković, V.

    1982-10-01

    In this work we used a simple local model pseudopotential which includes screening for the phonon spectra calculations of alkali metals. The results obtained are in very good agreement with experimental data. In some branches of phonon spectra the differences between theoretical and experimental results are within 1-2%, while the maximum error is about 6%. The suggested form of the pseudopotential allows us to describe the phonon spectra of Na, K and Rb with only one, and, at the same time, a unique, parameter. In this case, the maximum disagreements from experiment are 9% for Na, 8% for K and 7% for Rb.

  2. Infrared spectra of joint fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eysel, Hans H.; Mantsch, Henry H.; Jackson, Michael

    1994-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the application of infrared spectroscopy to the diagnosis of arthritic conditions by analysis of joint fluids. The detection of carbon dioxide clathrates, their origin and the nature of the host material is discussed. The analytical sensitivity of mid IR second derivative spectra is demonstrated with the detection of the local anaesthetic lidocaine in some of the samples. Linear discriminant analysis and hierarchical clustering are successfully used to classify the spectra according to their respective clinical diagnosis.

  3. Spectra ID of recent SN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challis, Peter

    2013-12-01

    P. Challis, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA), on behalf of the CfA Supernova Group, report spectra (range 320-860 nm) of various SN obtained during Dec. 24-27 UT by P. Challis, S. Gottilla (MMTO.org), and E. Marin (MMTO.org) with the MMT 6.5-m telescope (+ Blue Channel). Cross-correlation with a library of supernova spectra using the "Supernova Identification" code (SNID; Blondin and Tonry 2007, Ap.J.

  4. How fast do quasar emission lines vary? First results from a program to monitor the Balmer lines of the Palomar-Green Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maoz, Dan; Smith, Paul S.; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Kaspi, Shai; Netzer, Hagai

    1994-01-01

    We have monitored spectrophotometrically a subsample (28) of the Palomar-Green Bright Quasar Sample for 2 years in order to test for correlations between continuum and emission-line variations and to determine the timescales relevant to mapping the broad-line regions of high-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Half of the quasars showed optical continuum variations with amplitudes in the range 20-75%. The rise and fall time for the continuum variations is typically 0.5-2 years. In most of the objects with continuum variations, we detect correlated variations in the broad H-alpha and H-beta emission lines. The amplitude of the line variations is usually 2-4 times smaller than the optical continuum fluctuations. We present light curves and analyze spectra for six of the variable quasars with 1000-10,000 A luminosity in the range 0.3-4 x 10(exp 45) ergs/s. In four of these objects the lines respond to the continuum variations with a lag that is smaller than or comparable to our typical sampling interval (a few months). Although continued monitoring is required to confirm these results and increase their accuracy, the present evidence indicates that quasars with the above luminosities have broad-line regions smaller than about 1 1t-yr. Two of the quasars monitored show no detectable line variations despite relatively large-amplitude continuum changes. This could be a stronger manifestation of the low-amplitude line-response phenomenon we observe in the other quasars.

  5. Enhancement of spectra by digital convolution.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorre, J. J.

    1973-01-01

    A method is presented for convolving digitally scanned spectra by means of computerized filtering. This method is an effective tool for improving the quality of noisy spectra and for deconvolving high-quality spectra by removing instrument signature.

  6. Analysis of photometric spectra of 17 meteors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millman, P. M.

    1982-01-01

    The initial phase of the photometry which involved 17 meteor spectra consisting of eight Geminid spectra, six Orionid spectra and three Eta Aquarid spectra is discussed. Among these 17 spectra it is found that the Geminid spectra are of the best quality and are used for the identification of the atomic lines and molecular bands that normally appear on video tape spectra. The data from the Geminid records are used for developing calibration techniques in photometry. The Orionid and Eta Aquarid spectra are chosen for early analysis because of the current interest in all physical and chemical data relating to Comet Halley.

  7. Vibrational Spectra of Selected Monohalogenated Monocarboxylic Acids.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    HALOGENATED HYDROCARBONS, INFRARED SPECTRA), (*CARBOXYLIC ACIDS, *INFRARED SPECTRA), IODINE COMPOUNDS, CHLORINE COMPOUNDS, BROMINE COMPOUNDS, ACETIC ACID , ACETATES, MOLECULAR STRUCTURE, MOLECULAR ASSOCIATION

  8. QUALITATIVE INTERPRETATION OF GALAXY SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez Almeida, J.; Morales-Luis, A. B.; Terlevich, R.; Terlevich, E.; Cid Fernandes, R. E-mail: abml@iac.es E-mail: eterlevi@inaoep.mx

    2012-09-10

    We describe a simple step-by-step guide to qualitative interpretation of galaxy spectra. Rather than an alternative to existing automated tools, it is put forward as an instrument for quick-look analysis and for gaining physical insight when interpreting the outputs provided by automated tools. Though the recipe is for general application, it was developed for understanding the nature of the Automatic Spectroscopic K-means-based (ASK) template spectra. They resulted from the classification of all the galaxy spectra in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release 7, thus being a comprehensive representation of the galaxy spectra in the local universe. Using the recipe, we give a description of the properties of the gas and the stars that characterize the ASK classes, from those corresponding to passively evolving galaxies, to H II galaxies undergoing a galaxy-wide starburst. The qualitative analysis is found to be in excellent agreement with quantitative analyses of the same spectra. We compare the mean ages of the stellar populations with those inferred using the code STARLIGHT. We also examine the estimated gas-phase metallicity with the metallicities obtained using electron-temperature-based methods. A number of byproducts follow from the analysis. There is a tight correlation between the age of the stellar population and the metallicity of the gas, which is stronger than the correlations between galaxy mass and stellar age, and galaxy mass and gas metallicity. The galaxy spectra are known to follow a one-dimensional sequence, and we identify the luminosity-weighted mean stellar age as the affine parameter that describes the sequence. All ASK classes happen to have a significant fraction of old stars, although spectrum-wise they are outshined by the youngest populations. Old stars are metal-rich or metal-poor depending on whether they reside in passive galaxies or in star-forming galaxies.

  9. Gallery of Planetary Nebula Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwitter, Karen B.; Henry, Richard B. C.

    In the course of our abundance studies over the past decade we have accumulated more than 120 high-quality, medium resolution spectra of planetary nebulae (PNe) from 3600-9600 Å using the KPNO 2.1m Goldcam CCD spectrograph and the CTIO 1.5m RC spectrograph. Results have been published in, e.g., Kwitter & Henry (1998); Henry, Kwitter & Balick (2004); and Milingo et al. (2006). We have created this website as a place where the spectra are available for graphical display, and where PN atlas information and image links are tabulated. The URL is: http://oit.williams.edu/nebulae

  10. The structure of BPS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhi, Pietro

    In this thesis we develop and apply novel techniques for analyzing BPS spectra of supersymmetric quantum field theories of class S. By a combination of wall-crossing, spectral networks and quiver methods we explore the BPS spectra of higher rank four-dimensional N = 2 super Yang-Mills, uncovering surprising new phenomena. Focusing on the SU(3) case, we prove the existence of wild BPS spectra in field theory, featuring BPS states of higher spin whose degeneracies grow exponentially with the energy. The occurrence of wild BPS states is surprising because it appears to be in tension with physical expectations on the behavior of the entropy as a function of the energy scale. The solution to this puzzle comes from realizing that the size of wild BPS states grows rapidly with their mass, and carefully analyzing the volume-dependence of the entropy of BPS states. We also find some interesting structures underlying wild BPS spectra, such as a Regge-like relation between the maximal spin of a BPS multiplet and the square of its mass, and the existence of a universal asymptotic distribution of spin-j irreps within a multiplet of given charge. We also extend the spectral networks construction by introducing a refinement in the topological classification of 2d-4d BPS states, and identifying their spin with a topological invariant known as the "writhe of soliton paths". A careful analysis of the 2d-4d wall-crossing behavior of this refined data reveals that it is described by motivic Kontsevich-Soibelman transformations, controlled by the Protected Spin Character, a protected deformation of the BPS index encoding the spin of BPS states. Our construction opens the way for the systematic study of refined BPS spectra in class S theories. We apply it to several examples, including ones featuring wild BPS spectra, where we find an interesting relation between spectral networks and certain functional equations. For class S theories of A 1 type, we derive an alternative technique for

  11. The hydrogen line spectra of narrow-line radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferland, G. J.; Osterbrock, D. E.

    1985-02-01

    The results of the first detection of Ly-alpha in a narrow-line radio galaxy are reported. Nearly simultaneous optical and UV observations of 3C 192 and 3C 223 allow the measurement of both Balmer and Lyman decrements. These line ratios are approximate functions of the interstellar reddening and of a parameter which is proportional to the amount of H I collisional excitation present. The reddening of 3C 192 is slightly larger than that due to the Galaxy, although 3C 223 may have a larger value. Both galaxies have intrinsic Balmer and Lyman decrements which are significantly steeper than case B, suggesting that the gas is photoionized by a fairly hard X-ray continuum. The deduced values of L-alpha/H-beta and H-alpha/H-beta compare favorably with predictions of recent models.

  12. The hydrogen line spectra of narrow-line radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferland, G. J.; Osterbrock, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    The results of the first detection of Ly-alpha in a narrow-line radio galaxy are reported. Nearly simultaneous optical and UV observations of 3C 192 and 3C 223 allow the measurement of both Balmer and Lyman decrements. These line ratios are approximate functions of the interstellar reddening and of a parameter which is proportional to the amount of H I collisional excitation present. The reddening of 3C 192 is slightly larger than that due to the Galaxy, although 3C 223 may have a larger value. Both galaxies have intrinsic Balmer and Lyman decrements which are significantly steeper than case B, suggesting that the gas is photoionized by a fairly hard X-ray continuum. The deduced values of L-alpha/H-beta and H-alpha/H-beta compare favorably with predictions of recent models.

  13. Computer Simulation of NMR Spectra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, A.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a PASCAL computer program which provides interactive analysis and display of high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra from spin one-half nuclei using a hard-copy or monitor. Includes general and theoretical program descriptions, program capability, and examples of its use. (Source for program/documentation is included.)…

  14. Classical Trajectories and Quantum Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielnik, Bogdan; Reyes, Marco A.

    1996-01-01

    A classical model of the Schrodinger's wave packet is considered. The problem of finding the energy levels corresponds to a classical manipulation game. It leads to an approximate but non-perturbative method of finding the eigenvalues, exploring the bifurcations of classical trajectories. The role of squeezing turns out decisive in the generation of the discrete spectra.

  15. Shape effects on asteroid spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davalos, J.; Carvano, J.

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this work is to probe how the shape of a body like an asteroid could be modifying its observed spectra and the derived mineralogical interfaces based on spectral modeling. To model this effect, we construct an oblate ellipsoid with triangular facets, where each facet contributes to the overall reflectance. The synthetic spectra is generated by the isotropic multiple-scattering approximation (IMSA) reflectance model of Hapke (1993). First, we obtained optical constants by inverting the spectra of meteorites, obtained from the RELAB spectral database. These optical constants were found inverting the reflectance bidirectional equation of Hapke; this is made in two steps: (i) The first inversion is to find the single-scattering albedo π (ii) in the model of Hapke, this albedo is found under the regime of the geometric optics, where the particle size is much larger than the wavelength of the incident radiation. Here we assumed a constant value for the real part of the optical constant n=1.5. With these optical constants, we can construct synthetic spectra for any particle size. The phase function used is the double Henyey-Greenstein phase function and an accurate expression for the H-functions. We started with the ellipsoidal shape a=1.0, b=c=0.5 for two particle size 50 and 250 μ m, in this part, we found good differences in the BAR parameter between the two geometric models, this was done for 100 Eucrite meteorites spectra. In this first study, we found that the BAR parameter between the two models is bigger when the particle size increases. In the second part, we started with different ellipsoidal shapes and produced synthetic spectra for material with eucrite and diogenite composition with a phase angle of 20 degrees, incidence and emission angles of 10 degrees, and particle size at 250 μ m. All spectra was generated for four parameters of phase angle b=[0.2,0.4,0.6,0.8] taking the empirical relation between the phase constants of Hapke (2012

  16. Phobos surface spectra mineralogical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajola, M.; Lazzarin, M.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Roush, T. L.; Pendleton, Y.; Bertini, I.; Magrin, S.; Carli, C.; La Forgia, F.; Barbieri, C.

    2014-04-01

    A mineralogical model composed of a mixture of Tagish Lake meteorite (TL) and Pyroxene Glass (PM80) was presented in [1] to explain the surface reflectance of Phobos from 0.25 to 4.0 μm. The positive results we obtained, when comparing the OSIRIS data [2] extended in wavelength to include the [3,4] spectra, forced us to perform a wider comparison between our TL-PM80 model and the CRISM and OMEGA Phobos spectra presented in [5]. Such spectra cover three different regions of interest (ROIs) situated in the Phobos sub-Mars hemisphere: the interior of the Stickney crater, its eastern rim, and its proximity terrain southeast of the Reldresal crater. We decided to vary the percentage mixture of the components of our model (80% TL, 20% PM80), between pure TL and pure PM80, by means of the radiative transfer code based on the [6] formulation of the slab approximation. Once this spectral range was derived, see Fig. 1, we attempted to compare it with the [5] spectra between 0.4 and 2.6 μm, i.e. below the thermal emitted radiation, to see if any spectral match was possible. We observed that CRISM scaled spectra above 1.10 μm fall within pure Tagish Lake composition and the [1] model. The CRISM data below 1.10 μm present more discrepancies with our models, in particular for the Stickney's rim spectrum. Nevertheless the TL and PM80 components seem to be good mineralogical candidates on Phobos. We performed the same analysis with the OMEGA data and, again, we found out that the Stickney's rim spectrum lies out of our model range, while the two remaining spectra still lie between pure TL and 80% TL - 20% PM80, but indicating that a different, more complicated mixture is expected in order to explain properly both the spectral trend and the possible absorption bands located above 2.0 μm. Within this analysis, we point out that a big fraction of TL material (modeled pure or present with a minimum percentage of 80% mixed together with 20% PM80) seems to explain Phobos spectral

  17. Near-infrared spectra and intrinsic luminosities of candidate type II quasars at 2 < z < 3.4

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Jenny E.; Strauss, Michael A.; Pattarakijwanich, Petchara; Alexandroff, Rachael; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Liu, Guilin; Lang, Dustin; Hamann, Frederick; Ross, Nicholas P.; Myers, Adam D.; Brandt, W. Niel; Schneider, Donald P.; York, Donald

    2014-06-10

    We present JHK near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy of 25 candidate Type II quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), using Triplespec on the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m telescope, the Folded-port InfraRed Echellette at the Magellan/Baade 6.5 m telescope, and the Gemini Near-Infrared Spectrograph on Gemini. At redshifts of 2 < z < 3.4, our NIR spectra probe the rest-frame optical region of these targets, which were initially selected to have strong lines of C IV and Ly α, with FWHM < 2000 km s{sup –1} from the SDSS pipeline. We use the [O III] λ5007 line shape as a model for the narrow-line region emission and find that Hα consistently requires a broad component with FWHMs ranging from 1000 to 7500 km s{sup –1}. Interestingly, the C IV lines also require broad bases, but with considerably narrower widths of 1000-4500 km s{sup –1}. Estimating the extinction using the Balmer decrement and also the relationship in lower-z quasars between rest equivalent width and luminosity in the [O III] line, we find typical A{sub V} values of 0-2 mag, which naturally explains the attenuated C IV lines relative to Hα. We propose that our targets are moderately obscured quasars. We also describe one unusual object with three distinct velocity peaks in its [O III] spectrum.

  18. Eigenvectors of optimal color spectra.

    PubMed

    Flinkman, Mika; Laamanen, Hannu; Tuomela, Jukka; Vahimaa, Pasi; Hauta-Kasari, Markku

    2013-09-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) and weighted PCA were applied to spectra of optimal colors belonging to the outer surface of the object-color solid or to so-called MacAdam limits. The correlation matrix formed from this data is a circulant matrix whose biggest eigenvalue is simple and the corresponding eigenvector is constant. All other eigenvalues are double, and the eigenvectors can be expressed with trigonometric functions. Found trigonometric functions can be used as a general basis to reconstruct all possible smooth reflectance spectra. When the spectral data are weighted with an appropriate weight function, the essential part of the color information is compressed to the first three components and the shapes of the first three eigenvectors correspond to one achromatic response function and to two chromatic response functions, the latter corresponding approximately to Munsell opponent-hue directions 9YR-9B and 2BG-2R.

  19. Hierarchical analysis of molecular spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.J.

    1996-03-01

    A novel representation of molecular spectra in terms of hierarchical trees has proven to be an important aid for the study of many significant problems in gas-phase chemical dynamics. Trees are generated from molecular spectra by monitoring the changes that occur in a spectrum as resolution is changed in a continuous manner. A tree defines a genealogy among all lines of a spectrum. This allows for a detailed understanding of the assignment of features of a spectrum that may be difficult to obtain any other way as well as an understanding of intramolecular energy transfer time scales, mechanisms, and pathways. The methodology has been applied to several problems: transition state spectroscopy, intramolecular energy transfer in highly excited molecules, high-resolution overtone spectroscopy, and the nature of the classical-quantum correspondence when there is classical chaos (``quantum chaos``).

  20. Accelerated Fitting of Stellar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Yuan-Sen; Conroy, Charlie; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2016-07-01

    Stellar spectra are often modeled and fitted by interpolating within a rectilinear grid of synthetic spectra to derive the stars’ labels: stellar parameters and elemental abundances. However, the number of synthetic spectra needed for a rectilinear grid grows exponentially with the label space dimensions, precluding the simultaneous and self-consistent fitting of more than a few elemental abundances. Shortcuts such as fitting subsets of labels separately can introduce unknown systematics and do not produce correct error covariances in the derived labels. In this paper we present a new approach—Convex Hull Adaptive Tessellation (chat)—which includes several new ideas for inexpensively generating a sufficient stellar synthetic library, using linear algebra and the concept of an adaptive, data-driven grid. A convex hull approximates the region where the data lie in the label space. A variety of tests with mock data sets demonstrate that chat can reduce the number of required synthetic model calculations by three orders of magnitude in an eight-dimensional label space. The reduction will be even larger for higher dimensional label spaces. In chat the computational effort increases only linearly with the number of labels that are fit simultaneously. Around each of these grid points in the label space an approximate synthetic spectrum can be generated through linear expansion using a set of “gradient spectra” that represent flux derivatives at every wavelength point with respect to all labels. These techniques provide new opportunities to fit the full stellar spectra from large surveys with 15-30 labels simultaneously.

  1. Ultraviolet Spectra of Uranian Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roush, Ted

    1996-07-01

    The ultraviolet reflectance spectra of the icy satellites ofUranus are largely unknown. We propose to use the HubbleSpace Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph in order to obtainthe first high S/N UV spectra of Ariel, Titania, and Oberon.Because of our innovative targeting approach, we have alsobeen able to include Umbriel in our observational plans.These satellites sample almost the full range of UV albedosand UV/VIS colors exhibited by the large Uranian satellites.The spectral resolution and range will overlap with earth-based telescopic and spacecraft observations of these objectsallowing for comparisons of the UV data with existing visualand near-infrared spectra of these objects. These comparisonswill ultimately provide greater constraints on the relativelylow albedo spectrally neutral non-ice component on the Uraniansatellites. The existance of UV spectral features due tospecies such as O_3, H_2O_2 or carbon-rich macromolecules(e.g. polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) can provide evidencefor modification of the surfaces via plasma or meteoriticbombardment, alteration by high-energy ultraviolet radiation,or accretion of particles from nearby sources such asplanetary rings or dust bands.

  2. Optical Spectra of Triggered Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, T. D.; Biagi, C. J.; Hill, J. D.; Jordan, D. M.; Uman, M. A.; Christian, H. J., Jr.

    2009-12-01

    In August 2009, the first optical spectra of triggered lightning flashes were acquired. Data from two triggered lightning flashes were obtained at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing in north-central Florida. The spectrometer that was used has an average dispersion of 260 Å/mm resulting in an average resolution of 5 Å when mated to a Photron (SA1.1) high-speed camera. The spectra captured with this system had a free spectral range of 3800-8000 Å. The spectra were captured at 300,000 frames per second. The spectrometer's vertical field of view was 3 m at an altitude 50 m above the launch tower, intended to view the middle of the triggering wire. Preliminary results show that the copper spectrum dominated the earliest part of the flash and copper lines persisted during the total lifetime of the detectable spectrum. Animations over the lifetime of the stroke from the initial wire illumination to multiple return strokes show the evolution of the spectrum. In addition, coordinated high speed channel base current, electric field and imagery measurements of the exploding wire, downward leaders, and return strokes were recorded. Quantitative analysis of the spectral evolution will be discussed in the context of the overall flash development.

  3. Ultraviolet emission spectra of sunbeds.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Beat; Mathys, Patrick; Moser, Mirjana; Bressoud, Dominique; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte

    2002-12-01

    It is well known that UV radiation contributes to the development of skin cancer. Exposure to solar radiation is predominantly responsible for the high incidence rate of skin cancer, but there are also indications that sunbeds are involved. The aim of the present investigation was to determine the UV emission spectra of sunbeds. It included the most common sunbed models, which cover more than 50% of the Swiss market. The UV emission spectra of sunbeds have special characteristics and are different from the sun spectrum, which can be seen in high-resolution spectral measurements. Sunbed emission spectra are similar to the sun spectrum in the UVB (280-320 nm) range but reach values 10 to 15 times higher in the UVA (320-400 nm) range. An average erythema-effective irradiance of 0.33 W/m2 was determined for sunbeds. This corresponds to a UV index of 13, which is significantly higher than the UV index of 8.5 of the high summer sun at noon at intermediate latitudes. The measurements were spread over the whole effective area of the sunbeds, and an inhomogeneous distribution of the irradiances with variations of up to 30% from the average value was found.

  4. DETECTION OF BROAD Hα EMISSION LINES IN THE LATE-TIME SPECTRA OF A HYDROGEN-POOR SUPERLUMINOUS SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Lin; Masci, F.; Quimby, R.; Ofek, E.; Gal-Yam, A.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Leloudas, G.; Cia, A. de; Yaron, O.; Mazzali, P.; Perley, D.; Cenko, S. B.; Cao, Y.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Nugent, P. E.; Rebbapragada, Umaa D.; Woźniak, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    iPTF13ehe is a hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova (SLSN) at z = 0.3434, with a slow-evolving light curve and spectral features similar to SN2007bi. It rises in 83–148 days to reach a peak bolometric luminosity of ∼1.3 × 10{sup 44} erg s{sup −1}, then decays slowly at 0.015 mag day{sup −1}. The measured ejecta velocity is ∼ 13,000 km s{sup −1}. The inferred explosion characteristics, such as the ejecta mass (70–220 M{sub ⊙}), and the total radiative and kinetic energy (E{sub rad} ∼ 10{sup 51} erg, E{sub kin} ∼ 2 × 10{sup 53} erg), are typical of slow-evolving H-poor SLSN events. However, the late-time spectrum taken at +251 days (rest, post-peak) reveals a Balmer Hα emission feature with broad and narrow components, which has never been detected before among other H-poor SLSNe. The broad component has a velocity width of ∼4500 km s{sup −1} and a ∼300 km s{sup −1} blueward shift relative to the narrow component. We interpret this broad Hα emission with a luminosity of ∼2 × 10{sup 41} erg s{sup −1} as resulting from the interaction between the supernova ejecta and a discrete H-rich shell, located at a distance of ∼4 × 10{sup 16} cm from the explosion site. This interaction causes the rest-frame r-band LC to brighten at late times. The fact that the late-time spectra are not completely absorbed by the shock-ionized H-shell implies that its Thomson scattering optical depth is likely ≤1, thus setting upper limits on the shell mass ≤30 M{sub ⊙}. Of the existing models, a Pulsational Pair Instability supernova model can naturally explain the observed 30 M{sub ⊙} H-shell, ejected from a progenitor star with an initial mass of (95–150) M{sub ⊙} about 40 years ago. We estimate that at least ∼15% of all SLSNe-I may have late-time Balmer emission lines.

  5. Detection of Broad Hα Emission Lines in the Late-time Spectra of a Hydrogen-poor Superluminous Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lin; Quimby, R.; Ofek, E.; Gal-Yam, A.; Mazzali, P.; Perley, D.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Leloudas, G.; de Cia, A.; Masci, F.; Cenko, S. B.; Cao, Y.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Nugent, P. E.; Rebbapragada, Umaa D.; Woźniak, P. R.; Yaron, O.

    2015-12-01

    iPTF13ehe is a hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova (SLSN) at z = 0.3434, with a slow-evolving light curve and spectral features similar to SN2007bi. It rises in 83-148 days to reach a peak bolometric luminosity of ˜1.3 × 1044 erg s-1, then decays slowly at 0.015 mag day-1. The measured ejecta velocity is ˜ 13,000 km s-1. The inferred explosion characteristics, such as the ejecta mass (70-220 M⊙), and the total radiative and kinetic energy (Erad ˜ 1051 erg, Ekin ˜ 2 × 1053 erg), are typical of slow-evolving H-poor SLSN events. However, the late-time spectrum taken at +251 days (rest, post-peak) reveals a Balmer Hα emission feature with broad and narrow components, which has never been detected before among other H-poor SLSNe. The broad component has a velocity width of ˜4500 km s-1 and a ˜300 km s-1 blueward shift relative to the narrow component. We interpret this broad Hα emission with a luminosity of ˜2 × 1041 erg s-1 as resulting from the interaction between the supernova ejecta and a discrete H-rich shell, located at a distance of ˜4 × 1016 cm from the explosion site. This interaction causes the rest-frame r-band LC to brighten at late times. The fact that the late-time spectra are not completely absorbed by the shock-ionized H-shell implies that its Thomson scattering optical depth is likely ≤1, thus setting upper limits on the shell mass ≤30 M⊙. Of the existing models, a Pulsational Pair Instability supernova model can naturally explain the observed 30 M⊙ H-shell, ejected from a progenitor star with an initial mass of (95-150) M⊙ about 40 years ago. We estimate that at least ˜15% of all SLSNe-I may have late-time Balmer emission lines.

  6. Detection of Broad Hα Emission Lines in the Late-Time Spectra of a Hydrogen-Poor Superluminous Supernova

    DOE PAGES

    Yan, Lin; Quimby, R.; Ofek, E.; ...

    2015-11-23

    iPTF13ehe is a hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova (SLSN) at z = 0.3434, with a slow-evolving light curve and spectral features similar to SN2007bi. It rises in 83–148 days to reach a peak bolometric luminosity of ~1.3 × 1044 erg s-1, then decays slowly at 0.015 mag day-1. The measured ejecta velocity is ~ 13,000 km s-1. The inferred explosion characteristics, such as the ejecta mass (70–220 M⊙), and the total radiative and kinetic energy (Erad ~ 1051 erg, Ekin ~ 2 × 1053 erg), are typical of slow-evolving H-poor SLSN events. However, the late-time spectrum taken at +251 days (rest, post-peak)more » reveals a Balmer Hα emission feature with broad and narrow components, which has never been detected before among other H-poor SLSNe. The broad component has a velocity width of ~4500 km s-1 and a ~300 km s-1 blueward shift relative to the narrow component. In this paper, we interpret this broad Hα emission with a luminosity of ~2 × 1041 erg s-1 as resulting from the interaction between the supernova ejecta and a discrete H-rich shell, located at a distance of ~4 × 1016 cm from the explosion site. This interaction causes the rest-frame r-band LC to brighten at late times. The fact that the late-time spectra are not completely absorbed by the shock-ionized H-shell implies that its Thomson scattering optical depth is likely ≤1, thus setting upper limits on the shell mass ≤30 M⊙. Of the existing models, a Pulsational Pair Instability supernova model can naturally explain the observed 30 M⊙ H-shell, ejected from a progenitor star with an initial mass of (95–150) M⊙ about 40 years ago. Finally, we estimate that at least ~15% of all SLSNe-I may have late-time Balmer emission lines.« less

  7. Detection of Broad Hα Emission Lines in the Late-Time Spectra of a Hydrogen-Poor Superluminous Supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Lin; Quimby, R.; Ofek, E.; Gal-Yam, A.; Mazzali, P.; Perley, D.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Leloudas, G.; Cia, A. de; Masci, F.; Cenko, S. B.; Cao, Y.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Nugent, P. E.; Rebbapragada, Umaa D.; Woźniak, P. R.; Yaron, O.

    2015-11-23

    iPTF13ehe is a hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova (SLSN) at z = 0.3434, with a slow-evolving light curve and spectral features similar to SN2007bi. It rises in 83–148 days to reach a peak bolometric luminosity of ~1.3 × 1044 erg s-1, then decays slowly at 0.015 mag day-1. The measured ejecta velocity is ~ 13,000 km s-1. The inferred explosion characteristics, such as the ejecta mass (70–220 M), and the total radiative and kinetic energy (Erad ~ 1051 erg, Ekin ~ 2 × 1053 erg), are typical of slow-evolving H-poor SLSN events. However, the late-time spectrum taken at +251 days (rest, post-peak) reveals a Balmer Hα emission feature with broad and narrow components, which has never been detected before among other H-poor SLSNe. The broad component has a velocity width of ~4500 km s-1 and a ~300 km s-1 blueward shift relative to the narrow component. In this paper, we interpret this broad Hα emission with a luminosity of ~2 × 1041 erg s-1 as resulting from the interaction between the supernova ejecta and a discrete H-rich shell, located at a distance of ~4 × 1016 cm from the explosion site. This interaction causes the rest-frame r-band LC to brighten at late times. The fact that the late-time spectra are not completely absorbed by the shock-ionized H-shell implies that its Thomson scattering optical depth is likely ≤1, thus setting upper limits on the shell mass ≤30 M. Of the existing models, a Pulsational Pair Instability supernova model can naturally explain the observed 30 M H-shell, ejected from a progenitor star with an initial mass of (95–150) M about 40 years ago. Finally, we estimate that at least ~15% of all SLSNe-I may have late-time Balmer emission lines.

  8. Prediction of earthquake response spectra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joyner, W.B.; Boore, David M.

    1982-01-01

    We have developed empirical equations for predicting earthquake response spectra in terms of magnitude, distance, and site conditions, using a two-stage regression method similar to the one we used previously for peak horizontal acceleration and velocity. We analyzed horizontal pseudo-velocity response at 5 percent damping for 64 records of 12 shallow earthquakes in Western North America, including the recent Coyote Lake and Imperial Valley, California, earthquakes. We developed predictive equations for 12 different periods between 0.1 and 4.0 s, both for the larger of two horizontal components and for the random horizontal component. The resulting spectra show amplification at soil sites compared to rock sites for periods greater than or equal to 0.3 s, with maximum amplification exceeding a factor of 2 at 2.0 s. For periods less than 0.3 s there is slight deamplification at the soil sites. These results are generally consistent with those of several earlier studies. A particularly significant aspect of the predicted spectra is the change of shape with magnitude (confirming earlier results by McGuire and by Irifunac and Anderson). This result indicates that the conventional practice of scaling a constant spectral shape by peak acceleration will not give accurate answers. The Newmark and Hall method of spectral scaling, using both peak acceleration and peak velocity, largely avoids this error. Comparison of our spectra with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Regulatory Guide 1.60 spectrum anchored at the same value at 0.1 s shows that the Regulatory Guide 1.60 spectrum is exceeded at soil sites for a magnitude of 7.5 at all distances for periods greater than about 0.5 s. Comparison of our spectra for soil sites with the corresponding ATC-3 curve of lateral design force coefficient for the highest seismic zone indicates that the ATC-3 curve is exceeded within about 7 km of a magnitude 6.5 earthquake and within about 15 km of a magnitude 7.5 event. The amount by

  9. EXTINCTION IN STAR-FORMING DISK GALAXIES FROM INCLINATION-DEPENDENT COMPOSITE SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, Ching-Wa; Szalay, Alex S.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Budavari, Tamas; Dobos, Laszlo; Csabai, Istvan E-mail: szalay@pha.jhu.ed

    2010-02-01

    Extinction in galaxies affects their observed properties. In scenarios describing the distribution of dust and stars in individual disk galaxies, the amplitude of the extinction can be modulated by the inclination of the galaxies. In this work, we investigate the inclination dependency in composite spectra of star-forming disk galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5. In a volume-limited sample within a redshift range 0.065-0.075 and a r-band Petrosian absolute magnitude range -19.5 to -22 mag which exhibits a flat distribution of inclination, the inclined relative to face-on extinction in the stellar continuum is found empirically to increase with inclination in the g, r, and i bands. Within the central 0.5 intrinsic half-light radius of the galaxies, the g-band relative extinction in the stellar continuum for the highly inclined objects (axis ratio b/a = 0.1) is 1.2 mag, agreeing with previous studies. The extinction curve of the disk galaxies is given in the rest-frame wavelengths 3700-8000 A, identified with major optical emission and absorption lines in diagnostics. The Balmer decrement, Halpha/Hbeta, remains constant with inclination, suggesting a different kind of dust configuration and/or reddening mechanism in the H II region from that in the stellar continuum. One factor is shown to be the presence of spatially non-uniform interstellar extinction, presumably caused by clumped dust in the vicinity of the H II region.

  10. Abundance analysis of the supergiant stars HD 80057 and HD 80404 based on their UVES Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanrıverdi, T.; Baştürk, Ö.

    2016-08-01

    This study presents elemental abundances of the early A-type supergiant HD 80057 and the late A-type supergiant HD 80404. High resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio spectra published by the UVES Paranal Observatory Project (Bagnulo et al., 2003) were analyzed to compute their elemental abundances using ATLAS9 (Kurucz, 1993; 2005; Sbordone et al., 2004). In our analysis we assumed local thermodynamic equilibrium. The atmospheric parameters of HD 80057 used in this study are from Firnstein and Przybilla (2012), and that of HD 80404 are derived from spectral energy distribution, ionization equilibria of Cr I/II and Fe I/II, the fits to the wings of Balmer and Paschen lines as Teff = 7700 ± 150 K and log g = 1.60 ± 0.15 (in cgs). The microturbulent velocities of HD 80057 and HD 80404 have been determined as 4.3 ± 0.1 and 2.2 ± 0.0 km s^-1, respectively. The rotational velocities are 15 ± 1 and 7 ± 2 km s^-1 and their macroturbulence velocities are 24 ± 2 and 2 ± 1 km s^1. We have given the abundances of 25 ions of 19 elements for HD 80057 and 36 ions of 25 elements for HD 80404. The abundances are close to solar values, except for some elements (Na, Sc, Ti, V, Ba, and Sr). We have found the metallicities [M/H] for HD 80057 and HD 80404 as -0.16 ± 0.24 and -0.04 ± 0.16 dex, respectively. The evolutionary status of these stars are discussed and their nitrogen-to-carbon (N/C) and nitrogen-to-oxygen (N/O) ratios show that they are in their blue supergiant phase before the red supergiant region.

  11. [Analysis of three-dimensional fluorescence overlapping spectra using differential spectra and independent component analysis].

    PubMed

    Yu, Shao-Hui; Zhang, Yu-Jun; Zhao, Nan-Jing; Xiao, Xue; Wang, Huan-Bo; Yin, Gao-Fang

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of multi-component three-dimensional fluorescence overlapping spectra is always very difficult. In view of the advantage of differential spectra and based on the calculation principle of two-dimensional differential spectra, the three-dimensional fluorescence spectra with both excitation and emission spectra is fully utilized. Firstly, the excitation differential spectra and emission differential spectra are respectively computed after unfolding the three-dimensional fluorescence spectra. Then the excitation differential spectra and emission differential spectra of the single component are obtained by analyzing the multicomponent differential spectra using independent component analysis. In this process, the use of cubic spline increases the data points of excitation spectra, and the roughness penalty smoothing reduces the noise of emission spectra which is beneficial for the computation of differential spectra. The similarity indices between the standard spectra and recovered spectra show that independent component analysis based on differential spectra is more suitable for the component recognition of three-dimensional fluorescence overlapping spectra.

  12. Satellite spectra of heliumlike nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Hsuan, H.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K.W.; von Goeler, S. Grek, B.; Johnson, D.; Johnson, L.C.; Sesnic, S.; Bhalla, C.P.; Karim, K.R.

    1987-02-01

    Spectra of heliumlike nickel, NiXXVII, have been observed from Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) plasmas with a high resolution crystal spectrometer. The experimental arrangement permits simultaneous observation of the heliumlike resonance line, the intercombination and forbidden lines, and all the associated satellites due to transitions 1s/sup 2/nl - 1s2l'nl'' with N greater than or equal to 2. Relative wavelengths and line intensities can thus be determined very accurately. The observed spectral data are in good agreement with results from the present Hartree-Fock-Slater atomic model calculations and predictions from the Z-expansion method.

  13. Two slow meteors with spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubs, Martin; Sposetti, Stefano; Spinner, Roger; Booz, Beat

    2017-01-01

    On January 2, 2017 two peculiar meteors (M20170102_001216 and M20170102_015202) were observed by several stations in Switzerland. Both had a long duration, slow velocity, similar brightness and a very similar radiant. As they appeared in a time interval of 100 minutes, a satellite was suspected as a possible origin of these two observations. A closer inspection however showed that this interpretation was incorrect. The two objects were slow meteors. Spectra were taken from both objects, which were nearly identical. Together this points to a common origin of the two meteors.

  14. Modeling Kilonova Spectra Using PHOENIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallely, Patrick; Baron, Edward A.

    2017-06-01

    Powered by the radioactive decay of r-process nuclei, kilonova (alternatively referred to as macronova) emission provides an electromagnetic counterpart to the gravitational waves expected to be produced during binary neutron star and neutron star - black hole mergers. As such, kilonovae are potentially powerful tools for localizing gravitational wave sources and better probing the physics behind the events that generate them. We utilize the detailed Non-LTE code PHOENIX to simulate kilonova spectra by modeling r-process-rich ejecta, and we present the very preliminary results of these models.

  15. Doppler Spectra of Radar Clutter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-30

    spatial difference of two wind components. Thus, for the longitudinal co -structure function for lag is the vertical direction, D (•L) [u(Z+6Z) - U(z...Turbulence in Precipitations," Zu. V. Mel’nichuk, Fizika atmosfery i okeana, Vol. II, No. 7, 1966, pages 695-704. 26 APPENDIX A NON-COHERENT SPECTRA OF...0) (A-5) RLjr) =( Rc(0) ( cos (a) + a sin() (A-6) Note that because the coherent signal has zero mean, as T varies from zero to large values, Ct varies

  16. Action spectra for photosynthetic inhibition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, M. M.; Flint, S.; Camp, L. B.

    1981-01-01

    The ultraviolet action spectrum for photosynthesis inhibition was determined to fall between that of the general DNA action spectrum and the generalized plant action spectrum. The characteristics of this action spectrum suggest that a combination of pronounced increase in effectiveness with decreasing wavelength, substantial specificity for the UV-B waveband, and very diminished response in the UV-A waveband result in large radiation amplification factors when the action spectra are used as weighting functions. Attempted determination of dose/response relationships for leaf disc inhibition provided inconclusive data from which to deconvolute an action spectrum.

  17. Action spectra for photosynthetic inhibition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, M. M.; Flint, S.; Camp, L. B.

