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Sample records for band electronic structure

  1. Engineering the Electronic Band Structure for Multiband Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, N.; Reichertz, L.A.; Yu, K.M.; Campman, K.; Walukiewicz, W.

    2010-07-12

    Using the unique features of the electronic band structure of GaNxAs1-x alloys, we have designed, fabricated and tested a multiband photovoltaic device. The device demonstrates an optical activity of three energy bands that absorb, and convert into electrical current, the crucial part of the solar spectrum. The performance of the device and measurements of electroluminescence, quantum efficiency and photomodulated reflectivity are analyzed in terms of the Band Anticrossing model of the electronic structure of highly mismatched alloys. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using highly mismatched alloys to engineer the semiconductor energy band structure for specific device applications.

  2. Electronic band structure of surface-doped black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jimin; Ryu, Sae Hee; Sohn, Yeongsup; Kim, Keun Su

    2015-03-01

    There are rapidly growing interests in the study of few-layer black phosphorus owing to its promising device characteristics that may impact our future electronics technology. The low-energy band structure of black phosphorus has been widely predicted to be controllable by external perturbations, such as strain and doping. In this work, we attempt to control the electronic band structure of black phosphorous by in-situ surface deposition of alkali-metal atoms. We found that surface doping induces steep band bending towards the bulk, leading to the emergence of new 2D electronic states that are confined within only few phosphorene layers of black phosphorus. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we directly measured the electronic band structure and its evolution as a function of dopant density. Supported by IBS.

  3. The electronic structure of heavy fermions: Narrow temperature independent bands

    SciTech Connect

    Arko, A.J.; Joyce, J.J.; Smith, J.L.; Andrews, A.B.

    1996-08-01

    The electronic structure of both Ce and U heavy fermions appears to consist of extremely narrow temperature independent bands. There is no evidence from photoemission for a collective phenomenon normally referred to as the Kondo resonance. In uranium compounds a small dispersion of the bands is easily measurable.

  4. Electronic band structure and photoemission: A review and projection

    SciTech Connect

    Falicov, L.M.

    1987-09-01

    A brief review of electronic-structure calculations in solids, as a means of interpreting photoemission spectra, is presented. The calculations are, in general, of three types: ordinary one-electron-like band structures, which apply to bulk solids and are the basis of all other calculations; surface modified calculations, which take into account, self-consistently if at all possible, the presence of a vacuum-solid interface and of the electronic modifications caused thereby; and many-body calculations, which go beyond average-field approximations and consider dynamic rearrangement effects caused by electron-electron correlations during the photoemission process. 44 refs.

  5. Electron-Phonon Renormalization of Electronic Band Structures of C Allotropes and BN Polymorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutchton, Roxanne M.; Marchbanks, Christopher; Wu, Zhigang

    The effect of lattice vibration on electronic band structures has been mostly neglected in first-principles calculations because the electron-phonon (e-ph) renormalization of quasi-particle energies is often small (< 100 meV). However, in certain materials, such as diamond, the electron-phonon coupling reduces the band gap by nearly 0.5 eV, which is comparable to the many-body corrections of the electronic band structures calculated using the density functional theory (DFT). In this work, we compared two implementations of the Allen-Heine-Cardona theory in the EPW code and the ABINIT package respectively. Our computations of Si and diamond demonstrate that the ABINIT implementation converges much faster. Using this method, the e-ph renormalizations of electronic structures of three C allotropes (diamond, graphite, graphene) and four BN polymorphs (zincblend, wurtzite, mono-layer, and layered-hexagonal) were calculated. Our results suggest that (1) all of the zero-point renormalizations of band gaps in these materials, except for graphene, are larger than 100 meV, and (2) there are large variations in e-ph renormalization of band gaps due to differences in crystal structure. This work was supported by a U.S. DOE Early Career Award (Grant No. DE-SC0006433). Computations were carried out at the Golden Energy Computing Organization at CSM and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC).

  6. Electronic transitions in GdN band structure

    SciTech Connect

    Vidyasagar, R. Kita, T.; Sakurai, T.; Ohta, H.

    2014-05-28

    Using the near-infrared (NIR) absorbance spectroscopy, electronic transitions and spin polarization of the GdN epitaxial film have been investigated; and the GdN epitaxial film was grown by a reactive rf sputtering technique. The GdN film exhibited three broad bands in the NIR frequency regimes; and those bands are attributable primarily to the minority and majority spin transitions at the X-point and an indirect transition along the Γ-X symmetric direction of GdN Brillouin zone. We experimentally observe a pronounced red-shift of the indirect band gap when cooling down below the Curie temperature which is ascribed to the orbital-dependent coulomb interactions of Gd-5dxy electrons, which tend to push-up the N-2p bands. On the other hand, we have evaluated the spin polarization of 0.17 (±0.005), which indicates that the GdN epitaxial film has almost 100% spin-polarized carriers. Furthermore, the experimental result of GdN electronic transitions are consistent with the previous reports and are thus well-reproduced. The Arrott plots evidenced that the Curie temperature of GdN film is 36 K and the large spin moment is explained by the nitrogen vacancies and the intra-atomic exchange interaction.

  7. Electronic band structure calculations of bismuth-antimony nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Andrei; Dresselhaus, Mildred

    2012-02-01

    Alloys of bismuth and antimony received initial interest due to their unmatched low-temperature thermoelectric performance, and have drawn more recent attention as the first 3D topological insulators. One-dimensional bismuth-antimony (BiSb) nanowires display interesting quantum confinement effects, and are expected to exhibit even better thermoelectric properties than bulk BiSb. Due to the small, anisotropic carrier effective masses, the electronic properties of BiSb nanowires show great sensitivity to nanowire diameter, crystalline orientation, and alloy composition. We develop a theoretical model for calculating the band structure of BiSb nanowires. For a given crystalline orientation, BiSb nanowires can be in the semimetallic, direct semiconducting, or indirect semiconducting phase, depending on nanowire diameter and alloy composition. These ``phase diagrams'' turn out to be remarkably similar among the different orientations, which is surprising in light of the anisotropy of the bulk BiSb Fermi surface. We predict a novel direct semiconducting phase for nanowires with diameter less than ˜15 nm, over a narrow composition range. We also find that, in contrast to the bulk and thin film BiSb cases, a gapless state with Dirac dispersion cannot be realized in BiSb nanowires.

  8. Analysis of the electronic structure of crystals through band structure unfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordienko, A. B.; Kosobutsky, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we consider an alternative implementation of the band structure unfolding method within the framework of the density functional theory, which combines the advantages of the basis of localized functions and plane waves. This approach has been used to analyze the electronic structure of the ordered CuCl x Br1- x copper halide alloys and F 0 center in MgO that enables us to reveal qualitatively the features remaining hidden when using the standard supercell method, because of the complex band structure of systems with defects.

  9. Electron momentum density, band structure, and structural properties of SrS

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, G.; Munjal, N.; Vyas, V.; Kumar, R.; Sharma, B. K.; Joshi, K. B.

    2013-10-15

    The electron momentum density, the electronic band structure, and the structural properties of SrS are presented in this paper. The isotropic Compton profile, anisotropies in the directional Compton profiles, the electronic band structure and density of states are calculated using the ab initio periodic linear combination of atomic orbitals method with the CRYSTAL06 code. Structural parameters of SrS-lattice constants and bulk moduli in the B1 and B2 phases-are computed together with the transition pressure. The computed parameters are well in agreement with earlier investigations. To compare the calculated isotropic Compton profile, measurement on polycrystalline SrS is performed using 5Ci-{sup 241}Am Compton spectrometer. Additionally, charge transfer is studied by means of the Compton profiles computed from the ionic model. The nature of bonding in the isovalent SrS and SrO compounds is compared on the basis of equal-valenceelectron-density profiles and the bonding in SrS is found to be more covalent than in SrO.

  10. Electronic band structure effects in monolayer, bilayer, and hybrid graphene structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puls, Conor

    Since its discovery in 2005, graphene has been the focus of intense theoretical and experimental study owing to its unique two-dimensional band structure and related electronic properties. In this thesis, we explore the electronic properties of graphene structures from several perspectives including the magnetoelectrical transport properties of monolayer graphene, gap engineering and measurements in bilayer graphene, and anomalous quantum oscillation in the monolayer-bilayer graphene hybrids. We also explored the device implications of our findings, and the application of some experimental techniques developed for the graphene work to the study of a complex oxide, Ca3Ru2O7, exhibiting properties of strongly correlated electrons. Graphene's high mobility and ballistic transport over device length scales, make it suitable for numerous applications. However, two big challenges remain in the way: maintaining high mobility in fabricated devices, and engineering a band gap to make graphene compatible with logical electronics and various optical devices. We address the first challenge by experimentally evaluating mobilities in scalable monolayer graphene-based field effect transistors (FETs) and dielectric-covered Hall bars. We find that the mobility is limited in these devices, and is roughly inversely proportional to doping. By considering interaction of graphene's Dirac fermions with local charged impurities at the interface between graphene and the top-gate dielectric, we find that Coulomb scattering is responsible for degraded mobility. Even in the cleanest devices, a band gap is still desirable for electronic applications of graphene. We address this challenge by probing the band structure of bilayer graphene, in which a field-tunable energy band gap has been theoretically proposed. We use planar tunneling spectroscopy of exfoliated bilayer graphene flakes demonstrate both measurement and control of the energy band gap. We find that both the Fermi level and

  11. Visualizing the influence of point defects on the electronic band structure of graphene.

    PubMed

    Farjam, M

    2014-04-16

    The supercell approach enables us to treat the electronic structure of defective crystals, but the calculated energy bands are too complicated to understand or compare with angle-resolved photoemission spectra because of inevitable zone folding. We discuss how to visualize supercell band structures more effectively by incorporating unfolded spectral weights and orbital decompositions into them. We then apply these ideas to gain a better understanding of the band structure of graphene containing various types of point defects, including nitrogen impurity, hydrogen adsorbate, vacancy defects and the Stone-Wales defect.

  12. Coexisting Honeycomb and Kagome Characteristics in the Electronic Band Structure of Molecular Graphene.

    PubMed

    Paavilainen, Sami; Ropo, Matti; Nieminen, Jouko; Akola, Jaakko; Räsänen, Esa

    2016-06-01

    We uncover the electronic structure of molecular graphene produced by adsorbed CO molecules on a copper (111) surface by means of first-principles calculations. Our results show that the band structure is fundamentally different from that of conventional graphene, and the unique features of the electronic states arise from coexisting honeycomb and Kagome symmetries. Furthermore, the Dirac cone does not appear at the K-point but at the Γ-point in the reciprocal space and is accompanied by a third, almost flat band. Calculations of the surface structure with Kekulé distortion show a gap opening at the Dirac point in agreement with experiments. Simple tight-binding models are used to support the first-principles results and to explain the physical characteristics behind the electronic band structures.

  13. Topological band order, structural, electronic and optical properties of XPdBi (X = Lu, Sc) compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narimani, M.; Nourbakhsh, Z.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the structural, electronic and optical properties of LuPdBi and ScPdBi compounds are investigated using the density functional theory by WIEN2K package within the generalized gradient approximation, local density approximation, Engel-Vosco generalized gradient approximations and modified Becke-Johnson potential approaches. The topological phases and band orders of these compounds are studied. The effect of pressure on band inversion strength, electron density of states and the linear coefficient of the electronic specific heat of these compounds is investigated. Furthermore, the effect of pressure on real and imaginary parts of dielectric function, absorption and reflectivity coefficients of these compounds is studied.

  14. Electronic structure and band alignment at an epitaxial spinel/perovskite heterojunction.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Liang; Li, Wei; Xiao, Haiyan; Meyer, Harry M; Liang, Xuelei; Nguyen, N V; Weber, William J; Biegalski, Michael D

    2014-08-27

    The electronic properties of solid-solid interfaces play critical roles in a variety of technological applications. Recent advances of film epitaxy and characterization techniques have demonstrated a wealth of exotic phenomena at interfaces of oxide materials, which are critically dependent on the alignment of their energy bands across the interface. Here we report a combined photoemission and electrical investigation of the electronic structures across a prototypical spinel/perovskite heterojunction. Energy-level band alignment at an epitaxial Co3O4/SrTiO3(001) heterointerface indicates a chemically abrupt, type I heterojunction without detectable band bending at both the film and substrate. The unexpected band alignment for this typical p-type semiconductor on SrTiO3 is attributed to its intrinsic d-d interband excitation, which significantly narrows the fundamental band gap between the top of the valence band and the bottom of the conduction band. The formation of the type I heterojunction with a flat-band state results in a simultaneous confinement of both electrons and holes inside the Co3O4 layer, thus rendering the epitaxial Co3O4/SrTiO3(001) heterostructure to be a very promising material for high-efficiency luminescence and optoelectronic device applications.

  15. Observation of 'Band' Structures in Spacecraft Observations of Inner Magnetosphere Plasma Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan Narasimhan, Kirthika; Fazakerley, Andrew; Milhaljcic, Branislav; Grimald, Sandrine; Dandouras, Iannis; Owen, Chris

    2013-04-01

    In previous studies, several authors have reported inner magnetosphere observations of proton distributions confined to narrow energy bands in the range of 1-25 keV. These structures have been known as "nose structures", with reference to their appearance in energy-time spectrograms and are known as "bands" if they are observed for extended periods of time. These proton structures have been studied quite extensively with multiple mechanisms proposed for their formation, not all of which apply for electrons. We examine Double-Star TC1 PEACE electron data recorded in the inner magnetosphere (L<15) near the equatorial plane to see if these features are also observed in the electron energy spectra. These "bands" also appear in electron spectrograms, spanning an energy range of 0.2-30 keV, and are shown to occur predominantly towards the dayside and dusk sectors. We also see multiple bands in some instances. We investigate the properties of these multi-banded structures and carry out a statistical survey analysing them as a function of geomagnetic activity, looking at both the Kp and Auroral Indices, in an attempt to explain their presence.

  16. Exploring the Electronic Band Structure of Organometal Halide Perovskite via Photoluminescence Anisotropy of Individual Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Täuber, Daniela; Dobrovolsky, Alexander; Camacho, Rafael; Scheblykin, Ivan G

    2016-08-10

    Understanding electronic processes in organometal halide perovskites, flourishing photovoltaic, and emitting materials requires unraveling the origin of their electronic transitions. Light polarization studies can provide important information regarding transition dipole moment orientations. Investigating individual methylammonium lead triiodide perovskite nanocrystals enabled us to detect the polarization of photoluminescence intensity and photoluminescence excitation, hidden in bulk samples by ensemble averaging. Polarization properties of the crystals were correlated with their photoluminescence spectra and electron microscopy images. We propose that distortion of PbI6 octahedra leads to peculiarities of the electronic band structure close to the band-edge. Namely, the lowest band transition possesses a transition dipole moment along the apical Pb-I-Pb bond resulting in polarized photoluminescence. Excitation of photoluminescence above the bandgap is unpolarized because it involves molecular orbitals delocalized both in the apical and equatorial directions of the perovskite octahedron. Trap-assisted emission at 77 K, rather surprisingly, was polarized similar to the bandgap emission.

  17. The electronic structures of vanadate salts: Cation substitution as a tool for band gap manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgos, Michelle R.; Paraskos, Alexandra M.; Stoltzfus, Matthew W.; Yarnell, Samantha C.; Woodward, Patrick M.

    2009-07-01

    The electronic structures of six ternary metal oxides containing isolated vanadate ions, Ba 3(VO 4) 2, Pb 3(VO 4) 2, YVO 4, BiVO 4, CeVO 4 and Ag 3VO 4 were studied using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations. While the electronic structure near the Fermi level originates largely from the molecular orbitals of the vanadate ion, both experiment and theory show that the cation can strongly influence these electronic states. The observation that Ba 3(VO 4) 2 and YVO 4 have similar band gaps, both 3.8 eV, shows that cations with a noble gas configuration have little impact on the electronic structure. Band structure calculations support this hypothesis. In Pb 3(VO 4) 2 and BiVO 4 the band gap is reduced by 0.9-1.0 eV through interactions of (a) the filled cation 6 s orbitals with nonbonding O 2 p states at the top of the valence band, and (b) overlap of empty 6 p orbitals with antibonding V 3 d-O 2 p states at the bottom of the conduction band. In Ag 3VO 4 mixing between filled Ag 4 d and O 2 p states destabilizes states at the top of the valence band leading to a large decrease in the band gap ( Eg=2.2 eV). In CeVO 4 excitations from partially filled 4 f orbitals into the conduction band lower the effective band gap to 1.8 eV. In the Ce 1-xBi xVO 4 (0≤ x≤0.5) and Ce 1-xY xVO 4 ( x=0.1, 0.2) solid solutions the band gap narrows slightly when Bi 3+ or Y 3+ are introduced. The nonlinear response of the band gap to changes in composition is a result of the localized nature of the Ce 4 f orbitals.

  18. Valence-band electronic structure evolution of graphene oxide upon thermal annealing for optoelectronics

    DOE PAGES

    Yamaguchi, Hisato; Ogawa, Shuichi; Watanabe, Daiki; Hozumi, Hideaki; Gao, Yongqian; Eda, Goki; Mattevi, Cecilia; Fujita, Takeshi; Yoshigoe, Akitaka; Ishizuka, Shinji; et al

    2016-04-08

    We report valence band electronic structure evolution of graphene oxide (GO) upon its thermal reduction. Degree of oxygen functionalization was controlled by annealing temperatures, and an electronic structure evolution was monitored using real-time ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. We observed a drastic increase in density of states around the Fermi level upon thermal annealing at ~600 °C. The result indicates that while there is an apparent band gap for GO prior to a thermal reduction, the gap closes after an annealing around that temperature. This trend of band gap closure was correlated with electrical, chemical, and structural properties to determine a setmore » of GO material properties that is optimal for optoelectronics. The results revealed that annealing at a temperature of ~500 °C leads to the desired properties, demonstrated by a uniform and an order of magnitude enhanced photocurrent map of an individual GO sheet compared to as-synthesized counterpart.« less

  19. The LDA+U calculation of electronic band structure of GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahuguna, B. P.; Sharma, R. O.; Saini, L. K.

    2016-05-01

    We present the electronic band structure of bulk gallium arsenide (GaAs) using first principle approach. A series of calculations has been performed by applying norm-conserving pseudopotentials and ultrasoft non-norm-conserving pseudopotentials within the density functional theory. These calculations yield too small band gap as compare to experiment. Thus, we use semiemperical approach called local density approximation plus the multi-orbital mean-field Hubbard model (LDA+U), which is quite effective in order to describe the band gap of GaAs.

  20. Engineering the electronic structure and band gap of boron nitride nanoribbon via external electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chegel, Raad

    2016-06-01

    By using the third nearest neighbor modified tight binding (3NN-TB) method, the electronic structure and band gap of BNNRs under transverse electric fields are explored. The band gap of the BNNRs has a decreasing with increasing the intensity of the applied electric field, independent on the ribbon edge types. Furthermore, an analytic model for the dependence of the band gap in armchair and zigzag BNNRs on the electric field is proposed. The reduction of E g is similar for some N a armchair and N z zigzag BNNRs independent of their edges.

  1. Electronic band structure effects in the stopping of protons in copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quashie, Edwin E.; Saha, Bidhan C.; Correa, Alfredo A.

    2016-10-01

    We present an ab initio study of the electronic stopping power of protons in copper over a wide range of proton velocities v =0.02 -10 a .u . where we take into account nonlinear effects. Time-dependent density functional theory coupled with molecular dynamics is used to study electronic excitations produced by energetic protons. A plane-wave pseudopotential scheme is employed to solve the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equations for a moving ion in a periodic crystal. The electronic excitations and the band structure determine the stopping power of the material and alter the interatomic forces for both channeling and off-channeling trajectories. Our off-channeling results are in quantitative agreement with experiments, and at low velocity they unveil a crossover region of superlinear velocity dependence (with a power of ˜1.5 ) in the velocity range v =0.07 -0.3 a .u . , which we associate to the copper crystalline electronic band structure. The results are rationalized by simple band models connecting two separate regimes. We find that the limit of electronic stopping v →0 is not as simple as phenomenological models suggest and it is plagued by band-structure effects.

  2. Electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction evidence for two Z-band structural states.

    PubMed

    Perz-Edwards, Robert J; Reedy, Michael K

    2011-08-01

    In vertebrate muscles, Z-bands connect adjacent sarcomeres, incorporate several cell signaling proteins, and may act as strain sensors. Previous electron microscopy (EM) showed Z-bands reversibly switch between a relaxed, "small-square" structure, and an active, "basketweave" structure, but the mechanism of this transition is unknown. Here, we found the ratio of small-square to basketweave in relaxed rabbit psoas muscle varied with temperature, osmotic pressure, or ionic strength, independent of activation. By EM, the A-band and both Z-band lattice spacings varied with temperature and pressure, not ionic strength; however, the basketweave spacing was consistently 10% larger than small-square. We next sought evidence for the two Z-band structures in unfixed muscles using x-ray diffraction, which indicated two Z-reflections whose intensity ratios and spacings correspond closely to the EM measurements for small-square and basketweave if the EM spacings are adjusted for 20% shrinkage due to EM processing. We conclude that the two Z-reflections arise from the small-square and basketweave forms of the Z-band as seen by EM. Regarding the mechanism of transition during activation, the effects of Ca(2+) in the presence of force inhibitors suggested that the interconversion of Z-band forms was correlated with tropomyosin movement on actin. PMID:21806939

  3. Enlarged band gap and electron switch in graphene-based step-barrier structure

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei-Tao Ye, Cheng-Zhi; Li, Wen

    2013-11-04

    We study the transmission through a step-barrier in gapped graphene and propose a method to enlarge the band gap. The step-barrier structure consists of two or more barriers with different strengths. It is found that the band gap could be effectively enlarged and controlled by adjusting the barrier strengths in the light of the mass term. Klein tunneling at oblique incidence is suppressed due to the asymmetry of step-barrier, contrary to the cases in single-barrier and superlattices. Furthermore, a tunable conductance channel could be opened up in the conductance gap, suggesting an application of the structure as an electron switch.

  4. Electronic structure of Pt based topological Heusler compounds with C1{sub b} structure and 'zero band gap'

    SciTech Connect

    Ouardi, Siham; Shekhar, Chandra; Fecher, Gerhard H.; Kozina, Xeniya; Stryganyuk, Gregory; Felser, Claudia; Ueda, Shigenori; Kobayashi, Keisuke

    2011-05-23

    Besides of their well-known wide range of properties it was recently shown that many of the heavy Heusler semiconductors with 1:1:1 composition and C1{sub b} structure exhibit a zero band gap behavior and are topological insulators induced by their inverted band structure. In the present study, the electronic structure of the Heusler compounds PtYSb and PtLaBi was investigated by bulk sensitive hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The measured valence band spectra are clearly resolved and in well agreement to the first-principles calculations of the electronic structure of the compounds. The experimental results give clear evidence for the zero band gap state.

  5. Electronic Band Structures and Native Point Defects of Ultrafine ZnO Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yu-Jia; Schouteden, Koen; Amini, Mozhgan N; Ruan, Shuang-Chen; Lu, Yang-Fan; Ye, Zhi-Zhen; Partoens, Bart; Lamoen, Dirk; Van Haesendonck, Chris

    2015-05-20

    Ultrafine ZnO nanocrystals with a thickness down to 0.25 nm are grown by a metalorganic chemical vapor deposition method. Electronic band structures and native point defects of ZnO nanocrystals are studied by a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and first-principles density functional theory calculations. Below a critical thickness of ∼1 nm ZnO adopts a graphitic-like structure and exhibits a wide band gap similar to its wurtzite counterpart. The hexagonal wurtzite structure, with a well-developed band gap evident from scanning tunneling spectroscopy, is established for a thickness starting from ∼1.4 nm. With further increase of the thickness to 2 nm, VO-VZn defect pairs are easily produced in ZnO nanocrystals due to the self-compensation effect in highly doped semiconductors. PMID:25923131

  6. Band gap and electronic structure of MgSiN{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Quirk, J. B. Råsander, M.; McGilvery, C. M.; Moram, M. A.; Palgrave, R.

    2014-09-15

    Density functional theory calculations and electron energy loss spectroscopy indicate that the electronic structure of ordered orthorhombic MgSiN{sub 2} is similar to that of wurtzite AlN. A band gap of 5.7 eV was calculated for both MgSiN{sub 2} (indirect) and AlN (direct) using the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof approximation. Correction with respect to the experimental room-temperature band gap of AlN indicates that the true band gap of MgSiN{sub 2} is 6.2 eV. MgSiN{sub 2} has an additional direct gap of 6.3 eV at the Γ point.

  7. Tuning two-dimensional band structure of Cu(111) surface-state electrons that interplay with artificial supramolecular architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiyong; Wang, Weihua; Tan, Liang Z.; Li, Xing Guang; Shi, Zilang; Kuang, Guowen; Liu, Pei Nian; Louie, Steven G.; Lin, Nian

    2013-12-01

    We report on the modulation of two-dimensional (2D) bands of Cu(111) surface-state electrons by three isostructural supramolecular honeycomb architectures with different periodicity or constituent molecules. Using Fourier-transformed scanning tunneling spectroscopy and model calculations, we resolved the 2D band structures and found that the intrinsic surface-state band is split into discrete bands. The band characteristics including band gap, band bottom, and bandwidth are controlled by the network unit cell size and the nature of the molecule-surface interaction. In particular, Dirac cones emerge where the second and third bands meet at the K points of the Brillouin zone of the supramolecular lattice.

  8. Doping and strain dependence of the electronic band structure in Ge and GeSn alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chi; Gallagher, James; Senaratne, Charutha; Brown, Christopher; Fernando, Nalin; Zollner, Stefan; Kouvetakis, John; Menendez, Jose

    2015-03-01

    A systematic study of the effect of dopants and strain on the electronic structure of Ge and GeSn alloys is presented. Samples were grown by UHV-CVD on Ge-buffered Si using Ge3H8 and SnD4 as the sources of Ge and Sn, and B2H6/P(GeH3)3 as dopants. High-energy critical points in the joint-density of electronic states were studied using spectroscopic ellipsometry, which yields detailed information on the strain and doping dependence of the so-called E1, E1 +Δ1 , E0' and E2 transitions. The corresponding dependencies of the lowest direct band gap E0 and the fundamental indirect band gap Eindwere studied via room-T photoluminescence spectroscopy. Of particular interest for this work were the determination of deformation potentials, band gap renormalization effects, Burstein-Moss shifts due to the presence of carriers at band minima, and the dependence of other critical point parameters, such as amplitudes and phase angles, on the doping concentration. The selective blocking of transitions due to high doping makes it possible to investigate the precise k-space location of critical points. These studies are complemented with detailed band-structure calculations within a full-zone k-dot- p approach. Supported by AFOSR under DOD AFOSR FA9550-12-1-0208 and DOD AFOSR FA9550-13-1-0022.

  9. Electronic band structure and optical properties of the cubic, Sc, Y and La hydride systems

    SciTech Connect

    Peterman, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    Electronic band structure calculations are used to interpret the optical spectra of the cubic Sc, Y and La hydride systems. Self-consistent band calculations of ScH/sub 2/ and YH/sub 2/ were carried out. The respective joint densities of states are computed and compared to the dielectric functions determined from the optical measurements. Additional calculations were performed in which the Fermi level or band gap energies are rigidly shifted by a small energy increment. These calculations are then used to simulate the derivative structure in thermomodulation spectra and relate the origin of experimental interband features to the calculated energy bands. While good systematic agreement is obtained for several spectral features, the origin of low-energy interband transitions in YH/sub 2/ cannot be explained by these calculated bands. A lattice-size-dependent premature occupation of octahedral sites by hydrogen atoms in the fcc metal lattice is suggested to account for this discrepancy. Various non-self-consistent calculations are used to examine the effect of such a premature occupation. Measurements of the optical absorptivity of LaH/sub x/ with 1.6 < x < 2.9 are presented which, as expected, indicate a more premature occupation of the octahedral sites in the larger LaH/sub 2/ lattice. These experimental results also suggest that, in contrast to recent calculations, LaH/sub 3/ is a small-band-gap semiconductor.

  10. Structural characteristic correlated to the electronic band gap in Mo S2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Shengqi; Park, Changyong; Shen, Guoyin

    2016-07-01

    The structural evolution with pressure in bulk Mo S2 has been investigated by high-pressure x-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. We found that the out-of-plane S-Mo-S bond angle θ increases and that in in-plane angle ϕ decreases linearly with increasing pressure across the known semiconducting-to-metal phase transition, whereas the Mo-S bond length and the S-Mo-S trilayer thickness display only little change. Extrapolating the experimental result along the in-plane lattice parameter with pressure, both S-Mo-S bond angles trend to those found in monolayer Mo S2 , which manifests as a structural characteristic closely correlating the electronic band gap of Mo S2 to its physical forms and phases, e.g., monolayer as direct band gap semiconductor, multilayer or bulk as indirect band gap semiconductor, and high-pressure (>19 GPa ) bulk form as metal. Combined with the effects of bond strength and van der Waals interlayer interactions, the structural correlations between the characteristic bond angle and electronic band gaps are readily extendible to other transition metal dichalcogenide systems (M X2 , where M =Mo , W and X =S , Se, Te).

  11. Ferromagnetism and the electronic band structure in (Ga,Mn)(Bi,As) epitaxial layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yastrubchak, O.; Sadowski, J.; Gluba, L.; Domagala, J. Z.; Rawski, M.; Żuk, J.; Kulik, M.; Andrearczyk, T.; Wosinski, T.

    2014-08-01

    Impact of Bi incorporation into (Ga,Mn)As layers on their electronic- and band-structures as well as their magnetic and structural properties has been studied. Homogenous (Ga,Mn)(Bi,As) layers of high structural perfection have been grown by the low-temperature molecular-beam epitaxy technique. Post-growth annealing treatment of the layers results in an improvement of their structural and magnetic properties and an increase in the hole concentration in the layers. The modulation photoreflectance spectroscopy results are consistent with the valence-band model of hole-mediated ferromagnetism in the layers. This material combines the properties of (Ga,Mn)As and Ga(Bi,As) ternary compounds and offers the possibility of tuning its electrical and magnetic properties by controlling the alloy composition.

  12. Ferromagnetism and the electronic band structure in (Ga,Mn)(Bi,As) epitaxial layers

    SciTech Connect

    Yastrubchak, O.; Sadowski, J.; Domagala, J. Z.; Andrearczyk, T.; Wosinski, T.

    2014-08-18

    Impact of Bi incorporation into (Ga,Mn)As layers on their electronic- and band-structures as well as their magnetic and structural properties has been studied. Homogenous (Ga,Mn)(Bi,As) layers of high structural perfection have been grown by the low-temperature molecular-beam epitaxy technique. Post-growth annealing treatment of the layers results in an improvement of their structural and magnetic properties and an increase in the hole concentration in the layers. The modulation photoreflectance spectroscopy results are consistent with the valence-band model of hole-mediated ferromagnetism in the layers. This material combines the properties of (Ga,Mn)As and Ga(Bi,As) ternary compounds and offers the possibility of tuning its electrical and magnetic properties by controlling the alloy composition.

  13. Banded structures in electron pitch angle diffusion coefficients from resonant wave-particle interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, A. K.; Singhal, R. P.; Khazanov, G. V.; Avanov, L. A.

    2016-04-01

    Electron pitch angle (Dαα) and momentum (Dpp) diffusion coefficients have been calculated due to resonant interactions with electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) and whistler mode chorus waves. Calculations have been performed at two spatial locations L = 4.6 and 6.8 for electron energies ≤10 keV. Landau (n = 0) resonance and cyclotron harmonic resonances n = ±1, ±2, … ±5 have been included in the calculations. It is found that diffusion coefficient versus pitch angle (α) profiles show large dips and oscillations or banded structures. The structures are more pronounced for ECH and lower band chorus (LBC) and particularly at location 4.6. Calculations of diffusion coefficients have also been performed for individual resonances. It is noticed that the main contribution of ECH waves in pitch angle diffusion coefficient is due to resonances n = +1 and n = +2. A major contribution to momentum diffusion coefficients appears from n = +2. However, the banded structures in Dαα and Dpp coefficients appear only in the profile of diffusion coefficients for n = +2. The contribution of other resonances to diffusion coefficients is found to be, in general, quite small or even negligible. For LBC and upper band chorus waves, the banded structures appear only in Landau resonance. The Dpp diffusion coefficient for ECH waves is one to two orders smaller than Dαα coefficients. For chorus waves, Dpp coefficients are about an order of magnitude smaller than Dαα coefficients for the case n ≠ 0. In case of Landau resonance, the values of Dpp coefficient are generally larger than the values of Dαα coefficients particularly at lower energies. As an aid to the interpretation of results, we have also determined the resonant frequencies. For ECH waves, resonant frequencies have been estimated for wave normal angle 89° and harmonic resonances n = +1, +2, and +3, whereas for whistler mode waves, the frequencies have been calculated for angle 10° and Landau

  14. Interacting quasi-band theory for electronic states in compound semiconductor alloys: Wurtzite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishi, Ayaka; Oda, Masato; Shinozuka, Yuzo

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports on the electronic states of compound semiconductor alloys of wurtzite structure calculated by the recently proposed interacting quasi-band (IQB) theory combined with empirical sp3 tight-binding models. Solving derived quasi-Hamiltonian 24 × 24 matrix that is characterized by the crystal parameters of the constituents facilitates the calculation of the conduction and valence bands of wurtzite alloys for arbitrary concentrations under a unified scheme. The theory is applied to III-V and II-VI wurtzite alloys: cation-substituted Al1- x Ga x N and Ga1- x In x N and anion-substituted CdS1- x Se x and ZnO1- x S x . The obtained results agree well with the experimental data, and are discussed in terms of mutual mixing between the quasi-localized states (QLS) and quasi-average bands (QAB): the latter bands are approximately given by the virtual crystal approximation (VCA). The changes in the valence and conduction bands, and the origin of the band gap bowing are discussed on the basis of mixing character.

  15. Interacting quasi-band theory for electronic states in compound semiconductor alloys: Wurtzite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishi, Ayaka; Oda, Masato; Shinozuka, Yuzo

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports on the electronic states of compound semiconductor alloys of wurtzite structure calculated by the recently proposed interacting quasi-band (IQB) theory combined with empirical sp3 tight-binding models. Solving derived quasi-Hamiltonian 24 × 24 matrix that is characterized by the crystal parameters of the constituents facilitates the calculation of the conduction and valence bands of wurtzite alloys for arbitrary concentrations under a unified scheme. The theory is applied to III–V and II–VI wurtzite alloys: cation-substituted Al1‑ x Ga x N and Ga1‑ x In x N and anion-substituted CdS1‑ x Se x and ZnO1‑ x S x . The obtained results agree well with the experimental data, and are discussed in terms of mutual mixing between the quasi-localized states (QLS) and quasi-average bands (QAB): the latter bands are approximately given by the virtual crystal approximation (VCA). The changes in the valence and conduction bands, and the origin of the band gap bowing are discussed on the basis of mixing character.

  16. Electronic structure descriptor for the discovery of narrow-band red-emitting phosphors

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Zhenbin; Chu, Iek -Heng; Zhou, Fei; Ong, Shyue Ping

    2016-05-09

    Narrow-band red-emitting phosphors are a critical component of phosphor-converted light-emitting diodes for highly efficient illumination-grade lighting. In this work, we report the discovery of a quantitative descriptor for narrow-band Eu2+-activated emission identified through a comparison of the electronic structures of known narrow-band and broad-band phosphors. We find that a narrow emission bandwidth is characterized by a large splitting of more than 0.1 eV between the two highest Eu2+ 4f7 bands. By incorporating this descriptor in a high-throughput first-principles screening of 2259 nitride compounds, we identify five promising new nitride hosts for Eu2+-activated red-emitting phosphors that are predicted to exhibit goodmore » chemical stability, thermal quenching resistance, and quantum efficiency, as well as narrow-band emission. Lastly, our findings provide important insights into the emission characteristics of rare-earth activators in phosphor hosts and a general strategy to the discovery of phosphors with a desired emission peak and bandwidth.« less

  17. Band structure and electron-phonon coupling in H3S : A tight-binding model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortenzi, L.; Cappelluti, E.; Pietronero, L.

    2016-08-01

    We present a robust tight-binding description, based on the Slater-Koster formalism, of the band structure of H3S in the Im3 ¯m structure, stable in the range of pressure P =180 -220 GPa. We show that the interatomic hopping between the 3 s and 3 p orbitals (and partially between the 3 p orbitals themselves) of sulfur is fundamental to capturing the relevant physics associated with the Van Hove singularities close to the Fermi level. Comparing the model so defined with density functional theory calculations we obtain a very good agreement not only of the overall band structure but also of the low-energy states and the Fermi surface properties. The description in terms of Slater-Koster parameters permits us also to evaluate at a microscopic level a hopping-resolved linear electron-lattice coupling which can be employed for further tight-binding analyses also at a local scale.

  18. Correlation between morphology, electron band structure, and resistivity of Pb atomic chains on the Si(5 5 3)-Au surface.

    PubMed

    Jałochowski, M; Kwapiński, T; Łukasik, P; Nita, P; Kopciuszyński, M

    2016-07-20

    Structural and electron transport properties of multiple Pb atomic chains fabricated on the Si(5 5 3)-Au surface are investigated using scanning tunneling spectroscopy, reflection high electron energy diffraction, angular resolved photoemission electron spectroscopy and in situ electrical resistance. The study shows that Pb atomic chains growth modulates the electron band structure of pristine Si(5 5 3)-Au surface and hence changes its sheet resistivity. Strong correlation between chains morphology, electron band structure and electron transport properties is found. To explain experimental findings a theoretical tight-binding model of multiple atomic chains interacting on effective substrate is proposed.

  19. Giant amplification in degenerate band edge slow-wave structures interacting with an electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, Mohamed A. K.; Veysi, Mehdi; Figotin, Alexander; Capolino, Filippo

    2016-03-01

    We propose a new amplification regime based on a synchronous operation of four degenerate electromagnetic (EM) modes in a slow-wave structure and the electron beam, referred to as super synchronization. These four EM modes arise in a Fabry-Pérot cavity when degenerate band edge (DBE) condition is satisfied. The modes interact constructively with the electron beam resulting in superior amplification. In particular, much larger gains are achieved for smaller beam currents compared to conventional structures based on synchronization with only a single EM mode. We demonstrate giant gain scaling with respect to the length of the slow-wave structure compared to conventional Pierce type single mode traveling wave tube amplifiers. We construct a coupled transmission line model for a loaded waveguide slow-wave structure exhibiting a DBE, and investigate the phenomenon of giant gain via super synchronization using the Pierce model generalized to multimode interaction.

  20. Electronic Properties of ZnO: Band Structure and Directional Compton Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, G.; Mishra, M. C.; Dhaka, M. S.; Kothari, R. K.; Joshi, K. B.; Sharma, B. K.

    2013-12-01

    The electronic band structure and directional Compton profiles (DCPs) of ZnO are studied in this work. Calculations are performed considering a set of three schemes based on density functional theory (DFT), the Hartree-Fock (HF) method, and a hybrid scheme. All band structures predict direct bandgaps. The best agreement with experiment is, however, shown by the hybrid scheme. The three schemes are also applied to compute DCPs along [100], [110], and [001] directions. These are compared with measurements made on single crystals of ZnO employing a 59.54 keV gamma-ray Compton spectrometer. Calculations overestimate the momentum density in the low-momentum region while underestimate the anisotropies. Positions of extremes in anisotropies deduced from calculations are well reproduced by the measured anisotropies in some cases. Within the experimental limits, the DCPs from the HF method are in better agreement with the measurements compared with DFT.

  1. Valence-band electronic structure of silicon nitride studied with the use of soft-x-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, R. D.; Schnatterly, S. E.

    1986-02-01

    We have studied the valence-band electronic structure of α-phase, β-phase, and amorphous silicon nitride samples, using Si L-x-ray emission. Our results are compared with a recent band-structure calculation and show that Si 3d states are necessary to properly describe the upper-valence-band and lower-conduction-band density of states. A prominent feature is seen above the valence band which is attributed to conduction-band states that are populated by the incident electron beam. By reducing the energy of the electron beam it is possible to enhance the surface emission relative to bulk emission, and such spectra are also presented and discussed.

  2. Electronic band structure imaging of three layer twisted graphene on single crystal Cu(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Marquez Velasco, J.; Kelaidis, N.; Xenogiannopoulou, E.; Tsoutsou, D.; Tsipas, P.; Speliotis, Th.; Pilatos, G.; Likodimos, V.; Falaras, P.; Dimoulas, A.; Raptis, Y. S.

    2013-11-18

    Few layer graphene (FLG) is grown on single crystal Cu(111) by Chemical Vapor Deposition, and the electronic valence band structure is imaged by Angle-Resolved Photo-Emission Spectroscopy. It is found that graphene essentially grows polycrystalline. Three nearly ideal Dirac cones are observed along the Cu Γ{sup ¯}K{sup ¯} direction in k-space, attributed to the presence of ∼4° twisted three layer graphene with negligible interlayer coupling. The number of layers and the stacking order are compatible with Raman data analysis demonstrating the complementarity of the two techniques for a more accurate characterization of FLG.

  3. First principles electronic band structure and phonon dispersion curves for zinc blend beryllium chalcogenide

    SciTech Connect

    Dabhi, Shweta Mankad, Venu Jha, Prafulla K.

    2014-04-24

    A detailed theoretical study of structural, electronic and Vibrational properties of BeX compound is presented by performing ab-initio calculations based on density-functional theory using the Espresso package. The calculated value of lattice constant and bulk modulus are compared with the available experimental and other theoretical data and agree reasonably well. BeX (X = S,Se,Te) compounds in the ZB phase are indirect wide band gap semiconductors with an ionic contribution. The phonon dispersion curves are represented which shows that these compounds are dynamically stable in ZB phase.

  4. Optical Transitions and Electronic Band structure of Cuprous Oxide Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hosun; Park, Jun-Woo; Jang, Hyungkeun; Kim, Sung; Choi, Suk-Ho; Kang, Joongoo; Wei, Su-Huai

    2012-02-01

    Cu2O thin films were grown on Si and SiO2/Si substrates via RF sputtering deposition at various temperatures. The Cu2O thin films had a smooth surface when grown at RT, but developed grain boundaries when grown at 300 ^oC. We observed the high-energy photoluminescence (PL) peaks at 3.18 eV (Ep) and 3.27 eV (Eq). The dielectric functions of the Cu2O thin films were measured using spectroscopic ellipsometry. To estimate the critical point (CP) energies, we applied the standard critical point (SCP) model to the second derivative spectra of the dielectric functions (d^2ɛ/dE^2). We also calculated the electronic band structure of bulk Cu2O by using the screened HSE hybrid density functional. Based on the band structure, the CP was estimated as 2.05 eV (E0A(E0B)), 2.77 eV (E0C(E0D)) at the γ point, 4.17 eV (E1A) and 6.10 eV (E2) at the X point, 4.94 eV (E1B) at the R point. The experimental CP energies are consistent with the HSE results, but are systematically smaller than the calculated values by 0.3-0.8 eV due to large electron-hole interaction in CuO2 that was not included in the simulations. The high-energy peaks in the PL spectra at 3.18 eV (Ep) and 3.27 eV (Eq) were attributed to the quasi-direct transitions between the γ valence band and the M and X conduction bands, respectively. The physical origin of the quasi-direct transitions was attributed to the grain boundaries.

  5. Physical properties and electronic band structure of noncentrosymmetric Th7Co3 superconductor.

    PubMed

    Sahakyan, M; Tran, V H

    2016-05-25

    The physical properties of the noncentrosymmetric superconductor Th7Co3 have been investigated by means of ac-magnetic susceptibility, magnetization, specific heat, electrical resistivity, magnetoresistance and Hall effect measurements. From these data it is established that Th7Co3 is a dirty type-II superconductor with [Formula: see text] K, [Formula: see text] and moderate electron-phonon coupling [Formula: see text]. Some evidences for anisotropic superconducting gap are found, including e.g. reduced specific heat jump ([Formula: see text]) at T c, diminished superconducting energy gap ([Formula: see text]) as compared to the BCS values, power law field dependence of the Sommerfeld coefficient at 0.4 K ([Formula: see text]), and a concave curvature of the [Formula: see text] line. The magnitudes of the thermodynamic critical field and the energy gap are consistent with mean-squared anisotropy parameter [Formula: see text]. The electronic specific heat in the superconducting state is reasonably fitted to an oblate spheroidal gap model. Calculations of scalar relativistic and fully relativistic electronic band structures reveal considerable differences in the degenerate structure, resulting from asymmetric spin-orbit coupling (ASOC). A large splitting energy of spin-up spin-down bands at the Fermi level E F, [Formula: see text] meV is observed and a sizeable ratio [Formula: see text] could classify the studied compound into the class of noncentrosymmetric superconductors with strong ASOC. The noncentrosymmetry of the crystal structure and the atomic relativistic effects are both responsible for an importance of ASOC in Th7Co3. The calculated results for the density of states show a Van Hove singularity just below E F and dominant role of the 6d electrons of Th to the superconductivity. PMID:27120582

  6. Physical properties and electronic band structure of noncentrosymmetric Th7Co3 superconductor.

    PubMed

    Sahakyan, M; Tran, V H

    2016-05-25

    The physical properties of the noncentrosymmetric superconductor Th7Co3 have been investigated by means of ac-magnetic susceptibility, magnetization, specific heat, electrical resistivity, magnetoresistance and Hall effect measurements. From these data it is established that Th7Co3 is a dirty type-II superconductor with [Formula: see text] K, [Formula: see text] and moderate electron-phonon coupling [Formula: see text]. Some evidences for anisotropic superconducting gap are found, including e.g. reduced specific heat jump ([Formula: see text]) at T c, diminished superconducting energy gap ([Formula: see text]) as compared to the BCS values, power law field dependence of the Sommerfeld coefficient at 0.4 K ([Formula: see text]), and a concave curvature of the [Formula: see text] line. The magnitudes of the thermodynamic critical field and the energy gap are consistent with mean-squared anisotropy parameter [Formula: see text]. The electronic specific heat in the superconducting state is reasonably fitted to an oblate spheroidal gap model. Calculations of scalar relativistic and fully relativistic electronic band structures reveal considerable differences in the degenerate structure, resulting from asymmetric spin-orbit coupling (ASOC). A large splitting energy of spin-up spin-down bands at the Fermi level E F, [Formula: see text] meV is observed and a sizeable ratio [Formula: see text] could classify the studied compound into the class of noncentrosymmetric superconductors with strong ASOC. The noncentrosymmetry of the crystal structure and the atomic relativistic effects are both responsible for an importance of ASOC in Th7Co3. The calculated results for the density of states show a Van Hove singularity just below E F and dominant role of the 6d electrons of Th to the superconductivity.

  7. Band-structure-based collisional model for electronic excitations in ion-surface collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Faraggi, M.N.; Gravielle, M.S.; Alducin, M.; Silkin, V.M.; Juaristi, J.I.

    2005-07-15

    Energy loss per unit path in grazing collisions with metal surfaces is studied by using the collisional and dielectric formalisms. Within both theories we make use of the band-structure-based (BSB) model to represent the surface interaction. The BSB approach is based on a model potential and provides a precise description of the one-electron states and the surface-induced potential. The method is applied to evaluate the energy lost by 100 keV protons impinging on aluminum surfaces at glancing angles. We found that when the realistic BSB description of the surface is used, the energy loss obtained from the collisional formalism agrees with the dielectric one, which includes not only binary but also plasmon excitations. The distance-dependent stopping power derived from the BSB model is in good agreement with available experimental data. We have also investigated the influence of the surface band structure in collisions with the Al(100) surface. Surface-state contributions to the energy loss and electron emission probability are analyzed.

  8. Valence-band electronic structure of iron phthalocyanine: An experimental and theoretical photoelectron spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brena, Barbara; Puglia, Carla; de Simone, Monica; Coreno, Marcello; Tarafder, Kartick; Feyer, Vitaly; Banerjee, Rudra; Göthelid, Emmanuelle; Sanyal, Biplab; Oppeneer, Peter M.; Eriksson, Olle

    2011-02-01

    The electronic structure of iron phthalocyanine (FePc) in the valence region was examined within a joint theoretical-experimental collaboration. Particular emphasis was placed on the determination of the energy position of the Fe 3d levels in proximity of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO). Photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) measurements were performed on FePc in gas phase at several photon energies in the interval between 21 and 150 eV. Significant variations of the relative intensities were observed, indicating a different elemental and atomic orbital composition of the highest lying spectral features. The electronic structure of a single FePc molecule was first computed by quantum chemical calculations by means of density functional theory (DFT). The hybrid Becke 3-parameter, Lee, Yang and Parr (B3LYP) functional and the semilocal 1996 functional of Perdew, Burke and Ernzerhof (PBE) of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA-)type, exchange-correlation functionals were used. The DFT/B3LYP calculations find that the HOMO is a doubly occupied π-type orbital formed by the carbon 2p electrons, and the HOMO-1 is a mixing of carbon 2p and iron 3d electrons. In contrast, the DFT/PBE calculations find an iron 3d contribution in the HOMO. The experimental photoelectron spectra of the valence band taken at different energies were simulated by means of the Gelius model, taking into account the atomic subshell photoionization cross sections. Moreover, calculations of the electronic structure of FePc using the GGA+U method were performed, where the strong correlations of the Fe 3d electronic states were incorporated through the Hubbard model. Through a comparison with our quantum chemical calculations we find that the best agreement with the experimental results is obtained for a Ueff value of 5 eV.

  9. The electronic and transport properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides: a complex band structure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczesniak, Dominik

    Recently, monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides have attracted much attention due to their potential use in both nano- and opto-electronics. In such applications, the electronic and transport properties of group-VIB transition metal dichalcogenides (MX2 , where M=Mo, W; X=S, Se, Te) are particularly important. Herein, new insight into these properties is presented by studying the complex band structures (CBS's) of MX2 monolayers while accounting for spin-orbit coupling effects. By using the symmetry-based tight-binding model a nonlinear generalized eigenvalue problem for CBS's is obtained. An efficient method for solving such class of problems is presented and gives a complete set of physically relevant solutions. Next, these solutions are characterized and classified into propagating and evanescent states, where the latter states present not only monotonic but also oscillatory decay character. It is observed that some of the oscillatory evanescent states create characteristic complex loops at the direct band gaps, which describe the tunneling currents in the MX2 materials. The importance of CBS's and tunneling currents is demonstrated by the analysis of the quantum transport across MX2 monolayers within phase field matching theory. Present work has been prepared within the Qatar Energy and Environment Research Institute (QEERI) grand challenge ATHLOC project (Project No. QEERI- GC-3008).

  10. Electronic band structure calculation of GaNAsBi alloys and effective mass study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habchi, M. M.; Ben Nasr, A.; Rebey, A.; El Jani, B.

    2013-11-01

    Electronic band structures of GaNxAs1-x-yBiy dilute nitrides-bismides have been determined theoretically within the framework of the band anticrossing (BAC) model and k ṡ p method. We have developed computer codes based on our extended BAC model, denoted (16 × 16), in which the dimension of the used states basis was equal to 16. We have investigated the band gap and the spin orbit splitting as a function of Bi composition for alloys lattice matched to GaAs. We have found that the substitution of As element by N and Bi impurities leads to a significant reduction of band gap energy by roughly 198 meV/%Bi. Meanwhile, spin orbit splitting increases by 56 meV/%Bi regardless N content. There is an excellent agreement between the model predictions and experiment reported in the literature. In addition, alloys compositions and oscillator strengths of transition energies have been calculated for GaNAsBi alloys which represent active zone of temperature insensitive (1.55 μm and 1.3 μm) wavelength laser diodes intended for optical fiber communications. A crossover at about 0.6 eV has occurred between Eg and Δso of GaN.039As.893Bi.068. When the quaternary is lattice mismatched to GaAs, resonance energy increases with Bi content if N content decreases. On the other hand, effective mass behavior of carriers at Γ point has been discussed with respect to alloy composition, k-directions and lattice mismatch.

  11. Influence of variations in the electron-electron interaction on the ground state metric space "band structure" of a two-electron magnetic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, P. M.; D'Amico, I.

    2016-02-01

    We consider a model system of two electrons confined in a two-dimensional harmonic oscillator potential, with the electrons interacting via an α / r2 potential, and subject to a magnetic field applied perpendicular to the plane of confinement. Our results show that variations in the strength of the electron-electron interaction generate a "band structure" in ground state metric spaces, which shares many characteristics with those generated as a result of varying the confinement potential. In particular, the metric spaces for wavefunctions, particle densities, and paramagnetic current densities all exhibit distinct "bands" and "gaps". The behavior of the polar angle of the bands also shares traits with that obtained by varying the confinement potential, but the behavior of the arc lengths of the bands on the metric space spheres can be seen to be different for the two cases and opposite for a large range of angular momentum values. The findings here and in Refs. [1,2] demonstrate that the "band structure" that arises in ground state metric spaces when a magnetic field is applied is a robust feature.

  12. Correlating structure and electronic band-edge properties in organolead halide perovskites nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qiushi; Zheng, Kaibo; Abdellah, Mohamed; Generalov, Alexander; Haase, Dörthe; Carlson, Stefan; Niu, Yuran; Heimdal, Jimmy; Engdahl, Anders; Messing, Maria E; Pullerits, Tonu; Canton, Sophie E

    2016-06-01

    After having emerged as primary contenders in the race for highly efficient optoelectronics materials, organolead halide perovskites (OHLP) are now being investigated in the nanoscale regime as promising building blocks with unique properties. For example, unlike their bulk counterpart, quantum dots of OHLP are brightly luminescent, owing to large exciton binding energies that cannot be rationalized solely on the basis of quantum confinement. Here, we establish the direct correlation between the structure and the electronic band-edge properties of CH3NH3PbBr3 nanoparticles. Complementary structural and spectroscopic measurements probing long-range and local order reveal that lattice strain influences the nature of the valence band and modifies the subtle stereochemical activity of the Pb(2+) lone-pair. More generally, this work demonstrates that the stereochemical activity of the lone-pair at the metal site is a specific physicochemical parameter coupled to composition, size and strain, which can be employed to engineer novel functionalities in OHLP nanomaterials. PMID:27189431

  13. Pressure effect on electronic band structures of NiAs-type chromium chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagaki, M.; Kawakami, T.; Shirai, M.; Motizuki, K.

    1998-01-01

    Pressure influence on the electronic band structure of NiAs-type CrTe is studied for non-magnetic and ferromagnetic states by using a self-consistent LAPW method. The total energy is calculated as a function of the lattice spacing a, keeping the ratio c/a as the observed value. The ferromagnetic state is found to be always stable energetically. For the ferromagnetic state, which is realized below T C = 340 K, the theoretical lattice spacing a is obtained as 4.18 Å, which agrees fairly well with the observed one. The magnetic moment arises from mainly the Cr-site and it is remarkably reduced by the pressure as observed. A small magnetic moment is induced at Te-site in the direction antiparallel to the moment at the Cr-site.

  14. Physical properties and electronic band structure of noncentrosymmetric Th7Co3 superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahakyan, M.; Tran, V. H.

    2016-05-01

    The physical properties of the noncentrosymmetric superconductor Th7Co3 have been investigated by means of ac-magnetic susceptibility, magnetization, specific heat, electrical resistivity, magnetoresistance and Hall effect measurements. From these data it is established that Th7Co3 is a dirty type-II superconductor with {{T}\\text{c}}=1.8+/- 0.02 K, Hc2\\text{orb}<{{H}c2}(0)˜ 10~\\text{kOe}c2p and moderate electron-phonon coupling {λ\\text{el-\\text{ph}}}=0.56 . Some evidences for anisotropic superconducting gap are found, including e.g. reduced specific heat jump (Δ {{C}p}/γ {{T}\\text{c}}=1.01 ) at T c, diminished superconducting energy gap ({{Δ }0}/{{k}\\text{B}}{{T}\\text{c}}=2.17 ) as compared to the BCS values, power law field dependence of the Sommerfeld coefficient at 0.4 K ({{C}p}/T\\propto {{H}0.6} ), and a concave curvature of the {{H}c2}≤ft({{T}\\text{c}}\\right) line. The magnitudes of the thermodynamic critical field and the energy gap are consistent with mean-squared anisotropy parameter < {{a}2}> ˜ 0.23 . The electronic specific heat in the superconducting state is reasonably fitted to an oblate spheroidal gap model. Calculations of scalar relativistic and fully relativistic electronic band structures reveal considerable differences in the degenerate structure, resulting from asymmetric spin-orbit coupling (ASOC). A large splitting energy of spin-up spin-down bands at the Fermi level E F, Δ {{E}\\text{ASOC}}˜ 100 meV is observed and a sizeable ratio Δ {{E}\\text{ASOC}}/{{k}\\text{B}}{{T}\\text{c}}˜ 640 could classify the studied compound into the class of noncentrosymmetric superconductors with strong ASOC. The noncentrosymmetry of the crystal structure and the atomic relativistic effects are both responsible for an importance of ASOC in Th7Co3. The calculated results for the density of states show a Van Hove singularity just below E F and dominant role of the 6d electrons of Th to the superconductivity.

  15. Band structure and fermi surface of Electron-Doped C{sub 60} Monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, W.L.; Brouet, V.; Zhou, X.J.; Choi, Hyoung J.; Louie, Steven G.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Kellar, S.A.; Bogdanov, P.V.; Lanzara, A.; Goldoni, A.; Parmigiani, F.; Hussain, Z.; Shen, Z-X.

    2003-11-06

    C60 fullerides are challenging systems because both the electron-phonon and electron-electron interactions are large on the energy scale of the expected narrow band width. We report angle-resolved photoemission data on the band dispersion for an alkali doped C60 monolayer and a detailed comparison with theory. Compared to the maximum bare theoretical band width of 170 meV, the observed 100-meV dispersion is within the range of renormalization by electron-phonon coupling. This dispersion is only a fraction of the integrated peak width, revealing the importance of many-body effects. Additionally, measurements on the Fermi surface indicate the robustness of the Luttinger theorem even for materials with strong interactions.

  16. Micro-metric electronic patterning of a topological band structure using a photon beam

    PubMed Central

    Frantzeskakis, E.; De Jong, N.; Zwartsenberg, B.; Huang, Y. K.; Bay, T. V.; Pronk, P.; Van Heumen, E.; Wu, D.; Pan, Y.; Radovic, M.; Plumb, N. C.; Xu, N.; Shi, M.; De Visser, A.; Golden, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    In an ideal 3D topological insulator (TI), the bulk is insulating and the surface conducting due to the existence of metallic states that are localized on the surface; these are the topological surface states. Quaternary Bi-based compounds of Bi2−xSbxTe3−ySey with finely-tuned bulk stoichiometries are good candidates for realizing ideal 3D TI behavior due to their bulk insulating character. However, despite its insulating bulk in transport experiments, the surface region of Bi2−xSbxTe3−ySey crystals cleaved in ultrahigh vacuum also exhibits occupied states originating from the bulk conduction band. This is due to adsorbate-induced downward band-bending, a phenomenon known from other Bi-based 3D TIs. Here we show, using angle-resolved photoemission, how an EUV light beam of moderate flux can be used to exclude these topologically trivial states from the Fermi level of Bi1.46Sb0.54Te1.7Se1.3 single crystals, thereby re-establishing the purely topological character of the low lying electronic states of the system. We furthermore prove that this process is highly local in nature in this bulk-insulating TI, and are thus able to imprint structures in the spatial energy landscape at the surface. We illustrate this by ‘writing’ micron-sized letters in the Dirac point energy of the system. PMID:26543011

  17. Micro-metric electronic patterning of a topological band structure using a photon beam.

    PubMed

    Frantzeskakis, E; De Jong, N; Zwartsenberg, B; Huang, Y K; Bay, T V; Pronk, P; Van Heumen, E; Wu, D; Pan, Y; Radovic, M; Plumb, N C; Xu, N; Shi, M; De Visser, A; Golden, M S

    2015-01-01

    In an ideal 3D topological insulator (TI), the bulk is insulating and the surface conducting due to the existence of metallic states that are localized on the surface; these are the topological surface states. Quaternary Bi-based compounds of Bi(2-x)Sb(x)Te(3-y)Se(y) with finely-tuned bulk stoichiometries are good candidates for realizing ideal 3D TI behavior due to their bulk insulating character. However, despite its insulating bulk in transport experiments, the surface region of Bi(2-x)Sb(x)Te(3-y)Se(y) crystals cleaved in ultrahigh vacuum also exhibits occupied states originating from the bulk conduction band. This is due to adsorbate-induced downward band-bending, a phenomenon known from other Bi-based 3D TIs. Here we show, using angle-resolved photoemission, how an EUV light beam of moderate flux can be used to exclude these topologically trivial states from the Fermi level of Bi1.46Sb0.54Te1.7Se1.3 single crystals, thereby re-establishing the purely topological character of the low lying electronic states of the system. We furthermore prove that this process is highly local in nature in this bulk-insulating TI, and are thus able to imprint structures in the spatial energy landscape at the surface. We illustrate this by 'writing' micron-sized letters in the Dirac point energy of the system. PMID:26543011

  18. Physical properties and electronic band structure of noncentrosymmetric Th7Co3 superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahakyan, M.; Tran, V. H.

    2016-05-01

    The physical properties of the noncentrosymmetric superconductor Th7Co3 have been investigated by means of ac-magnetic susceptibility, magnetization, specific heat, electrical resistivity, magnetoresistance and Hall effect measurements. From these data it is established that Th7Co3 is a dirty type-II superconductor with {{T}\\text{c}}=1.8+/- 0.02 K, Hc2\\text{orb}<{{H}c2}(0)∼ 10~\\text{kOe}c2p and moderate electron–phonon coupling {λ\\text{el-\\text{ph}}}=0.56 . Some evidences for anisotropic superconducting gap are found, including e.g. reduced specific heat jump (Δ {{C}p}/γ {{T}\\text{c}}=1.01 ) at T c, diminished superconducting energy gap ({{Δ }0}/{{k}\\text{B}}{{T}\\text{c}}=2.17 ) as compared to the BCS values, power law field dependence of the Sommerfeld coefficient at 0.4 K ({{C}p}/T\\propto {{H}0.6} ), and a concave curvature of the {{H}c2}≤ft({{T}\\text{c}}\\right) line. The magnitudes of the thermodynamic critical field and the energy gap are consistent with mean-squared anisotropy parameter < {{a}2}> ∼ 0.23 . The electronic specific heat in the superconducting state is reasonably fitted to an oblate spheroidal gap model. Calculations of scalar relativistic and fully relativistic electronic band structures reveal considerable differences in the degenerate structure, resulting from asymmetric spin–orbit coupling (ASOC). A large splitting energy of spin-up spin-down bands at the Fermi level E F, Δ {{E}\\text{ASOC}}∼ 100 meV is observed and a sizeable ratio Δ {{E}\\text{ASOC}}/{{k}\\text{B}}{{T}\\text{c}}∼ 640 could classify the studied compound into the class of noncentrosymmetric superconductors with strong ASOC. The noncentrosymmetry of the crystal structure and the atomic relativistic effects are both responsible for an importance of ASOC in Th7Co3. The calculated results for the density of states show a Van Hove singularity just below E F and dominant role of the 6d electrons of Th to the superconductivity.

  19. The hybridizations of cobalt 3 d bands with the electron band structure of the graphene/cobalt interface on a tungsten substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jinwoong; Hwang, Choongyu; Chung, Nak-Kwan; N'Diaye, A. D.; Schmid, A. K.; Denlinger, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    The interface between graphene and a ferromagnetic substrate has attracted recent research interests due to its potential for spintronic applications. We report an angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study on the interface between graphene and cobalt epitaxially grown on a tungsten substrate. We find that the electron band structure of the interface exhibits clear discontinuities at the crossing points with cobalt 3 d bands. These observations indicate strong hybridizations between the electronic states in the interface and provide an important clue to understand the intriguing electromagnetic properties of the graphene/ferromagnet interface.

  20. Electronic band structure trends of perovskite halides: Beyond Pb and Sn to Ge and Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ling-yi; Lambrecht, Walter R. L.

