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Sample records for bamboo

  1. Coevolution of Cyanogenic Bamboos and Bamboo Lemurs on Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Ballhorn, Daniel J.; Rakotoarivelo, Fanny Patrika; Kautz, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    Feeding strategies of specialist herbivores often originate from the coevolutionary arms race of plant defenses and counter-adaptations of herbivores. The interaction between bamboo lemurs and cyanogenic bamboos on Madagascar represents a unique system to study diffuse coevolutionary processes between mammalian herbivores and plant defenses. Bamboo lemurs have different degrees of dietary specialization while bamboos show different levels of chemical defense. In this study, we found variation in cyanogenic potential (HCNp) and nutritive characteristics among five sympatric bamboo species in the Ranomafana area, southeastern Madagascar. The HCNp ranged from 209±72 μmol cyanide*g-1 dwt in Cathariostachys madagascariensis to no cyanide in Bambusa madagascariensis. Among three sympatric bamboo lemur species, the greater bamboo lemur (Prolemur simus) has the narrowest food range as it almost exclusively feeds on the highly cyanogenic C. madagascariensis. Our data suggest that high HCNp is the derived state in bamboos. The ancestral state of lemurs is most likely "generalist" while the ancestral state of bamboo lemurs was determined as equivocal. Nevertheless, as recent bamboo lemurs comprise several "facultative specialists" and only one "obligate specialist" adaptive radiation due to increased flexibility is likely. We propose that escaping a strict food plant specialization enabled facultative specialist bamboo lemurs to inhabit diverse geographical areas. PMID:27532127

  2. Benefits from additives and xylanase during enzymatic hydrolysis of bamboo shoot and mature bamboo.

    PubMed

    Li, Kena; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Jingfeng; Zhang, Junhua

    2015-09-01

    Effects of additives (BSA, PEG 6000, and Tween 80) on enzymatic hydrolysis of bamboo shoot and mature bamboo fractions (bamboo green, bamboo timber, bamboo yellow, bamboo node, and bamboo branches) by cellulases and/or xylanase were evaluated. The addition of additives was comparable to the increase of cellulase loadings in the conversion of cellulose and xylan in bamboo fractions. Supplementation of xylanase (1 mg/g DM) with cellulases (10 FPU/g DM) in the hydrolysis of bamboo fractions was more efficient than addition of additives in the production of glucose and xylose. Moreover, addition of additives could further increase the glucose release from different bamboo fractions by cellulases and xylanase. Bamboo green exhibited the lowest hydrolyzability. Almost all of the polysaccharides in pretreated bamboo shoot fractions were hydrolyzed by cellulases with the addition of additives or xylanase. Additives and xylanase showed great potential for reducing cellulase requirement in the hydrolysis of bamboo. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Study on bamboo gluing performance numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Z. R.; Sun, W. H.; Sui, X. M.; Zhang, X. F.

    2018-01-01

    Bamboo gluing timber is a green building materials, can be widely used as modern building beams and columns. The existing bamboo gluing timber is usually produced by bamboo columns or bamboo bundle rolled into by bamboo columns. The performance of new bamboo gluing timber is decided by bamboo adhesion character. Based on this, the cohesive damage model of bamboo gluing is created, experiment results are used to validate the model. The model proposed in the work is agreed on the experimental results. Different bamboo bonding length and bamboo gluing performance is analysed. The model is helpful to bamboo integrated timber application.

  4. Carbon dioxide emission from bamboo culms.

    PubMed

    Zachariah, E J; Sabulal, B; Nair, D N K; Johnson, A J; Kumar, C S P

    2016-05-01

    Bamboos are one of the fastest growing plants on Earth, and are widely considered to have high ability to capture and sequester atmospheric carbon, and consequently to mitigate climate change. We tested this hypothesis by measuring carbon dioxide (CO2 ) emissions from bamboo culms and comparing them with their biomass sequestration potential. We analysed diurnal effluxes from Bambusa vulgaris culm surface and gas mixtures inside hollow sections of various bamboos using gas chromatography. Corresponding variations in gas pressure inside the bamboo section and culm surface temperature were measured. SEM micrographs of rhizome and bud portions of bamboo culms were also recorded. We found very high CO2 effluxes from culm surface, nodes and buds of bamboos. Positive gas pressure and very high concentrations of CO2 were observed inside hollow sections of bamboos. The CO2 effluxes observed from bamboos were very high compared to their carbon sequestration potential. Our measurements suggest that bamboos are net emitters of CO2 during their lifespan. © 2016 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  5. Preparation of Bamboo Chars and Bamboo Activated Carbons to Remove Color and COD from Ink Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Hata, Motohide; Amano, Yoshimasa; Thiravetyan, Paitip; Machida, Motoi

    2016-01-01

    Bamboo chars and bamboo activated carbons prepared by steam activation were applied for ink wastewater treatment. Bamboo char at 800 °C was the best for the removal of color and chemical oxygen demand (COD) from ink wastewater compared to bamboo chars at 300 to 700 °C due to higher surface area and mesopore volume. Bamboo activated carbon at 600 °C (S600) was the best compared to bamboo activated carbon at 800 °C (S800), although S800 had larger surface area (1108 m(2)/g) than S600 (734 m(2)/g). S600 had higher mesopore volume (0.20 cm(3)/g) than S800 (0.16 cm(3)/g) and therefore achieved higher color and COD removal. All bamboo activated carbons showed higher color and COD removal efficiency than commercial activated carbon. In addition, S600 had the superior adsorption capacity for methylene blue (0.89 mmol/g). Therefore, bamboo is a suitable material to prepare adsorbents for removal of organic pollutants.

  6. Effect of fabricated density and bamboo species on physical-mechanical properties of bamboo fiber bundle reinforced composites

    Treesearch

    Jiulong Xie; Jinqiu Qi; Tingxing Hu; Cornelis F. De Hoop; Chung Yun Hse; Todd F. Shupe

    2016-01-01

    Bamboo stems were subjected to a mechanical treatment process for the extraction of bamboo fiber bundles. The fiber bundles were used as reinforcement for the fabrication of high-performance composites with phenolic resins as matrix. The influence of fabricated density and bamboo species on physical–mechanical properties of bamboo fiber bundle reinforced composites (...

  7. Review on Bamboo Utilization as Biocomposites, Pulp and Bioenergy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusuf, Sulaeman; Syamani, F. A.; Fatriasari, W.; Subyakto

    2018-03-01

    One of potential non wood bioresources utilized in industrial application is bamboos. Bamboos are include in graminae family which have high biomass productivity, easy and rapid production, wide avability and high holocellulose content. Indonesia has a huge potential of bamboos, more than 162 bamboo species are found however only some of them are planted that have a high economic value. Bamboos have some advantages such as can be harvested at 3 years, straight culm, high strength, easy to be processed, and relatively cheap. Research Center for Biomaterials has developed utilization of bamboo culm for ply bamboo product as alternative of plywood since 1995, using gombong bamboo, tali bamboo, sembilang bamboo, andong bamboo with PF resin as adhesive. Other biocomposite products from bamboos include particle board, cement board and polymer-bamboo fiber composites. In term of processing technique and final product quality, bamboo composites from ply bamboo are the most prospectable material to be utilized in industrial application. Yellow bamboo and betung bamboo have also been developed as pulp and paper. Biopulping using soda and kraft pulping after biological pretreatment using white rot fungi to remove lignin was used as pulping method in this conversion. Biokraft pulping with Trametes versicolor for 45 days with inoculum loading of 10% resulted better pulp quality compared to the other fungi. Betung bamboo had good morphological characteristics and chemical component content to be converted into bioenergy such as bioethanol. Several pretreatment methods have been developed in order to result high sugar yield. Microwave assisted acid hydrolysis was preferedin producing higher yield from the pretreated bamboo compared to enzymatic hydrolysis. By using this method, the bamboo pretreated by biological-microwave pretreatment results higher improvement to increase sugar yield.

  8. Phylogenetic variation of phytolith carbon sequestration in bamboos

    PubMed Central

    Li, Beilei; Song, Zhaoliang; Li, Zimin; Wang, Hailong; Gui, Renyi; Song, Ruisheng

    2014-01-01

    Phytoliths, the amorphous silica deposited in plant tissues, can occlude organic carbon (phytolith-occluded carbon, PhytOC) during their formation and play a significant role in the global carbon balance. This study explored phylogenetic variation of phytolith carbon sequestration in bamboos. The phytolith content in bamboo varied substantially from 4.28% to 16.42%, with the highest content in Sasa and the lowest in Chimonobambusa, Indocalamus and Acidosasa. The mean PhytOC production flux and rate in China's bamboo forests were 62.83 kg CO2 ha−1 y−1 and 4.5 × 108 kg CO2 y−1, respectively. This implies that 1.4 × 109 kg CO2 would be sequestered in world's bamboo phytoliths because the global bamboo distribution area is about three to four times higher than China's bamboo. Therefore, both increasing the bamboo area and selecting high phytolith-content bamboo species would increase the sequestration of atmospheric CO2 within bamboo phytoliths. PMID:24736571

  9. A Comparative Study of the Adsorption of Methylene Blue onto Synthesized Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron-Bamboo and Manganese-Bamboo Composites

    PubMed Central

    Shaibu, Solomon E.; Adekola, Folahan A.; Adegoke, Halimat I.; Ayanda, Olushola S.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, bamboo impregnated with nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) and nanoscale manganese (nMn) were prepared by the aqueous phase borohydride reduction method and characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and PIXE analysis. The synthesized nMn-bamboo and nZVI-bamboo composites were subsequently applied to the sorption of methylene blue (MB) dye from aqueous solution. The adsorption of MB dye was investigated under various experimental conditions such as pH, contact time, initial concentration of MB dye and adsorbent dosage. The results showed that the synthesized nZVI-bamboo composite was more effective than nMn-bamboo composite in terms of higher MB dye adsorption capacity of 322.5 mg/g compared to 263.5 mg/g of nMn-bamboo composite. At a concentration of 140 mg/L MB dye, 0.02 g of nZVI-bamboo and nMn-bamboo composites resulted in 79.6% and 78.3% removal, respectively, at 165 rpm, contact time of 120 min and at a solution pH of 7.6. The equilibrium data was best represented by Freundlich isotherm model and the pseudo-second order kinetic model better explained the kinetic data for both nZVI-bamboo and nMn-bamboo composites. PMID:28788688

  10. Timber Bamboo Pulp

    Treesearch

    Troy Runge; Carl Houtman; Alberto Negri; Jackie Heinricher

    2013-01-01

    Fast-growing biomass, such as bamboo, has the potential to serve an important future role in the pulp and paper industry with potential to both lower resource costs and improve a product’s sustainability. Moso bamboo is particularly interesting due to its fast growth and size, which allows it to be handled and chipped similarly to wood resources. In this study, we will...

  11. Wettability of three Honduran bamboo species

    Treesearch

    X. B. Li; T.F. Shube; C.Y. Hse

    2004-01-01

    This study was initiated to determine the wettability of three Honduran bamboo species by contact-angiemeasurements. Static contact angles of urea formaldehyde (UF), phenol formaldehyde (PF), isocyanate (ISO) and distilled water on the bamboo surfaces were measured. The effects of bamboo species, layer (outer, middle and inner) and chemical treatment (hydrochloric acid...

  12. Comparative Properties of Bamboo and Rice Straw Pellets

    Treesearch

    Xianmiao Liu; Zhijia Liu; Benhua Fei; Zhiyong Cai; Zehui Jiang; Xing' e Liu

    2013-01-01

    Bamboo is a potential major bio-energy resource. Tests were carried out to compare and evaluate the property of bamboo and rice straw pellets, rice straw being the other main source of biomass solid fuel in China. All physical properties of untreated bamboo pellets (UBP), untreated rice straw pellets (URP), carbonized bamboo pellets (CBP), and carbonized rice straw...

  13. Hormone Distribution and Transcriptome Profiles in Bamboo Shoots Provide Insights on Bamboo Stem Emergence and Growth.

    PubMed

    Gamuyao, Rico; Nagai, Keisuke; Ayano, Madoka; Mori, Yoshinao; Minami, Anzu; Kojima, Mikiko; Suzuki, Takamasa; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Ashikari, Motoyuki; Reuscher, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Growth and development are tightly co-ordinated events in the lifetime of living organisms. In temperate bamboo plants, spring is the season when environmental conditions are suitable for the emergence of new shoots. Previous studies demonstrated that bamboo plants undergo an energy-consuming 'fast stem growth' phase. However, the events during the initiation of stem elongation in bamboo are poorly understood. To understand the onset of bamboo stem growth, we performed hormone and transcriptome profiling of tissue regions in newly elongating shoots of the Moso bamboo Phyllostachys edulis. The growth hormones auxins, cytokinins and gibberellins accumulated in the shoot apex, while the stress hormones ABA, salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) are predominantly found in the lower part of the stem. The mature basal part of the stem showed enrichment of transcripts associated with cell wall metabolism and biosynthesis of phenylpropanoid metabolites, such as lignin. In the young upper stem region, expression of cell formation- and DNA synthesis-related genes was enriched. Moreover, the apical region showed enhanced expression of genes involved in meristem maintenance, leaf differentiation and development, abaxial/adaxial polarity and flowering. Our findings integrate the spatial regulation of hormones and transcriptome programs during the initiation of bamboo stem growth. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. The structure and mechanics of Moso bamboo material

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, P. G.; Gibson, L. J.

    2014-01-01

    Although bamboo has been used structurally for millennia, there is currently increasing interest in the development of renewable and sustainable structural bamboo products (SBPs). These SBPs are analogous to wood products such as plywood, oriented strand board and glue-laminated wood. In this study, the properties of natural Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens) are investigated to further enable the processing and design of SBPs. The radial and longitudinal density gradients in bamboo give rise to variations in the mechanical properties. Here, we measure the flexural properties of Moso bamboo in the axial direction, along with the compressive strengths in the axial and transverse directions. Based on the microstructural variations (observed with scanning electron microscopy) and extrapolated solid cell wall properties of bamboo, we develop models, which describe the experimental results well. Compared to common North American construction woods loaded along the axial direction, Moso bamboo is approximately as stiff and substantially stronger, in both flexure and compression but denser. This work contributes to critical knowledge surrounding the microstructure and mechanical properties of bamboo, which are vital to the engineering and design of sustainable SBPs. PMID:25056211

  15. Dadih bamboo ampel (bambusa vulgaris) and bamboo gombong (gigantochloa verticilata) 2 and 3 days fermented : effect on salad dressing hedonic quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginting, Nurzainah

    2018-03-01

    The study aims to find time of fermentation of dadih and hedonic quality of dadih salad dressing. Goat milk was fermented in two kinds of bamboo: bamboo Ampel (Bambusa vulgaris) and bamboo Gombong (Gigantochloa verticilata) with different days; i.e. 2 and 3 days which will then became dadih while the dadih then were used as a raw material for making salad dressing. In Indonesia today there is an increasing on vegetable salad demand due to understanding of the benefits of consuming vegetables. One form of vegetable preparation is vegetable salad that is generally used as non local dressings. This research was conducted from April to May 2017 using Factorial Completely Randomized Design with 2 factors; i.e factor 1 (2 and 3 days fermented dadih) and factor 2 (bamboo types : bamboo Ampel and bamboo Gombong) with 4 replications. The parameters were flavor, color, aroma and texture (hedonic evaluation) where there were 25 panelists in doing evaluation. The results showed that 2 days fermented in bamboo ampel significantly (P <0.05) were preferred.

  16. Bamboo: An Underutilized Resource with Extensive Application Possibilities.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bamboo is classified into Subtribe Bambusoideae of the Poaceae family which is comprised of over 1600 species of bamboo. Most species originated in Asia and Central and South America, although there are several species native to the United States. Often overlooked in the United States, bamboo is g...

  17. Impact performance of two bamboo-based laminated composites

    Treesearch

    Huanrong Liu; Zehui Jiang; Zhengjun Sun; Yan Yan; Zhiyong Cai; Xiubiao Zhang

    2017-01-01

    The present work aims to determine the impact performance of two bamboo-based laminated composites [bamboo/poplar laminated composite (BPLC) and bamboo/ glass fiber laminated composite (BGFLC)] using lowvelocity impact tests by a drop tower. In addition, fracture characteristics were evaluated using computed tomography (CT). Results showed that BPLC presented better...

  18. Bamboo vs. crops: an integrated emergy and economic evaluation of using bamboo to replace crops in south Sichuan Province, China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hong-Fang; Cai, Chun-Ju; Zeng, Xian-Shu; Campbell, Daniel E; Fan, Shao-Hui; Liu, Guang-Lu

    2018-03-10

    Based on long-term monitoring conducted in Chang-ning county, a pilot site of the 'Grain for Green Program' (GFGP), an integrated emergy and economic method was applied to evaluate the dynamic ecological-economic performance of 3 kinds of bamboo systems planted on sloping farmland. The results confirmed the positive effects of all 3 kinds of bamboo systems on water conservation and soil erosion control. The benefits gained progressively increased during the first 8 years after conversion, going from 4639 to 16127 EMyuan/ha/yr on average. All three bamboo plantations were much more sustainable than common agricultural crops planted on sloping land (CP) on both the short and long-term scales with their Emergy Sustainability Index (ESI) and Emergy Index for Sustainable Development (EISD), respectively, being 14.07-325.71 and 80.35-265.80 times that of CP. However, all 3 bamboo plantations had a Net Economic Benefit (NEB) less than that of CP during the first 8 years after conversion. Even with the government-mandated ecological compensation applied, the annual NEB EC s of the Bambusa rigida (BR) and Phyllostachys pubescense (PP) plantations were, respectively, 3922.03 and 7422.77 yuan/ha/yr lower than the NEB of CP. Emergy-based evaluation of ecosystem services provides an objective reference for applying ecological compensation in strategy-making, but it cannot wholly solve the economic viability problem faced by all bamboo plantations. Inter-planting annual herbs or edible fungus, such as Dictyophora echinovolvata , within bamboo forests, especially in young bamboo plantations, might be a direction for optimizing bamboo cultivation that would improve its economic viability.

  19. Different carbonization process of bamboo charcoal using Gigantochloa Albociliata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isa, S. S. M.; Ramli, M. M.; Halin, D. S. C.; Anhar, N. A. M.; Hambali, N. A. M. A.

    2017-09-01

    Bamboo charcoal has attracted a lot of interests due to their microporous structure, high surface area and great adsorption properties. Some of the applications utilizing this material focused on these advantages such as water purification, electromagnetic wave absorber and blood purification. However, these advantages really depend on the carbonization and activation process of bamboo charcoal. The production must be carried out in properly control environment with precise temperatures and timing. This paper report the production of bamboo charcoal using Gigantochloa Albociliata in controlled environment at 500 °C for 1 hour (lab-prepared). Then the material was characterized for their dispersibility and adsorption behaviour. Furthermore, the bamboo charcoal that was produced commercially, by company, was also characterized and compared. The results show, bamboo charcoal produced by lab-prepared has similar qualities with the commercial bamboo charcoal.

  20. The physical and mechanical properties of treated and untreated Gigantochloa Scortechinii bamboo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daud, Norhasliya Mohd; Nor, Norazman Mohamad; Yusof, Mohammed Alias; Bakhri, Azrul Affandhi Mustaffa Al; Shaari, Amalina Aisyah

    2018-02-01

    Bamboo's advantages such as fast growing, renewable and easily available raw material meets the demand of sustainable material in construction. Bamboo act as reinforcement to enhance strength in structural members. This paper investigated on the properties of Gigantochloa Scortechinii bamboo (moisture content, density, compression, shear and bending) by referring to ISO 22157. Moisture content for both untreated and treated bamboo high at the bottom section while density is high at the top section. Compression strength for untreated bamboo were between 19.96 to 23.80 MPa and treated bamboo were between 31.74 to 36.60 MPa. High compression was at the top section which have the greatest wall thickness. Shear strength recorded between 4.28 to 5.69 MPa for untreated bamboo with node and 3.67 to 5.21 MPa for treated bamboo with node. The shear strength of samples with node recorded high strength compared to internode. Untreated bamboo recorded the MOR between 53.64 to 73.66 MPa and 58.23 to 62.86 MPa for treated bamboo. MOE of untreated bamboo were between 26.70 GPa to 36.31 GPa while treated bamboo were between 28.83 to 33.41 GPa. By replacing bamboo to the conventional building material, cost of materials will be reduced and sustainability will be enhanced.

  1. Lithological control on phytolith carbon sequestration in moso bamboo forests

    PubMed Central

    Li, Beilei; Song, Zhaoliang; Wang, Hailong; Li, Zimin; Jiang, Peikun; Zhou, Guomo

    2014-01-01

    Phytolith-occluded carbon (PhytOC) is a stable carbon (C) fraction that has effects on long-term global C balance. Here, we report the phytolith and PhytOC accumulation in moso bamboo leaves developed on four types of parent materials. The results show that PhytOC content of moso bamboo varies with parent material in the order of granodiorite (2.0 g kg−1) > granite (1.6 g kg−1) > basalt (1.3 g kg−1) > shale (0.7 g kg−1). PhytOC production flux of moso bamboo on four types of parent materials varies significantly from 1.0 to 64.8 kg CO2 ha−1 yr−1, thus a net 4.7 × 106 –310.8 × 106 kg CO2 yr−1 would be sequestered by moso bamboo phytoliths in China. The phytolith C sequestration rate in moso bamboo of China will continue to increase in the following decades due to nationwide bamboo afforestation/reforestation, demonstrating the potential of bamboo in regulating terrestrial C balance. Management practices such as afforestation of bamboo in granodiorite area and granodiorite powder amendment may further enhance phytolith C sequestration through bamboo plants. PMID:24918576

  2. Development and mechanical characterization of green bamboo composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Aidy; Ng, W. K.; Arifin, F.; Rassiah, K.; Othman, F.; Hazin, M. S.; Ahmad, M. M. H. Megat

    2018-02-01

    In this study, a bamboo composite is developed using specific bamboo species known as Gigantochloa Scortechinii (Buluh Semantan) which can be found in Malaysia. In precise, the woven bamboo (WB) was formed from the culm fier composite with an average of 0.5 mm thickness and 5.0 mm width strip is laminated with Wowen E Glass (WEG) and reinforced with epoxy (EP). The laminated was using a hand lay-up technique. The developed bamboo composites are then characterized comprehensively in the term of tensile, hardness, impact, fatigue and fracture test. It is found that the strength was equivalent with the existing steel alloy in term of tensile and fracture properties.

  3. Bamboo: Strategies for Teaching about Aspects of Asian Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antolik, Brother Raymond

    1978-01-01

    Ten classroom activities introduce elementary and junior high school students to Asian culture by investigating the uses of bamboo. Students are directed to read about bamboo, investigate bamboo's roles (food, building material, clothing, tools), and construct artifacts such as a fishing pole and a flute. (Author/DB)

  4. Crystallization kinetics and thermal resistance of bamboo fiber reinforced biodegradable polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thumsorn, S.; Srisawat, N.; On, J. Wong; Pivsa-Art, S.; Hamada, H.

    2014-05-01

    Bamboo fiber reinforced biodegradable polymer composites were prepared in this study. Biodegradable poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) was blended with bamboo fiber in a twin screw extruder with varied bamboo content from 20-0wt%. PBS/bamboo fiber composites were fabricated by compression molding process. The effect of bamboo fiber contents on properties of the composites was investigated. Non-isothermal crystallization kinetic study of the composites was investigated based on Avrami equation. The kinetic parameters indicated that bamboo fiber acted as heterogeneous nucleation and enhanced crystallinity of the composites. Bamboo fiber was well dispersed on PBS matrix and good adhered with the matrix. Tensile strength of the composites slightly deceased with adding bamboo fiber. However, tensile modulus and impact strength of the composites increased when increasing bamboo fiber contents. It can be noted that bamboo fiber promoted crystallization and crystallinity of PBS in the composites. Therefore, the composites were better in impact load transferring than neat PBS, which exhibited improving on impact performance of the composites.

  5. The floral transcriptomes of four bamboo species (Bambusoideae; Poaceae): support for common ancestry among woody bamboos.

    PubMed

    Wysocki, William P; Ruiz-Sanchez, Eduardo; Yin, Yanbin; Duvall, Melvin R

    2016-05-20

    Next-generation sequencing now allows for total RNA extracts to be sequenced in non-model organisms such as bamboos, an economically and ecologically important group of grasses. Bamboos are divided into three lineages, two of which are woody perennials with bisexual flowers, which undergo gregarious monocarpy. The third lineage, which are herbaceous perennials, possesses unisexual flowers that undergo annual flowering events. Transcriptomes were assembled using both reference-based and de novo methods. These two methods were tested by characterizing transcriptome content using sequence alignment to previously characterized reference proteomes and by identifying Pfam domains. Because of the striking differences in floral morphology and phenology between the herbaceous and woody bamboo lineages, MADS-box genes, transcription factors that control floral development and timing, were characterized and analyzed in this study. Transcripts were identified using phylogenetic methods and categorized as A, B, C, D or E-class genes, which control floral development, or SOC or SVP-like genes, which control the timing of flowering events. Putative nuclear orthologues were also identified in bamboos to use as phylogenetic markers. Instances of gene copies exhibiting topological patterns that correspond to shared phenotypes were observed in several gene families including floral development and timing genes. Alignments and phylogenetic trees were generated for 3,878 genes and for all genes in a concatenated analysis. Both the concatenated analysis and those of 2,412 separate gene trees supported monophyly among the woody bamboos, which is incongruent with previous phylogenetic studies using plastid markers.

  6. Current and potential carbon stocks in Moso bamboo forests in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Pingheng; Zhou, Guomo; Du, Huaqiang; Lu, Dengsheng; Mo, Lufeng; Xu, Xiaojun; Shi, Yongjun; Zhou, Yufeng

    2015-06-01

    Bamboo forests provide important ecosystem services and play an important role in terrestrial carbon cycling. Of the approximately 500 bamboo species in China, Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens) is the most important one in terms of distribution, timber value, and other economic values. In this study, we estimated current and potential carbon stocks in China's Moso bamboo forests and in their products. The results showed that Moso bamboo forests in China stored about 611.15 ± 142.31 Tg C, 75% of which was in the top 60 cm soil, 22% in the biomass of Moso bamboos, and 3% in the ground layer (i.e., bamboo litter, shrub, and herb layers). Moso bamboo products store 10.19 ± 2.54 Tg C per year. The potential carbon stocks reach 1331.4 ± 325.1 Tg C, while the potential C stored in products is 29.22 ± 7.31 Tg C a(-1). Our results indicate that Moso bamboo forests and products play a critical role in C sequestration. The information gained in this study will facilitate policy decisions concerning carbon sequestration and management of Moso bamboo forests in China. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Bamboo reinforced polymer composite - A comprehensive review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roslan, S. A. H.; Rasid, Z. A.; Hassan, M. Z.

    2018-04-01

    Bamboo has greatly attention of researchers due to their advantages over synthetic polymers. It is entirely renewable, environmentally-friendly, non-toxic, cheap, non-abrasive and fully biodegradable. This review paper summarized an oveview of the bamboo, fiber extraction and mechanical behavior of bamboo reinforced composites. A number of studies proved that mechanical properties of bamboo fibers reinforced reinforced polymer composites are excellent and competent to be utilized in high-tech applications. The properties of the laminate are influenced by the fiber loading, fibre orientation, physical and interlaminar adhesion between fibre and matrix. In contrast, the presence of chemical constituents such as cellulose, lignin, hemicellulose and wax substances in natural fibres preventing them from firmly binding with polymer resin. Thus, led to poor mechanical properties for composites. Many attempt has been made in order to overcome this issue by using the chemical treatment.

  8. Pretreatment of bamboo residues with Coriolus versicolor for enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Xu, Chunyan; Wang, Hongxun

    2007-08-01

    Pretreatment by a white-rot fungus Coriolus versicolor B1 under different conditions and saccharification of bamboo were investigated. The saccharification rate was significantly enhanced and a maximum saccharification rate of 37.0% was achieved after pretreatment. Reducing sugars yield was 223.2 mg/g of bamboo residues, which was 2.34 times that of the raw material. It was feasible to treat bamboo residues with B1 for the saccharification of bamboo.

  9. Dense understory dwarf bamboo alters the retention of canopy tree seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Feng; Zhang, Tengda; Guo, Qinxue; Tao, Jianping

    2016-05-01

    Tree seed retention is thought to be an important factor in the process of forest community regeneration. Although dense understory dwarf bamboo has been considered to have serious negative effects on the regeneration of forest community species, little attention has been paid to the relationship between dwarf bamboo and seed retention. In a field experiment we manipulated the density of Fargesia decurvata, a common understory dwarf bamboo, to investigate the retention of seeds from five canopy tree species in an evergreen and deciduous broad-leaved mixed forest in Jinfoshan National Nature Reserve, SW China. We found that the median survival time and retention ratio of seeds increased with the increase in bamboo density. Fauna discriminately altered seed retention in bamboo groves of different densities. Arthropods reduced seed survival the most, and seeds removed decreased with increasing bamboo density. Birds removed or ate more seeds in groves of medium bamboo density and consumed fewer seeds in dense or sparse bamboo habitats. Rodents removed a greater number of large and highly profitable seeds in dense bamboo groves but more small and thin-husked seeds in sparse bamboo groves. Seed characteristics, including seed size, seed mass and seed profitability, were important factors affecting seed retention. The results suggested that dense understory dwarf bamboo not only increased seeds concealment and reduced the probability and speed of seed removal but also influenced the trade-off between predation and risk of animal predatory strategies, thereby impacting the quantity and composition of surviving seeds. Our results also indicated that dense understory dwarf bamboo and various seed characteristics can provide good opportunities for seed storage and seed germination and has a potential positive effect on canopy tree regeneration.

  10. Effects of carbonization conditions on properties of bamboo pellets

    Treesearch

    Zhijia Liu; Zehui Jiang; Zhiyong Cai; Benhua Fei; Yan Yu; Xing' e Liu

    2013-01-01

    Bamboo is a biomass material and has great potential as a bio-energy resource of the future in China. Bamboo pellets were successfully manufactured using a laboratory pellet mill in preliminary work. This study was therefore carried out to investigate the effect of carbonization conditions (temperature and time) on properties of bamboo pellets and to evaluate product...

  11. The Manufacturing Process of Bamboo Pellets

    Treesearch

    Zhijia Liu; Zehui Jiang; Zhiyong Cai; Benhua Fei; Xing' e Liu

    2012-01-01

    Bamboo was a kind of biomass materials and had great potential as a bio-energy resource of the future in China. The physical and combustion properties of bamboo pellets were determined and the effects of moisture content (MC) and sizes of particle on these properties were investigated in this research. The results showed that MC and sizes of particle affected these...

  12. Bamboo Flowering from the Perspective of Comparative Genomics and Transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Prasun; Chakraborty, Sukanya; Dutta, Smritikana; Pal, Amita; Das, Malay

    2016-01-01

    Bamboos are an important member of the subfamily Bambusoideae, family Poaceae. The plant group exhibits wide variation with respect to the timing (1–120 years) and nature (sporadic vs. gregarious) of flowering among species. Usually flowering in woody bamboos is synchronous across culms growing over a large area, known as gregarious flowering. In many monocarpic bamboos this is followed by mass death and seed setting. While in sporadic flowering an isolated wild clump may flower, set little or no seed and remain alive. Such wide variation in flowering time and extent means that the plant group serves as repositories for genes and expression patterns that are unique to bamboo. Due to the dearth of available genomic and transcriptomic resources, limited studies have been undertaken to identify the potential molecular players in bamboo flowering. The public release of the first bamboo genome sequence Phyllostachys heterocycla, availability of related genomes Brachypodium distachyon and Oryza sativa provide us the opportunity to study this long-standing biological problem in a comparative and functional genomics framework. We identified bamboo genes homologous to those of Oryza and Brachypodium that are involved in established pathways such as vernalization, photoperiod, autonomous, and hormonal regulation of flowering. Additionally, we investigated triggers like stress (drought), physiological maturity and micro RNAs that may play crucial roles in flowering. We also analyzed available transcriptome datasets of different bamboo species to identify genes and their involvement in bamboo flowering. Finally, we summarize potential research hurdles that need to be addressed in future research. PMID:28018419

  13. Mechanical properties of moso bamboo treated with chemical agents

    Treesearch

    Benhua Fei; Zhijia Liu; Zehui Jiang; Zhiyong Cai

    2013-01-01

    Bamboo is a type of biomass material and has great potential as a bioenergy resource for the future in China. Surface chemical and thermal–mechanical behavior play an important role in the manufacturing process of bamboo composites and pellets. In this study, moso bamboo was treated by sodium hydrate solution and acetic acid solution. Surface chemical and dynamic...

  14. Characteristics of Microactive Carbon from Bamboo Var. Petung as Adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirawan, I. P. S.; Sutrisno; Seminar, K. B.; Nelwan, L. O.

    2018-05-01

    Bamboo has unique characteristics, such as in the carbonization process at a temperature of 500°C, the carbon characteristics is homogeneous. The characteristics of bamboo have great potential as a future bio-energy resource. Apart from being a bio-energy source of bamboo can also be used as an adsorbent material in the form of activated carbon. Activated carbon is the most inexpensive and easy to produce adsorbent material. One of the activated carbons of bamboo materials used is the micro-active carbon from bamboo. Microactivated carbon bamboo has a pore structure which is good for adsorption because of its surface area being much better than the other adsorbent, mainly on mesopore and micropore pore size. The purpose of this research is to make micro-activated carbon adsorbent bamboo var. petungand to analyze their characteristics. The characteristic of microactivecarbon was analyzed by SEM EDS and Iod number. The result showed a variation in pore size from 1μm to 11.157μm. The surface area of micro-active carbon of 200 mesh and 80 mesh is 1954.95 m2g-1 and 1516.34 m2g-1.

  15. A mass cyanide poisoning from pickling bamboo shoots.

    PubMed

    Sang-A-Gad, Pensiriwan; Guharat, Suriya; Wananukul, Winai

    2011-11-01

    Bamboo shoots contain cyanogenic glycosides named taxiphyllin. Cyanide poisoning from cyanogenic glycosides commonly occurs following ingestion. However, toxicity caused by inhalation of hydrogen cyanide gas (HCN) produced from pickled shoots has never been reported. To describe cyanide poisoning in eight victims who were exposed to HCN produced in a well containing pickling bamboo shoots. Due to a series of botched rescue attempts, a total of eight patients entered into a 27 m(3) well containing pickled bamboo shoots and immediately lost consciousness. After rescue, two patients developed cardiac arrest, metabolic acidosis and died. Four other patients suffered metabolic acidosis, but recovered after supportive care. The remaining two regained consciousness and recovered soon after the event. Ambient air study and cyanide content of bamboo shoots helped confirm the diagnosis. All patients had high anion gap metabolic acidosis with normal oxygenation. Blood cyanide levels ranged from 2.66 to 3.30 mcg/ml (taken after about 18 h of incident). Ambient air study (21 h after incident) revealed oxygen 20.9%, and sulfur dioxide 19.4 ppm. The instrument was unfortunately not equipped to detect HCN. A simulation study revealed HCN and sulfur dioxide in the ambient air at 10 ppm and 7.5 ppm, respectively. Cyanide content in the bamboo shoots ranged from 39 to 434 mg/kg in the wet shoots. This series of patients developed sudden onset of alteration of consciousness and metabolic acidosis upon exposure, and cyanide was confirmed in all victims. The simulation study confirmed the presence of HCN in the ambient air of the well containing bamboo shoots. We have reported mass acute cyanide poisoning with two fatalities. The source of HCN was unusual as it was produced from pickling bamboo shoot.

  16. Physical and mechanical properties of flakeboard reinforced with bamboo strips

    Treesearch

    Ge Wang; Zhehui Jiang; Chung Y. Hse; Todd F. Shupe

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the physical and mechanical performance of flakeboard reinforced with bamboo strips. The study investigated three different bamboo strip alignment patterns and an experimental control. All panels were tested in static bending both along parallel and perpendicular to the lengths of the bamboo strips. Internal bond...

  17. [The changes in spectral features of the staple-food bamboos of giant panda after flowering].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xue-Hua; Wu, Yan

    2012-12-01

    Large-area flowering of the giant pandas' staple food is an important factor which can influence their survival. Therefore, it is necessary to predict the bamboo flowering. Foping Nature Reserve was taken as the study area. The research selected the giant pandas' staple-food bamboos Bashania fargesii, Fargesia qinlingensis and Fargesia dracocephala with different flowering situations (i. e., flowering, potential flowering, non-flowering with far distance) to measure the spectral reflectance of bamboo leaves. We studied the influence of bamboo flowering on the spectral features of three bamboo species through analyzing the original spectral reflectance and their red edge parameters. The results showed that (1) the flowering changed the spectra features of bamboo species. The spectral reflectance of B. fargesii shows a pattern: flowering bamboo < potential flowering bamboo < non-flowering bamboo with far distance, while F. qinlingensis and F. dracocephala show the different pattern: flowering bamboo > or = potential flowering bamboo > non-flowering bamboo with far distance. Among three bamboo species, F. dracocephala showed the greatest change, and then F. qinlingensis. (2) After bamboo flowering, the red edge of B. fargesii has no obvious shifting, while the other two bamboos have distinctive shifting towards the shorter waves. The study found that the original spectral feature and the red edge all changed under various flowering states, which can be used to provide the experimental basis and theoretic support for the future prediction of bamboo flowering through remote sensing.

  18. Investigating co-combustion characteristics of bamboo and wood.

    PubMed

    Liang, Fang; Wang, Ruijuan; Jiang, Changle; Yang, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Tao; Hu, Wanhe; Mi, Bingbing; Liu, Zhijia

    2017-11-01

    To investigate co-combustion characteristics of bamboo and wood, moso bamboo and masson pine were torrefied and mixed with different blend ratios. The combustion process was examined by thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). The results showed the combustion process of samples included volatile emission and oxidation combustion as well as char combustion. The main mass loss of biomass blends occurred at volatile emission and oxidation combustion stage, while that of torrefied biomass occurred at char combustion stage. With the increase of bamboo content, characteristic temperatures decreased. Compared with untreated biomass, torrefied biomass had a higher initial and burnout temperature. With the increase of heating rates, combustion process of samples shifted to higher temperatures. Compared with non-isothermal models, activation energy obtained from isothermal model was lower. The result is helpful to promote development of co-combustion of bamboo and masson pine wastes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evolution of the bamboos (Bambusoideae; Poaceae): a full plastome phylogenomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Wysocki, William P; Clark, Lynn G; Attigala, Lakshmi; Ruiz-Sanchez, Eduardo; Duvall, Melvin R

    2015-03-18

    Bambusoideae (Poaceae) comprise three distinct and well-supported lineages: tropical woody bamboos (Bambuseae), temperate woody bamboos (Arundinarieae) and herbaceous bamboos (Olyreae). Phylogenetic studies using chloroplast markers have generally supported a sister relationship between Bambuseae and Olyreae. This suggests either at least two origins of the woody bamboo syndrome in this subfamily or its loss in Olyreae. Here a full chloroplast genome (plastome) phylogenomic study is presented using the coding and noncoding regions of 13 complete plastomes from the Bambuseae, eight from Olyreae and 10 from Arundinarieae. Trees generated using full plastome sequences support the previously recovered monophyletic relationship between Bambuseae and Olyreae. In addition to these relationships, several unique plastome features are uncovered including the first mitogenome-to-plastome horizontal gene transfer observed in monocots. Phylogenomic agreement with previous published phylogenies reinforces the validity of these studies. Additionally, this study presents the first published plastomes from Neotropical woody bamboos and the first full plastome phylogenomic study performed within the herbaceous bamboos. Although the phylogenomic tree presented in this study is largely robust, additional studies using nuclear genes support monophyly in woody bamboos as well as hybridization among previous woody bamboo lineages. The evolutionary history of the Bambusoideae could be further clarified using transcriptomic techniques to increase sampling among nuclear orthologues and investigate the molecular genetics underlying the development of woody and floral tissues.

  20. Ampel Bamboo Leaves Silicon Dioxide (SiO2) Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irzaman; Oktaviani, Novi; Irmansyah

    2018-03-01

    The bamboo tree trunk was the most commonly used part of daily life. Bamboo leaves often wereconsidered waste by the community, and bamboo leaves contain Silicon dioxide (SiO2). We have developed and compare two silicon dioxide method, using combustion to washing method (A) and washing to combustion method (B). Atom purity of either method was 99.9 %, with the tetragonal crystal structure. Mg, Au, Ca, and K impurities were found in Method A sample, andnot in Method B.

  1. Bars to jars: bamboo value chains in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Verina; Tieguhong, Julius Chupezi

    2013-04-01

    Bamboo is a well know and versatile material, which is a common sight across Cameroon's diverse ecosystems, from dry to humid tropical and Afromontane forests. Its numerous uses range from storage jars to decorating restaurant-bars, beehives to knives, fences, fodder, and fuel. Responding to the paucity of data on species and uses, the value chain for bamboo in Cameroon was analyzed. Based on 171 interviews and field observations, two African indigenous species (alpine Yushania alpina and savannah Oxytenanthera abyssinica) and exotic (Bambusa vulgaris spp.) bamboos were identified as most utilized. They were tracked from major production zones to final consumers. The ecological, socio-economic, institutional, and governance contexts and impacts are described and analyzed. Issues for research, conservation, and development are highlighted. These include the ambiguous regulatory status, the relationship between tenure and management, threats and conservation of African species and options to increase the sustainable livelihoods for stakeholders dependent upon bamboo.

  2. Enhancing the combustible properties of bamboo by torrefaction.

    PubMed

    Rousset, Patrick; Aguiar, Clarissa; Labbé, Nicole; Commandré, Jean-Michel

    2011-09-01

    Bamboo has wide range of moisture content, low bulk energy density and is difficult to transport, handle, store and feed into existing combustion and gasification systems. Because of its important fuel characteristics such as low ash content, alkali index and heating value, bamboo is a promising energy crop for the future. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of torrefaction on the main energy properties of Bambusa vulgaris. Three different torrefaction temperatures were employed: 220, 250 and 280°C. The elemental characteristics of lignite and coal were compared to the torrefied bamboo. The characteristics of the biomass fuels tend toward those of low rank coals. Principal component analysis of FTIR data showed a clear separation between the samples by thermal treatment. The loadings plot indicated that the bamboo samples underwent chemical changes related to carbonyl groups, mostly present in hemicelluloses, and to aromatic groups present in lignin. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Study on bamboo treated with gamma rays by X-ray diffraction].

    PubMed

    Sun, Feng-Bo; Fei, Ben-Hua; Jiang, Ze-Hui; Yu, Zi-Xuan; Tian, Gen-Lin; Yang, Quan-Wen

    2011-06-01

    The microfibril angle and crystallinity of bamboo treated with gamma rays were tested by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The result indicated that crystallinity in bamboo increased when irradiation dose was less than 100 kGy, while the irradiation dose was raised to about 100 kGy, crystallinity in bamboo reduced. But during the whole irradiation process, the influence on microfibril angle was not obvious, so it was not the dominant factors on variation in physical-mechanical properties of bamboo during the process of irradiation.

  4. Evaluation and comparison of a lightweight bamboo composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loth, Andreas; Berwing, Michael; Förster, Ralf

    2016-10-01

    The demand for fast changing production lines and other facilities needs new lightweight and stable systems for partitioning walls. There is also a need for ecological products for this application. The wood like grass bamboo provides a wide potential to substitute conventional wood. A composite lightweight honeycomb like bamboo board was developed and compared with reinforced and unreinforced plywood specimen. The acquired mechanical properties gave a promising result for the usability of bamboo as basis material for wide span boards. It can be manufactured with minimal technical investments, that suits also well for regions with little industry. The ecological assessment of the structure is very positive.

  5. Self-adaptive formation of uneven node spacings in wild bamboo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shima, Hiroyuki; Sato, Motohiro; Inoue, Akio

    2016-02-01

    Bamboo has a distinctive structure wherein a long cavity inside a cylindrical woody section is divided into many chambers by stiff diaphragms. The diaphragms are inserted at nodes and thought to serve as ring stiffeners for bamboo culms against the external load; if this is the case, the separation between adjacent nodes should be configured optimally in order to enhance the mechanical stability of the culms. Here, we reveal the hitherto unknown blueprint of the optimal node spacings used in the growth of wild bamboo. Measurement data analysis together with theoretical formulations suggest that wild bamboos effectively control their node spacings as well as other geometric parameters in accord with the lightweight and high-strength design concept.

  6. Bamboo mapping of Ethiopia, Kenya and Uganda for the year 2016 using multi-temporal Landsat imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuanyuan; Feng, Duole; Jayaraman, Durai; Belay, Daniel; Sebrala, Heiru; Ngugi, John; Maina, Eunice; Akombo, Rose; Otuoma, John; Mutyaba, Joseph; Kissa, Sam; Qi, Shuhua; Assefa, Fiker; Oduor, Nellie Mugure; Ndawula, Andrew Kalema; Li, Yanxia; Gong, Peng

    2018-04-01

    Mapping the spatial distribution of bamboo in East Africa is necessary for biodiversity conservation, resource management and policy making for rural poverty reduction. In this study, we produced a contemporary bamboo cover map of Ethiopia, Kenya and Uganda for the year 2016 using multi-temporal Landsat imagery series at 30 m spatial resolution. This is the first bamboo map generated using remotely sensed data for these three East African countries that possess most of the African bamboo resource. The producer's and user's accuracies of bamboos are 79.2% and 84.0%, respectively. The hotspots with large amounts of bamboo were identified and the area of bamboo coverage for each region was estimated according to the map. The seasonal growth status of two typical bamboo zones (one highland bamboo and one lowland bamboo) were analyzed and the multi-temporal imagery proved to be useful in differentiating bamboo from other vegetation classes. The images acquired in September to February are less contaminated by clouds and shadows, and the image series cover the dying back process of lowland bamboo, which were helpful for bamboo identification in East Africa.

  7. Ethanosolv Pretreatment of Bamboo with Dilute Acid for Efficient Enzymatic Saccharification

    Treesearch

    Zhiqiang Li; Zehui Jiang; Benhua Fei; Zhiyong Cai; Xuejun Pan

    2012-01-01

    Bamboo is a potential lignocellulosic biomass for the production of bioethanol because of its high cellulose and hemicelluloses content. In this research, ethanosolv pretreatment catalyzed by sulfuric acid was studied in order to enhance enzymatic saccharification of moso bamboo. The addition of 2% (w/w on bamboo) sulfuric acid in water or 75% (v/v) ethanol was...

  8. Changes of foraging patch selection and utilization by a giant panda after bamboo flowering.

    PubMed

    Li, Guochun; Song, Huadong; Altigani, Latifa A A; Zheng, Xueli; Bu, Shuhai

    2017-07-01

    The bamboo flowering leads to the habitat fragmentation and food quality decline of a giant panda. Few empirical research has been conducted about the giant panda's response to the bamboo flowering. Here, we investigated the characteristics of bamboo stands, giant panda's activity, and selection and utilization of bamboo stands by giant panda in Taibaishan National Nature Reserve, China, over a 3-year period (September 2013-May 2016) during the Fargesia qinlingensis flowering period. Our results indicated that the proportion of whole bamboo stands flowering has gradually expanded from 26.7% in 2013 and 33.9% in 2014 to 52.3% in 2015. Although the flowering bamboo has lower crude protein and higher crude fiber than a non-flowering bamboo, the giant panda still fed on flowering bamboo from the evidence of droppings. The giant panda left its feeding sites and moved to the high elevation along river when the proportion of flowering reached 69.2% at elevation of 2350-2450 m in the third year. With the decline of the quality of bamboo stand of Fargesia qinlingensis, the giant panda abandoned its feeding sites when the threshold value of bamboo flowering reached 56.9-69.2%. Flexibility in foraging strategy and spatial behavior can help the giant panda to better adapt to the environment.

  9. Bamboo salt attenuates CCl4-induced hepatic damage in Sprague-Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xin; Song, Jia-Le; Kil, Jeung-Ha

    2013-01-01

    Bamboo salt, a Korean folk medicine, is prepared with solar salt (sea salt) and baked several times at high temperatures in a bamboo case. In this study, we compared the preventive effects of bamboo salt and purified and solar salts on hepatic damage induced by carbon tetrachloride in Sprague-Dawley rats. Compared with purified and solar salts, bamboo salts prevented hepatic damage in rats, as evidenced by significantly reduced serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase (P < 0.05). Bamboo salt (baked 9×) triggered the greatest reduction in these enzyme levels. In addition, it also reduced the levels of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6, interferon (IFN)-γ, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Histopathological sections of liver tissue demonstrated the protective effect of bamboo salt, whereas sections from animals treated with the other salt groups showed a greater degree of necrosis. We also performed reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses of the inflammation-related genes iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α, and IL-1β in rat liver tissues. Bamboo salt induced a significant decrease (~80%) in mRNA and protein expression levels of COX-2, iNOS, TNF-α, and IL-1β, compared with the other salts. Thus, we found that baked bamboo salt preparations could prevent CCl4-induced hepatic damage in vivo. PMID:23964314

  10. Giant panda foraging and movement patterns in response to bamboo shoot growth.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingchun; Zhang, Zhizhong; Li, Zhong; Hong, Mingsheng; Zhou, Xiaoping; Zhou, Shiqiang; Zhang, Jindong; Hull, Vanessa; Huang, Jinyan; Zhang, Hemin

    2018-03-01

    Diet plays a pivotal role in dictating behavioral patterns of herbivorous animals, particularly specialist species. The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is well-known as a bamboo specialist. In the present study, the response of giant pandas to spatiotemporal variation of bamboo shoots was explored using field surveys and GPS collar tracking. Results show the dynamics in panda-bamboo space-time relationships that have not been previously articulated. For instance, we found a higher bamboo stump height of foraged bamboo with increasing elevation, places where pandas foraged later in spring when bamboo shoots become more fibrous and woody. The time required for shoots to reach optimum height for foraging was significantly delayed as elevation increased, a pattern which corresponded with panda elevational migration patterns beginning from the lower elevational end of Fargesia robusta distribution and gradually shifting upward until the end of the shooting season. These results indicate that giant pandas can respond to spatiotemporal variation of bamboo resources, such as available shoots. Anthropogenic interference of low-elevation F. robusta habitat should be mitigated, and conservation attention and increased monitoring should be given to F. robusta areas at the low- and mid-elevation ranges, particularly in the spring shooting season.

  11. Comparing simulated carbon budget of a Lei bamboo forest with flux tower data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, Xuehe; Jiang, Hong; Liu, Jinxun; Sun, Cheng; Wang, Ying; Jin, Jiaxin

    2014-01-01

    Bamboo forest ecosystem is the part of the forest ecosystem. The distribution area of bamboo forest is limited, but in somewhere, like south China, it has been cultivate for a long time with human management. As the climate change has been take great effect on forest carbon budget, many researchers pay attention to the carbon budget in bamboo forest. Moreover cultivative management had a significant impact on the bamboo forest carbon budget. In this study, we modified a terrestrial ecosystem model named Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS) according the management of Lei bamboo forest. Some management, like fertilization, shoots harvesting and organic mulching in winter, had been incorporated into model. Then we had compared model results with the observation data from a Lei bamboo flux tower. The simulated and observed results had achieved good consistency. Our simulated Lei bamboo forest yearly net ecosystem productivity (NEP) was 0.41 kgC a-1 of carbon, which is very close to the observation data 0.45 kgC a-1 of carbon. And the monthly simulated results can take the change of carbon budget in each month, similar to the data we got from flux tower. It reflects that the modified IBIS model can characterize the growth of bamboo forest and perform the simulation well. And then two groups of simulations were set to evaluate effects of cultivative managements on Lei bamboo forests carbon budget. And results showed that both fertilization and organic mulching had taken positive effects on Lei bamboo forests carbon sequestration.

  12. Experimental Investigation and Analysis of Mercerized and Citric Acid Surface Treated Bamboo Fiber Reinforced Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, Jyotiraman; Baxi, R. N., Dr.

    2017-08-01

    Mercerization or NaOH fiber surface treatment is one of the most popular surface treatment processes to make the natural fibers such as bamboo fibers compatible for use as reinforcing material in composites. But NaOH being a chemical is hazardous and polluting to the nature. This paper explores the possibility of use of naturally derived citric acid for bamboo fiber surface treatment and its comparison with NaOH treated Bamboo Fiber Composites. Untreated, 2.5 wt% NaOH treated and 5 wt% citric acid treated Bamboo Fiber Composites with 5 wt% fiber content were developed by Hand Lay process. Bamboo mats made of bamboo slivers were used as reinforcing material. Mechanical and physical characterization was done to compare the effects of NaOH and citric acid bamboo fiber surface treatment on mechanical and physical properties of Bamboo Fiber Composite. The experiment data reveals that the tensile and flexural strength was found to be highest for citric acid and NaOH treated Bamboo Fiber Composite respectively. Water absorption tendency was found more than the NaOH treated Bamboo Fiber Composites. SEM micrographs used to analyze the morphology of fracture surface of tensile test specimens confirm improvement in fiber-matrix interface bonding due to surface treatment of bamboo fibers.

  13. Study on the mould-resistant properties of moso bamboo treated with high pressure and amylase

    Treesearch

    Xiao-Dong Huang; Chung-Yun Hse; Todd F. Shupe

    2014-01-01

    Starch of moso bamboo mainly exists in the elongated parenchyma cells, and it is difficult for amylase to enter moso bamboo and dissolve the starch. Therefore, the mould resistance capability of moso bamboo's products cannot meet the need for bamboo to resist fungal decay. In this experiment, moso bamboo blocks were first treated at six levels of pressure and for...

  14. Higher level phylogenetic relationships within the bamboos (Poaceae: Bambusoideae) based on five plastid markers.

    PubMed

    Kelchner, Scot A

    2013-05-01

    Bamboos are large perennial grasses of temperate and tropical forests worldwide. Two general growth forms exist: the economically and ecologically important woody bamboos (tribes Arundinarieae and Bambuseae), and the understory herbaceous bamboos (tribe Olyreae). Evolutionary relationships among the 1400+described species have been difficult to resolve with confidence. Comparative analysis of bamboo plastid (chloroplast) DNA has revealed three to five major lineages that show distinct biogeographic distributions. Taxon sampling across tribes and subtribes has been incomplete and most published data sets include a relatively small number of nucleotide characters. Branching order among lineages is often poorly supported, and in more than one study herbaceous bamboos form a clade within the woody bamboos. In this paper, the Bamboo Phylogeny Group presents the most complete phylogeny estimation to date of bamboo tribes and subtribes using 6.7 kb of coding and noncoding sequence data and 37 microstructural characters from the chloroplast genome. Quality of data is assessed, as is the possibility of long branch attraction, the degree of character conflict at key nodes in the tree, and the legitimacy of three alternative hypotheses of relationship. Four major plastid lineages are recognized: temperate woody, paleotropical woody, neotropical woody, and herbaceous bamboos. Woody bamboos are resolved as paraphyletic with respect to Olyreae but SH tests cannot reject monophyly of woody species (Arundinarieae+Bambuseae). Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Correlations between axial stiffness and microstructure of a species of bamboo

    PubMed Central

    Mannan, Sayyad; Paul Knox, J.

    2017-01-01

    Bamboo is a ubiquitous monocotyledonous flowering plant and is a member of the true grass family Poaceae. In many parts of the world, it is widely used as a structural material especially in scaffolding and buildings. In spite of its wide use, there is no accepted methodology for standardizing a species of bamboo for a particular structural purpose. The task of developing structure–property correlations is complicated by the fact that bamboo is a hierarchical material whose structure at the nanoscopic level is not very well explored. However, we show that as far as stiffness is concerned, it is possible to obtain reliable estimates of important structural properties like the axial modulus from the knowledge of certain key elements of the microstructure. Stiffness of bamboo depends most sensitively on the size and arrangement of the fibre sheaths surrounding the vascular bundles and the arrangement of crystalline cellulose microfibrils in their secondary cell walls. For the species of bamboo studied in this work, we have quantitatively determined the radial gradation that the arrangement of fibres renders to the structure. The arrangement of the fibres gives bamboo a radially graded property variation across its cross section. PMID:28280545

  16. Performance Using Bamboo Fiber Ash Concrete as Admixture Adding Superplasticizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, Gunalaan

    2017-06-01

    The increasing demand on natural resources for housing provisions in developing countries have called for sourcing and use of sustainable local materials for building and housing delivery. Natural materials to be considered sustainable for building construction should be ‘green’ and obtained from local sources, including rapidly renewable plant materials like palm fronds and bamboo, recycled materials and other products that are reusable and renewable. Each year, tens of millions of tons of bamboo are utilized commercially, generating a vast amount of waste. Besides that, bamboo fiber is easy availability, low density, low production cost and satisfactory mechanical properties. One solution is to activate this waste by using it as an additive admixture in concrete to keep it out of landfills and save money on waste disposal. The research investigates the mechanical and physical properties of bamboo fiber powder in a blended Portland cement. The structural value of the bamboo fiber powder in a blended Portland cement was evaluated with consideration for its suitability in concrete. Varied percentage of bamboo fiber powder (BFP) at 0%, 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% as an admixture in 1:2:4 concrete mixes. The workability of the mix was determined through slump; standard consistency test was carried on the cement. Compressive strength of hardened cured (150 x 150 x 150) mm concrete cubes at 7days, 14days and 28days were tested.

  17. Water Use Patterns of Four Tropical Bamboo Species Assessed with Sap Flux Measurements.

    PubMed

    Mei, Tingting; Fang, Dongming; Röll, Alexander; Niu, Furong; Hendrayanto; Hölscher, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Bamboos are grasses (Poaceae) that are widespread in tropical and subtropical regions. We aimed at exploring water use patterns of four tropical bamboo species (Bambusa vulgaris, Dendrocalamus asper, Gigantochloa atroviolacea, and G. apus) with sap flux measurement techniques. Our approach included three experimental steps: (1) a pot experiment with a comparison of thermal dissipation probes (TDPs), the stem heat balance (SHB) method and gravimetric readings using potted B. vulgaris culms, (2) an in situ calibration of TDPs with the SHB method for the four bamboo species, and (3) field monitoring of sap flux of the four bamboo species along with three tropical tree species (Gmelina arborea, Shorea leprosula, and Hevea brasiliensis) during a dry and a wet period. In the pot experiment, it was confirmed that the SHB method is well suited for bamboos but that TDPs need to be calibrated. In situ, species-specific parameters for such calibration formulas were derived. During field monitoring we found that some bamboo species reached high maximum sap flux densities. Across bamboo species, maximal sap flux density increased with decreasing culm diameter. In the diurnal course, sap flux densities in bamboos peaked much earlier than radiation and vapor pressure deficit (VPD), and also much earlier than sap flux densities in trees. There was a pronounced hysteresis between sap flux density and VPD in bamboos, which was less pronounced in trees. Three of the four bamboo species showed reduced sap flux densities at high VPD values during the dry period, which was associated with a decrease in soil moisture content. Possible roles of internal water storage, root pressure and stomatal sensitivity are discussed.

  18. Water Use Patterns of Four Tropical Bamboo Species Assessed with Sap Flux Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Tingting; Fang, Dongming; Röll, Alexander; Niu, Furong; Hendrayanto; Hölscher, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Bamboos are grasses (Poaceae) that are widespread in tropical and subtropical regions. We aimed at exploring water use patterns of four tropical bamboo species (Bambusa vulgaris, Dendrocalamus asper, Gigantochloa atroviolacea, and G. apus) with sap flux measurement techniques. Our approach included three experimental steps: (1) a pot experiment with a comparison of thermal dissipation probes (TDPs), the stem heat balance (SHB) method and gravimetric readings using potted B. vulgaris culms, (2) an in situ calibration of TDPs with the SHB method for the four bamboo species, and (3) field monitoring of sap flux of the four bamboo species along with three tropical tree species (Gmelina arborea, Shorea leprosula, and Hevea brasiliensis) during a dry and a wet period. In the pot experiment, it was confirmed that the SHB method is well suited for bamboos but that TDPs need to be calibrated. In situ, species-specific parameters for such calibration formulas were derived. During field monitoring we found that some bamboo species reached high maximum sap flux densities. Across bamboo species, maximal sap flux density increased with decreasing culm diameter. In the diurnal course, sap flux densities in bamboos peaked much earlier than radiation and vapor pressure deficit (VPD), and also much earlier than sap flux densities in trees. There was a pronounced hysteresis between sap flux density and VPD in bamboos, which was less pronounced in trees. Three of the four bamboo species showed reduced sap flux densities at high VPD values during the dry period, which was associated with a decrease in soil moisture content. Possible roles of internal water storage, root pressure and stomatal sensitivity are discussed. PMID:26779233

  19. Effect of Bamboo Viscose on the Wicking and Moisture Management Properties of Gauze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, Abdul R.; Su, Siwei; Amjad, Bilal; Cai, Yingjie; Lin, Lina

    2017-12-01

    Bamboo viscose or regenerated cellulose fibers were used to check their absorbency properties effect on the wicking and moisture management in gauzes. Bamboo viscose and cotton fibers were spun into five different yarn samples with different fiber proportion by ring spinning. Fifteen different gauze samples were made of these yarn samples. The gauze samples were subjected to wicking test to check the wicking ability. Water vapor transmission test was applied to check the vapor transmission rate. These tests were applied to measure the effectiveness of bamboo viscose, cotton and blended gauze samples in wound healing. Pure bamboo gauzes and gauzes with high content of bamboo fiber, i.e. 75B:25C and 50B:50C, shows better wicking and vapor transmission properties. It makes gauzes with high bamboo viscose suitable for wound care applications because of moisture absorbency.

  20. The Nutritional Facts of Bamboo Shoots and Their Usage as Important Traditional Foods of Northeast India

    PubMed Central

    Nongdam, P.; Tikendra, Leimapokpam

    2014-01-01

    Bamboo shoots are considered as one of the useful health foods because of their rich contents of proteins, carbohydrates, vitamins, fibres, and minerals and very low fat. Though bamboo shoots provide lots of health benefits, their consumption is confined mostly to Southeast Asian and East Asian countries. The acceptability of bamboo shoots as popular vegetable crop is very less due to their high pungent smell and bitter acidic taste. The use of bamboo as food in India is mainly restricted to Northeastern part of the country where they form an indispensable part of several traditional speciality dishes. The different ethnic communities take fresh or fermented bamboo shoot as one of most preferred traditional food items. Some of the important bamboo based traditional foods are ushoi, soibum, rep, mesu, eup, ekhung, hirring, and so forth. Bamboo shoots should be properly processed before they are consumed as freshly harvested shoots have high content of toxic cyanogenic glycosides which may pose serious health problems. The prospect of bamboo shoot industry in Northeast India is bright due to its rich genetic resources of bamboos. However, habitat destruction and extensive use of bamboos for food, handicraft, and construction purposes have resulted in severe depletion of natural bamboo resources. This review stresses upon the high nutritive values and health benefits of bamboo shoots and their usage as important traditional foods in Northeast India. The bamboo market potential of the region and use of in vitro plant micropropagation methods as effective means of bamboo conservation are also emphasized in this paper. PMID:27433496

  1. Experimental research on friction coefficient between grain bulk and bamboo clappers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Gan; Sun, Ping; Zhao, Yanqi; Yin, Lingfeng; Zhuang, Hong

    2017-12-01

    A silo is an important piece of storage equipment, especially in the grain industry. The internal friction angle and the friction coefficient between the grain and the silo wall are the main parameters needed for calculating the lateral pressure of the silo wall. Bamboo is used in silo walls, but there are no provisions about the friction coefficient between bulk grain and bamboo clappers in existing codes. In this paper, the material of the silo wall is bamboo. The internal friction of five types of grain and the friction coefficient between the grain and the bamboo clappers were measured with an equal-strain direct shear apparatus. By comparing the experimental result values with the code values, the friction coefficient between the grain bulk and bamboo clappers is lower than that between grain and steel wall and that between grain and concrete wall. The differences in value are 0.21 and 0.09, respectively.

  2. Withered on the stem: is bamboo a seasonally limiting resource for giant pandas?

    PubMed

    Li, Youxu; Swaisgood, Ronald R; Wei, Wei; Nie, Yonggang; Hu, Yibo; Yang, Xuyu; Gu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Zejun

    2017-04-01

    In response to seasonal variation in quality and quantity of available plant biomass, herbivorous foragers may alternate among different plant resources to meet nutritional requirements. Giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) are reliant almost exclusively on bamboo which appears omnipresent in most occupied habitat, but subtle temporal variation in bamboo quality may still govern foraging strategies, with population-level effects. In this paper, we investigated the possibility that temporal variation in the quality of this resource is involved in population regulation and examined pandas' adaptive foraging strategies in response to temporal variation in bamboo quality. Giant pandas in late winter and early spring consumed a less optimal diet in Foping Nature Reserve, as the availability of the most nutritious and preferred components and age classes of Bashania fargesii declined, suggesting that bamboo may be a seasonally limiting resource. Most panda mortalities and rescues occurred during the same period of seasonal food limitation. Our findings raised the possibility that while total bamboo biomass may not be a limiting factor, carrying capacity may be influenced by subtle seasonal variation in bamboo quality. We recommend that managers and policy-makers should consider more than just the quantity of bamboo in the understory and that carrying capacity estimates should be revised downward to reflect the fact that all bamboos are not equal.

  3. High-Throughput Sequencing of Six Bamboo Chloroplast Genomes: Phylogenetic Implications for Temperate Woody Bamboos (Poaceae: Bambusoideae)

    PubMed Central

    Li, De-Zhu

    2011-01-01

    Background Bambusoideae is the only subfamily that contains woody members in the grass family, Poaceae. In phylogenetic analyses, Bambusoideae, Pooideae and Ehrhartoideae formed the BEP clade, yet the internal relationships of this clade are controversial. The distinctive life history (infrequent flowering and predominance of asexual reproduction) of woody bamboos makes them an interesting but taxonomically difficult group. Phylogenetic analyses based on large DNA fragments could only provide a moderate resolution of woody bamboo relationships, although a robust phylogenetic tree is needed to elucidate their evolutionary history. Phylogenomics is an alternative choice for resolving difficult phylogenies. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we present the complete nucleotide sequences of six woody bamboo chloroplast (cp) genomes using Illumina sequencing. These genomes are similar to those of other grasses and rather conservative in evolution. We constructed a phylogeny of Poaceae from 24 complete cp genomes including 21 grass species. Within the BEP clade, we found strong support for a sister relationship between Bambusoideae and Pooideae. In a substantial improvement over prior studies, all six nodes within Bambusoideae were supported with ≥0.95 posterior probability from Bayesian inference and 5/6 nodes resolved with 100% bootstrap support in maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood analyses. We found that repeats in the cp genome could provide phylogenetic information, while caution is needed when using indels in phylogenetic analyses based on few selected genes. We also identified relatively rapidly evolving cp genome regions that have the potential to be used for further phylogenetic study in Bambusoideae. Conclusions/Significance The cp genome of Bambusoideae evolved slowly, and phylogenomics based on whole cp genome could be used to resolve major relationships within the subfamily. The difficulty in resolving the diversification among three clades of

  4. Rapid determination of chemical composition and classification of bamboo fractions using visible-near infrared spectroscopy coupled with multivariate data analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhong; Li, Kang; Zhang, Maomao; Xin, Donglin; Zhang, Junhua

    2016-01-01

    During conversion of bamboo into biofuels and chemicals, it is necessary to efficiently predict the chemical composition and digestibility of biomass. However, traditional methods for determination of lignocellulosic biomass composition are expensive and time consuming. In this work, a novel and fast method for quantitative and qualitative analysis of chemical composition and enzymatic digestibilities of juvenile bamboo and mature bamboo fractions (bamboo green, bamboo timber, bamboo yellow, bamboo node, and bamboo branch) using visible-near infrared spectra was evaluated. The developed partial least squares models yielded coefficients of determination in calibration of 0.88, 0.94, and 0.96, for cellulose, xylan, and lignin of bamboo fractions in raw spectra, respectively. After visible-near infrared spectra being pretreated, the corresponding coefficients of determination in calibration yielded by the developed partial least squares models are 0.994, 0.990, and 0.996, respectively. The score plots of principal component analysis of mature bamboo, juvenile bamboo, and different fractions of mature bamboo were obviously distinguished in raw spectra. Based on partial least squares discriminant analysis, the classification accuracies of mature bamboo, juvenile bamboo, and different fractions of bamboo (bamboo green, bamboo timber, bamboo yellow, and bamboo branch) all reached 100 %. In addition, high accuracies of evaluation of the enzymatic digestibilities of bamboo fractions after pretreatment with aqueous ammonia were also observed. The results showed the potential of visible-near infrared spectroscopy in combination with multivariate analysis in efficiently analyzing the chemical composition and hydrolysabilities of lignocellulosic biomass, such as bamboo fractions.

  5. Silicon isotope fractionation in bamboo and its significance to the biogeochemical cycle of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, T. P.; Zhou, J. X.; Wan, D. F.; Chen, Z. Y.; Wang, C. Y.; Zhang, F.

    2008-03-01

    A systematic investigation on silica contents and silicon isotope compositions of bamboos was undertaken. Seven bamboo plants and related soils were collected from seven locations in China. The roots, stem, branch and leaves for each plant were sampled and their silica contents and silicon isotope compositions were determined. The silica contents and silicon isotope compositions of bulk and water-soluble fraction of soils were also measured. The silica contents of studied bamboo organs vary from 0.30% to 9.95%. Within bamboo plant the silica contents show an increasing trend from stem, through branch, to leaves. In bamboo roots the silica is exclusively in the endodermis cells, but in stem, branch and leaves, the silica is accumulated mainly in epidermal cells. The silicon isotope compositions of bamboos exhibit significant variation, from -2.3‰ to 1.8‰, and large and systematic silicon isotope fractionation was observed within each bamboo. The δ 30Si values decrease from roots to stem, but then increase from stem, through branch, to leaves. The ranges of δ 30Si values within each bamboo vary from 1.0‰ to 3.3‰. Considering the total range of silicon isotope composition in terrestrial samples is only 7‰, the observed silicon isotope variation in single bamboo is significant and remarkable. This kind of silicon isotope variation might be caused by isotope fractionation in a Rayleigh process when SiO 2 precipitated in stem, branches and leaves gradually from plant fluid. In this process the Si isotope fractionation factor between dissolved Si and precipitated Si in bamboo ( αpre-sol) is estimated to be 0.9981. However, other factors should be considered to explain the decrease of δ 30Si value from roots to stem, including larger ratio of dissolved H 4SiO 4 to precipitated SiO 2 in roots than in stem. There is a positive correlation between the δ 30Si values of water-soluble fractions in soils and those of bulk bamboos, indicating that the dissolved

  6. Chemical changes with maturation of the bamboo species phyllostachys pubescens

    Treesearch

    X.B. Li; T.F. Shupe; G.F. Peter; C.Y. Hse; T.L. Eberhardt

    2007-01-01

    Chemical changes with maturation of the bamboo species Phyllostachys pubescens. Bamboo chemical properties were measured at three different heights from one-, three- and five-year-old plants and at three different radial positions from the thre-year-old culms of Phyllostachys pubescenssouth-eastern USA. Small but significant...

  7. Selected physical and mechanical properties of moso bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens)

    Treesearch

    H.Q. Yu; Z.H. Jiang; C.Y. Hse; T.F. Shupe

    2008-01-01

    Selected physical and mechanical properties of moso bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens). Selected physical and mechanical properties of 4?6 year old moso bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens) grown in Zhejiang, China were investigated at different vertical and horizontal positions. Two way analysis of variance and Tukey?s mean comparison...

  8. Preparation of sago starch-based biocomposite reinforced microfibrillated cellulose of bamboo assisted by mechanical treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silviana, S.; Hadiyanto, H.

    2017-06-01

    The utilization of green composites by using natural fibres is developed due to their availability, ecological benefits, and good properties in mechanical and thermal. One of the potential sources is bamboo that has relative high cellulose content. This paper was focused on the preparation of sago starch-based reinforced microfribrillated cellulose of bamboo that was assisted by mechanical treatment. Microfibrillated cellulose of bamboo was prepared by isolation of cellulose with chemical treatment. Preparation of bamboo microfibrillated cellulose was conducted by homogenizers for dispersing bamboo cellulose, i.e. high pressure homogenizer and ultrasonic homogenizer. Experiments were elaborated on several variables such as the concentration of bamboo microfibrillated cellulose dispersed in water (1-3 %w) and the volume of microfibrillated cellulose (37.5-75%v). Four %w of sago starch solution was mixed with bamboo microfibrillated cellulose and glycerol with plasticizer and citric acid as cross linker. This paper provided the analysis of tensile strength as well as SEM for mechanical and morphology properties of the biocomposite. The results showed that the preparation of sago starch-based biocomposite reinforced bamboo microfibrillated cellulose by using ultrasonic homogenizer yielded the highest tensile strength and well dispersed in the biocomposite.

  9. Bamboo as sustainable material for furniture design in disaster and remote areas in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofiana, Yunida; Wahidiyat, Mita; Caroline, Octaviana Sylvia

    2018-03-01

    Bamboo has been known as a sustainable material for architecture, but only used on a small scale for furniture. However, even though it a sustainable resource, many people considered Bamboo as outcast material for furniture because of its appearance. Evidently, the use of bamboo is often used to make simple tools with similar traditional designs for everyday life. The tradition of using bamboo was not further explored with respect to the ongoing development of creative design and function in the era of today’s modern technology. In retrospect to the above issues, this study is aimed to introduce the used of bamboo for material furniture in disaster and remote areas in Indonesia to increases their quality of life. It uses a research by a method of collecting data through surveys, literature review, interviews and training to determine the types of bamboo used for material furniture in disaster and remote territories. The results of this study is intended to show that the use of bamboo can be further developed into furniture for disaster and remote territory to create higher values of the products and increase the quality of life.

  10. Unusual sleeping site selection by southern bamboo lemurs.

    PubMed

    Eppley, Timothy M; Donati, Giuseppe; Ganzhorn, Jörg U

    2016-04-01

    Selection of sleeping sites has consequences for individual fitness. Non-human primates often bias their selection towards arboreal sites, and the lemurs of Madagascar typically rest/sleep in trees, tree holes, and/or constructed nests. Three non-mutually exclusive hypotheses to explain sleeping site selection include protection from predators, avoidance of parasitic vectors, and improved thermoregulation. Here, we examine these hypotheses for the unusual sleeping site selections by the southern bamboo lemur (Hapalemur meridionalis). Within the Mandena littoral forest of southeast Madagascar, the southern bamboo lemur is known for its ecological flexibility compared to other bamboo lemur species, including a dietary niche expansion to feeding on the ground. Between October 2012 and December 2013, we observed bamboo lemurs from three social groups for 1778.67 h, conducting full-day focal follows on 11 adult individuals (five males, six females). During this period, all three groups were observed to sleep on the ground, with one of these groups also using an abandoned nest of a Madagascar crested ibis (Lophotibis cristata). We collected habitat and temperature data to examine whether selection was influenced by environmental variables. Terrestrial sleeping (N = 17) was observed in all individuals but one adult female, with individuals burrowing under thick vegetation more often during the hot austral summer. While difficult to rigorously test, it is possible that terrestrial sleep sites and/or sleeping in a bird nest may impair visual detection by some aerial and terrestrial predators. Neither of these sites (i.e., terrestrial sleeping or use of a bird nest), however, is likely to minimize exposure to parasites/vectors. Terrestrial sleeping appears to support a thermoregulatory strategy, whereas the use of a bird nest could not be empirically tested. Our observations of unique sleeping site locations used by southern bamboo lemurs further the complexity of their

  11. New conceptual design of portable bamboo bridge for emergency purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musthaffa, A. A.; Nor, N. M.; Yusof, M. A.; Yuhazri, M. Y.

    2018-02-01

    Portable bridges serve as routes for troops during the military operations and the disaster relief operation. Nowadays, bamboo has been regarded as one of the alternative construction materials for building and bridge structures. This paper presents the conceptual design of the portable bridge. Several types of portable bridges and bamboo bridges are reviewed in the current work. The characteristics, capability and method of construction of each bridge are discussed. Finally, the conceptual of the portable bamboo bridge for emergency purposes is presented. The idea of producing portable bridge is proposed in the current work as it is crucial for providing route for communities affected by natural disasters.

  12. Diversity and Utilization of Bamboo Plants in The Area of Hotel in Kedewatan Village, Ubud, Bali

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utami, N. W. F.; Pradnyawathi, N. L. M.