    1981-01-01

    The ultraviolet action spectrum for photosynthesis inhibition was determined to fall between that of the general DNA action spectrum and the generalized plant action spectrum. The characteristics of this action spectrum suggest that a combination of pronounced increase in effectiveness with decreasing wavelength, substantial specificity for the UV-B waveband, and very diminished response in the UV-A waveband result in large radiation amplification factors when the action spectra are used as weighting functions. Attempted determination of dose/response relationships for leaf disc inhibition provided inconclusive data from which to deconvolute an action spectrum.

  18. Design spectra development considering short time histories

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, E.O.

    1983-08-22

    The need for generation of seismic acceleration histories to prescribed response spectra arises several ways in structural dynamics. For example, one way of obtaining floor spectra is to generate a history from a foundation spectra and then solve for the floor motion from which a floor spectrum can be obtained. Two separate programs, MODQKE and MDOF, were written to provide a capability of obtaining equipment spectra from design spectra. MODQKE generates or modifies acceleration histories to conform with design spectra pertaining to, say, a foundation. MDOF is a simple linear modal superposition program that solves for equipment support histories using the design spectra conforming histories as input. Equipment spectra, then, are obtained from the support histories using MODQKE.

  19. Method of processing positron lifetime spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Valuev, N.P.; Klimov, A.B.; Zhikharev, A.N.

    1985-05-01

    This paper describes a method for the processing of spectra of positron annihilation which permits a much more relaible determination of the lifetime during numerical processing of spectra by computer.

  20. Infrared Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Bakes, E. L. O.

    2000-01-01

    We have computed the synthetic infrared spectra of some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons containing up to 54 carbon atoms. The species studied include ovalene, circumcoronene, dicoronylene, and hexabenzocoronene. We report spectra for anions, neutrals, cations, and multiply charged cations.

  1. Visible Spectra of Titanium Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, V.; Nagarajan, R.; Maier, J. P.; Zhuang, X.; Le, A.; Steimle, T. C.

    2011-05-01

    Titanium oxide (TiO) has been extensively studied spectroscopically due to its astrophysical relevance. TiO is the main opacity source in the atmospheres of cool M-type stars in the visible and near infrared. In view of the high cosmic abundance of Ti and O, titanium dioxide (TiO2) is believed to play an important role in dust formation processes from the gas-phase in circumstellar shells of oxygen-rich stars. The electronic spectra of a cold molecular beam of TiO2 have been investigated using mass-resolved resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. TiO2 was produced by laser ablation of a pure titanium rod in the presence of a supersonic expanding mixture of approximately 5% O2 in either helium or argon. The spectra were recorded in the region 17500 cm-1 to 22500 cm-1 and the bands assigned to the A1B2 ← X1A1 transition. The origin and harmonic vibrational constants for the A1B2 state were determined to be: T000 = 17593(5) cm-1, ω1 = 876(3) cm-1, ω2 = 184(1) cm-1, and ω3 = 316(2) cm-1. Further, the dispersed fluorescence of a few bands were recorded to obtain vibrational parameters for the X1A1 state.

  2. Multiscale Climate Emulator of Multimodal Wave Spectra: MUSCLE-spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueda, A.; Hegermiller, C.; Alvarez Antolinez, J. A.; Camus, P.; Vitousek, S.; Ruggiero, P.; Barnard, P.; Erikson, L. H.; Tomas, A.; Mendez, F. J.

    2016-12-01

    Characterization of multimodal directional wave spectra is important for many offshore and coastal applications, such as marine forecasting, coastal hazard assessment, and design of offshore wave energy farms and coastal structures. However, the multivariate and multiscale nature of wave climate variability makes this problem complex yet tractable using computationally-expensive numerical models. So far, the skill of statistical-downscaling models based parametric (unimodal) wave conditions is limited in large ocean basins such as the Pacific. The recent availability of long-term directional spectral data from buoys and wave hindcast models allows for development of stochastic models that include multimodal sea-state parameters. This work introduces a statistical-downscaling framework based on weather types to predict multimodal wave spectra (e.g., significant wave height, mean wave period, and mean wave direction from different storm systems, including sea and swells) from large-scale atmospheric pressure fields. For each weather type, variables of interest are modeled using the categorical distribution for the sea-state type, the Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distribution for wave height and wave period, a multivariate Gaussian copula for the interdependence between variables, and a Markov chain model for the chronology of daily weather types. We apply the model to the Southern California coast, where local seas and swells from both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres contribute to the multimodal wave spectrum. This work allows attribution of particular extreme multimodal wave events to specific atmospheric conditions, expanding knowledge of time-dependent, climate-driven offshore and coastal sea-state conditions that have a significant influence on local nearshore processes, coastal morphology, and flood hazards.

  3. Multiscale climate emulator of multimodal wave spectra: MUSCLE-spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueda, Ana; Hegermiller, Christie A.; Antolinez, Jose A. A.; Camus, Paula; Vitousek, Sean; Ruggiero, Peter; Barnard, Patrick L.; Erikson, Li H.; Tomás, Antonio; Mendez, Fernando J.

    2017-02-01

    Characterization of multimodal directional wave spectra is important for many offshore and coastal applications, such as marine forecasting, coastal hazard assessment, and design of offshore wave energy farms and coastal structures. However, the multivariate and multiscale nature of wave climate variability makes this complex problem tractable using computationally expensive numerical models. So far, the skill of statistical-downscaling model-based parametric (unimodal) wave conditions is limited in large ocean basins such as the Pacific. The recent availability of long-term directional spectral data from buoys and wave hindcast models allows for development of stochastic models that include multimodal sea-state parameters. This work introduces a statistical downscaling framework based on weather types to predict multimodal wave spectra (e.g., significant wave height, mean wave period, and mean wave direction from different storm systems, including sea and swells) from large-scale atmospheric pressure fields. For each weather type, variables of interest are modeled using the categorical distribution for the sea-state type, the Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distribution for wave height and wave period, a multivariate Gaussian copula for the interdependence between variables, and a Markov chain model for the chronology of daily weather types. We apply the model to the southern California coast, where local seas and swells from both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres contribute to the multimodal wave spectrum. This work allows attribution of particular extreme multimodal wave events to specific atmospheric conditions, expanding knowledge of time-dependent, climate-driven offshore and coastal sea-state conditions that have a significant influence on local nearshore processes, coastal morphology, and flood hazards.

  4. An RGB approach to extraordinary spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grusche, Sascha; Theilmann, Florian

    2015-09-01

    After Newton had explained a series of ordinary spectra and Goethe had pointed out its complementary counterpart, Nussbaumer discovered a series of extraordinary spectra which are geometrically identical and colourwise analogous to Newton’s and Goethe’s spectra. To understand the geometry and colours of extraordinary spectra, the wavelength composition is explored with filters and spectroscopic setups. Visualized in a dispersion diagram, the wavelength composition is interpreted in terms of additive colour mixing. Finally, all spectra are simulated as the superposition of red, green, and blue images that are shifted apart. This RGB approach makes it easy to understand the complex relationship between wavelengths and colours.

  5. Antiresonant dielectric spectra: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turik, A. V.; Boldyrev, N. A.; Sitalo, E. I.; Reznichenko, L. A.

    2017-07-01

    It is established that, in ceramics based on solid solutions of BiFeO3-SrTiO3 and BiFeO3-BaTiO3 multiferroics, antiresonant dielectric spectra—a kind of spectra not described in literature—are possible in addition to relaxation and resonant spectra. Antiresonant dielectric spectra are simulated, and experimental data confirming the simulation results are obtained. It is shown that the antiresonant spectra are characterized by a large activation energy ( U > 1 eV). A relationship between the antiresonant spectra and hopping conductivity is supposed.

  6. Neutron and photon spectra in LINACs.

    PubMed

    Vega-Carrillo, H R; Martínez-Ovalle, S A; Lallena, A M; Mercado, G A; Benites-Rengifo, J L

    2012-12-01

    A Monte Carlo calculation, using the MCNPX code, was carried out in order to estimate the photon and neutron spectra in two locations of two linacs operating at 15 and 18 MV. Detailed models of both linac heads were used in the calculations. Spectra were estimated below the flattening filter and at the isocenter. Neutron spectra show two components due to evaporation and knock-on neutrons. Lethargy spectra under the filter were compared to the spectra calculated from the function quoted by Tosi et al. that describes reasonably well neutron spectra beyond 1 MeV, though tends to underestimate the energy region between 10(-6) and 1 MeV. Neutron and the Bremsstrahlung spectra show the same features regardless of the linac voltage.

  7. Spectra from pair-equilibrium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, A. A.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical model of relativistic nonmagnetized plasma with uniform temperature and electron density distributions is considered, and spectra from plasma in pair equilibrium are studied. A range of dimensionless temperature (T) greater than about 0.2 is considered. The spectra from low pair density plasmas in pair equilibrium vary from un-Comptonized bremsstrahlung spectra at Thomson cross section tau(N) much less than one to Comptonized bremsstrahlung spectra with tau(N) over one. For high pair density plasmas the spectra are flat for T greater than about one, and have broad intensity peaks at energy roughly equal to 3T for T less than one. In the latter region the total luminosity is approximately twice the annihilation luminosity. All spectra are flat in the X-ray region, in contradiction to observed AGN spectra. For dimensionless luminosity greater than about 100, the cooling time becomes shorter than the Thomson time.

  8. Pressure spectra and cross spectra at an area contraction in a ducted combustion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.; Raftopoulos, D. D.

    1980-01-01

    Pressure spectra and cross-spectra at an area contraction in a liquid fuel, ducted, combustion noise test facility are analyzed. Measurements made over a range of air and fuel flows are discussed. Measured spectra are compared with spectra calculated using a simple analytical model.

  9. ULTRAVIOLET DIFFERENCE SPECTRA OF PEPSIN

    PubMed Central

    Blumenfeld, Olga O.; Perlmann, Gertrude E.

    1959-01-01

    A shift of pH of pepsin solutions from 4.6 to 1.0 gives rise to spectral displacements in the ultraviolet. If represented as difference spectra three peaks with maxima at 2770, 2850, and 2930 Ångströms are present which can be attributed to the tyrosine and tryptophan residues in the protein. On mild autolysis of pepsin at pH 2.0 the absorbancy in the ultraviolet further decreases. Although some of these effects can be ascribed to the occurrence of hydrogen bonding between the aromatic residues and a carboxylate ion, those observed on autolysis are caused by charge effects of newly formed polar groups in the vicinity of a chromophore. No direct relation between the optical properties described here and enzymic activity of pepsin has been observed. PMID:13620886

  10. Reflectance spectra of primitive chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo-Rodríguez, J. M.; Moyano-Cambero, C. E.; Llorca, J.

    2013-05-01

    We are studying a wide sample of pristine carbonaceous chondrites from the NASA Antarctic collection in order to get clues on the physico-chemical processes occurred in the parent bodies of these meteorites. We are obtaining laboratory reflectance spectra of different groups of carbonaceous chondrites, but here we focus in CM and CI chondrites. We discuss the main spectral features that can be used to identify primitive carbonaceous asteroids by remote sensing techniques. Two different spectrometers were used covering the entire 0.3 to 30 μm electromagnetic window. Only a handful of Near Earth Objects (NEOs) exhibit bands or features clearly associated with aqueous alteration. Among them are the target asteroids of Osiris Rex and Marco Polo-R missions.

  11. [Vibrational spectra of Corallium elatius].

    PubMed

    Fan, Lu-wei; Zhang, Yan; Hu, Yang

    2013-09-01

    Corallium elatius, which has unique color distribution characteristic, is the most important species of Taiwan precious corals. EPMA, XRD, FTIR and Laser Raman detective methods were used to study the chemical, mineral composition and spectra characteristics of Corallium elatius. The result of EPMA, XRD and FTIR shows the high-Mg calcite mineral componentand the stable minor chemical constituents of the samples. Meanwhile, the cell parameter indicates the lattice distortion and the preferred orientation of calcite grain caused by organic matter. The red part of the samples shows a different Raman spectrum from that of the white part, located at 1517/1128 cm(-1) and 1296/1016 cm(-1). Raman scattering measurement reveals the relationship between the organic matter and color.

  12. Optimal Extraction of Echelle Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piskunov, Nikolai

    The extraction of the echelle spectra registered with a CCD detector represents a big challenge because of three reasons: (1) the pixel sampling is often close or worse then optimal, (2) spectral orders are curved and tilted with respect to the CCD rows (or columns) and (3) every pixel contains additional noise coming from various sources as illustrated in Figure 1. The main goal of an optimal extraction is to recover as much of the science signal while minimizing the contribution of the noise. Here we present the Slit Function Decomposition algorithm which replaces the summation in a sliding window with a reconstruction of the slit illumination profile. The reconstruction is formulated as an inverse problem solved by iterations and it is robust against most of the systematic problems including cosmic rays and cosmetic defects.

  13. Optical Spectra of Silicon Oligomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishida, Hideo; Tachibana, Hiroaki; Sakurai, Kouhei; Matsumoto, Mutsuyoshi; Abe, Shuji; Tokura, Yoshinori

    1996-06-01

    Optical absorption spectra have been measured for finite-chain analogs of linear polysilane, silicon oligomers CH3[Si(CH3)2]nCH3, with controlled chain length n(=2 to 16).The intense lowest electronic absorption peak and its higher-lying side bands,which correspond to the one-dimensional exciton series in the infinite chain,shift to higher energy with decrease of the chain length because of the confinement of the excited states.The oscillator strength of the main absorption peak increases with the chain length, while the linewidth of the main peak drastically decreases, especially in the region n=2 to 6.These finite size effects of the electronic (excitonic) absorptionare argued in terms of spatial extension of the excited states, motional narrowing and electron correlation effect.

  14. Power spectra of solar convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, D.-Y.; Labonte, B. J.; Braun, D. C.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The properties of convective motions on the sun are studied using Kitt Peak Doppler images and power spectra of convection. The power peaks at a scale of about 29,000 km and drops off smoothly with wavenumber. There is no evidence of apparent energy excess at the scale of the mesogranulation proposed by other authors. The vertical and horizontal power for each wavenumber are obtained and used to calculate the vertical and horizontal velocities of the supergranulation. The amplitude of vertical and horizontal velocities of the supergranulation are 0.034 (+ or - 0.002) km/s and 0.38 (+ or - 0.01) km/s, respectively. The corresponding rms values are 0.024 (+ or - 0.002) km/s and 0.27 (+ or - 0.01) km/s.

  15. Graviton spectra in string cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Galluccio, Massimo; Litterio, Marco; Occhionero, Franco

    1996-08-01

    We propose to uncover the signature of a stringy era in the primordial Universe by searching for a prominent peak in the relic graviton spectrum. This feature, which in our specific model terminates an ω³ increase and initiates an ω⁻⁷ decrease, is induced during the so far overlooked bounce of the scale factor between the collapsing deflationary era (or pre-Big Bang) and the expanding inflationary era (or post-Big Bang). We evaluate both analytically and numerically the frequency and the intensity of the peak and we show that they may likely fall in the realm of the new generation of interferometric detectors. The existence of a peak is at variance with ordinarily monotonic (either increasing or decreasing) graviton spectra of canonical cosmologies; its detection would therefore offer strong support to string cosmology.

  16. Background estimation in experimental spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, R.; Hanson, K. M.; Dose, V.; Linden, W. von der

    2000-02-01

    A general probabilistic technique for estimating background contributions to measured spectra is presented. A Bayesian model is used to capture the defining characteristics of the problem, namely, that the background is smoother than the signal. The signal is allowed to have positive and/or negative components. The background is represented in terms of a cubic spline basis. A variable degree of smoothness of the background is attained by allowing the number of knots and the knot positions to be adaptively chosen on the basis of the data. The fully Bayesian approach taken provides a natural way to handle knot adaptivity and allows uncertainties in the background to be estimated. Our technique is demonstrated on a particle induced x-ray emission spectrum from a geological sample and an Auger spectrum from iron, which contains signals with both positive and negative components. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  17. Line Coupling in Atmospheric Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipping, R. H.

    1996-01-01

    The theoretical modeling of atmospheric spectra is important for a number of different applications: for instance, in the determination of minor atmospheric constituents such as ozone, carbon dioxide, CFC's etc.; in monitoring the temperature profile for climate studies; and in measuring the incoming and outgoing radiation to input into global climate models. In order to accomplish the above mentioned goal, one needs to know the spectral parameters characterizing the individual spectral lines (frequency, width, strength, and shape) as well as the physical parameters of the atmosphere (temperature, abundances, and pressure). When all these parameters are known, it is usually assumed that the resultant spectra and concomitant absorption coefficient can then be calculated by a superposition of individual profiles of appropriate frequency, strength and shape. However, this is not true if the lines are 'coupled'. Line coupling is a subtle effect that takes place when lines of a particular molecule overlap in frequency. In this case when the initial states and the final states of two transitions are connected by collisions, there is a quantum interference resulting in perturbed shapes. In general, this results in the narrowing of Q-branches (those in which the rotational quantum number does not change), and vibration-rotational R- and P branches (those in which the rotational quantum number changes by +/- 1), and in the spectral region beyond band heads (regions where the spectral lines pile up due to centrifugal distortion). Because these features and spectral regions are often those of interest in the determination of the abundances and pressure-temperature profiles, one must take this effect into account in atmospheric models.

  18. Line Coupling in Atmospheric Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipping, R. H.

    1996-01-01

    The theoretical modeling of atmospheric spectra is important for a number of different applications: for instance, in the determination of minor atmospheric constituents such as ozone, carbon dioxide, CFC's etc.; in monitoring the temperature profile for climate studies; and in measuring the incoming and outgoing radiation to input into global climate models. In order to accomplish the above mentioned goal, one needs to know the spectral parameters characterizing the individual spectral lines (frequency, width, strength, and shape) as well as the physical parameters of the atmosphere (temperature, abundances, and pressure). When all these parameters are known, it is usually assumed that the resultant spectra and concomitant absorption coefficient can then be calculated by a superposition of individual profiles of appropriate frequency, strength and shape. However, this is not true if the lines are 'coupled'. Line coupling is a subtle effect that takes place when lines of a particular molecule overlap in frequency. In this case when the initial states and the final states of two transitions are connected by collisions, there is a quantum interference resulting in perturbed shapes. In general, this results in the narrowing of Q-branches (those in which the rotational quantum number does not change), and vibration-rotational R- and P branches (those in which the rotational quantum number changes by +/- 1), and in the spectral region beyond band heads (regions where the spectral lines pile up due to centrifugal distortion). Because these features and spectral regions are often those of interest in the determination of the abundances and pressure-temperature profiles, one must take this effect into account in atmospheric models.

  19. Rest-Frame Optical Spectra of Three Strongly Lensed Galaxies at z~2

    SciTech Connect

    Hainline, Kevin N.; Shapley, Alice E.; Kornei, Katherine A.; Pettini, Max; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth; Allam, Sahar S.; Tucker, Douglas L.; /Fermilab

    2009-06-01

    We present Keck II NIRSPEC rest-frame optical spectra for three recently discovered lensed galaxies: the Cosmic Horseshoe (z = 2.38), the Clone (z = 2.00), and SDSS J090122.37+181432.3 (z = 2.26). The boost in signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) from gravitational lensing provides an unusually detailed view of the physical conditions in these objects. A full complement of high S/N rest-frame optical emission lines is measured, spanning from rest frame 3600 to 6800 {angstrom}, including robust detections of fainter lines such as H{gamma}, [S II]{lambda}6717,6732, and in one instance [Ne III]{lambda}3869. SDSS J090122.37+181432.3 shows evidence for active galactic nucleus activity, and therefore we focus our analysis on star-forming regions in the Cosmic Horseshoe and the Clone. For these two objects, we estimate a wide range of physical properties. Current lensing models for the Cosmic Horseshoe and the Clone allow us to correct the measured H{alpha} luminosity and calculated star formation rate. Metallicities have been estimated with a variety of indicators, which span a range of values of 12+ log(O/H) = 8.3-8.8, between {approx}0.4 and {approx}1.5 of the solar oxygen abundance. Dynamical masses were computed from the H{alpha} velocity dispersions and measured half-light radii of the reconstructed sources. A comparison of the Balmer lines enabled measurement of dust reddening coefficients. Variations in the line ratios between the different lensed images are also observed, indicating that the spectra are probing different regions of the lensed galaxies. In all respects, the lensed objects appear fairly typical of ultraviolet-selected star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 2. The Clone occupies a position on the emission-line diagnostic diagram of [O III]/H{beta} versus [N II]/H{alpha} that is offset from the locations of z {approx} 0 galaxies. Our new NIRSPEC measurements may provide quantitative insights into why high-redshift objects display such properties. From the [S II

  20. OVI absorbers in SDSS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Stephan

    We conducted a systematic search for signatures of the Intergalactic Medium (IGM) in Quasar spectra of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 3 (DR3), focusing on finding intervening absorbers via detection of their O VI doublet. We present a search algorithm, and criteria for distinguishing candidates from spurious Lyman a forest lines. In addition, we compare our findings with simulations of the Lyman a forest in order to estimate the detectability of O VI doublets over various redshift intervals. We obtain a sample of 1866 O VI doublet candidates with rest-frame equivalent width >= 0.05 λ in 855 AGN spectra (out of 3702 objects with redshifts in the range accessible for O VI detection). This sample is subdivided into 3 groups according to the likelihood of being real and the potential for follow-up observation of the candidate. The group with the cleanest and most secure candidates is comprised of 145 candidates. 69 of these reside at a velocity separation >= 5000 km/s from the QSO, and can therefore be classified tentatively as intervening absorbers. Most of these absorbers have not been picked up by earlier, automated QSO absorption line detection algorithms. This sample increases the number of known O VI absorbers at redshifts beyond z abs >= 2.7 substantially. We propose to obtain observations of some of the candidates with the best signatures for O VI doublets with high signal-to-noise and high resolution in order to better constrain the physical state of the absorbers. We then focused on a subsample of 387 AGN sightlines with an average S/N >= 5: 0, allowing for the detection of absorbers above a rest-frame equivalent width limit of W r >= 0:19 ? A for the O VI 1032 λ component. Accounting for random interlopers mimicking an O VI doublet, we derive for the first time a secure lower limit for the redshift number density DN/Dz for redshifts z abs >= 2:8. With extensive Monte Carlo simulations we quantify the losses of absorbers due to blending

  1. The Theory of Spectra and Atomic Constitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohr, Niels

    2011-06-01

    Part I. On the Spectrum of Hydrogen: 1. Empirical spectral laws; 2. Laws of temperature radiation; 3. The nuclear theory of the atom; 4. Quantum theory of spectra; 5. Hydrogen spectrum; 6. The Pickering lines; 7. Other spectra; Part II. On the Series Spectra of the Elements; Section 1. Introduction; Section 2. General Principles of the Quantum Theory of Spectra: 8. Hydrogen spectrum; 9. The correspondence principle; 10. General spectral laws; 11. Absorption and excitation of radiation; Section 3. Development of the Quantum Theory of Spectra: 12. Effect of external forces on the hydrogen spectrum; 13. The Stark effect; 14. The Zoeman effect; 15. Central pertubations; 16. Relativity effect of hydrogen lines; 17. Theory of series spectra; 18. Correspondence principle and conservation of angular momentum; 19. The spectra of helium and lithium; 20. Complex structure of series lines; Section 4. Conclusion; Part III. The Structure of the Atom and the Physical and Chemical Properties of the Elements; Section 5. Preliminary: 21. The nuclear atom; 22. The postulates of the quantum theory; 23. Hydrogen atom; 24. Hydrogen spectrum and x-ray spectra; 25. The fine structure of the hydrogen lines; 26. Periodic table; 27. Recent atomic models; Section 6. Series Spectra and the Capture of Electrons by Atoms: 28. Arc and spark spectra; 29. Series diagram; 30. Correspondence principle; Section 7. Formation of Atoms and the Periodic Table: 31. First period. Hydrogen-helium; 32. Second period. Lithium-neon; 33. Third period. Sodium-argon; 34. Fourth period. Potassium-Krypton; 35. Fifth period. Rubidium-xenon; 36. Sixth period. Caesium-niton; 37. Seventh period; 38. Survey of the periodic table; Section 8. Reorganization of Atoms and X-Ray SPectra: 39. Absorption and emission of x-rays and correspondence principle; 40. X-ray spectra and atomic structure; 41. Classification of x-ray spectra; 42. Conclusion; Appendix.

  2. Predicted continuum spectra of type II supernovae - LTE results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaviv, G.; Wehrse, R.; Wagoner, R. V.

    1985-01-01

    The continuum spectral energy distribution of the flux emerging from type II supernovae is calculated from quasi-static radiative transfer through a power-law density gradient, assuming radiative equilibrium and LTE. It is found that the Balmer jump disappears at high effective temperatures and low densities, while the spectrum resembles that of a dilute blackbody but is flatter with a sharper cutoff at the short-wavelength end. A significant UV excess is found in all models calculated. The calculation should be considered exploratory because of significant effects which are anticipated to arise from departure from LTE.

  3. Energy Distributions and spectra of Orion B stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schild, R. E.; Chaffee, F.

    1972-01-01

    New MK spectral types and energy distributions are presented for B stars in Orion for which far ultraviolet flux excesses have recently been discovered. Significant differences between HD spectral energy distributions show the Orion late B stars to have smaller Balmer discontinuities than do field stars of the same spectral types. For the late B stars, these effects cause the 1500 A fluxes to be under-estimated by approximately 0.5 mag. No comparable systematic effects were found for the early B stars.

  4. Blind extraction of exoplanetary spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morello, Giuseppe; Waldmann, Ingo P.; Tinetti, Giovanna

    2016-06-01

    In the last decade, remote sensing spectroscopy enabled characterization of the atmospheres of extrasolar planets. Transmission and emission spectra of tens of transiting exoplanets have been measured with multiple instruments aboard Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescopes as well as ground-based facilities, revealing the presence of atomic, ionic and molecular species in their atmospheres, and constraining their temperature and pressure profiles.Early analyses were somehow heuristic both in measuring the spectra and in their interpretation, leading to some controversies in the literature.A photometric precision of 0.01% is necessary to detect the atmospheric spectral modulations. Current observatories, except Kepler, were not designed to achieve this precision. Data reduction is necessary to minimize the effect of instrument systematics in order to achieve the target precision. In the past, parametric models have extensively been used by most teams to remove correlated noise with the aid of auxiliary information of the instrument, the so-called optical state vectors (OSVs). Such OSVs can include inter- and intra-pixel position of the star or its spectrum, instrument temperatures and inclinations, and/or other parameters. In some cases, different parameterizations led to discrepant results.We recommend the use of blind non-parametric data detrending techniques to overcome those issues. In particular, we adopt Independent Component Analysis (ICA), i.e. a blind source separation (BSS) technique to disentangle the multiple instrument systematics and astrophysical signals in transit/eclipse light curves. ICA does not require a model for the systematics, and for this reason, it can be applied to any instrument with little changes, if any. ICA-based algorithms have been applied to Spitzer/IRAC and synthetic observations in photometry (Morello et al. 2014, 2015, 2016; Morello 2015) and to Hubble/NICMOS and Spitzer/IRS in spectroscopy (Waldmann 2012, 2014, Waldmann et al. 2013

  5. Interpretation of Nitroindolinospirobenzothiopyran Vibrational Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkov, L. L.; Khamchukov, Yu. D.; Lyubimov, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    The structures of four possible stereoisomers of the closed form of photochromic nitroindolinospirobenzothiopyran (NISTP) {1',3'-dihydro-1',3',3'-trimethyl-6-nitrospiro[2H-1-benzothiopyran-2,2'-(2H)-indoline]} were determined by the DFT method. The geometry of the most stable isomer was defined. Nitro-substitution changes mainly the lengths of bonds formed by S and N with spiro-atom Cs. According to the calculations, the CsS bond changes most and lengthens by 0.019 Å. It is shown that the S atom has large displacement amplitudes in normal modes assigned to Raman lines at 230, 285, 360, and 575 cm-1 and weak IR bands at 467 and 577 cm-1. Oscillations involving the nitro group are very active in Raman and IR spectra. Their frequencies are slightly lower than similar frequencies of nitrobenzene and nitroindolinospirobenzopyran, indicating a higher degree of vibrational coupling of the NO2 group with the NISTP molecular skeleton.

  6. Reflectance spectra of subarctic lichens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petzold, Donald E.; Goward, Samuel N.

    1988-01-01

    Lichens constitute a major portion of the ground cover of high latitude environments, but little has been reported concerning their in situ solar spectral reflectance properties. Knowledge of these properties is important for the interpretation of remotely sensed observations from high latitude regions, as well as in studies of high latitude ecology and energy balance climatology. The spectral reflectance of common boreal vascular plants is similar to that of vascular plants of the midlatitudes. The dominant lichens, in contrast, display variable reflectance patterns in visible wavelengths. The relative reflectance peak at 0.55 microns, common to green vegetation, is absent or indistinct in spectra of pervasive boreal forest and tundra lichens, despite the presence of chlorophyll in the inner algal cells. Lichens of the dominant genus, Cladina, display strong absorption of ultraviolet energy and short-wavelength blue light relative to their absorption in other visible wavelengths. Since the Cladinae dominate both the surface vegetation in open woodlands of the boreal forest and the low arctic tundra, their unusual spectral reflectance patterns will enable accurate monitoring of the boreal forest-tundra ecotone and detection of its vigor and movement in the future.

  7. X-ray spectra of supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szymkowiak, A. E.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray spectra were obtained from fields in three supernova remnants with the solid state spectrometer of the HEAO 2 satellite. These spectra, which contain lines from K-shell transitions of several abundant elements with atomic numbers between 10 and 22, were compared with various models, including some of spectra that would be produced by adiabatic phase remnants when the time-dependence of the ionization is considered.

  8. Near-Infrared Spectra of Uranian Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturini, C. C.; Lynch, D. K.; Rudy, R. J.; Mazuk, S.; Puetter, R. C.

    2001-05-01

    We present 0.8 to 2.5 micron spectra taken on June 21 & 22, 1998 UT of the Uranian satellites Miranda, Titania, Ariel, Oberon, and Umbriel. The spectra were taken using The Aerospace Corporation's Near-Infrared Imaging Spectragraph (NIRIS) on the University of California's Lick Observatory 3 meter Shane telescope. These spectra will be compared with previous work including Brown, R.H. and Cruikshank, D.P. (1983) as well as more recent spectra and analysis by Grundy, W. et al. (1999). Support for this research was provided by The Aerospace Corporation's Independent Research and Development Program.

  9. Energetic electron spectra in Saturn's plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbary, J. F.; Paranicas, C.; Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.; Krupp, N.

    2011-07-01

    The differential spectra of energetic electrons (27-400 keV) in Saturn's plasma sheet can be characterized by power law or kappa distributions. Using all available fluxes from 2005 to 2010, fits to these distributions reveal a striking and consistent pattern of radial dependence in Saturn's plasma sheet (∣z∣ < 1 RS = 60,268 km). The electron spectral indices show harder spectra at large radial distances (20-30 RS), softer spectra at middle radial distances (10-20 RS), and very steep spectra inside the orbit of Rhea (˜8.5 RS). The dayside spectra are somewhat harder than the nightside spectra outside the orbit of Titan (˜20 RS), although there is no local time dependence inside ˜10 RS. This spectral behavior exhibited essentially no dependence on pitch angle and remained remarkably constant throughout the Cassini mission. Inward of about 10 RS, the presence of the electron radiation belts and losses of lower-energy electrons to the gas and grain environment give rise to the very hard spectra in the inner magnetosphere, while the hard spectra in the outer magnetosphere may derive from auroral acceleration at high latitudes. The gradual softening of the spectra from 20 to 10 RS is explained by inward radial diffusion.

  10. A Bayesian method for analysing relaxation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciocci Brazzano, L.; Pellizza, L. J.; Matteo, C. L.; Sorichetti, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of electrical and mechanical properties of material, relies on a precise analysis of the relaxation spectra. We explore the ability of a Bayesian method to achieve an accurate estimation of spectral parameters. We implemented a parallel-tempering Markov-chain Monte Carlo algorithm and used it to fit simulated and measured spectra. An exhaustive testing of the code shows that it presents an extremely good performance, accurately fitting complex spectra under strong noise and overlapping components. We conclude that this technique is quite suitable for relaxation spectra analysis, complementing classical methods.

  11. [Describing language of spectra and rough set].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Bo; Hu, Zhan-yi; Zhao, Yong-heng

    2002-06-01

    It is the traditional way to analyze spectra by experiences in astronomical field. And until now there has never been a suitable theoretical frame to describe spectra, which is may be owing to small spectra datasets that astronomers can get by low-level instruments. With the high-speed development of telescopes, especially on behalf of LAMOST, a large telescope which can collect more than 20,000 spectra in an observing night, spectra datasets are becoming larger and larger very fast. Facing these voluminous datasets, the traditional spectra-processing way simply depending on experiences becomes unfit. In this paper, we develop a brand-new language--describing language of spectra (DLS) to describe spectra of celestial bodies by defining BE (Basic element). And based on DLS, we introduce the method of RSDA (Rough set and data analysis), which is a technique of data mining. By RSDA we extract some rules of stellar spectra, and this experiment can be regarded as an application of DLS.

  12. STUDIES IN METABOLIC SPECTRA IV.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lorraine; Snell, J. F.

    1962-01-01

    Cheng, Lorraine (Radiobiochemistry Department, Chas. Pfizer & Co., Inc., Maywood, N. J.) and J. F. Snell. Studies in metabolic spectra. IV. Effects of tetracyclines, some of their derivatives, and chloramphenicol on accumulation of glutamic acid in Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 83:711–719. 1962.—Escherichia coli strain 21 was incubated in the Warburg apparatus at 37 C with sodium acetate-2-C14 and 0.1 μmole/ml of various test compounds. Up to 1 hr, de novo C14-glutamic acid (synthesized from the C14-acetate precursor) accumulation in the fermentation broth was found to be a common phenomenon for the control cells and cells treated with oxytetracycline, chlortetracycline, tetracycline, and chloramphenicol. Subsequently, C14-glutamic acid continued to accumulate in the broth of the inhibited cells, but began to disappear from the broth of the control cells. During the first half hour, the rate of accumulation was most rapid in the presence of oxytetracycline. At 3 hr the total de nova C14-glutamic acid was found to be the same whether cells were treated with oxytetracycline or not. However, the distribution of this glutamic acid was different. In the oxytetracycline-treated cells, more than 87% of the total de nova C14-glutamic acid was in the broth, and only 13% was incorporated into the cell residue. In the control cells, no C14-glutamic acid was found in the broth, although 67% was in the cell residue. The possibility that the tetracyclines and chloramphenicol have different modes of action, and that oxytetracycline inhibits the incorporation of d-glutamic acid into the cell wall and membrane material in E. coli 21, was discussed. PMID:13878663

  13. Lightning Field Spectra Obtained from Airborne Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    ground-based elec- tric field measurements have been obtained by Serhan (11) and more recently by Weidman (12). Serhan calculated spectra from 2 kHz...Sensors." Air Force Con- tract F33615-81-C-3409 Final Report, AFWAL-TR- 82-3095, December 1982. 11. G.I. Serhan , et al., "The RF Spectra of First and

  14. Spectra of the Jovian ring and Amalthea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, G.; Becklin, E. E.; Jewitt, D. C.; Danielson, G. E.; Terrile, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements made between 0.887 and 2.4 microns demonstrate that the Jovian ring and Amalthea have similar reflection spectra. The spectra, in particular the ratio of the 0.9- to 2.2-micron reflectivities, are inconsistent with those expected from water, ammonia, or methane frosts, but are consistent with reflection from large rock bodies.

  15. Resolution enhancement in second-derivative spectra.

    PubMed

    Czarnecki, Mirosław A

    2015-01-01

    Derivative spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the resolution enhancement in infrared, near-infrared, Raman, ultraviolet-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance, electron paramagnetic resonance, and fluorescence spectroscopy. Despite its great significance in analytical chemistry, not all aspects of the applications of this method have been explored as yet. This is the first systematic study of the parameters that influence the resolution enhancement in the second derivative spectra. The derivative spectra were calculated with the Savitzky-Golay method with different window size (5, 15, 25) and polynomial order (2, 4). The results obtained in this work show that the resolution enhancement in the second derivative spectra strongly depends on the data spacing in the original spectra, window size, polynomial order, and peak profile. As shown, the resolution enhancement is related to variations in the width of the peaks upon the differentiation. The present study reveals that in order to maximize the separation of the peaks in the second derivative spectra, the original spectra should be recorded at high resolution and differentiated using a small window size and high polynomial order. However, working with the real spectra one has to compromise between the noise reduction and optimization of the resolution enhancement in the second derivative spectra.

  16. Isotope shifts in spectra of molecular liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovskaya, E. V.; Kolomiitsova, T. D.; Shurukhina, A. V.; Shchepkin, D. N.

    2016-02-01

    In the IR absorption spectra of low-temperature molecular liquids, we have observed anomalously large isotope shifts of frequencies of vibrational bands that are strong in the dipole absorption. The same effect has also been observed in their Raman spectra. At the same time, in the spectra of cryosolutions, the isotope shifts of the same bands coincide with a high accuracy (±(0.1-0.5) cm-1) with the shifts that are observed in the spectra of the gas phase. The difference between the spectra of examined low-temperature systems is caused by the occurrence of resonant dipole-dipole interactions between spectrally active identical molecules. The calculation of the band contour in the spectrum of liquid freon that we have performed in this work taking into account the resonant interaction between states of simultaneous transitions in isotopically substituted molecules can explain this effect.

  17. Mid-Infrared Spectra of Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, B.; Potter, A. E.; Killen, R. M.; Morgan, T. H.

    2001-01-01

    Mid-infrared (8-13 microns) spectra of radiation emitted from the surface of solar system objects can be interpreted in terms of surface composition. However, the spectral features are weak, and require exceptionally high signal-to-noise ratio spectra to detect them. Ground-based observations of spectra in this region are plagued by strong atmospheric absorptions from water and ozone. High-altitude balloon measurements that avoid atmospheric absorptions can be affected by contamination of the optics by dust. We have developed a technique to obtain mid-infrared spectra of Mercury that minimizes these problems. The resulting spectra show evidence of transparency features that can be used to qualitatively characterize the surface composition. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. PCA: Principal Component Analysis for spectra modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Peter D.; Oliver, Seb; Farrah, Duncan; Wang, Lingyu; Efstathiou, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    The mid-infrared spectra of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) contain a variety of spectral features that can be used as diagnostics to characterize the spectra. However, such diagnostics are biased by our prior prejudices on the origin of the features. Moreover, by using only part of the spectrum they do not utilize the full information content of the spectra. Blind statistical techniques such as principal component analysis (PCA) consider the whole spectrum, find correlated features and separate them out into distinct components. This code, written in IDL, classifies principal components of IRS spectra to define a new classification scheme using 5D Gaussian mixtures modelling. The five PCs and average spectra for the four classifications to classify objects are made available with the code.