    2016-05-01

    The trends in electronic band structure are studied in the cubic A B X3 halide perovskites for A =Cs ; B =Pb , Sn, Ge, Si; and X =I , Br, Cl. The gaps are found to decrease from Pb to Sn and from Ge to Si, but increase from Sn to Ge. The trend is explained in terms of the atom s levels of the group-IV element and the atomic sizes which changes the amount of hybridization with X -p and hence the valence bandwidth. Along the same series spin-orbit coupling also decreases and this tends to increase the gap because of the smaller splitting of the conduction band minimum. Both effects compensate each other to a certain degree. The trend with halogens is to reduce the gap from Cl to I, i.e., with decreasing electronegativity. The role of the tolerance factor in avoiding octahedron rotations and octahedron edge sharing is discussed. The Ge containing compounds have tolerance factor t >1 and hence do not show the series of octahedral rotation distortions and the existence of edge-sharing octahedral phases known for Pb and Sn-based compounds, but rather a rhombohedral distortion. CsGeI3 is found to have a suitable gap for photovoltaics both in its cubic (high-temperature) and rhombohedral (low-temperature) phases. The structural stability of the materials in the different phases is also discussed. We find the rhombohedral phase to have lower total energy and slightly larger gaps but to present a less significant distortion of the band structure than the edge-sharing octahedral phases, such as the yellow phase in CsSnI3. The corresponding silicon based compounds have not yet been synthesized and therefore our estimates are less certain but indicate a small gap for cubic CsSiI3 and CsSiBr3 of about 0.2 ±0.2 eV and 0.8 ±0.6 eV for CsSiCl3. The intrinsic stability of the Si compounds is discussed.

  1. The electronic band structures of gadolinium chalcogenides: a first-principles prediction for neutron detecting.

    PubMed

    Li, Kexue; Liu, Lei; Yu, Peter Y; Chen, Xiaobo; Shen, D Z

    2016-05-11

    By converting the energy of nuclear radiation to excited electrons and holes, semiconductor detectors have provided a highly efficient way for detecting them, such as photons or charged particles. However, for detecting the radiated neutrons, those conventional semiconductors hardly behave well, as few of them possess enough capability for capturing these neutral particles. While the element Gd has the highest nuclear cross section, here for searching proper neutron-detecting semiconductors, we investigate theoretically the Gd chalcogenides whose electronic band structures have never been characterized clearly. Among them, we identify that γ-phase Gd2Se3 should be the best candidate for neutron detecting since it possesses not only the right bandgap of 1.76 eV for devices working under room temperature but also the desired indirect gap nature for charge carriers surviving longer. We propose further that semiconductor neutron detectors with single-neutron sensitivity can be realized with such a Gd-chalcogenide on the condition that their crystals can be grown with good quality. PMID:27049355

  2. The electronic band structures of gadolinium chalcogenides: a first-principles prediction for neutron detecting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kexue; Liu, Lei; Yu, Peter Y.; Chen, Xiaobo; Shen, D. Z.

    2016-05-01

    By converting the energy of nuclear radiation to excited electrons and holes, semiconductor detectors have provided a highly efficient way for detecting them, such as photons or charged particles. However, for detecting the radiated neutrons, those conventional semiconductors hardly behave well, as few of them possess enough capability for capturing these neutral particles. While the element Gd has the highest nuclear cross section, here for searching proper neutron-detecting semiconductors, we investigate theoretically the Gd chalcogenides whose electronic band structures have never been characterized clearly. Among them, we identify that γ-phase Gd2Se3 should be the best candidate for neutron detecting since it possesses not only the right bandgap of 1.76 eV for devices working under room temperature but also the desired indirect gap nature for charge carriers surviving longer. We propose further that semiconductor neutron detectors with single-neutron sensitivity can be realized with such a Gd-chalcogenide on the condition that their crystals can be grown with good quality.

  3. Experimental and theoretical investigations of the electronic band structure of metal-organic frameworks of HKUST-1 type

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Zhi-Gang; Heinke, Lars Wöll, Christof; Neumann, Tobias; Wenzel, Wolfgang; Li, Qiang; Fink, Karin; Gordan, Ovidiu D.; Zahn, Dietrich R. T.

    2015-11-02

    The electronic properties of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are increasingly attracting the attention due to potential applications in sensor techniques and (micro-) electronic engineering, for instance, as low-k-dielectric in semiconductor technology. Here, the band gap and the band structure of MOFs of type HKUST-1 are studied in detail by means of spectroscopic ellipsometry applied to thin surface-mounted MOF films and by means of quantum chemical calculations. The analysis of the density of states, the band structure, and the excitation spectrum reveal the importance of the empty Cu-3d orbitals for the electronic properties of HKUST-1. This study shows that, in contrast to common belief, even in the case of this fairly “simple” MOF, the excitation spectra cannot be explained by a superposition of “intra-unit” excitations within the individual building blocks. Instead, “inter-unit” excitations also have to be considered.

  4. A class of monolayer metal halogenides MX2: Electronic structures and band alignments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Feng; Wang, Weichao; Luo, Xiaoguang; Xie, Xinjian; Cheng, Yahui; Dong, Hong; Liu, Hui; Wang, Wei-Hua

    2016-03-01

    With systematic first principles calculations, a class of monolayer metal halogenides MX2 (M = Mg, Ca, Zn, Cd, Ge, Pb; M = Cl, Br, I) has been proposed. Our study indicates that these monolayer materials are semiconductors with the band gaps ranging from 2.03 eV of ZnI2 to 6.08 eV of MgCl2. Overall, the band gap increases with the increase of the electronegativity of the X atom or the atomic number of the metal M. Meanwhile, the band gaps of monolayer MgX2 (X = Cl, Br) are direct while those of other monolayers are indirect. Based on the band edge curvatures, the derived electron (me) and hole (mh) effective masses of MX2 monolayers are close to their corresponding bulk values except that the me of CdI2 is three times larger and the mh for PbI2 is twice larger. Finally, the band alignments of all the studied MX2 monolayers are provided using the vacuum level as energy reference. These theoretical results may not only introduce the monolayer metal halogenides family MX2 into the emerging two-dimensional materials, but also provide insights into the applications of MX2 in future electronic, visible and ultraviolet optoelectronic devices.

  5. Pressure Effect on Electronic Band Structure of NiAs-Type CrTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagaki, Masafumi; Kawakami, Takuya; Tanaka, Norikazu; Shirai, Masafumi; Motizuki, Kazuko

    1998-03-01

    Pressure influence on the electronic band structure of NiAs-type CrTe is studied for non-magnetic, ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic states by using a self-consistent LAPW method. The total energy is calculated as a function of the lattice spacing a, keeping the ratio c/a as the observed value. The ferromagnetic state is stable energetically among three states for a>3.83 A. For a<3.83 A, the energy of antiferromagnetic state becomes lower than that of ferromagnetic state. Therefore pressure-induced ferromagnetic→antiferromagnetic transition is expected at about 20 GP. For the ferromagnetic state, which is realized below T C=340 K, the theoretical lattice spacing a is obtained as 4.180 A, which agrees fairly well with the observed one (a obs=3.981). The magnetic moment arises from mainly Cr-site and it is remarkably reduced by the pressure as observed. A small magnetic moment is induced at Te-site in the direction antiparallel to the moment at Cr-site.

  6. Band gap engineering and \\vec{k}\\cdot \\vec{\\pi } electronic structure of lead and tin tellurides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, S. S.; Tripathi, G. S.

    2016-06-01

    We study the effect of the variation of energy gap on the k\\cdot π electronic structure of PbTe and SnTe, using a six-level basis at the L point. The basis functions in both the systems have the same transformation properties. However, the basis functions of the band edge states in SnTe are reversed with respect to the same in PbTe. Band dispersions are obtained analytically for a two band model. As the band gap decreases, the bands become linear. Far bands are included in the electronic dispersion, using perturbation theory. Fermi energy and the Density of States at the Fermi energy, { D }({\\varepsilon }F), are calculated for different carrier concentrations and energy gaps through a self-consistent approach. Interesting results are seen when the energy gap is reduced from the respective equilibrium values. For both the systems, the Fermi energy increases as the gap is decreased. The behavior of { D }({\\varepsilon }F) is, however, different. It decreases with the gap. It is also on expected lines. Calculated values of the electronic effective mass, as a function of temperature, energy gap and carrier concentration, are compared with previously published data. As distinguished from a first principles calculation, the work has focused on the carrier dependent electronic parameters for use both by theorists and experimenters as well.

  7. Electronic Band Structures of the Highly Desirable III-V Semiconductors: TB-mBJ DFT Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Gul; Shafiq, M.; Saifullah; Ahmad, Rashid; Jalali-Asadabadi, S.; Maqbool, M.; Khan, Imad; Rahnamaye-Aliabad, H.; Ahmad, Iftikhar

    2016-07-01

    The correct band gaps of semiconductors are highly desirable for their effective use in optoelectronic and other photonic devices. However, the experimental and theoretical results of the exact band gaps are quite challenging and sometimes tricky. In this article, we explore the electronic band structures of the highly desirable optical materials, III-V semiconductors. The main reason of the ineffectiveness of the theoretical band gaps of these compounds is their mixed bonding character, where large proportions of electrons reside outside atomic spheres in the intestinal regions, which are challenging for proper theoretical treatment. In this article, the band gaps of the compounds are revisited and successfully reproduced by properly treating the density of electrons using the recently developed non-regular Tran and Blaha's modified Becke-Johnson (nTB-mBJ) approach. This study additionally suggests that this theoretical scheme could also be useful for the band gap engineering of the III-V semiconductors. Furthermore, the optical properties of these compounds are also calculated and compared with the experimental results.

  8. Valence state, hybridization and electronic band structure in the charge ordered AlV2O4.

    PubMed

    Kalavathi, S; Amirthapandian, S; Chandra, Sharat; Sahu, P Ch; Sahu, H K

    2014-01-01

    The valence state, hybridization and electronic band structure of charge ordered AlV2O4 are investigated by measuring the electron energy loss spectra (EELS) and performing band structure calculations using the WIEN2k code. White line ratio and O K edges of V2O5, VO2, V2O3 and AlV2O4, obtained using electron energy loss spectroscopy, are analysed specifically to probe systematically the VO6 octahedra in all of them. The systematic decrease of the L2 intensity and the O K edge intensity from V(5+) in V2O5 to AlV2O4 indicates a progressive increase in the occupancy of the hybridized states, which is corroborated by the absence of a transition from O 1s to hybridized 2t(2g). Band structure calculations on the parent charge frustrated cubic phase and the charge ordered rhombohedral phase clearly document a band gap in the charge ordered state. From the structural information obtained after convergence and the spectroscopic information from EELS, it appears that partial orbital occupancy may lead to a deviation from an integral valence state on all the vanadium in this exotic charge ordered spinel system.

  9. Valence state, hybridization and electronic band structure in the charge ordered AlV2O4.

    PubMed

    Kalavathi, S; Amirthapandian, S; Chandra, Sharat; Sahu, P Ch; Sahu, H K

    2014-01-01

    The valence state, hybridization and electronic band structure of charge ordered AlV2O4 are investigated by measuring the electron energy loss spectra (EELS) and performing band structure calculations using the WIEN2k code. White line ratio and O K edges of V2O5, VO2, V2O3 and AlV2O4, obtained using electron energy loss spectroscopy, are analysed specifically to probe systematically the VO6 octahedra in all of them. The systematic decrease of the L2 intensity and the O K edge intensity from V(5+) in V2O5 to AlV2O4 indicates a progressive increase in the occupancy of the hybridized states, which is corroborated by the absence of a transition from O 1s to hybridized 2t(2g). Band structure calculations on the parent charge frustrated cubic phase and the charge ordered rhombohedral phase clearly document a band gap in the charge ordered state. From the structural information obtained after convergence and the spectroscopic information from EELS, it appears that partial orbital occupancy may lead to a deviation from an integral valence state on all the vanadium in this exotic charge ordered spinel system. PMID:24285259

  10. Dynamical and anharmonic effects on the electron-phonon coupling and the zero-point renormalization of the band structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonius, Gabriel; Poncé, Samuel; Lantagne-Hurtubise, Étienne; Auclair, Gabriel; Côté, Michel; Gonze, Xavier

    2015-03-01

    The electron-phonon coupling in solids renormalizes the band structure, reducing the band gap by several tenths of an eV in light-atoms semiconductors. Using the Allen-Heine-Cardona theory (AHC), we compute the zero-point renormalization (ZPR) as well as the quasiparticle lifetimes of the full band structure in diamond, BN, LiF and MgO. We show how dynamical effects can be included in the AHC theory, and still allow for the use of a Sternheimer equation to avoid the summation over unoccupied bands. The convergence properties of the electron-phonon coupling self-energy with respect to the Brillouin zone sampling prove to be strongly affected by dynamical effects. We complement our study with a frozen-phonon approach, which reproduces the static AHC theory, but also allows to probe the phonon wavefunctions at finite displacements and include anharmonic effects in the self-energy. We show that these high-order components tend to reduce the strongest electron-phonon coupling elements, which affects significantly the band gap ZPR.

  11. Effect of low-temperature annealing on the electronic- and band-structures of (Ga,Mn)As epitaxial layers

    SciTech Connect

    Yastrubchak, O. Gluba, L.; Żuk, J.; Wosinski, T. Andrearczyk, T.; Domagala, J. Z.; Sadowski, J.

    2014-01-07

    The effect of outdiffusion of Mn interstitials from (Ga,Mn)As epitaxial layers, caused by post-growth low-temperature annealing, on their electronic- and band-structure properties has been investigated by modulation photoreflectance (PR) spectroscopy. The annealing-induced changes in structural and magnetic properties of the layers were examined with high-resolution X-ray diffractometry and superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry, respectively. They confirmed an outdiffusion of Mn interstitials from the layers and an enhancement in their hole concentration, which were more efficient for the layer covered with a Sb cap acting as a sink for diffusing Mn interstitials. The PR results demonstrating a decrease in the band-gap-transition energy in the as-grown (Ga,Mn)As layers, with respect to that in the reference GaAs one, are interpreted by assuming a merging of the Mn-related impurity band with the GaAs valence band. Whereas an increase in the band-gap-transition energy caused by the annealing treatment of the (Ga,Mn)As layers is interpreted as a result of annealing-induced enhancement of the free-hole concentration and the Fermi level location within the valence band. The experimental results are consistent with the valence-band origin of itinerant holes mediating ferromagnetic ordering in (Ga,Mn)As, in agreement with the Zener model for ferromagnetic semiconductors.

  12. Tuning band structure and electronic transport properties of ZrN nanotube--a first-principles investigation.

    PubMed

    Chandiramouli, R; Nagarajan, V

    2015-02-01

    The band structure and electronic transport properties of pristine ZrN nanotube, oxygen, fluorine and niobium substituted ZrN are successfully optimized using density functional theory. The transport properties of ZrN nanotube are studied in terms of band structure, density of states, electron density and transmission spectrum of ZrN nanotube. The band structure reveals that the nanostructures show metallic nature due to orbital overlapping of zirconium and nitrogen atoms. The density of states gives the information of localization of charges in energy intervals. The major contribution in density of states arises from p and d orbitals of zirconium and nitrogen atoms. The electron density is observed more in nitrogen sites for pristine and impurity substituted ZrN nanotube. The electrons near the Fermi level contributes more to the transmission, the impact in the transmission is seen due to substitution impurity and position of the defect in the ZrN nanotube. The results of the present work focus light to tailor ZrN nanotube with enhanced electronic properties in nanoelectronics applications. PMID:25459628

  13. Tuning band structure and electronic transport properties of ZrN nanotube - A first-principles investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandiramouli, R.; Nagarajan, V.

    2015-02-01

    The band structure and electronic transport properties of pristine ZrN nanotube, oxygen, fluorine and niobium substituted ZrN are successfully optimized using density functional theory. The transport properties of ZrN nanotube are studied in terms of band structure, density of states, electron density and transmission spectrum of ZrN nanotube. The band structure reveals that the nanostructures show metallic nature due to orbital overlapping of zirconium and nitrogen atoms. The density of states gives the information of localization of charges in energy intervals. The major contribution in density of states arises from p and d orbitals of zirconium and nitrogen atoms. The electron density is observed more in nitrogen sites for pristine and impurity substituted ZrN nanotube. The electrons near the Fermi level contributes more to the transmission, the impact in the transmission is seen due to substitution impurity and position of the defect in the ZrN nanotube. The results of the present work focus light to tailor ZrN nanotube with enhanced electronic properties in nanoelectronics applications.

  14. Tuning band structure and electronic transport properties of ZrN nanotube--a first-principles investigation.

    PubMed

    Chandiramouli, R; Nagarajan, V

    2015-02-01

    The band structure and electronic transport properties of pristine ZrN nanotube, oxygen, fluorine and niobium substituted ZrN are successfully optimized using density functional theory. The transport properties of ZrN nanotube are studied in terms of band structure, density of states, electron density and transmission spectrum of ZrN nanotube. The band structure reveals that the nanostructures show metallic nature due to orbital overlapping of zirconium and nitrogen atoms. The density of states gives the information of localization of charges in energy intervals. The major contribution in density of states arises from p and d orbitals of zirconium and nitrogen atoms. The electron density is observed more in nitrogen sites for pristine and impurity substituted ZrN nanotube. The electrons near the Fermi level contributes more to the transmission, the impact in the transmission is seen due to substitution impurity and position of the defect in the ZrN nanotube. The results of the present work focus light to tailor ZrN nanotube with enhanced electronic properties in nanoelectronics applications.

  15. Application of mid-infrared free-electron laser tuned to amide bands for dissociation of aggregate structure of protein.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Takayasu; Yaji, Toyonari; Ohta, Toshiaki; Tsukiyama, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    A mid-infrared free-electron laser (FEL) is a linearly polarized, high-peak powered pulse laser with tunable wavelength within the mid-infrared absorption region. It was recently found that pathogenic amyloid fibrils could be partially dissociated to the monomer form by the irradiation of the FEL targeting the amide I band (C=O stretching vibration), amide II band (N-H bending vibration) and amide III band (C-N stretching vibration). In this study, the irradiation effect of the FEL on keratin aggregate was tested as another model to demonstrate an applicability of the FEL for dissociation of protein aggregates. Synchrotron radiation infrared microscopy analysis showed that the α-helix content in the aggregate structure decreased to almost the same level as that in the monomer state after FEL irradiation tuned to 6.06 µm (amide I band). Both irradiations at 6.51 µm (amide II band) and 8.06 µm (amide III band) also decreased the content of the aggregate but to a lesser extent than for the irradiation at the amide I band. On the contrary, the irradiation tuned to 5.6 µm (non-absorbance region) changed little the secondary structure of the aggregate. Scanning-electron microscopy observation at the submicrometer order showed that the angular solid of the aggregate was converted to non-ordered fragments by the irradiation at each amide band, while the aggregate was hardly deformed by the irradiation at 5.6 µm. These results demonstrate that the amide-specific irradiation by the FEL was effective for dissociation of the protein aggregate to the monomer form. PMID:26698057

  16. Role of Electronic Structure In Ion Band State Theory of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubb, Scott

    2004-03-01

    The Nuts and Bolts of our Ion Band State (IBS) theory of low energy nuclear reactions (LENR's) in palladium-deuteride (PdD) and palladium-hydride (PdH) are the electrons that hold together or tear apart the bonds (or lack of bonds) between deuterons (d's) or protons (p's) and the host material. In PdDx and PdH_x, this bonding is strongly correlated with loading: in ambient loading conditions (x< 0. 6), the bonding in hibits IBS occupation. As x arrow 1, slight increases and decreases in loading can lead to vibrations (which have conventionally been thought to occur from phonons) that can induce potential losses or increases of p/d. Naive assumptions about phonons fail to include these losses and increases. These effects can occur because neither H or D has core electrons and because in either PdD or PdH, the electrons near the Fermi Energy have negligible overlap with the nucleus of either D or H. I use these ideas to develop a formal justification, based on a generalization of conventional band theory (Scott Chubb, "Semi-Classical Conduction of Charged and Neutral Particles in Finite Lattices," 2004 March Meeting."), for the idea that occupation of IBS's can occur and that this can lead to nuclear reactions.

  17. All-electron GW quasiparticle band structures of group 14 nitride compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Iek-Heng; Cheng, Hai-Ping; Kozhevnikov, Anton; Schulthess, Thomas C.

    2014-07-28

    We have investigated the group 14 nitrides (M{sub 3}N{sub 4}) in the spinel phase (γ-M{sub 3}N{sub 4} with M = C, Si, Ge, and Sn) and β phase (β-M{sub 3}N{sub 4} with M = Si, Ge, and Sn) using density functional theory with the local density approximation and the GW approximation. The Kohn-Sham energies of these systems have been first calculated within the framework of full-potential linearized augmented plane waves (LAPW) and then corrected using single-shot G{sub 0}W{sub 0} calculations, which we have implemented in the modified version of the Elk full-potential LAPW code. Direct band gaps at the Γ point have been found for spinel-type nitrides γ-M{sub 3}N{sub 4} with M = Si, Ge, and Sn. The corresponding GW-corrected band gaps agree with experiment. We have also found that the GW calculations with and without the plasmon-pole approximation give very similar results, even when the system contains semi-core d electrons. These spinel-type nitrides are novel materials for potential optoelectronic applications because of their direct and tunable band gaps.

  18. All-electron GW quasiparticle band structures of group 14 nitride compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Iek-Heng; Kozhevnikov, Anton; Schulthess, Thomas C.; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    2014-07-01

    We have investigated the group 14 nitrides (M3N4) in the spinel phase (γ-M3N4 with M = C, Si, Ge, and Sn) and β phase (β-M3N4 with M = Si, Ge, and Sn) using density functional theory with the local density approximation and the GW approximation. The Kohn-Sham energies of these systems have been first calculated within the framework of full-potential linearized augmented plane waves (LAPW) and then corrected using single-shot G0W0 calculations, which we have implemented in the modified version of the Elk full-potential LAPW code. Direct band gaps at the Γ point have been found for spinel-type nitrides γ-M3N4 with M = Si, Ge, and Sn. The corresponding GW-corrected band gaps agree with experiment. We have also found that the GW calculations with and without the plasmon-pole approximation give very similar results, even when the system contains semi-core d electrons. These spinel-type nitrides are novel materials for potential optoelectronic applications because of their direct and tunable band gaps.

  19. Electronic Band Structure, Optical, Thermal and Bonding Properties of XMg2O4(X = Si, Ge) Spinel Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semari, F.; Ouahrani, T.; Khachai, H.; Khenata, R.; Rabah, M.; Bouhemadou, A.; Murtaza, G.; Amin, B.; Rached, D.

    2013-07-01

    Bonding nature as well as structural, optoelectronic and thermal properties of the cubic XMg2O4(X = Si, Ge) spinel compounds have been calculated using a full-potential augmented plane-wave plus local orbitals (FP-APW+lo) method within the density functional theory. The exchange-correlation potential was treated with the PBE-GGA approximation to calculate the total energy. Moreover, the modified Becke-Johnson potential (TB-mBJ) was also applied to improve the electronic band structure calculations. The computed ground-state parameters (a, B, B‧ and u) are in excellent agreements with the available theoretical data. Calculations of the electronic band structure and bonding properties show that these compounds have a direct energy band gap (Γ-Γ) with a dominated ionic character and the TB-mBJ approximation yields larger fundamental band gaps compared to those obtained using the PBE-GGA. Optical properties such as the complex dielectric function ɛ(ω), reflectivity R(ω) and energy loss function L(ω), for incident photon energy up to 40 eV, have been predicted. Through the quasi-harmonic Debye model, in which the phononic effects are considered, the effects of pressure P and temperature T on the thermal expansion coefficient, Debye temperature and heat capacity for the considered compounds are investigated for the first time.

  20. Observations of Multi-band Structures in Double Star TC-1 PEACE Electron and HIA Ion Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan Narasimhan, K.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Grimald, S.; Dandouras, I. S.; Mihaljcic, B.; Kistler, L. M.; Owen, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Several authors have reported inner magnetosphere observations of proton distributions confined to narrow energy bands in the range 1 - 25 keV (Smith and Hoffman (1974), etc). These structures have been described as "nose structures", with reference to their appearance in energy-time spectrograms and are also known as "bands" if they occur for extended periods of time. Multi-nose structures have been observed if 2 or more noses appear at the same time (Vallat et al., 2007). Gaps between "noses" (or "bands") have been explained in terms of the competing corotation, convection and magnetic gradient drifts. Charge exchange losses in slow drift paths for steady state scenarios and the role of substorm injections have also been considered (Li et al., 2000; Ebihara et al., 2004). We analyse observations of electron and ion multi-band structures frequently seen in Double-Star TC1 PEACE and HIA data. We present results from statistical surveys conducted using data from the duration of the mission. Furthermore, using a combination of both statistics and simulations, we test previous theories as to possible formation mechanisms and explore other possible explanations.

  1. Electronic and geometric structures of oligothiophenes studied by UPS and MNDO: π-band evolution and effect of disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, H.; Nagashima, U.; Inokuchi, H.; Seki, K.; Nakahara, N.; Nakayama, J.; Hoshino, M.; Fukuda, K.

    1990-01-01

    Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) has been applied to the investigation of the electronic structure of oligothiophenes with 4-8 thiophene ring. In a series of α-linked oligomers (αn, with the number of rings n = 4-8), a systematic evolution of the π band forming levels are observed in the region of 0.7-3eV below the Fermi level (EF) and the bandwidth becomes broader with n. The non-bonding π band is observed at 3.5eV below EF and its energy is almost independent of n. UPS spectra of α7 and α8 are fairly similar to the spectra of polythiophene, showing that these oligomers are good model compounds of the polymer. The effect of irregularity on the π-electron system was also studied by using oligomers which contain a β linkage or a vinylene group in the middle of the molecule. The UPS spectra showed that the β linkages significantly affect the electronic structure of polythiophene, but vinylene does not. In order to analyze the UPS spectra and to investigate the electronic structures of oligomers, the orbital energies and the geometry of these oligomers are calculated by the semi-empirical modified neglect of diatomic overlap self-consistent field molecular orbital (MNDO-SCF-MO) method. The calculated spectra using the obtained orbital energies agree well with the observed ones, particularly in the π region. It is shown from the optimized geometry that (1) αn's have planar structures and π electrons can be delocalized, (2) the oligomer with β-linkages have nonplanar structure leading to limited delocalization of π-electrons, and (3) the oligomers with a vinylene group are almost planar and the disturbance by the vinylene group on the delocalization is small.

  2. 8-band and 14-band kp modeling of electronic band structure and material gain in Ga(In)AsBi quantum wells grown on GaAs and InP substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Gladysiewicz, M.; Wartak, M. S.; Kudrawiec, R.

    2015-08-07

    The electronic band structure and material gain have been calculated for GaAsBi/GaAs quantum wells (QWs) with various bismuth concentrations (Bi ≤ 15%) within the 8-band and 14-band kp models. The 14-band kp model was obtained by extending the standard 8-band kp Hamiltonian by the valence band anticrossing (VBAC) Hamiltonian, which is widely used to describe Bi-related changes in the electronic band structure of dilute bismides. It has been shown that in the range of low carrier concentrations n < 5 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}, material gain spectra calculated within 8- and 14-band kp Hamiltonians are similar. It means that the 8-band kp model can be used to calculate material gain in dilute bismides QWs. Therefore, it can be applied to analyze QWs containing new dilute bismides for which the VBAC parameters are unknown. Thus, the energy gap and electron effective mass for Bi-containing materials are used instead of VBAC parameters. The electronic band structure and material gain have been calculated for 8 nm wide GaInAsBi QWs on GaAs and InP substrates with various compositions. In these QWs, Bi concentration was varied from 0% to 5% and indium concentration was tuned in order to keep the same compressive strain (ε = 2%) in QW region. For GaInAsBi/GaAs QW with 5% Bi, gain peak was determined to be at about 1.5 μm. It means that it can be possible to achieve emission at telecommunication windows (i.e., 1.3 μm and 1.55 μm) for GaAs-based lasers containing GaInAsBi/GaAs QWs. For GaInAsBi/Ga{sub 0.47}In{sub 0.53}As/InP QWs with 5% Bi, gain peak is predicted to be at about 4.0 μm, i.e., at the wavelengths that are not available in current InP-based lasers.

  3. Electronic structure modification of graphene on d-band metal surfaces and its Raman signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coh, Sinisa; Zhou, Qin; Zettl, Alex; Cohen, Marvin L.; Louie, Steven G.

    2014-03-01

    We find strong modifications of the graphene electronic structure when it is placed on a platinum surface. Additionally, these modifications strongly depend on the relative orientation of the graphene and platinum lattices. We expect that the same will occur whenever graphene is brought in contact with a surface of a material that has d-orbital close to the Fermi level. We demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that these modifications leave a distinct signature in the Raman spectrum of graphene. Out of two prominent graphene Raman peaks, one is unaffected (the G peak) while the other (the 2D peak) is severely affected, in proportion with the modification of the graphene electronic structure. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Computational resources have been provided by the DOE at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's NERSC facility.

  4. Satellite band structure in silicon caused by electron-plasmon coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lischner, Johannes; Pálsson, G. K.; Vigil-Fowler, Derek; Nemsak, S.; Avila, J.; Asensio, M. C.; Fadley, C. S.; Louie, Steven G.

    2015-05-01

    We report an angle-resolved photoemission measurement of the wave-vector-dependent plasmon satellite structure of a three-dimensional solid, crystalline silicon. In sharp contrast to nanomaterials, which typically exhibit strongly wave-vector-dependent low-energy plasmons, the large plasmon energy of silicon facilitates the search for a plasmaron state consisting of resonantly bound holes and plasmons and its distinction from a weakly interacting plasmon-hole pair. Employing a first-principles theory, which is based on a cumulant expansion of the one-electron Green's function and contains significant electron correlation effects, we obtain good agreement with the measured photoemission spectrum for the wave-vector-dependent dispersion of the satellite feature, but without observing the existence of plasmarons in the calculations.

  5. Atomic and electronic structures evolution of the narrow band gap semiconductor Ag2Se under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, P.; Barkalov, O.; Mirhosseini, H.; Felser, C.; Medvedev, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    Non-trivial electronic properties of silver telluride and other chalcogenides, such as the presence of a topological insulator state, electronic topological transitions, metallization, and the possible emergence of superconductivity under pressure have attracted attention in recent years. In this work, we studied the electronic properties of silver selenide (Ag2Se). We performed direct current electrical resistivity measurements, in situ Raman spectroscopy, and synchrotron x-ray diffraction accompanied by ab initio calculations to explore pressure-induced changes to the atomic and electronic structure of Ag2Se. The temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity was measured up to 30 GPa in the 4–300 K temperature interval. Resistivity data showed an unusual increase in the thermal energy gap of phase I, which is a semiconductor under ambient conditions. Recently, a similar effect was reported for the 3D topological insulator Bi2Se3. Raman spectroscopy studies revealed lattice instability in phase I indicated by the softening of observed vibrational modes with pressure. Our hybrid functional band structure calculations predicted that phase I of Ag2Se would be a narrow band gap semiconductor, in accordance with experimental results. At a pressure of ~7.5 GPa, Ag2Se underwent a structural transition to phase II with an orthorhombic Pnma structure. The temperature dependence of the resistivity of Ag2Se phase II demonstrated its metallic character. Ag2Se phase III, which is stable above 16.5 GPa, is also metallic according to the resistivity data. No indication of the superconducting transition is found above 4 K in the studied pressure range.

  6. Atomic and electronic structures evolution of the narrow band gap semiconductor Ag2Se under high pressure.

    PubMed

    Naumov, P; Barkalov, O; Mirhosseini, H; Felser, C; Medvedev, S A

    2016-09-28

    Non-trivial electronic properties of silver telluride and other chalcogenides, such as the presence of a topological insulator state, electronic topological transitions, metallization, and the possible emergence of superconductivity under pressure have attracted attention in recent years. In this work, we studied the electronic properties of silver selenide (Ag2Se). We performed direct current electrical resistivity measurements, in situ Raman spectroscopy, and synchrotron x-ray diffraction accompanied by ab initio calculations to explore pressure-induced changes to the atomic and electronic structure of Ag2Se. The temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity was measured up to 30 GPa in the 4-300 K temperature interval. Resistivity data showed an unusual increase in the thermal energy gap of phase I, which is a semiconductor under ambient conditions. Recently, a similar effect was reported for the 3D topological insulator Bi2Se3. Raman spectroscopy studies revealed lattice instability in phase I indicated by the softening of observed vibrational modes with pressure. Our hybrid functional band structure calculations predicted that phase I of Ag2Se would be a narrow band gap semiconductor, in accordance with experimental results. At a pressure of ~7.5 GPa, Ag2Se underwent a structural transition to phase II with an orthorhombic Pnma structure. The temperature dependence of the resistivity of Ag2Se phase II demonstrated its metallic character. Ag2Se phase III, which is stable above 16.5 GPa, is also metallic according to the resistivity data. No indication of the superconducting transition is found above 4 K in the studied pressure range. PMID:27439023

  7. Atomic and electronic structures evolution of the narrow band gap semiconductor Ag2Se under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, P.; Barkalov, O.; Mirhosseini, H.; Felser, C.; Medvedev, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    Non-trivial electronic properties of silver telluride and other chalcogenides, such as the presence of a topological insulator state, electronic topological transitions, metallization, and the possible emergence of superconductivity under pressure have attracted attention in recent years. In this work, we studied the electronic properties of silver selenide (Ag2Se). We performed direct current electrical resistivity measurements, in situ Raman spectroscopy, and synchrotron x-ray diffraction accompanied by ab initio calculations to explore pressure-induced changes to the atomic and electronic structure of Ag2Se. The temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity was measured up to 30 GPa in the 4-300 K temperature interval. Resistivity data showed an unusual increase in the thermal energy gap of phase I, which is a semiconductor under ambient conditions. Recently, a similar effect was reported for the 3D topological insulator Bi2Se3. Raman spectroscopy studies revealed lattice instability in phase I indicated by the softening of observed vibrational modes with pressure. Our hybrid functional band structure calculations predicted that phase I of Ag2Se would be a narrow band gap semiconductor, in accordance with experimental results. At a pressure of ~7.5 GPa, Ag2Se underwent a structural transition to phase II with an orthorhombic Pnma structure. The temperature dependence of the resistivity of Ag2Se phase II demonstrated its metallic character. Ag2Se phase III, which is stable above 16.5 GPa, is also metallic according to the resistivity data. No indication of the superconducting transition is found above 4 K in the studied pressure range.

  8. Electron currents associated with an auroral band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiger, R. J.; Anderson, H. R.

    1975-01-01

    Measurements of electron pitch angle distributions and energy spectra over a broad auroral band were used to calculate net electric current carried by auroral electrons in the vicinity of the band. The particle energy spectrometers were carried by a Nike-Tomahawk rocket launched from Poker Flat, Alaska, at 0722 UT on February 25, 1972. Data are presented which indicate the existence of upward field-aligned currents of electrons in the energy range 0.5-20 keV. The spatial relationship of these currents to visual structure of the auroral arc and the characteristics of the electrons carrying the currents are discussed.

  9. Photonic band structure

    SciTech Connect

    Yablonovitch, E.

    1993-05-01

    We learned how to create 3-dimensionally periodic dielectric structures which are to photon waves, as semiconductor crystals are to electron waves. That is, these photonic crystals have a photonic bandgap, a band of frequencies in which electromagnetic waves are forbidden, irrespective of propagation direction in space. Photonic bandgaps provide for spontaneous emission inhibition and allow for a new class of electromagnetic micro-cavities. If the perfect 3-dimensional periodicity is broken by a local defect, then local electromagnetic modes can occur within the forbidden bandgap. The addition of extra dielectric material locally, inside the photonic crystal, produces {open_quotes}donor{close_quotes} modes. Conversely, the local removal of dielectric material from the photonic crystal produces {open_quotes}acceptor{close_quotes} modes. Therefore, it will now be possible to make high-Q electromagnetic cavities of volume {approx_lt}1 cubic wavelength, for short wavelengths at which metallic cavities are useless. These new dielectric micro-resonators can cover the range all the way from millimeter waves, down to ultraviolet wavelengths.

  10. Electronic Band Structure and Optical Characteristics of Quantum-Size Cadmium Telluride Crystals in Glass Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Barrett George, Jr.

    Low-dimensional semiconductor structures now occupy a position of central importance with regard to the understanding and application of the basic physics of quantum confinement. Isolated II-VI semiconductor crystals embedded in transparent, insulating matrices represent a convenient medium for the study of quantum-size effects on the electronic and optical properties of compound semiconductors. The present study simultaneously examines finite crystal size-related shifts in the energies of optical transitions originating from states located at two different critical points of the zincblende Brillouin zone of CdTe. Using a versatile, dual source, R.F.-sputtering technique, CdTe-glass composite thin films have been produced possessing average crystal sizes ranging from 24 to 125 A in films containing 5 vol% semiconductor as determined by cross-sectional, transmission electron microscopy. Previously unattainable control over such microstructural characteristics as volume fraction and crystalline phase distribution throughout the matrix have been demonstrated using the sequential sputtering process. Analysis of quantum-size induced transition energy shifts, monitored by optical absorption, indicates the persistence of significant Coulomb interactions between carriers at the T-point of CdTe in crystallite sizes 0.3 times the size of the bulk exciton. L-point transition energy shifts support the existence of two-dimensional bound electron-hole pair states whose center-of-mass motion is confined within the potential well. The influence of finite crystal size distribution width on the interpretation of quantum confinement effects in these materials was also analyzed using a numerical integration technique. Findings substantiate the relative dominance of inhomogeneous broadening effects over homogeneous broadening in determining the observed absorption lineshape of the polydisperse collection of crystallites. This does not, however, explain an apparent saturation of the

  11. Effect of spin-orbit interaction on the electronic structure of indium-antimonide d bands

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolev, V. V. Perevoshchikov, D. A.

    2015-05-15

    The bands and densities of states of d bands in indium antimonide (InSb) are determined taking into account and disregarding the spin-orbit interaction. It is established that taking into account the effect of spin-orbit interaction results also in a substantial change in the dispersion of the obtained bands instead of only in the doublet splitting of the band of core d levels at ∼(0.79–0.86) eV. It is established that it is indium 4d states with e{sub g} and t{sub 2g} symmetry that give the main contribution to the density of states. The calculations are carried out by the LAPW method with the exchange-correlation potential in the generalized gradient approximation (LAPW + GGA)

  12. Micro-metric electronic patterning of a topological band structure using a photon beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, Mark; Frantzeskakis, Emmanouil; de Jong, Nick; Huang, Yingkai; Wu, Dong; Pan, Yu; de Visser, Anne; van Heumen, Erik; van Bay, Tran; Zwartsenberg, Berend; Pronk, Pieter; Varier Ramankutty, Shyama; Tytarenko, Alona; Xu, Nan; Plumb, Nick; Shi, Ming; Radovic, Milan; Varkhalov, Andrei

    2015-03-01

    The only states crossing EF in ideal, 3D TIs are topological surface states. Single crystals of Bi2Se3andBi2Te3 are too defective to exhibit bulk-insulating behaviour, and ARPES shows topologically trivial 2DEGs at EF in the surface region due to downward band bending. Ternary & quaternary alloys of Bi /Te /Se /Sb hold promise for obtaining bulk-insulating crystals. Here we report ARPES data from quaternary, bulk-insulating, Bi-based TIs. Shortly after cleavage in UHV, downward band bending pulls the bulk conduction band below EF, once again frustrating the ``topological only'' ambition for the Fermi surface. However, there is light at the end of the tunnel: we show that a super-band-gap photon beam generates a surface photovoltage sufficient to flatten the bands, thereby recovering the ideal, ``topological only'' situation. In our bulk-insulating quaternary TIs, this effect is local in nature, and permits the writing of arbitrary, micron-sized patterns in the topological energy landscape at the surface. Support from FOM, NWO and the EU is gratefully acknowledged.

  13. Effect of electron correlations on the Fe3Si and α -FeSi2 band structure and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandalov, Igor; Zamkova, Natalia; Zhandun, Vyacheslav; Tarasov, Ivan; Varnakov, Sergey; Yakovlev, Ivan; Solovyov, Leonid; Ovchinnikov, Sergey

    2015-11-01

    We use the Vienna ab initio simulation package (vasp) for evaluation of the quasiparticle spectra and their spectral weights within Hedin's GW approximation (GWA) for Fe3Si and α -FeSi2 within the non-self-consistent one-shot approximation G0W0 and self-consistent scGWA with the vertex corrections in the particle-hole channel, taken in the form of two-point kernel. As input for G0W0 , the band structure and wave functions evaluated within the generalized gradient corrected local-density approximation to density functional theory (GGA) have been used. The spectral weights of quasiparticles in these compounds deviate from unity everywhere and show nonmonotonic behavior in those parts of bands where the delocalized states contribute to their formation. The G0W0 and scGWA spectral weights are the same within 2%-5%. The scGWA shows a general tendency to return G0W0 bands to their GGA positions for the delocalized states, while in the flat bands it flattens even more. Variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements at T =296 K on grown single-crystalline ˜50 -nm-thick films of Fe3Si on n -Si(111) wafer have been performed in the interval of energies ω ˜(1.3 -5 ) eV. The comparison of G0W0 and scGW theory with experimental real and imaginary parts of permittivity, refractive index, extinction and absorption coefficients, reflectivity, and electron energy loss function shows that both G0W0 and scGW qualitatively describe experiment correctly, the position of the low-energy peaks is described better by the scGW theory, however, its detailed structure is not observed in the experimental curves. We suggest that the angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy experiments, which can reveal the fine details of the quasiparticle band structure and spectral weights, could help to understand (i) if the scGWA with this type of vertex correction is sufficiently good for description of these iron silicides and, possibly, (ii) why some features of calculated permittivity are

  14. Electronic structure of the conduction band upon the formation of ultrathin fullerene films on the germanium oxide surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komolov, A. S.; Lazneva, E. F.; Gerasimova, N. B.; Panina, Yu. A.; Baramygin, A. V.; Zashikhin, G. D.

    2016-06-01

    The results of the investigation of the electronic structure of the conduction band in the energy range 5-25 eV above the Fermi level E F and the interfacial potential barrier upon deposition of aziridinylphenylpyrrolofullerene (APP-C60) and fullerene (C60) films on the surface of the real germanium oxide ((GeO2)Ge) have been presented. The content of the oxide on the (GeO2)Ge surface has been determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The electronic properties have been measured using the very low energy electron diffraction (VLEED) technique in the total current spectroscopy (TCS) mode. The regularities of the change in the fine structure of total current spectra (FSTCS) with an increase in the thickness of the APP-C60 and C60 coatings to 7 nm have been investigated. A comparison of the structures of the FSTCS maxima for the C60 and APP-C60 films has made it possible to reveal the energy range (6-10 eV above the Fermi level E F) in which the energy states are determined by both the π* and σ* states and the FSTCS spectra have different structures of the maxima for the APP-C60 and unsubstituted C60 films. The formation of the interfacial potential barrier upon deposition of APP-C60 and C60 on the (GeO2)Ge surface is accompanied by an increase in the work function of the surface E vac- E F by the value of 0.2-0.3 eV, which corresponds to the transfer of the electron density from the substrate to the organic films under investigation. The largest changes occur with an increase in the coating thickness to 3 nm, and with further deposition of APP-C60 and C60, the work function of the surface changes only slightly.

  15. Band Spectra and Molecular Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronig, R. De L.

    2011-06-01

    Introduction; Part I. The Energy Levels of Diatomic Molecules and their Classification by Means of Quantum Numbers: 1. General foundations; 2. Wave mechanics of diatomic molecules; 3. Electronic levels; 4. Vibrational levels; 5. Rotational levels; 6. Stark and Zeeman effect; 7. Energy levels of polyatomic molecules; Part II. Fine Structure and Wave Mechanical Properties of the Energy Levels of Diatomic Molecules: 8. The perturbation function; 9. Rotational distortion of spin multiplets; 10. Fine structure; 11. Perturbations and predissociation; 12. Even and odd levels; 13. Symmetrical and antisymmetrical levels; Part III. Selection Rules and Intensities in Diatomic Molecules: 14. General foundations; 15. Electronic bands; 16. Vibrational bands; 17. Rotational bands; 18. Band spectra and nuclear structure; 19. Transitions in the Stark and Zeeman effect; Part IV. Macroscopic Properties of Molecular Gases: 20. Scattering; 21. Dispersion; 22. Kerr and Faraday effect; 23. Dielectric constants; 24. Magnetic susceptibilities; 25. Specific heats; Part V. Molecule Formation and Chemical Binding: 26. Heteropolar molecules; 27. Homopolar molecules. Chemical forces between two H-atoms and two He-atoms; 28. The general theory of homopolar compounds; Bibliography; Subject index.

  16. Atomic structure, electronic properties, and band offsets of SrRuO3/TiO2 heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferdous, Naheed; Ertekin, Elif

    2015-03-01

    Photocatalytic water splitting by sunlight can in principle be an environmentally green approach to hydrogen fuel production, but at present photocatalytic conversion efficiencies remain too small. In titanium dioxide (TiO2) , the most commonly used photocatalyst, the biggest limitation arises from poor absorption of visible light. One way to increase the visible light absorption is to create a composite heterojunction by integrating TiO2 with a strongly light absorbing material. Inspired by experimental results demonstrating good light absorption in the correlated metal oxide Strontium Ruthenate (SrRuO3) , as well as enhanced photocatalytic activity of SrRuO3/TiO2 heterojunctions, we have carried out electronic structure calculations based on density functional theory to explain and improve on the observed properties of such heterojunctions. Our calculations present that this heterojunction exhibits type-II band alignment which is necessary to transport optically excited electrons from the SrRuO3 to the TiO2, with calculated work functions in good agreement with experimental measurements. Also, DFT calculations help to explain the origin of large light absorption in the correlated metal oxide, which arises from electronic excitations from O 2p levels into the Ru d-orbital quasiparticle states in the material. The use of correlated metal oxide/ TiO2 heterojunctions is a potentially interesting approach to improved photocatalytic activity.

  17. Importance of doping, dopant distribution, and defects on electronic band structure alteration of metal oxide nanoparticles: Implications for reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Navid B; Milliron, Delia J; Aich, Nirupam; Katz, Lynn E; Liljestrand, Howard M; Kirisits, Mary Jo

    2016-10-15

    Metal oxide nanoparticles (MONPs) are considered to have the potency to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), one of the key mechanisms underlying nanotoxicity. However, the nanotoxicology literature demonstrates a lack of consensus on the dominant toxicity mechanism(s) for a particular MONP. Moreover, recent literature has studied the correlation between band structure of pristine MONPs to their ability to introduce ROS and thus has downplayed the ROS-mediated toxicological relevance of a number of such materials. On the other hand, material science can control the band structure of these materials to engineer their electronic and optical properties and thereby is constantly modulating the pristine electronic structure. Since band structure is the fundamental material property that controls ROS-producing ability, band tuning via introduction of dopants and defects needs careful consideration in toxicity assessments. This commentary critically evaluates the existing material science and nanotoxicity literature and identifies the gap in our understanding of the role of important crystal structure features (i.e., dopants and defects) on MONPs' electronic structure alteration as well as their ROS-generation capability. Furthermore, this commentary provides suggestions on characterization techniques to evaluate dopants and defects on the crystal structure and identifies research needs for advanced theoretical predictions of their electronic band structures and ROS-generation abilities. Correlation of electronic band structure and ROS will not only aid in better mechanistic assessment of nanotoxicity but will be impactful in designing and developing ROS-based applications ranging from water disinfection to next-generation antibiotics and even cancer therapeutics.

  18. Importance of doping, dopant distribution, and defects on electronic band structure alteration of metal oxide nanoparticles: Implications for reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Navid B; Milliron, Delia J; Aich, Nirupam; Katz, Lynn E; Liljestrand, Howard M; Kirisits, Mary Jo

    2016-10-15

    Metal oxide nanoparticles (MONPs) are considered to have the potency to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), one of the key mechanisms underlying nanotoxicity. However, the nanotoxicology literature demonstrates a lack of consensus on the dominant toxicity mechanism(s) for a particular MONP. Moreover, recent literature has studied the correlation between band structure of pristine MONPs to their ability to introduce ROS and thus has downplayed the ROS-mediated toxicological relevance of a number of such materials. On the other hand, material science can control the band structure of these materials to engineer their electronic and optical properties and thereby is constantly modulating the pristine electronic structure. Since band structure is the fundamental material property that controls ROS-producing ability, band tuning via introduction of dopants and defects needs careful consideration in toxicity assessments. This commentary critically evaluates the existing material science and nanotoxicity literature and identifies the gap in our understanding of the role of important crystal structure features (i.e., dopants and defects) on MONPs' electronic structure alteration as well as their ROS-generation capability. Furthermore, this commentary provides suggestions on characterization techniques to evaluate dopants and defects on the crystal structure and identifies research needs for advanced theoretical predictions of their electronic band structures and ROS-generation abilities. Correlation of electronic band structure and ROS will not only aid in better mechanistic assessment of nanotoxicity but will be impactful in designing and developing ROS-based applications ranging from water disinfection to next-generation antibiotics and even cancer therapeutics. PMID:27350094

  19. Optical properties and electronic band structure of AgGaTe2 chalcopyrite semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Arai, Shinya; Ozaki, Shunji; Adachi, Sadao

    2010-02-10

    The optical properties of AgGaTe(2) chalcopyrite semiconductor are studied by optical absorption, spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), and thermoreflectance (TR) spectroscopy. Optical absorption spectra suggest that AgGaTe(2) is a direct-gap semiconductor having a bandgap of approximately 1.2 eV at T=300 K. The pseudodielectric-function spectra of AgGaTe(2) are determined by SE in the range between E=1.2 and 5.2 eV for both states of polarization. These spectra reveal distinct structures at energies of the critical points in the Brillouin zone. The TR spectra are also measured in the E=1.0-5.3 eV ranges at T=20 K-300 K. The spin-orbit and crystal-field splitting parameters of AgGaTe(2) are determined to be Delta(so)=0.70 eV and Delta(cr)=-0.23 eV, respectively.

  20. Comparison of the electronic band structures of LiCaAlF6 and LiSrAlF6 ultraviolet laser host media from ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viet Luong, Mui; Cadatal-Raduban, Marilou; Empizo, Melvin John F.; Arita, Ren; Minami, Yuki; Shimizu, Toshihiko; Sarukura, Nobuhiko; Azechi, Hiroshi; Pham, Minh Hong; Nguyen, Hung Dai; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2015-12-01

    We report the electronic structures and density of states (DOS) of perfect LiCAF and LiSAF crystals calculated from density functional theory (DFT) with local density approximation (LDA) using optimized lattice constants. DOS calculations reveal that the valence band is mainly derived from F 2p, thereby resulting to a very narrow valence band manifold. Meanwhile, the conduction band is mainly derived from Ca 4s or Sr 5s resulting to Sr having a broader band dispersion compared to Ca. Both fluoride compounds have indirect band gaps with LiCAF having a band gap of 8.02 eV and LiSAF a band gap of 7.92 eV. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first report on the electronic structure of LiSAF calculated using DFT with LDA. Our results suggest that when doped with Ce3+, the shorter 5d-conduction band distance in Ce:LiSAF combined with the difficulty of growing high-purity crystals lead to the more pronounced excited state absorption (ESA) and solarization effect experimentally observed in Ce:LiSAF, limiting its potential as a laser material compared with Ce:LiCAF.

  1. Engineering of optical polarization based on electronic band structures of A-plane ZnO layers under biaxial strains

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Hiroaki Tabata, Hitoshi; Hasuike, Noriyuki; Harima, Hiroshi

    2014-09-21

    In-plane anisotropic strains in A-plane layers on the electronic band structure of ZnO were investigated from the viewpoint of optical polarization anisotropy. Investigations utilizing k·p perturbation theory revealed that energy transitions and associated oscillation strengths were dependent on in-plane strains. The theoretical correlation between optical polarizations and in-plane strains was experimentally demonstrated using A-plane ZnO layers with different in-plane strains. Finally, optical polarization anisotropy and its implications for in-plane optical properties are discussed in relation to the energy shift between two orthogonal directions. Higher polarization rotations were obtained in an A-plane ZnO layer with in-plane biaxially compressive strains as compared to strain-free ZnO. This study provides detailed information concerning the role played by in-plane strains in optically polarized applications based on nonpolar ZnO in the ultra-violet region.

  2. Calculation of the Energy-Band Structure of the Kronig-Penney Model Using the Nearly-Free and Tightly-Bound-Electron Approximations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetsel, Grover C., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Calculates the energy-band structure of noninteracting electrons in a one-dimensional crystal using exact and approximate methods for a rectangular-well atomic potential. A comparison of the two solutions as a function of potential-well depth and ratio of lattice spacing to well width is presented. (Author/GA)

  3. On the influence of tetrahedral covalent-hybridization on electronic band structure of topological insulators from first principles

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. M.; Xu, G. Z.; Liu, E. K.; Wang, W. H. Wu, G. H.; Liu, Z. Y.

    2015-01-28

    Based on first-principles calculations, we investigate the influence of tetrahedral covalent-hybridization between main-group and transition-metal atoms on the topological band structures of binary HgTe and ternary half-Heusler compounds, respectively. Results show that, for the binary HgTe, when its zinc-blend structure is artificially changed to rock-salt one, the tetrahedral covalent-hybridization will be removed and correspondingly the topologically insulating band character lost. While for the ternary half-Heusler system, the strength of covalent-hybridization can be tuned by varying both chemical compositions and atomic arrangements, and the competition between tetrahedral and octahedral covalent-hybridization has been discussed in details. As a result, we found that a proper strength of tetrahedral covalent-hybridization is probably in favor to realizing the topologically insulating state with band inversion occurring at the Γ point of the Brillouin zone.

  4. Electronic band structure and optical gain of GaNxBiyAs1-x-y/GaAs pyramidal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhi-Gang; Bose, Sumanta; Fan, Wei-Jun; Li, Shu-Shen

    2016-04-01

    The electronic band structure and optical gain of GaNxBiyAs1-x-y/GaAs pyramidal quantum dots (QDs) are investigated using the 16-band k ṡ p model with constant strain. The optical gain is calculated taking both homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings into consideration. The effective band gap falls as we increase the composition of nitrogen (N) and bismuth (Bi) and with an appropriate choice of composition we can tune the emission wavelength to span within 1.3 μm-1.55 μm, for device application in fiber technology. The extent of this red shift is more profound in QDs compared with bulk material due to quantum confinement. Other factors affecting the emission characteristics include virtual crystal, strain profile, band anticrossing (BAC), and valence band anticrossing (VBAC). The strain profile has a profound impact on the electronic structure, specially the valence band of QDs, which can be determined using the composition distribution of wave functions. All these factors eventually affect the optical gain spectrum. With an increase in QD size, we observe a red shift in the emission energy and emergence of secondary peaks owing to transitions or greater energy compared with the fundamental transition.

  5. Effects of Side-Chain and Electron Exchange Correlation on the Band Structure of Perylene Diimide Liquid Crystals: A Density Functional Study

    SciTech Connect

    Arantes, J. T.; Lima, M. P.; Fazzio, A.; Xiang, H.; Wei, S. H.; Dalpian, G. M.

    2009-04-01

    The structural and electronic properties of perylene diimide liquid crystal PPEEB are studied using ab initio methods based on the density functional theory (DFT). Using available experimental crystallographic data as a guide, we propose a detailed structural model for the packing of solid PPEEB. We find that due to the localized nature of the band edge wave function, theoretical approaches beyond the standard method, such as hybrid functional (PBE0), are required to correctly characterize the band structure of this material. Moreover, unlike previous assumptions, we observe the formation of hydrogen bonds between the side chains of different molecules, which leads to a dispersion of the energy levels. This result indicates that the side chains of the molecular crystal not only are responsible for its structural conformation but also can be used for tuning the electronic and optical properties of these materials.

  6. Tuning the electronic band gap of graphene by oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Dabhi, Shweta D.; Jha, Prafulla K.

    2015-06-24

    Using plane wave pseudo potential density functional theory, we studied the electronic properties of graphene with different C:O ratio. In this work, we discussed the changes that occur in electronic band structure of graphene functionalized with different amount of epoxy group. Electronic band gap depends on C:O ratio in graphene oxide containing epoxy group. The present work will have its implication for making devices with tunable electronic properties by oxidizing graphene.

  7. Electronic Structures, Bonding Configurations, and Band-Gap-Opening Properties of Graphene Binding with Low-Concentration Fluorine

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Yuhua; Stinespring, Charter D.; Chorpening, Benjamin

    2015-06-18

    To better understand the effects of low-level fluorine in graphene-based sensors, first-principles density functional theory (DFT) with van der Waals dispersion interactions has been employed to investigate the structure and impact of fluorine defects on the electrical properties of single-layer graphene films. The results show that both graphite-2H and graphene have zero band gaps. When fluorine bonds to a carbon atom, the carbon atom is pulled slightly above the graphene plane, creating what is referred to as a CF defect. The lowest-binding energy state is found to correspond to two CF defects on nearest neighbor sites, with one fluorine above the carbon plane and the other below the plane. Overall this has the effect of buckling the graphene. The results further show that the addition of fluorine to graphene leads to the formation of an energy band (BF) near the Fermi level, contributed mainly from the 2p orbitals of fluorine with a small contribution from the porbitals of the carbon. Among the 11 binding configurations studied, our results show that only in two cases does the BF serve as a conduction band and open a band gap of 0.37 eV and 0.24 eV respectively. The binding energy decreases with decreasing fluorine concentration due to the interaction between neighboring fluorine atoms. The obtained results are useful for sensor development and nanoelectronics.

  8. Electronic Structures, Bonding Configurations, and Band-Gap-Opening Properties of Graphene Binding with Low-Concentration Fluorine

    DOE PAGES

    Duan, Yuhua; Stinespring, Charter D.; Chorpening, Benjamin

    2015-06-18

    To better understand the effects of low-level fluorine in graphene-based sensors, first-principles density functional theory (DFT) with van der Waals dispersion interactions has been employed to investigate the structure and impact of fluorine defects on the electrical properties of single-layer graphene films. The results show that both graphite-2H and graphene have zero band gaps. When fluorine bonds to a carbon atom, the carbon atom is pulled slightly above the graphene plane, creating what is referred to as a CF defect. The lowest-binding energy state is found to correspond to two CF defects on nearest neighbor sites, with one fluorine abovemore » the carbon plane and the other below the plane. Overall this has the effect of buckling the graphene. The results further show that the addition of fluorine to graphene leads to the formation of an energy band (BF) near the Fermi level, contributed mainly from the 2p orbitals of fluorine with a small contribution from the porbitals of the carbon. Among the 11 binding configurations studied, our results show that only in two cases does the BF serve as a conduction band and open a band gap of 0.37 eV and 0.24 eV respectively. The binding energy decreases with decreasing fluorine concentration due to the interaction between neighboring fluorine atoms. The obtained results are useful for sensor development and nanoelectronics.« less

  9. Electronic structure and phase stability of oxide semiconductors: Performance of dielectric-dependent hybrid functional DFT, benchmarked against G W band structure calculations and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerosa, Matteo; Bottani, Carlo Enrico; Caramella, Lucia; Onida, Giovanni; Di Valentin, Cristiana; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2015-04-01

    We investigate band gaps, equilibrium structures, and phase stabilities of several bulk polymorphs of wide-gap oxide semiconductors ZnO, TiO2,ZrO2, and WO3. We are particularly concerned with assessing the performance of hybrid functionals built with the fraction of Hartree-Fock exact exchange obtained from the computed electronic dielectric constant of the material. We provide comparison with more standard density-functional theory and GW methods. We finally analyze the chemical reduction of TiO2 into Ti2O3 , involving a change in oxide stoichiometry. We show that the dielectric-dependent hybrid functional is generally good at reproducing both ground-state (lattice constants, phase stability sequences, and reaction energies) and excited-state (photoemission gaps) properties within a single, fully ab initio framework.

  10. Probing the Electronic Structure and Band Gap Evolution of Titanium Oxide Clusters (TiO2)n- (n=1-10) Using Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Hua-jin; Wang, Lai S.

    2007-03-14

    TiO2 is a wide-band gap semiconductor and it is an important material for photocatalysis. Here we report an experimental investigation of the electronic structure of (TiO2)n clusters and how their band gap evolves as a function of size using anion photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). PES spectra of (TiO2)n– clusters for n = 1–10 have been obtained at 193 (6.424 eV) and 157 nm (7.866 eV). The high photon energy at 157 nm allows the band gap of the TiO2 clusters to be clearly revealed up to n = 10. The band gap is observed to be strongly size-dependent for n < 7, but it rapidly approaches the bulk limit at n = 7 and remains constant up to n = 10. All PES features are observed to be very broad, suggesting large geometry changes between the anions and the neutral clusters due to the localized nature of the extra electron in the anions. The measured electron affinities and the energy gaps are compared with available theoretical calculations. The extra electron in the (TiO2)n– clusters for n > 1 appears to be localized in a tricoodinated Ti atom, creating a single Ti3+ site and making these clusters ideal molecular models for mechanistic understanding of TiO2 surface defects and photocatalytic properties.

  11. Interaction of an ultrarelativistic electron bunch train with a W-band accelerating structure: High power and high gradient

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, D.; Antipov, S.; Jing, C.; Power, J. G.; Conde, M.; Wisniewski, E.; Liu, W.; Qiu, J.; Ha, G.; Dolgashev, V.; et al

    2016-02-05

    Electron beam interaction with high frequency structures (beyond microwave regime) has a great impact on future high energy frontier machines. We report on the generation of multimegawatt pulsed rf power at 91 GHz in a planar metallic accelerating structure driven by an ultrarelativistic electron bunch train. This slow-wave wakefield device can also be used for high gradient acceleration of electrons with a stable rf phase and amplitude which are controlled by manipulation of the bunch train. To achieve precise control of the rf pulse properties, a two-beam wakefield interferometry method was developed in which the rf pulse, due to themore » interference of the wakefields from the two bunches, was measured as a function of bunch separation. As a result, measurements of the energy change of a trailing electron bunch as a function of the bunch separation confirmed the interferometry method.« less

  12. Interaction of an Ultrarelativistic Electron Bunch Train with a W-Band Accelerating Structure: High Power and High Gradient.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Antipov, S; Jing, C; Power, J G; Conde, M; Wisniewski, E; Liu, W; Qiu, J; Ha, G; Dolgashev, V; Tang, C; Gai, W

    2016-02-01

    Electron beam interaction with high frequency structures (beyond microwave regime) has a great impact on future high energy frontier machines. We report on the generation of multimegawatt pulsed rf power at 91 GHz in a planar metallic accelerating structure driven by an ultrarelativistic electron bunch train. This slow-wave wakefield device can also be used for high gradient acceleration of electrons with a stable rf phase and amplitude which are controlled by manipulation of the bunch train. To achieve precise control of the rf pulse properties, a two-beam wakefield interferometry method was developed in which the rf pulse, due to the interference of the wakefields from the two bunches, was measured as a function of bunch separation. Measurements of the energy change of a trailing electron bunch as a function of the bunch separation confirmed the interferometry method. PMID:26894715

  13. F-electron systems: Pushing band theory

    SciTech Connect

    Koelling, D.D.

    1990-08-01

    The f-electron orbitals have always been the incomplete atomic shell acting as a local moment weakly interacting with the remaining electronic structure'' in the minds of most people. So examining them using a band theory where one views them as itinerant once was -- and to some extent even today still is -- considered with some skepticism. Nonetheless, a very significant community has successfully utilized band theory as a probe of the electronic structure of the appropriate actinides and rare earths. Those people actually using the approach would be the first to declare that it is not the whole solution. Instead, one is pushing and even exceeding its limits of applicability. However, the appropriate procedure is to push the model consistently to its limits, patch where possible, and then look to see where discrepancies remain. I propose to offer a selected review of past developments (emphasizing the career to date of A. J. Freeman in this area), offer a list of interesting puzzles for the future, and then make some guesses as to the techniques one might want to use. 27 refs.