    2017-10-01

    Bamboo or tiying (Balinese language) is a widely used non-timber plant in Indonesia especially in Bali. The presence of bamboo appertains to its ethno-botanical function of bamboo especially for rituals. However, there are other utilization of bamboo which is naturally grown or intentionally planted. Kedewatan as a famous place in northern Ubud, Bali have many lavish hotels with its natural environment and appealing place. The aims of this study is to invent bamboo species diversity and bamboo utilization on private areas of hotel in Kedewatan. Methods used in this study was field survey with observation and interview technic. Observation was implemented by purposive sampling methods by selecting hotel which adjacent to Ayung and Wos rivers. Interview was conducted with some key persons in charge on managing hotel garden. In addition, bamboo species identification was established through literature study. The results show that there are eleven bamboo species found on the survey area with most commonly employed species in the area were tiying tali (Gigantochloa apus (J.A. & J.H. Schultes) Kurz.) and tiying gading (Phyllostachys sulphurea (Carr.) A. e.t. C. Riv.) which were belong to exotic species. The areas which bamboo cultivated were welcome area as a hedgerow and near hotel lobby, between, outside and inside villa buildings, and naturally grown in the riverbanks with a good landscaping arrangement. Bamboo plantations were utilized to adorn and support the quality of the hotel building as well as to conserve soil and water along Ayung and Wos river canyons. The other utilization of bamboo was to facilitate ritual activity in Kedewatan village. They are allowed to ask for limited amount of bamboo culms with condition not to damage the physical appearance and function that desired by the hotel manager or hotel owner.

  13. Modified bamboo rayon-copper nanoparticle composites as antibacterial textiles.

    PubMed

    Teli, M D; Sheikh, Javed

    2013-10-01

    In the current study the bamboo rayon fabric grafted with acrylamide was utilized as a backbone to immobilize copper nanoprticles. The grafted bamboo rayon was first treated with CuSO4 followed by chemical reduction. The modified product was characterized using FTIR, TGA and SEM. The characteristic color developed after reduction was measured spectrophotometrically. The grafted bamboo rayon with Cu nanoparticles was then evaluated for antibacterial activity against both gram positive and gram negative bacteria and the durability of their antibacterial activity after washing. The product showed antibacterial activity against both types of bacterias which was found to be durable till 50 washes. The material can be claimed as suitable candidate for medical textile applications to prevent cross-infections. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Bamboo shoot preservation for enhancing its business potential and local economy: a review.

    PubMed

    Bal, Lalit M; Singhal, Poonam; Satya, Santosh; Naik, S N; Kar, Abhijit

    2012-01-01

    Bamboo shoot as food has been used in traditional ways by the tribal community the world over. For enhancing its business potential, research on various aspects of bamboo shoot as food is being carried out in Japan, Taiwan, Thailand, and Asian countries and several products are available in the market. Bamboo shoots are used as a delicacy in human food, are a good source of dietary fiber, low in fat and calories. The research studies included in this review paper focus on post-harvest preservation of bamboo shoot. In view of the seasonal availability of bamboo shoot, the post-harvest preservation system for handling cynogenic toxicity in raw shoot while keeping nutrients intact and enhancement of shelf life of the value added products assume great significance for the business potential of this natural product. A yardstick of assessing the "Shelf life-Quality Matrix" developed in this review paper would give a new perspective of quality control in case of preservation of bamboo shoot. Also, knowledge gaps identified in this paper would give impetus to new academic and R&D activities, in turn generating an innovative job profile in the food industry as well as rural entrepreneurship.

  15. Ethnopedology and soil quality of bamboo (Bambusa sp.) based agroforestry system.

    PubMed

    Arun Jyoti, Nath; Lal, Rattan; Das, Ashesh Kumar

    2015-07-15

    It is widely recognized that farmers' hold important knowledge of folk soil classification for agricultural land for its uses, yet little has been studied for traditional agroforestry systems. This article explores the ethnopedology of bamboo (Bambusa sp.) based agroforestry system in North East India, and establishes the relationship of soil quality index (SQI) with bamboo productivity. The study revealed four basic folk soil (mati) types: kalo (black soil), lal (red soil), pathal (stony soil) and balu (sandy soil). Of these, lal mati soil was the most predominant soil type (~ 40%) in bamboo-based agroforestry system. Soil physio-chemical parameters were studied to validate the farmers' soil hierarchal classification and also to correlate with productivity of the bamboo stand. Farmers' hierarchal folk soil classification was consistent with the laboratory scientific analysis. Culm production (i.e. measure of productivity of bamboo) was the highest (27culmsclump(-1)) in kalo mati (black soil) and the lowest (19culmsclump(-1)) in balu mati (sandy soil). Linear correlation of individual soil quality parameter with bamboo productivity explained 16 to 49% of the variability. A multiple correlation of the best fitted linear soil quality parameter (soil organic carbon or SOC, water holding capacity or WHC, total nitrogen) with productivity improved explanatory power to 53%. Development of SQI from ten relevant soil quality parameters and its correlation with bamboo productivity explained the 64% of the variation and therefore, suggest SQI as the best determinant of bamboo yield. Data presented indicate that the kalo mati (black soil) is sustainable or sustainable with high input. However, the other three folk soil types (red, stony and sandy soil) are also sustainable but for other land uses. Therefore, ethnopedological studies may move beyond routine laboratory analysis and incorporate SQI for assessing the sustainability of land uses managed by the farmers'. Additional

  16. Comparison of aqueous ammonia and dilute acid pretreatment of bamboo fractions: Structure properties and enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Xin, Donglin; Yang, Zhong; Liu, Feng; Xu, Xueru; Zhang, Junhua

    2015-01-01

    The effect of two pretreatments methods, aqueous ammonia (SAA) and dilute acid (DA), on the chemical compositions, cellulose crystallinity, morphologic change, and enzymatic hydrolysis of bamboo fractions (bamboo yellow, timber, green, and knot) was compared. Bamboo fractions with SAA pretreatment had better hydrolysability than those with DA pretreatment. High crystallinity index resulted in low hydrolysis yield in the conversion of SAA pretreated bamboo fractions, not DA pretreated fractions. The increase of cellulase loading had modestly positive effect in the hydrolysis of both SAA and DA pretreated bamboo fractions, while supplement of xylanase significantly increased the hydrolysis of the pretreated bamboo fractions, especially after SAA pretreatment. The results indicated that SAA pretreatment was more effective than DA pretreatment in conversion of bamboo fractions, and supplementation of xylanase was necessary in effective conversion of the SAA pretreated fractions into fermentable sugars. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Exploring bamboo leaf nutrient value in the US NPGS germplasm collection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bamboo shoots and leaves are nutritious, providing food for both human and animal consumption. But their nutrient value may depend on the bamboo species, harvesting season, and growing location. Leaf crude protein content, amino acid composition, and mineral element concentration were quantified fro...

  18. Effective of Microwave-KOH Pretreatment on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Bamboo

    Treesearch

    Zhiqiang Li; Zehui Jiang; Yan Yu; Zhiyong Cai

    2012-01-01

    Bamboo, with its advantages of fast growth, short renovation, easy propagation and rich in cellulose and hemicellulose, is a potential feedstock for bioethanol or other biofuels production. The objective of this study was to examine the fea- sibility of microwave assistant KOH pretreatments to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis of bamboo. Pretreatment was car- ried out by...

  19. Potential Mechanism of Detoxification of Cyanide Compounds by Gut Microbiomes of Bamboo-Eating Pandas

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gut microbes can enhance the ability of hosts to consume secondary plant compounds and, therefore, expand the dietary niche breadth of mammalian herbivores. The giant and red pandas are bamboo-eating specialists within the mammalian order Carnivora. Bamboo contains abundant plant secondary metabolites (e.g., cyanide-containing compounds). However, Carnivora species, including the giant panda, have deficient levels of rhodanese (one of the essential cyanide detoxification enzymes) in their tissues compared with the same tissues of herbivores. Here, we make a comparative analysis of 94 gut metagenomes, including 25 from bamboo-eating pandas (19 from giant pandas and 6 from red pandas), 30 from Père David’s deer, and 39 from published data for other mammals. The bamboo-eating pandas’ gut microbiomes had some common features, such as high proportions of Pseudomonas bacteria. The results revealed that bamboo-eating pandas’ gut microbiomes were significantly enriched in putative genes coding for enzymes related to cyanide degradation (e.g., rhodanese) compared with the gut microbiomes of typical herbivorous mammals, which might have coevolved with their special bamboo diets. The enrichment of putative cyanide-digesting gut microbes, in combination with adaptations related to morphology (e.g., pseudothumbs) and genomic signatures, show that the giant panda and red panda have evolved some common traits to adapt to their bamboo diet. IMPORTANCE The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and red panda (Ailurus fulgens), two obligate bamboo feeders, have distinct phylogenetic positions in the order Carnivora. Bamboo is extraordinarily rich in plant secondary metabolites, such as allied phenolic and polyphenolic compounds and even toxic cyanide compounds. Here, the enrichment of putative cyanide-digesting gut microbes, in combination with adaptations related to morphology (e.g., pseudothumbs) and genomic signatures, show that the giant panda and red panda have

  20. Experimental study on the strength of double shear timber connection using bamboo dowel fastener

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anshari, Buan; Sugiartha, Wayan; Mahmud, Fathmah; Rofaida, Aryani; Pathurrahman

    2017-11-01

    Utilization of timber and bamboo as building materials was very promising for now and future. As renewable resources they have high mechanical properties, lightweight, environmentally friendly and economic. Utilization of bamboo as connector was rarely published. Therefore, this study focused on utilization of non-metal material as connector in timber structure especially for beam and column. This research was conducted in the laboratory to examine the strength of double shear timber connection by using glued in rods (bamboo dowel) as connector with variation of adhesive thickness. As control specimen was used bamboo dowel Ø14 mm without adhesive in double shear connection. The results showed that the strength of double shear timber connection by using glued in rods (bamboo dowel) as connector could increased by 41% to resist axial force higher than the control one.

  1. Molecular Origin of Strength and Stiffness in Bamboo Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Youssefian, Sina; Rahbar, Nima

    2015-06-08

    Bamboo, a fast-growing grass, has a higher strength-to-weight ratio than steel and concrete. The unique properties of bamboo come from the natural composite structure of fibers that consists mainly of cellulose microfibrils in a matrix of intertwined hemicellulose and lignin called lignin-carbohydrate complex (LCC). Here, we have used atomistic simulations to study the mechanical properties of and adhesive interactions between the materials in bamboo fibers. With this aim, we have developed molecular models of lignin, hemicellulose and LCC structures to study the elastic moduli and the adhesion energies between these materials and cellulose microfibril faces. Good agreement was observed between the simulation results and experimental data. It was also shown that the hemicellulose model has stronger mechanical properties than lignin while lignin exhibits greater tendency to adhere to cellulose microfibrils. The study suggests that the abundance of hydrogen bonds in hemicellulose chains is responsible for improving the mechanical behavior of LCC. The strong van der Waals forces between lignin molecules and cellulose microfibril is responsible for higher adhesion energy between LCC and cellulose microfibrils. We also found out that the amorphous regions of cellulose microfibrils are the weakest interfaces in bamboo fibrils. Hence, they determine the fibril strength.

  2. Molecular Origin of Strength and Stiffness in Bamboo Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Youssefian, Sina; Rahbar, Nima

    2015-01-01

    Bamboo, a fast-growing grass, has a higher strength-to-weight ratio than steel and concrete. The unique properties of bamboo come from the natural composite structure of fibers that consists mainly of cellulose microfibrils in a matrix of intertwined hemicellulose and lignin called lignin-carbohydrate complex (LCC). Here, we have used atomistic simulations to study the mechanical properties of and adhesive interactions between the materials in bamboo fibers. With this aim, we have developed molecular models of lignin, hemicellulose and LCC structures to study the elastic moduli and the adhesion energies between these materials and cellulose microfibril faces. Good agreement was observed between the simulation results and experimental data. It was also shown that the hemicellulose model has stronger mechanical properties than lignin while lignin exhibits greater tendency to adhere to cellulose microfibrils. The study suggests that the abundance of hydrogen bonds in hemicellulose chains is responsible for improving the mechanical behavior of LCC. The strong van der Waals forces between lignin molecules and cellulose microfibril is responsible for higher adhesion energy between LCC and cellulose microfibrils. We also found out that the amorphous regions of cellulose microfibrils are the weakest interfaces in bamboo fibrils. Hence, they determine the fibril strength. PMID:26054045

  3. Molecular Origin of Strength and Stiffness in Bamboo Fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssefian, Sina; Rahbar, Nima

    2015-06-01

    Bamboo, a fast-growing grass, has a higher strength-to-weight ratio than steel and concrete. The unique properties of bamboo come from the natural composite structure of fibers that consists mainly of cellulose microfibrils in a matrix of intertwined hemicellulose and lignin called lignin-carbohydrate complex (LCC). Here, we have used atomistic simulations to study the mechanical properties of and adhesive interactions between the materials in bamboo fibers. With this aim, we have developed molecular models of lignin, hemicellulose and LCC structures to study the elastic moduli and the adhesion energies between these materials and cellulose microfibril faces. Good agreement was observed between the simulation results and experimental data. It was also shown that the hemicellulose model has stronger mechanical properties than lignin while lignin exhibits greater tendency to adhere to cellulose microfibrils. The study suggests that the abundance of hydrogen bonds in hemicellulose chains is responsible for improving the mechanical behavior of LCC. The strong van der Waals forces between lignin molecules and cellulose microfibril is responsible for higher adhesion energy between LCC and cellulose microfibrils. We also found out that the amorphous regions of cellulose microfibrils are the weakest interfaces in bamboo fibrils. Hence, they determine the fibril strength.

  4. Deployable bamboo structure project: A building life-cycle report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firdaus, Adrian; Prastyatama, Budianastas; Sagara, Altho; Wirabuana, Revian N.

    2017-11-01

    Bamboo is considered as a sustainable material in the world of construction, and it is vastly available in Indonesia. The general utilization of the material is increasingly frequent, however, its usage as a deployable structure-a recently-developed use of bamboo, is still untapped. This paper presents a report on a deployable bamboo structure project, covering the entire building life-cycle phase. The cycle encompasses the designing; fabrication; transportation; construction; operation and maintenance; as well as a plan for future re-use. The building is made of a configuration of the structural module, each being a folding set of bars which could be reduced in size to fit into vehicles for easy transportation. Each structural module was made of Gigantochloa apus bamboo. The fabrication, transportation, and construction phase require by a minimum of three workers. The fabrication and construction phase require three hours and fifteen minutes respectively. The building is utilized as cafeteria stands, the operation and maintenance phase started since early March 2017. The maintenance plan is scheduled on a monthly basis, focusing on the inspection of the locking mechanism element and the entire structural integrity. The building is designed to allow disassembly process so that it is reusable in the future.

  5. Bamboo thickets alter the demographic structure of Euterpe edulis population: A keystone, threatened palm species of the Atlantic forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rother, Débora Cristina; Rodrigues, Ricardo Ribeiro; Pizo, Marco Aurélio

    2016-01-01

    The rapid spread of bamboos can strongly affect forest structure by interfering plant regeneration and reducing local biodiversity. Considering that bamboos exert a negative influence on the plant community, our main goal was to investigate how this influence manifests at the population level. We compared the demographic structure of the threatened palm Euterpe edulis between bamboo and non-bamboo dominated patches within the Atlantic forest. In the study site, the native bamboo Guadua tagoara has created a marked patchiness and heterogeneity in the vegetation. Plots were set up randomly in bamboo and non-bamboo patches and the heights of all E. edulis individuals were measured. Data from canopy openness and litter depth were collected for both patches. Greater number of E. edulis was recorded in bamboo patches. However, frequency distribution of the height classes differed between patches revealing a predominance of seedling and sapling I classes in bamboo patches, in comparison to a more evenly distribution of height classes in non-bamboo patches. The canopy in bamboo patches was more open and the litter depth was thicker. Our analyses evidenced G. tagoara is functioning as a demographic bottleneck of natural population of E. edulis by arresting its later stages of regeneration and in high densities that bamboos may limit recruitment of this palm species.

  6. The Bending Strength, Internal Bonding and Thickness Swelling of a Five Layer Sandwiched Bamboo Particleboard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamaludin, M. A.; Bahari, S. A.; Nordin, K.; Soh, T. F. T.

    2010-03-01

    The demand for wood based material is increasing but the supply is decreasing. Therefore the price of these raw materials has increased. Bamboo provides an economically feasible alternative raw material for the wood based industry. Its properties are comparable to wood. It is also compatible with the existing processing technology. Bamboo is in abundance, easy to propagate and of short maturation period. Bamboo provides a cheaper alternative resource for the wood based industry. The development of new structural components from bamboo will widen its area of application from handicrafts to furniture and building components. In this study, five layer sandwiched bamboo particleboard were manufactured. The sandwiched Bamboo PB consists of a bamboo PB core, oil palm middle veneers and thin meranti surface veneers. The physical and mechanical properties of the bamboo sandwiched particleboards were tested in accordance to the BS-EN 317:1993 [1] and BS-EN 310:1993 [2], respectively. All the samples passed the standards. The modulus of elasticity was about 352% higher than the value specified in the BS standard, BS-EN 312-4:1996 [3]. The Internal bonding was about 23% higher than the general requirements specified in the standard. On the other hand, the thickness swelling was about 6% lower than the standard. No glue line failure was observed in the strength tests. Critical failures in the IB tests were observed in the particleboards. Tension failures were observed in the surface veneers in the bending tests. The five layer sandwiched bamboo particleboard can be used for light weight construction such as furniture, and wall and door panels in buildings.

  7. Techno-economic potential of bioethanol from bamboo in China

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bamboo is potentially an interesting feedstock for advanced bioethanol production in China due to its natural abundance, rapid growth, perennial nature and low management requirements. Liquid hot water (LHW) pretreatment was selected as a promising technology to enhance sugar release from bamboo lignocellulose whilst keeping economic and environmental costs to a minimum. The present research was conducted to assess: 1) by how much LHW pretreatment can enhance sugar yields in bamboo, and 2) whether this process has the potential to be economically feasible for biofuel use at the commercial scale. Pretreatments were performed at temperatures of 170-190°C for 10–30 minutes, followed by enzymatic saccharification with a commercial enzyme cocktail at various loadings. These data were then used as inputs to a techno-economic model using AspenPlus™ to determine the production cost of bioethanol from bamboo in China. Results At the selected LHW pretreatment of 190°C for 10 minutes, 69% of the initial sugars were released under a standardised enzyme loading; this varied between 59-76% when 10–140 FPU/g glucan of commercial enzyme Cellic CTec2 was applied. Although the lowest enzyme loading yielded the least amount of bioethanol, the techno-economic evaluation revealed it to be the most economically viable scenario with a production cost of $0.484 per litre (with tax exemption and a $0.16/litre subsidy). The supply-chain analysis demonstrated that bioethanol could be economically competitive with petrol at the pump at enzyme loadings up to 60 FPU/g glucan. However, in a prospective scenario with reduced government support, this enzyme loading threshold would be reduced to 30 FPU/g glucan. Conclusions Bioethanol from bamboo is shown to be both technically and economically feasible, as well as competitive with petrol in China. Alternative approaches to reduce bioethanol production costs are still needed however, to ensure its competitiveness in a possible

  8. Bamboo-Polylactic Acid (PLA) Composite Material for Structural Applications.

    PubMed

    Pozo Morales, Angel; Güemes, Alfredo; Fernandez-Lopez, Antonio; Carcelen Valero, Veronica; De La Rosa Llano, Sonia

    2017-11-09

    Developing an eco-friendly industry based on green materials, sustainable technologies, and optimum processes with low environmental impact is a general societal goal, but this remains a considerable challenge to achieve. Despite the large number of research on green structural composites, limited investigation into the most appropriate manufacturing methodology to develop a structural material at industrial level has taken place. Laboratory panels have been manufactured with different natural fibers but the methodologies and values obtained could not be extrapolated at industrial level. Bamboo industry panels have increased in the secondary structural sector such as building application, flooring and sport device, because it is one of the cheapest raw materials. At industrial level, the panels are manufactured with only the inner and intermediate region of the bamboo culm. However, it has been found that the mechanical properties of the external shells of bamboo culm are much better than the average cross-sectional properties. Thin strips of bamboo (1.5 mm thick and 1500 mm long) were machined and arranged with the desired lay-up and shape to obtain laminates with specific properties better than those of conventional E-Glass/Epoxy laminates in terms of both strength and stiffness. The strips of bamboo were bonded together by a natural thermoplastic polylactic acid (PLA) matrix to meet biodegradability requirements. The innovative mechanical extraction process developed in this study can extract natural strip reinforcements with high performance, low cost, and high rate, with no negative environmental impact, as no chemical treatments are used. The process can be performed at the industrial level. Furthermore, in order to validate the structural applications of the composite, the mechanical properties were analyzed under ageing conditions. This material could satisfy the requirements for adequate mechanical properties and life cycle costs at industrial sectors such

  9. Effect of carbonization temperatures on biochar formation of bamboo leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattnaik, D.; Kumar, S.; Bhuyan, S. K.; Mishra, S. C.

    2018-03-01

    Bamboo is a typical plant native in Asia, been used in many sectors, which also produces a large volume of leaves which goes waste and not find its application for any useful purposes; is often considered as a bio-waste and normally incinerated or dumped; as its applications are not yet fully explored. However, some research work done on bamboo fibers for use as a reinforcement in making polymer matrix composite. In the present piece of research work, the influence of burning/carbonization of bamboo leaves (at different temperatures) have been studied and characterized. Proximate analysis gave the fixed carbon content (of ~nearly21%). X-Ray diffraction results revealed the presence of various phases viz. cristobalite (SiO2), Calcite (Ca2O3) etc. accompanied with changes in crystal structures. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy results showed various modes of vibrations viz. O-H stretching bending of other bonds; (for aromatic benzene derivatives) etc. Scanning Electron Microscopic observation (of morphology) showed irregular stacking arrangements between the randomly spaced lamellae structure, with variation in carbonizing temperature. Results revealed the advantages of pyrolysis process in biochar production/formation. It appears that, the bamboo biochar can have suitable properties for its use as an alternative energy source and also for agricultural applications. Its high porosity and carbon content suggest its application as activated carbon also; after physical or chemical treatments. The present research focuses on extending the frontiers of use of bamboo leaves from being an unutilized biowaste to its conversion into a value added product, which can be compassed in terms of sustainable applications.

  10. Hydrolysis of bamboo biomass by subcritical water treatment.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Mood; Banerjee, Tamal; Goud, Vaibhav V

    2015-09-01

    The aim of present study was to obtain total reducing sugars (TRS) from bamboo under subcritical water (SCW) treatment in a batch reactor at the temperature ranging from 170 °C to 220 °C and 40 min hydrolysis time. Experiments were performed to investigate the effects of temperature and time on TRS yield. The maximum TRS yield (42.21%) was obtained at lower temperature (180 °C), however longer reaction time (25 min). X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis were used to characterise treated and untreated bamboo samples. The XRD profile revealed that crystallinity of bamboo increased to 71.90% with increase in temperature up to 210 °C and decreased thereafter to 70.92%. The first-order reaction kinetic model was used to fit the experimental data to obtain rate constants. From the Arrhenius plot, activation energy and pre-exponential factor at 25 min time were found to be 17.97 kJ mol(-1) and 0.154 min(-1), respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Effects of bamboo charcoal on the growth of Trifolium repens and soil bacterial community structure].

    PubMed

    Li, Song-Hao; He, Dong-Hua; Shen, Qiu-Lan; Xu, Qiu-Fang

    2014-08-01

    The effects of addition rates (0, 3% and 9%) and particle sizes (0.05, 0.05-1.0 and 1.0-2.0 mm) of bamboo charcoal on the growth of Trifolium repens and soil microbial community structure were investigated. The results showed that bamboo charcoal addition greatly promoted the early growth of T. repens, with the 9% charcoal addition rate being slightly better than the 3% charcoal addition rate. The effects of different particle sizes of bamboo charcoal on the growth of T. repens were not different significantly. Growth promotion declined with time during 120 days after sowing, and disappeared completely after 5 months. DGGE analysis of the bacterial 16S rDNA V3 fragment indicated that bamboo charcoal altered the soil bacterial community structure. The amount and Shannon diversity index of bacteria in the bamboo charcoal addition treatments increased compared with CK. The quantitative analysis showed that the amount of bacteria in the treatment with bamboo charcoal of fine particle (D < 0.05 mm) at the 9% addition rate was significantly higher than in the other treatments. The fine bamboo charcoal had a great effect on soil bacteria amount compared with the charcoal of other sizes at the same addition rate.

  12. Bamboo-Dominated Forests of the Southwest Amazon: Detection, Spatial Extent, Life Cycle Length and Flowering Waves

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Anelena L.; Nelson, Bruce W.; Bianchini, Milton C.; Plagnol, Daniela; Kuplich, Tatiana M.; Daly, Douglas C.

    2013-01-01

    We map the extent, infer the life-cycle length and describe spatial and temporal patterns of flowering of sarmentose bamboos (Guadua spp) in upland forests of the southwest Amazon. We first examine the spectra and the spectral separation of forests with different bamboo life stages. False-color composites from orbital sensors going back to 1975 are capable of distinguishing life stages. These woody bamboos flower produce massive quantities of seeds and then die. Life stage is synchronized, forming a single cohort within each population. Bamboo dominates at least 161,500 km2 of forest, coincident with an area of recent or ongoing tectonic uplift, rapid mechanical erosion and poorly drained soils rich in exchangeable cations. Each bamboo population is confined to a single spatially continuous patch or to a core patch with small outliers. Using spatial congruence between pairs of mature-stage maps from different years, we estimate an average life cycle of 27–28 y. It is now possible to predict exactly where and approximately when new bamboo mortality events will occur. We also map 74 bamboo populations that flowered between 2001 and 2008 over the entire domain of bamboo-dominated forest. Population size averaged 330 km2. Flowering events of these populations are temporally and/or spatially separated, restricting or preventing gene exchange. Nonetheless, adjacent populations flower closer in time than expected by chance, forming flowering waves. This may be a consequence of allochronic divergence from fewer ancestral populations and suggests a long history of widespread bamboo in the southwest Amazon. PMID:23359438

  13. Spatial distribution and variability of carbon storage in different sympodial bamboo species in China.

    PubMed

    Teng, Jiangnan; Xiang, Tingting; Huang, Zhangting; Wu, Jiasen; Jiang, Peikun; Meng, Cifu; Li, Yongfu; Fuhrmann, Jeffry J

    2016-03-01

    Selection of tree species is potentially an important management decision for increasing carbon storage in forest ecosystems. This study investigated and compared spatial distribution and variability of carbon storage in 8 sympodial bamboo species in China. The results of this study showed that average carbon densities (CDs) in the different organs decreased in the order: culms (0.4754 g g(-1)) > below-ground (0.4701 g g(-1)) > branches (0.4662 g g(-1)) > leaves (0.4420 g g(-1)). Spatial distribution of carbon storage (CS) on an area basis in the biomass of 8 sympodial bamboo species was in the order: culms (17.4-77.1%) > below-ground (10.6-71.7%) > branches (3.8-11.6%) > leaves (0.9-5.1%). Total CSs in the sympodial bamboo ecosystems ranged from 103.6 Mg C ha(-1) in Bambusa textilis McClure stand to 194.2 Mg C ha(-1) in Dendrocalamus giganteus Munro stand. Spatial distribution of CSs in 8 sympodial bamboo ecosystems decreased in the order: soil (68.0-83.5%) > vegetation (16.8-31.1%) > litter (0.3-1.7%). Total current CS and biomass carbon sequestration rate in the sympodial bamboo stands studied in China is 93.184 × 10(6) Mg C ha(-1) and 8.573 × 10(6) Mg C yr(-1), respectively. The sympodial bamboos had a greater CSs and higher carbon sequestration rates relative to other bamboo species. Sympodial bamboos can play an important role in improving climate and economy in the widely cultivated areas of the world. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Sulfuryl fluoride as a quarantine treatment for Chlorophorus annularis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in Chinese bamboo poles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Daojian; Barak, Alan V; Jiao, Yi; Chen, Zhinan; Zhang, Guiming; Chen, Zhilin; Kang, Lin; Yang, Weidong

    2010-04-01

    Bamboo (genera Bambusa and Phyllstachys) is one of the fastest growing and economically important plants in the world, and it is cultivated widely throughout southern China. China annually exports to the United States significant quantities of bamboo garden stakes (Bambusa spp.). In recent years, Plant Protection and Quarantine officers of the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service have made numerous interceptions of the bamboo borer, Chlorophorus annularis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), in bamboo products from China. This species is considered to have high pest risk potential in the trade of bamboo products. As a fumigant, sulfuryl fluoride (SF) would be a practical alternative to methyl bromide (MeBr) fumigation. Here, we report the results of SF fumigation tests for C. annularis in bamboo poles at three doses--96 g/m3 at 15.9 degrees C, 80 g/m3 at 21.5 degrees C, and 64 g/m3 at 26.0 degrees C--in glass test chambers. Commercial standard fumigations were also conducted in a standard 6.1-m-long, 33.2-m3 (standard height, 20-feet) marine general cargo container loaded to 80% (vol:vol) with similar bamboo poles, and sufficient levels of SF were obtained during the 24-h fumigations. During the course of these tests, 2424 larvae, 90 pupae, and 23 adults in total were killed, with no survivors. A treatment schedule using SF is proposed for bamboo as an alternative to MeBr at several temperatures tested.

  15. Characterization of Nano Bamboo Charcoal Drug Delivery System for Eucommia ulmoides Extract and Its Anticancer Effect In vitro.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhaoyan; Li, Xiangzhou; Zhang, Sheng; Huang, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Nano bamboo charcoal is being widely used as sustained release carrier for chemicals for its high specific surface area, sound biocompatibility, and nontoxicity; however, there have been no reports on nano bamboo charcoal as sustained release carrier for traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). To study the effect of nano bamboo charcoal in absorbing and sustained releasing Eucommia ulmoides extract (EUE) and to verify the in vitro anticancer effect of the sustained release liquid, so as to provide a theoretical basis for the development and utilization of nano bamboo charcoal as TCM sustained-release preparation. The adsorption capacity for the nano bamboo charcoal on EUE was measured by Langmuir model, and the release experiment was carried out under intestinal fluid condition. Characteristic changes for the nano bamboo charcoal nano-drug delivery system with and without adsorption of E. ulmoides were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and specific surface area. In addition, the anticancer effect from this novel bamboo charcoal E. ulmoides delivery system was evaluated against a human colon cancer cell line (HCT116). It was found that nano bamboo charcoal exhibits good adsorption capacity (up to 462.96 mg/g at 37°C). The cumulative release rate for EUE from this nano bamboo charcoal delivery system was 70.67%, and specific surface area for the nano bamboo charcoal decreased from 820.32 m 2 /g to 443.80 m 2 /g after EUE was loaded. An in vitro anticancer study showed that the inhibition rate for E. ulmoides against HCT116 cancer cells was 23.07%, for this novel bamboo charcoal nano-drug delivery system. This study provides a novel strategy for the delivery of traditional Chinese medicine using bamboo charcoal nano-drug delivery system. The adsorption equilibrium was reached after 30 min of ultrasonic treatmentThe saturated adsorption capacity of Eucommia ulmoides extract by nano bamboo

  16. Characteristics of Ampel bamboo as a biomass energy source potential in Bali

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sucipta, M.; Putra Negara, D. N. K.; Tirta Nindhia, T. G.; Surata, I. W.

    2017-05-01

    Currently, non-renewable fossil energy dominates utilization of the world energy need for many applications. Efforts has been developed to find alternative renewable energy sources, due to fossil energy availability is diminishing. And one of renewable energy source is from biomass. The aim of this research is to determine characteristics of the Ampel bamboo (Bambusa vulgaris) as an energy potential of biomass. The Ampel bamboo’s characteristics possessed are evaluated based on its chemical composition; moisture, volatile, ash, and fixed carbon through proximate analysis; and also carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen content through ultimate analysis. From the Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) indicates that Ampel bamboo contains of about 18.10% hemicelluloses, 47.75% cellulose and 18.86% lignin. While from the ultimate analysis results in the content of carbon, hydrogen, and Nitrogen of Ampel bamboo are 39.75%, 5.75% and 0% respectively. With such characteristics, it indicates that Ampel bamboo has an attractive potential as a renewable energy source.

  17. Carbon stock of Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens) forests along a latitude gradient in the subtropical region of China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mengjie; Ji, Haibao; Zhuang, Shunyao

    2018-01-01

    Latitude is an important factor that influences the carbon stock of Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens) forests. Accurate estimation of the carbon stock of Moso bamboo forest can contribute to sufficient evaluation of forests in carbon sequestration worldwide. Nevertheless, the effect of latitude on the carbon stock of Moso bamboo remains unclear. In this study, a field survey with 36 plots of Moso bamboo forests along a latitude gradient was conducted to investigate carbon stock. Results showed that the diameter at breast height (DBH) of Moso bamboo culms increased from 8.37 cm to 10.12 cm that well fitted by Weibull model, whereas the bamboo culm density decreased from 4722 culm ha-1 to 3400 culm ha-1 with increasing latitude. The bamboo biomass carbon decreased from 60.58 Mg C ha-1 to 48.31 Mg C ha-1 from north to south. The total carbon stock of Moso bamboo forests, which comprises soil and biomass carbon, ranged from 87.83 Mg C ha-1 to 119.5 Mg C ha-1 and linearly increased with latitude. As a fast-growing plant, Moso bamboo could be harvested amounts of 6.0 Mg C ha-1 to 7.6 Mg C ha-1 annually, which indicates a high potential of this species for carbon sequestration. Parameters obtained in this study can be used to accurately estimate the carbon stock of Moso bamboo forest to establish models of the global carbon balance.

  18. Carbon stock of Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens) forests along a latitude gradient in the subtropical region of China

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Mengjie; Ji, Haibao

    2018-01-01

    Latitude is an important factor that influences the carbon stock of Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens) forests. Accurate estimation of the carbon stock of Moso bamboo forest can contribute to sufficient evaluation of forests in carbon sequestration worldwide. Nevertheless, the effect of latitude on the carbon stock of Moso bamboo remains unclear. In this study, a field survey with 36 plots of Moso bamboo forests along a latitude gradient was conducted to investigate carbon stock. Results showed that the diameter at breast height (DBH) of Moso bamboo culms increased from 8.37 cm to 10.12 cm that well fitted by Weibull model, whereas the bamboo culm density decreased from 4722 culm ha−1 to 3400 culm ha−1 with increasing latitude. The bamboo biomass carbon decreased from 60.58 Mg C ha−1 to 48.31 Mg C ha−1 from north to south. The total carbon stock of Moso bamboo forests, which comprises soil and biomass carbon, ranged from 87.83 Mg C ha−1 to 119.5 Mg C ha−1 and linearly increased with latitude. As a fast-growing plant, Moso bamboo could be harvested amounts of 6.0 Mg C ha−1 to 7.6 Mg C ha−1 annually, which indicates a high potential of this species for carbon sequestration. Parameters obtained in this study can be used to accurately estimate the carbon stock of Moso bamboo forest to establish models of the global carbon balance. PMID:29451911

  19. Optimisation of mechanical properties of bamboo fibre reinforced-PLA biocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurnadia M., J.; Fazita, M. R. Nurul; Abdul Khalil H. P., S.; Mohamad Haafiz M., K.

    2017-12-01

    The majority of the raw materials that have been widely used in industries are petroleum-based. Growing environmental awareness, the depletion of fossil fuels, and climate change are the key drivers to seek more ecologically friendly materials, such as natural fibres to replace synthetic fibres in polymeric composite. Among the natural fibres available, bamboo fibre has relatively high strength. Poly (lactic) acid (PLA), one of the well-known biopolymers, has been used as a matrix in order to produce totally biodegradable biocomposites. In this study, bamboo fibres were compounded with PLA by a twin screw extruder. The bamboo fibre reinforced PLA composites were then manufactured via the compression moulding method. The influences of screw speed and die temperature during extrusion on the mechanical properties, the tensile and flexural of the biocomposites, were studied. The effects of fibre content and fibre length were also investigated. Taguchi experimental design approach was adopted to determine the optimum set of conditions to achieve the "best" mechanical properties of the composites. Tensile and flexural properties were characterised based on the D638-10 and D790-10 standards, respectively. It was observed that the fibre aspect ratio and fibre content significantly affected the mechanical performance of bamboo fibres reinforced PLA composites.

  20. Measuring and modeling the spatial pattern of understory bamboo across landscapes: Implications for giant panda habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linderman, Marc Alan

    We examined an approach to classifying understory bamboo, the staple food of the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), from remote sensing imagery in the Wolong Nature Reserve, China. We also used these data to estimate the landscape-scale distribution of giant panda habitat, and model the human effects on forest cover and the spatio-temporal dynamics of bamboo and the resulting implications for giant panda habitat. The spatial distribution of understory bamboo was mapped using an artificial neural network and leaf-on remote sensing data. Training on a limited set of ground truth data and using widely available Landsat TM data as input, a non-linear artificial neural network achieved a classification accuracy of 80% despite the presence of co-occurring mid-story and understory vegetation. Using information on the spatial distribution of bamboo in Wolong, we compared the results of giant panda habitat analyses with and without bamboo information. Total amount of habitat decreased by 29--56% and overall habitat patch size decreased by 16--48% after bamboo information was incorporated into the analyses. The decreases in the quantity of panda habitat and increases in habitat fragmentation resulted in decreases of 41--60% in carrying capacity. Using a spatio-temporal model of bamboo dynamics and human activities, we found that local fuelwood collection and household creation will likely reduce secondary habitat relied upon by pandas. Human impacts would likely contribute up to an additional 16% loss of habitat. Furthermore, these impacts primarily occur in the habitat relied upon by giant pandas during past bamboo die-offs. Decreased total area of habitat and increased fragmentation from human activities will likely make giant pandas increasingly sensitive to natural disturbances such as cyclical bamboo die-offs. Our studies suggest that it is necessary to further examine approaches to monitor understory vegetation and incorporate understory information into wildlife

  1. An optimal proportion of mixing broad-leaved forest for enhancing the effective productivity of moso bamboo.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiao-Fei; Shi, Pei-Jian; Hui, Cang; Wang, Fu-Sheng; Liu, Guo-Hua; Li, Bai-Lian

    2015-04-01

    Moso bamboos (Phyllostachys edulis) are important forestry plants in southern China, with substantial roles to play in regional economic and ecological systems. Mixing broad-leaved forests and moso bamboos is a common management practice in China, and it is fundamental to elucidate the interactions between broad-leaved trees and moso bamboos for ensuring the sustainable provision of ecosystem services. We examine how the proportion of broad-leaved forest in a mixed managed zone, topology, and soil profile affects the effective productivity of moso bamboos (i.e., those with significant economic value), using linear regression and generalized additive models. Bamboo's diameter at breast height follows a Weibull distribution. The importance of these variables to bamboo productivity is, respectively, slope (25.9%), the proportion of broad-leaved forest (24.8%), elevation (23.3%), gravel content by volume (16.6%), slope location (8.3%), and soil layer thickness (1.2%). Highest productivity is found on the 25° slope, with a 600-m elevation, and 30% broad-leaved forest. As such, broad-leaved forest in the upper slope can have a strong influence on the effective productivity of moso bamboo, ranking only after slope and before elevation. These factors can be considered in future management practice.

  2. Effects of moso bamboo encroachment into native, broad-leaved forests on soil carbon and nitrogen pools.

    PubMed

    Bai, Shangbin; Conant, Richard T; Zhou, Guomo; Wang, Yixiang; Wang, Nan; Li, Yanhua; Zhang, Kaiqiang

    2016-08-16

    Across southern China, Moso bamboo has been encroaching on most neighboring secondary broad-leaved forests and/or coniferous plantations, leading to the land cover changes that alter abiotic and biotic conditions. Little is known about how this conversion alters soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N). We selected three sites, each with three plots arrayed along the bamboo encroachment pathway: moso bamboo forest (BF); transition zone, mixed forest plots (MF); and broad-leaved forest (BLF), and examined how bamboo encroachment affects soil organic C (SOC), soil total N, microbial biomass C (MBC), microbial biomass N (MBN), water-soluble organic C (WSOC), and water-soluble organic N (WSON) in three forests. Over nine years, moso bamboo encroachment leads to a decrease in SOC and total soil N, an increase in MBC and WSOC, and a decrease in MBN and WSON. Changes in soil C and N occurred mainly in the topsoil. We conclude that moso bamboo encroachment on broadleaved forest not only substantially altered soil C and N pools, but also changed the distribution pattern of C and N in the studied forest soils. Continued bamboo encroachment into evergreen broadleaved forests seems likely to lead to net CO2 emissions to the atmosphere as ecosystem C stocks decline.

  3. Bamboo tea: reduction of taxonomic complexity and application of DNA diagnostics based on rbcL and matK sequence data

    PubMed Central

    Häser, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Background Names used in ingredient lists of food products are trivial and in their nature rarely precise. The most recent scientific interpretation of the term bamboo (Bambusoideae, Poaceae) comprises over 1,600 distinct species. In the European Union only few of these exotic species are well known sources for food ingredients (i.e., bamboo sprouts) and are thus not considered novel foods, which would require safety assessments before marketing of corresponding products. In contrast, the use of bamboo leaves and their taxonomic origin is mostly unclear. However, products containing bamboo leaves are currently marketed. Methods We analysed bamboo species and tea products containing bamboo leaves using anatomical leaf characters and DNA sequence data. To reduce taxonomic complexity associated with the term bamboo, we used a phylogenetic framework to trace the origin of DNA from commercially available bamboo leaves within the bambusoid subfamily. For authentication purposes, we introduced a simple PCR based test distinguishing genuine bamboo from other leaf components and assessed the diagnostic potential of rbcL and matK to resolve taxonomic entities within the bamboo subfamily and tribes. Results Based on anatomical and DNA data we were able to trace the taxonomic origin of bamboo leaves used in products to the genera Phyllostachys and Pseudosasa from the temperate “woody” bamboo tribe (Arundinarieae). Currently available rbcL and matK sequence data allow the character based diagnosis of 80% of represented bamboo genera. We detected adulteration by carnation in four of eight tea products and, after adapting our objectives, could trace the taxonomic origin of the adulterant to Dianthus chinensis (Caryophyllaceae), a well known traditional Chinese medicine with counter indications for pregnant women. PMID:27957401

  4. Structural Variation of Bamboo Lignin before and after Ethanol Organosolv Pretreatment

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yuan-Yuan; Xiao, Ling-Ping; Shi, Zheng-Jun; Sun, Run-Cang

    2013-01-01

    In order to make better use of lignocellulosic biomass for the production of renewable fuels and chemicals, it is necessary to disrupt its recalcitrant structure through pretreatment. Specifically, organosolv pretreatment is a feasible method. The main advantage of this method compared to other lignocellulosic pretreatment technologies is the extraction of high-quality lignin for the production of value-added products. In this study, bamboo was treated in a batch reactor with 70% ethanol at 180 °C for 2 h. Lignin fractions were isolated from the hydrolysate by centrifugation and then precipitated as ethanol organosolv lignin. Two types of milled wood lignins (MWLs) were isolated from the raw bamboo and the organosolv pretreated residue separately. After the pretreatment, a decrease of lignin (preferentially guaiacyl unit), hemicelluloses and less ordered cellulose was detected in the bamboo material. It was confirmed that the bamboo MWL is of HGS type (p-hydroxyphenyl (H), vanillin (G), syringaldehyde (S)) associated with a considerable amount of p-coumarate and ferulic esters of lignin. The ethanol organosolv treatment was shown to remove significant amounts of lignin and hemicelluloses without strongly affecting lignin primary structure and its lignin functional groups. PMID:24169436

  5. The Effect of Water Molecules on Mechanical Properties of Bamboo Microfibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahbar, Nima

    Bamboo fibers have higher strength-to-weight ratios than steel and concrete. The unique properties of bamboo fibers come from their natural composite structures that comprise mainly cellulose nanofibrils in a matrix of intertwined hemicellulose and lignin called lignin-carbohydrate complex (LCC). Here, we have utilized atomistic simulations to investigate the mechanical properties and mechanisms of interactions between these materials, in the presence of water molecules. Our results suggest that hemicellulose exhibits better mechanical properties and lignin shows greater tendency to adhere to cellulose nanofibrils. Consequently, the role of hemicellulose found to be enhancing the mechanical properties and lignin found to be providing the strength of bamboo fibers. The abundance of Hbonds in hemicellulose chains is responsible for improving the mechanical behavior of LCC. The strong van der Waals forces between lignin molecules and cellulose nanofibrils is responsible for higher adhesion energy between LCC/cellulose nanofibrils. We also found out that the amorphous regions of cellulose nanofibrils is the weakest interface in bamboo Microfibrils. In presence of water, the elastic modulus of lignin increases at low water content (less than 10 NSF CAREER Grant No. 1261284.

  6. Rational synthesis of zerovalent iron/bamboo charcoal composites with high saturation magnetization

    Treesearch

    Mingshan Wu; Jianfeng Ma; Zhiyong Cai; Genlin Tian; Shumin Yang; Youhong Wang; Xing' e Liu

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of magnetic biochar composites is a major new research area in advanced materials sciences. A series of magnetic bamboo charcoal composites (MBC800, MBC1000 and MBC1200) with high saturation magnetization (Ms) was fabricated in this work by mixing bamboo charcoal powder with an aqueous ferric chloride solution and subsequently...

  7. Surface characterization and chemical analysis of bamboo substrates pretreated by alkali hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Song, Xueping; Jiang, Yan; Rong, Xianjian; Wei, Wei; Wang, Shuangfei; Nie, Shuangxi

    2016-09-01

    The surface characterization and chemical analysis of bamboo substrates by alkali hydrogen peroxide pretreatment (AHPP) were investigated in this study. The results tended to manifest that AHPP prior to enzymatic and chemical treatment was potential for improving accessibility and reactivity of bamboo substrates. The inorganic components, organic solvent extractives and acid-soluble lignin were effectively removed by AHPP. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis indicated that the surface of bamboo chips had less lignin but more carbohydrate after pre-treatment. Fiber surfaces became etched and collapsed, and more pores and debris on the substrate surface were observed with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Brenauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) results showed that both of pore volume and surface area were increased after AHPP. Although XRD analysis showed that AHPP led to relatively higher crystallinity, pre-extraction could overall enhance the accessibility of enzymes and chemicals into the bamboo structure. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Adsorption of malachite green dye from aqueous solution on the bamboo leaf ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntari, Priwidyanjati, Dessyntha Anggiani

    2017-12-01

    Bamboo leaf ash has been developed as an adsorbent material for removal malachite green from aqueous solution. Adsorption parameters have studied are contact time and initial pH. The effect of contact time and pH were examined in the batch adsorption processes. The physicochemical characters of bamboo leaf ash were investigated by using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and FT-IR spectroscopy. Malachite green concentration was determined by UV-Vis spectrophotometer. FT-IR spectrogram of bamboo leaf ash shows that typical fingerprint of adsorbent material with Si-O-Si or Al-O-Al group. The X-ray diffractograms of bamboo leaf ash show that adsorbent material has a highly amorphous nature. The percentage of adsorption was showed raised with increasing contact time. The optimum removal of malachite green when the initial dye concentration, initial pH, weight of adsorbent and contact time was 20 mg/L, 7, 0.25 g and 75 minutes respectively.

  9. An Efficient Plant Regeneration and Transformation System of Ma Bamboo (Dendrocalamus latiflorus Munro) Started from Young Shoot as Explant

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Shanwen; Cai, Changyang; Ren, Huibo; Wang, Wenjia; Xiang, Mengqi; Tang, Xiaoshan; Zhu, Caiping; Yin, Tengfei; Zhang, Li; Zhu, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Genetic engineering technology has been successfully used in many plant species, but is limited in woody plants, especially in bamboos. Ma bamboo (Dendrocalamus latiflorus Munro) is one of the most important bamboo species in Asia, and its genetic improvement was largely restricted by the lack of an efficient regeneration and transformation method. Here we reported a plantlet regeneration and Agrobacterium-mediated transformation protocol by using Ma bamboo young shoots as explants. Under our optimized conditions, embryogenic calluses were successfully induced from the excised young shoots on callus induction medium and rapidly grew on callus multiplication medium. Shoots and roots were regenerated on shoot induction medium and root induction medium, respectively, with high efficiency. An Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation protocol of Ma bamboo was established, verified by PCR and GUS staining. Furthermore, the maize Lc gene under the control of the ubiquitin promoter was successfully introduced into Ma bamboo genome and generated an anthocyanin over-accumulation phenotype. Our methods established here will facilitate the basic research as well as genetic breeding of this important bamboo species. Key achievements: A stable and high efficiency regeneration and Agrobacterium-mediated transformation protocol for Ma bamboo from vegetative organ is established. PMID:28798758

  10. Climate-change impacts on understorey bamboo species and giant pandas in China's Qinling Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuanmu, Mao-Ning; Viña, Andrés; Winkler, Julie A.; Li, Yu; Xu, Weihua; Ouyang, Zhiyun; Liu, Jianguo

    2013-03-01

    Climate change is threatening global ecosystems through its impact on the survival of individual species and their ecological functions. Despite the important role of understorey plants in forest ecosystems, climate impact assessments on understorey plants and their role in supporting wildlife habitat are scarce in the literature. Here we assess climate-change impacts on understorey bamboo species with an emphasis on their ecological function as a food resource for endangered giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). An ensemble of bamboo distribution projections associated with multiple climate-change projections and bamboo dispersal scenarios indicates a substantial reduction in the distributional ranges of three dominant bamboo species in the Qinling Mountains, China during the twenty-first century. As these three species comprise almost the entire diet of the panda population in the region, the projected changes in bamboo distribution suggest a potential shortage of food for this population, unless alternative food sources become available. Although the projections were developed under unavoidable simplifying assumptions and uncertainties, they indicate potential challenges for panda conservation and underscore the importance of incorporating interspecific interactions into climate-change impact assessments and associated conservation planning.

  11. Culm Age and Rhizome Affects Night-Time Water Recharge in the Bamboo Phyllostachys pubescens

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiuhua; Zhao, Ping; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Zhu, Liwei; Hu, Yanting; Ouyang, Lei; Ni, Guangyan; Ye, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Bamboo species—the only herbaceous trees—have unique structural and physiological characteristics that differ from those of other tree taxa. However, the role of night-time water use in bamboo is poorly understood and has rarely been investigated. We studied the day- and night-time sap flow response to culm age and rhizome structure in three age levels (juvenile, mature, and senescent) of Phyllostachys pubescens growing in the Nankun Mountain Natural Reserve, South China. We found that sap flow density and whole-tree hydraulic conductance decreased with culm age. After cutting of rhizome, the day-time sap flow and night-time water recharge decreased obviously. In addition, night-time water recharge accounted for the largest proportion (up to 30%) of total daily transpiration in normal senescent bamboos. Therefore, our study indicates that the connected rhizome system and night-time water recharge played a significant role in water compensation during the day and at night in bamboos. Night-time water recharge is especially critical to senescent bamboos, given their weaker transpiration due to the lower whole-tree hydraulic conductance, and consequently, they are more dependent on night-time water recharge for fulfilling their whole-day water consumption needs. PMID:29176989

  12. Culm Age and Rhizome Affects Night-Time Water Recharge in the Bamboo Phyllostachys pubescens.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiuhua; Zhao, Ping; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Zhu, Liwei; Hu, Yanting; Ouyang, Lei; Ni, Guangyan; Ye, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Bamboo species-the only herbaceous trees-have unique structural and physiological characteristics that differ from those of other tree taxa. However, the role of night-time water use in bamboo is poorly understood and has rarely been investigated. We studied the day- and night-time sap flow response to culm age and rhizome structure in three age levels (juvenile, mature, and senescent) of Phyllostachys pubescens growing in the Nankun Mountain Natural Reserve, South China. We found that sap flow density and whole-tree hydraulic conductance decreased with culm age. After cutting of rhizome, the day-time sap flow and night-time water recharge decreased obviously. In addition, night-time water recharge accounted for the largest proportion (up to 30%) of total daily transpiration in normal senescent bamboos. Therefore, our study indicates that the connected rhizome system and night-time water recharge played a significant role in water compensation during the day and at night in bamboos. Night-time water recharge is especially critical to senescent bamboos, given their weaker transpiration due to the lower whole-tree hydraulic conductance, and consequently, they are more dependent on night-time water recharge for fulfilling their whole-day water consumption needs.

  13. Effect of bamboo vinegar powder as an antibiotic alternative on the digesta bacteria communities of finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Qu, Huan; Huang, Yanjie; Shi, Yinghao; Liu, Ying; Wu, Shenglong; Bao, Wenbin

    2018-05-18

    This study investigated the use for bamboo vinegar powder as an antibiotic alternative in the diet of growing-finishing pigs by examining their digestive bacterial communities. Forty-five Duroc × Landrace × Yorkshire growing-finishing pigs were randomly allocated to five diet groups: 0%,0.5%, 1.0%, or 1.5% bamboo vinegar levels and antibiotics. After 37 days, the digesta in duodenum of four pigs from each treatment were analyzed for their bacterial community compositions using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Addition of 1.5% bamboo vinegar powder had the most similar effect on the intestinal microflora to that of antibiotics, indicating its potential to promote the growth and development of finishing pigs. We also found the 1.5% bamboo vinegar powder group to have an increased abundance of Firmicute/Bacteroidetes compared with the other bamboo vinegar powder groups, which may enhance the ability of the host to absorb food energy and store more body fat. Additionally, the effects of bamboo vinegar powder on promoting the abundances of Lactobacillus and Thalassospira and on inhibiting Streptococcus and Prevotella growth revealed it may play an important role in animal production. Moreover, functional predictions of microbes via PICRUSt indicated that feed supplemented with 1.5% bamboo vinegar powder could promote many vital metabolic pathways.

  14. Pharmacokinetics of cefovecin (Convenia) in white bamboo sharks (Chiloscyllium plagiosum) and Atlantic horseshoe crabs (Limulus polyphemus).

    PubMed

    Steeil, James C; Schumacher, Juergen; George, Robert H; Bulman, Frank; Baine, Katherine; Cox, Sherry

    2014-06-01

    Cefovecin was administered to six healthy adult white bamboo sharks (Chiloscyllium plagiosum) and six healthy adult Atlantic horseshoe crabs (Limulus polyphemus) to determine its pharmacokinetics in these species. A single dose of cefovecin at 8 mg/kg was administered subcutaneously in the epaxial region of the bamboo sharks and in the proximal articulation of the lateral leg of the horseshoe crabs. Blood and hemolymph samples were collected at various time points from bamboo sharks and Atlantic horseshoe crabs. High performance liquid chromatography was performed to determine plasma levels of cefovecin. The terminal halflife of cefovecin in Atlantic horseshoe crabs was 37.70 +/- 9.04 hr and in white bamboo sharks was 2.02 +/- 4.62 hr. Cefovecin concentrations were detected for 4 days in white bamboo sharks and for 14 days in Atlantic horseshoe crabs. No adverse effects associated with cefovecin administration were seen in either species.

  15. Multiscale analysis of bamboo deformation mechanisms following NaOH treatment using X-ray and correlative microscopy.

    PubMed

    Salvati, E; Brandt, L R; Uzun, F; Zhang, H; Papadaki, C; Korsunsky, A M

    2018-05-01

    For hundreds of years, bamboo has been employed for a variety of applications ranging from load-bearing structures to textiles. Thanks to its hierarchical structure that is functionally graded and naturally optimised, bamboo displays a variation in properties across its stem that ensures exceptional flexural performance. Often, alkaline solutions are employed for the treatment of bamboo in order to alter its natural elastic behaviour and make it suitable for particular applications. In this work we study the effect of NaOH solutions of five different concentrations (up to 25%) on the elastic properties of bamboo. By exploiting the capabilities of modern experimental techniques such as in situ synchrotron X-ray scattering and Digital Image Correlation, we present detailed analysis of the deformation mechanisms taking place in the main constituents of bamboo, i.e. fibres and matrix (Parenchyma). The principal achievement of this study is the elucidation of the deformation mechanisms at the fibre scale, where the relative sliding of fibrils plays a crucial role in the property modification of the whole bamboo stem. Furthermore, we shed light on the parenchyma toughness variation as a consequence of alkali treatments. Alkaline solutions are often employed for the treatment of bamboo in order to alter its natural elastic behaviour. In this work we study the effect of alkaline solutions on the elastic properties of bamboo. Using state of the art experimental techniques allowed shedding light on the deformation mechanisms occurring in the bamboo main constituents, i.e. fibres and matrix (parenchyma cells). Enhancement of fibre stiffness was experienced when up to 20% NaOH solution was employed, while for higher concentration a decay was observed. This effect was imputed to the modification of adhesion between fibrils induced by disruption of ligand elements (e.g. lignin). Modification of the matrix toughness was also experienced, that indicated an improved resistance to

  16. High Per formance and Flexible Supercapacitors based on Carbonized Bamboo Fibers for Wide Temperature Applications

    PubMed Central

    Zequine, Camila; Ranaweera, C. K.; Wang, Z.; Singh, Sweta; Tripathi, Prashant; Srivastava, O. N.; Gupta, Bipin Kumar; Ramasamy, K.; Kahol, P. K.; Dvornic, P. R.; Gupta, Ram K.

    2016-01-01

    High performance carbonized bamboo fibers were synthesized for a wide range of temperature dependent energy storage applications. The structural and electrochemical properties of the carbonized bamboo fibers were studied for flexible supercapacitor applications. The galvanostatic charge-discharge studies on carbonized fibers exhibited specific capacity of ~510F/g at 0.4 A/g with energy density of 54 Wh/kg. Interestingly, the carbonized bamboo fibers displayed excellent charge storage stability without any appreciable degradation in charge storage capacity over 5,000 charge-discharge cycles. The symmetrical supercapacitor device fabricated using these carbonized bamboo fibers exhibited an areal capacitance of ~1.55 F/cm2 at room temperature. In addition to high charge storage capacity and cyclic stability, the device showed excellent flexibility without any degradation to charge storage capacity on bending the electrode. The performance of the supercapacitor device exhibited ~65% improvement at 70 °C compare to that at 10 °C. Our studies suggest that carbonized bamboo fibers are promising candidates for stable, high performance and flexible supercapacitor devices. PMID:27546225

  17. High Per formance and Flexible Supercapacitors based on Carbonized Bamboo Fibers for Wide Temperature Applications.

    PubMed

    Zequine, Camila; Ranaweera, C K; Wang, Z; Singh, Sweta; Tripathi, Prashant; Srivastava, O N; Gupta, Bipin Kumar; Ramasamy, K; Kahol, P K; Dvornic, P R; Gupta, Ram K

    2016-08-22

    High performance carbonized bamboo fibers were synthesized for a wide range of temperature dependent energy storage applications. The structural and electrochemical properties of the carbonized bamboo fibers were studied for flexible supercapacitor applications. The galvanostatic charge-discharge studies on carbonized fibers exhibited specific capacity of ~510F/g at 0.4 A/g with energy density of 54 Wh/kg. Interestingly, the carbonized bamboo fibers displayed excellent charge storage stability without any appreciable degradation in charge storage capacity over 5,000 charge-discharge cycles. The symmetrical supercapacitor device fabricated using these carbonized bamboo fibers exhibited an areal capacitance of ~1.55 F/cm(2) at room temperature. In addition to high charge storage capacity and cyclic stability, the device showed excellent flexibility without any degradation to charge storage capacity on bending the electrode. The performance of the supercapacitor device exhibited ~65% improvement at 70 °C compare to that at 10 °C. Our studies suggest that carbonized bamboo fibers are promising candidates for stable, high performance and flexible supercapacitor devices.

  18. High Per formance and Flexible Supercapacitors based on Carbonized Bamboo Fibers for Wide Temperature Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zequine, Camila; Ranaweera, C. K.; Wang, Z.; Singh, Sweta; Tripathi, Prashant; Srivastava, O. N.; Gupta, Bipin Kumar; Ramasamy, K.; Kahol, P. K.; Dvornic, P. R.; Gupta, Ram K.

    2016-08-01

    High performance carbonized bamboo fibers were synthesized for a wide range of temperature dependent energy storage applications. The structural and electrochemical properties of the carbonized bamboo fibers were studied for flexible supercapacitor applications. The galvanostatic charge-discharge studies on carbonized fibers exhibited specific capacity of ~510F/g at 0.4 A/g with energy density of 54 Wh/kg. Interestingly, the carbonized bamboo fibers displayed excellent charge storage stability without any appreciable degradation in charge storage capacity over 5,000 charge-discharge cycles. The symmetrical supercapacitor device fabricated using these carbonized bamboo fibers exhibited an areal capacitance of ~1.55 F/cm2 at room temperature. In addition to high charge storage capacity and cyclic stability, the device showed excellent flexibility without any degradation to charge storage capacity on bending the electrode. The performance of the supercapacitor device exhibited ~65% improvement at 70 °C compare to that at 10 °C. Our studies suggest that carbonized bamboo fibers are promising candidates for stable, high performance and flexible supercapacitor devices.

  19. Dynamic allocation and transfer of non-structural carbohydrates, a possible mechanism for the explosive growth of Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys heterocycla)

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xinzhang; Peng, Changhui; Zhou, Guomo; Gu, Honghao; Li, Quan; Zhang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Moso bamboo can rapidly complete its growth in both height and diameter within only 35–40 days after shoot emergence. However, the underlying mechanism for this “explosive growth” remains poorly understood. We investigated the dynamics of non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs) in shoots and attached mature bamboos over a 20-month period. The results showed that Moso bamboos rapidly completed their height and diameter growth within 38 days. At the same time, attached mature bamboos transferred almost all the NSCs of their leaves, branches, and especially trunks and rhizomes to the “explosively growing” shoots via underground rhizomes for the structural growth and metabolism of shoots. Approximately 4 months after shoot emergence, this transfer stopped when the leaves of the young bamboos could independently provide enough photoassimilates to meet the carbon demands of the young bamboos. During this period, the NSC content of the leaves, branches, trunks and rhizomes of mature bamboos declined by 1.5, 23, 28 and 5 fold, respectively. The trunk contributed the most NSCs to the shoots. Our findings provide new insight and a possible rational mechanism explaining the “explosive growth” of Moso bamboo and shed new light on understanding the role of NSCs in the rapid growth of Moso bamboo. PMID:27181522

  20. Dynamic allocation and transfer of non-structural carbohydrates, a possible mechanism for the explosive growth of Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys heterocycla)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xinzhang; Peng, Changhui; Zhou, Guomo; Gu, Honghao; Li, Quan; Zhang, Chao

    2016-05-01

    Moso bamboo can rapidly complete its growth in both height and diameter within only 35-40 days after shoot emergence. However, the underlying mechanism for this “explosive growth” remains poorly understood. We investigated the dynamics of non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs) in shoots and attached mature bamboos over a 20-month period. The results showed that Moso bamboos rapidly completed their height and diameter growth within 38 days. At the same time, attached mature bamboos transferred almost all the NSCs of their leaves, branches, and especially trunks and rhizomes to the “explosively growing” shoots via underground rhizomes for the structural growth and metabolism of shoots. Approximately 4 months after shoot emergence, this transfer stopped when the leaves of the young bamboos could independently provide enough photoassimilates to meet the carbon demands of the young bamboos. During this period, the NSC content of the leaves, branches, trunks and rhizomes of mature bamboos declined by 1.5, 23, 28 and 5 fold, respectively. The trunk contributed the most NSCs to the shoots. Our findings provide new insight and a possible rational mechanism explaining the “explosive growth” of Moso bamboo and shed new light on understanding the role of NSCs in the rapid growth of Moso bamboo.

  1. Structural Solutions for Low-Cost Bamboo Frames: Experimental Tests and Constructive Assessments

    PubMed Central

    Sassu, Mauro; De Falco, Anna; Giresini, Linda; Puppio, Mario Lucio

    2016-01-01

    Experimental tests and constructive assessments are presented for a simple bamboo framed structure with innovative low-cost and low technology joints, specifically conceived for small buildings in developing countries. Two full scale one-storey bamboo frames have been designed by using the simplest joints solution among three different tested typologies. The entire building process is based on low-technology and natural materials: bamboo canes, wooden cylinders, plywood plates and canapé rods. The first full scale specimen (Unit A) is a one-storey single deck truss structure subjected to monotonic collapse test; the second full scale specimen (Unit B) is a one-storey double deck truss structure used to evaluate the construction time throughout assembling tests. The first full scale specimen showed ductility in collapse and ease in strengthening; the second one showed remarkable ease and speed in assembling structural elements. Finally several constructive solutions are suggested for the design of simple one-storey buildings; they are addressed to four purposes (housing, school, chapel, health center) by the composition of the proposed full scale bamboo frames. Ease of use and maintenance with a low level of technology contribute to application in developing countries although not exclusively. PMID:28773472

  2. Effect of Plasma Treatment on Air and Water-Vapor Permeability of Bamboo Knitted Fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, C.; Ramakrishnan, G.; Chinnadurai, S.; Vignesh, S.; Senthilkumar, M.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, the effects of oxygen and atmospheric plasma on air and water-vapor permeability properties of single jersey bamboo fabric have been investigated. The changes in these properties are believed to be related closely to the inter-fiber and inter-yarn friction force induced by the plasma treatments. The outcomes showed that the water-vapor permeability increased, although the air permeability decreased along with the plasma treatments. The SEM images clearly showed that the plasma modified the fiber surface outwardly. The results showed that the atmospheric plasma has an etching effect and increases the functionality of a bamboo surface, which is evident from SEM and FTIR-ATR analysis. These results reveal that atmospheric pressure plasma treatment is an effective method to improve the performance of bamboo fabric. Statistical analysis also indicates that the results are significant for air permeability and water-vapor permeability of the plasma-treated bamboo fabric.

  3. Liquefaction behaviors of bamboo residues in a glycerol-based solvent using microwave energy

    Treesearch

    Jiulong Xie; Chung-Yun Hse; Todd F. Shupe; Jinqiu Qi; Hui Pan

    2014-01-01

    Liquefaction of bamboo was performed in glycerol–methanol as co-solvent using microwave energy and was evaluated by characterizing the liquefied residues. High efficiency conversion of bamboo was achieved under mild reaction conditions. Liquefaction temperature and time interacted to affect the liquefaction reaction. Fourier transform infrared analyzes of the residues...

  4. Experimental Study on the Flexural Performance of Parallel Strand Bamboo Beams

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Aiping; Bian, Yuling

    2014-01-01

    Searching for materials to provide proper housing with less emission and low energy becomes an urgent demand with the ever-growing population. Bamboo has gained a reputation as an ecofriendly, highly renewable source of material. Parallel Strand Bamboo (PSB) is a new biocomposite made of bamboo strips which has superiority performances than wood products. It has attracted considerable interests as a sustainable alternative for more traditional building materials. But the mechanical performance study of PSB as construction materials is still inadequate. Also, the structural behavior of PSB is not quite understood as conventional construction materials, which results in the difficulties to predict the performances of PSB structural members. To achieve this purpose, 4-point bending experiments for PSB beams were carried out. The flexural performances, mode of failure in bending, and the damage mechanism of PSB beams were investigated in this paper. PMID:24701141

  5. Isolation, chemical characterization, and immunomodulatory activity of naturally acetylated hemicelluloses from bamboo shavings* #

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ju-qing; Qi, Rui-ting; Pang, Mei-rong; Liu, Cong; Li, Guang-yu; Zhang, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Bamboo shavings, the outer or intermediate layer of bamboo stems, are the bulk of by-products produced in bamboo processing. In this study we investigated the isolation, chemical characterization, and immunostimulatory activity in vitro of the hemicelluloses from bamboo shavings. Shavings were first pretreated by steam explosion. The optimal pretreatment was found to be steam explosion at 2.2 MPa for 1 min. Following this pretreatment, the yield of hemicelluloses reached (2.05±0.22)% (based on the dry dewaxed raw materials), which was 5.7-fold higher than that of untreated samples. Bamboo-shavings hemicellulose (BSH) was then prepared by hot water extraction and ethanol precipitation from the steam-exploded shavings. Purification of BSH by anion-exchange chromatography of diethylaminoethanol (DEAE)-sepharose Fast Flow resulted in a neutral fraction (BSH-1, purity of 95.3%, yield of 1.06%) and an acidic fraction (BSH-2, purity of 92.5%, yield of 0.79%). The weight-average molecular weights (M w) of BSH-1 and BSH-2 were 12 800 and 11 300 g/mol, respectively. Chemical and structural analyses by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), 1D (1H and 13C) and 2D (heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC)) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra revealed that BSH-1 was O-acetylated-arabinoxylan and BSH-2 was O-acetylated-(4-O-methylglucurono)-arabinoxylan. BSH-1 had a higher content of acetyl groups than BSH-2. For the immunomodulatory activity in vitro, BSH and BSH-2 significantly stimulated mouse splenocyte proliferation while BSH-1 had no effect; BSH, BSH-1, and BSH-2 markedly enhanced the phagocytosis activity and nitric oxide production of the murine macrophage RAW264.7 in a dose-dependent manner. Our results suggest that the water-extractable hemicelluloses from steam-exploded bamboo shavings are naturally acetylated and have immunostimulatory activity. PMID:28124842

  6. Isolation, chemical characterization, and immunomodulatory activity of naturally acetylated hemicelluloses from bamboo shavings.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ju-Qing; Qi, Rui-Ting; Pang, Mei-Rong; Liu, Cong; Li, Guang-Yu; Zhang, Ying

    Bamboo shavings, the outer or intermediate layer of bamboo stems, are the bulk of by-products produced in bamboo processing. In this study we investigated the isolation, chemical characterization, and immunostimulatory activity in vitro of the hemicelluloses from bamboo shavings. Shavings were first pretreated by steam explosion. The optimal pretreatment was found to be steam explosion at 2.2 MPa for 1 min. Following this pretreatment, the yield of hemicelluloses reached (2.05±0.22)% (based on the dry dewaxed raw materials), which was 5.7-fold higher than that of untreated samples. Bamboo-shavings hemicellulose (BSH) was then prepared by hot water extraction and ethanol precipitation from the steam-exploded shavings. Purification of BSH by anion-exchange chromatography of diethylaminoethanol (DEAE)-sepharose Fast Flow resulted in a neutral fraction (BSH-1, purity of 95.3%, yield of 1.06%) and an acidic fraction (BSH-2, purity of 92.5%, yield of 0.79%). The weight-average molecular weights (M w ) of BSH-1 and BSH-2 were 12 800 and 11 300 g/mol, respectively. Chemical and structural analyses by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), 1D ( 1 H and 13 C) and 2D (heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC)) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra revealed that BSH-1 was O-acetylated-arabinoxylan and BSH-2 was O-acetylated-(4-O-methylglucurono)-arabinoxylan. BSH-1 had a higher content of acetyl groups than BSH-2. For the immunomodulatory activity in vitro, BSH and BSH-2 significantly stimulated mouse splenocyte proliferation while BSH-1 had no effect; BSH, BSH-1, and BSH-2 markedly enhanced the phagocytosis activity and nitric oxide production of the murine macrophage RAW264.7 in a dose-dependent manner. Our results suggest that the water-extractable hemicelluloses from steam-exploded bamboo shavings are naturally acetylated and have immunostimulatory activity.

  7. Copper induced oxidative stresses, antioxidant responses and phytoremediation potential of Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Junren; Shafi, Mohammad; Li, Song; Wang, Ying; Wu, Jiasen; Ye, Zhengqian; Peng, Danli; Yan, Wenbo; Liu, Dan

    2015-09-01

    Moso bamboo is recognized as phytoremediation plant due to production of huge biomass and high tolerance in stressed environment. Hydroponics and pot experiments were conducted to investigate mechanism of copper tolerance and to evaluate copper accumulation capacity of Moso bamboo. In hydroponics experiment there was non significant variation in MDA contents of leaves compared with control. SOD and POD initially indicated enhancing trend with application of 5 μM Cu and then decreased consistently with application of 25 and 100 μM Cu. Application of each additional increment of copper have constantly enhanced proline contents while maximum increase of proline was observed with application of 100 μM copper. In pot experiment chlorophyll and biomass initially showed increasing tendency and decreased gradually with application of each additional increment of Cu. Normal growth of Moso bamboo was observed with application of 100 mg kg-1 copper. However, additional application of 300 or 600 mg kg-1 copper had significantly inhibited growth of Moso bamboo. The concentration of Cu in Moso bamboo has attained the levels of 340, 60, 23 mg kg-1 in roots, stems and leaves respectively. The vacuoles were the main organs which accumulated copper and reduced toxicity of copper as studied by TEM-DEX technology.

  8. Copper induced oxidative stresses, antioxidant responses and phytoremediation potential of Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junren; Shafi, Mohammad; Li, Song; Wang, Ying; Wu, Jiasen; Ye, Zhengqian; Peng, Danli; Yan, Wenbo; Liu, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Moso bamboo is recognized as phytoremediation plant due to production of huge biomass and high tolerance in stressed environment. Hydroponics and pot experiments were conducted to investigate mechanism of copper tolerance and to evaluate copper accumulation capacity of Moso bamboo. In hydroponics experiment there was non significant variation in MDA contents of leaves compared with control. SOD and POD initially indicated enhancing trend with application of 5 μM Cu and then decreased consistently with application of 25 and 100 μM Cu. Application of each additional increment of copper have constantly enhanced proline contents while maximum increase of proline was observed with application of 100 μM copper. In pot experiment chlorophyll and biomass initially showed increasing tendency and decreased gradually with application of each additional increment of Cu. Normal growth of Moso bamboo was observed with application of 100 mg kg−1 copper. However, additional application of 300 or 600 mg kg−1 copper had significantly inhibited growth of Moso bamboo. The concentration of Cu in Moso bamboo has attained the levels of 340, 60, 23 mg kg−1 in roots, stems and leaves respectively. The vacuoles were the main organs which accumulated copper and reduced toxicity of copper as studied by TEM-DEX technology. PMID:26337551

  9. Comparative genomics reveals convergent evolution between the bamboo-eating giant and red pandas

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yibo; Wu, Qi; Ma, Shuai; Ma, Tianxiao; Shan, Lei; Wang, Xiao; Nie, Yonggang; Ning, Zemin; Yan, Li; Xiu, Yunfang; Wei, Fuwen

    2017-01-01

    Phenotypic convergence between distantly related taxa often mirrors adaptation to similar selective pressures and may be driven by genetic convergence. The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and red panda (Ailurus fulgens) belong to different families in the order Carnivora, but both have evolved a specialized bamboo diet and adaptive pseudothumb, representing a classic model of convergent evolution. However, the genetic bases of these morphological and physiological convergences remain unknown. Through de novo sequencing the red panda genome and improving the giant panda genome assembly with added data, we identified genomic signatures of convergent evolution. Limb development genes DYNC2H1 and PCNT have undergone adaptive convergence and may be important candidate genes for pseudothumb development. As evolutionary responses to a bamboo diet, adaptive convergence has occurred in genes involved in the digestion and utilization of bamboo nutrients such as essential amino acids, fatty acids, and vitamins. Similarly, the umami taste receptor gene TAS1R1 has been pseudogenized in both pandas. These findings offer insights into genetic convergence mechanisms underlying phenotypic convergence and adaptation to a specialized bamboo diet. PMID:28096377

  10. Comparative genomics reveals convergent evolution between the bamboo-eating giant and red pandas.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yibo; Wu, Qi; Ma, Shuai; Ma, Tianxiao; Shan, Lei; Wang, Xiao; Nie, Yonggang; Ning, Zemin; Yan, Li; Xiu, Yunfang; Wei, Fuwen

    2017-01-31

    Phenotypic convergence between distantly related taxa often mirrors adaptation to similar selective pressures and may be driven by genetic convergence. The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and red panda (Ailurus fulgens) belong to different families in the order Carnivora, but both have evolved a specialized bamboo diet and adaptive pseudothumb, representing a classic model of convergent evolution. However, the genetic bases of these morphological and physiological convergences remain unknown. Through de novo sequencing the red panda genome and improving the giant panda genome assembly with added data, we identified genomic signatures of convergent evolution. Limb development genes DYNC2H1 and PCNT have undergone adaptive convergence and may be important candidate genes for pseudothumb development. As evolutionary responses to a bamboo diet, adaptive convergence has occurred in genes involved in the digestion and utilization of bamboo nutrients such as essential amino acids, fatty acids, and vitamins. Similarly, the umami taste receptor gene TAS1R1 has been pseudogenized in both pandas. These findings offer insights into genetic convergence mechanisms underlying phenotypic convergence and adaptation to a specialized bamboo diet.