  19. Blind extraction of exoplanetary spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morello, Giuseppe; Waldmann, Ingo; Damiano, Mario; Tinetti, Giovanna

    2016-10-01

    In the last decade, remote sensing spectroscopy enabled characterization of the atmospheres of extrasolar planets. Transmission and emission spectra of tens of transiting exoplanets have been measured with multiple instruments aboard Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescopes as well as ground-based facilities, revealing the presence of chemical species in their atmospheres, and constraining their temperature and pressure profiles.Early analyses were somehow heuristic, leading to some controversies in the literature.A photometric precision of 0.01% is necessary to detect the atmospheric spectral modulations. Current observatories, except Kepler, were not designed to achieve this precision. Data reduction is necessary to minimize the effect of instrument systematics in order to achieve the target precision. In the past, parametric models have extensively been used by most teams to remove correlated noise with the aid of auxiliary information of the instrument, the so-called optical state vectors (OSVs). Such OSVs can include inter- and intra-pixel position of the star or its spectrum, instrument temperatures and inclinations, and/or other parameters. In some cases, different parameterizations led to discrepant results.We recommend the use of blind non-parametric data detrending techniques to overcome those issues. In particular, we adopt Independent Component Analysis (ICA), i.e. a powerful blind source separation (BSS) technique to disentangle the multiple instrument systematics and astrophysical signals in transit/eclipse light curves. ICA does not require a model for the systematics, thence it can be applied to any instrument with little changes, if any. ICA-based algorithms have been applied to Spitzer/IRAC and synthetic observations in photometry (Morello et al. 2014, 2015, 2016; Morello 2015) and to Hubble/WFC3, Hubble/NICMOS and Spitzer/IRS and Hubble/WFC3 in spectroscopy (Damiano, Morello et al., in prep., Waldmann 2012, 2014, Waldmann et al. 2013) with excellent

  20. HST Spatially Resolved Spectra of the Accretion Disc and Gas Stream of the Nova-Like Variable UX Ursae Majoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baptista, Raymundo; Horne, Keith; Wade, Richard A.; Hubeny, Ivan; Long, Knox S.; Rutten, Rene G. M.

    1998-01-01

    Time-resolved eclipse spectroscopy of the nova-like variable UX UMa obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope/Faint Object Spectrograph (HST/FOS) on 1994 August and November is analysed with eclipse mapping techniques to produce spatially resolved spectra of its accretion disk and gas stream as a function of distance from the disk centre. The inner accretion disk is characterized by a blue continuum filled with absorption bands and lines, which cross over to emission with increasing disk radius, similar to that reported at optical wavelengths. The comparison of spatially resolved spectra at different azimuths reveals a significant asymmetry in the disk emission at ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths, with the disk side closest to the secondary star showing pronounced absorption by an 'iron curtain' and a Balmer jump in absorption. These results suggest the existence of an absorbing ring of cold gas whose density and/or vertical scale increase with disk radius. The spectrum of the infalling gas stream is noticeably different from the disc spectrum at the same radius suggesting that gas overflows through the impact point at the disk rim and continues along the stream trajectory, producing distinct emission down to 0.1 R(sub LI). The spectrum of the uneclipsed light shows prominent emission lines of Lyalpha, N v lambda1241, SiIV Lambda 1400, C IV Lambda 1550, HeII Lambda 1640, and MgII Lambda 2800, and a UV continuum rising towards longer wavelengths. The Balmer jump appears clearly in emission indicating that the uneclipsed light has an important contribution from optically thin gas. The lines and optically thin continuum emission are most probably emitted in a vertically extended disk chromosphere + wind. The radial temperature profiles of the continuum maps are well described by a steady-state disc model in the inner and intermediate disk regions (R greater than or equal to 0.3R(sub LI) ). There is evidence of an increase in the mass accretion rate from August to November

  1. Characteristics of energetic solar flare electron spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Dan; Droege, Wolfgang; Meyer, Peter; Evenson, Paul

    1989-01-01

    A 55 event survey of energy spectra of 0.1-100 MeV interplanetary electrons originating from solar flares as measured by two spectrometers onboard the ISEE 3 (ICE) spacecraft for the years 1978-1982 has been completed. Spectra generated using the maximum flux of a given event in each energy channel were restricted to events with a well-defined flux rise time. Two broad groups of electron spectra are considered. In one group, the spectra are well represented by a single power law in rigidity with spectral index in the range 3-4.5. The spectra in the other group deviate from a power law in rigidity systematically in that they harden with increasing rigidity. Events with near power-law spectra are found to be correlated with long-duration soft X-ray events, whereas those with hardening spectra are correlated with short-duration events. The possible variation of acceleration and propagation processes with the properties of the flare site is discussed, using the duration of the soft X-ray flare emission as an indicator of the physical parameters of the flare site (flare volume, density, coronal height, and magnetic field geometry).

  2. Handbook of Monochromatic XPS Spectra, Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crist, B. Vincent

    2000-10-01

    This handbook is one of three containing an invaluable collection of research grade XPS Spectra. Each handbook concentrates on a specific family of materials (the elements and their native oxides, semiconductors and polymers) and is entirely self-contained. The introductory section to each handbook includes comprehensive information about the XPS instrument used, the materials and the advanced methods used to collect the spectra. Energy resolution settings, instrument characteristics, energy referencing methods, traceability, energy scale calibration details and transmission function are all reported. Among the many valuable features included in each of these handbooks are: ? All spectra were measured by using AlK monochromatic X-rays ? All spectra were collected in a self-consistent manner to maximise data reliability and quality ? All peaks in the wide spectra are fully annotated and accompanied by detailed atom % tables that report BEs for each of the labelled peaks ? Each high-energy resolution spectrum is peak-fitted and accompanied by detailed tables containing binding energies, FWHMs and relative percentages. In this volume 'Semiconductors' are contained XPS Spectra from a wide range of semiconductive materials and related materials, a rare tool for scientists and analysts in this area. Exclusive features of this volume include: ? Binding energies are accurate to +/- 0.08eV ? Charge compensation was done with a flood-gun mesh-screen system ? Valence band spectra document the occupied density of states (DOS) and the fundamental electronic nature of the semi-conductive materials analysed ? Analyses were done: "as received", "freshly fractured in air", "ion etched" and "chemically treated" ? Alphabetically organised by chemical abbreviations for ease of locating each material This handbook is an invaluable reference for materials scientists and electrical engineers in industry, academia and government laboratories interested in the analysis of semiconductors

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Spectra of 5 Type II supernovae (Inserra+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inserra, C.; Pastorello, A.; Turatto, M.; Pumo, M. L.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Botticella, M. T.; Bufano, F.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Harutyunyan, A.; Taubenberger, S.; Valenti, S.; Zampieri, L.

    Core-collapse Supernovae (CC-SNe) descend from progenitors more massive than about 8M⊙. Because of the young age of the progenitors, the ejecta may eventually interact with the circumstellar medium (CSM) via highly energetic processes detectable in the radio, X-ray, ultraviolet (UV) and, sometimes, in the optical domains. In this paper we present ultraviolet, optical and near infrared observations of five type II SNe, namely SNe 2009dd, 2007pk, 2010aj, 1995ad, and 1996W. Together with few other SNe they form a group of moderately luminous type II events. We investigate the photometric similarities and differences among these bright objects. We also attempt to characterise them by analysing the spectral evolutions, in order to find some traces of CSM-ejecta interaction. We collected photometry and spectroscopy with several telescopes in order to construct well-sampled light curves and spectral evolutions from the photospheric to the nebular phases. Both photometry and spectroscopy indicate a degree of heterogeneity in this sample. Modelling the data of SNe 2009dd, 2010aj and 1995ad allows us to constrain the explosion parameters and the properties of the progenitor stars. The light curves have luminous peak magnitudes (-16.95Balmer lines, are visible in the photospheric spectra of SNe 2009dd and 1996W. For SN2007pk we observe a spectral transition from a type IIn to a standard type II SN. Modelling the observations of SNe 2009dd, 2010aj and 1995ad with radiation hydrodynamics codes, we infer kinetic plus thermal energies of about 0.2-0.5 foe, initial radii of 2-5x1013cm and ejected masses of ~5.0-9.5M⊙. These values suggest moderate-mass, super-asymptotic giant branch (SAGB) or

  4. Chromospheric activity and lithium line variations in the spectra of the spotted star LQ Hydrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores Soriano, M.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Weber, M.

    2015-03-01

    Context. Although the relationship between lithium abundance in stars and their magnetic activity is commonly accepted, it is still unclear how the different phenomena related to it can increase the amount of Li, reduce its depletion, or be a source of bias for the measurements. Aims: We study the rotational modulation of chromospheric and photospheric parameters of the young, active, single K2 dwarf LQ Hya and their connection with the variability of the Li i 6708 Å line. Methods: A total of 199 high-resolution STELLA spectra and quasi-simultaneous photometry were used to compute effective temperature, gravity, and chromospheric activity indicators such as Hα and Hβ emission, Balmer decrement, and chromospheric electron density, as a function of the rotational phase. The variation of the Li i 6708 Å line was characterized in terms of equivalent width, abundance, and of 6Li/7Li isotopic ratio in the form of line shifts. Results: Photospheric and chromospheric parameters show clear rotational modulation. Effective temperatures and continuum variations reveal a higher concentration of cool spots on the side of the star on which we also detect stronger chromospheric activity. Increased electron densities and the modulation of the He i D3 line suggest that the source of this activity can be a combination of plages and repeated low-intensity flares. The Li line and other temperature-sensitive lines are clearly enhanced by the spots located on the most active side of the star. Li abundances calculated taking into account the temperature variations simultaneously show, although with high dispersion, a small overabundance of this element that correlates well with the surface magnetic activity. In addition, the Li line center is more intensely redshifted than in the other hemisphere, which might be interpreted as a weak enrichment of 6Li. Based on data obtained with the STELLA robotic telescope in Tenerife, an AIP facility jointly operated by AIP and IAC, and the Vienna

  5. IRAS low-resolution spectra of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Martin; Volk, Kevin

    1989-01-01

    The spectra of external galaxies are selected and extracted from the IRAS LRS database. Twenty-one objects present viable spectra. One is a peculiar star-forming E-S0 galaxy. The remainder are all starburst or H II region galaxies. Their average spectrum demonstrates the importance of the PAH emission bands in the 8-23-micron region and reinforces the conclusion reached from ground-based spectra, that there is a strong correlation between the PAH bands and the starburst or H II region character of a galaxy.

  6. Computer processing of tunable diode laser spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Randy D.

    1989-01-01

    A computer-controlled tunable diode laser spectrometer and spectral analysis software are described. The three-channel system records simultaneously the transmission of a subject gas, a temperature-stabilized etalon, and a calibration gas. The software routines are applied to diode laser spectra of HNO3 and NO2 to illustrate the procedures adopted for conversion of raw spectral data to useful transmission and harmonic spectra. Extraction of line positions, absorption intensities, collisional broadening coefficients, and gas concentrations from recorded spectra is also described.

  7. Vibrational spectra and structure of isopropylbenzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishman, A. I.; Noskov, A. I.; Remizov, A. B.; Chachkov, D. V.

    2008-12-01

    Infrared spectra (4000-400 cm -1) and Raman spectra (1700-40 cm -1) of the liquid and two crystalline solids of isopropylbenzene (cumene) and isopropylbenzene-d 12 have been recorded. The spectra indicate that in the liquid and crystalline solids isopropylbenzene exists in planar conformation only (C sbnd H bond is in the plane of the benzene ring). An assignment of the observed band wave numbers both isopropylbenzene and isopropylbenzene-d 12 is discussed by comparison with normal mode wave numbers and IR intensities calculated from ab initio 6-31G (d) force fields.

  8. Comparing Ultraviolet Spectra Against Calculations: First Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Ruth C.

    2003-01-01

    The five-year goal of this effort is to calculate high fidelity mid-UV spectra for individual stars and stellar systems for a wide range of ages, abundances, and abundance ratios. In this first year, the emphasis was placed on revising the list of atomic line parameters used to calculate mid-UV spectra. First, new identifications of atomic lines and measurements of their transition probabilities were obtained for lines of the first and second ionization stages of iron-peak elements. Second, observed mid-UV and optical spectra for standard stars were re-analyzed and compared to new calculations, to refine the determination of transition probabilities and to estimate the identity of lines still missing from the laboratory lists. As evidenced by the figures, a dramatic improvement has resulted in the reproduction of the spectra of standard stars by the calculations.

  9. Frequency Spectra of Magnetoacoustic Emission in Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanchenko, S. V.; Grokhovsky, V. I.; Kolchanov, N. N.

    2016-08-01

    We analyzed the magnetoacoustic emission spectra of iron meteorites and their industrial analogs. The revealed differences in signal amplitude, position and width of the peaks are associated with the features of structure and the magnetic texture.

  10. An analysis of middle ultraviolet dayglow spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walden, Billie S.

    1991-12-01

    Middle ultraviolet spectra from 1800 to 3400A are analyzed. These spectra were obtained from the March 1990 rocket flight of the NPS MUSTANG instrument over the altitudes 105km to 315km. The data were compared with computer generated synthetic spectra. A least squares fitting procedure was developed for this purpose. Each data point was weighted using the standard deviation of the means. Synthetic spectra were generated for the following emissions: N2 Vegard-Kaphan; N2 Lyman-Birge-Hopfield; NO gamma, delta, and epsilon; OI 2972A, OII 2470A; and NII 2143A. Altitude profiles for the emissions were obtained. Tentative identification was made of the OIII 2853A emission. A comparison of VK and LBH profiles demonstrates the process of N2 A-state quenching by atomic oxygen.

  11. Vibrational and vibronic spectra of tryptamine conformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayorkas, Nitzan; Bernat, Amir; Izbitski, Shay; Bar, Ilana

    2013-03-01

    Conformation-specific ionization-detected stimulated Raman spectra, including both Raman loss and Raman gain lines, along with visible-visible-ultraviolet hole-burning spectra of tryptamine (TRA) conformers have been measured simultaneously, with the aim of obtaining new data for identifying them. The slightly different orientations of the ethylamine side chain relative to the indole lead to unique spectral signatures, pointing to the presence of seven TRA conformers in the molecular beam. Comparison of ionization-loss stimulated Raman spectra to computationally scaled harmonic Raman spectra, especially in the alkyl C-H and amine N-H stretch regions together with the retrieved information on the stabilities of the TRA conformers assisted their characterization and structural identification. The prospects and limitations of using these spectroscopic methods as potential conformational probes of flexible molecules are discussed.

  12. [Spectra of dark green jade from Myanmar].

    PubMed

    Mao, Jian; Chai, Lin-Tao; Guo, Shou-Guo; Fan, Jian-Liang; Bao, Feng

    2013-05-01

    Chemical compositions and spectral characteristics of one type of dark green jades assumed from omphacite jadeite from Myanmar jadeite mining area were studied by X-ray powder diffraction(XRD), X-ray fluorescence spectra(XRF), Raman spectra(RM) and UV-Vis Spectroscopy, etc. Based on testing by XRD and XRF, it was shown that it belongs to iron-enriched plagioclase, including albite and anorthite. The compositions range is between Ab0.731 An0.264 Or0.004 and Ab0.693 An0.303 Or0.004. Raman spectra of samples, albite jade and anorthite were collected and analyzed. Additionally, the distributions of Si, Al in the crystal structure were also discussed. UV-Vis spectra showed that dark green hue of this mineral is associated with d--d electronic transition of Fe3+ and Cr3+.

  13. PIA update: Correlation analyses of mass spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, L. W.; Clark, B. C.

    1988-01-01

    The PIA instrument aboard the Giotto spacecraft (a time of flight spectrometer) has been presented elsewhere. The mass spectra used in this analysis were decoded and mass numbers assigned according to the presence of carbon and silver, using the global values for these elements in their spectral absence. The results presented here were obtained using a frequency of occurrence based on analysis which correlated how often mass numbers appear in the mass spectra and which mass numbers tend to occur together in the same spectra; no amplitude information is utilized. The data are presented as plots of mass vs coincident mass for different subsets of the PIA data set, with both axes having units of atomic mass. Frequency contours are plotted at approximately five percent contour intervals, relative to the maximum AMU occurrence in that plot. The plots presented are symmetrical about the matrix diagonal, i.e., every mass is coincident with itself in a given spectra.

  14. Microwave spectra of some volatile organic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    A computer-controlled microwave (MRR) spectrometer was used to catalog reference spectra for chemical analysis. Tables of absorption frequency, peak absorption intensity, and integrated intensity are included for 26 volatile organic compounds, all but one of which contain oxygen.

  15. Spatial evolution of ocean wave spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beal, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    The spatially evolving deep water synthetic aperture radar (SAR) directional spectra of a mixed ocean wave system are compared with a comprehensive set of surface and aircraft measurements. The evolution of the SAR spectra, at least for ocean wavelengths greater than 80 m, is seen as generally consistent with the auxiliary data set in both time and space. From the spatial evolution of the angular component of the spectra, it is possible to project back to an apparent remote storm source that is also consistent with the storm location via GOES satellite imagery. The data provide compelling evidence that the spatial evolution of SAR ocean wave spectra can be a useful tool in global ocean wave monitoring and forecasting.

  16. Spectra: Time series power spectrum calculator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo, Tabaré

    2017-01-01

    Spectra calculates the power spectrum of a time series equally spaced or not based on the Spectral Correlation Coefficient (Ferraz-Mello 1981, Astron. Journal 86 (4), 619). It is very efficient for detection of low frequencies.

  17. Multivariate analysis of endometrial tissue fluorescence spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitkuviene, Aurelija; Auksorius, E.; Fuchs, D.; Gavriushin, V.

    2002-10-01

    Background and Objective: The detailed multivariate analysis of endometrial tissue fluorescence spectra was done. Spectra underlying features and classification algorithm were analyzed. An effort has been made to determine the importance of neopterin component in endometrial premalignization. Study Design/Materials and Methods: Biomedical tissue fluorescence was measured by excitation with the Nd YAG laser third harmonic. Multivariate analysis techniques were used to analyze fluorescence spectra. Biomedical optics group at Vilnius University analyzed the neopterin substance supplied by the Institute of Medical Chemistry and Biochemistry of Innsbruck University. Results: Seven statistically significant spectral compounds were found. The classification algorithm classifying samples to histopathological categories was developed and resulted in sensitivity of 80% and specificity 93% for malignant vs. hyperplastic and normal. Conclusions: Fluorescence spectra could be classified with high accuracy. Spectral variation underlying features can be extracted. Neopterin component might play an important role in endometrial hyperplasia development.

  18. Contribution to the study of turbulence spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumas, R.

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus suitable for turbulence measurement between ranges of 1 to 5000 cps and from 6 to 16,000 cps was developed and is described. Turbulence spectra downstream of the grills were examined with reference to their general characteristics, their LF qualities, and the effects of periodic turbulence. Medium and HF are discussed. Turbulence spectra in the boundary layers are similarly examined, with reference to their fluctuations at right angles to the wall, and to lateral fluctuations. Turbulence spectra in a boundary layer with suction to the wall is discussed. Induced turbulence, and turbulence spectra at high Reynolds numbers. Calculations are presented relating to the effect of filtering on the value of the correlations in time and space.

  19. Investigation of Raman spectra of polyethylene terephthalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Changjun; Tong, Na; Song, Lixin; Zhang, Guoqing

    2015-08-01

    Raman spectrometry was employed to study the characteristics of Raman spectra of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), which were treated with sodium hydroxide, sulfuric acid and copper sulfate, respectively. Raman spectra under different conditions were obtained and the characteristics of the Raman spectra were analyzed. The morphology structures were observed under different conditions using Atomic Force Microscope. The results show that the spectral intensity of PET treated with sodium hydroxide is higher than that untreated between 200-1750 cm-1, while the intensity of PET treated with sodium hydroxide is lower than that untreated beyond 1750 cm-1 and the fluorescence background of Raman spectra is decreased. The spectral intensity of PET treated with sulfuric acid is remarkably reduced than that untreated, and the intensity of PET treated with copper sulphate is much higher than that untreated.

  20. Synthesis and Spectra of Vanadium Complexes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ophardt, Charles E.; Stupgia, Sean

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment which illustrates simple synthetic techniques, redox principles in synthesis reactions, interpretation of visible spectra using Orgel diagrams, and the spectrochemical series. The experiment is suitable for the advanced undergraduate inorganic chemistry laboratory. (JN)

  1. Synthesis and Spectra of Vanadium Complexes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ophardt, Charles E.; Stupgia, Sean

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment which illustrates simple synthetic techniques, redox principles in synthesis reactions, interpretation of visible spectra using Orgel diagrams, and the spectrochemical series. The experiment is suitable for the advanced undergraduate inorganic chemistry laboratory. (JN)

  2. POLLUX: a database of synthetic stellar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, A.; Gebran, M.; Josselin, E.; Martins, F.; Plez, B.; Belmas, M.; Lèbre, A.

    2010-06-01

    Aims: Synthetic spectra are needed to determine fundamental stellar and wind parameters of all types of stars. They are also used for the construction of theoretical spectral libraries helpful for stellar population synthesis. Therefore, a database of theoretical spectra is required to allow rapid and quantitative comparisons to spectroscopic data. We provide such a database offering an unprecedented coverage of the entire Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Methods: We present the POLLUX database of synthetic stellar spectra. For objects with Teff ≤ 6000 K, MARCS atmosphere models are computed and the program TURBOSPECTRUM provides the synthetic spectra. ATLAS12 models are computed for stars with 7000 K ≤ Teff ≤ 15 000 K. SYNSPEC gives the corresponding spectra. Finally, the code CMFGEN provides atmosphere models for the hottest stars (Teff > 25 000 K). Their spectra are computed with CMF_FLUX. Both high resolution (R > 150 000) optical spectra in the range 3000 to 12 000 Å and spectral energy distributions extending from the UV to near-IR ranges are presented. These spectra cover the HR diagram at solar metallicity. Results: We propose a wide variety of synthetic spectra for various types of stars in a format that is compliant with the Virtual Observatory standards. A user-friendly web interface allows an easy selection of spectra and data retrieval. Upcoming developments will include an extension to a large range of metallicities and to the near-IR high resolution spectra, as well as a better coverage of the HR diagram, with the inclusion of models for Wolf-Rayet stars and large datasets for cool stars. The POLLUX database is accessible at http://pollux.graal.univ-montp2.fr/ and through the Virtual Observatory. Copy of database is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb

  3. Trigonometric Polynomials For Estimation Of Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, Charles A.

    1990-01-01

    Orthogonal sets of trigonometric polynomials used as suboptimal substitutes for discrete prolate-spheroidal "windows" of Thomson method of estimation of spectra. As used here, "windows" denotes weighting functions used in sampling time series to obtain their power spectra within specified frequency bands. Simplified windows designed to require less computation than do discrete prolate-spheroidal windows, albeit at price of some loss of accuracy.

  4. THE SPITZER ATLAS OF STELLAR SPECTRA (SASS)

    SciTech Connect

    Ardila, David R.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Makowiecki, Wojciech; Stauffer, John; Rho, Jeonghee; Fajardo-Acosta, Sergio; Hoard, D. W.; Wachter, Stefanie; Song, Inseok

    2010-12-15

    We present the Spitzer Atlas of Stellar Spectra, which includes 159 stellar spectra (5-32 {mu}m; R {approx} 100) taken with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. This Atlas gathers representative spectra of a broad section of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, intended to serve as a general stellar spectral reference in the mid-infrared. It includes stars from all luminosity classes, as well as Wolf-Rayet (WR) objects. Furthermore, it includes some objects of intrinsic interest, such as blue stragglers and certain pulsating variables. All of the spectra have been uniformly reduced, and all are available online. For dwarfs and giants, the spectra of early-type objects are relatively featureless, characterized by the presence of hydrogen lines in A spectral types. Besides these, the most noticeable photospheric features correspond to water vapor and silicon monoxide in late-type objects and methane and ammonia features at the latest spectral types. Most supergiant spectra in the Atlas present evidence of circumstellar gas and/or dust. The sample includes five M supergiant spectra, which show strong dust excesses and in some cases polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon features. Sequences of WR stars present the well-known pattern of lines of He I and He II, as well as forbidden lines of ionized metals. The characteristic flat-top shape of the [Ne III] line is evident even at these low spectral resolutions. Several Luminous Blue Variables and other transition stars are present in the Atlas and show very diverse spectra, dominated by circumstellar gas and dust features. We show that the [8]-[24] Spitzer colors (IRAC and MIPS) are poor predictors of spectral type for most luminosity classes.

  5. Analytical calculation of two-dimensional spectra.

    PubMed

    Bell, Joshua D; Conrad, Rebecca; Siemens, Mark E

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate an analytical calculation of two-dimensional (2D) coherent spectra of electronic or vibrational resonances. Starting with the solution to the optical Bloch equations for a two-level system in the 2D time domain, we show that a fully analytical 2D Fourier transform can be performed if the projection-slice and Fourier-shift theorems of Fourier transforms are applied. Results can be fit to experimental 2D coherent spectra of resonances with arbitrary inhomogeneity.

  6. On the Photoelectron Spectra of Li4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The most stable structure for Li4(-) is found to be the rhombus. Electron detachment from this structure does not seem able to fully explain the photoelectron spectra. The computed results are consistent with those Rao, Jena, and Ray who have proposed that the experimental spectra consists of a superposition of detachment from the Li4(-) rhombus and tetrahedron, forming the singlet and triplet states of Li4, respectively.

  7. New atlas of IR solar spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A.; Blatherwick, R. D.; Murcray, F. H.; Vanallen, J. W.; Bradford, C. M.; Cook, G. R.; Murcray, D. G.

    1980-01-01

    Over 4500 absorption lines have been marked on the spectra and the corresponding line positions tabulated. The associated absorbing telluric or solar species for more than 90% of these lines have been identified and only a fraction of the unidentified lines have peak absorptions greater than a few percent. The high resolution and the low Sun spectra greatly enhance the sensitivity limits for identification of trace constituents.

  8. INDOR spectra in AX n systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czekalski, M.; De Milou, M. E.; Kowalewski, V. J.

    A model previously proposed by the same authors for the INDOR spectra of twos-pin- {1}/{2} systems is generalized for the AX n systems, which present the complications arising from the degeneracy of some of the lines. The basic idea of the model is the superposition of the effects of tickling and the redistribution of populations. Explicit calculations were made for the AX 3 case, resulting a reasonable agreement with experimentally observed spectra in methyl formate.

  9. Pulsed Ge + n microcluster concentration spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. C.

    1986-11-01

    Bloomfield, Geusic, Freeman, and Brown have used the Smalley synchronized laser and supersonic quenching carrier gas pulsed method to obtain spectra for Ge+n similar to pulsed spectra obtained previously for Si+n. Their data are presented, compared to data obtained with electron beam ionization, and discussed extensively in order to separate effects due to cluster stabilization energies, growth kinetics, and ionization fragmentation. Differences in chemical bonding and growth kinetics between Si+n and Ge+n microclusters are discussed.

  10. Diffuse emission and pathological Seyfert spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.

    1995-01-01

    In this annual ROSAT status report, the diffuse emission and spectra from Seyfert galaxies are examined. Three papers are presented and their contents include the soft x-ray properties and spectra of a binary millisecond pulsar, the PSPC and HRI observations of a Starburst/Seyfert 2 Galaxy, and an analysis of the possibility of x-ray luminous starbursts in the Einstein Medium Sensitivity Survey.

  11. On optimization of absorption-dispersion spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawranek, J. P.; Grabska, J.; Beć, K. B.

    2016-12-01

    A modified approach to the analysis of spectra of the complex electric permittivity of liquids in the Infrared region is presented. These spectra are derived from experimental spectra of the complex refractive index. Subsequently they are used to determine important secondary quantities, e.g. spectra of complex molecular polarizabilities and an integral property - the molar vibrational polarization. The accuracy of these quantities depends essentially on the accuracy of both components of the complex electric permittivity spectrum. In the proposed procedure, the spectra of the complex electric permittivity are approximated using the Classical Damped Harmonic Oscillator (CDHO) model for the description of individual bandshapes. The CDHO model defines both the real and imaginary part of the complex permittivity. The fitting procedure includes a simultaneous optimization of both the real and imaginary parts of the complex permittivity spectrum. A comparison of absorption-only curve fitting and the novel absorption-dispersion double curve fitting is presented; advantages of the new approach in accuracy, reliability and convergence time are pointed out. Due to the complexity of the problem, the choice was restricted to non-gradient methods of optimization. The performance of several gradientless algorithms was tested. Among numerous procedures the Powell General Least Squares Method Without Derivatives was found to be the most efficient. The reliability of obtained results of the band separatiovn process was tested on several simulated spectra of increasing complexity. The applicability of the developed approach to the analysis of exemplary experimental data was evaluated and discussed.

  12. Computer simulation of backscattering spectra from paint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, M.; Silva, T. F.

    2017-09-01

    To study the role of lateral non-homogeneity on backscattering analysis of paintings, a simplified model of paint consisting of randomly distributed spherical pigment particles embedded in oil/binder has been developed. Backscattering spectra for lead white pigment particles in linseed oil have been calculated for 3 MeV H+ at a scattering angle of 165° for pigment volume concentrations ranging from 30 vol.% to 70 vol.% using the program STRUCTNRA. For identical pigment volume concentrations the heights and shapes of the backscattering spectra depend on the diameter of the pigment particles: This is a structural ambiguity for identical mean atomic concentrations but different lateral arrangement of materials. Only for very small pigment particles the resulting spectra are close to spectra calculated supposing atomic mixing and assuming identical concentrations of all elements. Generally, a good fit can be achieved when evaluating spectra from structured materials assuming atomic mixing of all elements and laterally homogeneous depth distributions. However, the derived depth profiles are inaccurate by a factor of up to 3. The depth range affected by this structural ambiguity ranges from the surface to a depth of roughly 0.5-1 pigment particle diameters. Accurate quantitative evaluation of backscattering spectra from paintings therefore requires taking the correct microstructure of the paint layer into account.

  13. Identifying Broadband Rotational Spectra with Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaleski, Daniel P.; Prozument, Kirill

    2017-06-01

    A typical broadband rotational spectrum may contain several thousand observable transitions, spanning many species. Identifying the individual spectra, particularly when the dynamic range reaches 1,000:1 or even 10,000:1, can be challenging. One approach is to apply automated fitting routines. In this approach, combinations of 3 transitions can be created to form a "triple", which allows fitting of the A, B, and C rotational constants in a Watson-type Hamiltonian. On a standard desktop computer, with a target molecule of interest, a typical AUTOFIT routine takes 2-12 hours depending on the spectral density. A new approach is to utilize machine learning to train a computer to recognize the patterns (frequency spacing and relative intensities) inherit in rotational spectra and to identify the individual spectra in a raw broadband rotational spectrum. Here, recurrent neural networks have been trained to identify different types of rotational spectra and classify them accordingly. Furthermore, early results in applying convolutional neural networks for spectral object recognition in broadband rotational spectra appear promising. Perez et al. "Broadband Fourier transform rotational spectroscopy for structure determination: The water heptamer." Chem. Phys. Lett., 2013, 571, 1-15. Seifert et al. "AUTOFIT, an Automated Fitting Tool for Broadband Rotational Spectra, and Applications to 1-Hexanal." J. Mol. Spectrosc., 2015, 312, 13-21. Bishop. "Neural networks for pattern recognition." Oxford university press, 1995.

  14. Modeling lateral geniculate nucleus cell response spectra and Munsell reflectance spectra with cone sensitivity curves.

    PubMed

    Romney, A Kimball; D'Andrade, Roy G

    2005-11-08

    We find that the cell response spectra of lateral geniculate nucleus cells, as well as the reflectance spectra of Munsell color chips, may be modeled by using the cone sensitivity functions of the long and medium cones. We propose a simple model for how the neural signals from the photoreceptors might be combined in the retina to closely approximate the reflectance spectra of Munsell color chips without input from the short cone.

  15. Parameterizing Stellar Spectra Using Deep Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang-Ru; Pan, Ru-Yang; Duan, Fu-Qing

    2017-03-01

    Large-scale sky surveys are observing massive amounts of stellar spectra. The large number of stellar spectra makes it necessary to automatically parameterize spectral data, which in turn helps in statistically exploring properties related to the atmospheric parameters. This work focuses on designing an automatic scheme to estimate effective temperature ({T}{eff}), surface gravity ({log}g) and metallicity [Fe/H] from stellar spectra. A scheme based on three deep neural networks (DNNs) is proposed. This scheme consists of the following three procedures: first, the configuration of a DNN is initialized using a series of autoencoder neural networks; second, the DNN is fine-tuned using a gradient descent scheme; third, three atmospheric parameters {T}{eff}, {log}g and [Fe/H] are estimated using the computed DNNs. The constructed DNN is a neural network with six layers (one input layer, one output layer and four hidden layers), for which the number of nodes in the six layers are 3821, 1000, 500, 100, 30 and 1, respectively. This proposed scheme was tested on both real spectra and theoretical spectra from Kurucz’s new opacity distribution function models. Test errors are measured with mean absolute errors (MAEs). The errors on real spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) are 0.1477, 0.0048 and 0.1129 dex for {log}g, {log}{T}{eff} and [Fe/H] (64.85 K for {T}{eff}), respectively. Regarding theoretical spectra from Kurucz’s new opacity distribution function models, the MAE of the test errors are 0.0182, 0.0011 and 0.0112 dex for {log}g, {log}{T}{eff} and [Fe/H] (14.90 K for {T}{eff}), respectively.

  16. Parameterizing Stellar Spectra Using Deep Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang-Ru; Pan, Ru-Yang; Duan, Fu-Qing

    2017-03-01

    Large-scale sky surveys are observing massive amounts of stellar spectra. The large number of stellar spectra makes it necessary to automatically parameterize spectral data, which in turn helps in statistically exploring properties related to the atmospheric parameters. This work focuses on designing an automatic scheme to estimate effective temperature ({T}{eff}), surface gravity ({log}g) and metallicity [Fe/H] from stellar spectra. A scheme based on three deep neural networks (DNNs) is proposed. This scheme consists of the following three procedures: first, the configuration of a DNN is initialized using a series of autoencoder neural networks; second, the DNN is fine-tuned using a gradient descent scheme; third, three atmospheric parameters {T}{eff}, {log}g and [Fe/H] are estimated using the computed DNNs. The constructed DNN is a neural network with six layers (one input layer, one output layer and four hidden layers), for which the number of nodes in the six layers are 3821, 1000, 500, 100, 30 and 1, respectively. This proposed scheme was tested on both real spectra and theoretical spectra from Kurucz’s new opacity distribution function models. Test errors are measured with mean absolute errors (MAEs). The errors on real spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) are 0.1477, 0.0048 and 0.1129 dex for {log}g, {log}{T}{eff} and [Fe/H] (64.85 K for {T}{eff}), respectively. Regarding theoretical spectra from Kurucz’s new opacity distribution function models, the MAE of the test errors are 0.0182, 0.0011 and 0.0112 dex for {log}g, {log}{T}{eff} and [Fe/H] (14.90 K for {T}{eff}), respectively.

  17. EXPLORING THE MORPHOLOGY OF RAVE STELLAR SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Matijevic, G.; Zwitter, T.; Bienayme, O.; Siebert, A.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Boeche, C.; Grebel, E. K.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B. K.; Gilmore, G.; Helmi, A.; Munari, U.; Navarro, J.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G.; Siviero, A.; Steinmetz, M.; Williams, M.; Watson, F. G.; and others

    2012-06-01

    The RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) is a medium-resolution (R {approx} 7500) spectroscopic survey of the Milky Way that has already obtained over half a million stellar spectra. They present a randomly selected magnitude-limited sample, so it is important to use a reliable and automated classification scheme that identifies normal single stars and discovers different types of peculiar stars. To this end, we present a morphological classification of {approx}350, 000 RAVE survey stellar spectra using locally linear embedding, a dimensionality reduction method that enables representing the complex spectral morphology in a low-dimensional projected space while still preserving the properties of the local neighborhoods of spectra. We find that the majority of all spectra in the database ({approx} 90%-95%) belong to normal single stars, but there is also a significant population of several types of peculiars. Among them, the most populated groups are those of various types of spectroscopic binary and chromospherically active stars. Both of them include several thousands of spectra. Particularly the latter group offers significant further investigation opportunities since activity of stars is a known proxy of stellar ages. Applying the same classification procedure to the sample of normal single stars alone shows that the shape of the projected manifold in two-dimensional space correlates with stellar temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity.

  18. Disk-averaged synthetic spectra of Mars.

    PubMed

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Meadows, Victoria S; Crisp, David; Fong, William; Velusamy, Thangasamy; Snively, Heather

    2005-08-01

    The principal goal of the NASA Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and European Space Agency's Darwin mission concepts is to directly detect and characterize extrasolar terrestrial (Earthsized) planets. This first generation of instruments is expected to provide disk-averaged spectra with modest spectral resolution and signal-to-noise. Here we use a spatially and spectrally resolved model of a Mars-like planet to study the detectability of a planet's surface and atmospheric properties from disk-averaged spectra. We explore the detectability as a function of spectral resolution and wavelength range, for both the proposed visible coronograph (TPFC) and mid-infrared interferometer (TPF-I/Darwin) architectures. At the core of our model is a spectrum-resolving (line-by-line) atmospheric/surface radiative transfer model. This model uses observational data as input to generate a database of spatially resolved synthetic spectra for a range of illumination conditions and viewing geometries. The model was validated against spectra recorded by the Mars Global Surveyor-Thermal Emission Spectrometer and the Mariner 9-Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer. Results presented here include disk-averaged synthetic spectra, light curves, and the spectral variability at visible and mid-infrared wavelengths for Mars as a function of viewing angle, illumination, and season. We also considered the differences in the spectral appearance of an increasingly ice-covered Mars, as a function of spectral resolution, signal-to-noise and integration time for both TPF-C and TPFI/ Darwin.

  19. H. N. Russell and Atomic Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devorkin, David

    2001-04-01

    “I would rather analyze spectra than do cross-word puzzles or do almost anything else” Henry Norris Russell wrote to William F. Meggers in 1927. Meggers, chief of the spectroscopy division at the NBS, had been surprised that an astrophysicist could be so keen about the analysis of complex spectra. But Russell was a new type of astrophysicist, one who made physics the core of his research. Spectra, for Russell, held the "master key" to knowledge about the universe, and of the atom. He was first attracted by the challenge of detecting and explaining anomalies, which he hoped would lead to new knowledge about the structure of matter. Then, influenced by physicists such as Meggers, he devoted himself to filling in the picture of the structure of atoms from their characteristic spectra as completely as possible. In this talk I will review how Russell worked with Meggers and became the nucleus of an ever-widening circle of spectroscopists devoted to the analysis of complex spectra.

  20. Disk-averaged synthetic spectra of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Meadows, Victoria S.; Crisp, David; Fong, William; Velusamy, Thangasamy; Snively, Heather

    2005-01-01

    The principal goal of the NASA Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and European Space Agency's Darwin mission concepts is to directly detect and characterize extrasolar terrestrial (Earthsized) planets. This first generation of instruments is expected to provide disk-averaged spectra with modest spectral resolution and signal-to-noise. Here we use a spatially and spectrally resolved model of a Mars-like planet to study the detectability of a planet's surface and atmospheric properties from disk-averaged spectra. We explore the detectability as a function of spectral resolution and wavelength range, for both the proposed visible coronograph (TPFC) and mid-infrared interferometer (TPF-I/Darwin) architectures. At the core of our model is a spectrum-resolving (line-by-line) atmospheric/surface radiative transfer model. This model uses observational data as input to generate a database of spatially resolved synthetic spectra for a range of illumination conditions and viewing geometries. The model was validated against spectra recorded by the Mars Global Surveyor-Thermal Emission Spectrometer and the Mariner 9-Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer. Results presented here include disk-averaged synthetic spectra, light curves, and the spectral variability at visible and mid-infrared wavelengths for Mars as a function of viewing angle, illumination, and season. We also considered the differences in the spectral appearance of an increasingly ice-covered Mars, as a function of spectral resolution, signal-to-noise and integration time for both TPF-C and TPFI/ Darwin.