  14. Electronic structure of CeRhIn5: de Haas-van Alphen and energy band calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Donavan; Palm, E. C.; Murphy, T. P.; Tozer, S. W.; Petrovic, C.; Miller-Ricci, Eliza; Peabody, Lydia; Li, Charis Quay Huei; Alver, U.; Goodrich, R. G.; Sarrao, J. L.; Pagliuso, P. G.; Wills, J. M.; Fisk, Z.

    2001-08-01

    The de Haas-van Alphen effect and energy-band calculations are used to study angular-dependent extremal areas and effective masses of the Fermi surface of the highly correlated antiferromagnetic material CeRhIn5. The agreement between experiment and theory is reasonable for the areas measured with the field applied along the (100) axis of the tetragonal structure, but there is disagreement in size for the areas observed with the field applied along the (001) axis where the antiferromagnetic spin alignment is occurring. Detailed comparisons between experiment and theory are given.

  15. Band structure engineering in organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarze, Martin; Tress, Wolfgang; Beyer, Beatrice; Gao, Feng; Scholz, Reinhard; Poelking, Carl; Ortstein, Katrin; Günther, Alrun A.; Kasemann, Daniel; Andrienko, Denis; Leo, Karl

    2016-06-01

    A key breakthrough in modern electronics was the introduction of band structure engineering, the design of almost arbitrary electronic potential structures by alloying different semiconductors to continuously tune the band gap and band-edge energies. Implementation of this approach in organic semiconductors has been hindered by strong localization of the electronic states in these materials. We show that the influence of so far largely ignored long-range Coulomb interactions provides a workaround. Photoelectron spectroscopy confirms that the ionization energies of crystalline organic semiconductors can be continuously tuned over a wide range by blending them with their halogenated derivatives. Correspondingly, the photovoltaic gap and open-circuit voltage of organic solar cells can be continuously tuned by the blending ratio of these donors.

  16. Band structure engineering in organic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Schwarze, Martin; Tress, Wolfgang; Beyer, Beatrice; Gao, Feng; Scholz, Reinhard; Poelking, Carl; Ortstein, Katrin; Günther, Alrun A; Kasemann, Daniel; Andrienko, Denis; Leo, Karl

    2016-06-17

    A key breakthrough in modern electronics was the introduction of band structure engineering, the design of almost arbitrary electronic potential structures by alloying different semiconductors to continuously tune the band gap and band-edge energies. Implementation of this approach in organic semiconductors has been hindered by strong localization of the electronic states in these materials. We show that the influence of so far largely ignored long-range Coulomb interactions provides a workaround. Photoelectron spectroscopy confirms that the ionization energies of crystalline organic semiconductors can be continuously tuned over a wide range by blending them with their halogenated derivatives. Correspondingly, the photovoltaic gap and open-circuit voltage of organic solar cells can be continuously tuned by the blending ratio of these donors. PMID:27313043

  17. First-principles study of the structures and electronic band properties of Bi 2 Te 3 { 0 1 1 ¯ 5 } nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jing; Zhou, Jian-Ping; Yang, Jia; Zhao, Hong-Sheng; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Deng, Chao-Yong

    2015-06-01

    Bi2Te3 is known to be an excellent thermoelectric material as well as a topological insulator. We prepare Bi 2 Te 3 { 0 1 1 ¯ 5 } nanosheets with a hydrothermal method and find that the interplanar spacings have a little difference though they belong to a same family of crystal planes. Then, we investigate the structural and electronic properties of Bi 2 Te 3 { 0 1 1 ¯ 5 } nanoribbons with one to six atomic layers by density-functional theory. The results indicate that the nanoribbons exhibit insulator with a band gap except the three-atomic-layer ribbon, which unexpectedly shows a metallic behavior with a gapless band structure.

  18. Ballistic-electron-emission spectroscopy of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}As/GaAs heterostructures: Conduction-band offsets, transport mechanisms, and band-structure effects

    SciTech Connect

    OShea, J.J.; Brazel, E.G.; Rubin, M.E.; Bhargava, S.; Chin, M.A.; Narayanamurti, V.

    1997-07-01

    We report an extensive investigation of semiconductor band-structure effects in single-barrier Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}As/GaAs heterostructures using ballistic-electron-emission spectroscopy (BEES). The transport mechanisms in these single-barrier structures were studied systematically as a function of temperature and Al composition over the full compositional range (0{le}x{le}1). The initial ({Gamma}) BEES thresholds for Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}As single barriers with 0{le}x{le}0.42 were extracted using a model which includes the complete transmission probability of the metal-semiconductor interface and the semiconductor heterostructure. Band offsets measured by BEES are in good agreement with previous measurements by other techniques which demonstrates the accuracy of this technique. BEES measurements at 77 K give the same band-offset values as at room temperature. When a reverse bias is applied to the heterostructures, the BEES thresholds shift to lower voltages in good agreement with the expected bias-induced band-bending. In the indirect band-gap regime ({ital x}{gt}0.45), spectra show a weak ballistic-electron-emission microscopy current contribution due to intervalley scattering through Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}As {ital X} valley states. Low-temperature spectra show a marked reduction in this intervalley current component, indicating that intervalley phonon scattering at the GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}As interface produces a significant fraction of this{ital X} valley current. A comparison of the BEES thresholds with the expected composition dependence of the Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}As {Gamma}, {ital L}, and {ital X} points yields good agreement over the entire composition range. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Electromagnetic metamaterial-inspired band gap and perfect transmission in semiconductor and graphene-based electronic and photonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdy, M. R. C.; Al Sayem, Ayed; Shahriar, Arif; Shawon, Jubayer; Al-Quaderi, Golam Dastegir; Jahangir, Ifat; Matin, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    In this article, at first we propose a unified and compact classification of single negative electromagnetic metamaterial-based perfect transmission unit cells. The classes are named as: type-A, -B and -C unit cells. Then based on the classification, we have extended these ideas in semiconductor and graphene regimes. For type-A: Based on the idea of electromagnetic Spatial Average Single Negative bandgap, novel bandgap structures have been proposed for electron transmission in semiconductor heterostructures. For type-B: with dielectric-graphene-dielectric structure, almost all angle transparency is achieved for both polarizations of electromagnetic wave in the terahertz frequency range instead of the conventional transparency in the microwave frequency range. Finally the application of the gated dielectric-graphene-dielectric has been demonstrated for the modulation and switching purpose.

  20. Fowler-Nordheim tunneling and conduction-band discontinuity in GaAs/GaAsAl high electron mobility transistor structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoliner, J.; Christanell, R.; Hauser, M.; Gornik, E.; Weimann, G.

    1987-06-01

    Oscillatory structure is observed in the dI/dV characteristics of conventional GaAs/GaAlAs high electron mobility transistor samples at liquid-helium temperature, which can be explained using a Fowler-Nordheim tunneling theory. The position of the oscillations allows a determination of the conduction-band discontinuity, and the depth of the deep donor levels in the GaAlAs for high aluminum concentrations. The fit of the data gives a value of Delta Ec/Delta Eg = 0.61 + or - 0.04 for aluminum concentration 30, 36, and 40 percent. The deep donor level in the GaAlAs was determined to be 130 meV below the conduction band.

  1. Band structures in 99Rh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Singh, V.; Singh, K.; Sihotra, S.; Singh, N.; Goswamy, J.; Malik, S. S.; Ragnarsson, I.; Trivedi, T.; Singh, R. P.; Muralithar, S.; Kumar, R.; Bhowmik, R. K.; Palit, R.; Bharti, A.; Mehta, D.

    2014-10-01

    Excited states in the 99Rh nucleus were populated using the fusion-evaporation reaction 75As(28Si,2p2n) at {{E}_{lab}}=120\\;MeV and the de-excitations were investigated through in-beam γ-ray spectroscopic techniques using the INGA spectrometer consisting of 18 clover detectors. The observed band structures are discussed in the framework of tilted axis cranking shell-model calculations. Level structures at low energies are identified as resulting from the rotational bands based on the \\pi {{p}_{1/2}} and \\pi {{g}_{9/2}} configurations. The \\Delta I = 1 coupled bands are observed at higher excitation energies and have been interpreted as based on the \\pi {{g}_{9/2}}\\otimes \

  2. Structural, electronic structure, and band alignment properties at epitaxial NiO/Al2O3 heterojunction evaluated from synchrotron based X-ray techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. D.; Nand, Mangla; Das, Arijeet; Ajimsha, R. S.; Upadhyay, Anuj; Kamparath, Rajiv; Shukla, D. K.; Mukherjee, C.; Misra, P.; Rai, S. K.; Sinha, A. K.; Jha, S. N.; Phase, D. M.; Ganguli, Tapas

    2016-04-01

    The valence band offset value of 2.3 ± 0.2 eV at epitaxial NiO/Al2O3 heterojunction is determined from photoelectron spectroscopy experiments. Pulsed laser deposited thin film of NiO on Al2O3 substrate is epitaxially grown along [111] direction with two domain structures, which are in-plane rotated by 60° with respect to each other. Observation of Pendellosung oscillations around Bragg peak confirms high interfacial and crystalline quality of NiO layer deposited on Al2O3 substrate. Surface related feature in Ni 2p3/2 core level spectra along with oxygen K-edge soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy results indicates that the initial growth of NiO on Al2O3 substrate is in the form of islands, which merge to form NiO layer for the larger coverage. The value of conduction band offset is also evaluated from the measured values of band gaps of NiO and Al2O3 layers. A type-I band alignment at NiO and Al2O3 heterojunction is also obtained. The determined values of band offsets can be useful in heterojunction based light emitting devices.

  3. Single layer lead iodide: computational exploration of structural, electronic and optical properties, strain induced band modulation and the role of spin-orbital-coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Mei; Duan, Wenhui; Chen, Ying; Du, Aijun

    2015-09-01

    Graphitic like layered materials exhibit intriguing electronic structures and thus the search for new types of two-dimensional (2D) monolayer materials is of great interest for developing novel nano-devices. By using density functional theory (DFT) method, here we for the first time investigate the structure, stability, electronic and optical properties of monolayer lead iodide (PbI2). The stability of PbI2 monolayer is first confirmed by phonon dispersion calculation. Compared to the calculation using generalized gradient approximation, screened hybrid functional and spin-orbit coupling effects can not only predicts an accurate bandgap (2.63 eV), but also the correct position of valence and conduction band edges. The biaxial strain can tune its bandgap size in a wide range from 1 eV to 3 eV, which can be understood by the strain induced uniformly change of electric field between Pb and I atomic layer. The calculated imaginary part of the dielectric function of 2D graphene/PbI2 van der Waals type hetero-structure shows significant red shift of absorption edge compared to that of a pure monolayer PbI2. Our findings highlight a new interesting 2D material with potential applications in nanoelectronics and optoelectronics.Graphitic like layered materials exhibit intriguing electronic structures and thus the search for new types of two-dimensional (2D) monolayer materials is of great interest for developing novel nano-devices. By using density functional theory (DFT) method, here we for the first time investigate the structure, stability, electronic and optical properties of monolayer lead iodide (PbI2). The stability of PbI2 monolayer is first confirmed by phonon dispersion calculation. Compared to the calculation using generalized gradient approximation, screened hybrid functional and spin-orbit coupling effects can not only predicts an accurate bandgap (2.63 eV), but also the correct position of valence and conduction band edges. The biaxial strain can tune its

  4. Elucidating the stop bands of structurally colored systems through recursion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amir, Ariel; Vukusic, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Interference is the source of some of the spectacular colors of animals and plants in nature. In some of these systems, the physical structure consists of an ordered array of layers with alternating high and low refractive indices. This periodicity leads to an optical band structure that is analogous to the electronic band structure encountered in semiconductor physics: specific bands of wavelengths (the stop bands) are perfectly reflected. Here, we present a minimal model for optical band structure in a periodic multilayer structure and solve it using recursion relations. The stop bands emerge in the limit of an infinite number of layers by finding the fixed point of the recursion. We compare to experimental data for various beetles, whose optical structure resembles the proposed model. Thus, using only the phenomenon of interference and the idea of recursion, we are able to elucidate the concept of band structure in the context of the experimentally observed high reflectance and iridescent appearance of structurally colored beetles.

  5. Band structure in 113Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, P.; Ganguly, S.; Pradhan, M. K.; Sharma, H. P.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R. P.; Bhowmik, R. K.

    2016-07-01

    The structure of collective bands in 113Sn, populated in the reaction 100Mo(19F,p 5 n ) at a beam energy of 105 MeV, has been studied. A new positive-parity sequence of eight states extending up to 7764.9 keV and spin (39 /2+) has been observed. The band is explained as arising from the coupling of the odd valence neutron in the g7 /2 or the d5 /2 orbital to the deformed 2p-2h proton configuration of the neighboring even-A Sn isotope. Lifetimes of six states up to an excitation energy of 9934.9 keV and spin 47 /2-belonging to a Δ I =2 intruder band have been measured for the first time, including an upper limit for the last state, from Doppler-shift-attenuation data. A moderate average quadrupole deformation β2=0.22 ±0.02 is deduced from these results for the five states up to spin 43 /2- . The transition quadrupole moments decrease with increase in rotational frequency, indicating a reduction of collectivity with spin, a feature common for terminating bands. The behavior of the kinematic and dynamic moments of inertia as a function of rotational frequency has been studied and total Routhian surface calculations have been performed in an attempt to obtain an insight into the nature of the states near termination.

  6. Mn Doping Effects on the Electronic Band Structure of PbS Quantum Dot Thin Films: A Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yost, Andrew J.; Rimal, Gaurab; Tang, Jinke; Chien, Teyu

    A thorough understanding of the phenomena associated with doping of transition metals in semiconductors is important for the development of semiconducting electronic technologies such as semiconducting quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSC). Manganese doping is of particular interest in a PbS QD as it is potentially capable of increasing overall QDSSC performance. Here we present scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy studies about the effects of Manganese doping on the energy band structures of PbS semiconducting QD thin films, grown using pulsed laser deposition. As a result of Manganese doping in the PbS QD thin films, a widening of the electronic band gap was observed, which is responsible for the observed increase in resistivity. Furthermore, a loss of long range periodicity observed by XRD, upon incorporation of Manganese, indicates that the Manganese dopants also induce a large amount of grain boundaries. This work was supported by the following: U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, DEFG02-10ER46728 and the National Science Foundation Grant #0948027.

  7. The electronic structure of the Mott insulator VO2: the strongly correlated metal state is screened by impurity band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Tak

    A Mott insulator VO2 (3d1) has a direct gap (Δdirect ~Vdirect) of 0.6 eV and an indirect gap of Δact ~Vdirect ~ 0.15 eV coming from impurity indirect band. At Tc, Δdirect =Δact = O is satisfied and the insulator-to-metal transition (IMT) occurs. The metallic carriers near core region can be trapped when a critical onsite Coulomb Uc exists. Then, a potential energy is defined as Vg =Vdirect +Uc +Vindirect = - (2 2 3) EF (1 + e (NtotNtotntot) (1 - exp (-Δact-ΔactkB T))) +Uc kB T))) +Uc ntot) (1 - exp (-Δact-ΔactkB T))) +Uc kB T))) +Uc 3) EF (1 + e (NtotNtotntot) (1 - exp (-Δact-ΔactkB T))) +Uc kB T))) +Uc ntot) (1 - exp (-Δact-ΔactkB T))) +Uc kB T))) +Uc , where Vdirect = - (2 2 3 3) EF is the screened Coulomb pseudopotential at K = 0. Δρ =NtotNtotntot ~ 0 . 018 % ntot ~ 0 . 018 % [1] is defined as the critical doping quantity, where ntot is the carrier density in the direct band and Ntot is the carrier density in the impurity band. In Uc < (2

  8. Electronic and crystalline structures of zero band-gap LuPdBi thin films grown epitaxially on MgO(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, Rong; Ouardi, Siham; Fecher, Gerhard H.; ViolBarbosa, Carlos E.; Felser, Claudia; Gao, Li; Kellock, Andrew; Roche, Kevin P.; Samant, Mahesh G.; Parkin, Stuart S. P.; Ikenaga, Eiji

    2013-04-29

    Thin films of the proposed topological insulator LuPdBi-a Heusler compound with the C1{sub b} structure-were prepared on Ta-Mo-buffered MgO(100) substrates by co-sputtering from PdBi{sub 2} and Lu targets. Epitaxial growth of LuPdBi films was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and reflection high-energy electron diffraction. The root-mean-square roughness of the films was as low as 1.45 nm, even though the films were deposited at high temperature. The film composition is close to the ideal stoichiometric ratio. The valence band spectra of the LuPdBi films, observed by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, correspond very well with the ab initio-calculated density of states.

  9. Li induced effects in the core level and π-band electronic structure of graphene grown on C-face SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, Leif I. Xia, Chao; Virojanadara, Chariya

    2015-11-15

    Studies of the effects induced in the electronic structure after Li deposition, and subsequent heating, on graphene samples prepared on C-face SiC are reported. The as prepared graphene samples are essentially undoped, but after Li deposition, the Dirac point shifts down to 1.2 eV below the Fermi level due to electron doping. The shape of the C 1s level also indicates a doping concentration of around 10{sup 14 }cm{sup −2} after Li deposition, when compared with recent calculated results of core level spectra of graphene. The C 1s, Si 2p, and Li 1s core level results show little intercalation directly after deposition but that most of the Li has intercalated after heating at 280 °C. Heating at higher temperatures leads to desorption of Li from the sample, and at 1030 °C, Li can no longer be detected on the sample. The single π-band observable from multilayer C-face graphene samples in conventional angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy is reasonably sharp both on the initially prepared sample and after Li deposition. After heating at 280 °C, the π-band appears more diffuse and possibly split. The Dirac point becomes located at 0.4 eV below the Fermi level, which indicates occurrence of a significant reduction in the electron doping concentration. Constant energy photoelectron distribution patterns extracted from the as prepared graphene C-face sample and also after Li deposition and heating at 280 °C look very similar to earlier calculated distribution patterns for monolayer graphene.

  10. X-ray diffraction and electronic band structure study of the organic superconductor ϰ-(ET) 2Cu[N(CN) 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Arthur J.; Wang, Hau H.; Williams, Jack M.; Finger, Larry W.; Hazen, Robert M.; Rovira, Carme; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan

    1994-12-01

    The previously observed pressure-induced amorphization transition at 11 kbar [A.J. Schultz, U. Geiser, H.H. Wang, J.M. Williams, L.W. Finger and B.M. Hazen, Physica C 208 (1993) 277] was avoided and single-crystal X-ray data up to 28 kbar were obtained by replacing mineral oil with a hydrostatic alcohol mixture as the pressure medium in diamond anvil cell. The linear compressibilities of the crystallographic axes are remarkably isotropic given the two-dimensional nature of the structure. A full structure determination was performed at room temperature and 28 kbar with the use of X-ray data. It is noteworthy that, a novel structure feature, short interlayer H…H contacts through a hole in the anion layer, may account for the isotropic compressibilities. Electronic band structures calculated for the crystal structures of κ-(ET) 2Cu[N(CN) 2]Cl at 1 bar, 3 kbar and 28 kbar show that this salt is a two-dimensional metal, and that the density of states at the Fermi level decreases gradually with increasing pressure.

  11. Correlation effects of π electrons on the band structures of conjugated polymers using the self-consistent GW approximation with vertex corrections.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yao-Wen; Jin, Bih-Yaw

    2012-01-14

    Many-body perturbation theory is used to investigate the effect of π-electron correlations on the quasi-particle band structures of conjugated polymers at the level of the Pariser-Parr-Pople model. The self-consistent GW approximation with vertex corrections to both the self-energy and the polarization in Hedin's equations is employed in order to eliminate self-interaction errors and include the effects of electron-hole attraction in screening processes. The dynamic inverse dielectric function is constructed from the generalized plasmon-pole approximation with the static dressed polarization given by the coupled-perturbed Hartree-Fock equation. The bandgaps of trans-polyacetylene, trans-polyphenylenevinylene and poly(para)phenylene are calculated by both the Hartree-Fock and GW approximation, and a lowering of bandgaps due to electron correlations is found. We conclude that both dielectric screening and vertex corrections are important for calculating the quasi-particle bandgaps of conjugated polymers.

  12. Electronic structure of the conduction band of the interface region of ultrathin films of substituted perylenedicarboximides and the germanium oxide surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komolov, A. S.; Lazneva, E. F.; Gerasimova, N. B.; Panina, Yu. A.; Baramygin, A. V.; Pshenichnyuk, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    The results of the investigation of the electronic structure of the conduction band and the interfacial potential barrier during the formation of interfaces of dioctyl-substituted perylenedicarboximide (PTCDI-C8) and diphenyl-substituted perylenedicarboximide (PTCDI-Ph) ultrathin films with the oxidized germanium surface have been presented. The experimental results have been obtained using the very low energy electron diffraction (VLEED) technique in the total current spectroscopy (TCS) mode at energies in the range from 5 to 20 eV above the Fermi level E F. The positions of the maxima of the fine structure of total current spectra (FSTCS) of the PTCDI-C8 and PTCDI-Ph films differ significantly in the energy range from 9 to 20 eV above the Fermi level E F, which can be associated with the difference between the substituents of the chosen molecules, dioctyl- and diphenyl-, respectively. At the same time, the positions of the lowenergy maxima in the FSTCS spectra at an energy 6-7 eV above the Fermi level E F for the PTCDI-C8 and PTCDI-Ph films almost coincide with each other. It has been suggested that these maxima are attributed to the electronic states of the perylene core of the molecules under investigation. The process of the formation of interfacial potential barriers of the PTCDI-C8 and PTCDI-Ph films with the oxidized germanium surface has been analyzed. It has been found that the work functions of the surface, E vac- E F, differ little from 4.6 ± 0.1 eV over the entire range of organic coating thicknesses from 0 to 6 nm.

  13. Photonic band gap structure simulator

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Chiping; Shapiro, Michael A.; Smirnova, Evgenya I.; Temkin, Richard J.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.

    2006-10-03

    A system and method for designing photonic band gap structures. The system and method provide a user with the capability to produce a model of a two-dimensional array of conductors corresponding to a unit cell. The model involves a linear equation. Boundary conditions representative of conditions at the boundary of the unit cell are applied to a solution of the Helmholtz equation defined for the unit cell. The linear equation can be approximated by a Hermitian matrix. An eigenvalue of the Helmholtz equation is calculated. One computation approach involves calculating finite differences. The model can include a symmetry element, such as a center of inversion, a rotation axis, and a mirror plane. A graphical user interface is provided for the user's convenience. A display is provided to display to a user the calculated eigenvalue, corresponding to a photonic energy level in the Brilloin zone of the unit cell.

  14. Effects of crystal orientation on electronic band structure and anomalous shift of higher critical point in VO2 thin films during the phase transition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Huang, Ting; You, Qinghu; Zhang, Jinzhong; Li, Wenwu; Wu, Jiada; Hu, Zhigao; Chu, Junhao

    2015-12-01

    The phase transition behaviour of vanadium dioxide (VO2) with different thicknesses has been investigated by temperature-dependent optical transmittance and Raman spectra. It is found that the crystal orientation has a great effect on the metal-insulator transition (MIT) of VO2 films. The x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows that the films are polycrystalline and exhibit the characteristics of the monoclinic phase. The preferential growth crystal orientation (0 2 0) is converted to the (\\bar{1} 1 1) plane with the film thickness increasing. It is believed that the (\\bar{1} 1 1) plane is the reflection of a twinned structure with (0 1 1) crystal orientation, which will lead to the arrangements of oxygen atoms and vanadium atoms deviating from the pure monoclinic structure. It is found that the highest order transition (E 3) is highly susceptible to the crystal orientation, whereas the lowest order transition (E 1) is nearly unaffected by it. The E 3 exhibits an anomalous temperature dependence with an abrupt blue-shift (˜0.5 eV) in the vicinity of the metal-insulator transition (MIT) for VO2 film with a thickness of 84 nm. The findings show that the empty {σ*} band can be driven close to the Fermi level when the (0 2 0) orientation is converted to the (\\bar{1} 1 1) orientation. Compared to the VO2 films with thicknesses of 39 and 57 nm, the E 3 decreases by 0.8 eV and the E 2 increases by about 0.1 eV at the insulator state for the VO2 film with a thickness of 84 nm. The abnormal electronic transition and the variation of energy band is likely caused by the lattice distortion and V-V dimerisation deviation from the monoclinic {{a}\\text{m}} axis.

  15. First-principle calculation of the elastic, band structure, electronic states, and optical properties of Cu-doped ZnS nanolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiji, Mohammadreza Askaripour; Ziabari, Ali Abdolahzadeh

    2016-11-01

    The structural, elastic, electronic, and optical properties of undoped and Cu-doped ZnS nanostructured layers have been studied in the zincblende (ZB) phase, by first-principle approach. Density functional theory (DFT) has been employed to calculate the fundamental properties of the layers using full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave (FPLAPW) method. Mechanical analysis revealed that the bulk modulus increases with the increase of Cu content. Cu doping was found to reduce the band gap value of the material. In addition, DOS effective mass of the electrons and heavy holes was evaluated. Adding Cu caused the decrement/increment of transmission/reflectance of nanolayers in the UV-vis region. The substitution by Cu increased the intensity of the peaks, and a slight red shift was observed in the absorption peak. Moreover, the static dielectric constant, and static refractive index increased with Cu content. The optical conductivity also followed a similar trend to that of the dielectric constants. Energy loss function of the modeled compounds was also evaluated. All calculated parameters were compared with the available experimental and other theoretical results.

  16. Band structure of the heavily-electron-doped FeAs-based Ba(Fe,Co)2As2 superconductor suppresses antiferromagnetic correlations.

    PubMed

    Sudayama, T; Wakisaka, Y; Takubo, K; Morinaga, R; Sato, T J; Arita, M; Namatame, H; Taniguchi, M; Mizokawa, T

    2010-04-30

    In the heavily-electron-doped regime of the Ba(Fe,Co)2As2 superconductor, three hole bands at the zone center are observed and two of them reach the Fermi level. The larger hole pocket at the zone center is apparently nested with the smaller electron pocket around the zone corner. However, the (pi,0) Fermi surface reconstruction reported for the hole-doped case is absent in the heavily-electron-doped case. This observation shows that the apparent Fermi surface nesting alone is not enough to enhance the antiferromagnetic correlation as well as the superconducting transition temperature.

  17. Band Structure of SnTe Studied by Photoemission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littlewood, P. B.; Mihaila, B.; Schulze, R. K.; Safarik, D. J.; Gubernatis, J. E.; Bostwick, A.; Rotenberg, E.; Opeil, C. P.; Durakiewicz, T.; Smith, J. L.; Lashley, J. C.

    2010-08-01

    We present an angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study of the electronic structure of SnTe and compare the experimental results to ab initio band structure calculations as well as a simplified tight-binding model of the p bands. Our study reveals the conjectured complex Fermi surface structure near the L points showing topological changes in the bands from disconnected pockets, to open tubes, and then to cuboids as the binding energy increases, resolving lingering issues about the electronic structure. The chemical potential at the crystal surface is found to be 0.5 eV below the gap, corresponding to a carrier density of p=1.14×1021cm-3 or 7.2×10-2 holes per unit cell. At a temperature below the cubic-rhombohedral structural transition a small shift in spectral energy of the valance band is found, in agreement with model predictions.

  18. Band structure of SnTe studied by photoemission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Littlewood, P B; Mihaila, B; Schulze, R K; Safarik, D J; Gubernatis, J E; Bostwick, A; Rotenberg, E; Opeil, C P; Durakiewicz, T; Smith, J L; Lashley, J C

    2010-08-20

    We present an angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study of the electronic structure of SnTe and compare the experimental results to ab initio band structure calculations as well as a simplified tight-binding model of the p bands. Our study reveals the conjectured complex Fermi surface structure near the L points showing topological changes in the bands from disconnected pockets, to open tubes, and then to cuboids as the binding energy increases, resolving lingering issues about the electronic structure. The chemical potential at the crystal surface is found to be 0.5 eV below the gap, corresponding to a carrier density of p=1.14 × 10(21)  cm(-3) or 7.2 × 10(-2) holes per unit cell. At a temperature below the cubic-rhombohedral structural transition a small shift in spectral energy of the valance band is found, in agreement with model predictions. PMID:20868120

  19. Atomic structure of amorphous shear bands in boron carbide.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K Madhav; Liu, P; Hirata, A; Fujita, T; Chen, M W

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous shear bands are the main deformation and failure mode of super-hard boron carbide subjected to shock loading and high pressures at room temperature. Nevertheless, the formation mechanisms of the amorphous shear bands remain a long-standing scientific curiosity mainly because of the lack of experimental structure information of the disordered shear bands, comprising light elements of carbon and boron only. Here we report the atomic structure of the amorphous shear bands in boron carbide characterized by state-of-the-art aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Distorted icosahedra, displaced from the crystalline matrix, were observed in nano-sized amorphous bands that produce dislocation-like local shear strains. These experimental results provide direct experimental evidence that the formation of amorphous shear bands in boron carbide results from the disassembly of the icosahedra, driven by shear stresses.

  20. A hybridized basis for simple band structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spałek, J.; Ray, D. K.; Acquarone, M.

    1985-12-01

    We show that a model Hamiltonian representing a degenerate band composed of d equally hybridized and equivalent narrow subbands can be diagonalized for arbitrary d.A simple transformation removing the hybridization entirely is constructed. It gives both the eigenvalues and the eigen-functions in explicit form. The conditions under which the electron-electron intrasite interactions are invariant under the transformation are discussed..An analogous transformation is constructed also for the band part of the degenerate periodic Anderson model with the component bands mixed to the same extent with the atomic level.

  1. Electronic structure of Ca, Sr, and Ba under pressure.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Animalu, A. O. E.; Heine, V.; Vasvari, B.

    1967-01-01

    Electronic band structure calculations phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure electronic band structure calculations for fcc phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure electronic band structure calculations for fcc phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure

  2. Electronic Structure of Few-Electron Quantum Dot Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popsueva, V.; Hansen, J. P.; Caillat, J.

    2007-12-01

    We present a study of strongly correlated few-electron quantum dots, exploring the spectra of various few-electron quantum dot molecules: a double (diatomic) structure a quadruple two-electron quantum dot, and a three-electron double dot. Electron energy spectra are computed for different values of dot separation. All spectra show clear band structures and can be understood from asymptotical properties of the system.

  3. Theoretical study on electronic structure of bathocuproine: Renormalization of the band gap in the crystalline state and the large exciton binding energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, Susumu; Hatada, Shin-No-Suke; Morikawa, Yoshitada

    Bathocuproine (BCP) is a promising organic material of a hole blocking layer in organic light-emitting diodes or an electron buffer layer in organic photovoltaic cells. The nature of the unoccupied electronic states is a key characteristic of the material, which play vital roles in the electron transport. To elucidate the electronic properties of the molecular or crystalline BCP, we use the GW approximation for calculation of the fundamental gap, and the long-range corrected density functional theory for the molecular optical absorption. It is found that the band gap of the BCP single crystal is 4.39 eV, and it is in agreement with the recent low-energy inverse photoemission spectroscopy measurement. The polarization energy is estimated to be larger than 1 eV, demonstrating the large polarization effects induced by the electronic clouds surrounding the injected charge. The theoretical optical absorption energy is 3.68 eV, and the exciton binding energy is estimated to be 0.71 eV, implying the large binding in the eletron-hole pair distributed around the small part of the molecular region. This work was supported by the Grants-in-Aid for Young Scientists (B) (No. 26810009), and for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas ``3D Active-Site Science'' (No. 26105011) from Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.

  4. Crystal and electronic structures and high-pressure behavior of AgSO4, a unique narrow band gap antiferromagnetic semiconductor: LDA(+U) picture.

    PubMed

    Derzsi, Mariana; Stasiewicz, Juliusz; Grochala, Wojciech

    2011-09-01

    We demonstrate that DFT calculations performed with the local density approximation (LDA) allow for significantly better reproduction of lattice constants, the unit cell volume and the density of Ag(II)SO(4) than those done with generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The LDA+U scheme, which accounts for electronic correlation effects, enables the accurate prediction of the magnetic superexchange constant of this strongly correlated material and its band gap at the Fermi level. The character of the band gap places the compound on the borderline between a Mott insulator and a charge transfer insulator. The size of the band gap (0.82 eV) indicates that AgSO(4) is a ferrimagnetic semiconductor, and possibly an attractive material for spintronics. A bulk modulus of 27.0 GPa and a compressibility of 0.037 GPa(-1) were determined for AgSO(4) from the third-order Birch-Murnaghan isothermal equation of state up to 20 GPa. Several polymorphic types compete with the ambient pressure P-1 phase as the external pressure is increased. The P-1 phase is predicted to resist pressure-induced metallization up to at least 20 GPa.

  5. Electronic band structure and optical properties of titanium oxyphosphates Li{sub 0.50}Co{sub 0.25}TiO(PO{sub 4}) single crystals: An ab-initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Reshak, Ali Hussain; Khenata, R.; Auluck, S.

    2011-08-15

    From the refined atomic positions obtained by Belmal et al. (2004) using X-ray diffraction for Li{sub 0.50}Co{sub 0.25}TiO(PO{sub 4}), we have performed a structural optimization by minimizing the forces acting on the atoms keeping the lattice parameters fixed at the experimental values. With this relaxed (optimized) geometry we have performed a comprehensive theoretical study of electronic properties and dispersion of the linear optical susceptibilities using the full potential linear augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method. The generalized gradient approximation (GGA) exchange-correlation potential was applied. In addition, the Engel-Vosko generalized gradient approximation (EVGGA) was used for comparison with GGA because it is known that EVGGA approach yields better band splitting compared to the GGA. We have calculated the band structure, and the total and partial densities of states. The electron charge densities and the bonding properties were analyzed and discussed. The complex dielectric optical susceptibilities were discussed in detail. - Graphical abstract: It is shown that P is tetrahedrally coordinated by four O ions. Highlights: > Comprehensive theoretical study of electronic and optical properties was performed. > Using X-ray diffraction data we have performed a structural optimization. > The electron charge densities and the bonding properties were analyzed and discussed. > Fermi surface was analyzed since it is useful for predicting thermal, magnetic, and optical properties. > The density of states at E{sub F} and the electronic specific heat coefficient were calculated.

  6. Atomic arrangement and electron band structure of Si(1 1 1)-ß-√3 x √3-Bi reconstruction modified by alkali-metal adsorption: ab initio study.

    PubMed

    Eremeev, S V; Chukurov, E N; Gruznev, D V; Zotov, A V; Saranin, A A

    2015-08-01

    Using ab initio calculations, atomic structure and electronic properties of Si(1 1 1)[Formula: see text]-Bi surface modified by adsorption of 1/3 monolayer of alkali metals, Li, Na, K, Rb and Cs, have been explored. Upon adsorption of all metals, a similar atomic structure develops at the surface where twisted chained Bi trimers are arranged into a honeycomb network and alkali metal atoms occupy the [Formula: see text] sites in the center of each honeycomb unit. Among other structural characteristics, the greatest variation concerns the relative heights at which alkali metals reside with respect to Bi-trimer layer. Except for Li, the other metals reside higher than Bi layer and their heights increase with atomic number. All adsorbed surface structures display similar electron band structures of which the most essential feature is metallic surface-state band with a giant spin splitting. This electronic property allows one to consider the Si(1 1 1)[Formula: see text]-Bi surfaces modified by alkali metal adsorption as a set of material systems showing promise for spintronic applications.

  7. Band structures and band offsets of high K dielectrics on Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, J.

    2002-05-01

    Various high dielectric constant oxides will be used as insulator in ferroelectric memories, dynamic random access memories, and as the gate dielectric material in future complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. These oxides which have moderately wide bandgaps provide a good test of our understanding of Schottky barrier heights and band offsets at semiconductor interfaces. Metal induced gap states (MIGS) are found to give a good description of these interfaces. The electronic structure and band offsets of these oxides are calculated. It is found that Ta 2O 5 and SrTiO 3 have small or vanishing conduction band offsets on Si. La 2O 3, Y 2O 3, ZrO 2, HfO 2, Al 2O 3 and silicates like ZrSiO 4 have offsets over 1.4 eV for both electrons and holes, making them better gate dielectrics.

  8. Multiple band structures of {sup 131}Cs

    SciTech Connect

    Sihotra, S.; Palit, R.; Naik, Z.; Joshi, P. K.; Deo, A. Y.; Jain, H. C.; Singh, K.; Goswamy, J.; Mehta, D.; Singh, N.; Malik, S. S.; Praharaj, C. R.

    2008-09-15

    Excited states in {sup 131}Cs were investigated through in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopic techniques following its population in the {sup 124}Sn({sup 11}B, 4n) fusion-evaporation reaction at a beam energy of 46 MeV. The previously known level scheme has been substantially extended up to {approx}9 MeV excitation energy and 49/2({Dirac_h}/2{pi}) spin with the addition of seven new band structures. The present level scheme consisting of 15 bands exhibits a variety of collective features in this nucleus at intermediate spin. The excitation energies of the observed levels in different bands and the corresponding ratios of transition strengths, i.e., B(M1)/B(E2), have been compared with the results of projected deformed Hartree-Fock calculations based on various quasiparticle configurations. A strongly coupled band has been reassigned a high-K three-quasiparticle {pi}h{sub 11/2} x {nu}(h{sub 11/2}d{sub 3/2}) configuration based on the properties of this band and that of its new coupled side band. The configurations of these bands are also discussed in the framework of tilted-axis cranking model calculations and the systematics of the odd-A Cs isotopes. Additional three energetically closely placed coupled bands have been assigned different unpaired three-quasiparticle configurations. {gamma}-vibrational bands coupled to the {pi}h{sub 11/2} and {pi}g{sub 7/2} single-particle configurations have been reported in this nucleus. Observation of new E1 transitions linking the opposite-parity {pi}h{sub 11/2} and {pi}d{sub 5/2} bands provides fingerprints of possible octupole correlations.

  9. Theory of Auger-electron and appearance-potential spectroscopy for interacting valence-band electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolting, W.; Geipel, G.; Ertl, K.

    1991-12-01

    A theory of Auger-electron spectroscopy (AES) and appearance-potential spectroscopy (APS) is presented for interacting electrons in a nondegenerate energy band, described within the framework of the Hubbard model. Both types of spectroscopy are based on the same two-particle spectral density. A diagrammatic vertex-correction method (Matsubara formalism) is used to express this function in terms of the one-particle spectral density. The latter is approximately determined for arbitrary temperature T, arbitrary coupling strength U/W (U, the intra-atomic Coulomb matrix element; W, the width of the ``free'' Bloch band), and arbitrary band occupations n (0<=n<=2 average number of band electrons per site) by a self-consistent moment method. In weakly coupled systems the electron correlations give rise to certain deformations of the quasiparticle density of states (QDOS) in relation to the Bloch density of states (BDOS), where, however, spontaneous magnetic order is excluded, irrespective of the band filling n. The AE (AP) spectra consist of only one structure a few eV wide (``bandlike'') which is strongly n dependent, but only slightly T dependent, being rather well approximated by a simple self-convolution of the occupied (unoccupied) QDOS. For strongly correlated electrons the Bloch band splits into two quasiparticle subbands. This leads for n<1 to one line in the AE spectrum and three lines in the AP spectrum, and vice versa for n>1. For sufficiently strong correlations U/W additional satellites appear that refer to situations where the two excited quasiparticles (quasiholes) propagate as tightly bound pairs through the lattice without being scattered by other charge carriers. As soon as the satellite splits off from the bandlike part of the spectrum, it takes almost the full spectral weight, conveying the impression of an ``atomiclike'' AE (AP) line shape. The satellite has almost exactly the structure of the free BDOS. If the particle density n as well as the hole

  10. Nonreciprocal microwave band-gap structures.

    PubMed

    Belov, P A; Tretyakov, S A; Viitanen, A J

    2002-07-01

    An electrically controlled nonreciprocal electromagnetic band-gap material is proposed and studied. The new material is a periodic three-dimensional regular lattice of small magnetized ferrite spheres. In this paper, we consider plane electromagnetic waves in this medium and design an analytical model for the material parameters. An analytical solution for plane-wave reflection from a planar interface is also presented. In the proposed material, a new electrically controlled stop band appears for one of the two circularly polarized eigenwaves in a frequency band around the ferrimagnetic resonance frequency. This frequency can be well below the usual lattice band gap, which allows the realization of rather compact structures. The main properties of the material are outlined. PMID:12241501

  11. Quasi-particle electronic band structure and alignment of the V-VI-VII semiconductors SbSI, SbSBr, and SbSeI for solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Keith T.; McKechnie, Scott; Azarhoosh, Pooya; van Schilfgaarde, Mark; Scanlon, David O.; Walsh, Aron

    2016-03-01

    The ternary V-VI-VII chalcohalides consist of one cation and two anions. Trivalent antimony—with a distinctive 5s2 electronic configuration—can be combined with a chalcogen (e.g., S or Se) and halide (e.g., Br or I) to produce photoactive ferroelectric semiconductors with similarities to the Pb halide perovskites. We report—from relativistic quasi-particle self-consistent GW theory—that these materials have a multi-valley electronic structure with several electron and hole basins close to the band extrema. We predict ionisation potentials of 5.3-5.8 eV from first-principles for the three materials, and assess electrical contacts that will be suitable for achieving photovoltaic action from these unconventional compounds.

  12. Ultrafast Band Structure Control of a Two-Dimensional Heterostructure.

    PubMed

    Ulstrup, Søren; Čabo, Antonija Grubišić; Miwa, Jill A; Riley, Jonathon M; Grønborg, Signe S; Johannsen, Jens C; Cacho, Cephise; Alexander, Oliver; Chapman, Richard T; Springate, Emma; Bianchi, Marco; Dendzik, Maciej; Lauritsen, Jeppe V; King, Phil D C; Hofmann, Philip

    2016-06-28

    The electronic structure of two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors can be significantly altered by screening effects, either from free charge carriers in the material or by environmental screening from the surrounding medium. The physical properties of 2D semiconductors placed in a heterostructure with other 2D materials are therefore governed by a complex interplay of both intra- and interlayer interactions. Here, using time- and angle-resolved photoemission, we are able to isolate both the layer-resolved band structure and, more importantly, the transient band structure evolution of a model 2D heterostructure formed of a single layer of MoS2 on graphene. Our results reveal a pronounced renormalization of the quasiparticle gap of the MoS2 layer. Following optical excitation, the band gap is reduced by up to ∼400 meV on femtosecond time scales due to a persistence of strong electronic interactions despite the environmental screening by the n-doped graphene. This points to a large degree of tunability of both the electronic structure and the electron dynamics for 2D semiconductors embedded in a van der Waals-bonded heterostructure. PMID:27267820

  13. New linear accelerator (Linac) design based on C-band accelerating structures for SXFEL facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Gu, Qiang

    2011-11-01

    A C-band accelerator structure is one promising technique for a compact XFEL facility. It is also attractive in beam dynamics in maintaining a high quality electron beam, which is an important factor in the performance of a free electron laser. In this paper, a comparison between traditional S-band and C-band accelerating structures is made based on the linac configuration of a Shanghai Soft X-ray Free Electron Laser (SXFEL) facility. Throughout the comprehensive simulation, we conclude that the C-band structure is much more competitive.

  14. Measurement of valence band structure in arbitrary dielectric films

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Han S.; Choi, Eun H.

    2012-10-15

    A new way of measuring the band structure of various dielectric materials using the secondary electron emission from Auger neutralization of ions is introduced. The first example of this measurement scheme is the magnesium oxide (MgO) films with respect to the application of the films in the display industries. The density of state in the valence bands of MgO film and MgO film with a functional layer (FL) deposited over a dielectric surface reveals that the density peak of film with a FL is considerably less than that of film, thereby indicating a better performance of MgO film with functional layer in display devices. The second example of the measurement is the boron-zinc oxide (BZO) films with respect to the application of the films to the development of solar cells. The measurement of density of state in BZO film suggests that a high concentration of boron impurity in BZO films may enhance the transition of electrons and holes through the band gap from the valence to the conduction band in zinc oxide crystals; thereby improving the conductivity of the film. Secondary electron emission by the Auger neutralization of ions is highly instrumental for the determination of the density of states in the valence band of dielectric materials.

  15. Synthesis, microstructure, and electronic band structure properties of nanocrystalline neodymium-doped bismuth titanate ferroelectric films fabricated by the sol–gel method

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Fengjuan; Tao, Bairui; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-01-15

    Graphical abstract: X-ray diffraction indicates that the films are polycrystalline with the pure perovskite phase. Ten Raman active modes and one silicon substrate mode can be observed. The A{sub 1} {sub g}[Bi] at about 59 cm{sup −1} is unchanged whereas the B{sub 1} {sub g} and A{sub 1} {sub g}[Ti] phonon modes shift towards higher frequencies. Photoluminescence shows that the intensities of the two peaks increase with Nd concentration except the Bi{sub 3}NdTi{sub 3}O{sub 12} film, due to the smallest grain size and oxygen vacancy defects. Good optical functions of the BNT films are achieved due to the SE suggesting potential applications in ferroelectric-based optoelectronic devices. - Abstract: Bi{sub 4−x}Nd{sub x}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 12} (BNT) films with different Nd contents (from 0 to 1 with 0.25 intervals) are prepared by the sol–gel process. The Nd substitution effects on the preferred orientation, surface morphology, phonon modes, emission bands, andelectronic band structures of the BNT films are investigated by microscopy, Raman scattering, photoluminescence, and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) at room temperature. X-ray diffraction indicates that the films are polycrystalline with the pure perovskite phase. Ten Raman active modes and one silicon substrate mode can be observed. The A{sub 1} {sub g}[Bi] at about 59 cm{sup −1} is unchanged whereas the B{sub 1} {sub g} and A{sub 1} {sub g}[Ti] phonon modes shift towards higher frequencies. Photoluminescence shows that the intensities of the two peaks increase with Nd concentration except the Bi{sub 3}NdTi{sub 3}O{sub 12} film, due to the smallest grain size and oxygen vacancy defects. Good optical functions of the BNT films are achieved due to the SE suggesting potential applications in ferroelectric-based optoelectronic devices.

  16. Deduction of the chemical state and the electronic structure of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy core-level and valence-band spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Liang, Le; Zhang, Lanting E-mail: lmsun@sjtu.edu.cn; Sun, Limin E-mail: lmsun@sjtu.edu.cn; Hirano, Shinichi

    2014-10-28

    Characterization of chemical state and electronic structure of the technologically important Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound is attractive for understanding the physical nature of its excellent magnetic properties. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study of such rare-earth compound is important and also challenging due to the easy oxidation of surface and small photoelectron cross-sections of rare-earth 4f electrons and B 2p electrons, etc. Here, we reported an investigation based on XPS spectra of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound as a function of Ar ion sputtering time. The chemical state of Fe and that of B in Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound can be clearly determined to be 0 and −3, respectively. The Nd in Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound is found to have the chemical state of close to +3 instead of +3 as compared with the Nd in Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}. In addition, by comparing the valence-band spectrum of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound to that of the pure Fe, the contributions from Nd, Fe, and B to the valence-band structure of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound is made more clear. The B 2p states and B 2s states are identified to be at ∼11.2 eV and ∼24.6 eV, respectively, which is reported for the first time. The contribution from Nd 4f states can be identified both in XPS core-level spectrum and XPS valence-band spectrum. Although Nd 4f states partially hybridize with Fe 3d states, Nd 4f states are mainly localized in Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound.

  17. Complex band structure of topological insulator Bi2Se3.

    PubMed

    Betancourt, J; Li, S; Dang, X; Burton, J D; Tsymbal, E Y; Velev, J P

    2016-10-01

    Topological insulators are very interesting from a fundamental point of view, and their unique properties may be useful for electronic and spintronic device applications. From the point of view of applications it is important to understand the decay behavior of carriers injected in the band gap of the topological insulator, which is determined by its complex band structure (CBS). Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the dispersion and symmetry of the complex bands of Bi2Se3 family of three-dimensional topological insulators. We compare the CBS of a band insulator and a topological insulator and follow the CBS evolution in both when the spin-orbit interaction is turned on. We find significant differences in the CBS linked to the topological band structure. In particular, our results demonstrate that the evanescent states in Bi2Se3 are non-trivially complex, i.e. contain both the real and imaginary contributions. This explains quantitatively the oscillatory behavior of the band gap obtained from Bi2Se3 (0 0 0 1) slab calculations. PMID:27485021

  18. Complex band structure of topological insulator Bi2Se3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancourt, J.; Li, S.; Dang, X.; Burton, J. D.; Tsymbal, E. Y.; Velev, J. P.

    2016-10-01

    Topological insulators are very interesting from a fundamental point of view, and their unique properties may be useful for electronic and spintronic device applications. From the point of view of applications it is important to understand the decay behavior of carriers injected in the band gap of the topological insulator, which is determined by its complex band structure (CBS). Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the dispersion and symmetry of the complex bands of Bi2Se3 family of three-dimensional topological insulators. We compare the CBS of a band insulator and a topological insulator and follow the CBS evolution in both when the spin-orbit interaction is turned on. We find significant differences in the CBS linked to the topological band structure. In particular, our results demonstrate that the evanescent states in Bi2Se3 are non-trivially complex, i.e. contain both the real and imaginary contributions. This explains quantitatively the oscillatory behavior of the band gap obtained from Bi2Se3 (0 0 0 1) slab calculations.

  19. Complex banded structures in directional solidification processes.

    PubMed

    Korzhenevskii, A L; Rozas, R E; Horbach, J

    2016-01-27

    A combination of theory and numerical simulation is used to investigate impurity superstructures that form in rapid directional solidification (RDS) processes in the presence of a temperature gradient and a pulling velocity with an oscillatory component. Based on a capillary wave model, we show that the RDS processes are associated with a rich morphology of banded structures, including frequency locking and the transition to chaos.

  20. Complex banded structures in directional solidification processes.

    PubMed

    Korzhenevskii, A L; Rozas, R E; Horbach, J

    2016-01-27

    A combination of theory and numerical simulation is used to investigate impurity superstructures that form in rapid directional solidification (RDS) processes in the presence of a temperature gradient and a pulling velocity with an oscillatory component. Based on a capillary wave model, we show that the RDS processes are associated with a rich morphology of banded structures, including frequency locking and the transition to chaos. PMID:26704726

  1. Terra MODIS Band 27 Electronic Crosstalk Effect and Its Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Junqiang; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Madhavan, Sriharsha; Wenny, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is one of the primary instruments in the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS). The first MODIS instrument was launched in December, 1999 on-board the Terra spacecraft. MODIS has 36 bands, covering a wavelength range from 0.4 micron to 14.4 micron. MODIS band 27 (6.72 micron) is a water vapor band, which is designed to be insensitive to Earth surface features. In recent Earth View (EV) images of Terra band 27, surface feature contamination is clearly seen and striping has become very pronounced. In this paper, it is shown that band 27 is impacted by electronic crosstalk from bands 28-30. An algorithm using a linear approximation is developed to correct the crosstalk effect. The crosstalk coefficients are derived from Terra MODIS lunar observations. They show that the crosstalk is strongly detector dependent and the crosstalk pattern has changed dramatically since launch. The crosstalk contributions are positive to the instrument response of band 27 early in the mission but became negative and much larger in magnitude at later stages of the mission for most detectors of the band. The algorithm is applied to both Black Body (BB) calibration and MODIS L1B products. With the crosstalk effect removed, the calibration coefficients of Terra MODIS band 27 derived from the BB show that the detector differences become smaller. With the algorithm applied to MODIS L1B products, the Earth surface features are significantly removed and the striping is substantially reduced in the images of the band. The approach developed in this report for removal of the electronic crosstalk effect can be applied to other MODIS bands if similar crosstalk behaviors occur.

  2. The Band Structure of Polymers: Its Calculation and Interpretation. Part 3. Interpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke, B. J.; O'Leary, Brian

    1988-01-01

    In this article, the third part of a series, the results of ab initio polymer calculations presented in part 2 are discussed. The electronic structure of polymers, symmetry properties of band structure, and generalizations are presented. (CW)

  3. The band-gap enhanced photovoltaic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessler, Nir

    2016-05-01

    We critically examine the recently suggested structure that was postulated to potentially add 50% to the photo-conversion efficiency of organic solar cells. We find that the structure could be realized using stepwise increase in the gap as long as the steps are not above 0.1 eV. We also show that the charge extraction is not compromised due to an interplay between the contact's space charge and the energy level modification, which result in a flat energy band at the extracting contact.

  4. Electronic band structure of highly mismatched GaN{sub 1−x}Sb{sub x} alloys in a broad composition range

    SciTech Connect

    Segercrantz, N.; Yu, K. M.; Ting, M.; Sarney, W. L.; Svensson, S. P.; Novikov, S. V.; Foxon, C. T.; Walukiewicz, W.

    2015-10-05

    In this letter, we study the optical properties of GaN{sub 1−x}Sb{sub x} thin films. Films with an Sb fraction up to 42% were synthesized by alternating GaN-GaSb layers at a constant temperature of 325 °C. The measured optical absorption data of the films are interpreted using a modified band anticrossing model that is applicable to highly mismatched alloys such as GaN{sub 1−x}Sb{sub x} in the entire composition range. The presented model allows us to more accurately determine the band gap as well as the band edges over the entire composition range thereby providing means for determining the composition for, e.g., efficient spontaneous photoelectrochemical cell applications.

  5. Quasiparticle band structure of vanadium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, R; Miyake, T; Aryasetiawan, F

    2009-02-11

    Vanadium dioxide is insulating below 340 K in experiments, whereas the band structure calculated in the local density approximation (LDA) is gapless. We study the self-energy effects using the ab initio GW method. We found that the self-energy depends strongly on the energy, and proper treatment of the dynamical effect is essential for getting precise quasiparticle energies. Off-diagonal matrix elements in the Kohn-Sham basis are also important for disentangling bands. Inclusion of the two effects opens up a direct gap. Our results also suggest that one-shot GW on top of LDA is not enough, and the impact of self-consistency is significant.

  6. Band structure of doubly-odd nuclei around mass 130

    SciTech Connect

    Higashiyama, Koji; Yoshinaga, Naotaka

    2011-05-06

    Nuclear structure of the doublet bands in the doubly-odd nuclei with mass A{approx}130 is studied in terms of a pair-truncated shell model. The model reproduces quite well the energy levels of the doublet bands and the electromagnetic transitions. The analysis of the electromagnetic transitions reveals new band structure of the doublet bands.

  7. Electronic structure of Calcium hexaborides

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Byounghak; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2005-06-15

    We present a theoretical study of crystal and electronic structures of CaB6 within a screened-exchange local density approximation (sX-LDA). Our ab initio total energy calculations show that CaB6 is a semiconductor with a gap of >1.2 eV, in agreement with recent experimental observations. We show a very sensitive band gap dependence on the crystal internal parameter, which might partially explain the scatter of previous theoretical results. Our calculation demonstrates that it is essential to study this system simultaneously for both crystal structures and electronic properties, and that the sX-LDA provides an ideal method for this problem.

  8. Photonic bands in two-dimensional microplasma arrays. I. Theoretical derivation of band structures of electromagnetic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Osamu; Sakaguchi, Takui; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2007-04-01

    Two theoretical approaches appropriate for two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals reveal dispersions of propagating waves including photonic (electromagnetic) band gaps and multiflatbands. A modified plane-wave expansion method yields dispersions of collisional periodical plasmas, and the complex-value solution of a wave equation by a finite difference method enables us to obtain dispersions with structure effects in an individual microplasma. Periodical plasma arrays form band gaps as well as normal photonic crystals, and multiflatbands are present below the electron plasma frequency in the transverse electric field mode. Electron elastic collisions lower the top frequency of the multiflatbands but have little effect on band gap properties. The spatial gradient of the local dielectric constant resulting from an electron density profile widens the frequency region of the multiflatbands, as demonstrated by the change of surface wave distributions. Propagation properties described in dispersions including band gaps and flatbands agree with experimental observations of microplasma arrays.

  9. Electronic structure of metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Oelhafen, P.; Lapka, R.; Gubler, U.; Krieg, J.; DasGupta, A.; Guentherodt, H.J.; Mizoguchi, T.; Hague, C.; Kuebler, J.; Nagel, S.R.

    1981-01-01

    This paper is organized in six sections and deals with (1) the glassy transition metal alloys, their d-band structure, the d-band shifts on alloying and their relation to the alloy heat of formation (..delta..H) and the glass forming ability, (2) the glass to crystal phase transition viewed by valence band spectroscopy, (3) band structure calculations, (4) metallic glasses prepared by laser glazing, (5) glassy normal metal alloys, and (6) glassy hydrides.

  10. Electronic band structure of compressively strained Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} with x < 0.11 studied by contactless electroreflectance

    SciTech Connect

    Zelazna, K.; Polak, M. P.; Scharoch, P.; Gladysiewicz, M.; Misiewicz, J.; Kudrawiec, R.; Serafinczuk, J.

    2015-04-06

    Contactless electroreflectance is applied to study direct optical transitions from the heavy hole, light hole, and spin-orbit split-off band to the conduction band in compressively strained Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} layers of various Sn concentrations at room temperature. It is shown that the energies of these transitions are in very good agreement with theoretical predictions, which take into account non-linear variation of bandgap and spin-orbit splitting plus the strain-related shifts obtained from the Bir-Pikus theory. The bowing parameter for the direct bandgap has been determined to be 1.8 ± 0.2 eV and agree with this one obtained within ab initio calculations, which is 1.97 eV (for indirect bandgap the bowing parameter is 0.26 eV)

  11. Analytical band Monte Carlo analysis of electron transport in silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeoh, K. H.; Ong, D. S.; Ooi, C. H. Raymond; Yong, T. K.; Lim, S. K.

    2016-06-01

    An analytical band Monte Carlo (AMC) with linear energy band dispersion has been developed to study the electron transport in suspended silicene and silicene on aluminium oxide (Al2O3) substrate. We have calibrated our model against the full band Monte Carlo (FMC) results by matching the velocity-field curve. Using this model, we discover that the collective effects of charge impurity scattering and surface optical phonon scattering can degrade the electron mobility down to about 400 cm2 V-1 s-1 and thereafter it is less sensitive to the changes of charge impurity in the substrate and surface optical phonon. We also found that further reduction of mobility to ˜100 cm2 V-1 s-1 as experimentally demonstrated by Tao et al (2015 Nat. Nanotechnol. 10 227) can only be explained by the renormalization of Fermi velocity due to interaction with Al2O3 substrate.

  12. Engineering flat electronic bands in quasiperiodic and fractal loop geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandy, Atanu; Chakrabarti, Arunava

    2015-11-01

    Exact construction of one electron eigenstates with flat, non-dispersive bands, and localized over clusters of various sizes is reported for a class of quasi-one-dimensional looped networks. Quasiperiodic Fibonacci and Berker fractal geometries are embedded in the arms of the loop threaded by a uniform magnetic flux. We work out an analytical scheme to unravel the localized single particle states pinned at various atomic sites or over clusters of them. The magnetic field is varied to control, in a subtle way, the extent of localization and the location of the flat band states in energy space. In addition to this we show that an appropriate tuning of the field can lead to a re-entrant behavior of the effective mass of the electron in a band, with a periodic flip in its sign.

  13. Valence band structure of binary chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors by high-resolution XPS

    SciTech Connect

    Kozyukhin, S.; Golovchak, R.; Kovalskiy, A.; Shpotyuk, O.; Jain, H.

    2011-04-15

    High-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to study regularities in the formation of valence band electronic structure in binary As{sub x}Se{sub 100-x}, As{sub x}S{sub 100-x}, Ge{sub x}Se{sub 100-x} and Ge{sub x}S{sub 100-x} chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors. It is shown that the highest occupied energetic states in the valence band of these materials are formed by lone pair electrons of chalcogen atoms, which play dominant role in the formation of valence band electronic structure of chalcogen-rich glasses. A well-expressed contribution from chalcogen bonding p electrons and more deep s orbitals are also recorded in the experimental valence band XPS spectra. Compositional dependences of the observed bands are qualitatively analyzed from structural and compositional points of view.

  14. Electron Structure of Francium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koufos, Alexander

    2012-02-01

    This talk presents the first calculations of the electronic structure of francium for the bcc, fcc and hcp structures, using the Augmented Plane Wave (APW) method in its muffin-tin and linearized general potential forms. Both the Local Density Approximation (LDA) and Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA), were used to calculate the electronic structure and total energy of francium (Fr). The GGA and LDA both found the total energy of the hcp structure slightly below that of the fcc and bcc structure, respectively. This is in agreement with similar results for the other alkali metals using the same methodology. The equilibrium lattice constant, bulk modulus and superconductivity parameters were calculated. We found that under pressures, in the range of 1-5 GPa, Fr could be a superconductor at a critical temperature of about 4K.

  15. Electronic structure calculations on helical conducting polymers.

    PubMed

    Ripoll, Juan D; Serna, Andrei; Guerra, Doris; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2010-10-21

    We present a study of the electronic structure and derived properties of polyfurane (PFu), polypyrrol (PPy), and polythiophene (PTh). Two spatial arrangements are considered: trans chain (tc-PFu, tc-PPy, tc-PTh) and cis α-helical (α-PFu, α-PPy, α-PTh). Even at the small sizes considered here, helical conformations appear to be stable. Band gaps of pure, undoped oligomers fall into the semiconductor range. Density of states (DOS) analysis suggest dense valence and conduction bands. Bond length alternation analysis predicts almost complete delocalization of the π clouds in all spatial arrangements. Doping with electron donors or electron-withdrawing impurities reduces all band gaps close to the metallic regime in addition to increasing the DOS for the valence and conduction bands.

  16. From lattice Hamiltonians to tunable band structures by lithographic design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadjine, Athmane; Allan, Guy; Delerue, Christophe

    2016-08-01

    Recently, new materials exhibiting exotic band structures characterized by Dirac cones, nontrivial flat bands, and band crossing points have been proposed on the basis of effective two-dimensional lattice Hamiltonians. Here, we show using atomistic tight-binding calculations that these theoretical predictions could be experimentally realized in the conduction band of superlattices nanolithographed in III-V and II-VI semiconductor ultrathin films. The lithographed patterns consist of periodic lattices of etched cylindrical holes that form potential barriers for the electrons in the quantum well. In the case of honeycomb lattices, the conduction minibands of the resulting artificial graphene host several Dirac cones and nontrivial flat bands. Similar features, but organized in different ways, in energy or in k -space are found in kagome, distorted honeycomb, and Lieb superlattices. Dirac cones extending over tens of meV could be obtained in superlattices with reasonable sizes of the lithographic patterns, for instance in InAs/AlSb heterostructures. Bilayer artificial graphene could be also realized by lithography of a double quantum-well heterostructure. These new materials should be interesting for the experimental exploration of Dirac-based quantum systems, for both fundamental and applied physics.

  17. Band gap bowing parameter in pseudomorphic Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N/GaN high electron mobility transistor structures

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Anshu; Kapoor, Ashok K.; Raman, R.; Dalal, Sandeep; Mohan, Premila; Muralidharan, R.

    2015-06-14

    A method for evaluation of aluminium composition in pseudomorphic Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N layer from the measured photoluminescence (PL) peak energy is presented here. The layers were grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition and characterized by high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD), PL, cathodoluminescence, and atomic force microscopy. We estimated the value of biaxial stress in pseudomorphic Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N layers grown on sapphire and silicon carbide substrates using HRXRD scans. The effect of biaxial stress on the room temperature band edge luminescence in pseudomorphic Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N/GaN layers for various aluminium compositions in the range of 0.2 < x < 0.3 was determined. The value of pressure coefficient of band gap was also estimated. The stress corrected bowing parameter in Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N was determined as 0.50 ± 0.06 eV. Our values match well with the theoretically obtained value of bowing parameter from the density functional theory.