  11. Development of the BIOME-BGC model for the simulation of managed Moso bamboo forest ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Mao, Fangjie; Li, Pingheng; Zhou, Guomo; Du, Huaqiang; Xu, Xiaojun; Shi, Yongjun; Mo, Lufeng; Zhou, Yufeng; Tu, Guoqing

    2016-05-01

    Numerical models are the most appropriate instrument for the analysis of the carbon balance of terrestrial ecosystems and their interactions with changing environmental conditions. The process-based model BIOME-BGC is widely used in simulation of carbon balance within vegetation, litter and soil of unmanaged ecosystems. For Moso bamboo forests, however, simulations with BIOME-BGC are inaccurate in terms of the growing season and the carbon allocation, due to the oversimplified representation of phenology. Our aim was to improve the applicability of BIOME-BGC for managed Moso bamboo forest ecosystem by implementing several new modules, including phenology, carbon allocation, and management. Instead of the simple phenology and carbon allocation representations in the original version, a periodic Moso bamboo phenology and carbon allocation module was implemented, which can handle the processes of Moso bamboo shooting and high growth during "on-year" and "off-year". Four management modules (digging bamboo shoots, selective cutting, obtruncation, fertilization) were integrated in order to quantify the functioning of managed ecosystems. The improved model was calibrated and validated using eddy covariance measurement data collected at a managed Moso bamboo forest site (Anji) during 2011-2013 years. As a result of these developments and calibrations, the performance of the model was substantially improved. Regarding the measured and modeled fluxes (gross primary production, total ecosystem respiration, net ecosystem exchange), relative errors were decreased by 42.23%, 103.02% and 18.67%, respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Developing genome-wide microsatellite markers of bamboo and their applications on molecular marker assisted taxonomy for accessions in the genus Phyllostachys.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hansheng; Yang, Li; Peng, Zhenhua; Sun, Huayu; Yue, Xianghua; Lou, Yongfeng; Dong, Lili; Wang, Lili; Gao, Zhimin

    2015-01-26

    Morphology-based taxonomy via exiguously reproductive organ has severely limitation on bamboo taxonomy, mainly owing to infrequent and unpredictable flowering events of bamboo. Here, we present the first genome-wide analysis and application of microsatellites based on the genome of moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) to assist bamboo taxonomy. Of identified 127,593 microsatellite repeat-motifs, the primers of 1,451 microsatellites were designed and 1,098 markers were physically mapped on the genome of moso bamboo. A total of 917 markers were successfully validated in 9 accessions with ~39.8% polymorphic potential. Retrieved from validated microsatellite markers, 23 markers were selected for polymorphic analysis among 78 accessions and 64 alleles were detected with an average of 2.78 alleles per primers. The cluster result indicated the majority of the accessions were consistent with their current taxonomic classification, confirming the suitability and effectiveness of the developed microsatellite markers. The variations of microsatellite marker in different species were confirmed by sequencing and in silico comparative genome mapping were investigated. Lastly, a bamboo microsatellites database (http://www.bamboogdb.org/ssr) was implemented to browse and search large information of bamboo microsatellites. Consequently, our results of microsatellite marker development are valuable for assisting bamboo taxonomy and investigating genomic studies in bamboo and related grass species.

  13. A biorefinery scheme to fractionate bamboo into high-grade dissolving pulp and ethanol.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhaoyang; Wen, Yangbing; Kapu, Nuwan Sella; Beatson, Rodger; Mark Martinez, D

    2017-01-01

    Bamboo is a highly abundant source of biomass which is underutilized despite having a chemical composition and fiber structure similar as wood. The main challenge for the industrial processing of bamboo is the high level of silica, which forms water-insoluble precipitates negetively affecting the process systems. A cost-competitive and eco-friendly scheme for the production of high-purity dissolving grade pulp from bamboo not only requires a process for silica removal, but also needs to fully utilize all of the materials dissolved in the process which includes lignin, and cellulosic and hemicellulosic sugars as well as the silica. Many investigations have been carried out to resolve the silica issue, but none of them has led to a commercial process. In this work, alkaline pretreatment of bamboo was conducted to extract silica prior to pulping process. The silica-free substrate was used to produce high-grade dissolving pulp. The dissolved silica, lignin, hemicellulosic sugars, and degraded cellulose in the spent liquors obtained from alkaline pretreatment and pulping process were recovered for providing high-value bio-based chemicals and fuel. An integrated process which combines dissolving pulp production with the recovery of excellent sustainable biofuel and biochemical feedstocks is presented in this work. Pretreatment at 95 °C with 12% NaOH charge for 150 min extracted all the silica and about 30% of the hemicellulose from bamboo. After kraft pulping, xylanase treatment and cold caustic extraction, pulp with hemicellulose content of about 3.5% was obtained. This pulp, after bleaching, provided a cellulose acetate grade dissolving pulp with α-cellulose content higher than 97% and hemicellulose content less than 2%. The amount of silica and lignin that could be recovered from the process corresponded to 95 and 77.86% of the two components in the original chips, respectively. Enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of the concentrated and detoxified sugar mixture

  14. Characterization and hypoglycemic activity of a β-pyran polysaccharides from bamboo shoot (Leleba oldhami Nakal) shells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yafeng; Zhang, Shuai; Wang, Qi; Lu, Xu; Lin, Liangmei; Tian, Yuting; Xiao, Jianbo; Zheng, Baodong

    2016-06-25

    The bamboo shoot (Leleba oldhami Nakal) shell is a by-product during bamboo shoot processing. It is a cheap and available resource for dietary polysaccharides. Herein, a novel polysaccharide BSSP2a was isolated and characterized from the bamboo shoot shell polysaccharides, and it was identified as a homogeneous highly-branched beta type pyran polysaccharide with a molecular weight of 1.63×10(4)kDa, which consisted of arabinose, xylose, mannose, glucose and galactose at a molar ratio of 20.4:4.9:1:3.4:20.6. The crude polysaccharides (BSSP) from the bamboo shoots shell showed hypoglycemic activity on the high fat diet and streptozotocin induced diabetic mice in a dose-dependent manner. The administration of high dose BSSP (400mg/kg) improved body weight loss and serum insulin loss, and significantly decreased the blood glucose level, serum triglycerides as well as total cholesterol levels by 48.7%, 34.8% and 26.5%, respectively. The results highlight the potential of the bamboo shoot shell polysaccharides as a natural anti-diabetic agent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of anatomical characteristics and chemical components on microwave-assisted liquefaction of bamboo wastes

    Treesearch

    JiuLong Xie; XingYan Huang; JinQiu Qi; Chung Hse; Todd Shupe

    2014-01-01

    The epidermis layer waste (ELW) and the inner layer waste (ILW) were removed from Phyllostachys pubescens bamboo, and the anatomical characteristics and chemical components of these wastes were comparatively investigated. Both the ELW and the ILW were subjected to a microwave-assisted liquefaction process to evaluate the relationship between bamboo...

  16. Improvement of acoustical characteristics : wideband bamboo based polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farid, M.; Purniawan, A.; Rasyida, A.; Ramadhani, M.; Komariyah, S.

    2017-07-01

    Environmental friendly and comfortable materials are desirable for applications in the automobile interior. The objective of this research was to examine and develop bamboo based polymer composites applied to the sound absorption materials of automobile door panels. Morphological analysis of the polyurethane/bamboo powder composite materials was carried out using scanning electron microscope to reveal the microscopic material behavior and followed by the FTIR and TGA testing. The finding demonstrated that this acoustical polymer composite materials provided a potential wideband sound absorption material. The range of frequency can be controlled between 500 and 4000 Hz with an average of sound absorption coefficient around 0.411 and it met to the door panels criteria.

  17. Functional traits enhance invasiveness of bamboos over co-occurring tree saplings in the semideciduous Atlantic Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montti, Lía; Villagra, Mariana; Campanello, Paula I.; Gatti, M. Genoveva; Goldstein, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Many woody bamboo species are forest understory plants that become invasive after disturbance. They can grow rapidly forming a dense, nearly monospecific understory that inhibits tree regeneration. The principal aim of this study was to understand what functional traits of bamboos allow them to outcompete tree seedlings and saplings and become successful species in the semideciduous Atlantic Forests of northeastern Argentina. We studied leaf and whole-plant functional traits of two bamboo species of the genus Chusquea and five co-occurring saplings of common tree species growing under similar solar radiation and soil nutrient availabilities. Nutrient addition had no effect on bamboo or tree sapling survival and growth after two years. Tree species with high-light requirements had higher growth rates and developed relatively thin leaves with high photosynthetic capacity per unit leaf area and short leaf life-span when growing in gaps, but had lower survival rates in the understory. The opposite pattern was observed in shade-tolerant species that were able to survive in the understory but had lower photosynthetic capacity and growth than light-requiring species in gaps. Bamboos exhibited a high plasticity in functional traits and leaf characteristics that enabled them to grow rapidly in gaps (e.g., higher photosynthetic capacity per unit dry mass and clonal reproduction in gaps than in the understory) but at the same time to tolerate closed-canopy conditions (they had thinner leaves and a relatively longer leaf life-span in the understory compared to gaps). Photosynthetic capacity per unit dry mass was higher in bamboos than in trees. Bamboo plasticity in key functional traits, such as clonal reproduction at the plant level and leaves with a relatively low C cost and high photosynthesis rates, allows them to colonize disturbed forests with consequences at the community and ecosystem levels. Increasing disturbance in some forests worldwide will likely enhance bamboo

  18. Analysis of Phyllostachys pubescens bamboo residues for liquefaction: chemical components, infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetry

    Treesearch

    Jinqiu Qi; Chung-Yun Hse; Todd F. Shupe

    2013-01-01

    Residues of Phyllostachys pubescens bamboo obtained from central Louisiana, USA, were comprehensively investigated for use in liquefaction. The results showed that bamboo branches had the highest Klason lignin and ash content, about 26% and 2.75%, respectively. The epidermis layer sample had relatively higher carbohydrate content, while the wax layer sample had the...

  19. An effective protocol for micropropagation of edible bamboo species (Bambusa tulda and Melocanna baccifera) through nodal culture.

    PubMed

    Waikhom, Sayanika Devi; Louis, Bengyella

    2014-01-01

    High demand for edible bamboo shoots of Bambusa tulda and Melocanna baccifera in many Asian ethnic groups has led to the need for developing intensive bamboo farming. To achieve this, in vitro regeneration of bamboo plantlets is needed due to the long and irregular bamboo flowering cycle and scarcity of bamboo seeds. An effective protocol for plantlets regeneration in B. tulda and M. baccifera from nodal explants following validation of the species using the sequence of trnL-F intergenic spacer region is described. Effective axillary bud breaking was achieved at 3 mg/L of 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) in MS medium. Importantly, combining 2 mg/L of kinetin (Kn) with 3 mg/L of BAP produced a synergistic effect for shoot multiplication in B. tulda and M. baccifera. Under optimized conditions in half-strength MS medium supplemented with 3 mg/L of indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), 10 mg/L of coumarin, and 3% sucrose, profuse production of dark-brown rhizome in B. tulda and abundant rooting (81.67%, P < 0.05, F = 15.46) for M. baccifera within 30 days were achieved. The established protocol and the validation of the reported species at the molecular level will be of help to stakeholders in edible bamboo trade to conserve gene-pool and increase productivity.

  20. Addition of antioxidant from bamboo leaves as an effective way to reduce the formation of acrylamide in fried chicken wings.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Xu, Weizhong; Wu, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Xiaoling; Zhang, Ying

    2007-03-01

    The efficiency of antioxidant from bamboo leaves on the reduction of acrylamide during thermal processing and optimization of levels of addition of antioxidant from bamboo leaves applied to fried chicken wings are reported. The authors optimized the method of the addition of antioxidant from bamboo leaves to fried chicken wings and the frying processing parameters, and also compared the relationship between the content of total flavonoids in three extracts (EBL(971), EBL(972) and antioxidant from bamboo leaves) and the extent of the reduction of acrylamide. The acrylamide levels were quantified by a validated liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry detection method and the sensory evaluation was performed in a double-blind manner. The results showed that nearly 57.8 and 59.0% of acrylamide in fried chicken wings were reduced when the antioxidant from bamboo leaves addition ratios were 0.1 and 0.5% (w/w), respectively. The maximum inhibitory rate was achieved when antioxidant from bamboo leaves was chosen as the additive with a total flavonoid content of 32% compared with other two extracts and antioxidant from bamboo leaves mixed with flour was selected as the method of addition. Sensory evaluation results showed that the odour and flavour of fried chicken wings with antioxidant from bamboo leaves treatments had no significant difference compared with normal food matrixes (p > 0.05) when the antioxidant from bamboo leaves addition ratio was <0.5% (w/w). Colour acceptability in the study of sensory evaluation was in good correspondence with colour formation of fried chicken wings in each test group. These results suggest that antioxidant from bamboo leaves could significantly reduce acrylamide formation in fried chicken wings and yet still retain the original flavour and odour of the fried products. This study could be regarded as a pioneer contribution to the reduction of acrylamide in various foods by natural antioxidants.

  1. Young bamboo culm: Potential food as source of fiber and starch.

    PubMed

    Felisberto, Mária Herminia Ferrari; Miyake, Patricia Satie Endo; Beraldo, Antonio Ludovico; Clerici, Maria Teresa Pedrosa Silva

    2017-11-01

    With the objective of widening the use of bamboo in the food industry, the present work aimed to produce and characterize the young bamboo culm flours from varieties Dendrocalamus asper, Bambusa tuldoides and Bambusa vulgaris as potential sources of fiber and starch. The young culms were collected, cut in three sections (bottom, middle, top), processed into flour, and they were physically, chemically and technologically analyzed. The data were obtained in triplicate and evaluated by means of average differences, using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Scott-Knott test (p<0.05). The young bamboo culms flours presented low values for moisture content (<10g/100g), protein, lipids and ash contents (<3g/100g). Regarding the carbohydrates profile, the flours were significantly different in their sugar, starch and total fiber contents. All flour samples presented a potential for fiber extraction (>60g/100g), and the varieties B. vulgaris and D. asper, presented an additional potential for starch extraction (16 and 10g/100g, respectively). Regarding technological characteristics, all flours presented bright yellow color, lightly acidic pH (>5.0), water solubility index (WSI) lower to 2.5%, excepting D. asper, which presented a WSI superior to 7.5%. In this way, the evaluated young bamboo culms present potential application in the food industry as flours and as source of fibers; in addition, the varieties D. asper and B. vulgaris can also be used for starch extraction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Influence of Surface Modification on the Microstructure and Thermo-Mechanical Properties of Bamboo Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoping; Wang, Fang; Keer, Leon M.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of surface treatment on the morphology and thermo-mechanical properties of bamboo fibers. The fibers are subjected to an alkali treatment using 4 wt % sodium hydroxide (NaOH) for 1 h. Mechanical measurements show that the present concentration has an insignificant effect on the fiber tensile strength. In addition, systematic experimental results characterizing the morphological aspects and thermal properties of the bamboo fibers are analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and differential scanning calorimetry. It is found that an alkali treatment may increase the effective surface area, which is in turn available for superior bonding with the matrix. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis reveals that the alkali treatment leads to a gradual removal of binding materials, such as hemicellulose and lignin from the bamboo fiber. A comparison of the curve of thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry for the treated and untreated samples is presented to demonstrate that the presence of treatment contributes to a better thermal stability for bamboo fibers. PMID:28793585

  3. The pyrolysis characteristics of moso bamboo

    Treesearch

    Zehui Jiang; Zhijia Liu; Benhua Fei; Zhiyong Cai; Yan Yu; Xing’e Liu

    2012-01-01

    In the research, thermogravimetry (TG), a combination of thermogravimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (TG–FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to investigate pyrolysis characteristics of moso bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens). The Flynn–Wall–Ozawa and Coats–Redfern (modified) methods were used to determine the apparent activation energy (

  4. Sympodial bamboo species differ in carbon bio-sequestration and stocks within phytoliths of leaf litters and living leaves.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Tingting; Ying, Yuqi; Teng, Jiangnan; Huang, Zhangting; Wu, Jiasen; Meng, Cifu; Jiang, Peikun; Tang, Caixian; Li, Jianmin; Zheng, Rong

    2016-10-01

    Phytolith-occluded carbon (PhytOC) with high resistance against decomposition is an important carbon (C) sink in many ecosystems. This study compared concentrations of phytolith in plants and the PhytOC production of seven sympodial bamboo species in southern China, aiming to provide the information for the managed bamboo plantation and selection of bamboo species to maximize phytolith C sequestration. Leaf litters and living leaves of seven sympodial bamboo species were collected from the field sites. Concentrations of phytoliths, silicon (Si), and PhytOC in leaf litters and living leaves were measured. Carbon sequestration as PhytOC was estimated. There was a considerable variation in the PhytOC concentrations in the leaf litters and living leaves among the seven bamboo species. The mean concentrations of PhytOC ranged from 3.4 to 6.9 g kg(-1) in leaf litters and from 1.6 to 5.9 g kg(-1) in living leaves, with the PhytOC production rates ranging from 5.7 to 52.3 kg e-CO2 ha(-1) year(-1) as leaf litters. Dendrocalamopsis oldhami (Munro) Keng f. had the highest PhytOC production rate. Based on a bio-sequestration rate of 52.3 kg e-CO2 ha(-1) year(-1), we estimated that the current 8 × 10(5) ha of sympodial bamboo stands in China could potentially acquire 4.2 × 10(4) t e-CO2 yearly via phytolith carbon. Furthermore, the seven sympodial bamboo species stored 5.38 × 10(5) t e-CO2 as PhytOC in living leaves and leaf litters in China. It is concluded that sympodial bamboos make a significant contribution to C sequestration and that to maximize the PhytOC accumulation, the bamboo species with the highest PhytOC production rate should be selected for plantation.

  5. Important properties of bamboo pellets to be used as commercial solid fuel in China

    Treesearch

    Zhijia Liu; Benhua Fei; Zehui Jiang; Zhiyong Cai; Xing' e Liu

    2014-01-01

    Bamboo is a type of biomass material and has great potential as a bioenergy resource of the future in China. Some properties of bamboo pellets, length, diameter, moisture content (MC), particle density, bulk density, durability, fine content, ash, gross calorific value, combustion rate and heat release rate, were determined and the effects of MC and particle size (PS)...

  6. Seasonal Variations of the Antioxidant Composition in Ground Bamboo Sasa argenteastriatus Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Qinxue; Xu, Guangzhi; Wang, Zhiqiang; Gao, Qianxin; Wang, Shu; Zhang, Youzuo

    2012-01-01

    Sasa argenteastriatus, with abundant active compounds and high antioxidant activity in leaves, is a new leafy bamboo grove suitable for exploitation. To utilize it more effectively and scientifically, we investigate the seasonal variations of antioxidant composition in its leaves and antioxidant activity. The leaves of Sasa argenteastriatus were collected on the 5th day of each month in three same-sized sample plots from May 2009 to May 2011. The total flavonoids (TF): phenolics (TP) and triterpenoid (TT) of bamboo leaves were extracted and the contents analyzed by UV-spectrophotometer. Our data showed that all exhibited variations with the changing seasons, with the highest levels appearing in November to March. Antioxidant activity was measured using DPPH and FRAP methods. The highest antioxidant activity appeared in December with the lowest in May. Correlation analyses demonstrated that TP and TF exhibited high correlation with bamboo antioxidant activity. Eight bamboo characteristic compounds (orientin, isoorientin, vitexin, homovitexin and p-coumaric acid, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid) were determined by RP-HPLC synchronously. We found that chlorogenic acid, isoorientin and vitexin are the main compounds in Sasa argenteastriatus leaves and the content of isovitexin and chlorogenic acid showed a similar seasonal variation with the TF, TP and TT. Our results suggested that the optimum season for harvesting Sasa argenteastriatus leaves is between autumn and winter. PMID:22408451

  7. An Effective Protocol for Micropropagation of Edible Bamboo Species (Bambusa tulda and Melocanna baccifera) through Nodal Culture

    PubMed Central

    Waikhom, Sayanika Devi; Louis, Bengyella

    2014-01-01

    High demand for edible bamboo shoots of Bambusa tulda and Melocanna baccifera in many Asian ethnic groups has led to the need for developing intensive bamboo farming. To achieve this, in vitro regeneration of bamboo plantlets is needed due to the long and irregular bamboo flowering cycle and scarcity of bamboo seeds. An effective protocol for plantlets regeneration in B. tulda and M. baccifera from nodal explants following validation of the species using the sequence of trnL-F intergenic spacer region is described. Effective axillary bud breaking was achieved at 3 mg/L of 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) in MS medium. Importantly, combining 2 mg/L of kinetin (Kn) with 3 mg/L of BAP produced a synergistic effect for shoot multiplication in B. tulda and M. baccifera. Under optimized conditions in half-strength MS medium supplemented with 3 mg/L of indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), 10 mg/L of coumarin, and 3% sucrose, profuse production of dark-brown rhizome in B. tulda and abundant rooting (81.67%, P < 0.05, F = 15.46) for M. baccifera within 30 days were achieved. The established protocol and the validation of the reported species at the molecular level will be of help to stakeholders in edible bamboo trade to conserve gene-pool and increase productivity. PMID:24967429

  8. Bamboo vs. crops: An integrated emergy and economic evaluation of using bamboo to replace crops in south Sichuan Province, China

    EPA Science Inventory

    Based on long-term monitoring conducted in Chang-ning county, a pilot site of the ‘Grain for Green Program’ (GFGP), an integrated emergy and economic method was applied to evaluate the dynamic ecological-economic performance of 3 kinds of bamboo systems planted on slo...

  9. [The Use of FTIR Coupled with Partial Least Square for Quantitative Analysis of the Main Composition of Bamboo/Polypropylene Composites].

    PubMed

    Lao, Wan-li; He, Yu-chan; Li, Gai-yun; Zhou, Qun

    2016-01-01

    The biomass to plastic ratio in wood plastic composites (WPCs) greatly affects the physical and mechanical properties and price. Fast and accurate evaluation of the biomass to plastic ratio is important for the further development of WPCs. Quantitative analysis of the WPC main composition currently relies primarily on thermo-analytical methods. However, these methods have some inherent disadvantages, including time-consuming, high analytical errors and sophisticated, which severely limits the applications of these techniques. Therefore, in this study, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy in combination with partial least square (PLS) has been used for rapid prediction of bamboo and polypropylene (PP) content in bamboo/PP composites. The bamboo powders were used as filler after being dried at 105 degrees C for 24 h. PP was used as matrix materials, and some chemical regents were used as additives. Then 42 WPC samples with different ratios of bamboo and PP were prepared by the methods of extrusion. FTIR spectral data of 42 WPC samples were collected by means of KBr pellets technique. The model for bamboo and PP content prediction was developed by PLS-2 and full cross validation. Results of internal cross validation showed that the first derivative spectra in the range of 1 800-800 cm(-1) corrected by standard normal variate (SNV) yielded the optimal model. For both bamboo and PP calibration, the coefficients of determination (R2) were 0.955. The standard errors of calibration (SEC) were 1.872 for bamboo content and 1.848 for PP content, respectively. For both bamboo and PP validation, the R2 values were 0.950. The standard errors of cross validation (SECV) were 1.927 for bamboo content and 1.950 for PP content, respectively. And the ratios of performance to deviation (RPD) were 4.45 for both biomass and PP examinations. The results of external validation showed that the relative prediction deviations for both biomass and PP contents were lower than ± 6

  10. Shade Tolerance of Temperate Asian Bamboos: a Harbinger of their Naturalization in Pacific Northwest Coniferous Forests?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bamboos native to temperate East Asian forests may be pre-adapted to floristically related coniferous forests in western North America that conspicuously lack large, rhizomatous grasses. Given the increasing opportunity for Asian bamboos to enter North America through horticulture, such pre-adaptat...

  11. Effect of iron(III) ion on moso bamboo pyrolysis under microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qing; Li, Xiangqian; Wang, Zhaoyu; Bi, Yanhong; Yang, Rongling; Zhang, Jinfeng; Luo, Hongzhen; Niu, Miaomiao; Qi, Bo; Lu, Chen

    2017-11-01

    The effect of iron(III) ion on microwave pyrolysis of moso bamboo was investigated. Hydrofluoric acid washing was used as a pilot process to demineralize moso bamboo in order to eliminate the influences of the other inorganics contained in moso bamboo itself. The results indicated that the addition of iron(III) ion increased the maximal reaction temperatures under microwave condition dependent on the amount of the added iron(III) ion. The production of the non-condensable gases was promoted by the addition of iron(III) ion mainly at the expense of liquid products. Iron(III) ion exhibited the positive effect for syngas production and inhibited the formation of CO 2 and CH 4 . The formation of Fe 2 O 3 and Fe 3 O 4 was found during microwave pyrolysis and the mechanism of the two metallic oxides formation was described in this work. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Removal of microcystin-LR from drinking water using a bamboo-based charcoal adsorbent modified with chitosan.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hangjun; Zhu, Guoying; Jia, Xiuying; Ding, Ying; Zhang, Mi; Gao, Qing; Hu, Ciming; Xu, Shuying

    2011-01-01

    A new kind of low-cost syntactic adsorbent from bamboo charcoal and chitosan was developed for the removal of microcystin-LR from drinking water. Removal efficiency was higher for the syntactic adsorbent when the amount of bamboo charcoal was increased. The optimum dose ratio of bamboo charcoal to chitosan was 6:4, and the optimum amount was 15 mg/L; equilibrium time was 6 hr. The adsorption isotherm was non-linear and could be simulated by the Freundlich model (R2 = 0.9337). Adsorption efficiency was strongly affected by pH and natural organic matter (NOM). Removal efficiency was 16% higher at pH 3 than at pH 9. Efficiency rate was reduced by 15% with 25 mg/L NOM (UV254 = 0.089 cm(-1)) in drinking water. This study demonstrated that the bamboo charcoal modified with chitosan can effectively remove microcystin-LR from drinking water.

  13. Reproducibility of Ba/Ca variations recorded by northeast Pacific bamboo corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrato Marks, G.; LaVigne, M.; Hill, T. M.; Sauthoff, W.; Guilderson, T. P.; Roark, E. B.; Dunbar, R. B.; Horner, T. J.

    2017-09-01

    Trace elemental ratios preserved in the calcitic skeleton of bamboo corals have been shown to serve as archives of past ocean conditions. The concentration of dissolved barium (BaSW), a bioactive nutrientlike element, is linked to biogeochemical processes such as the cycling and export of nutrients. Recent work has calibrated bamboo coral Ba/Ca, a new BaSW proxy, using corals spanning the oxygen minimum zone beneath the California Current System. However, it was previously unclear whether Ba/Cacoral records were internally reproducible. Here we investigate the accuracy of using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for Ba/Cacoral analyses and test the internal reproducibility of Ba/Ca among replicate radial transects in the calcite of nine bamboo corals collected from the Gulf of Alaska (643-720 m) and the California margin (870-2054 m). Data from replicate Ba/Ca transects were aligned using visible growth bands to account for nonconcentric growth; smoothed data were reproducible within 4% for eight corals (n = 3 radii/coral). This intracoral reproducibility further validates using bamboo coral Ba/Ca for BaSW reconstructions. Sections of the Ba/Ca records that were potentially influenced by noncarbonate bound Ba phases occurred in regions where elevated Mg/Ca or Pb/Ca and coincided with anomalous regions on photomicrographs. After removing these regions of the records, increased Ba/Cacoral variability was evident in corals between 800 and 1500 m. These findings support additional proxy validation to understand BaSW variability on interannual timescales, which could lead to new insights into deep sea biogeochemistry over the past several centuries.

  14. The Aquatic Communities Inhabiting Internodes of Two Sympatric Bamboos in Argentinean Subtropical Forest

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Raúl E.

    2013-01-01

    In order to determine if phytotelmata in sympatric bamboos of the genus Guadua might be colonized by different types of arthropods and contain communities of different complexities, the following objectives were formulated: (1) to analyze the structure and species richness of the aquatic macroinvertebrate communities, (2) to comparatively analyze co-occurrences; and (3) to identify the main predators. Field studies were conducted in a subtropical forest in Argentina, where 80 water-filled bamboo internodes of Guadua chacoensis (Rojas Acosta) Londoño and Peterson (Poales: Poaceae) and G. trinii (Nees) Nees and Rupr. were sampled. Morphological measurements indicated that G. chacoensis held more fluid than G. trinii. The communities differed between Guadua species, but many macroinvertebrate species used both bamboo species. The phytotelmata were mainly colonized by Diptera of the families Culicidae and Ceratopogonidae. PMID:24224775

  15. Methyl bromide as a quarantine treatment for Chlorophorus annularis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in raw bamboo poles.

    PubMed

    Barak, Alan V; Weidong, Yang; Daojian, Yu; Yi, Jiao; Lin, Kang; Zhilin, Chen; Xingyuan, Ling; Guoping, Zhan

    2009-06-01

    At least 26 different species of insects of quarantine significance were intercepted from 1985 to 2005 on bamboo (Bambusa spp.) garden stakes from China. Three fifths of the live insects were cerambycids in nine genera, including Chlorophorus annularis F., the bamboo borer. The current APHIS-PPQ treatment is fumigation schedule T404-d, which requires high doses of methyl bromide (MeBr) for 24 h. No specific fumigation data exist for C. annularis. Chinese and American quarantine scientists cooperated in testing to determine whether this schedule, or lower doses, would be effective as a quarantine treatment for C. annularis infesting dried bamboo poles. A lower dose based on APHIS tests for solid wood packing (SWP) failed (3/511 survivors) at 56 g/m3 for 24 h at 10.0 degrees C. We therefore tested five progressive doses at five temperatures intermediate between the lower SWP schedule and the much higher applied doses (e.g., 120 g/m3 for 24 h at 10.0 degrees C) of schedule T404-d. Fumigations of infested bamboo poles conducted in 403.2-liter chambers with 52% vol:vol loading at doses of 48, 64, 80, 96, and 112 g/m3 at 26.7, 21.1, 15.6, 10.0, and 4.4 degrees C, respectively (20 total replicates, with 4 replicates per dose), had no survivors among 2,847 larvae, 140 pupae, and 122 adults. Control replicates (three) had a total of 455 live stages (397 larvae, 31 pupae, and 27 adults). Tests conducted with a sea/land cargo container loaded to 80% capacity with bamboo poles verified the ability of the schedule to maintain effective concentrations over 24 h in commercial-sized fumigations. We propose a new bamboo quarantine treatment schedule at reduced rates of applied MeBr.

  16. Giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) population dynamics and bamboo (subfamily Bambusoideae) life history: a structured population approach to examining carrying capacity when the prey are semelparous

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, J.; Ackleh, A.S.; Leonard, B.P.; Wang, Hongfang

    1999-01-01

    The giant panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca, is a highly specialized Ursid whose diet consists almost entirely of various species of bamboo. Bamboo (Bambusoideae) is a grass subfamily whose species often exhibit a synchronous semelparity. Synchronous semelparity can create local drops in carrying capacity for the panda. We modeled the interaction of pandas and their bamboo food resources with an age structured panda population model linked to a natural history model of bamboo biomass dynamics based on literature values of bamboo biomass, and giant panda life history dynamics. This paper reports the results of our examination of the interaction between pandas and their bamboo food resource and its implications for panda conservation. In the model all panda populations were well below the carrying capacity of the habitat. The giant panda populations growth was most sensitive to changes in birth rates and removal of reproductive aged individuals. Periodic starvation that has been documented in conjunction with bamboo die-offs is probably related to the inability to move to other areas within the region where bamboo is still available. Based on the results of this model, giant panda conservation should concentrate on keeping breeding individuals in the wild, keep corridors to different bamboo species open to pandas, and to concentrate research on bamboo life history.

  17. Silica distribution in various bamboos species and its effects on plant growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collin, B.; Meunier, J.; Keller, C.; Doelsch, E.; Panfili, F.

    2010-12-01

    Bamboos are distributed throughout the world’s temperate, tropical and subtropical regions. They are widely used in industry, as fresh edible shoots, paper maker, building and even in medicine. Bamboos also play multiple ecologic functions such as soil and water conservation and erosion control. Bamboos have generally high silicon (Si) content. Silicon is known to have beneficial effects on plants and alleviate various stresses. The aim of this study is to quantify the Si uptake and distribution in various bamboos species and to investigate the effects of Si on the plant growth. Two complementary studies were carried out, one under natural conditions and one under controlled conditions. First of all, we performed an inventory of Si tissue content in 16 bamboos species growing in a non-polluted tropical soil at the Reunion Island (France, Indian ocean). We determined Si content in leaf and in stem tissues sampled at several heights for each plant. One of these species Gigantocloa sp « Malay Dwarf » was grown for 3 months in nutrient solution at five Si concentrations (0, 0.25, 0.75, 1.15, 1.5 mM Si). Silica deposition was examined in leaves using a cryo-SEM equipped with EDS. The Si concentration varies significantly between species, depending on rhizome morphology. Bamboos having leptomorph rhizomes show significantly higher leaf and stem Si content than that of species having pachymorph rhizomes. The distribution of Si in the plant has the same trends for all species. Leaves are the most concentrated organs (10.9 %), and within the stem Si concentration significantly increases from the bottom (0.32%) to the top of the plant (2.1%). Plant Si content increases with the Si supply. Leaves of Gigantocloa sp « Malay Dwarf » accumulate 15.2 % of Si under natural conditions and up to 24 % when exposed to the highest Si treatment. Unlike previous studies, our experiment shows that the concentration of Si had no significant effect on nutrient uptake and biomass

  18. Batchwise dyeing of bamboo cellulose fabric with reactive dye using ultrasonic energy.

    PubMed

    Larik, Safdar Ali; Khatri, Awais; Ali, Shamshad; Kim, Seong Hun

    2015-05-01

    Bamboo is a regenerated cellulose fiber usually dyed with reactive dyes. This paper presents results of the batchwise dyeing of bamboo fabric with reactive dyes by ultrasonic (US) and conventional (CN) dyeing methods. The study was focused at comparing the two methods for dyeing results, chemicals, temperature and time, and effluent quality. Two widely used dyes, CI Reactive Black 5 (bis-sulphatoethylsulphone) and CI Reactive Red 147 (difluorochloropyrimidine) were used in the study. The US dyeing method produced around 5-6% higher color yield (K/S) in comparison to the CN dyeing method. A significant savings in terms of fixation temperature (10°C) and time (15 min), and amounts of salt (10 g/L) and alkali (0.5-1% on mass of fiber) was realized. Moreover, the dyeing effluent showed considerable reductions in the total dissolved solids content (minimum around 29%) and in the chemical oxygen demand (minimum around 13%) for the US dyebath in comparison to the CN dyebath. The analysis of colorfastness tests demonstrated similar results by US and CN dyeing methods. A microscopic examination on the field emission scanning electron microscope revealed that the US energy did not alter the surface morphology of the bamboo fibers. It was concluded that the US dyeing of bamboo fabric produces better dyeing results and is a more economical and environmentally sustainable method as compared to CN dyeing method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Bamboo leaf ash as the stabilizer for soft soil treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, A. S. A.; Jais, I. B. M.; Sidek, N.; Ahmad, J.; Rosli, M. I. F.

    2018-04-01

    Soft soil is a type of soil that have the size of particle less than 0.063mm. The strength of the soft soil does not fulfil the requirement for construction. The present of soft soil at the construction site always give a lot of problems and issues to geotechnical sector. Soil settlement is one of the problems that related to soft soil. The determination of the soft soil physical characteristics will provide a detail description on its characteristic. Soft soil need to be treated in order to gain the standard strength for construction. One of the method to strengthen the soft soil is by using pozzolanic material as a treatment method for soft soil. Furthermore bamboo leaf ash is one of the newly founded materials that contain pozzolanic material. Any material that consist of Silicon Dioxide (SiO2) as the main component and followed by Aluminium Oxide (Al2O3) and Iron Oxide (Fe2O3) are consider as pozzolanic material. Bamboo leaf ash is mix with the cement as the treatment material. Bamboo leaf ash will react with the cement to produce additional cement binder. Thus, it will increase the soil strength and will ease the geotechnical sector to achieve high quality of construction product.

  20. Potential Role of Masting by Introduced Bamboos in Deer Mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) Population Irruptions Holds Public Health Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Melissa C.; Gomulkiewicz, Richard; Mack, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that the ongoing naturalization of frost/shade tolerant Asian bamboos in North America could cause environmental consequences involving introduced bamboos, native rodents and ultimately humans. More specifically, we asked whether the eventual masting by an abundant leptomorphic (“running”) bamboo within Pacific Northwest coniferous forests could produce a temporary surfeit of food capable of driving a population irruption of a common native seed predator, the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), a hantavirus carrier. Single-choice and cafeteria-style feeding trials were conducted for deer mice with seeds of two bamboo species (Bambusa distegia and Yushania brevipaniculata), wheat, Pinus ponderosa, and native mixed diets compared to rodent laboratory feed. Adult deer mice consumed bamboo seeds as readily as they consumed native seeds. In the cafeteria-style feeding trials, Y. brevipaniculata seeds were consumed at the same rate as native seeds but more frequently than wheat seeds or rodent laboratory feed. Females produced a median litter of 4 pups on a bamboo diet. Given the ability of deer mice to reproduce frequently whenever food is abundant, we employed our feeding trial results in a modified Rosenzweig-MacArthur consumer-resource model to project the population-level response of deer mice to a suddenly available/rapidly depleted supply of bamboo seeds. The simulations predict rodent population irruptions and declines similar to reported cycles involving Asian and South American rodents but unprecedented in deer mice. Following depletion of a mast seed supply, the incidence of Sin Nombre Virus (SNV) transmission to humans could subsequently rise with dispersal of the peridomestic deer mice into nearby human settlements seeking food. PMID:25898267

  1. [Effects of intensive management on soil C and N pools and soil enzyme activities in Moso bamboo plantations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meng; Li, Yong Fu; Li, Yong Chun; Xiao, Yong Heng; Yue, Tian; Jiang, Pei Kun; Zhou, Guo Mo; Liu, Juan

    2016-11-18

    In order to elucidate the effects of intensive management on soil carbon pool, nitrogen pool, enzyme activities in Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens) plantations, we collected soil samples from the soil surface (0-20 cm) and subsurface (20-40 cm) layers in the adjacent Moso bamboo plantations with extensive and intensive managements in Sankou Township, Lin'an City, Zhejiang Province. We determined different forms of C, N and soil invertase, urease, catalase and acid phosphatase activities. The results showed that long-term intensive management of Moso bamboo plantations significantly decreased the content and storage of soil organic carbon (SOC), with the SOC storage in the soil surface and subsurface layers decreased by 13.2% and 18.0%, respectively. After 15 years' intensive management of Masoo bamboo plantations, the contents of soil water soluble carbon (WSOC), hot water soluble carbon (HWSOC), microbial carbon (MBC) and readily oxidizable carbon (ROC) were significantly decreased in the soil surface and subsurface layers. The soil N storage in the soil surface and subsurface layers in intensively managed Moso bamboo plantations increased by 50.8% and 36.6%, respectively. Intensive management significantly increased the contents of nitrate-N (NO 3 - -N) and ammonium-N (NH 4 + -N), but decreased the contents of water-soluble nitrogen (WSON) and microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN). After 15 years' intensive management of Masoo bamboo plantations, the soil invertase, urease, catalase and acid phosphatase activities in the soil surface layer were significantly decreased, the soil acid phosphatase activity in the soil subsurface layer were significantly decreased, and other enzyme activities in the soil subsurface layer did not change. In conclusion, long-term intensive management led to a significant decline of soil organic carbon storage, soil labile carbon and microbial activity in Moso bamboo plantations. Therefore, we should consider the use of organic

  2. [Study on chemical compositions and crystallinity changes of bamboo treated with gamma rays].

    PubMed

    Sun, Feng-Bo; Jiang, Ze-hui; Fei, Ben-hua; Lu, Fang; Yu, Zi-xuan; Chang, Xiang-zhen

    2011-07-01

    The structures and qualities of main chemical compositions in cell wall of bamboo treated with gamma rays were tested by nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer (NMR) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The result indicated that the bamboo crystallinity increased at the beginning of irradiation process, while the crystallinity reduced when the irradiation dose was raised to about 100 kGy. During the whole irradiation process, hemicellulose degraded, and with the irradiation doses increased the non-phenolic lignin changed to the phenolic.

  3. A staging table for the embryonic development of the brownbanded bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium punctatum)

    PubMed Central

    Onimaru, Koh; Motone, Fumio; Kiyatake, Itsuki; Nishida, Kiyonori

    2018-01-01

    Background: Studying cartilaginous fishes (chondrichthyans) has helped us understand vertebrate evolution and diversity. However, resources such as genome sequences, embryos, and detailed staging tables are limited for species within this clade. To overcome these limitations, we have focused on a species, the brownbanded bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium punctatum), which is a relatively common aquarium species that lays eggs continuously throughout the year. In addition, because of its relatively small genome size, this species is promising for molecular studies. Results: To enhance biological studies of cartilaginous fishes, we establish a normal staging table for the embryonic development of the brownbanded bamboo shark. Bamboo shark embryos take around 118 days to reach the hatching period at 25°C, which is approximately 1.5 times as fast as the small‐spotted catshark (Scyliorhinus canicula) takes. Our staging table divides the embryonic period into 38 stages. Furthermore, we found culture conditions that allow early embryos to grow in partially opened egg cases. Conclusions: In addition to the embryonic staging table, we show that bamboo shark embryos exhibit relatively fast embryonic growth and are amenable to culture, key characteristics that enhance their experimental utility. Therefore, the present study is a foundation for cartilaginous fish research. Developmental Dynamics 247:712–723, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:29396887

  4. Spatial distribution of soil organic carbon stock in Moso bamboo forests in subtropical China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaolu; Xia, Mingpeng; Pérez-Cruzado, César; Guan, Fengying; Fan, Shaohui

    2017-02-14

    Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys heterocycla (Carr.) Mitford cv. Pubescens) is an important timber substitute in China. Site specific stand management requires an accurate estimate of soil organic carbon (SOC) stock for maintaining stand productivity and understanding global carbon cycling. This study compared ordinary kriging (OK) and inverse distance weighting (IDW) approaches to study the spatial distribution of SOC stock within 0-60 cm using 111 soil samples in Moso bamboo forests in subtropical China. Similar spatial patterns but different spatial distribution ranges of SOC stock from OK and IDW highlighted the necessity to apply different approaches to obtain accurate and consistent results of SOC stock distribution. Different spatial patterns of SOC stock suggested the use of different fertilization treatments in Moso bamboo forests across the study area. SOC pool within 0-60 cm was 6.46 and 6.22 Tg for OK and IDW; results which were lower than that of conventional approach (CA, 7.41 Tg). CA is not recommended unless coordinates of the sampling locations are missing and the spatial patterns of SOC stock are not required. OK is recommended for the uneven distribution of sampling locations. Our results can improve methodology selection for investigating spatial distribution of SOC stock in Moso bamboo forests.

  5. Spatial distribution of soil organic carbon stock in Moso bamboo forests in subtropical China

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaolu; Xia, Mingpeng; Pérez-Cruzado, César; Guan, Fengying; Fan, Shaohui

    2017-01-01

    Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys heterocycla (Carr.) Mitford cv. Pubescens) is an important timber substitute in China. Site specific stand management requires an accurate estimate of soil organic carbon (SOC) stock for maintaining stand productivity and understanding global carbon cycling. This study compared ordinary kriging (OK) and inverse distance weighting (IDW) approaches to study the spatial distribution of SOC stock within 0–60 cm using 111 soil samples in Moso bamboo forests in subtropical China. Similar spatial patterns but different spatial distribution ranges of SOC stock from OK and IDW highlighted the necessity to apply different approaches to obtain accurate and consistent results of SOC stock distribution. Different spatial patterns of SOC stock suggested the use of different fertilization treatments in Moso bamboo forests across the study area. SOC pool within 0–60 cm was 6.46 and 6.22 Tg for OK and IDW; results which were lower than that of conventional approach (CA, 7.41 Tg). CA is not recommended unless coordinates of the sampling locations are missing and the spatial patterns of SOC stock are not required. OK is recommended for the uneven distribution of sampling locations. Our results can improve methodology selection for investigating spatial distribution of SOC stock in Moso bamboo forests. PMID:28195207

  6. Effects of Carbonization Parameters of Moso-Bamboo-Based Porous Charcoal on Capturing Carbon Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Jhan, Jhih-Wei; Cheng, Yi-Ming; Cheng, Hau-Hsein

    2014-01-01

    This study experimentally analyzed the carbon dioxide adsorption capacity of Moso-bamboo- (Phyllostachys edulis-) based porous charcoal. The porous charcoal was prepared at various carbonization temperatures and ground into powders with 60, 100, and 170 meshes, respectively. In order to understand the adsorption characteristics of porous charcoal, its fundamental properties, namely, charcoal yield, ash content, pH value, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, iodine number, pore volume, and powder size, were analyzed. The results show that when the carbonization temperature was increased, the charcoal yield decreased and the pH value increased. Moreover, the bamboo carbonized at a temperature of 1000°C for 2 h had the highest iodine sorption value and BET surface area. In the experiments, charcoal powders prepared at various carbonization temperatures were used to adsorb 1.854% CO2 for 120 h. The results show that the bamboo charcoal carbonized at 1000°C and ground with a 170 mesh had the best adsorption capacity, significantly decreasing the CO2 concentration to 0.836%. At room temperature and atmospheric pressure, the Moso-bamboo-based porous charcoal exhibited much better CO2 adsorption capacity compared to that of commercially available 350-mesh activated carbon. PMID:25225639

  7. Isolation and characterization of cellulose nanofibers from bamboo using microwave liquefaction combined with chemical treatment and ultrasonication

    Treesearch

    Jiulong Xie; Chung Hse; Cornelis F. De Hoop; Tingxing Hu; Jinqiu Qi; Todd F. Shupe

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose nanofibers were successfully isolated from bamboo using microwave liquefaction combinedwith chemical treatment and ultrasonic nanofibrillation processes. The microwave liquefaction couldeliminate almost all the lignin in bamboo, resulting in high cellulose content residues within 7 min, andthe cellulose enriched residues could be readily purified by...

  8. Determination of Hemicellulose, Cellulose and Lignin in Moso Bamboo by Near Infrared Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoli; Sun, Chanjun; Zhou, Binxiong; He, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The contents of hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin are important for moso bamboo processing in biomass energy industry. The feasibility of using near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy for rapid determination of hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin was investigated in this study. Initially, the linear relationship between bamboo components and their NIR spectroscopy was established. Subsequently, successive projections algorithm (SPA) was used to detect characteristic wavelengths for establishing the convenient models. For hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin, 22, 22 and 20 characteristic wavelengths were obtained, respectively. Nonlinear determination models were subsequently built by an artificial neural network (ANN) and a least-squares support vector machine (LS-SVM) based on characteristic wavelengths. The LS-SVM models for predicting hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin all obtained excellent results with high determination coefficients of 0.921, 0.909 and 0.892 respectively. These results demonstrated that NIR spectroscopy combined with SPA-LS-SVM is a useful, nondestructive tool for the determinations of hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin in moso bamboo. PMID:26601657

  9. Comparison of bamboo green, timber and yellow in sulfite, sulfuric acid and sodium hydroxide pretreatments for enzymatic saccharification

    Treesearch

    Zhiqiang Li; Zehui Jiang; Benhua Fei; Zhiyong Cai; Xuejun Pan

    2014-01-01

    The response and behavior of bamboo green, timber, and yellow of moso bamboo (Phyllostachys heterocycla) to three pretreatments, sulfite (SPORL), dilute acid (DA), and alkali (NaOH), were investigated and compared with varied chemical loadings at 180

  10. Synthesis of Composit From Bamboo Fiber, Zeolite and Epoxy for Room Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raihan Muhammad, Dhany; Basuki, Kris Tri; Wasito, Bangun; Suroso

    2018-01-01

    This research aims is to search a subtitute of the asbestos for the separator rontgen room using bamboo fiber filled with zeolite; which harden using epoxy it is all caused because the hazard of the asbestos to the human body. Bamboo stem degenerated using NaOH (20%) to get the bamboo fiber. Bamboo fiber added with CS2 (10 mL) to form xanthate cellulose. Xanthate Cellulose mixed with filler zeolite and harden of epoxy, layer by layer until getting the right width. The variant of the mass composition is 3: 0:1; 3: 0.25:0.75; 3 :0.5:0.5; 3: 0.75:0.25; 3: 1:0, and the variant of the temperature 28 °C 40 °C 60 °C 80 °C and 100 °C. The sample tested using microscopic method, impact test with Charpy method, corrosivity method, Electricity conduct method, thermal conduct method, and radiation resistance or attenuation method. The result shown the optimum composition of the composite it is at the variant 3 :0.5:0.5, with the optimum temperature is 40°C with the density of the sample is 1.5789 g/cm3. Impact resistance of the sample is 44 Joule. The Radiation resistance is 0.46, with the thermal conductivity of the sample is 0.016 Kkal/m.s.c. it shown that the sample is isolator. From the result is shown that the sample is can be a substitute for asbestos as material of the separator in the Rontgen room.

  11. 6. VIEW OF BAMBOO GATE LEADING INTO WHITE GRAVEL AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF BAMBOO GATE LEADING INTO WHITE GRAVEL AND ROCK CLUSTER GARDEN REMINISCENT OF RYOAN-JI TEMPLE GARDEN IN KYOTO - Kykuit, Japanese Gardens, 200 Lake Road, Pocantico Hills, Westchester County, NY

  12. Surface runoff and nitrogen (N) loss in a bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens) forest under different fertilization regimes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qichun; Shamsi, Imran Haider; Wang, Jinwen; Song, Qiujin; Xue, Qiaoyun; Yu, Yan; Lin, Xianyong; Hussain, Sayed

    2013-07-01

    Nitrogen (N) losses from agricultural fields have been extensively studied. In contrast, surface runoff and N losses have rarely been considered for bamboo forests that are widespread in regions such as southern China. The thriving of bamboo industries has led to increasing fertilizer use in bamboo forests. In this study, we evaluated surface runoff and N losses in runoff following different fertilization treatments under field conditions in a bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens) forest in the catchment of Lake Taihu in Jiangsu, China. Under three different fertilization regimes, i.e., control, site-specific nutrient management (SSNM), and farmer's fertilization practice (FFP), the water runoff rate amounted to 356, 361, and 342 m(3) ha(-1) and accounted for 1.91, 1.98, and 1.85% of the water input, respectively, from June 2009 to May 2010. The total N losses via surface runoff ranged from 1.2 to 1.8 kg ha(-1). Compared with FFP, the SSNM treatment reduced total nitrogen (TN) and dissolved nitrogen (DN) losses by 31 and 34%, respectively. The results also showed that variations in N losses depended mainly on runoff fluxes, not N concentrations. Runoff samples collected from all treatments throughout the year showed TN concentrations greater than 0.35 mg L(-1), with the mean TN concentration in the runoff from the FFP treatment reaching 8.97 mg L(-1). The loss of NO3(-)-N was greater than the loss of NH4(+)-N. The total loss of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) reached 23-41% of the corresponding DN. Therefore, DON is likely the main N species in runoff from bamboo forests and should be emphasized in the assessment and management of N losses in bamboo forest.

  13. Total leaf crude protein, amino acid composition and elemental content in the USDA-ARS bamboo germplasm collection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bamboo shoots and leaves are valuable food sources for both humans and livestock. The USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System (NPGS) collections hold 93 bamboo species in 20 genera. Total leaf protein, amino acid composition and elemental content for these important genetic resources had never bee...

  14. Traumatic pericarditis caused by a bamboo twig in captive waterbuck (Kobus ellipsiprymnus)

    PubMed Central

    EO, Kyung-Yeon; LEE, Hyun-Ho; LEE, Seul-Kee; JUNG, Young-Mok; YEO, Yong-Gu; RYU, Ji-Sook; KANG, Sin-Geun; KWAK, Dongmi; KWON, Oh-Deog

    2017-01-01

    A 19-year-old captive male waterbuck (Kobus ellipsiprymnus) exhibited traumatic pericarditis at necropsy. The animal weighed 182 kg at necropsy and revealed no remarkable findings in external observation. Severe pericardial adhesions with fibrosis, hepato-diaphragmatic adhesions, straw-colored ascites and hepatosplenomegaly were observed upon examining the internal organs. Perforations made by a 12-cm-long sharp-ended bamboo twig were detected in the reticulum, diaphragm, pericardium, lung and liver. Trueperella pyogenes was identified in pericardial fluid. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of traumatic reticulopericarditis caused by a sharp-ended bamboo twig in a captive waterbuck. PMID:28757525

  15. Non-indigenous bamboo along headwater streams of the Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico: leaf fall, aquatic leaf decay and patterns of invasion

    Treesearch

    PAUL J. O' CONNOR; ALAN P. COVICH; F. N. SCATENA; LLOYD L. LOOPE

    2000-01-01

    The introduction of bamboo to montane rain forests of the Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico in the 1930s and 1940s has led to present-day bamboo monocultures in numerous riparian areas. When a non-native species invades a riparian ecosystem, in-stream detritivores can be affected. Bamboo dynamics expected to in¯uence stream communities in the Luquillo Experimental Forest...

  16. Secondary metabolites from the unique bamboo, Melocanna baccifera.

    PubMed

    Govindan, Balaji; Johnson, Anil John; Viswanathan, Gayathri; Ramaswamy, Venkataraman; Koshy, Konnath Chacko; Baby, Sabulal

    2018-02-15

    Phytochemistry of fruits and leaves of the unique bamboo Melocanna baccifera resulted in the isolation of 27 secondary metabolites, including 4-Oxabicyclo[3.2.2]nona-1(7),5,8-triene and Verbacine. Biological activity studies of Verbacine revealed it as an inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase and as cytotoxic against C6 cancer cells.

  17. Detection of piRNAs in whitespotted bamboo shark liver.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lingrong; Ge, Yinghua; Cheng, Dandan; Nie, Zuoming; Lv, Zhengbing

    2016-09-15

    Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are 26 to 31-nt small non-coding RNAs that have been reported mostly in germ-line cells and cancer cells. However, the presence of piRNAs in the whitespotted bamboo shark liver has not yet been reported. In a previous study of microRNAs in shark liver, some piRNAs were detected from small RNAs sequenced by Solexa technology. A total of 4857 piRNAs were predicted and found in shark liver. We further selected 17 piRNAs with high and significantly differential expression between normal and regenerative liver tissues for subsequent verification by Northern blotting. Ten piRNAs were further identified, and six of these were matched to known piRNAs in piRNABank. The actual expression of six known and four novel piRNAs was validated by qRT-PCR. In addition, a total of 401 target genes of the 10 piRNAs were predicted by miRanda. Through GO and pathway function analyses, only five piRNAs could be annotated with eighteen GO annotations. The results indicated that the identified piRNAs are involved in many important biological responses, including immune inflammation, cell-specific differentiation and development, and angiogenesis. This manuscript provides the first identification of piRNAs in the liver of whitespotted bamboo shark using Solexa technology as well as further elucidation of the regulatory role of piRNAs in whitespotted bamboo shark liver. These findings may provide a useful resource and may facilitate the development of therapeutic strategies against liver damage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Diversity and Antimicrobial Activity of Culturable Endophytic Fungi Isolated from Moso Bamboo Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Chun-Ju; Fan, Li; Gao, Jian; Hou, Cheng-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Bamboos, regarded as therapeutic agents in ethnomedicine, have been used to inhibit inflammation and enhance natural immunity for a long time in Asia, and there are many bamboo associated fungi with medical and edible value. In the present study, a total of 350 fungal strains were isolated from the uncommon moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) seeds for the first time. The molecular diversity of these endophytic fungi was investigated and bioactive compound producers were screened for the first time. All the fungal endophytes were categorized into 69 morphotypes according to culturable characteristics and their internal transcriber spacer (ITS) regions were analyzed by BLAST search with the NCBI database. The fungal isolates showed high diversity and were divided in Ascomycota (98.0%) and Basidiomycota (2.0%), including at least 19 genera in nine orders. Four particular genera were considered to be newly recorded bambusicolous fungi, including Leptosphaerulina, Simplicillium, Sebacina and an unknown genus in Basidiomycetes. Furthermore, inhibitory effects against clinical pathogens and phytopathogens were screened preliminarily and strains B09 (Cladosporium sp.), B34 (Curvularia sp.), B35 (undefined genus 1), B38 (Penicillium sp.) and zzz816 (Shiraia sp.) displayed broad-spectrum activity against clinical bacteria and yeasts by the agar diffusion method. The crude extracts of isolates B09, B34, B35, B38 and zzz816 under submerged fermentation, also demonstrated various levels of bioactivities against bambusicolous pathogenic fungi. This study is the first report on the antimicrobial activity of endophytic fungi associated with moso bamboo seeds, and the results show that they could be exploited as a potential source of bioactive compounds and plant defense activators. In addition, it is the first time that strains of Shiraia sp. have been isolated and cultured from moso bamboo seeds, and one of them (zzz816) could produce hypocrellin A at high yield, which is

  19. Assessment of hydrothermal carbonization and coupling washing with torrefaction of bamboo sawdust for biofuels production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuping; Su, Yinhai; Xu, Dan; Zhu, Shuguang; Zhang, Houlei; Liu, Xinzhi

    2018-06-01

    Two kinds of biofuels were produced and compared from hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) and coupling washing with torrefaction (CWT) processes of bamboo sawdust in this study. The mass and energy yields, mass energy density, fuel properties, structural characterizations, combustion behavior and ash behavior during combustion process were investigated. Significant increases in the carbon contents resulted in the improvement of mass energy density and fuel properties of biofuels obtained. Both HTC and CWT improved the safety of the biofuels during the process of handling, storing and transportation. The ash-related issues of the biofuels were significantly mitigated and combustion behavior was remarkably improved after HTC and CWT processes of bamboo sawdust. In general, both HTC and CWT processes are suitable to produce biofuels with high fuel quality from bamboo sawdust. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Ultrasound-assisted extraction of hemicellulose and phenolic compounds from bamboo bast fiber powder

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jing; Vielnascher, Robert; Silva, Carla; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur; Guebitz, Georg M.

    2018-01-01

    Ultrasound-assisted extraction of hemicellulose and phenolic compounds from bamboo bast fibre powder was investigated. The effect of ultrasonic probe depth and power input parameters on the type and amount of products extracted was assessed. The results of input energy and radical formation correlated with the calculated values for the anti-nodal point (λ/4; 16.85 mm, maximum amplitude) of the ultrasonic wave in aqueous medium. Ultrasonic treatment at optimum probe depth of 15 mm improve 2.6-fold the extraction efficiencies of hemicellulose and phenolic lignin compounds from bamboo bast fibre powder. LC-Ms-Tof (liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-time of flight) analysis indicated that ultrasound led to the extraction of coniferyl alcohol, sinapyl alcohol, vanillic acid, cellobiose, in contrast to boiling water extraction only. At optimized conditions, ultrasound caused the formation of radicals confirmed by the presence of (+)-pinoresinol which resulted from the radical coupling of coniferyl alcohol. Ultrasounds revealed to be an efficient methodology for the extraction of hemicellulosic and phenolic compounds from woody bamboo without the addition of harmful solvents. PMID:29856764

  1. Investigating pyrolysis characteristics of moso bamboo through TG-FTIR and Py-GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Liang, Fang; Wang, Ruijuan; Hongzhong, Xiang; Yang, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Tao; Hu, Wanhe; Mi, Bingbing; Liu, Zhijia

    2018-05-01

    This study was carried out to investigate pyrolysis characteristics of moso bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens), including outer layer (OB), middle layer (MB) and inner layer (IB) and bamboo leaves (BL), through TG-FTIR and Py-GC/MS. The results showed that 70% of weight loss occurred at rapid pyrolysis stage with temperature of 200-400 °C. With increase in heating rate, pyrolysis process shifted toward higher temperature. IB, OB, MB and BL had a different activation energy at different conversion rates. BL had a higher activation energy than IB, OB and MB. The volatiles of bamboo was complicated with 2-30 of C atoms. IB, OB and MB mainly released benzofuran, hydroxyacetaldehyde and 2-Pentanone. BL released furan, acetic acid and phenol. The main pyrolysis products included H 2 O, CH 4 , CO 2 , CO, carboxylic acids, NO, NO 2 . Pyrolysis products of IB was the most and that of BL was the lowest. MB had the lowest pyrolysis temperature. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Anatomy and muscle activity of the dorsal fins in bamboo sharks and spiny dogfish during turning maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Maia, Anabela; Wilga, Cheryl D

    2013-11-01

    Stability and procured instability characterize two opposing types of swimming, steady and maneuvering, respectively. Fins can be used to manipulate flow to adjust stability during swimming maneuvers either actively using muscle control or passively by structural control. The function of the dorsal fins during turning maneuvering in two shark species with different swimming modes is investigated here using musculoskeletal anatomy and muscle function. White-spotted bamboo sharks are a benthic species that inhabits complex reef habitats and thus have high requirements for maneuverability. Spiny dogfish occupy a variety of coastal and continental shelf habitats and spend relatively more time cruising in open water. These species differ in dorsal fin morphology and fin position along the body. Bamboo sharks have a larger second dorsal fin area and proportionally more muscle insertion into both dorsal fins. The basal and radial pterygiophores are plate-like structures in spiny dogfish and are nearly indistinguishable from one another. In contrast, bamboo sharks lack basal pterygiophores, while the radial pterygiophores form two rows of elongated rectangular elements that articulate with one another. The dorsal fin muscles are composed of a large muscle mass that extends over the ceratotrichia overlying the radials in spiny dogfish. However, in bamboo sharks, the muscle mass is divided into multiple distinct muscles that insert onto the ceratotrichia. During turning maneuvers, the dorsal fin muscles are active in both species with no differences in onset between fin sides. Spiny dogfish have longer burst durations on the outer fin side, which is consistent with opposing resistance to the medium. In bamboo sharks, bilateral activation of the dorsal in muscles could also be stiffening the fin throughout the turn. Thus, dogfish sharks passively stiffen the dorsal fin structurally and functionally, while bamboo sharks have more flexible dorsal fins, which result from a

  3. Main regulatory pathways, key genes and microRNAs involved in flower formation and development of moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis).

    PubMed

    Ge, Wei; Zhang, Ying; Cheng, Zhanchao; Hou, Dan; Li, Xueping; Gao, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Moso bamboo is characterized by infrequent sexual reproduction and erratic flowering habit; however, the molecular biology of flower formation and development is not well studied in this species. We studied the molecular regulation mechanisms of moso bamboo development and flowering by selecting three key regulatory pathways: plant-pathogen interaction, plant hormone signal transduction and protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum at different stages of flowering in moso bamboo. We selected PheDof1, PheMADS14 and six microRNAs involved in the three pathways through KEGG pathway and cluster analysis. Subcellular localization, transcriptional activation, Western blotting, in situ hybridization and qRT-PCR were used to further investigate the expression patterns and regulatory roles of pivotal genes at different flower development stages. Differential expression patterns showed that PheDof1, PheMADS14 and six miRNAs may play vital regulatory roles in flower development and floral transition in moso bamboo. Our research paves way for further studies on metabolic regulatory networks and provides insight into the molecular regulation mechanisms of moso bamboo flowering and senescence. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The global distribution of bamboos: assessing correlates of introduction and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, David M.; Visser, Vernon; Le Roux, Johannes J.; Vorontsova, Maria S.; Wilson, John R. U.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract There is a long history of species being moved around the world by humans. These introduced species can provide substantial benefits, but they can also have undesirable consequences. We explore the importance of human activities on the processes of species dissemination and potential invasions using the Poaceae subfamily Bambusoideae (‘bamboos’), a group that contains taxa that are widely utilised and that are often perceived as weedy. We (1) compiled an inventory of bamboo species and their current distributions; (2) determined which species have been introduced and become invasive outside their native ranges; and (3) explored correlates of introduction and invasion. Distribution data were collated from Kew’s GrassBase, the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and other online herbarium information sources. Our list comprised 1662 species in 121 genera, of which 232 (14 %) have been introduced beyond their native ranges. Twelve (0.7 % of species) were found to be invasive. A non-random selection of bamboos have been introduced and become invasive. Asiatic species in particular have been widely introduced. There was a clear over-representation of introduced species in the genera Bambusa and Phyllostachys which also contain most of the listed invasive species. The introduction of species also correlated with certain traits: taxa with larger culm dimensions were significantly more likely to have been moved to new areas; and those with many cultivars had a higher rate of dissemination and invasion. It is difficult to determine whether the patterns of introduction and invasion are due simply to differences in propagule pressure, or whether humans have deliberately selected inherently invasive taxa. In general, we suggest that human usage is a stronger driver of introductions and invasions in bamboos than in other taxa that have been well studied. It is likely that as bamboos are used more widely, the number and impact of invasions will increase

  5. Bamboo shoot fiber prevents obesity in mice by modulating the gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiufen; Guo, Juan; Ji, Kailong; Zhang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Dietary fiber has been shown to prevent high-fat diet induced obesity through modulating the gut microbiota; however, quality difference in fiber type is largely unknown. We performed a 6 week study on C57BL/6J mice fed a macronutrient matched high-fat diet with different fiber types including cellulose (HFC), bamboo shoot fiber (HFBS) and several other commonly consumed fibers. Our results showed that the HFBS group exhibited the lowest weight gain among all diet groups and had improved lipid profiles and glycemic control compared with the HFC group. As revealed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, loss of diversity in the gut microbiota induced by the HFC diet was largely prevented by the HFBS diet. Moreover, compared with the HFC diet, the HFBS diet resulted in markedly increased relative abundance of Bacteroidetes and strong inhibition of Verrucomicrobia, two divisions strongly correlated with body weight. In conclusion, the present study provides evidence of a quality difference among different types of dietary fibers and shows that bamboo shoot fiber is the most effective in suppressing high-fat diet induced obesity. Our findings indicate that bamboo shoot fiber is a potential prebiotic fiber which modulates the gut microbiota and improves host metabolism. PMID:27599699

  6. A lucrative chemical processing of bamboo leaf biomass to synthesize biocompatible amorphous silica nanoparticles of biomedical importance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangaraj, Suriyaprabha; Venkatachalam, Rajendran

    2017-06-01

    Synthesis of silica nanoparticles from natural resources/waste via cost effective route is presently one of the anticipating strategies for extensive applications. This study reports the low-cost indigenous production of silica nanoparticles from the leftover of bamboo (leaf biomass) through thermal combustion and alkaline extraction, and examination of physico-chemical properties and yield percentage using comprehensive characterization tools. The outcome of primed silica powder exhibits amorphous particles (average size: 25 nm) with high surface area (428 m2 g-1) and spherical morphology. Despite the yield percentage of silica nanoparticles from bamboo leave ash is 50.2%, which is less than rice husk ask resources (62.1%), the bamboo waste is only an inexpensive resource yielding high purity (99%). Synthesis of silica nanoparticles from natural resources/waste with the help of lucrative route is at present times one of the anticipating strategies for extensive applications. In vitro study on animal cell lines (MG-63) shows non-toxic nature of silica nanoparticles up to 125 µg mL-1. Hence, this study highlights the feasibility for the mass production of silica nanoparticles from bamboo leave waste rather using chemical precursor of silica for drug delivery and other medical applications.

  7. Bamboo Nodes of Vocal Folds: A Description of 10 Cases and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Todic, Jelena; Schweizer, Valérie; Leuchter, Igor

    2018-05-30

    Bamboo nodes are vocal fold lesions, mostly associated with autoimmune diseases. This is a retrospective clinical study including 10 patients with bamboo nodes. Data were collected regarding associated autoimmune disorder and type of treatment. A systematic review of the literature was conducted. All patients were women, with hoarseness as the most frequent symptom. There was in most cases an associated autoimmune disease: 3 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus; 3 with rheumatoid arthritis; 1 with Sjögren syndrome; 1 with Hashimoto disease; and 1 with mixed connective tissue disease. Four patients were treated with speech therapy, 3 with oral steroids, 1 with speech therapy and oral steroids combined, 1 with oral steroids and laryngeal steroid injections, and 1 had oral steroids, surgery, and speech therapy. Speech therapy was the first-line treatment. Bamboo nodes should be looked for in every patient with a diagnosis of autoimmune disease complaining of dysphonia. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Flowering, die-back and recovery of a semelparous woody bamboo in the Atlantic Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montti, Lía; Campanello, Paula I.; Goldstein, Guillermo

    2011-07-01

    Chusquea ramosissima is a semelparous woody bamboo growing in the understory of the semideciduous Atlantic Forest that increases in abundance after disturbance and consequently has profound effects on vegetation dynamics. Flowering and death of C. ramosissima may open a window of opportunity leaving space vacant for the recruitment of tree seedlings. We describe the flowering pattern and seedling demography of this species at different spatio-temporal scales between the years 2001 and 2009, and evaluate if tree seedling abundance of canopy species increased after the flowering event. At a landscape scale, flowering sites were interspersed with sites that did not flower. At a local scale, the flowering extended over 5 years, with flowering and non-flowering culms intermingled, also in small patches (i.e., 4 m 2). Seeds germinated soon after flowering and die-back. Four successive seedling cohorts were studied. Mortality rate was high during the first 4 months after seedling emergence but several fast-growing seedlings were able to become established successfully. At the end of the study, 10%-20% of the initial number of bamboo seedlings in each cohort survived. Seedling abundance of tree canopy species was similar in flowering and non-flowering sites. C. ramosissima was able to re-colonize and perpetuate in sites it previously occupied. The coexistence of flowering and non-flowering culms at different spatio-temporal scales and clonal growth by rhizomes, together with the successful bamboo seedlings establishment, enhanced bamboo persistence in gaps and disturbed sites. Flowering and death of C. ramosissima did not facilitate seedling growth of canopy tree species.

  9. Enhanced capture of elemental mercury by bamboo-based sorbents.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zengqiang; Xiang, Jun; Su, Sheng; Zeng, Hancai; Zhou, Changsong; Sun, Lushi; Hu, Song; Qiu, Jianrong

    2012-11-15

    To develop cost-effective sorbent for gas-phase elemental mercury removal, the bamboo charcoal (BC) produced from renewable bamboo and KI modified BC (BC-I) were used for elemental mercury removal. The effect of NO, SO2 on gas-phase Hg0 adsorption by KI modified BC was evaluated on a fixed bed reactor using an online mercury analyzer. BET surface area analysis, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to determine the pore structure and surface chemistry of the sorbents. The results show that KI impregnation reduced the sorbents' BET surface area and total pore volume compared with that of the original BC. But the BC-I has excellent adsorption capacity for elemental mercury at a relatively higher temperature of 140 °C and 180 °C. The presence of NO or SO2 could inhibit Hg0 capture, but BC-I has strong anti-poisoning ability. The specific reaction mechanism has been further analyzed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Antioxidant Capacities of Fractions of Bamboo Shaving Extract and Their Antioxidant Components.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jinyan; Huang, Jun; Xiao, Gongnian; Chen, Feng; Lee, Bolim; Ge, Qing; You, Yuru; Liu, Shiwang; Zhang, Ying

    2016-07-30

    This research was conducted for evaluation of antioxidant activities of four fractions from bamboo shavings extract (BSE) and their antioxidant components. The antioxidant capacities of BSE and four fractions on ABTS, DPPH, FRAP and total antioxidant capacity assays exhibited the following descending order: DF > n-butanol fraction (BF) > BSE ≈ ethyl acetate fraction (AF) > water fraction (WF). Among the identified phenolic compounds, caffeic acid exhibited the highest antioxidant capacities on DPPH, FRAP and total antioxidant capacity assays. An extremely significant positive correlation between the antioxidant activities with the contents of total flavonoids, total phenolic acids, or total phenolics was observed in this study. The result indicated that the bamboo shaving extract and its solvent fractions could act as natural antioxidants in light of their potent antioxidant activities.

  11. Influence of solvent type on microwave-assisted liquefaction of bamboo

    Treesearch

    Jiulong Xie; Chung Hse; Todd F. Shupe; Tingxing Hu

    2016-01-01

    Microwave-assisted liquefaction of bamboo in glycerol, polyethylene glycerol (PEG), methanol, ethanol, and water were comparatively investigated by evaluating the temperature-dependence for conversion and liquefied residue characteristics. The conversion for the liquefaction in methanol, ethanol, and water increased with an increase in reaction temperature, while that...

  12. Effect of EDTA and citric acid on absorption of heavy metals and growth of Moso bamboo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Zhong, Bin; Shafi, Mohammad; Guo, Jia; Liu, Chen; Guo, Hua; Peng, Danli; Wang, Ying; Liu, Dan

    2018-04-30

    The effect of EDTA and citric acid on accumulation, toxicity of heavy metals (Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb), and growth of Moso bamboo was investigated in current experiment. The availability of heavy metals in soil and its uptake by plants has indicated toxicity. The results revealed that EDTA and citric acid has reduced biomass of Moso bamboo but non-significant difference in biomass was observed compared with control. Application of EDTA (10 mmol kg -1 ) has significantly improved copper (Cu) by 56.5 and 84.9% in roots and above ground parts of plants. Application of EDTA (10 mmol kg -1 ) has significantly enhanced lead (Pb) by 51.8 and 210.8% in roots and above ground parts of Moso bamboo. Furthermore, treatment of EDTA has significantly improved activities of water-soluble Cd, Cu, and Pb in soil by 98.9, 70.1, and 73.1 times compared with control. In case of contents of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA)-extractable metals, the treatment of EDTA (10 mmol kg -1 ) has produced maximum increase of 244.5 mg kg -1 Zn and 157.9 mg kg -1 Pb, respectively. It is concluded that effect of EDTA was superior compared with citric acid for improvement of phytoremediation potential of Moso bamboo.

  13. Equilibrium and kinetic studies of sorption of 2.4-dichlorophenol onto 2 mixtures: bamboo biochar plus calcium sulphate (BC) and hydroxyapatite plus bamboo biochar plus calcium sulphate (HBC), in a fluidized bed circulation column

    DOE PAGES

    Alamin, Ahmed Hassan; Kaewsichan, Lupong

    2016-06-30

    Sorption studies were carried out to investigate removal of 2.4-dichlorophenol (2.4-DCP) from aqueous solution in a fluidized bed by two types of adsorbent mixtures: BC (Bamboo char plus Calcium sulphate), and HBC (Hydroxyapatite plus Bamboo char plus Calcium sulphate); both manufactured in ball shape. The main material bamboo char was characterized by FTIR, DTA and SEM. The adsorption experiments were conducted in a fluidized bed circulation column. Adsorption, isotherms and kinetic studies were established under 180 min operating process time, at different initial 2.4-DCP solution concentrations ranging from 5–10 mg/L, and at different flow rates ranging from 0.25–0.75 L/min. Themore » data obtained fitted well for both the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models; indicating favorable condition of monolayer adsorption. The kinetics of both adsorbents complies with the pseudo second-order kinetic model. BC was proven a new effective composite and low cost adsorbent which can be applied in the field of wastewater treatment, and it can also play an important role in industry water treatment« less

  14. Equilibrium and kinetic studies of sorption of 2.4-dichlorophenol onto 2 mixtures: bamboo biochar plus calcium sulphate (BC) and hydroxyapatite plus bamboo biochar plus calcium sulphate (HBC), in a fluidized bed circulation column

    SciTech Connect

    Alamin, Ahmed Hassan; Kaewsichan, Lupong

    Sorption studies were carried out to investigate removal of 2.4-dichlorophenol (2.4-DCP) from aqueous solution in a fluidized bed by two types of adsorbent mixtures: BC (Bamboo char plus Calcium sulphate), and HBC (Hydroxyapatite plus Bamboo char plus Calcium sulphate); both manufactured in ball shape. The main material bamboo char was characterized by FTIR, DTA and SEM. The adsorption experiments were conducted in a fluidized bed circulation column. Adsorption, isotherms and kinetic studies were established under 180 min operating process time, at different initial 2.4-DCP solution concentrations ranging from 5–10 mg/L, and at different flow rates ranging from 0.25–0.75 L/min. Themore » data obtained fitted well for both the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models; indicating favorable condition of monolayer adsorption. The kinetics of both adsorbents complies with the pseudo second-order kinetic model. BC was proven a new effective composite and low cost adsorbent which can be applied in the field of wastewater treatment, and it can also play an important role in industry water treatment« less

  15. [Effect of seasonal high temperature and drought on carbon flux of bamboo forest ecosystem in subtropical region].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-feng; Jiang, Hong; Niu, Xiao-dong; Zhang, Jin-meng; Liu, Yu-li; Fang, Cheng-yuan

    2016-02-01

    The carbon flux of subtropical bamboo forest ecosystem was continuously measured using eddy covariance technique in Anji County of Zhejiang Province, China. The monthly net ecosystem productivity (NEP), ecosystem respiration (Re) and gross ecosystem productivity (GEP) data from 2011 to 2013 were selected to analyze the impacts of seasonal high temperature and drought on the carbon flux of bamboo forest ecosystem. The results showed that there were big differences among annual NEP of bamboo forest from 2011 to 2013. Because of the asynchronization of precipitation and heat, the seasonal high temperature and drought in July and August of 2013 caused significant decline in NEP by 59.9% and 80.0% when compared with the same months in 2011. Correlation analysis of the NEP, Re, GEP and environmental factors suggested that the atmosphere temperatures were significantly correlated with Re and GEP in 2011 and 2013 (P<0.05). However, to air and soil moisture, Re and GEP had different responses, that was, GEP was more vulnerable by the decrease of the soil moisture compared with Re. Besides, the raising of saturation vapour pressure promoted the Re modestly but inhibited the GEP, which was supposed to be the main reason for NEP decrease of bamboo forest ecosystem in Anji, from July to August in 2013.