  1. Principal component analysis of synthetic galaxy spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronen, Shai; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso; Lahav, Ofer

    1999-02-01

    We analyse synthetic galaxy spectra from the evolutionary models of Bruzual & Charlot and Fioc & Rocca-Volmerange using the method of principal component analysis (PCA). We explore synthetic spectra with different ages, star formation histories and metallicities, and identify the principal components (PCs) of variance in the spectra resulting from these different model parameters. The PCA provides a more objective and informative alternative to diagnostics by individual spectral lines. We discuss how the PCs can be used to estimate the input model parameters, and explore the impact of dust and noise in this inverse problem. We also discuss how changing the sampling of the ages and other model parameters affects the resulting PCs. Our first two synthetic PCs agree with a similar analysis on observed spectra obtained by Kennicutt and the 2dF redshift survey. We conclude that with a good enough signal-to-noise ratio (S/N> > 10) it is possible to derive age, star formation history and metallicity from observed galaxy spectra using PCA.

  2. Exploring the Morphology of RAVE Stellar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matijevič, G.; Zwitter, T.; Bienaymé, O.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Boeche, C.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B. K.; Gilmore, G.; Grebel, E. K.; Helmi, A.; Munari, U.; Navarro, J.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G.; Siebert, A.; Siviero, A.; Steinmetz, M.; Watson, F. G.; Williams, M.; Wyse, R. F. G.

    2012-06-01

    The RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) is a medium-resolution (R ~ 7500) spectroscopic survey of the Milky Way that has already obtained over half a million stellar spectra. They present a randomly selected magnitude-limited sample, so it is important to use a reliable and automated classification scheme that identifies normal single stars and discovers different types of peculiar stars. To this end, we present a morphological classification of ~350, 000 RAVE survey stellar spectra using locally linear embedding, a dimensionality reduction method that enables representing the complex spectral morphology in a low-dimensional projected space while still preserving the properties of the local neighborhoods of spectra. We find that the majority of all spectra in the database (~ 90%-95%) belong to normal single stars, but there is also a significant population of several types of peculiars. Among them, the most populated groups are those of various types of spectroscopic binary and chromospherically active stars. Both of them include several thousands of spectra. Particularly the latter group offers significant further investigation opportunities since activity of stars is a known proxy of stellar ages. Applying the same classification procedure to the sample of normal single stars alone shows that the shape of the projected manifold in two-dimensional space correlates with stellar temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity.

  3. Ir Spectra of Cold Protonated Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asvany, Oskar; Yamada, Koichi MT; Brünken, Sandra; Potapov, Alexey; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2015-06-01

    High-resolution infrared spectra of mass selected protonated methane, CH_5^+, have been recorded in the C-H stretching region in a 22-pole ion trap experiment at low temperatures. The frequencies of the infrared OPO system (pump and signal) have been calibrated using a NIR frequency comb. As a result the ro-vibrational IR transition frequencies of CH_5^+ could be determined to an accuracy in the MHz regime. In this contribution we discuss different techniques of laser induced reactions which enabled recording spectra at different temperatures. The spectra simplify dramatically at a nominal trap temperature of 4~K. Nevertheless an assignment of these spectra is very difficult. We apply the idea of the Rydberg-Ritz combination principle to the complex spectra of protonated methane in order to get first hints at the energy level structure of this enigmatic molecule. O. Asvany, J. Krieg, and S. Schlemmer, Frequency comb assisted mid-infrared spectroscopy of cold molecular ions, Review of Scientific Instruments, 83 (2012), 076102. O. Asvany, S. Brünken, L. Kluge, and S. Schlemmer, COLTRAP: a 22-pole ion trapping machine for spectroscopy at 4 K, Applied Physics B: Lasers and Optics, 114 (2014), 203-211

  4. Disk-Averaged Synthetic Spectra of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Meadows, Victoria S.; Crisp, David; Fong ,William; Velusamy, Thangasamy; Snively, Heather

    2005-08-01

    The principal goal of the NASA Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and European Space Agency's Darwin mission concepts is to directly detect and characterize extrasolar terrestrial (Earthsized) planets. This first generation of instruments is expected to provide disk-averaged spectra with modest spectral resolution and signal-to-noise. Here we use a spatially and spectrally resolved model of a Mars-like planet to study the detectability of a planet's surface and atmospheric properties from disk-averaged spectra. We explore the detectability as a function of spectral resolution and wavelength range, for both the proposed visible coronograph (TPFC) and mid-infrared interferometer (TPF-I/Darwin) architectures. At the core of our model is a spectrum-resolving (line-by-line) atmospheric/surface radiative transfer model. This model uses observational data as input to generate a database of spatially resolved synthetic spectra for a range of illumination conditions and viewing geometries. The model was validated against spectra recorded by the Mars Global Surveyor-Thermal Emission Spectrometer and the Mariner 9-Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer. Results presented here include disk-averaged synthetic spectra, light curves, and the spectral variability at visible and mid-infrared wavelengths for Mars as a function of viewing angle, illumination, and season. We also considered the differences in the spectral appearance of an increasingly ice-covered Mars, as a function of spectral resolution, signal-to-noise and integration time for both TPF-C and TPFI/ Darwin.

  5. Improving Algorithm for Automatic Spectra Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rackovic, K.; Nikolic, S.; Kotrc, P.

    2009-09-01

    Testing and improving of the computer program for automatic processing (flat-fielding) of a great number of solar spectra obtained with the horizontal heliospectrograph HSFA2 has been done. This program was developed in the Astronomical Institute of Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic in Ondřejov. An irregularity in its work has been discovered, i.e. the program didn't work for some of the spectra. To discover a cause of this error an algorithm has been developed, and a program for examination of the parallelism of reference hairs crossing the spectral slit on records of solar spectra has been made. The standard methods for data processing have been applied-calculating and analyzing higher-order moments of distribution of radiation intensity. The spectra with the disturbed parallelism of the reference hairs have been eliminated from further processing. In order to improve this algorithm of smoothing of spectra, isolation and removal of the harmonic made by a sunspot with multiple elementary transformations of ordinates (Labrouste's transformations) are planned. This project was accomplished at the first summer astronomy practice of students of the Faculty of Mathematics, University of Belgrade, Serbia in 2007 in Ondřejov.

  6. Cloud supersaturations from CCN spectra Hoppel minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, James G.; Noble, Stephen; Tabor, Samantha

    2015-04-01

    High-resolution cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) spectral measurements in two aircraft field projects, Marine Stratus/Stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) and Ice in Clouds Experiment-Tropical (ICE-T), often showed bimodality that had previously been observed in submicrometer aerosol size distributions obtained by differential mobility analyzers. However, a great deal of spectral shape variability from very bimodal to very monomodal was observed in close proximity. Cloud supersaturation (S) estimates based on critical S, Sc, at minimal CCN concentrations between two modes (Hoppel minima) were ascertained for 63% of 325 measured spectra. These cloud S were lower than effective S (Seff) determined by comparing ambient CCN spectra with nearby cloud droplet concentrations (Nc). Averages for the polluted MASE stratus were 0.15 and 0.23% and for the cumulus clouds of ICE-T 0.44 and 1.03%. This cloud S disagreement between the two methods might in part be due to the fact that Hoppel minima include the effects of cloud processing, which push CCN spectra toward lower S. Furthermore, there is less cloud processing by the smaller cloud droplets, which might be related to smaller droplets evaporating more readily. Significantly lower concentrations within the more bimodal spectra compared with the monomodal spectra indicated active physical processes: Brownian capture of interstitial CCN and droplet coalescence. Chemical cloud processing also contributed to bimodality, especially in MASE.

  7. Background noise spectra of global seismic stations

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M.M.; Claassen, J.P.

    1996-08-01

    Over an extended period of time station noise spectra were collected from various sources for use in estimating the detection and location performance of global networks of seismic stations. As the database of noise spectra enlarged and duplicate entries became available, an effort was mounted to more carefully select station noise spectra while discarding others. This report discusses the methodology and criteria by which the noise spectra were selected. It also identifies and illustrates the station noise spectra which survived the selection process and which currently contribute to the modeling efforts. The resulting catalog of noise statistics not only benefits those who model network performance but also those who wish to select stations on the basis of their noise level as may occur in designing networks or in selecting seismological data for analysis on the basis of station noise level. In view of the various ways by which station noise were estimated by the different contributors, it is advisable that future efforts which predict network performance have available station noise data and spectral estimation methods which are compatible with the statistics underlying seismic noise. This appropriately requires (1) averaging noise over seasonal and/or diurnal cycles, (2) averaging noise over time intervals comparable to those employed by actual detectors, and (3) using logarithmic measures of the noise.

  8. The energy spectra of solar energetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, R. E.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    1984-01-01

    A survey of recent results on the shapes and relative slopes of the spectra of various solar energetic particle populations is presented, with emphasis on the more extensive results currently available for protons, alphas and electrons. From previous work, it is found that proton spectra 0.8 to more than 400 MeV and alpha spectra 1.4 to 80 MeV/nucleon are best characterized, on average, by a functional form involving a Bessel function in momentum/nucleon. However, proton and alpha spectral slopes using this form are not equal, and there is significant variation from event to event. From other studies, electrons 0.02 to 20 MeV are also found to have curved spectra, but seem to be better fit with a double power law in energy. The spectral properties in both cases correlate with other measures of solar particle acceleration; e.g. gamma-ray line production, hard X-ray burst spectra and microwave fluxes.

  9. Artificial intelligence analysis of paraspinal power spectra.

    PubMed

    Oliver, C W; Atsma, W J

    1996-10-01

    OBJECTIVE: As an aid to discrimination of sufferers with back pain an artificial intelligence neural network was constructed to differentiate paraspinal power spectra. DESIGN: Clinical investigation using surface electromyography. METHOD: The surface electromyogram power spectra from 60 subjects, 33 non-back-pain sufferers and 27 chronic back pain sufferers were used to construct a back propagation neural network that was then tested. Subjects were placed on a test frame in 30 degrees of lumbar forward flexion. An isometric load of two-thirds maximum voluntary contraction was held constant for 30 s whilst surface electromyograms were recorded at the level of the L(4-5). Paraspinal power spectra were calculated and loaded into the input layer of a three-layer back propagation network. The neural network classified the spectra into normal or back pain type. RESULTS: The back propagation neural was shown to have satisfactory convergence with a specificity of 79% and a sensitivity of 80%. CONCLUSIONS: Artificial intelligence neural networks appear to be a useful method of differentiating paraspinal power spectra in back-pain sufferers.

  10. Cleaning HI Spectra Contaminated by GPS RFI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvia, Kamin; Hallenbeck, Gregory L.; Undergraduate ALFALFA Team

    2016-01-01

    The NUDET systems aboard GPS satellites utilize radio waves to communicate information regarding surface nuclear events. The system tests appear in spectra as RFI (radio frequency interference) at 1381MHz, which contaminates observations of extragalactic HI (atomic hydrogen) signals at 50-150 Mpc. Test durations last roughly 20-120 seconds and can occur upwards of 30 times during a single night of observing. The disruption essentially renders the corresponding HI spectra useless.We present a method that automatically removes RFI in HI spectra caused by these tests. By capitalizing on the GPS system's short test durations and predictable frequency appearance we are able to devise a method of identifying times containing compromised data records. By reevaluating the remaining data, we are able to recover clean spectra while sacrificing little in terms of sensitivity to extragalactic signals. This method has been tested on 500+ spectra taken by the Undergraduate ALFALFA Team (UAT), in which it successfully identified and removed all sources of GPS RFI. It will also be used to eliminate RFI in the upcoming Arecibo Pisces-Perseus Supercluster Survey (APPSS).This work has been supported by NSF grant AST-1211005.

  11. Disk-averaged synthetic spectra of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Meadows, Victoria S.; Crisp, David; Fong, William; Velusamy, Thangasamy; Snively, Heather

    2005-01-01

    The principal goal of the NASA Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and European Space Agency's Darwin mission concepts is to directly detect and characterize extrasolar terrestrial (Earthsized) planets. This first generation of instruments is expected to provide disk-averaged spectra with modest spectral resolution and signal-to-noise. Here we use a spatially and spectrally resolved model of a Mars-like planet to study the detectability of a planet's surface and atmospheric properties from disk-averaged spectra. We explore the detectability as a function of spectral resolution and wavelength range, for both the proposed visible coronograph (TPFC) and mid-infrared interferometer (TPF-I/Darwin) architectures. At the core of our model is a spectrum-resolving (line-by-line) atmospheric/surface radiative transfer model. This model uses observational data as input to generate a database of spatially resolved synthetic spectra for a range of illumination conditions and viewing geometries. The model was validated against spectra recorded by the Mars Global Surveyor-Thermal Emission Spectrometer and the Mariner 9-Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer. Results presented here include disk-averaged synthetic spectra, light curves, and the spectral variability at visible and mid-infrared wavelengths for Mars as a function of viewing angle, illumination, and season. We also considered the differences in the spectral appearance of an increasingly ice-covered Mars, as a function of spectral resolution, signal-to-noise and integration time for both TPF-C and TPFI/ Darwin.

  12. Soil emissivity and reflectance spectra measurements.

    PubMed

    Sobrino, José A; Mattar, Cristian; Pardo, Pablo; Jiménez-Muñoz, Juan C; Hook, Simon J; Baldridge, Alice; Ibañez, Rafael

    2009-07-01

    We present an analysis of the laboratory reflectance and emissivity spectra of 11 soil samples collected on different field campaigns carried out over a diverse suite of test sites in Europe, North Africa, and South America from 2002 to 2008. Hemispherical reflectance spectra were measured from 2.0 to 14 microm with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, and x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) was used to determine the mineralogical phases of the soil samples. Emissivity spectra were obtained from the hemispherical reflectance measurements using Kirchhoff's law and compared with in situ radiance measurements obtained with a CIMEL Electronique CE312-2 thermal radiometer and converted to emissivity using the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) temperature and emissivity separation algorithm. The CIMEL has five narrow bands at approximately the same positions as the ASTER. Results show a root mean square error typically below 0.015 between laboratory emissivity measurements and emissivity measurements derived from the field radiometer.

  13. Red spectra from white and blue noise

    PubMed Central

    Balmforth, N. J.; Provenzale, A.; Spiegel, E. A.; Martens, M.; Tresser, C.; Wu, C. W.

    1999-01-01

    The value of maps of the interval in modelling population dynamics has recently been called into question because temporal variations from such maps have blue or white power spectra, whereas many observations of real populations show time-series with red spectra. One way to deal with this discrepancy is to introduce chaotic or stochastic fluctuations in the parameters of the map. This leads to on–off intermittency and can markedly redden the spectrum produced by a model that does not by itself have a red spectrum. The parameter fluctuations need not themselves have a red spectrum in order to achieve this effect. Because the power spectrum is not invariant under a change of variable, another way to redden the spectrum is by a suitable transformation of the variables used. The question this poses is whether spectra are the best means of characterizing a fluctuating variable.

  14. Cosmic ray proton spectra at low rigidities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seo, E. S.; Ormes, J. F.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Lloyd-Evans, J.; Jones, W. V.

    1990-01-01

    The cosmic ray proton rigidity spectra have been investigated with data collected in the Low Energy Antiproton (LEAP) balloon flight experiment flown from Prince Albert, Canada in 1987. The LEAP apparatus was designed to measure antiprotons using a superconducting magnet spectrometer with ancillary scintillator, time-of-flight, and liquid Cherenkov detectors. After reaching float altitude the balloon drifted south and west to higher geomagnetic cutoffs. The effect of the changing geomagnetic cutoff on the observed spectra was observed during analysis of the proton data along the balloon trajectory. This is the first measurement of the primary and splash albedo spectra over a wide rigidity range (few hundred MV to about 100 GV) with a single instrument.

  15. Crystal field spectra of lunar pyroxenes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R. G.; Abu-Eid, R. M.; Huggins, F. E.

    1972-01-01

    Absorption spectra in the visible and near infrared regions have been obtained for pyroxene single crystals in rocks from the Apollo 11, 12, 14, and 15 missions. The polarized spectra are compared with those obtained from terrestrial calcic clinopyroxenes, subcalcic augites, pigeonites, and orthopyroxenes. The lunar pyroxenes contain several broad, intense absorption bands in the near infrared, the positions of which are related to bulk composition, Fe(2+) site occupancy and structure type of the pyroxene. The visible spectra contain several sharp, weak peaks mainly due to spin-forbidden transitions in Fe(2+). Additional weak bands in this region in Apollo 11 pyroxenes are attributed to Ti(3+) ions. Spectral features from Fe(3+), Mn(2+), Cr(3+), and Cr(2+) were not observed.

  16. BRUCE/KYLIE: Pulsating star spectra synthesizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Rich

    2014-12-01

    BRUCE and KYLIE, written in Fortran 77, synthesize the spectra of pulsating stars. BRUCE constructs a point-sampled model for the surface of a rotating, gravity-darkened star, and then subjects this model to perturbations arising from one or more non-radial pulsation modes. Departures from adiabaticity can be taken into account, as can the Coriolis force through adoption of the so-called traditional approximation. BRUCE writes out a time-sequence of perturbed surface models. This sequence is read in by KYLIE, which synthesizes disk-integrated spectra for the models by co-adding the specific intensity emanating from each visible point toward the observer. The specific intensity is calculated by interpolation in a large temperature-gravity-wavelength-angle grid of pre-calculated intensity spectra.

  17. Luminescence spectra of a cholesteric photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolganov, P. V.

    2017-05-01

    The transmission and luminescence spectra of a cholesteric photonic crystal doped with an organic dye are measured. The density of photon states is calculated using the material parameters obtained from the comparison of the experimental and theoretical spectra. The shape of the luminescence spectra is modified with respect to the density of photon states owing to the difference in the structure of the normal modes of the photonic crystal near the short-wavelength and long-wavelength edges of the photonic quasi-band gap upon the "pushing" of the photon states from the gap and to the nonvanishing orientation ordering of the luminescent molecules. The luminescence spectrum calculated taking into account the chiral structure of the photonic crystal agrees with the experimental spectrum.

  18. Janus Spectra in Two-Dimensional Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chien-Chia; Cerbus, Rory T.; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2016-09-01

    In large-scale atmospheric flows, soap-film flows, and other two-dimensional flows, the exponent of the turbulent energy spectra, α , may theoretically take either of two distinct values, 3 or 5 /3 , but measurements downstream of obstacles have invariably revealed α =3 . Here we report experiments on soap-film flows where downstream of obstacles there exists a sizable interval in which α transitions from 3 to 5 /3 for the streamwise fluctuations but remains equal to 3 for the transverse fluctuations, as if two mutually independent turbulent fields of disparate dynamics were concurrently active within the flow. This species of turbulent energy spectra, which we term the Janus spectra, has never been observed or predicted theoretically. Our results may open up new vistas in the study of turbulence and geophysical flows.

  19. Vibrational spectra of molecular fluids in nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakcheev, V. G.; Morozov, V. B.

    2012-12-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is applied for quantitative analysis of carbon dioxide phase composition in pores of nanoporous glass samples at nearcritical temperatures. Measurements of the 1388 1/cm Q-branch were made in a wide pressure range corresponding to coexistence of gas (gas-like), adsorbed and condensed phases within pores. At temperatures several degrees below the critical value, CARS spectra behavior is easy to interpret in terms of thermodynamic model of surface adsorption and capillary condensation. It allows estimating mass fractions of different phase components. Moreover, spectra measured at near critical temperatures 30.5 and 33°C have pronounced inhomogeneous shapes and indicate the presence of condensed phase in the volume of pores. The effect obviously reflects the fluid behaviour near the critical point in nanopores. Pores with smaller radii are filled with condensed phase at lower pressures. The analysis of the CARS spectra is informative for quantitative evaluation of phase composition in nanopores.

  20. Ultraviolet spectra and chromospheres of R stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, J. A.; Johnson, H. R.; Obrien, G. T.; Baumert, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    Long-wavelength IUE spectra of 13 normal R stars and two hydrogen-deficient R0 supergiants were obtained. Early R stars are noted to have line spectra and levels of flux in the ultraviolet characteristic of G5-K2 III stars, whereas late R stars were observed to have colors and line spectra similar to late K and M stars, but with greatly enhanced strength of low-lying multiplets of neutral metals. Hydrogen-deficient carbon stars show readily apparent differences from the normal early R stars, reflecting their luminosity and somewhat higher temperatures. The lines of neutral metals in these stars are weakened, while those of ionized metals are strengthened.

  1. FAST INVERSION OF SOLAR Ca II SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, C.; Choudhary, D. P.; Rezaei, R.; Louis, R. E.

    2015-01-10

    We present a fast (<<1 s per profile) inversion code for solar Ca II lines. The code uses an archive of spectra that are synthesized prior to the inversion under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). We show that it can be successfully applied to spectrograph data or more sparsely sampled spectra from two-dimensional spectrometers. From a comparison to a non-LTE inversion of the same set of spectra, we derive a first-order non-LTE correction to the temperature stratifications derived in the LTE approach. The correction factor is close to unity up to log τ ∼ –3 and increases to values of 2.5 and 4 at log τ = –6 in the quiet Sun and the umbra, respectively.

  2. Molecular dynamics and spectra. II. Diatomic Raman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berens, Peter H.; White, Steven R.; Wilson, Kent R.

    1981-07-01

    This paper and paper I in this series [P.H. Berens and K.R. Wilison, J. Chem. Phys. 74, 4872 (1981)] indicate that infrared and Raman rotational and fundamental vibrational-rotational spectra of dense systems (high pressure gases, liquids, and solids) are essentially classical, in that they can be computed and understood from a basically classical mechanical viewpoint, with some caveats for features in which anharmonicity is important, such as the detailed shape of Q branches. It is demonstrated here, using the diatomic case as an example, that ordinary, i.e., nonresonant, Raman band contours can be computed from classical mechanics plus simple quantum corrections. Classical versions of molecular dynamics, linear response theory, and ensemble averaging, followed by straightforward quantum corrections, are used to compute the pure rotational and fundamental vibration-rotational Raman band contours of N2 for the gas phase and for solutions of N2 in different densities of gas phase Ar and in liquid Ar. The evolution is seen from multiple peaked line shapes characteristic of free rotation in the gas phase to single peaks characteristic of hindered rotation in the liquid phase. Comparison is made with quantum and correspondence principle classical gas phase spectral calculations and with experimental measurements for pure N2 and N2 in liquid Ar. Three advantages are pointed out for a classical approach to infrared and Raman spectra. First, a classical approach can be used to compute the spectra of complex molecular systems, e.g., of large molecules, clusters, liquids, solutions, and solids. Second, this classical approach can be extended to compute the spectra of nonequilibrium and time-dependent systems, e.g., infrared and Raman spectra during the course of chemical reactions. Third, a classical viewpoint allows experimental infrared and Raman spectra to be understood and interpreted in terms of atomic motions with the considerable aid of classical models and of our

  3. Infrared spectra of cesium chloride aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, Jean-Joseph; Chapados, Camille

    2000-10-01

    The aqueous solutions of CsCl were studied at room temperature by infrared (IR) spectroscopy in the entire solubility range, 0-1200 g/L, using attenuated total reflection (ATR) sampling. The influence of anomalous dispersion on the IR-ATR spectra was evaluated by calculating the imaginary refractive index, k(ν), of each sample. Factor analysis (FA) was used to determine the number and abundance of species in the solutions. FA applied to both k(ν) spectra and IR-ATR spectra produced two principal spectra with a similar abundance of species. This result indicates that, even at high salt concentration, the optical effects do not influence the chemical analysis of IR-ATR spectra. The spectral modifications related to the salt concentrations are mainly first order. Second order effects were observed, but being weak, were not investigated. The two principal spectra are related to the two species present in the solution: pure water and CsCl-solvated water. From the latter, 2.8±0.4 water molecules were calculated to be associated with each close-bound Cs+/Cl- ion pair. In the case of KCl and NaCl aqueous solutions, both of which showed the same number of species, the number of water molecules associated to an ion pair was 5.0±0.4. That the latter number is different from that of CsCl indicates that the interaction between water molecules and ion pairs is different when cation Na or K in the chloride salt is replaced by Cs.

  4. A Catalog of Chandra Grating Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huenemoerder, David; Nichols, J.; Mitschang, A.; Dewey, D.; Marshall, H.; Nowak, M.; Schulz, N.; Davis, J. E.; Houck, J. C.; Canizares, C.

    2008-03-01

    We are developing a Chandra Grating-Data Archive and Catalog to make all grating spectra more visible and accessible to users. We intend to to provide a simple browser interface to analysis-quality standard spectral products (binned spectra and corresponding response files), with the addition of summary graphical products and model-independent flux properties tables. Such products and a browser interface will make it easy for a user to find observations of a particular object, type of object, or type of observation, to quickly assess the quality and potential usefulness of the spectra, and to download the data and responses as a package if desired. We will include LETG data as well as ACIS CC-mode observations. In addition to the data, portable reprocessing scripts, using CXC and other publicly available software which were used to create the archive will also be available to users, facilitating standard or customized reprocessing from download of Level 1 archive data to production of spectra and responses with minimal interaction (analogous to the "psextract" script commonly used for automated imaging spectral extraction). We will add some customized products which may take time, effort, or special expertise to produce. Candidates for such include extended source extractions, crowded field extractions, and aggregate products such as summed Capella or summed Orion-field-objects spectra. Additional content will grow according to user feedback. This catalog builds upon experience with other relevant work, such as the X-Atlas of HETGS spectra (http://cxc.harvard.edu/XATLAS) or the XMM-RGS spectral browser (http://xmm.esac.esa.int/BiRD). It is intended to be a long-term legacy product for Chandra gratings observations. This work was supported by NASA through the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) contract SV3-73016 for the Chandra X-Ray Center and Science Instruments.

  5. Observed and theoretical spectra in the 10-100 A interval. [of solar spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. A.; Bruner, M. E.; Acton, L. W.

    1988-01-01

    The soft X-ray spectra recorded in two sounding-rocket flights in 1982 and 1985 are compared with predicted spectra. The processed densitometer trace of the full spectrum is presented, together with the new spectrum from the 1985 experiment. The intensities of the lines are then compared with predictions.

  6. Experimental Constraints on Neutrino Spectra Following Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napolitano, Jim; Daya Bay Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    We discuss new initiatives to constrain predictions of fission neutrino spectra from nuclear reactors. These predictions are germane to the understanding of reactor flux anomalies; are needed to reduce systematic uncertainty in neutrino oscillation spectra; and inform searches for the diffuse supernova neutrino background. The initiatives include a search for very high- Q beta decay components to the neutrino spectrum from the Daya Bay power plant; plans for a measurement of the β- spectrum from 252Cf fission products; and precision measurements of the 235U fission neutrino spectrum from PROSPECT and other very short baseline reactor experiments.

  7. [Wavelet property analysis of near infrared spectra].

    PubMed

    Tian, Gao-You; Yuan, Hong-Fu; Liu, Hui-Ying

    2006-08-01

    Wavelet analysis (WT) was conducted on the simulated near infrared spectra (NIR) obtained by adding simulated background and simulated noise into diesel NIR Results show that the background components are mainly located in the low frequency region, while noise in the high frequency region, and useful signal in the middle frequency region. Background and noise components can be simultaneously subtracted from the spectra by WT. The WT coefficients in mid-frequency details can be selected as variables to build the multivariate calibration model, which can improve analytic accuracy and reduce the analysis time.

  8. Algorithms for classification of astronomical object spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasiewicz, P.; Szuppe, J.; Hryniewicz, K.

    2015-09-01

    Obtaining interesting celestial objects from tens of thousands or even millions of recorded optical-ultraviolet spectra depends not only on the data quality but also on the accuracy of spectra decomposition. Additionally rapidly growing data volumes demands higher computing power and/or more efficient algorithms implementations. In this paper we speed up the process of substracting iron transitions and fitting Gaussian functions to emission peaks utilising C++ and OpenCL methods together with the NOSQL database. In this paper we implemented typical astronomical methods of detecting peaks in comparison to our previous hybrid methods implemented with CUDA.

  9. Hadron rapidity spectra within a hybrid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khvorostukhin, A. S.; Toneev, V. D.

    2017-01-01

    A 2-stage hybrid model is proposed that joins the fast initial state of interaction, described by the hadron string dynamics (HSD) model, to subsequent evolution of the expanding system at the second stage, treated within ideal hydrodynamics. The developed hybrid model is assigned to describe heavy-ion collisions in the energy range of the NICA collider under construction in Dubna. Generally, the model is in reasonable agreement with the available data on proton rapidity spectra. However, reproducing proton rapidity spectra, our hybrid model cannot describe the rapidity distributions of pions. The model should be improved by taking into consideration viscosity effects at the hydrodynamical stage of system evolution.

  10. Vibrational spectra study on quinolones antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Yu, Ke; Wang, Sihuan

    2006-09-01

    In order to be able to fully understand and easily identify the quilonoles, we collected IR and Raman spectra of six quinolones, and attempted to assign the attribution of the observed frequencies and their association with specific modes of vibration. According to the structure, the compounds were divided into the groups, and the similarities and differences were further studied by comparing. The result of the study shows that the frequency and intensity are comparable to the corresponding structure. The spectra not only have the commonness but also the individualities.

  11. Elemental Spectra from the First ATIC Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, H. S.; Adams, J. H.; Bashindzhagyan, G.; Batkov, K. E.; Changv, J.; Christl, M.; Fazely, A. R.; Ganel, O.; Gunasingha, R. M.; Guzik, T. G.

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) instrument is a balloon-borne experiment designed to measure the composition and energy spectra of Z = l to 26 cosmic rays over the energy range from approx. 10(exp 11) to approx. 10(exp 14) eV. The instrument consists of a silicon matrix charge detector, plastic scintillator strip hodoscopes interleaved with graphite interaction targets, and a fully active Bismuth Germanate (BGO) calorimeter. ATIC had two successful Long Duration Balloon flights launched from McMurdo Station, Antarctica in 2000 and 2002. In this paper, spectra of various elements measured during the first 16 day flight are presented.

  12. Gravitational effects on planetary neutron flux spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, W. C.; Drake, D. M.; O'Dell, R. D.; Brinkley, F. W., Jr.; Anderson, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of gravity on the planetary neutron flux spectra for planet Mars, and the lifetime of the neutron, were investigated using a modified one-dimensional diffusion accelerated neutral-particle transport code, coupled with a multigroup cross-section library tailored specifically for Mars. The results showed the presence of a qualitatively new feature in planetary neutron leakage spectra in the form of a component of returning neutrons with kinetic energies less than the gravitational binding energy (0.132 eV for Mars). The net effect is an enhancement in flux at the lowest energies that is largest at and above the outermost layer of planetary matter.

  13. Four years of meteor spectra patrol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    The development of the NASA-Langley Research Center meteor spectra patrol is described in general terms. The recording of very faint meteors was made possible by three great strides in optical and photographic technology in the 1960's: (1) the availability of optical-grade fused silica at modest cost, (2) the development of large transmission gratings with high blaze efficiency, and (3) the development of a method for avoiding plate fogging due to background skylight, which consisted of using a photoelectric meteor detector which actuates the spectrograph shutter when a meteor occurs in the field. The classification scheme for meteor spectra developed by Peter M. Millman is described.

  14. Micro-Raman spectra of ugrandite garnet.

    PubMed

    Moroz, T; Ragozin, A; Salikhov, D; Belikova, G; Puchkov, V; Kagi, H

    2009-08-01

    The natural garnets from chromite ores associated with pegmatoid pyroxenites of Sangalyk area (Uchaly ore district, southern Urals, Russia) were studied by means of micro-Raman spectroscopy. The compositions of these garnets were close to ugrandite, an isomorphous intermediate group of uvarovite-grossularite-andradite, X(3)Y(2)(SiO(4))(3), X = Ca(2+), Y = Al(3+), Fe(3+), Cr(3+), according to Raman spectra and X-ray microprobe analyses. An assignment of most of the observed bands in visible and near infrared Raman spectra is reported.

  15. Micro-Raman spectra of ugrandite garnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, T.; Ragozin, A.; Salikhov, D.; Belikova, G.; Puchkov, V.; Kagi, H.

    2009-08-01

    The natural garnets from chromite ores associated with pegmatoid pyroxenites of Sangalyk area (Uchaly ore district, southern Urals, Russia) were studied by means of micro-Raman spectroscopy. The compositions of these garnets were close to ugrandite, an isomorphous intermediate group of uvarovite-grossularite-andradite, X 3Y 2(SiO 4) 3, X = Ca 2+, Y = Al 3+, Fe 3+, Cr 3+, according to Raman spectra and X-ray microprobe analyses. An assignment of most of the observed bands in visible and near infrared Raman spectra is reported.

  16. FIT3D: Fitting optical spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, S. F.; Pérez, E.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; González, J. J.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Cano-Díaz, M.; López-Cobá, C.; Marino, R. A.; Gil de Paz, A.; Mollá, M.; López-Sánchez, A. R.; Ascasibar, Y.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J.

    2016-09-01

    FIT3D fits optical spectra to deblend the underlying stellar population and the ionized gas, and extract physical information from each component. FIT3D is focused on the analysis of Integral Field Spectroscopy data, but is not restricted to it, and is the basis of Pipe3D, a pipeline used in the analysis of datasets like CALIFA, MaNGA, and SAMI. It can run iteratively or in an automatic way to derive the parameters of a large set of spectra.

  17. A data base of geologic field spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, A. B.; Goetz, A. F. H.; Paley, H. N.; Alley, R. E.; Abbott, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    It is noted that field samples measured in the laboratory do not always present an accurate picture of the ground surface sensed by airborne or spaceborne instruments because of the heterogeneous nature of most surfaces and because samples are disturbed and surface characteristics changed by collection and handling. The development of new remote sensing instruments relies on the analysis of surface materials in their natural state. The existence of thousands of Portable Field Reflectance Spectrometer (PFRS) spectra has necessitated a single, all-inclusive data base that permits greatly simplified searching and sorting procedures and facilitates further statistical analyses. The data base developed at JPL for cataloging geologic field spectra is discussed.

  18. Separating Peaks in X-Ray Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolas, David; Taylor, Clayborne; Wade, Thomas

    1987-01-01

    Deconvolution algorithm assists in analysis of x-ray spectra from scanning electron microscopes, electron microprobe analyzers, x-ray fluorescence spectrometers, and like. New algorithm automatically deconvolves x-ray spectrum, identifies locations of spectral peaks, and selects chemical elements most likely producing peaks. Technique based on similarities between zero- and second-order terms of Taylor-series expansions of Gaussian distribution and of damped sinusoid. Principal advantage of algorithm: no requirement to adjust weighting factors or other parameters when analyzing general x-ray spectra.

  19. RM-CLEAN: RM spectra cleaner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heald, George

    2017-08-01

    RM-CLEAN reads in dirty Q and U cubes, generates rmtf based on the frequencies given in an ASCII file, and cleans the RM spectra following the algorithm given by Brentjens (2007). The output cubes contain the clean model components and the CLEANed RM spectra. The input cubes must be reordered with mode=312, and the output cubes will have the same ordering and thus must be reordered after being written to disk. RM-CLEAN runs as a MIRIAD (ascl:1106.007) task and a Python wrapper is included with the code.

  20. Parallel Genetic Algorithm for Alpha Spectra Fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Orellana, Carlos J.; Rubio-Montero, Pilar; González-Velasco, Horacio

    2005-01-01

    We present a performance study of alpha-particle spectra fitting using parallel Genetic Algorithm (GA). The method uses a two-step approach. In the first step we run parallel GA to find an initial solution for the second step, in which we use Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) method for a precise final fit. GA is a high resources-demanding method, so we use a Beowulf cluster for parallel simulation. The relationship between simulation time (and parallel efficiency) and processors number is studied using several alpha spectra, with the aim of obtaining a method to estimate the optimal processors number that must be used in a simulation.

  1. Temperature invariant energy value in LED spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Hans; Vaskuri, Anna; Kärhä, Petri; Ikonen, Erkki

    2016-12-01

    Relative emission spectra of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) depend on the junction temperature. The high-energy region of the emission spectrum can be modelled with Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution as a function of energy and junction temperature. We show that according to the model and our experiments, the normalized emission spectra at different junction temperatures intersect at a unique energy value. The invariant intersection energy exists for many types of LEDs and can be used to determine the alloy composition of the material. Furthermore, the wavelength determined by the intersection energy can be used as a temperature invariant wavelength reference in spectral measurements.

  2. Thermal Emission and Reflected Light Spectra of Super Earths with Flat Transmission Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morley, Caroline V.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Marley, Mark S.; Zahnle, Kevin; Line, Michael; Kempton, Eliza; Lewis, Nikole; Cahoy, Kerri

    2015-12-01

    Planets larger than Earth and smaller than Neptune are some of the most numerous in the galaxy, but observational efforts to understand this population have proved challenging because optically thick clouds or hazes at high altitudes obscure molecular features. We present models of super Earths that include thick clouds and hazes and predict their transmission, thermal emission, and reflected light spectra. Very thick, lofted clouds of salts or sulfides in high metallicity (1000× solar) atmospheres create featureless transmission spectra in the near-infrared. Photochemical hazes with a range of particle sizes also create featureless transmission spectra at lower metallicities. Cloudy thermal emission spectra have muted features more like blackbodies, and hazy thermal emission spectra have emission features caused by an inversion layer at altitudes where the haze forms. Close analysis of reflected light from warm (˜400-800 K) planets can distinguish cloudy spectra, which have moderate albedos (0.05-0.20), from hazy models, which are very dark (0.0-0.03). Reflected light spectra of cold planets (˜200 K) accessible to a space-based visible light coronagraph will have high albedos and large molecular features that will allow them to be more easily characterized than the warmer transiting planets. We suggest a number of complementary observations to characterize this population of planets, including transmission spectra of hot (≳ 1000 K) targets, thermal emission spectra of warm targets using the James Webb Space Telescope, high spectral resolution (R ˜ 105) observations of cloudy targets, and reflected light spectral observations of directly imaged cold targets. Despite the dearth of features observed in super Earth transmission spectra to date, different observations will provide rich diagnostics of their atmospheres.

  3. The peculiar optical-UV X-ray spectra of the X-ray weak quasar PG 0043+039

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollatschny, W.; Schartel, N.; Zetzl, M.; Santos-Lleó, M.; Rodríguez-Pascual, P. M.; Ballo, L.; Talavera, A.

    2016-01-01

    Context. The object PG 0043+039 has been identified as a broad absorption line (BAL) quasar based on its UV spectra. However, this optical luminous quasar has not been detected before in deep X-ray observations, making it the most extreme X-ray weak quasar known today. Aims: This study aims to detect PG 0043+039 in a deep X-ray exposure. The question is what causes the extreme X-ray weakness of PG 0043+039? Does PG 0043+039 show other spectral or continuum peculiarities? Methods: We took simultaneous deep X-ray spectra with XMM-Newton, far-ultraviolet (FUV) spectra with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and optical spectra of PG 0043+039 with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) and Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) in July, 2013. Results: We have detected PG 0043+039 in our X-ray exposure taken in 2013. We presented our first results in a separate paper (Kollatschny et al. 2015). PG 0043+039 shows an extreme αox gradient (αox = -2.37). Furthermore, we were able to verify an X-ray flux of this source in a reanalysis of the X-ray data taken in 2005. At that time, it was fainter by a factor of 3.8 ±0.9 with αox = -2.55. The X-ray spectrum is compatible with a normal quasar power-law spectrum (Γ = 1.70-0.45+0.57) with moderate intrinsic absorption (NH = 5.5-3.9+6.9 × 1021 cm-2) and reflection. The UV/optical flux of PG 0043+039 has increased by a factor of 1.8 compared to spectra taken in the years 1990-1991. The FUV spectrum is highly peculiar and dominated by broad bumps besides Lyα. There is no detectable Lyman edge associated with the BAL absorbing gas seen in the CIV line. PG 0043+039 shows a maximum in the overall continuum flux at around λ ≈ 2500 Å in contrast to most other AGN where the maximum is found at shorter wavelengths. All the above is compatible with an intrinsically X-ray weak quasar, rather than an absorbed X-ray emission. Besides strong FeII multiplets and broad Balmer and HeI lines in the optical band we only detect a narrow [O ii

  4. Variations on supersymmetry breaking and neutrino spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Borzumati, F.; Hamaguchi, K.; Nomura, Y.; Yanagida, T.