  18. Electronic structures of TiO2-TCNE, -TCNQ, and -2,6-TCNAQ surface complexes studied by ionization potential measurements and DFT calculations: Mechanism of the shift of interfacial charge-transfer bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisawa, Jun-ichi; Hanaya, Minoru

    2016-06-01

    Interfacial charge-transfer (ICT) transitions between inorganic semiconductors and π-conjugated molecules allow direct charge separation without loss of energy. This feature is potentially useful for efficient photovoltaic conversions. Charge-transferred complexes of TiO2 nanoparticles with 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) and its analogues (TCNX) show strong ICT absorption in the visible region. The ICT band was reported to be significantly red-shifted with extension of the π-conjugated system of TCNX. In order to clarify the mechanism of the red-shift, in this work, we systematically study electronic structures of the TiO2-TCNX surface complexes (TCNX; TCNE, TCNQ, 2,6-TCNAQ) by ionization potential measurements and density functional theory (DFT) calculations.

  19. Loss of Linear Band Dispersion and Trigonal Structure in Silicene on Ir(111).

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Dai, Ying; Huang, Baibiao; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan; Jacob, Timo

    2015-03-19

    The structure of silicene/Ir(111) was examined on the basis of density functional theory. We have found that Ir(111) preserves the 2D character of silicene but significantly distorts its structure from the trigonal one expected for an isolated silicene. The electronic structure of silicene is strongly hybridized with that of Ir(111) so that silicene on Ir(111) loses its linear band dispersion around the Fermi level, giving rise to a metallic band structure; however, silicene/Ir(111) exhibits a hidden linear-dispersive band, which is related to the linear-dispersive conduction band of an isolated silicene.

  20. Hydrogen production by Tuning the Photonic Band Gap with the Electronic Band Gap of TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waterhouse, G. I. N.; Wahab, A. K.; Al-Oufi, M.; Jovic, V.; Anjum, D. H.; Sun-Waterhouse, D.; Llorca, J.; Idriss, H.

    2013-10-01

    Tuning the photonic band gap (PBG) to the electronic band gap (EBG) of Au/TiO2 catalysts resulted in considerable enhancement of the photocatalytic water splitting to hydrogen under direct sunlight. Au/TiO2 (PBG-357 nm) photocatalyst exhibited superior photocatalytic performance under both UV and sunlight compared to the Au/TiO2 (PBG-585 nm) photocatalyst and both are higher than Au/TiO2 without the 3 dimensionally ordered macro-porous structure materials. The very high photocatalytic activity is attributed to suppression of a fraction of electron-hole recombination route due to the co-incidence of the PBG with the EBG of TiO2 These materials that maintain their activity with very small amount of sacrificial agents (down to 0.5 vol.% of ethanol) are poised to find direct applications because of their high activity, low cost of the process, simplicity and stability.

  1. Segmental structure in banded mongoose calls

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In complex animal vocalizations, such as bird or whale song, a great variety of songs can be produced via rearrangements of a smaller set of 'syllables', known as 'phonological syntax' or 'phonocoding' However, food or alarm calls, which function as referential signals, were previously thought to lack such combinatorial structure. A new study of calls in the banded mongoose Mungos mungo provides the first evidence of phonocoding at the level of single calls. The first portion of the call provides cues to the identity of the caller, and the second part encodes its current activity. This provides the first example known in animals of something akin to the consonants and vowels of human speech. See research article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/10/97 PMID:23206277

  2. Segmental structure in banded mongoose calls.

    PubMed

    Fitch, W Tecumseh

    2012-01-01

    In complex animal vocalizations, such as bird or whale song, a great variety of songs can be produced via rearrangements of a smaller set of 'syllables', known as 'phonological syntax' or 'phonocoding' However, food or alarm calls, which function as referential signals, were previously thought to lack such combinatorial structure. A new study of calls in the banded mongoose Mungos mungo provides the first evidence of phonocoding at the level of single calls. The first portion of the call provides cues to the identity of the caller, and the second part encodes its current activity. This provides the first example known in animals of something akin to the consonants and vowels of human speech. PMID:23206277

  3. 5 CFR 9701.321 - Structure of bands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Structure of bands. 9701.321 Section 9701.321 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM... Structure of bands. (a) DHS may, after coordination with OPM, establish ranges of basic pay for bands,...

  4. 5 CFR 9701.321 - Structure of bands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Structure of bands. 9701.321 Section 9701.321 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM... Structure of bands. (a) DHS may, after coordination with OPM, establish ranges of basic pay for bands,...

  5. A Theoretical Structure of High School Concert Band Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergee, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    This study used exploratory (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to verify a theoretical structure for high school concert band performance and to test that structure for viability, generality, and invariance. A total of 101 university students enrolled in two different bands rated two high school band performances (a "first"…

  6. Band structure engineering in topological insulator based heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Menshchikova, T V; Otrokov, M M; Tsirkin, S S; Samorokov, D A; Bebneva, V V; Ernst, A; Kuznetsov, V M; Chulkov, E V

    2013-01-01

    The ability to engineer an electronic band structure of topological insulators would allow the production of topological materials with tailor-made properties. Using ab initio calculations, we show a promising way to control the conducting surface state in topological insulator based heterostructures representing an insulator ultrathin films on the topological insulator substrates. Because of a specific relation between work functions and band gaps of the topological insulator substrate and the insulator ultrathin film overlayer, a sizable shift of the Dirac point occurs resulting in a significant increase in the number of the topological surface state charge carriers as compared to that of the substrate itself. Such an effect can also be realized by applying the external electric field that allows a gradual tuning of the topological surface state. A simultaneous use of both approaches makes it possible to obtain a topological insulator based heterostructure with a highly tunable topological surface state.

  7. Achieving Higher Energies via Passively Driven X-band Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipahi, Taylan; Sipahi, Nihan; Milton, Stephen; Biedron, Sandra

    2014-03-01

    Due to their higher intrinsic shunt impedance X-band accelerating structures significant gradients with relatively modest input powers, and this can lead to more compact particle accelerators. At the Colorado State University Accelerator Laboratory (CSUAL) we would like to adapt this technology to our 1.3 GHz L-band accelerator system using a passively driven 11.7 GHz traveling wave X-band configuration that capitalizes on the high shunt impedances achievable in X-band accelerating structures in order to increase our overall beam energy in a manner that does not require investment in an expensive, custom, high-power X-band klystron system. Here we provide the design details of the X-band structures that will allow us to achieve our goal of reaching the maximum practical net potential across the X-band accelerating structure while driven solely by the beam from the L-band system.

  8. Band Structure Asymmetry of Bilayer Graphene Revealed by Infrared Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.Q.; Henriksen, E.A.; Jiang, Z.; Hao, Zhao; Martin, Michael C.; Kim, P.; Stormer, H.L.; Basov, Dimitri N.

    2008-12-10

    We report on infrared spectroscopy of bilayer graphene integrated in gated structures. We observe a significant asymmetry in the optical conductivity upon electrostatic doping of electrons and holes. We show that this finding arises from a marked asymmetry between the valence and conduction bands, which is mainly due to the inequivalence of the two sublattices within the graphene layer and the next-nearest-neighbor interlayer coupling. From the conductivity data, the energy difference of the two sublattices and the interlayer coupling energy are directly determined.

  9. Impact of cation-based localized electronic states on the conduction and valence band structure of Al{sub 1−x}In{sub x}N alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, S.; Caro, M. A.; O'Reilly, E. P.

    2014-04-28

    We demonstrate that cation-related localized states strongly perturb the band structure of Al{sub 1−x}In{sub x}N leading to a strong band gap bowing at low In content. Our first-principles calculations show that In-related localized states are formed both in the conduction and the valence band in Al{sub 1−x}In{sub x}N for low In composition, x, and that these localized states dominate the evolution of the band structure with increasing x. Therefore, the commonly used assumption of a single composition-independent bowing parameter breaks down when describing the evolution both of the conduction and of the valence band edge in Al{sub 1−x}In{sub x}N.

  10. Electronic materials with a wide band gap: recent developments

    PubMed Central

    Klimm, Detlef

    2014-01-01

    The development of semiconductor electronics is reviewed briefly, beginning with the development of germanium devices (band gap E g = 0.66 eV) after World War II. A tendency towards alternative materials with wider band gaps quickly became apparent, starting with silicon (E g = 1.12 eV). This improved the signal-to-noise ratio for classical electronic applications. Both semiconductors have a tetrahedral coordination, and by isoelectronic alternative replacement of Ge or Si with carbon or various anions and cations, other semiconductors with wider E g were obtained. These are transparent to visible light and belong to the group of wide band gap semiconductors. Nowadays, some nitrides, especially GaN and AlN, are the most important materials for optical emission in the ultraviolet and blue regions. Oxide crystals, such as ZnO and β-Ga2O3, offer similarly good electronic properties but still suffer from significant difficulties in obtaining stable and technologically adequate p-type conductivity. PMID:25295170

  11. Discrete Electronic Bands in Semiconductors and Insulators: Potential High-Light-Yield Scintillators

    DOE PAGES

    Shi, Hongliang; Du, Mao-Hua

    2015-05-12

    Bulk semiconductors and insulators typically have continuous valence and conduction bands. In this paper, we show that valence and conduction bands of a multinary semiconductor or insulator can be split to narrow discrete bands separated by large energy gaps. This unique electronic structure is demonstrated by first-principles calculations in several quaternary elpasolite compounds, i.e., Cs2NaInBr6, Cs2NaBiCl6, and Tl2NaBiCl6. The narrow discrete band structure in these quaternary elpasolites is due to the large electronegativity difference among cations and the large nearest-neighbor distances in cation sublattices. We further use Cs2NaInBr6 as an example to show that the narrow bands can stabilize self-trappedmore » and dopant-bound excitons (in which both the electron and the hole are strongly localized in static positions on adjacent sites) and promote strong exciton emission at room temperature. The discrete band structure should further suppress thermalization of hot carriers and may lead to enhanced impact ionization, which is usually considered inefficient in bulk semiconductors and insulators. Finally, these characteristics can enable efficient room-temperature light emission in low-gap scintillators and may overcome the light-yield bottleneck in current scintillator research.« less

  12. Discrete Electronic Bands in Semiconductors and Insulators: Potential High-Light-Yield Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Hongliang; Du, Mao-Hua

    2015-05-12

    Bulk semiconductors and insulators typically have continuous valence and conduction bands. In this paper, we show that valence and conduction bands of a multinary semiconductor or insulator can be split to narrow discrete bands separated by large energy gaps. This unique electronic structure is demonstrated by first-principles calculations in several quaternary elpasolite compounds, i.e., Cs2NaInBr6, Cs2NaBiCl6, and Tl2NaBiCl6. The narrow discrete band structure in these quaternary elpasolites is due to the large electronegativity difference among cations and the large nearest-neighbor distances in cation sublattices. We further use Cs2NaInBr6 as an example to show that the narrow bands can stabilize self-trapped and dopant-bound excitons (in which both the electron and the hole are strongly localized in static positions on adjacent sites) and promote strong exciton emission at room temperature. The discrete band structure should further suppress thermalization of hot carriers and may lead to enhanced impact ionization, which is usually considered inefficient in bulk semiconductors and insulators. Finally, these characteristics can enable efficient room-temperature light emission in low-gap scintillators and may overcome the light-yield bottleneck in current scintillator research.

  13. Band structure and optical properties of diglycine nitrate crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriyevsky, Bohdan; Ciepluch-Trojanek, Wioleta; Romanyuk, Mykola; Patryn, Aleksy; Jaskólski, Marcin

    2005-07-01

    Experimental and theoretical investigations of the electron energy characteristics and optical spectra for diglycine nitrate crystal (DGN), (NH 2CH 2COOH) 2·HNO 3, in the paraelectric phase ( T=295 K) are presented. Spectral dispersion of light reflection R( E) have been measured in the range of 3-22 eV and the optical functions n( E) and k( E) have been calculated using Kramers-Kronig relations. First principal calculations of the electron energy characteristic and optical spectra of DGN crystal have been performed in the frame of density functional theory using CASTEP code (CAmbridge Serial Total Energy Package). Optical transitions forming the low-energy edge of fundamental absorption are associated with the nitrate groups NO 3. Peculiarities of the band structure and DOS projected onto glycine and NO 3 groups confirm the molecular character of DGN crystal.

  14. Structural and electronic properties of thallium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliwal, Neetu; Srivastava, Vipul

    2016-05-01

    The tight binding linear muffin-tin-orbital (TB-LMTO) method within the local density approximation (LDA has been used to calculate structural and electronic properties of thallium pnictides TlX (X=Sb, Bi) at high pressure. As a function of volume, the total energy is evaluated. Apart from this, the lattice parameter (a0), bulk modulus (B0), band structure (BS) and density of states (DOS) are calculated. From energy band diagram we observed metallic behaviour in TlSb and TlBi compounds. The values of equilibrium lattice constants and bulk modulus are agreed well with the available data.

  15. Detecting Band Inversions by Measuring the Environment: Fingerprints of Electronic Band Topology in Bulk Phonon Linewidths.

    PubMed

    Saha, Kush; Légaré, Katherine; Garate, Ion

    2015-10-23

    The interplay between topological phases of matter and dissipative baths constitutes an emergent research topic with links to condensed matter, photonic crystals, cold atomic gases, and quantum information. While recent studies suggest that dissipative baths can induce topological phases in intrinsically trivial quantum materials, the backaction of topological invariants on dissipative baths is overlooked. By exploring this backaction for a centrosymmetric Dirac insulator coupled to phonons, we show that the linewidths of bulk optical phonons can reveal electronic band inversions. This result is the first known example where topological phases of an open quantum system may be detected by measuring the bulk properties of the surrounding environment.

  16. Band structures of 4f and 5f materials studied by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fujimori, Shin-ichi

    2016-04-20

    Recent remarkable progress in angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) has enabled the direct observation of the band structures of 4f and 5f materials. In particular, ARPES with various light sources such as lasers (hν ~ 7 eV) or high-energy synchrotron radiations (hν >/~ 400 eV) has shed light on the bulk band structures of strongly correlated materials with energy scales of a few millielectronvolts to several electronvolts. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the behaviors of 4f and 5f band structures of various rare-earth and actinide materials observed by modern ARPES techniques, and understand how they can be described using various theoretical frameworks. For 4f-electron materials, ARPES studies of CeMIn5(M = Rh, Ir, and Co) and YbRh2Si2 with various incident photon energies are summarized. We demonstrate that their 4f electronic structures are essentially described within the framework of the periodic Anderson model, and that the band-structure calculation based on the local density approximation cannot explain their low-energy electronic structures. Meanwhile, electronic structures of 5f materials exhibit wide varieties ranging from itinerant to localized states. For itinerant U5f compounds such as UFeGa5, their electronic structures can be well-described by the band-structure calculation assuming that all U5f electrons are itinerant. In contrast, the band structures of localized U5f compounds such as UPd3 and UO2 are essentially explained by the localized model that treats U5f electrons as localized core states. In regards to heavy fermion U-based compounds such as the hidden-order compound URu2Si2, their electronic structures exhibit complex behaviors. Their overall band structures are generally well-explained by the band-structure calculation, whereas the states in the vicinity of EF show some deviations due to electron correlation effects. Furthermore, the electronic structures of URu2Si2 in the paramagnetic and hidden-order phases are

  17. Band structures of 4f and 5f materials studied by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fujimori, Shin-ichi

    2016-04-20

    Recent remarkable progress in angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) has enabled the direct observation of the band structures of 4f and 5f materials. In particular, ARPES with various light sources such as lasers (hν ~ 7 eV) or high-energy synchrotron radiations (hν >/~ 400 eV) has shed light on the bulk band structures of strongly correlated materials with energy scales of a few millielectronvolts to several electronvolts. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the behaviors of 4f and 5f band structures of various rare-earth and actinide materials observed by modern ARPES techniques, and understand how they can be described using various theoretical frameworks. For 4f-electron materials, ARPES studies of CeMIn5(M = Rh, Ir, and Co) and YbRh2Si2 with various incident photon energies are summarized. We demonstrate that their 4f electronic structures are essentially described within the framework of the periodic Anderson model, and that the band-structure calculation based on the local density approximation cannot explain their low-energy electronic structures. Meanwhile, electronic structures of 5f materials exhibit wide varieties ranging from itinerant to localized states. For itinerant U5f compounds such as UFeGa5, their electronic structures can be well-described by the band-structure calculation assuming that all U5f electrons are itinerant. In contrast, the band structures of localized U5f compounds such as UPd3 and UO2 are essentially explained by the localized model that treats U5f electrons as localized core states. In regards to heavy fermion U-based compounds such as the hidden-order compound URu2Si2, their electronic structures exhibit complex behaviors. Their overall band structures are generally well-explained by the band-structure calculation, whereas the states in the vicinity of EF show some deviations due to electron correlation effects. Furthermore, the electronic structures of URu2Si2 in the paramagnetic and hidden-order phases are

  18. Band structures of 4f and 5f materials studied by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimori, Shin-ichi

    2016-04-01

    Recent remarkable progress in angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) has enabled the direct observation of the band structures of 4f and 5f materials. In particular, ARPES with various light sources such as lasers (hν ∼ 7~\\text{eV} ) or high-energy synchrotron radiations (hν ≳ 400~\\text{eV} ) has shed light on the bulk band structures of strongly correlated materials with energy scales of a few millielectronvolts to several electronvolts. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the behaviors of 4f and 5f band structures of various rare-earth and actinide materials observed by modern ARPES techniques, and understand how they can be described using various theoretical frameworks. For 4f-electron materials, ARPES studies of \\text{Ce}M\\text{I}{{\\text{n}}5} (M=\\text{Rh} , \\text{Ir} , and \\text{Co} ) and \\text{YbR}{{\\text{h}}2}\\text{S}{{\\text{i}}2} with various incident photon energies are summarized. We demonstrate that their 4f electronic structures are essentially described within the framework of the periodic Anderson model, and that the band-structure calculation based on the local density approximation cannot explain their low-energy electronic structures. Meanwhile, electronic structures of 5f materials exhibit wide varieties ranging from itinerant to localized states. For itinerant \\text{U}~5f compounds such as \\text{UFeG}{{\\text{a}}5} , their electronic structures can be well-described by the band-structure calculation assuming that all \\text{U}~5f electrons are itinerant. In contrast, the band structures of localized \\text{U}~5f compounds such as \\text{UP}{{\\text{d}}3} and \\text{U}{{\\text{O}}2} are essentially explained by the localized model that treats \\text{U}~5f electrons as localized core states. In regards to heavy fermion \\text{U} -based compounds such as the hidden-order compound \\text{UR}{{\\text{u}}2}\\text{S}{{\\text{i}}2} , their electronic structures exhibit complex behaviors. Their overall band structures

  19. Energy loss of ions at metal surfaces: Band-structure effects

    SciTech Connect

    Alducin, M.; Silkin, V.M.; Juaristi, J.I.; Chulkov, E.V.

    2003-03-01

    We study band-structure effects on the energy loss of protons scattered off the Cu (111) surface. The distance dependent stopping power for a projectile traveling parallel to the surface is calculated within the linear response theory. The self-consistent electronic response of the system is evaluated within the random-phase approximation. In order to characterize the surface band structure, the electronic single-particle wave functions and energies are obtained by solving the Schroedinger equation with a realistic one-dimensional model potential. This potential reproduces the main features of the Cu (111) surface: the energy band gap for electron motion along the surface normal, as well as the binding energy of the occupied surface state and the first image state. Comparison of our results with those obtained within the jellium model allows us to characterize the band-structure effects in the energy loss of protons interacting with the Cu (111) surface.

  20. Band Structure Characteristics of Nacreous Composite Materials with Various Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, H. W.; Chen, B. S.

    2016-06-01

    Nacreous composite materials have excellent mechanical properties, such as high strength, high toughness, and wide phononic band gap. In order to research band structure characteristics of nacreous composite materials with various defects, supercell models with the Brick-and-Mortar microstructure are considered. An efficient multi-level substructure algorithm is employed to discuss the band structure. Furthermore, two common systems with point and line defects and varied material parameters are discussed. In addition, band structures concerning straight and deflected crack defects are calculated by changing the shear modulus of the mortar. Finally, the sensitivity of band structures to the random material distribution is presented by considering different volume ratios of the brick. The results reveal that the first band gap of a nacreous composite material is insensitive to defects under certain conditions. It will be of great value to the design and synthesis of new nacreous composite materials for better dynamic properties.

  1. Planar electromagnetic band-gap structure based on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yanfei; Liu, Peiguo; Yin, Wen-Yan; Li, Gaosheng; Yi, Bo

    2015-06-01

    Electromagnetic band-gap structure with slow-wave effect is instrumental in effectively controlling electromagnetic wave propagation. In this paper, we theoretically analyze equivalent circuit model of electromagnetic band-gap structure based on graphene and evaluate its potential applications. Graphene electromagnetic band-gap based on parallel planar waveguide is investigated, which display good characteristics in dynamically adjusting the electromagnetic wave propagation in terahertz range. The same characteristics are retrieved in a spiral shape electromagnetic band-gap based on coplanar waveguide due to tunable conductivity of graphene. Various potential terahertz planar devices are expected to derive from the prototype structures.

  2. The ? electronic band system of nickel acetylide, NiCCH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Eric L.; Morse, Michael D.

    2015-08-01

    Optical spectra of the supersonically cooled NiCCH radical have been recorded in the 530-650 nm region using the resonant two-photon ionisation method, and five of the observed bands have been rotationally resolved. The rotationally resolved studies demonstrate that the ground state of NiCCH is of ? symmetry, corresponding to a 3d9 configuration on the nickel atom, with the hole located in a 3dδ orbital. Most of the observed bands are assigned to the ? electronic transition, which shows a progression in the Ni-C stretching mode, ν3. In addition, single excitations of the modes ν2 (C≡C stretch), ν4 (C≡C-H bend), and ν5 (Ni-C≡C bend) are observed, allowing these vibrational intervals to be determined for the ? state. Hot bands also allow the determination of ν5 in the ground ? state. Quantum chemical computations have also been performed, confirming that the ground state is of 2Δ symmetry. The results are placed in context via comparison to other monovalent, monoligated Ni complexes, particularly NiCu, NiH, and NiCN.

  3. Electron and hole photoemission detection for band offset determination of tunnel field-effect transistor heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei; Zhang, Qin; Kirillov, Oleg A.; Levin, Igor; Richter, Curt A.; Gundlach, David J.; Nguyen, N. V. E-mail: liangxl@pku.edu.cn; Bijesh, R.; Datta, S.; Liang, Yiran; Peng, Lian-Mao; Liang, Xuelei E-mail: liangxl@pku.edu.cn

    2014-11-24

    We report experimental methods to ascertain a complete energy band alignment of a broken-gap tunnel field-effect transistor based on an InAs/GaSb hetero-junction. By using graphene as an optically transparent electrode, both the electron and hole barrier heights at the InAs/GaSb interface can be quantified. For a Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InAs/GaSb layer structure, the barrier height from the top of the InAs and GaSb valence bands to the bottom of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} conduction band is inferred from electron emission whereas hole emissions reveal the barrier height from the top of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} valence band to the bottom of the InAs and GaSb conduction bands. Subsequently, the offset parameter at the broken gap InAs/GaSb interface is extracted and thus can be used to facilitate the development of predicted models of electron quantum tunneling efficiency and transistor performance.

  4. First-principle study of energy band structure of armchair graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fei; Guo, Zhankui; Xu, Kewei; Chu, Paul K.

    2012-07-01

    First-principle calculation is carried out to study the energy band structure of armchair graphene nanoribbons (AGNRs). Hydrogen passivation is found to be crucial to convert the indirect band gaps into direct ones as a result of enhanced interactions between electrons and nuclei at the edge boundaries, as evidenced from the shortened bond length as well as the increased differential charge density. Ribbon width usually leads to the oscillatory variation of band gaps due to quantum confinement no matter hydrogen passivated or not. Mechanical strain may change the crystal symmetry, reduce the overlapping integral of C-C atoms, and hence modify the band gap further, which depends on the specific ribbon width sensitively. In practical applications, those effects will be hybridized to determine the energy band structure and subsequently the electronic properties of graphene. The results can provide insights into the design of carbon-based devices.

  5. Band structure controlled by chiral imprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Garay, P.; Adrian Reyes, J.; Ramos-Garcia, R.

    2007-09-01

    Using the configuration of an imprinted cholesteric elastomer immersed in a racemic solvent, the authors find the solution of the boundary-value problem for the reflection and transmission of incident optical waves due to the elastomer. They show a significant width reduction of the reflection band for certain values of nematic penetration depth, which depends on the volume fraction of molecules from the solvent, whose handedness is preferably absorbed. The appearance of nested band gaps of both handednesses during the sorting mixed chiral process is also obtained. This suggests the design of chemically controlled optical filters and optically monitored chiral pumps.

  6. An electronic structure perspective of graphene interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Brian J.; Dennis, Robert V.; Lee, Vincent; Banerjee, Sarbajit

    2014-03-01

    The unusual electronic structure of graphene characterized by linear energy dispersion of bands adjacent to the Fermi level underpins its remarkable transport properties. However, for practical device integration, graphene will need to be interfaced with other materials: 2D layered structures, metals (as ad-atoms, nanoparticles, extended surfaces, and patterned metamaterial geometries), dielectrics, organics, or hybrid structures that in turn are constituted from various inorganic or organic components. The structural complexity at these nanoscale interfaces holds much promise for manifestation of novel emergent phenomena and provides a means to modulate the electronic structure of graphene. In this feature article, we review the modifications to the electronic structure of graphene induced upon interfacing with disparate types of materials with an emphasis on iterative learnings from theoretical calculations and electronic spectroscopy (X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD)). We discuss approaches for engineering and modulating a bandgap in graphene through interfacial hybridization, outline experimental methods for examining electronic structure at interfaces, and overview device implications of engineered interfaces. A unified view of how geometric and electronic structure are correlated at interfaces will provide a rational means for designing heterostructures exhibiting emergent physical phenomena with implications for plasmonics, photonics, spintronics, and engineered polymer and metal matrix composites.

  7. An electronic structure perspective of graphene interfaces.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Brian J; Dennis, Robert V; Lee, Vincent; Banerjee, Sarbajit

    2014-04-01

    The unusual electronic structure of graphene characterized by linear energy dispersion of bands adjacent to the Fermi level underpins its remarkable transport properties. However, for practical device integration, graphene will need to be interfaced with other materials: 2D layered structures, metals (as ad-atoms, nanoparticles, extended surfaces, and patterned metamaterial geometries), dielectrics, organics, or hybrid structures that in turn are constituted from various inorganic or organic components. The structural complexity at these nanoscale interfaces holds much promise for manifestation of novel emergent phenomena and provides a means to modulate the electronic structure of graphene. In this feature article, we review the modifications to the electronic structure of graphene induced upon interfacing with disparate types of materials with an emphasis on iterative learnings from theoretical calculations and electronic spectroscopy (X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD)). We discuss approaches for engineering and modulating a bandgap in graphene through interfacial hybridization, outline experimental methods for examining electronic structure at interfaces, and overview device implications of engineered interfaces. A unified view of how geometric and electronic structure are correlated at interfaces will provide a rational means for designing heterostructures exhibiting emergent physical phenomena with implications for plasmonics, photonics, spintronics, and engineered polymer and metal matrix composites.

  8. Quasiparticle band structure of the almost-gapless transition-metal-based Heusler semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tas, M.; Şaşıoǧlu, E.; Galanakis, I.; Friedrich, C.; Blügel, S.

    2016-05-01

    Transition-metal-based Heusler semiconductors are promising materials for a variety of applications ranging from spintronics to thermoelectricity. Employing the G W approximation within the framework of the FLAPW method, we study the quasiparticle band structure of a number of such compounds being almost gapless semiconductors. We find that in contrast to the s p -electron based semiconductors such as Si and GaAs, in these systems, the many-body corrections have a minimal effect on the electronic band structure and the energy band gap increases by less than 0.2 eV, which makes the starting point density functional theory (DFT) a good approximation for the description of electronic and optical properties of these materials. Furthermore, the band gap can be tuned either by the variation of the lattice parameter or by the substitution of the s p -chemical element.

  9. Tuning the electronic band-gap of fluorinated 3C-silicon carbide nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda Durán, Álvaro; Trejo Baños, Alejandro; Pérez, Luis Antonio; Cruz Irisson, Miguel

    The possibility of control and modulation of the electronic properties of silicon carbide nanowires (SiCNWs) by varying the wire diameter is well known. SiCNWs are particularly interesting and technologically important, due to its electrical and mechanical properties, allowing the development of materials with specific electronic features for the design of stable and robust electronic devices. Tuning the band gap by chemical surface passivation constitutes a way for the modification of the electronic band gap of these nanowires. We present, the structural and electronic properties of fluorinated SiCNWs, grown along the [111] crystallographic direction, which are investigated by first principles. We consider nanowires with six diameters, varying from 0.35 nm to 2.13 nm, and eight random covering schemes including fully hydrogen- and fluorine terminated ones. Gibbs free energy of formation and electronic properties were calculated for the different surface functionalization schemes and diameters considered. The results indicate that the stability and band gap of SiCNWs can be tuned by surface passivation with fluorine atoms This work was supported by CONACYT infrastructure project 252749 and UNAM-DGAPA-PAPIIT IN106714. A.M. would like to thank for financial support from CONACyT-Retención. Computing resources from proyect SC15-1-IR-27 of DGTIC-UNAM are acknowledged.

  10. Thermoreflectance investigation of Th band structure

    SciTech Connect

    Colavita, E.; Paolucci, G.; Rosei, R.

    1982-06-15

    Thermoreflectance measurements have been carried out on thorium bulk samples at about 140 K in the 0.5--5-eV photon energy range. The data are interpreted within the framework of existing energy-band calculations. Several critical-point transitions and a Fermi-surface transition have been clearly identified and located in the Brillouin zone.

  11. Transition-metal-substituted indium thiospinels as novel intermediate-band materials: prediction and understanding of their electronic properties.

    PubMed

    Palacios, P; Aguilera, I; Sánchez, K; Conesa, J C; Wahnón, P

    2008-07-25

    Results of density-functional calculations for indium thiospinel semiconductors substituted at octahedral sites with isolated transition metals (M=Ti,V) show an isolated partially filled narrow band containing three t2g-type states per M atom inside the usual semiconductor band gap. Thanks to this electronic structure feature, these materials will allow the absorption of photons with energy below the band gap, in addition to the normal light absorption of a semiconductor. To our knowledge, we demonstrate for the first time the formation of an isolated intermediate electronic band structure through M substitution at octahedral sites in a semiconductor, leading to an enhancement of the absorption coefficient in both infrared and visible ranges of the solar spectrum. This electronic structure feature could be applied for developing a new third-generation photovoltaic cell. PMID:18764346

  12. Band structure of hydrogenated silicene on Ag(111): Evidence for half-silicane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Olovsson, W.; Uhrberg, R. I. G.

    2016-02-01

    In the case of graphene, hydrogenation removes the conductivity due to the bands forming the Dirac cone by opening up a band gap. This type of chemical functionalization is of the utmost importance for electronic applications. As predicted by theoretical studies, a similar change in the band structure is expected for silicene, the closest analog to graphene. We here report a study of the atomic and electronic structures of hydrogenated silicene with hydrogen on one side, the so-called half-silicane. The ("2 √{3 }×2 √{3 } ") phase of silicene on Ag(111) was used in this Rapid Communication since it can be formed homogeneously across the entire surface of the Ag substrate. Low-energy electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy data clearly show that hydrogenation changes the structure of silicene on Ag(111) resulting in a (1 × 1) periodicity with respect to the silicene lattice. The hydrogenated silicene also exhibits a quasiregular (2 √{3 }×2 √{3 } )-like arrangement of vacancies. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy revealed two dispersive bands which can be unambiguously assigned to half-silicane. The common top of these bands is located at ˜0.9 eV below the Fermi level. We find that the experimental bands are closely reproduced by the theoretical band structure of free-standing silicene with H adsorbed on the upper hexagonal sublattice.

  13. Measurement of valence band structure in boron-zinc-oxide films by making use of ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Han S.; Kwon, Gi C.; Choi, Eun H.

    2011-12-26

    Measurement of valence band structure in the boron-zinc oxide (BZO) films was developed using the secondary electron emission due to the Auger neutralization of ions. The energy distribution profile of the electrons emitted from boron-zinc-oxide films was measured and rescaled so that Auger self-convolution arose; thus, revealing the detailed structure of the valence band and suggesting that a high concentration of boron impurity in BZO films may enhance the transition of electrons and holes through the band gap from the valence to the conduction band in zinc oxide crystals; thereby improving the conductivity of the film.

  14. Convergence of multi-valley bands as the electronic origin of high thermoelectric performance in CoSb3 skutterudites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yinglu; Gibbs, Zachary M.; Agapito, Luis A.; Li, Guodong; Kim, Hyun-Sik; Nardelli, Marco Buongiorno; Curtarolo, Stefano; Snyder, G. Jeffrey

    2015-12-01

    Filled skutterudites RxCo4Sb12 are excellent n-type thermoelectric materials owing to their high electronic mobility and high effective mass, combined with low thermal conductivity associated with the addition of filler atoms into the void site. The favourable electronic band structure in n-type CoSb3 is typically attributed to threefold degeneracy at the conduction band minimum accompanied by linear band behaviour at higher carrier concentrations, which is thought to be related to the increase in effective mass as the doping level increases. Using combined experimental and computational studies, we show instead that a secondary conduction band with 12 conducting carrier pockets (which converges with the primary band at high temperatures) is responsible for the extraordinary thermoelectric performance of n-type CoSb3 skutterudites. A theoretical explanation is also provided as to why the linear (or Kane-type) band feature is not beneficial for thermoelectrics.

  15. Band structures in Sierpinski triangle fractal porous phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kai; Liu, Ying; Liang, Tianshu

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the band structures in Sierpinski triangle fractal porous phononic crystals (FPPCs) are studied with the aim to clarify the effect of fractal hierarchy on the band structures. Firstly, one kind of FPPCs based on Sierpinski triangle routine is proposed. Then the influence of the porosity on the elastic wave dispersion in Sierpinski triangle FPPCs is investigated. The sensitivity of the band structures to the fractal hierarchy is discussed in detail. The results show that the increase of the hierarchy increases the sensitivity of ABG (Absolute band gap) central frequency to the porosity. But further increase of the fractal hierarchy weakens this sensitivity. On the same hierarchy, wider ABGs could be opened in Sierpinski equilateral triangle FPPC; whilst, a lower ABG could be opened at lower porosity in Sierpinski right-angled isosceles FPPCs. These results will provide a meaningful guidance in tuning band structures in porous phononic crystals by fractal design.

  16. Broadening of effective photonic band gaps in biological chiral structures: From intrinsic narrow band gaps to broad band reflection spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, W. E.; Hernández-Jiménez, M.; Libby, E.; Azofeifa, D. E.; Solis, Á.; Barboza-Aguilar, C.

    2015-09-01

    Under normal illumination with non-polarized light, reflection spectra of the cuticle of golden-like and red Chrysina aurigans scarabs show a structured broad band of left-handed circularly polarized light. The polarization of the reflected light is attributed to a Bouligand-type left-handed chiral structure found through the scarab's cuticle. By considering these twisted structures as one-dimensional photonic crystals, a novel approach is developed from the dispersion relation of circularly polarized electromagnetic waves traveling through chiral media, to show how the broad band characterizing these spectra arises from an intrinsic narrow photonic band gap whose spectral position moves through visible and near-infrared wavelengths.

  17. Exciton band structure of monolayer MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fengcheng; Qu, Fanyao; MacDonald, Allan

    2015-03-01

    We describe a theory of the momentum-dependent exciton spectrum of monolayer molybdenum disulfide. Low-energy excitons occur both at the Brillouin zone center and at the Brillouin-zone corners. We find that binding energies at the Brillouin-zone center deviate qualitatively from the (n - 1 / 2) - 2 pattern of the two-dimensional hydrogenic model. Moreover, the four 2 p states of A series are lower in energy than the corresponding 2 s states and not degenerate. The two-fold ground-state valley degeneracy is lifted linearly at small momenta by electron-hole exchange processes that establish inter valley coherence. We conclude that atlhough monolayer MoS2 is a direct-gap semiconductor when classified by its quasiparticle band structure it may well be an indirect gap material when classified by its excitation spectra, and speculate on the role of this property in luminescence characteristics.

  18. Surface band structure of Si(111)2×1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B.; Haneman, D.

    1995-02-01

    The surface band structures of the three-bond scission (TBS) model and the Pandey-chain (PC) model have been computed using an ab initio Hartree-Fock program crystal 92. In the case of the bulk energy bands, the method gives the correct shapes and structure but overestimates the valence-band dispersion by about 50%. For the TBS model, the calculated valence-band dispersion came out about 50% wider than measured experimentally. This would suggest that the model is consistent with optical data. In the case of the PC model, the valence-band dispersion was qualitatively similar to those of previous calculations, but the width discrepancy was large. The method overestimates the surface band gap for both TBS and PC models. The significance is discussed.

  19. New Band Structures in Aapprox110 Neutron-Rich Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, S. J.; Wang, J. G.; Ding, H. B.; Gu, L.; Xu, Q.; Yeoh, E. Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Hamilton, J. H.; Ramayya, A. V.; Hwang, J. K.; Liu, S. H.; Li, K.; Luo, Y. X.; Rasmussen, J. O.; Lee, I. Y.; Qi, B.; Meng, J.

    2010-05-12

    The high spin states of neutron-rich nuclei in Aapprox110 region have been carefully investigated by measuring prompt gamma-gamma-gamma coincident measurements populated in the spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf with the Gammasphere detector array. Many new collective bands have been discovered. In this proceeding paper, we introduce some interesting new band structures recently observed by our cooperative groups, that is, the one-phonon- and two-phonon gamma-vibrational bands in odd-A {sup 103}Nb, {sup 105}Mo and {sup 107}Tc, the chiral doublet bands in even-even {sup 106}Mo, {sup 110}Ru and {sup 112}Ru, and the pseudospin partner bands with in {sup 108}Tc. The characteristics of these band structures have been discussed.

  20. One-dimensional electromagnetic band gap structures formed by discharge plasmas in a waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Arkhipenko, V. I.; Simonchik, L. V. Usachonak, M. S.; Callegari, Th.; Sokoloff, J.

    2014-09-28

    We demonstrate the ability to develop one-dimensional electromagnetic band gap structure in X-band waveguide solely by using the positive columns of glow discharges in neon at the middle pressure. Plasma inhomogeneities are distributed uniformly along a typical X-band waveguide with cross section of 23×10 mm². It is shown that electron densities larger than 10¹⁴ cm ⁻³ are needed in order to create an effective one-dimensional electromagnetic band gap structure. Some applications for using the one-dimensional electromagnetic band gap structure in waveguide as a control of microwave (broadband filter and device for variation of pulse duration) are demonstrated.

  1. Hydrogen production by Tuning the Photonic Band Gap with the Electronic Band Gap of TiO2

    PubMed Central

    Waterhouse, G. I. N.; Wahab, A. K.; Al-Oufi, M.; Jovic, V.; Anjum, D. H.; Sun-Waterhouse, D.; Llorca, J.; Idriss, H.

    2013-01-01

    Tuning the photonic band gap (PBG) to the electronic band gap (EBG) of Au/TiO2 catalysts resulted in considerable enhancement of the photocatalytic water splitting to hydrogen under direct sunlight. Au/TiO2 (PBG-357 nm) photocatalyst exhibited superior photocatalytic performance under both UV and sunlight compared to the Au/TiO2 (PBG-585 nm) photocatalyst and both are higher than Au/TiO2 without the 3 dimensionally ordered macro-porous structure materials. The very high photocatalytic activity is attributed to suppression of a fraction of electron-hole recombination route due to the co-incidence of the PBG with the EBG of TiO2 These materials that maintain their activity with very small amount of sacrificial agents (down to 0.5 vol.% of ethanol) are poised to find direct applications because of their high activity, low cost of the process, simplicity and stability. PMID:24108361

  2. Convergence of electronic bands for high performance bulk thermoelectrics.

    PubMed

    Pei, Yanzhong; Shi, Xiaoya; LaLonde, Aaron; Wang, Heng; Chen, Lidong; Snyder, G Jeffrey

    2011-05-01

    Thermoelectric generators, which directly convert heat into electricity, have long been relegated to use in space-based or other niche applications, but are now being actively considered for a variety of practical waste heat recovery systems-such as the conversion of car exhaust heat into electricity. Although these devices can be very reliable and compact, the thermoelectric materials themselves are relatively inefficient: to facilitate widespread application, it will be desirable to identify or develop materials that have an intensive thermoelectric materials figure of merit, zT, above 1.5 (ref. 1). Many different concepts have been used in the search for new materials with high thermoelectric efficiency, such as the use of nanostructuring to reduce phonon thermal conductivity, which has led to the investigation of a variety of complex material systems. In this vein, it is well known that a high valley degeneracy (typically ≤6 for known thermoelectrics) in the electronic bands is conducive to high zT, and this in turn has stimulated attempts to engineer such degeneracy by adopting low-dimensional nanostructures. Here we demonstrate that it is possible to direct the convergence of many valleys in a bulk material by tuning the doping and composition. By this route, we achieve a convergence of at least 12 valleys in doped PbTe(1-x)Se(x) alloys, leading to an extraordinary zT value of 1.8 at about 850 kelvin. Band engineering to converge the valence (or conduction) bands to achieve high valley degeneracy should be a general strategy in the search for and improvement of bulk thermoelectric materials, because it simultaneously leads to a high Seebeck coefficient and high electrical conductivity.

  3. Band Structure and Effective Mass in Monolayer MoS2.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Ting; Fan, Jun-Wei; Chen, Kuan-Ting; Chang, Shu-Tong; Lin, Chung-Yi

    2015-11-01

    Monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenide is a very promising two-dimensional material for future transistor technology. Monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), owing to the unique electronic properties of its atomically thin two-dimensional layered structure, can be made into a high-performance metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor, or MOSFET. In this work, we focus on band structure and carrier mobility calculations for MoS2. We use the tight-binding method to calculate the band structure, including a consideration of the linear combination of different atomic orbitals, the interaction of neighboring atoms, and spin-orbit coupling for different tight-binding matrices. With information about the band structure, we can obtain the density of states, the effective mass, and other physical quantities. Carrier mobility using the Kubo-Greenwood formula is calculated based on the tight-binding band structure. PMID:26726660

  4. Electronic structure studies of topological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shuyun

    Three-dimensional (3D) Dirac fermions are a new class of topological quantum materials. In 3D Dirac semimetals, the conduction and valence bands touch each other at discrete points in the momentum space and show linear dispersions along all momentum directions, forming 3D Dirac cones which are protected by the crystal symmetry. Here I will present our recent studies of the electronic structures of novel materials which host 3D Dirac fermions by using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy.

  5. Coupling between Fano and Bragg bands in the photonic band structure of two-dimensional metallic photonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markoš, P.; Kuzmiak, V.

    2016-09-01

    The frequency and transmission spectrum of a two-dimensional array of metallic rods is investigated numerically. Based on the recent analysis of the band structure of two-dimensional photonic crystals with dielectric rods [Phys. Rev. A 92, 043814 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.92.043814], we identify two types of bands in the frequency spectrum: Bragg (P ) bands resulting from a periodicity and Fano (F ) bands which arise from Fano resonances associated with each of the cylinders within the periodic structure. It is shown that the existence of the Fano band in a certain frequency range is manifested by a Fano resonance in the transmittance. In particular, we reexamine the symmetry properties of the H -polarized band structure in the frequency range where the spectrum consists of the localized modes associated with the single-scatterer resonances and we explore the process of formation of Fano bands by identifying individual terms in the expansion of the linear combination of atomic orbitals states. We demonstrate how the interplay between the two scattering mechanisms affects the properties of the resulting band structure when the radius of cylinders is increased. We show that a different character of both kinds of bands is reflected in the spatial distribution of the magnetic field, which displays patterns corresponding to the corresponding irreducible symmetry representations.

  6. Band Structure Controlled by Chiral Imprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes Cervantes, Adrian; Castro-Garay, P.; Ramos-Garcia, Ruben

    2008-03-01

    Using the configuration of an imprinted cholesteric elastomer immersed in a racemic solvent, we find the solution of the boundary--value problem for the reflection and transmission of incident optical waves due to the elastomer. We show a significant width reduction of the reflection band for certain values of nematic penetration depth, which depends on the volume fraction of molecules from the solvent, whose handedness is preferably absorbed. The appearance of nested bandgaps of both handednesses during the sorting mixed chiral process is also obtained. This suggests the design of chemically controlled optical filters and optically monitored chiral pumps.

  7. Shell model description of band structure in 48Cr

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Carlos E.; Velazquez, Victor M.

    2007-02-12

    The band structure for normal and abnormal parity bands in 48Cr are described using the m-scheme shell model. In addition to full fp-shell, two particles in the 1d3/2 orbital are allowed in order to describe intruder states. The interaction includes fp-, sd- and mixed matrix elements.

  8. Dependence of the band structure of C-60 monolayers on molecularorientations and doping observed by angle resolved photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Brouet, V.; Yang, W.L.; Zhou, X.J.; Hussain, Z.; Shen, Z.X.

    2008-01-17

    We present angle resolved photoemission studies of C60monolayers deposited on Ag surfaces. The electronic structure of thesemonolayers is derived from the partial filling of the narrow, 6-folddegenerated, C60 conduction band. By comparing the band structure in twomonolayers deposited, respectively, on Ag(111) and Ag(100), we show thatthe molecular degree of freedom, in this case the relative orientationsbetween C60 molecules, is essential to describe the band structure. Wefurther show that the evolution of the band as a function of doping doesnot follow a rigid band-filling picture. Phase separation is observedbetween a metallic and an insulating phase, which might be a result ofstrong correlations.

  9. Controlling the Electronic Structure of Bilayer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Taisuke; Bostwick, Aaron; McChesney, Jessica; Seyller, Thomas; Horn, Karsten; Rotenberg, Eli

    2007-03-01

    Carbon-based materials such as carbon nanotubes, graphite intercalation compounds, fullerenes, and ultrathin graphite films exhibit many exotic phenomena such as superconductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect. These findings have caused renewed interest in the electronic structure of ultrathin layers of graphene: a single honeycomb carbon layer that is the building block for these materials. There is a strong motivation to incorporate graphene multilayers into atomic-scale devices, spurred on by rapid progress in their fabrication and manipulation. We have synthesized bilayer graphene thin films deposited on insulating silicon carbide and characterized their electronic band structure using angle-resolved photoemission. By selectively adjusting the carrier concentration in each layer, changes in the Coulomb potential led to control of the gap between valence and conduction bands [1]. This control over the band structure suggests the potential application of bilayer graphene to switching functions in atomic scale electronic devices. [1] T. Ohta, A. Bostwick, T. Seyller, K. Horn, E. Rotenberg, Science, 313, 951 (2006).

  10. Topologically nontrivial electronic bands and tunable Dirac cones in graphynes with spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juricic, Vladimir; van Miert, Guido; Morais Smith, Cristiane

    2015-03-01

    Graphynes represent an emerging family of carbon allotropes that differ from graphene by the presence of the triple bonds (-C ≡C-) in their band structure. They have recently attracted much interest due to the tunability of the Dirac cones in the band structure. I will show that the spin-orbit coupling in β-graphyne could produce various effects related to the topological properties of its electronic bands. Intrinsic spin-orbit coupling yields high- and tunable Chern-number bands, which may host both topological and Chern insulators, in the presence and absence of time-reversal symmetry, respectively. Furthermore, Rashba spin-orbit coupling can be used to control the position and the number of Dirac cones in the Brillouin zone. Finally, I will also discuss the electronic properties of α - and γ - graphyne in the presence of the spin-orbit coupling within recently developed general theory of spin-orbit couplings in graphynes. Work supported by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO).

  11. Band gap widening at random CIGS grain boundary detected by valence electron energy loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Debora; Buecheler, Stephan; Reinhard, Patrick; Pianezzi, Fabian; Bissig, Benjamin; Carron, Romain; Hage, Fredrik; Ramasse, Quentin; Erni, Rolf; Tiwari, Ayodhya N.

    2016-10-01

    Cu(In,Ga) Se2 (CIGS) thin film solar cells have demonstrated very high efficiencies, but still the role of nanoscale inhomogeneities in CIGS and their impact on the solar cell performance are not yet clearly understood. Due to the polycrystalline structure of CIGS, grain boundaries are very common structural defects that are also accompanied by compositional variations. In this work, we apply valence electron energy loss spectroscopy in scanning transmission electron microscopy to study the local band gap energy at a grain boundary in the CIGS absorber layer. Based on this example, we demonstrate the capabilities of a 2nd generation monochromator that provides a very high energy resolution and allows for directly relating the chemical composition and the band gap energy across the grain boundary. A band gap widening of about 20 meV is observed at the grain boundary. Furthermore, the compositional analysis by core-loss EELS reveals an enrichment of In together with a Cu, Ga and Se depletion at the same area. The experimentally obtained results can therefore be well explained by the presence of a valence band barrier at the grain boundary.

  12. Experimental Benchmarking of Pu Electronic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G; Moore, K T; Chung, B W; Wall, M A; Schwartz, A J; Ebbinghaus, B B; Butterfield, M T; Teslich, Jr., N E; Bliss, R A; Morton, S A; Yu, S W; Komesu, T; Waddill, G D; der Laan, G v; Kutepov, A L

    2005-10-13

    The standard method to determine the band structure of a condensed phase material is to (1) obtain a single crystal with a well defined surface and (2) map the bands with angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (occupied or valence bands) and inverse photoelectron spectroscopy (unoccupied or conduction bands). Unfortunately, in the case of Pu, the single crystals of Pu are either nonexistent, very small and/or having poorly defined surfaces. Furthermore, effects such as electron correlation and a large spin-orbit splitting in the 5f states have further complicated the situation. Thus, we have embarked upon the utilization of unorthodox electron spectroscopies, to circumvent the problems caused by the absence of large single crystals of Pu with well-defined surfaces. Our approach includes the techniques of resonant photoelectron spectroscopy [1], x-ray absorption spectroscopy [1,2,3,4], electron energy loss spectroscopy [2,3,4], Fano Effect measurements [5], and Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy [6], including the utilization of micro-focused beams to probe single-crystallite regions of polycrystalline Pu samples. [2,3,6

  13. Experimental Benchmarking of Pu Electronic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J.G.; Moore, K.T.; Chung, B.W.; Wall, M.A.; Schwartz, A.J.; Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Butterfield, M.T.; Teslich, Jr., N.E.; Bliss, R.A.; Morton, S.A.; Yu, S.W.; Komesu, T.; Waddill, G.D.; van der Laan, G.; Kutepov, A.L.

    2008-10-30

    The standard method to determine the band structure of a condensed phase material is to (1) obtain a single crystal with a well defined surface and (2) map the bands with angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (occupied or valence bands) and inverse photoelectron spectroscopy (unoccupied or conduction bands). Unfortunately, in the case of Pu, the single crystals of Pu are either nonexistent, very small and/or having poorly defined surfaces. Furthermore, effects such as electron correlation and a large spin-orbit splitting in the 5f states have further complicated the situation. Thus, we have embarked upon the utilization of unorthodox electron spectroscopies, to circumvent the problems caused by the absence of large single crystals of Pu with well-defined surfaces. Our approach includes the techniques of resonant photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, Fano Effect measurements, and Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy, including the utilization of micro-focused beams to probe single-crystallite regions of polycrystalline Pu samples.

  14. Unfolding the band structure of non-crystalline photonic band gap materials

    PubMed Central

    Tsitrin, Samuel; Williamson, Eric Paul; Amoah, Timothy; Nahal, Geev; Chan, Ho Leung; Florescu, Marian; Man, Weining

    2015-01-01

    Non-crystalline photonic band gap (PBG) materials have received increasing attention, and sizeable PBGs have been reported in quasi-crystalline structures and, more recently, in disordered structures. Band structure calculations for periodic structures produce accurate dispersion relations, which determine group velocities, dispersion, density of states and iso-frequency surfaces, and are used to predict a wide-range of optical phenomena including light propagation, excited-state decay rates, temporal broadening or compression of ultrashort pulses and complex refraction phenomena. However, band calculations for non-periodic structures employ large super-cells of hundreds to thousands building blocks, and provide little useful information other than the PBG central frequency and width. Using stereolithography, we construct cm-scale disordered PBG materials and perform microwave transmission measurements, as well as finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. The photonic dispersion relations are reconstructed from the measured and simulated phase data. Our results demonstrate the existence of sizeable PBGs in these disordered structures and provide detailed information of the effective band diagrams, dispersion relation, iso-frequency contours, and their angular dependence. Slow light phenomena are also observed in these structures near gap frequencies. This study introduces a powerful tool to investigate photonic properties of non-crystalline structures and provides important effective dispersion information, otherwise difficult to obtain. PMID:26289434

  15. Band structure in Yang-Mills theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachas, Constantin; Tomaras, Theodore

    2016-05-01

    We show how Yang-Mills theory on S3 × ℝ can exhibit a spectrum with continuous bands if coupled either to a topological 3-form gauge field, or to a dynamical axion with heavy Peccei-Quinn scale. The basic mechanism consists in associating winding histories to a bosonic zero mode whose role is to convert a circle in configuration space into a helix. The zero mode is, respectively, the holonomy of the 3-form field or the axion momentum. In these models different θ sectors coexist and are only mixed by (non-local) volume operators. Our analysis sheds light on, and extends Seiberg's proposal for modifying the topological sums in quantum field theories. It refutes a recent claim that B + L violation at LHC is unsuppressed.

  16. Crystal structure and band gap of AlGaAsN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munich, D. P.; Pierret, R. F.

    1987-09-01

    Quantum dielectric theory is applied to the quaternary alloy Al xGa 1- xAs 1- yN y to predict its electronic properties as a function of Al and N mole fractions. Results are presented for the expected crystal structure, minimum electron energy band gap, and direction in k-space of the band gap minimum for all x and y values. The results suggest that, for a proper choice of x and y, Al xGa 1- xAs 1- yN y could exhibit certain advantages over Al xGa 1- xAs when utilized in field-effect transistor structures.

  17. Band structure engineering through orbital interaction for enhanced thermoelectric power factor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Hong; Sun, Wenhao; Ceder, Gerbrand; Armiento, Rickard; Lazic, Predrag

    2014-02-24

    Band structure engineering for specific electronic or optical properties is essential for the further development of many important technologies including thermoelectrics, optoelectronics, and microelectronics. In this work, we report orbital interaction as a powerful tool to finetune the band structure and the transport properties of charge carriers in bulk crystalline semiconductors. The proposed mechanism of orbital interaction on band structure is demonstrated for IV-VI thermoelectric semiconductors. For IV-VI materials, we find that the convergence of multiple carrier pockets not only displays a strong correlation with the s-p and spin-orbit coupling but also coincides with the enhancement of power factor. Our results suggest a useful path to engineer the band structure and an enticing solid-solution design principle to enhance thermoelectric performance.

  18. Electronic structure interpolation via atomic orbitals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mohan; Guo, G-C; He, Lixin

    2011-08-17

    We present an efficient scheme for accurate electronic structure interpolation based on systematically improvable optimized atomic orbitals. The atomic orbitals are generated by minimizing the spillage value between the atomic basis calculations and the converged plane wave basis calculations on some coarse k-point grid. They are then used to calculate the band structure of the full Brillouin zone using the linear combination of atomic orbitals algorithms. We find that usually 16-25 orbitals per atom can give an accuracy of about 10 meV compared to the full ab initio calculations, and the accuracy can be systematically improved by using more atomic orbitals. The scheme is easy to implement and robust, and works equally well for metallic systems and systems with complicated band structures. Furthermore, the atomic orbitals have much better transferability than Shirley's basis and Wannier functions, which is very useful for perturbation calculations.

  19. Electronic structure of the superconducting layered perovskite niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, Izumi; Nishihara, Yoshikazu

    1998-07-01

    The electronic energy-band structure for RbLaNb2O7, which is closely related to the layered perovskite niobate superconducting KCa2Nb3O10 and metallic KLaNb2O7 with Li intercalation, has been calculated by using the scalar-relativistic full-potential linearized augmented-plane-wave method within the local-density approximation. The result of the calculation shows that this compound is a band insulator with a small gap, and its conduction band is a typical two-dimensional one and the valence band is rather three dimensional. We can conclude that the layered perovskite niobate KCa2Nb3O10 is a band insulator that can be superconducting with electron doping, and have the highly two-dimensional electronic structure.

  20. Electronic Structure and Properties of Organic Bulk-Heterojunction Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Street, Robert A

    2016-05-01

    The electronic structure and physical mechanisms of carrier generation and transport in the organic bulk heterojunction are reviewed. The electronic structure describes the bands and band-tail states, the band alignment at the bulk-heterojunction interface, and the overall density-of-states model. The different electronic character of excitons and mobile charge is discussed, the former being highly molecular and the latter more delocalized. Dissociation of the exciton via the charge-transfer (CT) states is attributed to weak binding of the CT state arising from charge delocalization. Carrier transport and charge collection is strongly influenced by the presence of localized band-tail states. Recombination is attributed primarily to transitions from mobile carriers to band-tail or deep trap states. PMID:26603977

  1. Predicted band structures of III-V semiconductors in the wurtzite phase

    SciTech Connect

    De, A.; Pryor, Craig E.

    2010-04-15

    While non-nitride III-V semiconductors typically have a zinc-blende structure, they may also form wurtzite crystals under pressure or when grown as nanowhiskers. This makes electronic structure calculation difficult since the band structures of wurtzite III-V semiconductors are poorly characterized. We have calculated the electronic band structure for nine III-V semiconductors in the wurtzite phase using transferable empirical pseudopotentials including spin-orbit coupling. We find that all the materials have direct gaps. Our results differ significantly from earlier ab initio calculations, and where experimental results are available (InP, InAs, and GaAs) our calculated band gaps are in good agreement. We tabulate energies, effective masses, and linear and cubic Dresselhaus zero-field spin-splitting coefficients for the zone-center states. The large zero-field spin-splitting coefficients we find may facilitate the development of spin-based devices.

  2. High-Pressure Crystal Structure, Lattice Vibrations, and Band Structure of BiSbO4.

    PubMed

    Errandonea, Daniel; Muñoz, Alfonso; Rodríguez-Hernández, Placida; Gomis, Oscar; Achary, S Nagabhusan; Popescu, Catalin; Patwe, Sadeque J; Tyagi, Avesh K

    2016-05-16

    The high-pressure crystal structure, lattice-vibrations, and electronic band structure of BiSbO4 were studied by ab initio simulations. We also performed Raman spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and diffuse-reflectance measurements, as well as synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction. High-pressure X-ray diffraction measurements show that the crystal structure of BiSbO4 remains stable up to at least 70 GPa, unlike other known MTO4-type ternary oxides. These experiments also give information on the pressure dependence of the unit-cell parameters. Calculations properly describe the crystal structure of BiSbO4 and the changes induced by pressure on it. They also predict a possible high-pressure phase. A room-temperature pressure-volume equation of state is determined, and the effect of pressure on the coordination polyhedron of Bi and Sb is discussed. Raman- and infrared-active phonons were measured and calculated. In particular, calculations provide assignments for all the vibrational modes as well as their pressure dependence. In addition, the band structure and electronic density of states under pressure were also calculated. The calculations combined with the optical measurements allow us to conclude that BiSbO4 is an indirect-gap semiconductor, with an electronic band gap of 2.9(1) eV. Finally, the isothermal compressibility tensor for BiSbO4 is given at 1.8 GPa. The experimental (theoretical) data revealed that the direction of maximum compressibility is in the (0 1 0) plane at ∼33° (38°) to the c-axis and 47° (42°) to the a-axis. The reliability of the reported results is supported by the consistency between experiments and calculations.

  3. High-Pressure Crystal Structure, Lattice Vibrations, and Band Structure of BiSbO4.

    PubMed

    Errandonea, Daniel; Muñoz, Alfonso; Rodríguez-Hernández, Placida; Gomis, Oscar; Achary, S Nagabhusan; Popescu, Catalin; Patwe, Sadeque J; Tyagi, Avesh K

    2016-05-16

    The high-pressure crystal structure, lattice-vibrations, and electronic band structure of BiSbO4 were studied by ab initio simulations. We also performed Raman spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and diffuse-reflectance measurements, as well as synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction. High-pressure X-ray diffraction measurements show that the crystal structure of BiSbO4 remains stable up to at least 70 GPa, unlike other known MTO4-type ternary oxides. These experiments also give information on the pressure dependence of the unit-cell parameters. Calculations properly describe the crystal structure of BiSbO4 and the changes induced by pressure on it. They also predict a possible high-pressure phase. A room-temperature pressure-volume equation of state is determined, and the effect of pressure on the coordination polyhedron of Bi and Sb is discussed. Raman- and infrared-active phonons were measured and calculated. In particular, calculations provide assignments for all the vibrational modes as well as their pressure dependence. In addition, the band structure and electronic density of states under pressure were also calculated. The calculations combined with the optical measurements allow us to conclude that BiSbO4 is an indirect-gap semiconductor, with an electronic band gap of 2.9(1) eV. Finally, the isothermal compressibility tensor for BiSbO4 is given at 1.8 GPa. The experimental (theoretical) data revealed that the direction of maximum compressibility is in the (0 1 0) plane at ∼33° (38°) to the c-axis and 47° (42°) to the a-axis. The reliability of the reported results is supported by the consistency between experiments and calculations. PMID:27128858

  4. Electronic structure of scandium-doped MgB2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Peña, Omar; Agrestini, Stefano

    2005-03-01

    Recently has been reported the synthesis of a new superconducting alloy based on MgB2, where Mg is partially substituted with Sc. In order to analyze the effect of Sc doping on the structural and superconducting properties of Mg1-xScxB2, we have performed a detailed study of the electronic structure for this new diboride. The calculations have been done using the first-principles LAPW method, within the supercell approach for modeling the doping. In this work we report results for the electronic band structure, Fermi surface, and density of states. The effect of the Sc-d orbitals on the structural and electronic properties of Mg1-xScxB2 is analyzed. Increasing the Sc concentration (x) the σ-band is gradually filled, because Sc have one valence electron more than Mg. Interestingly, the analysis of the band structure shows that even for ScB2 the top of the σ-band remain above the Fermi level, nevertheless the σ-band presents high dispersion and has an important contribution of d states. In this way, in addition to the band filling effect, Sc doping gradually reduces the two-dimensional character of the σ- band in Mg1-xScxB2 as a result of increasing the sp(B)-d(Sc) hybridization. This research was partially supported by Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnolog'ia (CONACYT, M'exico) under Grant. No. 43830-F

  5. Characterization of electronic structure of periodically strained graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Aslani, Marjan; Garner, C. Michael Nishi, Yoshio; Kumar, Suhas; Nordlund, Dennis; Pianetta, Piero

    2015-11-02

    We induced periodic biaxial tensile strain in polycrystalline graphene by wrapping it over a substrate with repeating pillar-like structures with a periodicity of 600 nm. Using Raman spectroscopy, we determined to have introduced biaxial strains in graphene in the range of 0.4% to 0.7%. Its band structure was characterized using photoemission from valance bands, shifts in the secondary electron emission, and x-ray absorption from the carbon 1s levels to the unoccupied graphene conduction bands. It was observed that relative to unstrained graphene, strained graphene had a higher work function and higher density of states in the valence and conduction bands. We measured the conductivity of the strained and unstrained graphene in response to a gate voltage and correlated the changes in their behavior to the changes in the electronic structure. From these sets of data, we propose a simple band diagram representing graphene with periodic biaxial strain.

  6. Characterization of electronic structure of periodically strained graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Aslani, Marjan; Garner, C. Michael; Kumar, Suhas; Nordlund, Dennis; Pianetta, Piero; Nishi, Yoshio

    2015-11-03

    We induced periodic biaxial tensile strain in polycrystalline graphene by wrapping it over a substrate with repeating pillar-like structures with a periodicity of 600 nm. Using Raman spectroscopy, we determined to have introduced biaxial strains in graphene in the range of 0.4% to 0.7%. Its band structure was characterized using photoemission from valance bands, shifts in the secondary electron emission, and x-ray absorption from the carbon 1s levels to the unoccupied graphene conduction bands. It was observed that relative to unstrained graphene, strained graphene had a higher work function and higher density of states in the valence and conduction bands. Furthermore, we measured the conductivity of the strained and unstrained graphene in response to a gate voltage and correlated the changes in their behavior to the changes in the electronic structure. From these sets of data, we propose a simple band diagram representing graphene with periodic biaxial strain.