  16. Lead accumulation and tolerance of Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens) seedlings: applications of phytoremediation*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dan; Li, Song; Islam, Ejazul; Chen, Jun-ren; Wu, Jia-sen; Ye, Zheng-qian; Peng, Dan-li; Yan, Wen-bo; Lu, Kou-ping

    2015-01-01

    A hydroponics experiment was aimed at identifying the lead (Pb) tolerance and phytoremediation potential of Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens) seedlings grown under different Pb treatments. Experimental results indicated that at the highest Pb concentration (400 μmol/L), the growth of bamboo seedlings was inhibited and Pb concentrations in leaves, stems, and roots reached the maximum of 148.8, 482.2, and 4282.8 mg/kg, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the excessive Pb caused decreased stomatal opening, formation of abundant inclusions in roots, and just a few inclusions in stems. The ultrastructural analysis using transmission electron microscopy revealed that the addition of excessive Pb caused abnormally shaped chloroplasts, disappearance of endoplasmic reticulum, shrinkage of nucleus and nucleolus, and loss of thylakoid membranes. Although ultrastructural analysis revealed some internal damage, even the plants exposed to 400 μmol/L Pb survived and no visual Pb toxicity symptoms such as necrosis and chlorosis were observed in these plants. Even at the highest Pb treatment, no significant difference was observed for the dry weight of stem compared with controls. It is suggested that use of Moso bamboo as an experimental material provides a new perspective for remediation of heavy metal contaminated soil owing to its high metal tolerance and greater biomass. PMID:25644467

  17. Overexpression of PvPin1, a Bamboo Homolog of PIN1-Type Parvulin 1, Delays Flowering Time in Transgenic Arabidopsis and Rice

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhigang; Yang, Xiaoming; Fu, Yaping; Zhu, Longfei; Wei, Hantian; Lin, Xinchun

    2017-01-01

    Because of the long and unpredictable flowering period in bamboo, the molecular mechanism of bamboo flowering is unclear. Recent study showed that Arabidopsis PIN1-type parvulin 1 (Pin1At) is an important floral activator and regulates floral transition by facilitating the cis/trans isomerization of the phosphorylated Ser/Thr residues preceding proline motifs in suppressor of overexpression of CO 1 (SOC1) and agamous-like 24 (AGL24). Whether bamboo has a Pin1 homolog and whether it works in bamboo flowering are still unknown. In this study, we cloned PvPin1, a homolog of Pin1At, from Phyllostachys violascens (Bambusoideae). Bioinformatics analysis showed that PvPin1 is closely related to Pin1-like proteins in monocots. PvPin1 was widely expressed in all tested bamboo tissues, with the highest expression in young leaf and lowest in floral bud. Moreover, PvPin1 expression was high in leaves before bamboo flowering then declined during flower development. Overexpression of PvPin1 significantly delayed flowering time by downregulating SOC1 and AGL24 expression in Arabidopsis under greenhouse conditions and conferred a significantly late flowering phenotype by upregulating OsMADS56 in rice under field conditions. PvPin1 showed subcellular localization in both the nucleus and cytolemma. The 1500-bp sequence of the PvPin1 promoter was cloned, and cis-acting element prediction showed that ABRE and TGACG-motif elements, which responded to abscisic acid (ABA) and methyl jasmonate (MeJA), respectively, were characteristic of P. violascens in comparison with Arabidopsis. On promoter activity analysis, exogenous ABA and MeJA could significantly inhibit PvPin1 expression. These findings suggested that PvPin1 may be a repressor in flowering, and its delay of flowering time could be regulated by ABA and MeJA in bamboo. PMID:28951734

  18. Overexpression of PvPin1, a Bamboo Homolog of PIN1-Type Parvulin 1, Delays Flowering Time in Transgenic Arabidopsis and Rice.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhigang; Yang, Xiaoming; Fu, Yaping; Zhu, Longfei; Wei, Hantian; Lin, Xinchun

    2017-01-01

    Because of the long and unpredictable flowering period in bamboo, the molecular mechanism of bamboo flowering is unclear. Recent study showed that Arabidopsis PIN1-type parvulin 1 (Pin1At) is an important floral activator and regulates floral transition by facilitating the cis/trans isomerization of the phosphorylated Ser/Thr residues preceding proline motifs in suppressor of overexpression of CO 1 (SOC1) and agamous-like 24 (AGL24). Whether bamboo has a Pin1 homolog and whether it works in bamboo flowering are still unknown. In this study, we cloned PvPin1 , a homolog of Pin1At , from Phyllostachys violascens (Bambusoideae). Bioinformatics analysis showed that PvPin1 is closely related to Pin1-like proteins in monocots. PvPin1 was widely expressed in all tested bamboo tissues, with the highest expression in young leaf and lowest in floral bud. Moreover, PvPin1 expression was high in leaves before bamboo flowering then declined during flower development. Overexpression of PvPin1 significantly delayed flowering time by downregulating SOC1 and AGL24 expression in Arabidopsis under greenhouse conditions and conferred a significantly late flowering phenotype by upregulating OsMADS56 in rice under field conditions. PvPin1 showed subcellular localization in both the nucleus and cytolemma. The 1500-bp sequence of the PvPin1 promoter was cloned, and cis -acting element prediction showed that ABRE and TGACG-motif elements, which responded to abscisic acid (ABA) and methyl jasmonate (MeJA), respectively, were characteristic of P. violascens in comparison with Arabidopsis . On promoter activity analysis, exogenous ABA and MeJA could significantly inhibit PvPin1 expression. These findings suggested that PvPin1 may be a repressor in flowering, and its delay of flowering time could be regulated by ABA and MeJA in bamboo.

  19. Recovery of diurnal depression of leaf hydraulic conductance in a subtropical woody bamboo species: embolism refilling by nocturnal root pressure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shi-Jian; Zhang, Yong-Jiang; Sun, Mei; Goldstein, Guillermo; Cao, Kun-Fang

    2012-04-01

    Despite considerable investigations of diurnal water use characteristics in different plant functional groups, the research on daily water use strategies of woody bamboo grasses remains lacking. We studied the daily water use and gas exchange of Sinarundinaria nitida (Mitford) Nakai, an abundant subtropical bamboo species in Southwest China. We found that the stem relative water content (RWC) and stem hydraulic conductivity (K(s)) of this bamboo species did not decrease significantly during the day, whereas the leaf RWC and leaf hydraulic conductance (K(leaf)) showed a distinct decrease at midday, compared with the predawn values. Diurnal loss of K(leaf) was coupled with a midday decline in stomatal conductance (g(s)) and CO(2) assimilation. The positive root pressures in the different habitats were of sufficient magnitude to refill the embolisms in leaves. We concluded that (i) the studied bamboo species does not use stem water storage for daily transpiration; (ii) diurnal down-regulation in K(leaf) and gs has the function to slow down potential water loss in stems and protect the stem hydraulic pathway from cavitation; (iii) since K(leaf) did not recover during late afternoon, refilling of embolism in bamboo leaves probably fully depends on nocturnal root pressure. The embolism refilling mechanism by root pressure could be helpful for the growth and persistence of this woody monocot species.

  20. Bamboo Classification Using WorldView-2 Imagery of Giant Panda Habitat in a Large Shaded Area in Wolong, Sichuan Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yunwei; Jing, Linhai; Li, Hui; Liu, Qingjie; Yan, Qi; Li, Xiuxia

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the ability of WorldView-2 (WV-2) imagery for bamboo mapping in a mountainous region in Sichuan Province, China. A large area of this place is covered by shadows in the image, and only a few sampled points derived were useful. In order to identify bamboos based on sparse training data, the sample size was expanded according to the reflectance of multispectral bands selected using the principal component analysis (PCA). Then, class separability based on the training data was calculated using a feature space optimization method to select the features for classification. Four regular object-based classification methods were applied based on both sets of training data. The results show that the k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) method produced the greatest accuracy. A geostatistically-weighted k-NN classifier, accounting for the spatial correlation between classes, was then applied to further increase the accuracy. It achieved 82.65% and 93.10% of the producer’s and user’s accuracies respectively for the bamboo class. The canopy densities were estimated to explain the result. This study demonstrates that the WV-2 image can be used to identify small patches of understory bamboos given limited known samples, and the resulting bamboo distribution facilitates the assessments of the habitats of giant pandas. PMID:27879661

  1. Bamboo Classification Using WorldView-2 Imagery of Giant Panda Habitat in a Large Shaded Area in Wolong, Sichuan Province, China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yunwei; Jing, Linhai; Li, Hui; Liu, Qingjie; Yan, Qi; Li, Xiuxia

    2016-11-22

    This study explores the ability of WorldView-2 (WV-2) imagery for bamboo mapping in a mountainous region in Sichuan Province, China. A large area of this place is covered by shadows in the image, and only a few sampled points derived were useful. In order to identify bamboos based on sparse training data, the sample size was expanded according to the reflectance of multispectral bands selected using the principal component analysis (PCA). Then, class separability based on the training data was calculated using a feature space optimization method to select the features for classification. Four regular object-based classification methods were applied based on both sets of training data. The results show that the k -nearest neighbor ( k -NN) method produced the greatest accuracy. A geostatistically-weighted k -NN classifier, accounting for the spatial correlation between classes, was then applied to further increase the accuracy. It achieved 82.65% and 93.10% of the producer's and user's accuracies respectively for the bamboo class. The canopy densities were estimated to explain the result. This study demonstrates that the WV-2 image can be used to identify small patches of understory bamboos given limited known samples, and the resulting bamboo distribution facilitates the assessments of the habitats of giant pandas.

  2. Spatial Variability of the Topsoil Organic Carbon in the Moso Bamboo Forests of Southern China in Association with Soil Properties

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Houxi; Zhuang, Shunyao; Qian, Haiyan; Wang, Feng; Ji, Haibao

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the spatial variability of soil organic carbon (SOC) must be enhanced to improve sampling design and to develop soil management strategies in terrestrial ecosystems. Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens Mazel ex Houz.) forests have a high SOC storage potential; however, they also vary significantly spatially. This study investigated the spatial variability of SOC (0-20 cm) in association with other soil properties and with spatial variables in the Moso bamboo forests of Jian’ou City, which is a typical bamboo hometown in China. 209 soil samples were collected from Moso bamboo stands and then analyzed for SOC, bulk density (BD), pH, cation exchange capacity (CEC), and gravel content (GC) based on spatial distribution. The spatial variability of SOC was then examined using geostatistics. A Kriging map was produced through ordinary interpolation and required sample numbers were calculated by classical and Kriging methods. An aggregated boosted tree (ABT) analysis was also conducted. A semivariogram analysis indicated that ln(SOC) was best fitted with an exponential model and that it exhibited moderate spatial dependence, with a nugget/sill ratio of 0.462. SOC was significantly and linearly correlated with BD (r = −0.373**), pH (r = −0.429**), GC (r = −0.163*), CEC (r = 0.263**), and elevation (r = 0.192**). Moreover, the Kriging method requires fewer samples than the classical method given an expected standard error level as per a variance analysis. ABT analysis indicated that the physicochemical variables of soil affected SOC variation more significantly than spatial variables did, thus suggesting that the SOC in Moso bamboo forests can be strongly influenced by management practices. Thus, this study provides valuable information in relation to sampling strategy and insight into the potential of adjustments in agronomic measure, such as in fertilization for Moso bamboo production. PMID:25789615

  3. Breeding system and pollination of two closely related bamboo species.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling-Na; Cui, Yong-Zhong; Wong, Khoon-Meng; Li, De-Zhu; Yang, Han-Qi

    2017-05-01

    An understanding of the breeding systems and pollination of agriculturally important plants is critical to germplasm improvement. Breeding system characteristics greatly influence the amount and spatial distribution of genetic variation within and amongst populations and influence the rarity and extinction vulnerability of plant species. Many woody bamboos have a long vegetative period (20-150 years) followed by gregarious monocarpy. Relatively, little is known about their pollination and breeding systems. We studied these characteristics in wild Dendrocalamus membranaceus populations and cultivated Dendrocalamus sinicus populations distributed in the Yunnan Province of China. Floral morphology, flower visitors and breeding system were studied from 2013 to 2015. Both bamboos were protogynous, but flowering periods of florets overlapped providing opportunities for self-pollination amongst florets, especially in D. membranaceus . There was no agamospermy in either species. Seed set of D. sinicus was low (0.42 ± 0.42 %) under natural pollination but higher (8.89 ± 2.55 %) after artificial xenogamy. Seed set of D. membranaceus was higher (7.49 ± 0.82 %) in mass flowering populations and 2.14 ± 0.25 % in sporadically flowering populations. The Asian honeybee Apis cerana could provide cross-pollination of D. membranaceus and D. sinicus , and flower visitation peaked at 1000-1200 h. Pollination limitation due to lack of pollinators or pollen was detected in the cultivated populations of D. sinicus and sporadically flowering populations of D. membranaceus . Pollination limitation was not obvious within mass flowering populations. Hand pollination could significantly increase seed set of these two bamboo species. Dendrocalamus membranaceus and D. sinicus were self-compatible and have a mixed-mating system with outcrossing being pre-dominant. Their seed production was limited by the quantity of pollen and pollinator activity. Honeybees were

  4. Negative correlation between rates of molecular evolution and flowering cycles in temperate woody bamboos revealed by plastid phylogenomics.

    PubMed

    Ma, Peng-Fei; Vorontsova, Maria S; Nanjarisoa, Olinirina Prisca; Razanatsoa, Jacqueline; Guo, Zhen-Hua; Haevermans, Thomas; Li, De-Zhu

    2017-12-21

    Heterogeneous rates of molecular evolution are universal across the tree of life, posing challenges for phylogenetic inference. The temperate woody bamboos (tribe Arundinarieae, Poaceae) are noted for their extremely slow molecular evolutionary rates, supposedly caused by their mysterious monocarpic reproduction. However, the correlation between substitution rates and flowering cycles has not been formally tested. Here we present 15 newly sequenced plastid genomes of temperate woody bamboos, including the first genomes ever sequenced from Madagascar representatives. A data matrix of 46 plastid genomes representing all 12 lineages of Arundinarieae was assembled for phylogenetic and molecular evolutionary analyses. We conducted phylogenetic analyses using different sequences (e.g., coding and noncoding) combined with different data partitioning schemes, revealing conflicting relationships involving internodes among several lineages. A great difference in branch lengths were observed among the major lineages, and topological inconsistency could be attributed to long-branch attraction (LBA). Using clock model-fitting by maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches, we furthermore demonstrated extensive rate variation among these major lineages. Rate accelerations mainly occurred for the isolated lineages with limited species diversification, totaling 11 rate shifts during the tribe's evolution. Using linear regression analysis, we found a negative correlation between rates of molecular evolution and flowering cycles for Arundinarieae, notwithstanding that the correlation maybe insignificant when taking the phylogenetic structure into account. Using the temperate woody bamboos as an example, we found further evidence that rate heterogeneity is universal in plants, suggesting that this will pose a challenge for phylogenetic reconstruction of bamboos. The bamboos with longer flowering cycles tend to evolve more slowly than those with shorter flowering cycles, in accordance

  5. Effervescent Granules Prepared Using Eucommia ulmoides Oliv. and Moso Bamboo Leaves: Hypoglycemic Activity in HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang-Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Eucommia ulmoides Oliv. (E. ulmoides Oliv.) and moso bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens) leaves are used as folk medicines in central-western China to treat diabetes. To investigate the hypoglycemic activity of the effervescent granules prepared using E. ulmoides Oliv. and moso bamboo leaves (EBEG) in HepG2 cells, EBEG were prepared with 5% of each of polysaccharides and chlorogenic acids from moso bamboo and E. ulmoides Oliv. leaves, respectively. HepG2 cells cultured in a high-glucose medium were classified into different groups. The results displayed EBEG-treated cells showed better glucose utilization than the negative controls; thus, the hypoglycemic effect of EBEG was much greater than that of granules prepared using either component alone, thereby indicating that this effect was due to a synergistic action of the components. Further, glucose consumption levels in the cells treated with EBEG (156.35% at 200 μg/mL) and the positive controls (metformin, 162.29%; insulin, 161.52%) were similar. Thus, EBEG exhibited good potential for use as a natural antidiabetic agent. The hypoglycemic effect of EBEG could be due to the synergistic action of polysaccharides from the moso bamboo leaves and chlorogenic acids from E. ulmoides Oliv. leaves via the inhibition of alpha-glucosidase and glucose-6-phosphate displacement enzyme. PMID:27656239

  6. A novel method for preparing microfibrillated cellulose from bamboo fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dat Nguyen, Huu; Thanh Thuy Mai, Thi; Bich Nguyen, Ngoc; Duy Dang, Thanh; Loan Phung Le, My; Dang, Tan Tai; Tran, Van Man

    2013-03-01

    The bamboo fiber is a potential candidate for biomass and power source application. In this study, microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) is prepared from raw fibers of bamboo tree (Bambusa Blumeana J A & J H Schultes) by an alkali treatment at room temperature in association with a bleaching treatment followed by a sulfuric acid hydrolysis. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) images indicated that final products ranged from 20 to 40 nm in diameter. The chemical composition measurement and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed that both hemicellulose and lignin are mostly removed in the MFC. The x-ray diffraction (XRD) results also show that MFC has crystallinity of more than 70%. The thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) curves revealed that cellulose microfibers have a two-step thermal decomposition behavior owing to the attachment of sulfated groups onto the cellulose surface in the hydrolysis process with sulfuric acid. The obtained MFCs may have potential applications in alternative power sources as biomass, in pharmaceutical and optical industries as additives, as well as in composite fields as a reinforcement phase.

  7. Cadmium-induced oxidative stress, response of antioxidants and detection of intracellular cadmium in organs of moso bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Li, Song; Chen, Junren; Islam, Ejazul; Wang, Ying; Wu, Jiasen; Ye, Zhengqian; Yan, Wenbo; Peng, Danli; Liu, Dan

    2016-06-01

    Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens (Pradelle) Mazel ex J.Houz.) is recognized as a potential phytoremediation plant due to its huge biomass and high tolerance to environmental stresses. The objectives of this study were to investigate mechanism related to cadmium (Cd) tolerance and to evaluate Cd accumulation capacity of moso bamboo. The results of the pot experiment showed that Cd accumulation by bamboo increased with increasing the Cd levels in soil and the values in stem ranged from 28.51 to 132.13 mg kg(-1). Meanwhile chlorophyll in leaves and total biomass showed a decreasing trend. The bioaccumulation factors (BAF) for roots and stem in all the treatments were more than 1.0 and the translocation factor (TF) ranged from 0.70 to 1.06. In hydroponics experiment, the concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA) in the leaves were significantly increased in Cd treated plants as compared with control. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) were enhanced at initial stage and then decreased consistently with the increase of Cd addition. The proline concentrations were also increased due to the presence of Cd, particularly at 25 μM Cd treatment. According to TEM-EDX analysis, the cytoplasm was the main site for accumulation of Cd in moso bamboo. On the basis of overall results, it is suggested that moso bamboo could be successfully used for the remediation of low Cd (no more than 5 mg kg(-1)) contaminated soils. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Evaluation on the feasibility of using bamboo fillers in plastic gear manufacturing via the Taguchi optimization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehat, N. M.; Kamaruddin, S.

    2017-10-01

    An increase in demand for industrial gears has instigated the escalating uses of plastic-matrix composites, particularly carbon or glass fibre reinforced plastics as gear material to enhance the properties and limitation in plastic gears. However, the production of large quantity of these synthetic fibres reinforced composites has posed serious threat to ecosystem. Therefore, this work is conducted to study the applicability and practical ability of using bamboo fillers particularly in plastic gear manufacturing as opposed to synthetic fibres via the Taguchi optimization method. The results showed that no failure mechanism such as gear tooth root cracking and severe tooth wear were observed in gear tested made of 5-30 wt% of bamboo fillers in comparing with the unfilled PP gear. These results indicated that bamboo can be practically and economically used as an alternative filler in plastic material reinforcement as well as in minimizing the cost of raw material in general.

  9. Quantifying bamboo coral growth rate nonlinearity with the radiocarbon bomb spike: A new model for paleoceanographic chronology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenkel, M. M.; LaVigne, M.; Miller, H. R.; Hill, T. M.; McNichol, A.; Gaylord, M. Lardie

    2017-07-01

    Bamboo corals, long-lived cold water gorgonin octocorals, offer unique paleoceanographic archives of the intermediate ocean. These Isididae corals are characterized by alternating gorgonin nodes and high Mg-calcite internodes, which synchronously extend radially. Bamboo coral calcite internodes have been utilized to obtain geochemical proxy data, however, growth rate uncertainty has made it difficult to construct precise chronologies for these corals. Previous studies have relied upon a single tie point from records of the anthropogenic Δ14C bomb spike preserved in the gorgonin nodes of live-collected corals to calculate a mean radial extension rate for the outer 50 years of skeletal growth. Bamboo coral chronologies are typically constructed by applying this mean extension rate to the entire coral record, assuming constant radial extension with coral age. In this study, we aim to test this underlying assumption by analyzing the organic nodes of six California margin bamboo corals at high enough resolution (<0.5 mm) to identify the Δ14C bomb spike, including two tie points at 1957 and 1970, plus the coral collection date (2007.5) for four samples. Radial extension rates between tie points ranged from 10 to 204 μm/year, with a decrease in growth rate evident between the 1957-1970 and 1970-2007.5 periods for all four corals. A negative correlation between growth rate and coral radius (r =-0.7; p=0.04) was determined for multiple bamboo coral taxa and individuals from the California margin, demonstrating a decline in radial extension rate with specimen age and size. To provide a mechanistic basis for these observations, a simple mathematical model was developed based on the assumption of a constant increase in circular cross sectional area with time to quantify this decline in radial extension rate with coral size between chronological tie points. Applying the area-based model to our Δ14C bomb spike time series from individual corals improves chronology accuracy

  10. Determination of cyanide in bamboo shoots by microdiffusion combined with ion chromatography–pulsed amperometric detection

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ming

    2018-01-01

    A practical method for the determination of cyanide in bamboo shoots has been developed using microdiffusion preparation integrated with ion chromatography–pulsed amperometric detection (IC-PAD). Cyanide was released from bamboo shoots after Conway cell microdiffusion, and then analysed by IC-PAD. In comparison with the previously reported methods, derivatization and ion-pairing agent addition were not required in this proposed microdiffusion combined with IC-PAD method. The microdiffusion parameters were optimized including hydrolysis systems, temperature, time, and so on. Under the optimum conditions, the linear range of the calibration curve for cyanide was 0.2–200.0 µg kg−1 with satisfactory correlation coefficients of 0.9996 and the limit of detection was 0.2 µg kg−1 (S/N = 3). The spiked recovery range was from 92.8 to 98.6%. The intra-day and inter-day relative standard deviations of cyanide were 2.7–14.9% and 3.0–18.3%, respectively. This method was proved to be convenient in operation with high sensitivity, precision and accuracy, and was successfully applied in the determination of cyanide in bamboo shoot samples. PMID:29765664

  11. Transcriptome Sequencing and Analysis for Culm Elongation of the World's Largest Bamboo (Dendrocalamus sinicus).

    PubMed

    Cui, Kai; Wang, Haiying; Liao, Shengxi; Tang, Qi; Li, Li; Cui, Yongzhong; He, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Dendrocalamus sinicus is the world's largest bamboo species with strong woody culms, and known for its fast-growing culms. As an economic bamboo species, it was popularized for multi-functional applications including furniture, construction, and industrial paper pulp. To comprehensively elucidate the molecular processes involved in its culm elongation, Illumina paired-end sequencing was conducted. About 65.08 million high-quality reads were produced, and assembled into 81,744 unigenes with an average length of 723 bp. A total of 64,338 (79%) unigenes were annotated for their functions, of which, 56,587 were annotated in the NCBI non-redundant protein database and 35,262 were annotated in the Swiss-Prot database. Also, 42,508 and 21,009 annotated unigenes were allocated to gene ontology (GO) categories and clusters of orthologous groups (COG), respectively. By searching against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Pathway database (KEGG), 33,920 unigenes were assigned to 128 KEGG pathways. Meanwhile, 8,553 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and 81,534 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) were identified, respectively. Additionally, 388 transcripts encoding lignin biosynthesis were detected, among which, 27 transcripts encoding Shikimate O-hydroxycinnamoyltransferase (HCT) specifically expressed in D. sinicus when compared to other bamboo species and rice. The phylogenetic relationship between D. sinicus and other plants was analyzed, suggesting functional diversity of HCT unigenes in D. sinicus. We conjectured that HCT might lead to the high lignin content and giant culm. Given that the leaves are not yet formed and culm is covered with sheaths during culm elongation, the existence of photosynthesis of bamboo culm is usually neglected. Surprisedly, 109 transcripts encoding photosynthesis were identified, including photosystem I and II, cytochrome b6/f complex, photosynthetic electron transport and F-type ATPase, and 24 transcripts were characterized as antenna

  12. Pyrolysis characteristics and kinetics of lignin derived from enzymatic hydrolysis residue of bamboo pretreated with white-rot fungus.

    PubMed

    Yan, Keliang; Liu, Fang; Chen, Qing; Ke, Ming; Huang, Xin; Hu, Weiyao; Zhou, Bo; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Yu, Hongbo

    2016-01-01

    The lignocellulose biorefinery based on the sugar platform usually focuses on polysaccharide bioconversion, while lignin is only burned for energy recovery. Pyrolysis can provide a novel route for the efficient utilization of residual lignin obtained from the enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose. The pyrolysis characteristics of residual lignin are usually significantly affected by the pretreatment process because of structural alteration of lignin during pretreatment. In recent years, biological pretreatment using white-rot fungi has attracted extensive attention, but there are only few reports on thermal conversion of lignin derived from enzymatic hydrolysis residue (EHRL) of the bio-pretreated lignocellulose. Therefore, the study investigated the pyrolysis characteristics and kinetics of EHRL obtained from bamboo pretreated with Echinodontium taxodii in order to evaluate the potential of thermal conversion processes of EHRL. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra showed that EHRL of bamboo treated with E. taxodii had the typical lignin structure, but aromatic skeletal carbon and side chain of lignin were partially altered by the fungus. Thermogravimetric analysis indicated that EHRL pyrolysis at different heating rates could be divided into two depolymerization stages and covered a wide temperature range from 500 to 900 K. The thermal decomposition reaction can be well described by two third-order reactions. The kinetics study indicated that the EHRL of bamboo treated with white-rot fungus had lower apparent activation energies, lower peak temperatures of pyrolysis reaction, and higher char residue than the EHRL of raw bamboo. Pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) was applied to characterize the fast pyrolysis products of EHRL at 600 ℃. The ratios of guaiacyl-type to syringyl-type derivatives yield (G/S) and guaiacyl-type to p-hydroxy-phenylpropane-type derivatives yield (G/H) for the treated sample were increased by 33.18 and

  13. Bamboo fiberboards and attapulgite : does it lead to an improvement of humidity control in buildings?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, D. M.; Grillet, A. C.; Goldin, T.; Hanh Diep, T. M.; Woloszyn, M.

    2018-04-01

    In order to save energy used to heat or cool buildings and to improve the inhabitants comfort, control of humidity inside buildings must be improved. This can be done by using buffering materials able to absorb and release moisture when necessary. Natural fibers and mineral absorbent are good candidates to manufacture such materials. The aim of this research is to mix bamboo fibers with attapulgite to evaluate the influence of this mineral absorbent on the hygric behavior of the fiberboards. The hygric properties are slightly improved by the attapulgite and thus bamboo fiberboards can be used as building insulation materials able to participate to the indoor moisture control.

  14. Extraction of chitosan from shrimp shells waste and application in antibacterial finishing of bamboo rayon.

    PubMed

    Teli, M D; Sheikh, Javed

    2012-06-01

    Chitosan can be best utilized as safe antibacterial agent for textiles but there is always a limitation of its durability. The chitin containing shellfish waste is available in huge quantities, but very low quantities are utilized for extraction of high value products like chitosan. In the current work chitosan was extracted from shrimp shells and then used as antibacterial exhaust finishing agent for grafted bamboo rayon. Chitosan bound bamboo rayon was then evaluated for antibacterial activity against both gram positive and gram negative bacteria. The product showed antibacterial activity against both types of bacterias which was durable till 30 washes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Novel bamboo structured TiO2 nanotubes for energy storage/production applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuel, J. J.; Beh, K. P.; Cheong, Y. L.; Yusuf, W. A. A.; Yam, F. K.

    2018-04-01

    Nanostructured TiO2 received much attention owing to its high surface-to-volume ratio, which can be advantageous in energy storage and production applications. However, the increase in energy consumption at present and possibly the foreseeable future has demanded energy storage and production devices of even higher performance. A direct approach would be manipulating the physical aspects of TiO2 nanostructures, particularly, nanotubes. In this work, dual voltage anodization system has been implemented to fabricate bamboo shaped TiO2 nanotubes, which offers even greater surface area. This unique nanostructure would be used in Dye Sensitized Solar Cell (DSSC) fabrication and its performance will be evaluated and compared along other forms of TiO2 nanotubes. The results showed that bamboo shaped nanotubes indeed are superior morphologically, with an increase of efficiency of 107% at 1.130% efficiency when compared to smooth walled nanotubes at 0.546% efficiency.

  16. Effects of application of composted water-bamboo leaves on soil nutrients and vegetable quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhi-Qing; Hu, Xue-Feng; Lu, Xinzhe; Luo, Fan

    2017-04-01

    Liantang Town of Qingpu District in the western suburbs of Shanghai is known as a land of water-bamboo, where the cultivation of water-bamboo attains more than 2000 ha in area. A huge amount of water-bamboo leaves, approximately 1.5×108 kg, are produced annually in the town and become a headachy agricultural waste. The leaves of water-bamboo are difficult to be biodegraded, and will adversely affect the growth of next crops if being directly returned to the fields due to its high C/N ratio. We transformed these water-bamboo leaves into organic manure through fermenting and composting. Total N, total P and total K of this fermented manure are 23.7 g kg-1, 6.39 g kg-1 and 44.3 g kg-1, respectively. To study the fertilizer efficiency of this organic manure, four field experiments on vegetables were carried out in the suburb of Shanghai. Each experiment designed the same four treatments of fertilization, including a lower amount of the fermented manure (LM), 3750 kg ha-1; a higher amount of the manure (HM), 7500 kg ha-1; synthetic chemical fertilizer (CF), 750 kg ha-1; non-fertilized CK. Each treatment has three replicate plots, and each plot was 9 m2 in area. The results indicated that the application of the fermented manure increased the contents of organic matter and nutrients in the soils significantly. Compared with CK, the content of organic matter in the soils treated with HM increased by 16.0%, and those of alkali-hydrolyzable N, available P, available K, total N, total P and total K in the soils increased by 14.5%, 4.8%, 12.8%, 16.7%, 48.0% and 9.1%, respectively. Compared with CF and CK, the application of the fermented manure, both LM and HM, increased the numbers of bacteria, fungi and actinomycetes and improved the activities of urease and phosphatase in the soils significantly. The study also indicated that the contents of soluble sugar and Vitamin C in green peppers and tomatoes treated with HM increased by 62.8% and 14.8%, respectively, compared with

  17. Fine root dynamics in moso bamboo and Japanese cedar forest by scanner method in central Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi-Wei; Lin, Po-Hsuan; Kume, Tomonori

    2017-04-01

    Phyllostachys pubescens is one of the most important economic plant in the world. Phyllostachys pubescens originates from China and it had been introduced to neighbor countries about three hundred ago due to its economic value. But substantial bamboo forests were abandoned due to declines in demand. These unmanaged bamboo forests have been expanding to adjacent original forests in northern Taiwan. This vegetation alternation may not only decrease the local biodiversity but also affect the carbon cycle. Fine roots are responsible for water and nutrients acquisition and forming the most active part of the whole root system. The characteristics of fine roots are non-woody, small diameter and short lifespan. When roots keep producing new roots and replacing old roots, carbon and nutrients was transported into soil. Consequently, fine root production is one of the important component to understand the below-ground carbon cycle. However, there is few studies about fine root production in moso bamboo forests. We still lack effective method to obtain quantitative and objective data in Taiwan. It severely limits us to understand the below-ground carbon dynamics there. Minirhizotrons method has been used to investigate fine root dynamics by inserting transparent tubes into soil and by comparing changes in root length in images taken by micro-camera. But this method has some shortcomings; i.e. Most of image analysis are conducted manually and time-consuming. And it is difficult to estimate the stand level fine root production from small observation view. A new method "scanner method", which collect A4-size image (bigger than minirhizotrons) can overcome some parts of the shortcoming of minirhizotrons. The transparent acrylic box with A4-box view is inserted into soil and the interface between soil and box is scanned by commercial scanner. We can monitor the total projected root area, growth and decomposition separately by series of images. The primary objective of this study

  18. Mechanical Properties in a Bamboo Fiber/PBS Biodegradable Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogihara, Shinji; Okada, Akihisa; Kobayashi, Satoshi

    In recent years, biodegradable plastics which have low effect on environment have been developed. However, many of them have lower mechanical properties than conventional engineering plastics. Reinforcing them with a natural fiber is one of reinforcing methods without a loss of their biodegradability. In the present study, we use a bamboo fiber as the reinforcement and polybutylenesuccinate (PBS) as the matrix. We fabricate long fiber unidirectional composites and cross-ply laminate with different fiber weight fractions (10, 20, 30, 40 and 50wt%). We conduct tensile tests to evaluate the mechanical properties of these composites. In addition, we measure bamboo fiber strength distribution. We discuss the experimentally-obtained properties based on the mechanical properties of the constituent materials. Young's modulus and tensile strength in unidirectional composite and cross-ply laminate increase with increasing fiber weight fraction. However, the strain at fracture showed decreasing tendency. Young's modulus in fiber and fiber transverse directions are predictable by the rules of mixture. Tensile strength in fiber direction is lower than Curtin's prediction of strength which considers distribution of fiber strength. Young's modulus in cross-ply laminate is predictable by the laminate theory. However, analytical prediction of Poisson's ratio in cross-ply laminate by the laminate theory is lower than the experimental results.

  19. Bamboo-like 3C-SiC nanowires with periodical fluctuating diameter: Homogeneous synthesis, synergistic growth mechanism, and their luminescence properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Meng; Zhao, Jian; Li, Zhenjiang, E-mail: zhenjiangli@qust.edu.cn

    Herein, bamboo-like 3C-SiC nanowires have been successfully fabricated on homogeneous 6H-SiC substrate by a simple chemical vapor reaction (CVR) approach. The obtained 3C-SiC nanostructure with periodical fluctuating diameter, is composed of two alternating structure units, the typical normal-sized stem segment with perfect crystallinity and obvious projecting nodes segment having high-density stacking faults. The formation of the interesting morphology is significantly subjected to the peculiar growth condition provided by the homogeneous substrate as well as the varying growth elastic energy. Furthermore, the photoluminescence (PL) performance measured on the bamboo-like SiC nanowire shows an intensive emission peaks centered at 451 nm andmore » 467 nm, which has been expected to make a positive progress toward the optical application of the SiC-based one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures, such as light emission diode (LED). - Graphical abstract: Based on the synergistic growth mechanism from homogeneous substrate and elastic energy, bamboo-like 3C-SiC nanowires with periodically fluctuating diameter have been synthesized on 6H-SiC. The blue-violet light emission properties of the bamboo-like nanowires have also been investigated for exploring their peculiar optical application. - Highlights: • Bamboo-like 3C-SiC nanowires with periodically fluctuating diameter have been synthesized on 6H-SiC. • A synergistic growth mechanism from homogeneous substrate and elastic energy has been proposed firstly. • The blue-violet light emission properties of the products displayed peculiar optical application.« less

  20. Detecting latitudinal and altitudinal expansion of invasive bamboo Phyllostachys edulis and Phyllostachys bambusoides (Poaceae) in Japan to project potential habitats under 1.5°C-4.0°C global warming.

    PubMed

    Takano, Kohei Takenaka; Hibino, Kenshi; Numata, Ayaka; Oguro, Michio; Aiba, Masahiro; Shiogama, Hideo; Takayabu, Izuru; Nakashizuka, Tohru

    2017-12-01

    Rapid expansion of exotic bamboos has lowered species diversity in Japan's ecosystems by hampering native plant growth. The invasive potential of bamboo, facilitated by global warming, may also affect other countries with developing bamboo industries. We examined past (1975-1980) and recent (2012) distributions of major exotic bamboos ( Phyllostachys edulis and P. bambusoides ) in areas adjacent to 145 weather stations in central and northern Japan. Bamboo stands have been established at 17 sites along the latitudinal and altitudinal distributional limit during the last three decades. Ecological niche modeling indicated that temperature had a strong influence on bamboo distribution. Using mean annual temperature and sun radiation data, we reproduced bamboo distribution (accuracy = 0.93 and AUC (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve) = 0.92). These results infer that exotic bamboo distribution has shifted northward and upslope, in association with recent climate warming. Then, we simulated future climate data and projected the climate change impact on the potential habitat distribution of invasive bamboos under different temperature increases (i.e., 1.5°C, 2.0°C, 3.0°C, and 4.0°C) relative to the preindustrial period. Potential habitats in central and northern Japan were estimated to increase from 35% under the current climate (1980-2000) to 46%-48%, 51%-54%, 61%-67%, and 77%-83% under 1.5°C, 2.0°C, 3.0°C, and 4.0°C warming levels, respectively. These infer that the risk areas can increase by 1.3 times even under a 1.5°C scenario and expand by 2.3 times under a 4.0°C scenario. For sustainable ecosystem management, both mitigation and adaptation are necessary: bamboo planting must be carefully monitored in predicted potential habitats, which covers most of Japan.

  1. Two new species of Aleurodiscus s.l. (Russulales, Basidiomycota) on bamboo from tropics

    Treesearch

    Li-Dan Dai; Sheng-Hua Wu; Karen K. Nakasone; Harold H. Burdsall; Shuang-Hui He

    2017-01-01

    Aleurodiscus tenuissimus and A. tropicus, on dead bamboo, are new species from tropical Asia. Both species have effused basidiocarps and simple-septate generative hyphae. Aleurodiscus tenuissimus, from southern China, lacks acanthophyses and possesses echinulate basidiospores, whereas A. tropicus...

  2. Metal-Embedded Porous Graphitic Carbon Fibers Fabricated from Bamboo Sticks as a Novel Cathode for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuqing; Zhong, Yu; Xia, Xinhui; Xia, Yang; Wang, Donghuang; Zhou, Cheng'ao; Tang, Wangjia; Wang, Xiuli; Wu, J B; Tu, Jiangping

    2018-04-25

    Lithium-sulfur batteries (LSBs) are deemed to be among the most prospective next-generation advanced high-energy batteries. Advanced cathode materials fabricated from biological carbon are becoming more popular due to their unique properties. Inspired by the fibrous structure of bamboo, herein we put forward a smart strategy to convert bamboo sticks for barbecue into uniform bamboo carbon fibers (BCF) via a simple hydrothermal treatment proceeded in alkaline solution. Then NiCl 2 is used to etch the fibers through a heat treatment to achieve Ni-embedded porous graphitic carbon fibers (PGCF/Ni) for LSBs. The designed PGCF/Ni/S electrode exhibits improved electrochemical performances including high initial capacity (1198 mAh g -1 at 0.2 C), prolonged cycling life (1030 mAh g -1 at 0.2 C after 200 cycles), and improved rate capability. The excellent properties are attributed to the synergistic effect of 3D porous graphitic carbon fibers with highly conductive Ni nanoparticles embedded.

  3. Associating cooking additives with sodium hydroxide to pretreat bamboo residues for improving the enzymatic saccharification and monosaccharides production.

    PubMed

    Huang, Caoxing; He, Juan; Wang, Yan; Min, Douyong; Yong, Qiang

    2015-10-01

    Cooking additive pulping technique is used in kraft mill to increase delignification degree and pulp yield. In this work, cooking additives were firstly applied in the sodium hydroxide pretreatment for improving the bioconversion of bamboo residues to monosaccharides. Meanwhile, steam explosion and sulfuric acid pretreatments were also carried out on the sample to compare their impacts on monosaccharides production. Results indicated that associating anthraquinone with sodium hydroxide pretreatment showed the best performance in improving the original carbohydrates recovery, delignification, enzymatic saccharification, and monosaccharides production. After consecutive pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification process, 347.49 g, 307.48 g, 142.93 g, and 87.15 g of monosaccharides were released from 1000 g dry bamboo residues pretreated by sodium hydroxide associating with anthraquinone, sodium hydroxide, steam explosion and sulfuric acid, respectively. The results suggested that associating cooking additive with sodium hydroxide is an effective pretreatment for bamboo residues to enhance enzymatic saccharification for monosaccharides production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Optimisation of pressurised liquid extraction of antioxidants from black bamboo leaves.

    PubMed

    Shang, Ya Fang; Kim, Sang Min; Um, Byung-Hun

    2014-07-01

    To develop an efficient green extraction approach for recovering bioactive compounds from natural plants, the potential of using pressurised liquid extraction (PLE) was examined on black bamboo (Phyllostachys nigra) leaves, with ethanol/water as solvents. The superheated PLE process showed a higher recovery of most constituents and antioxidative activity, compared to reflux extraction, with a significantly improved recovery of the total phenolic (TP) and flavonoid (TF) content and DPPH radical scavenging ability. For a broad range of ethanol aqueous solutions and temperatures, 50% EtOH and 200°C (static time: 25min) gave the best performance, in terms of the TP and TF (75% EtOH) content yield and DPPH scavenging ability (25% EtOH). Under the optimised extraction conditions, eight main antioxidative compounds were isolated and identified with HPLC-ABTS(+) assay guidance and assessed for radical scavenging activity. The superheated extraction process for black bamboo leaves enhanced the antioxidant properties by increasing the extraction of the phenolic components. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Nutrient and mineral composition during shoot growth in seven species of Phyllostachys and Pseudosasa bamboo consumed by giant panda.

    PubMed

    Christian, A L; Knott, K K; Vance, C K; Falcone, J F; Bauer, L L; Fahey, G C; Willard, S; Kouba, A J

    2015-12-01

    During the annual period of bamboo shoot growth in spring, free-ranging giant pandas feed almost exclusively on the shoots while ignoring the leaves and full- height culm. Little is known about the nutritional changes that occur during bamboo shoot growth, if nutritional changes differ among species, or how these changes might influence forage selection. Our objective was to examine the nutrient and mineral composition during three phases of shoot growth (<60, 90-150 and >180 cm) for seven species of bamboo (Phyllostachys (P.) aurea, P. aureosulcata, P. bissetii, P. glauca, P. nuda, P. rubromarginata, Pseudosasa japonica) fed to captive giant pandas at the Memphis Zoo. Total dietary fiber content of bamboo shoots increased (p < 0.0001) from an overall species average of 61% dry matter (DM) at < 60 cm to 75% DM at shoot heights > 180 cm, while crude protein, fat and ash exhibited significant declines (p < 0.05). Phyllostachys nuda had the overall greatest (p = 0.007) crude protein (21% DM) and fat (4% DM) content, and lowest overall total fibre (61% DM) content compared to the other species examined. In contrast, Pseudosasa japonica had the overall lowest crude protein and fat, and relatively higher fibre content (9%, 3% and 74% respectively). Concentrations of Zn and Fe were highest in shoots <60 cm (10-50 μg/g DM) and decreased (p < 0.05) during growth in all species examined. Concentrations of Ca, Cu, Mn, Na and K varied among species and were largely unaffected by growth stage. Due to their higher concentrations of nutrients and lower fibre content in comparison to culm and leaf, bamboo shoots should be a major component of captive giant panda diets when available. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Transcriptome Sequencing and Analysis for Culm Elongation of the World’s Largest Bamboo (Dendrocalamus sinicus)

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Kai; Wang, Haiying; Liao, Shengxi; Tang, Qi; Li, Li; Cui, Yongzhong; He, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Dendrocalamus sinicus is the world’s largest bamboo species with strong woody culms, and known for its fast-growing culms. As an economic bamboo species, it was popularized for multi-functional applications including furniture, construction, and industrial paper pulp. To comprehensively elucidate the molecular processes involved in its culm elongation, Illumina paired-end sequencing was conducted. About 65.08 million high-quality reads were produced, and assembled into 81,744 unigenes with an average length of 723 bp. A total of 64,338 (79%) unigenes were annotated for their functions, of which, 56,587 were annotated in the NCBI non-redundant protein database and 35,262 were annotated in the Swiss-Prot database. Also, 42,508 and 21,009 annotated unigenes were allocated to gene ontology (GO) categories and clusters of orthologous groups (COG), respectively. By searching against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Pathway database (KEGG), 33,920 unigenes were assigned to 128 KEGG pathways. Meanwhile, 8,553 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and 81,534 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) were identified, respectively. Additionally, 388 transcripts encoding lignin biosynthesis were detected, among which, 27 transcripts encoding Shikimate O-hydroxycinnamoyltransferase (HCT) specifically expressed in D. sinicus when compared to other bamboo species and rice. The phylogenetic relationship between D. sinicus and other plants was analyzed, suggesting functional diversity of HCT unigenes in D. sinicus. We conjectured that HCT might lead to the high lignin content and giant culm. Given that the leaves are not yet formed and culm is covered with sheaths during culm elongation, the existence of photosynthesis of bamboo culm is usually neglected. Surprisedly, 109 transcripts encoding photosynthesis were identified, including photosystem I and II, cytochrome b6/f complex, photosynthetic electron transport and F-type ATPase, and 24 transcripts were characterized as antenna

  7. Reproductive Behavior and Basic Biology of the Oriental Bamboo-Inhabiting Anoplomus rufipes and a Comparison with Frugivorous Dacinae Fruit Flies

    PubMed Central

    Kovac, Damir

    2015-01-01

    The reproductive behaviors and mating systems of the fruit-infesting species of the Dacinae tribes Ceratitidini and Dacini are increasingly well understood, while in the non-frugivorous tribe Gastrozonini, data are lacking. In the present study, the reproductive behavior of Anoplomus rufipes from North Thailand was studied in the field, other behaviors also in the laboratory. A. rufipes mated on young bamboo plants growing in areas destroyed by fire. Exudates of extrafloral nectaries produced by the young bamboo plants provided food for the females. Factors affecting the choice of the mating site were favorable microclimatic conditions and food. Courtship behavior was performed on the upper sides of bamboo leaves and included pheromone calling (abdominal elevation, anal pouch eversion, abdominal pleural distention), anal dabbing, looping flights and a specific lofting/body swaying behavior. The males searched individually for females or formed leks containing up to four males. The reproductive behaviors and lek formation of A. rufipes are compared to other Dacinae (Ceratitis, Bactrocera), and their functions are discussed. Hitherto unknown data on the general biology of A. rufipes are also included. A. rufipes larvae infested living bamboo shoots of Cephalostachyum pergracile, and the observed behaviors of the adults included locomotion, grooming, feeding, oral droplet deposition, bubbling and agonistic behavior. PMID:26512699

  8. [Comparison study on total flavonoid content and anti-free redical activity of the leaves of bamboo, phyllostachys nigra, and Ginkgo bilabo].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Wu, Xiao-qing; Yu, Zuo-yu

    2002-04-01

    To investigate the differences of total flavonoid (TF) content and antifree radical activity between the-leaves of bamboo and Gingo biloba, as well as their seasonal changes. Spectrophotometery and Chemiluminescence methods were adopted to determine TF and half inhibiting concentration (IC50) on active oxygen free radicals of the leaves of bamboo, phyllostachys nigra (Lodd. ex. Lindl.) Munro, and Ginkgo biloba. Two kinds of leaves were picked in the same plot at the same time monthly. The TF of bamboo leaf varied in the range of 0.67%-1.71% (in dry basis of leaf, below as same) throughout a year, the minimum apparing in June and the maximum in July, then going down obviously, and remaining at a much high lever during November to next April. However, the TF of Ginkgo bilabo leaf varied in 1.48%-2.49% during whole growing period, early April to late November. It ascended with the growth of leaf, reaching the top during June and July, the going down slowly, and finally another peak appeared before defoliation. The average IC50 values on O2-. and .OH of bamboo leaf were at 11.0 micrograms.mL-1 and 5.3 mg.mL-1, and Ginkgo biloba at 19.0 micrograms.mL-1 and 3.6 mg.mL-1, respectively. The TF content and anti-free radical activity the bamboo leaf are comparable with the leaf of ginkgo biloba, which is a kind of potential resources for natural antioxidant and free radical scavenger.

  9. First Report of Korean Cyst Nematode, Heterodera koreana, Parasitic on Bamboo, Phyllostachys nigra, from Iran.

    PubMed

    Maafi, Zahra Tanha; Taheri, Zahra Majd

    2015-09-01

    Bamboo is grown sporadically in the north of Iran and is confined to very limited areas. The history of growing bamboo was to some extent simultaneous with the entrance, commencement, and growth of the tea industry in the north about a century ago. The bamboo was used for making baskets to transfer the harvested tea foliage from farm to the factory and other linked functions. A main area allocated for bamboo growing is located in Lahidjan Agricultural Research Station (LARS) in the north of Iran, where several species of bamboo were cultivated in an area of 5 ha. The species include five species of Phyllostachys (viz., P. aurea, P. bambusoides, P. decora, P. nigra, P. vivax) and one species of Arundinaria gigantean, Pleioblastus fortune, and Semiarundinaria fastuosa; however, only P. aurea and P. nigra have been precisely identified. A survey on plant parasitic nematodes associated with bamboo mainly on P. nigra in LARS revealed second-stage juveniles of cyst forming nematode in soil samples. Further analysis of root and soil samples led to recovery of a cyst nematode belonging to the genus Heterodera and the Afenestrata group. Cysts, vulval cone, and second-stage juveniles were studied for morphological and morphometric features. The classical identification was followed by amplification of the ribosomal RNA-ITS region and the D2-D3 expansion segments of 28S large-subunit rRNA gene; the amplified fragments were sequenced, edited, and compared with those of the corresponding published gene sequences. New D2-D3 and rRNA-ITS gene sequences were deposited in the GenBank database under the accession numbers KR818910 and KR818911, respectively. Based on the morphological and molecular data, the species of the cyst-forming nematode was identified as H. koreana (Vovlas et al., 1992; Mundo-Ocampo et al., 2008). The body contour of cysts was mainly subspherical, vey often with irregular shape (Fig. 1A), yellowish to light brown, thin cuticle with fine zigzag pattern

  10. Running Bamboo: A Mentoring Network of Women Intending to Thrive in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agosto, Vonzell; Karanxha, Zorka; Unterreiner, Ann; Cobb-Roberts, Deirdre; Esnard, Talia; Wu, Ke; Beck, Makini

    2016-01-01

    This article is based on the authors' experiences as women academics who engage in informal peer mentoring to persist in the cultural milieus of their respective institutions. The authors draw on poststructural perspectives and the metaphor of the rhizome "running bamboo" to illustrate the connections they forged in a mentoring network…

  11. No rainbow for grey bamboo sharks: evidence for the absence of colour vision in sharks from behavioural discrimination experiments.

    PubMed

    Schluessel, V; Rick, I P; Plischke, K

    2014-11-01

    Despite convincing data collected by microspectrophotometry and molecular biology, rendering sharks colourblind cone monochromats, the question of whether sharks can perceive colour had not been finally resolved in the absence of any behavioural experiments compensating for the confounding factor of brightness. The present study tested the ability of juvenile grey bamboo sharks to perceive colour in an experimental design based on a paradigm established by Karl von Frisch using colours in combination with grey distractor stimuli of equal brightness. Results showed that contrasts but no colours could be discriminated. Blue and yellow stimuli were not distinguished from a grey distractor stimulus of equal brightness but could be distinguished from distractor stimuli of varying brightness. In addition, different grey stimuli were distinguished significantly above chance level from one another. In conclusion, the behavioural results support the previously collected physiological data on bamboo sharks, which mutually show that the grey bamboo shark, like several marine mammals, is a cone monochromate and colourblind.

  12. Overwintering in the Bamboo Mosquito Tripteroides bambusa (Diptera: Culicidae) During a Warm, But Unpredictably Changing, Winter.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Luis Fernando; Jian, Jiun-Yu; Moji, Kazuhiko

    2018-02-08

    The bamboo mosquito, Tripteroides bambusa (Yamada) (Diptera: Culicidae), is a common insect across forested landscapes in Japan. Several studies have reported its overwintering as larvae and eggs, in both natural and artificial water containers. Nevertheless, it is unclear how sensitive this mosquito species is to changes in weather patterns associated with global warming. The El Niño event of 2015 through 2016 was one of the strongest on record and provided an ideal scenario for observations on the overwintering of the bamboo mosquito during a winter predicted to be unusually warm. Thus, we set oviposition traps in mid October 2015 and made weekly observations, from December 2015 to May 2016, on bamboo mosquito larval recruitment and pupation in Nagasaki, Japan. We found that larvae were pupating as late as the first week of January (prior records from the study site indicated mosquito pupation ended by mid-late October) and that pupation resumed in mid April (one month earlier than previous records at the study site). We also found that fourth instar larvae were able to survive in frozen oviposition traps following an extremely unusual snowstorm and cold spell and that recruitment of larvae from eggs happened after this unusual event. Our analysis suggested that overwintering and metamorphosis of the bamboo mosquito is sensitive to average and extreme temperatures, the latter measured by temperature kurtosis. Our results highlight the need to better understand changes in overwintering strategies in insects, and associated trade-offs and impacts on population dynamics, in light of climate change. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Efficient production of free fatty acids from ionic liquid-based acid- or enzyme-catalyzed bamboo hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Mi, Le; Qin, Dandan; Cheng, Jie; Wang, Dan; Li, Sha; Wei, Xuetuan

    2017-03-01

    Two engineered Escherichia coli strains, DQ101 (MG1655 fadD - )/pDQTES and DQ101 (MG1655 fadD - )/pDQTESZ were constructed to investigate the free fatty acid production using ionic liquid-based acid- or enzyme-catalyzed bamboo hydrolysate as carbon source in this study. The plasmid, pDQTES, carrying an acyl-ACP thioesterase 'TesA of E. coli in pTrc99A was constructed firstly, and then (3R)-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase was ligated after the TesA to give the plasmid pDQTESZ. These two strains exhibited efficient fatty acid production when glucose was used as the sole carbon source, with a final concentration of 2.45 and 3.32 g/L, respectively. The free fatty acid production of the two strains on xylose is not as efficient as that on glucose, which was 2.32 and 2.96 g/L, respectively. For mixed sugars, DQ101 (MG1655 fadD - )-based strains utilized glucose and pentose sequentially under the carbon catabolite repression (CCR) regulation. The highest total FFAs concentration from the mixed sugar culture reached 2.81 g/L by DQ101 (MG1655 fadD - )/pDQTESZ. Furthermore, when ionic liquid-based enzyme-catalyzed bamboo hydrolysate was used as the carbon source, the strain DQ101 (MG1655 fadD - )/pDQTESZ could produce 1.23 g/L FFAs with a yield of 0.13 g/g, and while it just produced 0.65 g/L free fatty acid with the ionic liquid-based acid-catalyzed bamboo hydrolysate as the feedstock. The results suggested that enzymatic catalyzed bamboo hydrolysate with ionic liquid pretreatment could serve as an efficient feedstock for free fatty acid production.

  14. Bamboo Expansion Alters Ecosystem NPP and N Cycling of Evergreen Broad-leaved Forest in Subtropical China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, H.; Song, Q. N.; Wang, W.

    2016-12-01

    Background and Aims The bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens) expansion into adjacent forests is a widespread phenomenon in subtropical region, and it has imposed great effects on the species compositions and community structures of cloned ecosystems. This shift in dominant plant life form, from trees to bamboos, may be accompanied by changes in the productivity, standing accumulation of biomass and nutrients and biogeochemical cycles. Methods We compared the net primary production (NPP) and major pools and fluxes of nitrogen (N) in bamboo-dominant forest (BDF) and neighboring secondary evergreen broadleaved forest (EBF) in South China using the space-for-time substitution method. Results The mean annual NPP of BDF was 30.0 t ha-1 a-1, which was 51.5 % greater than that of the EBF (19.8 t ha-1 a-1), with fine root contributed more than 8.2 kg ha-1. The plant N pool for BDF was 37.5% larger than that of the EBF, because of higher N content in P. pubescens tissues relative to that in trees, whereas the soil inorganic N pool significantly decreased in the EBF by 31.2 % compared with that in the BDF. Additionally, the ratio of N return to N uptake was 0.69 in the BDF and 0.88 in the EBF because of the lower litter N return of the BDF compared with that of the EBF. Conclusion These results indicated that the expansion of P. pubescens significantly increased the NPP and plant N accumulation but reduced the soil N available pool and slowed the N cycling rate, which could lead to soil degradation. These findings have great additional information for the assessment of P. pubescens expansion, and enrich our understanding of bamboo expansion into neighboring forests in subtropical China.

  15. Volatile organic compound emissions from elephant grass and bamboo cultivars used as potential bioethanol crop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo, E.; Graus, M.; Gilman, J. B.; Lerner, B. M.; Fall, R.; Harren, F. J. M.; Warneke, C.

    2013-02-01

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from elephant grass (Miscanthus gigantus) and black bamboo (Phyllostachys nigra) were measured online in semi-field chamber and plant enclosure experiments during growth and harvest using proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), proton-transfer reaction ion-trap mass spectrometry (PIT-MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Both cultivars are being considered for second-generation biofuel production. Before this study, no information was available on their yearly VOC emissions. This exploratory investigation shows that black bamboo is a strong isoprene emitter (daytime 28,516 ng gdwt-1 h-1) and has larger VOC emissions, especially for wound compounds from the hexanal and hexenal families, than elephant grass. Daytime emissions of methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone + propanal and acetic acid of black bamboo were 618, 249, 351, and 1034 ng gdwt-1 h-1, respectively. In addition, it is observed that elephant grass VOC emissions after harvesting strongly depend on the seasonal stage. Not taking VOC emission variations throughout the season for annual and perennial species into account, may lead to an overestimation of the impact on local air quality in dry periods. In addition, our data suggest that the use of perennial grasses for extensive growing for biofuel production have lower emissions than woody species, which might be important for regional atmospheric chemistry.

  16. A moso bamboo WRKY gene PeWRKY83 confers salinity tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min; Liu, Huanlong; Han, Guomin; Cai, Ronghao; Pan, Feng; Xiang, Yan

    2017-09-15

    The WRKY family are transcription factors, involved in plant development, and response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Moso bamboo is an important bamboo that has high ecological, economic and cultural value and is widely distributed in the south of China. In this study, we performed a genome-wide identification of WRKY members in moso bamboo and identified 89 members. By comparative analysis in six grass genomes, we found the WRKY gene family may have experienced or be experiencing purifying selection. Based on relative expression levels among WRKY IIc members under three abiotic stresses, PeWRKY83 functioned as a transcription factor and was selected for detailed analysis. The transgenic Arabidopsis of PeWRKY83 showed superior physiological properties compared with the WT under salt stress. Overexpression plants were less sensitive to ABA at both germination and postgermination stages and accumulated more endogenous ABA under salt stress conditions. Further studies demonstrated that overexpression of PeWRKY83 could regulate the expression of some ABA biosynthesis genes (AtAAO3, AtNCED2, AtNCED3), signaling genes (AtABI1, AtPP2CA) and responsive genes (AtRD29A, AtRD29B, AtABF1) under salt stress. Together, these results suggested that PeWRKY83 functions as a novel WRKY-related TF which plays a positive role in salt tolerance by regulating stress-induced ABA synthesis.

  17. A cell sorter with modified bamboo charcoal for the efficient selection of specific antibody-producing hybridomas.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Chen; Ni, Mei-Hui; Chang, Yu-Chung; Yeh, Hsiu-Lun; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2010-11-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been proven useful in research and clinical applications. However, the generation of mAbs by conventional hybridoma technology is time-, cost- and labor-consuming. Here we developed a simplified procedure for efficient generation and selection of antibody-producing hybridomas within 1 h, using a particular cell sorter design, a cytoflow reactor-based cell sorter (CBCS) which consists mainly of the "cytoflow reactor" that comprises two components, a reaction chamber and a glass tubing for air and medium exchange by gravity, and the "sorting material", human EGFR-conjugated bamboo charcoal, for specific B-cell enrichment. The high surface area and porous structure of bamboo charcoal greatly increased cell density and protein production. Moreover, from Raman, FT-IR spectroscopy and IFA analysis, the carboxylation and immobilization of bamboo charcoal can be introduced easily by nitric acid treatment and conjugated handily with human EGFR using EDC/NHS. Other evidences, such as IFA, showed that the specific hybridomas generated in this study could secrete specific anti-human EGFR antibodies. Our design allows the production of mAbs while avoiding time-consuming steps, such as large numbers of limiting dilutions and screening assays, and demonstrates that the CBCS could be a powerful tool for monoclonal antibody production. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A Bamboo Joint-Like Appearance is a Characteristic Finding in the Upper Gastrointestinal Tract of Crohn's Disease Patients: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Fujiya, Mikihiro; Sakatani, Aki; Dokoshi, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Kazuyuki; Ando, Katsuyoshi; Ueno, Nobuhiro; Gotoh, Takuma; Kashima, Shin; Tominaga, Motoya; Inaba, Yuhei; Ito, Takahiro; Moriichi, Kentaro; Tanabe, Hiroki; Ikuta, Katsuya; Ohtake, Takaaki; Yokota, Kinnichi; Watari, Jiro; Saitoh, Yusuke; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2015-09-01

    The clinical importance of Crohn's disease (CD)-specific lesions in the upper gastrointestinal tract (upper GIT) has not been sufficiently established. The aim of this case-control study is to investigate the characteristic findings of CD in the upper GIT. In 2740 patients who underwent gastroduodenoscopy at Asahikawa Medical University between April 2011 and December 2012, 81 CD patients, 81 gender- and age-matched non-IBD patients, and 66 ulcerative colitis (UC) patients were investigated in the present study. (1) The diagnostic ability and odds ratio of each endoscopic finding (a bamboo joint-like appearance in the cardia, erosions, and/or ulcers in the antrum, notched signs, and erosions and/or ulcers in the duodenum) were compared between the CD and non-IBD patients or UC patients. (2) The interobserver agreement of the diagnosis based on the endoscopic findings was evaluated by 3 experienced and 3 less-experienced endoscopists. The incidence of detecting a bamboo joint-like appearance, notched signs, and erosions and/or ulcers in the duodenum was significantly higher in the CD patients than in the non-IBD and UC patients. In addition, the diagnostic ability and odds ratio of a bamboo joint-like appearance for CD were higher than those for the other findings. Kendall's coefficients of concordance in the group of experienced and less-experienced endoscopists were relatively high for a bamboo joint-like appearance (0.748 and 0.692, respectively). A cardiac bamboo joint-like appearance is a useful finding for identifying high-risk groups of CD patients using only gastroduodenoscopy.

  19. Optimizing selective cutting strategies for maximum carbon stocks and yield of Moso bamboo forest using BIOME-BGC model.

    PubMed

    Mao, Fangjie; Zhou, Guomo; Li, Pingheng; Du, Huaqiang; Xu, Xiaojun; Shi, Yongjun; Mo, Lufeng; Zhou, Yufeng; Tu, Guoqing

    2017-04-15

    The selective cutting method currently used in Moso bamboo forests has resulted in a reduction of stand productivity and carbon sequestration capacity. Given the time and labor expense involved in addressing this problem manually, simulation using an ecosystem model is the most suitable approach. The BIOME-BGC model was improved to suit managed Moso bamboo forests, which was adapted to include age structure, specific ecological processes and management measures of Moso bamboo forest. A field selective cutting experiment was done in nine plots with three cutting intensities (high-intensity, moderate-intensity and low-intensity) during 2010-2013, and biomass of these plots was measured for model validation. Then four selective cutting scenarios were simulated by the improved BIOME-BGC model to optimize the selective cutting timings, intervals, retained ages and intensities. The improved model matched the observed aboveground carbon density and yield of different plots, with a range of relative error from 9.83% to 15.74%. The results of different selective cutting scenarios suggested that the optimal selective cutting measure should be cutting 30% culms of age 6, 80% culms of age 7, and all culms thereafter (above age 8) in winter every other year. The vegetation carbon density and harvested carbon density of this selective cutting method can increase by 74.63% and 21.5%, respectively, compared with the current selective cutting measure. The optimized selective cutting measure developed in this study can significantly promote carbon density, yield, and carbon sink capacity in Moso bamboo forests. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Organic acid compounds in root exudation of Moso Bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens) and its bioactivity as affected by heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junren; Shafi, Mohammad; Wang, Ying; Wu, Jiasen; Ye, Zhengqian; Liu, Chen; Zhong, Bin; Guo, Hua; He, Lizhi; Liu, Dan

    2016-10-01

    Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens) has great potential as phytoremediation material in soil contaminated by heavy metals. A hydroponics experiment was conducted to determine organic acid compounds of root exudates of lead- (Pb), zinc- (Zn), copper- (Cu), and cadmium (Cd)-tolerant of Moso bamboo. Plants were grown in nutrients solution which included Pb, Zn, Cu, and Cd applied as Pb(NO 3 ) 2 (200 μM), ZnSO 4 ·7H 2 O (100 μM), CuSO 4 ·5H 2 O (25 μM), and CdCl 2 (10 μM), respectively. Oxalic acid and malic acid were detected in all treatments. Lactic acid was observed in Cu, Cd, and control treatments. The oxalic was the main organic acid exudated by Moso bamboo. In the sand culture experiment, the Moso bamboo significantly activated carbonate heavy metals under activation of roots. The concentration of water-soluble metals (except Pb) in sand were significantly increased as compared with control. Organic acids (1 mM mixed) were used due to its effect on the soil adsorption of heavy metals. After adding mixed organic acids, the Cu and Zn sorption capacity in soils was decreased markedly compared with enhanced Pb and Cd sorption capacity in soils. The sorption was analyzed using Langmuir and Freundlich equations with R 2 values that ranged from 0.956 to 0.999 and 0.919 to 0.997, respectively.

  1. Bergbambos and Oldeania, new genera of African bamboos (Poaceae, Bambusoideae)

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Chris M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Two new monotypic genera, Bergbambos and Oldeania are described for African temperate bamboo species in the tribe Arundinarieae, after a comparison of their morphological characteristics with those of similar species from Asia. Morphological differences are supported by their isolated geographical distributions. Molecular evidence does not support the inclusion of these species in related Asian genera, recognising them instead as distinct lineages. New combinations Bergbambos tessellata and Oldeania alpina are made. PMID:24198715

  2. Flexible architecture: bamboo as a tool for children to play in urban kampung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susanto, D.; Widyarko; Ilmiani, A. N.

    2018-03-01

    Due to the dense population and increase of development, urban kampung in Indonesia is facing a problem of limited children’s play spaces. Flexible architecture with its movable principle is expected to be a solution by creating children’s playing tool that is built among the dense urban kampung. Bamboo is the staple material because it is local, able to regenerate quickly, lightweight, and affordable. By using the exploratory method, this research tries to reveal the previously hidden aspects by evaluating all processes of design-build of three created children’s playing tools. These playing tools can be built in the kampung after three processes of apart-and-reassemble. However, there are several questions which need to be discussed further; the right configuration between the component and the joint of the bamboo, to make apart-and-reassemble process more effective in a dense urban kampung, and also how to make bamboo’s structure able to survive better under rainy seasons and surface humidity.

  3. Acoustic Emission from Breaking a Bamboo Chopstick

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Sun-Ting; Wang, Li-Min; Huang, Panpan; Yang, Zhengning; Chang, Chin-De; Hong, Tzay-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The acoustic emission from breaking a bamboo chopstick or a bundle of spaghetti is found to exhibit similar behavior as the famous seismic laws of Gutenberg and Richter, Omori, and Båth. By the use of a force-sensing detector, we establish a positive correlation between the statistics of sound intensity and the magnitude of a tremor. We also manage to derive these laws analytically without invoking the concept of a phase transition, self-organized criticality, or fractal. Our model is deterministic and relies on the existence of a structured cross section, either fibrous or layered. This success at explaining the power-law behavior supports the proposal that geometry is sometimes more important than mechanics.

  4. "So Far from the Bamboo Grove:" Multiculturalism, Historical Context, and Close Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walach, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    In May 2006, the summer-reading committee in the author's middle school debated the relevance of "So Far from the Bamboo Grove" by Yoko Kawashima Watkins and decided against using the book as a required summer-reading selection. Therefore, the author was interested in the controversy that erupted a few months later in Dover-Sherborn, a district…

  5. Hydrodynamic function of dorsal fins in spiny dogfish and bamboo sharks during steady swimming.

    PubMed

    Maia, Anabela; Lauder, George V; Wilga, Cheryl D

    2017-11-01

    A key feature of fish functional design is the presence of multiple fins that allow thrust vectoring and redirection of fluid momentum to contribute to both steady swimming and maneuvering. A number of previous studies have analyzed the function of dorsal fins in teleost fishes in this context, but the hydrodynamic function of dorsal fins in freely swimming sharks has not been analyzed, despite the potential for differential functional roles between the anterior and posterior dorsal fins. Previous anatomical research has suggested a primarily stabilizing role for shark dorsal fins. We evaluated the generality of this hypothesis by using time-resolved particle image velocimetry to record water flow patterns in the wake of both the anterior and posterior dorsal fins in two species of freely swimming sharks: bamboo sharks ( Chiloscyllium plagiosum ) and spiny dogfish ( Squalus acanthias ). Cross-correlation analysis of consecutive images was used to calculate stroke-averaged mean longitudinal and lateral velocity components, and vorticity. In spiny dogfish, we observed a velocity deficit in the wake of the first dorsal fin and flow acceleration behind the second dorsal fin, indicating that the first dorsal fin experiences net drag while the second dorsal fin can aid in propulsion. In contrast, the wake of both dorsal fins in bamboo sharks displayed increased net flow velocity in the majority of trials, reflecting a thrust contribution to steady swimming. In bamboo sharks, fluid flow in the wake of the second dorsal fin had higher absolute average velocity than that for first dorsal fin, and this may result from a positive vortex interaction between the first and second dorsal fins. These data suggest that the first dorsal fin in spiny dogfish has primarily a stabilizing function, while the second dorsal fin has a propulsive function. In bamboo sharks, both dorsal fins can contribute thrust and should be considered as propulsive adjuncts to the body during steady

  6. Effect of three cooking methods on nutrient components and antioxidant capacities of bamboo shoot (Phyllostachys praecox C.D. Chu et C.S. Chao).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-jie; Ji, Rong; Hu, Ya-qin; Chen, Jian-chu; Ye, Xing-qian

    2011-09-01

    Three cooking methods, namely boiling, steaming, and stir-frying for 5 to 10 min, were used to evaluate the effect on nutrient components, free amino acids, L-ascorbic acid, total phenolic contents, and antioxidant capacities of bamboo shoots (Phyllostachys praecox). Results showed that boiling and stir-frying had a great effect on the nutrient components and they decreased the contents of protein, soluble sugar, and ash, and caused a great loss in the total free amino acids (decreased by 38.35% and 34.86%, respectively). Significant differences (P<0.05) in free amino acids were observed in the samples cooked by different methods. Stir-fried bamboo shoots had a high fat content which increased by 528.57% because of the addition of edible oil. After boiling, the L-ascorbic acid and total phenolic contents were significantly reduced, while steaming increased total phenolic content by 3.98% and stir-frying well-preserved L-ascorbic acid (78.87% of its previous content). Results of the antioxidative property study showed that stir-frying could increase antioxidant capacities of bamboo shoots. It is concluded that stir-frying is more suitable for bamboo shoots because it could obtain the maximum retention of antioxidant capacities.

  7. Optimization for microwave-assisted direct liquefaction of bamboo residue in glycerol/methanol mixtures

    Treesearch

    Jiulong Xie; Jinqiu Qi; Chungyun Hse; Todd F. Shupe

    2015-01-01

    Bamboo residues were liquefied in a mixture of glycerol and methanol in the presence of sulfuric acid using microwave energy. We investigated the effects of liquefaction conditions, including glycerol/methanol ratio, liquefaction temperature, and reaction time on the conversion yield. The optimal liquefaction conditions were under the temperature of 120

  8. Fabrication and tribological response of aluminium 6061 hybrid composite reinforced with bamboo char and boron carbide micro-fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chethan, K. N.; Pai, Anand; Keni, Laxmikant G.; Singhal, Ashish; Sinha, Shubham

    2018-02-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) have a wide scope of industrial applications and triumph over conventional materials due to their light weight, higher specific strength, good wear resistance and lower coefficient of thermal expansion. The present study aims at establishing the feasibility of using Bamboo charcoal particulate and boron carbide as reinforcements in Al-6061 alloy matrix and to investigate their effect on the wear of composites taking into consideration the interfacial adhesion of the reinforcements in the alloy. Al-6061 alloy was chosen as a base metallic alloy matrix. Sun-dried bamboo canes were used for charcoal preparation with the aid of a muffle furnace. The carbon content in the charcoal samples was determined by EDS (energy dispersive spectroscopy). In present study, stir casting technique was used to prepare the samples with 1%, 2%, and 3% weight of bamboo charcoal and boron carbide with Al-6061. The fabricated composites were homogenised at 570°C for 6 hours and cooled at room temperature. Wear studies were carried out on the specimens with different speed and loads. It was found that wear rate and coefficient of friction decreased with increase in the reinforcement content.

  9. Phylogenetic inference and SSR characterization of tropical woody bamboos tribe Bambuseae (Poaceae: Bambusoideae) based on complete plastid genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Leila do Nascimento; Dos Anjos, Karina Goulart; Faoro, Helisson; Fraga, Hugo Pacheco de Freitas; Greco, Thiago Machado; Pedrosa, Fábio de Oliveira; de Souza, Emanuel Maltempi; Rogalski, Marcelo; de Souza, Robson Francisco; Guerra, Miguel Pedro

    2016-05-01

    The complete plastome sequencing is an efficient option for increasing phylogenetic resolution and evolutionary studies, as well as may greatly facilitate the use of plastid DNA markers in plant population genetic studies. Merostachys and Guadua stand out as the most common and the highest potential utilization bamboos indigenous of Brazil. Here, we sequenced the complete plastome sequences of the Brazilian Guadua chacoensis and Merostachys sp. to perform full plastome phylogeny and characterize the occurrence, type, and distribution of SRRs using 20 Bambuseae species. The determined plastome sequence of Merostachys sp. and G. chacoensis is 136,334 and 135,403 bp in size, respectively, with an identical gene content and typical quadripartite structure consisting of a pair of IRs separated by the LSC and SSC regions. The Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian Inference analyses produced phylogenomic trees identical in topology. These trees supported monophyly of Paleotropical and Neotropical Bamboos clades. The Neotropical bamboos segregated into three well-supported lineages, Chusqueinae, Guaduinae, and Arthrostylidiinae, with the last two forming a well-supported sister relationship. Paleotropical bamboos segregated into two well-supported lineages, Hickeliinae and Bambusinae + Melocanninae. We identified 141.8 cpSSR in Bambuseae plastomes and an inferior value (38.15) for plastome coding sequences. Among them, we identified 16 polymorphic SSR loci, with number of alleles varying from 3 to 10. These 16 polymorphic cpSSR loci in Bambuseae plastome can be assessed for the intraspecific level of polymorphism, leading to innovative highly sensitive phylogeographic and population genetics studies for this tribe.

  10. Comprehensive profiling of rhizome-associated alternative splicing and alternative polyadenylation in moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis).