    2000-12-11

    The problem of generating light neutrinos within supersymmetric models is discussed. It is shown that the hierarchy of scales induced by supersymmetry breaking can give rise to suppression factors of the correct order of magnitude to produce experimentally allowed neutrino spectra.

  5. Astronomy Spectra Experiment for Nonscience Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental technique to develop inferential thinking in less scientifically-oriented community college students is described. Students activate unlabeled gas discharge tubes and identify the gases by comparing color photographs with spectrometer observations. Includes methods for taking color photographs of spectra. (SK)

  6. Raman spectra of lignin model compounds

    Treesearch

    Umesh P. Agarwal; Richard S. Reiner; Ashok K. Pandey; Sally A. Ralph; Kolby C. Hirth; Rajai H. Atalla

    2005-01-01

    To fully exploit the value of Raman spectroscopy for analyzing lignins and lignin containing materials, a detailed understanding of lignins’ Raman spectra needs to be achieved. Although advances made thus far have led to significant growth in application of Raman techniques, further developments are needed to improve upon the existing knowledge. Considering that lignin...

  7. Automatic Spike Removal Algorithm for Raman Spectra.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yao; Burch, Kenneth S

    2016-11-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful technique, widely used in both academia and industry. In part, the technique's extensive use stems from its ability to uniquely identify and image various material parameters: composition, strain, temperature, lattice/excitation symmetry, and magnetism in bulk, nano, solid, and organic materials. However, in nanomaterials and samples with low thermal conductivity, these measurements require long acquisition times. On the other hand, charge-coupled device (CCD) detectors used in Raman microscopes are vulnerable to cosmic rays. As a result, many spurious spikes occur in the measured spectra, which can distort the result or require the spectra to be ignored. In this paper, we outline a new method that significantly improves upon existing algorithms for removing these spikes. Specifically, we employ wavelet transform and data clustering in a new spike-removal algorithm. This algorithm results in spike-free spectra with negligible spectral distortion. The reduced dependence on the selection of wavelets and intuitive wavelet coefficient adjustment strategy enables non-experts to employ these powerful spectra-filtering techniques.

  8. Astronomy Spectra Experiment for Nonscience Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental technique to develop inferential thinking in less scientifically-oriented community college students is described. Students activate unlabeled gas discharge tubes and identify the gases by comparing color photographs with spectrometer observations. Includes methods for taking color photographs of spectra. (SK)

  9. Students' Mental Models of Atomic Spectra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Körhasan, Nilüfer Didis; Wang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Mental modeling, which is a theory about knowledge organization, has been recently studied by science educators to examine students' understanding of scientific concepts. This qualitative study investigates undergraduate students' mental models of atomic spectra. Nine second-year physics students, who have already taken the basic chemistry and…

  10. Principal component analysis of phenolic acid spectra

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phenolic acids are common plant metabolites that exhibit bioactive properties and have applications in functional food and animal feed formulations. The ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) spectra of four closely related phenolic acid structures were evaluated by principal component analysis (PCA) to...

  11. Correlation Functions Aid Analyses Of Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, Reinhard; Norton, Robert H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    New uses found for correlation functions in analyses of spectra. In approach combining elements of both pattern-recognition and traditional spectral-analysis techniques, spectral lines identified in data appear useless at first glance because they are dominated by noise. New approach particularly useful in measurement of concentrations of rare species of molecules in atmosphere.

  12. Prompt fission neutron spectra of actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Capote, R.; Chen, Y. -J.; Hambsch, F. -J.; Kornilov, N. V.; Lestone, J. P.; Litaize, O.; Morillon, B.; Neudecker, D.; Oberstedt, S.; Ohsawa, T.; Otuka, N.; Pronyaev, V. G.; Saxena, A.; Serot, O.; Shcherbakov, O. A.; Shu, N. -C.; Smith, D. L.; Talou, P.; Trkov, A.; Tudora, A. C.; Vogt, R.; Vorobyev, A. S.

    2016-01-06

    Here, the energy spectrum of prompt neutrons emitted in fission (PFNS) plays a very important role in nuclear science and technology. A Coordinated Research Project (CRP) "Evaluation of Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra of Actinides" was established by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section in 2009, with the major goal to produce new PFNS evaluations with uncertainties for actinide nuclei.

  13. Chaotic spectra: How to extract dynamic information

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, H.S.; Gomez Llorente, J.M.; Zakrzewski, J.; Kulander, K.C.

    1988-10-01

    Nonlinear dynamics is applied to chaotic unassignable atomic and molecular spectra with the aim of extracting detailed information about regular dynamic motions that exist over short intervals of time. It is shown how this motion can be extracted from high resolution spectra by doing low resolution studies or by Fourier transforming limited regions of the spectrum. These motions mimic those of periodic orbits (PO) and are inserts into the dominant chaotic motion. Considering these inserts and the PO as a dynamically decoupled region of space, resonant scattering theory and stabilization methods enable us to compute ladders of resonant states which interact with the chaotic quasi-continuum computed in principle from basis sets placed off the PO. The interaction of the resonances with the quasicontinuum explains the low resolution spectra seen in such experiments. It also allows one to associate low resolution features with a particular PO. The motion on the PO thereby supplies the molecular movements whose quantization causes the low resolution spectra. Characteristic properties of the periodic orbit based resonances are discussed. The method is illustrated on the photoabsorption spectrum of the hydrogen atom in a strong magnetic field and on the photodissociation spectrum of H/sub 3//sup +/. Other molecular systems which are currently under investigation using this formalism are also mentioned. 53 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Optical Emission Spectra of Plasma Display Panel

    SciTech Connect

    Pat, S.; Ekem, N.; Balbag, M. Z.; Cenik, M. I.; Akan, T.; Aydin, O.; Musa, G.; Surdu-Bob, C. C.

    2007-04-23

    In this study, optical emission spectra of plasma display panel (PDP) was investigated between 200-850 nm at various pressure, pure (Ar) an mixture gas (0,5Ar+0,5 N2). This device is an application of dielectric barrier discharge.

  15. Discriminating Dysarthria Type from Envelope Modulation Spectra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liss, Julie M.; LeGendre, Sue; Lotto, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Previous research demonstrated the ability of temporally based rhythm metrics to distinguish among dysarthrias with different prosodic deficit profiles (J. M. Liss et al., 2009). The authors examined whether comparable results could be obtained by an automated analysis of speech envelope modulation spectra (EMS), which quantifies the…

  16. Spectra of Angrites and Possible Parent Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burbine, T. H.; McCoy, T. J.; Binzel, R. P.

    2001-01-01

    One meteorite class where very little progress has been made in identifying possible parent bodies is the angrites. We have obtained spectra of two new angrites (D'Orbigny and Sahara 99555). Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  17. Prompt fission neutron spectra of actinides

    DOE PAGES

    Capote, R.; Chen, Y. -J.; Hambsch, F. -J.; ...

    2016-01-06

    Here, the energy spectrum of prompt neutrons emitted in fission (PFNS) plays a very important role in nuclear science and technology. A Coordinated Research Project (CRP) "Evaluation of Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra of Actinides" was established by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section in 2009, with the major goal to produce new PFNS evaluations with uncertainties for actinide nuclei.

  18. Calculated late time spectra of supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Axelrod, T.S.

    1987-10-30

    We consider here the nebular phase spectra of supernovae whose late time luminosity is provided by the radioactive decay of /sup 56/Ni and /sup 56/Co synthesized in the explosion. A broad variety of supernovae are known or suspected to fall in this category. This includes all SNIa and SNIb, and at least some SNII, in particular SN1987a. At sufficiently late times the expanding supernova becomes basically nebular in character due to its decreasing optical depth. The spectra produced during this stage contain information on the density and abundance structure of the entire supernova, as opposed to spectra near maximum light which are affected only by the outermost layers. A numerical model for nebular spectrum formation is therefore potentially very valuable for answering currently outstanding questions about the post-explosion supernova structure. As an example, we can hope to determine the degree of mixing which occurs between the layers of the ''onion-skin'' abundance structure predicted by current one dimensional explosion calculations. In the sections which follow, such a numerical model is briefly described and then applied to SN1972e, a typical SNIa, SN1985f, an SNIb, and finally to SN1987a. In the case of SN1987a predicted spectra are presented for the wavelength range from 1 to 100 microns at a time 300 days after explosion. 18 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Vibrational Spectra of γ-Aminobutyric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, D. M.; Sajan, D.; Laladas, K. P.; Joe, I. Hubert; Jayakumar, V. S.

    2008-11-01

    The NIR-FT Raman, FT-IR spectral analysis of γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) a simple amino acid is carried out by density functional computations. The vibrational spectra confirm the existence of NH3+ in GABA. Hydroxyl groups H-bonded to the different extents are analysed, supported by computed results.

  20. Discriminating Dysarthria Type from Envelope Modulation Spectra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liss, Julie M.; LeGendre, Sue; Lotto, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Previous research demonstrated the ability of temporally based rhythm metrics to distinguish among dysarthrias with different prosodic deficit profiles (J. M. Liss et al., 2009). The authors examined whether comparable results could be obtained by an automated analysis of speech envelope modulation spectra (EMS), which quantifies the…

  1. Fourier smoothing of digital photographic spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anupama, G. C.

    1990-03-01

    Fourier methods of smoothing one-dimensional data are discussed with particular reference to digital photographic spectra. Data smoothed using lowpass filters with different cut-off frequencies are intercompared. A method to scale densities in order to remove the dependence of grain noise on density is described. Optimal filtering technique which models signal and noise in Fourier domain is also explained.

  2. Solar Energetic Particle Spectra Measured with PAMELA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, J. M.; Boezio, M.; de Nolfo, G. A.; Christian, E. R.; Stochaj, S.; Martucci, M.; Mergè, M.; Bruno, A.; Munini, R.; Sparvoli, R.; Bravar, U.

    2016-12-01

    We have measured the event integrated spectra from several SEP events from 2006 to 2014 in the energy range starting at 80 MeV and extending well above the neutron monitor threshold. The PAMELA instrument is in a high inclination, low Earth orbit and has access to SEPs when at high geographic latitudes. This means that the spectra have been assembled from regularly spaced measurements with gaps during the course of the event. Furthermore, the field of view of PAMELA is small and during the high latitude passes it scans a wide range of asymptotic directions as the spacecraft moves. Correcting for data gaps and solid angle effects, we have compiled event-integrated intensity spectra that typically exhibit power law shapes in energy with an exponential roll over. The events analyzed include two, maybe three, GLEs. In those cases the roll over energy lies above the neutron monitor threshold ( 1 GV) while the others are lower. We see no qualitative difference between the spectra of GLE vs. non-GLE events.

  3. Scattering Spectra of Single Gold Nanoshells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, Jason H.; Nehl, Colleen L.; Goodrich, Glenn P.; Tam, Felicia; Halas, Naomi J.

    2004-03-01

    Gold nanoshells are metal coated silica nanoparticles whose plasmon resonances vary from the visible to IR depending on their core to shell thickness ratio. Monodisperse nanoshell solutions can be synthesized such that their absorbance spectra match the calculated extinction spectra for the corresponding nanoshell structure. Using transmitted light dark field illumination and high numerical aperture optics, we have studied the scattering spectra of single gold nanoshells supported on ITO substrates in an optically homogeneous medium. With the aid of alignment marks, the same nanoshell can then be structurally characterized by electron microscopy. We have used this system to investigate the lineshape of single nanoshell scattering spectra to further elucidate the relative contributions of retardation, electron-interface scattering, and structural inhomogeneity. [1] Single particle measurements also facilitate the observation subtle interparticle and particle-substrate hybridization effects. [2] [1] S. L. Westcott, J. B. Jackson, C. Radloff, N. J. Halas, Phys. Rev. B 66, 155431 (2002). [2] E. Prodan, C. Radloff, N. J. Halas, P. Nordlander, Science 302, 419-422 (2003).

  4. Synthetic spectra for the Arizona Airglow Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Jeff E.; Hatfield, D. B.; Broadfoot, A. Lyle

    1994-09-01

    The Arizona Airglow Experiment (GLO) is a panchromatic intensified CCD (ICCD) spectrograph, bore sighted with 12 monochromatic imagers. The spectrograph provides continuous spectral coverage from 1150 angstrom to 11,000 angstrom with a resolution of 5 angstrom to 20 angstrom. The spectrograph was designed to record simultaneously as much information as possible from a single column of gas. The resolution was selected to allow the determination of molecular emission vibrational and rotational structure. Molecular band emissions contain much more information than atomic lines, although interpretation of band emissions is more complicated. This complexity is due to the distribution of their energies over broad spectral ranges that overlap. The most productive method of interpreting molecular spectra is by modeling. The nature of the molecular transitions is well known, and synthetic spectra can be calculated to match the recorded spectrum accurately. Our knowledge of the transition probabilities allows accurate estimates of the intensity and shape of blended bands. It is our goal to synthesize all of the emissions recorded by the GLO as a tool to aid in detailed analysis of spectra. This work describes the approach used in calculating the synthetic spectra and references the source of parameters used for 14 band systems. This software utility will become a part of the GLO facility.

  5. EEG Power Spectra of Adolescent Poor Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, Peggy T.; McPherson, W. Brian; Oglesby, D. Michael; Dykman, Roscoe A.

    1998-01-01

    Electroencephalographic power spectra were studied in two poor-reading adolescent groups (n=38), dysphonetic and phonetic. Significant Group x Hemisphere effects were found in the alpha and beta bands, with the phonetic group showing right greater than left asymmetry. Results suggest more circumscribed and mature processing in the phonetically…

  6. Rotational and Vibrational Spectra of Molecular Clusters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-30

    3 I D ’- 2095 205 209 2105 i k (c),,.-..0 WavenumbersHCN/Av ixture .Pekarlbld asM -mnmr dmr 6 9014 CARS spectra ofthe v, region of HCN in...shown above, the bond stretching constants below the structure. Values shown in parentheses were held fixed. %% -.. .4 .. 0 Table 8 Sumawy of norma

  7. Laboratory millimeter and submillimeter spectra of CO/+/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastry, K. V. L. N.; Helminger, P.; Herbst, E.; De Lucia, F. C.

    1981-01-01

    The strong electric dipole-allowed transitions of the molecular ion CO(+) in the region 235-470 GHz have been measured in the laboratory. The laboratory spectra at 235 GHz appear to confirm the claim by Erickson et al. (1981) to have observed CO(+) in OMC-1.

  8. Solar Energetic Particle Spectra Measured with PAMELA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, James; Bruno, Alessandro; Boezio, Mirko; Bravar, Ulisse; Christian, Eric; Georgia, De Nolfo; Martucci, Matteo; Merge, Matteo; Munini, Riccardo; Sparvoli, Roberta; Stochaj, Steven; Pamela Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We have measured the event integrated spectra from several SEP events from 2006 to 2014 in the energy range starting at 80 MeV and extending well above the neutron monitor threshold. The PAMELA instrument is in a high inclination, low Earth orbit and has access to SEPs when at high geographic latitudes. This means that the spectra have been assembled from regularly spaced measurements with gaps during the course of the event. Furthermore, the field of view of PAMELA is small and during the high latitude passes it scans a wide range of asymptotic directions as the spacecraft moves. Correcting for data gaps and solid angle effects, we have compiled event-integrated intensity spectra that typically exhibit power law shapes in energy with an exponential roll over. The events analyzed include two, maybe three, GLEs. In those cases the roll over energy lies above the neutron monitor threshold (1 GV) while the others are lower. We see no qualitative difference between the spectra of GLE vs. non-GLE events. National Science Foundation, NASA, Italian Space Agency, Russian Space Agency.

  9. Temporal Evolution of Solar Energetic Particle Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, Donald J.; Dalla, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    During solar flares and coronal mass ejections, Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) may be released into the interplanetary medium and near-Earth locations. The energy spectra of SEP events at 1 AU are typically averaged over the entire event or studied in a few snapshots. In this article we analyze the time evolution of the energy spectra of four large selected SEP events using a large number of snapshots. We use a multi-spacecraft and multi-instrument approach for the observations, obtained over a wide SEP energy range. We find large differences in the spectra at the beginning of the events as measured by different instruments. We show that over time, a wave-like structure is observed traveling through the spectra from the highest energies to the lowest energies, creating an "arch" shape that then straightens into a power law later in the event, after times on the order of 10 hours. We discuss the processes that determine SEP intensities and their role in shaping the spectral time evolution.

  10. Students' Mental Models of Atomic Spectra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Körhasan, Nilüfer Didis; Wang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Mental modeling, which is a theory about knowledge organization, has been recently studied by science educators to examine students' understanding of scientific concepts. This qualitative study investigates undergraduate students' mental models of atomic spectra. Nine second-year physics students, who have already taken the basic chemistry and…

  11. Mid-infrared spectra of comet nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Michael S. P.; Woodward, Charles E.; Gehrz, Robert D.; Reach, William T.; Harker, David E.

    2017-03-01

    Comet nuclei and D-type asteroids have several similarities at optical and near-IR wavelengths, including near-featureless red reflectance spectra, and low albedos. Mineral identifications based on these characteristics are fraught with degeneracies, although some general trends can be identified. In contrast, spectral emissivity features in the mid-infrared provide important compositional information that might not otherwise be achievable. Jovian Trojan D-type asteroids have emissivity features strikingly similar to comet comae, suggesting that they have the same compositions and that the surfaces of the Trojans are highly porous. However, a direct comparison between a comet and asteroid surface has not been possible due to the paucity of spectra of comet nuclei at mid-infrared wavelengths. We present 5-35 μm thermal emission spectra of comets 10P/Tempel 2, and 49P/Arend-Rigaux observed with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. Our analysis reveals no evidence for a coma or tail at the time of observation, suggesting the spectra are dominated by the comet nucleus. We fit each spectrum with the near-Earth asteroid thermal model (NEATM) and find sizes in agreement with previous values. However, the NEATM beaming parameters of the nuclei, 0.74-0.83, are systematically lower than the Jupiter-family comet population mean of 1.03 ± 0.11, derived from 16- and 22-μm photometry. We suggest this may be either an artifact of the spectral reduction, or the consequence of an emissivity low near 16 μm. When the spectra are normalized by the NEATM model, a weak 10-μm silicate plateau is evident, with a shape similar to those seen in mid-infrared spectra of D-type asteroids. A silicate plateau is also evident in previously published Spitzer spectra of the nucleus of comet 9P/Tempel 1. We compare, in detail, these comet nucleus emission features to those seen in spectra of the Jovian Trojan D-types (624) Hektor, (911) Agamemnon, and (1172) Aneas, as well

  12. An Interactive Gallery of Planetary Nebula Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwitter, K. B.; Henry, R. B. C.

    2002-12-01

    We have created a website containing high-quality moderate-resolution spectra of 88 planetary nebulae (PNe) from 3600 to 9600 Å, obtained at KPNO and CTIO. Spectra are displayed in a zoomable window, and there are templates available that show wavelength and ion identifications. In addition to the spectra themselves, the website also contains a brief discussion of PNe as astronomical objects and as contributors to our understanding of stellar evolution, and a table with atlas information for each object along with a link to an image. This table can be re-ordered by object name, galactic or equatorial coordinates, distance from the sun, the galactic center, or the galactic plane. We envision that this website, which concentrates a large amount of data in one place, will be of interest to a variety of users. PN researchers might need to check the spectrum of a particular object of interest; the non-specialist astronomer might simply be interested in perusing such a collection of spectra; and finally, teachers of introductory astronomy can use this database to illustrate basic principles of atomic physics and radiation. To encourage such use, we have written two simple exercises at a basic level to introduce beginning astronomy students to the wealth of information that PN spectra contain. We are grateful to Adam Wang of the Williams College OIT and to his summer student teams who worked on various apects of the implementation of this website. This work has been supported by NSF grant AST-9819123 and by Williams College and the University of Oklahoma.

  13. Raman spectra of carotenoids in natural products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withnall, Robert; Chowdhry, Babur Z.; Silver, Jack; Edwards, Howell G. M.; de Oliveira, Luiz F. C.

    2003-08-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of naturally occurring carotenoids have been obtained from nautilus, periwinkle ( Littorina littorea) and clam shells under 514.5 nm excitation and these spectra are compared with the resonance Raman spectra obtained in situ from tomatoes, carrots, red peppers and saffron. The tomatoes, carrots and red peppers gave rise to resonance Raman spectra exhibiting a ν1 band at ca. 1520 cm -1, in keeping with its assignment to carotenoids with ca. nine conjugated carboncarbon double bonds in their main chains, whereas the resonance Raman spectrum of saffron showed a ν1 band at 1537 cm -1 which can be assigned to crocetin, having seven conjugated carboncarbon double bonds. A correlation between ν1 wavenumber location and effective conjugated chain length has been used to interpret the data obtained from the shells, and the wavenumber position (1522 cm -1) of the ν1 band of the carotenoid in the orange clam shell suggests that it contains nine conjugated double bonds in the main chain. However, the black periwinkle and nautilus shells exhibit ν1 bands at 1504 and 1496 cm -1, respectively. On the basis of the correlation between ν1 wavenumber location and effective conjugated chain length, this indicates that they contain carotenoids with longer conjugated chains, the former having ca. 11 double bonds and the latter ca. 13 or even more. Raman spectra of the nautilus, periwinkle and clam shells also exhibited a strong band at 1085 cm -1 and a doublet with components at 701 and 705 cm -1, which can be assigned to biogenic calcium carbonate in the aragonite crystallographic form.

  14. Improving interpretation of infrared spectra for OM characterization by subtraction of spectra from incinerated samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellerbrock, Ruth H.; Gerke, Horst H.; Leue, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Non-destructive methods such as diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFT) have been applied to characterize organic matter (OM) at intact structural surfaces among others. However, it is often difficult to distinguish effects of organic components on DRIFT signal intensities from those of mineral components. The objective of this study was to re-evaluate DRIFT spectra from intact earthworm burrow walls and coated cracks to improve the interpretation of C-H and C=O bands. We compared DRIFT and transmission Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of entire samples that were from the same pedogenetic soil horizon, but different in mineral composition and texture (i.e., glacial till versus loess). Spectra of incinerated samples were subtracted from the original spectra. Transmission FTIR and DRIFT spectra were almost identical for entire soil samples. However, the DRIFT spectra were affected by the bulk mode bands (i.e., wavenumbers 2000 to 1700 cm-1) that affected spectral resolution and reproducibility. The ratios between C-H and C=O band intensities as indicator for OM quality obtained with DRIFT were smaller than those obtained from transmission FTIR. A spectral subtraction procedure was found to reduce effects of mineral absorption bands on DRIFT spectra allowing an improved interpretation. DRIFT spectroscopy as a non-destructive method for analyzing OM composition at intact surfaces in structured soils could be calibrated with information obtained with the more detailed transmission FTIR and complementary methods.

  15. Reflectance spectra of mafic silicate-opaque assemblages with applications to meteorite spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cloutis, Edward A.; Smith, Dorian G. W.; Lambert, Richard St. J.; Gaffey, Michael J.

    1990-01-01

    The addition of fine-grained magnetite to mafic silicate spectra can impart not only an overall blue slope, but also lower overall reflectance and band intensities. The reflectance spectra of the CO and CV magnetite-bearing carbonaceous chondrites are noted to exhibit many of these features; the low band depths of these meteorites suggest that an additional dark, neutral phase, such as ordered carbon, is present. Carbon + mafic silicate spectra possess a red overall slope at low amorphous carbon concentrations. The parent bodies of some of the darkest meteorites should exhibit spectral features attributable to mafic silicates.

  16. EMPCA and Cluster Analysis of Quasar Spectra: Construction and Application to Simulated Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrs, Adam; Leighly, Karen; Wagner, Cassidy; Macinnis, Francis

    2017-01-01

    Quasars have complex spectra with emission lines influenced by many factors. Therefore, to fully describe the spectrum requires specification of a large number of parameters, such as line equivalent width, blueshift, and ratios. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) aims to construct eigenvectors-or principal components-from the data with the goal of finding a few key parameters that can be used to predict the rest of the spectrum fairly well. Analysis of simulated quasar spectra was used to verify and justify our modified application of PCA.We used a variant of PCA called Weighted Expectation Maximization PCA (EMPCA; Bailey 2012) along with k-means cluster analysis to analyze simulated quasar spectra. Our approach combines both analytical methods to address two known problems with classical PCA. EMPCA uses weights to account for uncertainty and missing points in the spectra. K-means groups similar spectra together to address the nonlinearity of quasar spectra, specifically variance in blueshifts and widths of the emission lines.In producing and analyzing simulations, we first tested the effects of varying equivalent widths and blueshifts on the derived principal components, and explored the differences between standard PCA and EMPCA. We also tested the effects of varying signal-to-noise ratio. Next we used the results of fits to composite quasar spectra (see accompanying poster by Wagner et al.) to construct a set of realistic simulated spectra, and subjected those spectra to the EMPCA /k-means analysis. We concluded that our approach was validated when we found that the mean spectra from our k-means clusters derived from PCA projection coefficients reproduced the trends observed in the composite spectra.Furthermore, our method needed only two eigenvectors to identify both sets of correlations used to construct the simulations, as well as indicating the linear and nonlinear segments. Comparing this to regular PCA, which can require a dozen or more components, or to

  17. Measurement and interpretation of plutonium spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise, J.; Fred, M.S.; Carnall, W.T.; Crosswhite, H.M.; Crosswhite, H.

    1982-01-01

    The atomic spectroscopic data available for plutonium are among the rickest of any in the periodic system. They include high-resolution grating and Fourier-transform spectra as well as extensive Zeeman and isotope-shift studies. We summarize the present status of the term analysis and cite the configurations that have been identified. A least-squares adjustment of a parametric Hamiltonian for configurations of both Pu I and Pu II has shown that almost all of the expected low levels are now known. The use of a model Hamiltonian applicable to both lanthanide and actinide atomic species has been applied to the low configurations of Pu I and Pu II making use of trends predicted by ab initio calculations. This same model has been used to describe the energy levels of Pu/sup 3 +/ in LaCl/sub 3/, and an extension has permitted preliminary calculations of the spectra of other valence states.

  18. Neutron Spectra in a 15 MV LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Chu, Wei-Han; Tung, Chuan-Jong; Lan, Jen-Hong

    2010-12-07

    Neutron spectra were calculated inside the treatment hall of a 15 MV LINAC, calculations were carried out using Monte Carlo methods. With a Bonner sphere spectrometer with pairs of thermoluminiscent dosimeters the neutron spectrum at 100 cm from the isocenter was measured and compared with the calculated spectrum. All the spectra in the treatment hall show the presence of evaporation and knock-on neutrons; also the room-return due to the hall features is shown. In the maze the large contribution are due to epithermal and thermal neutrons. A good agreement between the calculated and measured spectrum at 100 cm was noticed, from this comparison the differences are attributed to the water content in the concrete of the hall.

  19. Raman spectra of deuteriated taurine single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, J. M. de; Lima, R. J. C.; Freire, P. T. C.; Sasaki, J. M.; Melo, F. E. A.; Filho, J. Mendes; Jones, Derry W.

    2005-05-01

    The polarized Raman spectra of partially deuteriated taurine [(ND 3+) 0.65(NH 3+) 0.35(CH 2) 2SO 3-] crystals from x( zz) x and x( zy) x scattering geometries of the A g and B g irreducible representations of the factor group C 2h are reported. The temperature-dependent Raman spectra of partially deuteriated taurine do not reveal any evidence of the structural phase transition undergone by normal taurine at about 250 K, but an anomaly observed in the 180 cm -1 band at ˜120 K implies a different dynamic for this band (which is involved in a pressure-induced phase transition) in the deuteriated crystal.

  20. Rotational Spectra and Structural Determination of Hccncs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wenhao; Davis, Rebecca; van Wijngaarden, Jennifer

    2017-06-01

    The ground state of HCCNCS, prepared by high voltage electric discharge of a gas mixture of acetylene and CH_3NCS in neon during supersonic expansion, was studied using both chirped pulse Fourier transform microwave (cp-FTMW) and Balle Flygare FTMW spectrometers. The pure rotational spectra were measured for the parent, ^{34}S, and three ^{13}C isotopologues in natural abundance and the ^{14}N nuclear quadrupole hyperfine structure was resolved. The observed spectra are consistent with a linear or quasilinear ground state of HCCNCS. The corresponding rotational constants were used to derive the substitution (r_{s}) and effective ground state (r_{0}) geometries. Supporting calculations at the MP2/cc-pVQZ and CCSD(T)/cc-pVQZ (expanded basis cc-pV(Q+d)Z for sulfur) levels of theory reveal that the potential energy surface is virtually flat around the minimum and yield an equilibrium structure (r_{e}) that is consistent with experiment.

  1. Specific heat of multifractal energy spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, L. R.; Vallejos, R. O.; Tsallis, C.; Mendes, R. S.; Roux, S.

    2001-07-01

    Motivated by the self-similar character of energy spectra demonstrated for quasicrystals, we investigate the case of multifractal energy spectra, and compute the specific heat associated with simple archetypal forms of multifractal sets as generated by iterated maps. We considered the logistic map and the circle map at their threshold to chaos. Both examples show nontrivial structures associated with the scaling properties of their respective chaotic attractors. The specific heat displays generically log-periodic oscillations around a value that characterizes a single exponent, the ``fractal dimension,'' of the distribution of energy levels close to the minimum value set to 0. It is shown that when the fractal dimension and the frequency of log oscillations of the density of states are large, the amplitude of the resulting log oscillation in the specific heat becomes much smaller than the log-periodic oscillation measured on the density of states.

  2. Cathodoluminescence spectra of gallium nitride nanorods

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Gallium nitride [GaN] nanorods grown on a Si(111) substrate at 720°C via plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy were studied by field-emission electron microscopy and cathodoluminescence [CL]. The surface topography and optical properties of the GaN nanorod cluster and single GaN nanorod were measured and discussed. The defect-related CL spectra of GaN nanorods and their dependence on temperature were investigated. The CL spectra along the length of the individual GaN nanorod were also studied. The results reveal that the 3.2-eV peak comes from the structural defect at the interface between the GaN nanorod and Si substrate. The surface state emission of the single GaN nanorod is stronger as the diameter of the GaN nanorod becomes smaller due to an increased surface-to-volume ratio. PMID:22168896

  3. Terahertz-sideband spectra involving Kapteyn series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerche, Ian; Tautz, Robert C.; Citrin, D. S.

    2009-09-01

    Kapteyn series of the second kind appear in models of even- and odd-order sideband spectra in the optical regime of a quantum system modulated by a high-frequency (e.g., terahertz) electromagnetic field (Citrin D S 1999 Phys. Rev. B 60 5659) and in certain time-periodic transport problems in superlattices (Ignatov A A and Romanov Y A 1976 Phys. Status Solidi b 73 327; Feise M W and Citrin D S 1999 Appl. Phys. Lett. 75 3536). This paper shows that both the even- and the odd-order Kapteyn series that appear can be summed in closed form, thereby allowing more transparent insight into the structural dependence of the sideband spectra and also providing an analytic control for the accuracy of numerical procedures designed to evaluate the series. The general method of analysis may also be of interest for other Kapteyn series.

  4. Polarization in astronomical spectra - Theoretical evidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fymat, A. L.

    1974-01-01

    Theoretical evidence for the existence and behavior of polarization in astronomical spectra is provided. The theory for the study of spectral multiple scattering of arbitrarily polarized light is first developed, and the detailed and integrated spectropolarimetry of a planetary atmosphere is then studied for cases in which the spectra are formed in the presence of either very small nonspherical particles (Rayleigh-Cabannes scattering) or large polydisperse spherical particles (Mie scattering). It is shown in both cases that polarization is indeed present; it increases with the line strength but decreases afterwards as the line becomes very strong and tends to saturation. A polarization reversal is also predicted during latitudinal (pole-to-equator) scan and possibly also during longitudinal (terminator-to-limb) scan of the planet. The reversal happened at all phase angles considered. Our companion article (Forbes and Fymat) will provide observational substantiation to these theoretical predictions.

  5. Analysis of spectra using correlation functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, Reinhard; Norton, Robert H.

    1988-01-01

    A novel method is presented for the quantitative analysis of spectra based on the properties of the cross correlation between a real spectrum and either a numerical synthesis or laboratory simulation. A new goodness-of-fit criterion called the heteromorphic coefficient H is proposed that has the property of being zero when a fit is achieved and varying smoothly through zero as the iteration proceeds, providing a powerful tool for automatic or near-automatic analysis. It is also shown that H can be rendered substantially noise-immune, permitting the analysis of very weak spectra well below the apparent noise level and, as a byproduct, providing Doppler shift and radial velocity information with excellent precision. The technique is in regular use in the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) project and operates in an interactive, realtime computing environment with turn-around times of a few seconds or less.

  6. Neutron Spectra in a 15 MV LINAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Chu, Wei-Han; Tung, Chuan-Jong; Lan, Jen-Hong

    2010-12-01

    Neutron spectra were calculated inside the treatment hall of a 15 MV LINAC, calculations were carried out using Monte Carlo methods. With a Bonner sphere spectrometer with pairs of thermoluminiscent dosimeters the neutron spectrum at 100 cm from the isocenter was measured and compared with the calculated spectrum. All the spectra in the treatment hall show the presence of evaporation and knock-on neutrons; also the room-return due to the hall features is shown. In the maze the large contribution are due to epithermal and thermal neutrons. A good agreement between the calculated and measured spectrum at 100 cm was noticed, from this comparison the differences are attributed to the water content in the concrete of the hall.

  7. High resolution derivative spectra in remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demetriades-Shah, Tanvir H.; Steven, Michael D.; Clark, Jeremy A.

    1990-01-01

    The use of derivative spectra is an established technique in analytical chemistry for the elimination of background signals and for resolving overlapping spectral features. Application of this technique for tackling analogous problems such as interference from soil background reflectance in the remote sensing of vegetation or for resolving complex spectra of several target species within individual pixels in remote sensing is proposed. Methods for generating derivatives of high spectral resolution data are reviewed. Results of experiments to test the use of derivatives for monitoring chlorosis in vegetation show that derivative spectral indices are superior to conventional broad-band spectral indices such as the near-infrared/red reflectance ratio. Conventional broad-band indices are sensitive to both leaf cover as well as leaf color. New derivative spectral indices which were able to monitor chlorosis unambiguously were identified. Potential areas for the application of this technique in remote sensing are considered.

  8. Creating semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo Jin; Fan, Pengyu; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of semiconductors are typically considered intrinsic and fixed. Here we leverage the rapid developments in the field of optical metamaterials to create ultrathin semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra. We show how such metafilms can be constructed by placing one or more types of high-index semiconductor antennas into a dense array with subwavelength spacings. It is argued that the large absorption cross-section of semiconductor antennas and their weak near-field coupling open a unique opportunity to create strongly absorbing metafilms whose spectral absorption properties directly reflect those of the individual antennas. Using experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that near-unity absorption at one or more target wavelengths of interest can be achieved in a sub-50-nm-thick metafilm using judiciously sized and spaced Ge nanobeams. The ability to create semiconductor metafilms with custom absorption spectra opens up new design strategies for planar optoelectronic devices and solar cells. PMID:26184335

  9. Slit Spectra of Second Byurakan Survey Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterbrock, D. E.; Martel, A.

    1993-12-01

    Slit spectra have been obtained at Lick Observatory of 18 Seyfert galaxy candidates from the Second Byurakan Spectral Sky Survey (SBS). The great majority of them turned out to be Seyfert galaxies. The classifications and redshifts of all the galaxies are reported. Measurements of the intensity ratios of the emission lines used in classifying the galaxies are tabulated and plotted on diagnostic diagrams. The spectra of seven of the galaxies are described in detail. In general, our classification and redshift measurements are in very good accord with those of Lipovetsky, Stepanian, and their collaborators at the Special Astrophysical Observatory, showing that their results can be used in conjunction with the Lick results with little if any systematic difference between the two data sets. The importance of the SBS as a source of new Seyferts bridging the gap between low-redshift Seyfert galaxies and higher-luminosity QSOs is also emphasized.

  10. Chemomertical analysis of endometrial tissue fluorescence spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitkuviene, Aurelija; Auksorius, E.; Fuchs, D.; Gavriushin, V.

    2002-10-01

    An effort has been made to detect neopterin spectrum in fluorescence of premalignant endometrial tissue and to estimate the number of fluorophores naturally existing in the tissue with fluorescence present above the noise level. Endometrial Tissue fluorescence was measured in vitro by excitation with the third harmonic of Nd YAG laser. Multivariate curve resolution was used for testing neopterin presence in endometrial tissue. Fluorescence spectra ofneopterin was measured and used as a target spectrum for testing. Seven factors -fluorescence ofnatural fluorophores ofendometrial tissue were found to be present above the noise level in the overall autofluorescence. Neopterin concentration may be too low in endometrial tissue to make its fluorescence above the noise level because neopterin spectrum was not found to be among the spectra resolved by multivariate curve resolution. An intensity increase in the neopterin spectrum spectral region in hyperplastic endometrial samples might be associated with neopterin concentration increase.

  11. Ab initio infrared and Raman spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredkin, D. R.; White, S. R.; Wilson, K. R.; Komornicki, A.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that with increased computer power and improved computational techniques, such as the gradients developed in recent years, it is becoming practical to compute spectra ab initio, from the fundamental constants of nature, for systems of increasing complexity. The present investigation has the objective to explore several possible ab initio approaches to spectra, giving particular attention to infrared and nonresonance Raman. Two approaches are discussed. The sequential approach, in which first the electronic part and then later the nuclear part of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation is solved, is appropriate for small systems. The simultaneous approach, in which the electronic and nuclear parts are solved at the same time, is more appropriate for many-atom systems. A review of the newer quantum gradient techniques is provided, and the infrared and Raman spectral band contours for the water molecule are computed.

  12. Bone densitometry using x-ray spectra.

    PubMed

    Krmar, M; Shukla, S; Ganezer, K

    2010-10-21

    In contrast to the two distinct energy regions that are involved in dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry for bone densitometry, the complete spectrum of a beam transmitted through two layers of different materials is utilized in this study to calculate the areal density of each material. Test objects constructed from aluminum and Plexiglas were used to simulate cortical bone and soft tissue, respectively. Solid-state HPGe (high-purity germanium) detectors provided high-resolution x-ray spectra over an energy range of approximately 20-80 keV. Areal densities were obtained from spectra using two methods: a system of equations for two spectral regions and a nonlinear fit of the entire spectrum. Good agreement with the known areal densities of aluminum was obtained over a wide range of PMMA thicknesses. The spectral method presented here can be used to decrease beam hardening at a small number of bodily points selected for examination.