  7. Quantitative study of band structure in BaTiO3 particles with vacant ionic sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshime, Norihiro; Kano, Jun; Ikeda, Naoshi; Teranishi, Takashi; Fujii, Tatsuo; Ueda, Takeji; Ohkubo, Tomoko

    2016-10-01

    Levels of the conduction band minimum and the valence band maximum in ion-deficient BaTiO3 particles were investigated with optical band gap and ionization energy measurements. Though it is known that the quantification of the band structure in an insulator is difficult, due to the poor electrical conductivity of BaTiO3, systematic variation in the band energy levels was found that correlated with the introduction of vacancies. Photoelectron yield spectroscopy provided direct observation of the occupancy level of electrons, which is altered by the presence of oxygen and barium vacancies. In addition, the conduction band deviation from the vacuum level was determined by optical reflectance spectroscopy. Our results show that: (1) Introduction of oxygen vacancies forms a donor level below the conduction band. (2) The conduction band is shifted to a lower level by a larger number of oxygen vacancies, while the valence band also shifts to a lower level, due to the reduction in the density of O 2p orbitals. (3) Introduction of barium vacancies widens the band gap. Since barium vacancies can induce a small number of oxygen vacancies with accompanying charge compensation, this behavior suppresses any large formation of donor levels in the gap states, indicating that cation vacancies can control the number of both donor and acceptor levels.

  8. The C-Band accelerating structures for SPARC photoinjector energy upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alesini, D.; Boni, R.; Di Pirro, G.; Di Raddo, R.; Ferrario, M.; Gallo, A.; Lollo, V.; Marcellini, F.; Palumbo, L.; Spizzo, V.; Mostacci, A.; Campogiani, G.; Persichelli, S.; Enomoto, A.; Higo, T.; Kakihara, K.; Kamitani, T.; Matsumoto, S.; Sugimura, T.; Yokoyama, K.; Verdú-Andrés, S.

    2013-05-01

    The use of C-Band structures for electron acceleration and production of high quality beams has been proposed and adopted in several linac projects all over the world. The two main projects that adopted such type of structures are the Japanese Free Electron Laser (FEL) project in Spring-8 and the SwissFEL project at Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Also the energy upgrade of the SPARC photo-injector at LNF-INFN (Italy) from 150 to more than 240 MeV will be done by replacing a low gradient S-Band accelerating structure with two C-band structures. The structures are Traveling Wave (TW) and Constant Impedance (CI), have symmetric axial input couplers and have been optimized to work with a SLED RF input pulse. The paper presents the design criteria of the structures, the realization procedure and the low and high power RF test results on a prototype. The high power tests have been carried out by the Frascati INFN Laboratories in close collaboration with the Japanese Laboratory KEK. Experimental results confirmed the feasibility of the operation of the prototype at 50 MV/m with about 10-6 breakdowns per pulse per meter. Such high gradients have not been reached before in C-Band systems and demonstrated the possibility to use C-band accelerators, if needed, at such high field level. The results of the internal inspection of the structure after the high power test are also presented.

  9. Band structure of core-shell semiconductor nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistol, Mats-Erik; Pryor, Craig

    2009-03-01

    We present band structures of strained core-shell nanowires composed of zincblende III-V (binary) semiconductors. We consider all combinations of AlN, GaN, InN, and all combinations of AlP, GaP, AlAs, GaAs, InP, InAs, AlSb, GaSb, and InSb. We compute the γ- and X-conduction band minima as well as the valence band maximum, all as functions of the core and shell radii. The calculations were performed using continuum elasticity theory for the strain, eight-band strain-dependent k.p theory for the γ-point energies, and single band approximation for the X-point conduction minima. We identify structures with type-I, type-II and type-III band alignment, as well as systems in which one material becomes metallic due to a negative band-gap. We identify structures that may support exciton crystals with and without photoexcitation. We have also computed the effective masses, from which the confinement energy may be estimated. All the results [Pistol and Pryor, Phys. Rev. B 78, 115319] are available in graphical and tabular form at www.semiconductor.physics.uiowa.edu

  10. Electronic structure of germanium selenide investigated using ultra-violet photo-electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, P.; Lohani, H.; Kundu, A. K.; Patel, R.; Solanki, G. K.; Menon, Krishnakumar S. R.; Sekhar, B. R.

    2015-07-01

    The valence band electronic structure of GeSe single crystals has been investigated using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The experimentally observed bands from ARPES, match qualitatively with our LDA-based band structure calculations along the Γ-Z, Γ-Y and Γ-T symmetry directions. The valence band maximum occurs nearly midway along the Γ-Z direction, at a binding energy of -0.5 eV, substantiating the indirect band gap of GeSe. Non-dispersive features associated with surface states and indirect transitions have been observed. The difference in hybridization of Se and Ge 4p orbitals leads to the variation of dispersion along the three symmetry directions. The predominance of the Se 4pz orbitals, evidenced from theoretical calculations, may be the cause for highly dispersive bands along the Γ-T direction. Detailed electronic structure analysis reveals the significance of the cation-anion 4p orbitals hybridization in the valence band dispersion of IV-VI semiconductors. This is the first comprehensive report of the electronic structure of a GeSe single crystal using ARPES in conjugation with theoretical band structure analysis.

  11. Development of X-Band Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, S. H.; Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.; Kinkead, A. K.

    2010-11-04

    This paper presents a progress report on the development and testing of X-band dielectric-loaded accelerating structures. Recent tests on several quartz DLA structures with different inner diameters are reported. Designs for gap-free DLA structures are presented. Also, planned new experiments are discussed, including higher gradient traveling-wave and standing-wave structures and special grooved structures for multipactor suppression.

  12. Stacking dependent electronic structures of transition metal dichalcogenides heterobilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yea-Lee; Park, Cheol-Hwan; Ihm, Jisoon

    The systematic study of the electronic structures and optical properties of the transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD) heterobilayers can significantly improve the designing of new electronic and optoelectronic devices. Here, we theoretically study the electronic structures and optical properties of TMD heterobilayers using the first-principles methods. The band structures of TMD heterobilayer are shown to be determined by the band alignments of the each layer, the weak interlayer interactions, and angle dependent stacking patterns. The photoluminescence spectra are investigated using the calculated band structures, and the optical absorption spectra are examined by the GW approximations including the electron-hole interaction through the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation. It is expected that the weak interlayer interaction gives rise to the substantial interlayer optical transition which will be corresponding to the interlayer exciton.

  13. Electronic Power Conditioner for Ku-band Travelling Wave Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowstubha, Palle; Krishnaveni, K.; Ramesh Reddy, K.

    2016-07-01

    A highly sophisticated regulated power supply is known as electronic power conditioner (EPC) is required to energise travelling wave tubes (TWTs), which are used as RF signal amplifiers in satellite payloads. The assembly consisting of TWT and EPC together is known as travelling wave tube amplifier (TWTA). EPC is used to provide isolated and conditioned voltage rails with tight regulation to various electrodes of TWT and makes its RF performance independent of solar bus variations which are caused due to varying conditions of eclipse and sunlit. The payload mass and their power consumption is mainly due to the existence of TWTAs that represent about 35 % of total mass and about 70-90 % (based on the type of satellite application) of overall dc power consumption. This situation ensures a continuous improvement in the design of TWTAs and their associated EPCs to realize more efficient and light products. Critical technologies involved in EPCs are design and configuration, closed loop regulation, component and material selection, energy limiting of high voltage (HV) outputs and potting of HV card etc. This work addresses some of these critical technologies evolved in realizing and testing the state of art of EPC and it focuses on the design of HV supply with a HV and high power capability, up to 6 kV and 170 WRF, respectively required for a space TWTA. Finally, an experimental prototype of EPC with a dc power of 320 W provides different voltages required by Ku-band TWT in open loop configuration.

  14. Ab initio theory for ultrafast magnetization dynamics with a dynamic band structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, B. Y.; Haag, M.; Fähnle, M.

    2016-09-01

    Laser-induced modifications of magnetic materials on very small spatial dimensions and ultrashort timescales are a promising field for novel storage and spintronic devices. Therefore, the contribution of electron-electron spin-flip scattering to the ultrafast demagnetization of ferromagnets after an ultrashort laser excitation is investigated. In this work, the dynamical change of the band structure resulting from the change of the magnetization in time is taken into account on an ab initio level. We find a large influence of the dynamical band structure on the magnetization dynamics and we illustrate the thermalization and relaxation process after laser irradiation. Treating the dynamical band structure yields a demagnetization comparable to the experimental one.

  15. Two-zone heterogeneous structure within shear bands of a bulk metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Yang; Yao, Kefu; Liu, Xue; Li, Mo

    2013-10-21

    Shear bands, the main plastic strain carrier in metallic glasses, are severely deformed regions often considered as disordered and featureless. Here we report the observations of a sandwich-like heterogeneous structure inside shear bands in Pd{sub 40.5}Ni{sub 40.5}P{sub 19} metallic glass sample after plastic deformation by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The experimental results suggest a two-step plastic deformation mechanism with corresponding microstructure evolution at atomic scale, which may intimately connected to the stability of the shear band propagation and the overall plastic deformability.

  16. GaN m -plane: Atomic structure, surface bands, and optical response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landmann, M.; Rauls, E.; Schmidt, W. Â. G.; Neumann, M. Â. D.; Speiser, E.; Esser, N.

    2015-01-01

    Density-functional-theory calculations are combined with many-body perturbation theory in order to elucidate the geometry, electronic, and optical properties of the w z -GaN (1 1 ¯00 ) surface, i.e., the so-called m -plane. The optical absorption and reflection anisotropy related to electronic transitions between surface states are identified by comparison with measured data covering transition energies from 2.4 up to 5.4 eV. Our results show a surface relaxation mechanism consistent with the electron counting rule that causes a moderate buckling of the GaN surface dimers and gives rise to two distinct surface states: The doubly occupied N dangling bonds form a surface band that is resonant with the GaN valence-band edge at the center of the Brillouin zone, whereas the empty Ga dangling bonds occur within the GaN band gap closely following the dispersion of the conduction-band edge. These two states contribute strongly to the formation of surface excitons that redshift the optical absorption with respect to the bulk optical response. The surface optical absorption i.e., the excitonic onset below the bulk band gap followed by a broad absorption band at higher energies related to the dispersion of the surface band structure, is calculated in agreement with the experimental data.

  17. The Development of Layered Photonic Band Gap Structures Using a Micro-Transfer Molding Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Jerome Sutherland

    2001-05-01

    Photonic band gap (PBG) crystals are periodic dielectric structures that manipulate electromagnetic radiation in a manner similar to semiconductor devices manipulating electrons. Whereas a semiconductor material exhibits an electronic band gap in which electrons cannot exist, similarly, a photonic crystal containing a photonic band gap does not allow the propagation of specific frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. This phenomenon results from the destructive Bragg diffraction interference that a wave propagating at a specific frequency will experience because of the periodic change in dielectric permitivity. This gives rise to a variety of optical applications for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of opto-electronic devices. These applications are reviewed later. Several methods are currently used to fabricate photonic crystals, which are also discussed in detail. This research involves a layer-by-layer micro-transfer molding ({mu}TM) and stacking method to create three-dimensional FCC structures of epoxy or titania. The structures, once reduced significantly in size can be infiltrated with an organic gain media and stacked on a semiconductor to improve the efficiency of an electronically pumped light-emitting diode. Photonic band gap structures have been proven to effectively create a band gap for certain frequencies of electro-magnetic radiation in the microwave and near-infrared ranges. The objective of this research project was originally two-fold: to fabricate a three dimensional (3-D) structure of a size scaled to prohibit electromagnetic propagation within the visible wavelength range, and then to characterize that structure using laser dye emission spectra. As a master mold has not yet been developed for the micro transfer molding technique in the visible range, the research was limited to scaling down the length scale as much as possible with the current available technology and characterizing these structures with other methods.

  18. Evidence of Eu{sup 2+} 4f electrons in the valence band spectra of EuTiO{sub 3} and EuZrO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Kolodiazhnyi, T.; Valant, M.; Williams, J. R.; Bugnet, M.; Botton, G. A.; Ohashi, N.; Sakka, Y.

    2012-10-15

    We report on optical band gap and valence electronic structure of two Eu{sup 2+}-based perovskites, EuTiO{sub 3} and EuZrO{sub 3} as revealed by diffuse optical scattering, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and valence-band x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The data show good agreement with the first-principles studies in which the top of the valence band structure is formed by the narrow Eu 4f{sup 7} electron band. The O 2p band shows the features similar to those of the Ba(Sr)TiO{sub 3} perovskites except that it is shifted to higher binding energies. Appearance of the Eu{sup 2+} 4f{sup 7} band is a reason for narrowing of the optical band gap in the title compounds as compared to their Sr-based analogues.

  19. The Superatom States of Fullerenes and Their Hybridization into the Nearly Free Electron Bands of Fullerites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jin; Feng, Min; Yang, Jinlong; Petek, Hrvoje

    2009-04-07

    Motivated by the discovery of the superatom states of C₆₀ molecules, we investigate the factors that influence their energy and wave function hybridization into nearly free electron bands in molecular solids. As the n = 3 solutions of the radial Schro¨dinger equation of the central attractive potential consisting of the shortrange C atom core and the long-range collective screening potentials, respectively, located on the icosahedral C60 molecule shell and within its hollow core, superatom states are distinguished by their atom-like orbitals corresponding to different orbital angular momentum states (l = 0, 1, 2,...). Because they are less tightly bound than the π orbitals, that is, the n = 2 states, which are often exploited in the intermolecular electron transport in aromatic organic molecule semiconductors, superatom orbitals hybridize more extensively among aggregated molecules to form bands with nearly free electron dispersion. The prospect of exploiting the strong intermolecular coupling to achieve metal-like conduction in applications such as molecular electronics may be attained by lowering the energy of superatom states from 3.5 eV for single chemisorbed C₆₀ molecules to below the Fermi level; therefore, we study how the superatom state energies depend on factors such as their aggregation into 1D - 3D solids, cage size, and exo- and endohedral doping by metal atoms. We find, indeed, that if the ionization potential of endohedral atom, such as copper, is sufficiently large, superatom states can form the conduction band in the middle of the gap between the HOMO and LUMO of the parent C₆₀ molecule. Through a plane-wave density functional theory study, we provide insights for a new paradigm for intermolecular electronic interaction beyond the conventional one among the spn hybridized orbitals of the organic molecular solids that could lead to design of novel molecular materials and quantum structures with extraordinary optical and

  20. Millimeter-wave waveguiding using photonic band structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliyahu, Danny; Sadovnik, Lev S.; Manasson, Vladimir A.

    2000-07-01

    Current trends in device miniaturization and integration, especially in the development of microwave monolithic integrated circuits, calls for flexible, arbitrarily shaped and curved interconnects. Standard dielectric waveguides and microstrip lines are subject to prohibitive losses and their functionality is limited because of their unflexible structures. The problem is addressed by confining the wave- guiding path in a substrate with a Photonic Band Gap structure in a manner that will result in the guided mode being localized within the band gap. Two devices implementing Photonic Band Structures for millimeter waves confinement are presented. The first waveguide is a linear defect in triangular lattice created in a silicon slab (TE mode). The structure consists of parallel air holes of circular cross sections. The silicon was laser drilled to create the 2D crystal. The second device consists of alumina rods arranged in a triangular lattice, surrounded by air and sandwiched between two parallel metal plates (TM mode). Electromagnetic wave (W-band) confinement was obtained in both devices for straight and bent waveguides. Three branch waveguides (intersecting line defects) was studied as well. Measurements confirmed the lowloss waveguide confinement property of the utilizing Photonic Band Gap structure. This structure can find applications in power combiner/splitter and other millimeter wave devices.

  1. Band structure of ABC-trilayer graphene superlattice

    SciTech Connect

    Uddin, Salah Chan, K. S.

    2014-11-28

    We investigate the effect of one-dimensional periodic potentials on the low energy band structure of ABC trilayer graphene first by assuming that all the three layers have the same potential. Extra Dirac points having the same electron hole crossing energy as that of the original Dirac point are generated by superlattice potentials with equal well and barrier widths. When the potential height is increased, the numbers of extra Dirac points are increased. The dispersions around the Dirac points are not isotropic. It is noted that the dispersion along the k{sub y} direction for k{sub x} = 0 oscillates between a non-linear dispersion and a linear dispersion when the potential height is increased. When the well and barrier widths are not identical, the symmetry of the conduction and valence bands is broken. The extra Dirac points are shifted either upward or downward depending on the barrier and well widths from the zero energy, while the position of the central Dirac point oscillates with the superlattice potential height. By considering different potentials for different layers, extra Dirac points are generated not from the original Dirac points but from the valleys formed in the energy spectrum. Two extra Dirac points appear from each pair of touched valleys, so four Dirac points appeared in the spectrum at particular barrier height. By increasing the barrier height of superlattice potential two Dirac points merge into the original Dirac point. This emerging and merging of extra Dirac points is different from the equal potential case.

  2. Electronics for Piezoelectric Smart Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warkentin, D. J.; Tani, J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper briefly presents work addressing some of the basic considerations for the electronic components used in smart structures incorporating piezoelectric elements. After general remarks on the application of piezoelectric elements to the problem of structural vibration control, three main topics are described. Work to date on the development of techniques for embedding electronic components within structural parts is presented, followed by a description of the power flow and dissipation requirements of those components. Finally current work on the development of electronic circuits for use in an 'active wall' for acoustic noise is introduced.

  3. Band structures in light neutron-rich nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohlen, H. G.; von Oertzen, W.; Kalpakchieva, R.; Massey, T. N.; Dorsch, T.; Milin, M.; Schulz, C.; Kokalova, T.; Wheldon, C.

    2008-05-01

    The structure of beryllium isotopes in the mass range A = 8-12 has been investigated using the properties of different bands, which are populated in specific reactions. The different structures are formed in transfer reactions with neutron stripping on 9,10Be or proton pick-up on 12,13,14C. The slope in the linear dependence of the excitation energies on J(J+1), where J is the spin, has been deduced for 13 bands and compared for common systematics. From the measured moments-of-inertia the α - α distance has been deduced for molecular structures.

  4. Electronic structure of disordered conjugated polymers: Polythiophenes

    SciTech Connect

    Vukmirovic, Nenad; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2008-11-26

    Electronic structure of disordered semiconducting conjugated polymers was studied. Atomic structure was found from a classical molecular dynamics simulation and the charge patching method was used to calculate the electronic structure with the accuracy similar to the one of density functional theory in local density approximation. The total density of states, the local density of states at different points in the system and the wavefunctions of several states around the gap were calculated in the case of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and polythiophene (PT) systems to gain insight into the origin of disorder in the system, the degree of carrier localization and the role of chain interactions. The results indicated that disorder in the electronic structure of alkyl substituted polythiophenes comes from disorder in the conformation of individualchains, while in the case of polythiophene there is an additional contribution due to disorder in the electronic coupling between the chains. Each of the first several wavefunctions in the conduction and valence band of P3HT is localized over several rings of a single chain. It was shown that the localization can be caused in principle both by ring torsions and chain bending, however the effect of ring torsions is much stronger. PT wavefunctions are more complicated due to larger interchain electronic coupling and are not necessarily localized on a single chain.

  5. Fine structure of the red luminescence band in undoped GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Reshchikov, M. A.; Usikov, A.; Helava, H.; Makarov, Yu.

    2014-01-20

    Many point defects in GaN responsible for broad photoluminescence (PL) bands remain unidentified. Their presence in thick GaN layers grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) detrimentally affects the material quality and may hinder the use of GaN in high-power electronic devices. One of the main PL bands in HVPE-grown GaN is the red luminescence (RL) band with a maximum at 1.8 eV. We observed the fine structure of this band with a zero-phonon line (ZPL) at 2.36 eV, which may help to identify the related defect. The shift of the ZPL with excitation intensity and the temperature-related transformation of the RL band fine structure indicate that the RL band is caused by transitions from a shallow donor (at low temperature) or from the conduction band (above 50 K) to an unknown deep acceptor having an energy level 1.130 eV above the valence band.

  6. Band structure engineering and thermoelectric properties of charge-compensated filled skutterudites

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Xiaoya; Yang, Jiong; Wu, Lijun; Salvador, James R.; Zhang, Cheng; Villaire, William L.; Haddad, Daad; Yang, Jihui; Zhu, Yimei; Li, Qiang

    2015-10-12

    Thermoelectric properties of semiconductors are intimately related to their electronic band structure, which can be engineered via chemical doping. Dopant Ga in the cage-structured skutterudite Co4Sb12 substitutes Sb sites while occupying the void sites. Combining quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy and first-principles calculations, we show that Ga dual-site occupancy breaks the symmetry of the Sb-Sb network, splits the deep triply-degenerate conduction bands, and drives them downward to the band edge. The charge-compensating nature of the dual occupancy Ga increases overall filling fraction limit. By imparting this unique band structure feature, and judiciously doping the materials by increasing the Yb content, we promote the Fermi level to a point where carriers are in energetic proximity to these features. Increased participation of these heavier bands in electronic transport leads to increased thermopower and effective mass. Further, the localized distortion from Ga/Sb substitution enhances the phonon scattering to reduce the thermal conductivity effectively.

  7. Band structure engineering and thermoelectric properties of charge-compensated filled skutterudites

    DOE PAGES

    Shi, Xiaoya; Yang, Jiong; Wu, Lijun; Salvador, James R.; Zhang, Cheng; Villaire, William L.; Haddad, Daad; Yang, Jihui; Zhu, Yimei; Li, Qiang

    2015-10-12

    Thermoelectric properties of semiconductors are intimately related to their electronic band structure, which can be engineered via chemical doping. Dopant Ga in the cage-structured skutterudite Co4Sb12 substitutes Sb sites while occupying the void sites. Combining quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy and first-principles calculations, we show that Ga dual-site occupancy breaks the symmetry of the Sb-Sb network, splits the deep triply-degenerate conduction bands, and drives them downward to the band edge. The charge-compensating nature of the dual occupancy Ga increases overall filling fraction limit. By imparting this unique band structure feature, and judiciously doping the materials by increasing the Yb content,more » we promote the Fermi level to a point where carriers are in energetic proximity to these features. Increased participation of these heavier bands in electronic transport leads to increased thermopower and effective mass. Further, the localized distortion from Ga/Sb substitution enhances the phonon scattering to reduce the thermal conductivity effectively.« less

  8. Band Structure Engineering and Thermoelectric Properties of Charge-Compensated Filled Skutterudites

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaoya; Yang, Jiong; Wu, Lijun; Salvador, James R.; Zhang, Cheng; Villaire, William L.; Haddad, Daad; Yang, Jihui; Zhu, Yimei; Li, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Thermoelectric properties of semiconductors are intimately related to their electronic band structure, which can be engineered via chemical doping. Dopant Ga in the cage-structured skutterudite Co4Sb12 substitutes Sb sites while occupying the void sites. Combining quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy and first-principles calculations, we show that Ga dual-site occupancy breaks the symmetry of the Sb-Sb network, splits the deep triply-degenerate conduction bands, and drives them downward to the band edge. The charge-compensating nature of the dual occupancy Ga increases overall filling fraction limit. By imparting this unique band structure feature, and judiciously doping the materials by increasing the Yb content, we promote the Fermi level to a point where carriers are in energetic proximity to these features. Increased participation of these heavier bands in electronic transport leads to increased thermopower and effective mass. Further, the localized distortion from Ga/Sb substitution enhances the phonon scattering to reduce the thermal conductivity effectively. PMID:26456013

  9. Curvature effects in the band structure of carbon nanotubes including spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong; Heinze, Dirk; Thanh Duc, Huynh; Schumacher, Stefan; Meier, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    The Kane-Mele model was previously used to describe effective spin-orbit couplings (SOCs) in graphene. Here we extend this model and also incorporate curvature effects to analyze the combined influence of SOC and curvature on the band structure of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The extended model then reproduces the chirality-dependent asymmetric electron-hole splitting for semiconducting CNTs and in the band structure for metallic CNTs shows an opening of the band gap and a change of the Fermi wave vector with spin. For chiral semiconducting CNTs with large chiral angle we show that the spin-splitting configuration of bands near the Fermi energy depends on the value of \\text{mod}(2n+m,3) .

  10. Bulk electronic structure of metals resolved with scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pascual, J I; Dick, A; Hansmann, M; Rust, H-P; Neugebauer, J; Horn, K

    2006-02-01

    We demonstrate that bulk band structure can have a strong influence in scanning tunneling microscopy measurements by resolving electronic interference patterns associated with scattering phenomena of bulk states at a metal surface and reconstructing the bulk band topology. Our data reveal that bulk information can be detected because states at the edge of the surface-projected bulk band have a predominant role on the scattering patterns. With the aid of density functional calculations, we associate this effect with an intrinsic increase in the projected density of states of edge states. This enhancement is characteristic of the three-dimensional bulk band curvature, a phenomenon analog to a van Hove singularity.

  11. Shell model and band structures in 19O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Oertzen, W.; Milin, M.; Dorsch, T.; Bohlen, H. G.; Krücken, R.; Faestermann, T.; Hertenberger, R.; Kokalova, Tz.; Mahgoub, M.; Wheldon, C.; Wirth, H.-F.

    2010-12-01

    We have studied the reaction ( ^7Li, p) on 13C targets at E lab = 44 MeV, populating states in the oxygen isotope 19O . The experiments were performed at the Tandem Laboratory (Maier-Leibniz Laboratorium) using the high-resolution Q3D magnetic spectrometer. States were populated up to an excitation energy of 21MeV, with an overall energy resolution of 45keV. We discuss shell model states and cluster bands related to the rotational bands in the 18O -isotope, using the weak-coupling approach. Similar to 18O , the broken intrinsic reflection symmetry in these states must give rise to rotational bands as parity doublets, so two K = 3/2 bands (parities, + and - are proposed with large moments of inertia. These are discussed in terms of an underlying cluster structure, ( ^14C ⊗ n ⊗ α) . An extended molecular binding diagram is proposed which includes the 14C -cluster.

  12. Electronic properties of Janus silicene: new direct band gap semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Minglei; Ren, Qingqiang; Wang, Sake; Yu, Jin; Tang, Wencheng

    2016-11-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we propose a new class of materials, Janus silicene, which is silicene asymmetrically functionalized with hydrogen and halogen atoms. Formation energies and phonon dispersion indicated that all the Janus silicene systems exhibit good kinetic stability. As compared to silicane, all Janus silicene systems are direct band gap semiconductors. The band gap of Janus silicene can take any value between 1.91 and 2.66 eV by carefully tuning the chemical composition of the adatoms. In addition, biaxial elastic strain can further reduce the band gap to 1.11 eV (under a biaxial tensile strain up to 10%). According to moderate direct band gap, these materials demonstrate potential applications in optoelectronics, exhibiting a very wide spectral range, and they are expected to be highly stable under ambient conditions.

  13. Electronic structure and optical properties of resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Zhi-Fan; Zhou, Rong-Feng

    2013-03-01

    We used the density of functional theory (DFT) to study the electronic structure and density of states of resin by ab initio calculation. The results show the band gap of resin is 1.7 eV. The covalent bond is combined C/O atoms with H atoms. The O 2p orbital is the biggest effect near the Fermi level. The results of optical properties show the reflectivity is low, and the refractive index is 1.7 in visible light range. The highest absorption coefficient peak is in 490 nm and the value is 75,000.

  14. Determination of the valence band structure of an alkali phosphorus oxynitride glass: A synchrotron XPS study on LiPON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwöbel, André; Precht, Ruben; Motzko, Markus; Carrillo Solano, Mercedes A.; Calvet, Wolfram; Hausbrand, René; Jaegermann, Wolfram

    2014-12-01

    Lithium phosphorus oxynitride (LiPON) is a solid state electrolyte commonly used in thin film batteries (TFBs). Advanced TFBs face the issue of detrimental electrode-electrolyte interlayer formation, related to the electronic structure of the interface. In this contribution, we study the valence band structure of LiPON using resonant photoemission and synchrotron photoemission with variable excitation energies. The identification of different valence band features is done according to the known valence band features of meta- and orthophosphates. Additionally we compare our results with partial density of states simulations from literature. We find that the valence band structure is similar to the known metaphosphates with an additional contribution of nitrogen states at the top of the valence band. From the results we conclude that synchrotron X-ray photoemission (XPS) is a useful tool to study the valence band structure of nitridated alkali phosphate glasses.

  15. 5 CFR 9701.321 - Structure of bands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Structure of bands. 9701.321 Section 9701.321 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...

  16. 5 CFR 9701.321 - Structure of bands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Structure of bands. 9701.321 Section 9701.321 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...

  17. Band structure of W and Mo by empirical pseudopotential method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridhar, C. G.; Whiting, E. E.

    1977-01-01

    The empirical pseudopotential method (EPM) is used to calculate the band structure of tungsten and molybdenum. Agreement between the calculated reflectivity, density of states, density of states at the Fermi surface and location of the Fermi surface from this study and experimental measurements and previous calculations is good. Also the charge distribution shows the proper topological distribution of charge for a bcc crystal.

  18. Complex band structures of transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers with spin-orbit coupling effects.

    PubMed

    Szczęśniak, Dominik; Ennaoui, Ahmed; Ahzi, Saïd

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the transition metal dichalcogenides have attracted renewed attention due to the potential use of their low-dimensional forms in both nano- and opto-electronics. In such applications, the electronic and transport properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides play a pivotal role. The present paper provides a new insight into these essential properties by studying the complex band structures of popular transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers (MX 2, where M  =  Mo, W; X  =  S, Se, Te) while including spin-orbit coupling effects. The conducted symmetry-based tight-binding calculations show that the analytical continuation from the real band structures to the complex momentum space leads to nonlinear generalized eigenvalue problems. Herein an efficient method for solving such a class of nonlinear problems is presented and yields a complete set of physically relevant eigenvalues. Solutions obtained by this method are characterized and classified into propagating and evanescent states, where the latter states manifest not only monotonic but also oscillatory decay character. It is observed that some of the oscillatory evanescent states create characteristic complex loops at the direct band gap of MX 2 monolayers, where electrons can directly tunnel between the band gap edges. To describe these tunneling currents, decay behavior of electronic states in the forbidden energy region is elucidated and their importance within the ballistic transport regime is briefly discussed.

  19. Complex band structures of transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers with spin-orbit coupling effects.

    PubMed

    Szczęśniak, Dominik; Ennaoui, Ahmed; Ahzi, Saïd

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the transition metal dichalcogenides have attracted renewed attention due to the potential use of their low-dimensional forms in both nano- and opto-electronics. In such applications, the electronic and transport properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides play a pivotal role. The present paper provides a new insight into these essential properties by studying the complex band structures of popular transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers (MX 2, where M  =  Mo, W; X  =  S, Se, Te) while including spin-orbit coupling effects. The conducted symmetry-based tight-binding calculations show that the analytical continuation from the real band structures to the complex momentum space leads to nonlinear generalized eigenvalue problems. Herein an efficient method for solving such a class of nonlinear problems is presented and yields a complete set of physically relevant eigenvalues. Solutions obtained by this method are characterized and classified into propagating and evanescent states, where the latter states manifest not only monotonic but also oscillatory decay character. It is observed that some of the oscillatory evanescent states create characteristic complex loops at the direct band gap of MX 2 monolayers, where electrons can directly tunnel between the band gap edges. To describe these tunneling currents, decay behavior of electronic states in the forbidden energy region is elucidated and their importance within the ballistic transport regime is briefly discussed. PMID:27367475

  20. Complex band structures of transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers with spin-orbit coupling effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczęśniak, Dominik; Ennaoui, Ahmed; Ahzi, Saïd

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the transition metal dichalcogenides have attracted renewed attention due to the potential use of their low-dimensional forms in both nano- and opto-electronics. In such applications, the electronic and transport properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides play a pivotal role. The present paper provides a new insight into these essential properties by studying the complex band structures of popular transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers (MX 2, where M  =  Mo, W; X  =  S, Se, Te) while including spin-orbit coupling effects. The conducted symmetry-based tight-binding calculations show that the analytical continuation from the real band structures to the complex momentum space leads to nonlinear generalized eigenvalue problems. Herein an efficient method for solving such a class of nonlinear problems is presented and yields a complete set of physically relevant eigenvalues. Solutions obtained by this method are characterized and classified into propagating and evanescent states, where the latter states manifest not only monotonic but also oscillatory decay character. It is observed that some of the oscillatory evanescent states create characteristic complex loops at the direct band gap of MX 2 monolayers, where electrons can directly tunnel between the band gap edges. To describe these tunneling currents, decay behavior of electronic states in the forbidden energy region is elucidated and their importance within the ballistic transport regime is briefly discussed.

  1. Complex band structures of transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers with spin–orbit coupling effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczęśniak, Dominik; Ennaoui, Ahmed; Ahzi, Saïd

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the transition metal dichalcogenides have attracted renewed attention due to the potential use of their low-dimensional forms in both nano- and opto-electronics. In such applications, the electronic and transport properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides play a pivotal role. The present paper provides a new insight into these essential properties by studying the complex band structures of popular transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers (MX 2, where M  =  Mo, W; X  =  S, Se, Te) while including spin–orbit coupling effects. The conducted symmetry-based tight-binding calculations show that the analytical continuation from the real band structures to the complex momentum space leads to nonlinear generalized eigenvalue problems. Herein an efficient method for solving such a class of nonlinear problems is presented and yields a complete set of physically relevant eigenvalues. Solutions obtained by this method are characterized and classified into propagating and evanescent states, where the latter states manifest not only monotonic but also oscillatory decay character. It is observed that some of the oscillatory evanescent states create characteristic complex loops at the direct band gap of MX 2 monolayers, where electrons can directly tunnel between the band gap edges. To describe these tunneling currents, decay behavior of electronic states in the forbidden energy region is elucidated and their importance within the ballistic transport regime is briefly discussed.

  2. X-Band Photonic Band-Gap Accelerator Structure Breakdown Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, Roark A.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.; Dolgashev, Valery A.; Laurent, Lisa L.; Lewandowski, James R.; Yeremian, A.Dian; Tantawi, Sami G.; /SLAC

    2012-06-11

    In order to understand the performance of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures under realistic high gradient, high power, high repetition rate operation, a PBG accelerator structure was designed and tested at X band (11.424 GHz). The structure consisted of a single test cell with matching cells before and after the structure. The design followed principles previously established in testing a series of conventional pillbox structures. The PBG structure was tested at an accelerating gradient of 65 MV/m yielding a breakdown rate of two breakdowns per hour at 60 Hz. An accelerating gradient above 110 MV/m was demonstrated at a higher breakdown rate. Significant pulsed heating occurred on the surface of the inner rods of the PBG structure, with a temperature rise of 85 K estimated when operating in 100 ns pulses at a gradient of 100 MV/m and a surface magnetic field of 890 kA/m. A temperature rise of up to 250 K was estimated for some shots. The iris surfaces, the location of peak electric field, surprisingly had no damage, but the inner rods, the location of the peak magnetic fields and a large temperature rise, had significant damage. Breakdown in accelerator structures is generally understood in terms of electric field effects. These PBG structure results highlight the unexpected role of magnetic fields in breakdown. The hypothesis is presented that the moderate level electric field on the inner rods, about 14 MV/m, is enhanced at small tips and projections caused by pulsed heating, leading to breakdown. Future PBG structures should be built to minimize pulsed surface heating and temperature rise.

  3. [Structure of human erythrocyte band 3: two-dimensional crystallographic analysis of the membrane domain].

    PubMed

    Hirai, Teruhisa; Yamaguchi, Tomohiro

    2015-07-01

    Band 3 (also known as anion exchanger 1, AE1) is one of the most abundant membrane proteins in human erythrocytes. Band 3 has 911 amino acids and consists of two structurally and functionally distinct domains. One is a 40-kDa N-terminal cytoplasmic domain and the other is a 55-kDa C-terminal membrane domain. The cytoplasmic domain maintains red cell shape through interactions with cytoskeletal proteins, such as protein 4.1, protein 4.2, ankyrin, and spectrin. On the other hand, the membrane domain mediates electroneutral exchange of anions, such as bicarbonate and chloride across the erythrocyte membrane. We reported the three-dimensional structure of the outward-open membrane domain of band 3, which was cross-linked between K539 and K851 with H2DIDS, at 7.5 Å resolution using cryo-electron crystallography. Although the results showed significantly improved resolution as compared with previous structural analyses, we could not assign all α-helices because of low resolution and uncertainty persists regarding the fold of band 3. However, we recognized that band 3 has internal repeats, because the structure exhibited distinctive anti-parallel V-shaped motifs, which protrude from the membrane bilayer on both sides. One of the helices in the motif is very long and highly tilted with respect to the normal structure of the bilayer.

  4. Electronic Structure of II-Vi Semiconductors and Their Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Su-Huai

    The II-VI semiconductors ZnXVI, CdXVI, and HgXVI are known to have a metal d band inside the main valence band. Using all-electron self-consistent electronic structure techniques, we study their effects on valence properties. For II-VI semiconductors, we find that p-d repulsion and hybridization (i) lower the band gaps, (ii) alter the sign of the crystal-field splitting, (iii) reduce the spin-orbit splitting, (iv) change the valence band offset between common-anion semiconductors, and (v) increase the equilibrium lattice parameters, p-d repulsion is also shown to be responsible for the anomalously small band gaps in chalcopyrites, and for the negative exchange splitting in MnTe. We also study the electronic structure of ordered and random II-VI substitutional alloys and identify the mechanism for their band gap narrowing. The random {A_{1-x}^{II}B_{x}^{II}C^{VI}} alloys are represented by the "special quasirandom structures." We show how chemical and structural perturbations lead to (i) distinct A-like and B-like features in the density of states and (ii) different C-like features associated with fluctuations in the local environments around the common sublattice.

  5. Inter-band optoelectronic properties in quantum dot structure of low band gap III-V semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Anup; Maiti, Biswajit; Chanda, Debasree

    2014-04-14

    A generalized theory is developed to study inter-band optical absorption coefficient (IOAC) and material gain (MG) in quantum dot structures of narrow gap III-V compound semiconductor considering the wave-vector (k{sup →}) dependence of the optical transition matrix element. The band structures of these low band gap semiconducting materials with sufficiently separated split-off valance band are frequently described by the three energy band model of Kane. This has been adopted for analysis of the IOAC and MG taking InAs, InSb, Hg{sub 1−x}Cd{sub x}Te, and In{sub 1−x}Ga{sub x}As{sub y}P{sub 1−y} lattice matched to InP, as example of III–V compound semiconductors, having varied split-off energy band compared to their bulk band gap energy. It has been found that magnitude of the IOAC for quantum dots increases with increasing incident photon energy and the lines of absorption are more closely spaced in the three band model of Kane than those with parabolic energy band approximations reflecting the direct the influence of energy band parameters. The results show a significant deviation to the MG spectrum of narrow-gap materials having band nonparabolicity compared to the parabolic band model approximations. The results reflect the important role of valence band split-off energies in these narrow gap semiconductors.

  6. S-band linac-based X-ray source with π/2-mode electron linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Abhay; Araki, Sakae; Dixit, Tanuja; Fukuda, Masafumi; Krishnan, R.; Pethe, Sanjay; Sakaue, Kazuyuki; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; Urakawa, Junji; Washio, Masakazu

    2011-05-01

    The activities with the compact X-ray source are attracting more attention, particularly for the applications of the source in medical fields. We propose the fabrication of a compact X-ray source using the SAMEER electron linear accelerator and the KEK laser undulator X-ray source (LUCX) technologies. The linac developed at SAMEER is a standing wave side-coupled S-band linac operating in the π/2 mode. In the proposed system, a photocathode RF gun will inject bunches of electrons in the linac to accelerate and achieve a high-energy, low-emittance beam. This beam will then interact with the laser in the laser cavity to produce X-rays of a type well suited for various applications. The side-coupled structure will make the system more compact, and the π/2 mode of operation will enable a high repetition rate operation, which will help to increase the X-ray yield.

  7. Coherent phonon spectroscopy characterization of electronic bands at buried semiconductor heterointerfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishioka, Kunie; Brixius, Kristina; Beyer, Andreas; Rustagi, Avinash; Stanton, Christopher J.; Stolz, Wolfgang; Volz, Kerstin; Höfer, Ulrich; Petek, Hrvoje

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate an all-optical approach to probe electronic band structure at buried interfaces involving polar semiconductors. Femtosecond optical pulses excite coherent phonons in epitaxial GaP films grown on Si(001) substrate. We find that the coherent phonon amplitude critically depends on the film growth conditions, specifically in the presence of antiphase domains, which are independently characterized by transmission electron microscopy. We determine the Fermi levels at the buried interface of GaP/Si from the coherent phonon amplitudes and demonstrate that the internal electric fields are created in the nominally undoped GaP films as well as the Si substrates, possibly due to the carrier trapping at the antiphase boundaries and/or at the interface.

  8. Electronic Structure of Silicon Nanowires Matrix from Ab Initio Calculations.

    PubMed

    Monastyrskii, Liubomyr S; Boyko, Yaroslav V; Sokolovskii, Bogdan S; Potashnyk, Vasylyna Ya

    2016-12-01

    An investigation of the model of porous silicon in the form of periodic set of silicon nanowires has been carried out. The electronic energy structure was studied using a first-principle band method-the method of pseudopotentials (ultrasoft potentials in the basis of plane waves) and linearized mode of the method of combined pseudopotentials. Due to the use of hybrid exchange-correlation potentials (B3LYP), the quantitative agreement of the calculated value of band gap in the bulk material with experimental data is achieved. The obtained results show that passivation of dangling bonds with hydrogen atoms leads to substantial transformation of electronic energy structure. At complete passivation of the dangling silicon bonds by hydrogen atoms, the band gap value takes the magnitude which substantially exceeds that for bulk silicon. The incomplete passivation gives rise to opposite effect when the band gap value decreases down the semimetallic range.

  9. Electronic structure and optic absorption of phosphorene under strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Houjian; Yang, Mou; Wang, Ruiqiang

    2016-07-01

    We studied the electronic structure and optic absorption of phosphorene (monolayer of black phosphorus) under strain. Strain was found to be a powerful tool for the band structure engineering. The in-plane strain in armchair or zigzag direction changes the effective mass components along both directions, while the vertical strain only has significant effect on the effective mass in the armchair direction. The band gap is narrowed by compressive in-plane strain and tensile vertical strain. Under certain strain configurations, the gap is closed and the energy band evolves to the semi-Dirac type: the dispersion is linear in the armchair direction and is gapless quadratic in the zigzag direction. The band-edge optic absorption is completely polarized along the armchair direction, and the polarization rate is reduced when the photon energy increases. Strain not only changes the absorption edge (the smallest photon energy for electron transition), but also the absorption polarization.

  10. Identical band gaps in structurally re-entrant honeycombs.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhu-Wei; Deng, Zi-Chen

    2016-08-01

    Structurally re-entrant honeycomb is a sort of artificial lattice material, characterized by star-like unit cells with re-entrant topology, as well as a high connectivity that the number of folded sheets jointing at each vertex is at least six. In-plane elastic wave propagation in this highly connected honeycomb is investigated through the application of the finite element method in conjunction with the Bloch's theorem. Attention is devoted to exploring the band characteristics of two lattice configurations with different star-like unit cells, defined as structurally square re-entrant honeycomb (SSRH) and structurally hexagonal re-entrant honeycomb (SHRH), respectively. Identical band gaps involving their locations and widths, interestingly, are present in the two considered configurations, attributed to the resonance of the sketch folded sheets, the basic component elements for SSRH and SHRH. In addition, the concept of heuristic models is implemented to elucidate the underlying physics of the identical gaps. The phenomenon of the identical bandgaps is not only beneficial for people to further explore the band characteristics of lattice materials, but also provides the structurally re-entrant honeycombs as potential host structures for the design of lattice-based metamaterials of interest for elastic wave control. PMID:27586722

  11. Novel band structures in silicene on monolayer zinc sulfide substrate.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng-shi; Zhang, Chang-wen; Yan, Shi-shen; Hu, Shu-jun; Ji, Wei-xiao; Wang, Pei-ji; Li, Ping

    2014-10-01

    Opening a sizable band gap in the zero-gap silicene without lowering the carrier mobility is a key issue for its application in nanoelectronics. Based on first-principles calculations, we find that the interaction energies are in the range of -0.09‒0.3 eV per Si atom, indicating a weak interaction between silicene and ZnS monolayer and the ABZn stacking is the most stable pattern. The band gap of silicene can be effectively tuned ranging from 0.025 to 1.05 eV in silicene and ZnS heterobilayer (Si/ZnS HBL). An unexpected indirect-direct band gap crossover is also observed in HBLs, dependent on the stacking pattern, interlayer spacing and external strain effects on silicene. Interestingly, the characteristics of Dirac cone with a nearly linear band dispersion relation of silicene can be preserved in the ABS pattern which is a metastable state, accompanied by a small electron effective mass and thus the carrier mobility is expected not to degrade much. These provide a possible way to design effective FETs out of silicene on a ZnS monolayer.

  12. Valley-dependent band structure and valley polarization in periodically modulated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wei-Tao

    2016-08-01

    The valley-dependent energy band and transport property of graphene under a periodic magnetic-strained field are studied, where the time-reversal symmetry is broken and the valley degeneracy is lifted. The considered superlattice is composed of two different barriers, providing more degrees of freedom for engineering the electronic structure. The electrons near the K and K' valleys are dominated by different effective superlattices. It is found that the energy bands for both valleys are symmetric with respect to ky=-(AM+ξ AS) /4 under the symmetric superlattices. More finite-energy Dirac points, more prominent collimation behavior, and new crossing points are found for K' valley. The degenerate miniband near the K valley splits into two subminibands and produces a new band gap under the asymmetric superlattices. The velocity for the K' valley is greatly renormalized compared with the K valley, and so we can achieve a finite velocity for the K valley while the velocity for the K' valley is zero. Especially, the miniband and band gap could be manipulated independently, leading to an increase of the conductance. The characteristics of the band structure are reflected in the transmission spectra. The Dirac points and the crossing points appear as pronounced peaks in transmission. A remarkable valley polarization is obtained which is robust to the disorder and can be controlled by the strain, the period, and the voltage.

  13. Quasiparticle band structures and optical properties of magnesium fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zhijun; Jia, Ran

    2012-02-01

    The quasiparticle and optical properties of magnesium fluoride (MgF2) are computed within the GW approximation based on many-body perturbation theory (MBPT). The many-body effects appearing in self-energy and electron-hole interactions have an important influence on the electronic and optical properties. The DFT-LDA calculation shows a 6.78 eV band gap. Two methods are employed to evaluate the self-energy within the GW approximation in the present work. The generalized plasmon pole model (GPP) provides a band gap of 12.17 eV, which agrees well with the experimental value of 12.4 eV (Thomas et al 1973 Phys. Status Solidi b 56 163). Another band gap value of 11.30 eV is obtained by using a full frequency-dependent self-energy, which is also not far from the experimental value and is much better than the result from the LDA calculation. The calculated optical spectrum within DFT is significantly different from the experiment. Although the calculated optical absorption threshold within the GW method is close to the experiment, the overall shape of the spectrum is still similar to the case of DFT. However, the overall shape of the spectrum via the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) method agrees well with the experiment.

  14. Quasiparticle band structures and optical properties of magnesium fluoride.

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhijun; Jia, Ran

    2012-02-29

    The quasiparticle and optical properties of magnesium fluoride (MgF(2)) are computed within the GW approximation based on many-body perturbation theory (MBPT). The many-body effects appearing in self-energy and electron-hole interactions have an important influence on the electronic and optical properties. The DFT-LDA calculation shows a 6.78 eV band gap. Two methods are employed to evaluate the self-energy within the GW approximation in the present work. The generalized plasmon pole model (GPP) provides a band gap of 12.17 eV, which agrees well with the experimental value of 12.4 eV (Thomas et al 1973 Phys. Status Solidi b 56 163). Another band gap value of 11.30 eV is obtained by using a full frequency-dependent self-energy, which is also not far from the experimental value and is much better than the result from the LDA calculation. The calculated optical spectrum within DFT is significantly different from the experiment. Although the calculated optical absorption threshold within the GW method is close to the experiment, the overall shape of the spectrum is still similar to the case of DFT. However, the overall shape of the spectrum via the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) method agrees well with the experiment.

  15. Promoting Photochemical Water Oxidation with Metallic Band Structures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongfei; Moré, René; Grundmann, Henrik; Cui, Chunhua; Erni, Rolf; Patzke, Greta R

    2016-02-10

    The development of economic water oxidation catalysts is a key step toward large-scale water splitting. However, their current exploration remains empirical to a large extent. Elucidating the correlations between electronic properties and catalytic activity is crucial for deriving general and straightforward catalyst design principles. Herein, strongly correlated electronic systems with abundant and easily tunable electronic properties, namely La(1-x)Sr(x)BO3 perovskites and La(2-x)Sr(x)BO4 layered perovskites (B = Fe, Co, Ni, or Mn), were employed as model systems to identify favorable electronic structures for water oxidation. We established a direct correlation between the enhancement of catalytic activity and the insulator to metal transition through tuning the electronic properties of the target perovskite families via the La(3+)/Sr(2+) ratio. Their improved photochemical water oxidation performance was clearly linked to the increasingly metallic character. These electronic structure-activity relations provide a promising guideline for constructing efficient water oxidation catalysts.

  16. Electronic Structure Principles and Aromaticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chattaraj, P. K.; Sarkar, U.; Roy, D. R.

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between aromaticity and stability in molecules on the basis of quantities such as hardness and electrophilicity is explored. The findings reveal that aromatic molecules are less energetic, harder, less polarizable, and less electrophilic as compared to antiaromatic molecules, as expected from the electronic structure principles.

  17. Mini-Dirac cones in the band structure of a copper intercalated epitaxial graphene superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forti, S.; Stöhr, A.; Zakharov, A. A.; Coletti, C.; Emtsev, K. V.; Starke, U.

    2016-09-01

    The electronic band structure of an epitaxial graphene superlattice, generated by intercalating a monolayer of Cu atoms, is directly imaged by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. The 3.2 nm lateral period of the superlattice is induced by a varying registry between the graphene honeycomb and the Cu atoms as imposed by the heteroepitaxial interface Cu/SiC. The carbon atoms experience a lateral potential across the supercell of an estimated value of about 65 meV. The potential leads to strong energy renormalization in the band structure of the graphene layer and the emergence of mini-Dirac cones. The mini-cones’ band velocity is reduced to about half of graphene's Fermi velocity. Notably, the ordering of the interfacial Cu atoms can be reversibly blocked by mild annealing. The superlattice indeed disappears at ∼220 °C.

  18. Impact of lattice distortion and electron doping on α-MoO3 electronic structure

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peng-Ru; He, Yao; Cao, Chao; Lu, Zheng-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Band structure of transition metal oxides plays a critical role in many applications such as photo-catalysis, photovoltaics, and electroluminescent devices. In this work we report findings that the band structure of MoO3 can be significantly altered by a distortion in the octahedral coordination structure. We discovered that, in addition to epitaxial type of structural strain, chemical force such as hydrogen inclusion can also cause extended lattice distortion. The lattice distortion in hydrogenated MoO3 led to a significant reduction of the energy gap, overshadowing the Moss-Burstein effect of band filling. Charge doping simulations revealed that filling of conduction band drives the lattice distortion. This suggests that any charge transfer or n-type electron doping could lead to lattice distortion and consequentially a reduction in energy gap. PMID:25410814

  19. Quantum Unfolding: A program for unfolding electronic energy bands of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fawei; Zhang, Ping; Duan, Wenhui

    2015-04-01

    We present Quantum Unfolding, a Fortran90 program for unfolding first-principles electronic energy bands. It unfolds energy bands accurately by handling the Fourier components of Bloch wavefunctions, which are reconstructed from Wannier functions from Wannier90. Due to the wide application of Wannier90 package and the possibility of focusing only on the most important energy bands, the present code works very conveniently.

  20. Feasibility study of electron transfer quantum well infrared photodetectors for spectral tuning in the long-wave infrared band

    SciTech Connect

    Jolley, Greg; Dehdashti Akhavan, Nima; Umana-Membreno, Gilberto; Antoszewski, Jarek; Faraone, Lorenzo

    2013-11-21

    An electron transfer quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) consisting of repeating units of two coupled quantum wells (QWs) is capable of exhibiting a two color voltage dependent spectral response. However, significant electron transfer between the coupled QWs is required for spectral tuning, which may require the application of relatively high electric fields. Also, the band structure of coupled quantum wells is more complicated in comparison to a regular quantum well and, therefore, it is not always obvious if an electron transfer QWIP can be designed such that it meets specific performance characteristics. This paper presents a feasibility study of the electron transfer QWIP and its suitability for spectral tuning. Self consistent calculations have been performed of the bandstructure and the electric field that results from electron population within the quantum wells, from which the optical characteristics have been obtained. The band structure, spectral response, and the resonant final state energy locations have been compared with standard QWIPs. It is shown that spectral tuning in the long-wave infrared band can be achieved over a wide wavelength range of several microns while maintaining a relatively narrow spectral response FWHM. However, the total absorption strength is more limited in comparison to a standard QWIP, since the higher QW doping densities require much higher electric fields for electron transfer.

  1. Band structure of germanium carbides for direct bandgap silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, C. A.; O'Brien, W. A.; Penninger, M. W.; Schneider, W. F.; Gillett-Kunnath, M.; Zajicek, J.; Yu, K. M.; Kudrawiec, R.; Stillwell, R. A.; Wistey, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    Compact optical interconnects require efficient lasers and modulators compatible with silicon. Ab initio modeling of Ge1-xCx (x = 0.78%) using density functional theory with HSE06 hybrid functionals predicts a splitting of the conduction band at Γ and a strongly direct bandgap, consistent with band anticrossing. Photoreflectance of Ge0.998C0.002 shows a bandgap reduction supporting these results. Growth of Ge0.998C0.002 using tetrakis(germyl)methane as the C source shows no signs of C-C bonds, C clusters, or extended defects, suggesting highly substitutional incorporation of C. Optical gain and modulation are predicted to rival III-V materials due to a larger electron population in the direct valley, reduced intervalley scattering, suppressed Auger recombination, and increased overlap integral for a stronger fundamental optical transition.

  2. Plasmonic band structure controls single-molecule fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Langguth, Lutz; Punj, Deep; Wenger, Jérôme; Koenderink, A Femius

    2013-10-22

    Plasmonics and photonic crystals are two complementary approaches to tailor single-emitter fluorescence, using strong local field enhancements near metals on one hand and spatially extended photonic band structure effects on the other hand. Here, we explore the emergence of spontaneous emission control by finite-sized hexagonal arrays of nanoapertures milled in gold film. We demonstrate that already small lattices enable highly directional and enhanced emission from single fluorescent molecules in the central aperture. Even for clusters just four unit cells across, the directionality is set by the plasmonic crystal band structure, as confirmed by full-wave numerical simulations. This realization of plasmonic phase array antennas driven by single quantum emitters opens a flexible toolbox to engineer fluorescence and its detection.

  3. Quasi-particle band structure of potassium-doped few-layer black phosphorus with GW approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Han-Gyu; Baik, Seung Su; Choi, Hyoung Joon

    We calculate the quasi-particle band structure of pristine and potassium-doped black phosphorus (BP) by using the GW approximation. We obtain band gaps of pristine bulk and few-layer BP and compare them with the result of the density functional calculations and experimental measurements. For potassium-doped cases, we calculate the electronic band structure of potassium-doped few-layer BPs with various doping densities. We obtain the critical doping density for the band-gap closing, and the energy-band dispersions when the band gap is inverted. We discuss Dirac semimetal properties of doped few-layer BPs obtained by the GW approximation. This work was supported by NRF of Korea (Grant No. 2011-0018306) and KISTI supercomputing center (Project No. KSC-2015-C3-039).

  4. Carrier Multiplication in Semiconductor Nanocrystals: Theoretical Screening of Candidate Materials Based on Band-Structure Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, J. W.; Franceschetti, A.; Zunger, A.

    2008-01-01

    Direct carrier multiplication (DCM) occurs when a highly excited electron-hole pair decays by transferring its excess energy to the electrons rather than to the lattice, possibly exciting additional electron-hole pairs. Atomistic electronic structure calculations have shown that DCM can be induced by electron-hole Coulomb interactions, in an impact-ionization-like process whose rate is proportional to the density of biexciton states {rho}{sub XX}. Here we introduce a DCM 'figure of merit' R{sub 2}(E) which is proportional to the ratio between the biexciton density of states {rho}{sub XX} and the single-exciton density of states {rho}{sub x}, restricted to single-exciton and biexciton states that are coupled by Coulomb interactions. Using R{sub 2}(E), we consider GaAs, InAs, InP, GaSb, InSb, CdSe, Ge, Si, and PbSe nanocrystals of different sizes. Although DCM can be affected by both quantum-confinement effects (reflecting the underly electronic structure of the confined dot-interior states) and surface effects, here we are interested to isolate the former. To this end the nanocrystal energy levels are obtained from the corresponding bulk band structure via the truncated crystal approximation. We find that PbSe, Si, GaAs, CdSe, and InP nanocrystals have larger DCM figure of merit than the other nanocrystals. Our calculations suggest that high DCM efficiency requires high degeneracy of the corresponding bulk band-edge states. Interestingly, by considering band structure effects we find that as the dot size increases the DCM critical energy E{sub 0} (the energy at which R{sub 2}(E) becomes {ge}1) is reduced, suggesting improved DCM. However, whether the normalized E{sub 0}/{var_epsilon}{sub g} increases or decreases as the dot size increases depends on dot material.

  5. Electronic and thermoelectric properties of Mexican hat bands in van-der-Waals materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramaratne, Darshana; Zahid, Ferdows; Lake, Roger

    2015-03-01

    Mexican hat dispersions are relatively common in few-layer two-dimensional materials. In one to four monolayers of the group-III chalcogenides (GaS, GaSe, InS, InSe) and Bi2Se3 the valence band undergoes a band inversion from a parabolic to an inverted Mexican hat dispersion as the film thickness is reduced from bulk to a single monolayer. The band inversion is robust against changes in stacking order, omission or inclusion of spin-orbit coupling and the choice of functional. The Mexican hat dispersion results in a 1/√{ E} singularity in the two-dimensional density of states and a step-function turn on in the density of modes. The largest radius of the ring of states occurs for a single monolayer of each material. The dispersion with the largest radius coincides with the maximum power factor and ZT for a material at room temperature. Ab-initio electronic structure calculations are used with a Landauer approach to calculate the thermoelectric transport coefficients. Analytical models of the Mexican hat and the parabolic dispersions are used for comparison and analysis. Vertically biased bilayer graphene could serve as an experimental test-bed for measuring this effect since the radius of the Mexican hat band edge increases linearly with vertical electric field. Support by the NSF and SRC-NRI Project 2204.001 (NSF-ECCS-1124733), FAME, one of six centers of STARnet, a SRC program sponsored by MARCO and DARPA and the use of XSEDE NSF Grant # OCI-1053575.

  6. Vertical Electron Transport through PbS-EuS Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrotek, S.; Dybko, K.; Morawski, A.; Makosa, A.; Wosinski, T.; Figielski, T.; Tkaczyk, Z.; Lusakowska, E.; Story, T.; Sipatov, A. Yu

    2003-01-01

    Temperature dependence of current-voltage I-V characteristics and resistivity is studied in ferromagnetic PbS-EuS semiconductor tunnel structures grown on n-PbS (100) substrates. For the structures with a single (2-4 nm thick) ferromagnetic EuS electron barrier we observe strongly non-linear I-V characteristics with an effective tunneling barrier height of 0.3-0.7 eV. The experimentally observed non-monotonic temperature dependence of the (normal to the plane of the structure) electrical resistance of these structures is discussed in terms of the electron tunneling mechanism taking into account the temperature dependent shift of the band offsets at the EuS-PbS heterointerface as well as the exchange splitting of the electronic states at the bottom of the conduction band of EuS.

  7. Band to band tunneling in III-V semiconductors: Implications of complex band structure, strain, orientation, and off-zone center contribution

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, Kausik

    2014-05-07

    In this paper, we use a tight binding Hamiltonian with spin orbit coupling to study the real and complex band structures of relaxed and strained GaAs. A simple d orbital on-site energy shift coupled with appropriate scaling of the off-diagonal terms is found to correctly reproduce the band-edge shifts with strain. Four different 〈100〉 strain combinations, namely, uniaxial compressive, uniaxial tensile, biaxial compressive, and biaxial tensile strain are studied, revealing rich valence band structure and strong relative orientation dependent tunneling. It is found that complex bands are unable to provide unambiguous tunneling paths away from the Brillouin zone center. Tunneling current density distribution over the Brillouin zone is computed using non-equilibrium Green's function approach elucidating a physical picture of band to band tunneling.

  8. Three-Dimensional Structure of Vertebrate Muscle Z-Band: The Small-Square Lattice Z-Band in Rat Cardiac Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Burgoyne, Thomas; Morris, Edward P.; Luther, Pradeep K.

    2015-01-01

    The Z-band in vertebrate striated muscle crosslinks actin filaments of opposite polarity from adjoining sarcomeres and transmits tension along myofibrils during muscular contraction. It is also the location of a number of proteins involved in signalling and myofibrillogenesis; mutations in these proteins lead to myopathies. Understanding the high-resolution structure of the Z-band will help us understand its role in muscle contraction and the role of these proteins in the function of muscle. The appearance of the Z-band in transverse-section electron micrographs typically resembles a small-square lattice or a basketweave appearance. In longitudinal sections, the Z-band width varies more with muscle type than species: slow skeletal and cardiac muscles have wider Z-bands than fast skeletal muscles. As the Z-band is periodic, Fourier methods have previously been used for three-dimensional structural analysis. To cope with variations in the periodic structure of the Z-band, we have used subtomogram averaging of tomograms of rat cardiac muscle in which subtomograms are extracted and compared and similar ones are averaged. We show that the Z-band comprises four to six layers of links, presumably α-actinin, linking antiparallel overlapping ends of the actin filaments from the adjoining sarcomeres. The reconstruction shows that the terminal 5–7 nm of the actin filaments within the Z-band is devoid of any α-actinin links and is likely to be the location of capping protein CapZ. PMID:26362007

  9. Electronic structure of atomically precise graphene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Ruffieux, Pascal; Cai, Jinming; Plumb, Nicholas C; Patthey, Luc; Prezzi, Deborah; Ferretti, Andrea; Molinari, Elisa; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Pignedoli, Carlo A; Fasel, Roman

    2012-08-28

    Some of the most intriguing properties of graphene are predicted for specifically designed nanostructures such as nanoribbons. Functionalities far beyond those known from extended graphene systems include electronic band gap variations related to quantum confinement and edge effects, as well as localized spin-polarized edge states for specific edge geometries. The inability to produce graphene nanostructures with the needed precision, however, has so far hampered the verification of the predicted electronic properties. Here, we report on the electronic band gap and dispersion of the occupied electronic bands of atomically precise graphene nanoribbons fabricated via on-surface synthesis. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling spectroscopy data from armchair graphene nanoribbons of width N = 7 supported on Au(111) reveal a band gap of 2.3 eV, an effective mass of 0.21 m(0) at the top of the valence band, and an energy-dependent charge carrier velocity reaching 8.2 × 10(5) m/s in the linear part of the valence band. These results are in quantitative agreement with theoretical predictions that include image charge corrections accounting for screening by the metal substrate and confirm the importance of electron-electron interactions in graphene nanoribbons.