    PubMed

    Wang, Taotao; Wang, Huiyuan; Cai, Dawei; Gao, Yubang; Zhang, Hangxiao; Wang, Yongsheng; Lin, Chentao; Ma, Liuyin; Gu, Lianfeng

    2017-08-01

    Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) represents one of the fastest-spreading plants in the world, due in part to its well-developed rhizome system. However, the post-transcriptional mechanism for the development of the rhizome system in bamboo has not been comprehensively studied. We therefore used a combination of single-molecule long-read sequencing technology and polyadenylation site sequencing (PAS-seq) to re-annotate the bamboo genome, and identify genome-wide alternative splicing (AS) and alternative polyadenylation (APA) in the rhizome system. In total, 145 522 mapped full-length non-chimeric (FLNC) reads were analyzed, resulting in the correction of 2241 mis-annotated genes and the identification of 8091 previously unannotated loci. Notably, more than 42 280 distinct splicing isoforms were derived from 128 667 intron-containing full-length FLNC reads, including a large number of AS events associated with rhizome systems. In addition, we characterized 25 069 polyadenylation sites from 11 450 genes, 6311 of which have APA sites. Further analysis of intronic polyadenylation revealed that LTR/Gypsy and LTR/Copia were two major transposable elements within the intronic polyadenylation region. Furthermore, this study provided a quantitative atlas of poly(A) usage. Several hundred differential poly(A) sites in the rhizome-root system were identified. Taken together, these results suggest that post-transcriptional regulation may potentially have a vital role in the underground rhizome-root system. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Rapid soil organic carbon re-accumulation after bamboo invasion on recovering landslide scars in a subtropical forest ecosystem of Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehetner, Franz; Schomakers, Jasmin; Jien, Shih-Hao; Lin, Zan Liang; Chen, Ting-Chien; Hseu, Zeng-Yei; Lee, Tsung-Yu; Huang, -Chuan, Jr.; Lee, Li-Chin; Mentler, Axel; Hein, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Typhoon-induced landslides occasionally strip parts of the landscape off its vegetative cover and soil layer and export large amounts of biomass and soil organic carbon (OC). The resulting landslide scars remain low in OC and vulnerable for re-activation for several years until closed vegetation is re-established. In the subtropical mountains of Taiwan and in other parts of the world, bamboo species may invade at a certain point in the succession of recovering landslide scars. Bamboo has a high potential for carbon sequestration because of its fast growth and dense rooting system. However, it is still largely unknown how these properties translate into soil OC re-accumulation rates after landslide disturbance. In this study, we investigated a chronosequence with 5 different sites on former landslide scars in the Alishan area in Central Taiwan, ranging in age from 6 to 53 years post disturbance. The younger landslide scars were colonized by Miscanthus giganteus, while after approx. 15 to 20 years of succession, bamboo (Phyllostachys) species were dominating. Biomass and soil OC stocks were measured on the recovering landslide scars and compared to an old-growth Cryptomeria japonica forest stand in the same area. Humic acids were extracted from the newly formed soils of the recovering landslide scars and analyzed for molecular characteristics. Biomass carbon accumulated rapidly in bamboo stands but was significantly lower compared to the old-growth coniferous forest. However, soil OC stocks on the recovering landslide scars approached the levels of the old-growth forest after only few decades of succession. Similarly, humic acid characteristics (obtained from fluorescence and NMR spectroscopy) rapidly changed in the early phase of succession but seemed to stabilize during the later phase of landslide recovery. Our results demonstrate the high potential of bamboo for below-ground OC sequestration and storage, and show that the fresh OC inputs are rapidly converted to

  12. TLC screening for antioxidant activity of extracts from fifteen bamboo species and identification of antioxidant flavone glycosides from leaves of Bambusa. textilis McClure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin; Yue, Yong-De; Tang, Feng; Sun, Jia

    2012-10-19

    Interest in the antioxidant activity of bamboo leaves is growing. To discover new sources of natural antioxidants, a TLC bioautography method combined with a new image processing method was developed to evaluate the antioxidant activity of leaf extracts from 15 different species of bamboo. The results showed that the methanolic extract of Bambusa. textilis McClure possessed the highest antioxidant activity among the selected bamboo species. To rapidly identify the antioxidant compounds, the crude extract of B. textilis McClure was analysed by HPLC-UV, and HPLC-micro-fractionation of the extract was carried out. Based on TLC bioautography-guided fractionation, three antioxidant fractions were isolated from B. textilis McClure by preparative chromatography. These three antioxidant compounds were identified as isoorientin 4''-O β-D-xylopyranoside, isoorientin 2''-O-α-L-rhamnoside and isoorientin according to their UV, MS, and NMR data. The proposed TLC screening method could therefore be an easy way to evaluate the antioxidant activity of bamboo leaves, and the results achieved should prove very helpful for promoting their utilization, as B. textilis McClure can be considered a promising plant source of natural antioxidants.

  13. Effect of preparation conditions of activated carbon from bamboo waste for real textile wastewater.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, A A; Hameed, B H

    2010-01-15

    This study deals with the use of activated carbon prepared from bamboo waste (BMAC), as an adsorbent for the removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and color of cotton textile mill wastewater. Bamboo waste was used to prepare activated carbon by chemical activation using phosphoric acid (H(3)PO(4)) as chemical agent. The effects of three preparation variables activation temperature, activation time and H(3)PO(4):precursor (wt%) impregnation ratio on the color and COD removal were investigated. Based on the central composite design (CCD) and quadratic models were developed to correlate the preparation variables to the color and COD. From the analysis of variance (ANOVA), the most influential factor on each experimental design response was identified. The optimum condition was obtained by using temperature of 556 degrees C, activation time of 2.33 h and chemical impregnation ratio of 5.24, which resulted in 93.08% of color and 73.98% of COD.

  14. ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY. Exceptionally low daily energy expenditure in the bamboo-eating giant panda.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yonggang; Speakman, John R; Wu, Qi; Zhang, Chenglin; Hu, Yibo; Xia, Maohua; Yan, Li; Hambly, Catherine; Wang, Lu; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Jinguo; Wei, Fuwen

    2015-07-10

    The carnivoran giant panda has a specialized bamboo diet, to which its alimentary tract is poorly adapted. Measurements of daily energy expenditure across five captive and three wild pandas averaged 5.2 megajoules (MJ)/day, only 37.7% of the predicted value (13.8 MJ/day). For the wild pandas, the mean was 6.2 MJ/day, or 45% of the mammalian expectation. Pandas achieve this exceptionally low expenditure in part by reduced sizes of several vital organs and low physical activity. In addition, circulating levels of thyroid hormones thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) averaged 46.9 and 64%, respectively, of the levels expected for a eutherian mammal of comparable size. A giant panda-unique mutation in the DUOX2 gene, critical for thyroid hormone synthesis, might explain these low thyroid hormone levels. A combination of morphological, behavioral, physiological, and genetic adaptations, leading to low energy expenditure, likely enables giant pandas to survive on a bamboo diet. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  15. Effect of three cooking methods on nutrient components and antioxidant capacities of bamboo shoot (Phyllostachys praecox C.D. Chu et C.S. Chao)*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin-jie; Ji, Rong; Hu, Ya-qin; Chen, Jian-chu; Ye, Xing-qian

    2011-01-01

    Three cooking methods, namely boiling, steaming, and stir-frying for 5 to 10 min, were used to evaluate the effect on nutrient components, free amino acids, L-ascorbic acid, total phenolic contents, and antioxidant capacities of bamboo shoots (Phyllostachys praecox). Results showed that boiling and stir-frying had a great effect on the nutrient components and they decreased the contents of protein, soluble sugar, and ash, and caused a great loss in the total free amino acids (decreased by 38.35% and 34.86%, respectively). Significant differences (P<0.05) in free amino acids were observed in the samples cooked by different methods. Stir-fried bamboo shoots had a high fat content which increased by 528.57% because of the addition of edible oil. After boiling, the L-ascorbic acid and total phenolic contents were significantly reduced, while steaming increased total phenolic content by 3.98% and stir-frying well-preserved L-ascorbic acid (78.87% of its previous content). Results of the antioxidative property study showed that stir-frying could increase antioxidant capacities of bamboo shoots. It is concluded that stir-frying is more suitable for bamboo shoots because it could obtain the maximum retention of antioxidant capacities. PMID:21887851

  16. Verification of the FBR fuel bundle-duct interaction analysis code BAMBOO by the out-of-pile bundle compression test with large diameter pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uwaba, Tomoyuki; Ito, Masahiro; Nemoto, Junichi; Ichikawa, Shoichi; Katsuyama, Kozo

    2014-09-01

    The BAMBOO computer code was verified by results for the out-of-pile bundle compression test with large diameter pin bundle deformation under the bundle-duct interaction (BDI) condition. The pin diameters of the examined test bundles were 8.5 mm and 10.4 mm, which are targeted as preliminary fuel pin diameters for the upgraded core of the prototype fast breeder reactor (FBR) and for demonstration and commercial FBRs studied in the FaCT project. In the bundle compression test, bundle cross-sectional views were obtained from X-ray computer tomography (CT) images and local parameters of bundle deformation such as pin-to-duct and pin-to-pin clearances were measured by CT image analyses. In the verification, calculation results of bundle deformation obtained by the BAMBOO code analyses were compared with the experimental results from the CT image analyses. The comparison showed that the BAMBOO code reasonably predicts deformation of large diameter pin bundles under the BDI condition by assuming that pin bowing and cladding oval distortion are the major deformation mechanisms, the same as in the case of small diameter pin bundles. In addition, the BAMBOO analysis results confirmed that cladding oval distortion effectively suppresses BDI in large diameter pin bundles as well as in small diameter pin bundles.

  17. Diversity and antimicrobial activity of culturable fungi from fishscale bamboo (Phyllostachys heteroclada) in China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying-Ke; Shen, Xiao-Ye; Hou, Cheng-Lin

    2017-06-01

    An important and useful bamboo species, fishscale bamboo (Phyllostachys heteroclada Oliver), is broadly distributed in Southeast China and has multiple purposes, including uses in cuisine, weaving, Chinese medicine and ecological protection. However, no previous studies have focused on the endophytes of this plant. In our article, a total of 127 fungal strains were first isolated from the healthy branches and leaves of common P. heteroclada. These endophytic fungi could be directly categorized into 50 morphotypes according to their culture characteristics, and their internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions were analyzed for molecular identification. Using the BLAST search tool of the NCBI database and phylogenetic tree analysis, these isolates were divided into two phyla, Ascomycota (95.28%) and Basidiomycota (4.72%), including at least six orders (Xylariales, Capnodiales, Pleosporales, Hypocreales, Chaetothyriales and Polyporales) and fourteen genera (Arthrinium, Pestalotiopsis, Epicoccum, Cladosporium, Nigrospora, Setophoma, Didymella, Calcarisporium, Preussia, Nemania, Creosphaeria, Ophiobolus, Phialophora and Perenniporia). It is fascinating that four genera, Calcarisporium, Preussia, Creosphaeria and Phialophora were isolated from bamboos for the first time. The inhibitory effects against clinical pathogens were also preliminarily screened, and four isolates FB43 (Calcarisporium arbuscula), FB06 (Preussia minima), FB16 (Setophoma sp.) and FB21 (Perenniporia medulla-pains) among the candidate strains displayed broad-spectrum activities according to the agar diffusion method and the disk diffusion assay. Strain FB16 (Setophoma sp.) especially indicated high bioactivity against both clinical bacteria and yeast. This study is the first report on the diversity and antimicrobial activity of the endophytic fungi associated with P. heteroclada, which could be regarded as a potential source of drug precursors and could be used in biocontrol development.

  18. Granular bamboo-derived activated carbon for high CO(2) adsorption: the dominant role of narrow micropores.

    PubMed

    Wei, Haoran; Deng, Shubo; Hu, Bingyin; Chen, Zhenhe; Wang, Bin; Huang, Jun; Yu, Gang

    2012-12-01

    Cost-effective biomass-derived activated carbons with a high CO(2) adsorption capacity are attractive for carbon capture. Bamboo was found to be a suitable precursor for activated carbon preparation through KOH activation. The bamboo size in the range of 10-200 mesh had little effect on CO(2) adsorption, whereas the KOH/C mass ratio and activation temperature had a significant impact on CO(2) adsorption. The bamboo-derived activated carbon had a high adsorption capacity and excellent selectivity for CO(2) , and also the adsorption process was highly reversible. The adsorbed amount of CO(2) on the granular activated carbon was up to 7.0 mmol g(-1) at 273 K and 1 bar, which was higher than almost all carbon materials. The pore characteristics of activated carbons responsible for high CO(2) adsorption were fully investigated. Based on the analysis of narrow micropore size distribution of several activated carbons prepared under different conditions, a more accurate micropore range contributing to CO(2) adsorption was proposed. The volume of micropores in the range of 0.33-0.82 nm had a good linear relationship with CO(2) adsorption at 273 K and 1 bar, and the narrow micropores of about 0.55 nm produced the major contribution, which could be used to evaluate CO(2) adsorption on activated carbons. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Extraction and characterization of holocellulose fibers by microwave-assisted selective liquefaction of bamboo

    Treesearch

    Jiulong Xie; Chung Hse; Todd F. Shupe; Hui Pan; Tingxing Hu

    2016-01-01

    Microwave-assisted selective liquefaction was proposed and used as a novel method for the isolation of holocellulose fibers. The results showed that the bamboo lignin component and extractives were almost completely removed by using a liquefaction process at 120 8C for 9 min, and the residual lignin and extractives in the solid residue were as low as 0.65% and 0.49%,...

  20. Long-term intensive management increased carbon occluded in phytolith (PhytOC) in bamboo forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhang-Ting; Li, Yong-Fu; Jiang, Pei-Kun; Chang, Scott X.; Song, Zhao-Liang; Liu, Juan; Zhou, Guo-Mo

    2014-01-01

    Carbon (C) occluded in phytolith (PhytOC) is highly stable at millennium scale and its accumulation in soils can help increase long-term C sequestration. Here, we report that soil PhytOC storage significantly increased with increasing duration under intensive management (mulching and fertilization) in Lei bamboo (Phyllostachys praecox) plantations. The PhytOC storage in 0-40 cm soil layer in bamboo plantations increased by 217 Mg C ha-1, 20 years after being converted from paddy fields. The PhytOC accumulated at 79 kg C ha-1 yr-1, a rate far exceeding the global mean long-term soil C accumulation rate of 24 kg C ha-1 yr-1 reported in the literature. Approximately 86% of the increased PhytOC came from the large amount of mulch applied. Our data clearly demonstrate the decadal scale management effect on PhytOC accumulation, suggesting that heavy mulching is a potential method for increasing long-term organic C storage in soils for mitigating global climate change.

  1. Surface evolution in bare bamboo-type metal lines under diffusion and electric field effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averbuch, Amir; Israeli, Moshe; Nathan, Menachem; Ravve, Igor

    2003-07-01

    Irregularities such as voids and cracks often occur in bamboo-type metal lines of microelectronic interconnects. They increase the resistance of the circuits, and may even lead to a fatal failure. In this work, we analyze numerically the electromigration of an unpassivated bamboo-type line with pre-existing irregularities in its top surface (also called a grain-void interface). The bamboo line is subjected to surface diffusion forces and external electric fields. Under these forces, initial defects may either heal or become worse. The grain-void interface is considered to be one-dimensional, and the physical formulation of an electromigration and diffusion model results in two coupled, fourth order, one-dimensional time-dependent PDEs, with the boundary conditions imposed at the electrode points and at the triple point, which belongs to two neighboring grains and the void. These equations are discretized by finite differences on a regular grid in space, and by a Runge-Kutta integration scheme in time, and solved simultaneously with a static Laplace equation describing the voltage distribution throughout each grain, when the substrate conductivity is neglected. Since the voltage distribution is required only along an interface line, the two-dimensional discretization of the grain interior is not needed, and the static problem is solved by the boundary element method at each time step. The motion of the interface line is studied for different ratios between diffusion and electric field forces, and for different initial configurations of the grain-void interface. We study plain and tilted contour lines, considering positive and negative tilts with respect to the external electric field, a stepped contour with field lines entering or exiting the 'step', and a number of modifications of the classical Mullins problem of thermal grooving. We also consider a two-grain Mullins problem with a normal and tilted boundary between the grains, examining positive and negative

  2. Structural characterization of polysaccharides from bamboo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamil, Ruzaimah Nik Mohamad; Yusuf, Nur'aini Raman; Yunus, Normawati M.; Yusup, Suzana

    2014-10-01

    The alkaline and water soluble polysaccharides were isolate by sequential extractions with distilled water, 60% ethanol containing 1%, 5% and 8% NaOH. The samples were prepared at 60 °C for 3 h from local bamboo. The functional group of the sample were examined using FTIR analysis. The most precipitate obtained is from using 60% ethanol containing 8% NaOH with yield of 2.6%. The former 3 residues isolated by sequential extractions with distilled water, 60% ethanol containing 1% and 5% NaOH are barely visible after filtering with cellulose filter paper. The FTIR result showed that the water-soluble polysaccharides consisted mainly of OH group, CH group, CO indicates the carbohydrate and sugar chain. The sample weight loss was slightly decreased with increasing of temperature.

  3. Microwave-assisted organic acid extraction of lignin from bamboo: structure and antioxidant activity investigation.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming-Fei; Sun, Shao-Ni; Xu, Feng; Sun, Run-Cang

    2012-10-01

    Microwave-assisted extraction in organic acid aqueous solution (formic acid/acetic acid/water, 3/5/2, v/v/v) was applied to isolate lignin from bamboo. Additionally, the structural features of the extracted lignins were thoroughly investigated in terms of C₉ formula, molecular weight distribution, FT-IR, (1)H NMR and HSQC spectroscopy. It was found that with an increase in the severity of microwave-assisted extraction, there was an increase of phenolic hydroxyl content in the lignin. In addition, an increase of the severity resulted in a decrease of the bound carbohydrate content as well as molecular weight of the lignin. Antioxidant activity investigation indicated that the radical scavenging index of the extracted lignins (0.35-1.15) was higher than that of BHT (0.29) but lower than that of BHA (3.85). The results suggested that microwave-assisted organic acid extraction provides a promising way to prepare lignin from bamboo with good antioxidant activity for potential application in the food industry. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Antimicrobial and enzymatic antibrowning film used as coating for bamboo shoot quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Badwaik, Laxmikant S; Borah, Pallab Kumar; Deka, Sankar C

    2014-03-15

    Edible films were prepared with varying proportion of alginate and starch in the ratio of 2:0(F1), 2:1(F2), 1:1(F3), 1:1.5(F4), 1:2(F5), 0:2(F6) with added carboxymethyl cellulose (15%, w/w of starch). The film F5 had superior barrier, mechanical and thermal properties over the other films. Water vapor permeability, moisture absorption, water solubility, breakage strength and elongation capacity of F5 film were reported as 1.21 × 10(-9)g/Pa h m, 9.37%, 40%, 977.3g and 14.62 mm respectively. However, surface characteristics showed the smooth and uniform film and thermal decomposition took place above 200 °C. The film forming solution of selected F5 film, added with antioxidant and antimicrobial extracts was coated on bamboo shoots and stored for 5 days. The film was successful in lowering the browning of bamboo shoots, and also successfully inhibited surface microbial load. Moreover, the moisture loss of coated shoot was less compared to uncoated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of a more efficient process for production of fuel ethanol from bamboo.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhao-Yong; Wang, Ting; Tan, Li; Tang, Yue-Qin; Kida, Kenji

    2015-06-01

    A process for production of fuel ethanol from bamboo treated with concentrated sulfuric acid has been previously proposed. To improve efficiency of the process, we tested saccharification with 70 weight% (wt%) sulfuric acid, acid-sugar separation by ion exclusion, addition of nutrients to the ethanol fermentation, and bioconversion of xylose to xylitol. A high efficiency of both sugar recovery (82.5 %) and acid recovery (97.5 %) was achieved in the saccharification process and in the continuous acid-sugar separation using a modified anion exchange resin, respectively. Reduction of the amount of mineral salts added to the saccharified liquid after acid-sugar separation did not negatively affect performance of the continuous ethanol fermentation. The ethanol yield and productivity were 93.7 % and 6 g/l h, respectively, at 35 °C and pH 4.0. And the ethanol yield and productivity were almost the same even at pH 3.5. Moreover, the xylose remaining in the fermented mash was efficiently converted to xylitol in batch fermentation by Candida tropicalis strain 2.1776. These results demonstrate a more efficient process for the production of fuel ethanol from bamboo.

  6. Remembering or Misremembering? Historicity and the Case of "So Far from the Bamboo Grove"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sung-Ae

    2008-01-01

    A recent controversy in the USA centres on classroom use of Yoko Kawashima Watkins's semi-autobiographical "So Far from the Bamboo Grove" (1986), a novel focused on the flight of Japanese settler families to Japan after the liberation of Korea at the end of World War II. Taught in a literary and historical vacuum under the thematic…

  7. Molecular phylogeny of 21 tropical bamboo species reconstructed by integrating non-coding internal transcribed spacer (ITS1 and 2) sequences and their consensus secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Jayadri Sekhar; Bhattacharya, Samik; Pal, Amita

    2017-06-01

    The unavailability of the reproductive structure and unpredictability of vegetative characters for the identification and phylogenetic study of bamboo prompted the application of molecular techniques for greater resolution and consensus. We first employed internal transcribed spacer (ITS1, 5.8S rRNA and ITS2) sequences to construct the phylogenetic tree of 21 tropical bamboo species. While the sequence alone could grossly reconstruct the traditional phylogeny amongst the 21-tropical species studied, some anomalies were encountered that prompted a further refinement of the phylogenetic analyses. Therefore, we integrated the secondary structure of the ITS sequences to derive individual sequence-structure matrix to gain more resolution on the phylogenetic reconstruction. The results showed that ITS sequence-structure is the reliable alternative to the conventional phenotypic method for the identification of bamboo species. The best-fit topology obtained by the sequence-structure based phylogeny over the sole sequence based one underscores closer clustering of all the studied Bambusa species (Sub-tribe Bambusinae), while Melocanna baccifera, which belongs to Sub-Tribe Melocanneae, disjointedly clustered as an out-group within the consensus phylogenetic tree. In this study, we demonstrated the dependability of the combined (ITS sequence+structure-based) approach over the only sequence-based analysis for phylogenetic relationship assessment of bamboo.

  8. Bifunctional bamboo-like CoSe2 arrays for high-performance asymmetric supercapacitor and electrocatalytic oxygen evolution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tian; Li, Songzhan; Gui, Pengbin; Wen, Jian; Fu, Xuemei; Fang, Guojia

    2018-05-18

    Bifunctional bamboo-like CoSe 2 arrays are synthesized by thermal annealing of Co(CO 3 ) 0.5 OH grown on carbon cloth in Se atmosphere. The CoSe 2 arrays obtained have excellent electrical conductivity, larger electrochemical active surface areas, and can directly serve as a binder-free electrode for supercapacitors and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). When tested as a supercapacitor electrode, the CoSe 2 delivers a higher specific capacitance (544.6 F g -1 at current density of 1 mA cm -2 ) compared with CoO (308.2 F g -1 ) or Co 3 O 4 (201.4 F g -1 ). In addition, the CoSe 2 electrode possesses excellent cycling stability. An asymmetric supercapacitor (ASC) is also assembled based on bamboo-like CoSe 2 as a positive electrode and active carbon as a negative electrode in a 3.0 M KOH aqueous electrolyte. Owing to the unique stucture and good electrochemical performance of bamboo-like CoSe 2 , the as-assembled ACS can achieve a maximum operating voltage window of 1.7 V, a high energy density of 20.2 Wh kg -1 at a power density of 144.1 W kg -1 , and an outstanding cyclic stability. As the catalyst for the OER, the CoSe 2 exhibits a lower potential of 1.55 V (versus RHE) at current density of 10 mA cm -2 , a smaller Tafel slope of 62.5 mV dec -1 and an also outstanding stability.

  9. Bifunctional bamboo-like CoSe2 arrays for high-performance asymmetric supercapacitor and electrocatalytic oxygen evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tian; Li, Songzhan; Gui, Pengbin; Wen, Jian; Fu, Xuemei; Fang, Guojia

    2018-05-01

    Bifunctional bamboo-like CoSe2 arrays are synthesized by thermal annealing of Co(CO3)0.5OH grown on carbon cloth in Se atmosphere. The CoSe2 arrays obtained have excellent electrical conductivity, larger electrochemical active surface areas, and can directly serve as a binder-free electrode for supercapacitors and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). When tested as a supercapacitor electrode, the CoSe2 delivers a higher specific capacitance (544.6 F g‑1 at current density of 1 mA cm‑2) compared with CoO (308.2 F g‑1) or Co3O4 (201.4 F g‑1). In addition, the CoSe2 electrode possesses excellent cycling stability. An asymmetric supercapacitor (ASC) is also assembled based on bamboo-like CoSe2 as a positive electrode and active carbon as a negative electrode in a 3.0 M KOH aqueous electrolyte. Owing to the unique stucture and good electrochemical performance of bamboo-like CoSe2, the as-assembled ACS can achieve a maximum operating voltage window of 1.7 V, a high energy density of 20.2 Wh kg‑1 at a power density of 144.1 W kg‑1, and an outstanding cyclic stability. As the catalyst for the OER, the CoSe2 exhibits a lower potential of 1.55 V (versus RHE) at current density of 10 mA cm‑2, a smaller Tafel slope of 62.5 mV dec‑1 and an also outstanding stability.

  10. Reinforcing and Toughening Effects of Bamboo Pulp Fiber on Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) Fiber Composites.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV)/bamboo pulp fiber composites were melt-compounded and injection-molded. Tensile, impact and dynamic mechanical properties of the composites were studied. In contrast to many other short natural fiber reinforced biocomposites which demonstrate decre...

  11. Biochar amendment decreases soil microbial biomass and increases bacterial diversity in Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) plantations under simulated nitrogen deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Quan; Lei, Zhaofeng; Song, Xinzhang; Zhang, Zhiting; Ying, Yeqing; Peng, Changhui

    2018-04-01

    Biochar amendment has been proposed as a strategy to improve acidic soils after overuse of nitrogen fertilizers. However, little is known of the role of biochar in soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and bacterial community structure and diversity after soil acidification induced by nitrogen (N) deposition. Using high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, we determined the effects of biochar amendment (BC0, 0 t bamboo biochar ha‑1 BC20, 20 t bamboo biochar ha‑1 and BC40, 40 t bamboo biochar ha‑1) on the soil bacterial community structure and diversity in Moso bamboo plantations that had received simulated N deposition (N30, 30 kg N ha‑1 yr‑1 N60, 60 kg N ha‑1 yr‑1 N90, 90 kg N ha‑1 yr‑1 and N-free) for 21 months. After treatment of N-free plots, BC20 significantly increased soil MBC and bacterial diversity, while BC40 significantly decreased soil MBC but increased bacterial diversity. When used to amend N30 and N60 plots, biochar significantly decreased soil MBC and the reducing effect increased with biochar amendment amount. However, these significant effects were not observed in N90 plots. Under N deposition, biochar amendment largely increased soil bacterial diversity, and these effects depended on the rates of N deposition and biochar amendment. Soil bacterial diversity was significantly related to the soil C/N ratio, pH, and soil organic carbon content. These findings suggest an optimal approach for using biochar to offset the effects of N deposition in plantation soils and provide a new perspective for understanding the potential role of biochar amendments in plantation soil.

  12. The enhancement of the hydrolysis of bamboo biomass in ionic liquid with chitosan-based solid acid catalysts immobilized with metal ions.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jie; Wang, Nan; Zhao, Dezhou; Qin, Dandan; Si, Wenqing; Tan, Yunfei; Wei, Shun'an; Wang, Dan

    2016-11-01

    Three kinds of sulfonated cross-linked chitosan (SCCR) immobilized with metal ions of Cu(2+), Fe(3+) and Zn(2+) individually were synthesized and firstly used as solid acid catalysts in the hydrolysis of bamboo biomass. FTIR spectra showed that metal ions had been introduced into SCCR and the N-metal ions coordinate bound was formed. The particle sizes of these catalysts were about 500-1000μm with a pore size of 50-160μm. All of the three kinds of catalysts performed well for bamboo hydrolysis with 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium chloride used as solvent. The most effective one was sulfonated cross-linked chitosan immobilized with Fe(3+) (Fe(3+)-SCCR). TRS yields were up to 73.42% for hydrolysis of bamboo powder in [C4mim]Cl with Fe(3+)-SCCR at 120°C and 20RPM after 24h. These novel chitosan-based metal ions immobilized solid acid catalysts with ionic liquids as the solvent might be promising to facilitate cost-efficient conversion of biomass into biofuels and bioproducts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterization of compressive and short beam shear strength of bamboo opened cell foam core sandwich composites

    SciTech Connect

    Setyawan, Paryanto Dwi, E-mail: paryanto-ds@yahoo.com; Sugiman,; Saputra, Yudhi

    The paper presents the compressive and the short beam shear strength of a sandwich composite with opened cell foam made of bamboo fiber as the core and plywood as the skins. The core thickness was varied from 10 mm to 40 mm keeping the volume fraction of fiber constant. Several test s were carried out including the core density, flatwise compressive and the short beam shear testing in three point bending. The results show that the density of bamboo opened cell foam is comparable with commercial plastic foam, such as polyurethane foam. The compressive strength tends to increase linearly with increasing themore » core thickness. The short beam shear failure load of the sandwich composite increases with the increase of core thickness, however on the contrary, the short beam shear strength which tends to sharply decrease from the thickness of 10 mm to 30 mm and then becomes flat.« less

  14. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of SBP-like transcription factor genes in Moso Bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis).

    PubMed

    Pan, Feng; Wang, Yue; Liu, Huanglong; Wu, Min; Chu, Wenyuan; Chen, Danmei; Xiang, Yan

    2017-06-27

    The SQUAMOSA promoter binding protein-like (SPL) proteins are plant-specific transcription factors (TFs) that function in a variety of developmental processes including growth, flower development, and signal transduction. SPL proteins are encoded by a gene family, and these genes have been characterized in two model grass species, Zea mays and Oryza sativa. The SPL gene family has not been well studied in moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis), a woody grass species. We identified 32 putative PeSPL genes in the P. edulis genome. Phylogenetic analysis arranged the PeSPL protein sequences in eight groups. Similarly, phylogenetic analysis of the SBP-like and SBP proteins from rice and maize clustered them into eight groups analogous to those from P. edulis. Furthermore, the deduced PeSPL proteins in each group contained very similar conserved sequence motifs. Our analyses indicate that the PeSPL genes experienced a large-scale duplication event ~15 million years ago (MYA), and that divergence between the PeSPL and OsSPL genes occurred 34 MYA. The stress-response expression profiles and tissue-specificity of the putative PeSPL gene promoter regions showed that SPL genes in moso bamboo have potential biological functions in stress resistance as well as in growth and development. We therefore examined PeSPL gene expression in response to different plant hormone and drought (polyethylene glycol-6000; PEG) treatments to mimic biotic and abiotic stresses. Expression of three (PeSPL10, -12, -17), six (PeSPL1, -10, -12, -17, -20, -31), and nine (PeSPL5, -8, -9, -14, -15, -19, -20, -31, -32) genes remained relatively stable after treating with salicylic acid (SA), gibberellic acid (GA), and PEG, respectively, while the expression patterns of other genes changed. In addition, analysis of tissue-specific expression of the moso bamboo SPL genes during development showed differences in their spatiotemporal expression patterns, and many were expressed at high levels in flowers and

  15. Identification of Phase Relationships and Incorporation Mechanisms of Barium in Calcite Internodes of Deep-Sea Bamboo Corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptacek, J. L.; Geyman, B.; Horner, T. J.; Auro, M. E. E.; Hill, T. M.; LaVigne, M.

    2016-12-01

    Insufficient instrumental and geochemical records have led to a gap in knowledge of how intermediate/deep water masses respond to decadal shifts in surface atmospheric-ocean climate that drive changes in ocean ventilation, nutrient cycling, and export productivity. Due to their longevity, depth range (500-2000m), and radial growth bands, bamboo corals have been proposed as high-resolution intermediate/deep ocean archives of elements with nutrient-like distributions, such as barium. Previous work showed bamboo corals incorporate barium into their calcitic internodes with a near-constant proportionality to dissolved (Ba)sw, indicating that (Ba/Ca)coral may be a useful tracer of refractory nutrient distributions in the past. However, some intermediate- and deep-sea bamboo corals exhibit highly variable Ba/Ca, which may result from incorporation of extraneous Ba-bearing phases into coral skeletons (e.g. barite, organic matter, lithogenic particles) rather than true changes in ambient (Ba)SW. To this end, we developed and applied a sequential cleaning experiment to identify the host phases of Ba in coral samples recovered from the North Pacific California Margin oxygen minimum zone (800-2000m). Milled coral samples were homogenized and subjected to multiple cleaning protocols to isolate and remove detrital/fine grain particles (with H2O and HNO3), organic matter (with H2O2), and barite (with an alkaline DTPA solution), before Ba/Ca analysis via ICP-MS. We found that the cleaning process did not systematically alter the Ba/Ca of the samples, and analysis of powders via SEM BSE-EDS revealed no identifiable barite. Our preliminary results indicate that there is minimal incorporation of non-lattice bound barium phases by these corals, and further verifies the suggestion that the main driver of (Ba/Ca)coral is the incorporation of Ba2+ in proportion to (Ba)sw. The results of our study help to evaluate how the Ba/Ca proxy in deep-sea bamboo corals should be interpreted in

  16. Long-term intensive management increased carbon occluded in phytolith (PhytOC) in bamboo forest soils

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhang-ting; Li, Yong-fu; Jiang, Pei-kun; Chang, Scott X.; Song, Zhao-liang; Liu, Juan; Zhou, Guo-mo

    2014-01-01

    Carbon (C) occluded in phytolith (PhytOC) is highly stable at millennium scale and its accumulation in soils can help increase long-term C sequestration. Here, we report that soil PhytOC storage significantly increased with increasing duration under intensive management (mulching and fertilization) in Lei bamboo (Phyllostachys praecox) plantations. The PhytOC storage in 0–40 cm soil layer in bamboo plantations increased by 217 Mg C ha−1, 20 years after being converted from paddy fields. The PhytOC accumulated at 79 kg C ha−1 yr−1, a rate far exceeding the global mean long-term soil C accumulation rate of 24 kg C ha−1 yr−1 reported in the literature. Approximately 86% of the increased PhytOC came from the large amount of mulch applied. Our data clearly demonstrate the decadal scale management effect on PhytOC accumulation, suggesting that heavy mulching is a potential method for increasing long-term organic C storage in soils for mitigating global climate change. PMID:24398703

  17. Effect of chitosan coating and bamboo FSC (fruit storage chamber) to expand banana shelf life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratiwi, Aksarani'Sa; Dwivany, Fenny M.; Larasati, Dwinita; Islamia, Hana Cahya; Martien, Ronny

    2015-09-01

    Chitosan has been widely used as fruit preserver and proven to extend the shelf life of many fruits, such as banana. However, banana producers and many industries in Indonesia still facing storage problems which may lead to mechanical damage of the fruits and ripening acceleration. Therefore, we have designed food storage chamber (FSC) based on bamboo material. Bamboo was selected because of material abundance in Indonesia, economically effective, and not causing an autocatalytic reaction to the ethylene gas produced by the banana. In this research, Cavendish banana that has reached the maturity level of mature green were coated with 1% chitosan and placed inside the FSC. As control treatments, uncoated banana was also placed inside the FSC as well as uncoated banana that were placed at open space. All of the treatments were placed at 25°C temperature and observed for 9 days. Water produced by respiration was reduced by the addition of charcoal inside a fabric pouch. The result showed that treatment using FSC and chitosan can delay ripening process.

  18. Mechanical properties evaluation of single and hybrid composites polyester reinforced bamboo, PALF and coir fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rihayat, T.; Suryani, S.; Fauzi, T.; Agusnar, H.; Wirjosentono, B.; Syafruddin; Helmi; Zulkifli; Alam, P. N.; Sami, M.

    2018-03-01

    This study aims to determine the composition fiber natural of bamboo, pineapple leaf and coir in single and hybrid composite to see the best characteristics of tensile strength and flexural test by using a Universal Testing Machine (UTM) and observe the effect on the microstructure of the composite through optical and scanning electron microscopy. Bamboo, Palf and coir have synthesis from natural fiber was used as reinforcement in polyester composite using hand lay up or a hot-compression moulding while filler:matrix was used (45%:55wt.%, 70%:30wt.% and 15%:85wt.%). From the variation of the volume fraction between filler and matrix show that mechanical properties of composites increased with increasing amount of filler in the matrix. This is evidenced by the high mechanical properties A:B:C/Ps in compositions 45%: 55wt.% 136 Mpa while flexural strength 93 N and good structure surface morphology. This research has produced a hybrid composite materials that have high mechanical properties and bending compared with conventional synthetic fibers and other materials.

  19. Development of immobilized cellulase through functionalized gold nano-particles for glucose production by continuous hydrolysis of waste bamboo chopsticks.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheanyeh; Chang, Kuo-Chung

    2013-12-10

    Cellulase immobilized on silica through the assistance of l-cysteine functionalized gold nano-particle was applied for the continuous hydrolysis of waste bamboo chopsticks powder to produce glucose. The optimal conditions for the continuous hydrolysis were pH 8.0, 50°C. A 4-day reaction with an initial 0.3 gL⁻¹ waste bamboo chopsticks powder, a feed containing 0.2 gL⁻¹ waste bamboo chopsticks powder at a continuous feed and draw rate of 0.5 mLmin⁻¹, and an enzyme loading of 40 mgcellulase(gsilica)⁻¹, has 72.0-76.6% conversion rates of repeated hydrolyses that correspond to a total production of 630.5-671.2mg glucose and are much better than batch hydrolyses. At higher enzyme loading (117 mgcellulase(gsilica)⁻¹), higher initial concentration (0.5 gL⁻¹), and higher feed concentration (0.42 gL⁻¹) the conversion rate increases to 82.9% and a total amount of 1418 mgglucose. The immobilized cellulase can be recovered easily by filtration and used repeatedly at least 6 times over a period more than 90 days with a recovered activity approximately the same as or better than previous reactions. Thus the process is promising for scaling up. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Production and optimization of bamboo hydrochars for adsorption of Congo red and 2-naphthol.

    PubMed

    Li, Yin; Meas, Arun; Shan, Shengdao; Yang, Ruiqin; Gai, Xikun

    2016-05-01

    Twelve hydrochars were produced from bamboo sawdust for adsorption of Congo red and 2-naphthol. The bamboo hydrochars have Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas ranging from 2.63m(2)/g to 43.07m(2)/g, average pore diameters from 3.05nm to 3.83nm, pore volumes between 0.02cm(3)/g and 0.53cm(3)/g, and the surfaces of the hydrochars have diverse functional groups. The physico-chemical properties of the hydrochars critically depend on the hydrothermal conditions. All the hydrochars can adsorb Congo red and 2-naphthol from aqueous solutions, the largest adsorption capacity for Congo red is 33.7mg/g at the equilibrium concentration of 0.1mg/mL at 25°C, and the highest adsorption amount for 2-naphthol is 12.2mg/g at 25°C and 0.1mg/mL. Freundlich model can describe the adsorption isotherms of the both adsorbates slightly better than Langmuir model. These results provide a reference to the production and use of hydrochars as potential adsorbents in wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A Bamboo-Inspired Nanostructure Design for Flexible, Foldable, and Twistable Energy Storage Devices.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yongming; Sills, Ryan B; Hu, Xianluo; Seh, Zhi Wei; Xiao, Xu; Xu, Henghui; Luo, Wei; Jin, Huanyu; Xin, Ying; Li, Tianqi; Zhang, Zhaoliang; Zhou, Jun; Cai, Wei; Huang, Yunhui; Cui, Yi

    2015-06-10

    Flexible energy storage devices are critical components for emerging flexible electronics. Electrode design is key in the development of all-solid-state supercapacitors with superior electrochemical performances and mechanical durability. Herein, we propose a bamboo-like graphitic carbon nanofiber with a well-balanced macro-, meso-, and microporosity, enabling excellent mechanical flexibility, foldability, and electrochemical performances. Our design is inspired by the structure of bamboos, where a periodic distribution of interior holes along the length and graded pore structure at the cross section not only enhance their stability under different mechanical deformation conditions but also provide a high surface area accessible to the electrolyte and low ion-transport resistance. The prepared nanofiber network electrode recovers its initial state easily after 3-folded manipulation. The mechanically robust membrane is explored as a free-standing electrode for a flexible all-solid-state supercapacitor. Without the need for extra support, the volumetric energy and power densities based on the whole device are greatly improved compared to the state-of-the-art devices. Even under continuous dynamic operations of forceful bending (90°) and twisting (180°), the as-designed device still exhibits stable electrochemical performances with 100% capacitance retention. Such a unique supercapacitor holds great promise for high-performance flexible electronics.

  2. Nutritional properties of the largest bamboo fruit Melocanna baccifera and its ecological significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindan, Balaji; Johnson, Anil John; Nair, Sadasivan Nair Ajikumaran; Gopakumar, Bhaskaran; Mallampalli, Karuna Sri Lakshmi; Venkataraman, Ramaswamy; Koshy, Konnath Chacko; Baby, Sabulal

    2016-05-01

    Melocanna baccifera is a unique bamboo which produces the largest fruits in the grass family. Its gregarious flowering once in 45-50 years in north east India and adjacent regions is a botanical enigma, resulting in a glut of fruits. Proper utilization of M. baccifera fruits is not extant, and huge quantities of fruits are left underexploited due to lack of scientific information on their chemical composition and nutritional potential. Here we report the nutritional properties of M. baccifera fruits, and the ecological significance of its fruiting. This pear-shaped, fleshy bamboo fruit is rich in amino acids (lysine, glutamic acid), sugars (sucrose, glucose, fructose) and phenolics (ferulic acid). Protein content (free, bound) in M. baccifera fruits is very low. Fruits are rich in saturated fatty acids (palmitic acid), minerals (potassium), and only B series vitamins (B3) are detected in them. Rat feeding experiments showed that M. baccifera fruit alone is not a complete food, but with other protein supplements, it is a valuable food additive. This study could lead to better utilization of M. baccifera fruits during future flowering/fruiting events. These results could also help in the successful management of rodent outbreaks and other ecological problems associated with M. baccifera fruiting.

  3. Nutritional properties of the largest bamboo fruit Melocanna baccifera and its ecological significance

    PubMed Central

    Govindan, Balaji; Johnson, Anil John; Nair, Sadasivan Nair Ajikumaran; Gopakumar, Bhaskaran; Mallampalli, Karuna Sri Lakshmi; Venkataraman, Ramaswamy; Koshy, Konnath Chacko; Baby, Sabulal

    2016-01-01

    Melocanna baccifera is a unique bamboo which produces the largest fruits in the grass family. Its gregarious flowering once in 45–50 years in north east India and adjacent regions is a botanical enigma, resulting in a glut of fruits. Proper utilization of M. baccifera fruits is not extant, and huge quantities of fruits are left underexploited due to lack of scientific information on their chemical composition and nutritional potential. Here we report the nutritional properties of M. baccifera fruits, and the ecological significance of its fruiting. This pear-shaped, fleshy bamboo fruit is rich in amino acids (lysine, glutamic acid), sugars (sucrose, glucose, fructose) and phenolics (ferulic acid). Protein content (free, bound) in M. baccifera fruits is very low. Fruits are rich in saturated fatty acids (palmitic acid), minerals (potassium), and only B series vitamins (B3) are detected in them. Rat feeding experiments showed that M. baccifera fruit alone is not a complete food, but with other protein supplements, it is a valuable food additive. This study could lead to better utilization of M. baccifera fruits during future flowering/fruiting events. These results could also help in the successful management of rodent outbreaks and other ecological problems associated with M. baccifera fruiting. PMID:27194218

  4. A bamboo-inspired nanostructure design for flexible foldable and twistable energy storage devices

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Yongming; Sills, Ryan B; Hu, Xianluo; ...

    2015-05-26

    Flexible energy storage devices are critical components for emerging flexible electronics. Electrode design is key in the development of all-solid-state supercapacitors with superior electrochemical performances and mechanical durability. We propose a bamboo-like graphitic carbon nanofiber with a well-balanced macro-, meso-, and microporosity, enabling excellent mechanical flexibility, foldability, and electrochemical performances. Our design is inspired by the structure of bamboos, where a periodic distribution of interior holes along the length and graded pore structure at the cross section not only enhance their stability under different mechanical deformation conditions but also provide a high surface area accessible to the electrolyte and lowmore » ion-transport resistance. The prepared nanofiber network electrode recovers its initial state easily after 3-folded manipulation. The mechanically robust membrane is explored as a free-standing electrode for a flexible all-solid-state supercapacitor. Without the need for extra support, the volumetric energy and power densities based on the whole device are greatly improved compared to the state-of-the-art devices. Furthermore, even under continuous dynamic operations of forceful bending (90°) and twisting (180°), the as-designed device still exhibits stable electrochemical performances with 100% capacitance retention. As a result, such a unique supercapacitor holds great promise for high-performance flexible electronics.« less

  5. Effects of climate and forest structure on palms, bromeliads and bamboos in Atlantic Forest fragments of Northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Hilário, R R; Toledo, J J

    2016-01-01

    Palms, bromeliads and bamboos are key elements of tropical forests and understanding the effects of climate, anthropogenic pressure and forest structure on these groups is crucial to forecast structural changes in tropical forests. Therefore, we investigated the effects of these factors on the abundance of these groups in 22 Atlantic forest fragments of Northeastern Brazil. Abundance of bromeliads and bamboos were assessed through indexes. Palms were counted within a radius of 20 m. We also obtained measures of vegetation structure, fragment size, annual precipitation, precipitation seasonality and human population density. We tested the effects of these predictors on plant groups using path analysis. Palm abundance was higher in taller forests with larger trees, closed canopy and sparse understory, which may be a result of the presence of seed dispersers and specific attributes of local palm species. Bromeliads were negatively affected by both annual precipitation and precipitation seasonality, what may reflect adaptations of these plants to use water efficiently, but also the need to capture water in a regular basis. Bamboos were not related to any predictor variable. As climate and forest structure affected the abundance of bromeliads and palms, human-induced climatic changes and disturbances in forest structure may modify the abundance of these groups. In addition, soil properties and direct measurements of human disturbance should be used in future studies in order to improve the predictability of models about plant groups in Northeastern Atlantic Forest.

  6. Effects of Music Instruction with Bamboo Xylophone Accompaniment on Singing Achievement among Second-Grade Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simeon, Jinky Jane C.; Ku, Agnes Chun Moi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine the effect of music instruction with bamboo xylophone as harmonic accompaniment on the singing achievement of second-grade children. Eighty children (N = 80) from four randomly selected classes in two different public schools in the city of Kota Kinabalu participated in this study and they were assigned to…

  7. Effects of green tea or Sasa quelpaertensis bamboo leaves on plasma and liver lipids, erythrocyte Na efflux, and platelet aggregation in ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    Ryou, Sung Hee; Kang, Min Sook; Kim, Kyu Il; Kang, Young Hee

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of Sasa quelpaertensis bamboo and green tea on plasma and liver lipids, platelet aggregation, and erythrocyte membrane Na channels in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Thirty female rats were OVX, and ten female rats were sham-operated at the age of 6 weeks. The rats were divided into four groups at the age of 10 weeks and fed the experiment diets: sham-control, OVX-control, OVX-bamboo leaves (10%), or OVX-green tea leaves (10%) for four weeks. Final body weight increased significantly in the OVX groups compared with that in the sham-control, whereas body weight in the OVX-green tea group decreased significantly compared with that in the OVX-control (P < 0.01). High density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol level decreased in all OVX groups compared with that in the sham-control rats (P < 0.05) but without a difference in plasma total cholesterol. Plasma triglycerides in the OVX-green tea group were significantly lower than those in the sham-control or OVX-control group (P < 0.05). Liver triglycerides increased significantly in the OVX-control compared with those in the sham-control (P < 0.01) but decreased significantly in the OVX-green tea group compared with those in the OVX-control or OVX-bamboo group (P < 0.01). Platelet aggregation in both maximum and initial slope tended to be lower in all OVX rats compared with that in the sham-control rats but was not significantly different. Na-K ATPase tended to increase and Na-K cotransport tended to decrease following ovariectomy. Na-K ATPase decreased significantly in the OVX-green tea group compared with that in the OVX-control group (P < 0.01), and Na-K cotransport increased significantly in the OVX-bamboo and OVX-green tea groups compared with that in the OVX-control (P < 0.05). Femoral bone mineral density tended to be lower in OVX rats than that in the sham-control, whereas the green tea and bamboo leaves groups recovered bone density to some extent. The results show that

  8. Isolation and characterization of cellulose nanofibers from bamboo using microwave liquefaction combined with chemical treatment and ultrasonication.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jiulong; Hse, Chung-Yun; De Hoop, Cornelis F; Hu, Tingxing; Qi, Jinqiu; Shupe, Todd F

    2016-10-20

    Cellulose nanofibers were successfully isolated from bamboo using microwave liquefaction combined with chemical treatment and ultrasonic nanofibrillation processes. The microwave liquefaction could eliminate almost all the lignin in bamboo, resulting in high cellulose content residues within 7min, and the cellulose enriched residues could be readily purified by subsequent chemical treatments with lower chemical charging and quickly. The results of wet chemistry analyses, SEM images, and FTIR and X-ray spectra indicated the combination of microwave liquefaction and chemical treatment was significantly efficient in removing non-cellulosic compounds. Ultrasonication was used to separate the nanofibrils from the purified residues to extract nanofibers. The TEM images confirmed the presence of elementary fibrils, nano-sized fibril bundles, and aggregated fibril bundles. As evidenced by the TGA analysis, cellulose nanofibers isolated by this novel technique had high thermal stability indicating that the isolated nanofibers could possibly be applied as reinforcing elements in biomaterials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Mechanical characteristics of box-section beam made of sliced-laminated Asian bamboo (Dendrocalamus asper) in bending failure mode under transversal load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karyadi, Susanto, Prijono Bagus

    2017-09-01

    A box-section beam has a larger moment of inertia than solid beam for the same amount of materials, so, it is expected the box-section beams has larger strength and stiffness compared to the solid beam. In other hand, research about the box-section beams, especially from bamboo lamination material, is limited. For the reason the research was done. The research aimed at finding mechanical characteristic of box-section beams made of sliced-laminated Asian bamboo in bending failure mode under transversal load. The results showed that the strength and stiffness of the box-section beams increase according to the increasing moment of inertia. The strength of the box-section beam increase up to ratio between the section height (h) and section width (b) reach 1.50. Larger than the ratio the strength of the beam will decrease. The average of bending stress at the time of beam collapse reached 106.5MPa and the average of flexural of elastic modulus reached 14.504MPa. The serviceability load reached 8.64% of the maximum load. Based on the results it can be concluded that the box-section beams made of sliced-laminated Asian bamboo more efficient in receiving the transversal load compared to the solid beam for the same amount of materials.

  10. Motion interference analysis and optimal control of an electronic controlled bamboo-dance mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaohong; Xu, Liang; Hu, Xiaobin

    2017-08-01

    An electric bamboo-dance mechanism was designed and developed to realize mechanism of automation and mechanization. For coherent and fluent motion, ANSYS finite element analysis was applied on movement interference. Static structural method was used for analyzing dynamic deflection and deformation of the slender rod, while modal analysis was applied on frequency analysis to avoid second deformation caused by resonance. Therefore, the deformation in vertical and horizontal direction was explored and reasonable optimization was taken to avoid interference.

  11. Temperature and vital effect controls on Bamboo coral (Isididae) isotopegeochemistry: A test of the "lines method"

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, T M; Spero, H J; Guilderson, T P

    Deep-sea bamboo corals hold promise as long-term climatic archives, yet little information exists linking bamboo coral geochemistry to measured environmental parameters. This study focuses on a suite of 10 bamboo corals collected from the Pacific and Atlantic basins (250-2136 m water depth) to investigate coral longevity, growth rates, and isotopic signatures. Calcite samples for stable isotopes and radiocarbon were collected from the base the corals, where the entire history of growth is recorded. In three of the coral specimens, samples were also taken from an upper branch for comparison. Radiocarbon and growth band width analyses indicate that the skeletal calcitemore » precipitates from ambient dissolved inorganic carbon and that the corals live for 150-300 years, with extension rates of 9-128 {micro}m/yr. A linear relationship between coral calcite {delta}{sup 18}O and {delta}{sup 13}C indicates that the isotopic composition is influenced by vital effects ({delta}{sup 18}O:{delta}{sup 13}C slope of 0.17-0.47). As with scleractinian deep-sea corals, the intercept from a linear regression of {delta}{sup 18}O versus {delta}{sup 13}C is a function of temperature, such that a reliable paleotemperature proxy can be obtained, using the 'lines method.' Although the coral calcite {delta}{sup 18}O:{delta}{sup 13}C slope is maintained throughout the coral base ontogeny, the branches and central cores of the bases exhibit {delta}{sup 18}O:{delta}{sup 13}C values that are shifted far from equilibrium. We find that a reliable intercept value can be derived from the {delta}{sup 18}O:{delta}{sup 13}C regression of multiple samples distributed throughout one specimen or from multiple samples within individual growth bands.« less

  12. Production of fuel ethanol from bamboo by concentrated sulfuric acid hydrolysis followed by continuous ethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhao-Yong; Tang, Yue-Qin; Iwanaga, Tomohiro; Sho, Tomohiro; Kida, Kenji

    2011-12-01

    An efficient process for the production of fuel ethanol from bamboo that consisted of hydrolysis with concentrated sulfuric acid, removal of color compounds, separation of acid and sugar, hydrolysis of oligosaccharides and subsequent continuous ethanol fermentation was developed. The highest sugar recovery efficiency was 81.6% when concentrated sulfuric acid hydrolysis was carried out under the optimum conditions. Continuous separation of acid from the saccharified liquid after removal of color compounds with activated carbon was conducted using an improved simulated moving bed (ISMB) system, and 98.4% of sugar and 90.5% of acid were recovered. After oligosaccharide hydrolysis and pH adjustment, the unsterilized saccharified liquid was subjected to continuous ethanol fermentation using Saccharomycescerevisiae strain KF-7. The ethanol concentration, the fermentation yield based on glucose and the ethanol productivity were approximately 27.2 g/l, 92.0% and 8.2 g/l/h, respectively. These results suggest that the process is effective for production of fuel ethanol from bamboo. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Optimizing the use of bamboo biomass for energy and fiber from small-scale plantations in Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darabant, András; Haruthaithanasan, Maliwan; Atkla, Wanida; Phudphong, Tepa; Thanavat, Eakpong; Haruthaithanasan, Kasem

    2014-05-01

    Farmers in Thailand have recently started to establish bamboo plantations on marginal land, aiming at utilizing them for bioenergy and fiber. On two sites in eastern Thailand, first-year yield data of Bambusa beecheyana and Dendrocalamus membranaceus plantations indicated vast differences between sites (1 vs. 18 t*ha-1*a-1), but none between species. In terms of feedstock quality for power plants, High Heating Values (19.2 to 19.5 MJ*t-1) did not, but culm moisture contents did differ between species (51% for B. beecheyana vs. 45% for D. membranaceus), and culm sections (38% wet base at top vs. 55% at bottom). This gradient was stronger in D. membranaceus, which additionally showed significantly higher moisture content in internodes, as compared to nodes (46% vs. 43%). Analysis of fiber yield and quality indicated better suitability of D. membranaceus as opposed to B. beecheyana to be used in the textile industry. Our results provide guidance on increasing value addition to bamboo biomass by optimizing the allotment of different species and biomass compartments to different uses (bioenergy, fibers).

  14. Comparison of dwarf bamboos (Indocalamus sp.) leaf parameters to determine relationship between spatial density of plants and total leaf area per plant.

    PubMed

    Shi, Pei-Jian; Xu, Qiang; Sandhu, Hardev S; Gielis, Johan; Ding, Yu-Long; Li, Hua-Rong; Dong, Xiao-Bo

    2015-10-01

    The relationship between spatial density and size of plants is an important topic in plant ecology. The self-thinning rule suggests a -3/2 power between average biomass and density or a -1/2 power between stand yield and density. However, the self-thinning rule based on total leaf area per plant and density of plants has been neglected presumably because of the lack of a method that can accurately estimate the total leaf area per plant. We aimed to find the relationship between spatial density of plants and total leaf area per plant. We also attempted to provide a novel model for accurately describing the leaf shape of bamboos. We proposed a simplified Gielis equation with only two parameters to describe the leaf shape of bamboos one model parameter represented the overall ratio of leaf width to leaf length. Using this method, we compared some leaf parameters (leaf shape, number of leaves per plant, ratio of total leaf weight to aboveground weight per plant, and total leaf area per plant) of four bamboo species of genus Indocalamus Nakai (I. pedalis (Keng) P.C. Keng, I. pumilus Q.H. Dai and C.F. Keng, I. barbatus McClure, and I. victorialis P.C. Keng). We also explored the possible correlation between spatial density and total leaf area per plant using log-linear regression. We found that the simplified Gielis equation fit the leaf shape of four bamboo species very well. Although all these four species belonged to the same genus, there were still significant differences in leaf shape. Significant differences also existed in leaf area per plant, ratio of leaf weight to aboveground weight per plant, and leaf length. In addition, we found that the total leaf area per plant decreased with increased spatial density. Therefore, we directly demonstrated the self-thinning rule to improve light interception.

  15. Evidence for horizontal transfer of mitochondrial DNA to the plastid genome in a bamboo genus.

    PubMed

    Ma, Peng-Fei; Zhang, Yu-Xiao; Guo, Zhen-Hua; Li, De-Zhu

    2015-06-23

    In flowering plants, three genomes (nuclear, mitochondrial, and plastid) coexist and intracellular horizontal transfer of DNA is prevalent, especially from the plastid to the mitochondrion genome. However, the plastid genomes are generally conserved in evolution and have long been considered immune to foreign DNA. Recently, the opposite direction of DNA transfer from the mitochondrial to the plastid genome has been reported in two eudicot lineages. Here we sequenced 6 plastid genomes of bamboos, three of which are neotropical woody species and three are herbaceous ones. Several unusual features were found, including the duplication of trnT-GGU and loss of one copy of rps19 due to contraction of inverted repeats (IRs). The most intriguing was the ~2.7 kb insertion in the plastid IR regions in the three herbaceous bamboos. Furthermore, the insertion was documented to be horizontally transferred from the mitochondrial to the plastid genome. Our study provided evidence of the mitochondrial-to-plastid DNA transfer in the monocots, demonstrating again that this rare event does occur in other angiosperm lineages. However, the mechanism underlying the transfer remains obscure, and more studies in other plants may elucidate it in the future.

  16. A novel method of extraction of bamboo seed oil (Bambusa bambos Druce) and its promising effect on metabolic symptoms of experimentally induced polycystic ovarian disease

    PubMed Central

    Soumya, V.; Muzib, Y. Indira; Venkatesh, P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the potential effect of bamboo seed oil in decreasing the major metabolic symptoms associated with letrozole-induced polycystic ovarian disease using female rat model. Materials and Methods: A new method of microwave-assisted extraction was developed. Female rats were grouped into four with six animals each. All rats were daily administered with letrozole (1 mg/kg b.wt.) for 21 days except control, and during this period, changes in estrous cycle were observed. After letrozole treatment, Group 2 was considered negative control, Groups 3 and 4 were treated orally with bamboo oil, 0.5 ml/kg b.wt. and 1 ml/kg b.wt., respectively, for 3 weeks (five consecutive estrus cycles). Various parameters such as estrus cycle, blood sugar level, lipid profile, and weights of reproductive system were determined. The characteristics of cystic ovaries were evaluated by histopathological studies. Results: The isolated bamboo oil restored estrus cyclicity showed hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects. 1 ml/kg b.wt. of bamboo oil showed a marked glucose reduction from 254.04 ± 2.08 to 92.6 ± 1.63, and levels of total cholesterol, very low-density lipoprotein, triglyceride were reduced from 186.45 ± 2.28, 30.07 ± 2.36, 100.36 ± 2.35 to 152.14 ± 2.63, 25.94 ± 1.66, 93.32 ± 1.09, respectively. Histopathological results showed the presence of ovulation and recovery from cystic ovaries. Conclusion: A novel and promising drug was isolated in the treatment and maintenance of various metabolic symptoms associated with polycystic ovary disease. PMID:27127318

  17. Effects of steam treatment on bending properties and chemical composition of moso bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens)

    Treesearch

    R. J. Zhao; Z. H. Jiang; C. Hse; T. Shupe

    2010-01-01

    Effects of temperature (25, 160 and 200 °C) and time (15 and 30 min) of steam treatment on the mechanical and chemical characteristics of moso bamboo were studied. The modulus of rupture (MOR) and modulus of elasticity (MOE) of the outer culm were at least 2.4 and 2.2 times respectively greater than those of the inner culm. Temperature and time had no effect on bending...

  18. Metabolic rate of the red panda, Ailurus fulgens, a dietary bamboo specialist

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Yuxiang; Hou, Rong; Paladino, Frank V.; Qi, Dunwu; Zhang, Zhihe

    2017-01-01

    The red panda (Ailurus fulgens) has a similar diet, primarily bamboo, and shares the same habitat as the giant panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca. There are considerable efforts underway to understand the ecology of the red panda and to increase its populations in natural reserves. Yet it is difficult to design an effective strategy for red panda reintroduction if we do not understand its basic biology. Here we report the resting metabolic rate of the red panda and find that it is higher than previously measured on animals from a zoo. The resting metabolic rate was 0.290 ml/g/h (range 0.204–0.342) in summer and 0.361 ml/g/h in winter (range 0.331–0.406), with a statistically significant difference due to season and test temperature. Temperatures in summer were probably within the thermal neutral zone for metabolism but winter temperatures were below the thermal neutral zone. There was no difference in metabolic rate between male and female red pandas and no difference due to mass. Our values for metabolic rate were much higher than those measured by McNab for 2 red pandas from a zoo. The larger sample size (17), more natural conditions at the Panda Base and improved accuracy of the metabolic instruments provided more accurate metabolism measurements. Contrary to our expectations based on their low quality bamboo diet, the metabolic rates of red pandas were similar to mammals of the same size. Based on their metabolic rates red pandas would not be limited by their food supply in natural reserves. PMID:28306740

  19. Metabolic rate of the red panda, Ailurus fulgens, a dietary bamboo specialist.

    PubMed

    Fei, Yuxiang; Hou, Rong; Spotila, James R; Paladino, Frank V; Qi, Dunwu; Zhang, Zhihe

    2017-01-01

    The red panda (Ailurus fulgens) has a similar diet, primarily bamboo, and shares the same habitat as the giant panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca. There are considerable efforts underway to understand the ecology of the red panda and to increase its populations in natural reserves. Yet it is difficult to design an effective strategy for red panda reintroduction if we do not understand its basic biology. Here we report the resting metabolic rate of the red panda and find that it is higher than previously measured on animals from a zoo. The resting metabolic rate was 0.290 ml/g/h (range 0.204-0.342) in summer and 0.361 ml/g/h in winter (range 0.331-0.406), with a statistically significant difference due to season and test temperature. Temperatures in summer were probably within the thermal neutral zone for metabolism but winter temperatures were below the thermal neutral zone. There was no difference in metabolic rate between male and female red pandas and no difference due to mass. Our values for metabolic rate were much higher than those measured by McNab for 2 red pandas from a zoo. The larger sample size (17), more natural conditions at the Panda Base and improved accuracy of the metabolic instruments provided more accurate metabolism measurements. Contrary to our expectations based on their low quality bamboo diet, the metabolic rates of red pandas were similar to mammals of the same size. Based on their metabolic rates red pandas would not be limited by their food supply in natural reserves.

  20. Bending efficiency through property gradients in bamboo, palm, and wood-based composites.

    PubMed

    Wegst, Ulrike G K

    2011-07-01

    Nature, to a greater extent than engineering, takes advantage of hierarchical structures. These allow for optimization at each structural level to achieve mechanical efficiency, meaning mechanical performance per unit mass. Palms and bamboos do this exceptionally well; both are fibre-reinforced cellular materials in which the fibres are aligned parallel to the stem or culm, respectively. The distribution of these fibres is, however, not uniform: there is a density and modulus gradient across the section. This property gradient increases the flexural rigidity of the plants per unit mass, mass being a measure of metabolic investment made into an organism's construction. An analytical model is presented with which a 'gradient shape factor' can be calculated that describes by how much a plant's bending efficiency is increased through gradient structures. Combining the 'gradient shape factor' with a 'microstructural shape factor' that captures the efficiency gained through the cellular nature of the fibre composite's matrix, and a 'macroscopical shape factor' with which the tubular shape of bamboo can be described, for example, it is possible to explore how much each of these three structural levels of the hierarchy contributes to the overall bending performance of the stem or culm. In analogy, the bending efficiency of the commonly used wood-based composite medium-density fibreboard can be analysed; its property gradient is due to its manufacture by hot pressing. A few other engineered materials exist that emulate property gradients; new manufacturing routes to prepare them are currently being explored. It appears worthwhile to pursue these further. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Adsorption characteristics of trace levels of bromate in drinking water by modified bamboo-based activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ho-Wen; Chuang, Yen Hsun; Hsu, Cheng-Feng; Huang, Winn-Jung

    2017-09-19

    This study was undertaken to investigate the adsorption kinetics and isotherms of bromate (BrO 3 - ) on bamboo charcoals that are activated with nitrogen and water vapor. Bamboo-based activated carbon (AC) was dipped in acid and oxidized in a mixture of potassium permanganate and sulfuric acid. Oxidation treatment considerably improved the physicochemical properties of AC, including purity, pore structure and surface nature, significantly enhancing BrO 3 - adsorption capacity. AC with many oxygenated groups and a high mesopore volume exhibited a particularly favorable tendency for BrO 3 - adsorption. Its adsorption of BrO 3 - is best fitted using Langmuir isotherm, and forms a monolayer. A kinetic investigation revealed that the adsorption of BrO 3 - by the ACs involved chemical sorption and was controlled by intra-particle diffusion. The competitive effects of natural organic matter (NOM) on AC were evaluated, and found to reduce the capacity of carbon to adsorb BrO 3 - . Residual dissolved ozone reacted with AC, reducing its capacity to absorb BrO 3 - . Proper dosing and staging of the ozonation processes can balance the ozone treatment efficiency, BrO 3 - formation, and the subsequent removal of BrO 3 - .

  2. Distinctive diet-tissue isotopic discrimination factors derived from the exclusive bamboo-eating giant panda.

    PubMed

    Han, Han; Wei, Wei; Nie, Yonggang; Zhou, Wenliang; Hu, Yibo; Wu, Qi; Wei, Fuwen

    2016-11-01

    Stable isotope analysis is very useful in animal ecology, especially in diet reconstruction and trophic studies. Differences in isotope ratios between consumers and their diet, termed discrimination factors, are essential for studies of stable isotope ecology and are species-specific and tissue-specific. Given the specialized bamboo diet and clear foraging behavior, here, we calculated discrimination factors for carbon and nitrogen isotopes from diet to tissues (tooth enamel, hair keratin and bone collagen) for the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), a species derived from meat-eating ancestors. Our results showed that carbon discrimination factor obtained from giant panda tooth enamel (ε 13 C diet-enamel = 10.0‰) and nitrogen discrimination factors from hair keratin (Δ 15 N diet-hair = 2.2‰) and bone collagen (Δ 15 N diet-collagen = 2.3‰) were lower, and carbon discrimination factors from hair keratin (Δ 13 C diet-hair = 5.0‰) and bone collagen (Δ 13 C diet-collagen = 6.1‰) were higher than those of other mammalian carnivores, omnivores and herbivores. Such distinctive values are likely the result of a low-nutrient and specialized bamboo diet, carnivore-like digestive system and exceptionally low metabolism in giant pandas. © 2016 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  3. Compensation effect during the pyrolysis of tyres and bamboo.

    PubMed

    Mui, Edward L K; Cheung, W H; Lee, Vinci K C; McKay, Gordon

    2010-05-01

    Pyrolysis parameters (e.g. pre-exponential factor A, and activation energy E) of two waste materials, namely, tyre rubber and bamboo scaffolding, based on the Arrhenius equation were obtained from weight loss data via thermogravimetry at different heating rates. The compensation effect, which suggests that the linear variation in the pre-exponential factor and the activation energy, was observed for these materials. This can be attributed to the variety of active sites over the reactant surface in the course of decomposition. The calculated data from several revised, first-order models were compared with similar models in the literature. It has been shown that both literature and our calculated data exhibit high linearity in terms of lnA and E, revealing that the latter agree well with other researchers' work. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Saccharification of bamboo carbohydrates for the production of ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    De Menezes, T.J.B.; Azzini, A.; Dos Santos, C.L.M.

    1983-04-01

    Bamboo carbohydrates were hydrolyzed with commercial amylases and a mixture of fungal culture broths containing cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic enzymes. The effects of cooking temperature and the size of fiber particles were also investigated. It was found that the higher the cooking temperature, the higher the rate of sugar formation and the lower the viscosity of the slurry. Additions of cellulose and hemicellulose digesting enzymes increased the sugar yield and decreased the viscosity of both the cooked and noncooked slurries. A smaller size of particle appeared to favor the average saccharification rate. Although glucose, xylose, and cellobiose were present in themore » hydrolysates, only 50% of the total carbohydrate was digested, and 78.9% of this was converted to reducing sugars. The alcohol efficiency for the fermentation of cooked and noncooked mashes by Saccharomyces was about 85%.« less

  5. Antioxidant and antimicrobial effects of kordoi (Averrhoa carambola) fruit juice and bamboo (Bambusa polymorpha) shoot extract in pork nuggets.

    PubMed

    Thomas, R; Jebin, N; Saha, R; Sarma, D K

    2016-01-01

    Pork nuggets with 'very good' acceptability was processed by incorporating kordoi (Averrhoa carambola) fruit juice and bamboo (Bambusa polymorpha) shoot extract, and their physical, chemical, microbiological and sensorial characteristics were evaluated during 35 days storage under refrigeration. Addition of kordoi fruit juice (4%) and bamboo shoot extract (6%) had a significant effect on the pH, moisture, protein, fat, fiber, instrumental color values and texture profiles of nuggets. Nuggets with juice and extract had significantly lower TBARS values towards the end of the storage period compared to the control. Microbial and sensory qualities of nuggets were significantly improved by the addition of juice and extract. Incorporation of juice and extract at 4% and 6% levels, respectively, increased the storage life of pork nuggets by at least two weeks, i.e. from 21 days to 35 days at 4 ± 1 °C compared to the control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Preparation and characterization of bio-nanocomposite films based on cassava starch or chitosan, reinforced with montmorillonite or bamboo nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Llanos, Jaiber H R; Tadini, Carmen C

    2018-02-01

    In this study, films based on two different polysaccharides (chitosan and cassava starch) were produced by casting technique and nanostructured by montmorillonite (MMTNPs) or bamboo nanofibers (BNFs) at two different concentrations: 0.5g/100g and 1.0g/100g of polymer, using glycerol as plasticizer at concentration of 30g/100g of polymer. The particle size and surface charge of the MMTNPs and BNFs nanoparticles were 315±14nm and 60±3nm and -31.78mV and -20.77mV, respectively. In relation to the mechanical properties, the nanofibers increased the tensile strength in 50% of starch films, while the elongation at break shows a similar increase (66%) for both types of nanoparticles at concentration of 1.0g/100g. Cassava starch films showed a better response to nanostructure process, noticed through by the mechanical properties. XRD analyses showed good interaction between the polymer matrix and bamboo nanofibers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Characterization of microwave liquefied bamboo residue and its potential use in the generation of nanofibrillated cellulosic fiber

    Treesearch

    Jiulong Xie; Chung Hse; Chunjie Li; Todd F. Shupe; Tingxing Hu; Jinqiu Qi; Cornelis F. De Hoop

    2016-01-01

    Bamboo raw feedstocks with large particle size (20−80 mesh) were subjected to a microwave liquefaction system, and the liquefied products were separated into biopolyols and liquefied residues. Biopolyols were first analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC−MS), and the main components were sugar derivatives with 2−4 hydroxyl groups and phenolic compounds...

  8. Cumulative effects of bamboo sawdust addition on pyrolysis of sewage sludge: Biochar properties and environmental risk from metals.

    PubMed

    Jin, Junwei; Wang, Minyan; Cao, Yucheng; Wu, Shengchun; Liang, Peng; Li, Yanan; Zhang, Jianyun; Zhang, Jin; Wong, Ming Hung; Shan, Shengdao; Christie, Peter

    2017-03-01

    A novel type of biochar was produced by mixing bamboo sawdust with sewage sludge (1:1, w/w) via a co-pyrolysis process at 400-600°C. Changes in physico-chemical properties and the intrinsic speciation of metals were investigated before and after pyrolysis. Co-pyrolysis resulted in a lower biochar yield but a higher C content in the end product compared with use of sludge alone as the raw material. FT-IR analysis indicates that phosphine derivatives containing PH bonds were formed in the co-pyrolyzed biochars. In addition, co-pyrolysis of sludge with bamboo sawdust transformed the potentially toxic metals in the sludge into more stable fractions, leading to a considerable decrease in their direct toxicity and bioavailability in the co-pyrolyzed biochar. In conclusion, the co-pyrolysis technology provides a feasible method for the safe disposal of metal-contaminated sewage sludge in an attempt to minimize the environmental risk from potentially toxic metals after land application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. In vitro seed germination of economically important edible bamboo Dendrocalamus membranaceus Munro.

    PubMed

    Brar, Jasmine; Anand, Manju; Sood, Anil

    2013-01-01

    An in vitro propagation protocol using mature seeds of D. membranaceus was successfully established. Scarcity of seeds in bamboos because of their long flowering periods and irregular seed set resulting in low viability and germination potential, motivated us to undertake the present study. The effects of sterilants, light conditions, exogenous application of plant growth regulators and temperature in overcoming germination barriers in ageing seeds of bamboo were studied. It was found that HgCl2 (0.1%) along with bleach (15%) was more effective in raising aseptic cultures. Dark conditions, high temperatures around 30 degrees C and soaking of seeds in GA3 solution (50 ppm) overnight stimulated high percent of seed germination with corresponding increase in shoot length (2.7 +/- 0.7 mm) and number of sprouts (2.1 +/- 0.7) per explants during culture initiation. 6-benzylaminopurine acted synergistically with kinetin to give optimum germination rate of 70 +/- 13.9% as compared to 63.13% when used individually. For prolonged maintenance of cultures, 2% sucrose was found to be suitable for promoting photomixotrophic micropropagation. Following this procedure, about 65% survival of plantlets could be achieved during hardening. Biochemically seeds consume starchy endosperm for emergence of radicle which is taken as a sign of germination as also evident from the present study. Loss of viability and vigour after a year was confirmed by Tetrazolium chloride test. Micropropagation protocol developed here will ensure regeneration of large number of plants in a relatively short time. Conclusively, in vitro propagation protocol developed in D. membranaceus using mature seeds as an explants is reported for the first time.

  10. Effect of lignin derivatives in the bio-polyols from microwave liquefied bamboo on the properties of polyurethane foams

    Treesearch

    Jiulong Xie; Jinqiu Qi; Chung-Yun Hse; Todd F. Shupe

    2014-01-01

    Bamboo residues were subjected to a microwave-assisted liquefaction process for the production of crude bio-polyols (CBP). The fractionated bio-polyols (FBP) were obtained by the removal of lignin derivatives from the crude bio-polyols (CBP) using a simple method. Polyurethane (PU) foams were successfully prepared from both CBP and FBP. The object of this study was to...

  11. Impact of Plasma Surface Treatment on Bamboo Charcoal/silver Nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignesh, K.; Vijayalakshmi, K. A.; Karthikeyan, N.

    2016-10-01

    Bamboo charcoal (BC) accompanied silver (Ag) nanocomposite is synthesized through sol-gel method. The produced BC/Ag nanocomposite was surface modified by air and oxygen plasma treatments. Silver ions (Ag+) will serve to improve the antibacterial activity as well as the surface area of BC. Plasma treatment has improved the surface functional groups, crystalline intensity and antibacterial activity of the prepared nanocomposite. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies show that Ag nanoparticles have good agreement with BC and the particle size has a mean diameter of 20-40nm. We observe the carboxyl functional groups in Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) after the oxygen plasma treatment. Moreover surface area and adsorption were analyzed by using the Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (BET) surface area (SBET) and UV-Vis spectroscopy.

  12. Preparation of a specific bamboo based activated carbon and its application for ciprofloxacin removal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y X; Ngo, H H; Guo, W S

    2015-11-15

    The studied bamboo based activated carbon (BbAC) with high specific surface area (SSA) and high micro pore volume was prepared from bamboo scraps by the combined activation of H3PO4 and K2CO3. The BbAC was characterized based on the N2 adsorption isotherm at 77K. The results showed that the SSA and pore volume of BbAC increased with increasing impregnation ratio and reached maxima at the impregnation ratio of 3:1 at 750°C. Under these optimal conditions, the BbAC obtained could have a maximum SSA of 2237 m(2)/g and a maximum total pore volume of 1.23 cm(3)/g with the micro pore ratio of more than 90%. The adsorption performance of ciprofloxacin (CIP) on the BbAC was determined at 298 K. The Langmuir and Freundlich models were employed to describe the adsorption equilibrium and the kinetic data were fitted by pseudo first-order and pseudo second-order kinetic models. The results showed that the Langmuir model and the pseudo second-order kinetic model presented better fittings for the adsorption equilibrium and kinetics data, respectively. The maximum adsorption amount of CIP (613 mg/g) on the BbAC was much higher than the report in the literature. Conclusively, the BbAC could be a promising adsorption material for CIP removal from water. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Catalytic Graphitization for Preparation of Porous Carbon Material Derived from Bamboo Precursor and Performance as Electrode of Electrical Double-Layer Capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubota, Toshiki; Maguchi, Yuta; Kamimura, Sunao; Ohno, Teruhisa; Yasuoka, Takehiro; Nishida, Haruo

    2015-12-01

    The combination of addition of Fe (as a catalyst for graphitization) and CO2 activation (a kind of gaseous activation) was applied to prepare a porous carbon material from bamboo powder (a waste product of superheated steam treatment). Regardless of the heat treatment temperature, many macropores were successfully formed after the heating process by removal of Fe compounds. A turbostratic carbon structure was generated in the Fe-added sample heated at 850°C. It was confirmed that the added Fe acted as a template for pore formation. Moreover, it was confirmed that the added Fe acted as a catalyst for graphitization. The resulting electrochemical performance as the electrode of an electrical double-layer capacitor, as demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and charge-discharge testing, could be explained based on the graphitization and activation effects. Addition of Fe could affect the electrical properties of carbon material derived from bamboo.