  13. Strategies for Interpreting Two Dimensional Microwave Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; Crabtree, Kyle N.; Buchanan, Zachary

    2017-06-01

    Microwave spectroscopy can uniquely identify molecules because their rotational energy levels are sensitive to the three principal moments of inertia. However, a priori predictions of a molecule's structure have traditionally been required to enable efficient assignment of the rotational spectrum. Recently, automated microwave double resonance spectroscopy (AMDOR) has been employed to rapidly generate two dimensional spectra based on transitions that share a common rotational level, which may enable automated extraction of rotational constants without any prior estimates of molecular structure. Algorithms used to date for AMDOR have relied on making several initial assumptions about the nature of a subset of the linked transitions, followed by testing possible assignments by "brute force." In this talk, we will discuss new strategies for interpreting AMDOR spectra, using eugenol as a test case, as well as prospects for library-free, automated identification of the molecules in a volatile mixture.

  14. RADLite: Raytracer for infrared line spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontoppidan, Klaus; Dullemond, Kees

    2013-08-01

    RADLite is a raytracer that is optimized for producing infrared line spectra and images from axisymmetric density structures, originally developed to function on top of the dust radiative transfer code RADMC. RADLite can consistently deal with a wide range of velocity gradients, such as those typical for the inner regions of protoplanetary disks. The code is intended as a back-end for chemical and excitation codes, and can rapidly produce spectra of thousands of lines for grids of models for comparison with observations. It includes functionality for simulating telescopic images for optical/IR/midIR/farIR telescopes. It takes advantage of multi-threaded CPUs and includes an escape-probability non-LTE module.

  15. Optical absorption spectra of ? in ? (YGG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binnemans, K.; Görller-Walrand, C.

    1997-02-01

    Optical absorption spectra of trivalent europium in the rare-earth garnet 0953-8984/9/7/025/img3 (YGG) have been recorded between 4600 and 0953-8984/9/7/025/img4 at 77 and at 293 K. A total of 117 crystal-field transitions has been detected in the spectra. The symmetry of the 0953-8984/9/7/025/img5 site is 0953-8984/9/7/025/img6, so a total removal of the crystal-field degeneracy of the 0953-8984/9/7/025/img7 configuration can be expected. The energy level scheme of 0953-8984/9/7/025/img5 in YGG is parametrized in terms of 20 free-ion parameters and nine crystal-field parameters. The crystal field is strong in the garnet host, so J-mixing has to be taken into account for the crystal-field calculation.

  16. Sulphur compounds in cometary IUE spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishna Swamy, K. S.; Wallis, M. K.

    1987-01-01

    From a study of cometary IUE spectra, a tentative identification of bands of the B-X systems of the SO molecule in the comet IRAS-Araki-Alcock in the 2200-2400 A region is reported, and it is suggested that sulphur compounds are more prevalent in comets than has been previously realized. S(+) and possibly SH are evident in comet Halley spectra, and new bands in the (A-X) system of CS and the (B-X) system of S2 are identified. The present results throw doubts on previous assessments of dust abundances from scattered continua in the 2900-3000 A region. The relatively strong abundance of S2 compared to OH in the Cernis and Bowell comets suggests that S2 is not well mixed and is not bound in H2O-ice.

  17. Automated analysis of slitless spectra - Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauchemin, M.; Borra, E. F.; Levesque, S.

    1991-09-01

    The stellar spectral classification that can be achieved with very low-dispersion spectroscopy is examined. Several methods are applied to slitless spectra taken from the automated grens plates analysis project undertaken at Laval University. It is suggested that an accuracy in B - V of about 0.1 mag at B approximating 19 for stars bluer than B - V below 0.8 mag or better for redder stars can be obtained by probing the continuum. Results from DDO-like photometry show that grens data behave similarly to the Gunn and Stryker library of standard stars for many indices. Results of multivariate analysis are coherent with the stellar spectral classification and provide a powerful and objective means of cataloging spectra of the same spectral shape.

  18. Energy spectra in elasto-inertial turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, P. C.; da Silva, C. B.; Pinho, F. T.

    2016-07-01

    Direct numerical simulations of statistically steady homogeneous isotropic turbulence in viscoelastic fluids described by the FENE-P model are presented. Emphasis is given to large polymer relaxation times compared to the eddy turnover time, which is a regime recently termed elasto-inertial turbulence. In this regime the polymers are ineffective in dissipating kinetic energy but they play a lead role in transferring kinetic energy to the small solvent scales which turns out to be concomitant with the depletion of the usual non-linear energy cascade. However, we show that the non-linear interactions are still highly active, but they lead to no net downscale energy transfer because the forward and reversed energy cascades are nearly balanced. Finally, we show that the tendency for a steeper elasto-inertial power-law spectra is reversed for large polymer relaxation times and the spectra tend towards the usual k-5/3 functional form.

  19. Vibrational Spectra of Hydrolysed Triethoxysilane on Germania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anabtawi, Sami; Mallik, Robert

    1996-04-01

    Hydrolysed triethoxysilane (TES) monolayers are introduced onto ultra-thin (of order 1.5 nm) and relatively hydrogern-free sputtered germania films. Two methods are used to dope the germania surface: (i) from TES vapor under a water vapor/nitrogen atmosphere, and (ii) from aqueous acidic hydrolysed TES solution. Vibrational Spectra obtained using these two methods are similar; in both cases Si-H stretching and bending modes are present at approximately 2000 - 2200, and 900 wavenumbers respectively, together with broad Si-O-Si symmetric and asymmetric stretching peaks centered at 700 and 1100 wavenumbers respectively. Only very weak features due to residual CH species are present indicating a large degree of hydrolysis in both cases. All spectra obtained closely resemble those of hydrogenated amorphous silicon monoxide films, confirming that a polysiloxane matrix is present.

  20. Theoretical investigation of carotenoid ultraviolet spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, João B. L.; Durães, Jussara A.; Sales, Maria J. A.; Vilela, Alessandra F. A.; E Silva, Geraldo M.; Gargano, Ricardo

    We have determined the π band-gaps of the main carotenoids present in poly(methyl)methacrylate/buriti blends, namely, trans-β-carotene, 13-cis-β-carotene, 9-cis-β-carotene, phytofluene, and zeaxanthin. Semiempirical, model Hamiltonian, and density functional calculations were carried out to study these structures. The geometries were fully optimized using AM1, PM3, and B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) methods. The TD-DFT and ZINDO/S methods were applied for the calculation of the electronic absorption spectra of the optimized B3LYP geometries. The calculated spectra using the polarizable continuum model for the solvent effects were compared with the available experimental.

  1. Characteristics of magnetospheric radio noise spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Magnetospheric radio noise spectra (30 kHz to 10 MHz) taken by IMP-6 and RAE-2 exhibit time-varying characteristics which are related to spacecraft position and magnetospheric processes. In the mid-frequency range (100-1,000 kHz) intense noise peaks rise by a factor of 100 or more above background; 80% of the peak frequencies are within the band 125 kHz to 600 kHz, and the peak occurs most often (18% of the time) at 280 kHz. This intense mid-frequency noise has been detected at radial distances from 1.3 Re to 60 Re on all sides of the Earth during magnetically quiet as well as disturbed periods. Maximum occurrence of the mid-frequency noise is in the evening to midnight hours where splash-type energetic particle precipitation takes place. ""Magnetospheric lightning'' can be invoked to explain the spectral shape of the observed spectra.

  2. Cathodoluminescence spectra of gallium nitride nanorods.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia-Chang; Li, Guan-Hua; Lin, Yuan-Ting; Chang, Ching-Wen; Wadekar, Paritosh; Chen, Quark Yung-Sung; Rigutti, Lorenzo; Tchernycheva, Maria; Julien, François Henri; Tu, Li-Wei

    2011-12-14

    Gallium nitride [GaN] nanorods grown on a Si(111) substrate at 720°C via plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy were studied by field-emission electron microscopy and cathodoluminescence [CL]. The surface topography and optical properties of the GaN nanorod cluster and single GaN nanorod were measured and discussed. The defect-related CL spectra of GaN nanorods and their dependence on temperature were investigated. The CL spectra along the length of the individual GaN nanorod were also studied. The results reveal that the 3.2-eV peak comes from the structural defect at the interface between the GaN nanorod and Si substrate. The surface state emission of the single GaN nanorod is stronger as the diameter of the GaN nanorod becomes smaller due to an increased surface-to-volume ratio.

  3. Knowledge Discovery in Mega-Spectra Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škoda, P.; Bromová, P.; Lopatovsk'y, L.; Palička, A.; Vávzný, J.

    2015-09-01

    The recent progress of astronomical instrumentation resulted in the construction of multi-object spectrographs with hundreds to thousands of micro-slits or optical fibres allowing the acquisition of tens of thousands of spectra of celestial objects per observing night. Currently there are two spectroscopic surveys containing millions of spectra. These surveys are being processed by automatic pipelines, spectrum by spectrum, in order to estimate physical parameters of individual objects resulting in extensive catalogues, used typically to construct the better models of space-kinematic structure and evolution of the Universe or its subsystems. Such surveys are, however, very good source of homogenised, pre-processed data for application of machine learning techniques common in Astroinformatics. We present challenges of knowledge discovery in such surveys as well as practical examples of machine learning based on specific shapes of spectral features used in searching for new candidates of interesting astronomical objects, namely Be and B[e] stars and quasars.

  4. Specific heat spectra for quasiperiodic ladder sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, D. A.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Bezerra, C. G.

    2006-12-01

    We performed a theoretical study of the specific heat C(T) as a function of the temperature for double-strand quasiperiodic sequences. To mimic DNA molecules, the sequences are made up from the nucleotides guanine G, adenine A, cytosine C and thymine T, arranged according to the Fibonacci and Rudin-Shapiro quasiperiodic sequences. The energy spectra are calculated using the two-dimensional Schrödinger equation, in a tight-binding approximation, with the on-site energy exhibiting long-range disorder and non-random hopping amplitudes. We compare the specific heat features of these quasiperiodic artificial sequences to the spectra considering a segment of the first sequenced human chromosome 22 (Ch22), a real genomic DNA sequence.

  5. Reanalysis of Tyrannosaurus rex Mass Spectra.

    PubMed

    Bern, Marshall; Phinney, Brett S; Goldberg, David

    2009-09-01

    Asara et al. reported the detection of collagen peptides in a 68-million-year-old Tyrannosaurus rex bone by shotgun proteomics. This finding has been called into question as a possible statistical artifact. We reanalyze Asara et al.'s tandem mass spectra using a different search engine and different statistical tools. Our reanalysis shows a sample containing common laboratory contaminants, soil bacteria, and bird-like hemoglobin and collagen.

  6. Approaching word length distribution via level spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Weibing; Pato, Mauricio Porto

    2017-09-01

    Treating a text, after the removal of paragraphs and punctuations, as a spectrum of blanks, the distributions of the length of words of ten languages are analyzed. Using models from the statistical theory of spectra, it is found that the ten languages can be classified into two families: one with words that follow a Wigner-like distribution while the words of the other obey a Poisson-like distribution.

  7. Wavevector-Frequency Spectra of Nonhomogeneous Fields

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-22

    TITLE (Indud* Security Qasafication) WAVEVECTOR-FREQUENCY SPECTRA OF NONHOMOGENEOUS FIELDS 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Dr . Wayne A. Strawderman...SAME AS RPT. D DTIC USERS 22a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE INDIVIDUAL Dr . Wayne A. Strawderman 21. ABSTRACT SECURITY CLASSIFICATION UNCLASSIFIED 22b.T...Program Element 62314N. The NUSC Project No. is B60010. Principal Investigator Dr . H. P. Bakewell, Jr., Code 2141. The Sponsoring Activity was the Office

  8. Dynamical analysis of highly excited molecular spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Kellman, M.E.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is new methods for analysis of spectra and dynamics of highly excited vibrational states of molecules. In these systems, strong mode coupling and anharmonicity give rise to complicated classical dynamics, and make the simple normal modes analysis unsatisfactory. New methods of spectral analysis, pattern recognition, and assignment are sought using techniques of nonlinear dynamics including bifurcation theory, phase space classification, and quantization of phase space structures. The emphasis is chaotic systems and systems with many degrees of freedom.

  9. Trailed Spectra of Bright Spectrophotometric Standard Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitts, Ronald E.

    The IUE archives is an extensive and growing database of UV spectra of a wide variety of astronomical objects. The usefulness of the archives will be greatly enhanced by the presence of a number of wellobserved standard stars including those which define the visual wavelength absolute flux calibrations. Observation of ground-based spectrophotometric standards by IUE will be useful for providing a selfconsistent flux calibration for bright stars and for permitting direct comparisons with fainter standards for future missions, already in the archives, on the IUE system. New observing techniques now make it possible for IUE to obtain well-exposed spectra of these bright stars. However, this observing method is one of the few which may not be possible if IUE were to lose another gyro and the backup control mode, now under development, were used. We propose to obtain short and long wavelength spectra for four of the brightest spectrophotometric standard stars which have either not been observed with with IUE or are poorly represented in the IUE archives. Over a number of years these stars have been observed and defined as standards by a number of ground based observers including Oke(1964), Breger (1976), Stone(1977), Oke and Gunn (1983), and Taylor (1984). The primary standard has been Vega with 109 Vir as an alternate (Davis Philip and Hayes 1984). By combining trailed and point source spectra, ultraviolet absolute flux distributions will be obtained for the 1200-3200 A interval. A comparison will be made of Alpha Lyr and 109 Vir with the nearby star Alpha CMA A, which has a well-determined distance and measured radius. The suspected low-level intermittent variability of Alpha Lyr is not believed to pose major problems for our analysis.

  10. Understanding the baryon and meson spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, Michael R.

    2013-10-01

    A brief overview is given of what we know of the baryon and meson spectra, with a focus on what are the key internal degrees of freedom and how these relate to strong coupling QCD. The challenges, experimental, theoretical and phenomenological, for the future are outlined, with particular reference to a program at Jefferson Lab to extract hadronic states in which glue unambiguously contributes to their quantum numbers.

  11. Raman spectra of benzophenone and benzopinacol crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydova, N. A.; Babkov, L. M.; Baran, J.; Kukielski, J. I.; Mel'nik, V. I.; Truchkachev, S. V.

    2002-09-01

    For the first time Raman spectra of benzopinacol crystals, which are a result of photochemical decomposition of benzophenone crystals, have been measured over the range 10-3600 cm -1. A tentative model of benzopinacol molecule has been proposed to calculate Raman active modes. The comparison of the calculated frequencies with those experimentally observed shows good accordance. Thus, the proposed model of benzopinacol molecule apparently is quite adequate to the real structure.

  12. The Zeeman effect in stellar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanyuk, I. I.

    A short biography of Pieter Zeeman is presented. The main formulae for the normal, anomalous, quadratic Zeeman effects and Paschen-Back effect are given. Instrumentation for Zeeman effect measurements in stellar spectra is described, the most important scientific achievements in magnetic stars investigations with the world's largest telescopes for 50 years are demonstrated. The devices for magnetic measurements made at SAO and the main results of stellar magnetic observations obtained with the 6 m telescope are described in detail.

  13. Spectra of sparse regular graphs with loops.

    PubMed

    Metz, F L; Neri, I; Bollé, D

    2011-11-01

    We derive exact equations that determine the spectra of undirected and directed sparsely connected regular graphs containing loops of arbitrary lengths. The implications of our results for the structural and dynamical properties of network models are discussed by showing how loops influence the size of the spectral gap and the propensity for synchronization. Analytical formulas for the spectrum are obtained for specific lengths of the loops.

  14. Reanalysis of Tyrannosaurus rex Mass Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Bern, Marshall; Phinney, Brett S.; Goldberg, David

    2009-01-01

    Asara et al. reported the detection of collagen peptides in a 68-million-year-old T. rex bone by shotgun proteomics. This finding has been called into question as a possible statistical artifact. We reanalyze Asara et al.'s tandem mass spectra using a different search engine and different statistical tools. Our reanalysis shows a sample containing common laboratory contaminants, soil bacteria, and bird-like hemoglobin and collagen. PMID:19603827

  15. Ir spectra of preparations of ozonized pyrocatechin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khovratovich, N. N.; Novikova, T. M.; Khmel'Nitskii, A. I.; Cherenkevich, S. N.; Loban, V. A.

    1998-03-01

    We investigate IR spectra of the solid phase of products obtained at different stages in the process of ozonizing aqueous solutions of pyrocatechin. We found that melanin structures are formed in the process of pyrocatechin ozonization. The existence of intra- and intermolecular interactions in the melanin preparations formed, leading to the formation of molecular associates, is shown. Thorough treatment of preparations with ozone leads to destruction of polymer systems and formation of water-soluble products of acid type.

  16. CUBISM: CUbe Builder for IRS Spectra Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sings Irs Team; Smith, J. D.; Armus, Lee; Bot, Caroline; Buckalew, Brent; Dale, Danny; Helou, George; Jarrett, Tom; Roussel, Helene; Sheth, Kartik

    2011-11-01

    CUBISM, written in IDL, constructs spectral cubes, maps, and arbitrary aperture 1D spectral extractions from sets of mapping mode spectra taken with Spitzer's IRS spectrograph. CUBISM is optimized for non-sparse maps of extended objects, e.g. the nearby galaxy sample of SINGS, but can be used with data from any spectral mapping AOR (primarily validated for maps which are designed as suggested by the mapping HOWTO).

  17. Nebular spectra of pair-instability supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerkstrand, A.; Smartt, S. J.; Heger, A.

    2016-01-01

    If very massive stars (M ≳ 100 M⊙) can form and avoid too strong mass-loss during their evolution, they are predicted to explode as pair-instability supernovae (PISNe). One critical test for candidate events is whether their nucleosynthesis yields and internal ejecta structure, being revealed through nebular-phase spectra at t ≳ 1 yr, match those of model predictions. Here, we compute theoretical spectra based on model PISN ejecta at 1-3 yr post-explosion to allow quantitative comparison with observations. The high column densities of PISNe lead to complete gamma-ray trapping for t ≳ 2 yr which, combined with fulfilled conditions of steady state, leads to bolometric supernova luminosities matching the 56Co decay. Most of the gamma-rays are absorbed by the deep-lying iron and silicon/sulphur layers. The ionization balance shows a predominantly neutral gas state, which leads to emission lines of Fe I, Si I, and S I. For low-mass PISNe, the metal core expands slowly enough to produce a forest of distinct lines, whereas high-mass PISNe expand faster and produce more featureless spectra. Line blocking is complete below ˜5000 Å for several years, and the model spectra are red. The strongest line is typically [Ca II] λλ7291, 7323, one of few lines from ionized species. We compare our models with proposed PISN candidates SN 2007bi and PTF12dam, finding discrepancies for several key observables and thus no support for a PISN interpretation. We discuss distinct spectral features predicted by the models, and the possibility of detecting pair-instability explosions among non-superluminous supernovae.

  18. Simultaneous Confidence Bands for Autoregressive Spectra.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    CONFIDENCE BANDS FOR AUTOREGRESSIVE SPECTRA H. Joseph Newton Marcello Pagano Institute of Statistics Department of Biostatistics Texas A&M University...AUTHOR(4) 8. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMIUER(a) H. Joseph Newton and Marcello Pagano ONR N00014-82-MP-2001 ARU DAAG 29-80-C-0070 0. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME...Parzen (1974), Uirych and Bishop (1975), and Beamish and Priestley (1981), for example) despite 1) a continuing discussion of the problems of order

  19. Haloes Seen In UVIS Reflectance Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry W.; Bradley, E.; Colwell, J.; Sremcevic, M.

    2012-10-01

    UVIS SOI reflectance spectra show bright ‘haloes’ around the locations of some of the strongest resonances in Saturn’s A ring (Esposito etal 2005). UV spectra constrain the size and composition of the icy ring particles (Bradley etal 2010, 2012). We investigate the Janus 4:3, 5:3, 6:5 and Mimas 5:3 inner Lindblad resonances as well as at the Mimas 5:3 vertical resonance (bending wave location). Models of ring particle regolith evolution (Elliott and Esposito 2010) indicate the deeper regolith is made of older and purer ice. The strong resonances cause streamline crowding (Lewis and Stewart 2005) which damps the interparticle velocity, allowing temporary clumps to grow, which in turn increase the velocity, eroding the clumps and releasing smaller particles and regolith (see the predator-prey model of Esposito etal 2012). This cyclic behavior, driven by the resonant perturbation from the moon, can yield collision velocities greater than 1m/sec, sufficient to erode the aggregates (Blum 2006), exposing older, purer materials. Thus, the radial location of the strongest resonances can be where we find both large aggregates and disrupted fragments, in a balance maintained by the periodic moon forcing. If this stirring exposes older, and purer ice, the velocity threshold for eroding the aggregates can explain why only the strongest Lindblad resonances show haloes. UVIS spectra can determine the relative contributions of particle size and purity at these locations, for comparison to estimates from the regolith evolution models.

  20. Soil emissivity and reflectance spectra measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Sobrino, Jose A.; Mattar, Cristian; Pardo, Pablo; Jimenez-Munoz, Juan C.; Hook, Simon J.; Baldridge, Alice; Ibanez, Rafael

    2009-07-01

    We present an analysis of the laboratory reflectance and emissivity spectra of 11 soil samples collected on different field campaigns carried out over a diverse suite of test sites in Europe, North Africa, and South America from 2002 to 2008. Hemispherical reflectance spectra were measured from 2.0 to 14 {mu}m with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, and x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) was used to determine the mineralogical phases of the soil samples. Emissivity spectra were obtained from the hemispherical reflectance measurements using Kirchhoff's law and compared with in situ radiance measurements obtained with a CIMEL Electronique CE312-2 thermal radiometer and converted to emissivity using the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) temperature and emissivity separation algorithm. The CIMEL has five narrow bands at approximately the same positions as the ASTER. Results show a root mean square error typically below 0.015 between laboratory emissivity measurements and emissivity measurements derived from the field radiometer.

  1. Meteor spectra in the EDMOND database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukal, J.; Gorková, S.; Srba, J.; Ferus, M.; Civiš, S.; di Pietro, C. A.

    2015-01-01

    We present a selection of five interesting meteor spectra obtained in the years 2014 and 2015 via CCTV video systems with a holographic grating, working in CEMENT and BRAMON meteor observation networks. Based on the EDMOND multi stations video meteor trajectory data an orbital classification of these meteors was performed. Selected meteors are members of the LYR, SPE, DSA and LVI meteor streams, one meteor is classified as sporadic background (SPO). In calibrated spectra the main chemical components were identified. Meteors are chemically classified based on relative intensities of the main spectral lines (or multiplets): Mg I (2), Na I (1), and Fe I (15). Bolide EN091214 is linked with the 23rd meteorite with known orbit (informally known as "Žďár"), two fragments of the parent body were found in the Czech Republic so far (August, 2015). For this particular event a time resolved spectral observation and comparison with laboratory spectra of LL3.2 chondritic meteorite are presented.

  2. Low Temperature Reflectance Spectra of Titan Tholins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roush, T. L.; Dalton, J. B.; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Compositional interpretation of remotely obtained reflectance spectra of outer solar system surfaces is achieved by a variety of methods. These include matching spectral curves, matching spectral features, quantitative spectral interpretation, and theoretical modeling of spectra. All of these approaches rely upon laboratory measurements of one kind or another. The bulk of these laboratory measurements are obtained with the sample of interest at ambient temperatures and pressures. However, surface temperatures of planets, satellites, and asteroids in the outer solar system are significantly cooler than ambient laboratory conditions on Earth. The infrared spectra of many materials change as a function of temperature. As has been recently demonstrated it is important to assess what effects colder temperatures have on spectral properties and hence, compositional interpretations. Titan tholin is a solid residue created by energetic processing of H-, C-, and N-bearing gases. Such residues can also be created by energetic processing if the gases are condensed into ices. Titan tholin has been suggested as a coloring agent for several surfaces in the outer solar system. Here we report laboratory measurements of Titan tholin at a temperature of 100 K and compare these to measurements of the same sample near room temperature. At low temperature the absorption features beyond 1 micrometer narrow slightly. At wavelengths greater than approx. 0.8 micrometer the overall reflectance of the sample decreases slightly making the sample less red at low temperatures. We will discuss the implications of the laboratory measurements for interpretation of cold outer solar system surfaces.

  3. IRAS Low Resolution Spectra of Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Martin; Walker, Russell G.

    2002-01-01

    Optical/near-infrared studies of asteroids are based on reflected sunlight and surface albedo variations create broad spectral features, suggestive of families of materials. There is a significant literature on these features, but there is very little work in the thermal infrared that directly probes the materials emitting on the surfaces of asteroids. We have searched for and extracted 534 thermal spectra of 245 asteroids from the original Dutch (Groningen) archive of spectra observed by the IRAS Low Resolution Spectrometer (LRS). We find that, in general, the observed shapes of the spectral continua are inconsistent with that predicted by the standard thermal model used by IRAS. Thermal models such as proposed by Harris (1998) and Harris et al.(1998) for the near-earth asteroids with the "beaming parameter" in the range of 1.0 to 1.2 best represent the observed spectral shapes. This implies that the IRAS Minor Planet Survey (IMPS, Tedesco, 1992) and the Supplementary IMPS (SIMPS, Tedesco, et al., 2002) derived asteroid diameters are systematically underestimated, and the albedos are overestimated. We have tentatively identified several spectral features that appear to be diagnostic of at least families of materials. The variation of spectral features with taxonomic class hints that thermal infrared spectra can be a valuable tool for taxonomic classification of asteroids.

  4. Optical spectra analysis for breast cancer diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkov, S. A.; Kochemasov, G. G.; Lyubynskaya, T. E.; Maslov, N. V.; Nuzhny, A. S.; da Silva, L. B.; Rubenchik, A.

    2011-11-01

    Minimally invasive probe and optical biopsy system based on optical spectra recording and analysis seem to be a promising tool for early diagnostics of breast cancer. Light scattering and absorption spectra are generated continuously as far as the needle-like probe with one emitting and several collecting optical fibers penetrates through the tissues toward to the suspicious area. That allows analyzing not only the state of local site, but also the structure of tissues along the needle trace. The suggested method has the advantages of automated on-line diagnosing and minimal tissue destruction and in parallel with the conventional diagnostic procedures provides the ground for decision-making. 165 medical trials were completed in Nizhny Novgorod Regional Oncology Centre, Russia. Independent diagnoses were the results of fine biopsy and histology. Application of wavelet expansion and clasterization techniques for spectra analysis revealed several main spectral types for malignant and benign tumors. Automatic classification algorithm demonstrated specificity ˜90% and sensitivity ˜91%. Large amount of information, fuzziness in criteria and data noisiness make neural networks to be an attractive analytic tool. The model based on three-layer perceptron was tested over the sample of 29 `cancer' and 29 `non-cancer' cases and demonstrated total separation.

  5. Analysis of positron lifetime spectra in polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Mall, Gerald H.; Sprinkle, Danny R.

    1988-01-01

    A new procedure for analyzing multicomponent positron lifetime spectra in polymers was developed. It requires initial estimates of the lifetimes and the intensities of various components, which are readily obtainable by a standard spectrum stripping process. These initial estimates, after convolution with the timing system resolution function, are then used as the inputs for a nonlinear least squares analysis to compute the estimates that conform to a global error minimization criterion. The convolution integral uses the full experimental resolution function, in contrast to the previous studies where analytical approximations of it were utilized. These concepts were incorporated into a generalized Computer Program for Analyzing Positron Lifetime Spectra (PAPLS) in polymers. Its validity was tested using several artificially generated data sets. These data sets were also analyzed using the widely used POSITRONFIT program. In almost all cases, the PAPLS program gives closer fit to the input values. The new procedure was applied to the analysis of several lifetime spectra measured in metal ion containing Epon-828 samples. The results are described.

  6. Infrared spectra of substituted polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langhoff, S. R.; Bauschlicher, C. W. Jr; Hudgins, D. M.; Sandford, S. A.; Allamandola, L. J.

    1998-01-01

    Calculations are carried out using density functional theory (DFT) to determine the harmonic frequencies and intensities of 1-methylanthracene, 9-methylanthracene, 9-cyanoanthracene, 2-aminoanthracene, acridine, and their positive ions. The theoretical data are compared with matrix-isolation spectra for these species also reported in this work. The theoretical and experimental frequencies and relative intensities for the neutral species are in generally good agreement, whereas the positive ion spectra are only in qualitative agreement. Relative to anthracene, we find that substitution of a methyl or CN for a hydrogen does not significantly affect the spectrum other than to add the characteristic methyl C-H and C triple bond N stretches near 2900 and 2200 cm-1, respectively. However, addition of NH2 dramatically affects the spectrum of the neutral. Not only are the NH2 modes themselves strong, but this electron-withdrawing group induces sufficient partial charge on the ring to give the neutral molecule spectra characteristics of the anthracene cation. The sum of the absolute intensities is about four times larger for 2-aminoanthracene than those for 9-cyanoanthracene. Substituting nitrogen in the ring at the nine position (acridine) does not greatly alter the spectrum compared with anthracene.

  7. VARIABILITY IN OPTICAL SPECTRA OF {epsilon} ORIONIS

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Gregory B.; Morrison, Nancy D. E-mail: nmorris@utnet.utoledo.edu

    2013-04-15

    We present the results of a time series analysis of 130 echelle spectra of {epsilon} Ori (B0 Ia), acquired over seven observing seasons between 1998 and 2006 at Ritter Observatory. The equivalent widths of H{alpha} (net) and He I {lambda}5876 were measured and radial velocities were obtained from the central absorption of He I {lambda}5876. Temporal variance spectra (TVS) revealed significant wind variability in both H{alpha} and He I {lambda}5876. The He I TVS have a double-peaked profile consistent with radial velocity oscillations. A periodicity search was carried out on the equivalent width and radial velocity data, as well as on wavelength-binned spectra. This analysis has revealed several periods in the variability with timescales of two to seven days. Many of these periods exhibit sinusoidal modulation in the associated phase diagrams. Several of these periods were present in both H{alpha} and He I, indicating a possible connection between the wind and the photosphere. Due to the harmonic nature of these periods, stellar pulsations may be the origin of some of the observed variability. Periods on the order of the rotational period were also detected in the He I line in the 1998-1999 season and in both lines during the 2004-2005 season. These periods may indicate rotational modulation due to structure in the wind.

  8. Janus spectra: cascades without local isotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chien-Chia; Cerbus, Rory; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2016-11-01

    Two-dimensional turbulent flows host two disparate cascades: of enstrophy and of energy. The phenomenological theory of turbulence, which provides the theoretical underpinning of these cascades, assumes local isotropy. This assumption has been amply verified via computational, experimental and field data amassed to date. Local isotropy mandates that the streamwise (u) and transverse (v) velocity fluctuations partake in the same cascade; consequently, the attendant spectral exponents (αu and αv) of the turbulent energy spectra are the same, αu =αv . Here we report experiments in soap-film flows where αu corresponds to the energy cascade, but concurrently αv corresponds to the enstrophy cascade, as if two mutually independent turbulent fields of disparate dynamics were concurrently active within the flow. This species of turbulent energy spectra, which we term the Janus spectra, has never been observed or predicted theoretically. Remarkably, the tools of phenomenological theory can be invoked to elucidate this manifestly anisotropic flow. Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology.

  9. The Rovibronic Spectra of the Cyclopentadienyl Radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ketan; Miller, Terry A.; Stanton, John F.; Nesbitt, David

    2017-06-01

    Cyclopentadienyl (Cp) radical has been subject to numerous studies for the greater part of half a century. Experimental work has involved photo-electron spectroscopy, laser induced fluorescence excitation and emission, infrared absorption spectroscopy, and recently rotationally resolved spectra in the CH stretch region taken at JILA. Even more theoretical works appear in the literature, but substantial advances in computation have occurred since their completion. Cp's highly symmetric (D_{5h}) structure and doubly degenerate electronic ground (˜{X}^2E_1^{''}), which is subject to linear Jahn-Teller distortion, have been a great motivation for work on it. We have commenced new computational work to obtain a broad understanding of the electronic, vibrational, and rotational, i.e. rovibronic, structure of the Cp radical as revealed by its spectra, with particular emphasis on the new infrared spectra. The goal is to guide experiments and their analyses and reconcile results from spectroscopy and quantum chemistry calculations. T. Ichino, et al. J. Chem. Phys. 129, 084310 (2008) L. Yu, S. C. Foster, J. M. Williamson, M. C. Heaven and T. A. Miller J. Phys. Chem. 92, 4263 (1988) B. E. Applegate, A. J. Bezant and T. A. Miller J. Chem. Phys 114, 4869 (2001) D. Leicht, M. Kaufmann, G. Schwaab, and M. Havenith J. Chem. Phys. 145, 7 (2016), 074304.

  10. Deconvolution of spectra for intimate mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mustard, John F.; Pieters, Carle M.; Pratt, Stephen F.

    1987-01-01

    Visible to near infrared reflectance spectra of macroscopic mixtures have been shown to be linear combinations of the reflections of the pure mineral components in the mixture. However, for microscopic mixtures the mixing systematics are in general nonlinear. The systematics may be linearized by conversion of reflectance to single scattering albedo (w), where the equations which relate reflectance to w depend on the method of data collection. Several proposed mixing models may be used to estimate mineral abundances from the reflectance spectra of intimate mixtures. These models are summarized and a revised model is presented. A noniterative (linear) least squares approach was used for curve fitting and the data, measured as bi-directional reflectance with incidence and emergence angles of 30 and 0 deg were converted to w by a simplified version of Hapke's equation for bi-directional reflectance. This model was tested with two mixture series composed of 45 to 75 micron particles: an anorthite-enstatite series and an olivine-magnetite series. The data indicate that the simplified Hapke's equation may be used to convolve reflectance spectra into mineral abundances if appropriate endmembers are known or derived from other techniques. For surfaces that contain a significant component of very low albedo material, a somewhat modified version of this technique will need to be developed. Since the abundances are calculated using a noniterative approach, the application of this method is especially efficient for large spectral data sets, such as those produced by mapping spectrometers.

  11. Near-infrared spectra of Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, A. E.

    1974-01-01

    Near infrared spectra of Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus were measured at resolutions higher than previously available in the range from 6,000 to 10,750/cm. The resolution was 0.5/cm for Jupiter and Saturn, and 32/cm for Uranus. The spectra are presented both individually and as ratio spectra, in which the planetary spectra are divided by the solar spectrum. The Uranus spectrum is shown with Saturn, Jupiter, and Sun spectra reduced to the same resolution so that Uranus can be compared with the other outer planets. The high resolution Saturn, Jupiter, and Sun spectra are presented in parallel plots to simplify comparisons between them.

  12. EMPCA and Cluster Analysis of Quasar Spectra: Application to SDSS Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leighly, Karen; Marrs, Adam; Wagner, Cassidy; Macinnis, Francis

    2017-01-01

    Accurate modeling of the quasar continuum is necessary to measure and analyze absorption lines. But quasar continua, in particular the emission lines, vary from object to object. Patterns in the variations allow a spectral principal component analysis (SPCA) approach using large samples of quasar spectra, e.g., from the SDSS. Then, a small number of the derived principal component spectra can be used to reconstruct an arbitrary quasar's continuum.A problem with this approach is that the number of principal components required to model an arbitrary quasar, usually 8 to 20 in the literature, is large. One reason why so many components are required is that SPCA implicitly assumes that spectra bins are independent. Quasar emission lines are spread over a range of spectral bins, and more importantly, can sometimes be blueshifted. So while the intrinsic variability may only be a function of a few physical parameters, the nonlinearity inherent in the variations from object to object requires a large number of prinicipal components to accurately model a quasar continuum.We present a modified approach. We perform a SPCA analysis, using an expectation-maximization algorithm by Bailey et al. 2012, which takes into account uncertainties and missing data. We project the sample spectra on the resulting eignevectors to obtain the projection coefficients. Reasoning that intriniscally similar spectra will have similar projection coefficients, we perform a cluster analysis on the projection coefficients. The results are used to divide the sample into groups of similar spectra. A second PCA analysis is then performed on each group. We find that many fewer eigenspectra are required to accurately model the spectra in each group. We apply this approach to several samples of quasars from the SDSS.

  13. Designing density fluctuation spectra in inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salopek, D. S.; Bond, J. R.; Bardeen, J. M.

    1989-09-01

    Scale-invariant (flat) fluctuation spectra are the most natural outcomes of inflation. Nonetheless current large-scale-structure observations seem to indicate more fluctuation power on large scales than flat spectra give. We consider a wide variety of models based on the chaotic inflation paradigm and sketch the effects that varying the expansion rate, structure of the potential surface, and the curvature coupling constants have on the quantum fluctuation spectra. We calculate in detail the quantum generation of fluctuation spectra by numerically solving the linearized perturbation equations for multiple scalar fields, the metric, and the radiation into which the scalars dissipate, following the evolution from inside the horizon through reheating. We conclude that (1) useful extended nonflat power laws are very difficult to realize in inflation, (2) double inflation leading to a mountain leveling off at a high-amplitude plateau at long wavelengths is generic, but to tune the cliff rising up to the plateau to lie in an interesting wavelength range, a special choice of initial conditions and/or scalar field potentials is required, and (3) small mountains (moguls) on the potential surface lead to mountains of extra power in the fluctuations added on top of an underlying flat spectrum. For quadratic and quartic couplings, the mountain fluctuations may obey Gaussian statistics but the spectral form will be very sensitive to initial conditions as well as potential parameters; non-Gaussian mountain fluctuations which depend upon potential parameters but not on initial field conditions will be the more likely outcome. However, adding cubic couplings can give mountains obeying Gaussian statistics independently of initial conditions. Since observations only probe a narrow patch of the potential surface, it is possible that it is littered with moguls, leading to arbitrarily complex ``mountain range'' spectra that can only be determined phenomenologically. We also construct an

  14. Evolution of Fourier spectra through interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitna, Alexander; Safrankova, Jana; Nemecek, Zdenek; Nemec, Frantisek; Goncharov, Oleksandr

    2014-05-01

    Well established nearly isothermic solar wind expansion requires an additional heating. A dissipation of large scale variations of the solar wind kinetic energy into the thermal energy via turbulence cascades is thought to be an important source of this heating, although the exact mechanism is yet to be found. For this reason, the turbulence in the solar wind is a subject of extensive theoretical and experimental studies on different time scales ranging from years to minutes. The frequency spectrum of magnetic field fluctuations can be divided into several domains differing by spectral indices - the lowest frequencies are controlled by the solar activity, MHD activity shapes the spectrum at higher (up to 0.1 Hz) frequencies, whereas the ion and electron kinetic effects dominate at the high frequency end of the spectra. Interplanetary shocks of various origins are a part of solar wind turbulence naturally occurring in the solar wind and the BMSW instrument onboard the Spektr-R spacecraft has detected tens of them in course of the 2011-2013 years. Based on its high-time resolution of the ion flux, density and velocity measurements reaching 31 ms, we study an evolution of the frequency spectra on MHD and kinetic scales across fast forward low Mach number shocks. We have found that the power of downstream fluctuations rises by an order of magnitude in a broad range of frequencies independently of its upstream value but the slope of the spectrum on the kinetic scale (≡3-8 Hz) has been found to be statistically steeper downstream than upstream of the shock. The time needed to a full relaxation to the pre-shock spectral shape is as long as several hours. A combination of the ion flux power spectra obtained by BMSW with fast magnetic field observations of other spacecraft enhances our understanding of dissipation mechanisms.

  15. High precision radial velocities with GIANO spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carleo, I.; Sanna, N.; Gratton, R.; Benatti, S.; Bonavita, M.; Oliva, E.; Origlia, L.; Desidera, S.; Claudi, R.; Sissa, E.