  10. Electron Coherence in Mesoscopic Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kamenev, Alex; Glazman, Leonid

    2011-03-20

    The recent rapid progress in nanofabrication and experimental techniques made it possible to investigate a variety of meso-- and nano--scale systems, which were unavailable only a few years ago. Examples include fabrication of high-quality quantum wires in semiconductor heterostructures, of nanoscale hybrid superconductor--normal metal structures, and of a variety of novel (and much smaller) quantum dot and q-bit designs. These technological advances have led to formulation of a number of condensed matter theory problems which are equally important for applications and for the fundamental science. The present proposal aims at filling the exposed gaps in knowledge and at facilitating further development of experimental and theoretical physics of nanoscale structures. Specifically, the two PIs address the following issues: (i) The theory of interacting electrons in a quantum wire which accounts adequately for the non-linear dispersion relation of the electrons. The existing approaches rely on models with {\\em linearized} electron spectrum, which fall short of addressing a growing list of experimentally relevant phenomena. (ii) Dynamics of hybrid normal--superconducting systems. A reliable treatment of dissipative phenomena in such structures is not developed as of yet, while rapid progress in fabrication makes finding the proper theoretical treatment methods highly desirable. (iii)~The fundamental limits on relaxation times of a superconducting charge q-bit. The latter is one of the most advanced scalable realizations of a quantum computing device. (iv)~The dynamics and relaxation times of a spin of an electron in a small semiconductor quantum dot. Besides the fundamental importance, these structures are also valuable candidates for quantum computing applications.

  11. Demonstration of molecular beam epitaxy and a semiconducting band structure for I-Mn-V compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Jungwirth, T.; Novak, V.; Cukr, M.; Zemek, J.; Marti, X.; Horodyska, P.; Nemec, P.; Holy, V.; Maca, F.; Shick, A. B.; Masek, J.; Kuzel, P.; Nemec, I.; Gallagher, B. L.; Campion, R. P.; Foxon, C. T.; Wunderlich, J.

    2011-01-15

    Our ab initio theory calculations predict a semiconducting band structure of I-Mn-V compounds. We demonstrate on LiMnAs that high-quality materials with group-I alkali metals in the crystal structure can be grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Optical measurements on the LiMnAs epilayers are consistent with the theoretical electronic structure. Our calculations also reproduce earlier reports of high antiferromagnetic ordering temperature and predict large, spin-orbit-coupling-induced magnetic anisotropy effects. We propose a strategy for employing antiferromagnetic semiconductors in high-temperature semiconductor spintronics.

  12. Collective structures and band termination in {sup 107}Sb

    SciTech Connect

    LaFosse, D. R.; Chiara, C. J.; Fossan, D. B.; Lane, G. J.; Sears, J. M.; Smith, J. F.; Starosta, K.; Boston, A. J.; Paul, E. S.; Semple, A. T.

    2000-07-01

    High-spin states in the near proton-dripline nucleus {sup 107}Sb have been identified, and collectivity in this nucleus has been observed for the first time in the form of two rotational bands. One of the observed rotational structures is a {delta}I=1 band, and is interpreted as based on a {pi}(g{sub 9/2}){sup -1}(multiply-in-circle sign){pi}(g{sub 7/2}d{sub 5/2}){sup 2} proton configuration. A second structure has {delta}I=2 character, and is explained as being based on a {pi}h{sub 11/2}(multiply-in-circle sign)[{pi}(g{sub 9/2}){sup -2}(multiply-in-circle sign){pi}(g{sub 7/2}d{sub 5/2}){sup 2}] proton configuration through comparison with cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky model calculations. The calculations predict that this band terminates at a spin of 79/2 ({Dirac_h}/2{pi}). (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  13. Quasiparticle band structures and thermoelectric transport properties of p-type SnSe

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Guangsha; Kioupakis, Emmanouil

    2015-02-14

    We used density functional and many-body perturbation theory to calculate the quasiparticle band structures and electronic transport parameters of p-type SnSe both for the low-temperature Pnma and high-temperature Cmcm phases. The Pnma phase has an indirect band gap of 0.829 eV, while the Cmcm has a direct band gap of 0.464 eV. Both phases exhibit multiple local band extrema within an energy range comparable to the thermal energy of carriers from the global extrema. We calculated the electronic transport coefficients as a function of doping concentration and temperature for single-crystal and polycrystalline materials to understand the previous experimental measurements. The electronic transport coefficients are highly anisotropic and are strongly affected by bipolar transport effects at high temperature. Our results indicate that SnSe exhibits optimal thermoelectric performance at high temperature when doped in the 10{sup 19}–10{sup 20 }cm{sup −3} range.

  14. Observation of Wakefield Suppression in a Photonic-Band-Gap Accelerator Structure

    DOE PAGES

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Arsenyev, Sergey A.; Buechler, Cynthia E.; Edwards, Randall L.; Romero, William P.; Conde, Manoel; Ha, Gwanghui; Power, John G.; Wisniewski, Eric E.; Jing, Chunguang

    2016-02-10

    We report experimental observation of higher order mode (HOM) wakefield suppression in a room-temperature traveling-wave photonic band gap (PBG) accelerating structure at 11.700 GHz. It has been long recognized that PBG structures have potential for reducing long-range wakefields in accelerators. The first ever demonstration of acceleration in a room-temperature PBG structure was conducted in 2005. Since then, the importance of PBG accelerator research has been recognized by many institutions. However, the full experimental characterization of the wakefield spectrum and demonstration of wakefield suppression when the accelerating structure is excited by an electron beam has not been performed to date. Wemore » conducted an experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) test facility and observed wakefields excited by a single high charge electron bunch when it passes through a PBG accelerator structure. Lastly, excellent HOM suppression properties of the PBG accelerator were demonstrated in the beam test.« less

  15. Photoconductivities from band states and a dissipative electron dynamics: Si(111) without and with adsorbed Ag clusters.

    PubMed

    Vazhappilly, Tijo; Hembree, Robert H; Micha, David A

    2016-01-14

    A new general computational procedure is presented to obtain photoconductivities starting from atomic structures, combining ab initio electronic energy band states with populations from density matrix theory, and implemented for a specific set of materials based on Si crystalline slabs and their nanostructured surfaces without and with adsorbed Ag clusters. The procedure accounts for charge mobility in semiconductors in photoexcited states, and specifically electron and hole photomobilities at Si(111) surfaces with and without adsorbed Ag clusters using ab initio energy bands and orbitals generated from a generalized gradient functional, however with excited energy levels modified to provide correct bandgaps. Photoexcited state populations for each band and carrier type were generated using steady state solution of a reduced density matrix which includes dissipative medium effects. The present calculations provide photoexcited electronic populations and photoinduced mobilities resulting from applied electric fields and obtained from the change of driven electron energies with their electronic momentum. Extensive results for Si slabs with 8 layers, without and with adsorbed Ag clusters, show that the metal adsorbates lead to substantial increases in the photomobility and photoconductivity of electrons and holes. PMID:26772554

  16. CdS and Cd-Free Buffer Layers on Solution Phase Grown Cu2ZnSn(SxSe1- x)4 :Band Alignments and Electronic Structure Determined with Femtosecond Ultraviolet Photoemission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Haight, Richard; Barkhouse, Aaron; Wang, Wei; Yu, Luo; Shao, Xiaoyan; Mitzi, David; Hiroi, Homare; Sugimoto, Hiroki

    2013-12-02

    The heterojunctions formed between solution phase grown Cu2ZnSn(SxSe1- x)4(CZTS,Se) and a number of important buffer materials including CdS, ZnS, ZnO, and In2S3, were studied using femtosecond ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (fs-UPS) and photovoltage spectroscopy. With this approach we extract the magnitude and direction of the CZTS,Se band bending, locate the Fermi level within the band gaps of absorber and buffer and measure the absorber/buffer band offsets under flatband conditions. We will also discuss two-color pump/probe experiments in which the band bending in the buffer layer can be independently determined. Finally, studies of the bare CZTS,Se surface will be discussed including our observation of mid-gap Fermi level pinning and its relation to Voc limitations and bulk defects.

  17. Effects of strain on the band structure of group-III nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Qimin; Rinke, Patrick; Janotti, Anderson; Scheffler, Matthias; Van de Walle, Chris G.

    2014-09-01

    We present a systematic study of strain effects on the electronic band structure of the group-III-nitrides (AlN, GaN and InN) in the wurtzite phase. The calculations are based on density functional theory with band-gap-corrected approaches including the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof hybrid functional (HSE) and quasiparticle G0W0 methods. We study strain effects under realistic strain conditions, hydrostatic pressure, and biaxial stress. The strain-induced modification of the band structures is found to be nonlinear; transition energies and crystal-field splittings show a strong nonlinear behavior under biaxial stress. For the linear regime around the experimental lattice parameters, we present a complete set of deformation potentials (acz, act, D1, D2, D3, D4, D5, D6) that allows us to predict the band positions of group-III nitrides and their alloys (InGaN and AlGaN) under realistic strain conditions. The benchmarking G0W0 results for GaN agree well with the HSE data and indicate that HSE provides an appropriate description for the band structures of nitrides. We present a systematic study of strain effects on the electronic band structure of the group-III nitrides (AlN, GaN, and InN). We quantify the nonlinearity of strain effects by introducing a set of bowing parameters. We apply the calculated deformation potentials to the prediction of strain effects on transition energies and valence-band structures of InGaN alloys and quantum wells (QWs) grown on GaN, in various orientations (including c-plane, m-plane, and semipolar). The calculated band gap bowing parameters, including the strain effect for c-plane InGaN, agree well with the results obtained by hybrid functional alloy calculations. For semipolar InGaN QWs grown in (202¯1), (303¯1), and (303¯1¯) orientations, our calculated deformation potentials have provided results for polarization ratios in good agreement with the experimental observations, providing further confidence in the accuracy of our values.

  18. Dual-band metamaterial with a windmill-like structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Han; Hong, Jing-Song; Jin, Da-Lin

    2013-01-01

    A broadband negative refractive index metamaterial based on a windmill-like structure is proposed, and investigated numerically and experimentally at the microwave frequency range. From the numerical and experimental results, effect media parameters are retrieved, which clearly show that two broad frequency bands exist in which the permittivity and permeability are negative. The two negative bands are from 9.1 GHz to 10.5 GHz and from 12.05 GHz to 14.65 GHz respectively, and the negative bandwidth is 4 GHz. Due to the good bandwidth performance, the metallic cell with double negative property obtained in this paper is suitable for use in the design of multiband or broadband microwave devices.

  19. Vibrational renormalisation of the electronic band gap in hexagonal and cubic ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Edgar A.; Monserrat, Bartomeu; Needs, Richard J.

    2015-12-01

    Electron-phonon coupling in hexagonal and cubic water ice is studied using first-principles quantum mechanical methods. We consider 29 distinct hexagonal and cubic ice proton-orderings with up to 192 molecules in the simulation cell to account for proton-disorder. We find quantum zero-point vibrational corrections to the minimum electronic band gaps ranging from -1.5 to -1.7 eV, which leads to improved agreement between calculated and experimental band gaps. Anharmonic nuclear vibrations play a negligible role in determining the gaps. Deuterated ice has a smaller band-gap correction at zero-temperature of -1.2 to -1.4 eV. Vibrations reduce the differences between the electronic band gaps of different proton-orderings from around 0.17 eV to less than 0.05 eV, so that the electronic band gaps of hexagonal and cubic ice are almost independent of the proton-ordering when quantum nuclear vibrations are taken into account. The comparatively small reduction in the band gap over the temperature range 0 - 240 K of around 0.1 eV does not depend on the proton ordering, or whether the ice is protiated or deuterated, or hexagonal, or cubic. We explain this in terms of the atomistic origin of the strong electron-phonon coupling in ice.

  20. Vibrational renormalisation of the electronic band gap in hexagonal and cubic ice

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, Edgar A. Needs, Richard J.; Monserrat, Bartomeu

    2015-12-28

    Electron-phonon coupling in hexagonal and cubic water ice is studied using first-principles quantum mechanical methods. We consider 29 distinct hexagonal and cubic ice proton-orderings with up to 192 molecules in the simulation cell to account for proton-disorder. We find quantum zero-point vibrational corrections to the minimum electronic band gaps ranging from −1.5 to −1.7 eV, which leads to improved agreement between calculated and experimental band gaps. Anharmonic nuclear vibrations play a negligible role in determining the gaps. Deuterated ice has a smaller band-gap correction at zero-temperature of −1.2 to −1.4 eV. Vibrations reduce the differences between the electronic band gaps of different proton-orderings from around 0.17 eV to less than 0.05 eV, so that the electronic band gaps of hexagonal and cubic ice are almost independent of the proton-ordering when quantum nuclear vibrations are taken into account. The comparatively small reduction in the band gap over the temperature range 0 − 240 K of around 0.1 eV does not depend on the proton ordering, or whether the ice is protiated or deuterated, or hexagonal, or cubic. We explain this in terms of the atomistic origin of the strong electron-phonon coupling in ice.

  1. Photoinduced Charge-Carrier Generation in Epitaxial MOF Thin Films: High Efficiency as a Result of an Indirect Electronic Band Gap?

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinxuan; Zhou, Wencai; Liu, Jianxi; Howard, Ian; Kilibarda, Goran; Schlabach, Sabine; Coupry, Damien; Addicoat, Matthew; Yoneda, Satoru; Tsutsui, Yusuke; Sakurai, Tsuneaki; Seki, Shu; Wang, Zhengbang; Lindemann, Peter; Redel, Engelbert; Heine, Thomas; Wöll, Christof

    2015-06-15

    For inorganic semiconductors crystalline order leads to a band structure which gives rise to drastic differences to the disordered material. An example is the presence of an indirect band gap. For organic semiconductors such effects are typically not considered, since the bands are normally flat, and the band-gap therefore is direct. Herein we show results from electronic structure calculations demonstrating that ordered arrays of porphyrins reveal a small dispersion of occupied and unoccupied bands leading to the formation of a small indirect band gap. We demonstrate herein that such ordered structures can be fabricated by liquid-phase epitaxy and that the corresponding crystalline organic semiconductors exhibit superior photophysical properties, including large charge-carrier mobility and an unusually large charge-carrier generation efficiency. We have fabricated a prototype organic photovoltaic device based on this novel material exhibiting a remarkable efficiency. PMID:25960115

  2. Photoinduced Charge-Carrier Generation in Epitaxial MOF Thin Films: High Efficiency as a Result of an Indirect Electronic Band Gap?

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinxuan; Zhou, Wencai; Liu, Jianxi; Howard, Ian; Kilibarda, Goran; Schlabach, Sabine; Coupry, Damien; Addicoat, Matthew; Yoneda, Satoru; Tsutsui, Yusuke; Sakurai, Tsuneaki; Seki, Shu; Wang, Zhengbang; Lindemann, Peter; Redel, Engelbert; Heine, Thomas; Wöll, Christof

    2015-06-15

    For inorganic semiconductors crystalline order leads to a band structure which gives rise to drastic differences to the disordered material. An example is the presence of an indirect band gap. For organic semiconductors such effects are typically not considered, since the bands are normally flat, and the band-gap therefore is direct. Herein we show results from electronic structure calculations demonstrating that ordered arrays of porphyrins reveal a small dispersion of occupied and unoccupied bands leading to the formation of a small indirect band gap. We demonstrate herein that such ordered structures can be fabricated by liquid-phase epitaxy and that the corresponding crystalline organic semiconductors exhibit superior photophysical properties, including large charge-carrier mobility and an unusually large charge-carrier generation efficiency. We have fabricated a prototype organic photovoltaic device based on this novel material exhibiting a remarkable efficiency.

  3. Strain effect on graphene nanoribbon carrier statistic in the presence of non-parabolic band structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izuani Che Rosid, N. A.; Ahmadi, M. T.; Ismail, Razali

    2016-09-01

    The effect of tensile uniaxial strain on the non-parabolic electronic band structure of armchair graphene nanoribbon (AGNR) is investigated. In addition, the density of states and the carrier statistic based on the tight-binding Hamiltonian are modeled analytically. It is found that the property of AGNR in the non-parabolic band region is varied by the strain. The tunable energy band gap in AGNR upon strain at the minimum energy is described for each of n-AGNR families in the non-parabolic approximation. The behavior of AGNR in the presence of strain is attributed to the breakable AGNR electronic band structure, which varies the physical properties from its normality. The linear relation between the energy gap and the electrical properties is featured to further explain the characteristic of the deformed AGNR upon strain. Project supported by the Ministry of Higher Education (MOHE), Malaysia under the Fundamental Research Grant Scheme (FRGS) (Grant No.Q.J130000.7823.4F477). We also thank the Research Management Center (RMC) of Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM) for providing an excellent research environment.

  4. G0W0 band structure of CdWO4.

    PubMed

    Laasner, Raul

    2014-03-26

    The full quasiparticle band structure of CdWO4 is calculated within the single-shot GW (G0W0) approximation using maximally localized Wannier functions, which allows one to assess the validity of the commonly used scissor operator. Calculations are performed using the Godby-Needs plasmon pole model and the accurate contour deformation technique. It is shown that while the two methods yield identical band gap energies, the low-lying states are given inaccurately by the plasmon pole model. We report a band gap energy of 4.94 eV, including spin-orbit interaction at the DFT-LDA (density functional theory-local density approximation) level. Quasiparticle renormalization in CdWO4 is shown to be correlated with localization distance. Electron and hole effective masses are calculated at the DFT and G0W0 levels. PMID:24599225

  5. General study on the crystal, electronic and band structures, the morphological characterization, and the magnetic properties of the Sr{sub 2}DyRuO{sub 6} complex perovskite

    SciTech Connect

    Triana, C.A.; Landínez Téllez, D.A.; Roa-Rojas, J.

    2015-01-15

    A comprehensive investigation of the general properties of the Sr{sub 2}DyRuO{sub 6} complex perovskite was undertaken. Crystal structure characterization performed by X-ray diffraction measurements and Rietveld analysis allowed establishing that the material crystallizes in a distorted monoclinic perovskite-like structure belonging to the P2{sub 1}/n (#14) space group, with alternating distribution of Dy{sup 3} {sup +} (2c: 0, 0.5, 0) and Ru{sup 5} {sup +} (2d: 0.5, 0, 0). Because of the mismatch in the ionic radii, the DyO{sub 6} and RuO{sub 6} octahedra are forced to tilt around the cubic directions so as to optimize the Sr–O inter-atomic bond lengths. Morphological characterization carried out by scanning electron microscopy indicated a particle size D = 37.17 nm and an activation energy Q = 109.8 kJ/mol. Semi-quantitative compositional study, performed through energy-dispersive X-ray experiments, corroborated that the pure phase of the Sr{sub 2}DyRuO{sub 6} was correctly obtained. Magnetic properties determined from the fit of the Curie–Weiss law to the curves of magnetic susceptibility as a function of temperature showed that Sr{sub 2}DyRuO{sub 6} exhibits an antiferromagnetic-like behavior at low temperatures as a consequence of a magnetic transition at T = 38 K. Data collected with respect to the field dependence of the magnetization showed the existence of a weak ferromagnetic moment relationship with antiferromagnetic-like behavior. Density functional theory allowed establishing the optimum electronic structure for Sr{sub 2}DyRuO{sub 6}, and the study of the density of states showed that Dy{sup 3} {sup +} and Ru{sup 5} {sup +} are responsible for the magnetic character of the compound, with the prediction that at T = 0 K it behaves as a half-metallic material. The spin magnetic moment of the cell is close to 16 μ{sub B}, and the integer number of Bohr magneton is a signature of half-metallic character. Evolution of crystal structure at high

  6. k.p Parameters with Accuracy Control from Preexistent First-Principles Band Structure Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipahi, Guilherme; Bastos, Carlos M. O.; Sabino, Fernando P.; Faria Junior, Paulo E.; de Campos, Tiago; da Silva, Juarez L. F.

    The k.p method is a successful approach to obtain band structure, optical and transport properties of semiconductors. It overtakes the ab initio methods in confined systems due to its low computational cost since it is a continuum method that does not require all the atoms' orbital information. From an effective one-electron Hamiltonian, the k.p matrix representation can be calculated using perturbation theory and the parameters identified by symmetry arguments. The parameters determination, however, needs a complementary approach. In this paper, we developed a general method to extract the k.p parameters from preexistent band structures of bulk materials that is not limited by the crystal symmetry or by the model. To demonstrate our approach, we applied it to zinc blende GaAs band structure calculated by hybrid density functional theory within the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof functional (DFT-HSE), for the usual 8 ×8 k.p Hamiltonian. Our parameters reproduced the DFT-HSE band structure with great accuracy up to 20% of the first Brillouin zone (FBZ). Furthermore, for fitting regions ranging from 7-20% of FBZ, the parameters lie inside the range of values reported by the most reliable studies in the literature. The authors acknowledge financial support from the Brazilian agencies CNPq (Grant #246549/2012-2) and FAPESP (Grants #2011/19333-4, #2012/05618-0 and #2013/23393-8).

  7. Molecular Electronic Angular Motion Transducer Broad Band Self-Noise

    PubMed Central

    Zaitsev, Dmitry; Agafonov, Vadim; Egorov, Egor; Antonov, Alexander; Shabalina, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Modern molecular electronic transfer (MET) angular motion sensors combine high technical characteristics with low cost. Self-noise is one of the key characteristics which determine applications for MET sensors. However, until the present there has not been a model describing the sensor noise in the complete operating frequency range. The present work reports the results of an experimental study of the self-noise level of such sensors in the frequency range of 0.01–200 Hz. Based on the experimental data, a theoretical model is developed. According to the model, self-noise is conditioned by thermal hydrodynamic fluctuations of the operating fluid flow in the frequency range of 0.01–2 Hz. At the frequency range of 2–100 Hz, the noise power spectral density has a specific inversely proportional dependence of the power spectral density on the frequency that could be attributed to convective processes. In the high frequency range of 100–200 Hz, the noise is conditioned by the voltage noise of the electronics module input stage operational amplifiers and is heavily reliant to the sensor electrical impedance. The presented results allow a deeper understanding of the molecular electronic sensor noise nature to suggest the ways to reduce it. PMID:26610502

  8. Electronic structure of EuFe2As2.

    PubMed

    Adhikary, Ganesh; Sahadev, Nishaina; Biswas, Deepnarayan; Bindu, R; Kumar, Neeraj; Thamizhavel, A; Dhar, S K; Maiti, Kalobaran

    2013-06-01

    Employing high resolution photoemission spectroscopy, we studied the temperature evolution of the electronic structure of EuFe2As2, a unique pnictide, where antiferromagnetism of the Eu layer survives within the superconducting phase due to 'FeAs' layers, achieved via substitution and/or pressure. High energy and angle resolution helped to reveal the signature of peak-dip features, having significant p orbital character and spin density wave transition induced band folding in the electronic structure. A significant spectral weight redistribution is observed below 20 K manifesting the influence of antiferromagnetic order on the conduction electrons.

  9. Structural Dynamics of Electronic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhir, E.

    2013-03-01

    The published work on analytical ("mathematical") and computer-aided, primarily finite-element-analysis (FEA) based, predictive modeling of the dynamic response of electronic systems to shocks and vibrations is reviewed. While understanding the physics of and the ability to predict the response of an electronic structure to dynamic loading has been always of significant importance in military, avionic, aeronautic, automotive and maritime electronics, during the last decade this problem has become especially important also in commercial, and, particularly, in portable electronics in connection with accelerated testing of various surface mount technology (SMT) systems on the board level. The emphasis of the review is on the nonlinear shock-excited vibrations of flexible printed circuit boards (PCBs) experiencing shock loading applied to their support contours during drop tests. At the end of the review we provide, as a suitable and useful illustration, the exact solution to a highly nonlinear problem of the dynamic response of a "flexible-and-heavy" PCB to an impact load applied to its support contour during drop testing.

  10. Electronic structure of α-oligothiophenes with various substituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikramaditya, Talapunur; Saisudhakar, Mukka; Sumithra, Kanakamma

    2015-02-01

    Density functional theory is employed to investigate the effect of various substituents on the electronic structure of α-oligothiophenes. The effect of electron donating and withdrawing groups of oligothiophenes in the regio regular HT-HT form is studied. Depending on the type of substituent and the substitution pattern, large differences in the delocalization pattern are observed between the substituted and unsubstituted oligomers. It is found that the band gaps critically depend on the chemical structure and regioselectivity of the building blocks. For the 3-substitued systems, electron donating and electron withdrawing substituents are shown to decrease and increase band gaps respectively compared to unsubstituted systems. There are charge separation effects introduced as a result of lack of symmetry in some of the substituted oligothiophenes. A new strategy is explained to achieve low band gap materials by making use of the regioselective form with lesser symmetry. Push-pull substitution with an electron donor at one end of the conjugation and an acceptor the other end is also investigated. Comparisons of band gaps of the substituted oligothiophenes with the corresponding polymeric systems are also done.

  11. Correlation effects and electronic properties of Cr-substituted SZn with an intermediate band.

    PubMed

    Tablero, C

    2005-09-15

    A study using first principles of the electronic properties of S32Zn31Cr, a material derived from the SZn host semiconductor where a Cr atom has been substituted for each of the 32 Zn atoms, is presented. This material has an intermediate band sandwiched between the valence and conduction bands of the host semiconductor, which in a formal band-theoretic picture is metallic because the Fermi energy is located within the impurity band. The potential technological application of these materials is that when they are used to absorb photons in solar cells, the efficiency increases significantly with respect to the host semiconductor. An analysis of the gaps, bandwidths, density of states, total and orbital charges, and electronic density is carried out. The main effects of the local-density approximation with a Hubbard term corrections are an increase in the bandwidth, a modification of the relative composition of the five d and p transition-metal orbitals, and a splitting of the intermediate band. The results demonstrate that the main contribution to the intermediate band is the Cr atom. For values of U greater than 6 eV, where U is the empirical Hubbard term U parameter, this band is unfolded, thus creating two bands, a full one below the Fermi energy and an empty one above it, i.e., a metal-insulator transition. PMID:16392585

  12. Birefringence and band structure of CdP2 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beril, S. I.; Stamov, I. G.; Syrbu, N. N.; Zalamai, V. V.

    2013-08-01

    The spatial dispersion in CdP2 crystals was investigated. The dispersion is positive (nk||с>nk||у) at λ>λ0 and negative (nk||сbands. Minimal direct energy intervals correspond to transitions Г1→Г1 for Е||с and Г2→Г1 for Е⊥с. The temperature coefficient of energy gap sifting in the case of temperature changing between 2 and 4.2 K equals to 10.6 meV/K and 3.2 mev/K for Г1→Г1 and Г2→Г1 band gap correspondingly. Reflectivity spectra were measured for energy interval 1.5-10 eV and optical functions (n, k, ε1, ε2,d2ε1/dE2 and d2ε2/dE2) were calculated by using Kramers-Kronig analyses. All features were interpreted as optical transitions on the basis of both theoretical calculations of band structure.

  13. Band gaps, ionization potentials, and electron affinities of periodic electron systems via the adiabatic-connection fluctuation-dissipation theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trushin, Egor; Betzinger, Markus; Blügel, Stefan; Görling, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    An approach to calculate fundamental band gaps, ionization energies, and electron affinities of periodic electron systems is explored. Starting from total energies obtained with the help of the adiabatic-connection fluctuation-dissipation (ACFD) theorem, these physical observables are calculated according to their basic definition by differences of the total energies of the N -, (N -1 ) -, and (N +1 ) -electron system. The response functions entering the ACFD theorem are approximated here by the direct random phase approximation (dRPA). For a set of prototypical semiconductors and insulators it is shown that even with this quite drastic approximation the resulting band gaps are very close to experiment and of a similar quality to those from the computationally more involved G W approximation. By going beyond the dRPA in the future the accuracy of the calculated band gaps may be significantly improved further.

  14. Electronic instrumentation for smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanar, George J.

    1995-04-01

    The requirements of electronic instrumentation for smart structures are similar to those of data acquisition systems at our national particle physics laboratories. Modern high energy and heavy ion physics experiments may have tens of thousands of channels of data sources producing data that must be converted to digital form, compacted, stored and interpreted. In parallel, multiple sensors distributed in and around smart structures generate either binary or analog signals that are voltage, charge, or time like in their information content. In all cases, they must be transmitted, converted and preserved into a unified digital format for real-time processing. This paper will review the current status of practical large scale electronic measurement systems with special attention to architectures and physical organization. Brief surveys of the current state of the art will include preamplifiers and amplifiers, comparators and discriminators, voltage or charge analog-to-digital converters, time internal meters or time-to-digital converters, and finally, counting or scalar systems. The paper will conclude by integrating all of these ideas in a concept for an all-digital readout of a smart structure using the latest techniques used in physics research today.

  15. Towards scalable electronic structure calculations for alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Stocks, G.M.; Nicholson, D.M.C.; Wang, Y.; Shelton, W.A.; Szotek, Z.; Temmermann, W.M.

    1994-06-01

    A new approach to calculating the properties of large systems within the local density approximation (LDA) that offers the promise of scalability on massively parallel supercomputers is outlined. The electronic structure problem is formulated in real space using multiple scattering theory. The standard LDA algorithm is divided into two parts. Firstly, finding the self-consistent field (SCF) electron density, Secondly, calculating the energy corresponding to the SCF density. We show, at least for metals and alloys, that the former problem is easily solved using real space methods. For the second we take advantage of the variational properties of a generalized Harris-Foulkes free energy functional, a new conduction band Fermi function, and a fictitious finite electron temperature that again allow us to use real-space methods. Using a compute-node {R_arrow} atom equivalence the new method is naturally highly parallel and leads to O(N) scaling where N is the number of atoms making up the system. We show scaling data gathered on the Intel XP/S 35 Paragon for systems up to 512-atoms/simulation cell. To demonstrate that we can achieve metallurgical-precision, we apply the new method to the calculation the energies of disordered CuO{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5} alloys using a large random sample.

  16. Surface electronic structure of polar NiO thin film grown on Ag(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Jayanta; Menon, Krishnakumar S. R.

    2015-06-01

    The growth and structure of NiO thin films on top of Ag(111) substrate were studied where the formation of faceted surface was confirmed by Low Energy Electron Diffraction. The electronic structure of polar NiO(111) surface has been probed using photoemission techniques. The core energy levels and the valence band electronic structure were excited by x-ray and ultraviolet photons respectively. The modifications in physical structure and valence band electronic structure of the film under vacuum annealing have also been enlightened.

  17. Surface electronic structure of polar NiO thin film grown on Ag(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Jayanta; Menon, Krishnakumar S. R.

    2015-06-24

    The growth and structure of NiO thin films on top of Ag(111) substrate were studied where the formation of faceted surface was confirmed by Low Energy Electron Diffraction. The electronic structure of polar NiO(111) surface has been probed using photoemission techniques. The core energy levels and the valence band electronic structure were excited by x-ray and ultraviolet photons respectively. The modifications in physical structure and valence band electronic structure of the film under vacuum annealing have also been enlightened.

  18. Experimental studies of W-band accelerator structures at high field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Marc Edward

    2001-06-01

    A high-gradient electron accelerator is desired for high- energy physics research, where frequency scalings of breakdown and trapping of itinerant beamline particles dictates operation of the accelerator at short wavelengths. The first results of design and test of a high-gradient mm-wave linac with an operating frequency at 91.392 GHz (W-band) are presented. A novel approach to particle acceleration is presented employing a planar, dielectric lined waveguide used for particle acceleration. The traveling wave fields in the planar dielectric accelerator (PDA) are analyzed for an idealized structure, along with a circuit equivalent model used for understanding the structure as a microwave circuit. Along with the W-band accelerator structures, other components designed and tested are high power rf windows, high power attenuators, and a high power squeeze-type phase shifter. The design of the accelerator and its components where eased with the aide of numerical simulations using a finite-difference electromagnetic field solver. Manufacturing considerations of the small, delicate mm-wave components and the steps taken to reach a robust fabrication process are detailed. These devices were characterized under low power using a two-port vector network analyzer to verify tune and match, including measurements of the structures' fields using a bead-pull. The measurements are compared with theory throughout. Addition studies of the W-band structures were performed under high power utilizing a 11.424 GHz electron linac as a current source. Test results include W-band power levels of 200 kW, corresponding to fields in the PDA of over 20 MV/m, higher than any collider. Also presented are the first measurements of the quadrapole component of the monopole accelerating field.

  19. Band structure, Fermi surface, superconductivity, and resistivity of actinium under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Dakshinamoorthy, M.; Iyakutti, K.

    1984-12-15

    The electronic band structures of fcc actinium (Ac) have been calculated for a wide range of pressures by reducing the unit-cell volume from 1.0V/sub 0/ to 0.5V/sub 0/ with use of the relativistic augmented-plane-wave method. The density of states and Fermi-surface cross sections corresponding to various volumes are obtained. Calculations for the band-structure-related quantities such as electron-phonon mass enhancement factor lambda, superconducting transition temperature T/sub c/, and resistivity rho corresponding to different volumes are performed. It is seen that T/sub c/ increases with pressure, i.e., with decreasing volume. A new empirical relation for the volume dependence of T/sub c/ is proposed and its validity is checked using the T/sub c/ values obtained from the above band-structure results. The resistivity rho first increases with increasing pressure (i.e., with decreasing volume) and then decreases for higher pressures (i.e., for smaller volumes).

  20. The dependence of the tunneling characteristic on the electronic energy bands and the carrier’s states of Graphene superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C. H.; Shen, G. Z.; Ao, Z. M.; Xu, Y. W.

    2016-09-01

    Using the transfer matrix method, the carrier tunneling properties in graphene superlattice generated by the Thue-Morse sequence and Kolakoski sequence are investigated. The positions and strength of the transmission can be modulated by the barrier structures, the incident energy and angle, the height and width of the potential. These carriers tunneling characteristic can be understood from the energy band structures in the corresponding superlattice systems and the carrier’s states in well/barriers. The transmission peaks above the critical incident angle rely on the carrier’s resonance in the well regions. The structural diversity can modulate the electronic and transport properties, thus expanding its applications.

  1. Meissner Effect of Dirac Electrons in Superconducting State Due to Inter-Band Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizoguchi, Tomonari; Ogata, Masao

    2015-08-01

    Dirac electrons in solids show characteristic physical properties due to their linear dispersion relation and two-band nature. Although the transport phenomena of Dirac electrons in a normal state have intensively been studied, the transport phenomena in a superconducting state have not been fully understood. In particular, it is not clear whether Dirac electrons in a superconducting state show Meissner effect (ME), since a diamagnetic term of a current operator is absent as a result of the linear dispersion. We investigate the ME of three dimensional massive Dirac electrons in a superconducting state on the basis of Kubo formula, and clarify that Meissner kernel becomes finite by use of the inter-band contribution. This mechanism of the ME for Dirac electrons is completely different from that for the electrons in usual metals. Our result shows that the Meissner kernel remains finite even when the superconducting gap vanishes. This is an unavoidable problem in the Dirac electron system as reported in the previous works. Thus, we use a prescription in which we subtract the normal state contribution. In order to justify this prescription, we develop a specific model where the Meissner kernel is obtained by the prescription. We also derive the result for the electron gas by taking the non-relativistic limit of Dirac Hamiltonian, and clarify that the diamagnetic term of the Meissner kernel can be regarded as the inter-band contribution between electrons and positrons in terms of the Dirac model.

  2. Observation of valence band electron emission from n-type silicon field emitter arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Meng; Kim, Han; Akinwande, Akintunde I.

    1999-08-01

    Electron emission from the valence band of n-type Si field emitter arrays is reported. High electrostatic field at the surface of Si was achieved by reducing the radius of the emitter tip. Using oxidation sharpening, 1 μm aperture polycrystalline Si gate, n-type Si field emitter arrays with small tip radius (˜10 nm) were fabricated. Three distinct emission regions were observed: conduction band emission at low gate voltages, saturated current emission from the conduction band at intermediate voltages, and valence band plus conduction band emission at high gate voltages. Emission currents at low and high voltages obey the Fowler-Nordheim theory. The ratio of the slopes of the corresponding Fowler-Nordheim fits for these two regions is 1.495 which is in close agreement with the theoretical value of 1.445.

  3. Manipulation of electronic structure in WSe2 monolayer by strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cong-xia; Zhao, Xu; Wei, Shu-yi

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we study the electronic properties of WSe2 monolayer with biaxial tensile strain and compressive strain by using first principles based on the density function theory. Under the biaxial tensile strain, WSe2 monolayer retains direct band gap with increasing strain and the band gap of WSe2 continuously decreases with increasing strain, eventually turn to metal when strain is equal to or more than 13%. Under the biaxial compressive strain, WSe2 monolayer turns to indirect gap and the band gap continuously decreases with increasing strain, finally turn to metal when strain is up to -7%. The strain can reduce the band gap of the WSe2 monolayer regardless of the strain direction. By comparison, we can see that the tensile strain appears to be more effective in reducing the band gap of pristine WSe2 monolayer than the compressive strain from -5% to 5%. But the band gap turns to zero quickly from -6% to -7% under compressive strain, however for tensile strain from 5% to 13%, the band gap decreases slowly. Based on the further analysis of the projected charge density for WSe2 monolayer, the fundamental reason of the change of band structure under biaxial tensile strain is revealed.

  4. Engineered band structure for an enhanced performance on quantum dot-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Bin Bin; Wang, Ye Feng; Wei, Dong; Cui, Bin; Chen, Yu; Zeng, Jing Hui

    2016-06-01

    A photon-to-current efficiency of 2.93% is received for the Mn-doped CdS (MCdS)-quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) using Mn:ZnO (MZnO) nanowire as photoanode. Hydrothermal synthesized MZnO are spin-coated on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) glass with P25 paste to serve as photoanode after calcinations. MCdS was deposited on the MZnO film by the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction method. The long lived excitation energy state of Mn2+ is located inside the conduction band in the wide bandgap ZnO and under the conduction band of CdS, which increases the energetic overlap of donor and acceptor states, reducing the "loss-in-potential," inhibiting charge recombination, and accelerating electron injection. The engineered band structure is well reflected by the electrochemical band detected using cyclic voltammetry. Cell performances are evidenced by current density-voltage (J-V) traces, diffuse reflectance spectra, transient PL spectroscopy, and incident photon to current conversion efficiency characterizations. Further coating of CdSe on MZnO/MCdS electrode expands the light absorption band of the sensitizer, an efficiency of 4.94% is received for QDSSCs.

  5. Quasiparticle band gap of organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites: Crystal structure, spin-orbit coupling, and self-energy effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Weiwei; Gao, Xiang; Abtew, Tesfaye; Sun, Yiyang; Zhang, Shengbai; Zhang, Peihong

    The quasiparticle band gaps of organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites are often determined (and can be controlled) by various factors, complicating predictive materials optimization. Here we report a comprehensive investigation on the band gap formation mechanism in CH3NH3PbI3 by decoupling various contributing factors which ultimately determine their electronic structure and quasiparticle band gap. Four major factors, namely, quasiparticle self-energy, spin-orbit coupling, volume (lattice constant) effects, and structural distortions due to the presence of organic molecules, and their influences on the quasiparticle band structure of organometal hybrid perovskites are illustrated. We find that although methylammonium cations do not contribute directly to the electronic states near band edges, they play an important role in defining the band gap through a lattice distortion mechanism and by controlling the overall lattice constants (thus the chemical bonding of the optically active PbI3-). The spin-orbit coupling effects drastically reduce the electron and hole effective masses in these systems, which is beneficial for high carrier mobilities and small exciton binding energies. This work is supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11328401), NSF (Grant No. DMR-0946404 and DMR-1506669), and the SUNY Networks of Excellence.

  6. The structure and electronic properties of hexagonal Fe2Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chi Pui; Tam, Kuan Vai; Xiong, Shi Jie; Cao, Jie; Zhang, Xiaoping

    2016-06-01

    On the basis of first principle calculations, we show that a hexagonal structure of Fe2Si is a ferromagnetic crystal. The result of the phonon spectra indicates that it is a stable structure. Such material exhibits a spin-polarized and half-metal-like band structure. From the calculations of generalized gradient approximation, metallic and semiconducting behaviors are observed with a direct and nearly 0 eV band gap in various spin channels. The densities of states in the vicinity of the Fermi level is mainly contributed from the d-electrons of Fe. We calculate the reflection spectrum of Fe2Si, which has minima at 275nm and 3300nm with reflectance of 0.27 and 0.49, respectively. Such results may provide a reference for the search of hexagonal Fe2Si in experiments. With this band characteristic, the material may be applied in the field of novel spintronics devices.

  7. Electronic structure of hydrogenated diamond: Microscopical insight into surface conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacobucci, S.; Alippi, Paola; Calvani, P.; Girolami, M.; Offi, F.; Petaccia, L.; Trucchi, D. M.

    2016-07-01

    We have correlated the surface conductivity of hydrogen-terminated diamond to the electronic structure in the Fermi region. Significant density of electronic states (DOS) in proximity of the Fermi edge has been measured by photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) on surfaces exposed to air, corresponding to a p -type electric conductive regime, while upon annealing a depletion of the DOS has been achieved, resembling the diamond insulating state. The surface and subsurface electronic structure has been determined, exploiting the different probing depths of PES applied in a photon energy range between 7 and 31 eV. Ab initio density functional calculations including surface charge depletion and band-bending effects favorably compare with electronic states measured by angular-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Such states are organized in the energy-momentum space in a twofold structure: one, bulk-derived, band disperses in the Γ -X direction with an average hole effective mass of (0.43 ±0.02 ) m0 , where m0 is the bare electron mass; a second flatter band, with an effective mass of (2.2 ±0.9 ) m0 , proves that a hole gas confined in the topmost layers is responsible for the conductivity of the (2 ×1 ) hydrogen-terminated diamond (100 ) surface.

  8. Electronic structure and magnetic properties of zigzag blue phosphorene nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Tao; Hong, Jisang

    2015-08-07

    We investigated the electronic structure and magnetism of zigzag blue phosphorene nanoribbons (ZBPNRs) using first principles density functional theory calculations by changing the widths of ZBPNRs from 1.5 to 5 nm. In addition, the effect of H and O passivation was explored as well. The ZBPNRs displayed intra-edge antiferromagnetic ground state with a semiconducting band gap of ∼0.35 eV; and this was insensitive to the edge structure relaxation effect. However, the edge magnetism of ZBPNRs disappeared with H-passivation. Moreover, the band gap of H-passivated ZBPNRs was greatly enhanced because the calculated band gap was ∼1.77 eV, and this was almost the same as that of two-dimensional blue phosphorene layer. For O-passivated ZBPNRs, we also found an intra-edge antiferromagnetic state. Besides, both unpassivated and O-passivated ZBPNRs preserved almost the same band gap. We predict that the electronic band structure and magnetic properties can be controlled by means of passivation. Moreover, the edge magnetism can be also modulated by the strain. Nonetheless, the intrinsic physical properties are size independent. This feature can be an advantage for device applications because it may not be necessary to precisely control the width of the nanoribbon.

  9. Characterization of electronic structure of periodically strained graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Aslani, Marjan; Garner, C. Michael; Kumar, Suhas; Nordlund, Dennis; Pianetta, Piero; Nishi, Yoshio

    2015-11-03

    We induced periodic biaxial tensile strain in polycrystalline graphene by wrapping it over a substrate with repeating pillar-like structures with a periodicity of 600 nm. Using Raman spectroscopy, we determined to have introduced biaxial strains in graphene in the range of 0.4% to 0.7%. Its band structure was characterized using photoemission from valance bands, shifts in the secondary electron emission, and x-ray absorption from the carbon 1s levels to the unoccupied graphene conduction bands. It was observed that relative to unstrained graphene, strained graphene had a higher work function and higher density of states in the valence and conduction bands.more » Furthermore, we measured the conductivity of the strained and unstrained graphene in response to a gate voltage and correlated the changes in their behavior to the changes in the electronic structure. From these sets of data, we propose a simple band diagram representing graphene with periodic biaxial strain.« less

  10. Variable-energy microtron-injector for a compact wide-band FIR free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakevitch, Grigori M.; Jeong, Young Uk; Lee, Byung Cheol; Gavrilov, Nikolay G.; Kondaurov, Mikhail N.

    2003-07-01

    A microtron-injector (Proceedings of the 2001 Particle Accelerator Conference, USA, 2001, 2739) for the KAERI compact far infrared free electron laser (FIR FEL) facility has been upgraded to provide tuning of the FEL wavelength from 100 μm to more than 300 μm. The wide-band tunability of the radiation has been achieved by changing the kinetic energy of the accelerated electrons from 6.5 to 4.9 MeV. To do so, the position of an RF cavity inside the microtron is movable within the range of ˜170 mm, and it changes the maximum orbit number of the electrons from 12 to 8. Dependence of the electron beam parameters on the orbit number has been investigated to choose acceptable operating conditions of the microtron for stable operation of the wide-band FIR FEL. Measured parameters of the electron beam and corresponding lasing results of the FIR FEL are presented and discussed.

  11. Kohn-Sham Band Structure Benchmark Including Spin-Orbit Coupling for 2D and 3D Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huhn, William; Blum, Volker

    2015-03-01

    Accurate electronic band structures serve as a primary indicator of the suitability of a material for a given application, e.g., as electronic or catalytic materials. Computed band structures, however, are subject to a host of approximations, some of which are more obvious (e.g., the treatment of the exchange-correlation of self-energy) and others less obvious (e.g., the treatment of core, semicore, or valence electrons, handling of relativistic effects, or the accuracy of the underlying basis set used). We here provide a set of accurate Kohn-Sham band structure benchmarks, using the numeric atom-centered all-electron electronic structure code FHI-aims combined with the ``traditional'' PBE functional and the hybrid HSE functional, to calculate core, valence, and low-lying conduction bands of a set of 2D and 3D materials. Benchmarks are provided with and without effects of spin-orbit coupling, using quasi-degenerate perturbation theory to predict spin-orbit splittings. This work is funded by Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft.

  12. Extraordinary electronic properties in uncommon structure types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mazhar Nawaz

    In this thesis I present the results of explorations into several uncommon structure types. In Chapter 1 I go through the underlying idea of how we search for new compounds with exotic properties in solid state chemistry. The ideas of exploring uncommon structure types, building up from the simple to the complex, using chemical intuition and thinking by analogy are discussed. Also, the history and basic concepts of superconductivity, Dirac semimetals, and magnetoresistance are briefly reviewed. In chapter 2, the 1s-InTaS2 structural family is introduced along with the discovery of a new member of the family, Ag0:79VS2; the synthesis, structure, and physical properties of two different polymorphs of the material are detailed. Also in this chapter, we report the observation of superconductivity in another 1s structure, PbTaSe2. This material is especially interesting due to it being very heavy (resulting in very strong spin orbit coulping (SOC)), layered, and noncentrosymmetric. Electronic structure calculations reveal the presence of a bulk 3D Dirac cone (very similar to graphene) that is gapped by SOC originating from the hexagonal Pb layer. In Chapter 3 we show the re-investigation of the crystal structure of the 3D Dirac semimetal, Cd3As2. It is found to be centrosymmetric, rather than noncentrosymmetric, and as such all bands are spin degenerate and there is a 4-fold degenerate bulk Dirac point at the Fermi level, making Cd3As2 a 3D electronic analog to graphene. Also, for the first time, scanning tunneling microscopy experiments identify a 2x2 surface reconstruction in what we identify as the (112) cleavage plane of single crystals; needle crystals grow with a [110] long axis direction. Lastly, in chapter 4 we report the discovery of "titanic" (sadly dubbed ⪉rge, nonsaturating" by Nature editors and given the acronym XMR) magnetoresistance (MR) in the non-magnetic, noncentrosymmetric, layered transition metal dichalcogenide WTe2; over 13 million% at 0.53 K in

  13. Quasiparticle electronic structure of bismuth telluride in the GW approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kioupakis, Emmanouil; Tiago, Murilo L.; Louie, Steven G.

    2010-12-01

    The quasiparticle band structure of bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) , an important thermoelectric material that exhibits topologically insulating surface states, is calculated from first principles in the GW approximation. The quasiparticle energies are evaluated in fine detail in the first Brillouin zone using a Wannier-function interpolation method, allowing the accurate determination of the location of the band extrema (which is in the mirror plane) as well as the values of the quasiparticle band gap (0.17 eV) and effective-mass tensors. Spin-orbit interaction effects were included. The valence band exhibits two distinct maxima in the mirror plane that differ by just 1 meV, giving rise to one direct and one indirect band gap of very similar magnitude. The effective-mass tensors are in reasonable agreement with experiment. The Wannier interpolation coefficients can be used for the tight-binding parametrization of the band structure. Our work elucidates the electronic structure of Bi2Te3 and sheds light on its exceptional thermoelectric and topologically insulating properties.

  14. Structural Evolution of a Warm Frontal Precipitation Band During GCPEx

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colle, Brian A.; Naeger, Aaron; Molthan, Andrew; Nesbitt, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    A warm frontal precipitation band developed over a few hours 50-100 km to the north of a surface warm front. The 3-km WRF was able to realistically simulate band development, although the model is somewhat too weak. Band genesis was associated with weak frontogenesis (deformation) in the presence of weak potential and conditional instability feeding into the band region, while it was closer to moist neutral within the band. As the band matured, frontogenesis increased, while the stability gradually increased in the banding region. Cloud top generating cells were prevalent, but not in WRF (too stable). The band decayed as the stability increased upstream and the frontogenesis (deformation) with the warm front weakened. The WRF may have been too weak and short-lived with the band because too stable and forcing too weak (some micro issues as well).

  15. Longitudinal spin relaxation of donor-bound electrons in direct band-gap semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linpeng, Xiayu; Karin, Todd; Durnev, M. V.; Barbour, Russell; Glazov, M. M.; Sherman, E. Ya.; Watkins, S. P.; Seto, Satoru; Fu, Kai-Mei C.

    2016-09-01

    We measure the donor-bound electron longitudinal spin-relaxation time (T1) as a function of magnetic field (B ) in three high-purity direct band-gap semiconductors: GaAs, InP, and CdTe, observing a maximum T1 of 1.4, 0.4, and 1.2 ms, respectively. In GaAs and InP at low magnetic field, up to ˜2 T, the spin-relaxation mechanism is strongly density and temperature dependent and is attributed to the random precession of the electron spin in hyperfine fields caused by the lattice nuclear spins. In all three semiconductors at high magnetic field, we observe a power-law dependence T1∝B-ν with 3 ≲ν ≲4 . Our theory predicts that the direct spin-phonon interaction is important in all three materials in this regime in contrast to quantum dot structures. In addition, the "admixture" mechanism caused by Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling combined with single-phonon processes has a comparable contribution in GaAs. We find excellent agreement between high-field theory and experiment for GaAs and CdTe with no free parameters, however a significant discrepancy exists for InP.

  16. Influence of GaAs surface termination on GaSb/GaAs quantum dot structure and band offsets

    SciTech Connect

    Zech, E. S.; Chang, A. S.; Martin, A. J.; Canniff, J. C.; Millunchick, J. M.; Lin, Y. H.; Goldman, R. S.

    2013-08-19

    We have investigated the influence of GaAs surface termination on the nanoscale structure and band offsets of GaSb/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. Transmission electron microscopy reveals both coherent and semi-coherent clusters, as well as misfit dislocations, independent of surface termination. Cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy reveal clustered GaSb QDs with type I band offsets at the GaSb/GaAs interfaces. We discuss the relative influences of strain and QD clustering on the band offsets at GaSb/GaAs interfaces.

  17. Comment on ``Photonic bands in two-dimensional microplasma array. I. Theoretical derivation of band structures of electromagnetic waves'' [J. Appl. Phys. 101, 073304 (2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-feng; Liu, Shao-bin; Kong, Xiang-kun; Zhou, Liang; Li, Chun-zao; Bian, Bo-rui

    2011-07-01

    Recently, theoretical derivation of band structures of electromagnetic waves in two-dimensional microplasma array has been induced by Osamu Sakai et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 101, 073304 (2007)] using a modified plane wave expansion (PWE) method and a frequency-dependent finite difference time-domain (FDTD) method. This report reveals band diagrams with the effects of plasma electron collision frequency, especially focuses on the TE wave by nonmagnetized plasma. Although the band diagrams of TE wave and formulas of calculation look correct at first glance, there are some mistakes in the report which are unfortunately ignored by the authors. The correct formulas of the modified PWE method and FDTD method will be proposed.

  18. Electron pairing in the presence of incipient bands in iron-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiao; Maiti, S.; Linscheid, A.; Hirschfeld, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Recent experiments on certain Fe-based superconductors have hinted at a role for paired electrons in "incipient" bands that are close to, but do not cross, the Fermi level. Related theoretical works disagree on whether or not strong-coupling superconductivity is required to explain such effects, and whether a critical interaction strength exists. In this work, we consider various versions of the model problem of pairing of electrons in the presence of an incipient band, within a simple multiband weak-coupling BCS approximation. We categorize the problem into two cases: case (i), where superconductivity arises from the "incipient band pairing" alone, and case (ii), where it is induced on an incipient band by pairing due to Fermi-surface-based interactions. Negative conclusions regarding the importance of incipient bands have been drawn so far largely based on case (i), but we show explicitly that models under case (ii) are qualitatively different, and can explain the nonexponential suppression of Tc, as well as robust large gaps on an incipient band. In the latter situation, large gaps on the incipient band do not require a critical interaction strength. We also model the interplay between phonon and spin fluctuation driven superconductivity and describe situations in which they can enhance each other rather than compete. Finally, we discuss the effect of the dimensionality of the incipient band on our results. We argue that pairing on incipient bands may be significant and important in several Fe-based materials, including LiFeAs, FeSe intercalates, and FeSe monolayers on strontium titanate, and indeed may contribute to high critical temperatures in some cases.

  19. Study of electronic structures of solids with strongly interacting electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yen-Sheng

    This work contains studies of two classes of perovskite transition metal oxides. The first class is the layered perovskite cuprates and the related nickelate. The second class is the three dimensional perovskite manganites. Both model and ab initio calculations are carried out for the two classes of systems. The dissertation is therefore divided into the following four parts. The first part is about the 3-band Hubbard model. The model is commonly used for describing the electronic properties of the important CuO2 layers in the crystals of high-Tc superconducting cuprates, such as doped La2CuO4 and YBa2Cu3O 7. The straightforward perturbation expansion on the model taking tpd/ɛpd (~0.36 for the cuprates) as the small parameter does not converge. In this work, I show that there exist canonical transformations on the model Hamiltonian such that the perturbation expansion based on the transformed Hamiltonians converges. In the second part, crystal Hartree-Fock calculations are carried out for La2NiO4 and La2CuO4. The results predict correctly that these two materials are antiferromagnetic insulators, in contrast to the wrong predictions made by the density functional calculations using the local spin density approximation (LSDA). The spin form factors of the materials are also calculated. The results agree with previous theoretical works using an embedded cluster model. The calculated spin form factor of La2CuO4 is consistent with the few experimental data currently available, while the results for La2NiO4 show a large discrepancy between theory and experiment. We question the accuracy of the experimental results of La2NiO4 and call for more experiments to settle the issue. In the third part, crystal Hartree-Fock calculations are carried out for LaMnO3. Our main focus is on the magnetic and orbital orderings, the effect of the crystal distortion from the cubic perovskite structure, and the analysis of the projected density of states. In addition, we also find

  20. Vanishing Electronic Energy Loss of Very Slow Light Ions in Insulators with Large Band Gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Markin, S. N.; Primetzhofer, D.; Bauer, P.

    2009-09-11

    Electronic energy loss of light ions in nanometer films of materials with large band gaps has been studied for very low velocities. For LiF, a threshold velocity is observed at 0.1 a.u. (250 eV/u), below which the ions move without transferring energy to the electronic system. For KCl, a lower (extrapolated) threshold velocity is found, identical for H and He ions. For SiO{sub 2}, no clear velocity threshold is observed for He particles. For protons and deuterons, electronic stopping is found to perfectly fulfill velocity scaling, as expected for binary ion-electron interaction.

  1. Band structure of solids from clusters SCF potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Nour, S.; Chermette, H.

    1995-01-05

    The possibilities and limits of the molecular orbital theory to deal with the problem of determining electronic structure of solids have been explored. A cluster model based on the charge neutrality in the solid has been used in test calculations on some III-V semiconductors and have given quite satisfactory results. Recommendations are given to widen the field of applications of this procedure. 33 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Conduction band discontinuity and electron confinement at the SixGe1-x/Ge interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzeo, G.; Yablonovitch, E.; Jiang, H. W.; Bai, Y.; Fitzgerald, E. A.

    2010-05-01

    Germanium rich heterostructures can constitute a valid alternative to Silicon for the confinement of single electron spins. The conduction band discontinuity in SiGe/Ge heterostructures grown on pure germanium substrate is predicted to allow the confinement of electrons in the germanium, and the conduction band profile of germanium rich heterostructures allow the implementation of g-factor modulation devices not possible in Silicon. We here prove that electrons can indeed be trapped at the Si0.1Ge0.9/Ge interface and we measure the height of the energy barrier to 0.55±0.05 eV by measuring the tunneling time of electrons as a function of the electric field.

  3. Electronic structure of a graphene superlattice with massive Dirac fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, Jonas R. F.

    2015-02-28

    We study the electronic and transport properties of a graphene-based superlattice theoretically by using an effective Dirac equation. The superlattice consists of a periodic potential applied on a single-layer graphene deposited on a substrate that opens an energy gap of 2Δ in its electronic structure. We find that extra Dirac points appear in the electronic band structure under certain conditions, so it is possible to close the gap between the conduction and valence minibands. We show that the energy gap E{sub g} can be tuned in the range 0 ≤ E{sub g} ≤ 2Δ by changing the periodic potential. We analyze the low energy electronic structure around the contact points and find that the effective Fermi velocity in very anisotropic and depends on the energy gap. We show that the extra Dirac points obtained here behave differently compared to previously studied systems.

  4. Orientation-dependent C-60 electronic structures revealed byphotoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Brouet, V.; Yang, W.L.; Zhou, X.J.; Choi, H.J.; Louie, S.G.; Cohen, M.L.; Goldoni, A.; Parmigiani, F.; Hussain, Z.; Shen, Z.X.

    2008-01-17

    We observe, with angle-resolved photoemission, a dramaticchange in the electronic structure of two C60 monolayers, deposited,respectively, on Ag (111) and (100) substrates, and similarly doped withpotassium to half filling of the C60 lowest unoccupied molecular orbital.The Fermi surface symmetry, the bandwidth, and the curvature of thedispersion at gamma point are different. Orient ations of the C60molecules on the two substrates are known to be the main structuraldifference between the two monolayers, and we present new band-structurecalculations for some of these orientations. We conclude thatorientations play a key role in the electronic structure offullerides.

  5. Effect of potassium doping on electronic structure and thermoelectric properties of topological crystalline insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychowdhury, Subhajit; Sandhya Shenoy, U.; Waghmare, Umesh V.; Biswas, Kanishka

    2016-05-01

    Topological crystalline insulator (TCI), Pb0.6Sn0.4Te, exhibits metallic surface states protected by crystal mirror symmetry with negligibly small band gap. Enhancement of its thermoelectric performances needs tuning of its electronic structure particularly through engineering of its band gap. While physical perturbations tune the electronic structure of TCI by breaking of the crystal mirror symmetry, chemical means such as doping have been more attractive recently as they result in better thermoelectric performance in TCIs. Here, we demonstrate that K doping in TCI, Pb0.6Sn0.4Te, breaks the crystal mirror symmetry locally and widens electronic band gap, which is confirmed by direct electronic absorption spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations. K doping in Pb0.6Sn0.4Te increases p-type carrier concentration and suppresses the bipolar conduction via widening a band gap, which collectively boosts the thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) to 1 at 708 K.

  6. Band gap bowing and electron localization of (GaxIn1-x)N

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Byounghak; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2006-05-09

    The band gap bowing and the electron localization ofGaxIn1-xN are calculated using both the local density approximation (LDA)and screened-exchange local density functional (sX-LDA) methods. Thecalculated sX-LDA band gaps are in good agreement with the experimentallyobserved values, with errors of -0.26 and 0.09 eV for bulk GaN and InN,respectively. The LDA band gap errors are 1.33 and 0.81 eV for GaN andInN, in order. In contrast to the gap itself, the band gap bowingparameter is found to be very similar in sX-LDA and LDA. We identify thelocalization of hole states in GaxIn1-xN alloys along In-N-In chains. Thepredicted localizationis stronger in sX-LDA.

  7. Electronic structure of interfaces between hexagonal and rhombohedral graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taut, M.; Koepernik, K.

    2016-07-01

    An analysis of the electronic structure of interfaces between hexagonal (A B ) and rhombohedral (A B C ) graphite based on density functional theory is presented. Both of the two simplest interface structures host (localized) interface bands, which are located around the K point in the Brillouin zone, and which give rise to strong peaks in the density of states at the Fermi level. All interface bands near the Fermi energy are localized at monomers (single atoms with dangling pz orbitals), whereas those around 0.5 eV belong to pz-bonded trimers, which are introduced by the interface and which are not found in the two adjacent bulk substances. There is also an interface band at the (A B ) side of the interface which resembles one of the interface states near a stacking fault in (A B ) graphite.

  8. Phase and frequency structure of superradiance pulses generated by relativistic Ka-band backward-wave oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostov, V. V.; Romanchenko, I. V.; Elchaninov, A. A.; Sharypov, K. A.; Shunailov, S. A.; Ul'masculov, M. R.; Yalandin, M. I.

    2016-08-01

    Phase and frequency stability of electromagnetic oscillations in sub-gigawatt superradiance (SR) pulses generated by an extensive slow-wave structure of a relativistic Ka-band backward-wave oscillator were experimentally investigated. Data on the frequency tuning and radiation phase stability of SR pulses with a variation of the energy and current of electron beam were obtained.

  9. Electron concentrations calculated from the lower hybrid resonance noise band observed by Ogo 3.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burtis, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    A noise band at the lower hybrid resonance (LHR) is often detected by the VLF and ELF receivers on Ogo 3, using the electric antenna. In some cases the noise band is at the geometric mean gyrofrequency as measured by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) magnetometer, and local LHR in a dense H(+) plasma is indicated; in such cases, electron concentration can be calculated, if it is assumed that heavy ions are negligible. Observations at midlatitudes and altitudes of a few earth radii show local concentrations as low as 1.4 electrons/cu cm. In one case the concentrations obtained from the LHR noise band agree with those measured simultaneously by the GSFC ion mass spectrometer within a factor of 2. In another case the concentration is observed to fall by a factor of 2 in 150 km and then to decrease roughly as R to the minus fourth power, in agreement with whistler measurements outside the plasmapause.

  10. Strongly correlated flat-band systems: The route from Heisenberg spins to Hubbard electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derzhko, Oleg; Richter, Johannes; Maksymenko, Mykola

    2015-05-01

    On a large class of lattices (such as the sawtooth chain, the kagome and the pyrochlore lattices), the quantum Heisenberg and the repulsive Hubbard models may host a completely dispersionless (flat) energy band in the single-particle spectrum. The flat-band states can be viewed as completely localized within a finite volume (trap) of the lattice and allow for construction of many-particle states, roughly speaking, by occupying the traps with particles. If the flat-band happens to be the lowest-energy one, the manifold of such many-body states will often determine the ground-state and low-temperature physics of the models at hand even in the presence of strong interactions. The localized nature of these many-body states makes possible the mapping of this subset of eigenstates onto a corresponding classical hard-core system. As a result, the ground-state and low-temperature properties of the strongly correlated flat-band systems can be analyzed in detail using concepts and tools of classical statistical mechanics (e.g., classical lattice-gas approach or percolation approach), in contrast to more challenging quantum many-body techniques usually necessary to examine strongly correlated quantum systems. In this review, we recapitulate the basic features of the flat-band spin systems and briefly summarize earlier studies in the field. The main emphasis is made on recent developments which include results for both spin and electron flat-band models. In particular, for flat-band spin systems, we highlight field-driven phase transitions for frustrated quantum Heisenberg antiferromagnets at low temperatures, chiral flat-band states, as well as the effect of a slight dispersion of a previously strictly flat-band due to nonideal lattice geometry. For electronic systems, we discuss the universal low-temperature behavior of several flat-band Hubbard models, the emergence of ground-state ferromagnetism in the square-lattice Tasaki-Hubbard model and the related Pauli

  11. Evolution of band structures in MoS2-based homo- and heterobilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H. L.; Zhou, C. J.; Huang, X. J.; Wang, X. L.; Xu, H. Z.; Lin, Yong; Yang, W. H.; Wu, Y. P.; Lin, W.; Guo, F.