  14. The Study of Biogenetic Organic Compound Emissions and Ozone in a Subtropical Bamboo Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Jianhui; Guenther, Alex; Turnipseed, Andrew; Duhl, Tiffany; Duhl, Nanhao; van der A, Ronald; Yu, Shuquan; Wang, Bin

    2016-08-01

    Emissions of Biogenic Volatile Organic compounds (BVOCs), Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR), and meteorological parameters were measured in some ecosystems in China. A Relaxed Eddy Accumulation system and an enclosure technique were used to measure BVOC emissions. Obvious diurnal and seasonal variations of BVOC emissions were found. Empirical models of BVOC emissions were developed, the estimated BVOC emissions were in agreement with observations. BVOC emissions in growing seasons in the Inner Mongolia grassland, Chnagbai Mountain temperate forest, LinAn subtropical bamboo forest were estimated. The emission factors of these ecosystems were calculated.

  15. Phenological changes in bamboo carbohydrates explain the preference for culm over leaves by giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) during spring.

    PubMed

    Knott, Katrina K; Christian, Amelia L; Falcone, Josephine F; Vance, Carrie K; Bauer, Laura L; Fahey, George C; Kouba, Andrew J

    2017-01-01

    Seasonal changes in the foodscape force herbivores to select different plant species or plant parts to meet nutritional requirements. We examined whether the search for calorie-rich carbohydrates explained giant panda's selection for bamboo culm over leaves during spring. Leaves and culms were collected from four Phyllostachys bamboos (P. aurea, P. aureosulcata, P. glauca, and P. nuda) once per month over 18-27 months. Monthly changes in annual plant part nutrients were examined, and compared to seasonal foraging behaviors of captive giant pandas. Although total fiber was greater (p<0.0001) in culm (85.6 ± 0.5%) than leaves (55.3 ± 0.4%) throughout the year, culm fiber was at its lowest in spring (79-85%) when culm selection by giant pandas exceeded 70% of their overall diet. Culm starch also was greatest (p = 0.044) during spring (5.5 ± 1.1%) and 2.5-fold the percentage of starch in leaves (2.2 ± 0.6%). The free sugars in spring culm consisted of a high proportion of glucose (35%) and fructose (47%), whereas sucrose made up 42% of the total free sugar content of spring leaves. Bound sugars in culm consisted of 60% glucose and 38% xylose likely representative of hemicellulose. The concentrations of bound sugars (hemicelluloses) in spring culms (543.7 ± 13.0 mg/g) was greater (p<0.001) than in leaves (373.0 ± 14.8 mg/g). These data help explain a long-standing question in giant panda foraging ecology: why consume the plant part with the lowest protein and fat during the energetically intensive spring breeding season? Giant pandas likely prefer spring culm that contains abundant mono- and polysaccharides made more bioavailable as a result of reduced fiber content. These data suggest that phenological changes in bamboo plant part nutrition drive foraging decisions by giant pandas.

  16. An investigation of the use of discriminant analysis for the classification of blade edge type from cut marks made by metal and bamboo blades.

    PubMed

    Bonney, Heather

    2014-08-01

    Analysis of cut marks in bone is largely limited to two dimensional qualitative description. Development of morphological classification methods using measurements from cut mark cross sections could have multiple uses across palaeoanthropological and archaeological disciplines, where cutting edge types are used to investigate and reconstruct behavioral patterns. An experimental study was undertaken, using porcine bone, to determine the usefulness of discriminant function analysis in classifying cut marks by blade edge type, from a number of measurements taken from their cross-sectional profile. The discriminant analysis correctly classified 86.7% of the experimental cut marks into serrated, non-serrated and bamboo blade types. The technique was then used to investigate a series of cut marks of unknown origin from a collection of trophy skulls from the Torres Strait Islands, to investigate whether they were made by bamboo or metal blades. Nineteen out of twenty of the cut marks investigated were classified as bamboo which supports the non-contemporaneous ethnographic accounts of the knives used for trophy taking and defleshing remains. With further investigation across a variety of blade types, this technique could prove a valuable tool in the interpretation of cut mark evidence from a wide variety of contexts, particularly in forensic anthropology where the requirement for presentation of evidence in a statistical format is becoming increasingly important. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Preparation of monoclonal antibody bank against whole water-soluble proteins from rapid-growing bamboo shoots.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Jen; Chen, Han-Min; Wu, Tai-Tse; Wu, Jiann-Shing; Chu, Rea-Min; Juang, Rong-Huay

    2006-11-01

    An antibody bank against the whole proteins in a proteome is a useful tool for biological research. Using the standard cell fusion method, and a modified screening protocol, we produced an mAb bank against the total water-soluble proteins extracted from the rapid-growing green bamboo shoots. An improved two-stage strategy was employed to enrich those poor immunogenic or lower expressed proteins. Totally, we obtained a bank of 192 mAb which were identified as distinctive to each other by 2-DE and immunostaining.

  18. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of freeze-dried grapefruit phenolics as affected by gum arabic and bamboo fibre addition and microwave pretreatment.

    PubMed

    García-Martínez, Eva; Andújar, Isabel; Yuste Del Carmen, Alberto; Prohens, Jaime; Martínez-Navarrete, Nuria

    2018-06-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have suggested that phenolic compounds present in grapefruit play an important role in the bioactive properties of this fruit. However, the consumption of fresh grapefruit is low. Freeze-dried powdered grapefruit can be an alternative to promote this fruit consumption. To improve the quality and stability of the powdered fruit, encapsulating and anticaking agents can be added. In the present study, different grapefruit powders obtained by freeze-drying with the addition of gum arabic (1.27 g per 100 g) and bamboo fibre (0.76 g per 100 g) with and without a pre-drying microwave treatment were compared with the fresh and freeze-dried fruit with no carriers added, aiming to evaluate the effect of these preservation processes on phenolics content and on its antioxidant [1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP)] and anti-inflamatory (evaluated in RAW 264.7 macrophages) capacities. Freeze-drying and gum arabic and bamboo fibre addition significantly increased total phenolics, as well as the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities (by inhibiting nitric oxide production of lipopolysaccharide activated RAW 264.7 macrophages), of grapefruit. An additional increase in these parameters was obtained with microwave pretreatment before freeze-drying. The combined addition of gum arabic and bamboo fibre to grapefruit puree and the application of a microwave pretreatment improve the functional properties of the fruit without showing cytotoxicity in vitro. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Nitrogen deposition and management practices increase soil microbial biomass carbon but decrease diversity in Moso bamboo plantations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Quan; Song, Xinzhang; Gu, Honghao; Gao, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Because microbial communities play a key role in carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling, changes in the soil microbial community may directly affect ecosystem functioning. However, the effects of N deposition and management practices on soil microbes are still poorly understood. We studied the effects of these two factors on soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and community composition in Moso bamboo plantations using high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Plantations under conventional (CM) or intensive management (IM) were subjected to one of four N treatments for 30 months. IM and N addition, both separately and in combination, significantly increased soil MBC while decreasing bacterial diversity. However, increases in soil MBC were inhibited when N addition exceeded 60 kg N∙ha−1∙yr−1. IM increased the relative abundances of Actinobacteria and Crenarchaeota but decreased that of Acidobacteria. N addition increased the relative abundances of Acidobacteria, Crenarchaeota, and Actinobacteria but decreased that of Proteobacteria. Soil bacterial diversity was significantly related to soil pH, C/N ratio, and nitrogen and available phosphorus content. Management practices exerted a greater influence over regulation of the soil MBC and microbial diversity compared to that of N deposition in Moso bamboo plantations. PMID:27302857

  20. Nitrogen deposition and management practices increase soil microbial biomass carbon but decrease diversity in Moso bamboo plantations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Quan; Song, Xinzhang; Gu, Honghao; Gao, Fei

    2016-06-01

    Because microbial communities play a key role in carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling, changes in the soil microbial community may directly affect ecosystem functioning. However, the effects of N deposition and management practices on soil microbes are still poorly understood. We studied the effects of these two factors on soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and community composition in Moso bamboo plantations using high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Plantations under conventional (CM) or intensive management (IM) were subjected to one of four N treatments for 30 months. IM and N addition, both separately and in combination, significantly increased soil MBC while decreasing bacterial diversity. However, increases in soil MBC were inhibited when N addition exceeded 60 kg N•ha-1•yr-1. IM increased the relative abundances of Actinobacteria and Crenarchaeota but decreased that of Acidobacteria. N addition increased the relative abundances of Acidobacteria, Crenarchaeota, and Actinobacteria but decreased that of Proteobacteria. Soil bacterial diversity was significantly related to soil pH, C/N ratio, and nitrogen and available phosphorus content. Management practices exerted a greater influence over regulation of the soil MBC and microbial diversity compared to that of N deposition in Moso bamboo plantations.

  1. [Simulating of carbon fluxes in bamboo forest ecosystem using BEPS model based on the LAI assimilated with Dual Ensemble Kalman Filter].

    PubMed

    Li, Xue Jian; Mao, Fang Jie; Du, Hua Qiang; Zhou, Guo Mo; Xu, Xiao Jun; Li, Ping Heng; Liu, Yu Li; Cui, Lu

    2016-12-01

    LAI is one of the most important observation data in the research of carbon cycle of forest ecosystem, and it is also an important parameter to drive process-based ecosystem model. The Moso bamboo forest (MBF) and Lei bamboo forest (LBF) were selected as the study targets. Firstly, the MODIS LAI time series data during 2014-2015 was assimilated with Dual Ensemble Kalman Filter method. Secondly, the high quality assimilated MBF LAI and LBF LAI were used as input dataset to drive BEPS model for simulating the gross primary productivity (GPP), net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and total ecosystem respiration (TER) of the two types of bamboo forest ecosystem, respectively. The modeled carbon fluxes were evaluated by the observed carbon fluxes data, and the effects of different quality LAI inputs on carbon cycle simulation were also studied. The LAI assimilated using Dual Ensemble Kalman Filter of MBF and LBF were significantly correlated with the observed LAI, with high R 2 of 0.81 and 0.91 respectively, and lower RMSE and absolute bias, which represented the great improvement of the accuracy of MODIS LAI products. With the driving of assimilated LAI, the modeled GPP, NEE, and TER were also highly correlated with the flux observation data, with the R 2 of 0.66, 0.47, and 0.64 for MBF, respectively, and 0.66, 0.45, and 0.73 for LBF, respectively. The accuracy of carbon fluxes modeled with assimilated LAI was higher than that acquired by the locally adjusted cubic-spline capping method, in which, the accuracy of mo-deled NEE for MBF and LBF increased by 11.2% and 11.8% at the most degrees, respectively.

  2. Electromigration-induced void grain-boundary interactions: The mean time to failure for copper interconnects with bamboo and near-bamboo structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogurtani, Tarik Omer; Oren, Ersin Emre

    2004-12-01

    A well-posed moving boundary-value problem, describing the dynamics of curved interfaces and surfaces associated with voids and/or cracks that are interacting with grain boundaries, is obtained. Extensive computer simulations are performed for void configuration evolution during intergranular motion, under the actions of capillary and electromigration forces in thin-film metallic interconnects with bamboo structures. The analysis of experimental data, utilizing the mean time to failure formulas derived in this paper, gives consistent values for the interface diffusion coefficients and enthalpies of voids. 5.85×10-5exp(-0.95eV/kT)m2s-1 is the value obtained for voids that form in the interior of the copper interconnects avoiding any surface contamination. 1.80×10-4exp(-1.20eV/kT)m2s-1 is obtained for those voids that nucleate either at triple junctions or at the grain-boundary technical surface intersections (grain-boundary groove), where the chemical impurities such as Si, O, S, and even C are segregated during the metallization and annealing processes and may act as trap centers for hopping vacancies.

  3. Photoprotection regulated by phosphorus application can improve photosynthetic performance and alleviate oxidative damage in dwarf bamboo subjected to water stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chenggang; Wang, Yanjie; Jin, Yanqiang; Pan, Kaiwen; Zhou, Xingmei; Li, Na

    2017-09-01

    Water and nutrients, particularly phosphorus (P), are the two most limiting factors for dwarf bamboo growth in tropical and subtropical areas. Dwarf bamboo is highly sensitive to water stress and often causes severe P deficiency in its growing soils due to the characteristics of shallower roots and expeditious growth. However, little is known about its photoprotective response to soil water deficit and the underlying mechanisms regulated by P application. In this study, a completely randomized design with two factors of two water regimes (well-watered and water-stressed) and two P levels (with and without P application) was arranged to investigate this issue in dwarf bamboo (Fargesia rufa) plants. Water stress not only decreased water status and photochemical activity but also increased lipid peroxidation due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation irrespective of P application. In this case, thermal dissipation and antioxidative defense were promoted. Moreover, the role of the water-water cycle under this stress still could not be ignored because it accounted for a large proportion of total energy (J PSII ). P application significantly enhanced photochemical activity accompanied by increased chlorophyll content in water-stressed plants. Meanwhile, P application remarkably reduced thermal dissipation and hardly affected photorespiration and the water-water cycle under water stress. Although P application only enhanced ascorbate (AsA) level, ROS, particularly hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), and lipid peroxidation were significantly reduced in water-stressed plants. Therefore, P application can improve the photosynthetic capacity by regulating the redistribution of energy absorbed by PSII antennae and independently activating of the H 2 O 2 -scavenging function of AsA to alleviate oxidative damage in F. rufa plants, thereby improving their survival under water stress conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Crashworthiness Design for Bionic Bumper Structures Inspired by Cattail and Bamboo.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tao; Liu, Nian; Yu, Zhenglei; Xu, Tianshuang; Zou, Meng

    2017-01-01

    Many materials in nature exhibit excellent mechanical properties. In this study, we evaluated the bionic bumper structure models by using nonlinear finite element (FE) simulations for their crashworthiness under full-size impact loading. The structure contained the structural characteristics of cattail and bamboo. The results indicated that the bionic design enhances the specific energy absorption (SEA) of the bumper. The numerical results showed that the bionic cross-beam and bionic box of the bionic bumper have a significant effect on the crashworthiness of the structure. The crush deformation of bionic cross-beam and box bumper model was reduced by 33.33%, and the total weight was reduced by 44.44%. As the energy absorption capacity under lateral impact, the bionic design can be used in the future bumper body.

  5. Crashworthiness Design for Bionic Bumper Structures Inspired by Cattail and Bamboo

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tao; Liu, Nian

    2017-01-01

    Many materials in nature exhibit excellent mechanical properties. In this study, we evaluated the bionic bumper structure models by using nonlinear finite element (FE) simulations for their crashworthiness under full-size impact loading. The structure contained the structural characteristics of cattail and bamboo. The results indicated that the bionic design enhances the specific energy absorption (SEA) of the bumper. The numerical results showed that the bionic cross-beam and bionic box of the bionic bumper have a significant effect on the crashworthiness of the structure. The crush deformation of bionic cross-beam and box bumper model was reduced by 33.33%, and the total weight was reduced by 44.44%. As the energy absorption capacity under lateral impact, the bionic design can be used in the future bumper body. PMID:29118571

  6. Use of Solid Waste (Foundry Slag) Mortar and Bamboo Reinforcement in Seismic Analysis for Single Storey Masonry Building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, S.; Husain, A.; Ghani, F.; Alam, M. N.

    2013-11-01

    were observed up to the table force of 4.25 kN (1,300 rpm), whereas for fixed base failure started at 800 rpm.To strengthen the fixed base model, bamboo reinforcement were used for economical point of view. Another model of same dimension with same mortar ratio was fabricated on the shake table with bamboo reinforcement as plinth band and lintel band. In addition another four round bamboo bars of 3 mm diameter were placed at each of the four corners of the model. The building model was tested and found very encouraging and surprising results. The model failure started at 1,600 rpm, which means that this model is surviving the double force in comparison with the non-bamboo reinforcement.

  7. Determination of trace triclosan in environmental water by microporous bamboo-activated charcoal solid-phase extraction combined with HPLC-ESI-MS.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Yi, Chun-Liang; Zhao, Ru-Song; Wang, Xia; Jiang, Wen-Qiang; Wang, Xi-Kui

    2012-10-01

    A sensitive and efficient analytical method for triclosan (TCS) determination in water, which involves enrichment with bamboo-activated charcoal and detection with HPLC-ESI-MS, was developed. The influence of several operational parameters, including the eluant and its volume, the flow rate, the volume andacidity of the sample, and the amount of bamboo-activated charcoal, were investigated and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, linearity of the method was observed in the range of 0.02-20 μg/L, with correlation coefficients (r(2) ) >0.9990. The limit of detection was 0.002 μg/L based on the ratio of chromatographic signal to baseline noise (S/N = 3). The spiked recoveries of TCS in real water samples were achieved in the range of 97.6-112.5%. The proposed method was applied to analyze TCS in real aqueous samples. All the surface water samples collected in Xiaoqing River had detectable levels of TCS with concentrations of 42-197 ng/L. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Effects of bamboo biochar on soybean root nodulation in multi-elements contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunyan; Alidoust, Darioush; Yang, Xueling; Isoda, Akihiro

    2018-04-15

    Improvements in plant physiological performance by means of biochar application in soils contaminated by multi-elements are determinants of agroecosystem functioning. This study analyzed the effects of bamboo-derived biochar on root nodulation and plant growth in a moderately acidic Andosol (pH = 5.56) contaminated with multi-elements during a 70-day investigation of soybean growth. Bamboo biochar that had been pyrolyzed at a temperature below 500°C was applied to soils at three different and moderately high rates (5%, 10%, and 15%, w/w). Biochar amendment beyond 5% stimulated root nodulation as well as soybean growth. The nodule weight per root system was significantly enhanced by 186% and 243% over the control at the 10% and 15% addition rates, respectively. The primary explanation for these stimulatory effects was attributed to an increase in the K and Mo supplies for plant uptake that was induced by the biochar application, whereas the increased availability of P contributed to a lesser extent. Leaf CO 2 assimilation rate was slightly enhanced at the highest application rate, but this enhancement was not associated with an increase in biomass. The incorporation of biochar into the soil reduced extractable-NH 4 NO 3 Cd, Cu, Mn, Ni, and Zn, but not Pb, regardless of the application dose. This change was accompanied by a significant (P < 0.05) suppression of the uptake od trace elements in soybean shoots at the optimum application rate (10%); the degree of reduction followed this order: Pb>Mn>Cd>Zn>Cu>Ni. The increase in soil pH and the diffusion/adsorption of trace elements onto the biochar may have contributed to the lowering of the concentration of trace elements in the soil as well as in soybean shoots. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Bamboo biochar amendment improves the growth and reproduction of Eisenia fetida and the quality of green waste vermicompost.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiaoqiang; Cai, Linlin; Li, Suyan; Chang, Scott X; Sun, Xiangyang; An, Zhengfeng

    2018-07-30

    Vermicomposting is a promising method for reusing urban green waste. However, high lignin content in the green waste could hinder the development of earthworm and microorganisms and the vermicomposting process, resulting in a low-quality vermicompost product. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of bamboo biochar addition (at 0%, 3%, and 6% on a dry w/w basis) on the activity of Eisenia fetida and the obtained vermicompost. Biochar addition increased (P < 0.05) earthworm biomass, juvenile and cocoon numbers of Eisenia fetida, as well as the activities of dehydrogenase, cellulase, urease and alkaline phosphatase. Compared to the control, lignin degradation rate was enhanced up to 13.89% by biochar addition. Biochar addition also improved the vermicompost quality in terms of cation exchange capacity (CEC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) degradation, humification, nitrogen transformation, toxicity to germinating seeds (Brassica rapa L., Chinensis group) and heavy metals concentrations. The 6% bamboo biochar addition rate achieved maturity after 60 days of vermicomposting and resulted in the highest quality vermicompost based on parameters such as CEC, DOC, NH 4 + -N/NO 3 - -N ratio, germination index and heavy metal concentration. We conclude that 6% biochar addition promoted earthworm growth and the vermicomposting of green waste. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Phenological changes in bamboo carbohydrates explain the preference for culm over leaves by giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) during spring

    PubMed Central

    Knott, Katrina K.; Christian, Amelia L.; Falcone, Josephine F.; Vance, Carrie K.; Bauer, Laura L.; Fahey, George C.; Kouba, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    Seasonal changes in the foodscape force herbivores to select different plant species or plant parts to meet nutritional requirements. We examined whether the search for calorie-rich carbohydrates explained giant panda’s selection for bamboo culm over leaves during spring. Leaves and culms were collected from four Phyllostachys bamboos (P. aurea, P. aureosulcata, P. glauca, and P. nuda) once per month over 18–27 months. Monthly changes in annual plant part nutrients were examined, and compared to seasonal foraging behaviors of captive giant pandas. Although total fiber was greater (p<0.0001) in culm (85.6 ± 0.5%) than leaves (55.3 ± 0.4%) throughout the year, culm fiber was at its lowest in spring (79–85%) when culm selection by giant pandas exceeded 70% of their overall diet. Culm starch also was greatest (p = 0.044) during spring (5.5 ± 1.1%) and 2.5-fold the percentage of starch in leaves (2.2 ± 0.6%). The free sugars in spring culm consisted of a high proportion of glucose (35%) and fructose (47%), whereas sucrose made up 42% of the total free sugar content of spring leaves. Bound sugars in culm consisted of 60% glucose and 38% xylose likely representative of hemicellulose. The concentrations of bound sugars (hemicelluloses) in spring culms (543.7 ± 13.0 mg/g) was greater (p<0.001) than in leaves (373.0 ± 14.8 mg/g). These data help explain a long-standing question in giant panda foraging ecology: why consume the plant part with the lowest protein and fat during the energetically intensive spring breeding season? Giant pandas likely prefer spring culm that contains abundant mono- and polysaccharides made more bioavailable as a result of reduced fiber content. These data suggest that phenological changes in bamboo plant part nutrition drive foraging decisions by giant pandas. PMID:28614359

  11. Reconnaissance 14C Dating and the Evaluation of Mg/Li as a Temperature Proxy in Bamboo Corals from the California Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freiberger, M. M.; LaVigne, M.; Miller, H.; Hill, T. M.; McNichol, A. P.; Lardie Gaylord, M.

    2015-12-01

    In the face of anthropogenically induced climate changes, it is becoming increasingly important to develop high-resolution paleoceanographic records that may elucidate how ocean conditions may shift in coming decades. Recently, bamboo corals (gorgonian octocorals) have been proposed as archives of intermediate ocean conditions. This study used 'reconnaissance' radiocarbon analysis to identify the nuclear bomb 14C spike in the proteinaceous nodes of bamboo corals and to quantify radial growth rates and ages of corals spanning the eastern Pacific oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) (790-2055 m). Preliminary data suggest that these corals exhibit a wide range of growth rates (9.4-350 μm/yr) that are non-linear over time and decrease with coral age and depth. Records of Mg/Li were investigated in these corals, given that previous studies have demonstrated positive correlations between Mg/Li and temperature in benthic foraminifera and surface and deep-sea aragonitic corals, with a reduced influence of vital effects over Mg/Ca. Intracoral reproducibility observed for replicate Mg/Li timeseries within each sample (p=0.6±0.2, n=6) and strong correlations between Mg/Ca and Li/Ca (0.9±0.1, n=6) indicate similar environmental or biological drivers of Mg and Li incorporation in bamboo corals. Given the strong positive correlations between Mg/Li and water temperature across a depth transect (r2=0.87, n=6), increasing Mg/Li observed over the growth history of each of the corals more likely reflects declining growth rates resulting in decreased Li incorporation over time rather than cooling of California Margin intermediate waters. Reductions in growth rate over the lifespan of each coral (~100+ years) may be a function of natural coral growth patterns or changes in carbonate chemistry, oxygen, or food supply in a sensitive OMZ coral ecosystem.

  12. Complications in transorbital penetrating injury by bamboo branch: A case report.

    PubMed

    Feng, Lei; He, Xiaojun; Chen, Jie; Ni, Shuang; Jiang, Biao; Hua, Jian-Ming

    2018-05-01

    Wooden transorbital penetrating injury is an uncommon and serious trauma that may cause multiply complications. Here we describe a 62-year-old Chinese woman with a transorbital penetrating injury caused by a long bamboo branch. Computed tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging showed the presence of a wooden foreign body. Cerebrovascular digital subtraction angiography and temporary balloon occlusion were performed with general anesthesia. Anti-inflammatory therapy was subsequently administered. Retention of wooden foreign body, orbital cellulitis, and traumatic aneurysm at the right internal carotid artery were diagnosed 1 month later. Coil embolization of the right internal carotid artery aneurysm and endoscopic sinus surgery were then performed, and postoperative condition was monitored and recorded. Penetrating transorbital injury complications may occur because of retained wooden foreign bodies near the intracranial arteries. Reasonable surgical intervention and special attention should be performed in this kind of trauma.

  13. Instrumental neutron activation analysis data for cloud-water particulate samples, Mount Bamboo, Taiwan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lin, Neng-Huei; Sheu, Guey-Rong; Wetherbee, Gregory A.; Debey, Timothy M.

    2013-01-01

    Cloud water was sampled on Mount Bamboo in northern Taiwan during March 22-24, 2002. Cloud-water samples were filtered using 0.45-micron filters to remove particulate material from the water samples. Filtered particulates were analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) at the U.S. Geological Survey National Reactor Facility in Denver, Colorado, in February 2012. INAA elemental composition data for the particulate materials are presented. These data complement analyses of the aqueous portion of the cloud-water samples, which were performed earlier by the Department of Atmospheric Sciences, National Central University, Taiwan. The data are intended for evaluation of atmospheric transport processes and air-pollution sources in Southeast Asia.

  14. Surface acetylation of bamboo cellulose: preparation and rheological properties.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jie; Fei, Peng; Xiong, Zhouyi; Shi, Yongjun; Yan, Kai; Xiong, Hanguo

    2013-01-30

    In this study, purified bamboo cellulose was used to synthesize cellulose diacetate (B-CDA). The synthesis was controlled by determination of the degree of substitution and insoluble residue content. The product then was characterized by FTIR. The rheological properties of B-CDA solutions in acetone/N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMAc) solvent system were systematically investigated on an advanced rheometer, including the dependence of apparent viscosity η(α), non-Newtonian index n, and structural viscosity index Δη on the concentration and temperature of the solutions. B-CDA-acetone/DMAc solution is a shear-thinning fluid. With increasing solution concentration and decreasing temperature, Δη increased, whereas n decreased, which indicates a deteriorating spinnability. Moreover, the values of the viscous flow activation energy E(η) based on the Arrhenius equation increased when the shear rate γ was enhanced, which indicates that the η(α) of the solution is more sensitive to temperature in the higher γ values. The results are favorable for predicting the B-CDA solution spinnability. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Retrieval of crown closure of moso bamboo forest using unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) remotely sensed imagery based on geometric-optical model].

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong; Du, Hua-qiang; Zhou, Guo-mo; Xu, Xiao-jun; Sun, Shao-bo; Gao, Guo-long

    2015-05-01

    This research focused on the application of remotely sensed imagery from unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) with high spatial resolution for the estimation of crown closure of moso bamboo forest based on the geometric-optical model, and analyzed the influence of unconstrained and fully constrained linear spectral mixture analysis (SMA) on the accuracy of the estimated results. The results demonstrated that the combination of UAV remotely sensed imagery and geometric-optical model could, to some degrees, achieve the estimation of crown closure. However, the different SMA methods led to significant differentiation in the estimation accuracy. Compared with unconstrained SMA, the fully constrained linear SMA method resulted in higher accuracy of the estimated values, with the coefficient of determination (R2) of 0.63 at 0.01 level, against the measured values acquired during the field survey. Root mean square error (RMSE) of approximate 0.04 was low, indicating that the usage of fully constrained linear SMA could bring about better results in crown closure estimation, which was closer to the actual condition in moso bamboo forest.

  16. Mild acetosolv process to fractionate bamboo for the biorefinery: structural and antioxidant properties of the dissolved lignin.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming-Fei; Sun, Shao-Ni; Xu, Feng; Sun, Run-Cang

    2012-02-22

    Fractionation of lignocellulosic material into its constitutive components is of vital importance for the production of biofuels as well as other value-added chemicals. The conventional acetosolv processes are mainly focused on the production of pulp from woody lignocelluloses. In this study, a mild acetosolv process was developed to fractionate bamboo under atmospheric pressure to obtain cellulosic pulp, water-soluble fraction, and acetic acid lignin. The structural features of the lignins obtained under various conditions were characterized with elemental analysis, sugar analysis, alkaline nitrobenzene oxidation, gel permeation chromatography (GPC), (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR), and heteronuclear single-quantum coherence (HSQC) spectroscopy. As compared to milled wood lignin (MWL) of bamboo, acetic acid lignins had low impurities (carbohydrates 2.48-4.56%) mainly due to the cleavage of linkages between lignin and carbohydrates. In addition, acetic acid lignins showed a low proportion of syringyl (S) units. Due to the cleavage of linkages between lignin units, acetic acid lignins had weight-average molecular weights ranging from 4870 to 5210 g/mol, less than half that of MWL (13000 g/mol). In addition, acetic acid lignins showed stronger antioxidant activity mainly due to the significant increase of free phenolic hydroxyls. The lignins obtained with such low impurities, high free phenolic hydroxyls, and medium molecular weights are promising feedstocks to replace petroleum chemicals.

  17. Formability Analysis of Bamboo Fabric Reinforced Poly (Lactic) Acid Composites

    PubMed Central

    M. R., Nurul Fazita; Jayaraman, Krishnan; Bhattacharyya, Debes

    2016-01-01

    Poly (lactic) acid (PLA) composites have made their way into various applications that may require thermoforming to produce 3D shapes. Wrinkles are common in many forming processes and identification of the forming parameters to prevent them in the useful part of the mechanical component is a key consideration. Better prediction of such defects helps to significantly reduce the time required for a tooling design process. The purpose of the experiment discussed here is to investigate the effects of different test parameters on the occurrence of deformations during sheet forming of double curvature shapes with bamboo fabric reinforced-PLA composites. The results demonstrated that the domes formed using hot tooling conditions were better in quality than those formed using cold tooling conditions. Wrinkles were more profound in the warp direction of the composite domes compared to the weft direction. Grid Strain Analysis (GSA) identifies the regions of severe deformation and provides useful information regarding the optimisation of processing parameters. PMID:28773662

  18. Multi-response parametric optimization in drilling of bamboo/Kevlar fiber reinforced sandwich composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Thingujam Jackson; Samanta, Sutanu

    2016-09-01

    In the present work an attempt was made towards parametric optimization of drilling bamboo/Kevlar K29 fiber reinforced sandwich composite to minimize the delamination occurred during the drilling process and also to maximize the tensile strength of the drilled composite. The spindle speed and the feed rate of the drilling operation are taken as the input parameters. The influence of these parameters on delamination and tensile strength of the drilled composite studied and analysed using Taguchi GRA and ANOVA technique. The results show that both the response parameters i.e. delamination and tensile strength are more influenced by feed rate than spindle speed. The percentage contribution of feed rate and spindle speed on response parameters are 13.88% and 81.74% respectively.

  19. Molecular Phylogeny of the Bamboo Sharks (Chiloscyllium spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Masstor, Noor Haslina; Samat, Abdullah; Nor, Shukor Md; Md-Zain, Badrul Munir

    2014-01-01

    Chiloscyllium, commonly called bamboo shark, can be found inhabiting the waters of the Indo-West Pacific around East Asian countries such as Malaysia, Myanmar, Thailand, Singapore, and Indonesia. The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List has categorized them as nearly threatened sharks out of their declining population status due to overexploitation. A molecular study was carried out to portray the systematic relationships within Chiloscyllium species using 12S rRNA and cytochrome b gene sequences. Maximum parsimony and Bayesian were used to reconstruct their phylogeny trees. A total of 381 bp sequences' lengths were successfully aligned in the 12S rRNA region, with 41 bp sites being parsimony-informative. In the cytochrome b region, a total of 1120 bp sites were aligned, with 352 parsimony-informative characters. All analyses yield phylogeny trees on which C. indicum has close relationships with C. plagiosum. C. punctatum is sister taxon to both C. indicum and C. plagiosum while C. griseum and C. hasseltii formed their own clade as sister taxa. These Chiloscyllium classifications can be supported by some morphological characters (lateral dermal ridges on the body, coloring patterns, and appearance of hypobranchials and basibranchial plate) that can clearly be used to differentiate each species. PMID:25013766

  20. A review of pipe and bamboo artificial refugia as sampling tools in anuran studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glorioso, Brad M.; Waddle, J. Hardin

    2014-01-01

    Artificial pipe-like refugia have been used for more than 40 years in anuran studies, and have captured 28 species, primarily (82%) hylid treefrogs. Early pipe-like refugia were made using cut pieces of bamboo in the tropical forests of Puerto Rico, but most recent studies have used synthetic pipes and have occurred primarily in the southeastern United States. Characteristics of artificial refugia (e.g., color, length, and diameter), and their placement in the environment have varied greatly among studies, making comparisons difficult. Here, we summarize and evaluate different pipe designs and placement, address potential concerns when using artificial pipe-like refugia, and suggest studies necessary to better interpret the data gained from this technique in anuran studies.

  1. A Case of endoscopic retrieval of a long bamboo stick from a Humboldt penguin (Spheniscus humboldti).

    PubMed

    Jung, Woo-Sung; Ko, Minho; Cho, Hyun Kee; Kang, Byung-Jae; Choi, Jung Hoon; Chung, Jin-Young

    2017-02-28

    An eighteen-month-old female Humboldt penguin (Spheniscus humboldti) that was 50 cm in length and 4.5 kg in weight was presented with anorexia and vomiting. The hematological and blood biochemical profiles revealed no remarkable findings, and no Salmonella, Shigella or Vibrio spp. were isolated from the fecal culture. However, radiographic imaging revealed a long linear foreign body presenting from the lower esophagus to the stomach. To retrieve this foreign body, flexible endoscopic extraction was performed using flexible rat tooth grasping forceps. A long bamboo stick (29 × 1 cm) was removed from the stomach, and the penguin fully recovered.

  2. A Case of endoscopic retrieval of a long bamboo stick from a Humboldt penguin (Spheniscus humboldti)

    PubMed Central

    JUNG, Woo-Sung; KO, Minho; CHO, Hyun Kee; KANG, Byung-Jae; CHOI, Jung Hoon; CHUNG, Jin-Young

    2016-01-01

    An eighteen-month-old female Humboldt penguin (Spheniscus humboldti) that was 50 cm in length and 4.5 kg in weight was presented with anorexia and vomiting. The hematological and blood biochemical profiles revealed no remarkable findings, and no Salmonella, Shigella or Vibrio spp. were isolated from the fecal culture. However, radiographic imaging revealed a long linear foreign body presenting from the lower esophagus to the stomach. To retrieve this foreign body, flexible endoscopic extraction was performed using flexible rat tooth grasping forceps. A long bamboo stick (29 × 1 cm) was removed from the stomach, and the penguin fully recovered. PMID:27990010

  3. Co-pyrolysis of microwave-assisted acid pretreated bamboo sawdust and soapstock.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunpu; Wu, Qiuhao; Duan, Dengle; Zhang, Yayun; Ruan, Roger; Liu, Yuhuan; Fu, Guiming; Zhang, Shumei; Zhao, Yunfeng; Dai, Leilei; Fan, Liangliang

    2018-05-30

    Fast microwave-assisted co-pyrolysis of pretreated bamboo sawdust and soapstock was conducted. The pretreatment process was carried out under microwave irradiation. The effects of microwave irradiation temperature, irradiation time, and concentration of hydrochloric acid on product distribution from co-pyrolysis and the relative contents of the major components in bio-oil were investigated. A maximum bio-oil yield of 40.00 wt.% was obtained at 200 °C for 60 min with 0.5 M hydrochloric acid. As pretreatment temperature, reaction time and acid concentration increased, respectively, the relative contents of phenols, diesel fraction (C12 + aliphatics), and other oxygenates decreased. The gasoline fraction (including C5-C12 aliphatics and aromatics) ranged from 55.77% to 73.30% under various pretreatment conditions. Therefore, excessive reaction time and concentration of acid are not beneficial to upgrading bio-oil. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Pb(II) removal from water using Fe-coated bamboo charcoal with the assistance of microwaves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zengsheng; Wang, Xuejiang; Wang, Yin; Xia, Siqing; Chen, Ling; Zhang, Yalei; Zhao, Jianfu

    2013-05-01

    Bamboo charcoal (BC) was used as starting material to prepare iron-modified bamboo charcoal (Fe-MBC) by its impregnation in FeCl3 and HNO3 solutions simultaneously, followed by microwave heating. The material can be used as an adsorbent for Pb(II) contaminants removal in water. The composites were prepared with Fe molar concentration of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mol/L and characterized by means of N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD), scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDS), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and point of zero charge (pH(pzc)) measurements. Nitrogen adsorption analyses showed that the BET specific surface area and total pore volume increased with iron impregnation. The adsorbent with Fe molar concentration of 2 mol/L (2Fe-MBC) exhibited the highest surface area and produced the best pore structure. The Pb(II) adsorption process of 2Fe-MBC and BC were evaluated in batch experiments and 2Fe-MBC showed an excellent adsorption capability for removal Pb(II). The adsorption of Pb(II) strongly depended on solution pH, with maximum values at pH 5.0. The ionic strength had a significant effect on the adsorption at pH < 6.0. The adsorption isotherms followed the Langmuir isotherm model well, and the maximum adsorption capacity for Pb(II) was 200.38 mg/g for 2Fe-MBC. The adsorption processes were well fitted by a pseudo second-order kinetic model. Thermodynamic parameters showed that the adsorption of Pb(II) onto Fe-MBC was feasible, spontaneous, and exothermic under the studied conditions, and the ion exchange mechanism played an significant role. These results have important implications for the design of low-cost and effective adsorbents in the removal of Pb(II) from wastewater.

  5. Mesoporous Bamboo Charcoal Nanoparticles as a New Near-Infrared Responsive Drug Carrier for Imaging-Guided Chemotherapy/Photothermal Synergistic Therapy of Tumor.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xinghua; Yin, Wenyan; Yu, Jie; Dou, Ruixia; Bao, Tao; Zhang, Xiao; Yan, Liang; Yong, Yuan; Su, Chunjian; Wang, Qing; Gu, Zhanjun; Zhao, Yuliang

    2016-07-01

    Near-infrared-(NIR)-light-triggered photothermal nanocarriers have attracted much attention for the construction of more smart and effective therapeutic platforms in nanomedicine. Here, a multifunctional drug carrier based on a low cost, natural, and biocompatible material, bamboo charcoal nanoparticles (BCNPs), which are prepared by the pyrolysis of bamboo followed by physical grinding and ultrasonication is reported. The as-prepared BCNPs with porous structure possess not only large surface areas for drug loading but also an efficient photothermal effect, making them become both a suitable drug carrier and photothermal agent for cancer therapy. After loading doxorubicin (DOX) into the BCNPs, the resulting DOX-BCNPs enhance drug potency and more importantly can overcome the drug resistance of DOX in a MCF-7 cancer cell model by significantly increasing cellular uptake while remarkably decreasing drug efflux. The in vivo synergistic effect of combining chemotherapy and photothermal therapy in this drug delivery system is also demonstrated. In addition, the BCNPs enhance optoacoustic imaging contrast due to their high NIR absorbance. Collectively, it is demonstrated that the BCNP drug delivery system constitutes a promising and effective nanocarrier for simultaneous bioimaging and chemo-photothermal synergistic therapy of cancer. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. The Effects of 4-Hydroxybenzoic Acid Identified from Bamboo (Dendrocalamus asper) Shoots on Kv1.4 Channel

    PubMed Central

    Mohamad, Fatin H.; Wong, Jia Hui; Mohamad, Habsah; Ismail, Abdul Hadi; Mohamed Yusoff, Abdul Aziz; Osman, Hasnah; Wong, Kok Tong; Idris, Zamzuri; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2018-01-01

    Background Bamboo shoot has been used as a treatment for epilepsy in traditional Chinese medicine for generations to treat neuronal disorders such as convulsive, dizziness and headaches. 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (4-hba) is a non-flavonoid phenol found abundantly in Dendrocalamus asper shoots (bamboo), fruits (strawberries and apples) and flowers. Kv1.4 is a rapidly inactivating Shaker-related member of the voltage-gated potassium channels with two inactivation mechanisms; the fast N-type and slow C-type. It plays vital roles in repolarisation, hyperpolarisation and signaling the restoration of resting membrane potential through the regulation of the movement of K+ across the cellular membrane. Methods Chemical compounds from Dendrocalamus asper bamboo shoots were purified and identified as major palmitic acids mixed with other minor fatty acids, palmitic acid, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, lauric acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and cholest-4-ene-3-one. The response of synthetic 4-hydroxybenzoic acid was tested on Kv1.4 potassium channel which was injected into viable oocytes that was extracted from Xenopus laevis. The current were detected by the two-microelectrode voltage clamp, holding potential starting from −80 mV with 20 mV step-up until +80 mV. Readings of treatments with 0.1% DMSO, 4-hba concentrations and K channel blockers were taken at +60 mV. The ratio of tail/peak amplitude is the index of the activity of the Kv1.4 channels with n ≥ 6 (number of oocytes tested). The decreases of the ratios of five different concentrations (1 μM, 10 μM, 100 μM, 1 mM and 2.5 mM) were compared with 0.1% DMSO as the control. Results All concentration showed statistically significant results with P < 0.05 except for 100 μM. The normalised current of the 4-hba concentrations were compared with potassium channel blockers (TEA and 4-AP) and all groups showed statistically significant results. This study also showed that time taken for each concentration to affect Kv1.4 does not play

  7. Production of Carbon Occluded in Phytolith Is Season-Dependent in a Bamboo Forest in Subtropical China

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhang-Ting; Jiang, Pei-Kun; Chang, Scott Xiaochuan; Zhang, Yan; Ying, Yu-Qi

    2014-01-01

    Carbon (C) occluded in phytolith (PhytOC) is a stable form of C; when PhytOC is returned to the soil through litterfall it is stored in the soil which can be an effective way for long-term C sequestration. However, few estimates on the rate of PhytOC input to the soil are available. To better understand the seasonal dynamics of PhytOC production and the annual rate of stable C sequestration through PhytOC input, we quantified the monthly litterfall, phytolith and PhytOC return to the soil over a year in a typical Lei bamboo (Phyllostachys praecox) forest in subtropical China. The monthly litterfall ranged between 14.81 and 131.18 g m−2, and the phytolith concentration in the monthly litterfall samples ranged between 47.21 and 101.68 g kg−1 of litter mass, with the PhytOC concentration in the phytolith ranged between 29.4 and 44.9 g kg−1 of phytolith, equivalent to 1.8–3.6 g kg−1 of PhytOC in the litterfall (based on litterfall dry mass). The amount of phytolith input to the soil system was 292.21±69.12 (mean±SD) kg ha−1 yr−1, sequestering 41.45±9.32 kg CO2−e ha−1 yr−1 of C in the studied Lei bamboo forest. This rate of C sequestration through the formation of PhytOC found in this study falls within the range of rates for other grass-type species reported in the literature. We conclude that return of C occluded in phytolith to the soil can be a substantial source of stable soil C and finding means to increase PhytOC storage in the soil should be able to play a significant role in mitigating the rapidly increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration. PMID:25188462

  8. Reverse chemical ecology: Olfactory proteins from the giant panda and their interactions with putative pheromones and bamboo volatiles

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiao; Arena, Simona; Spinelli, Silvia; Zhang, Guiquan; Wei, Rongping; Cambillau, Christian; Scaloni, Andrea; Wang, Guirong; Pelosi, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    The giant panda Ailuropoda melanoleuca belongs to the family of Ursidae; however, it is not carnivorous, feeding almost exclusively on bamboo. Being equipped with a typical carnivorous digestive apparatus, the giant panda cannot get enough energy for an active life and spends most of its time digesting food or sleeping. Feeding and mating are both regulated by odors and pheromones; therefore, a better knowledge of olfaction at the molecular level can help in designing strategies for the conservation of this species. In this context, we have identified the odorant-binding protein (OBP) repertoire of the giant panda and mapped the protein expression in nasal mucus and saliva through proteomics. Four OBPs have been identified in nasal mucus, while the other two were not detected in the samples examined. In particular, AimelOBP3 is similar to a subset of OBPs reported as pheromone carriers in the urine of rodents, saliva of the boar, and seminal fluid of the rabbit. We expressed this protein, mapped its binding specificity, and determined its crystal structure. Structural data guided the design and preparation of three protein mutants bearing single-amino acid replacements in the ligand-binding pocket, for which the corresponding binding affinity spectra were measured. We also expressed AimelOBP5, which is markedly different from AimelOBP3 and complementary in its binding spectrum. By comparing our binding data with the structures of bamboo volatiles and those of typical mammalian pheromones, we formulate hypotheses on which may be the most relevant semiochemicals for the giant panda. PMID:29078359

  9. Reverse chemical ecology: Olfactory proteins from the giant panda and their interactions with putative pheromones and bamboo volatiles.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiao; Arena, Simona; Spinelli, Silvia; Liu, Dingzhen; Zhang, Guiquan; Wei, Rongping; Cambillau, Christian; Scaloni, Andrea; Wang, Guirong; Pelosi, Paolo

    2017-11-14

    The giant panda Ailuropoda melanoleuca belongs to the family of Ursidae; however, it is not carnivorous, feeding almost exclusively on bamboo. Being equipped with a typical carnivorous digestive apparatus, the giant panda cannot get enough energy for an active life and spends most of its time digesting food or sleeping. Feeding and mating are both regulated by odors and pheromones; therefore, a better knowledge of olfaction at the molecular level can help in designing strategies for the conservation of this species. In this context, we have identified the odorant-binding protein (OBP) repertoire of the giant panda and mapped the protein expression in nasal mucus and saliva through proteomics. Four OBPs have been identified in nasal mucus, while the other two were not detected in the samples examined. In particular, AimelOBP3 is similar to a subset of OBPs reported as pheromone carriers in the urine of rodents, saliva of the boar, and seminal fluid of the rabbit. We expressed this protein, mapped its binding specificity, and determined its crystal structure. Structural data guided the design and preparation of three protein mutants bearing single-amino acid replacements in the ligand-binding pocket, for which the corresponding binding affinity spectra were measured. We also expressed AimelOBP5, which is markedly different from AimelOBP3 and complementary in its binding spectrum. By comparing our binding data with the structures of bamboo volatiles and those of typical mammalian pheromones, we formulate hypotheses on which may be the most relevant semiochemicals for the giant panda.

  10. Experimental evaluation of the sustainability of dwarf bamboo (Pseudosasa usawai) sprout-harvesting practices in Yangminshan National Park, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chi-Cheng; Chang, Chi-Ru; Hsu, Meng-Ting; Poo, Wak-Kim

    2014-08-01

    Sustainable harvest of natural products that meets the needs of local people has been viewed by many as an important means for sustaining conservation projects. Although plants often respond to tissue damage through compensatory growth, it may not secure long-term sustainability of the populations because many plants enhance individual well-being at the expense of propagation. Sustainability may further be threatened by infrequent, large-scale events, especially ill-documented ones. We studied the impacts of sprout harvesting on sprout growth in a dwarf bamboo (Pseudosasa usawai) population that has seemingly recovered from an infrequent, large-scale masting event. Experimental results suggest that although a single sprout harvest did not significantly alter the subsequent abundance and structure of sprouts, culm damage that accompanied sprout harvesting resulted in shorter, thinner, and fewer sprouts. Weaker recovery was found in windward, continually harvested, and more severely damaged sites. These findings suggest that sprout growth of damaged dwarf bamboos is likely non-compensatory, but is instead supported through physiological integration whose strength is determined by the well-being of the supplying ramets. Healthy culms closer to the damage also provided more resources than those farther away. Sustainable harvesting of sprouts could benefit from organized community efforts to limit the magnitude of culm damage, provide adequate spacing between harvested sites, and ensure sufficient time interval between harvests. Vegetation boundaries relatively resilient to infrequent, large-scale events are likely maintained by climatic factors and may be sensitive to climate change. Continual monitoring is, therefore, integral to the sustainability of harvesting projects.

  11. Diffraction evidence for the structure of cellulose microfibrils in bamboo, a model for grass and cereal celluloses.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Lynne H; Forsyth, V Trevor; Martel, Anne; Grillo, Isabelle; Altaner, Clemens M; Jarvis, Michael C

    2015-06-23

    Cellulose from grasses and cereals makes up much of the potential raw material for biofuel production. It is not clear if cellulose microfibrils from grasses and cereals differ in structure from those of other plants. The structures of the highly oriented cellulose microfibrils in the cell walls of the internodes of the bamboo Pseudosasa amabilis are reported. Strong orientation facilitated the use of a range of scattering techniques. Small-angle neutron scattering provided evidence of extensive aggregation by hydrogen bonding through the hydrophilic edges of the sheets of chains. The microfibrils had a mean centre-to-centre distance of 3.0 nm in the dry state, expanding on hydration. The expansion on hydration suggests that this distance between centres was through the hydrophilic faces of adjacent microfibrils. However in the other direction, perpendicular to the sheets of chains, the mean, disorder-corrected Scherrer dimension from wide-angle X-ray scattering was 3.8 nm. It is possible that this dimension is increased by twinning (crystallographic coalescence) of thinner microfibrils over part of their length, through the hydrophobic faces. The wide-angle scattering data also showed that the microfibrils had a relatively large intersheet d-spacing and small monoclinic angle, features normally considered characteristic of primary-wall cellulose. Bamboo microfibrils have features found in both primary-wall and secondary-wall cellulose, but are crystallographically coalescent to a greater extent than is common in celluloses from other plants. The extensive aggregation and local coalescence of the microfibrils are likely to have parallels in other grass and cereal species and to influence the accessibility of cellulose to degradative enzymes during conversion to liquid biofuels.

  12. [RS estimation of inventory parameters and carbon storage of moso bamboo forest based on synergistic use of object-based image analysis and decision tree].

    PubMed

    Du, Hua Qiang; Sun, Xiao Yan; Han, Ning; Mao, Fang Jie

    2017-10-01

    By synergistically using the object-based image analysis (OBIA) and the classification and regression tree (CART) methods, the distribution information, the indexes (including diameter at breast, tree height, and crown closure), and the aboveground carbon storage (AGC) of moso bamboo forest in Shanchuan Town, Anji County, Zhejiang Province were investigated. The results showed that the moso bamboo forest could be accurately delineated by integrating the multi-scale ima ge segmentation in OBIA technique and CART, which connected the image objects at various scales, with a pretty good producer's accuracy of 89.1%. The investigation of indexes estimated by regression tree model that was constructed based on the features extracted from the image objects reached normal or better accuracy, in which the crown closure model archived the best estimating accuracy of 67.9%. The estimating accuracy of diameter at breast and tree height was relatively low, which was consistent with conclusion that estimating diameter at breast and tree height using optical remote sensing could not achieve satisfactory results. Estimation of AGC reached relatively high accuracy, and accuracy of the region of high value achieved above 80%.

  13. Radiocarbon-based ages and growth rates of bamboo corals from the Gulf of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roark, E. Brendan; Guilderson, Thomas P.; Flood-Page, Sarah; Dunbar, Robert B.; Ingram, B. Lynn; Fallon, Stewart J.; McCulloch, Malcolm

    2005-02-01

    Deep-sea coral communities have long been recognized by fisherman as areas that support large populations of commercial fish. As a consequence, many deep-sea coral communities are threatened by bottom trawling. Successful management and conservation of this widespread deep-sea habitat requires knowledge of the age and growth rates of deep-sea corals. These organisms also contain important archives of intermediate and deep-water variability, and are thus of interest in the context of decadal to century-scale climate dynamics. Here, we present Δ14C data that suggest that bamboo corals from the Gulf of Alaska are long-lived (75-126 years) and that they acquire skeletal carbon from two distinct sources. Independent verification of our growth rate estimates and coral ages is obtained by counting seasonal Sr/Ca cycles and probable lunar cycle growth bands.

  14. Polysaccharides obtained from bamboo shoots (Chimonobambusa quadrangularis) processing by-products: New insight into ethanol precipitation and characterization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fusheng; Ran, ChunXia; Zheng, Jiong; Ding, Yongbo; Chen, Guangjing

    2018-06-01

    Chimonobambusa quadrangularis polysaccharides (CPS) were extracted by ultrasonic-assisted extraction from bamboo shoots (C. quadrangularis) processing by-products. Three polysaccharide fractions, CPS70, CPS75 and CPS80, were obtained by precipitation at final ethanol concentrations of 70%, 75% and 80%, respectively. The physicochemical characterization and chemical antioxidant activities of the three polysaccharide fractions were compared on the basis of HPLC, FT-IR, XRD, TGA, and antioxidant measurements in vitro. The results suggested that ethanol concentrations used for precipitation of CPS can affect its physicochemical and associated functional properties, and antioxidant activities. Compared with CPS70 and CPS80, CPS75 had lower glucose content, higher total sugar content, and higher protein and uronic acid contents. The CPS70 and CPS80 were composed of Man, Rha, GlcA, Glc, Gal, Xyl and Ara, but none of them were found to contain GalA. In contrast, CPS75 consisted of Man, Rha, GlcA, GalA, Glc, Gal, Xyl and Ara. CPS75 had the lowest medium-high-molecular-weight value (116.53-118.18kDa) and the highest medium-low-molecular-weight value (21.30-22.68kDa). Meanwhile, CPS75 exhibited better functional properties including the repose angle, swelling capacity (SC), water retention capacity (WRC), and oil retention capacity (ORC). Moreover, CPS75 possessed higher scavenging capacities on DPPH, hydroxyl and ABTS radicals, higher oxygen radical absorbance capacity (OARC), higher metal chelating activity, and more significant reducing power. According to the results above, a final ethanol concentration of 75% could be chose to precipitate polysaccharides from bamboo shoots (C. quadrangularis) processing by-products. In summary, it is strongly recommended that the ethanol concentration employed in precipitation of natural polysaccharides could be optimized in advance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of pyrolysis temperature on the chemical oxidation stability of bamboo biochar.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dengyu; Yu, Xinzhi; Song, Chao; Pang, Xiaoli; Huang, Jing; Li, Yanjun

    2016-10-01

    Biochar produced by biomass pyrolysis has the advantage of carbon sequestration. However, some of the carbon atoms in biochar are not very stable. In this study, the effect of pyrolysis temperature on the chemical oxidation stability of bamboo biochar was investigated using the atomic ratios of H/C and O/C, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7) oxidation spectrophotometric method. The results show that the carbon yield and ratios of H/C and O/C decreased from 71.72%, 0.71, and 0.32 to 38.48%, 0.22, and 0.06, respectively, as the temperature was increased from 300°C to 700°C. Moreover, the main oxygen-containing functional groups gradually decreased, while the degree of aromatization increased accordingly. The biochar showed a better stability at a higher pyrolysis temperature. The proportion of carbon loss, i.e., the amount of oxidized carbon with respect to the total carbon of the biochar, decreased from 16.52% to 6.69% with increasing temperature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Chloroplast phylogenomic analyses resolve deep-level relationships of an intractable bamboo tribe Arundinarieae (poaceae).

    PubMed

    Ma, Peng-Fei; Zhang, Yu-Xiao; Zeng, Chun-Xia; Guo, Zhen-Hua; Li, De-Zhu

    2014-11-01

    The temperate woody bamboos constitute a distinct tribe Arundinarieae (Poaceae: Bambusoideae) with high species diversity. Estimating phylogenetic relationships among the 11 major lineages of Arundinarieae has been particularly difficult, owing to a possible rapid radiation and the extremely low rate of sequence divergence. Here, we explore the use of chloroplast genome sequencing for phylogenetic inference. We sampled 25 species (22 temperate bamboos and 3 outgroups) for the complete genome representing eight major lineages of Arundinarieae in an attempt to resolve backbone relationships. Phylogenetic analyses of coding versus noncoding sequences, and of different regions of the genome (large single copy and small single copy, and inverted repeat regions) yielded no well-supported contradicting topologies but potential incongruence was found between the coding and noncoding sequences. The use of various data partitioning schemes in analysis of the complete sequences resulted in nearly identical topologies and node support values, although the partitioning schemes were decisively different from each other as to the fit to the data. Our full genomic data set substantially increased resolution along the backbone and provided strong support for most relationships despite the very short internodes and long branches in the tree. The inferred relationships were also robust to potential confounding factors (e.g., long-branch attraction) and received support from independent indels in the genome. We then added taxa from the three Arundinarieae lineages that were not included in the full-genome data set; each of these were sampled for more than 50% genome sequences. The resulting trees not only corroborated the reconstructed deep-level relationships but also largely resolved the phylogenetic placements of these three additional lineages. Furthermore, adding 129 additional taxa sampled for only eight chloroplast loci to the combined data set yielded almost identical

  17. Radiocarbon-Based Ages and Growth Rates of Bamboo Corals from the Gulf of Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Roark, E B; Guilderson, T P; Flood-Page, S

    2004-12-12

    Deep-sea coral communities have long been recognized by fisherman as areas that support large populations of commercial fish. As a consequence, many deep-sea coral communities are threatened by bottom trawling. Successful management and conservation of this widespread deep-sea habitat requires knowledge of the age and growth rates of deep-sea corals. These organisms also contain important archives of intermediate and deep-water variability, and are thus of interest in the context of decadal to century-scale climate dynamics. Here, we present {Delta}{sup 14}C data that suggest that bamboo corals from the Gulf of Alaska are long-lived (75-126 years) and that they acquire skeletalmore » carbon from two distinct sources. Independent verification of our growth rate estimates and coral ages is obtained by counting seasonal Sr/Ca cycles and probable lunar cycle growth bands.« less

  18. Slow pyrolysis polygeneration of bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens): Product yield prediction and biochar formation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huihui; Wang, Xin; Cui, Yanshan; Xue, Zhongcai; Ba, Yuxin

    2018-05-11

    Slow pyrolysis of bamboo was conducted at 400-600 °C and pyrolysis products were characterized with FTIR, BET, XRD, SEM, EDS and GC to establish a pyrolysis product yield prediction model and biochar formation mechanism. Pyrolysis biochar yield was predicted based on content of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin in biomass with their carbonization index of 0.20, 0.35 and 0.45. The formation mechanism of porous structure in pyrolysis biochar was established based on its physicochemical property evolution and emission characteristics of pyrolysis gas. The main components (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin) had different pyrolysis or chemical reaction pathways to biochar. Lignin had higher aromatic structure, which resulted higher biochar yield. It was the main biochar precursor during biomass pyrolysis. Cellulose was likely to improve porous structure of pyrolysis biochar due to its high mass loss percentage. Higher pyrolysis temperatures (600 °C) promoted inter- and intra-molecular condensation reactions and aromaticity in biochar. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Bioelectricity from kitchen and bamboo waste in a microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Moqsud, M Azizul; Omine, Kiyoshi; Yasufuku, Noriyuki; Bushra, Quazi S; Hyodo, Masayuki; Nakata, Yukio

    2014-02-01

    This study evaluated bioelectricity generation by using kitchen garbage (KG) and bamboo waste (BW) as a solid waste management option by a microbial fuel cell (MFC) method. The nutrient content [nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (NPK)] of the by-products of bioelectricity were also analyzed and assessed for their potential use as a soil amendment. A one-chamber MFC was used for bioelectricity generation in laboratory experiments using both KG and BW. A data-logger recorded voltage every 20 mins at a constant room temperature of 25°C over 45 days. The trend of voltage generation was different for the two organic wastes. In the case of KG, the voltage at the initial stage (0-5 days) increased rapidly and then gradually to a peak of 620 mV. In contrast, the voltage increased gradually to a peak of 540 mV in the case of BW. The by-products of bioelectricity can be used as soil conditioner as its NPK content was in the range of soil conditioner mentioned in other literature. Thus, the MFC has emerged as an efficient and eco-friendly solution for organic waste management, especially in developing and technologically less sophisticated countries, and can provide green and safe electricity from organic waste.

  20. Green Composites Made of Bamboo Fabric and Poly (Lactic) Acid for Packaging Applications—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Nurul Fazita, M.R.; Jayaraman, Krishnan; Bhattacharyya, Debes; Mohamad Haafiz, M.K.; Saurabh, Chaturbhuj K.; Hussin, M. Hazwan; H.P.S., Abdul Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Petroleum based thermoplastics are widely used in a range of applications, particularly in packaging. However, their usage has resulted in soaring pollutant emissions. Thus, researchers have been driven to seek environmentally friendly alternative packaging materials which are recyclable as well as biodegradable. Due to the excellent mechanical properties of natural fibres, they have been extensively used to reinforce biopolymers to produce biodegradable composites. A detailed understanding of the properties of such composite materials is vital for assessing their applicability to various products. The present review discusses several functional properties related to packaging applications in order to explore the potential of bamboo fibre fabric-poly (lactic) acid composites for packaging applications. Physical properties, heat deflection temperature, impact resistance, recyclability and biodegradability are important functional properties of packaging materials. In this review, we will also comprehensively discuss the chronological events and applications of natural fibre biopolymer composites. PMID:28773558

  1. New distributional records and conservation implications for the critically endangered greater bamboo lemur Prolemur simus.

    PubMed

    Rakotonirina, Laingoniaina; Rajaonson, Andry; Ratolojanahary, Tianasoa; Rafalimandimby, Jean; Fanomezantsoa, Prosper; Ramahefasoa, Bellarmin; Rasolofoharivelo, Tovonanahary; Ravaloharimanitra, Maholy; Ratsimbazafy, Jonah; Dolch, Rainer; King, Tony

    2011-01-01

    To improve our knowledge of the distribution of the critically endangered greater bamboo lemur Prolemur simus, we surveyed 6 sites in eastern Madagascar. We found its characteristic feeding signs at 5 sites and made a direct sighting at one of these. One site represents a northern extension of 45 km of the known extant range of the species. Two sites are located in a forest corridor approximately halfway between the previously known southern and northern populations, therefore suggesting a broadly continuous distribution of the species within its range rather than the previously suspected distribution of two distinct populations separated by a distance of over 200 km. Our results illustrate the benefit of species-focussed surveys in determining the true distribution of endangered species, a realistic measure which is necessary in order to assess their current status and to prioritise long-term conservation interventions. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Electromigration-induced drift in damascene and plasma-etched Al(Cu). II. Mass transport mechanisms in bamboo interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proost, Joris; Maex, Karen; Delacy, Luc

    2000-01-01

    We have discussed electromigration (EM)-induced drift in polycrystalline damascene versus reactive ion etched (RIE) Al(Cu) in part I. For polycrystalline Al(Cu), mass transport is well documented to occur through sequential stages : an incubation period (attributed to Cu depletion beyond a critical length) followed by the Al drift stage. In this work, the drift behavior of bamboo RIE and damascene Al(Cu) is analyzed. Using Blech-type test structures, mass transport in RIE lines was shown to proceed both by lattice and interfacial diffusion. The dominating mechanism depends on the Cu distribution in the line, as was evidenced by comparing as-patterned (lattice EM) and RTP-annealed (interface EM) samples. The interfacial EM only occurs at metallic interfaces. In that case, Cu alloying was observed to retard Al interfacial mass transport, giving rise to an incubation time. Although the activation energy for the incubation time was found similar to the one controlling Al lattice drift, for which no incubation time was observed, lattice EM is preferred over interfacial EM because it is insensitive to enhancing geometrical effects upon scaling. When comparing interfacial electromigration in RIE with bamboo damascene Al(Cu), with the incubation time rate controlling for both, the higher EM threshold observed for damascene was shown to be insufficient to compensate for its significantly increased Cu depletion rate, contrary to the case of polycrystalline Al(Cu) interconnects. Two factors were demonstrated to contribute. First, there are more metallic interfaces, intrinsically related to the use of wetting or barrier layers in recessed features. Second, specific to this study, the additional formation of TiAl3 at the trench sidewalls further enhanced the Cu depletion rate, and reduced the rate-controlling incubation time. A separate drift study on RIE via-type test structures indicated that it is very difficult to suppress interfacial mass transport in favor of lattice EM

  3. Effect of bamboo and rice straw biochars on the mobility and redistribution of heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn) in contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kouping; Yang, Xing; Gielen, Gerty; Bolan, Nanthi; Ok, Yong Sik; Niazi, Nabeel Khan; Xu, Song; Yuan, Guodong; Chen, Xin; Zhang, Xiaokai; Liu, Dan; Song, Zhaoliang; Liu, Xingyuan; Wang, Hailong

    2017-01-15

    Biochar has emerged as an efficient tool to affect bioavailability of heavy metals in contaminated soils. Although partially understood, a carefully designed incubation experiment was performed to examine the effect of biochar on mobility and redistribution of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in a sandy loam soil collected from the surroundings of a copper smelter. Bamboo and rice straw biochars with different mesh sizes (<0.25 mm and <1 mm), were applied at three rates (0, 1, and 5% w/w). Heavy metal concentrations in pore water were determined after extraction with 0.01 M CaCl 2 . Phytoavailable metals were extracted using DTPA/TEA (pH 7.3). The European Union Bureau of Reference (EUBCR) sequential extraction procedure was adopted to determine metal partitioning and redistribution of heavy metals. Results showed that CaCl 2 -and DTPA-extractable Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn concentrations were significantly (p < 0.05) lower in the bamboo and rice straw biochar treated soils, especially at 5% application rate, than those in the unamended soil. Soil pH values were significantly correlated with CaCl 2 -extractable metal concentrations (p < 0.01). The EUBCR sequential extraction procedure revealed that the acid extractable fractions of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn decreased significantly (p < 0.05) with biochar addition. Rice straw biochar was more effective than bamboo biochar in decreasing the acid extractable metal fractions, and the effect was more pronounced with increasing biochar application rate. The effect of biochar particle size on extractable metal concentrations was not consistent. The 5% rice straw biochar treatment reduced the DTPA-extractable metal concentrations in the order of Cd < Cu < Pb < Zn, and reduced the acid extractable pool of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn by 11, 17, 34 and 6%, respectively, compared to the control. In the same 5% rice straw biochar treatments, the organic bound fraction increased by 37, 58, 68 and 18% for Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn, respectively, compared to the

  4. ZrO2/bamboo leaves ash (BLA) Catalyst in Biodiesel Conversion of Rice Bran Oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatimah, Is; Taushiyah, Ana; Badriatun Najah, Fitri; Azmi, Ulil

    2018-04-01

    Preparation, characterization and catalytic activity of ZrO2/bamboo leaves ash (BLA) catalyst for conversion of rice bran oil to biodiesel have been investigated. The catalyst was prepared by impregnation method of ZrOCl2 as ZrO2 precursor with BLA at a theoretical content of 20% wt. followed by calcination. The physicochemical properties of the catalyst material were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), FTIR and surface acidity measurement. Activity test of materials in biodiesel conversion of rice bran oil was used by reflux method and microwave (MW) assisted method. Reaction variables studied in the investigation were the effect of catalyst weight and time of MW irradiation compared with the use reflux method. The results showed that ZrO2/BLA catalyst exhibited competitively effective and efficient processes for the production of biodiesel. The reflux method demonstrated an higher conversion (%) compared to MW method, however MW method showed the better reusable properties.

  5. Electrical conductivity of graphite oxide nanoplatelets obtained from bamboo: Effect of the deoxidation degree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, K.; Prias-Barragan, J. J.; Sangiao, S.; de Teresa, J. M.; Lajaunie, L.; Arenal, R.; Ariza-Calderón, H.; Prieto, P.

    Given the high interest in the fabrication and application of carbon-based materials, we present a new and cost-effective method for the synthesis of graphite oxide nanoplatelets (GONP) using bamboo pyroligneous acid (BPA) as source. GONP-BPA present lateral dimensions of 5-100 micro-meter and thickness less than 80 nm, as confirmed by TEM. EEL spectra show that locally the carbon is mainly in sp2 bonding configuration and confirm a short/medium range crystalline order. Elemental analysis by EDX confirms the presence of oxygen in an atomic percentage ranging from 17 to 5%. For electrical characterization, single platelets were contacted by focused-ion-beam-induced deposition of Pt nanowires. The four-point probe electrical conductivity shows a direct correlation with the oxygen percentage. Three orders of magnitude conductivity rise is observed by the oxygen reduction, reaching a value of 2.3x103 S/m at the final deoxidation degree. The results suggest that GONP-BPA could be used in the development of advanced devices and sensors.

  6. Variability in hematology of white-spotted bamboo sharks (Chiloscyllium plagiosum) in different living environments.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Lily A; Alexander, Amy B; Campbell, Terry W

    2017-07-01

    Elasmobranch hematology continues to reveal new peculiarities within this specialized field. This report compares total hematologic values from the same white-spotted bamboo sharks (Chiloscyllium plagiosum) housed in different environments. We compared the hemograms one year apart, using a standardized Natt-Herrick's technique. The total white blood cell (WBC) counts of the sharks were statistically different between the two time points (initial median total WBC count = 18,920 leukocytes/μl, SD = 8,108; 1 year later total WBC count = 1,815 leukocytes/μl, SD = 1,309). The packed cell volumes were additionally found to be statistically different (19%, SD = 2.9 vs. 22%, SD = 2.0). Analysis revealed the only differences between the time points were the temperature and stocking densities at which these sharks were housed. This report emphasizes the need for a thorough understanding of the husbandry of an elasmobranch prior to interpretation of a hemogram and suggests that reference intervals should be created for each environment. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Dispersion of bamboo type multi-wall carbon nanotubes in calf-thymus double stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Primo, Emiliano N; Cañete-Rosales, Paulina; Bollo, Soledad; Rubianes, María D; Rivas, Gustavo A

    2013-08-01

    We report for the first time the use of double stranded calf-thymus DNA (dsDNA) to successfully disperse bamboo-like multi-walled carbon nanotubes (bCNT). The dispersion and the modified electrodes were studied by different spectroscopic, microscopic and electrochemical techniques. The drastic treatment for dispersing the bCNT (45min sonication in a 50% (v/v) ethanol:water solution), produces a partial denaturation and a decrease in the length of dsDNA that facilitates the dispersion of CNT and makes possible an efficient electron transfer of guanine residues to the electrode. A critical analysis of the influence of different experimental conditions on the efficiency of the dispersion and on the performance of glassy carbon electrodes (GCE) modified with bCNT-dsDNA dispersion is also reported. The electron transfer of redox probes and guanine residues was more efficient at GCE modified with bCNT dispersed in dsDNA than at GCE modified with hollow CNT (hCNT) dispersed in dsDNA, demonstrating the importance of the presence of bCNT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of bamboo charcoal on fouling and microbial diversity in a flat-sheet ceramic membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjie; Liu, Xiaoning; Wang, Dunqiu; Jin, Yue

    2017-11-01

    Membrane fouling is a problem in full-scale membrane bioreactors. In this study, bamboo charcoal (BC) was evaluated for its efficacy in alleviating membrane fouling in flat-sheet membrane bioreactors treating municipal wastewater. The results showed that BC addition markedly improved treatment performance based on COD, NH 4 + -N, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus levels. Adding BC slowed the increase in the trans-membrane pressure rate and resulted in lower levels of soluble microbial products and extracellular polymeric substances detected in the flat-sheet membrane bioreactor. BC has a porous structure, and a large quantity of biomass was detected using scanning electron microscopy. The microbial community analysis results indicated that BC increased the microbial diversity and Aminomonas, Anaerofustis, uncultured Anaerolineaceae, Anaerolinea, and Anaerotruncus were found in higher abundances in the reactor with BC. BC addition is an effective method for reducing membrane fouling, and can be applied to full-scale flat-sheet membrane bioreactors to improve their function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Suction generation in white-spotted bamboo sharks Chiloscyllium plagiosum.