    2016-06-01

    Radial velocities (RV) measured from near-infrared (NIR) spectra are a potentially excellent tool to search for extrasolar planets around cool or active stars. High resolution infrared (IR) spectrographs now available are reaching the high precision of visible instruments, with a constant improvement over time. GIANO is an infrared echelle spectrograph at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) and it is a powerful tool to provide high resolution spectra for accurate RV measurements of exoplanets and for chemical and dynamical studies of stellar or extragalactic objects. No other high spectral resolution IR instrument has GIANO's capability to cover the entire NIR wavelength range (0.95-2.45 μm) in a single exposure. In this paper we describe the ensemble of procedures that we have developed to measure high precision RVs on GIANO spectra acquired during the Science Verification (SV) run, using the telluric lines as wavelength reference. We used the Cross Correlation Function (CCF) method to determine the velocity for both the star and the telluric lines. For this purpose, we constructed two suitable digital masks that include about 2000 stellar lines, and a similar number of telluric lines. The method is applied to various targets with different spectral type, from K2V to M8 stars. We reached different precisions mainly depending on the H-magnitudes: for H ˜ 5 we obtain an rms scatter of ˜ 10 m s-1, while for H ˜ 9 the standard deviation increases to ˜ 50 ÷ 80 m s-1. The corresponding theoretical error expectations are ˜ 4 m s-1 and 30 m s-1, respectively. Finally we provide the RVs measured with our procedure for the targets observed during GIANO Science Verification.

  16. Effect of Temperature on Jet Velocity Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James E.; Wernet, Mark P.

    2007-01-01

    Statistical jet noise prediction codes that accurately predict spectral directivity for both cold and hot jets are highly sought both in industry and academia. Their formulation, whether based upon manipulations of the Navier-Stokes equations or upon heuristic arguments, require substantial experimental observation of jet turbulence statistics. Unfortunately, the statistics of most interest involve the space-time correlation of flow quantities, especially velocity. Until the last 10 years, all turbulence statistics were made with single-point probes, such as hotwires or laser Doppler anemometry. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) brought many new insights with its ability to measure velocity fields over large regions of jets simultaneously; however, it could not measure velocity at rates higher than a few fields per second, making it unsuitable for obtaining temporal spectra and correlations. The development of time-resolved PIV, herein called TR-PIV, has removed this limitation, enabling measurement of velocity fields at high resolution in both space and time. In this paper, ground-breaking results from the application of TR-PIV to single-flow hot jets are used to explore the impact of heat on turbulent statistics of interest to jet noise models. First, a brief summary of validation studies is reported, undertaken to show that the new technique produces the same trusted results as hotwire at cold, low-speed jets. Second, velocity spectra from cold and hot jets are compared to see the effect of heat on the spectra. It is seen that heated jets possess 10 percent more turbulence intensity compared to the unheated jets with the same velocity. The spectral shapes, when normalized using Strouhal scaling, are insensitive to temperature if the stream-wise location is normalized relative to the potential core length. Similarly, second order velocity correlations, of interest in modeling of jet noise sources, are also insensitive to temperature as well.

  17. Intrinsic Wavelength Shifts in Stellar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dravins, D.; Lindegren, L.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Madsen, S.

    2004-12-01

    Wavelengths of stellar spectral lines do not have the precise values `naively' expected from laboratory wavelengths merely Doppler-shifted by stellar radial motion. Slight displacements may originate as convective shifts (correlated velocity and brightness patterns in the photosphere), as gravitational redshifts, or perhaps be induced by wave motions. Intrinsic lineshifts thus reveal stellar surface structure, while possible periodic changes (during a stellar activity cycle, say) need to be segregated from variability induced by orbiting exoplanets. Absolute lineshifts can now be studied also in some stars other than the Sun, thanks to astrometric determinations of stellar radial motion. Comparisons between spectroscopic apparent radial velocities and astrometrically determined radial motions reveal greater spectral blueshifts in F-type stars than in the Sun (as theoretically expected from their more vigorous convection), further increasing in A-type stars (possibly due to atmospheric shockwaves). Solar spectral atlases, and high-resolution spectra (from UVES on ESO VLT) of a dozen solar-type stars are being surveyed for `unblended' photospheric lines of most atomic species with accurate laboratory wavelengths available. One aim is to understand the ultimate information content of stellar spectra, and in what detail it will be feasible to verify models of stellar atmospheric hydrodynamics. These may predict line asymmetries (bisectors) and shifts for widely different classes of lines, but there will not result any comparison with observations if such lines do not exist in real spectra. An expected near-future development in stellar physics is spatially resolved spectroscopy across stellar disks, enabled by optical interferometry and adaptive optics on very large telescopes. Stellar surface structure manifests itself in the center-to-limb wavelength changes along a stellar diameter, and their spatially resolved time variability, diagnostics which already now can be

  18. Synthesized Spectra of Optically Thin Emission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olluri, K.; Gudiksen, B. V.; Hansteen, V. H.; De Pontieu, B.

    2015-03-01

    In recent years realistic 3D numerical models of the solar atmosphere have become available. The models attempt to recreate the solar atmosphere and mimic observations in the best way, in order to make it possible to couple complicated observations with physical properties such as the temperatures, densities, velocities, and magnetic fields. We here present a study of synthetic spectra created using the Bifrost code in order to assess how well they fit with previously taken solar data. A study of the synthetic intensity, nonthermal line widths, Doppler shifts, and correlations between any two of these three components of the spectra first assuming statistical equilibrium is made, followed by a report on some of the effects nonequilibrium ionization will have on the synthesized spectra. We find that the synthetic intensities compare well with the observations. The synthetic observations depend on the assumed resolution and point-spread function (PSF) of the instrument, and we find a large effect on the results, especially for intensity and nonthermal line width. The Doppler shifts produce the reported persistent redshifts for the transition region (TR) lines and blueshifts for the upper TR and corona lines. The nonthermal line widths reproduce the well-known turnoff point around (2-3) × 105 K, but with much lower values than those observed. The nonthermal line widths tend to increase with decreasing assumed instrumental resolution, also when nonequilibrium ionization is included. Correlations between the nonthermal line width of any two TR line studies as reported by Chae et al. are reproduced, while the correlations of intensity to line width are reproduced only after applying a PSF to the data. Doppler shift correlations reported by Doschek for the TR lines and correlations of Doppler shift to nonthermal line width of the Fe xii 19.5 line reported by Doschek et al. are reproduced.

  19. Ultraviolet Spectra of Normal Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, Anne

    1997-01-01

    The data related to this grant on the Ultraviolet Spectra of Normal Spiral Galaxies have been entirely reduced and analyzed. It is incorporated into templates of Spiral galaxies used in the calculation of K corrections towards the understanding of high redshift galaxies. The main paper was published in the Astrophysical Journal, August 1996, Volume 467, page 38. The data was also used in another publication, The Spectral Energy Distribution of Normal Starburst and Active Galaxies, June 1997, preprint series No. 1158. Copies of both have been attached.

  20. Methane and the Spectra of T Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homeier, Derek; Hauschildt, Peter H.; Allard, France

    2003-06-01

    We have updated our PHOENIX model atmospheres and theoretical spectra for ultracool dwarfs with new opacity data for methane based on line strength predictions with the STDS software. By extending the line list to rotational levels of J = 40 we can significantly improve the shape of the near-IR absorption features of CH_4, and in addition find an enhanced blanketing effect, resulting in up to 50% more flux emerging in the J band than seen in previous models, which may thus contribute to the brightening in J and blue IR colors observed in T dwarfs.

  1. Conductance Spectra in Graphene-Superconductor Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jie; Zhou, Shi-Ping; Deng, Zhen-Yan

    2015-01-01

    The conductance spectra of a graphene ribbon and graphene-superconductor (G-S) junctions are investigated, using the tight-binding model and non-equilibrium Green' function formalism. It is found that the quantized conductance related to graphene' edge-states is robust against perturbations in the model parameters for a graphene monolayer ribbon with the zigzag boundary. With appropriate model parameter of the spin-orbit interaction strength, a new bound state with odd-frequency symmetry is found in the G-S junction. An enhancement in the zero-energy conductance amplitude is followed.

  2. Far-infrared spectra of acetanilide revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spire, A.; Barthes, M.; Kellouai, H.; De Nunzio, G.

    2000-03-01

    A new investigation of the temperature dependence of the far-infrared spectra of acetanilide and some isotopomers is presented. Four absorption bands are considered at 31, 42, 64, and 80 cm-1, and no significant change of their integrated intensity is observed when reducing the temperature. The temperature induced frequency shift values and other properties of these bands are consistent with an assignment as anharmonic lattice phonons. These results rule out the assignment of the 64, 80, and 106 cm-1 bands as normal modes of the polaronic excitation, as previously suggested.

  3. SIMULATION OF PARTICLE SPECTRA AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    KAHANA,D.E.; KAHANA,S.H.

    2001-09-04

    A purely hadronic simulation is performed of the recently reported data from PHOBOS at energies of {radical}s = 56, 130 GeV using the relativistic heavy ion cascade LUCIFER which had previously given a good description of the NA49 inclusive spectra at {radical}s = 17.2 GeV/A. The results compare well with these early measurements at RHIC and indeed successfully predict the increase in multiplicity now seen by PHOBOS and the other RHIC detectors at the nominal maximum energy of {radical}s = 200 GeV/A, suggesting that evidence for quark-gluon matter remains elusive.

  4. Beamstrahlung spectra in next generation linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Barklow, T.; Chen, P. ); Kozanecki, W. )

    1992-04-01

    For the next generation of linear colliders, the energy loss due to beamstrahlung during the collision of the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} beams is expected to substantially influence the effective center-of-mass energy distribution of the colliding particles. In this paper, we first derive analytical formulae for the electron and photon energy spectra under multiple beamstrahlung processes, and for the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and {gamma}{gamma} differential luminosities. We then apply our formulation to various classes of 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider designs currently under study.

  5. Electronic absorption spectra from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, Anirban

    Methods for simulating electronic absorption spectra of molecules from first principles (i.e., without any experimental input, using quantum mechanics) are developed and compared. The electronic excitation and photoelectron spectra of ethylene are simulated, using the EOM-CCSD method for the electronic structure calculations. The different approaches for simulating spectra are broadly of two types---Frank-Condon (FC) approaches and vibronic coupling approaches. For treating the vibrational motion, the former use the Born-Oppenheimer or single surface approximation while the latter do not. Moreover, in our FC approaches the vibrational Hamiltonian is additively separable along normal mode coordinates, while in vibronic approaches a model Hamiltonian (obtained from ab initio electronic structure theory) provides an intricate coupling between both normal modes and electronic states. A method called vertical FC is proposed, where in accord with the short-time picture of molecular spectroscopy, the approximate excited-state potential energy surface that is used to calculate the electronic spectrum is taken to reproduce the ab initio potential at the ground-state equilibrium geometry. The potential energy surface along normal modes may be treated either in the harmonic approximation or using the full one-dimensional potential. Systems with highly anharmonic potential surfaces can be treated and expensive geometry optimizations are not required, unlike the traditional FC approach. The ultraviolet spectrum of ethylene between 6.2 and 8.7 eV is simulated using vertical FC. While FC approaches for simulation are computationally very efficient, they are not accurate when the underlying approximations are unreasonable. Then, vibronic coupling model Hamiltonians are necessary. Since these Hamiltonians have an analytic form, they are used to map the potential energy surfaces and understand their topology. Spectra are obtained by numerical diagonalization of the Hamiltonians. The

  6. Non equilibrium spectra of degenerate relic neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, S.; Miele, G.; Pastor, S.; Peloso, M.; Pisanti, O.

    2000-12-01

    We calculate the exact kinetic evolution of cosmic neutrinos until complete decoupling, in the case when a large neutrino asymmetry exists. While not excluded by present observations, this large asymmetry can have relevant cosmological consequences and in particular may be helpful in reconciling Primordial Nucleosynthesis with a high baryon density as suggested by the most recent observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation. By solving numerically the Boltzmann kinetic equations for the neutrino distribution functions, we find the momentum-dependent corrections to the equilibrium spectra and briefly discuss their phenomenological implications.

  7. Multifractal spectra in homogeneous shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deane, A. E.; Keefe, L. R.

    1988-01-01

    Employing numerical simulations of 3-D homogeneous shear flow, the associated multifractal spectra of the energy dissipation, scalar dissipation and vorticity fields were calculated. The results for (128) cubed simulations of this flow, and those obtained in recent experiments that analyzed 1- and 2-D intersections of atmospheric and laboratory flows, are in some agreement. A two-scale Cantor set model of the energy cascade process which describes the experimental results from 1-D intersections quite well, describes the 3-D results only marginally.

  8. Glow Sticks: Spectra and Color Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birriel, Jennifer; Birriel, Ignacio

    2014-10-01

    Glow sticks are a popular Halloween staple familiar to most of our students. The production of light via a chemical reaction is called "chemiluminescence," and glow sticks are often used as demonstrations and experiments in the chemistry classroom to study reaction rates as a function of temperature.1-3 A black light can be used to illuminate glow sticks that have not been cracked or those that are "dead" in order to demonstrate fluorescence in liquid chemicals.4 In this article, we present the use of glow sticks as an inexpensive demonstration of spectra and color addition.

  9. Applying Zeeman Doppler imaging to solar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, G. A. J.; Saar, S. H.; Collier Cameron, A.

    2004-03-01

    A new generation of spectro-polarimeters with high throughput (e.g. CFHT/ESPADONS and LBT/PEPSI) is becoming available. This opportunity can be exploited using Zeeman Doppler imaging (ZDI), a technique that inverts time-series of Stokes V spectra to map stellar surface magnetic fields (Semel 1989). ZDI is assisted by ``Least squares deconvolution'' (LSD), which sums up the signal from 1000's of photospheric lines to produce a mean deconvolved profile with higher S:N (Donati & Collier Cameron 1997).

  10. Quark Spectra, Topology, and Random Matrix Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, R.G.; Heller, U.M.; Kiskis, J.; Narayanan, R.

    1999-05-01

    Quark spectra in QCD are linked to fundamental properties of the theory including the identification of pions as the Goldstone bosons of spontaneously broken chiral symmetry. The lattice overlap Dirac operator provides a nonperturbative, ultraviolet-regularized description of quarks with the correct chiral symmetry. Properties of the spectrum of this operator and their relation to random matrix theory are studied here. In particular, the predictions from chiral random matrix theory in topologically nontrivial gauge field sectors are tested for the first time. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Computing absolute and essential spectra using continuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rademacher, Jens D. M.; Sandstede, Björn; Scheel, Arnd

    2007-05-01

    A continuation approach to the computation of essential and absolute spectra of differential operators on the real line is presented. The advantages of this approach, compared with direct eigenvalue computations for the discretized operator, are the efficient and accurate computation of selected parts of the spectrum (typically those near the imaginary axis) and the option to compute nonlinear travelling waves and selected eigenvalues or other stability indicators simultaneously in order to locate accurately the onset to instability. We also discuss the implementation and usage of this approach with the software package AUTO and provide example computations for the FitzHugh-Nagumo and the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation.

  12. Transmission spectra of sausage-like microresonators.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ming-Yong; Shen, Mei-Xia; Lin, Xiu-Min

    2015-10-05

    We experimentally develop a sausage-like microresonator (SLM) by making two microtapers on a single-mode fiber, and study whispering-gallery modes (WGMs) in SLMs with different lengths. The transmission spectra from 1530 nm to 1550 nm of several SLMs are presented and SLMs with different lengths are shown to have different transmission features. The maximal Q factor observed in the SLMs is 3.8 * 10(7). For comparison, the transmission spectrum of a fiber cylinder microresonator is given and the maximal Q factor achieved in the fiber microcylinder resonator is 1.7 * 10(7). The strain tuning of the SLM is also demonstrated.

  13. Covariance Analysis of Gamma Ray Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Trainham, R.; Tinsley, J.

    2013-01-01

    The covariance method exploits fluctuations in signals to recover information encoded in correlations which are usually lost when signal averaging occurs. In nuclear spectroscopy it can be regarded as a generalization of the coincidence technique. The method can be used to extract signal from uncorrelated noise, to separate overlapping spectral peaks, to identify escape peaks, to reconstruct spectra from Compton continua, and to generate secondary spectral fingerprints. We discuss a few statistical considerations of the covariance method and present experimental examples of its use in gamma spectroscopy.

  14. Covariance analysis of gamma ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Trainham, R.; Tinsley, J.

    2013-01-15

    The covariance method exploits fluctuations in signals to recover information encoded in correlations which are usually lost when signal averaging occurs. In nuclear spectroscopy it can be regarded as a generalization of the coincidence technique. The method can be used to extract signal from uncorrelated noise, to separate overlapping spectral peaks, to identify escape peaks, to reconstruct spectra from Compton continua, and to generate secondary spectral fingerprints. We discuss a few statistical considerations of the covariance method and present experimental examples of its use in gamma spectroscopy.

  15. GENERAL RELATIVISTIC EFFECTS ON NONLINEAR POWER SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Donghui; Gong, Jinn-Ouk; Noh, Hyerim; Hwang, Jai-chan E-mail: jgong@lorentz.leidenuniv.nl E-mail: jchan@knu.ac.kr

    2011-01-20

    The nonlinear nature of Einstein's equation introduces genuine relativistic higher order corrections to the usual Newtonian fluid equations describing the evolution of cosmological perturbations. We study the effect of such novel nonlinearities on the next-to-leading order matter and velocity power spectra for the case of a pressureless, irrotational fluid in a flat Friedmann background. We find that pure general relativistic corrections are negligibly small over all scales. Our result guarantees that, in the current paradigm of standard cosmology, one can safely use Newtonian cosmology even in nonlinear regimes.

  16. Solar Doppler shifts - Sources of continuous spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Harvey, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    Oscillation observations can be used to study nonoscillatory solar phenomena that exhibit Doppler shifts. The paper discusses several effects of these phenomena and their associated temporal and spatial power spectra: (1) they limit the signal-to-noise ratio and sometimes detectability of oscillation modes; (2) there is the potential for better understanding and/or detection of solar phenomena; (3) large-scale convection may spatially modulate oscillation modes, leading to a continuous background spectrum; and (4) in regions of the spectrum where the resolution to separate modes is lacking one can determine upper limits for the integrated effects of modes.

  17. Quantum synchrotron spectra from semirelativistic electrons in teragauss magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainerd, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Synchrotron spectra are calculated from quantum electrodynamic transition rates for thermal and power-law electron distributions. It is shown that quantum effects appear in thermal spectra when the photon energy is greater than the electron temperature, and in power-law spectra when the electron energy in units of the electron rest mass times the magnetic field strength in units of the critical field strength is of order unity. These spectra are compared with spectra calculated from the ultrarelativistic approximation for synchrotron emission. It is found that the approximation for the power-law spectra is good, and the approximation for thermal spectra produces the shape of the spectrum accurately but fails to give the correct normalization. Single photon pair creation masks the quantum effects for power-law distributions, so only modifications to thermal spectra are important for gamma-ray bursts.

  18. REPS: REscaled Power Spectra for initial conditions with massive neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zennaro, Matteo; Bel, Julien; Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Carbone, Carmelita; Sefusatti, Emiliano; Guzzo, Luigi

    2016-12-01

    REPS (REscaled Power Spectra) provides accurate, one-percent level, numerical simulations of the initial conditions for massive neutrino cosmologies, rescaling the late-time linear power spectra to the simulation initial redshift.

  19. Identifying Minerals from Their Infra-red Spectra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paterson, W. G.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a British secondary school's use of a spectrometer to identify minerals. Discusses the origins of mineral spectra, the preparation of the specimen, the actual spectroscopic scanning, and the interpretation of the spectra. (TW)

  20. Study on Mössbauer spectra of hemoglobin in thalassemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuanhui, Guo; Nanming, Zhao; Xiufang, Zhang; Naifei, Gao; Youwen, Huang; Rongxin, Wang

    1988-02-01

    The57Fe Mössbauer spectra of erythrocytes in normal subjects and nine patients of different thalassemias were studied. Together with clinical analysis, the correlation between the components in the spectra and different types of anemias was discussed.

  1. [Effect of spectra on growth of chlorella and isochrysis].

    PubMed

    Mao, An-Jun; Wang, Jing; Lin, Xue-Zheng; Meng, Ji-Wu

    2008-05-01

    Focusing on the speed and efficiency, the effects of different spectra on the growth of chlorella vulgaris and isochrysis galbana Parke 8701 were investigated by using monochromatic LED (light-emitting diode) and fluorescent lamp as light sources. It was concluded that continuous spectra accelerate the top-growth-rate, blue light has the best efficiency, and the combination of them can obtain a good balance of speed and efficiency. For the purpose of measuring spectra as a parameter of irradiation quantitatively, spectra-absorbability-coefficient defined as the quanta-absorbability- efficiency of spectra for algae was calculated by means of absorption spectra of algae and emission spectra of light sources. Compared with the experimental results the coefficients of different light sources have a positive correlation to their efficiency for growth, so the coefficient can be used to elementarily quantify the relation between the spectra and the efficiency for growth.

  2. Classification of specialty seed meals from NIR reflectance spectra

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Near infrared reflectance spectroscopy was used to identify alternative seed meals proposed for food and feed formulations. Spectra were collected from cold pressed Camelina (Camelina sativa), Coriander (Coriandrum sativum), and Pennycress (Thlaspi arvense) meals. Additional spectra were collected ...

  3. Quantum synchrotron spectra from semirelativistic electrons in teragauss magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainerd, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Synchrotron spectra are calculated from quantum electrodynamic transition rates for thermal and power-law electron distributions. It is shown that quantum effects appear in thermal spectra when the photon energy is greater than the electron temperature, and in power-law spectra when the electron energy in units of the electron rest mass times the magnetic field strength in units of the critical field strength is of order unity. These spectra are compared with spectra calculated from the ultrarelativistic approximation for synchrotron emission. It is found that the approximation for the power-law spectra is good, and the approximation for thermal spectra produces the shape of the spectrum accurately but fails to give the correct normalization. Single photon pair creation masks the quantum effects for power-law distributions, so only modifications to thermal spectra are important for gamma-ray bursts.

  4. Velocity, scalar and transfer spectra in numerical turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Robert M.

    1990-02-01

    Velocity and passive-scalar spectra for turbulent fields generated by a forced three-dimensional simulation with 128-cubed grid points and Taylor-microscale Reynolds numbers up to 83 are shown to have convective and diffusive spectral regimes. One- and three-dimensional spectra are compared with experiment and theory. If normalized by the Kolmogorov dissipation scales and scalar dissipation, velocity spectra and scalar spectra for given Prandtl numbers collapse to single curves in the dissipation regime with exponentail tails. If multiplied by k exp 5/3, the velocity spectra show an anomalously high Kolmogorov constant that is consistent with low Reynolds number experiments. When normalized by the Batchelor scales, the scalar spectra show a universal dissipation regime that is independent of Prandtl numbers from 0.1 to 1.0. The time development of velocity spectra is illustrated by energy-transfer spectra in which distinct pulses propagate to high wavenumbers.

  5. Methods for retrieval of sea wave spectra from aerospace image spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondur, V. G.; Murynin, A. B.

    2016-12-01

    An approach to the retrieval of sea wave spatial spectra based on satellite optical imagery in linear and nonlinear approximations is described. Physical mechanisms of the formation of disturbed sea surface brightness fields recorded by remote sensing equipment are analyzed. Wave spectra retrieval methods using brightness field formation models that consider linear and nonlinear dependencies on sea surface slopes are suggested. A method for the construction of operators that retrieve the spatial spectra of surface wave slopes and elevations from aerospace imagery and take into account nonlinear modulations of disturbed sea surface brightness fields is developed. This method is based on the numerical simulation of sea surface images and the construction of a retrieving operator with respect to a set of parameters determined by aerospace imaging conditions. Examples of the use of the developed methods are given.

  6. Retrieving sea-wave spectra using satellite-imagery spectra in a wide range of frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondur, V. G.; Dulov, V. A.; Murynin, A. B.; Ignatiev, V. Yu.

    2016-11-01

    A method to register sea-wave spectra using optical aerospace imagery has been developed. The method is based on the use of retrieval operators both in areas of high and low spatial frequencies, including the areas of spectral maximum. The approach to adjust and validate the method developed using sea truth data obtained by string wave recorders has been suggested. This paper presents the results of using the suggested method to study sea-wave spectra using high-resolution satellite imagery for various water areas under different conditions of wave generation.

  7. Millimeter wave absorption spectra of biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, O.P.; Hagmann, M.J.; Hill, D.W.; Partlow, L.M.; Bush, L.

    1980-01-01

    A solid-state computer-controlled system has been used to make swept-frequency measurements of absorption of biological specimens from 26.5 to 90.0 GHz. A wide range of samples was used, including solutions of DNA and RNA, and suspensions of BHK-21/C13 cells, Candida albicans, C krusei, and Escherichia coli. Sharp spectra reported by other workers were not observed. The strong absorbance of water (10--30 dB/mm) caused the absorbance of all aqueous preparations that we examined to have a water-like dependence on frequency. Reduction of incident power (to below 1.0 microW), elimination of modulation, and control of temperature to assure cell viability were not found to significantly alter the water-dominated absorbance. Frozen samples of BHK-21/C13 cells tested at dry ice and liquid nitrogen temperatures were found to have average insertion loss reduced to 0.2 dB/cm but still showed no reproducible peaks that could be attributed to absorption spectra. It is concluded that the special resonances reported by others are likely to be in error.

  8. Nuclear size effects in vibrational spectra.

    PubMed

    Almoukhalalati, Adel; Shee, Avijit; Saue, Trond

    2016-06-01

    We present a theoretical study of nuclear volume in the rovibrational spectra of diatomic molecules which is an extension of a previous study restricted to rotational spectra [Chem. Phys., 2012, 401, 103]. We provide a new derivation for the electron-nucleus electrostatic interaction energy which is basically independent of the choice of model for the nuclear charge distribution. Starting from this expression we derive expressions for the electronic, rotational and vibrational field shift parameters in terms of effective electron density and its first and second derivatives with respect to internuclear distance. The effective density is often approximated by the contact density, but we demonstrate that this leads to errors on the order of 10% and is furthermore not necessary since the contact and effective densities can be obtained at the same computational cost. We calculate the field shift parameters at the 4-component relativistic coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles level and find that our results confirm the experimental findings of Tiemann and co-workers [Chem. Phys., 1982, 68(21), 1982, Ber. Bunsenges. Phys. Chem., 1982, 86, 821], whereas we find no theoretical justification for a scaling factor introduced in later work [Chem. Phys., 1985, 93, 349]. For lead sulfide we study the effective density as a function of internuclear distance and find a minimum some 0.2 Å inside the equilibrium bond distance. We also discuss Bigeleisen-Goeppert-Mayer theory of isotope fractionation in light of our results.

  9. Odor Impression Prediction from Mass Spectra.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Yuji; Nakamoto, Takamichi

    2016-01-01

    The sense of smell arises from the perception of odors from chemicals. However, the relationship between the impression of odor and the numerous physicochemical parameters has yet to be understood owing to its complexity. As such, there is no established general method for predicting the impression of odor of a chemical only from its physicochemical properties. In this study, we designed a novel predictive model based on an artificial neural network with a deep structure for predicting odor impression utilizing the mass spectra of chemicals, and we conducted a series of computational analyses to evaluate its performance. Feature vectors extracted from the original high-dimensional space using two autoencoders equipped with both input and output layers in the model are used to build a mapping function from the feature space of mass spectra to the feature space of sensory data. The results of predictions obtained by the proposed new method have notable accuracy (R≅0.76) in comparison with a conventional method (R≅0.61).

  10. Microwave Spectra of 9-FLUORENONE and Benzophenone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Channing; Sedo, Galen; van Wijngaarden, Jennifer

    2015-06-01

    The pure rotational spectra of 9-fluorenone (C13H8O) and benzophenone (C13H10O) were observed using chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy (cp-FTMW). The 9-fluorenone spectrum was collected between 8 and 13 GHz, which allowed for the assignment of 124 rotational transitions. A separate spectrum spanning from 8 to 14 GHz was collected for benzophenone, allowing for the assignment of 133 rotational transitions. Both aromatic ketones exhibited strong b-type spectra with little to no centrifugal distortion, indicating highly rigid molecular structures. A comparison of the experimentally determined spectral constants of 9-fluorenone to those calculated using both ab initio and density functional theory strongly suggest the molecule conforms to a planar C2v symmetric geometry as expected for its polycyclic structure. Whereas, a comparison of the experimental benzophenone constants to those predicted by theory suggests a molecule with non-planar C2 symmetry, where the two phenyl groups are rotated approximately 32° out-of-plane to form a paddlewheel like geometry.

  11. Spectra and statistics in compressible isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianchun; Gotoh, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Spectra and one-point statistics of velocity and thermodynamic variables in isotropic turbulence of compressible fluid are examined by using numerical simulations with solenoidal forcing at the turbulent Mach number Mt from 0.05 to 1.0 and at the Taylor Reynolds number Reλ from 40 to 350. The velocity field is decomposed into a solenoidal component and a compressible component in terms of the Helmholtz decomposition, and the compressible velocity component is further decomposed into a pseudosound component, namely, the hydrodynamic component associated with the incompressible field and an acoustic component associated with sound waves. It is found that the acoustic mode dominates over the pseudosound mode at turbulent Mach numbers Mt≥0.4 in our numerical simulations. At turbulent Mach numbers Mt≤0.4 , there exists a critical wave number kc beyond which the pseudosound mode dominates while the acoustic mode dominates at small wave numbers k spectra of pressure, density, and temperature exhibit a k-7 /3 scaling for Mt≤0.3 and a k-5 /3 scaling for Mt≥0.5 .

  12. An atlas of selected calibrated stellar spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Russell G.; Cohen, Martin

    1992-01-01

    Five hundred and fifty six stars in the IRAS PSC-2 that are suitable for stellar radiometric standards and are brighter than 1 Jy at 25 microns were identified. In addition, 123 stars that meet all of our criteria for calibration standards, but which lack a luminosity class were identified. An approach to absolute stellar calibration of broadband infrared filters based upon new models of Vega and Sirius due to Kurucz (1992) is presented. A general technique used to assemble continuous wide-band calibrated infrared spectra is described and an absolutely calibrated 1-35 micron spectrum of alpha(Tau) is constructed and the method using new and carefully designed observations is independently validated. The absolute calibration of the IRAS Low Resolution Spectrometer (LRS) database is investigated by comparing the observed spectrum of alpha(Tau) with that assumed in the original LRS calibration scheme. Neglect of the SiO fundamental band in alpha(Tau) has led to the presence of a specious 'emission' feature in all LRS spectra near 8.5 microns, and to an incorrect spectral slope between 8 and 12 microns. Finally, some of the properties of asteroids that effect their utility as calibration objects for the middle and far infrared region are examined. A technique to determine, from IRAS multiwaveband observations, the basic physical parameters needed by various asteroid thermal models that minimize the number of assumptions required is developed.

  13. Video-based ocean wave spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbitz, Alf

    1994-07-01

    A particular video spot detector provides an irradiance time series from an arbitrarily chosen pixel in the video frame. The detector is applied to video records of the ocean surface, and the correspondence between the 1D irradiance frequency spectrum and the corresponding ocean surface elevation spectrum is studied. A major experimental results is that the frequency peak in the irradiance spectrum for a typical wind-driven sea is significantly enhanced compared to the surface slope spectrum. Video experiments from the oil rig Gullfaks A in the North Sea show an excellent agreement between the enhanced peak frequency in the irradiance spectrum and the peak frequency in the surface elevation spectrum measured by a microwave remote ocean surveillance wave radar. The enhancement of the peak in the irradiance spectrum is explained by a strong nonlinear geometrical projection effect. This is due to the rather small look angle with the horizontal, which is chosen so as to neglect irradiance contributions from beneath the sea surface. Based on a simple stochastic model that takes the geometric effect into account, irradiance spectra are simulated and are in good agreement with the experimental spectra.

  14. Equilibria and absorption spectra of tryptophanase.

    PubMed

    Metzler, C M; Viswanath, R; Metzler, D E

    1991-05-25

    Tryptophanase (tryptophan: indole-lyase) from Escherichia coli has been isolated in the holoenzyme form and its absorption spectra and acid-base chemistry have been reevaluated. Apoenzyme has been prepared by dialysis against sodium phosphate and L-alanine and molar absorptivities of the coenzyme bands have been estimated by readdition of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. The spectrophotometric titration curve, whose midpoint is at pH 7.6 in 0.1 M potassium phosphate buffers, indicates some degree of cooperativity in dissociation of a pair of protons. Resolution of the computed spectra of individual ionic forms of the enzyme with lognormal distribution curves shows that band shapes are similar to those of model Schiff bases and of aspartate aminotransferase. Using molar areas from the latter we estimated amounts of individual tautomeric species. In addition to ketoenamine and enolimine or covalent adduct the high pH form also appears to contain approximately 18% of a species with a dipolar ionic ring (protonated on the ring nitrogen and with phenolate -O-). We suggest that this may be the catalytically active form of the coenzyme in tryptophanase. The equilibrium between tryptophanase and L-alanine has also been reevaluated.

  15. Odor Impression Prediction from Mass Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Nakamoto, Takamichi

    2016-01-01

    The sense of smell arises from the perception of odors from chemicals. However, the relationship between the impression of odor and the numerous physicochemical parameters has yet to be understood owing to its complexity. As such, there is no established general method for predicting the impression of odor of a chemical only from its physicochemical properties. In this study, we designed a novel predictive model based on an artificial neural network with a deep structure for predicting odor impression utilizing the mass spectra of chemicals, and we conducted a series of computational analyses to evaluate its performance. Feature vectors extracted from the original high-dimensional space using two autoencoders equipped with both input and output layers in the model are used to build a mapping function from the feature space of mass spectra to the feature space of sensory data. The results of predictions obtained by the proposed new method have notable accuracy (R≅0.76) in comparison with a conventional method (R≅0.61). PMID:27326765

  16. The energy spectra of solar flare electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evenson, P. A.; Hovestadt, D.; Meyer, P.; Moses, D.

    1985-01-01

    A survey of 50 electron energy spectra from .1 to 100 MeV originating from solar flares was made by the combination of data from two spectrometers onboard the International Sun Earth Explorer-3 spacecraft. The observed spectral shapes of flare events can be divided into two classes through the criteria of fit to an acceleration model. This standard two step acceleration model, which fits the spectral shape of the first class of flares, involves an impulsive step that accelerates particles up to 100 keV and a second step that further accelerates these particles up to 100 MeV by a single shock. This fit fails for the second class of flares that can be characterized as having excessively hard spectra above 1 MeV relative to the predictions of the model. Correlations with soft X-ray and meter radio observations imply that the acceleration of the high energy particles in the second class of flares is dominated by the impulsive phase of the flares.

  17. Theory of giant planet atmospheres and spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, Adam Seth

    2014-06-01

    Giant exoplanet atmospheres have now been studied by transit spectroscopy, spectroscopy and photometry at secondary eclipse, photometric light curves as a function of orbital phase, very high-resolution spectroscopic velocity measurements, and high-contrast imaging. Moreover, there is a correspondence between brown dwarf and giant planet atmospheres and spectra that has been profitably exploited for many years to better understand exoplanets. In this presentation, I endeavor to review the information extracted by these techniques about close-in giant exoplanet compositions and temperatures. Then, I will summarize the expected character of the spectra, light curves, and polarizations of the objects soon to be studied using high-contrast imaging by GPI, SPHERE, WFIRST-AFTA, and Subaru/HiCIAO as a function of mass, age, Keplerian elements, and birth properties (such as entropy). The goal will be to frame the theoretical discussion concerning what physical information can be gleaned in the next years about giant planet atmospheres by direct (or almost direct) imaging and characterization campaigns, and their role as stepping stones to the even more numerous sub-Neptunes, super-Earths, and Earths.

  18. INFRARED SPECTRA OF AMMONIA-WATER ICES

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Weijun; Jewitt, David; Kaiser, Ralf I. E-mail: ralfk@hawaii.edu

    2009-03-15

    We conducted a systematic study of the near-IR and mid-IR spectra of ammonia-water ices at various NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O ratios. The differences between the spectra of amorphous and crystalline ammonia-water ices were also investigated. The 2.0 {mu}m ammonia band central wavelength is a function of the ammonia/water ratio. It shifts from 2.006 {+-} 0.003 {mu}m (4985 {+-} 5 cm{sup -1}) to 1.993 {+-} 0.003 {mu}m (5018 {+-} 5 cm{sup -1}) as the percentage of ammonia decreases from 100% to 1%. The 2.2 {mu}m ammonia band center shifts from 2.229 {+-} 0.003 {mu}m (4486 {+-} 5 cm{sup -1}) to 2.208 {+-} 0.003 {mu}m (4528 {+-} 5 cm{sup -1}) over the same range. Temperature-dependent shifts of those bands are below the uncertainty of the measurement, and therefore are not detectable. These results are important for comparison with astronomical observations as well as for estimating the concentration of ammonia in outer solar system ices.

  19. Reflectance Spectra of Space Debris in GEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schildknecht, T.; Vannanti, A.; Krag, H.; Erd, C.

    The space debris environment in the Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) region is mostly investigated by means of optical surveys. Such surveys revealed a considerable amount of debris in the size range of 10 centimeter to one meter. Some of these debris exhibit particularly high area-to-mass ratios as derived from the evolution of their orbits. In order to understand the nature and eventually the origin of these objects, observations allowing to derive physical characteristics like size, shape and material are required. Information on the shape and the attitude motion of a debris piece may be obtained by photometric light curves. The most promising technique to investigate the surface material properties is reflectance spectroscopy. This paper discusses preliminary results obtained from spectrometric observations of space debris in GEO. The observations were acquired at the 1-meter ESA Space Debris Telescope (ESASDT) on Tenerife with a low-resolution spectrograph in the wavelength range of 450-960 nm. The target objects were space debris of different types with brightness as small as magnitude 15. Some simple-shaped, intact "calibration objects" with known surface materials like the MSG-2 satellites were also observed. The spectra show shape variations expected to be caused by the different physical properties of the objects. The determination of the possible materials is still in a preliminary phase. Limitations of the acquisition process of the spectra and the subsequent analysis are discussed. Future steps planned for a better characterization of the debris from the observed data are briefly outlined.

  20. Infrared Spectra of Substituted Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Hudgins, Douglas M.; Sandford, Scott A.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Calculations are carried out using density functional theory (DFT) to determine the harmonic frequencies and intensities of 1-methylanthracene, 9-methylanthracene, 9-cyanoanthracene, 2-aminoanthracene, acridine, and their positive ions. The theoretical data are compared with matrix-isolation spectra for these species also reported in this work. The theoretical and experimental frequencies and relative intensities for the neutral species are in generally good agreement, whereas the positive ion spectra are only in qualitative agreement. Relative to anthracene, we find that substitution of amethyl or CN for a hydrogen does not significantly affect the spectrum other than to add the characteristic methyl C-H stretch and C-N stretch (near 2200/cm), respectively. However, addition of NH2 dramatically affects the spectrum of the neutral. Not only are the NH2 modes themselves strong, but this electron withdrawing group induces sufficient partial charge on the ring to give the neutral molecule characteristics of the anthracene cation spectrum. The sum of the absolute intensities is about four times larger for 2-aminoanthracene than for 9-cyanoanthracene. Substituting nitrogen in the ring at the nine position (acridine) does not greatly alter the spectrum compared with anthracene.