    2016-02-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed to elucidate the detailed evolution of band structures in MoS2-based homo- and heterobilayers. By constructing the energy-band alignments we observed that biaxial tensile and compressive strain in the constituent transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMD) monolayer shifts the states at the K C, Q C, and K V points down and up, respectively, while the states at the ΓV point are almost unaltered. In contrast, interlayer coupling tends to modify the states at the ΓV and Q C points by splitting the band-edge states of two strained or unstrained constituent TMD monolayers, while it does not affect the states at the K C and K V points. Considering the combined actions of strain and interlayer coupling, the relevant electronic parameters, especially the detailed evolution processes, of the band structures of the investigated bilayer systems can be clearly described. When further applying the extra biaxial strain to the three bilayer systems, it is found that energy differences ΔE(K C  -  Q C) and ΔE(K V  -  ΓV) decrease linearly as the increasing of the biaxial strain. According to the varying trends of ΔE(K C  -  Q C) and ΔE(K V  -  ΓV), MoS2 bilayer will maintain the indirect-bandgap character under any compressive or tensile strain. Differently, WS2/MoS2 heterobilayer transforms interestingly to the direct-bandgap material under the strain from  -1.6% to  -1.2% with the valence band maximum and conduction band minimum located at the K C and K V point respectively. The direct-to-indirect bandgap transition can be obtained for the WSe2/MoS2 heterobilayer when applying much larger extra tensile or compressive strain. The results offer an effective route to verify and tailor the electronic properties of TMD homo- and heterostructures and can be helpful in evaluating the performance of TMD-based electronic devices.

  12. Silicane nanoribbons: electronic structure and electric field modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, D. Q.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, S. L.

    2014-11-01

    We present electronic band structure, Gibbs free energy of formation, and electric field modulation calculations for silicane nanoribbons (NRs), i.e., completely hydrogenated or fluorinated silicene NRs, using density functional theory. We find that although the completely hydrogenated silicene (H-silicane) sheet in the chair-like configuration is an indirect-band-gap semiconductor, a direct band gap can be achieved in the zigzag H-silicane NRs by using Brillouin-zone folding. Compared to H-silicane NRs, the band gaps of completely fluorinated silicene (F-silicane) NRs reduce at least by half. For all silicane NRs considered here, the Gibbs free energy of formation is negative but shows different trends by changing the ribbon width for H-silicane NRs and F-silicane NRs. Furthermore, by analyzing the effect of transverse electric fields on the electronic properties of silicane NRs, we show that an external electric field can make the electrons and holes states spatially separated and even render silicane NRs self-doped. The tunable electronic properties of silicane NRs make them suitable for nanotechnology application.

  13. Crystal lattice and band structure of the intermediate high-pressure phase of PbSe.

    PubMed

    Streltsov, S V; Manakov, A Yu; Vokhmyanin, A P; Ovsyannikov, S V; Shchennikov, V V

    2009-09-23

    In the present paper the results of fitting synchrotron diffraction data are obtained for the intermediate high-pressure phase (9.5 GPa) of the lead selenide based compound Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Se (x = 0.125)-an optoelectronic as well as a thermoelectric material-for two types of lattice symmetries Pnma (space group #62) and Cmcm (space group #63). Both lattice parameters and positions of atoms for the above mentioned structures have been used in calculations of the electron structure of high-pressure phases. The main difference between the electronic properties for Cmcm and Pnma structures established in electronic structure calculations is that in the first one the PbSe compound was found to be a metal, while in the second a small semiconductor gap (E(G) = 0.12 eV) was obtained. Moreover, the forces in the Cmcm structure are an order of magnitude larger than those calculated for the Pnma lattice. In the optimized, Pnma structure within a generalized gradient approximation (GGA), the band gap increases up to E(G) = 0.27 eV. The result coincides with the data on thermoelectric power and electrical resistance data pointing to a semiconductor gap of ∼0.2 eV at ∼9.5 GPa. Thus, the Pmna type of lattice seems to be a preferable version for the intermediate phase compared with the Cmcm one. PMID:21832372

  14. Ab initio calculations of quasiparticle band structure in correlated systems: LDA++ approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenstein, A. I.; Katsnelson, M. I.

    1998-03-01

    We discuss a general approach to a realistic theory of the electronic structure in materials containing correlated d or f electrons. The main feature of this approach is the taking into account of the energy dependence of the electron self-energy with the momentum dependence being neglected (local approximation). It allows us to consider such correlation effects as the non-Fermi-step form of the distribution function, the enhancement of the effective mass including Kondo resonances,'' the appearance of the satellites in the electron spectra, etc. To specify the form of the self-energy, it is useful to distinguish (according to the ratio of the on-site Coulomb energy U to the bandwidth W) three regimes-strong, moderate, and weak correlations. In the case of strong interactions (U/W>1-rare-earth system) the Hubbard-I approach is the most suitable. Starting from an exact atomic Green function with the constrained density matrix nmm' the band-structure problem is formulated as the functional problem on nmm' for f electrons and the standard local-denisty-approximation functional for delocalized electrons. In the case of moderate correlations (U/W~1-metal-insulator regime, Kondo systems) we start from the d=∞ dynamical mean-field iterative perturbation scheme of Kotliar and co-workers and also make use of our multiband atomic Green function for constrained nmm'. Finally for the weak interactions (U/W<1-transition metals) the self-consistent diagrammatic fluctuation-exchange approach of Bickers and Scalapino is generalized to the realistic multiband case. We present two-band, two-dimensional model calculations for all three regimes. A realistic calculation in the Hubbard-I scheme with the exact solution of the on-site multielectron problem for f(d) shells was performed for mixed-valence 4f compound TmSe, and for the classical Mott insulator NiO.

  15. Electron pairing in the presence of incipient bands in iron-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linscheid, Andy; Chen, Xiao; Maiti, Saurabh; Hirschfeld, Peter

    Recent experiments on certain Fe-based superconductors (SC) have hinted at a role for paired electrons in ``incipient'' bands that are close to, but do not cross the Fermi level. Within a simple multiband weak-coupling BCS approximation, we categorize the problem into two cases: case(I) where SC arises from the incipient band pairing alone, and case(II) where it is induced on an incipient band by pairing due to Fermi-surface based interactions. Negative conclusions regarding the importance of incipient bands are largely based on case(I). However, we show explicitly that models under case(II) can explain the mild suppression of Tc, as well as robust large gaps on an incipient band. We also model the interplay between phonon and spin fluctuation (SF) driven SC and describe the bootstrap of electron-phonon SC by SF coupling the incipient and the regular bands. We argue that pairing on incipient bands may be important in several Fe-based materials, including LiFeAs, FeSe intercalates and FeSe monolayers on SrTiO3, and indeed may contribute to high Tc in some cases. In addition, we address the question whether this conclusion holds if the SF interaction is derived explicitly in the incipient band scenario and retardation effects are included on the level of the Eliashberg equations. SM was supported by NHMFL through NSF-DMR-1157490, AL and PJH were supported in part by DOE DE-FG02-05ER46236.

  16. Assignment of the Schüler band of the ammonium radical to the 3 p2F2-3 s2A1 electronic transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, James K. G.

    1984-09-01

    Various visible emission bands observed by Schuster and by Schüler, Michel, and Grün when ammonia was subjected to a discharge or to electron beam excitation have been shown by Herzberg to be due to the ammonium radical, NH 4. It is proposed here that the main band of Schüler et al. near 6635 Å in NH 4 and 6750 Å in ND 4 is the 0-0 band of the electronic transition 3 p2F2-3 s2A1 of the odd electron outside the closed-shell NH 4+ or ND 4+ core, analogous to the D lines of the isoelectronic Na atom. This interpretation is consistent with recent work by Porter and co-workers on neutralized-ion-beam spectroscopy and by Hunziker and co-workers on the absorption spectrum of ND 4 by laser frequency modulation spectroscopy. The theory of the rotational structure of a p2F2- s2A1 electronic transition is developed. In the accompanying paper by Alberti, Huber, and Watson on the absorption spectrum of the Schüler band obtained in a flash discharge experiment, it is shown that the observed rotational structure is fully explained by this assignment. The other visible bands of the ammonium radical may represent vibrational structure of the 3 p2F2-3 s2A1 electronic transition.

  17. Efficient evaluation of epitaxial MoS2 on sapphire by direct band structure imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hokwon; Dumcenco, Dumitru; Fregnaux, Mathieu; Benayad, Anass; Kung, Yen-Cheng; Kis, Andras; Renault, Olivier; Lanes Group, Epfl Team; Leti, Cea Team

    The electronic band structure evaluation of two-dimensional metal dichalcogenides is critical as the band structure can be greatly influenced by the film thickness, strain, and substrate. Here, we performed a direct measurement of the band structure of as-grown monolayer MoS2 on single crystalline sapphire by reciprocal-space photoelectron emission microscopy with a conventional laboratory ultra-violet He I light source. Arrays of gold electrodes were deposited onto the sample in order to avoid charging effects due to the insulating substrate. This allowed the high resolution mapping (ΔE = 0.2 eV Δk = 0.05 Å-1) of the valence states in momentum space down to 7 eV below the Fermi level. The high degree of the epitaxial alignment of the single crystalline MoS2 nuclei was verified by the direct momentum space imaging over a large area containing multiple nuclei. The derived values of the hole effective mass were 2.41 +/-0.05 m0 and 0.81 +/-0.05 m0, respectively at Γ and K points, consistent with the theoretical values of the freestanding monolayer MoS2 reported in the literature. HK acknowledges the french CEA Basic Technological Research program (RTB) for funding.

  18. Strain-tunable band parameters of ZnO monolayer in graphene-like honeycomb structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, Harihar; Mukhopadhyay, Gautam

    2012-10-01

    We present ab initio calculations which show that the direct-band-gap, effective masses and Fermi velocities of charge carriers in ZnO monolayer (ML-ZnO) in graphene-like honeycomb structure are all tunable by application of in-plane homogeneous biaxial strain. Within our simulated strain limit of ±10%, the band gap remains direct and shows a strong non-linear variation with strain. Moreover, the average Fermi velocity of electrons in unstrained ML-ZnO is of the same order of magnitude as that in graphene. The results promise potential applications of ML-ZnO in mechatronics/straintronics and other nano-devices such as the nano-electromechanical systems (NEMS) and nano-optomechanical systems (NOMS).

  19. The effect of spin-orbit coupling in band structure of few-layer graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Sahdan, Muhammad Fauzi Darma, Yudi

    2014-03-24

    Topological insulators are electronic materials that have a bulk band gap like an ordinary insulator but have protected conducting states on their edge or surface. This can be happened due to spin-orbit coupling and time-reversal symmetry. Moreover, the edge current flows through their edge or surface depends on its spin orientation and also it is robust against non-magnetic impurities. Therefore, topological insulators are predicted to be useful ranging from spintronics to quantum computation. Graphene was first predicted to be the precursor of topological insulator by Kane-Mele. They developed a Hamiltonian model to describe the gap opening in graphene. In this work, we investigate the band structure of few-layer graphene by using this model with analytical approach. The results of our calculations show that the gap opening occurs at K and K’ point, not only in single layer, but also in bilayer and trilayer graphene.

  20. Electronic structure of transparent oxides with the Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson potential.

    PubMed

    Dixit, H; Saniz, R; Cottenier, S; Lamoen, D; Partoens, B

    2012-05-23

    We present electronic band structures of transparent oxides calculated using the Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson (TB-mBJ) potential. We studied the basic n-type conducting binary oxides In(2)O(3), ZnO, CdO and SnO(2) along with the p-type conducting ternary oxides delafossite CuXO(2) (X=Al, Ga, In) and spinel ZnX(2)O(4) (X=Co, Rh, Ir). The results are presented for calculated band gaps and effective electron masses. We discuss the improvements in the band gap determination using TB-mBJ compared to the standard generalized gradient approximation (GGA) in density functional theory (DFT) and also compare the electronic band structure with available results from the quasiparticle GW method. It is shown that the calculated band gaps compare well with the experimental and GW results, although the electron effective mass is generally overestimated. PMID:22538303

  1. Structural and electronic properties of oligo- and polythiophenes modified by substituents

    PubMed Central

    Rittmeyer, Simon P

    2012-01-01

    Summary The electronic and structural properties of oligo- and polythiophenes that can be used as building blocks for molecular electronic devices have been studied by using periodic density functional theory calculations. We have in particular focused on the effect of substituents on the electronic structure of thiophenes. Whereas singly bonded substituents, such as methyl, amino or nitro groups, change the electronic properties of thiophene monomers and dimers, they hardly influence the band gap of polythiophene. In contrast, phenyl-substituted polythiophenes as well as vinyl-bridged polythiophene derivatives exhibit drastically modified band gaps. These effects cannot be explained by simple electron removal or addition, as calculations for charged polythiophenes demonstrate. PMID:23365804

  2. A microscopic two-band model for the electron-hole asymmetry in high-Tc superconductors and reentering behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bru, J.-B.; Pedra, W. de Siqueira; Dömel, A.-S.

    2011-07-01

    To our knowledge there is no rigorously analyzed microscopic model explaining the electron-hole asymmetry of the critical temperature seen in high-Tc cuprate superconductors - at least no model not breaking artificially this symmetry. We present here a microscopic two-band model based on the structure of energetic levels of holes in CuO2 conducting layers of cuprates. In particular, our Hamiltonian does not contain ad hoc terms implying - explicitly - different masses for electrons and holes. We prove that two energetically near-lying interacting bands can explain the electron-hole asymmetry. Indeed, we rigorously analyze the phase diagram of the model and show that the critical temperatures for fermion densities below half-filling can manifest a very different behavior as compared to the case of densities above half-filling. This fact results from the inter-band interaction and intra-band Coulomb repulsion in interplay with thermal fluctuations between two energetic levels. So, if the energy difference between bands is too big (as compared to the energy scale defined by the critical temperatures of superconductivity) then the asymmetry disappears. Moreover, the critical temperature turns out to be a non-monotonic function of the fermion density and the phase diagram of our model shows "superconducting domes" as in high-Tc cuprate superconductors. This explains why the maximal critical temperature is attained at donor densities away from the maximal one. Outside the superconducting phase and for fermion densities near half-filling the thermodynamics governed by our Hamiltonian corresponds, as in real high-Tc materials, to a Mott-insulating phase. The nature of the inter-band interaction can be electrostatic (screened Coulomb interaction), magnetic (for instance, some Heisenberg-type one-site spin-spin interaction), or a mixture of both. If the inter-band interaction is predominately magnetic then - additionally to the electron-hole asymmetry - we observe a

  3. Method of manufacturing flexible metallic photonic band gap structures, and structures resulting therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Gupta, Sandhya; Tuttle, Gary L.; Sigalas, Mihail; McCalmont, Jonathan S.; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2001-08-14

    A method of manufacturing a flexible metallic photonic band gap structure operable in the infrared region, comprises the steps of spinning on a first layer of dielectric on a GaAs substrate, imidizing this first layer of dielectric, forming a first metal pattern on this first layer of dielectric, spinning on and imidizing a second layer of dielectric, and then removing the GaAs substrate. This method results in a flexible metallic photonic band gap structure operable with various filter characteristics in the infrared region. This method may be used to construct multi-layer flexible metallic photonic band gap structures. Metal grid defects and dielectric separation layer thicknesses are adjusted to control filter parameters.

  4. Band-structure analysis from photoreflectance spectroscopy in (Ga,Mn)As

    SciTech Connect

    Yastrubchak, Oksana; Gluba, Lukasz; Zuk, Jerzy; Wosinski, Tadeusz; Andrearczyk, Tomasz; Domagala, Jaroslaw Z.; Sadowski, Janusz

    2013-12-04

    Modulation photoreflectance spectroscopy has been applied to study the band-structure evolution in (Ga,Mn)As epitaxial layers with increasing Mn content. Structural and magnetic properties of the layers were characterized with high-resolution X-ray diffractometry and SQUID magnetometery, respectively. The revealed results of decrease in the band-gap-transition energy in the (Ga,Mn)As layers with increasing Mn content are interpreted in terms of a disordered valence band, extended within the band gap, formed, in highly Mn-doped (Ga,Mn)As, as a result of merging the Mn-related impurity band with the host GaAs valence band.

  5. Advanced Accelerating Structures and Their Interaction with Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gai Wei

    2009-01-22

    In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

  6. Advanced accelerating structures and their interaction with electron beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, W.; High Energy Physics

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

  7. Structural, optical and electronic structure studies of Al doped ZnO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Vanita; Kumar, Manish; Shukla, D. K.; Choudhary, R. J.; Phase, D. M.; Kumar, Ravindra; Joshi, B. C.

    2015-07-01

    Structural, optical and electronic structure of Al doped ZnO thin films grown using pulsed laser deposition on glass substrate are investigated. X-ray diffraction measurements reveal that all the films are textured along the c-axis and have wurtzite structure. Al doping in ZnO films leads to increase in grain size due to relaxation in compressive stress. Enhancement in band gap of ZnO films with the Al doping is also noticed which can be ascribed to the Brustein-Moss shift. The changes in the electronic structure caused by Al in the doped thin film samples are understood through X-ray absorption measurements.

  8. 1D-TlInSe2: Band Structure, Dielectric Function and Nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamedov, Nazim; Wakita, Kazuki; Akita, Seiji; Nakayama, Yoshikazu

    2005-01-01

    Linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) analysis of the electronic band states has been completed for one-dimensional (1D) TlInSe2 having rod-like ground state shape of bulky crystal. The total scenario of the occurrence of the band states from the atomic states has been established. According to this scenario, in dipole approximation the optical transitions at band gap (point T of Brillouin zone) are either entirely forbidden or allowed for T2-T10 transitions in e\\perpc configuration provided that either initial or terminate state has T2 symmetry and both are Se-like. As a whole, the obtained results on the electronic spectrum, including dielectric function, are applicable to all obtained 1D-TlInSe2 nanorods which were as thin as 30--50 nm in cross-section, and apparently preserved tetragonal crystal structure of bulky material. The thermal instabilities developing already in bulky samples of 1D-TlInSe2 are considered to be an ultimate source of the nanoparticles emerging in plenty during nanorods preparation. The nanoplates of a chemically similar but 2D material, TlInS2, are demonstrated for comparison to show the absence of nanoparticles in that case. A possibility of nanoparticle preparation using laser excited coherent phonon trains in the nanorods of 1D-TlInSe2 is figured out.

  9. Theoretical investigation of the band structure of picene single crystals within the GW approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, Susumu; Morikawa, Yoshitada; Schindlmayr, Arno

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the band dispersion and related electronic properties of picene single crystals within the GW approximation for the electronic self-energy. The width of the upper highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMOu) band along the Γ-Y direction, corresponding to the b crystal axis in real space along which the molecules are stacked, is determined to be 0.60 eV and thus 0.11 eV larger than the value obtained from density-functional theory. As in our recent study of rubrene using the same methodology [S. Yanagisawa, Y. Morikawa, and A. Schindlmayr, Phys. Rev. B 88, 115438 (2013)], this increase in the bandwidth is due to the strong variation of the GW self-energy correction across the Brillouin zone, which in turn reflects the increasing hybridization of the HOMOu states of neighboring picene molecules from Γ to Y. In contrast, the width of the lower HOMO (HOMOl) band along Γ-Y remains almost unchanged, consistent with the fact that the HOMOl(Γ) and HOMOl(Y) states exhibit the same degree of hybridization, so that the nodal structure of the wave functions and the matrix elements of the self-energy correction are very similar.

  10. Structural and electronic properties of poly(vinyl alcohol) using density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Dabhi, Shweta Jha, Prafulla K.

    2014-04-24

    The first principles calculations have been carried out to investigate the structural, electronic band structure density of states along with the projected density of states for poly(vinyl alcohol). Our structural calculation suggests that the poly(vinyl alcohol) exhibits monoclinic structure. The calculated structural lattice parameters are in excellent agreement with available experimental values. The band structure calculations reveal that the direct and indirect band gaps are 5.55 eV and 5.363 eV respectively in accordance with experimental values.

  11. Electronic structures of two-dimensional metallic oxides and bronzes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyot, H.; Motta, N.; Marcus, J.; Drouard, S.; Balaska, B.

    2001-06-01

    The electronic structures of some molybdenum and tungsten oxides or bronzes exhibiting Peierls transitions are investigated at room temperature. The detection of a weak conduction band, well separated from a large valence band, evidences the metallic character of each oxide. The distributions of the valences of the different transition metals are analyzed by XPS. In each oxide, the presence of atleast two contributive components to the main core levels reveals a mixed valence state of the transition metal. But the proportions of the different components do not reflect the distribution of the cationic valences, as expected from the crystallographic structures. To understand this disagreement, we suggest that two alternative ways, including or rejecting a screening effect generated by the conduction electrons contribute to the photoemission processes and alter the real distribution of the cationic charges.

  12. Semiconducting properties of amorphous GaZnSnO thin film based on combinatorial electronic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B. K.; Park, J. S.; Kim, D. H.; Chung, K. B.

    2014-05-05

    Semiconducting properties and electronic structures of amorphous GaZnSnO (GZTO) thin films are investigated with respect to metal cationic composition. An increase of the cationic Sn ratio resulted in an increase of the carrier concentration and a decrease of the mobility of the films. Combinatorial analysis revealed that the electrical characteristics of GZTO films are strongly correlated to changes in electronic structure. The increase in carrier concentration is related to the generation of vacancies by the changes of oxygen coordination around the cationic metal and the shallow band edge state below the conduction band. On the other hand, the decrease of mobility can be explained by the deep band edge state, and the difference between the experimental conduction band and simulated conduction band by the combinatorial electronic structure based on the chemical composition.

  13. Electronic structure of (Ca0.85La0.15)FeAs2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.-H.; Kim, T. K.; Sala, A.; Ogino, H.; Shimoyama, J.; Büchner, B.; Borisenko, S. V.

    2015-02-01

    We report a comprehensive study of orbital character and tridimensional nature of the electronic structure of (Ca0.85La0.15)FeAs2 from recently discovered "112" family of Iron-based superconductors (IBS), with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We observed that the band structure is similar to that of "122" family, namely, there are three hole-like bands at the Brillouin zone (BZ) center and two electron-like bands at the BZ corner. The bands near the Fermi level (EF) are mainly derived from the Fe t2g orbitals. On the basis of our present and earlier studies, we classify IBS into the three types according to their crystal structures. We show that although the bands near EF mainly originate from Fe 3d electrons, they are significantly modified by the interaction between the superconducting slabs and the intermediate atoms.

  14. Semiconducting properties of amorphous GaZnSnO thin film based on combinatorial electronic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, B. K.; Park, J. S.; Kim, D. H.; Chung, K. B.

    2014-05-01

    Semiconducting properties and electronic structures of amorphous GaZnSnO (GZTO) thin films are investigated with respect to metal cationic composition. An increase of the cationic Sn ratio resulted in an increase of the carrier concentration and a decrease of the mobility of the films. Combinatorial analysis revealed that the electrical characteristics of GZTO films are strongly correlated to changes in electronic structure. The increase in carrier concentration is related to the generation of vacancies by the changes of oxygen coordination around the cationic metal and the shallow band edge state below the conduction band. On the other hand, the decrease of mobility can be explained by the deep band edge state, and the difference between the experimental conduction band and simulated conduction band by the combinatorial electronic structure based on the chemical composition.

  15. Analysis of Kikuchi band contrast reversal in electron backscatter diffraction patterns of silicon.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, Aimo; Nolze, Gert

    2010-02-01

    We analyze the contrast reversal of Kikuchi bands that can be seen in electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns under specific experimental conditions. The observed effect can be reproduced using dynamical electron diffraction calculations. Two crucial contributions are identified to be at work: First, the incident beam creates a depth distribution of incoherently backscattered electrons which depends on the incidence angle of the beam. Second, the localized inelastic scattering in the outgoing path leads to pronounced anomalous absorption effects for electrons at grazing emission angles, as these electrons have to go through the largest amount of material. We use simple model depth distributions to account for the incident beam effect, and we assume an exit angle dependent effective crystal thickness in the dynamical electron diffraction calculations. Very good agreement is obtained with experimental observations for silicon at 20keV primary beam energy.

  16. More light on the low electronic transition energy bands of dithizone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, M. R.; El Gaber, A. A. Abd; El Roudi, A. M.; Soliman, E. M.

    The visible electronic spectral behaviour of different concentrations of dithizone in pure and mixed various organic solvents has been investigated. It is identified that in dilute basic solvents solutions, dithizone (H 2DZ) exists mainly in monovalent anionic form (HDZ -), where its extent of ionization is largely dependent on the solvent basicity effect. The visible absorption band belonging to absorption of HDZ - form and the shorter visible one belonging to absorption of H 2DZ form are assigned to a transition involving the whole solute associated with intramolecular CT interaction. On the other hand, the longer wavelength visible band observed in the spectrum of the H 2DZ form is assigned to absorption of hydrogen bonding solvated molecular complex. This involves an electron transfer from the lone pair of electrons belonging to solvent molecule to the σ*-antibonding orbital of the acidic NH bond belongs to H 2DZ form.

  17. X-Band Microwave Undulators for Short Wavelength Free-Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrini, C.

    2006-01-03

    Microwave undulators have two features that make them attractive to use in free-electron lasers, when compared with conventional static magnetic undulators. One is that the beam aperture is larger than the period, and thus the undulator period is smaller than that achievable with static systems. The second is the possibility of easily producing both circular and planar polarization and dynamically controlling the polarization characteristic and the undulator field intensity. The recent development of high power klystrons and pulse compression techniques at X-band frequency, near 12 GHz, is making this type of undulators very attractive for use in short wavelength free-electron lasers operating in the few nanometers to the Angstrom spectral region. In this paper we discuss the choice of parameters for X-band microwave undulators, the effect of microwave energy losses in the waveguide walls and its possible compensation by tapering the waveguide geometry, and the characteristics of free-electron lasers based on these systems.

  18. Excitation of the ligand-to-metal charge transfer band induces electron tunnelling in azurin

    SciTech Connect

    Baldacchini, Chiara; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    2014-03-03

    Optical excitation of azurin blue copper protein immobilized on indium-tin oxide, in resonance with its ligand-to-metal charge transfer absorption band, resulted in a light-induced current tunnelling within the protein milieu. The related electron transport rate is estimated to be about 10{sup 5} s{sup −1}. A model based on resonant tunnelling through an azurin excited molecular state is proposed. The capability of controlling electron transfer processes through light pulses opens interesting perspectives for implementation of azurin in bio-nano-opto-electronic devices.

  19. The two dimensional electron system as a nanoantenna in the microwave and terahertz bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iñarrea, Jesús

    2011-12-01

    We study the magnetoresistance of two-dimensional electron systems under several radiation sources of different frequencies for moderate power. We use the model of radiation-driven electron orbits extended to this regime. First, we consider the case of two different radiations and we find a regime of superposition or interference of harmonic motions, i.e., a modulated magnetoresistance response with pulses and beats. Finally, we consider a multiple photoexcitation case where we propose the two-dimensional electron system as a potential nanoantenna device or ultrasensitive detector for the microwave and terahertz bands. Thus, these results could be of special interest in nanophotonics and nanoelectronics.

  20. Band structure of silicene in the tight binding approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Gert, A. V. Nestoklon, M. O.; Yassievich, I. N.

    2015-07-15

    The electronic structure of silicene is simulated by the tight binding method with the basis sp{sup 3}d{sup 5}s*. The results are in good agreement with ab initio calculations. The effective Hamiltonian of silicene in the vicinity of the Dirac point is constructed by the method of invariants. Silicon atoms in silicene are located in two parallel planes displaced perpendicularly to each other by Δ{sub z}; the energy spectrum essentially depends on this displacement. Using the tight binding technique, the coefficients of the effective Hamiltonian are determined for various values of Δ{sub z}.

  1. Long-term drift induced by the electronic crosstalk in Terra MODIS Band 29

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Junqiang; Madhavan, Sriharsha; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Wang, Menghua

    2015-10-01

    Terra MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is one of the key sensors in the NASA's Earth Observing System, which has successfully completed 15 years of on-orbit operation. Terra MODIS continues to collect valuable information of the Earth's energy radiation from visible to thermal infrared wavelengths. The instrument has been well characterized over its lifetime using onboard calibrators whose calibration references are traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology standards. In this paper, we focus on the electronic crosstalk effect of Terra MODIS band 29, a thermal emissive band (TEB) whose center wavelength is 8.55 µm. Previous works have established the mechanism to describe the effect of the electronic crosstalk in the TEB channels of Terra MODIS. This work utilizes the established methodology to apply to band 29. The electronic crosstalk is identified and characterized using the regularly scheduled lunar observations. The moon being a near-pulse-like source allowed easy detection of extraneous signals around the actual Moon surface. First, the crosstalk-transmitting bands are identified along with their amplitudes. The crosstalk effect then is characterized using a moving average mechanism that allows a high fidelity of the magnitude to be corrected. The lunar-based analysis unambiguously shows that the crosstalk contamination is becoming more severe in recent years and should be corrected in order to maintain calibration quality for the affected spectral bands. Finally, two radiometrically well-characterized sites, Pacific Ocean and Libya 1 desert, are used to assess the impact of crosstalk effect. It is shown that the crosstalk contamination induces a long-term upward drift of 1.5 K in band 29 brightness temperature of MODIS Collection 6 L1B, which could significantly impact the science products. The crosstalk effect also induces strong detector-to-detector differences, which result in severe stripping in the Earth view

  2. Electronic and structural properties of the (1010) and (1120) ZnO surfaces.

    PubMed

    Marana, N L; Longo, V M; Longo, E; Martins, J B L; Sambrano, J R

    2008-09-25

    The structural and electronic properties of ZnO (1010) and (1120) surfaces were investigated by means of density functional theory applied to periodic calculations at B3LYP level. The stability and relaxation effects for both surfaces were analyzed. The electronic and energy band properties were discussed on the basis of band structure as well as density of states. There is a significant relaxation in the (1010) as compared to the (1120) terminated surfaces. The calculated direct gap is 3.09, 2.85, and 3.09 eV for bulk, (1010), and (1120) surfaces, respectively. The band structures for both surfaces are very similar.

  3. Enhanced tunable narrow-band THz emission from laser-modulated electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, D.; Stupakov, G.; /SLAC

    2009-06-19

    We propose and analyze a scheme to generate enhanced narrow-band terahertz (THz) radiation through down-conversion of the frequency of optical lasers using laser-modulated electron beams. In the scheme the electron beam is first energy modulated by two lasers with wave numbers k{sub 1} and k2, respectively. After passing through a dispersion section, the energy modulation is converted to density modulation. Due to the nonlinear conversion process, the beam will have density modulation at wave number k = nk{sub 1} + mk{sub 2}, where n and m are positive or negative integers. By properly choosing the parameters for the lasers and dispersion section, one can generate density modulation at THz frequency in the beam using optical lasers. This density-modulated beam can be used to generate powerful narrow-band THz radiation. Since the THz radiation is in tight synchronization with the lasers, it should provide a high temporal resolution for the optical-pump THz-probe experiments. The central frequency of the THz radiation can be easily tuned by varying the wavelength of the two lasers and the energy chirp of the electron beam. The proposed scheme is in principle able to generate intense narrow-band THz radiation covering the whole THz range and offers a promising way towards the tunable intense narrow-band THz sources.

  4. Phase analysis on dual-phase steel using band slope of electron backscatter diffraction pattern.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jun-Yun; Park, Seong-Jun; Moon, Man-Been

    2013-08-01

    A quantitative and automated phase analysis of dual-phase (DP) steel using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was attempted. A ferrite-martensite DP microstructure was produced by intercritical annealing and quenching. An EBSD map of the microstructure was obtained and post-processed for phase discrimination. Band slope (BS), which was a measure of pattern quality, exhibited much stronger phase contrast than another conventional one, band contrast. Owing to high sensitivity to lattice defect and little orientation dependence, BS provided handiness in finding a threshold for phase discrimination. Its grain average gave a superior result on the discrimination and volume fraction measurement of the constituent phases in the DP steel.

  5. Electronic structure and photoelectron spectra of osmium and ruthenium tetraoxides

    SciTech Connect

    Topol', I.A.; Vovna, V.I.; Kazachek, M.V.

    1988-01-01

    The X/sub ..cap alpha../-SW method has been used in the nonrelativistic and quasirelativistic approximations to calculate the electronic structures of OsO/sub 4/, RuO/sub 4/, and FeO/sub 4/. When the 5d element is replaced by a 4d or 3d one, the electron-density redistribution is due mainly to the d electrons. All the d electrons in FeO/sub 4/ are localized on the iron atom, which markedly reduced the ionic and covalent bonding on the transition from RuO/sub 4/ to FeO/sub 4/, which explains the instability of FeO/sub 4/. The calculated spin-orbit splittings agree well with the structure of the PES bands, which enables one to establish the sequence of MO ionization energies unambiguously.

  6. Computational Search for Strong Topological Insulators: An Exercise in Data Mining and Electronic Structure

    DOE PAGES

    Klintenberg, M.; Haraldsen, Jason T.; Balatsky, Alexander V.

    2014-06-19

    In this paper, we report a data-mining investigation for the search of topological insulators by examining individual electronic structures for over 60,000 materials. Using a data-mining algorithm, we survey changes in band inversion with and without spin-orbit coupling by screening the calculated electronic band structure for a small gap and a change concavity at high-symmetry points. Overall, we were able to identify a number of topological candidates with varying structures and composition. Lastly, our overall goal is expand the realm of predictive theory into the determination of new and exotic complex materials through the data mining of electronic structure.

  7. Electronic structure of herbicides: Atrazine and bromoxynil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Igor; Kovač, Branka

    2011-06-01

    The electronic structures of herbicides atrazine and bromoxynil have been investigated by UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), quantum chemical calculations and comparison with X-ray diffraction, molecular docking and molecular dynamics studies. Their electronic and molecular structures are discussed in the context of their biological activity. This is the first report which correlates the molecular mechanism of biological activity of these herbicides with their experimentally determined electronic and molecular structures.

  8. Influence of the sequence on the ab initio band structures of single and double stranded DNA models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogár, Ferenc; Bende, Attila; Ladik, János

    2014-06-01

    The solid state physical approach is widely used for the characterization of electronic properties of DNA. In the simplest case the helical symmetry is explicitly utilized with a repeat unit containing only a single nucleotide or nucleotide pair. This model provides a band structure that is easily interpretable and reflects the main characteristic features of the single nucleotide or a nucleotide pair chain, respectively. The chemical variability of the different DNA chains is, however, almost completely neglected in this way. In the present work we have investigated the effect of the different sequences on the band structure of periodic DNA models. For this purpose we have applied the Hartree-Fock crystal orbital method for single and double stranded DNA chains with two different subsequent nucleotides in the repeat unit of former and two different nucleotide pairs in the latter case, respectively. These results are compared to simple helical models with uniform sequences. The valence and conduction bands related to the stacked nucleotide bases of single stranded DNA built up only from guanidine as well as of double stranded DNA built up only from guanidine-cytidine pairs showed special properties different from the other cases. Namely, they had higher conduction and lower valence band positions and this way larger band gaps and smaller widths of these bands. With the introduction of non-uniform guanidine containing sequences band structures became more similar to each other and to the band structures of other sequences without guanidine. The maximal bandwidths of the non-uniform sequences are considerably smaller than in the case of uniform sequences implying smaller charge carrier mobilities both in the conduction and valence bands.

  9. Structural electronic and phonon properties of some transition metal aluminides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatima, Bushra; Pandit, Premlata; Sanyal, Sankar P.

    2012-06-01

    The structural and electronic properties of some Transition metal Aluminides (TMAl) namely ruthenium aluminide (RuAl), nickel aluminide (NiAl) and cobalt aluminide (CoAl) have been studied using plane wave pseudopotential method (PWSCF) within the local density approximation (LDA). The three TMAl's crystallizes in the CsCl-type structure (B2 phase). From the analysis of band structure and density of state, we found that these TMAl's are metallic in nature. The vibrational properties in terms of phonon dispersion curves and density of state have also been reported for RuAl using density functional perturbation theory (DFPT).

  10. Measurements of band gap structure in diamond compressed to 370 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamboa, Eliseo; Fletcher, Luke; Lee, Hae-Ja; Zastrau, Ulf; Gauthier, Maxence; Gericke, Dirk; Vorberger, Jan; Granados, Eduardo; Heimann, Phillip; Hastings, Jerome; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2015-06-01

    We present the first measurements of the electronic structure of dynamically compressed diamond demonstrating a widening of the band gap to pressures of up to 370 +/- 25 GPa. The 8 keV free electron laser x-ray beam from the Linac Coherently Light Source (LCLS) has been focussed onto a diamond foil compressed by two counter-propagating laser pulses to densities of up to 5.3 g/cm3 and temperatures of up to 3000 +/- 400 K. The x-ray pulse excites a collective interband transition of the valence electrons, leading to a plasmon-like loss. We find good agreement with the observed plasmon shift by including the pressure dependence of the band gap as determined from density functional theory simulations. This work was performed at the Matter at Extreme Conditions (MEC) instrument of LCLS, supported by the DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science under Contract No. SF00515. This work was supported by DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science under F.

  11. Structure and electronic properties of saturated and unsaturated gallium nitride nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhiguo; Wang, Shengjie; Li, Jingbo; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2009-11-05

    The atomic and electronic structures of saturated and unsaturated GaN nanotubes along the [001] direction with (100) lateral facets are studied using first-principles calculations. Atomic relaxation of nanotubes shows that appreciable distortion occurs in the unsaturated nanotubes. All the nanotubes considered, including saturated and unsaturated ones, exhibit semiconducting, with a direct band gap. Surface states arisen from the threefold-coordinated N and Ga atoms at the lateral facets exist inside the bulk-like band gap. When the nanotubes saturated with hydrogen, these dangling bond bands are removed from the band gap, but the band gap decreases with increasing the wall thickness of the nanotubes.

  12. Electronic properties of InP (001)/HfO{sub 2} (001) interface: Band offsets and oxygen dependence

    SciTech Connect

    KC, Santosh; Dong, Hong; Longo, Roberto C.; Xiong, Ka; Wang, Weichao; Wallace, Robert M.; Cho, Kyeongjae

    2014-01-14

    Using ab-initio methods, atomic structures and electronic properties of InP (001)/HfO{sub 2} (001) interface are studied within the framework of density functional theory. We examine the InP/HfO{sub 2} model interface electronic structures under varying oxidation conditions. The effects of indium and phosphorous concentrations on interfacial bonding, defect states, band offsets, and the thermodynamic stability at the interface are also investigated. The origin of interfacial gap states in InP (001)/HfO{sub 2} (001) interface are proposed, mainly from the P-rich oxides, which is validated by our experimental work. This highlights the importance of surface passivation prior to high-κ deposition based on the in situ spectroscopic results of atomic layer deposition of HfO{sub 2} on InP.

  13. Spatially resolved band alignments at Au-hexadecanethiol monolayer-GaAs(001) interfaces by ballistic electron emission microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Junay, A.; Guézo, S. Turban, P.; Delhaye, G.; Lépine, B.; Tricot, S.; Ababou-Girard, S.; Solal, F.

    2015-08-28

    We study structural and electronic inhomogeneities in Metal—Organic Molecular monoLayer (OML)—semiconductor interfaces at the sub-nanometer scale by means of in situ Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy (BEEM). BEEM imaging of Au/1-hexadecanethiols/GaAs(001) heterostructures reveals the evolution of pinholes density as a function of the thickness of the metallic top-contact. Using BEEM in spectroscopic mode in non-short-circuited areas, local electronic fingerprints (barrier height values and corresponding spectral weights) reveal a low-energy tunneling regime through the insulating organic monolayer. At higher energies, BEEM evidences new conduction channels, associated with hot-electron injection in the empty molecular orbitals of the OML. Corresponding band diagrams at buried interfaces can be thus locally described. The energy position of GaAs conduction band minimum in the heterostructure is observed to evolve as a function of the thickness of the deposited metal, and coherently with size-dependent electrostatic effects under the molecular patches. Such BEEM analysis provides a quantitative diagnosis on metallic top-contact formation on organic molecular monolayer and appears as a relevant characterization for its optimization.

  14. Electronic structure of beryllium fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedford, K. L.; Williams, R. T.; Hunter, W. R.; Rife, J. C.; Weber, M. J.; Kingman, D. D.; Cline, C. F.

    1983-02-01

    Vacuum-ultraviolet reflectance, absorptance, and photoelectron spectroscopy of vitreous and crystalline BeF2 are reported. The data are interpreted with reference to self-consistent unrestricted Hartree-Fock cluster calculations also presented in this paper. The first allowed exciton reflectance peak in crystalline BeF2 is at 12.9 eV, similar to the 12.8-eV peak found in the glass. Optical transmission of bulk samples extends at least to 9.5 eV, and can be assumed to be impurity limited in available material. Calculations of several defect and impurity levels are presented. Since the calculations presented here indicate that BeF2 should have an optically forbidden band edge similar to that in SiO2, the ultimate transparency range of purified BeF2 will depend on the forbidden exciton absorption, not yet observable above the impurity background. Grazing-incidence reflectance spectra near the Be2+ K edge are interpreted in terms of a core exciton state lying at or slightly below the conduction-band minimum as determined from x-ray photoelectron data and the optical band gap.

  15. Band structure parameters of Zn 1- xCd xSe investigated by spin-flip Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolverson, D.; Karimov, O. Z.; Davies, J. J.; Irvine, S. J. C.; Ahmed, M. U.; Telfer, S. A.; Prior, K. A.; Ogata, K.; Fujita, Sz; Fujita, Sg

    2000-06-01

    Spin-flip Raman scattering spectroscopy has been applied to the study of the wide band-gap semiconductor material Zn 1- xCd xSe in order to determine for the first time the dependence on the composition, x, of the gyromagnetic ratio of electrons in the Γ 6 conduction band. The experimental values for the Zn 1- xCd xSe, Zn 1- xMg xSe and ZnS xSe 1- x alloy systems are discussed in terms of the k·p perturbation theory for the band structure near the direct band gap and it is found that the observed dependence on composition can be reproduced well only when the five-band level of approximation is used together with the addition of a third-order perturbation term. Simple interpolation schemes have been used to estimate the band structures between the binary end-members of each alloy, taking into account the bowing of the fundamental band gap and making reasonable assumptions about the behaviour of the spin-orbit coupling parameter.

  16. Quasiparticle band structure of infinite hydrogen fluoride and hydrogen chloride chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buth, Christian

    2006-10-01

    We study the quasiparticle band structure of isolated, infinite (HF)∞ and (HCl)∞ bent (zigzag) chains and examine the effect of the crystal field on the energy levels of the constituent monomers. The chains are one of the simplest but realistic models of the corresponding three-dimensional crystalline solids. To describe the isolated monomers and the chains, we set out from the Hartree-Fock approximation, harnessing the advanced Green's function methods local molecular orbital algebraic diagrammatic construction (ADC) scheme and local crystal orbital ADC (CO-ADC) in a strict second order approximation, ADC(2,2) and CO-ADC(2,2), respectively, to account for electron correlations. The configuration space of the periodic correlation calculations is found to converge rapidly only requiring nearest-neighbor contributions to be regarded. Although electron correlations cause a pronounced shift of the quasiparticle band structure of the chains with respect to the Hartree-Fock result, the bandwidth essentially remains unaltered in contrast to, e.g., covalently bound compounds.

  17. Growth of the 889 per cm infrared band in annealed electron-irradiated silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svensson, B. G.; Lindstrom, J. L.; Corbett, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    Isothermal annealing of electron-irradiated Czochralski silicon has been studied at four different temperatures ranging from 304 to 350 C using infrared spectroscopy. At annealing temperatures above 300 C the irradiation-induced band at 830 per cm, usually attributed to a vacancy-oxygen complex (the A center), disappears and a new band at 889 per cm grows up. Within the experimental accuracy, the activation energy for the growth of this band is found to be identical with the value given by Stavola et al. for 'anomalous' oxygen diffusion in silicon. Also the frequency factors for the two processes are in reasonable agreement. The results show that a vacancy-assisted process may provide an explanation for enhanced motion of oxygen in silicon.

  18. Large-area 2D periodic crystalline silicon nanodome arrays on nanoimprinted glass exhibiting photonic band structure effects.

    PubMed

    Becker, C; Lockau, D; Sontheimer, T; Schubert-Bischoff, P; Rudigier-Voigt, E; Bockmeyer, M; Schmidt, F; Rech, B

    2012-04-01

    Two-dimensional silicon nanodome arrays are prepared on large areas up to 50 cm² exhibiting photonic band structure effects in the near-infrared and visible wavelength region by downscaling a recently developed fabrication method based on nanoimprint-patterned glass, high-rate electron-beam evaporation of silicon, self-organized solid phase crystallization and wet-chemical etching. The silicon nanodomes, arranged in square lattice geometry with 300 nm lattice constant, are optically characterized by angular resolved reflection measurements, allowing the partial determination of the photonic band structure. This experimentally determined band structure agrees well with the outcome of three-dimensional optical finite-element simulations. A 16% photonic bandgap is predicted for an optimized geometry of the silicon nanodome arrays. By variation of the duration of the selective etching step, the geometry as well as the optical properties of the periodic silicon nanodome arrays can be controlled systematically.

  19. The surface electronic structure of silicon terminated (100) diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, A. K.; Tadich, A.; Sear, M. J.; Qi, D.; Wee, A. T. S.; Stacey, A.; Pakes, C. I.

    2016-07-01

    A combination of synchrotron-based x-ray spectroscopy and contact potential difference measurements have been used to examine the electronic structure of the (3 × 1) silicon terminated (100) diamond surface under ultra high vacuum conditions. An occupied surface state which sits 1.75 eV below the valence band maximum has been identified, and indications of mid-gap unoccupied surface states have been found. Additionally, the pristine silicon terminated surface is shown to possess a negative electron affinity of ‑0.86 ± 0.1 eV.

  20. Electronic d-band properties of gold nanoclusters grown on amorphous carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Visikovskiy, Anton; Matsumoto, Hisashi; Mitsuhara, Kei; Nakada, Toshitaka; Kido, Yoshiaki; Akita, Tomoki

    2011-04-15

    The electronic d-band properties are important factors for the emerging catalytic activity of Au nanoclusters of sub-5-nm size. We analyzed the d-band properties of Au nanoclusters grown on amorphous carbon supports by photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron-radiation light coupled with high-resolution ion scattering spectrometry which enables us to estimate the size and shape of Au nanoclusters. The d-band width (W{sub d}), d-band center position (E{sub d}), and apparent 5d{sub 3/2}-d{sub 5/2} spin-orbit splitting (E{sub SO}) were determined as a function of a number of Au atoms per cluster (n{sub A}) and an average coordination number (n{sub C}) in a wide range (11band narrowing which is caused by hybridization of fewer wave functions of the valence electrons. However, E{sub d} shifts to the higher binding energy side with decreasing cluster size. The rapid movement of E{sub d} is attributed to the dynamic final-state effect, which results in higher binding energy shifts of core and valence states due to a positive hole created after photoelectron emission. We have estimated the contribution from the final-state effect and derived the approximated initial-state spectra. Modified data, however, still show a slight movement of the d-band center away from the Fermi level (E{sub F}) although the E{sub d} values for Au nanoclusters are closer to E{sub F} compared to the bulk value. This behavior is ascribed to the contraction of average Au-Au bond length with decreasing cluster size.

  1. Electronic Structures of Free-Standing Nanowires made from Indirect Bandgap Semiconductor Gallium Phosphide

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Gaohua; Luo, Ning; Chen, Ke-Qiu; Xu, H. Q.

    2016-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electronic structures of freestanding nanowires made from gallium phosphide (GaP)—a III-V semiconductor with an indirect bulk bandgap. We consider [001]-oriented GaP nanowires with square and rectangular cross sections, and [111]-oriented GaP nanowires with hexagonal cross sections. Based on tight binding models, both the band structures and wave functions of the nanowires are calculated. For the [001]-oriented GaP nanowires, the bands show anti-crossing structures, while the bands of the [111]-oriented nanowires display crossing structures. Two minima are observed in the conduction bands, while the maximum of the valence bands is always at the Γ-point. Using double group theory, we analyze the symmetry properties of the lowest conduction band states and highest valence band states of GaP nanowires with different sizes and directions. The band state wave functions of the lowest conduction bands and the highest valence bands of the nanowires are evaluated by spatial probability distributions. For practical use, we fit the confinement energies of the electrons and holes in the nanowires to obtain an empirical formula. PMID:27307081

  2. Electronic Structures of Free-Standing Nanowires made from Indirect Bandgap Semiconductor Gallium Phosphide.

    PubMed

    Liao, Gaohua; Luo, Ning; Chen, Ke-Qiu; Xu, H Q

    2016-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electronic structures of freestanding nanowires made from gallium phosphide (GaP)-a III-V semiconductor with an indirect bulk bandgap. We consider [001]-oriented GaP nanowires with square and rectangular cross sections, and [111]-oriented GaP nanowires with hexagonal cross sections. Based on tight binding models, both the band structures and wave functions of the nanowires are calculated. For the [001]-oriented GaP nanowires, the bands show anti-crossing structures, while the bands of the [111]-oriented nanowires display crossing structures. Two minima are observed in the conduction bands, while the maximum of the valence bands is always at the Γ-point. Using double group theory, we analyze the symmetry properties of the lowest conduction band states and highest valence band states of GaP nanowires with different sizes and directions. The band state wave functions of the lowest conduction bands and the highest valence bands of the nanowires are evaluated by spatial probability distributions. For practical use, we fit the confinement energies of the electrons and holes in the nanowires to obtain an empirical formula. PMID:27307081

  3. Electronic Structures of Free-Standing Nanowires made from Indirect Bandgap Semiconductor Gallium Phosphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Gaohua; Luo, Ning; Chen, Ke-Qiu; Xu, H. Q.

    2016-06-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electronic structures of freestanding nanowires made from gallium phosphide (GaP)—a III-V semiconductor with an indirect bulk bandgap. We consider [001]-oriented GaP nanowires with square and rectangular cross sections, and [111]-oriented GaP nanowires with hexagonal cross sections. Based on tight binding models, both the band structures and wave functions of the nanowires are calculated. For the [001]-oriented GaP nanowires, the bands show anti-crossing structures, while the bands of the [111]-oriented nanowires display crossing structures. Two minima are observed in the conduction bands, while the maximum of the valence bands is always at the Γ-point. Using double group theory, we analyze the symmetry properties of the lowest conduction band states and highest valence band states of GaP nanowires with different sizes and directions. The band state wave functions of the lowest conduction bands and the highest valence bands of the nanowires are evaluated by spatial probability distributions. For practical use, we fit the confinement energies of the electrons and holes in the nanowires to obtain an empirical formula.

  4. Electronic Structures of Free-Standing Nanowires made from Indirect Bandgap Semiconductor Gallium Phosphide.

    PubMed

    Liao, Gaohua; Luo, Ning; Chen, Ke-Qiu; Xu, H Q

    2016-06-16

    We present a theoretical study of the electronic structures of freestanding nanowires made from gallium phosphide (GaP)-a III-V semiconductor with an indirect bulk bandgap. We consider [001]-oriented GaP nanowires with square and rectangular cross sections, and [111]-oriented GaP nanowires with hexagonal cross sections. Based on tight binding models, both the band structures and wave functions of the nanowires are calculated. For the [001]-oriented GaP nanowires, the bands show anti-crossing structures, while the bands of the [111]-oriented nanowires display crossing structures. Two minima are observed in the conduction bands, while the maximum of the valence bands is always at the Γ-point. Using double group theory, we analyze the symmetry properties of the lowest conduction band states and highest valence band states of GaP nanowires with different sizes and directions. The band state wave functions of the lowest conduction bands and the highest valence bands of the nanowires are evaluated by spatial probability distributions. For practical use, we fit the confinement energies of the electrons and holes in the nanowires to obtain an empirical formula.

  5. Finding structures with specific properties in complex configurational spaces using multi-target inverse band structure approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piquini, Paulo; Zunger, Alex

    2009-03-01

    The conventional strategy to look for materials with desired properties is to use physical intuition to select some candidates among an enormous number of possibilities.Apart the very special cases, the solutions to these search problems are far from obvious. The inverse band structure (IBS) approach, on the other hand, search for the desired electronic structures (instead of atomic configurations) from the beginning. Here we illustrate the power of this inverse approach by applying it to the simultaneous engineering of multi-target problems, which encompass huge configurational spaces: (i) the search of a specific band gap in the quaternary (In,Ga)(As,Sb) semiconductors(a) lattice-matched to InP and, (ii) the stacking sequence of (In,Ga)As/InP superlattices leading to band gaps and strains within the range suitable for thermophotovoltaic applications(b). [3pt] (a) P. Piquini, P.A. Graf, and A. Zunger, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 186403 (2008); [0pt] (b) P. Piquini and A. Zunger, Phys. Rev. B 78, 161302 (2008)

  6. Band Coupling Model of Electron and Hole Mediated Ferromagnetism in Semiconductors: The Case of GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, S. H.; Dalpian, G. M.

    2008-01-01

    Transition metal (TM) doped diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMSs) have many unique physical properties that can be used for magneto-optical and spintronic applications. The DMSs exhibit a wide range of magnetic ordering behavior. For example, Mn doped GaN can be either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic, depending on the Mn concentration, carrier density, or pressure. A unified band coupling model based on the p-d and d-d level repulsions between the TM and host elements are developed to explain the hole-induced ferromagnetism. We show that kinetic s-d coupling can be introduced through chemical ordering and strain, thus leading to electron-mediated ferromagnetism. Moreover, by using rare-earth elements (e.g., Gd) as magnetic dopants, the symmetry-allowed s-f coupling can also lead to a large splitting at the conduction band edge, producing electron-mediated ferromagnetism. Our model, therefore, provides a simple guideline for future band structure engineering of magnetic semiconductors.

  7. Experimental Work With Photonic Band Gap Fiber: Building A Laser Electron Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Melissa; Ischebeck, Rasmus; Nobel, Robert; Siemann, Robert; /SLAC

    2006-09-29

    In the laser acceleration project E-163 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, work is being done toward building a traveling wave accelerator that uses as its accelerating structure a length of photonic band gap fiber. The small scale of the optical fiber allows radiation at optical wavelengths to be used to provide the necessary accelerating energy. Optical wavelength driving energy in a small structure yields higher accelerating fields. The existence of a speed-of-light accelerating mode in a photonic band gap fiber has been calculated previously [1]. This paper presents an overview of several of the experimental challenges posed in the development of the proposed photonic band gap fiber accelerator system.

  8. Electronic correlation contributions to structural energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haydock, Roger

    2015-03-01

    The recursion method is used to calculate electronic excitation spectra including electron-electron interactions within the Hubbard model. The effects of correlation on structural energies are then obtained from these spectra and applied to stacking faults. http://arxiv.org/abs/1405.2288 Supported by the Richmond F. Snyder Fund and Gifts.

  9. Probing the graphite band structure with resonant soft-x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Carlisle, J.A.; Shirley, E.L.; Hudson, E.A.

    1997-04-01

    Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation offers several advantages over surface sensitive spectroscopies for probing the electronic structure of complex multi-elemental materials. Due to the long mean free path of photons in solids ({approximately}1000 {angstrom}), SXF is a bulk-sensitive probe. Also, since core levels are involved in absorption and emission, SXF is both element- and angular-momentum-selective. SXF measures the local partial density of states (DOS) projected onto each constituent element of the material. The chief limitation of SXF has been the low fluorescence yield for photon emission, particularly for light elements. However, third generation light sources, such as the Advanced Light Source (ALS), offer the high brightness that makes high-resolution SXF experiments practical. In the following the authors utilize this high brightness to demonstrate the capability of SXF to probe the band structure of a polycrystalline sample. In SXF, a valence emission spectrum results from transitions from valence band states to the core hole produced by the incident photons. In the non-resonant energy regime, the excitation energy is far above the core binding energy, and the absorption and emission events are uncoupled. The fluorescence spectrum resembles emission spectra acquired using energetic electrons, and is insensitive to the incident photon`s energy. In the resonant excitation energy regime, core electrons are excited by photons to unoccupied states just above the Fermi level (EF). The absorption and emission events are coupled, and this coupling manifests itself in several ways, depending in part on the localization of the empty electronic states in the material. Here the authors report spectral measurements from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  10. Interlayer interaction and π-band electron occupation on top layers of freshly cleaved bulk HOPG investigated with N(E) C KVV Auger electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dementjev, A. P.; Ivanov, K. E.; Tsyvkunova, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    N(E) C KVV Auger spectra (V = σsσpπ) were used for measurement of the π-band electron occupation of five outer layers on freshly cleaved bulk HOPG. The π-band electron occupation of the 1-5 graphene layers was measured relative to the electron concentration in the σp-band. In-depth π-band profiles were obtained by means of variation of the Auger electron takeoff angle within the range of 15-90°. Differences in the π-band electron occupation of the 1-5 graphene layers were determined. The π-band electron occupation varies from 0 at the top graphene layer to that of the π-band electron occupation typical for bulk HOPG at the 5th graphene layer counted from the outer surface. These results are discussed on the basis of the π-band formation under the interlayer interaction of the pz-electrons.

  11. Size effect on the electronic and optical band gap of CdSe QD

    SciTech Connect

    Sisodia, Namita

    2014-04-24

    Present paper deals with a critical and comprehensive analysis of the dependence of photo emission (PE) electronic band gap and optical absorption (OA) excitonic band gap on the size of CdSe QD, via connecting it with excitonic absorbance wavelength. Excitonic absorbance wavelength is determined through an empirical fit of established experimental evidences. Effective excitonic charge and Bohr radius is determined as a function of size. Increase in size of the CdSe QD results in greater Bohr radius and smaller effective excitonic charge. Excitonic binding energy as a degree of size of QD is also calculated which further relates with the difference in PE electronic and OA optical band gaps. It is also shown that with increase in size of CdSe QD, the excitonic binding energy decreases which consequently increases differences in two band gaps. Our results are very well comparable with the established results. Explanation for the origin of the unusual optical properties of CdSe QD has been also discussed.

  12. Band structures in transmission coefficients generated by Dirac comb potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharani, M.; Shastry, C. S.

    2016-11-01

    Using the threshold conditions and bound state energies investigated earlier by us as a critical input we systematically study the nature of band formation in the transmission coefficient generated by Dirac comb potentials having equispaced (i) attractive, (ii) repulsive and (iii) alternating attractive and repulsive delta terms having same strength and confined within a fixed range. We find that positions of the peaks of transmission coefficient generated by a combination of one attractive and one repulsive delta terms having same strength and separated by gap a is independent of the potential strength and coincide with the energy eigenvalues of 1D box of range a. We further study analytically and numerically the transmission across Dirac comb potentials containing two or three delta terms and these results are useful in the analysis of the transmission in the general case. In the case of Dirac comb potentials containing Na attractive delta terms we find that the nature of the first band and higher bands of the transmission coefficient are different, and if such a potential generates Nb number of bound states, the first band in the transmission coefficient generated by the potential has NT1 =Na -Nb peaks. In the case of higher bands generated by delta comb potential having N delta terms each band has N - 1 peaks. Further we systematically study the behavior of band gaps and band spread as a function of potential strength and number of terms in the Dirac comb. The results obtained by us provide a relation between bound state spectrum, number of delta terms in the Dirac comb and the band pattern which can be explored for potential applications.

  13. Microstructural evolution in adiabatic shear bands of copper at high strain rates: Electron backscatter diffraction characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Lin; Chen Zhiyong; Zhan Congkun; Yang Xuyue; Liu Chuming; Cai Hongnian

    2012-02-15

    The microstructural evolution of adiabatic shear bands in annealed copper with different large strains at high strain rates has been investigated by electron backscatter diffraction. The results show that mechanical twinning can occur with minimal contribution to shear localization under dynamic loading. Elongated ultrafine grains with widths of 100-300 nm are observed during the evolution of the adiabatic shear bands. A rotational dynamic recrystallization mechanism is proposed to explain the formation of the elongated ultrafine grains. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The microstructural evolution of ASB is studied by electron backscatter diffraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Twinning can occur in ASB while the contribution to shear localization is slight. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elongated ultrafine grains are observed during the evolution process of ASB. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A possible mechanism is proposed to explain the microstructure evolution of ASB.

  14. Room-Temperature Electron Spin Relaxation of Triarylmethyl Radicals at X- and Q-bands

    PubMed Central

    Krumkacheva, Olesya A.; Strizhakov, Rodion K.; Rogozhnikova, Olga Yu.; Troitskaya, Tatiana I.

    2016-01-01

    Triarylmethyl radicals (trityls, TAMs) represent a relatively new class of spin labels. The long relaxation of trityls at room temperature in liquid solutions makes them a promising alternative for traditional nitroxides. In this work we have synthesized a series of TAMs including perdeuterated Finland trityl (D36 form) , mono-, di-, and tri-ester derivatives of Finland-D36 trityl, deuterated form of OX63, dodeca-n-butyl homologue of Finland trityl, and triamide derivatives of Finland trityl with primary and secondary amines attached. We have studied room-temperature relaxation properties of these TAMs in liquids using pulsed Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) at two microwave frequency bands. We have found the clear dependence of phase memory time (Tm~T2) on magnetic field: room-temperature Tm values are ~1.5-2.5 times smaller at Q-band (34 GHz, 1.2 T) compared to X-band (9 GHz, 0.3 T). This trend is ascribed to the contribution from g-anisotropy that is negligible at lower magnetic fields but comes into play at Q-band. In agreement with this, while T1~Tm at X-band, we observe T1>Tm at Q-band due to increased contributions from incomplete motional averaging of g-anisotropy. In addition, the viscosity dependence shows that (1/Tm-1/T1) is proportional to the tumbling correlation time of trityls. Based on the analysis of previous data and results of the present work, we conclude that in general situation where spin label is at least partly mobile, X-band is most suitable for application of trityls for room-temperature pulsed EPR distance measurements. PMID:26001103

  15. Electronic Structure of Single-Crystal Monolayer Graphene on Hydrogen-Terminated Germanium Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sung Joon; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Ahn, Joung Real; Whang, Dongmok

    2015-03-01

    Graphene, atomically flat 2-Dimensional layered nano material, has a lot of interesting characteristics from its unusual electronic structure. Almost properties of graphene are influenced by its crystallinity, therefore the uniform growth of single crystal graphene and layer control over the wafer scale areas remains a challenge in the fields of electronic, photonic and other devices based on graphene. Here, we report the method to make wafer scale single crystal monolayer graphene on hydrogen terminated germanium(110) surface and properties and electronic band structure of the graphene by using the tool of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, electron transport measurement, electron diffraction and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy.

  16. Cohesive band structure of carbon nanotubes for applications in quantum transport.

    PubMed

    Arora, Vijay K; Bhattacharyya, Arkaprava

    2013-11-21

    An integrated cohesive band structure of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) applicable to all chirality directions (n, m), starting from the Dirac cone of a graphene nanolayer in k-space, is demarcated, in direct contrast to dissimilar chiral and achiral versions in the published literature. The electron wave state of a CNT is quantized into one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructure with a wrapping mode, satisfying the boundary conditions from one Dirac K-point to an equivalent neighboring one with an identical phase and returning to the same K point. The repetitive rotation for an identical configuration with added band index (n-m)mod3, yields one metallic (M) with zero bandgap corresponding to (n-m)mod3 = 0, semiconducting state SC1 with (n-m)mod3 = 1 and SC2 with (n-m)mod3 = 2. The band gap and effective mass of SC2 state are twice as large as those of SC1 state. A broad-spectrum expression signifying the linear dependence of the effective mass on the bandgap is obtained. Both the Fermi energy and the intrinsic velocity limiting the current to the saturation level is calculated as a function of the carrier concentration. Limitations of the parabolic approximation are pointed out. Several new features of the band structure are acquired in a seamlessly unified mode for all CNTs, making it suitable for all-encompassing applications. Applications of the theory to high-field transport are advocated with an example of a metallic CNT, in agreement with experimental observations. The mechanism behind the breakdown of the linear current-voltage relation of Ohm's law and the associated surge in resistance are explained on the basis of the nonequilibrium Arora's distribution function (NEADF). These results are important for the performance evaluation and characterization of a variety of applications on CNT in modern nanoscale circuits and devices.