    PubMed

    Wilga, Cheryl D; Sanford, Christopher P

    2008-10-01

    After the divergence of chondrichthyans and teleostomes, the structure of the feeding apparatus also diverged leading to alterations in the suction mechanism. In this study we investigated the mechanism for suction generation during feeding in white-spotted bamboo sharks, Chiloscyllium plagiosum and compared it with that in teleosts. The internal movement of cranial elements and pressure in the buccal, hyoid and pharyngeal cavities that are directly responsible for suction generation was quantified using sonomicrometry and pressure transducers. Backward stepwise multiple linear regressions were used to explore the relationship between expansion and pressure, accounting for 60-96% of the variation in pressure among capture events. The progression of anterior to posterior expansion in the buccal, hyoid and pharyngeal cavities is accompanied by the sequential onset of subambient pressure in these cavities as prey is drawn into the mouth. Gape opening triggers the onset of subambient pressure in the oropharyngeal cavities. Peak gape area coincides with peak subambient buccal pressure. Increased velocity of hyoid area expansion is primarily responsible for generating peak subambient pressure in the buccal and hyoid regions. Pharyngeal expansion appears to function as a sink to receive water influx from the mouth, much like that of compensatory suction in bidirectional aquatic feeders. Interestingly, C. plagiosum generates large suction pressures while paradoxically compressing the buccal cavity laterally, delaying the time to peak pressure. This represents a fundamental difference from the mechanism used to generate suction in teleost fishes. Interestingly, pressure in the three cavities peaks in the posterior to anterior direction. The complex shape changes that the buccal cavity undergoes indicate that, as in teleosts, unsteady flow predominates during suction feeding. Several kinematic variables function together, with great variation over long gape cycles to

  10. Humic Acid Composition and Characteristics of Soil Organic Matter in Relation to the Elevation Gradient of Moso Bamboo Plantations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsueh-Ching; Chou, Chiao-Ying; Chiou, Chyi-Rong; Tian, Guanglong; Chiu, Chih-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Studying the influence of climatic and/or site-specific factors on soil organic matter (SOM) along an elevation gradient is important for understanding the response of SOM to global warming. We evaluated the composition of SOM and structure of humic acids along an altitudinal gradient from 600 to 1400 m in moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) plantations in central Taiwan using NMR spectroscopy and photometric analysis. Total organic C and total nitrogen (N) content increased with increasing elevation. Aromaticity decreased and ΔlogK (the logarithm of the absorbance ratio of humic acids at 400 and 600 nm) increased with increasing elevation, which suggests that SOM humification decreased with increasing elevation. High temperature at low elevations seemed to enhance the decomposition (less accumulation of total organic C and N) and humification (high aromaticity and low ΔlogK). The alkyl-C/O-alkyl-C (A/O-A) ratio of humic acids increased with increasing elevation, which suggests that SOM humification increased with increasing elevation; this finding was contrary to the trend observed for ΔlogK and aromaticity. Such a discrepancy might be due to the relatively greater remaining of SOM derived from high alkyl-C broadleaf litter of previous forest at high elevations. The ratio of recalcitrant C to total organic C was low at low elevations, possibly because of enhanced decomposition of recalcitrant SOM from the previous broadleaf forest during long-term intensive cultivation and high temperature. Overall, the change in SOM pools and in the rate of humification with elevation was primarily affected by changes in climatic conditions along the elevation gradient in these bamboo plantations. However, when the composition of SOM, as assessed by NMR spectroscopy and photometric analysis was considered, site-specific factors such as residual SOM from previous forest and intensive cultivation history could also have an important effect on the humic acid composition and

  11. Humic Acid Composition and Characteristics of Soil Organic Matter in Relation to the Elevation Gradient of Moso Bamboo Plantations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hsueh-Ching; Chou, Chiao-Ying; Chiou, Chyi-Rong; Tian, Guanglong

    2016-01-01

    Studying the influence of climatic and/or site-specific factors on soil organic matter (SOM) along an elevation gradient is important for understanding the response of SOM to global warming. We evaluated the composition of SOM and structure of humic acids along an altitudinal gradient from 600 to 1400 m in moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) plantations in central Taiwan using NMR spectroscopy and photometric analysis. Total organic C and total nitrogen (N) content increased with increasing elevation. Aromaticity decreased and ΔlogK (the logarithm of the absorbance ratio of humic acids at 400 and 600 nm) increased with increasing elevation, which suggests that SOM humification decreased with increasing elevation. High temperature at low elevations seemed to enhance the decomposition (less accumulation of total organic C and N) and humification (high aromaticity and low ΔlogK). The alkyl-C/O-alkyl-C (A/O-A) ratio of humic acids increased with increasing elevation, which suggests that SOM humification increased with increasing elevation; this finding was contrary to the trend observed for ΔlogK and aromaticity. Such a discrepancy might be due to the relatively greater remaining of SOM derived from high alkyl-C broadleaf litter of previous forest at high elevations. The ratio of recalcitrant C to total organic C was low at low elevations, possibly because of enhanced decomposition of recalcitrant SOM from the previous broadleaf forest during long-term intensive cultivation and high temperature. Overall, the change in SOM pools and in the rate of humification with elevation was primarily affected by changes in climatic conditions along the elevation gradient in these bamboo plantations. However, when the composition of SOM, as assessed by NMR spectroscopy and photometric analysis was considered, site-specific factors such as residual SOM from previous forest and intensive cultivation history could also have an important effect on the humic acid composition and

  12. Lignin from bamboo shoot shells as an activator and novel immobilizing support for α-amylase.

    PubMed

    Gong, Weihua; Ran, Zhanxiang; Ye, Fayin; Zhao, Guohua

    2017-08-01

    This study examined the feasibility of α-amylase activation and immobilization, using lignin from bamboo shoot shells (BSS). Our results demonstrated that BSS lignin is an excellent α-amylase activator and it elevated α-amylase activity more than two-fold at a concentration of 5mg/ml. For immobilization of α-amylase via adsorption, BSS lignin was incubated in an α-amylase solution (5mg/ml) for 20min, and the maximum specific activity, amount of loaded protein and activity recovery were 92.4U/mg, 19.0mg/g and 111%, respectively. In contrast to its free counterpart, immobilized α-amylase improved the catalytic efficiency and storage stability, under comparable working conditions (temperature and pH). Regarding its convenient usage, immobilized enzyme can be suspended in advance, but a suspension incubated at 60°C should be used within 30min. The residual activity after 14 re-uses remained at a reasonable level (53.2%). In conclusion, this study reveals a novel support for enzyme immobilization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Reduction in environmental impact of sulfuric acid hydrolysis of bamboo for production of fuel ethanol.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhao-Yong; Tang, Yue-Qin; Morimura, Shigeru; Kida, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Fuel ethanol can be produced from bamboo by concentrated sulfuric acid hydrolysis followed by continuous ethanol fermentation. To reduce the environmental impact of this process, treatment of the stillage, reuse of the sulfuric acid and reduction of the process water used were studied. The total organic carbon (TOC) concentration of stillage decreased from 29,688 to 269 mg/l by thermophilic methane fermentation followed by aerobic treatment. Washing the solid residue from acid hydrolysis with effluent from the biological treatment increased the sugar recovery from 69.3% to 79.3%. Sulfuric acid recovered during the acid-sugar separation process was condensed and reused for hydrolysis, resulting in a sugar recovery efficiency of 76.8%, compared to 80.1% when fresh sulfuric acid was used. After acetate removal, the condensate could be reused as elution water in the acid-sugar separation process. As much as 86.3% of the process water and 77.6% of the sulfuric acid could be recycled. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Ethanol production from bamboo using mild alkaline pre-extraction followed by alkaline hydrogen peroxide pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhaoyang; Wen, Yangbing; Kapu, Nuwan Sella

    2018-01-01

    A sequential two-stage pretreatment process comprising alkaline pre-extraction and alkaline hydrogen peroxide pretreatment (AHP) was investigated to convert bamboo carbohydrates into bioethanol. The results showed that mild alkaline pre-extraction using 8% (w/w) sodium hydroxide (NaOH) at 100°C for 180min followed by AHP pretreatment with 4% (w/w) hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) was sufficient to generate a substrate that could be efficiently digested with low enzyme loadings. Moreover, alkali pre-extraction enabled the use of lower H 2 O 2 charges in AHP treatment. Two-stage pretreatment followed by enzymatic hydrolysis with only 9FPU/g cellulose led to the recovery of 87% of the original sugars in the raw feedstock. The use of the pentose-hexose fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae SR8u strain enabled the utilization of 95.7% sugars in the hydrolysate to reach 4.6%w/v ethanol titer. The overall process also enabled the recovery of 62.9% lignin and 93.8% silica at high levels of purity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Enhanced adsorption of perfluorooctane sulfonate and perfluorooctanoate by bamboo-derived granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shubo; Nie, Yao; Du, Ziwen; Huang, Qian; Meng, Pingping; Wang, Bin; Huang, Jun; Yu, Gang

    2015-01-23

    A bamboo-derived granular activated carbon with large pores was successfully prepared by KOH activation, and used to remove perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) from aqueous solution. The granular activated carbon prepared at the KOH/C mass ratio of 4 and activation temperature of 900°C had fast and high adsorption for PFOS and PFOA. Their adsorption equilibrium was achieved within 24h, which was attributed to their fast diffusion in the micron-sized pores of activated carbon. This granular activated carbon exhibited the maximum adsorbed amount of 2.32mmol/g for PFOS and 1.15mmol/g for PFOA at pH 5.0, much higher than other granular and powdered activated carbons reported. The activated carbon prepared under the severe activation condition contained many enlarged pores, favorable for the adsorption of PFOS and PFOA. In addition, the spent activated carbon was hardly regenerated in NaOH/NaCl solution, while the regeneration efficiency was significantly enhanced in hot water and methanol/ethanol solution, indicating that hydrophobic interaction was mainly responsible for the adsorption. The regeneration percent was up to 98% using 50% ethanol solution at 45°C. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Structural features and antioxidant activities of lignins from steam-exploded bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens).

    PubMed

    Sun, Shao-Ni; Cao, Xue-Fei; Xu, Feng; Sun, Run-Cang; Jones, Gwynn Lloyd

    2014-06-25

    An environmentally friendly steam explosion process of bamboo, followed by alkali and alkaline ethanol delignification, was developed to fractionate lignins. Results showed that after steam explosion the lignins isolated showed relatively low carbohydrate contents (0.55-1.76%) and molecular weights (780-1050 g/mol). For each steam-exploded sample, alkali-extracted lignins presented higher phenolic OH values (1.41-1.82 mmol/g), p-coumaric acid to ferulic acid ratios (pCA/FA ratios 4.5-14.1), and syringyl to guaiacyl ratios (S/G ratios 5.0-8.5) than those from alkaline ethanol-extracted lignins (phenolic OH 0.85-1.35 mmol/g, pCA/FA ratios 1.6-5.2, and S/G ratios 3.5-4.8). The lignins obtained consisted mainly of β-O-4' linkages combined with small amounts of β-β', β-5', and α-O-4/β-O-4 linkages. Antioxidant activities of the lignins obtained were tested by the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, 2,2'-azobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), and ferric reducing activity power methods. It was found that alkali-extracted lignins obtained during the initial extraction process had higher antioxidant activities than alkaline ethanol-extracted lignins obtained during the second extraction process.

  17. The bamboo-eating giant panda harbors a carnivore-like gut microbiota, with excessive seasonal variations.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zhengsheng; Zhang, Wenping; Wang, Linghua; Hou, Rong; Zhang, Menghui; Fei, Lisong; Zhang, Xiaojun; Huang, He; Bridgewater, Laura C; Jiang, Yi; Jiang, Chenglin; Zhao, Liping; Pang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Zhihe

    2015-05-19

    The giant panda evolved from omnivorous bears. It lives on a bamboo-dominated diet at present, but it still retains a typical carnivorous digestive system and is genetically deficient in cellulose-digesting enzymes. To find out whether this endangered mammalian species, like other herbivores, has successfully developed a gut microbiota adapted to its fiber-rich diet, we conducted a 16S rRNA gene-based large-scale structural profiling of the giant panda fecal microbiota. Forty-five captive individuals were sampled in spring, summer, and late autumn within 1 year. Significant intraindividual variations in the diversity and structure of gut microbiota across seasons were observed in this population, which were even greater than the variations between individuals. Compared with published data sets involving 124 gut microbiota profiles from 54 mammalian species, these giant pandas, together with 9 captive and 7 wild individuals investigated previously, showed extremely low gut microbiota diversity and an overall structure that diverged from those of nonpanda herbivores but converged with those of carnivorous and omnivorous bears. The giant panda did not harbor putative cellulose-degrading phylotypes such as Ruminococcaceae and Bacteroides bacteria that are typically enriched in other herbivores, but instead, its microbiota was dominated by Escherichia/Shigella and Streptococcus bacteria. Members of the class Clostridia were common and abundant in the giant panda gut microbiota, but most of the members present were absent in other herbivores and were not phylogenetically related with known cellulolytic lineages. Therefore, the giant panda appears not to have evolved a gut microbiota compatible with its newly adopted diet, which may adversely influence the coevolutionary fitness of this herbivore. The giant panda, an endangered mammalian species endemic to western China, is well known for its unique bamboo diet. Unlike other herbivores that have successfully evolved

  18. A transgenic plant cell-suspension system for expression of epitopes on chimeric Bamboo mosaic virus particles.

    PubMed

    Muthamilselvan, Thangarasu; Lee, Chin-Wei; Cho, Yu-Hsin; Wu, Feng-Chao; Hu, Chung-Chi; Liang, Yu-Chuan; Lin, Na-Sheng; Hsu, Yau-Heiu

    2016-01-01

    We describe a novel strategy to produce vaccine antigens using a plant cell-suspension culture system in lieu of the conventional bacterial or animal cell-culture systems. We generated transgenic cell-suspension cultures from Nicotiana benthamiana leaves carrying wild-type or chimeric Bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV) expression constructs encoding the viral protein 1 (VP1) epitope of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Antigens accumulated to high levels in BdT38 and BdT19 transgenic cell lines co-expressing silencing suppressor protein P38 or P19. BaMV chimeric virus particles (CVPs) were subsequently purified from the respective cell lines (1.5 and 2.1 mg CVPs/20 g fresh weight of suspended biomass, respectively), and the resulting CVPs displayed VP1 epitope on the surfaces. Guinea pigs vaccinated with purified CVPs produced humoral antibodies. This study represents an important advance in the large-scale production of immunopeptide vaccines in a cost-effective manner using a plant cell-suspension culture system. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The developmental transcriptome of the bamboo snout beetle Cyrtotrachelus buqueti and insights into candidate pheromone-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei; Yang, Chunping; Lu, Lin; Chen, Zhangming

    2017-01-01

    Cyrtotrachelus buqueti is an extremely harmful bamboo borer, and the larvae of this pest attack clumping bamboo shoots. Pheromone-binding proteins (PBPs) play an important role in identifying insect sex pheromones, but the C. buqueti genome is not readily available for PBP analysis. Developmental transcriptomes of eggs, larvae from the first instar to the prepupal stage, pupae, and adults (females and males) from emergence to mating were built by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) in the present study to establish a sequence background of C. buqueti to help understand PBPs. Approximately 164.8 million clean reads were obtained and annotated into 108,854 transcripts. These were assembled into 24,338, 21,597, 24,798, 21,886, 24,642, and 83,115 unigenes for eggs, larvae, pupae, females, males, and the combined datasets, respectively. Unigenes were annotated against NCBI non-redundant protein sequences, NCBI non-redundant nucleotide sequences, Gene Ontology (GO), Protein family, Clusters of Orthologous Groups of Proteins/ Clusters of Eukaryotic Orthologous Groups (KOG), Swiss-Prot, and KEGG Orthology databases. A total of 17,213 unigenes were annotated into 55 sub-categories belonging to three main GO categories; 10,672 unigenes were classified into 26 functional categories by KOG classification, and 8,063 unigenes were classified into five functional KEGG categories. RSEM software for RNA sequencing showed that 4,816, 3,176, 3,661, 2,898, 4,316, 8,019, 7,273, 5,922, 5,844, and 4,570 genes were differentially expressed between larvae and males, larvae and eggs, larvae and pupae, larvae and females, males and females, males and eggs, males and pupae, females and eggs, females and pupae, and eggs and pupae, respectively. Of these, three were confirmed to be significantly differentially expressed between larvae, females, and males. Furthermore, PBP Cbuq7577_g1 was highly expressed in the antenna of males. A comprehensive sequence resource of a desirable quality was constructed from

  20. Waste water purification using new porous ceramics prepared by recycling waste glass and bamboo charcoal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Tetsuaki; Morimoto, Akane; Yamamoto, Yoshito; Kubuki, Shiro

    2017-12-01

    New porous ceramics (PC) prepared by recycling waste glass bottle of soft drinks (80 mass%) and bamboo charcoal (20 mass%) without any binder was applied to the waste water purification under aeration at 25 °C. Artificial waste water (15 L) containing 10 mL of milk was examined by combining 15 mL of activated sludge and 750 g of PC. Biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) showed a marked decrease from 178 to 4.0 (±0.1) mg L-1 in 5 days and to 2.0 (±0.1) mg L-1 in 7 days, which was equal to the Environmental Standard for the river water (class A) in Japan. Similarly, chemical oxygen demand (COD) decreased from 158 to 3.6 (±0.1) mg L-1 in 5 days and to 2.2 (±0.1) mg L-1 in 9 days, which was less than the Environmental Standard for the Seawater (class B) in Japan: 3.0 mg L-1. These results prove the high water purification ability of the PC, which will be effectively utilized for the purification of drinking water, fish preserve water, fish farm water, etc.

  1. Endosymbiotic Microbiota of the Bamboo Pseudococcid Antonina crawii (Insecta, Homoptera)

    PubMed Central

    Fukatsu, Takema; Nikoh, Naruo

    2000-01-01

    We characterized the intracellular symbiotic microbiota of the bamboo pseudococcid Antonina crawii by performing a molecular phylogenetic analysis in combination with in situ hybridization. Almost the entire length of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene was amplified and cloned from A. crawii whole DNA. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis revealed that the clones obtained included three distinct types of sequences. Nucleotide sequences of the three types were determined and subjected to a molecular phylogenetic analysis. The first sequence was a member of the γ subdivision of the division Proteobacteria (γ-Proteobacteria) to which no sequences in the database were closely related, although the sequences of endosymbionts of other homopterans, such as psyllids and aphids, were distantly related. The second sequence was a β-Proteobacteria sequence and formed a monophyletic group with the sequences of endosymbionts from other pseudococcids. The third sequence exhibited a high level of similarity to sequences of Spiroplasma spp. from ladybird beetles and a tick. Localization of the endosymbionts was determined by using tissue sections of A. crawii and in situ hybridization with specific oligonucleotide probes. The γ- and β-Proteobacteria symbionts were packed in the cytoplasm of the same mycetocytes (or bacteriocytes) and formed a large mycetome (or bacteriome) in the abdomen. The spiroplasma symbionts were also present intracellularly in various tissues at a low density. We observed that the anterior poles of developing eggs in the ovaries were infected by the γ- and β-Proteobacteria symbionts in a systematic way, which ensured vertical transmission. Five representative pseudococcids were examined by performing diagnostic PCR experiments with specific primers; the β-Proteobacteria symbiont was detected in all five pseudococcids, the γ-Proteobacteria symbiont was found in three, and the spiroplasma symbiont was detected only in A. crawii. PMID:10653730

  2. Superelasticity by reversible variant reorientation in a Ni-Mn-Ga microwire with bamboo grains

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Z. L.; Zheng, P.; Nie, Z. H.; ...

    2015-08-26

    The link between microstructure and mechanical properties is investigated for a superelastic Ni–Mn–Ga microwire with 226 μm diameter, created by solidification via the Taylor method. The wire, which consists of bamboo grains with tetragonal martensite matrix and coarse γ precipitates, exhibits fully reversible superelastic behavior up to 4% tensile strain. Upon multiple tensile load–unload cycles, reproducible stress fluctuations of ~3 MPa are measured on the loading superelastic stress plateau of ~50 MPa. During cycles at various temperatures spanning -70 to 55 °C, the plateau stress decreases from 58 to 48 MPa near linearly with increasing temperature. Based on in situmore » synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements, we conclude that this superelastic behavior is due to reversible martensite variants reorientation (i.e., reversible twinning) with lattice rotation of ~13°. The reproducible stress plateau fluctuations are assigned to reversible twinning at well-defined locations along the wire. The strain recovery during unloading is attributed to reverse twinning, driven by the internal stress generated on loading between the elastic γ precipitates and the twinning martensite matrix. Lastly, the temperature dependence of the twining stress on loading is related to the change in tetragonality of the martensite, as measured by X-ray diffraction.« less

  3. Characteristics and enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose-rich fractions from steam exploded and sequentially alkali delignified bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens).

    PubMed

    Sun, Shao-Ni; Cao, Xue-Fei; Zhang, Xue-Ming; Xu, Feng; Sun, Run-Cang; Jones, Gwynn Lloyd

    2014-07-01

    In this study, cellulose-rich fractions from bamboo were prepared with steam explosion pretreatment (SEP) followed by a successive alkaline delignification to improve the enzymatic digestibility for an efficient bioethanol production. The cellulose-rich fractions obtained were characterized by FT-IR, XRD, CP/MAS (13)C NMR, SEM, and BET surface area. It was found that the SEP alone significantly removed partial hemicelluloses, while the synergistic treatment by SEP and alkaline delignification removed most hemicelluloses and lignin. Results from enzymatic hydrolysis showed that SEP alone improved the enzymatic hydrolysis rate by 7.9-33.1%, while the synergistic treatment by SEP and alkaline delignification enhanced the rate by 45.7-63.9%. The synergistic treatment by SEP at 2.0 MPa for 5 min with water impregnation followed by a successive alkaline delignification with 0.5% NaOH and 70% ethanol containing 1.5% NaOH resulted in a maximum enzymatic hydrolysis rate of 70.6%. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Homogenate-assisted Vacuum-powered Bubble Extraction of Moso Bamboo Flavonoids for On-line Scavenging Free Radical Capacity Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yinnan; Yang, Kui; Cao, Qin; Sun, Jinde; Xia, Yu; Wang, Yinhang; Li, Wei; Ma, Chunhui; Liu, Shouxin

    2017-07-11

    A homogenate-assisted vacuum-powered bubble extraction (HVBE) method using ethanol was applied for extraction of flavonoids from Phyllostachys pubescens (P. pubescens) leaves. The mechanisms of homogenate-assisted extraction and vacuum-powered bubble generation were discussed in detail. Furthermore, a method for the rapid determination of flavonoids by HPLC was established. HVBE followed by HPLC was successfully applied for the extraction and quantification of four flavonoids in P. pubescens , including orientin, isoorientin, vitexin, and isovitexin. This method provides a fast and effective means for the preparation and determination of plant active components. Moreover, the on-line antioxidant capacity, including scavenging positive ion and negative ion free radical capacity of different fractions from the bamboo flavonoid extract was evaluated. Results showed that the scavenging DPPH ˙ free radical capacity of vitexin and isovitexin was larger than that of isoorientin and orientin. On the contrary, the scavenging ABTS⁺ ˙ free radical capacity of isoorientin and orientin was larger than that of vitexin and isovitexin.

  5. Ultra-lightweight and highly porous carbon aerogels from bamboo pulp fibers as an effective sorbent for water treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wei; Zhang, Xiaofang; Zhao, Jiangqi; Li, Qingye; Ao, Chenghong; Xia, Tian; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Canhui

    Sorbents derived from biomass provide a novel approach to settle issues of organic solvent and/or oil leakage. In this work, a novel carbon aerogel (CA) was prepared as sorbents using the cheap and abundant bamboo pulp fibers as precursors through the pyrolysis method. The CA displayed an ultra-low density (5.65 mg cm-3), high hydrophobicity (water contact angle of 135.9°) and a large specific surface area (379.39 m2 g-1) as well as great mechanical properties. The absorption capacities of CA for organic solvents/oils were extraordinary (50-150 g/g). Particularly, its absorption on organic solvents was superior to many other bio-based CAs. The reusability of CA was also found impressive. For over five absorption-desorption cycles, the CA still showed excellent absorption behaviors on organic solvents and oils. Importantly, the fabrication process of CA is quite simple and environmentally friendly, demonstrating high potentials for future water treatment applications.

  6. Neuroprotective and antioxidant activities of bamboo salt soy sauce against H2O2-induced oxidative stress in rat cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jong Hee; Noh, Min-Young; Choi, Jae-Hyeok; Lee, Haiwon; Kim, Seung Hyun

    2016-04-01

    Bamboo salt (BS) and soy sauce (SS) are traditional foods in Asia, which contain antioxidants that have cytoprotective effects on the body. The majority of SS products contain high levels of common salt, consumption of which has been associated with numerous detrimental effects on the body. However, BS may be considered a healthier substitute to common salt. The present study hypothesized that SS made from BS, known as bamboo salt soy sauce (BSSS), may possess enhanced cytoprotective properties; this was evaluated using a hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 )-induced neuronal cell death rat model. Rat neuronal cells were pretreated with various concentrations (0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 10%) of BSSS, traditional soy sauce (TRSS) and brewed soy sauce (BRSS), and were subsequently exposed to H 2 O 2 (100 µM). The viability of neuronal cells, and the occurrence of DNA fragmentation, was subsequently examined. Pretreatment of neuronal cells with TRSS and BRSS reduced cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas neuronal cells pretreated with BSSS exhibited increased cell viability, as compared with non-treated neuronal cells. Furthermore, neuronal cells pretreated with 0.01% BSSS exhibited the greatest increase in viability. Exposure of neuronal cells to H 2 O 2 significantly increased the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), B-cell lymphoma 2-associated X protein, poly (ADP-ribose), cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, cytochrome c , apoptosis-inducing factor, cleaved caspase-9 and cleaved caspase-3, in all cases. Pretreatment of neuronal cells with BSSS significantly reduced the levels of ROS generated by H 2 O 2 , and increased the levels of phosphorylated AKT and phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase-3β. Furthermore, the observed effects of BSSS could be blocked by administration of 10 µM LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor. The results of the present study suggested that BSSS may exert positive neuroprotective effects against H 2 O 2

  7. Antioxidative and Anti-Melanogenic Activities of Bamboo Stems (Phyllostachys nigra variety henosis) via PKA/CREB-Mediated MITF Downregulation in B16F10 Melanoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Moon-Hee; Jo, Han-Gyo; Yang, Ji Hye; Ki, Sung Hwan; Shin, Hyun-Jae

    2018-01-30

    Phyllostachys nigra var. henosis, a domestic bamboo species, has been attracting much attention; its bioactive compounds (especially in the leaf) show antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-obesity activities. Little information is available on the antioxidative and anti-melanogenetic activities of the bioactive compounds in bamboo stems. The anti-melanogenic and antioxidative activities of the EtOAc fraction (PN3) of a P. nigra stem extract were investigated in a cell-free system and in B16F10 melanoma cells. PN3 consisted of a mixture of flavonoids, such as catechin, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, and p -coumaric acid. The antioxidant activity (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS)), and hydroxyl radical scavenging) was evaluated, as well as the inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by the Fenton reaction. PN3 showed in vitro tyrosinase inhibition activity with the half maximal inbihitory concentration (IC 50 ) values of 240 μg/mL, and in vivo cytotoxic concentration ranges > 100 μg/mL. The protein expression levels and mRNA transcription levels of TYR , TRP-1 , and MITF were decreased in a dose-dependent manner by the treatment with PN3. PN3 interfered with the phosphorylation of intracellular protein kinase A (PKA)/cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), demonstrating potent anti-melanogenic effects. PN3 could inhibit PKA/CREB and the subsequent degradation of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), resulting in the suppression of melanogenic enzymes and melanin production, probably because of the presence of flavonoid compounds. These properties make it a candidate as an additive to whitening cosmetics.

  8. Antioxidative and Anti-Melanogenic Activities of Bamboo Stems (Phyllostachys nigra variety henosis) via PKA/CREB-Mediated MITF Downregulation in B16F10 Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Moon-Hee; Jo, Han-Gyo; Yang, Ji Hye; Ki, Sung Hwan

    2018-01-01

    Phyllostachys nigra var. henosis, a domestic bamboo species, has been attracting much attention; its bioactive compounds (especially in the leaf) show antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-obesity activities. Little information is available on the antioxidative and anti-melanogenetic activities of the bioactive compounds in bamboo stems. The anti-melanogenic and antioxidative activities of the EtOAc fraction (PN3) of a P. nigra stem extract were investigated in a cell-free system and in B16F10 melanoma cells. PN3 consisted of a mixture of flavonoids, such as catechin, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, and p-coumaric acid. The antioxidant activity (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS)), and hydroxyl radical scavenging) was evaluated, as well as the inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by the Fenton reaction. PN3 showed in vitro tyrosinase inhibition activity with the half maximal inbihitory concentration (IC50) values of 240 μg/mL, and in vivo cytotoxic concentration ranges > 100 μg/mL. The protein expression levels and mRNA transcription levels of TYR, TRP-1, and MITF were decreased in a dose-dependent manner by the treatment with PN3. PN3 interfered with the phosphorylation of intracellular protein kinase A (PKA)/cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), demonstrating potent anti-melanogenic effects. PN3 could inhibit PKA/CREB and the subsequent degradation of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), resulting in the suppression of melanogenic enzymes and melanin production, probably because of the presence of flavonoid compounds. These properties make it a candidate as an additive to whitening cosmetics. PMID:29385729

  9. Facilitating the enzymatic saccharification of pulped bamboo residues by degrading the remained xylan and lignin-carbohydrates complexes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Caoxing; He, Juan; Li, Xin; Min, Douyong; Yong, Qiang

    2015-09-01

    Kraft pulping was performed on bamboo residues and its impact on the chemical compositions and the enzymatic digestibility of the samples were investigated. To improve the digestibility of sample by degrading the xylan and lignin-carbohydrates complexes (LCCs), xylanase and α-L-arabinofuranosidase (AF) were supplemented with cellulase. The results showed more carbohydrates were remained in the samples pulped with low effective alkali (EA) charge, compared to conventional kraft pulping. When 120 IU/g xylanase and 15 IU/g AF were supplemented with 20 FPU/g cellulase, the xylan degradation yield of the sample pulped with 12% EA charge increased from 68.20% to 88.35%, resulting in an increased enzymatic saccharification efficiency from 58.98% to 83.23%. The amount of LCCs in this sample decreased from 8.63/100C9 to 2.99/100C9 after saccharification with these enzymes. The results indicated that degrading the remained xylan and LCCs in the pulp could improve its enzymatic digestibility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Drinking water decontamination by biological denitrification using fresh bamboo as inoculum source.

    PubMed

    Bucco, Samuel; Padoin, Natan; Netto, Willibaldo Schmidell; Soares, Hugo Moreira

    2014-10-01

    Groundwater contamination is becoming a serious problem in many Brazilian regions. European countries started to deal with this issue in the 1980s, mainly caused by the extensive usage of nitrogenous fertilizers and the absence of domestic wastewater treatment. Due to its high solubility, nitrate readily passes through the soil and reaches the aquifer. Thereafter, this ion moves, following groundwater flow, and can be found several kilometers from the area where the pollution occurred. Concern about nitrate contamination is due to the link found between this contaminant and various human health diseases, such as methemoglobin and cancer. Studies carried out in France enabled the design and implementation of several biological denitrification plants throughout the country, in order to remove nitrate from its contaminated groundwater. Heterotrophic denitrification facilities shown to be adequate to treat high water flows with satisfactory nitrate removal efficiency, especially when static media supports are employed. The objective of this research was to evaluate the existence of denitrifying microorganisms in bamboo (Bambusa tuldóides) and verify the feasibility of their use to inoculate a pilot-scale fixed-bed bioreactor. The support material selected to fill the bioreactor bed was commercial polypropylene Pall rings, since such support has a high porosity associated with a wide superficial area. The bioreactor was able to produce and retain a large amount of cells. Using ethanol as carbon source, nitrate (N-NO3(-)) removal efficiency of the bioreactor stood around 80 % for a maximum nitrogen loading rate of approximately 6.5 mg N-NO3 (-) L(-1) h(-1).

  11. Bioaccumulation of trace metals in banded Persian bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium arabicum) from the Persian Gulf: A food safety issue.

    PubMed

    Adel, Milad; Copat, Chiara; Saeidi Asl, Mohammad Reza; Conti, Gea Oliveri; Babazadeh, Mehdi; Ferrante, Margherita

    2018-03-01

    Persian bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium arabicum) was collected from two sites of the Khozestan province, northern basin of Persian Gulf, with the aim to identify differences in metal concentrations between fishing areas as well as the risk for human health due to consumption of the selected species. We analyzed Zn, Cu, Pb, Hg, Cd and Ni in muscle and liver tissues of specimens from both areas of study using atomic adsorption spectrometry. Statistical elaborations revealed higher bioaccumulation of metals in livers than muscle as well as in the site of worthy of Musa as regards Zn, Pb and Ni than the site of worthy of Darvis, due to the more intensive anthropogenic input. The risk for consumers is low for the most of metals, with the exception of the THQ for Hg, which resulted next to the level of risk with high frequencies of consumption. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Wildfires in bamboo-dominated Amazonian forest: impacts on above-ground biomass and biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Jos; Silveira, Juliana M; Mestre, Luiz A M; Andrade, Rafael B; Camacho D'Andrea, Gabriela; Louzada, Julio; Vaz-de-Mello, Fernando Z; Numata, Izaya; Lacau, Sébastien; Cochrane, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    Fire has become an increasingly important disturbance event in south-western Amazonia. We conducted the first assessment of the ecological impacts of these wildfires in 2008, sampling forest structure and biodiversity along twelve 500 m transects in the Chico Mendes Extractive Reserve, Acre, Brazil. Six transects were placed in unburned forests and six were in forests that burned during a series of forest fires that occurred from August to October 2005. Normalized Burn Ratio (NBR) calculations, based on Landsat reflectance data, indicate that all transects were similar prior to the fires. We sampled understorey and canopy vegetation, birds using both mist nets and point counts, coprophagous dung beetles and the leaf-litter ant fauna. Fire had limited influence upon either faunal or floral species richness or community structure responses, and stems <10 cm DBH were the only group to show highly significant (p = 0.001) community turnover in burned forests. Mean aboveground live biomass was statistically indistinguishable in the unburned and burned plots, although there was a significant increase in the total abundance of dead stems in burned plots. Comparisons with previous studies suggest that wildfires had much less effect upon forest structure and biodiversity in these south-western Amazonian forests than in central and eastern Amazonia, where most fire research has been undertaken to date. We discuss potential reasons for the apparent greater resilience of our study plots to wildfire, examining the role of fire intensity, bamboo dominance, background rates of disturbance, landscape and soil conditions.

  13. Dual function of the pectoral girdle for feeding and locomotion in white-spotted bamboo sharks.

    PubMed

    Camp, Ariel L; Scott, Bradley; Brainerd, Elizabeth L; Wilga, Cheryl D

    2017-07-26

    Positioned at the intersection of the head, body and forelimb, the pectoral girdle has the potential to function in both feeding and locomotor behaviours-although the latter has been studied far more. In ray-finned fishes, the pectoral girdle attaches directly to the skull and is retracted during suction feeding, enabling the ventral body muscles to power rapid mouth expansion. However, in sharks, the pectoral girdle is displaced caudally and entirely separate from the skull (as in tetrapods), raising the question of whether it is mobile during suction feeding and contributing to suction expansion. We measured three-dimensional kinematics of the pectoral girdle in white-spotted bamboo sharks during suction feeding with X-ray reconstruction of moving morphology, and found the pectoral girdle consistently retracted about 11° by rotating caudoventrally about the dorsal scapular processes. This motion occurred mostly after peak gape, so it likely contributed more to accelerating captured prey through the oral cavity and pharynx, than to prey capture as in ray-finned fishes. Our results emphasize the multiple roles of the pectoral girdle in feeding and locomotion, both of which should be considered in studying the functional and evolutionary morphology of this structure. © 2017 The Author(s).

  14. Electrical conductivity of oxidized-graphenic nanoplatelets obtained from bamboo: effect of the oxygen content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, K.; Prías Barragán, J. J.; Sangiao, S.; De Teresa, J. M.; Lajaunie, L.; Arenal, R.; Ariza Calderón, H.; Prieto, P.

    2016-09-01

    The large-scale production of graphene and reduced-graphene oxide (rGO) requires low-cost and eco-friendly synthesis methods. We employed a new, simple, cost-effective pyrolytic method to synthetize oxidized-graphenic nanoplatelets (OGNP) using bamboo pyroligneous acid (BPA) as a source. Thorough analyses via high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy provides a complete structural and chemical description at the local scale of these samples. In particular, we found that at the highest carbonization temperature the OGNP-BPA are mainly in a sp2 bonding configuration (sp2 fraction of 87%). To determine the electrical properties of single nanoplatelets, these were contacted by Pt nanowires deposited through focused-ion-beam-induced deposition techniques. Increased conductivity by two orders of magnitude is observed as oxygen content decreases from 17% to 5%, reaching a value of 2.3 × 103 S m-1 at the lowest oxygen content. Temperature-dependent conductivity reveals a semiconductor transport behavior, described by the Mott three-dimensional variable range hopping mechanism. From the localization length, we estimate a band-gap value of 0.22(2) eV for an oxygen content of 5%. This investigation demonstrates the great potential of the OGNP-BPA for technological applications, given that their structural and electrical behavior is similar to the highly reduced rGO sheets obtained by more sophisticated conventional synthesis methods.

  15. Surface properties, solubility and dissolution kinetics of bamboo phytoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraysse, Fabrice; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Schott, Jacques; Meunier, Jean-Dominique

    2006-04-01

    Although phytoliths, constituted mainly by micrometric opal, exhibit an important control on silicon cycle in superficial continental environments, their thermodynamic properties and reactivity in aqueous solution are still poorly known. In this work, we determined the solubility and dissolution rates of bamboo phytoliths collected in the Réunion Island and characterized their surface properties via electrophoretic measurements and potentiometric titrations in a wide range of pH. The solubility product of "soil" phytoliths ( pKsp0=2.74 at 25 °C) is equal to that of vitreous silica and is 17 times higher than that of quartz. Similarly, the enthalpy of phytoliths dissolution reaction (ΔHr25-80°C=10.85kJ/mol) is close to that of amorphous silica but is significantly lower than the enthalpy of quartz dissolution. Electrophoretic measurements yield isoelectric point pH IEP = 1.2 ± 0.1 and 2.5 ± 0.2 for "soil" (native) and "heated" (450 °C heating to remove organic matter) phytoliths, respectively. Surface acid-base titrations allowed generation of a 2-p K surface complexation model. Phytoliths dissolution rates, measured in mixed-flow reactors at far from equilibrium conditions at 2 ⩽ pH ⩽ 12, were found to be intermediate between those of quartz and vitreous silica. The dissolution rate dependence on pH was modeled within the concept of surface coordination theory using the equation: R=k1·{>SiOH2+}n+k2·{>SiOH0}+k3·{>SiO-}m, where {> i} stands for the concentration of the surface species present at the SiO 2-H 2O interface, ki are the rate constants of the three parallel reactions and n and m represent the order of the proton- and hydroxy-promoted reactions, respectively. It follows from the results of this study that phytoliths dissolution rates exhibit a minimum at pH ˜ 3. This can explain their good preservation in the acidic soil horizons of Réunion Island. In terms of silicon biogeochemical cycle, phytoliths represent a large buffering reservoir

  16. Mapping the transition from catalyst-pool to bamboo-like growth-mechanism in vertically-aligned free-standing films of carbon nanotubes filled with Fe3C: The key role of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boi, Filippo S.; Wang, Shanling; He, Yi

    2016-08-01

    The control of carbon nanotube growth has challenged researchers for more than a decade due to the complex parameters-control necessary in the commonly used CVD approaches. Here we show that a direct transition from the catalyst-pool growth mechanism characterized by graphene-caps in the direction of growth to a bamboo-shaped mechanism characterized by the repetition of periodic elongated graphitic compartments is present when controlled quantities of water are added to ferrocene/dichlorobenzene. Our results suggest that water-addition allows enhancing the level of stress accumulated under the graphitic nanotubes-cap.

  17. Characterization of the Trunk Neural Crest in the bamboo shark, Chiloscyllium punctatum

    PubMed Central

    Juarez, Marilyn; Reyes, Michelle; Coleman, Tiffany; Rotenstein, Lisa; Sao, Sothy; Martinez, Darwin; Jones, Matthew; Mackelprang, Rachel; de Bellard, Maria Elena

    2013-01-01

    The neural crest is a population of mesenchymal cells that after migrating from the neural tube give rise to a structures and cell-types: jaw, part of the peripheral ganglia and melanocytes. Although much is known about neural crest development in jawed vertebrates, a clear picture of trunk neural crest development for elasmobranchs is yet to be developed. Here we present a detailed study of trunk neural crest development in the bamboo shark, Chiloscyllium punctatum. Vital labeling with DiI and in situ hybridization using cloned Sox8 and Sox9 probes demonstrated that trunk neural crest cells follow a pattern similar to the migratory paths already described in zebrafish and amphibians. We found shark trunk neural crest along the rostral side of the somites, the ventromedial pathway, branchial arches, gut, sensory ganglia and nerves. Interestingly, Chiloscyllium punctatum Sox8 and Sox9 sequences aligned with vertebrate SoxE genes, but appeared to be more ancient than the corresponding vertebrate paralogs. The expression of these two SoxE genes in trunk neural crest cells, especially Sox9, matched the Sox10 migratory patterns observed in teleosts. Interestingly, we observed DiI cells and Sox9 labeling along the lateral line, suggesting that in C. punctatum, glial cells in the lateral line are likely of neural crest origin. Though this has been observed in other vertebrates, we are the first to show that the pattern is present in cartilaginous fishes. These findings demonstrate that trunk neural crest cell development in Chiloscyllium punctatum follows the same highly conserved migratory pattern observed in jawed vertebrates PMID:23640803

  18. Fractionation of bamboo culms by autohydrolysis, organosolv delignification and extended delignification: understanding the fundamental chemistry of the lignin during the integrated process.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jia-Long; Sun, Shao-Ni; Yuan, Tong-Qi; Xu, Feng; Sun, Run-Cang

    2013-12-01

    Bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens) was successfully fractionated using a three-step integrated process: (1) autohydrolysis pretreatment facilitating xylooligosaccharide (XOS) production (2) organosolv delignification with organic acids to obtain high-purity lignin, and (3) extended delignification with alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP) to produce purified pulp. The integrated process was comprehensively evaluated by component analysis, SEM, XRD, and CP-MAS NMR techniques. Emphatically, the fundamental chemistry of the lignin fragments obtained from the integrated process was thoroughly investigated by gel permeation chromatography and solution-state NMR techniques (quantitative (13)C, 2D-HSQC, and (31)P-NMR spectroscopies). It is believed that the integrated process facilitate the production of XOS, high-purity lignin, and purified pulp. Moreover, the enhanced understanding of structural features and chemical reactivity of lignin polymers will maximize their utilizations in a future biorefinery industry. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Wildfires in Bamboo-Dominated Amazonian Forest: Impacts on Above-Ground Biomass and Biodiversity

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Jos; Silveira, Juliana M.; Mestre, Luiz A. M.; Andrade, Rafael B.; Camacho D'Andrea, Gabriela; Louzada, Julio; Vaz-de-Mello, Fernando Z.; Numata, Izaya; Lacau, Sébastien; Cochrane, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Fire has become an increasingly important disturbance event in south-western Amazonia. We conducted the first assessment of the ecological impacts of these wildfires in 2008, sampling forest structure and biodiversity along twelve 500 m transects in the Chico Mendes Extractive Reserve, Acre, Brazil. Six transects were placed in unburned forests and six were in forests that burned during a series of forest fires that occurred from August to October 2005. Normalized Burn Ratio (NBR) calculations, based on Landsat reflectance data, indicate that all transects were similar prior to the fires. We sampled understorey and canopy vegetation, birds using both mist nets and point counts, coprophagous dung beetles and the leaf-litter ant fauna. Fire had limited influence upon either faunal or floral species richness or community structure responses, and stems <10 cm DBH were the only group to show highly significant (p = 0.001) community turnover in burned forests. Mean aboveground live biomass was statistically indistinguishable in the unburned and burned plots, although there was a significant increase in the total abundance of dead stems in burned plots. Comparisons with previous studies suggest that wildfires had much less effect upon forest structure and biodiversity in these south-western Amazonian forests than in central and eastern Amazonia, where most fire research has been undertaken to date. We discuss potential reasons for the apparent greater resilience of our study plots to wildfire, examining the role of fire intensity, bamboo dominance, background rates of disturbance, landscape and soil conditions. PMID:22428035

  20. Microscopy Characterization of Silica-Rich Agrowastes to be used in Cement Binders: Bamboo and Sugarcane Leaves.

    PubMed

    Roselló, Josefa; Soriano, Lourdes; Santamarina, M Pilar; Akasaki, Jorge L; Melges, José Luiz P; Payá, Jordi

    2015-10-01

    Agrowastes are produced worldwide in huge quantities and they contain interesting elements for producing inorganic cementing binders, especially silicon. Conversion of agrowastes into ash is an interesting way of yielding raw material used in the manufacture of low-CO2 binders. Silica-rich ashes are preferred for preparing inorganic binders. Sugarcane leaves (Saccharum officinarum, SL) and bamboo leaves (Bambusa vulgaris, BvL and Bambusa gigantea, BgL), and their corresponding ashes (SLA, BvLA, and BgLA), were chosen as case studies. These samples were analyzed by means of optical microscopy, Cryo-scanning electron microscopy (SEM), SEM, and field emission scanning electron microscopy. Spodograms were obtained for BvLA and BgLA, which have high proportions of silicon, but no spodogram was obtained for SLA because of the low silicon content. Different types of phytoliths (specific cells, reservoirs of silica in plants) in the studied leaves were observed. These phytoliths maintained their form after calcination at temperatures in the 350-850°C range. Owing to the chemical composition of these ashes, they are of interest for use in cements and concrete because of their possible pozzolanic reactivity. However, the presence of significant amounts of K and Cl in the prepared ashes implies a limitation of their applications.

  1. Three-phase succession of autochthonous lactic acid bacteria to reach a stable ecosystem within 7 days of natural bamboo shoot fermentation as revealed by different molecular approaches.

    PubMed

    Romi, Wahengbam; Ahmed, Giasuddin; Jeyaram, Kumaraswamy

    2015-07-01

    Microbial community structure and population dynamics during spontaneous bamboo shoot fermentation for production of 'soidon' (indigenous fermented food) in North-east India were studied using cultivation-dependent and cultivation-independent molecular approaches. Cultivation-dependent analyses (PCR-amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis and rRNA gene sequencing) and cultivation-independent analyses (PCR-DGGE, qPCR and Illumina amplicon sequencing) were conducted on the time series samples collected from three independent indigenous soidon fermentation batches. The current findings revealed three-phase succession of autochthonous lactic acid bacteria to attain a stable ecosystem within 7 days natural fermentation of bamboo shoots. Weissella spp. (Weissella cibaria, uncultured Weissella ghanensis) and Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris predominated the early phase (1-2 days) which was joined by Leuconostoc citreum during the mid-phase (3 days), while Lactobacillus brevis and Lactobacillus plantarum emerged and became dominant in the late phase (5-7 days) with concurrent disappearance of W. cibaria and L. lactis subsp. cremoris. Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and uncultured Lactobacillus acetotolerans were predominantly present throughout the fermentation with no visible dynamics. The above identified dominant bacterial species along with their dynamics can be effectively utilized for designing a starter culture for industrialization of soidon production. Our results showed that a more realistic view on the microbial ecology of soidon fermentation could be obtained by cultivation-dependent studies complemented with cultivation-independent molecular approaches. Moreover, the critical issues to be considered for reducing methodological biases while studying the microbial ecology of traditional food fermentation were also highlighted with this soidon fermentation model. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Preparation and Characterization of PVA Alkaline Solid Polymer Electrolyte with Addition of Bamboo Charcoal.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lidan; Wang, Mengyue; Zhang, Zhen; Qin, Gang; Hu, Xiaoyi; Chen, Qiang

    2018-04-26

    Natural bamboo charcoal (BC) powder has been developed as a novel filler in order to further improve performances of the polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-based alkaline solid polymer electrolyte (ASPE) by solution casting method. X-ray diffraction patterns of composite polymer electrolyte with BC revealed the decrease in the degree of crystallinity with increasing content of BC. Scanning electron microscopy images showed pores on a micrometer scale (average diameter about 2 μm) distributed inside and on the surface of the membranes, indicating a three-dimension network formed in the polymer framework. The ionic conductivity was measured by the alternating-current (AC) impedance method, and the highest conductivity value of 6.63 × 10 −2 S·cm −1 was obtained with 16 wt % of BC content and m KOH : m PVA = 2:1.5 at 30 °C. The contents of BC and KOH could significantly influence the conductivity. The temperature dependence of the bulk electrical conductivity displayed a combination of Arrhenius nature, and the activation energy for the ion in polymer electrolyte has been calculated. The electrochemical stability window of the electrolyte membrane was over 1.6 V. The thermogravimetric analysis curves showed that the degradation temperatures of PVA-BC-KOH ASPE membranes shifted toward higher with adding BC. A simple nickel-hydrogen battery containing PVA-BC-KOH electrolyte membrane was assembled with a maximum discharge capacity of 193 mAh·g −1 .

  3. Elevated tropospheric ozone affects the concentration and allocation of mineral nutrients of two bamboo species.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Minghao; Lam, Shu Kee; Li, Yingchun; Chen, Shuanglin

    2017-01-15

    The increase in tropospheric ozone (O 3 ) affects plant physiology and ecosystem processes, and consequently the cycle of nutrients. While mineral nutrients are critical for plant growth, the effect of elevated tropospheric O 3 concentration on the uptake and allocation of mineral nutrients by plants is not well understood. Using open top chambers (OTCs), we investigated the effect of elevated O 3 on calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg) and iron (Fe) in mature bamboo species Phyllostachys edulis and Oligostachyum lubricum. Our results showed that elevated O 3 decreased the leaf biomass of P. edulis and O. lubricum by 35.1% and 26.7%, respectively, but had no significant effect on the biomass of branches, stem or root. For P. edulis, elevated O 3 increased the nutrient (Ca, Mg and Fe) concentration and allocation in leaf but reduced the concentration in other organs. In contrast, elevated O 3 increased the nutrient concentration and allocation in the branch of O. lubricum but decreased that of other organs. We also found that that P. edulis and O. lubricum responded differently to elevated O 3 in terms of nutrient (Ca, Mg and Fe) uptake and allocation. This information is critical for nutrient management and adaptation strategies for sustainable growth of P. edulis and O. lubricum under global climate change. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Bamboo-like Composites of V2O5/Polyindole and Activated Carbon Cloth as Electrodes for All-Solid-State Flexible Asymmetric Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xi; Chen, Qiang; Wang, Anqi; Xu, Jian; Wu, Shishan; Shen, Jian

    2016-02-17

    A bamboo-like nanomaterial composed of V2O5/polyindole (V2O5/PIn) decorated onto the activated carbon cloth was fabricated for supercapacitors. The PIn could effectively enhance the electronic conductivity and prevent the dissolution of vanadium. And the activation of carbon cloth with functional groups is conducive to anchoring the V2O5 and improving surface area, which results in an enhancement of electrochemical performance and leads to a high specific capacitance of 535.5 F/g. Moreover, an asymmetric flexible supercapacitor based on V2O5/PIn@activate carbon cloth and reduced graphene oxide (rGO)@activate carbon cloth exhibits a high energy density (38.7 W h/kg) at a power density of 900 W/kg and good cyclic stability (capacitance retention of 91.1% after 5000 cycles). And the prepared device is shown to power the light-emitting diode bulbs efficiently.

  5. Development of ion-exchange properties of bamboo charcoal modified with concentrated nitric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandaker, S.; Kuba, T.; Toyohara, Y.; Kamida, S.; Uchikawa, Y.

    2017-08-01

    The surface chemistry and the structural properties of activated carbon can be altered by the acidic modification. The objective of this study is to investigate the changes occurring in bamboo charcoal (BC) during activation with concentrated nitric acid. Low temperature (500°C) carbonized BC has been prepared and oxidized with 70% concentrated boiling nitric acid (BC-AC). The porous properties of the BC are analyzed with nitrogen adsorption isotherm at 77 K. The surface structure is observed by Field emission scanning electronic microscope (FESEM) and the surface functional groups are examined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and the pH of the point of zero charge (pHPZC). The results reveal that severe oxidation with HNO3 considerably decreases the surface area of BC with enhanced pore widening and FESEM observation demonstrates the erosive effect of oxidation. The FTIR analysis detects that some absorption bands are assigned for carboxyl, aldehyde and ketone groups on BC-AC. The XPS analysis also clearly shows that the ratio of oxygen and acidic functional groups has been enriched significantly on the BC-AC. The low pHPZC value of BC-AC confirms that the surface is highly acidic for the fixation of acidic functional groups on surface. In general, the existence of the abundant amount of acidic functional groups on adsorbents enhances the sorption of heavy metals ions in aqueous solution. Therefore, it is strongly expected that the modified BC, activated under the proposed conditions would be a promising ion exchanger in aqueous solution and can be applied for the adsorption of different heavy metal ions and radioactive materials from effluent.

  6. Paenibacillus methanolicus sp. nov., a xylanolytic, methanol-utilizing bacterium isolated from the phyllosphere of bamboo (Pseudosasa japonica).

    PubMed

    Madhaiyan, Munusamy; Poonguzhali, Selvaraj; Saravanan, Venkatakrishnan Sivaraj; Pragatheswari, Dhandapani; Duraipandiyan, Veeramuthu; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Santhanakrishnan, Palani

    2016-11-01

    Strain BL24T, isolated from bamboo phyllosphere collected in Coimbatore, India, was studied for taxonomic classification. Cells of the strain were aerobic, Gram-stain-positive, motile, catalase- and oxidase-positive rods and grew on media containing methanol. In 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain BL24Tshowed the highest sequence similarities with Paenibacillus phyllosphaeraeKACC 11473T (97.8 %) and Paenibacillus sacheonensisSY01 (95.1 %). DNA-DNA hybridization with P. phyllosphaerae KACC 11473T, phylogenetically the most closely related species, was 21.6 %; this value showed that strain BL24Tbelonged to a different species. The cell-wall peptidoglycan was found to possess meso-diaminopimelic acid and the G+C content of genomic DNA was 52.1 mol %. It contained menaquinone (MK)-7 as the predominant respiratory quinone and the major cellular fatty acids are C16 : 0, anteiso-C15 : 0, iso-C16 : 0, and anteiso-C17 : 0. Based on the molecular and chemotaxonomic markers and physiological properties, strain BL24T (=NRRL B-51698T=CCM 7577T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Paenibacillus, for which the name Paenibacillusmethanolicusis proposed.

  7. Effects of nano bamboo charcoal on PAHs-degrading strain Sphingomonas sp. GY2B.

    PubMed

    She, Bojia; Tao, Xueqin; Huang, Ting; Lu, Guining; Zhou, Zhili; Guo, Chuling; Dang, Zhi

    2016-03-01

    Nano bamboo charcoal (NBC) has been commonly used in the production of textiles, plastics, paint, etc. However, little is known regarding their effects towards the microorganisms. The effects of NBC on phenanthrene degrading strain Sphingomonas sp. GY2B were investigated in the present study. Results showed that the addition of NBC could improve the phenanthrene removal by Sphingomonas sp. GY2B, with removal efficiencies increased by 10.29-18.56% in comparison to the control at 24h, and phenanthrene was almost completely removed at 48h. With the presence of low dose of NBC (20 and 50mgL(-1)), strain GY2B displayed a better growth at 6h, suggesting that NBC was beneficial to the growth of GY2B and thus resulting in the quick removal of phenanthrene from water. However, the growth of strain GY2B in high dose of NBC (200mgL(-1)) was inhibited at 6h, and the inhibition could be attenuated and eliminated after 12h. NBC-effected phenanthrene solubility experiment suggested that NBC makes a negligible contribution to the solubilization of phenanthrene in water. Results of electronic microscopy analysis (SEM and TEM) indicated NBC may interact with the cell membrane, causing the enhanced membrane permeability and then NBC adsorbed on the membrane would enter into the cells. The findings of this work would provide important information for the future usage and long-term environmental risk assessment of NBC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Designing and Evaluating Bamboo Harvesting Methods for Local Needs: Integrating Local Ecological Knowledge and Science.

    PubMed

    Darabant, András; Rai, Prem Bahadur; Staudhammer, Christina Lynn; Dorji, Tshewang

    2016-08-01

    Dendrocalamus hamiltonii, a large, clump-forming bamboo, has great potential to contribute towards poverty alleviation efforts across its distributional range. Harvesting methods that maximize yield while they fulfill local objectives and ensure sustainability are a research priority. Documenting local ecological knowledge on the species and identifying local users' goals for its production, we defined three harvesting treatments (selective cut, horseshoe cut, clear cut) and experimentally compared them with a no-intervention control treatment in an action research framework. We implemented harvesting over three seasons and monitored annually and two years post-treatment. Even though the total number of culms positively influenced the number of shoots regenerated, a much stronger relationship was detected between the number of culms harvested and the number of shoots regenerated, indicating compensatory growth mechanisms to guide shoot regeneration. Shoot recruitment declined over time in all treatments as well as the control; however, there was no difference among harvest treatments. Culm recruitment declined with an increase in harvesting intensity. When univariately assessing the number of harvested culms and shoots, there were no differences among treatments. However, multivariate analyses simultaneously considering both variables showed that harvested output of shoots and culms was higher with clear cut and horseshoe cut as compared to selective cut. Given the ease of implementation and issues of work safety, users preferred the horseshoe cut, but the lack of sustainability of shoot production calls for investigating longer cutting cycles.

  9. Effect of incorporation of fermented bamboo shoot on physicochemical and microbial quality of pork pickle.

    PubMed

    Chavhan, D M; Hazarika, M; Brahma, M L; Hazarika, R A; Rahman, Z

    2015-02-01

    Replacement of commercial chemical preservative (Vinegar) by incorporating fermented bamboo shoot (FBS) products partially or completely and their effect on physicochemical, microbial and shelf life qualities on pork pickle products was studied. Different FBS products such as FBS extract, paste and powder were incorporated in the pork pickle products at the level of 50 to 100 % with or without vinegar and stored at room temperature for 90 days. Highest pH values and lowest titrable acidity was recorded in products with 50 and 100 % FBS powder. No significant differences were observed with respect to proximate composition i.e. percent moisture, protein, fat and ash contents among the products except the product with 100 % FBS powder which had significantly (p < 0.01) lower moisture content. Microbial load (Log total plate counts) and thiobarbituric acid (TBA) values were found to be increasing as the storage periods were advancing. Except the product with 100 % FBS powder which could be stored for 30 days only, other products could be stored upto 90 days without any physicochemical and microbial problems. It can be concluded from this study that natural and organic FBS extract and paste can be used successfully replacing the conventional chemical preservative (Vinegar) for preparation of pork pickle products and preserved more than 90 days at room temperature. However, FBS powder can be used for preservation of the pickle products for a short period (30 days).

  10. [A preliminary discussion on the contents and value of All Diseases(1), the medical bamboo slips unearthed from Han tomb in Laoguanshan of Chengdu].

    PubMed

    Ye, Y; Zhang, Q; Ren, Y L; Li, J M

    2017-05-28

    Among the medical bamboo slips unearthed from Han tomb in Laoguanshan of Chengdu, the Zhu bing ( All Diseases ) is a monograph to discuss the characteristics of signs and symptoms. Based on the differences of writing styles, diseases involved, expounding methods and writing rules, the book is divided, by the research team, into 2 parts: All Diseases (1) and All Diseases (2). All Diseases (1) includes over 130 slips, 2 000 characters with totally more than 100 disease names, containing multiple clinical disciplines. The elaborated classification, varied naming methods, grasping the symptom characteristics guided by the four diagnostic approaches, paying attention to the comparison of similar diseases, and dealing with the prognosis and healthcare in this part reflect the holism of correspondence between human body and natural environment, and syndrome differentiation thought of combining disease with symptoms and signs, revealing its academic significance.

  11. Impact of ao-dake-humi, Japanese traditional bamboo foot stimulator, on lower urinary tract symptoms, constipation and hypersensitivity to cold: a single-arm prospective pilot study.

    PubMed

    Minagawa, Tomonori; Saitou, Tetsuichi; Suzuki, Toshiro; Domen, Takahisa; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Ishikawa, Masakuni; Hirakata, Shiro; Nagai, Takashi; Nakazawa, Masaki; Ogawa, Teruyuki; Ishizuka, Osamu

    2016-12-09

    Ao-dake-humi is a traditional Japanese bamboo foot stimulator consisting of a half-pipe-shaped step made of bamboo used to stimulate the foot by stepping on it, and is commonly used to promote general health among the elderly in Japan. However, its efficacy has not been reported in the scientific literature. This study was performed to investigate the role of ao-dake-humi focusing on lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), constipation, and hypersensitivity to cold (HC). Participants with LUTS, constipation, or HC were enrolled in this study. Ao-dake-humi was used twice a day for 28 days. Before and 28 days after starting ao-dake-humi use, international prostate symptom score (IPSS), quality-of-life (QoL) score, and overactive bladder symptom score (OABSS) were measured to evaluate the efficacy of ao-dake-humi on LUTS. To evaluate the objective efficacy of ao-dake-humi on LUTS, a frequency-volume chart (FVC) was plotted in LUTS patients for 3 days. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to evaluate the efficacy of ao-dake-humi on constipation (VAS-constipation) and HC (VAS-HC) in the participants with constipation or HC. A total of 24 participants were enrolled in this study. Twenty-one participants had LUTS, 11 had constipation, and 17 participants had HC. IPSS, especially storage-subscore, QoL score and OABSS, decreased significantly after use of ao-dake-humi. The use of ao-dake-humi increased maximal bladder capacity, resulting in a significant decrease in urinary frequency as determined from the FVC. In accordance with the results of VAS-constipation and VAS-HC, both constipation and HC were significantly relieved after ao-dake-humi use. The results of this prospective pilot study indicated that ao-dake-humi is safe and has therapeutic efficacy in cases of LUTS, constipation and HC. The possibility of using ao-dake-humi as physical neuromodulation therapy was shown in the management of LUTS, constipation and HC. UMIN000019333 (UMIN-CTR, Registered October-15

  12. Place learning prior to and after telencephalon ablation in bamboo and coral cat sharks (Chiloscyllium griseum and Atelomycterus marmoratus).

    PubMed

    Fuss, Theodora; Bleckmann, Horst; Schluessel, Vera

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed complex spatial learning and memory in two species of shark, the grey bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium griseum) and the coral cat shark (Atelomycterus marmoratus). It was hypothesized that sharks can learn and apply an allocentric orientation strategy. Eight out of ten sharks successfully completed the initial training phase (by locating a fixed goal position in a diamond maze from two possible start points) within 14.9 ± 7.6 sessions and proceeded to seven sets of transfer tests, in which sharks had to perform under altered environmental conditions. Transfer tests revealed that sharks had oriented and solved the tasks visually, using all of the provided environmental cues. Unintentional cueing did not occur. Results correspond to earlier studies on spatial memory and cognitive mapping in other vertebrates. Future experiments should investigate whether sharks possess a cognitive spatial mapping system as has already been found in several teleosts and stingrays. Following the completion of transfer tests, sharks were subjected to ablation of most of the pallium, which compromised their previously acquired place learning abilities. These results indicate that the telencephalon plays a crucial role in the processing of information on place learning and allocentric orientation strategies.

  13. Modification of bamboo-based activated carbon using microwave radiation and its effects on the adsorption of methylene blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qing-Song; Zheng, Tong; Li, Nan; Wang, Peng; Abulikemu, Gulizhaer

    2010-03-01

    Modification of bamboo-based activated carbon was carried out in a microwave oven under N 2 atmosphere. The virgin and modified activated carbons were characterized by means of low temperature N 2 adsorption, acid-base titration, point of zero charge (pH pzc) measurement, FTIR and XPS spectra. A gradual decrease in the surface acidic groups was observed during the modification, while the surface basicity was enhanced to some extent, which gave rise to an increase in the pH pzc value. The species of the functional groups and relative content of various elements and groups were given further analysis using FTIR and XPS spectra. An increase in the micropores was found at the start, and the micropores were then extended into larger ones, resulting in an increase in the pore volume and average pore size. Adsorption studies showed enhanced adsorption of methylene blue on the modified activated carbons, caused mainly by the enlargement of the micropores. Adsorption isotherm fittings revealed that Langmuir and Freundlich models were applicable for the virgin and modified activated carbons, respectively. Kinetic studies exhibited faster adsorption rate of methylene blue on the modified activated carbons, and the pseudo-second-order model fitted well for all of the activated carbons.

  14. Population Explosion in the Yellow-Spined Bamboo Locust Ceracris kiangsu and Inferences for the Impact of Human Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zhou; Jiang, Guo-Fang; Liu, Yu-Xiang; He, Qi-Xin; Blanchard, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Geographic distance and geographical barriers likely play a considerable role in structuring genetic variation in species, although some migratory species may have less phylogeographic structure on a smaller spatial scale. Here, genetic diversity and the phylogenetic structure among geographical populations of the yellow-spined bamboo locust, Ceracris kiangsu, were examined with 16S rDNA and amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs). In this study, no conspicuous phylogeographical structure was discovered from either Maximum parsimony (MP) and Neighbor-joining (NJ) phylogenetic analyses. The effect of geographical isolation was not conspicuous on a large spatial scale.At smaller spatial scales local diversity of some populations within mountainous areas were detected using Nei's genetic distance and AMOVA. There is a high level of genetic diversity and a low genetic differentiation among populations in the C. kiangsu of South and Southeast China. Our analyses indicate that C. kiangsu is a monophyletic group. Our results also support the hypothesis that the C. kiangsu population is in a primary differentiation stage. Given the mismatch distribution, it is likely that a population expansion in C. kiangsu occurred about 0.242 Ma during the Quaternary interglaciation. Based on historical reports, we conjecture that human activities had significant impacts on the C. kiangsu gene flow. PMID:24603526

  15. Physical properties, structure, and shape of radioactive Cs from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident derived from soil, bamboo and shiitake mushroom measurements.

    PubMed

    Niimura, Nobuo; Kikuchi, Kenji; Tuyen, Ninh Duc; Komatsuzaki, Masakazu; Motohashi, Yoshinobu

    2015-01-01

    We conducted an elution experiment with contaminated soils using various aqueous reagent solutions and autoradiography measurements of contaminated bamboo shoots and shiitake mushrooms to determine the physical and chemical characteristics of radioactive Cs from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Based on our study results and data in the literature, we conclude that the active Cs emitted by the accident fell to the ground as granular non-ionic materials. Therefore, they were not adsorbed or trapped by minerals in the soil, but instead physically adhere to the rough surfaces of the soil mineral particles. Granular Cs* can be transferred among media, such as soils and plants. The physical properties and dynamic behavior of the granular Cs* is expected to be helpful in considering methods for decontamination of soil, litter, and other media. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Bioelectrochemical sensing of promethazine with bamboo-type multiwalled carbon nanotubes dispersed in calf-thymus double stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Primo, Emiliano N; Oviedo, M Belén; Sánchez, Cristián G; Rubianes, María D; Rivas, Gustavo A

    2014-10-01

    We report the quantification of promethazine (PMZ) using glassy carbon electrodes (GCE) modified with bamboo-like multi-walled carbon nanotubes (bCNT) dispersed in double stranded calf-thymus DNA (dsDNA) (GCE/bCNT-dsDNA). Cyclic voltammetry measurements demonstrated that PMZ presents a thin film-confined redox behavior at GCE/bCNT-dsDNA, opposite to the irreversibly-adsorbed behavior obtained at GCE modified with bCNT dispersed in ethanol (GCE/bCNT). Differential pulse voltammetry-adsorptive stripping with medium exchange experiments performed with GCE/bCNT-dsDNA and GCE modified with bCNTs dispersed in single-stranded calf-thymus DNA (ssDNA) confirmed that the interaction between PMZ and bCNT-dsDNA is mainly hydrophobic. These differences are due to the intercalation of PMZ within the dsDNA that supports the bCNTs, as evidenced from the bathochromic displacement of UV-Vis absorption spectra of PMZ and quantum dynamics calculations at DFTB level. The efficient accumulation of PMZ at GCE/bCNT-dsDNA made possible its sensitive quantification at nanomolar levels (sensitivity: (3.50±0.05)×10(8) μA·cm(-2)·M(-1) and detection limit: 23 nM). The biosensor was successfully used for the determination of PMZ in a pharmaceutical product with excellent correlation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Why does the giant panda eat bamboo? A comparative analysis of appetite-reward-related genes among mammals.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ke; Xue, Chenyi; Wu, Xiaoli; Qian, Jinyi; Zhu, Yong; Yang, Zhen; Yonezawa, Takahiro; Crabbe, M James C; Cao, Ying; Hasegawa, Masami; Zhong, Yang; Zheng, Yufang

    2011-01-01

    The giant panda has an interesting bamboo diet unlike the other species in the order of Carnivora. The umami taste receptor gene T1R1 has been identified as a pseudogene during its genome sequencing project and confirmed using a different giant panda sample. The estimated mutation time for this gene is about 4.2 Myr. Such mutation coincided with the giant panda's dietary change and also reinforced its herbivorous life style. However, as this gene is preserved in herbivores such as cow and horse, we need to look for other reasons behind the giant panda's diet switch. Since taste is part of the reward properties of food related to its energy and nutrition contents, we did a systematic analysis on those genes involved in the appetite-reward system for the giant panda. We extracted the giant panda sequence information for those genes and compared with the human sequence first and then with seven other species including chimpanzee, mouse, rat, dog, cat, horse, and cow. Orthologs in panda were further analyzed based on the coding region, Kozak consensus sequence, and potential microRNA binding of those genes. Our results revealed an interesting dopamine metabolic involvement in the panda's food choice. This finding suggests a new direction for molecular evolution studies behind the panda's dietary switch.

  18. Why Does the Giant Panda Eat Bamboo? A Comparative Analysis of Appetite-Reward-Related Genes among Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ke; Xue, Chenyi; Wu, Xiaoli; Qian, Jinyi; Zhu, Yong; Yang, Zhen; Yonezawa, Takahiro; Crabbe, M. James C.; Cao, Ying; Hasegawa, Masami; Zhong, Yang; Zheng, Yufang

    2011-01-01

    Background The giant panda has an interesting bamboo diet unlike the other species in the order of Carnivora. The umami taste receptor gene T1R1 has been identified as a pseudogene during its genome sequencing project and confirmed using a different giant panda sample. The estimated mutation time for this gene is about 4.2 Myr. Such mutation coincided with the giant panda's dietary change and also reinforced its herbivorous life style. However, as this gene is preserved in herbivores such as cow and horse, we need to look for other reasons behind the giant panda's diet switch. Methodology/Principal Findings Since taste is part of the reward properties of food related to its energy and nutrition contents, we did a systematic analysis on those genes involved in the appetite-reward system for the giant panda. We extracted the giant panda sequence information for those genes and compared with the human sequence first and then with seven other species including chimpanzee, mouse, rat, dog, cat, horse, and cow. Orthologs in panda were further analyzed based on the coding region, Kozak consensus sequence, and potential microRNA binding of those genes. Conclusions/Significance Our results revealed an interesting dopamine metabolic involvement in the panda's food choice. This finding suggests a new direction for molecular evolution studies behind the panda's dietary switch. PMID:21818345

  19. Methylobacterium pseudosasae sp. nov., a pink-pigmented, facultatively methylotrophic bacterium isolated from the bamboo phyllosphere.

    PubMed

    Madhaiyan, Munusamy; Poonguzhali, Selvaraj

    2014-02-01

    A pink-pigmented, Gram negative, aerobic, facultatively methylotrophic bacterium, strain BL44(T), was isolated from bamboo leaves and identified as a member of the genus Methylobacterium. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed similarity values of 98.7-97.0 % with closely related type strains and showed highest similarity to Methylobacterium zatmanii DSM 5688(T) (98.7 %) and Methylobacterium thiocyanatum DSM 11490(T) (98.7 %). Methylotrophic metabolism in this strain was confirmed by PCR amplification and sequencing of the mxaF gene coding for the α-subunit of methanol dehydrogenase. Strain BL44(T) produced three known quorum sensing signal molecules with similar retention time to C8, C10 and C12-HSLs when characterized by GC-MS. The fatty acid profiles contained major amounts of C18:1 ω7c, iso-3OH C17:0 and summed feature 3 (C16:1 ω7c and/or iso-C15:0 2-OH), which supported the grouping of the isolate in the genus Methylobacterium. The DNA G+C content was 66.9 mol%. DNA relatedness of the strain BL44(T) to its most closely related strains ranged from 12-43.3 %. On the basis of the phenotypic, phylogenetic and DNA-DNA hybridization data, strain BL44(T) is assigned to a novel species of the genus Methylobacterium for which the name Methylobacterium pseudosasae sp. nov. is proposed (type strain BL44(T) = NBRC 105205(T) = ICMP 17622(T)).

  20. Heterogeneous Expression and Functional Characterization of Cellulose-Degrading Enzymes from Aspergillus niger for Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Alkali Pretreated Bamboo Biomass.

    PubMed

    Ali, Nasir; Ting, Zhang; Li, Hailong; Xue, Yong; Gan, Lihui; Liu, Jian; Long, Minnan

    2015-09-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass has caught much attention because of modest reaction conditions and environment friendly conditions. To reduce the cost and to achieve good quantity of cellulases, a heterologous expression system is highly favored. In this study, cellulose-degrading enzymes, GH3 family β-glucosidase (BGL), GH7 family-related cellobiohydrolases (CBHs), and endoglucanase (EG) from a newly isolated Aspergillus niger BE-2 are highly expressed in Pichia pastoris GS115. The strain produced EG, CBHs, and BGL enzymatic concentration of 0.56, 0.11, and 22 IU/mL, respectively. Mode of actions of the recombinant enzymes for substrate specificity and end product analysis are verified and found specific for cellulose degradation. Bamboo biomass saccharification with A. niger cellulase released a high level of fermentable sugars. Hydrolysis parameters are optimized to obtain reducing sugars level of 3.18 g/L. To obtain reducing sugars from a cellulosic biomass, A. niger could be a good candidate for enzymes resource of cellulase to produce reducing sugars from a cellulosic biomass. This study also facilitates the development of highly efficient enzyme cocktails for the bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass into monosaccharides and oligosaccharides.

  1. Streptomyces rhizosphaerihabitans sp. nov. and Streptomyces adustus sp. nov., isolated from bamboo forest soil.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyo-Jin; Whang, Kyung-Sook

    2016-09-01

    Three novel isolates belonging to the genus Streptomyces, designated JR-35T, JR-46 and WH-9T, were isolated from bamboo forest soil in Damyang, Korea. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of strains JR-35T and JR-46 showed highest similarities with Streptomyces olivochromogenes NBRC 3178T (99.1 %), Streptomyces siamensis KC-038T (98.9 %), Streptomyces chartreusis NBRC 12753T (98.9 %), Streptomyces resistomycificus NRRL ISP-5133T (98.9 %) and Streptomyces bobili JCM 4627T (98.8 %), and strain WH-9Tshowed highest sequence similarities with Streptomyces. bobili JCM 4627T (99.2 %), Streptomyces phaeoluteigriseus NRRL ISP-5182T (99.2 %), Streptomyces alboniger NBRC 12738T (99.2 %), Streptomyces galilaeus JCM 4757T (99.1 %) and Streptomyces pseudovenezuelae NBRC 12904T (99.1 %). The predominant menaquinones were MK-9 (H6) and MK-9 (H8). The major fatty acids were anteiso-C15 : 0, iso-C16 : 0, iso-C14 : 0 and iso-C15 : 0 for strains JR-35T and JR-46 and anteiso-C15 : 0, iso-C15 : 0 and iso-C16 : 0 for strain WH-9T. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of strains JR-35T, JR-46 and WH-9T were 69.4, 74.4 and 74.1 mol%, respectively. Based on the phenotypic and genotypic data, the three strains are assigned to two novel species of the genus Streptomyces, for which the names Streptomyces rhizosphaerihabitans sp. nov. (type stain JR-35T=KACC 17181T=NBRC 109807T) and Streptomyces adustus sp. nov. (type strain WH-9T=KACC 17197T=NBRC 109810T) are proposed.

  2. The Bamboo-Eating Giant Panda Harbors a Carnivore-Like Gut Microbiota, with Excessive Seasonal Variations

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Zhengsheng; Zhang, Wenping; Wang, Linghua; Hou, Rong; Zhang, Menghui; Fei, Lisong; Zhang, Xiaojun; Huang, He; Bridgewater, Laura C.; Jiang, Yi; Jiang, Chenglin; Zhao, Liping

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The giant panda evolved from omnivorous bears. It lives on a bamboo-dominated diet at present, but it still retains a typical carnivorous digestive system and is genetically deficient in cellulose-digesting enzymes. To find out whether this endangered mammalian species, like other herbivores, has successfully developed a gut microbiota adapted to its fiber-rich diet, we conducted a 16S rRNA gene-based large-scale structural profiling of the giant panda fecal microbiota. Forty-five captive individuals were sampled in spring, summer, and late autumn within 1 year. Significant intraindividual variations in the diversity and structure of gut microbiota across seasons were observed in this population, which were even greater than the variations between individuals. Compared with published data sets involving 124 gut microbiota profiles from 54 mammalian species, these giant pandas, together with 9 captive and 7 wild individuals investigated previously, showed extremely low gut microbiota diversity and an overall structure that diverged from those of nonpanda herbivores but converged with those of carnivorous and omnivorous bears. The giant panda did not harbor putative cellulose-degrading phylotypes such as Ruminococcaceae and Bacteroides bacteria that are typically enriched in other herbivores, but instead, its microbiota was dominated by Escherichia/Shigella and Streptococcus bacteria. Members of the class Clostridia were common and abundant in the giant panda gut microbiota, but most of the members present were absent in other herbivores and were not phylogenetically related with known cellulolytic lineages. Therefore, the giant panda appears not to have evolved a gut microbiota compatible with its newly adopted diet, which may adversely influence the coevolutionary fitness of this herbivore. PMID:25991678

  3. Observations on the biology of Afrotropical Hesperiidae (Lepidoptera). Part 7. Hesperiinae incertae sedis: grass and bamboo feeders.

    PubMed

    Cock, Matthew J W; Congdon, T Colin E

    2014-10-10

    Partial life histories for 17 Hesperiinae incertae sedis that feed on grasses or bamboos (Poaceae) are described and illustrated. The genera dealt with are: Astictopterus (from Evans' (1937) Astictopterus group), Prosopalpus, Kedestes (from Evans' (1937) Ampittia group), Ceratrichia, Pardaleodes, Ankola (From Evans' (1937) Ceratrichia and Acleros groups), Perrotia (part), Chondrolepis, and Monza (part) (all from Evans' Ploetzia genera group). The Poaceae-feeders comprise a relatively small proportion of the Afrotropical Hesperiinae fauna, particularly the mainland Afrotropical fauna. The caterpillars shown here are fairly homogeneous, with the head wider nearer the base, and lacking obvious setae on the body. Wax glands have been noted over most of the ventral surface A1-A8 in the final instar of Ceratrichia, Pardaleodes and Monza, but are absent in Chondrolepis, and either absent or not documented for other genera. The short double frontal projection of Tsitana uitenhaga is unusual, but pupae of the congeneric species have not been documented. The pupae of Kedestes spp. generally have extensive black or dark areas. The pupae of Pardaleodes and Ankola are very flimsy and collapse after emergence. All known pupae of Chondrolepis spp. have a short, blunt downturned frontal projection, not seen for any other Afrotropical genera, although Semalea spp. may have a short blunt projection. The remaining pupae are all generally similar and undistinguished. These are not substantial differences, but suggest that pupal characters may be useful in grouping some of the genera of Afrotropical Hesperiinae incertae sedis.

  4. Effects of high fat diet and bamboo extract supplement on anxiety- and depression-like neurobehaviors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Del Rosario, Adeline; McDermott, Mindy M.; Panee, Jun

    2015-01-01

    High fat diet is a major causative factor of overweight and obesity, which are associated with increased risk of neuropsychiatric diseases, such as anxiety and depression. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of bamboo extract (BEX) on anxiety- and depression-like neurobehaviors in mice treated with a high fat diet. Male mice with CD-1 genetic background were treated for 2 months with either a standard or a high fat diet (10% or 45% calories from fat, respectively), with or without BEX supplement (11 g dry mass per 17 MJ). The anxiety levels of the mice were evaluated using open field and hole-board tests, and depression was measured using force swimming test. The anxiety responses of the animals were found significantly increased after high fat diet treatment, and this elevation was effectively abolished by BEX supplement. High fat diet seemed to have an anti-depressive effect in the mice at the tested time point, but the effect of BEX supplement on the depression level of the animals was not conclusive. High fat diet significantly decreased total glutathione content in the blood while BEX supplement increased glutathione oxidation. In summary, this study showed that decreased total glutathione concentration in the blood co-occurred with high fat treatment, high anxiety level and low depression level in the mice; and when supplemented in a high fat diet, BEX had anxiolytic effect in the mice. PMID:22313665

  5. A new shock wave assisted wood preservative injection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, K. S.; Ravikumar, G.; Lai, Ram; Jagadeesh, G.