  1. Discriminating Dysarthria Type From Envelope Modulation Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Liss, Julie M.; LeGendre, Sue; Lotto, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Previous research demonstrated the ability of temporally based rhythm metrics to distinguish among dysarthrias with different prosodic deficit profiles (J. M. Liss et al., 2009). The authors examined whether comparable results could be obtained by an automated analysis of speech envelope modulation spectra (EMS), which quantifies the rhythmicity of speech within specified frequency bands. Method EMS was conducted on sentences produced by 43 speakers with 1 of 4 types of dysarthria and healthy controls. The EMS consisted of the spectra of the slow-rate (up to 10 Hz) amplitude modulations of the full signal and 7 octave bands ranging in center frequency from 125 to 8000 Hz. Six variables were calculated for each band relating to peak frequency and amplitude and relative energy above, below, and in the region of 4 Hz. Discriminant function analyses (DFA) determined which sets of predictor variables best discriminated between and among groups. Results Each of 6 DFAs identified 2–6 of the 48 predictor variables. These variables achieved 84%–100% classification accuracy for group membership. Conclusions Dysarthrias can be characterized by quantifiable temporal patterns in acoustic output. Because EMS analysis is automated and requires no editing or linguistic assumptions, it shows promise as a clinical and research tool. PMID:20643800

  2. Rotary spectra analysis applied to static stabilometry.

    PubMed

    Chiaramello, E; Knaflitz, M; Agostini, V

    2011-01-01

    Static stabilometry is a technique aimed at quantifying postural sway during quiet standing in the upright position. Many different models and many different techniques to analyze the trajectories of the Centre of Pressure (CoP) have been proposed. Most of the parameters calculated according to these different approaches are affected by a relevant intra- and inter-subject variability or do not have a clear physiological interpretation. In this study we hypothesize that CoP trajectories have rotational characteristics, therefore we decompose them in clockwise and counter-clockwise components, using the rotary spectra analysis. Rotary spectra obtained studying a population of healthy subjects are described through the group average of spectral parameters, i.e., 95% spectral bandwidth, mean frequency, median frequency, and skewness. Results are reported for the clockwise and the counter-clockwise components and refer to the upright position maintained with eyes open or closed. This study demonstrates that the approach is feasible and that some of the spectral parameters are statistically different between the open and closed eyes conditions. More research is needed to demonstrate the clinical applicability of this approach, but results so far obtained are promising.

  3. Serial FBG sensor network allowing overlapping spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbenseth, S.; Lochmann, S.; Ahrens, A.; Rehm, B.

    2016-05-01

    For structure or material monitoring low impact serial fiber Bragg grating (FBG) networks have attracted increasing research interest. Common sensor networks using wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) for FBG interrogation are limited in their efficiency by the spectral width of their light source, the FBG tuning range and the spectral guard bands. Overlapping spectra are strictly forbidden in this case. Applying time division multiplexing (TDM) or active resonator schemes may overcome these restrictions. However, they introduce other substantial disadvantages like signal roundtrip dependency or sophisticated control of active resonating structures. Code division multiplexing (CDM) as a means of FBG interrogation by simple autocorrelation of appropriate codes has been shown to be superior in this respect. However, it came at the cost of a second spectrometer introducing additional equalization efforts. We demonstrate a new serial FBG sensor network utilizing CDM signal processing for efficient sensor interrogation without the need of a second spectrometer and additional state of polarization (SOP) controlling components. It allows overlapping spectra even when all sensing FBGs are positioned at the same centre wavelength and it shows a high degree of insensitivity to SOP. Sequence inversed keyed (SIK) serial signal processing utilizing quasi-orthogonal balanced codes ensures simple and quick sensor interrogation with high signal-to-interference/noise ratio.

  4. Fourier transform spectra of quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damian, V.; Ardelean, I.; Armăşelu, Anca; Apostol, D.

    2009-09-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots are nanometer-sized crystals with unique photochemical and photophysical properties that are not available from either isolated molecules or bulk solids. These nanocrystals absorb light over a very broad spectral range as compared to molecular fluorophores which have very narrow excitation spectra. High-quality QDs are proper to be use in different biological and medical applications (as fluorescent labels, the cancer treatment and the drug delivery). In this article, we discuss Fourier transform visible spectroscopy of commercial quantum dots. We reveal that QDs produced by Evident Technologies when are enlightened by laser or luminescent diode light provides a spectral shift of their fluorescence spectra correlated to exciting emission wavelengths, as shown by the ARCspectroNIR Fourier Transform Spectrometer. In the final part of this paper we show an important biological application of CdSe/ZnS core-shell ODs as microbial labeling both for pure cultures of cyanobacteria (Synechocystis PCC 6803) and for mixed cultures of phototrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms.

  5. Fourier transform spectra of quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damian, V.; Ardelean, I.; Armăşelu, Anca; Apostol, D.

    2010-05-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots are nanometer-sized crystals with unique photochemical and photophysical properties that are not available from either isolated molecules or bulk solids. These nanocrystals absorb light over a very broad spectral range as compared to molecular fluorophores which have very narrow excitation spectra. High-quality QDs are proper to be use in different biological and medical applications (as fluorescent labels, the cancer treatment and the drug delivery). In this article, we discuss Fourier transform visible spectroscopy of commercial quantum dots. We reveal that QDs produced by Evident Technologies when are enlightened by laser or luminescent diode light provides a spectral shift of their fluorescence spectra correlated to exciting emission wavelengths, as shown by the ARCspectroNIR Fourier Transform Spectrometer. In the final part of this paper we show an important biological application of CdSe/ZnS core-shell ODs as microbial labeling both for pure cultures of cyanobacteria (Synechocystis PCC 6803) and for mixed cultures of phototrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms.

  6. Blind Source Separation For Ion Mobility Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Marco, S.; Pomareda, V.

    2009-05-23

    Miniaturization is a powerful trend for smart chemical instrumentation in a diversity of applications. It is know that miniaturization in IMS leads to a degradation of the system characteristics. For the present work, we are interested in signal processing solutions to mitigate limitations introduced by limited drift tube length that basically involve a loss of chemical selectivity. While blind source separation techniques (BSS) are popular in other domains, their application for smart chemical instrumentation is limited. However, in some conditions, basically linearity, BSS may fully recover the concentration time evolution and the pure spectra with few underlying hypothesis. This is extremely helpful in conditions where non-expected chemical interferents may appear, or unwanted perturbations may pollute the spectra. SIMPLISMA has been advocated by Harrington et al. in several papers. However, more modern methods of BSS for bilinear decomposition with the restriction of positiveness have appeared in the last decade. In order to explore and compare the performances of those methods a series of experiments were performed.

  7. Wave spectra from sun glint patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Borrego, Josue

    1992-12-01

    The problem of retrieving spatial information of the sea surface heights from aerial images is considered. We proceed, for simplicity, by considering a one-dimensional model of the problem. With some simplifying assumptions, we derive some analytical and numerical results that relate the autocorrelation of the surface heights and those of the sunglint patterns. We assume that the surfaces are such that they constitute approximations to Gaussian random processes. We also assume that the surfaces are illuminated by a source (the sun) of a fixed angular extent and imaged through a lens that subtends a very small solid angle. With these assumptions, we calculate their images, as they would be formed by a signal clipping detector. In order to do this, we define a `glitter function,' which operates on the slope of the surfaces. To test our predictions we have conducted a Monte Carlo type simulation. Random surfaces with two different power spectra have been generated in a computer. We find that under favorable conditions, it is possible to invert the relation numerically and estimate the surface height autocorrelation from the sunglint data. We obtain the wave spectra from the surface height autocorrelation via a Fourier transform.

  8. Spectra of {gamma} rays feeding superdeformed bands

    SciTech Connect

    Lauritsen, T.; Khoo, T.L.; Henry, R.G.

    1995-08-01

    The spectrum of {gamma}rays coincident with SD transitions contains the transitions which populate the SD band. This spectrum can provide information on the feeding mechanism and on the properties (moment of inertia, collectivity) of excited SD states. We used a model we developed to explain the feeding of SD bands, to calculate the spectrum of feeding {gamma}rays. The Monte Carlo simulations take into account the trigger conditions present in our Eurogam experiment. Both experimental and theoretical spectra contain a statistical component and a broad E2 peak (from transitions occurring between excited states in the SD well). There is good resemblance between the measured and calculated spectra although the calculated multiplicity of an E2 bump is low by {approximately}30%. Work is continuing to improve the quality of the fits, which will result in a better understanding of excited SD states. In addition, a model for the last steps, which cool the {gamma} cascade into the SD yrast line, needs to be developed. A strong M1/E2 low-energy component, which we believe is responsible for this cooling, was observed.

  9. High Resolution Infrared Spectra of Triacetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doney, Kirstin D.; Zhao, Dongfeng; Linnartz, Harold

    2015-06-01

    Triacetylene, HC6H, is the longest poly-acetylene chain found in space, and is believed to be involved in the formation of longer chain molecules and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). However, abundances are expected to be low, and observational confirmation requires knowledge of the gas-phase spectra, which up to now has been incomplete with only the weak, low lying bending modes being known. We present new infrared (IR) spectra in the C-H stretch region obtained using ultra-sensitive and highly precise IR continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (cw-CRDS), combined with supersonic plasma expansions The talk reviews the accurate determination of the rotational constants of the asymmetric fundamental mode, νb{5}, including discussion on the perturber state, and associated hot bands. The determined molecular parameters are accurate enough to aid astronomical searches with such facilities as ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter Array) or the upcoming JWST (James Webb Space Telecscope), which can now probe even trace molecules (abundances of ˜ 10-6 - 10-10 with respect to H2). D. Zhao, J. Guss, A. Walsh, H. Linnartz, Chem. Phys. Lett., 565, 132 (2013) K.D. Doney, D. Zhao, H. Linnartz, in preparation

  10. Supernova spectra below strong circumstellar interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leloudas, G.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Johansson, J.; Maeda, K.; Moriya, T. J.; Nordin, J.; Petrushevska, T.; Silverman, J. M.; Sollerman, J.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Taddia, F.; Xu, D.

    2015-02-01

    We construct spectra of supernovae (SNe) interacting strongly with a circumstellar medium (CSM) by adding SN templates, a black-body continuum, and an emission-line spectrum. In a Monte Carlo simulation we vary a large number of parameters, such as the SN type, brightness and phase, the strength of the CSM interaction, the extinction, and the signal to noise ratio (S/N) of the observed spectrum. We generate more than 800 spectra, distribute them to ten different human classifiers, and study how the different simulation parameters affect the appearance of the spectra and their classification. The SNe IIn showing some structure over the continuum were characterized as "SNe IInS" to allow for a better quantification. We demonstrate that the flux ratio of the underlying SN to the continuum fV is the single most important parameter determining whether a spectrum can be classified correctly. Other parameters, such as extinction, S/N, and the width and strength of the emission lines, do not play a significant role. Thermonuclear SNe get progressively classified as Ia-CSM, IInS, and IIn as fV decreases. The transition between Ia-CSM and IInS occurs at fV ~ 0.2-0.3. It is therefore possible to determine that SNe Ia-CSM are found at the (un-extincted) magnitude range -19.5 >M> -21.6, in very good agreement with observations, and that the faintest SN IIn that can hide a SN Ia has M = -20.1. The literature sample of SNe Ia-CSM shows an association with 91T-like SNe Ia. Our experiment does not support that this association can be attributed to a luminosity bias (91T-like being brighter than normal events). We therefore conclude that this association has real physical origins and we propose that 91T-like explosions result from single degenerate progenitors that are responsible for the CSM. Despite the spectroscopic similarities between SNe Ibc and SNe Ia, the number of misclassifications between these types was very small in our simulation and mostly at low S/N. Combined with

  11. Stellar parametrization from Gaia RVS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recio-Blanco, A.; de Laverny, P.; Allende Prieto, C.; Fustes, D.; Manteiga, M.; Arcay, B.; Bijaoui, A.; Dafonte, C.; Ordenovic, C.; Ordoñez Blanco, D.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Among the myriad of data collected by the ESA Gaia satellite, about 150 million spectra will be delivered by the Radial Velocity Spectrometer (RVS) for stars as faint as GRVS~ 16. A specific stellar parametrization will be performed on most of these RVS spectra, i.e. those with enough high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N), which should correspond to single stars that have a magnitude in the RVS band brighter than ~14.5. Some individual chemical abundances will also be estimated for the brightest targets. Aims: We describe the different parametrization codes that have been specifically developed or adapted for RVS spectra within the GSP-Spec working group of the analysis consortium. The tested codes are based on optimisation (FERRE and GAUGUIN), projection (MATISSE), or pattern-recognition methods (Artificial Neural Networks). We present and discuss each of their expected performances in the recovered stellar atmospheric parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, overall metallicity) for B- to K-type stars. The performances for determining of [α/Fe] ratios are also presented for cool stars. Methods: Each code has been homogeneously tested with a large grid of RVS simulated synthetic spectra of BAFGK-spectral types (dwarfs and giants), with metallicities varying from 10-2.5 to 10+ 0.5 the solar metallicity, and taking variations of ±0.4 dex in the composition of the α-elements into consideration. The tests were performed for S/N ranging from ten to 350. Results: For all the stellar types we considered, stars brighter than GRVS~ 12.5 are very efficiently parametrized by the GSP-Spec pipeline, including reliable estimations of [α/Fe]. Typical internal errors for FGK metal-rich and metal-intermediate stars are around 40 K in Teff, 0.10 dex in log(g), 0.04 dex in [M/H], and 0.03 dex in [α/Fe] at GRVS = 10.3. They degrade to 155 K in Teff, 0.15 dex in log(g), 0.10 dex in [M/H], and 0.1 dex in [α/Fe] at GRVS~ 12. Similar accuracies in Teff and [M/H] are

  12. Spatially Resolved Mid-IR Spectra from Meteorites; Linking Composition, Crystallographic Orientation and Spectra on the Micro-Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephen, N. R.

    2016-08-01

    IR spectroscopy is used to infer composition of extraterrestrial bodies, comparing bulk spectra to databases of separate mineral phases. We extract spatially resolved meteorite-specific spectra from achondrites with respect to zonation and orientation.

  13. Estimation of vertical sea level muon energy spectra from the latest primary cosmic ray elemental spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, M.; Molla, N. H.; Bhattacharyya, D. P.

    The directly measured elemental spectra of primary cosmic rays obtained from Webber et al., Seo et al., Menn et al., Ryan et al. and experiments like JACEE, CRN, SOKOL, RICH on P, He, CNO, Ne-S and Fe have been considered to estimate the vertical sea level muon energy spectra. The primary elemental energy spectra of P, He, CNO, Ne-S and Fe available from the different experimental data duly fitted by power law are given by Np(E)dE = 1.2216E-2.68 dE [cm2 .s.sr.GeV/n]-1 NHe(E)dE = 0.0424E-2.59 dE [cm2 .s.sr.GeV/n]-1 NCNO(E)dE = 0.0026E-2.57 dE[cm2 .s.sr.GeV/n]-1 NNe-S(E)dE = 0.00066E-2.57 dE [cm2 .s.sr.GeV/n]-1 NF e(E)dE = 0.0056E-2.55 dE [cm2 .s.sr.GeV/n]-1 Using the conventional superposition model the all nucleon primary cosmic ray spectrum has been derived which is of the form N(E)dE = 1.42E-2.66 dE [cm2 .s.sr.GeV/n]-1 We have considered all these spectra separately as parents of the secondary mesons and finallty the sea level muon fluxes at 00 from each species have been derived. To evaluate the meson spectra which are the initial air shower interaction products initiated by the primary nucleon air collisions, the hadronic energy moments have been calculated from the CERN LEBCEHS data for pp collisions and FNAL data for πp collisions. Pion production by secondary pions have been taken into account and the final total muon spectrum has been derived from pp rightarrowπ± x, pp → K± x, πp → π± x channels. The Z-factors have been corrected for p-air collisions. We have adopted the constant values of σp-air and σπ-air crosssections which are 273 mb and 213 mb, respectively. The adopted inelastic cross-sections for pp and πp interactions are 35 mb and 22 mb, respectively. The Q-G plasma correction of Z-factors have also been incorporated in the final form. The solution to the standard differential equation for mesons is considered for muon flux estimation from Ngenerations of the parent mesons. By this formulation vertical muon spectra from each element

  14. Optical coherence tomography with pre-calculated reference spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Chen, Xiaodong; Liang, Haitao; Yu, Daoyin

    2017-02-01

    The resample of spectra which is essential for high-precision spectral-domain OCT data processing is sophisticated, and its precision is dependent on the method and equipment. In this paper, we proposed an OCT without inverse FFT. A series of reference spectra corresponding to different optical path length difference was used to convolve with spectra gotten by OCT to acquire time-domain tomography instead of inverse FFT, thus eliminating the resample of spectra. The reference spectra were calculated before imaging and corrected with correction spectrum from sample arm to compensate the influence of sample arm. Experiment was done with a mirror as sample and validated our setup.

  15. IR SPECTRA BY DFT FOR GLUCOSE AND ITS EPIMERS: A COMPARISON BETWEEN VACUUM AND SOLVATED SPECTRA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infrared spectra were calculated for the low energy geometry optimized structures of glucose and all of its epimers, at B3LYP/6-311++G** level of theory. Calculations were performed both in vacuo and using the COSMO solvation method. Frequencies, zero point energies, enthalpies, entropies, and rel...

  16. Automatic one dimensional spectra extraction for Weihai fiber-fed high resolution echelle spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shao Ming; Gao, Dong Yang

    2014-11-01

    One fiber-fed high resolution echelle spectrograph was built for the one meter telescope atWeihai Observatory of Shandong University. It is used for exoplanet searching by radial velocity method and for stellar spectra analysis. One dimensional spectra extraction from the raw echelle data is researched in this paper. Flat field images with different exposure times were used to trace the order position accurately. The accurate background was fitted from each CCD image and it was subtracted from the raw image to correct the background and straylight. The intensity of each order decreases towards the order margin, and the lengths of order are different between the blue and red regions. The order tracing during the data reduction was investigated in this work. Accurate flux can be obtained after considering the effects of bad pixels, the curvature of each order and so on. One Interactive Data Language program for one dimensional spectra extraction was adopted and implemented to echelle data reduction for Weihai fiber-fed high resolution echelle spectra, and the results are illustrated here. The program is efficient and accurate for echelle data reduction. It can be adopted to reduce data taken by other instruments even the spectrographs in other fields, and it is very convenient for astronomers.

  17. Mineral Spectra from Nili Fossae, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Spectra collected by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) indicate the presence of three distinct minerals. The graphed information comes from an observation of terrain in the Nili Fossae area of northern Mars. CRISM is one of six science instruments on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

    Iron-magnesium smectite clay is formed through alteration of rocks by liquid water and is characterized by distinctive absorptions at 1.4, 1.9, and 2.3 micrometers due to water (H2O) and OH in the atomic structure of the mineral. Olivine is an iron magnesium silicate and primary igneous mineral, and water is not in its structure. Its spectrum is characterized by a strong and broad absorption at 1.0 micrometer due to ferrous iron (Fe2+). Carbonate is an alteration mineral identified by the distinctive paired absorptions at 2.3 and 2.5 micrometers. The precise band positions at 2.31 and 2.51 micrometers identify the carbonate at this location as magnesium carbonate. The broad 1.0 micrometer band indicates some small amount of ferrous iron is also present and the feature at 1.9 micrometers indicates the presence of water. CRISM researchers believe the magnesium carbonate found in the Nili Fossae region formed from alteration of olivine by water.

    The data come from a CRISM image catalogued as FRT00003E12. The spectra shown here are five-pixel-by-five-pixel averages of CRISM L-detector spectra taken from three different areas within the image that have then been ratioed to a five-pixel-by-five-pixel common denominator spectrum taken from a spectrally unremarkable area with no distinctive mineralogic signatures. This technique highlights the spectral contrasts between regions due to their unique mineralogy. The spectral wavelengths near 2.0 micrometers are affected by atmospheric absorptions and have been removed for clarity.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, manages the Mars

  18. Mineral Spectra from Nili Fossae, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Spectra collected by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) indicate the presence of three distinct minerals. The graphed information comes from an observation of terrain in the Nili Fossae area of northern Mars. CRISM is one of six science instruments on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

    Iron-magnesium smectite clay is formed through alteration of rocks by liquid water and is characterized by distinctive absorptions at 1.4, 1.9, and 2.3 micrometers due to water (H2O) and OH in the atomic structure of the mineral. Olivine is an iron magnesium silicate and primary igneous mineral, and water is not in its structure. Its spectrum is characterized by a strong and broad absorption at 1.0 micrometer due to ferrous iron (Fe2+). Carbonate is an alteration mineral identified by the distinctive paired absorptions at 2.3 and 2.5 micrometers. The precise band positions at 2.31 and 2.51 micrometers identify the carbonate at this location as magnesium carbonate. The broad 1.0 micrometer band indicates some small amount of ferrous iron is also present and the feature at 1.9 micrometers indicates the presence of water. CRISM researchers believe the magnesium carbonate found in the Nili Fossae region formed from alteration of olivine by water.

    The data come from a CRISM image catalogued as FRT00003E12. The spectra shown here are five-pixel-by-five-pixel averages of CRISM L-detector spectra taken from three different areas within the image that have then been ratioed to a five-pixel-by-five-pixel common denominator spectrum taken from a spectrally unremarkable area with no distinctive mineralogic signatures. This technique highlights the spectral contrasts between regions due to their unique mineralogy. The spectral wavelengths near 2.0 micrometers are affected by atmospheric absorptions and have been removed for clarity.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, manages the Mars

  19. Infrared Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: Nitrogen Substitution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The B3LYP/4-31G approach is used to compute the harmonic frequencies of substituted naphthalene, anthracene, and their cations. The substitutions include cyano (CN), aminio (NH2), imino (NH), and replacement of a CH group by a nitrogen atom. All unique sites are considered, namely 1 and 2 for naphthalene and 1, 2, and 9 for an'tracene, except for the imino, where only 2-iminonaphthalene is studied. The IR spectra of these substituted species are compared with those of the unsubstituted molecules. The addition of a CN group does not significantly affect the spectra except to add the CN stretching frequency. Replacing a CH group by N has only a small effect on the IR spectra. The addition of the NH2 group dramatically affects the neutral spectra, giving it much of the character of the cation spectra. However, the neutral 2-irrinonaphthalene spectra looks more like that of naphthalene than like the 2-aminonaphthalene spectra.

  20. Infrared Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: Nitrogen Substitution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The B3LYP/4-31G approach is used to compute the harmonic frequencies of substituted naphthalene, anthracene, and their cations. The substitutions include cyano (CN), aminio (NH2), imino (NH), and replacement of a CH group by a nitrogen atom. All unique sites are considered, namely 1 and 2 for naphthalene and 1, 2, and 9 for an'tracene, except for the imino, where only 2-iminonaphthalene is studied. The IR spectra of these substituted species are compared with those of the unsubstituted molecules. The addition of a CN group does not significantly affect the spectra except to add the CN stretching frequency. Replacing a CH group by N has only a small effect on the IR spectra. The addition of the NH2 group dramatically affects the neutral spectra, giving it much of the character of the cation spectra. However, the neutral 2-irrinonaphthalene spectra looks more like that of naphthalene than like the 2-aminonaphthalene spectra.

  1. Phonon spectra of plutonium at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorado, Boris; Bottin, François; Bouchet, Johann

    2017-03-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics calculations are used to investigate the vibrational properties of the high-temperature δ and ɛ phases of plutonium. We combine the local-density approximation (LDA)+U for strong electron correlations and the temperature-dependent effective potential method in order to calculate the phonon spectra of the two phases, as well as their dependence on temperature. Our results show that the ɛ phase can only be stabilized when temperature and correlations are simultaneously accounted for. We are also able to quantify the degree of anharmonicity of the two phases. While the δ phase is fairly harmonic up to 1000 K, we find that the ɛ phase is strongly anharmonic, which explains why this structure dominates the phase diagram at high temperature.

  2. Towards simulation of high temperature methane spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borysov, A.; Champion, J. P.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Wenger, C.

    Methane plays a central role in gas layers of temperatures up to around 3000K in a number of astrophysical objects ranging from giant planets to brown dwarfs, over proto-solar nebulae, to several classes of cool stars. In order to model and analyse these objects correctly, an accurate and complete list of spectral lines at high temperature is demanded. Predicting high temperature spectra implies, however, predicting hot bands and thus modelling highly excited vibrational states. This is a real challenge in the case of methane. We report the preliminary results of a theoretical study combining the global effective Hamiltonian approach and its computational implementation (STDS package: http://www.u-bourgogne.fr/LPUB/ shTDS.html) with semi-quantitative statistical considerations.

  3. Workshop to establish databases of carbohydrate spectra

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The workshop was organized to formulate guidelines for establishing spectral databases of complex carbohydrates. The databases will enable the scientific community to avoid the great waste of research effort and funds that frequently occurs when carbohydrate chemists are forced to duplicate the structural characterization of previously characterized complex carbohydrates. Chemists waste their effort on repetitive characterizations because in the absence of spectral databases they are unaware they are analyzing a known molecule until they have completely determined its structure. Chemists will be able to avoid much of this wasted effort when the collections of mass and of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra initiated at the workshop are subsequently developed into searchable databases. Then scientists only need query the databases with the spectrum or with information defining the spectrum of an unidentified carbohydrate to find out if it has been previously characterized.

  4. Spectra of Particulate Backscattering in Natural Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Howard, R.; Lewis, Marlon R.; McLean, Scott D.; Twardowski, Michael S.; Freeman, Scott A.; Voss, Kenneth J.; Boynton, Chris G.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperspectral profiles of downwelling irradiance and upwelling radiance in natural waters (oligotrophic and mesotrophic) are combined with inverse radiative transfer to obtain high resolution spectra of the absorption coefficient (a) and the backscattering coefficient (bb) of the water and its constituents. The absorption coefficient at the mesotrophic station clearly shows spectral absorption features attributable to several phytoplankton pigments (Chlorophyll a, b, c, and Carotenoids). The backscattering shows only weak spectral features and can be well represented by a power-law variation with wavelength (lambda): b(sub b) approx. Lambda(sup -n), where n is a constant between 0.4 and 1.0. However, the weak spectral features in b(sub b), suggest that it is depressed in spectral regions of strong particle absorption. The applicability of the present inverse radiative transfer algorithm, which omits the influence of Raman scattering, is limited to lambda < 490 nm in oligotrophic waters and lambda < 575 nm in mesotrophic waters.

  5. Spectra as windows into exoplanet atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Adam S

    2014-09-02

    Understanding a planet's atmosphere is a necessary condition for understanding not only the planet itself, but also its formation, structure, evolution, and habitability. This requirement puts a premium on obtaining spectra and developing credible interpretative tools with which to retrieve vital planetary information. However, for exoplanets, these twin goals are far from being realized. In this paper, I provide a personal perspective on exoplanet theory and remote sensing via photometry and low-resolution spectroscopy. Although not a review in any sense, this paper highlights the limitations in our knowledge of compositions, thermal profiles, and the effects of stellar irradiation, focusing on, but not restricted to, transiting giant planets. I suggest that the true function of the recent past of exoplanet atmospheric research has been not to constrain planet properties for all time, but to train a new generation of scientists who, by rapid trial and error, are fast establishing a solid future foundation for a robust science of exoplanets.

  6. Optical absorption spectra of dications of carotenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Jeevarajan, J.A.; Wei, C.C.; Jeevarajan, A.S.; Kispert, L.D.

    1996-04-04

    Quantitative optical absorption spectra of the cation radicals and the dications of canthaxanthin (I), {beta}carotene (II), 7`-cyano-7`-ethoxycarbonyl-7`-apo-{beta}-carotene (III), and 7`,7`-dimethyl-7`-apo-{beta}-carotene (IV) in dichloromethane solution are reported. Exclusive formation of dications occurs when the carotenoids are oxidized with ferric chloride. Addition of neutral carotenoid to the dications results in equilibrium formation of cation radicals. Oxidation with iodine in dichloromethane affords only cation radicals; electrochemical oxidation under suitable conditions yields both dications and cation radicals. Values of the optical parameters depend on the nature of the oxidative medium. The oscillator strengths calculated for gas phase cation radicals and dications of I-IV using the INDO/S method show the same trend as the experimental values. 31 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Satellite spectra for helium-like titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Bely-Dubac, F.; Faucher, P.; Steeman-Clark, L.; Dubau, J.; Cammy-Val, C.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K.W.; von Goeler, S.

    1982-06-01

    Wavelengths and atomic parameters for both dielectronic and inner-shell satellite lines of the type ls/sup 2/ nl - 1s2l' nl, with n = 2, 3, and 4, have been calculated for Ti XX. The atomic data were calculated in a multiconfiguration intermediate coupling scheme and are compared with previous results for n = 2. The intensities of the higher n satellites are derived from these data, and thus an estimate of the contribution of the unresolved dielectronic satellites to the resonance line is obtained. Direct excitation rates are also given for the resonance, intercombination and forbidden lines for He-like titanium. Cascades and the effect of resonances for these lines are not considered in this paper. These results are used to fit an experimental soft x-ray spectrum from the PDX (Poloidal Divertor Experiment) tokamak discharge. Good agreement is obtained between computed and observed spectra.

  8. Neural Network Solutions to Optical Absorption Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbrock, Conrad

    2012-10-01

    Artificial neural networks have been effective in reducing computation time while achieving remarkable accuracy for a variety of difficult physics problems. Neural networks are trained iteratively by adjusting the size and shape of sums of non-linear functions by varying the function parameters to fit results for complex non-linear systems. For smaller structures, ab initio simulation methods can be used to determine absorption spectra under field perturbations. However, these methods are impractical for larger structures. Designing and training an artificial neural network with simulated data from time-dependent density functional theory may allow time-dependent perturbation effects to be calculated more efficiently. I investigate the design considerations and results of neural network implementations for calculating perturbation-coupled electron oscillations in small molecules.

  9. First dynamic spectra of stellar microwave flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastian, T. S.; Bookbinder, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    The VLA has been used in the spectral-line mode at 1.4 GHz to obtain the first dynamic spectra of stellar sources other than the sun. Two very intense, highly circularly polarized, microwave outbursts were observed on the dMe flare star UV Cet, in addition to a slowly varying, unpolarized component. One outburst was purely left circularly polarized and showed no variations as a function of frequency across the 41 MHz band, whereas the other was as much as 70 percent right-circularly polarized and showed distinct variations with frequency. Although the slowly varying emission is probably due to incoherent gyrosynchrotron emission, the two flaring events are the result of coherent mechanisms. The coherent emission is interpreted in terms of plasma radiation and the cyclotron maser instability.

  10. Spectra of Particulate Backscattering in Natural Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Howard, R.; Lewis, Marlon R.; McLean, Scott D.; Twardowski, Michael S.; Freeman, Scott A.; Voss, Kenneth J.; Boynton, Chris G.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperspectral profiles of downwelling irradiance and upwelling radiance in natural waters (oligotrophic and mesotrophic) are combined with inverse radiative transfer to obtain high resolution spectra of the absorption coefficient (a) and the backscattering coefficient (bb) of the water and its constituents. The absorption coefficient at the mesotrophic station clearly shows spectral absorption features attributable to several phytoplankton pigments (Chlorophyll a, b, c, and Carotenoids). The backscattering shows only weak spectral features and can be well represented by a power-law variation with wavelength (lambda): b(sub b) approx. Lambda(sup -n), where n is a constant between 0.4 and 1.0. However, the weak spectral features in b(sub b), suggest that it is depressed in spectral regions of strong particle absorption. The applicability of the present inverse radiative transfer algorithm, which omits the influence of Raman scattering, is limited to lambda < 490 nm in oligotrophic waters and lambda < 575 nm in mesotrophic waters.

  11. X ray spectra of cataclysmic variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Joseph; Halpern, Jules

    1990-01-01

    X ray spectral parameters of cataclysmic variables observed with the 'Einstein' imaging proportional counter were determined by fitting an optically thin, thermal bremsstrahlung spectrum to the raw data. Most of the sources show temperatures of order a few keV, while a few sources exhibit harder spectra with temperatures in excess of 10 keV. Estimated 0.1 to 3.5 keV luminosities are generally in the range from 10(exp 30) to 10(exp 32) erg/sec. The results are consistent with the x rays originating in a disk/white dwarf boundary layer of non-magnetic systems, or in a hot, post-shock region in the accretion column of DQ Her stars, with a negligible contribution from the corona of the companion. In a few objects column densities were found that are unusually high for interstellar material. It was suggested that the absorption occurs in the system itself.

  12. A Study of Pioneer Venus Nightglow Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slanger, Tom G.

    1993-01-01

    The work performed during the 12-month period of this contract involved: (1) further analysis of latitudinal variations in the Venusian NO nightglow intensity from PVOUVS data; (2) corrections made to the input data for the VTGCM model, relating specifically to a factor of three increase in the three-body recombination rate coefficient of N + O; (3) consideration of limits on the rate of reaction of N-atoms with CO2; (4) consideration of the Venusian equivalent of the terrestrial hot N-atom reaction for NO production; and (5) successful location of video images of meteor trails from space, for the purpose of making a comparison with the meteor trail that we have hypothesized as an explanation of intense UV spectra observed on a particular Pioneer Venus (PV) orbit.

  13. Galactic cosmic ray composition and energy spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    Galactic cosmic ray nuclei represent a significant risk to long-duration spaceflight outside the magnetosphere. We review briefly existing measurements of the composition and energy spectra of heavy cosmic ray nuclei, pointing out which species and energy ranges are most critical to assessing cosmic ray risks for spaceflight. Key data sets are identified and a table of cosmic ray abundances is presented for elements from H to Ni (Z = 1 to 28). Because of the 22-year nature of the solar modulation cycle, data from the approaching 1998 solar minimum is especially important to reducing uncertainties in the cosmic ray radiation hazard. It is recommended that efforts to model this hazard take advantage of approaches that have been developed to model the astrophysical aspects of cosmic rays.

  14. 3- to 13-micron spectra of Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Keith S.; Hammel, H. B.; Young, Leslie; Joiner, Joanna; Hackwell, J.; Lynch, D. K.; Russell, R.

    1993-01-01

    The Broadband Array Spectrograph System with the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility was used to obtain 3- to 13-micron spectra of Io on June 14-16, 1991. The extinction correction and its error for each standard star (Alpha Boo, Alpha Lyr, and Mu UMa) were found individually by performing an unweighted linear fit of instrumental magnitude as a function of airmass. The model results indicate two significant trends: (1) modest differences between the two hemispheres at lower background temperatures and (2) a tendency to higher temperatures, smaller areas, and less power from the warm component at higher background temperatures with an increased contrast between the two hemispheres. The increased flux from 8 to 13 microns is due primarily to a greater area on the Loki (trailing) hemisphere for the warm component, although temperature also plays a role.

  15. Electron spectra from decay of fission products

    SciTech Connect

    Dickens, J K

    1982-09-01

    Electron spectra following decay of individual fission products (72 less than or equal to A less than or equal to 162) are obtained from the nuclear data given in the compilation using a listed and documented computer subroutine. Data are given for more than 500 radionuclides created during or after fission. The data include transition energies, absolute intensities, and shape parameters when known. An average beta-ray energy is given for fission products lacking experimental information on transition energies and intensities. For fission products having partial or incomplete decay information, the available data are utilized to provide best estimates of otherwise unknown decay schemes. This compilation is completely referenced and includes data available in the reviewed literature up to January 1982.

  16. Radioactive sample effects on EDXRF spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, Christopher G

    2008-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) is a rapid, straightforward method to determine sample elemental composition. A spectrum can be collected in a few minutes or less, and elemental content can be determined easily if there is adequate energy resolution. Radioactive alpha emitters, however, emit X-rays during the alpha decay process that complicate spectral interpretation. This is particularly noticeable when using a portable instrument where the detector is located in close proximity to the instrument analysis window held against the sample. A portable EDXRF instrument was used to collect spectra from specimens containing plutonium-239 (a moderate alpha emitter) and americium-241 (a heavy alpha emitter). These specimens were then analyzed with a wavelength dispersive XRF (WDXRF) instrument to demonstrate the differences to which sample radiation-induced X-ray emission affects the detectors on these two types of XRF instruments.

  17. Vibrational spectra and DFT calculations of squalene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Hye Jin; Weiss, Taylor L.; Devarenne, Timothy P.; Laane, Jaan

    2013-01-01

    The isoprenoid compound squalene is a building block molecule for the production of essential cellular molecules such as membrane sterols, has several therapeutic activities including anticancer properties, and has commercial applications for a variety of industries including the production of cosmetics. While the physical structure of squalene has been known for many years, a spectroscopic understanding of the squalene molecular structure and how these spectrometric properties relate to the physical squalene structure has yet to be reported. In the present work we present the Raman and infrared spectra of liquid squalene, complemented by DFT calculations. The molecule has 234 vibrational frequencies and these have been categorized according to the different types of vibrational modes present. The vibrational modes are highly mixed and these have been assigned for the more prominent infrared and Raman bands.

  18. 3- to 13-micron spectra of Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Keith S.; Hammel, H. B.; Young, Leslie; Joiner, Joanna; Hackwell, J.; Lynch, D. K.; Russell, R.

    1993-01-01

    The Broadband Array Spectrograph System with the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility was used to obtain 3- to 13-micron spectra of Io on June 14-16, 1991. The extinction correction and its error for each standard star (Alpha Boo, Alpha Lyr, and Mu UMa) were found individually by performing an unweighted linear fit of instrumental magnitude as a function of airmass. The model results indicate two significant trends: (1) modest differences between the two hemispheres at lower background temperatures and (2) a tendency to higher temperatures, smaller areas, and less power from the warm component at higher background temperatures with an increased contrast between the two hemispheres. The increased flux from 8 to 13 microns is due primarily to a greater area on the Loki (trailing) hemisphere for the warm component, although temperature also plays a role.

  19. UV Spectra, Bombs, and the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, Philip G.

    2015-08-01

    A recent analysis of UV data from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) reports plasma “bombs” with temperatures near 8 × 104 K within the solar photosphere. This is a curious result, first because most bomb plasma pressures p (the largest reported case exceeds 103 dyn cm-2) fall well below photospheric pressures (\\gt 7× {10}3), and second, UV radiation cannot easily escape from the photosphere. In the present paper the IRIS data is independently analyzed. I find that the bombs arise from plasma originally at pressures between ≤ 80 and 800 dyne cm-2 before explosion, i.e., between ≥ 850 and 550 km above {τ }500=1. This places the phenomenon’s origin in the low-mid chromosphere or above. I suggest that bomb spectra are more compatible with Alfvénic turbulence than with bi-directional reconnection jets.

  20. Multiconfigurational Effects in Theoretical Resonance Raman Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yingjin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We analyze resonance Raman spectra of the nucleobase uracil in the short‐time approximation calculated with multiconfigurational methods. We discuss the importance of static electron correlation by means of density‐matrix renormalization group self‐consistent field (DMRG‐SCF) calculations. Our DMRG‐SCF results reveal that a minimal active orbital space that leads to a qualitatively correct description of the resonance Raman spectrum of uracil should encompass parts of the σ/σ* bonding/anti‐bonding orbitals of the pyrimidine ring. We trace these findings back to the considerable entanglement between the σ/σ* bonding/anti‐bonding as well as valence π/π* orbitals in the excited‐state electronic structure of uracil, which indicates non‐negligible non‐dynamical correlation effects that are less pronounced in the electronic ground state. PMID:27933695