  17. Cohesive band structure of carbon nanotubes for applications in quantum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Vijay K.; Bhattacharyya, Arkaprava

    2013-10-01

    An integrated cohesive band structure of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) applicable to all chirality directions (n, m), starting from the Dirac cone of a graphene nanolayer in k-space, is demarcated, in direct contrast to dissimilar chiral and achiral versions in the published literature. The electron wave state of a CNT is quantized into one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructure with a wrapping mode, satisfying the boundary conditions from one Dirac K-point to an equivalent neighboring one with an identical phase and returning to the same K point. The repetitive rotation for an identical configuration with added band index (n - m)mod3, yields one metallic (M) with zero bandgap corresponding to (n - m)mod3 = 0, semiconducting state SC1 with (n - m)mod3 = 1 and SC2 with (n - m)mod3 = 2. The band gap and effective mass of SC2 state are twice as large as those of SC1 state. A broad-spectrum expression signifying the linear dependence of the effective mass on the bandgap is obtained. Both the Fermi energy and the intrinsic velocity limiting the current to the saturation level is calculated as a function of the carrier concentration. Limitations of the parabolic approximation are pointed out. Several new features of the band structure are acquired in a seamlessly unified mode for all CNTs, making it suitable for all-encompassing applications. Applications of the theory to high-field transport are advocated with an example of a metallic CNT, in agreement with experimental observations. The mechanism behind the breakdown of the linear current-voltage relation of Ohm's law and the associated surge in resistance are explained on the basis of the nonequilibrium Arora's distribution function (NEADF). These results are important for the performance evaluation and characterization of a variety of applications on CNT in modern nanoscale circuits and devices.

  18. Electronic structure of a linear C 60 polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kazuyoshi; Matsuura, Yukihito; Oshima, Yoshiaki; Yamabe, Tokio; Asai, Yoshihiro; Tokumoto, Madoka

    1995-01-01

    The electronic structure of a C 60-polymer chain was studied based on the tight-binding calculation including both σ and π electrons. The C 60-polymer turns out semiconducting with a finite band gap ( ca 1.1 eV) and its lowest unoccupied (LU) band is no more degenerate. The LU bandwidth of this polymer is generally smaller than that of A 3C 60 by more than one order of magnitude around the Fermi level assuring that C 60-1-polymer ( o-RbC 60) is a strongly correlated system ( {U}/{t ≫ 1}) and can have the antiferromagnetic ground state. Such reduction of t comes from the cut of π-conjugation on the surface of C 60 molecule by the bridging.

  19. Electron-impact excitation of the 31. 4-eV band in N sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    de Souza, G.G.B.; Bielschowsky, C.E.; Lucas, C.A.; Souza, A.C.A. )

    1990-08-01

    Generalized oscillator strengths (GOS) for the dipole-forbidden 31.4-eV band in N{sub 2} have been determined both experimentally and theoretically. The experimental values for the GOS were obtained using a crossed-beam electron spectrometer at 1-keV impact energy. The theoretical results were determined using the first Born approximation with {ital ab} {ital initio} configuration-interaction target wave functions.

  20. Electronic structure and crystal phase stability of palladium hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Houari, Abdesalem; Matar, Samir F.; Eyert, Volker

    2014-11-07

    The results of electronic structure calculations for a variety of palladium hydrides are presented. The calculations are based on density functional theory and used different local and semilocal approximations. The thermodynamic stability of all structures as well as the electronic and chemical bonding properties are addressed. For the monohydride, taking into account the zero-point energy is important to identify the octahedral Pd-H arrangement with its larger voids and, hence, softer hydrogen vibrational modes as favorable over the tetrahedral arrangement as found in the zincblende and wurtzite structures. Stabilization of the rocksalt structure is due to strong bonding of the 4d and 1s orbitals, which form a characteristic split-off band separated from the main d-band group. Increased filling of the formerly pure d states of the metal causes strong reduction of the density of states at the Fermi energy, which undermines possible long-range ferromagnetic order otherwise favored by strong magnetovolume effects. For the dihydride, octahedral Pd-H arrangement as realized, e.g., in the pyrite structure turns out to be unstable against tetrahedral arrangement as found in the fluorite structure. Yet, from both heat of formation and chemical bonding considerations, the dihydride turns out to be less favorable than the monohydride. Finally, the vacancy ordered defect phase Pd{sub 3}H{sub 4} follows the general trend of favoring the octahedral arrangement of the rocksalt structure for Pd:H ratios less or equal to one.

  1. Experimental high gradient testing of a 17.1 GHz photonic band-gap accelerator structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munroe, Brian J.; Zhang, JieXi; Xu, Haoran; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2016-03-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and high gradient testing of a 17.1 GHz photonic band-gap (PBG) accelerator structure. Photonic band-gap (PBG) structures are promising candidates for electron accelerators capable of high-gradient operation because they have the inherent damping of high order modes required to avoid beam breakup instabilities. The 17.1 GHz PBG structure tested was a single cell structure composed of a triangular array of round copper rods of radius 1.45 mm spaced by 8.05 mm. The test assembly consisted of the test PBG cell located between conventional (pillbox) input and output cells, with input power of up to 4 MW from a klystron supplied via a TM01 mode launcher. Breakdown at high gradient was observed by diagnostics including reflected power, downstream and upstream current monitors and visible light emission. The testing procedure was first benchmarked with a conventional disc-loaded waveguide structure, which reached a gradient of 87 MV /m at a breakdown probability of 1.19 ×10-1 per pulse per meter. The PBG structure was tested with 100 ns pulses at gradient levels of less than 90 MV /m in order to limit the surface temperature rise to 120 K. The PBG structure reached up to 89 MV /m at a breakdown probability of 1.09 ×10-1 per pulse per meter. These test results show that a PBG structure can simultaneously operate at high gradients and low breakdown probability, while also providing wakefield damping.

  2. Europium underneath graphene on Ir(111): Intercalation mechanism, magnetism, and band structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Stefan; Huttmann, Felix; Petrović, Marin; Witt, Christian; Förster, Daniel F.; Vo-Van, Chi; Coraux, Johann; Martínez-Galera, Antonio J.; Sessi, Violetta; Vergara, Ignacio; Rückamp, Reinhard; Grüninger, Markus; Schleheck, Nicolas; Meyer zu Heringdorf, Frank; Ohresser, Philippe; Kralj, Marko; Wehling, Tim O.; Michely, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    The intercalation of Eu underneath Gr on Ir(111) is comprehensively investigated by microscopic, magnetic, and spectroscopic measurements, as well as by density functional theory. Depending on the coverage, the intercalated Eu atoms form either a (2 ×2 ) or a (√{3 }×√{3 }) R 30∘ superstructure with respect to Gr. We investigate the mechanisms of Eu penetration through a nominally closed Gr sheet and measure the electronic structures and magnetic properties of the two intercalation systems. Their electronic structures are rather similar. Compared to Gr on Ir(111), the Gr bands in both systems are essentially rigidly shifted to larger binding energies resulting in n doping. The hybridization of the Ir surface state S1 with Gr states is lifted, and the moiré superperiodic potential is strongly reduced. In contrast, the magnetic behavior of the two intercalation systems differs substantially, as found by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. The (2 ×2 ) Eu structure displays plain paramagnetic behavior, whereas for the (√{3 }×√{3 }) R 30∘ structure the large zero-field susceptibility indicates ferromagnetic coupling, despite the absence of hysteresis at 10 K. For the latter structure, a considerable easy-plane magnetic anisotropy is observed and interpreted as shape anisotropy.

  3. Theoretical and experimental differential cross sections for electron impact excitation of the electronic bands of furfural

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D. B.; Neves, R. F. C.; Lopes, M. C. A.; da Costa, R. F.; do N. Varella, M. T.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Lima, M. A. P.; García, G.; Limão-Vieira, P.; Brunger, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    We report results from a joint experimental and theoretical investigation into electron scattering from the important industrial species furfural (C5H4O2). Specifically, differential cross sections (DCSs) have been measured and calculated for the electron-impact excitation of the electronic states of C5H4O2. The measurements were carried out at energies in the range 20-40 eV, and for scattered-electron angles between 10° and 90°. The energy resolution of those experiments was typically ˜80 meV. Corresponding Schwinger multichannel method with pseudo-potential calculations, for energies between 6-50 eV and with and without Born-closure, were also performed for a sub-set of the excited electronic-states that were accessed in the measurements. Those calculations were undertaken at the static exchange plus polarisation-level using a minimum orbital basis for single configuration interaction (MOB-SCI) approach. Agreement between the measured and calculated DCSs was qualitatively quite good, although to obtain quantitative accord, the theory would need to incorporate even more channels into the MOB-SCI. The role of multichannel coupling on the computed electronic-state DCSs is also explored in some detail.

  4. Chiral phosphorus nanotubes: structure, bonding, and electronic properties.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Escamilla, H N; Quijano-Briones, J J; Tlahuice-Flores, A

    2016-05-14

    The study of black phosphorus nanotubes (PNTs) had been devoted to zigzag and armchair structures, with no consideration of chiral structures to date. In this communication, we studied the structural and electronic (band structure) properties of chiral nanotubes using a periodic plane wave-pseudopotential approach. We found that some chiral nanotubes display similar bandgaps and binding energies per atom (BEA) as armchair PNTs and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) calculations attest their thermal stability. Interestingly, we determined that the bandgap is tuned by varying the PNTs chirality and it is not related to their diameters. This feature can be exploited in optical and electronic applications wherein a direct and sizable bandgap is required. PMID:27094567

  5. Stacking-dependent electronic structure of bilayer silicene

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Huixia; Zhang, Jin; Ding, Zijing; Li, Hui E-mail: smeng@iphy.ac.cn; Meng, Sheng E-mail: smeng@iphy.ac.cn

    2014-03-31

    Bilayer silicene (BLS) is a class of material that possibly holds both topological and superconducting properties; however, its structure is not fully understood. By scanning stacking modes and lattice constants using first principles calculations, several meta-stable configurations are identified, including a slightly faulted-AA packing structure, named slide-2AA. Different from the metallic properties of conventional AA and AB stacking forms, band structure of slide-2AA bilayer presents a sizeable indirect energy gap of ∼1.16 eV. A metal-semiconductor phase transition along the sliding pathway with a small energy barrier is also observed, indicating its electronic properties can be easily tuned by applying small shear force along the BLS surface plane. Such unique quantitative relationship of structure and electronic properties has profound implications in nanoelectronics and electromechanical devices.

  6. Theoretical modeling of low-energy electronic absorption bands in reduced cobaloximes

    DOE PAGES

    Bhattacharjee, Anirban; Chavarot-Kerlidou, Murielle; Dempsey, Jillian L.; Gray, Harry B.; Fujita, Etsuko; Muckerman, James T.; Fontecave, Marc; Artero, Vincent; Arantes, Guilherme M.; Field, Martin J.

    2014-08-11

    Here, we report that the reduced Co(I) states of cobaloximes are powerful nucleophiles that play an important role in the hydrogen-evolving catalytic activity of these species. In this work we have analyzed the low energy electronic absorption bands of two cobaloxime systems experimentally and using a variety of density functional theory and molecular orbital ab initio quantum chemical approaches. Overall we find a reasonable qualitative understanding of the electronic excitation spectra of these compounds but show that obtaining quantitative results remains a challenging task.

  7. Theoretical modeling of low-energy electronic absorption bands in reduced cobaloximes

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Anirban; Chavarot-Kerlidou, Murielle; Dempsey, Jillian L.; Gray, Harry B.; Fujita, Etsuko; Muckerman, James T.; Fontecave, Marc; Artero, Vincent; Arantes, Guilherme M.; Field, Martin J.

    2014-08-11

    Here, we report that the reduced Co(I) states of cobaloximes are powerful nucleophiles that play an important role in the hydrogen-evolving catalytic activity of these species. In this work we have analyzed the low energy electronic absorption bands of two cobaloxime systems experimentally and using a variety of density functional theory and molecular orbital ab initio quantum chemical approaches. Overall we find a reasonable qualitative understanding of the electronic excitation spectra of these compounds but show that obtaining quantitative results remains a challenging task.

  8. Band Alignment and Controllable Electron Migration between Rutile and Anatase TiO2

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Yang; Weng, Yuxiang

    2015-01-01

    TiO2 is the most promising semiconductor for photocatalytic splitting of water for hydrogen and degradation of pollutants. The highly photocatalytic active form is its mixed phase of two polymorphs anatase and rutile rather than their pristine compositions. Such a synergetic effect is understood by the staggered band alignment favorable to spatial charge separation. However, electron migration in either direction between the two phases has been reported, the reason of which is still unknown. We determined the band alignment by a novel method, i.e., transient infrared absorption-excitation energy scanning spectra, showing their conduction bands being aligned, thus the electron migration direction is controlled by dynamical factors, such as varying the particle size of anatase, putting electron or hole scavengers on either the surface of anatase or rutile phases, or both. A quantitative criterion capable of predicting the migration direction under various conditions including particle size and surface chemical reactions is proposed, the predictions have been verified experimentally in several typical cases. This would give rise to a great potential in designing more effective titania photocatalysts. PMID:26169699

  9. Surface-plasmon enhanced photodetection at communication band based on hot electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Kai; Zhan, Yaohui E-mail: xfli@suda.edu.cn; Wu, Shaolong; Deng, Jiajia; Li, Xiaofeng E-mail: xfli@suda.edu.cn

    2015-08-14

    Surface plasmons can squeeze light into a deep-subwavelength space and generate abundant hot electrons in the nearby metallic regions, enabling a new paradigm of photoconversion by the way of hot electron collection. Unlike the visible spectral range concerned in previous literatures, we focus on the communication band and design the infrared hot-electron photodetectors with plasmonic metal-insulator-metal configuration by using full-wave finite-element method. Titanium dioxide-silver Schottky interface is employed to boost the low-energy infrared photodetection. The photodetection sensitivity is strongly improved by enhancing the plasmonic excitation from a rationally engineered metallic grating, which enables a strong unidirectional photocurrent. With a five-step electrical simulation, the optimized device exhibits an unbiased responsivity of ∼0.1 mA/W and an ultra-narrow response band (FWHM = 4.66 meV), which promises to be a candidate as the compact photodetector operating in communication band.

  10. Spectroscopic investigations of the electronic structure of neptunyl ions.

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkerson, M. P.; Berg, J. M.; Dewey, H. J.

    2003-01-01

    Molecular electronic structures are innately sensitive to the geometric and chemical environments around the metal center of coordination compounds . However, the interrelationships between the electronic structures and molecular geometries of actinide species, which often contain more than one electron in the Sf valence shell, are quite complex due to the large numbers of possible electronic states and high densities of vibronically enabled transitions .1'2 Investigations of the optical signatures of simple, well-defined molecular systems should provide the most straightforward approach for unharnessing these fundamental relationships, and in particular, systems with a single electron in the valence Sf shell, such as the neptunyl ion (Np0 22+), should provide the most viable means for characte rizing actinide electronic structure. Furthermore, Sf orbital-occupied actinide systems exhibit not only visible and ultraviolet ligand-to-metal charge-transfer spectral bands, but also near-infrared Sf-Sf transitions resulting from promotion of a Sf electron to an orbital of primarily Sf character .

  11. Ab initio quasiparticle band structure of ABA and ABC-stacked graphene trilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, Marcos G.; Capaz, Rodrigo B.; Louie, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    We obtain the quasiparticle band structure of ABA and ABC-stacked graphene trilayers through ab initio density-functional theory (DFT) and many-body quasiparticle calculations within the GW approximation. To interpret our results, we fit the DFT and GW π bands to a low-energy tight-binding model, which is found to reproduce very well the observed features near the K point. The values of the extracted hopping parameters are reported and compared with available theoretical and experimental data. For both stackings, the self-energy corrections lead to a renormalization of the Fermi velocity, an effect also observed in previous calculations on monolayer graphene. They also increase the separation between the higher-energy bands, which is proportional to the nearest-neighbor interlayer hopping parameter γ1. Both features are brought to closer agreement with experiment through the self-energy corrections. Finally, other effects, such as trigonal warping, electron-hole asymmetry, and energy gaps, are discussed in terms of the associated parameters.

  12. Band structure characterization of WS2 grown by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Iori; Gomez, Michael; Coley, William C.; Le, Duy; Echeverria, Elena M.; Stecklein, Gordon; Kandyba, Viktor; Balijepalli, Santosh K.; Klee, Velveth; Nguyen, Ariana E.; Preciado, Edwin; Lu, I.-Hsi; Bobek, Sarah; Barroso, David; Martinez-Ta, Dominic; Barinov, Alexei; Rahman, Talat S.; Dowben, Peter A.; Crowell, Paul A.; Bartels, Ludwig

    2016-06-01

    Growth by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) leads to multilayer WS2 of very high quality, based on high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The experimental valence band electronic structure is considered to be in good agreement with that obtained from density functional theory calculations. We find the spin-orbit splitting at the K ¯ point to be 420 ± 20 meV with a hole effective mass of -0.35 ± 0.02 me for the upper spin-orbit component (the branch closer to the Fermi level) and -0.43 ± 0.07 me for the lower spin-orbit component. As predicted by theory, a thickness-dependent increase of bandwidth is observed at the top of the valence band, in the region of the Brillouin zone center. The top of the valence band of the CVD-prepared films exhibits a substantial binding energy, consistent with n-type behavior, and in agreement with transistor characteristics acquired using devices incorporating the same WS2 material.

  13. Prediction of a large number of electron pockets near the band edges in type-VIII clathrate Si46 and its physical properties from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norouzzadeh, Payam; Myles, Charles W.; Vashaee, Daryoosh

    2013-11-01

    The material design of type-VIII clathrate Si46 is presented based on first principles. The structural, electronic, elastic, vibrational, and thermodynamic properties of this hypothetical material are presented. Our results predict that type-VIII clathrate Si46 is an indirect semiconductor with a bandgap of 1.24 eV. The band structure revealed an interestingly large number of electron pockets near both conduction and valance band edges. Such a large density of states near the band edges, which is higher than that of the best thermoelectric materials discovered so far, can result in a large thermoelectric power factor (>0.004 W m-1 K-2) making it a promising candidate for thermoelectric applications. The elastic properties as well as the vibrational modes and the phonon state densities of this material were also calculated. Our calculations predict that the heat capacity at constant volume (isochoric) of this clathrate increases smoothly with temperature and approaches the Dulong-Petit value near room temperature. The electronic band structure shows a large number of valleys closely packed around the valance band edge, which is rare among the known semiconducting materials. These valleys can contribute to transport at high temperature resulting in a possibly high performance (ZT > 1.5) p-type thermoelectric material.

  14. Evidence for an ultrafast breakdown of the BeO band structure due to swift argon and xenon ions.

    PubMed

    Schiwietz, G; Czerski, K; Roth, M; Grande, P L; Koteski, V; Staufenbiel, F

    2010-10-29

    Auger-electron spectra associated with Be atoms in the pure metal lattice and in the stoichiometric oxide have been investigated for different incident charged particles. For fast incident electrons, for Ar7+ and Ar15+ ions as well as Xe15+ and Xe31+ ions at velocities of 6% to 10% the speed of light, there are strong differences in the corresponding spectral distributions of Be-K Auger lines. These differences are related to changes in the local electronic band structure of BeO on a femtosecond time scale after the passage of highly charged heavy ions.

  15. Evidence for an ultrafast breakdown of the BeO band structure due to swift argon and xenon ions.

    PubMed

    Schiwietz, G; Czerski, K; Roth, M; Grande, P L; Koteski, V; Staufenbiel, F

    2010-10-29

    Auger-electron spectra associated with Be atoms in the pure metal lattice and in the stoichiometric oxide have been investigated for different incident charged particles. For fast incident electrons, for Ar7+ and Ar15+ ions as well as Xe15+ and Xe31+ ions at velocities of 6% to 10% the speed of light, there are strong differences in the corresponding spectral distributions of Be-K Auger lines. These differences are related to changes in the local electronic band structure of BeO on a femtosecond time scale after the passage of highly charged heavy ions. PMID:21231139

  16. A combined representation method for use in band structure calculations. 1: Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedli, C.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    1975-01-01

    A representation was described whose basis levels combine the important physical aspects of a finite set of plane waves with those of a set of Bloch tight-binding levels. The chosen combination has a particularly simple dependence on the wave vector within the Brillouin Zone, and its use in reducing the standard one-electron band structure problem to the usual secular equation has the advantage that the lattice sums involved in the calculation of the matrix elements are actually independent of the wave vector. For systems with complicated crystal structures, for which the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker (KKR), Augmented-Plane Wave (APW) and Orthogonalized-Plane Wave (OPW) methods are difficult to apply, the present method leads to results with satisfactory accuracy and convergence.

  17. Differential cross sections for electron impact excitation of the electronic bands of phenol

    SciTech Connect

    Neves, R. F. C.; Jones, D. B.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Nixon, K. L.; Silva, G. B. da; Duque, H. V.; Oliveira, E. M. de; Lima, M. A. P.; Costa, R. F. da; Varella, M. T. do N.; Bettega, M. H. F.; and others

    2015-03-14

    We report results from a joint theoretical and experimental investigation into electron scattering from the important organic species phenol (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH). Specifically, differential cross sections (DCSs) have been measured and calculated for the electron-impact excitation of the electronic states of C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH. The measurements were carried out at energies in the range 15–40 eV, and for scattered-electron angles between 10{sup ∘} and 90{sup ∘}. The energy resolution of those experiments was typically ∼80 meV. Corresponding Schwinger multichannel method with pseudo-potentials calculations, with and without Born-closure, were also performed for a sub-set of the excited electronic-states that were accessed in the measurements. Those calculations were conducted at the static exchange plus polarisation (SEP)-level using a minimum orbital basis for single configuration interaction (MOBSCI) approach. Agreement between the measured and calculated DCSs was typically fair, although to obtain quantitative accord, the theory would need to incorporate even more channels into the MOBSCI.

  18. Electron tomography of dislocation structures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, G.S.; House, S.D.; Kacher, J.; Tanaka, M.; Higashida, K.; Robertson, I.M.

    2014-01-15

    Recent developments in the application of electron tomography for characterizing microstructures in crystalline solids are described. The underlying principles for electron tomography are presented in the context of typical challenges in adapting the technique to crystalline systems and in using diffraction contrast imaging conditions. Methods for overcoming the limitations associated with the angular range, the number of acquired images, and uniformity of image contrast are introduced. In addition, a method for incorporating the real space coordinate system into the tomogram is presented. As the approach emphasizes development of experimental solutions to the challenges, the solutions developed and implemented are presented in the form of examples.

  19. Design, realization and test of C-band accelerating structures for the SPARC_LAB linac energy upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alesini, D.; Bellaveglia, M.; Biagini, M. E.; Boni, R.; Brönnimann, M.; Cardelli, F.; Chimenti, P.; Clementi, R.; Di Pirro, G.; Di Raddo, R.; Ferrario, M.; Ficcadenti, L.; Gallo, A.; Kalt, R.; Lollo, V.; Palumbo, L.; Piersanti, L.; Schilcher, T.

    2016-11-01

    The energy upgrade of the SPARC_LAB photo-injector at LNF-INFN (Frascati, Italy) has been originally conceived replacing one low gradient (13 MV/m) 3 m long SLAC type S-band traveling wave (TW) section with two 1.4 m long C-band accelerating sections. Due to the higher gradients reached by such structures, a higher energy beam can be obtained within the same accelerator footprint length. The use of C-band structures for electron acceleration has been adopted in a few FEL linacs in the world, among others, the Japanese Free Electron Laser at SPring-8 and the SwissFEL at Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). The C-band sections are traveling wave, constant impedance structures with symmetric input and output axial couplers. Their design has been optimized for the operation with a SLED RF pulse compressor. In this paper we briefly review their design criteria and we focus on the construction, tuning, low and high-power RF tests. We also illustrate the design and realization of the dedicated low level RF system that has been done in collaboration with PSI in the framework of the EU TIARA project. Preliminary experimental results appear to confirm the operation of such structures with accelerating gradients larger than 35 MV/m.

  20. Large band gaps in radial phononic crystal structure with round mass block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Nansha; Wu, Jiu Hui; Jing, Li; Lu, Kuan; Yu, Lie

    2016-06-01

    Using the finite element method, we theoretically study the vibration properties of radial phononic crystal (RPC) structure with round mass block. The band structures, transmission spectra, and displacement fields of eigenmode are given to estimate the starting and cut-off frequency of band gaps. Compared to the contrast structure, numerical calculation results show that RPC structure with round mass block can yield several band gaps below 150 kHz. The physical mechanism of band gaps are attributed to the coupling between the longitudinal vibration in round mass block and vibrations in outer frame or coating layer. By changing geometrical dimensions r of round mass block, we can shift the location and width of band gaps. Significantly, as the increase of geometric parameter ratio a1/a2, band width shifts and the more new band gaps appear; the more bands become flat at this moment because of the stronger multiple vibration coupling effect plays a more prominent role in the opening of band gaps. These vibration properties of RPC structure with round mass block can potentially be applied to optimize band gaps, generate filters, and design acoustic devices.

  1. Electronic structure and electron energy-loss spectroscopy of ZrO2 zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, L. K.; Vast, Nathalie; Baranek, Philippe; Cheynet, Marie-Claude; Reining, Lucia

    2004-12-01

    The atomic and electronic structures of zirconia are calculated within density functional theory, and their evolution is analyzed as the crystal-field symmetry changes from tetrahedral [cubic (c-ZrO2) and tetragonal (t-ZrO2) phases] to octahedral (hypothetical rutile ZrO2 ), to a mixing of these symmetries (monoclinic phase, m-ZrO2 ). We find that the theoretical bulk modulus in c-ZrO2 is 30% larger than the experimental value, showing that the introduction of yttria in zirconia has a significant effect. Electronic structure fingerprints which characterize each phase from their electronic spectra are identified. We have carried out electron energy-loss spectroscopy experiments at low momentum transfer and compared these results to the theoretical spectra calculated within the random phase approximation. We show a dependence of the valence and 4p ( N2,3 edge) plasmons on the crystal structure, the dependence of the latter being brought into the spectra by local-field effects. Last, we attribute low energy excitations observed in EELS of m-ZrO2 to defect states 2eV above the top of the intrinsic valence band, and the EELS fundamental band gap value is reconciled with the 5.2 or 5.8eV gaps determined by vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy.

  2. Polymorphism, band-structure, band-lineup, and alloy energetics of the group II oxides and sulfides MgO, ZnO, CdO, MgS, ZnS, CdS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lany, Stephan

    2014-03-01

    The group II chalcogenides are an important class of functional semiconductor materials exhibiting a remarkable diversity in terms of structure and properties. In order to aid the materials design, a consistent set of electronic structure calculations is presented, including data on the polymorphic energy ordering, the band-structures, the band-lineups relative to the vacuum level, surface energies, as well as on the alloy energetics. To this end, current state-of-the-art electronic structure tools are employed, which, besides standard density functional theory (DFT), include totalenergy calculation in the random phase approximation and GW quasiparticle energy calculations. The ionization potentials and electron affinities are obtained by combining the results of bulk GW and surface DFT calculations. Considering both octahedral and tetrahedral coordination symmetries, exemplified by the rock-salt and zinc-blende lattices, respectively, this data reveals both the chemical and structural trends within this materials family.

  3. Photoemission study of the electronic structure and charge density waves of Na₂Ti₂Sb₂O

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, S. Y.; Jiang, J.; Ye, Z. R.; Niu, X. H.; Song, Y.; Zhang, C. L.; Dai, P. C.; Xie, B. P.; Lai, X. C.; Feng, D. L.

    2015-04-30

    The electronic structure of Na₂Ti₂Sb₂O single crystal is studied by photon energy and polarization dependent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). The obtained band structure and Fermi surface agree well with the band structure calculation of Na₂Ti₂Sb₂O in the non-magnetic state, which indicates that there is no magnetic order in Na₂Ti₂Sb₂O and the electronic correlation is weak. Polarization dependent ARPES results suggest the multi-band and multi-orbital nature of Na₂Ti₂Sb₂O. Photon energy dependent ARPES results suggest that the electronic structure of Na₂Ti₂Sb₂O is rather two-dimensional. Moreover, we find a density wave energy gap forms below the transition temperature and reaches 65 meV at 7 K, indicating that Na₂Ti₂Sb₂O is likely a weakly correlated CDW material in the strong electron-phonon interaction regime. (author)

  4. DFTB Parameters for the Periodic Table: Part 1, Electronic Structure.

    PubMed

    Wahiduzzaman, Mohammad; Oliveira, Augusto F; Philipsen, Pier; Zhechkov, Lyuben; van Lenthe, Erik; Witek, Henryk A; Heine, Thomas

    2013-09-10

    A parametrization scheme for the electronic part of the density-functional based tight-binding (DFTB) method that covers the periodic table is presented. A semiautomatic parametrization scheme has been developed that uses Kohn-Sham energies and band structure curvatures of real and fictitious homoatomic crystal structures as reference data. A confinement potential is used to tighten the Kohn-Sham orbitals, which includes two free parameters that are used to optimize the performance of the method. The method is tested on more than 100 systems and shows excellent overall performance.

  5. Electronic structure of substitutionally disordered alloys: Direct configurational averaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wolverton, C.; de Fontaine, D.; Dreysse, H.; Ceder, G.

    1992-04-01

    The method of direct configurational averaging (DCA) has been proposed to study the electronic structure of disordered alloys. Local density of states and band structure energies are obtained by averaging over a small number of configrations within a tight-binding Hamiltonian. Effective cluster interactions, the driving quantities for ordering in solids, are computed for various alloys using a tight-binding form of the linearized muffin-tin orbital method (TB-LMTO). The DCA calculations are used to determine various energetic and thermodynamic quantities for binary and ternasy alloys. (Pd, Rh, V).

  6. Electronic structures of endohedral fullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Changming; Hettich, R.L.; Puretzky, A.A.; Ying, Z.C.; Haufler, R.E.; Compton, R.N.

    1994-12-31

    Fullerenes with different elements trapped inside the cage have been the subject of active research both experimentally and theoretically ever since the initial discovery of C{sub 60}. La@C{sub n}, were the first endohedral fullerenes produced both in gas phase and in macroscopic quantities. Early electron spin resonance investigation of La@C{sub 82} by R.D. Johnson, et.al indicated that La transfer nearly all of the three valence electrons to the fullerene cage, forming a La{sup 3+}@C{sub 82}{sup 3-} complex. Theoretical calculations also have shown that La transfers its valence electrons to the fullerene cage in molecules of La@C{sub n}. Investigations with ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy by L. Wang, et.al. indicated that attaching a potassium atom outside the C{sub 60} cage lowers the electron affinity (EA) while trapping Ca atom inside the C{sub 60} sphere increases the EA compared with parent C{sub 60} molecule. These results indicate that metallofullerenes appear to have substantially lower ionization potentials (IP) and higher EA than empty fullerenes.

  7. Electron gun controlled smart structure

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Jeffrey W.; Main, John Alan; Redmond, James M.; Henson, Tammy D.; Watson, Robert D.

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and system for actively controlling the shape of a sheet of electroactive material; the system comprising: one or more electrodes attached to the frontside of the electroactive sheet; a charged particle generator, disposed so as to direct a beam of charged particles (e.g. electrons) onto the electrode; a conductive substrate attached to the backside of the sheet; and a power supply electrically connected to the conductive substrate; whereby the sheet changes its shape in response to an electric field created across the sheet by an accumulation of electric charge within the electrode(s), relative to a potential applied to the conductive substrate. Use of multiple electrodes distributed across on the frontside ensures a uniform distribution of the charge with a single point of e-beam incidence, thereby greatly simplifying the beam scanning algorithm and raster control electronics, and reducing the problems associated with "blooming". By placing a distribution of electrodes over the front surface of a piezoelectric film (or other electroactive material), this arrangement enables improved control over the distribution of surface electric charges (e.g. electrons) by creating uniform (and possibly different) charge distributions within each individual electrode. Removal or deposition of net electric charge can be affected by controlling the secondary electron yield through manipulation of the backside electric potential with the power supply. The system can be used for actively controlling the shape of space-based deployable optics, such as adaptive mirrors and inflatable antennae.

  8. Electronic structure characterization and bandgap engineeringofsolar hydrogen materials

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jinghua

    2007-11-01

    Bandgap, band edge positions as well as the overall band structure of semiconductors are of crucial importance in photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic applications. The energy position of the band edge level can be controlled by the electronegativity of the dopants, the pH of the solution (flatband potential variation of 60 mV per pH unit), as well as by quantum confinement effects. Accordingly, band edges and bandgap can be tailored to achieve specific electronic, optical or photocatalytic properties. Synchrotron radiation with photon energy at or below 1 keV is giving new insight into such areas as condensed matter physics and extreme ultraviolet optics technology. In the soft x-ray region, the question tends to be, what are the electrons doing as they migrated between the atoms. In this paper, I will present a number of soft x-ray spectroscopic study of nanostructured 3d metal compounds Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZnO.

  9. Electronic Structure Engineering of Elpasolites for Brighter and Faster Scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Mao-Hua; Biswas, Koushik

    2013-03-01

    Utilization of scintillator materials is one of the primary methods for radiation detection. Elpasolites are a large family of quaternary halides that have attracted considerable interest for their potential applications as γ-ray and neutron scintillators. However, many elpasolite scintillator materials currently under development suffer from low light yield and long scintillation decay time. The low light yield is partially due to a large band gap while the long scintillation decay time is a result of slow carrier transport to Ce dopants, where electrons and holes recombine to emit photons. We suggest that these problems may be mitigated by optimizing the band gap and carrier mobility by selecting constituent elements of proper electronegativity. For example, cations with lower electronegativity may lower the conduction band and increase the conduction band dispersion simultaneously, resulting in higher light yield and faster scintillation. First-principles calculations of electronic structure, small polarons, and Ce dopants in Cs2LiYCl6 and Cs2AgYCl6 compounds show that the strategy of manipulating electronegativity can lead to brighter and faster elpasolite-based scintillators. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE Office of Nonproliferation Research and Development NA22.

  10. Filling-Enforced Gaplessness in Band Structures of the 230 Space Groups.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Haruki; Po, Hoi Chun; Zaletel, Michael P; Vishwanath, Ashvin

    2016-08-26

    Nonsymmorphic symmetries like screws and glides produce electron band touchings, obstructing the formation of a band insulator and leading, instead, to metals or nodal semimetals even when the number of electrons in the unit cell is an even integer. Here, we calculate the electron fillings compatible with being a band insulator for all 230 space groups, for noninteracting electrons with time-reversal symmetry. Our bounds are tight-that is, we can rigorously eliminate band insulators at any forbidden filling and produce explicit models for all allowed fillings-and stronger than those recently established for interacting systems. These results provide simple criteria that should help guide the search for topological semimetals and, also, have implications for both the nature and stability of the resulting nodal Fermi surfaces. PMID:27610868

  11. Fine Structure in the Secondary Electron Emission Peak for Diamond Crystal with (100) Negative Electron Affinity Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asnin, V. M.; Krainsky, I. L.

    1998-01-01

    A fine structure was discovered in the low-energy peak of the secondary electron emission spectra of the diamond surface with negative electron affinity. We studied this structure for the (100) surface of the natural type-IIb diamond crystal. We have found that the low-energy peak consists of a total of four maxima. The relative energy positions of three of them could be related to the electron energy minima near the bottom of the conduction band. The fourth peak, having the lowest energy, was attributed to the breakup of the bulk exciton at the surface during the process of secondary electron emission.

  12. Interfacial Ga-As suboxide: Structural and electronic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Colleoni, Davide Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2015-07-20

    The structural and electronic properties of Ga-As suboxide representative of the transition region at the GaAs/oxide interface are studied through density functional calculations. Two amorphous models generated by quenches from the melt are taken under consideration. The absence of As–O bonds indicates that the structure is a mixture of GaAs and Ga-oxide, in accordance with photoemission experiments. The band edges of the models are found to be closely aligned to those of GaAs. The simulation of charging and discharging processes leads to the identification of an As-related defect with an energy level at ∼0.7 eV above the GaAs valence band maximum, in good agreement with the experimental density of interface states.

  13. Interfacial Ga-As suboxide: Structural and electronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colleoni, Davide; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2015-07-01

    The structural and electronic properties of Ga-As suboxide representative of the transition region at the GaAs/oxide interface are studied through density functional calculations. Two amorphous models generated by quenches from the melt are taken under consideration. The absence of As-O bonds indicates that the structure is a mixture of GaAs and Ga-oxide, in accordance with photoemission experiments. The band edges of the models are found to be closely aligned to those of GaAs. The simulation of charging and discharging processes leads to the identification of an As-related defect with an energy level at ˜0.7 eV above the GaAs valence band maximum, in good agreement with the experimental density of interface states.

  14. A New Q-Band EPR Probe for Quantitative Studies of Even Electron Metalloproteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petasis, D. T.; Hendrich, M. P.

    1999-02-01

    Existing Q-band (35 GHz) EPR spectrometers employ cylindrical cavities for more intense microwave magnetic fields B1, but are so constructed that only one orientation between the external field B and B1is allowed, namely the B ⊥ B1orientation, thus limiting the use of the spectrometer to measurements on Kramers spin systems (odd electron systems). We have designed and built a Q-band microwave probe to detect EPR signals in even electron systems, which operates in the range 2 K ≤ T ≤ 300 K for studies of metalloprotein samples. The cylindrical microwave cavity operates in the TE011mode with cylindrical wall coupling to the waveguide, thus allowing all orientations of the external magnetic field B relative to the microwave field B1. Such orientations allow observation of EPR transitions in non-Kramers ions (even electron) which are either forbidden or significantly weaker for B ⊥ B1. Rotation of the external magnetic field also permits easy differentiation between spin systems from even and odd electron oxidation states. The cavity consists of a metallic helix and thin metallic end walls mounted on epoxy supports, which allows efficient penetration of the modulation field. The first quantitative EPR measurements from a metalloprotein (Hemerythrin) at 35 GHz with B1‖ B are presented.

  15. Structural change of graphite during electron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, J. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Pedraza, D.F. )

    1992-01-01

    Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite was irradiated at room temperature with 300-keV electrons. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy were employed to study the structure of electron-irradiated graphite. Results consistently indicated absence of long-range order periodicity in the basal plane, and loose retention of the c-axis periodicity. Structure was modeled based on a mixture of sixfold and non-sixfold atom rings. Formation of non-sixfold atom rings was related to the observed buckling and discontinuity of the original graphite basal plane.

  16. Structural change of graphite during electron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, J.; Pedraza, D.F.

    1992-12-31

    Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite was irradiated at room temperature with 300-keV electrons. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy were employed to study the structure of electron-irradiated graphite. Results consistently indicated absence of long-range order periodicity in the basal plane, and loose retention of the c-axis periodicity. Structure was modeled based on a mixture of sixfold and non-sixfold atom rings. Formation of non-sixfold atom rings was related to the observed buckling and discontinuity of the original graphite basal plane.

  17. Band structures in silicene on monolayer gallium phosphide substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Miaojuan; Li, Mingming; Zhang, Changwen; Yuan, Min; Li, Ping; Li, Feng; Ji, Weixiao; Chen, Xinlian

    2016-07-01

    Opening a sizable band gap in the zero-gap silicene is a key issue for its application in nanoelectronics. We design new 2D silicene and GaP heterobilayer (Si/GaP HBL) composed of silicene and monolayer (ML) GaP. Based on first-principles calculations, we find that the interaction energies are in the range of -295.5 to -297.5 meV per unit cell, indicating a weak interaction between silicene and gallium phosphide (GaP) monolayer. The band gap changes ranging from 0.06 to 0.44 eV in hybrid HBLs. An unexpected indirect-direct band gap crossover is also observed in HBLs, dependent on the stacking pattern. These provide a possible way to design effective FETs out of silicene on GaP monolayer.

  18. Analytic band Monte Carlo model for electron transport in Si including acoustic and optical phonon dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, Eric; Dutton, Robert W.; Goodson, Kenneth E.

    2004-11-01

    We describe the implementation of a Monte Carlo model for electron transport in silicon. The model uses analytic, nonparabolic electron energy bands, which are computationally efficient and sufficiently accurate for future low-voltage (<1V) nanoscale device applications. The electron-lattice scattering is incorporated using an isotropic, analytic phonon-dispersion model, which distinguishes between the optical/acoustic and the longitudinal/transverse phonon branches. We show that this approach avoids introducing unphysical thresholds in the electron distribution function, and that it has further applications in computing detailed phonon generation spectra from Joule heating. A set of deformation potentials for electron-phonon scattering is introduced and shown to yield accurate transport simulations in bulk silicon across a wide range of electric fields and temperatures. The shear deformation potential is empirically determined at Ξu=6.8eV, and consequently, the isotropically averaged scattering potentials with longitudinal and transverse acoustic phonons are DLA=6.39eV and DTA=3.01eV, respectively, in reasonable agreement with previous studies. The room-temperature electron mobility in strained silicon is also computed and shown to be in better agreement with the most recent phonon-limited data available. As a result, we find that electron coupling with g-type phonons is about 40% lower, and the coupling with f-type phonons is almost twice as strong as previously reported.

  19. Asymmetric band profile of the Soret band of deoxymyoglobin is caused by electronic and vibronic perturbations of the heme group rather than by a doming deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard; Gorden, John Paul; Hagarman, Andrew

    2007-10-01

    We measured the Soret band of deoxymyoglobin (deoxyMb), myoglobin cyanide (MbCN), and aquo-metmyoglobin (all from horse heart) with absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies. A clear non-coincidence was observed between the absorption and CD profiles of deoxyMb and MbCN, with the CD profiles red- and blueshifted with respect to the absorption band position, respectively. On the contrary, the CD and absorption profiles of aquametMb were nearly identical. The observed noncoincidence indicates a splitting of the excited B state due to heme-protein interactions. CD and absorption profiles of deoxyMb and MbCN were self-consistently analyzed by employing a perturbation approach for weak vibronic coupling as well as the relative intensities and depolarization ratios of seven bands in the respective resonance Raman spectra measured with B-band excitation. The respective By component was found to dominate the observed Cotton effect of both myoglobin derivatives. The different signs of the noncoincidences between CD and absorption bands observed for deoxyMb and MbCN are due to different signs of the respective matrix elements of A1g electronic interstate coupling, which reflects an imbalance of Gouterman's 50:50 states. The splitting of the B band reflects contributions from electronic and vibronic perturbations of B1g symmetry. The results of our analysis suggest that the broad and asymmetric absorption band of deoxyMb results from this band splitting rather than from its dependence on heme doming. Thus, we are able to explain recent findings that the temperature dependences of CO rebinding to myoglobin and the Soret band profile are uncorrelated[Ormos et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci U.S.A. 95, 6762 (1998)].

  20. Electronic Structure of Small Lanthanide Containing Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafader, Jared O.; Ray, Manisha; Topolski, Josey E.; Chick Jarrold, Caroline

    2016-06-01

    Lanthanide-based materials have unusual electronic properties because of the high number of electronic degrees of freedom arising from partial occupation of 4f orbitals, which make these materials optimal for their utilization in many applications including electronics and catalysis. Electronic spectroscopy of small lanthanide molecules helps us understand the role of these 4f electrons, which are generally considered core-like because of orbital contraction, but are energetically similar to valence electrons. The spectroscopy of small lanthanide-containing molecules is relatively unexplored and to broaden this understanding we have completed the characterization of small cerium, praseodymium, and europium molecules using photoelectron spectroscopy coupled with DFT calculations. The characterization of PrO, EuH, EuO/EuOH, and CexOy molecules have allowed for the determination of their electron affinity, the assignment of numerous anion to neutral state transitions, modeling of anion/neutral structures and electron orbital occupation.

  1. Electronic and thermoelectric properties of van der Waals materials with ring-shaped valence bands

    SciTech Connect

    Wickramaratne, Darshana E-mail: rlake@ece.ucr.edu; Lake, Roger K. E-mail: rlake@ece.ucr.edu; Zahid, Ferdows

    2015-08-21

    The valence band of a variety of few-layer, two-dimensional materials consist of a ring of states in the Brillouin zone. The energy-momentum relation has the form of a “Mexican hat” or a Rashba dispersion. The two-dimensional density of states is singular at or near the band edge, and the band-edge density of modes turns on nearly abruptly as a step function. The large band-edge density of modes enhances the Seebeck coefficient, the power factor, and the thermoelectric figure of merit ZT. Electronic and thermoelectric properties are determined from ab initio calculations for few-layer III–VI materials GaS, GaSe, InS, InSe, for Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, for monolayer Bi, and for bilayer graphene as a function of vertical field. The effect of interlayer coupling on these properties in few-layer III–VI materials and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} is described. Analytical models provide insight into the layer dependent trends that are relatively consistent for all of these few-layer materials. Vertically biased bilayer graphene could serve as an experimental test-bed for measuring these effects.

  2. Electronic structure of self-assembled amorphous polyfluorenes.

    PubMed

    Kilina, Svetlana; Batista, Enrique R; Yang, Ping; Tretiak, Sergei; Saxena, Avadh; Martin, Richard L; Smith, Darryl L

    2008-07-01

    We investigate the role of conformational disorder and intermolecular interactions on the electronic structure of amorphous clusters of polyfluorenes. Classical molecular dynamics simulations are used to determine probable molecular geometries and chain packing, and first-principles density functional theory calculations are employed to determine electronic structure and orbital localization properties. Intramolecular and intermolecular effects are disentangled by contrasting results for densely packed oligomer clusters and for ensembles of isolated oligomers with the same intramolecular geometries. Our simulations show that intermolecular disorder allows for nearly planar configurations of interacting fluorenes compared to the isolated molecules. This rationalizes the experimentally detected formation of the planar crystalline morphologies that frequently accompany twisted glassy configurations in fluorene films. The energy gap (HOMO-LUMO gap) significantly decreases for planar configurations. The electron and hole orbital energies are strongly dependent on both torsional angles and intermolecular interactions. This leads to strong localization of electronic states in amorphous polymer aggregates, which is analyzed by examining the respective orbital participation ratios. Notably, the energies of unoccupied levels show stronger dependence on the conformational disorder, compared to that of occupied levels. This results in the more probable formation of trap states near the edge of the conduction band than near the valence band. PMID:19206305

  3. Atomic and electronic structure of exfoliated black phosphorus

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ryan J.; Topsakal, Mehmet; Jeong, Jong Seok; Wentzcovitch, Renata M.; Mkhoyan, K. Andre; Low, Tony; Robbins, Matthew C.; Haratipour, Nazila; Koester, Steven J.

    2015-11-15

    Black phosphorus, a layered two-dimensional crystal with tunable electronic properties and high hole mobility, is quickly emerging as a promising candidate for future electronic and photonic devices. Although theoretical studies using ab initio calculations have tried to predict its atomic and electronic structure, uncertainty in its fundamental properties due to a lack of clear experimental evidence continues to stymie our full understanding and application of this novel material. In this work, aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and ab initio calculations are used to study the crystal structure of few-layer black phosphorus. Directly interpretable annular dark-field images provide a three-dimensional atomic-resolution view of this layered material in which its stacking order and all three lattice parameters can be unambiguously identified. In addition, electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) is used to measure the conduction band density of states of black phosphorus, which agrees well with the results of density functional theory calculations performed for the experimentally determined crystal. Furthermore, experimental EELS measurements of interband transitions and surface plasmon excitations are also consistent with simulated results. Finally, the effects of oxidation on both the atomic and electronic structure of black phosphorus are analyzed to explain observed device degradation. The transformation of black phosphorus into amorphous PO{sub 3} or H{sub 3}PO{sub 3} during oxidation may ultimately be responsible for the degradation of devices exposed to atmosphere over time.

  4. Structural physiology based on electron crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    There are many questions in brain science, which are extremely interesting but very difficult to answer. For example, how do education and other experiences during human development influence the ability and personality of the adult? The molecular mechanisms underlying such phenomena are still totally unclear. However, technological and instrumental advancements of electron microscopy have facilitated comprehension of the structures of biological components, cells, and organelles. Electron crystallography is especially good for studying the structure and function of membrane proteins, which are key molecules of signal transduction in neural and other cells. Electron crystallography is now an established technique to analyze the structures of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, which are close to their natural biological environment. By utilizing cryo-electron microscopes with helium cooled specimen stages, which were developed through a personal motivation to understand functions of neural systems from a structural point of view, structures of membrane proteins were analyzed at a resolution higher than 3 Å. This review has four objectives. First, it is intended to introduce the new research field of structural physiology. Second, it introduces some of the personal struggles, which were involved in developing the cryo-electron microscope. Third, it discusses some of the technology for the structural analysis of membrane proteins based on cryo-electron microscopy. Finally, it reviews structural and functional analyses of membrane proteins. PMID:21416541

  5. Electronic structure and enthalpy of hydrogen and helium mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, M.; Klepeis, J. E.; Schafer, K. J.; Barbee, T. W., III

    1992-11-01

    The first local density approximation (LDA) calculations of the electronic structure, equation of state, and enthalpy of mixing were carried out for a number of different compositions of hydrogen and helium in bcc and fcc lattices. These are fully quantum mechanical, self-consistent calculations utilizing state-of-the-art methods of electron band theory, which make no assumptions regarding pressure ionization. The major approximation in the LDA method is that the exchange and correlation energy is given by a free electron functional in terms of the local electron density. The majority of previous mixture calculations start with the assumption that both hydrogen and helium are pressure-ionized so that the electronic structure is approximately that of free or weakly screened electrons in the presence of positive ions. Stevenson used a hard-sphere mixture model for the ions with an ion-ion pseudopotential to account for electron screening and predicted that a mixture containing 7% helium by number, the composition believed to be present in Jupiter and Saturn, would phase separate at a temperature of about 7000 K at 8 Mbar. Subsequent calculations carried out for the fully ionized mixture and for a mixture of screened ions (linear response theory) have all arrived at predictions similar to those of Stevenson. MacFarlane and Hubbard performed Thomas-Fermi-Dirac calculations for mixing enthalpies of hydrogen and helium in bcc and fcc lattices and predicted that phase separation would not occur at any temperature.

  6. Generation of Intense Narrow-Band Tunable Terahertz Radiation from Highly Bunched Electron Pulse Train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Heting; Lu, Yalin; He, Zhigang; Jia, Qika; Wang, Lin

    2016-07-01

    We present the analysis and start-to-end simulation of an intense narrow-band terahertz (THz) source with a broad tuning range of radiation frequency, using a single-pass free electron laser (FEL) driven by a THz-pulse-train photoinjector. The fundamental radiation frequency, corresponding to the spacing between the electron microbunches, can be easily tuned by varying the spacing time between the laser micropulses. Since the prebunched electron beam is highly bunched at the first several harmonics, with the harmonic generation technique, the radiation frequency range can be further enlarged by several times. The start-to-end simulation results show that this FEL is capable of generating a few tens megawatts power, several tens micro-joules pulse energy, and a few percent bandwidth at the frequencies of 0.5-5 THz. In addition, several practical issues are considered.

  7. Phosphorene Nanoribbons: Electronic Structure and Electric Field Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soleimanikahnoj, Sina; Knezevic, Irena

    Phosphorene, a newcomer among the 2D van der Waals materials, has attracted the attention of many scientists due to its promising electronic properties. Monolayer phosphorene has a direct band gap of 2 eV located at the Gamma point of the Brillouin zone. Increasing the number of layers reduces the bandgap due to the van der Waals interaction. The direct nature of the bandgap makes phosphorene particularly favorable for electronic transport and optoelectronic applications. While multilayer phosphorene sheets have been studied, the electronic properties of their 1D counterparts are still unexplored. An accurate tight-binding model was recently proposed for multilayer phosphorene nanoribbons. Employing this model along with the non-equilibrium Green's function method, we calculate the band structure and electronic properties of phosphorene nanoribbons. We show that, depending on the edge termination, phosphorene nanoribbons can be metallic or semiconducting. Our analysis also shows that the electronic properties of phosphorene nanoribbons are highly tunable by in-plane and out-of-plane electric fields. In metallic ribbons, the conductance can be switched off by a threshold electric field, similar to field effect devices. Support by the NSF through the University of Wisconsin MRSEC Seed (NSF Award DMR-1121288).

  8. Electronic structure and spectral characteristics of Zn-substituted clathrate silicides

    SciTech Connect

    Borshch, N. A. Pereslavtseva, N. S.; Kurganskii, S. I.

    2011-06-15

    The results of complex theoretical studies of the electron structure of Zn-substituted Si-based clathrates are reported. The calculation is carried out by the linearized augmented plane wave method. As a result, the energy band structures, the total and partial densities of electron states, and the X-ray emission spectra are obtained. The effect of the number of substitutions and their sites in the unit cell on the electron-energy spectrum of clathrates is analyzed.

  9. Stability, electronic structure and reactivity of the polymerized fullerite forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belavin, V. V.; Bulusheva, L. G.; Okotrub, A. V.; Tomanek, D.

    2000-12-01

    A study of band structure, stability and electron density distribution from selected crystal orbitals of polymerized C60 forms was carried out. Linear chain, tetragonal and hexagonal layers, and three-dimensional (3D) polymer with a simple cubic lattice were calculated using an empirical tight-binding method. The hopping parameters were chosen to fit a theoretical X-ray emission spectrum of C60 to the experimental one. Our results indicate that all calculated polymers are semiconductors with the smallest energy gap for hexagonal structure. Though the molecules C60 are linked by strong covalent bonds, the crystal orbitals characterized by the electron density localization on an individual carbon cage are separated in the electronic structure of polymers. The suggestions about reactivity of the 1D and 2D tetragonal polymers were made from the analyses of crystal orbitals accompanied with the highest occupied (HO) and lowest unoccupied (LU) bands. The polymerized C60 forms were found to be less stable than an icosahedral fullerene molecule.

  10. Band structure in two-dimensional fiber-air phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shu; Yu, Wei-Dong; Pan, Ning

    2011-02-01

    A two-dimensional phononic crystal (PC) composed of textile fiber and air is initially discussed in this paper, which is different from the previous PCs with rigid inclusions. The plain wave expansion method is used to calculate band structure of different PCs by altering fiber material properties and structure parameters. Numerical results show that the effect of material properties of soft fiber on band structure of phononic crystal can be ignored, while the effect of structural parameters is obvious.

  11. Near valence-band electronic properties of semiconducting β -Ga2O3 (100) single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-Quezada, A.; Alamé, S.; Esser, N.; Furthmüller, J.; Bechstedt, F.; Galazka, Z.; Skuridina, D.; Vogt, P.

    2015-11-01

    β -Ga2O3 is a transparent wide-band-gap semiconductor that has attracted considerable interest in recent years due to its suitable electrical conductivity and transparency in the ultraviolet spectral region. In this work we investigate the electronic properties of the near valence-band-edge region for semiconducting β -Ga2O3 (100) bulk single crystals using core-level photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio theory within the framework of density functional theory and the GW approach. We find good agreement between the experimental results and the theoretical calculations. This is explained by the hybridization of the Ga 3 d and O 2 s states, similar as for In2O3 .

  12. Band structures extending to very high spin in Xe126

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rønn Hansen, C.; Sletten, G.; Hagemann, G. B.; Herskind, B.; Jensen, D. R.; Bringel, P.; Engelhardt, C.; Hübel, H.; Neußer-Neffgen, A.; Singh, A. K.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Khoo, T. L.; Lauritsen, T.; Bednarczyk, P.; Byrski, T.; Curien, D.; Benzoni, G.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Leoni, S.; Clark, R. M.; Fallon, P.; Korichi, A.; Roccaz, J.; Maj, A.; Wilson, J. N.; Lisle, J. C.; Steinhardt, T.; Thelen, O.; Ødegård, S. W.

    2007-09-01

    High-spin states in Xe126 have been populated in the Se82(Ca48,4n)Xe126 reaction in two experiments, one at the VIVITRON accelerator in Strasbourg using the Euroball detector array, and a subsequent one with ATLAS at Argonne using the Gammasphere Ge-detector array. Levels and assignments made previously for Xe126 up to I=20 have been confirmed and extended. Four regular bands extending to a spin of almost I=60, which are interpreted as two pairs of signature partners with opposite parity, are identified for the first time. The α = 0 partner of each pair is connected to the lower-lying levels, whereas the two α = 1 partners remain floating. A fractional Doppler shift analysis of transitions in the strongest populated (π,α)=(-,0) band provides a value of 5.20.50.4 b for the transition quadrupole moment, which can be related to a minimum in the potential-energy surface calculated by the ULTIMATE CRANKER cranked shell-model code at ɛ≈0.35 and γ≈5°. The four lowest bands calculated for this minimum compare well with the two signature pairs experimentally observed over a wide spin range. A sharp upbend at ℏω~1170 keV is interpreted as a crossing with a band involving the j15/2 neutron orbital, for which pairing correlations are expected to be totally quenched. The four long bands extend to within ˜5 spin units of a crossing with an yrast line defined by calculated hyperdeformed transitions and will serve as important stepping stones into the spin region beyond 60ħ for future experiments.

  13. Determining the band gap and mean kinetic energy of atoms from reflection electron energy loss spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Vos, M.; Marmitt, G. G.; Finkelstein, Y.; Moreh, R.

    2015-09-14

    Reflection electron energy loss spectra from some insulating materials (CaCO{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, and SiO{sub 2}) taken at relatively high incoming electron energies (5–40 keV) are analyzed. Here, one is bulk sensitive and a well-defined onset of inelastic excitations is observed from which one can infer the value of the band gap. An estimate of the band gap was obtained by fitting the spectra with a procedure that includes the recoil shift and recoil broadening affecting these measurements. The width of the elastic peak is directly connected to the mean kinetic energy of the atom in the material (Doppler broadening). The experimentally obtained mean kinetic energies of the O, C, Li, Ca, and Si atoms are compared with the calculated ones, and good agreement is found, especially if the effect of multiple scattering is taken into account. It is demonstrated experimentally that the onset of the inelastic excitation is also affected by Doppler broadening. Aided by this understanding, we can obtain a good fit of the elastic peak and the onset of inelastic excitations. For SiO{sub 2}, good agreement is obtained with the well-established value of the band gap (8.9 eV) only if it is assumed that the intensity near the edge scales as (E − E{sub gap}){sup 1.5}. For CaCO{sub 3}, the band gap obtained here (7 eV) is about 1 eV larger than the previous experimental value, whereas the value for Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} (7.5 eV) is the first experimental estimate.

  14. Determining the band gap and mean kinetic energy of atoms from reflection electron energy loss spectra.

    PubMed

    Vos, M; Marmitt, G G; Finkelstein, Y; Moreh, R

    2015-09-14

    Reflection electron energy loss spectra from some insulating materials (CaCO3, Li2CO3, and SiO2) taken at relatively high incoming electron energies (5-40 keV) are analyzed. Here, one is bulk sensitive and a well-defined onset of inelastic excitations is observed from which one can infer the value of the band gap. An estimate of the band gap was obtained by fitting the spectra with a procedure that includes the recoil shift and recoil broadening affecting these measurements. The width of the elastic peak is directly connected to the mean kinetic energy of the atom in the material (Doppler broadening). The experimentally obtained mean kinetic energies of the O, C, Li, Ca, and Si atoms are compared with the calculated ones, and good agreement is found, especially if the effect of multiple scattering is taken into account. It is demonstrated experimentally that the onset of the inelastic excitation is also affected by Doppler broadening. Aided by this understanding, we can obtain a good fit of the elastic peak and the onset of inelastic excitations. For SiO2, good agreement is obtained with the well-established value of the band gap (8.9 eV) only if it is assumed that the intensity near the edge scales as (E - Egap)(1.5). For CaCO3, the band gap obtained here (7 eV) is about 1 eV larger than the previous experimental value, whereas the value for Li2CO3 (7.5 eV) is the first experimental estimate.

  15. The Development of Layered Photonic Band Gap Structures Using a Micro-Transfer Molding Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Jerome Sutherland

    2001-06-27

    Over the last ten years, photonic band gap (PBG) theory and technology have become an important area of research because of the numerous possible applications ranging from high-efficiency laser diodes to optical circuitry. This research concentrates on reducing the length scale in the fabrication of layered photonic band gap structures and developing procedures to improve processing consistency. Various procedures and materials have been used in the fabrication of layered PBG structures. This research focused on an economical micro transfer molding approach to create the final PBG structure. A poly dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) rubber mold was created from a silicon substrate. It was filled with epoxy and built layer-by-layer to create a 3-D epoxy structure. This structure was infiltrated with nanoparticle titania or a titania sol-gel, then fired to remove the polymer mold, leaving a monolithic ceramic inverse of the epoxy structure. The final result was a lattice of titania rolds that resembles a face-centered tetragonal structure. The original intent of this research was to miniaturize this process to a bar size small enough to create a photonic band gap for wavelengths of visible electro-magnetic radiation. The factor limiting progress was the absence of a silicon master mold of small enough dimensions. The Iowa State Microelectronics Research Center fabricated samples with periodicities of 2.5 and 1.0 microns with the existing technology, but a sample was needed on the order of 0.3 microns or less. A 0.4 micron sample was received from Sandia National Laboratory, which was made through an electron beam lithography process, but it contained several defects. The results of the work are primarily from the 2.5 and 1.0 micron samples. Most of the work focused on changing processing variables in order to optimize the infiltration procedure for the best results. Several critical parameters were identified, ranging from the ambient conditions to the specifics of the

  16. Electronic structure of p-type transparent conducting oxide CuAlO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Sung-Kwan; Yoon, Joonseok; Liu, Xiaosong; Yang, Wanli; Mun, Bongjin; Ju, Honglyoul

    2014-03-01

    CuAlO2 is a prototypical p-type transparent conducting oxide. Despite its importance for potential applications and number of studies on its band structure and gap characteristics, experimental study on the momentum-resolved electronic structure has been lacking. We present angle-resolved photoemission data on single crystalline CuAlO2 using synchrotron light source to reveal complete band structure. Complemented by the x-ray absorption and emission spectra, we also study band gap characteristics and compare them with theory.

  17. Implementation of electronic crosstalk correction for terra MODIS PV LWIR bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Xu; Madhavan, Sriharsha; Chen, Na; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2015-09-01

    The MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is one of the primary instruments in the fleet of NASA's Earth Observing Systems (EOS) in space. Terra MODIS has completed 15 years of operation far exceeding its design lifetime of 6 years. The MODIS Level 1B (L1B) processing is the first in the process chain for deriving various higher level science products. These products are used mainly in understanding the geophysical changes occurring in the Earth's land, ocean, and atmosphere. The L1B code is designed to carefully calibrate the responses of all the detectors of the 36 spectral bands of MODIS and provide accurate L1B radiances (also reflectances in the case of Reflective Solar Bands). To fulfill this purpose, Look Up Tables (LUTs), that contain calibration coefficients derived from both on-board calibrators and Earth-view characterized responses, are used in the L1B processing. In this paper, we present the implementation mechanism of the electronic crosstalk correction in the Photo Voltaic (PV) Long Wave InfraRed (LWIR) bands (Bands 27-30). The crosstalk correction involves two vital components. First, a crosstalk correction modular is implemented in the L1B code to correct the on-board Blackbody and Earth-View (EV) digital number (dn) responses using a linear correction model. Second, the correction coefficients, derived from the EV observations, are supplied in the form of LUTs. Further, the LUTs contain time stamps reflecting to the change in the coefficients assessed using the Noise Equivalent difference Temperature (NEdT) trending. With the algorithms applied in the MODIS L1B processing it is demonstrated that these corrections indeed restore the radiometric balance for each of the affected bands and substantially reduce the striping noise in the processed images.

  18. Computational Chemistry Using Modern Electronic Structure Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Stephen; Dines, Trevor J.; Chowdhry, Babur Z.; Withnall, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Various modern electronic structure methods are now days used to teach computational chemistry to undergraduate students. Such quantum calculations can now be easily used even for large size molecules.

  19. Structure of Wet Specimens in Electron Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, D. F.

    1974-01-01

    Discussed are past work and recent advances in the use of electron microscopes for viewing structures immersed in gas and liquid. Improved environmental chambers make it possible to examine wet specimens easily. (Author/RH)

  20. Instructional Approach to Molecular Electronic Structure Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dykstra, Clifford E.; Schaefer, Henry F.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a graduate quantum mechanics projects in which students write a computer program that performs ab initio calculations on the electronic structure of a simple molecule. Theoretical potential energy curves are produced. (MLH)