    Preservative treatment of many tropical hard woods and bamboo pose severe problem. A number of wood preservatives (chemical formulations toxic to wood decay/ destroying organisms like fungi, wood destroying termites, marine borers etc.) and wood impregnating techniques are currently in use for improving bio resistance of timber and bamboo and thereby enhancing service life for different end uses. How ever, some species of tropical hardwoods and many species of bamboo are difficult to treat, posing technical problems. In this paper we report preliminary results of treatment of bamboo with a novel Shockwave assisted injection treatment. Samples (30×2.5×1.00 cm) of an Indian species of bamboo Dendrocalamus strictus prepared from defect free culms of dry bamboo are placed in the driven section of a vertical shock tube filled with the 4Coppepr-Chrome-Arsenic(CCA) preservative solution.The bamboo samples are subjected to repeated shock wave loading (3 shots) with typical over pressures of 30 bar. The results from the study indicate excellent penetration and retention of CCA preservative in bamboo samples. The method itself is much faster compared to the conventional methods like pressure treatment or hot and cold process.

  6. Oviposition responses of Aedes mosquitoes to bacterial isolates from attractive bamboo infusions.

    PubMed

    Ponnusamy, Loganathan; Schal, Coby; Wesson, Dawn M; Arellano, Consuelo; Apperson, Charles S

    2015-09-23

    The mosquitoes Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus are vectors of pathogenic viruses that cause major human illnesses including dengue, yellow fever and chikungunya. Both mosquito species are expanding their geographic distributions and now occur worldwide in temperate and tropical climates. Collection of eggs in oviposition traps (ovitraps) is commonly used for monitoring and surveillance of container-inhabiting Aedes populations by public health agencies charged with managing mosquito-transmitted illness. Addition of an organic infusion in these traps increases the number of eggs deposited. Gravid females are guided to ovitraps by volatile chemicals produced from the breakdown of organic matter by microbes. We previously isolated and cultured 14 species of bacteria from attractive experimental infusions, made from the senescent leaves of canebrake bamboo (Arundinaria gigantea). Cultures were grown for 24 h at 28 °C with constant shaking (120 rpm) and cell densities were determined with a hemocytometer. Behavioral responses to single bacterial isolates and to a mix of isolates at different cell densities were evaluated using two-choice sticky-screen bioassay methods with gravid Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus. In behavioral assays of a mix of 14 bacterial isolates, significantly greater attraction responses were exhibited by Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus to bacterial densities of 10(7) and 10(8) cells/mL than to the control medium. When we tested single bacterial isolates, seven isolates (B1, B2, B3, B5, B12, B13 and B14) were significantly attractive to Ae. aegypti, and six isolates (B1, B5, B7, B10, B13 and B14) significantly attracted Ae. albopictus. Among all the isolates tested at three different cell densities, bacterial isolates B1, B5, B13 and B14 were highly attractive to both Aedes species. Our results show that at specific cell densities, some bacteria significantly influence the attraction of gravid Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus females to

  7. Heterodera guangdongensis n. sp. (Nematoda: Heteroderinae) from bamboo in Guangdong Province, China--a new cyst nematode in the Cyperi group.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Kan; Wang, Honghong; Zhang, Hongling; Liao, Jinling

    2014-11-07

    Heterodera guangdongensis n. sp. is described from bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens Mazel) based on morphology and molecular analyses of rRNA D2D3 expansion domains of large subunit (LSU D2D3) and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences. This new species can be classified in the Cyperi group. Cysts are characterized by a prominent, ambifenestrate vulval cone with weak underbridge, a vulva-anus distance of 28.9-35.9 μm and a vulval slit of 31.1-41.0 μm, but without bullae. Females are characterized by a 25.1-27.6 μm stylet with rounded knobs sloping slightly posteriorly. Males are characterized by a 21.5-23.0 μm stylet with knobs slightly projecting or flat anteriorly, lateral field with four lines, and a 22.0-26.0 μm spicule with bifurcate tip. Second-stage juveniles are characterized by a 19.3-21.3 stylet with slightly projecting or anteriorly flattened knobs, lateral field with three lines, a 41.7-61.3 μm tail with finely rounded terminus and hyaline portion forming 43.0-57.1% of the tail length. Molecular analyses show that the species has unique D2D3 and ITS rRNA sequences and RFLP-ITS-rRNA profiles.

  8. Heterodera fengi n. sp. (Nematoda: Heteroderinae) from bamboo in Guangdong Province, China--a new cyst nematode in the Cyperi group.

    PubMed

    Wang, Honghong; Zhuo, Kan; Ye, Weimin; Zhang, Hongling; Peng, Deliang; Liao, Jinling

    2013-01-01

    Heteroderafengi n. sp. is described and illustrated from bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens Mazel) based on morphology and molecular analyses of rRNA LSU D2D3 region and ITS. This new species belongs to the Cyperi group. Cysts are characterized by prominent vulval cone with ambifenestrate, bifurcate underbridge that is thicker in middle and a 47.0 (40.0-60.0) µm long vulval slit, but without bullae. The second-stage juveniles are characterized by a 23.2 (22.0-24.0) µm long stylet with slightly projected or anteriorly flattened knobs, three incisures in lateral field, a 70.2 (62.5-77.0) µm long tail with bluntly rounded terminus and hyaline portion ca 58.9 (50.0-62.5)% of the tail length. Males are characterized by a 25.1 (24.5-26.3) µm long stylet with rounded knobs sloping posteriorly, four incisures in lateral field, a 29.8 (27.5-31.3) µm long spicule with bifurcate tip. Phylogenetic analysis shows that the species has unique D2D3 and ITS rRNA sequences and RFLP-ITS-rRNA profiles. Heteroderafengi n. sp. is closest to H. elachista in dendrograms inferred from both DNA sequences.

  9. Using bamboo biochar with compost for the stabilization and phytotoxicity reduction of heavy metals in mine-contaminated soils of China.

    PubMed

    Ali, Amjad; Guo, Di; Zhang, Yue; Sun, Xining; Jiang, Shuncheng; Guo, Zhanyu; Huang, Hui; Liang, Wen; Li, Ronghua; Zhang, Zengqiang

    2017-06-02

    Anthropogenic activities have transformed the global geochemical cycling of heavy metals (HMs). Many physical, chemical and biological methods are used to reduce the toxicity of HMs to humans, plants and environment. This study aimed to investigate the immobilization and phytotoxicity reduction of HMs after application of bamboo biochar (BB) in mine-polluted soil in Feng county (FC) and Tongguan (TG). The results showed that BB application to contaminated soil immobilized HMs (Zn, Pb, Cd and Cu). The soil pH and EC increased and the bioavailability of HMs decreased in FC and TG, whereas Pb and Cu increased in TG soil. The addition of BB reduced HMs uptake in the shoot/root of Brassica juncea. Physiological responses showed that BB application improved the shoot/root growth, dry biomass, and enhanced the chlorophyll (a and b) and carotenoid concentrations in Brassica. The incorporation of BB improved the soil health and accelerated enzymatic activities (β-glucosidase, alkaline phosphatase and urease) in HMs polluted soils. Antioxidant activities (POD, PPO, CAT and SOD) were also used as biomarkers to determine the negative effects of HMs on the growth of Brassica. Overall, the immobilization potential and phytotoxicity reduction of HMs were confirmed by BCF, TF and MEA for both soils.

  10. Molecular characterization of a CpTRIM35-like protein and its splice variants from whitespotted bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xinshang, E-mail: sanmaosound@163.com; Zhao, Heng, E-mail: hengzhao2000@gmail.com; Chen, Yeyu, E-mail: cyyleaf@126.com

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • A TRIM gene and three splice variants were firstly cloned from elasmobranch fish. • The genes were constitutively expressed with high levels in spleen and kidney. • The gene products were distributed in cytoplasm alone or cytoplasm and nucleus. • As E3 ubiquitin ligases, the proteins differed in immune responses to challenges. - Abstract: The tripartite motif (TRIM) proteins play important roles in a broad range of biological processes, including apoptosis, cell proliferation and innate immunity response. In this study, a TRIM gene and its three splice variants were cloned from an elasmobranch fish—whitespotted bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium plagiosummore » Bennett). Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the gene was closely related to TRIM35 homologs, thus termed CpTRIM35-like. Deduced CpTRIM35 has a RBCC-PRY/SPRY structure typical of TRIM proteins, and its splice variants (CpTRIM35-1–3) have different truncations at the C-terminus. The gene products were constitutively expressed in adult sharks with the highest levels in spleen and kidney. The different subcellular locations, upregulation upon LPS and poly I:C stimulation, and significant E3 ubiquitin ligase activities suggested their different roles in immune responses as an E3 ubiquitin ligase. This is the first TRIM protein ever characterized in elasmobranch fish.« less

  11. Morphology and mechanics of the teeth and jaws of white-spotted bamboo sharks (Chiloscyllium plagiosum).

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Jason B; Wilga, Cheryl D

    2007-08-01

    The teeth of white-spotted bamboo sharks (Chiloscyllium plagiosum) are used to clutch soft-bodied prey and crush hard prey; however, the dual function is not evident from tooth morphology alone. Teeth exhibit characteristics that are in agreement with a clutching-type tooth morphology that is well suited for grasping and holding soft-bodied prey, but not for crushing hard prey. The dual role of this single tooth morphology is facilitated by features of the dental ligament and jaw joint. Tooth attachment is flexible and elastic, allowing movement in both sagittal and frontal planes. During prey capture spike-like tooth cusps pierce the flesh of soft prey, thereby preventing escape. When processing prey harder than the teeth can pierce the teeth passively depress, rotating inward towards the oral cavity such that the broader labial faces of the teeth are nearly parallel to the surface of the jaws and form a crushing surface. Movement into the depressed position increases the tooth surface area contacting prey and decreases the total stress applied to the tooth, thereby decreasing the risk of structural failure. This action is aided by a jaw joint that is ventrally offset from the occlusal planes of the jaws. The offset joint position allows many teeth to contact prey simultaneously and orients force vectors at contact points between the jaws and prey in a manner that shears or rolls prey between the jaws during a bite, thus, aiding in processing while reducing forward slip of hard prey from the mouth. Together the teeth, dental ligament, and jaws form an integrated system that may be beneficial to the feeding ecology of C. plagiosum, allowing for a diet that includes prey of varying hardness and elusiveness. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. TiO2 quantum dots embedded in bamboo-like porous carbon nanotubes as ultra high power and long life anodes for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yakun; Liu, Lang; Wang, Xingchao; Jia, Dianzeng; Xia, Wei; Zhao, Zongbin; Qiu, Jieshan

    2016-07-01

    TiO2 quantum dots embedded in bamboo-like porous carbon nanotubes have been constructed through the pyrolysis of sulfonated polymer nanotubes and TiO2 hybrids. The TiO2 quantum dots are formed during the pyrolysis, due to the space confinement within the highly cross-linked copolymer networks. The sulfonation degree of the polymer nanotubes is a critical factor to ensure the formation of the unique interpenetrating structure. The nanocomposites exhibit high reversible capacity of 523 mAh g-1 at 100 mA g-1 after 200 cycles, excellent rate capability and superior long-term cycling stability at high current density, which could attain a high discharge capacity of 189 mAh g-1 at 2000 mA g-1 for up to 2000 cycles. The enhanced electrochemical performance of the nanocomposites benefit from the uniform distribution of TiO2 quantum dots, high electronic conductivity of porous carbons and unique interpenetrating structure, which simultaneously solved the major problems of TiO2 anode facing the pulverization, loss of electrical contact and particle aggregation.

  13. Parametric and non-parametric species delimitation methods result in the recognition of two new Neotropical woody bamboo species.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Sanchez, Eduardo

    2015-12-01

    The Neotropical woody bamboo genus Otatea is one of five genera in the subtribe Guaduinae. Of the eight described Otatea species, seven are endemic to Mexico and one is also distributed in Central and South America. Otatea acuminata has the widest geographical distribution of the eight species, and two of its recently collected populations do not match the known species morphologically. Parametric and non-parametric methods were used to delimit the species in Otatea using five chloroplast markers, one nuclear marker, and morphological characters. The parametric coalescent method and the non-parametric analysis supported the recognition of two distinct evolutionary lineages. Molecular clock estimates were used to estimate divergence times in Otatea. The results for divergence time in Otatea estimated the origin of the speciation events from the Late Miocene to Late Pleistocene. The species delimitation analyses (parametric and non-parametric) identified that the two populations of O. acuminata from Chiapas and Hidalgo are from two separate evolutionary lineages and these new species have morphological characters that separate them from O. acuminata s.s. The geological activity of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt and the Isthmus of Tehuantepec may have isolated populations and limited the gene flow between Otatea species, driving speciation. Based on the results found here, I describe Otatea rzedowskiorum and Otatea victoriae as two new species, morphologically different from O. acuminata. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effective enzymatic in situ saccharification of bamboo shoot shell pretreated by dilute alkalic salts sodium hypochlorite/sodium sulfide pretreatment under the autoclave system.

    PubMed

    Chong, Gang-Gang; He, Yu-Cai; Liu, Qiu-Xiang; Kou, Xiao-Qin; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Di, Jun-Hua; Ma, Cui-Luan

    2017-10-01

    In this study, dilute alkali salts (0.6% NaClO, 0.067% Na 2 S) pretreatment at 10% sulfidity under the autoclave system at 120°C for 40min was used for pretreating bamboo shoot shell (BSS). Furthermore, FT-IR, XRD and SEM were employed to characterize the changes in the cellulose structural characteristics (porosity, morphology, and crystallinity) of the pretreated BSS solid residue. After 72h, the reducing sugars and glucose from the enzymatic in situ hydrolysis of 50g/L pretreated BSS in dilute NaClO/Na 2 S media could be obtained at 31.11 and 20.32g/L, respectively. Finally, the obtained BSS-hydrolysates containing alkalic salt NaClO/Na 2 S resulted in slightly negative effects on the ethanol production. Glucose in BSS-hydrolysates was fermented from 20.0 to 0.17g/L within 48h, and an ethanol yield of 0.41g/g glucose, which represents 80.1% of the theoretical yield, was obtained. This study provided an effective strategy for potential utilization of BSS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Insights Into Intermediate Ocean Barium Cycling From Deep-Sea Bamboo Coral Records on the California Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaVigne, M.; Serrato Marks, G.; Freiberger, M. M.; Miller, H. R.; Hill, T. M.; McNichol, A. P.; Lardie Gaylord, M.

    2016-02-01

    Dissolved barium (BaSW) has been linked to several biogeochemical processes such as the cycling and export of nutrients, organic carbon (Corg), and barite in surface and intermediate oceans. The dynamic nature of barium cycling in the water column has been demonstrated on short timescales (days-weeks) while sedimentary records have documented geologic-scale changes in barite preservation driven by export production. Our understanding of how inter-annual-decadal scale climate variability impacts these biogeochemical processes currently lacks robust instrumental and paleoceanographic records. Recent work has calibrated and demonstrated the reproducibility of a new BaSW proxy in California Current System (CCS) bamboo corals (Ba/Ca) using a coral depth transect spanning the CCS oxygen minimum zone (792-2055m water depth). New `reconnaissance' radiocarbon data identifying the bomb 14C spike in coral proteinaceous nodes and sclerochronological analyses of calcitic internodes are used to assign chronologies to the CCS coral records. Century-long coral records from 900-1500m record 4-7 year long increases in Ba/Ca ( 10-70 nmol/kg BaSW) at depths where rapid barite cycling occurs on day-weekly timescales. The BaSW peaks punctuate the coral records at different time periods and depths and do not coincide with inter-annual/decadal climate transitions (e.g. ENSO/PDO). Stable surface productivity and coral δ15N records indicate that Corg export from CCS surface waters has been relatively constant over the past century. Thus, the inter-annual scale BaSW peaks recorded by the 900-1500m corals more likely reflect periods of decreased barite formation (and/or increased dissolution) via reduced bacterial Corg respiration or barite saturation state. Paleoceanographic BaSW records and continued research on barium cycling in the modern ocean have the potential to elucidate the mechanisms linking intermediate water carbon and barium cycling, climate, and ocean oxygenation in the past.

  16. Bamboo- and pig-derived biochars reduce leaching losses of dibutyl phthalate, cadmium, and lead from co-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Qin, Peng; Wang, Hailong; Yang, Xing; He, Lizhi; Müller, Karin; Shaheen, Sabry M; Xu, Song; Rinklebe, Jörg; Tsang, Daniel C W; Ok, Yong Sik; Bolan, Nanthi; Song, Zhaoliang; Che, Lei; Xu, Xiaoya

    2018-05-01

    Biochar effect on the potential mobility of dibutyl phthalate (DBP), cadmium (Cd), and lead (Pb) in co-contaminated soils is not well investigated. A laboratory leaching study was conducted to evaluate the effect of biochars derived from bamboo (BB) and pig (PB) on the leachability of DBP, Cd, and Pb through soil columns packed with two soils with low or high organic carbon content (LOC; 0.35% C: HOC; 2.24% C) and spiked with DBP, Cd, and Pb. Application of PB to the LOC soil significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the leaching loss by up to 88% for DBP, 38% for Cd, and 71% for Pb, whereas its impact was insignificant in the HOC soil. The higher efficacy of PB in reducing the leaching of DBP, Cd, and Pb in the LOC soil than that of BB might be related to PB's higher specific surface area, surface alkalinity, pH, and mineral contents compared to those of BB. Co-contamination of Cd and Pb enhanced leaching of DBP in the LOC soil treated with PB, possibly by competition for the sorption sites. Leaching of DBP, Cd, and Pb were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in the LOC soil than in the HOC soil. This study revealed that the effectiveness of biochars was dependent on the soil organic carbon content. Application of PB to the LOC soil was effective in reducing the leaching risk of DBP, Cd, and Pb. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. In situ growth of NiFe alloy nanoparticles embedded into N-doped bamboo-like carbon nanotube as a bifunctional electrocatalyst for Zn-air battery.

    PubMed

    Bin, Duan; Yang, Beibei; Li, Chao; Liu, Yao; Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Yong-Gang; Xia, Yongyao

    2018-06-26

    Developing low-cost catalysts for electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) with superior performance in alkaline solution is of significance for large-scale application in aqueous zinc-air batteries (ZABs). Herein, we describe in situ design of embedded NiFe nanoparticles into the N-doped bamboo-like carbon nanotube (NBCNT) with high catalytic performance and stability. The obtained NiFe@NBCNT hybrid exhibits a high electrochemical activity and stability with an unexpectedly low overpotential of ~195 mV for OER at 10 mA cm-2, and an onset potential at 1.03 V for ORR, superior to the state-of-the-art Pt/C and RuO2 catalysts. Additionally, compared to the mixture Pt/C and RuO2 cathode, the ZAB based on the NiFe@NBCNT cathode displays lower overpotential (0.80 V), higher stable round-trip efficiency (58.3%) and improved power density for 200 cycles at 10 mA cm-2. Apparently, the obtained results indicate that NiFe@NBCNT hybird is proven to be one of the best non-noble metal catalysts for achieving commercial implementation of rechargeable ZABs.

  18. 78 FR 15885 - Western Pacific Fisheries; 2013 Annual Catch Limits and Accountability Measures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-13

    ...,512 lb (2,500 kg). Coral. Makapuu Bed--Pink 2,205 lb (1,000 kg). Coral. Makapuu Bed--Bamboo 551 lb (250 kg). Coral. 180 Fathom Bank-- 489 lb (222 kg). Pink Coral. 180 Fathom Bank-- 123 lb (56 kg). Bamboo Coral. Brooks Bank--Pink 979 lb (444 kg). Coral. Brooks Bank--Bamboo 245 lb (111 kg). Coral. Kaena...

  19. Isolation and characterization of Bacillus sp. GFP-2, a novel Bacillus strain with antimicrobial activities, from Whitespotted bamboo shark intestine.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jia; Xu, Guoqiang; Jin, Yangyang; Sun, Cong; Zhou, Li; Lin, Guodong; Xu, Rong; Wei, Ling; Fei, Hui; Wang, Dan; Chen, Jianqing; Lv, Zhengbing; Liu, Kuancheng

    2018-05-22

    The abuse of antibiotics and following rapidly increasing of antibiotic-resistant pathogens is the serious threat to our society. Natural products from microorganism are regarded as the important substitution antimicrobial agents of antibiotics. We isolated a new strain, Bacillus sp. GFP-2, from the Chiloscyllium plagiosum (Whitespotted bamboo shark) intestine, which showed great inhibitory effects on the growth of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Additionally, the growth of salmon was effectively promoted when fed with inactivated strain GFP-2 as the inhibition agent of pathogenic bacteria. The genes encoding antimicrobial peptides like LCI, YFGAP and hGAPDH and gene clusters for secondary metabolites and bacteriocins, such as difficidin, bacillibactin, bacilysin, surfactin, butirosin, macrolactin, bacillaene, fengycin, lanthipeptides and LCI, were predicted in the genome of Bacillus sp. GFP-2, which might be expressed and contribute to the antimicrobial activities of this strain. The gene encoding β-1,3-1,4-glucanase was successfully cloned from the genome and this protein was detected in the culture supernatant of Bacillus sp. GFP-2 by the antibody produced in rabbit immunized with the recombinant β-1,3-1,4-glucanase, indicating that this strain could express β-1,3-1,4-glucanase, which might partially contribute to its antimicrobial activities. This study can enhance a better understanding of the mechanism of antimicrobial activities in genus Bacillus and provide a useful material for the biotechnology study in antimicrobial agent development.

  20. Nitrogen-doped graphene/CoNi alloy encased within bamboo-like carbon nanotube hybrids as cathode catalysts in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yang; Yuan, Heyang; Wen, Zhenhai; Cui, Shumao; Guo, Xiaoru; He, Zhen; Chen, Junhong

    2016-03-01

    Cost-effective catalysts are of key importance to the successful deployment of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) for electricity generation from organic wastes. Herein, a novel catalyst prepared by one-step synthesis strategy is reported. The catalyst features N-doped bamboo-like carbon nanotube (BCNT) in which CoNi-alloy is encapsulated at the end and/or the middle section of the tube with many graphene layers inside inner cavities of BCNT (N-G@CoNi/BCNT). The prepared N-G@CoNi/BCNT exhibits a high oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity with an early onset potential of 0.06 V vs. Ag/AgCl and a comparable exchange current density to that of commercial Pt/C. The excellent catalytic activity is further evidenced by a high electron transfer number of 3.63. When being applied in MFCs, the N-G@CoNi/BCNT yields an average current density of 6.7 A m-2, slightly lower than that of Pt/C but with a less mass transfer potential loss. The cost of the N-G@CoNi/BCNT for constructing a 1-m2 cathode electrode is 200 times lower than that of Pt/C. With such a competitive price and excellent electrocatalytic-activity resulting from its unique morphology, CoNi-alloy/nitrogen dopants, considerable specific surface area, and carbon-coated alloy/graphene hybridization, the present catalyst is a promising candidate for ORR catalysts in MFCs for energy recovery from wastes.

  1. Dietary flexibility of Bale monkeys (Chlorocebus djamdjamensis) in southern Ethiopia: effects of habitat degradation and life in fragments.

    PubMed

    Mekonnen, Addisu; Fashing, Peter J; Bekele, Afework; Hernandez-Aguilar, R Adriana; Rueness, Eli K; Stenseth, Nils Chr

    2018-02-06

    Understanding the effects of habitat modification on the feeding strategies of threatened species is essential to designing effective conservation management plans. Bale monkeys (Chlorocebus djamdjamensis) are endemic to the rapidly shrinking montane forests of the southern Ethiopian Highlands. Most populations inhabit continuous bamboo forest subsisting largely on the young leaves and shoots of a single species of bamboo. Because of habitat disturbance in recent decades, however, there are now also several dozen small populations inhabiting isolated forest fragments where bamboo has been degraded. During 12-months, we assessed Bale monkey responses to habitat degradation by comparing habitat composition, phenological patterns, and feeding ecology in a largely undisturbed continuous forest (Continuous groups A and B) and in two fragments (Patchy and Hilltop groups). We found that habitat quality and food availability were much lower in fragments than in continuous forest. In response to the relative scarcity of bamboo in fragments, Bale monkeys spent significantly less time feeding on the young leaves and shoots of bamboo and significantly more time feeding on non-bamboo young leaves, fruits, seeds, stems, petioles, and insects in fragments than in continuous forest. Groups in fragments also broadened their diets to incorporate many more plant species (Patchy: ≥ 47 and Hilltop: ≥ 35 species)-including several forbs, graminoids and cultivated crops-than groups in continuous forest (Continuous A: 12 and Continuous B: 8 species). Nevertheless, bamboo was still the top food species for Patchy group (30% of diet) as well as for both continuous forest groups (mean = 81%). However, in Hilltop group, for which bamboo was especially scarce, Bothriochloa radicans (Poaceae), a grass, was the top dietary species (15% of diet) and bamboo ranked 10th (2%). We demonstrate that Bale monkeys are more dietarily flexible than previously thought and able to cope with some

  2. Supervisory Control Information Management Research (SCIMR) Studies: Determination of Efficiency for a Variety of Input Control Equipment (DEVICE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    Belkin n52te, the Saitek Cyborg Command Unit, the Wacom Bamboo Fun with stylus, the Wacom Bamboo Fun with touch, and the Xbox 360 controller...4 4 Saitek Cyborg Command Unit function mapping ....................................... 4 iv 5 Wacom Bamboo Fun with stylus and touch...versus Belkin n52te by task . 30 B-2 Participants’ preferences for standard mouse versus Saitek Cyborg Command Unit by task

  3. Application of EDTA-functionalized bamboo activated carbon (BAC) for Pb(II) and Cu(II) removal from aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Dan; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Jiasheng; Yang, Kunlun; Lou, Zimo; Baig, Shams Ali; Xu, Xinhua

    2018-01-01

    In this study, a novel bamboo activated carbon (BAC) with ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) functionality was prepared by direct grafting in the presence of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as a crosslinking agent. The BAC@SiO2-EDTA was characterized by SEM, TEM, TGA, FTIR, XPS and its adsorption property for removal of Pb(II) and Cu(II) under various experimental conditions was also investigated. The characterization results reflected that EDTA was successfully assembled on the surface of the BAC and average pore size increased from 4.10 to 4.83 nm as BAC grafted with EDTA. Adsorption data fitted very well in Langmuir isotherm model and pseudo-second-order kinetic model. As compared with the raw BAC, the maximum adsorption capacities of BAC@SiO2-EDTA for the Pb(II) and Cu(II) increased from 45.45 to 123.45 mg g-1 and from 6.85 to 42.19 mg g-1, since the existence of EDTA on modified BAC promoted the formation of chemical complex. The removal of heavy metal ions mainly depended on the complexation with EDTA and the electrostatic attractions with negatively charged surface of BAC@SiO2-EDTA. The adsorption of Pb(II)/Cu(II) on the BAC@SiO2-EDTA was pH dependent and pH 5-6 was considered an optimum. However, lower temperature favored the adsorption and the maximum adsorption was recorded at 20 °C. In addition, BAC@SiO2-EDTA had an excellent reusability with about 40% decline in the adsorption capacity for Pb(II) after fifth reuse. Insignificant influences of co-existing cations and natural organic matter (NOM) were found on the adsorption of Pb(II) and Cu(II). All the results demonstrate that BAC@SiO2-EDTA is a potential adsorbent for metal ions in wastewater.

  4. Effect of antioxidant of bamboo leaves on gene expression associated with mouse embryonic fibroblast reproduction and embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Yu, Feng; Qian, Xiaowei; Zeng, Zhanghui; Zhao, Xiaoli; Hou, Rong; Zhang, Zhihe; Bian, Hongwu; Han, Ning; Wang, Junhui; Zhu, Muyuan

    2017-11-01

    Antioxidant of bamboo leaves (AOB) was certified to be a natural antioxidant by the Chinese Ministry of Health in 2003. However, the effects of AOB on animal reproductive and developmental functions remain unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of different concentrations of AOB on mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells, and to examine the underlying molecular mechanism through which AOB affects the proliferation and apoptosis of MEFs. MEFs prepared from individual embryos were treated with various dosages of AOB. Cell viability and apoptosis were detected by MTT and flow cytometry assays, respectively. Reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses were used for the detection of mRNA and protein expression. Functional annotation of differentially‑expressed genes was performed according to the Gene Ontology database and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis. Compared with the control group, ~50% of MEF cells were inhibited following treatment with a 400 µg/ml concentration of AOB. Treatment with 400 µg/ml AOB for 72 h significantly increased the apoptotic rate of MEF cells compared with the control group. Following treatment with AOB, dehydrogenase/reductase 9, phospholipase A2 group IVE and platelet derived growth factor B were downregulated, while 17 other genes were upregulated in MEF cells. Treatment with AOB markedly increased the expression of phosphorylated extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK), β‑catenin, transcription factor SOX‑17, calcium‑binding tyrosine phosphorylation‑regulated protein, and cholesterol side chain cleavage enzyme mitochondrial (P<0.01). Additionally, the ERK pathway inhibitor U0126 and Wnt pathway inhibitor dickkopf‑related protein 1 markedly suppressed the expression of the above genes (P<0.01). AOB may impact the expression of proteins associated with embryonic fibroblast reproduction and embryonic development through

  5. Piloting the use of indigenous methods to prevent Nipah virus infection by interrupting bats' access to date palm sap in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Nahar, Nazmun; Mondal, Utpal Kumar; Sultana, Rebeca; Hossain, M Jahangir; Khan, M Salah Uddin; Gurley, Emily S; Oliveras, Elizabeth; Luby, Stephen P

    2013-09-01

    People in Bangladesh frequently drink fresh date palm sap. Fruit bats (Pteropus giganteus) also drink raw sap and may contaminate the sap by shedding Nipah virus through saliva and urine. In a previous study we identified two indigenous methods to prevent bats accessing the sap, bamboo skirts and lime (calcium carbonate). We conducted a pilot study to assess the acceptability of these two methods among sap harvesters. We used interactive community meetings and group discussions to encourage all the sap harvesters (n = 12) from a village to use either bamboo skirts or lime smear that some of them (n = 4) prepared and applied. We measured the preparation and application time and calculated the cost of bamboo skirts. We conducted interviews after the use of each method. The sap harvesters found skirts effective in preventing bats from accessing sap. They were sceptical that lime would be effective as the lime was washed away by the sap flow. Preparation of the skirt took ∼105 min. The application of each method took ∼1 min. The cost of the bamboo skirt is minimal because bamboo is widely available and they made the skirts with pieces of used bamboo. The bamboo skirt method appeared practical and affordable to the sap harvesters. Further studies should explore its ability to prevent bats from accessing date palm sap and assess if its use produces more or better quality sap, which would provide further incentives to make it more acceptable for its regular use.

  6. Rapid sequencing of the bamboo mitochondrial genome using Illumina technology and parallel episodic evolution of organelle genomes in grasses.

    PubMed

    Ma, Peng-Fei; Guo, Zhen-Hua; Li, De-Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Compared to their counterparts in animals, the mitochondrial (mt) genomes of angiosperms exhibit a number of unique features. However, unravelling their evolution is hindered by the few completed genomes, of which are essentially Sanger sequenced. While next-generation sequencing technologies have revolutionized chloroplast genome sequencing, they are just beginning to be applied to angiosperm mt genomes. Chloroplast genomes of grasses (Poaceae) have undergone episodic evolution and the evolutionary rate was suggested to be correlated between chloroplast and mt genomes in Poaceae. It is interesting to investigate whether correlated rate change also occurred in grass mt genomes as expected under lineage effects. A time-calibrated phylogenetic tree is needed to examine rate change. We determined a largely completed mt genome from a bamboo, Ferrocalamus rimosivaginus (Poaceae), through Illumina sequencing of total DNA. With combination of de novo and reference-guided assembly, 39.5-fold coverage Illumina reads were finally assembled into scaffolds totalling 432,839 bp. The assembled genome contains nearly the same genes as the completed mt genomes in Poaceae. For examining evolutionary rate in grass mt genomes, we reconstructed a phylogenetic tree including 22 taxa based on 31 mt genes. The topology of the well-resolved tree was almost identical to that inferred from chloroplast genome with only minor difference. The inconsistency possibly derived from long branch attraction in mtDNA tree. By calculating absolute substitution rates, we found significant rate change (∼4-fold) in mt genome before and after the diversification of Poaceae both in synonymous and nonsynonymous terms. Furthermore, the rate change was correlated with that of chloroplast genomes in grasses. Our result demonstrates that it is a rapid and efficient approach to obtain angiosperm mt genome sequences using Illumina sequencing technology. The parallel episodic evolution of mt and chloroplast

  7. Rapid Sequencing of the Bamboo Mitochondrial Genome Using Illumina Technology and Parallel Episodic Evolution of Organelle Genomes in Grasses

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Peng-Fei; Guo, Zhen-Hua; Li, De-Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Background Compared to their counterparts in animals, the mitochondrial (mt) genomes of angiosperms exhibit a number of unique features. However, unravelling their evolution is hindered by the few completed genomes, of which are essentially Sanger sequenced. While next-generation sequencing technologies have revolutionized chloroplast genome sequencing, they are just beginning to be applied to angiosperm mt genomes. Chloroplast genomes of grasses (Poaceae) have undergone episodic evolution and the evolutionary rate was suggested to be correlated between chloroplast and mt genomes in Poaceae. It is interesting to investigate whether correlated rate change also occurred in grass mt genomes as expected under lineage effects. A time-calibrated phylogenetic tree is needed to examine rate change. Methodology/Principal Findings We determined a largely completed mt genome from a bamboo, Ferrocalamus rimosivaginus (Poaceae), through Illumina sequencing of total DNA. With combination of de novo and reference-guided assembly, 39.5-fold coverage Illumina reads were finally assembled into scaffolds totalling 432,839 bp. The assembled genome contains nearly the same genes as the completed mt genomes in Poaceae. For examining evolutionary rate in grass mt genomes, we reconstructed a phylogenetic tree including 22 taxa based on 31 mt genes. The topology of the well-resolved tree was almost identical to that inferred from chloroplast genome with only minor difference. The inconsistency possibly derived from long branch attraction in mtDNA tree. By calculating absolute substitution rates, we found significant rate change (∼4-fold) in mt genome before and after the diversification of Poaceae both in synonymous and nonsynonymous terms. Furthermore, the rate change was correlated with that of chloroplast genomes in grasses. Conclusions/Significance Our result demonstrates that it is a rapid and efficient approach to obtain angiosperm mt genome sequences using Illumina sequencing

  8. Factors contributing to deep supercooling capability and cold survival in dwarf bamboo (Sasa senanensis) leaf blades.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Masaya; Oda, Asuka; Fukami, Reiko; Kuriyama, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Wintering Sasa senanensis, dwarf bamboo, is known to employ deep supercooling as the mechanism of cold hardiness in most of its tissues from leaves to rhizomes. The breakdown of supercooling in leaf blades has been shown to proceed in a random and scattered manner with a small piece of tissue surrounded by longitudinal and transverse veins serving as the unit of freezing. The unique cold hardiness mechanism of this plant was further characterized using current year leaf blades. Cold hardiness levels (LT20: the lethal temperature at which 20% of the leaf blades are injured) seasonally increased from August (-11°C) to December (-20°C). This coincided with the increases in supercooling capability of the leaf blades as expressed by the initiation temperature of low temperature exotherms (LTE) detected in differential thermal analyses (DTA). When leaf blades were stored at -5°C for 1-14 days, there was no nucleation of the supercooled tissue units either in summer or winter. However, only summer leaf blades suffered significant injury after prolonged supercooling of the tissue units. This may be a novel type of low temperature-induced injury in supercooled state at subfreezing temperatures. When winter leaf blades were maintained at the threshold temperature (-20°C), a longer storage period (1-7 days) increased lethal freezing of the supercooled tissue units. Within a wintering shoot, the second or third leaf blade from the top was most cold hardy and leaf blades at lower positions tended to suffer more injury due to lethal freezing of the supercooled units. LTE were shifted to higher temperatures (2-5°C) after a lethal freeze-thaw cycle. The results demonstrate that the tissue unit compartmentalized with longitudinal and transverse veins serves as the unit of supercooling and temperature- and time-dependent freezing of the units is lethal both in laboratory freeze tests and in the field. To establish such supercooling in the unit, structural ice barriers such as

  9. Community-wide spatial and temporal discordances of seed-seedling shadows in a tropical rainforest.

    PubMed

    Rother, Débora Cristina; Pizo, Marco Aurélio; Siqueira, Tadeu; Rodrigues, Ricardo Ribeiro; Jordano, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Several factors decrease plant survival throughout their lifecycles. Among them, seed dispersal limitation may play a major role by resulting in highly aggregated (contagious) seed and seedling distributions entailing increased mortality. The arrival of seeds, furthermore, may not match suitable environments for seed survival and, consequently, for seedling establishment. In this study, we investigated spatio-temporal patterns of seed and seedling distribution in contrasting microhabitats (bamboo and non-bamboo stands) from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. Spatial distribution patterns, spatial concordance between seed rain and seedling recruitment between subsequent years in two fruiting seasons (2004-2005 and 2007-2009), and the relation between seeds and seedlings with environmental factors were examined within a spatially-explicit framework. Density and species richness of both seeds and seedlings were randomly distributed in non-bamboo stands, but showed significant clustering in bamboo stands. Seed and seedling distributions showed across-year inconsistency, suggesting a marked spatial decoupling of the seed and seedling stages. Generalized linear mixed effects models indicated that only seed density and seed species richness differed between stand types while accounting for variation in soil characteristics. Our analyses provide evidence of marked recruitment limitation as a result of the interplay between biotic and abiotic factors. Because bamboo stands promote heterogeneity in the forest, they are important components of the landscape. However, at high densities, bamboos may limit recruitment for the plant community by imposing marked discordances of seed arrival and early seedling recruitment.

  10. The efficacy of bamboo charcoal in comparison with smectite to reduce the detrimental effect of aflatoxin B1 on in vitro rumen fermentation of a hay-rich feed mixture.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ya-Hui; Wang, Ping; Yang, Hong-Jian; Chen, Ying

    2014-07-10

    Two commercial materials, a bamboo charcoal (BC) and a smectite clay (SC), were assessed in vitro with aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) in an equilibrium adsorption test. The adsorption capacity and proportion adsorbed (0.381 μg/mg, 0.955) for BC were greater than for SC (0.372 μg/mg, 0.931). The effects of in vitro ruminal fermentation of hay-rich feed incubated with 1.0 μg/mL AFB1 for 0-10 g/L doses of BC and SC were measured at 39 °C for 72 h. The BC and SC binders increased AFB1 loss at dosages ≥1.0 g/L (p < 0.0001). Average AFB1 loss (p < 0.0001) was greater for SC (0.904) than BC (0.881). Both SC and SC addition increased in vitro dry matter loss, and the average dry matter losses were similar. Asymptotic gas volume and volatile fatty acid production were greater for BC than for SC (p < 0.0001). Thus, BC may be as effective as SC in removing aflatoxin B1's detrimental effects on rumen degradability and fermentation under the occurrence of microbial aflatoxin degradation.

  11. The Efficacy of Bamboo Charcoal in Comparison with Smectite to Reduce the Detrimental Effect of Aflatoxin B1 on In Vitro Rumen Fermentation of a Hay-Rich Feed Mixture

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ya-Hui; Wang, Ping; Yang, Hong-Jian; Chen, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Two commercial materials, a bamboo charcoal (BC) and a smectite clay (SC), were assessed in vitro with aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) in an equilibrium adsorption test. The adsorption capacity and proportion adsorbed (0.381 μg/mg, 0.955) for BC were greater than for SC (0.372 μg/mg, 0.931). The effects of in vitro ruminal fermentation of hay-rich feed incubated with 1.0 μg/mL AFB1 for 0–10 g/L doses of BC and SC were measured at 39 °C for 72 h. The BC and SC binders increased AFB1 loss at dosages ≥1.0 g/L (p < 0.0001). Average AFB1 loss (p < 0.0001) was greater for SC (0.904) than BC (0.881). Both SC and SC addition increased in vitro dry matter loss, and the average dry matter losses were similar. Asymptotic gas volume and volatile fatty acid production were greater for BC than for SC (p < 0.0001). Thus, BC may be as effective as SC in removing aflatoxin B1’s detrimental effects on rumen degradability and fermentation under the occurrence of microbial aflatoxin degradation. PMID:25014194

  12. Molecular cloning of the alpha subunit of complement component C8 (CpC8α) of whitespotted bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Mengmeng; Wang, Conghui; Ye, Boping; Hua, Zichun

    2013-12-01

    Complement-mediated cytolysis is the important effect of immune response, which results from the assembly of terminal complement components (C5b-9). Among them, α subunit of C8 (C8α) is the first protein that traverses the lipid bilayer, and then initiates the recruitment of C9 molecules to form pore on target membranes. In this article, a full-length cDNA of C8α (CpC8α) is identified from the whitespotted bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum) by RACE. The CpC8α cDNA is 2183 bp in length, encoding a protein of 591 amino acids. The deduced CpC8α exhibits 89%, 49% and 44% identity with nurse shark, frog and human orthologs, respectively. Sequence alignment indicates that the C8α is well conserved during the evolution process from sharks to mammals, with the same modular architecture as well as the identical cysteine composition in the mature protein. Phylogenetic analysis places CpC8α and nurse shark C8α in cartilaginous fish clade, in parallel with the teleost taxa, to form the C8α cluster with higher vertebrates. Hydrophobicity analysis also indicates a similar hydrophobicity of CpC8α to mammals. Finally, expression analysis revealed CpC8α transcripts were constitutively highly expressed in shark liver, with much less expression in other tissues. The well conserved structure and properties suggests an analogous function of CpC8α to mammalian C8α, though it remains to be confirmed by further study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Adsorption-photodegradation of humic acid in water by using ZnO coupled TiO2/bamboo charcoal under visible light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuejiang; Wu, Zhen; Wang, Yin; Wang, Wei; Wang, Xin; Bu, Yunjie; Zhao, Jianfu

    2013-11-15

    ZnO coupled TiO2/bamboo charcoal (ZnO-TiO2/BC) was prepared using the sol-gel method combined with microwave irradiation. The ZnO-TiO2/BC and TiO2/BC were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), N2 adsorption (BET), and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV-vis-DRS). The ZnO dopant promoted the transformation of anatase TiO2 to rutile phase, and a significant red shift of absorption edge was brought out due to the interfacial coupling effect between ZnO and TiO2 particles. The BET specific surface area and total pore volume decreased with ZnO doping, indicating that some micropores were blocked. SEM studies indicated that ZnO was almost uniformly deposited on the surface of the ZnO-TiO2/BC. The adsorption and photocatalytic degradation experiments showed that the photo-degrade efficiency for Zno-TiO2/BC was higher than that of TiO2/BC, and for both composites, the removal efficiency of HA increased as pH decreased from 10.0 to 2.0. The degradation of HA by ZnO-TiO2/BC and TiO2/BC fitted well with the Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics model, and HA degradation was achieved through a synergistic mechanism of adsorption and photocatalysis. ZnO-TiO2/BC could be used as an effective and alternative photocatalyst for the treatment of water contaminated by organic pollutants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Metabolic rates of giant pandas inform conservation strategies.

    PubMed

    Fei, Yuxiang; Hou, Rong; Spotila, James R; Paladino, Frank V; Qi, Dunwu; Zhang, Zhihe

    2016-06-06

    The giant panda is an icon of conservation and survived a large-scale bamboo die off in the 1980s in China. Captive breeding programs have produced a large population in zoos and efforts continue to reintroduce those animals into the wild. However, we lack sufficient knowledge of their physiological ecology to determine requirements for survival now and in the face of climate change. We measured resting and active metabolic rates of giant pandas in order to determine if current bamboo resources were sufficient for adding additional animals to populations in natural reserves. Resting metabolic rates were somewhat below average for a panda sized mammal and active metabolic rates were in the normal range. Pandas do not have exceptionally low metabolic rates. Nevertheless, there is enough bamboo in natural reserves to support both natural populations and large numbers of reintroduced pandas. Bamboo will not be the limiting factor in successful reintroduction.

  15. Metabolic rates of giant pandas inform conservation strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Yuxiang; Hou, Rong; Spotila, James R.; Paladino, Frank V.; Qi, Dunwu; Zhang, Zhihe

    2016-06-01

    The giant panda is an icon of conservation and survived a large-scale bamboo die off in the 1980s in China. Captive breeding programs have produced a large population in zoos and efforts continue to reintroduce those animals into the wild. However, we lack sufficient knowledge of their physiological ecology to determine requirements for survival now and in the face of climate change. We measured resting and active metabolic rates of giant pandas in order to determine if current bamboo resources were sufficient for adding additional animals to populations in natural reserves. Resting metabolic rates were somewhat below average for a panda sized mammal and active metabolic rates were in the normal range. Pandas do not have exceptionally low metabolic rates. Nevertheless, there is enough bamboo in natural reserves to support both natural populations and large numbers of reintroduced pandas. Bamboo will not be the limiting factor in successful reintroduction.

  16. Evaluation of the addition of charcoals to broiler diets on the recovery of Salmonella Typhimurium during grow-out and processing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two experiments evaluated prebiotics added to feed on the recovery of Salmonella in broilers during grow-out and processing. In experiment 1, "seeder" chicks were inoculated with Salmonella Typhimurium and placed with penmates. Treatments were: basal control, 0.3% bamboo charcoal, 0.6% bamboo charco...

  17. Assessment of indoor pollutants generated from bio and synthetic fuels in selected villages of Burdwan, West Bengal.

    PubMed

    Mondal, N K; Bhaumik, R; Das, C R; Aditya, P; Datta, J K; Banerjee, A; Das, K

    2013-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to access the pollutant generated from bio-fuels like bamboo sticks, cow dung, paddy straw, carbon dust cake, gobar gas, jute stick, and mustard stick and synthetic fuel like LPG during cooking in rural villages of Burdwan, West Bengal, India and its fluctuation in living room. The average SO2 released from the fuels was found in the following order: bamboo stick > cow dung > paddy straw > carbon cake > gobar gas > jute stick > LPG > mustard stick; NO2 emission was in the following order : mustard stick > carbon dust cake > paddy straw > cow dung cake > LPG, jute stick > gobar gas > bamboo stick > and SPM was obtained in the following sequence: cow dung cake > bamboo stick > carbon dust cake > gobar gas > LPG > mustard stick > paddy straw > jute stick, respectively. The highest living room to kitchen room (L/K) ratio of SO2, NO, and SPM was found in LPG, gobar gas, jute stick respectively in 2009 and followed by bamboo stick > paddy straw > jute stick > cow dung cake, respectively in 2010. Results of this study suggest that different fuels released different amount of air pollutants, but more extensive study is needed to confirm the relationship between fuels and released air pollutants.

  18. Culex (Thaiomyia) Dispectus, A New Subgenus and Species from Thailand (Diptera: Culicidae)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1966-06-01

    Province; and Doi Sutep, Chiang Mai Province. Biology. Larvae have been collected on four occasions from open bamboo internodes or bamboo stumps in a...primary rain forest en- vironment. The collection from Chiang Mai was from an artificial container. Collections from Tak Province were made at an

  19. Metabolic rates of giant pandas inform conservation strategies

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Yuxiang; Hou, Rong; Spotila, James R.; Paladino, Frank V.; Qi, Dunwu; Zhang, Zhihe

    2016-01-01

    The giant panda is an icon of conservation and survived a large-scale bamboo die off in the 1980s in China. Captive breeding programs have produced a large population in zoos and efforts continue to reintroduce those animals into the wild. However, we lack sufficient knowledge of their physiological ecology to determine requirements for survival now and in the face of climate change. We measured resting and active metabolic rates of giant pandas in order to determine if current bamboo resources were sufficient for adding additional animals to populations in natural reserves. Resting metabolic rates were somewhat below average for a panda sized mammal and active metabolic rates were in the normal range. Pandas do not have exceptionally low metabolic rates. Nevertheless, there is enough bamboo in natural reserves to support both natural populations and large numbers of reintroduced pandas. Bamboo will not be the limiting factor in successful reintroduction. PMID:27264109

  20. Automatic translation of MPI source into a latency-tolerant, data-driven form

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Tan; Cicotti, Pietro; Bylaska, Eric

    Hiding communication behind useful computation is an important performance programming technique but remains an inscrutable programming exercise even for the expert. We present Bamboo, a code transformation framework that can realize communication overlap in applications written in MPI without the need to intrusively modify the source code. Bamboo reformulates MPI source into the form of a task dependency graph that expresses a partial ordering among tasks, enabling the program to execute in a data-driven fashion under the control of an external runtime system. Experimental results demonstrate that Bamboo significantly reduces communication delays while requiring only modest amounts of programmer annotationmore » for a variety of applications and platforms, including those employing co-processors and accelerators. Moreover, Bamboo's performance meets or exceeds that of labor-intensive hand coding. The translator is more than a means of hiding communication costs automatically; it demonstrates the utility of semantic level optimization against a wellknown library.« less

  1. Biomonitoring of Urban Pollution Using Silicon-Accumulating Species, Phyllostachys aureosulcata 'Aureocaulis'.

    PubMed

    Morina, Filis; Vidović, Marija; Srećković, Tatjana; Radović, Vesela; Veljović-Jovanović, Sonja

    2017-12-01

    We investigated metal accumulation in bamboo leaves during three seasons at three urban locations differing in pollution levels. The higher content of Cu, Pb, and Zn in the leaves was in correlation with the highest bioavailable content of these elements in the soil at the most polluted location. The content of leaf trace elements was higher in summer and autumn compared to spring. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy showed that Si accumulation in bamboo leaves was the highest in epidermis and vascular tissue, and was co-localized with trace metals. Analysis of phytoliths showed co-deposition of Al, C, and Si, implying the involvement of Si in metal detoxification. Compared to a common urban tree, linden, bamboo showed better capacity to maintain cellular redox homeostasis under deteriorated environmental conditions. The results suggest that bamboo can be efficiently used for biomonitoring of air and soil metal pollution and remediation in urban areas.

  2. Pseudogenization of the umami taste receptor gene Tas1r1 in the giant panda coincided with its dietary switch to bamboo.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huabin; Yang, Jian-Rong; Xu, Huailiang; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2010-12-01

    Although it belongs to the order Carnivora, the giant panda is a vegetarian with 99% of its diet being bamboo. The draft genome sequence of the giant panda shows that its umami taste receptor gene Tas1r1 is a pseudogene, prompting the proposal that the loss of the umami perception explains why the giant panda is herbivorous. To test this hypothesis, we sequenced all six exons of Tas1r1 in another individual of the giant panda and five other carnivores. We found that the open reading frame (ORF) of Tas1r1 is intact in all these carnivores except the giant panda. The rate ratio (ω) of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions in Tas1r1 is significantly higher for the giant panda lineage than for other carnivore lineages. Based on the ω change and the observed number of ORF-disrupting substitutions, we estimated that the functional constraint on the giant panda Tas1r1 was relaxed ∼ 4.2 Ma, with its 95% confidence interval between 1.3 and 10 Ma. Our estimate matches the approximate date of the giant panda's dietary switch inferred from fossil records. It is probable that the giant panda's decreased reliance on meat resulted in the dispensability of the umami taste, leading to Tas1r1 pseudogenization, which in turn reinforced its herbivorous life style because of the diminished attraction of returning to meat eating in the absence of Tas1r1. Nonetheless, additional factors are likely involved because herbivores such as cow and horse still retain an intact Tas1r1.

  3. Pseudogenization of the Umami Taste Receptor Gene Tas1r1 in the Giant Panda Coincided with its Dietary Switch to Bamboo

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huabin; Yang, Jian-Rong; Xu, Huailiang; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2010-01-01

    Although it belongs to the order Carnivora, the giant panda is a vegetarian with 99% of its diet being bamboo. The draft genome sequence of the giant panda shows that its umami taste receptor gene Tas1r1 is a pseudogene, prompting the proposal that the loss of the umami perception explains why the giant panda is herbivorous. To test this hypothesis, we sequenced all six exons of Tas1r1 in another individual of the giant panda and five other carnivores. We found that the open reading frame (ORF) of Tas1r1 is intact in all these carnivores except the giant panda. The rate ratio (ω) of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions in Tas1r1 is significantly higher for the giant panda lineage than for other carnivore lineages. Based on the ω change and the observed number of ORF-disrupting substitutions, we estimated that the functional constraint on the giant panda Tas1r1 was relaxed ∼4.2 Ma, with its 95% confidence interval between 1.3 and 10 Ma. Our estimate matches the approximate date of the giant panda's dietary switch inferred from fossil records. It is probable that the giant panda's decreased reliance on meat resulted in the dispensability of the umami taste, leading to Tas1r1 pseudogenization, which in turn reinforced its herbivorous life style because of the diminished attraction of returning to meat eating in the absence of Tas1r1. Nonetheless, additional factors are likely involved because herbivores such as cow and horse still retain an intact Tas1r1. PMID:20573776

  4. Two key arginine residues in the coat protein of Bamboo mosaic virus differentially affect the accumulation of viral genomic and subgenomic RNAs.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chien-Jen; Hu, Chung-Chi; Lin, Na-Sheng; Lee, Ya-Chien; Meng, Menghsiao; Tsai, Ching-Hsiu; Hsu, Yau-Heiu

    2014-02-01

    The interactions between viral RNAs and coat proteins (CPs) are critical for the efficient completion of infection cycles of RNA viruses. However, the specificity of the interactions between CPs and genomic or subgenomic RNAs remains poorly understood. In this study, Bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV) was used to analyse such interactions. Using reversible formaldehyde cross-linking and mass spectrometry, two regions in CP, each containing a basic amino acid (R99 and R227, respectively), were identified to bind directly to the 5' untranslated region of BaMV genomic RNA. Analyses of the alanine mutations of R99 and R227 revealed that the secondary structures of CP were not affected significantly, whereas the accumulation of BaMV genomic, but not subgenomic, RNA was severely decreased at 24 h post-inoculation in the inoculated protoplasts. In the absence of CP, the accumulation levels of genomic and subgenomic RNAs were decreased to 1.1%-1.5% and 33%-40% of that of the wild-type (wt), respectively, in inoculated leaves at 5 days post-inoculation (dpi). In contrast, in the presence of mutant CPs, the genomic RNAs remained about 1% of that of wt, whereas the subgenomic RNAs accumulated to at least 87%, suggesting that CP might increase the accumulation of subgenomic RNAs. The mutations also restricted viral movement and virion formation in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves at 5 dpi. These results demonstrate that R99 and R227 of CP play crucial roles in the accumulation, movement and virion formation of BaMV RNAs, and indicate that genomic and subgenomic RNAs interact differently with BaMV CP. © 2013 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  5. Combined modified atmosphere packaging and low temperature storage delay lignification and improve the defense response of minimally processed water bamboo shoot.

    PubMed

    Song, Lili; Chen, Hangjun; Gao, Haiyan; Fang, Xiangjun; Mu, Honglei; Yuan, Ya; Yang, Qian; Jiang, Yueming

    2013-09-04

    Minimally processed water bamboo shoot (WBS) lignifies and deteriorates rapidly at room temperature, which limits greatly its marketability. This study was to investigate the effect of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) on the sensory quality index, lignin formation, production of radical oxygen species (ROS) and activities of scavenging enzymes, membrane integrity and energy status of minimally processed WBS when packaged with or without the sealed low-density polyethylene (LDPE) bags, and then stored at 20°C for 9 days or 2°C for 60 days. The sensory quality of minimally processed WBS decreased quickly after 6 days of storage at 20°C. Low temperature storage maintained a higher sensory quality index within the first 30 days, but exhibited higher contents of lignin and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as compared with non-MAP shoots at 20°C. Combined MAP and low temperature storage not only maintained good sensory quality after 30 days, but also reduced significantly the increases in lignin content, superoxide anion (O2.-) production rate, H2O2 content and membrane permeability, maintained high activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX), and reduced the increase in activities of lipase, phospholipase D (PLD) and lipoxygenase (LOX). Furthermore, the minimally processed WBS under MAP condition exhibited higher energy charge (EC) and lower adenosine monophosphate (AMP) content by the end of storage (60 days) at 2°C than those without MAP or stored for 9 days at 20°C. These results indicated that MAP in combination with low temperature storage reduced lignification of minimally processed WBS, which was closely associated with maintenance of energy status and enhanced activities of antioxidant enzymes, as well as reduced alleviation of membrane damage caused by ROS.

  6. Combined modified atmosphere packaging and low temperature storage delay lignification and improve the defense response of minimally processed water bamboo shoot

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Minimally processed water bamboo shoot (WBS) lignifies and deteriorates rapidly at room temperature, which limits greatly its marketability. This study was to investigate the effect of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) on the sensory quality index, lignin formation, production of radical oxygen species (ROS) and activities of scavenging enzymes, membrane integrity and energy status of minimally processed WBS when packaged with or without the sealed low-density polyethylene (LDPE) bags, and then stored at 20°C for 9 days or 2°C for 60 days. Results The sensory quality of minimally processed WBS decreased quickly after 6 days of storage at 20°C. Low temperature storage maintained a higher sensory quality index within the first 30 days, but exhibited higher contents of lignin and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as compared with non-MAP shoots at 20°C. Combined MAP and low temperature storage not only maintained good sensory quality after 30 days, but also reduced significantly the increases in lignin content, superoxide anion (O2.-) production rate, H2O2 content and membrane permeability, maintained high activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX), and reduced the increase in activities of lipase, phospholipase D (PLD) and lipoxygenase (LOX). Furthermore, the minimally processed WBS under MAP condition exhibited higher energy charge (EC) and lower adenosine monophosphate (AMP) content by the end of storage (60 days) at 2°C than those without MAP or stored for 9 days at 20°C. Conclusion These results indicated that MAP in combination with low temperature storage reduced lignification of minimally processed WBS, which was closely associated with maintenance of energy status and enhanced activities of antioxidant enzymes, as well as reduced alleviation of membrane damage caused by ROS. PMID:24006941

  7. De Novo Sequencing and Characterization of the Floral Transcriptome of Dendrocalamus latiflorus (Poaceae: Bambusoideae)

    PubMed Central

    Li, De-Zhu; Guo, Zhen-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Background Transcriptome sequencing can be used to determine gene sequences and transcript abundance in non-model species, and the advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies has greatly decreased the cost and time required for this process. Transcriptome data are especially desirable in bamboo species, as certain members constitute an economically and culturally important group of mostly semelparous plants with remarkable flowering features, yet little bamboo genomic research has been performed. Here we present, for the first time, extensive sequence and transcript abundance data for the floral transcriptome of a key bamboo species, Dendrocalamus latiflorus, obtained using the Illumina GAII sequencing platform. Our further goal was to identify patterns of gene expression during bamboo flower development. Results Approximately 96 million sequencing reads were generated and assembled de novo, yielding 146,395 high quality unigenes with an average length of 461 bp. Of these, 80,418 were identified as putative homologs of annotated sequences in the public protein databases, of which 290 were associated with the floral transition and 47 were related to flower development. Digital abundance analysis identified 26,529 transcripts differentially enriched between two developmental stages, young flower buds and older developing flowers. Unigenes found at each stage were categorized according to their putative functional categories. These sequence and putative function data comprise a resource for future investigation of the floral transition and flower development in bamboo species. Conclusions Our results present the first broad survey of a bamboo floral transcriptome. Although it will be necessary to validate the functions carried out by these genes, these results represent a starting point for future functional research on D. latiflorus and related species. PMID:22916120

  8. Study of moso bamboo’s permeability and mechanical properties

    Treesearch

    Todd F. Shupe; Chung-Yun Hse; Xiao-dong Huang

    2015-01-01

    In this article, moso bamboo blocks were first treated with hydrochloric acid solvents with different concentrations or microwave treatments with various microwave output power and treatment durations. The results showed that the crystalliferous region of cellulose of moso bamboo blocks formed porous or swelling type structures under hydrochloric acid pretreatment...

  9. Effects of High Temperature and Water Stress on Seed Germination of the Invasive Species Mexican Sunflower

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Mexican sunflower is native to Mexico and Central America and was introduced into China early last century. Now it has widely naturalized and is exhibiting increasing invasiveness in South China. As this species often dominates bare ground, a habitat characterized by extreme fluctuation in temperature and water, it is reasonable to hypothesize that it has special adaptations to high temperature and water stress. Using laboratory experiments to simulate these stresses, this study investigated the response of Mexican sunflower seed germination to temperature and water stress, and compared these responses with those previously reported for another invasive, bamboo piper, which is confined to relatively cool and moist habitats in Xishuangbanna. As expected, Mexican sunflower seeds exhibited higher tolerance to these stresses than bamboo piper. Germination of Mexican sunflower seeds was highest at 15–30°C, but significant numbers of seeds germinated and formed seedlings at 10°C and 35°C, at which no bamboo piper seeds formed seedlings, indicating a wider temperature range for germination than the latter. Roughly half the seeds survived 240 h continuous heat treatment and up to 15 h daily periodical heat treatment at 40°C, while bamboo piper seeds were mostly killed by these treatments. About 20% of Mexican sunflower but no bamboo piper seeds germinated after heat treatment for 30 min at 80°C. Germination was completely inhibited in bamboo piper seeds at -0.6 mPa, while 20–60% of Mexican sunflower seeds germinated depending on PEG or NaCl as osmoticum. This higher tolerance in Mexican sunflower seeds accords with its stronger invasiveness in this area. This comparison between two plant invaders demonstrates that invasiveness is not an all-or-nothing situation, and that adaptation to local habitats is a critical determinant of successful invasiveness for an alien plant. PMID:26509675

  10. Production and purification of anti-bacterial biometabolite from wild-type Lactobacillus, isolated from fermented bamboo shoot: future suggestions and a proposed system for secondary metabolite onsite recovery during continuous fermentation.

    PubMed

    Badwaik, Laxmikant S; Borah, Pallab Kumar; Deka, Sankar C

    2015-02-01

    Wild-type lactobacillus isolated form Khorisa, a fermented bamboo shoot product of Assam, India were evaluated for production anti-bacterial secondary biometabolites, against Staphylococcus aureus. Submerged fermentation technique was used for the production of secondary anti-microbial biometabolite by a single wild-type lactobacillus strain, which tested positive for the release of anti-bacterial factor(s). Crude cell-free supernatant was obtained, followed by extraction in water-immiscible solvents viz., chloroform, hexane, petroleum ether. Chloroform extract of cell-free crude supernatant showed maximum yield (0.054 g/ml) and inhibited all indicator bacterial strains viz., Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus cereus. Yields of hexane and petroleum ether extract were 0.052 and 0.026 g/ml, respectively. Minimum lethal dose concentration assay of the chloroform extract showed LDmin values at 27, 1.68, and 1.68 mg/ml for E. coli, S. aureus, and B. cereus, respectively. Kill time for all the indicator bacterial strains were less than 12 h. The efficacy of the anti-bacterial substance seemed to depend on the presence of organic acids, particularly lactic acid. Conceptual-based suggestion for the development of an onsite secondary metabolites recovery system during continuous fermentation has also been attempted.

  11. The giant panda gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fuwen; Wang, Xiao; Wu, Qi

    2015-08-01

    Giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) are bamboo specialists that evolved from carnivores. Their gut microbiota probably aids in the digestion of cellulose and this is considered an example of gut microbiota adaptation to a bamboo diet. However, this issue remains unresolved and further functional and compositional studies are needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Anatomical characteristics of fusoid cells and vascular bundles in Fargesia yunnanensis leaves

    Treesearch

    Shuguang Wang; Hui Zhang; Shuyan Lin; Chungyun Hse; Yulong Ding

    2016-01-01

    As of today, the functions of fusoid cell, and the transport and loading pathways of photoassimilate in bamboo leaves are still not clear. In this paper, the leaves of Fargesia yunnanensis from a greenhouse and the wild were respectively used as samples to analyze the anatomical characteristics of fusoid cells and vascular bundles. The results showed that the bamboo...

  13. [The disease and treatment of the frontline soldiers in Han dynasty].

    PubMed

    Min, Hookie

    2015-04-01

    This paper purports to identify and analyze the medical information of the frontline soldiers in the Northwest borderland provinces of Han Dynasty, especially Juyan and Dunhuang region, through an heuristic reading of the Juyan Bamboo Slips and the Dunhuang Bamboo Slips of the Han Dynasty. My findings are as follows. The most frequent disease found in the bamboo slips was the external injury. The injury of the frontline soldiers mainly occurred from the quarrels among armed soldiers using weapons. The bamboo slips also demonstrate that the quarrels usually arose due to the fierce tension caused by the frontier line service such as heavy guard activity and labour duty. Undernourishment and chronic stress the soldiers suffered might be another reasons. The second most common disease harassing the soldiers was exogenous febrile disease. In most cases reviewed in this paper, the exogenous febrile disease was usually concurrent with complex symptoms such as chills, fever, headache, etc. The bamboo slips show that the exogenous febrile disease was related to the harsh climate of the Northwest provinces, featuring extremely dry weather and the large magnitude of diurnal temperature fluctuations. In addition, the annual temperature range in the Northwest province was huge, fluctuating between very cold and dry winter and very hot and dry summer. The third most common disease this study identified was the disorder of the digestive system and respiratory system. However, these two types of disease were virtually indistinguishable in the bamboo slips, because the ancient Chinese chroniclers did not distinguish them, usually dubbing both diseases simply 'abdominal pain.' It should be mentioned that a few slips mention contagious disease such as dysentery and dermatolosis, and sudden death, as well. Overall, the bamboo slips demonstrate extremely poor status of the soldiers' heath condition and poor medical environment surrounding the soldiers stationing in the Northwest

  14. TTC Dyeing for Evaluation of Wetland Vegetation Activity in Sarobetsu Mire, Northern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashida, K.; Murakami, Y.; Mizugaki, S.; Yano, M.

    2011-12-01

    Reduced groundwater levels cause drying and shrinkage of mires, resulting in rapid changes in wetland vegetation. To conserve pre-existing wetland vegetation, it is important to clarify its behavior in relation to groundwater level fluctuations. Sarobetsu Mire, the biggest high moor in Japan, is experiencing a transition of its wetland vegetation due to increased invasion by dwarf bamboo (Sasa (Eusasa)). Previous studies have been limited to qualitative assessment concluding that the reduction of wetland vegetation areas is taking place. The invasion of dwarf bamboo was found to be inhibited in areas with high groundwater levels, but few studies have sought to quantitatively assess the responses of individual plants to groundwater variations. Growth activity has often been measured using the triphenyl-tetrazolium-chloride (TTC) method, which is a simple approach. The purpose of this study is to develop a quantitative method to assess the response (in terms of activity) of wetland vegetation to groundwater levels. To examine the relationship between the two (i.e., whether plants are dead or alive), a pair of laboratory experiments was conducted using the TTC method and absorptimetry with dwarf bamboo collected from Sarobetsu Mire. The first experiment was to investigate the activity of wetland vegetation in an inundated environment, and the second was to investigate annual fluctuations in such activity. The results showed that the activity (in terms of absorbance) of dwarf bamboo continued to decrease immediately after collection, and that the absorbance peak at a wavelength of 480 nm was also smaller. However, after the submersion period exceeded 30 days, there were no significant changes in absorbance as the submersion period went on. This indicates that dwarf bamboo underwent activity loss and died when the submersion period exceeded 30 days. Dwarf bamboo was considered dead when absorbance (480 nm) was 0.2 or lower and the peak became unclear. Since the change

  15. Large anthropogenic impacts on a charismatic small carnivore: Insights from distribution surveys of red panda Ailurus fulgens in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Panthi, Saroj; Khanal, Gopal; Acharya, Krishna Prasad; Aryal, Achyut; Srivathsa, Arjun

    2017-01-01

    Protected areas are key to preserving biodiversity and maintaining ecosystem services. However, their ability to ensure long-term survival of threatened andendangered species varies across countries, regions and landscapes. Distribution surveys can beparticularly important for assessing the value of protected areas, and gauging their efficacy incatering to species-specific requirements. We assessed the conservation value of one such reserve for a charismatic yet globally endangered species, the red panda Ailurus fulgens,in the light of on-going land-use transformation in Nepal. We conducted field surveys forindirect signs of red pandas along forest trails in 25-km2 sampling grid cells (n = 54) of Dhorpatan Hunting Reserve, and confronted a set of ecological hypotheses to the data using hierarchical occupancy models. We estimated overall occupancy at Ψ(SE) = 0.41 (0.007), with relatively high site-level detectability [p = 0.93 (SE = 0.001)]. Our results show that despitebeing a subsistence form of small-scale resource use, extraction of bamboo and livestock grazing negatively affected panda occurrence, albeit at different intensities. The amount of bamboo cover,rather than the overall proportion of forest cover, had greater influence on the panda occurrence. Despite availability of bamboo cover, areas with bamboo extraction and anthropogenic disturbances were less likely to be occupied by pandas. Together, these results suggest that long-term persistence of red pandas in this reserve and elsewhere across the species' range will require preventing commercial extractionof bamboo, coupled with case-specific regulation of anthropogenic exploitation of red panda habitats.

  16. Electromigration in Cu(Al) and Cu(Mn) damascene lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, C.-K.; Ohm, J.; Gignac, L. M.; Breslin, C. M.; Mittal, S.; Bonilla, G.; Edelstein, D.; Rosenberg, R.; Choi, S.; An, J. J.; Simon, A. H.; Angyal, M. S.; Clevenger, L.; Maniscalco, J.; Nogami, T.; Penny, C.; Kim, B. Y.

    2012-05-01

    The effects of impurities, Mn or Al, on interface and grain boundary electromigration (EM) in Cu damascene lines were investigated. The addition of Mn or Al solute caused a reduction in diffusivity at the Cu/dielectric cap interface and the EM activation energies for both Cu-alloys were found to increase by about 0.2 eV as compared to pure Cu. Mn mitigated and Al enhanced Cu grain boundary diffusion; however, no significant mitigation in Cu grain boundary diffusion was observed in low Mn concentration samples. The activation energies for Cu grain boundary diffusion were found to be 0.74 ± 0.05 eV and 0.77 ± 0.05 eV for 1.5 μm wide polycrystalline lines with pure Cu and Cu (0.5 at. % Mn) seeds, respectively. The effective charge number in Cu grain boundaries Z*GB was estimated from drift velocity and was found to be about -0.4. A significant enhancement in EM lifetimes for Cu(Al) or low Mn concentration bamboo-polycrystalline and near-bamboo grain structures was observed but not for polycrystalline-only alloy lines. These results indicated that the existence of bamboo grains in bamboo-polycrystalline lines played a critical role in slowing down the EM-induced void growth rate. The bamboo grains act as Cu diffusion blocking boundaries for grain boundary mass flow, thus generating a mechanical stress-induced back flow counterbalancing the EM force, which is the equality known as the "Blech short length effect."

  17. Renewable platform chemicals from directional microwave-assisted liquefaction coupling stepwise extraction of waste biomass

    Treesearch

    Junfeng Feng; Chungyun Hse; Zhongzhi Yang; Kui Wang; Jianchun Jiang; Junming Xu

    2017-01-01

    Directional microwave-assisted liquefaction and stepwise extraction are introduced for producing platform chemicals: aromatics and monosaccharides. When sulfuric acid was used as a catalyst, a 45% monosaccharides yield and a 29% aromatics yield were obtained from bamboo with 0.3 g catalyst per 18 g methanol and 2 g bamboo at 160 °C with 10 min. Approximately 78–86 wt%...

  18. The Bamboo-Eating Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) Has a Sweet Tooth: Behavioral and Molecular Responses to Compounds That Taste Sweet to Humans

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Peihua; Li, Xia; Brand, Joseph G.; Margolskee, Robert F.; Reed, Danielle R.; Beauchamp, Gary K.

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of behavioral and genetic information indicates that taste perception and food sources are highly coordinated across many animal species. For example, sweet taste perception is thought to serve to detect and motivate consumption of simple sugars in plants that provide calories. Supporting this is the observation that most plant-eating mammals examined exhibit functional sweet perception, whereas many obligate carnivores have independently lost function of their sweet taste receptors and exhibit no avidity for simple sugars that humans describe as tasting sweet. As part of a larger effort to compare taste structure/function among species, we examined both the behavioral and the molecular nature of sweet taste in a plant-eating animal that does not consume plants with abundant simple sugars, the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). We evaluated two competing hypotheses: as plant-eating mammals, they should have a well-developed sweet taste system; however, as animals that do not normally consume plants with simple sugars, they may have lost sweet taste function, as has occurred in strict carnivores. In behavioral tests, giant pandas avidly consumed most natural sugars and some but not all artificial sweeteners. Cell-based assays revealed similar patterns of sweet receptor responses toward many of the sweeteners. Using mixed pairs of human and giant panda sweet taste receptor units (hT1R2+gpT1R3 and gpT1R2+hT1R3) we identified regions of the sweet receptor that may account for behavioral differences in giant pandas versus humans toward various sugars and artificial sweeteners. Thus, despite the fact that the giant panda's main food, bamboo, is very low in simple sugars, the species has a marked preference for several compounds that taste sweet to humans. We consider possible explanations for retained sweet perception in this species, including the potential extra-oral functions of sweet taste receptors that may be required for animals that consume

  19. The bamboo-eating giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) has a sweet tooth: behavioral and molecular responses to compounds that taste sweet to humans.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Peihua; Josue-Almqvist, Jesusa; Jin, Xuelin; Li, Xia; Brand, Joseph G; Margolskee, Robert F; Reed, Danielle R; Beauchamp, Gary K

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of behavioral and genetic information indicates that taste perception and food sources are highly coordinated across many animal species. For example, sweet taste perception is thought to serve to detect and motivate consumption of simple sugars in plants that provide calories. Supporting this is the observation that most plant-eating mammals examined exhibit functional sweet perception, whereas many obligate carnivores have independently lost function of their sweet taste receptors and exhibit no avidity for simple sugars that humans describe as tasting sweet. As part of a larger effort to compare taste structure/function among species, we examined both the behavioral and the molecular nature of sweet taste in a plant-eating animal that does not consume plants with abundant simple sugars, the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). We evaluated two competing hypotheses: as plant-eating mammals, they should have a well-developed sweet taste system; however, as animals that do not normally consume plants with simple sugars, they may have lost sweet taste function, as has occurred in strict carnivores. In behavioral tests, giant pandas avidly consumed most natural sugars and some but not all artificial sweeteners. Cell-based assays revealed similar patterns of sweet receptor responses toward many of the sweeteners. Using mixed pairs of human and giant panda sweet taste receptor units (hT1R2+gpT1R3 and gpT1R2+hT1R3) we identified regions of the sweet receptor that may account for behavioral differences in giant pandas versus humans toward various sugars and artificial sweeteners. Thus, despite the fact that the giant panda's main food, bamboo, is very low in simple sugars, the species has a marked preference for several compounds that taste sweet to humans. We consider possible explanations for retained sweet perception in this species, including the potential extra-oral functions of sweet taste receptors that may be required for animals that consume

  20. Dietary resources shape the adaptive changes of cyanide detoxification function in giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Huang, He; Yie, Shangmian; Liu, Yuliang; Wang, Chengdong; Cai, Zhigang; Zhang, Wenping; Lan, Jingchao; Huang, Xiangming; Luo, Li; Cai, Kailai; Hou, Rong; Zhang, Zhihe

    2016-10-05

    The functional adaptive changes in cyanide detoxification in giant panda appear to be response to dietary transition from typical carnivore to herbivorous bear. We tested the absorption of cyanide contained in bamboo/bamboo shoots with a feeding trial in 20 adult giant pandas. We determined total cyanide content in bamboo shoots and giant panda's feces, levels of urinary thiocyanate and tissue rhodanese activity using color reactions with a spectrophotometer. Rhodanese expression in liver and kidney at transcription and translation levels were measured using real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. We compared differences of rhodanese activity and gene expressions among giant panda, rabbit (herbivore) and cat (carnivore), and between newborn and adult giant pandas. Bamboo shoots contained 3.2 mg/kg of cyanide and giant pandas absorbed more than 65% of cyanide. However, approximately 80% of absorbed cyanide was metabolized to less toxic thiocyanate that was discharged in urine. Rhodanese expression and activity in liver and kidney of giant panda were significantly higher than in cat, but lower than in rabbit (all P < 0.05). Levels in adult pandas were higher than that in newborn cub. Phylogenetic analysis of both nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the rhodanese gene supported a closer relationship of giant panda with carnivores than with herbivores.